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Sample records for acyl-homoserine lactone ahl

  1. Regulation of acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) in beef by spice marination.

    PubMed

    Gopu, Venkadesaperumal; Shetty, Prathapkumar Halady

    2016-06-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a signaling mechanism used by bacteria to communicate each other through the release of auto-inducing signaling molecules. Despite the fact that bacteria regulate its phenotypes by QS mechanism, their potential role in meat spoilage is not yet elucidated. In the current study, beef samples were analyzed for its microbial association and for the presence of N-acyl-homoserine-lactone (AHLs) throughout the storage experiments. Isolates were screened for AHLs production and selected spices were screened for their quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activity. In addition, effect of spices on AHLs production of Y. enterocolitica was quantified through high performance thin layer chromatography (HP-TLC). Outcome showed that microbial association of beef mainly consists of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and Enterobacteriaceae. Samples stored at both aerobic and modified atmospheric packaging (MAP) exhibited higher counts whereas; marinated samples stored at MAP exhibited the lowest. It was found that out of 35 isolates Y. enterocolitica induced reporter strain CV026 and its cell-free supernatant contained 26.36 nM/100 ml of AHLs when compared to standard. Among the tested spices, C. cyminum exhibited pronounced results by significantly reducing the AHLs concentration up to 47.75 %. Findings revealed the presence of quorum molecules (AHLs) in beef meat throughout the spoilage process and spices can acts as quorum quenchers to influence the spoilage rate by reducing AHLs production.

  2. Regulation of acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) in beef by spice marination.

    PubMed

    Gopu, Venkadesaperumal; Shetty, Prathapkumar Halady

    2016-06-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a signaling mechanism used by bacteria to communicate each other through the release of auto-inducing signaling molecules. Despite the fact that bacteria regulate its phenotypes by QS mechanism, their potential role in meat spoilage is not yet elucidated. In the current study, beef samples were analyzed for its microbial association and for the presence of N-acyl-homoserine-lactone (AHLs) throughout the storage experiments. Isolates were screened for AHLs production and selected spices were screened for their quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activity. In addition, effect of spices on AHLs production of Y. enterocolitica was quantified through high performance thin layer chromatography (HP-TLC). Outcome showed that microbial association of beef mainly consists of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and Enterobacteriaceae. Samples stored at both aerobic and modified atmospheric packaging (MAP) exhibited higher counts whereas; marinated samples stored at MAP exhibited the lowest. It was found that out of 35 isolates Y. enterocolitica induced reporter strain CV026 and its cell-free supernatant contained 26.36 nM/100 ml of AHLs when compared to standard. Among the tested spices, C. cyminum exhibited pronounced results by significantly reducing the AHLs concentration up to 47.75 %. Findings revealed the presence of quorum molecules (AHLs) in beef meat throughout the spoilage process and spices can acts as quorum quenchers to influence the spoilage rate by reducing AHLs production. PMID:27478224

  3. Involvement of Acylated Homoserine Lactones (AHLs) of Aeromonas sobria in Spoilage of Refrigerated Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Cui, Fangchao; Bai, Fengling; Zhao, Guohua; Li, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    One quorum sensing strain was isolated from spoiled turbot. The species was determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis and classical tests, named Aeromonas sobria AS7. Quorum-sensing (QS) signals (N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs)) were detected by report strains and their structures were further determined by GC-MS. The activity changes of AHLs on strain growth stage as well as the influence of different culture conditions on secretion activity of AHLs were studied by the punch method. The result indicated that strain AS7 could induce report strains to produce typical phenotypic response. N-butanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C4–HSL), N-hexanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C6–HSL), N-octanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C8–HSL), N-decanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C10–HSL), N-dodecanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C12–HSL) could be detected. The activities of AHLs were density-dependent and the max secretion level was at pH 8, sucrose culture, 1% NaCl and 32 h, respectively. The production of siderophore in strain AS7 was regulated by exogenous C8–HSL, rather than C6–HSL. Exogenous C4–HSL and C8–HSL accelerated the growth rate and population density of AS7 in turbot samples under refrigerated storage. However, according to the total viable counts and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) values of the fish samples, exogenous C6–HSL did not cause spoilage of the turbot fillets. In conclusion, our results suggested that QS was involved in the spoilage of refrigerated turbot. PMID:27420072

  4. Involvement of Acylated Homoserine Lactones (AHLs) of Aeromonas sobria in Spoilage of Refrigerated Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Cui, Fangchao; Bai, Fengling; Zhao, Guohua; Li, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    One quorum sensing strain was isolated from spoiled turbot. The species was determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis and classical tests, named Aeromonas sobria AS7. Quorum-sensing (QS) signals (N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs)) were detected by report strains and their structures were further determined by GC-MS. The activity changes of AHLs on strain growth stage as well as the influence of different culture conditions on secretion activity of AHLs were studied by the punch method. The result indicated that strain AS7 could induce report strains to produce typical phenotypic response. N-butanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C₄-HSL), N-hexanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C₆-HSL), N-octanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C₈-HSL), N-decanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL), N-dodecanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL) could be detected. The activities of AHLs were density-dependent and the max secretion level was at pH 8, sucrose culture, 1% NaCl and 32 h, respectively. The production of siderophore in strain AS7 was regulated by exogenous C₈-HSL, rather than C₆-HSL. Exogenous C₄-HSL and C₈-HSL accelerated the growth rate and population density of AS7 in turbot samples under refrigerated storage. However, according to the total viable counts and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) values of the fish samples, exogenous C₆-HSL did not cause spoilage of the turbot fillets. In conclusion, our results suggested that QS was involved in the spoilage of refrigerated turbot. PMID:27420072

  5. Involvement of Acylated Homoserine Lactones (AHLs) of Aeromonas sobria in Spoilage of Refrigerated Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Cui, Fangchao; Bai, Fengling; Zhao, Guohua; Li, Jianrong

    2016-07-13

    One quorum sensing strain was isolated from spoiled turbot. The species was determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis and classical tests, named Aeromonas sobria AS7. Quorum-sensing (QS) signals (N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs)) were detected by report strains and their structures were further determined by GC-MS. The activity changes of AHLs on strain growth stage as well as the influence of different culture conditions on secretion activity of AHLs were studied by the punch method. The result indicated that strain AS7 could induce report strains to produce typical phenotypic response. N-butanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C₄-HSL), N-hexanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C₆-HSL), N-octanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C₈-HSL), N-decanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL), N-dodecanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL) could be detected. The activities of AHLs were density-dependent and the max secretion level was at pH 8, sucrose culture, 1% NaCl and 32 h, respectively. The production of siderophore in strain AS7 was regulated by exogenous C₈-HSL, rather than C₆-HSL. Exogenous C₄-HSL and C₈-HSL accelerated the growth rate and population density of AS7 in turbot samples under refrigerated storage. However, according to the total viable counts and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) values of the fish samples, exogenous C₆-HSL did not cause spoilage of the turbot fillets. In conclusion, our results suggested that QS was involved in the spoilage of refrigerated turbot.

  6. Presence of acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) and AHL-producing bacteria in meat and potential role of AHL in spoilage of meat.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin; Christensen, Allan Beck; Flodgaard, Lars Ravn; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Givskov, Michael; Gram, Lone

    2004-07-01

    Quorum-sensing (QS) signals (N-acyl homoserine lactones [AHLs]) were extracted and detected from five commercially produced vacuum-packed meat samples. Ninety-six AHL-producing bacteria were isolated, and 92 were identified as Enterobacteriaceae. Hafnia alvei was the most commonly identified AHL-producing bacterium. Thin-layer chromatographic profiles of supernatants from six H. alvei isolates and of extracts from spoiling meat revealed that the major AHL species had an R(f) value and shape similar to N-3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone (OHHL). Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS) (high-resolution MS) analysis confirmed the presence of OHHL in pure cultures of H. alvei. Vacuum-packed meat spoiled at the same rate when inoculated with the H. alvei wild type compared to a corresponding AHL-lacking mutant. Addition of specific QS inhibitors to the AHL-producing H. alvei inoculated in meat or to naturally contaminated meat did not influence the spoilage of vacuum-packed meat. An extracellular protein of approximately 20 kDa produced by the H. alvei wild-type was not produced by the AHL-negative mutant but was restored in the mutant when complemented by OHHL, thus indicating that AHLs do have a regulatory role in H. alvei. Coinoculation of H. alvei wild-type with an AHL-deficient Serratia proteamaculans B5a, in which protease secretion is QS regulated, caused spoilage of liquid milk. By contrast, coinoculation of AHL-negative strains of H. alvei and S. proteamaculans B5a did not cause spoilage. In conclusion, AHL and AHL-producing bacteria are present in vacuum-packed meat during storage and spoilage, but AHL does not appear to influence the spoilage of this particular type of conserved meat. Our data indicate that AHL-producing H. alvei may induce food quality-relevant phenotypes in other bacterial species in the same environment. H. alvei may thus influence spoilage of food products in which Enterobacteriaceae participate in the spoilage process.

  7. Evidence that halogenated furanones from Delisea pulchra inhibit acylated homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated gene expression by displacing the AHL signal from its receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Manefield, M; de Nys, R; Kumar, N; Read, R; Givskov, M; Steinberg, P; Kjelleberg, S

    1999-02-01

    Acylated homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated gene expression controls phenotypes involved in colonization, often specifically of higher organisms, in both marine and terrestrial environments. The marine red alga Delisea pulchra produces halogenated furanones which resemble AHLs structurally and show inhibitory activity at ecologically realistic concentrations in AHL bioassays. Evidence is presented that halogenated furanones displace tritiated OHHL [N-3-(oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone] from Escherichia coli cells overproducing LuxR with potencies corresponding to their respective inhibitory activities in an AHL-regulated bioluminescence assay, indicating that this is the mechanism by which furanones inhibit AHL-dependent phenotypes. Alternative mechanisms for this phenomenon are also addressed. General metabolic disruption was assessed with two-dimensional PAGE, revealing limited non-AHL-related effects. A direct chemical interaction between the algal compounds and AHLs, as monitored by 1H NMR spectroscopy, was shown not to occur in vitro. These results support the contention that furanones, at the concentrations produced by the alga, can control bacterial colonization of surfaces by specifically interfering with AHL-mediated gene expression at the level of the LuxR protein.

  8. Characterization of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) producing bacteria isolated from vacuum-packaged refrigerated turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) and possible influence of exogenous AHLs on bacterial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Caili; Zhu, Suqin; Jatt, Abdul-Nabi; Zeng, Mingyong

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-to-cell communication mechanism through which microbial cells communicate and regulate their wide variety of biological activities. N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are considered to be the most important QS signaling molecules produced by several Gram-negative bacteria. The present study aimed to screen the AHLs-producing bacteria from spoiled vacuum-packaged refrigerated turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) by biosensor assays, and the profiles of AHLs produced by these bacteria were determined using reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography (RP-TLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Effects of exogenous AHLs and QS inhibitor (QSI) on the phenotypes (i.e., extracellular proteolytic activity and biofilm formation) of the AHLs-producing bacteria were also evaluated. Our results demonstrated that eight out of twenty-two isolates were found to produce AHLs. Three of the AHLs-producing isolates were identified as Serratia sp., and the other five were found to belong to the family of Aeromonas. Two isolates (i.e., S. liquefaciens A2 and A. sobria B1) with higher AHLs-producing activities were selected for further studies. Mainly, RP-TLC and GC-MS analysis revealed three AHLs, i.e., 3-oxo-C6-HSL, C8-HSL and C10-HSL were produced by S. liquefaciens A2, while five AHLs, i.e., C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, C10-HSL, and C12-HSL, were produced by A. sobria B1. Moreover, production of AHLs in both bacterial strains were found to be density-dependent, and the AHLs activity reached a maximum level in their middle logarithmic phase and decreased in the stationary phase. The addition of exogenous AHLs and QSI decreased the specific protease activity both of the Serratia A2 and Aeromonas B1. Exogenous AHLs inhibited the biofilm formation of Serratia A2 while it enhanced the biofilm formation in Aeromonas B1. QSI inhibited the specific protease activity and biofilm formation in both bacterial strains. PMID:27118073

  9. Characterization of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) producing bacteria isolated from vacuum-packaged refrigerated turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) and possible influence of exogenous AHLs on bacterial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Caili; Zhu, Suqin; Jatt, Abdul-Nabi; Zeng, Mingyong

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-to-cell communication mechanism through which microbial cells communicate and regulate their wide variety of biological activities. N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are considered to be the most important QS signaling molecules produced by several Gram-negative bacteria. The present study aimed to screen the AHLs-producing bacteria from spoiled vacuum-packaged refrigerated turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) by biosensor assays, and the profiles of AHLs produced by these bacteria were determined using reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography (RP-TLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Effects of exogenous AHLs and QS inhibitor (QSI) on the phenotypes (i.e., extracellular proteolytic activity and biofilm formation) of the AHLs-producing bacteria were also evaluated. Our results demonstrated that eight out of twenty-two isolates were found to produce AHLs. Three of the AHLs-producing isolates were identified as Serratia sp., and the other five were found to belong to the family of Aeromonas. Two isolates (i.e., S. liquefaciens A2 and A. sobria B1) with higher AHLs-producing activities were selected for further studies. Mainly, RP-TLC and GC-MS analysis revealed three AHLs, i.e., 3-oxo-C6-HSL, C8-HSL and C10-HSL were produced by S. liquefaciens A2, while five AHLs, i.e., C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, C10-HSL, and C12-HSL, were produced by A. sobria B1. Moreover, production of AHLs in both bacterial strains were found to be density-dependent, and the AHLs activity reached a maximum level in their middle logarithmic phase and decreased in the stationary phase. The addition of exogenous AHLs and QSI decreased the specific protease activity both of the Serratia A2 and Aeromonas B1. Exogenous AHLs inhibited the biofilm formation of Serratia A2 while it enhanced the biofilm formation in Aeromonas B1. QSI inhibited the specific protease activity and biofilm formation in both bacterial strains.

  10. Effects of Inhibiting Acylated Homoserine Lactones (AHLs) on Anammox Activity and Stability of Granules'.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ran; Zhang, Hanmin; Zou, Xiang; Yang, Fenglin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the effects of AHL-based QS signals on anammox activity and stability of granules' were investigated. Results clearly showed that the vanillin and porcine kidney acylase I could reduce the AHLs in anammox bacteria. Inactivation of AHLs by vanillin and porcine kidney acylase I depressed the nitrogen removal ability of anammox bacteria. A significant inhibition of specific anammox activity was observed when the concentration of vanillin and porcine kidney acylase I increased to 1 g/L. Anammox activity was depressed on enzyme level. Moreover, degradation of AHLs under vanillin and AHL-acylase exposure could result in anammox granules' disintegration. Further research showed that the contents of protein (PN) and polysaccharides (PS) in extracellular polymeric substances were reduced with AHLs blocked, and it further explained the instability and weakening strength of the anammox granules. The results of our investigation provided new insight into the AHL-based QS-regulated anammox activity, leading a potential way to enhance stability of anammox granules. PMID:27061587

  11. Investigation of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) molecule production in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from cooling tower water and biofilm samples.

    PubMed

    Haslan, Ezgi; Kimiran-Erdem, Ayten

    2013-09-01

    In this study, 99 Gram-negative rod bacteria were isolated from cooling tower water, and biofilm samples were examined for cell-to-cell signaling systems, N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecule types, and biofilm formation capacity. Four of 39 (10 %) strains isolated from water samples and 14 of 60 (23 %) strains isolated from biofilm samples were found to be producing a variety of AHL signal molecules. It was determined that the AHL signal molecule production ability and the biofilm formation capacity of sessile bacteria is higher than planktonic bacteria, and there was a statistically significant difference between the AHL signal molecule production of these two groups (p < 0.05). In addition, it was found that bacteria belonging to the same species isolated from cooling tower water and biofilm samples produced different types of AHL signal molecules and that there were different types of AHL signal molecules in an AHL extract of bacteria. In the present study, it was observed that different isolates of the same strains did not produce the same AHLs or did not produce AHL molecules, and bacteria known as AHL producers did not produce AHL. These findings suggest that detection of signal molecules in bacteria isolated from cooling towers may contribute to prevention of biofilm formation, elimination of communication among bacteria in water systems, and blockage of quorum-sensing controlled virulence of these bacteria. PMID:23250628

  12. Reaction of Acylated Homoserine Lactone Bacterial Signaling Molecules with Oxidized Halogen Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Borchardt, S. A.; Allain, E. J.; Michels, J. J.; Stearns, G. W.; Kelly, R. F.; McCoy, W. F.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidized halogen antimicrobials, such as hypochlorous and hypobromous acids, have been used extensively for microbial control in industrial systems. Recent discoveries have shown that acylated homoserine lactone cell-to-cell signaling molecules are important for biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suggesting that biofouling can be controlled by interfering with bacterial cell-to-cell communication. This study was conducted to investigate the potential for oxidized halogens to react with acylated homoserine lactone-based signaling molecules. Acylated homoserine lactones containing a 3-oxo group were found to rapidly react with oxidized halogens, while acylated homoserine lactones lacking the 3-oxo functionality did not react. The Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 bioassay was used to determine the effects of such reactions on acylated homoserine lactone activity. The results demonstrated that 3-oxo acyl homoserine lactone activity was rapidly lost upon exposure to oxidized halogens; however, acylated homoserine lactones lacking the 3-oxo group retained activity. Experiments with the marine alga Laminaria digitata demonstrated that natural haloperoxidase systems are capable of mediating the deactivation of acylated homoserine lactones. This may illustrate a natural defense mechanism to prevent biofouling on the surface of this marine alga. The Chromobacterium violaceum activity assay illustrates that reactions between 3-oxo acylated homoserine lactone molecules and oxidized halogens do occur despite the presence of biofilm components at much greater concentrations. This work suggests that oxidized halogens may control biofilm not only via a cidal mechanism, but also by possibly interfering with 3-oxo acylated homoserine lactone-based cell signaling. PMID:11425738

  13. gfp-based N-acyl homoserine-lactone sensor systems for detection of bacterial communication.

    PubMed

    Andersen, J B; Heydorn, A; Hentzer, M; Eberl, L; Geisenberger, O; Christensen, B B; Molin, S; Givskov, M

    2001-02-01

    In order to perform single-cell analysis and online studies of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated communication among bacteria, components of the Vibrio fischeri quorum sensor encoded by luxR-P(luxI) have been fused to modified versions of gfpmut3* genes encoding unstable green fluorescent proteins. Bacterial strains harboring this green fluorescent sensor detected a broad spectrum of AHL molecules and were capable of sensing the presence of 5 nM N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone in the surroundings. In combination with epifluorescent microscopy, the sensitivity of the sensor enabled AHL detection at the single-cell level and allowed for real-time measurements of fluctuations in AHL concentrations. This green fluorescent AHL sensor provides a state-of-the-art tool for studies of communication between the individuals present in mixed bacterial communities.

  14. Biofilm activity and sludge characteristics affected by exogenous N-acyl homoserine lactones in biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huizhi; He, Junguo; Liu, Jian; Yu, Huarong; Zhang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    This study verified the effect of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) concentrations on mature biofilm systems. Three concentrations of an AHL mixture were used in the batch test. Introducing of 5nM AHLs significantly increased biofilm activity and increased sludge characteristics, which resulted in better pollutant removal performance, whereas exogenous 50nM and 500nM AHLs limited pollutant removal, especially COD and nitrogen removal. To further identify how exogenous signal molecular affects biofilm system nitrogen removal, analyzing of nitrifying bacteria through real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that these additional signal molecules affect nitrifying to total bacteria ratio. In addition, the running state of the system was stable during 15days of operation without an AHL dose, which suggests that the changes in the system due to AHL are irreversible. PMID:27030953

  15. Pseudomonas cremoricolorata Strain ND07 Produces N-acyl Homoserine Lactones as Quorum Sensing Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Yunos, Nina Yusrina Muhamad; Tan, Wen-Si; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Mohamad, Nur Izzati; Tan, Pui-Wan; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial cell-to-cell communication system controlling QS-mediated genes which is synchronized with the population density. The regulation of specific gene activity is dependent on the signaling molecules produced, namely N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). We report here the identification and characterization of AHLs produced by bacterial strain ND07 isolated from a Malaysian fresh water sample. Molecular identification showed that strain ND07 is clustered closely to Pseudomonas cremoricolorata. Spent culture supernatant extract of P. cremoricolorata strain ND07 activated the AHL biosensor Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Using high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, it was confirmed that P. cremoricolorata strain ND07 produced N-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL) and N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation on the production of C10-HSL in P. cremoricolorata strain ND07. PMID:24984061

  16. Global and Phylogenetic Distribution of Quorum Sensing Signals, Acyl Homoserine Lactones, in the Family of Vibrionaceae

    PubMed Central

    Barker Rasmussen, Bastian; Fog Nielsen, Kristian; Machado, Henrique; Melchiorsen, Jette; Gram, Lone; Sonnenschein, Eva C.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) and the corresponding signals, acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), were first described for a luminescent Vibrio species. Since then, detailed knowledge has been gained on the functional level of QS; however, the abundance of AHLs in the family of Vibrionaceae in the environment has remained unclear. Three hundred and one Vibrionaceae strains were collected on a global research cruise and the prevalence and profile of AHL signals in this global collection were determined. AHLs were detected in 32 of the 301 strains using Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Chromobacterium violaceum reporter strains. Ethyl acetate extracts of the cultures were analysed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (MS) with automated tandem MS confirmation for AHLs. N-(3-hydroxy-hexanoyl) (OH-C6) and N-(3-hydroxy-decanoyl) (OH-C10) homoserine lactones were the most common AHLs found in 17 and 12 strains, respectively. Several strains produced a diversity of different AHLs, including N-heptanoyl (C7) HL. AHL-producing Vibrionaceae were found in polar, temperate and tropical waters. The AHL profiles correlated with strain phylogeny based on gene sequence homology, however not with geographical location. In conclusion, a wide range of AHL signals are produced by a number of clades in the Vibrionaceae family and these results will allow future investigations of inter- and intra-species interactions within this cosmopolitan family of marine bacteria. PMID:25419995

  17. Production of Acylated Homoserine Lactones by Psychrotrophic Members of the Enterobacteriaceae Isolated from Foods

    PubMed Central

    Gram, Lone; Christensen, Allan Beck; Ravn, Lars; Molin, Søren; Givskov, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Bacteria are able to communicate and gene regulation can be mediated through the production of acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules. These signals play important roles in several pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria. The following study was undertaken to investigate whether AHLs are produced by bacteria found in food at temperatures and NaCl conditions commercially used for food preservation and storage. A minimum of 116 of 154 psychrotrophic Enterobacteriaceae strains isolated from cold-smoked salmon or vacuum-packed chilled meat produced AHLs. Analysis by thin-layer chromatography indicated that N-3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone was the major AHL of several of the strains isolated from cold-smoked salmon and meat. AHL-positive strains cultured at 5°C in medium supplemented with 4% NaCl produced detectable amounts of AHL(s) at cell densities of 106 CFU/ml. AHLs were detected in cold-smoked salmon inoculated with strains of Enterobacteriaceae stored at 5°C under an N2 atmosphere when mean cell densities increased to 106 CFU/g and above. Similarly, AHLs were detected in uninoculated samples of commercially produced cold-smoked salmon when the level of indigenous Enterobacteriaceae reached 106 CFU/g. This level of Enterobacteriaceae is often found in lightly preserved foods, and AHL-mediated gene regulation may play a role in bacteria associated with food spoilage or food toxicity. PMID:10427034

  18. Construction of a dual fluorescence whole-cell biosensor to detect N-acyl homoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xuemei; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Ma, Anzhou; Yu, Qing; Zhuang, Xuliang

    2014-02-01

    Detection of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) is useful for understanding quorum sensing (QS) behaviors, including biofilm formation, virulence and metabolism. For detecting AHLs and indicating the host cells in situ, we constructed the plasmid pUCGMA2T(1-4) to make a dual fluorescent whole-cell biosensor based on the AhlIR AHL system of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a. The plasmid contains three components: constitutively expressed P(npatII::gfp) for indicating host cells, P(ahlI::mcherry) that produces red fluorescence in response to AHL, and the ahlR gene that encodes an AHL regulatory protein. Meanwhile, two copies of T(1-4) (four tandem copies of a transcriptional terminator) were added into the plasmid to reduce background. The results showed that when the plasmid was placed into Escherichia coli, the dual fluorescence whole-cell biosensor was able to respond with red fluorescence within 6 hr to 5 x 10(-8)-1 x 10(-5) mol/L of 3OC6-HSL. Bright green fluorescence indicated the host cells. Furthermore, when the plasmid was transferred to wildtype Pseudomonas PhTA125 (an AHL-producing bacterium), it also showed both green and red fluorescence. This result demonstrates that this plasmid can be used to construct whole-cell indicators that can indicate the AHL response and spatial behaviors of microbes in a microenvironmental niche.

  19. Pantoea sp. isolated from tropical fresh water exhibiting N-acyl homoserine lactone production.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen-Si; Muhamad Yunos, Nina Yusrina; Tan, Pui-Wan; Mohamad, Nur Izzati; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    N-Acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) serves as signaling molecule for quorum sensing (QS) in Gram-negative bacteria to regulate various physiological activities including pathogenicity. With the aim of isolating freshwater-borne bacteria that can cause outbreak of disease in plants and portrayed QS properties, environmental water sampling was conducted. Here we report the preliminary screening of AHL production using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Escherichia coli [pSB401] as AHL biosensors. The 16S rDNA gene sequence of isolate M009 showed the highest sequence similarity to Pantoea stewartii S9-116, which is a plant pathogen. The isolated Pantoea sp. was confirmed to produce N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-HSL (3-oxo-C6-HSL) through analysis of high resolution mass tandem mass spectrometry.

  20. Pantoea sp. Isolated from Tropical Fresh Water Exhibiting N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Production

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wen-Si; Tan, Pui-Wan; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    N-Acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) serves as signaling molecule for quorum sensing (QS) in Gram-negative bacteria to regulate various physiological activities including pathogenicity. With the aim of isolating freshwater-borne bacteria that can cause outbreak of disease in plants and portrayed QS properties, environmental water sampling was conducted. Here we report the preliminary screening of AHL production using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Escherichia coli [pSB401] as AHL biosensors. The 16S rDNA gene sequence of isolate M009 showed the highest sequence similarity to Pantoea stewartii S9-116, which is a plant pathogen. The isolated Pantoea sp. was confirmed to produce N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-HSL (3-oxo-C6-HSL) through analysis of high resolution mass tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:25197715

  1. Biofilm formation and acyl homoserine lactone production in Hafnia alvei isolated from raw milk.

    PubMed

    Viana, Eliseth Souza; Campos, Maria Emilene Martino; Ponce, Adriana Reis; Mantovani, Hilário Cuquetto; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to detect the presence of acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), signal molecules of the quorum sensing system in biofilm formed by Hafnia alvei strains. It also evaluated the effect of synthetic quorum sensing inhibitors in biofilm formation. AHLs were assayed using well diffusion techniques, thin layer chromatography (TLC) and detection directly in biofilm with biomonitors. The extracts obtained from planktonic and sessile cell of H. alvei induced at least two of three monitor strains evaluated. The presence of AHLs with up to six carbon atoms was confirmed by TLC. Biofilm formation by H. alvei was inhibited by furanone, as demonstrated by 96-well assay of crystal violet in microtitre plates and by scanning electron microscopy. The H. alvei 071 hall mutant was deficient in biofilm formation. All these results showed that the quorum sensing system is probably involved in the regulation of biofilm formation by H. alvei. PMID:20140298

  2. Novel Reporter for Identification of Interference with Acyl Homoserine Lactone and Autoinducer-2 Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Weiland-Bräuer, Nancy; Pinnow, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Two reporter strains were established to identify novel biomolecules interfering with bacterial communication (quorum sensing [QS]). The basic design of these Escherichia coli-based systems comprises a gene encoding a lethal protein fused to promoters induced in the presence of QS signal molecules. Consequently, these E. coli strains are unable to grow in the presence of the respective QS signal molecules unless a nontoxic QS-interfering compound is present. The first reporter strain designed to detect autoinducer-2 (AI-2)-interfering activities (AI2-QQ.1) contained the E. coli ccdB lethal gene under the control of the E. coli lsrA promoter. The second reporter strain (AI1-QQ.1) contained the Vibrio fischeri luxI promoter fused to the ccdB gene to detect interference with acyl-homoserine lactones. Bacteria isolated from the surfaces of several marine eukarya were screened for quorum-quenching (QQ) activities using the established reporter systems AI1-QQ.1 and AI2-QQ.1. Out of 34 isolates, two interfered with acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) signaling, five interfered with AI-2 QS signaling, and 10 were demonstrated to interfere with both signal molecules. Open reading frames (ORFs) conferring QQ activity were identified for three selected isolates (Photobacterium sp., Pseudoalteromonas sp., and Vibrio parahaemolyticus). Evaluation of the respective heterologously expressed and purified QQ proteins confirmed their ability to interfere with the AHL and AI-2 signaling processes. PMID:25527543

  3. Quorum sensing signal molecules (acylated homoserine lactones) in gram-negative fish pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Jesper B; Dalsgaard, Inger; Nielsen, Kristian F; Buchholtz, Christiane; Larsen, Jens L; Gram, Lone

    2005-06-14

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the production of quorum sensing signals (specifically acylated homoserine lactones, AHLs) among a selection of strains of Gram-negative fish bacterial pathogens. These signals are involved in the regulation of virulence factors in some human and plant-pathogenic bacteria. A total of 59 strains, representing 9 different fish pathogenic species, were tested against 2 AHL monitor bacteria (Agrobacterium tumefaciens NT1 [pZLR4] and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026) in a well diffusion assay and by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Representative samples were further characterized by high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC-HR-MS). AHLs were produced by all strains of Aeromonas salmonicida, Aeromonas hydrophila, Yersinia ruckeri, Vibrio salmonicida, and Vibrio vulnificus. Some strains of atypical Aeromonas salmonicida and Vibrio splendidus were also positive. Aeromonas species produced N-butanoyl homoserine lactone (BHL) and N-hexanoyl homoserine lactone (HHL) and 1 additional product, whereas N-3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone (OHHL) and HHL were detected in Vibrio salmonicida. N-3-oxo-octanoyl homoserine lactone (OOHL) and N-3-octanoyl homoserine lactone (OHL) were detected in Y. ruckeri. AHLs were not detected from strains of Photobacterium damselae, Flavobacterium psychrophilum or Moritella viscosa. AHLs were extracted from fish infected with Y. ruckeri but not from fish infected with A. salmonicida. In conclusion, the production of quorum sensing signals, AHLs, is common among the strains that we examined. If the AHL molecules regulate the expression of the virulence phenotype in these bacteria, as shown to occur in some bacterial pathogens, novel disease control measures may be developed by blocking AHL-mediated communication and suppressing virulence.

  4. Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Quorum Sensing in the Roseobacter Clade

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Jindong; Liu, Yue; Fuqua, Clay; Hill, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Roseobacter clade are ecologically important and numerically abundant in coastal environments and can associate with marine invertebrates and nutrient-rich marine snow or organic particles, on which quorum sensing (QS) may play an important role. In this review, we summarize current research progress on roseobacterial acyl-homoserine lactone-based QS, particularly focusing on three relatively well-studied representatives, Phaeobacter inhibens DSM17395, the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11 and the dinoflagellate symbiont Dinoroseobacter shibae. Bioinformatic survey of luxI homologues revealed that over 80% of available roseobacterial genomes encode at least one luxI homologue, reflecting the significance of QS controlled regulatory pathways in adapting to the relevant marine environments. We also discuss several areas that warrant further investigation, including studies on the ecological role of these diverse QS pathways in natural environments. PMID:24402124

  5. Detection of acyl-homoserine lactones by Escherichia and Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Jitesh A.; Ahmer, Brian M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia and Salmonella do not synthesize quorum sensing signaling molecules of the N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (AHL) type but they can detect AHLs produced by other species of bacteria. AHLs are present in the bovine rumen but not in the remainder of the gastrointestinal tract. Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) responds to AHLs extracted from the bovine rumen. Salmonella fails to detect AHLs in the gastrointestinal tracts of pathogen-free mice or pigs, suggesting that AHLs are not present. However, Salmonella does detect the AHL production of Yersinia enterocolitica in mouse Peyer’s patches. In response to AHLs, EHEC represses flagellar genes and the LEE pathogenicity island while it activates the acid fitness island, whereas Salmonella activates the rck operon and a gene, srgE, encoding a putative Type III secreted effector. PMID:21353625

  6. Production of N-acyl Homoserine Lactones and Virulence Factors of Waterborne Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Chu, Weihua; Liu, Yongwang; Jiang, Yan; Zhu, Wei; Zhuang, Xiyi

    2013-09-01

    Aeromonads are inhabitants of aquatic ecosystems and are described as being involved in intestinal disturbances and other infections. The purpose of this study was to investigate the production of N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules and some virulence factors, including hemolysins, proteases, extracellular nucleases production and cytotoxicity by waterborne Aeromonas hydrophila. A total of 24 strains isolated from fresh-water or diseased fish were used in the study. The majority A.hydrophila strains produce two AHL molecules (21/24), one is N-butanoyl homoserine lactone (BHL), and the other is N-hexanoyl homoserine lactone (HHL) according to thin-layer chromatography analysis. Among the virulence factors tested, more than 83 % of the isolates produced β haemolysin when inoculated on sheep blood agar, only 50 % of the isolates displayed DNase activity, 75 % of the isolates shown proteolytic activity on skimmed milk plate, and cytotoxic activity was detected in 20 of 24 of the isolates. The strains producing AHLs possessed one or more virulence factors. In conclusion, the production of quorum sensing signal molecules is common among the strains that we examined, and there seems to some relationships between quorum sensing signal production and virulence factors in A. hydrophila.

  7. Inhibiting N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthesis and quenching Pseudomonas quinolone quorum sensing to attenuate virulence

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Liu, Yi-Chia; Chang, Chien-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria sense their own population size, tune the expression of responding genes, and behave accordingly to environmental stimuli by secreting signaling molecules. This phenomenon is termed as quorum sensing (QS). By exogenously manipulating the signal transduction bacterial population behaviors could be controlled, which may be done through quorum quenching (QQ). QS related regulatory networks have been proven their involvement in regulating many virulence determinants in pathogenic bacteria in the course of infections. Interfering with QS signaling system could be a novel strategy against bacterial infections and therefore requires more understanding of their fundamental mechanisms. Here we review the development of studies specifically on the inhibition of production of N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL), a common proteobacterial QS signal. The opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, equips the alkylquinolone (AQ)-mediated QS which also plays crucial roles in its pathogenicity. The studies in QQ targeting on AQ are also discussed. PMID:26539190

  8. Are There Acyl-Homoserine Lactones within Mammalian Intestines?

    PubMed Central

    Swearingen, Matthew C.; Sabag-Daigle, Anice

    2013-01-01

    Many Proteobacteria are capable of quorum sensing using N-acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) signaling molecules that are synthesized by LuxI or LuxM homologs and detected by transcription factors of the LuxR family. Most quorum-sensing species have at least one LuxR and one LuxI homolog. However, members of the Escherichia, Salmonella, Klebsiella, and Enterobacter genera possess only a single LuxR homolog, SdiA, and no acyl-HSL synthase. The most obvious hypothesis is that these organisms are eavesdropping on acyl-HSL production within the complex microbial communities of the mammalian intestinal tract. However, there is currently no evidence of acyl-HSLs being produced within normal intestinal communities. A few intestinal pathogens, including Yersinia enterocolitica, do produce acyl-HSLs, and Salmonella can detect them during infection. Therefore, a more refined hypothesis is that SdiA orthologs are used for eavesdropping on other quorum-sensing pathogens in the host. However, the lack of acyl-HSL signaling among the normal intestinal residents is a surprising finding given the complexity of intestinal communities. In this review, we examine the evidence for and against the possibility of acyl-HSL signaling molecules in the mammalian intestine and discuss the possibility that related signaling molecules might be present and awaiting discovery. PMID:23144246

  9. Topical Administration of Acylated Homoserine Lactone Improves Epithelialization of Cutaneous Wounds in Hyperglycaemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Aya; Quinetti, Paes C.; Nakagami, Gojiro; Mugita, Yuko; Oe, Makoto; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Mori, Taketoshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians often experience delayed epithelialization in diabetic patients, for which a high glucose condition is one of the causes. However, the mechanisms underlying delayed wound closure have not been fully elucidated, and effective treatments to enhance epithelialization in patients with hyperglycaemia have not been established. Here we propose a new reagent, acylated homoserine lactone (AHL), to improve the delayed epithelialization due to the disordered formation of a basement membrane of epidermis in hyperglycaemic rats. Acute hyperglycaemia was induced by streptozotocin injection in this experiment. Full thickness wounds were created on the flanks of hyperglycaemic or control rats. Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to identify hyperglycaemia-specific abnormalities in epidermal regeneration by comparison between groups. We then examined the effects of AHL on delayed epithelialization in hyperglycaemic rats. Histological analysis showed the significantly shorter epithelializing tissue (P < 0.05), abnormal structure of basement membrane (fragmentation and immaturity), and hypo- and hyperproliferation of basal keratinocytes in hyperglycaemic rats. Treating the wound with AHL resulted in the decreased abnormalities of basement membrane, normal distribution of proliferating epidermal keratinocytes, and significantly promoted epithelialization (P < 0.05) in hyperglycemic rats, suggesting the improving effects of AHL on abnormal epithelialization due to hyperglycemia. PMID:27404587

  10. Acyl-homoserine Lactone from Saccharum × officinarum with Stereochemistry-Dependent Growth Regulatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Olher, Vanessa G A; Ferreira, Nagela P; Souza, Alan G; Chiavelli, Lucas U R; Teixeira, Aline F; Santos, Wanderley D; Santin, Silvana M O; Ferrarese Filho, Osvaldo; Silva, Cleuza C; Pomini, Armando M

    2016-05-27

    Acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are a class of compounds produced by Gram-negative bacteria that are used in a process of chemical communication called quorum sensing. Much is known about how bacteria use these chemical compounds to control the expression of important factors; however, there have been few reports about the presence and effects of AHLs in plants. In this study, the phytochemical study of leaves and culms of sugar cane (Saccharum × officinarum) led to the identification of N-(3-oxo-octanoyl)homoserine lactone. Since the absolute configuration of the natural product could not be determined, both R and S enantiomers of N-(3-oxo-octanoyl)homoserine lactone were synthesized and tested in sugar cane culms. The enantiomers caused changes in the mass and length of buds and roots when used at micromolar concentrations. Using the sugar cane RB96-6928 variety, the S enantiomer increased sprouting of roots more effectively than the R enantiomer. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy showed that both the R and S enantiomers led to more stretched root cells compared with the control. PMID:27192014

  11. Autoinduction in Erwinia amylovora: evidence of an acyl-homoserine lactone signal in the fire blight pathogen.

    PubMed

    Molina, Lázaro; Rezzonico, Fabio; Défago, Geneviève; Duffy, Brion

    2005-05-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight disease of apple, pear, and other members of the Rosaceae. Here we present the first evidence for autoinduction in E. amylovora and a role for an N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-type signal. Two major plant virulence traits, production of extracellular polysaccharides (amylovoran and levan) and tolerance to free oxygen radicals, were controlled in a bacterial-cell-density-dependent manner. Two standard autoinducer biosensors, Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 and Vibrio harveyi BB886, detected AHL in stationary-phase cultures of E. amylovora. A putative AHL synthase gene, eamI, was partially sequenced, which revealed homology with autoinducer genes from other bacterial pathogens (e.g., carI, esaI, expI, hsII, yenI, and luxI). E. amylovora was also found to carry eamR, a convergently transcribed gene with homology to luxR AHL activator genes in pathogens such as Erwinia carotovora. Heterologous expression of the Bacillus sp. strain A24 acyl-homoserine lactonase gene aiiA in E. amylovora abolished induction of AHL biosensors, impaired extracellular polysaccharide production and tolerance to hydrogen peroxide, and reduced virulence on apple leaves. PMID:15838048

  12. PA-I lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa binds acyl homoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Boteva, Raina N; Bogoeva, Vanya P; Stoitsova, Stoyanka R

    2005-03-14

    The study analyses the binding affinities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA-I lectin (PA-IL) to three N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHSL), quorum sensing signal molecules responsible for cell-cell communication in bacteria. It shows that like some plant lectins, PA-IL has a dual function and, besides its carbohydrate-binding capacity, can accommodate AHLS. Formation of complexes between PA-IL and AHSL with acyl side chains composed of 4, 6 or 12 methyl groups is characterized by changes in the emissions of two incorporated fluorescent markers, TNS and IAEDANS, both derivatives of naphthalene sulfonic acid. PA-IL shows increasing affinities to lactones with longer aliphatic side chains. The values of the apparent dissociation constants (K(d)), which are similar to the previously determined K(d) for the adenine high affinity binding, and the similar effects of lactones and adenine on the TNS emission indicate one identical binding site for these ligands, which is suggested to represent the central cavity of the oligomeric molecule formed after the association of the four identical subunits of PA-IL. Intramolecular distances between the fluorescent markers and protein Trp residues are determined by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET).

  13. Response of leaf-associated bacterial communities to primary acyl-homoserine lactone in the tobacco phyllosphere.

    PubMed

    Lv, Di; Ma, Anzhou; Bai, Zhihui; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2012-02-01

    The phyllosphere is inhabited by large populations of epiphytic bacteria that are able to modulate their phenotypes and behavior by quorum sensing (QS). However, the impact of acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) involved in QS on the ecology of bacteria in their natural habitat remains unclear. Therefore, we used a bioassay and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to detect AHLs in the tobacco phyllosphere. Our results identified several AHLs in the tobacco phyllosphere, the majority of which were short-chain AHLs. Furthermore, the addition of an exogenous N-(3-oxohexanoyl) homoserine lactone (3OC6HSL), which is seen in the naturally occurring tobacco phyllosphere, generated variability in the composition of the bacterial community as determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Notably, the ratio of Gram-positive (GP) bacteria increased in response to treatment with 1 μM AHL, but decreased incipiently when treated with 10 μM AHL. These observations provide insight into the composition of the leaf-colonizing epiphyte community responsible for AHLs, particularly GP bacteria as they do not use AHLs as signaling molecules for QS.

  14. Intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization and kinase activity during acylated homoserine lactone-dependent quorum sensing in Serratia liquefaciens.

    PubMed

    Werthén, M; Lundgren, T

    2001-03-01

    Quorum sensing in Gram-negative bacteria involves acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) and a transcription factor, activated by the AHLs. In this study, a possible involvement of intracellular Ca(2+) as second messenger and/or protein kinase activity during signal transduction is analyzed. When N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone was added to a suspension of Fura-2-loaded Serratia liquefaciens, there was a decline in [Ca(2+)](i), measured as a decrease in the Fura-2 fluorescence ratio. As controls, the addition of the signal molecule N-3-oxohexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone, which is not produced by S. liquefaciens, did not induce changes in [Ca(2+)](i). Using a protein kinase activity assay on AHL-stimulated cells, an increase in kinase activity after N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone stimulation of S. liquefaciens cells was detected, whereas the kinase activity induced by N-3-oxohexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone was not statistically significant. The conclusion from this study is that changes in [Ca(2+)](i) are involved in quorum sensing signal transduction in the Gram-negative bacteria S. liquefaciens. We also conclude that kinase activity is induced in S. liquefaciens upon AHL stimulation. We suggest that the transient intracellular [Ca(2+)] changes and kinase activity, activated by the AHL signal, are critical for the quorum-sensing signal transduction.

  15. The quorum sensing molecule N-acyl homoserine lactone produced by Acinetobacter baumannii displays antibacterial and anticancer properties.

    PubMed

    John, James; Saranathan, Rajagopalan; Adigopula, Lakshmi Narayana; Thamodharan, Vasanth; Singh, Satya Prakash; Lakshmi, T Pragna; CharanTej, Mallu Abhiram; Rao, R Srinivasa; Krishna, R; Rao, H Surya Prakash; Prashanth, K

    2016-10-01

    Secretory N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) mediate quorum sensing (QS) in bacteria. AHLs are shown to be inhibitory for an unrelated group of bacteria and might mimic host signalling elements, thereby subverting the regulatory events in host cells. This study investigated the AHL produced by Acinetobacter baumannii and analysed its effect on other bacterial species and mammalian cells. Chemically characterized AHL had an m/z value of 325 with a molecular formula C18H31NO4 and showed its inhibitory potential against Staphylococcus aureus. Molecular docking studies identified D-alanine-D-alanine synthetase A, a cell wall synthesizing enzyme of S. aureus having a strong binding affinity towards AHL. Electron microscopy showed the disruption and sloughing off of the S. aureus cell wall when treated with AHL. In vitro experiments revealed that this bacteriostatic AHL showed time-dependent activity and induced apoptosis in cancer cell lines. This compound could be a potential structural backbone for constructing new AHL analogues against S. aureus. The findings emphasize the need to re-evaluate all previously characterized AHLs for any additional new biological functions other than QS. PMID:27643959

  16. Diversity and N-acyl-homoserine lactone production by Gammaproteobacteria associated with Avicennia marina rhizosphere of South Indian mangroves.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Ganga; Jegan, Sekar; Baskaran, Viswanathan; Kathiravan, Raju; Prabavathy, Vaiyapuri Ramalingam

    2015-07-01

    The diversity of N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-producing rhizosphere bacterial community associated with Avicennia marina in the mangrove ecosystems of South India was investigated. Approximately 800 rhizobacteria were isolated from A. marina, and they were screened for the production of AHL using two biosensors, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 (pZLR4). Among the total isolates screened, 7% of the rhizobacteria showed positive induction for AHL signals. The BOX-PCR profile of 56 positive isolates represented 11 distinct genotypic groups. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA sequences of 16 representatives showed that the isolates belonged to the class Gammaproteobacteria, which represented six different genera: Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Vibrio, Photobacterium, Serratia and Halomonas. The study also identified three AHL-producing species, namely, Photobacterium halotolerans MSSRF QS48, Vibrio xiamenensis MSSRF QS47 and Pseudomonas sp. MSSRF QS1 that had not been reported previously. AHL profiling by TLC detected short chains C4, C6 and C8-HSL, and long chains C10 and C12-HSL with both unsubstituted and substituted side chains among the 16 representative AHL positives. This is the first report concerning the diversity of AHL-producing Gammaproteobacteria from mangrove ecosystems exhibiting diverse AHL profiles. PMID:25956585

  17. Beneficial effects of bacteria-plant communication based on quorum sensing molecules of the N-acyl homoserine lactone group.

    PubMed

    Schikora, Adam; Schenk, Sebastian T; Hartmann, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms play a crucial role in the proper performance and ecological fitness of bacterial populations. Many key physiological processes are regulated in a QS-dependent manner by auto-inducers, like the N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) in numerous Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, also the interaction between bacteria and eukaryotic hosts can be regulated by AHLs. Those mechanisms gained much attention, because of the positive effects of different AHL molecules on plants. This positive impact ranges from growth promotion to induced resistance and is quite contrasting to the rather negative effects observed in the interactions between bacterial AHL molecules and animals. Only very recently, we began to understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning plant responses to AHL molecules. In this review, we gathered the latest information in this research field. The first part gives an overview of the bacterial aspects of quorum sensing. Later we focus on the impact of AHLs on plant growth and AHL-priming, as one of the most understood phenomena in respect to the inter-kingdom interactions based on AHL-quorum sensing molecules. Finally, we discuss the potential benefits of the understanding of bacteria-plant interaction for the future agricultural applications.

  18. Second Acyl Homoserine Lactone Production System in the Extreme Acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans▿

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Mariella; Seeger, Michael; Jedlicki, Eugenia; Holmes, David S.

    2007-01-01

    The acidophilic proteobacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is involved in the industrial biorecovery of copper. It is found in acidic environments in biofilms and is important in the biogeochemical cycling of metals and nutrients. Its genome contains a cluster of four genes, glyQ, glysS, gph, and act, that are predicted to encode the α and β subunits of glycine tRNA synthetase, a phosphatase, and an acyltransferase, respectively (GenBank accession no. DQ149607). act, cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, produces acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) principally of chain length C14 according to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry measurements. The AHLs have biological activity as shown by in vivo studies using the reporter strain Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm41 SinI−. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) experiments indicate that the four genes are expressed as a single transcript, demonstrating that they constitute an operon. According to semiquantitative RT-PCR results, act is expressed more highly when A. ferrooxidans is grown in medium containing iron than when it is grown in medium containing sulfur. Since AHLs are important intercellular signaling molecules used by many bacteria to monitor their population density in quorum-sensing control of gene expression, this result suggests that A. ferrooxidans has two quorum-sensing systems, one based on Act, as described herein, and the other based on a Lux-like quorum-sensing system, reported previously. The latter system was shown to be upregulated in A. ferrooxidans grown in sulfur medium, suggesting that the two quorum-sensing systems respond to different environmental signals that may be related to their abilities to colonize and use different solid sulfur- and iron-containing minerals. PMID:17351095

  19. Acyl-homoserine lactone-dependent eavesdropping promotes competition in a laboratory co-culture model

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Josephine R; Heilmann, Silja; Mittler, John E; Greenberg, E Peter

    2012-01-01

    Many Proteobacteria use acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing to activate the production of antibiotics at high cell density. Extracellular factors like antibiotics can be considered public goods shared by individuals within a group. Quorum-sensing control of antibiotic production may be important for protecting a niche or competing for limited resources in mixed bacterial communities. To begin to investigate the role of quorum sensing in interspecies competition, we developed a dual-species co-culture model using the soil saprophytes Burkholderia thailandensis (Bt) and Chromobacterium violaceum (Cv). These bacteria require quorum sensing to activate the production of antimicrobial factors that inhibit growth of the other species. We demonstrate that quorum-sensing-dependent antimicrobials can provide a competitive advantage to either Bt or Cv by inhibiting growth of the other species in co-culture. Although the quorum-sensing signals differ for each species, we show that the promiscuous signal receptor encoded by Cv can sense signals produced by Bt, and that this ability to eavesdrop on Bt can provide Cv an advantage in certain situations. We use an in silico approach to investigate the effect of eavesdropping in competition, and show conditions where early activation of antibiotic production resulting from eavesdropping can promote competitiveness. Our work supports the idea that quorum sensing is important for interspecies competition and that promiscuous signal receptors allow eavesdropping on competitors in mixed microbial habitats. PMID:22763647

  20. Identification of N-acyl homoserine lactones produced by Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAL5 cultured in complex and synthetic media.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Peñalver, Carlos G; Bertini, Elisa V; de Figueroa, Lucía I C

    2012-07-01

    The endophytic diazotrophic Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAL5 was originally isolated from sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum). The biological nitrogen fixation, phytohormones secretion, solubilization of mineral nutrients and phytopathogen antagonism allow its classification as a plant growth-promoting bacterium. The recent genomic sequence of PAL5 unveiled the presence of a quorum sensing (QS) system. QS are regulatory mechanisms that, through the production of signal molecules or autoinducers, permit a microbial population the regulation of the physiology in a coordinated manner. The most studied autoinducers in gram-negative bacteria are the N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). The usage of biosensor strains evidenced the presence of AHL-like molecules in cultures of G. diazotrophicus PAL5 grown in complex and synthetic media. Analysis of AHLs performed by LC-APCI-MS permitted the identification of eight different signal molecules, including C6-, C8-, C10-, C12- and C14-HSL. Mass spectra confirmed that this diazotrophic strain also synthesizes autoinducers with carbonyl substitutions in the acyl chain. No differences in the profile of AHLs could be determined under both culture conditions. However, although the level of short-chain AHLs was not affected, a decrease of 30% in the production of long-chain AHLs could be measured in synthetic medium. PMID:22350020

  1. Production of N-acyl homoserine lactones by gram-negative bacteria isolated from contact lens wearers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Thuruthyil, S J; Willcox, M D

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the production of N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules in ocular gram-negative bacteria. A total of 91 ocular strains isolated from contact lens adverse response patients and asymptomatic subjects were used in the study. These included Acinetobacter, Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia liquefaciens, Serratia marcescens, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The biosensor strains Chromobacterium violaceum mutant CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136 were used for detection of AHL signal molecules. The majority of A. hydrophila, P. aeruginosa, and S. liquefaciens strains produced more than one AHL molecule. Serratia marcescens strains were AHL positive only under detection of A136. The rest of the test species did not show any AHL production under the current detection system. These findings indicate that AHL-mediated quorum-sensing systems are present in some of the ocular bacteria, and the different signal molecules may be involved with the quorum-sensing pathway in the other bacterial species.

  2. Transcriptome analysis of acyl-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing regulation in Yersinia pestis [corrected].

    PubMed

    LaRock, Christopher N; Yu, Jing; Horswill, Alexander R; Parsek, Matthew R; Minion, F Chris

    2013-01-01

    The etiologic agent of bubonic plague, Yersinia pestis, senses self-produced, secreted chemical signals in a process named quorum sensing. Though the closely related enteric pathogen Y. pseudotuberculosis uses quorum sensing system to regulate motility, the role of quorum sensing in Y. pestis has been unclear. In this study we performed transcriptional profiling experiments to identify Y. pestis quorum sensing regulated functions. Our analysis revealed that acyl-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing controls the expression of several metabolic functions. Maltose fermentation and the glyoxylate bypass are induced by acyl-homoserine lactone signaling. This effect was observed at 30°C, indicating a potential role for quorum sensing regulation of metabolism at temperatures below the normal mammalian temperature. It is proposed that utilization of alternative carbon sources may enhance growth and/or survival during prolonged periods in natural habitats with limited nutrient sources, contributing to maintenance of plague in nature.

  3. Sodium houttuyfonate affects production of N-acyl homoserine lactone and quorum sensing-regulated genes expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Daqiang; Huang, Weifeng; Duan, Qiangjun; Li, Fang; Cheng, Huijuan

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a means of cell-to-cell communication that uses diffusible signaling molecules that are sensed by the population to determine population density, thus allowing co-ordinate gene regulation in response to population density. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, production of the QS signaling molecule, N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL), co-ordinates expression of key factors of pathogenesis, including biofilm formation and toxin secretion. It is predicted that the inhibition of AHL sensing would provide an effective clinical treatment to reduce the expression of virulence factors and increase the effectiveness of antimicrobial agents. We previously demonstrated that sodium houttuyfonate (SH), commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat infectious diseases, can effectively inhibit QS-regulated processes, including biofilm formation. Here, using a model system, we demonstrate that SH causes the dose-dependent inhibition of AHL production, through down-regulation of the AHL biosynthesis gene, lasI. Addition of SH also resulted in down-regulation of expression of the AHL sensor and transcriptional regulator, LasR, and inhibited the production of the QS-regulated virulence factors, pyocyanin and LasA. These results suggest that the antimicrobial activity of SH may be due to its ability to disrupt QS in P. aeruginosa. PMID:25505457

  4. Cell adhesion, ammonia removal and granulation of autotrophic nitrifying sludge facilitated by N-acyl-homoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Li, An-Jie; Hou, Bao-Lian; Li, Mei-Xi

    2015-11-01

    In this study, six N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) molecules (C6-HSL, C8-HSL, C10-HSL, 3-oxo-C6-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL and 3-oxo-C10-HSL) were each dosed into a bioreactor and seeded using autotrophic nitrifying sludge (ANS). The effects of the AHLs on cell adhesion, nitrification and sludge granulation were investigated. The results indicated that the efficiencies of cell adhesion and ammonia removal both had a close correlation with the side chain length and β position substituent group of the AHLs. The best-performing AHL in terms of accelerating bacterial attached-growth was 3-oxo-C6-HSL, whereas C6-HSL outperformed the others in terms of the ammonia degradation rate. The addition of 3-oxo-C6-HSL or C6-HSL increased the biomass growth rate, microbial activity, extracellular proteins and nitrifying bacteria, which can accelerate the formation of nitrifying granules. Consequently, selecting AHL molecules that could improve bacteria in attached-growth mode and nitrification efficiency simultaneously will most likely facilitate the rapid granulation of nitrifying sludge.

  5. Genomic Analysis Reveals Versatile Organisms for Quorum Quenching Enzymes: Acyl-Homoserine Lactone-Acylase and -Lactonase

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Vipin Chandra; Raju, Sajan C; Purohit, Hemant J

    2011-01-01

    Microbial virulence and their resistance to multiple drugs have obliged researchers to look for novel drug targets. Virulence of pathogenic microbes is regulated by signal molecules such as acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) produced during a cell density dependent phenomenon of quorum sensing (QS). In contrast, certain microbes produce AHL-lactonases and -acylases to degrade QS signals, also termed as quorum quenching. Mining sequenced genome databases has revealed organisms possessing conserved domains for AHL-lactonases and –acylases: i) Streptomyces (Actinobacteria), ii) Deinococcus (Deinococcus-Thermus), iii) Hyphomonas (α-Proteobacteria), iv) Ralstonia (β-Proteobacteria), v) Photorhabdus (γ-Proteobacteria), and certain marine gamma proteobacterium. Presence of genes for both the enzymes within an organism was observed in the following: i) Deinococcus radiodurans R1, ii) Hyphomonas neptunium ATCC 15444 and iii) Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii TTO1. These observations are supported by the presence motifs for lactonase and acylase in these strains. Phylogenetic analysis and multiple sequence alignment of the gene sequences for AHL-lactonases and –acylases have revealed consensus sequences which can be used to design primers for amplifying these genes even among mixed cultures and metagenomes. Quorum quenching can be exploited to prevent food spoilage, bacterial infections and bioremediation. PMID:21660112

  6. Novel acridine-based N-acyl-homoserine lactone analogs induce endoreduplication in the human oral squamous carcinoma cell line SAS.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hongbo; Hazawa, Masaharu; Hosokawa, Yoichiro; Igarashi, Jun; Suga, Hiroaki; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of novel acridine-based N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) analogs was investigated on the human oral squamous carcinoma cell line SAS. One analog induced G2/M phase arrest at 5.3-10.6 µM and induced polyploidy at a higher dose (21.2 µM). Importantly, treatment of SAS cells with a combination of the AHL analog and the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, SP600125, prevented mitosis and induced polyploidy. The AHL analog synergized with X-irradiation to inhibit clonogenic survival of SAS cells; however, its radiosensitizing effects were relative to not X-irradiation-induced apoptosis but mitotic failure following enhanced expression of Aurora A and B. These results suggest that the active AHL analog showed growth-suppressive and radiosensitizing effects, which involve polyploidy followed by G2/M accumulation and atypical cell death in the SAS cell line.

  7. N-acyl-homoserine lactone confers resistance toward biotrophic and hemibiotrophic pathogens via altered activation of AtMPK6.

    PubMed

    Schikora, Adam; Schenk, Sebastian T; Stein, Elke; Molitor, Alexandra; Zuccaro, Alga; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    2011-11-01

    Pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria rely on quorum sensing to coordinate the collective behavior during the interactions with their eukaryotic hosts. Many Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signals in such communication. Here we show that plants have evolved means to perceive AHLs and that the length of acyl moiety and the functional group at the γ position specify the plant's response. Root treatment with the N-3-oxo-tetradecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (oxo-C14-HSL) reinforced the systemic resistance to the obligate biotrophic fungi Golovinomyces orontii in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei in barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants. In addition, oxo-C14-HSL-treated Arabidopsis plants were more resistant toward the hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Oxo-C14-HSL promoted a stronger activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases AtMPK3 and AtMPK6 when challenged with flg22, followed by a higher expression of the defense-related transcription factors WRKY22 and WRKY29, as well as the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 gene. In contrast to wild-type Arabidopsis and mpk3 mutant, the mpk6 mutant is compromised in the AHL effect, suggesting that AtMPK6 is required for AHL-induced resistance. Results of this study show that AHLs commonly produced in the rhizosphere are crucial factors in plant pathology and could be an agronomic issue whose full impact has to be elucidated in future analyses. PMID:21940998

  8. Indole inhibition of N-acylated homoserine lactone-mediated quorum signalling is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Romano, Benjamin; Gollihar, Jimmy; Brown, Stacie A; Whiteley, Marvin; Valenzuela, Ernesto; Kaplan, Heidi B; Wood, Thomas K; McLean, Robert J C

    2014-11-01

    The LuxI/R quorum-sensing system and its associated N-acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) signal is widespread among Gram-negative bacteria. Although inhibition by indole of AHL quorum signalling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter oleivorans has been reported previously, it has not been documented among other species. Here, we show that co-culture with wild-type Escherichia coli, but not with E. coli tnaA mutants that lack tryptophanase and as a result do not produce indole, inhibits AHL-regulated pigmentation in Chromobacterium violaceum (violacein), Pseudomonas chlororaphis (phenazine) and Serratia marcescens (prodigiosin). Loss of pigmentation also occurred during pure culture growth of Chro. violaceum, P. chlororaphis and S. marcescens in the presence of physiologically relevant indole concentrations (0.5-1.0 mM). Inhibition of violacein production by indole was counteracted by the addition of the Chro. violaceum cognate autoinducer, N-decanoyl homoserine lactone (C10-HSL), in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of exogenous indole or co-culture with E. coli also affected Chro. violaceum transcription of vioA (violacein pigment production) and chiA (chitinase production), but had no effect on pykF (pyruvate kinase), which is not quorum regulated. Chro. violaceum AHL-regulated elastase and chitinase activity were inhibited by indole, as was motility. Growth of Chro. violaceum was not affected by indole or C10-HSL supplementation. Using a nematode-feeding virulence assay, we observed that survival of Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to Chro. violaceum, P. chlororaphis and S. marcescens was enhanced during indole supplementation. Overall, these studies suggest that indole represents a general inhibitor of AHL-based quorum signalling in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25165125

  9. Indole inhibition of N-acylated homoserine lactone-mediated quorum signalling is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Romano, Benjamin; Gollihar, Jimmy; Brown, Stacie A; Whiteley, Marvin; Valenzuela, Ernesto; Kaplan, Heidi B; Wood, Thomas K; McLean, Robert J C

    2014-11-01

    The LuxI/R quorum-sensing system and its associated N-acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) signal is widespread among Gram-negative bacteria. Although inhibition by indole of AHL quorum signalling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter oleivorans has been reported previously, it has not been documented among other species. Here, we show that co-culture with wild-type Escherichia coli, but not with E. coli tnaA mutants that lack tryptophanase and as a result do not produce indole, inhibits AHL-regulated pigmentation in Chromobacterium violaceum (violacein), Pseudomonas chlororaphis (phenazine) and Serratia marcescens (prodigiosin). Loss of pigmentation also occurred during pure culture growth of Chro. violaceum, P. chlororaphis and S. marcescens in the presence of physiologically relevant indole concentrations (0.5-1.0 mM). Inhibition of violacein production by indole was counteracted by the addition of the Chro. violaceum cognate autoinducer, N-decanoyl homoserine lactone (C10-HSL), in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of exogenous indole or co-culture with E. coli also affected Chro. violaceum transcription of vioA (violacein pigment production) and chiA (chitinase production), but had no effect on pykF (pyruvate kinase), which is not quorum regulated. Chro. violaceum AHL-regulated elastase and chitinase activity were inhibited by indole, as was motility. Growth of Chro. violaceum was not affected by indole or C10-HSL supplementation. Using a nematode-feeding virulence assay, we observed that survival of Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to Chro. violaceum, P. chlororaphis and S. marcescens was enhanced during indole supplementation. Overall, these studies suggest that indole represents a general inhibitor of AHL-based quorum signalling in Gram-negative bacteria.

  10. Targeting N-acyl-homoserine-lactones to mitigate membrane biofouling based on quorum sensing using a biofouling reducer.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Faisal; Sakinah, Mimi; Singh, Lakhveer; Zularisam, A W

    2012-10-31

    Exploring novel biological anti-quorum sensing (QS) agents to control membrane biofouling is of great worth in order to allow sustainable performance of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for wastewater treatment. In recent studies, QS inhibitors have provided evidence of alternative route to control membrane biofouling. This study investigated the role of Piper betle extract (PBE) as an anti-QS agent to mitigate membrane biofouling. Results demonstrated the occurrence of the N-acyl-homoserine-lactone (AHL) autoinducers (AIs), correlate QS activity and membrane biofouling mitigation. The AIs production in bioreactor was confirmed using an indicator strain Agrobacterium tumefaciens (NTL4) harboring plasmid pZLR4. Moreover, three different AHLs were found in biocake using thin layer chromatographic analysis. An increase in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and transmembrane pressure (TMP) was observed with AHL activity of the biocake during continuous MBR operation, which shows that membrane biofouling was in close relationship with QS activity. PBE was verified to mitigate membrane biofouling via inhibiting AIs production. SEM analysis further confirmed the effect of PBE on EPS and biofilm formation. These results exhibited that PBE could be a novel agent to target AIs for mitigation of membrane biofouling. Further work can be carried out to purify the active compound of Piper betle extract to target the QS to mitigate membrane biofouling.

  11. A New Acyl-homoserine Lactone Molecule Generated by Nitrobacter winogradskyi

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qiuxuan; Gao, Jie; Liu, Jun; Liu, Shuangjiang; Liu, Zijun; Wang, Yinghuan; Guo, Baoyuan; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    It is crucial to reveal the regulatory mechanism of nitrification to understand nitrogen conversion in agricultural systems and wastewater treatment. In this study, the nwiI gene of Nitrobacter winogradskyi was confirmed to be a homoserine lactone synthase by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli that synthesized several acyl-homoserine lactone signals with 7 to 11 carbon acyl groups. A novel signal, 7, 8-trans-N-(decanoyl) homoserine lactone (C10:1-HSL), was identified in both N. winogradskyi and the recombined E. coli. Furthermore, this novel signal also triggered variances in the nitrification rate and the level of transcripts for the genes involved in the nitrification process. These results indicate that quorum sensing may have a potential role in regulating nitrogen metabolism. PMID:26965192

  12. Triazole-containing N-acyl homoserine lactones targeting the quorum sensing system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mette R; Jakobsen, Tim H; Bang, Claus G; Cohrt, Anders Emil; Hansen, Casper L; Clausen, Janie W; Le Quement, Sebastian T; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael; Nielsen, Thomas E

    2015-04-01

    In an attempt to devise new antimicrobial treatments for biofilm infections, the bacterial cell-cell communication system termed quorum sensing has emerged as an attractive target. It has proven possible to intercept the communication system by synthetic non-native ligands and thereby lower the pathogenesis and antibiotic tolerance of a bacterial biofilm. To identify the structural elements important for antagonistic or agonistic activity against the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasR protein, we report the synthesis and screening of new triazole-containing mimics of natural N-acyl homoserine lactones. A series of azide- and alkyne-containing homoserine lactone building blocks was used to prepare an expanded set of 123 homoserine lactone analogues through a combination of solution- and solid-phase synthesis methods. The resulting compounds were subjected to cell-based quorum sensing screening assays, thereby revealing several bioactive compounds, including 13 compounds with antagonistic activity and 9 compounds with agonistic activity.

  13. A New N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Synthase in an Uncultured Symbiont of the Red Sea Sponge Theonella swinhoei

    PubMed Central

    Britstein, Maya; Devescovi, Giulia; Handley, Kim M.; Malik, Assaf; Haber, Markus; Saurav, Kumar; Teta, Roberta; Costantino, Valeria; Burgsdorf, Ilia; Gilbert, Jack A.; Sher, Noa; Venturi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Sponges harbor a remarkable diversity of microbial symbionts in which signal molecules can accumulate and enable cell-cell communication, such as quorum sensing (QS). Bacteria capable of QS were isolated from marine sponges; however, an extremely small fraction of the sponge microbiome is amenable to cultivation. We took advantage of community genome assembly and binning to investigate the uncultured majority of sponge symbionts. We identified a complete N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-QS system (designated TswIR) and seven partial luxI homologues in the microbiome of Theonella swinhoei. The TswIR system was novel and shown to be associated with an alphaproteobacterium of the order Rhodobacterales, here termed Rhodobacterales bacterium TS309. The tswI gene, when expressed in Escherichia coli, produced three AHLs, two of which were also identified in a T. swinhoei sponge extract. The taxonomic affiliation of the 16S rRNA of Rhodobacterales bacterium TS309 to a sponge-coral specific clade, its enrichment in sponge versus seawater and marine sediment samples, and the presence of sponge-specific features, such as ankyrin-like domains and tetratricopeptide repeats, indicate a likely symbiotic nature of this bacterium. PMID:26655754

  14. A New N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Synthase in an Uncultured Symbiont of the Red Sea Sponge Theonella swinhoei.

    PubMed

    Britstein, Maya; Devescovi, Giulia; Handley, Kim M; Malik, Assaf; Haber, Markus; Saurav, Kumar; Teta, Roberta; Costantino, Valeria; Burgsdorf, Ilia; Gilbert, Jack A; Sher, Noa; Venturi, Vittorio; Steindler, Laura

    2016-02-01

    Sponges harbor a remarkable diversity of microbial symbionts in which signal molecules can accumulate and enable cell-cell communication, such as quorum sensing (QS). Bacteria capable of QS were isolated from marine sponges; however, an extremely small fraction of the sponge microbiome is amenable to cultivation. We took advantage of community genome assembly and binning to investigate the uncultured majority of sponge symbionts. We identified a complete N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-QS system (designated TswIR) and seven partial luxI homologues in the microbiome of Theonella swinhoei. The TswIR system was novel and shown to be associated with an alphaproteobacterium of the order Rhodobacterales, here termed Rhodobacterales bacterium TS309. The tswI gene, when expressed in Escherichia coli, produced three AHLs, two of which were also identified in a T. swinhoei sponge extract. The taxonomic affiliation of the 16S rRNA of Rhodobacterales bacterium TS309 to a sponge-coral specific clade, its enrichment in sponge versus seawater and marine sediment samples, and the presence of sponge-specific features, such as ankyrin-like domains and tetratricopeptide repeats, indicate a likely symbiotic nature of this bacterium. PMID:26655754

  15. Acyl-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing and quorum quenching hold promise to determine the performance of biological wastewater treatments: An overview.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinhui; Shi, Yahui; Zeng, Guangming; Gu, Yanling; Chen, Guiqiu; Shi, Lixiu; Hu, Yi; Tang, Bi; Zhou, Jianxin

    2016-08-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a communication process between cells, in which bacteria secrete and sense the specific chemicals, and regulate gene expression in response to population density. Quorum quenching (QQ) blocks QS system, and inhibits gene expression mediating bacterial behaviors. Given the extensive research of acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signals, existences and effects of AHL-based QS and QQ in biological wastewater treatments are being subject to high concern. This review summarizes AHL structure, synthesis mode, degradation mechanisms, analytical methods, environmental factors, AHL-based QS and QQ mechanisms. The existences and roles of AHL-based QS and QQ in biomembrane processes, activated sludge processes and membrane bioreactors are summarized and discussed, and corresponding exogenous regulation strategy by selective enhancement of AHL-based QS or QQ coexisting in biological wastewater treatments is suggested. Such strategies including the addition of AHL signals, AHL-producing bacteria as well as quorum quenching enzyme or bacteria can effectively improve wastewater treatment performance without killing or limiting bacterial survival and growth. This review will present the theoretical and practical cognition for bacterial AHL-based QS and QQ, suggest the feasibility of exogenous regulation strategies in biological wastewater treatments, and provide useful information to scientists and engineers who work in this field.

  16. Acyl-ACP Substrate Recognition in Burkholderia mallei BmaI1 Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) autoinducer mediated quorum sensing regulates virulence in several pathogenic bacteria. The hallmark of an efficient quorum sensing system relies on the tight specificity in the signal generated by each bacterium. Since AHL signal specificity is derived from the acyl-chain of the acyl-ACP (ACP = acyl carrier protein) substrate, AHL synthase enzymes must recognize and react with the native acyl-ACP with high catalytic efficiency while keeping reaction rates with non-native acyl-ACPs low. The mechanism of acyl-ACP substrate recognition in these enzymes, however, remains elusive. In this study, we investigated differences in catalytic efficiencies for shorter and longer chain acyl-ACP substrates reacting with an octanoyl-homoserine lactone synthase Burkholderia mallei BmaI1. With the exception of two-carbon shorter hexanoyl-ACP, the catalytic efficiencies of butyryl-ACP, decanoyl-ACP, and octanoyl-CoA reacting with BmaI1 decreased by greater than 20-fold compared to the native octanoyl-ACP substrate. Furthermore, we also noticed kinetic cooperativity when BmaI1 reacted with non-native acyl-donor substrates. Our kinetic data suggest that non-native acyl-ACP substrates are unable to form a stable and productive BmaI1·acyl-ACP·SAM ternary complex and are thus effectively discriminated by the enzyme. These results offer insights into the molecular basis of substrate recognition for the BmaI1 enzyme. PMID:25215658

  17. Characterization and complete sequence of lactonase enzyme from Bacillus weihenstephanensis isolate P65 with potential activity against acyl homoserine lactone signal molecules.

    PubMed

    Sakr, Masarra Mohammed; Aboshanab, Khaled Mohamed Anwar; Aboulwafa, Mohammad Mabrouk; Hassouna, Nadia Abdel-Haleem

    2013-01-01

    Acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are the most common class of quorum sensing signal molecules (autoinducers) that have been reported to be essential for virulence of many relevant pathogenic bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. New approach for controlling infections of such bacteria is through quorum quenching. In this study, the acyl homoserine lactone inhibitory activity of the crude enzyme from a Bacillus weihenstephanensis-isolate P65 was characterized. The crude enzyme was found to have relatively high thermal stability and was stable in pH range 6 to 9. The crude enzyme extract was found to have lactonase activity of 36.3 U/mg total protein. Maximum enzyme activity was achieved within a range of 28-50°C and pH 6-9. None of the metals used enhanced the activity neither did EDTA inhibit it. However, a concentration of 10 mM Fe(+2) reduced the activity to 73.8%. Catalytic activity and kinetic constants were determined using hexanoyl homoserine lactone as a substrate. Studying enzyme substrate specificity using synthetic standard signals displayed broad spectrum of activity. The enzyme was found to be constitutive. Isolation and complete nucleotide sequence of the respective lactonase gene were done and submitted to the Genbank database under accession code KC823046.

  18. A Sinorhizobium meliloti-specific N-acyl homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signal increases nodule numbers in Medicago truncatula independent of autoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Veliz-Vallejos, Debora F.; van Noorden, Giel E.; Yuan, Mengqi; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) act as quorum sensing signals that regulate cell-density dependent behaviors in many gram-negative bacteria, in particular those important for plant-microbe interactions. AHLs can also be recognized by plants, and this may influence their interactions with bacteria. Here we tested whether the exposure to AHLs affects the nodule-forming symbiosis between legume hosts and rhizobia. We treated roots of the model legume, Medicago truncatula, with a range of AHLs either from its specific symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, or from the potential pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Agrobacterium vitis. We found increased numbers of nodules formed on root systems treated with the S. meliloti-specific AHL, 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone, at a concentration of 1 μM, while the other AHLs did not result in significant changes to nodule numbers. We did not find any evidence for altered nodule invasion by the rhizobia. Quantification of flavonoids that could act as nod gene inducers in S. meliloti did not show any correlation with increased nodule numbers. The effects of AHLs were specific for an increase in nodule numbers, but not lateral root numbers or root length. Increased nodule numbers following 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone treatment were under control of autoregulation of nodulation and were still observed in the autoregulation mutant, sunn4 (super numeric nodules4). However, increases in nodule numbers by 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone were not found in the ethylene-insensitive sickle mutant. A comparison between M. truncatula with M. sativa (alfalfa) and Trifolium repens (white clover) showed that the observed effects of AHLs on nodule numbers were specific to M. truncatula, despite M. sativa nodulating with the same symbiont. We conclude that plant perception of the S. meliloti-specific 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone influences nodule numbers in M. truncatula via an ethylene-dependent, but autoregulation-independent mechanism. PMID

  19. A new role for penicillin acylases: degradation of acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing signals by Kluyvera citrophila penicillin G acylase.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Ruchira; Varshney, Nishant Kumar; Panigrahi, Priyabrata; Suresh, C G; Prabhune, Asmita

    2014-03-01

    Use of penicillin acylases for the production of semi-synthetic penicillins is well-known. Escherichia coli penicillin G acylase (EcPGA) has been extensively used for this purpose; however, Kluyvera citrophila penicillin G acylase (KcPGA) is assumed to be a better substitute, owing to its increased resilience to extreme pH conditions and ease of immobilization. In the present article we report a new dimension for the amidase activity of KcPGA by demonstrating its ability to cleave bacterial quorum sensing signal molecules, acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) with acyl chain length of 6-8 with or without oxo-substitution at third carbon position. Initial evidence of AHL degrading capability of KcPGA was obtained using CV026 based bioassay method. Kinetic studies performed at pH 8.0 and 50 °C revealed 3-oxo-C6 HSL to be the best substrate for the enzyme with V(max) and K(m) values of 21.37+0.85 mM/h/mg of protein and 0.1+0.01 mM, respectively. C6 HSL was found to be the second best substrate with V(max) and K(m) value of 10.06+0.27 mM/h/mg of protein and 0.28+0.02 mM, respectively. Molecular modeling and docking studies performed on the active site of the enzyme support these findings by showing the fitting of AHLs perfectly within the hydrophobic pocket of the enzyme active site.

  20. N-acyl-homoserine lactones-producing bacteria protect plants against plant and human pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Reyes, Casandra; Schenk, Sebastian T; Neumann, Christina; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Schikora, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of beneficial microorganisms for plant protection has a long history. Many rhizobia bacteria are able to influence the immune system of host plants by inducing resistance towards pathogenic microorganisms. In this report, we present a translational approach in which we demonstrate the resistance-inducing effect of Ensifer meliloti (Sinorhizobium meliloti) on crop plants that have a significant impact on the worldwide economy and on human nutrition. Ensifer meliloti is usually associated with root nodulation in legumes and nitrogen fixation. Here, we suggest that the ability of S. meliloti to induce resistance depends on the production of the quorum-sensing molecule, oxo-C14-HSL. The capacity to enhanced resistance provides a possibility to the use these beneficial bacteria in agriculture. Using the Arabidopsis-Salmonella model, we also demonstrate that the application of N-acyl-homoserine lactones-producing bacteria could be a successful strategy to prevent plant-originated infections with human pathogens. PMID:25234390

  1. A Burkholderia thailandensis Acyl-Homoserine Lactone-Independent Orphan LuxR Homolog That Activates Production of the Cytotoxin Malleilactone

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thao T.; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Burkholderia thailandensis has three acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) LuxR-LuxI quorum-sensing circuits and two orphan LuxR homologs. Orphans are LuxR-type transcription factors that do not have cognate LuxI-type AHL synthases. One of the orphans, MalR, is genetically linked to the mal gene cluster, which encodes enzymes required for production of the cytotoxic polyketide malleilactone. Under normal laboratory conditions the mal gene cluster is silent; however, antibiotics like trimethoprim induce mal transcription. We show that trimethoprim-dependent induction of the mal genes requires MalR. MalR has all of the conserved amino acid residues characteristic of AHL-responsive LuxR homologs, but in B. thailandensis, MalR activation of malleilactone synthesis genes is not responsive to AHLs. MalR can activate transcription from the mal promoter in E. coli without addition of AHLs or trimethoprim. Expression of malR in B. thailandensis is induced by trimethoprim. Our data indicate that MalR binds to a lux box-like element in the mal promoter and activates transcription of the mal genes in an AHL-independent manner. Antibiotics like trimethoprim appear to activate mal gene expression indirectly by somehow activating malR expression. MalR activation of the mal genes represents an example of a LuxR homolog that is not a receptor for an AHL quorum-sensing signal. Our evidence is consistent with the idea that mal gene activation depends solely on sufficient transcription of the malR gene. IMPORTANCE LuxR proteins are transcription factors that are typically activated by acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signals. We demonstrate that a conserved LuxR family protein, MalR, activates genes independently of AHLs. MalR is required for transcription of genes coding for synthesis of the cytotoxic polyketide malleilactone. These genes are not expressed when cells are grown under normal laboratory conditions. In laboratory culture, MalR induction of malleilactone requires certain

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Wild-Type Sinorhizobium meliloti Responses to N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Quorum-Sensing Signals and the Transition to Stationary Phase†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hancai; Teplitski, Max; Robinson, Jayne B.; Rolfe, Barry G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    2003-01-01

    Proteome analysis revealed that two long-chain N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) produced by Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 induced significant differences in the accumulation of more than 100 polypeptides in early-log-phase cultures of the wild type. Fifty-six of the corresponding proteins have been identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. The proteins affected by addition of these two AHLs had diverse functions in carbon and nitrogen metabolism, energy cycles, metabolite transport, DNA synthesis, and protein turnover. Two hours of exposure to 3-oxo-C16:1-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C16:1-HL) affected the accumulation of 40 of the 56 identified proteins, whereas comparable exposure to C14-HL affected 13 of the 56 proteins. Levels of four proteins were affected by both AHLs. Exposure to 3-oxo-C16:1-HL for 8 h affected the accumulation of 17 proteins, 12 of which had reduced accumulation. Of the 80 proteins identified as differing in accumulation between early-log- and early-stationary-phase cultures, only 13 were affected by exposure to 3-oxo-C16:1-HL or C14-HL. These results provide a foundation for future studies of the functions regulated by AHL quorum sensing in S. meliloti and help to establish proteomic analysis as a powerful global approach to the identification of quorum-sensing regulatory patterns in wild-type bacteria. PMID:12923075

  3. Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi Produces N-Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Autoinducers

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrobacter winogradskyi is a chemolithotrophic bacterium that plays a role in the nitrogen cycle by oxidizing nitrite to nitrate. Here, we demonstrate a functional N-acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) synthase in this bacterium. The N. winogradskyi genome contains genes encoding a putative acyl-HSL autoinducer synthase (nwi0626, nwiI) and a putative acyl-HSL autoinducer receptor (nwi0627, nwiR) with amino acid sequences 38 to 78% identical to those in Rhodopseudomonas palustris and other Rhizobiales. Expression of nwiI and nwiR correlated with acyl-HSL production during culture. N. winogradskyi produces two distinct acyl-HSLs, N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) and a monounsaturated acyl-HSL (C10:1-HSL), in a cell-density- and growth phase-dependent manner, during batch and chemostat culture. The acyl-HSLs were detected by bioassay and identified by ultraperformance liquid chromatography with information-dependent acquisition mass spectrometry (UPLC-IDA-MS). The C=C bond in C10:1-HSL was confirmed by conversion into bromohydrin and detection by UPLC-IDA-MS. PMID:26092466

  4. Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi Produces N-Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Autoinducers.

    PubMed

    Mellbye, Brett L; Bottomley, Peter J; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A

    2015-09-01

    Nitrobacter winogradskyi is a chemolithotrophic bacterium that plays a role in the nitrogen cycle by oxidizing nitrite to nitrate. Here, we demonstrate a functional N-acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) synthase in this bacterium. The N. winogradskyi genome contains genes encoding a putative acyl-HSL autoinducer synthase (nwi0626, nwiI) and a putative acyl-HSL autoinducer receptor (nwi0627, nwiR) with amino acid sequences 38 to 78% identical to those in Rhodopseudomonas palustris and other Rhizobiales. Expression of nwiI and nwiR correlated with acyl-HSL production during culture. N. winogradskyi produces two distinct acyl-HSLs, N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) and a monounsaturated acyl-HSL (C10:1-HSL), in a cell-density- and growth phase-dependent manner, during batch and chemostat culture. The acyl-HSLs were detected by bioassay and identified by ultraperformance liquid chromatography with information-dependent acquisition mass spectrometry (UPLC-IDA-MS). The C=C bond in C10:1-HSL was confirmed by conversion into bromohydrin and detection by UPLC-IDA-MS.

  5. Evolution of Acyl-Substrate Recognition by a Family of Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Quin H.; Brecht, Ryan M.; Dudekula, Dastagiri; Greenberg, E. Peter; Nagarajan, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Members of the LuxI protein family catalyze synthesis of acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) quorum sensing signals from S-adenosyl-L-methionine and an acyl thioester. Some LuxI family members prefer acyl-CoA, and others prefer acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) as the acyl-thioester substrate. We sought to understand the evolutionary history and mechanisms mediating this substrate preference. Our phylogenetic and motif analysis of the LuxI acyl-HSL synthase family indicates that the acyl-CoA-utilizing enzymes evolved from an acyl-ACP-utilizing ancestor. To further understand how acyl-ACPs and acyl-CoAs are recognized by acyl-HSL synthases we studied BmaI1, an octanoyl-ACP-dependent LuxI family member from Burkholderia mallei, and BjaI, an isovaleryl-CoA-dependent LuxI family member from Bradyrhizobium japonicum. We synthesized thioether analogs of their thioester acyl-substrates to probe recognition of the acyl-phosphopantetheine moiety common to both acyl-ACP and acyl-CoA substrates. The kinetics of catalysis and inhibition of these enzymes indicate that they recognize the acyl-phosphopantetheine moiety and they recognize non-preferred substrates with this moiety. We find that CoA substrate utilization arose through exaptation of acyl-phosphopantetheine recognition in this enzyme family. PMID:25401334

  6. N-Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Primes Plants for Cell Wall Reinforcement and Induces Resistance to Bacterial Pathogens via the Salicylic Acid/Oxylipin Pathway[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Sebastian T.; Hernández-Reyes, Casandra; Samans, Birgit; Stein, Elke; Neumann, Christina; Schikora, Marek; Reichelt, Michael; Mithöfer, Axel; Becker, Annette; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Schikora, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The ability of plants to monitor their surroundings, for instance the perception of bacteria, is of crucial importance. The perception of microorganism-derived molecules and their effector proteins is the best understood of these monitoring processes. In addition, plants perceive bacterial quorum sensing (QS) molecules used for cell-to-cell communication between bacteria. Here, we propose a mechanism for how N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), a group of QS molecules, influence host defense and fortify resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana against bacterial pathogens. N-3-oxo-tetradecanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (oxo-C14-HSL) primed plants for enhanced callose deposition, accumulation of phenolic compounds, and lignification of cell walls. Moreover, increased levels of oxylipins and salicylic acid favored closure of stomata in response to Pseudomonas syringae infection. The AHL-induced resistance seems to differ from the systemic acquired and the induced systemic resistances, providing new insight into inter-kingdom communication. Consistent with the observation that short-chain AHLs, unlike oxo-C14-HSL, promote plant growth, treatments with C6-HSL, oxo-C10-HSL, or oxo-C14-HSL resulted in different transcriptional profiles in Arabidopsis. Understanding the priming induced by bacterial QS molecules augments our knowledge of plant reactions to bacteria and suggests strategies for using beneficial bacteria in plant protection. PMID:24963057

  7. Complete genome sequencing of Pandoraea pnomenusa RB38 and Molecular Characterization of Its N-acyl homoserine lactone synthase gene ppnI

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yan-Lue; Ee, Robson; How, Kah-Yan; Lee, Siew-Kim; Yong, Delicia; Tee, Kok Keng; Yin, Wai-Fong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we sequenced the genome of Pandoraea pnomenusa RB38 using Pacific Biosciences RSII (PacBio) Single Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing technology. A pair of cognate luxI/R homologs was identified where the luxI homolog, ppnI, was found adjacent to a luxR homolog, ppnR1. An additional orphan luxR homolog, ppnR2, was also discovered. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that ppnI is an N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) synthase gene that is distinct from those of the nearest phylogenetic neighbor viz. Burkholderia spp. High resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis showed that Escherichia coli BL21 harboring ppnI produced a similar AHL profile (N-octanoylhomoserine lactone, C8-HSL) as P. pnomenusa RB38, the wild-type donor strain, confirming that PpnI directed the synthesis of AHL in P. pnomenusa RB38. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of the luxI/R homologs of the genus Pandoraea. PMID:26336650

  8. Reversible acyl-homoserine lactone binding to purified Vibrio fischeri LuxR protein.

    PubMed

    Urbanowski, M L; Lostroh, C P; Greenberg, E P

    2004-02-01

    The Vibrio fischeri LuxR protein is the founding member of a family of acyl-homoserine lactone-responsive quorum-sensing transcription factors. Previous genetic evidence indicates that in the presence of its quorum-sensing signal, N-(3-oxohexanoyl) homoserine lactone (3OC6-HSL), LuxR binds to lux box DNA within the promoter region of the luxI gene and activates transcription of the luxICDABEG luminescence operon. We have purified LuxR from recombinant Escherichia coli. Purified LuxR binds specifically and with high affinity to DNA containing a lux box. This binding requires addition of 3OC6-HSL to the assay reactions, presumably forming a LuxR-3OC6-HSL complex. When bound to the lux box at the luxI promoter in vitro, LuxR-3OC6-HSL enables E. coli RNA polymerase to initiate transcription from the luxI promoter. Unlike the well-characterized LuxR homolog TraR in complex with its signal (3-oxo-octanoyl-HSL), the LuxR-30C6-HSL complex can be reversibly inactivated by dilution, suggesting that 3OC6-HSL in the complex is not tightly bound and is in equilibrium with the bulk solvent. Thus, although LuxR and TraR both bind 3-oxoacyl-HSLs, the binding is qualitatively different. The differences have implications for the ways in which these proteins respond to decreases in signal concentrations or rapid drops in population density.

  9. Influence of bacterial N-acyl-homoserine lactones on growth parameters, pigments, antioxidative capacities and the xenobiotic phase II detoxification enzymes in barley and yam bean.

    PubMed

    Götz-Rösch, Christine; Sieper, Tina; Fekete, Agnes; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Hartmann, Anton; Schröder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are able to communicate with each other and sense their environment in a population density dependent mechanism known as quorum sensing (QS). N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are the QS signaling compounds of Gram-negative bacteria which are frequent colonizers of rhizospheres. While cross-kingdom signaling and AHL-dependent gene expression in plants has been confirmed, the responses of enzyme activities in the eukaryotic host upon AHLs are unknown. Since AHL are thought to be used as so-called plant boosters or strengthening agents, which might change their resistance toward radiation and/or xenobiotic stress, we have examined the plants' pigment status and their antioxidative and detoxifying capacities upon AHL treatment. Because the yield of a crop plant should not be negatively influenced, we have also checked for growth and root parameters. We investigated the influence of three different AHLs, namely N-hexanoyl- (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl- (C8-HSL), and N-decanoyl- homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) on two agricultural crop plants. The AHL-effects on Hordeum vulgare (L.) as an example of a monocotyledonous crop and on the tropical leguminous crop plant Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) were compared. While plant growth and pigment contents in both plants showed only small responses to the applied AHLs, AHL treatment triggered tissue- and compound-specific changes in the activity of important detoxification enzymes. The activity of dehydroascorbate reductase in barley shoots after C10-HSL treatment for instance increased up to 384% of control plant levels, whereas superoxide dismutase activity in barley roots was decreased down to 23% of control levels upon C6-HSL treatment. Other detoxification enzymes reacted similarly within this range, with interesting clusters of positive or negative answers toward AHL treatment. In general the changes on the enzyme level were more severe in barley than in yam bean which might be due to the different abilities of the plants to

  10. Influence of bacterial N-acyl-homoserine lactones on growth parameters, pigments, antioxidative capacities and the xenobiotic phase II detoxification enzymes in barley and yam bean

    PubMed Central

    Götz-Rösch, Christine; Sieper, Tina; Fekete, Agnes; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Hartmann, Anton; Schröder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are able to communicate with each other and sense their environment in a population density dependent mechanism known as quorum sensing (QS). N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are the QS signaling compounds of Gram-negative bacteria which are frequent colonizers of rhizospheres. While cross-kingdom signaling and AHL-dependent gene expression in plants has been confirmed, the responses of enzyme activities in the eukaryotic host upon AHLs are unknown. Since AHL are thought to be used as so-called plant boosters or strengthening agents, which might change their resistance toward radiation and/or xenobiotic stress, we have examined the plants’ pigment status and their antioxidative and detoxifying capacities upon AHL treatment. Because the yield of a crop plant should not be negatively influenced, we have also checked for growth and root parameters. We investigated the influence of three different AHLs, namely N-hexanoyl- (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl- (C8-HSL), and N-decanoyl- homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) on two agricultural crop plants. The AHL-effects on Hordeum vulgare (L.) as an example of a monocotyledonous crop and on the tropical leguminous crop plant Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) were compared. While plant growth and pigment contents in both plants showed only small responses to the applied AHLs, AHL treatment triggered tissue- and compound-specific changes in the activity of important detoxification enzymes. The activity of dehydroascorbate reductase in barley shoots after C10-HSL treatment for instance increased up to 384% of control plant levels, whereas superoxide dismutase activity in barley roots was decreased down to 23% of control levels upon C6-HSL treatment. Other detoxification enzymes reacted similarly within this range, with interesting clusters of positive or negative answers toward AHL treatment. In general the changes on the enzyme level were more severe in barley than in yam bean which might be due to the different abilities of the plants to

  11. LuxR homolog-independent gene regulation by acyl-homoserine lactones in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chugani, Sudha; Greenberg, Everett Peter

    2010-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum control of gene expression involves three LuxR-type signal receptors LasR, RhlR, and QscR that respond to the LasI- and RhlI-generated acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) signals 3OC12-HSL and C4-HSL. We found that a LasR-RhlR-QscR triple mutant responds to acyl-HSLs by regulating at least 37 genes. LuxR homolog-independent activation of the representative genes antA and catB also occurs in the wild type. Expression of antA was influenced the most by C10-HSL and to a lesser extent by other acyl-HSLs, including the P. aeruginosa 3OC12-HSL and C4-HSL signals. The ant and cat operons encode enzymes for the degradation of anthranilate to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Our results indicate that LuxR homolog-independent acyl-HSL control of the ant and cat operons occurs via regulation of antR, which codes for the transcriptional activator of the ant operon. Although P. aeruginosa has multiple pathways for anthranilate synthesis, one pathway-the kynurenine pathway for tryptophan degradation-is required for acyl-HSL activation of the ant operon. The kynurenine pathway is also the critical source of anthranilate for energy metabolism via the antABC gene products, as well as the source of anthranilate for synthesis of the P. aeruginosa quinolone signal. Our discovery of LuxR homolog-independent responses to acyl-HSLs provides insight into acyl-HSL signaling. PMID:20498077

  12. N-Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Confers Resistance toward Biotrophic and Hemibiotrophic Pathogens via Altered Activation of AtMPK61[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Schikora, Adam; Schenk, Sebastian T.; Stein, Elke; Molitor, Alexandra; Zuccaro, Alga; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria rely on quorum sensing to coordinate the collective behavior during the interactions with their eukaryotic hosts. Many Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signals in such communication. Here we show that plants have evolved means to perceive AHLs and that the length of acyl moiety and the functional group at the γ position specify the plant’s response. Root treatment with the N-3-oxo-tetradecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (oxo-C14-HSL) reinforced the systemic resistance to the obligate biotrophic fungi Golovinomyces orontii in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei in barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants. In addition, oxo-C14-HSL-treated Arabidopsis plants were more resistant toward the hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Oxo-C14-HSL promoted a stronger activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases AtMPK3 and AtMPK6 when challenged with flg22, followed by a higher expression of the defense-related transcription factors WRKY22 and WRKY29, as well as the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 gene. In contrast to wild-type Arabidopsis and mpk3 mutant, the mpk6 mutant is compromised in the AHL effect, suggesting that AtMPK6 is required for AHL-induced resistance. Results of this study show that AHLs commonly produced in the rhizosphere are crucial factors in plant pathology and could be an agronomic issue whose full impact has to be elucidated in future analyses. PMID:21940998

  13. N-acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated regulation of phenazine gene expression by Pseudomonas aureofaciens 30-84 in the wheat rhizosphere.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, D W; Gong, F; Daykin, M M; Williams, P; Pierson, L S

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas aureofaciens 30-84 is a soilborne bacterium that colonizes the wheat rhizosphere. This strain produces three phenazine antibiotics which suppress take-all disease of wheat by inhibition of the causative agent Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. Phenazines also enhance survival of 30-84 within the wheat rhizosphere in competition with other organisms. Expression of the phenazine biosynthetic operon is controlled by the phzR/phzI N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) response system (L. S. Pierson III et al., J. Bacterial 176:3966-3974, 1994; D. W. Wood and L. S. Pierson III, Gene 168:49-53, 1996). By using high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry, the AHL produced by PhzI has now been identified as N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone (HHL). In addition, the ability of HHL to serve as an interpopulation signal molecule in the wheat rhizosphere has been examined by using isogenic reporter strains. Disruption of phzI reduced expression of the phenazine biosynthetic operon 1,000-fold in the wheat rhizosphere. Coinoculation of an isogenic strain which produced the endogenous HHL signal restored phenazine gene expression in the phzI mutant to wild-type levels in situ. These results demonstrate that HHL is required for phenazine expression in situ and is an effective interpopulation signal molecule in the wheat rhizosphere. PMID:9401023

  14. Short Chain N-acyl Homoserine Lactone Production by Soil Isolate Burkholderia sp. Strain A9

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian Woon; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    In the bacteria kingdom, quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-to-cell communication that relies on the production of and response to specific signaling molecules. In proteobacteria, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) are the well-studied signaling molecules. The present study aimed to characterize the production of AHL of a bacterial strain A9 isolated from a Malaysian tropical soil. Strain A9 was identified as Burkholderia sp. using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and 16S rDNA nucleotide sequence analysis. AHL production by A9 was detected with two biosensors, namely Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Escherichia coli [pSB401]. Thin layer chromatography results showed N–hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6-HSL) and N–octanoylhomoserine lactone (C8-HSL) production. Unequivocal identification of C6-HSL and C8-HSL was achieved by high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. We have demonstrated that Burkholderia sp. strain A9 produces AHLs that are known to be produced by other Burkholderia spp. with CepI/CepR homologs. PMID:24084115

  15. Homoserine and quorum-sensing acyl homoserine lactones as alternative sources of threonine: a potential role for homoserine kinase in insect-stage Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Han B; Lee, Wai S; Patterson, Stephen; Wyllie, Susan; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    De novo synthesis of threonine from aspartate occurs via the β-aspartyl phosphate pathway in plants, bacteria and fungi. However, the Trypanosoma brucei genome encodes only the last two steps in this pathway: homoserine kinase (HSK) and threonine synthase. Here, we investigated the possible roles for this incomplete pathway through biochemical, genetic and nutritional studies. Purified recombinant TbHSK specifically phosphorylates L-homoserine and displays kinetic properties similar to other HSKs. HSK null mutants generated in bloodstream forms displayed no growth phenotype in vitro or loss of virulence in vivo. However, following transformation into procyclic forms, homoserine, homoserine lactone and certain acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) were found to substitute for threonine in growth media for wild-type procyclics, but not HSK null mutants. The tsetse fly is considered to be an unlikely source of these nutrients as it feeds exclusively on mammalian blood. Bioinformatic studies predict that tsetse endosymbionts possess part (up to homoserine in Wigglesworthia glossinidia) or all of the β-aspartyl phosphate pathway (Sodalis glossinidius). In addition S. glossinidius is known to produce 3-oxohexanoylhomoserine lactone which also supports trypanosome growth. We propose that T. brucei has retained HSK and threonine synthase in order to salvage these nutrients when threonine availability is limiting. PMID:25367138

  16. Acyl-homoserine lactones from Erwinia psidii R. IBSBF 435T, a guava phytopathogen (Psidium guajava L.).

    PubMed

    Pomini, Armando M; Manfio, Gilson P; Araújo, Welington L; Marsaioli, Anita J

    2005-08-10

    The phytopathogen Erwinia psidii R. IBSBF 435T causes rot in branches, flowers, and fruits of guava (Psidium guajava L.), being responsible for crop losses, and has no effective control. It was demonstrated that this strain produces two compounds [S-(-)-N-hexanoyl and N-heptanoyl-homoserine lactone], both belonging to the class of quorum-sensing signaling substances. A protocol using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection with chiral stationary phase is described for the absolute configuration determination of a natural acyl-homoserine lactone. Biological assays with specific reporter and synthesis of identified substances are also described. This is the first report on the N-heptanoyl-homoserine lactone occurrence in the Erwinia genus.

  17. N-Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Inhibition of Rhizobial Growth Is Mediated by Two Quorum-Sensing Genes That Regulate Plasmid Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, A.; Danino, V.; Wisniewski-Dyé, F.; Lithgow, J. K.; Downie, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    The growth of some strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae is inhibited by N-(3-hydroxy-7-cis tetradecenoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3OH-C14:1-HSL), which was previously known as the small bacteriocin before its characterization as an N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL). Tn5-induced mutants of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae resistant to 3OH-C14:1-HSL were isolated, and mutations in two genes were identified. These genes, bisR and triR, which both encode LuxR-type regulators required for plasmid transfer, were found downstream of an operon containing trb genes involved in the transfer of the symbiotic plasmid pRL1JI. The first gene in this operon is traI, which encodes an AHL synthase, and the trbBCDEJKLFGHI genes were found between traI and bisR. Mutations in bisR, triR, traI, or trbL blocked plasmid transfer. Using gene fusions, it was demonstrated that bisR regulates triR in response to the presence of 3OH-C14:1-HSL. In turn, triR is then required for the induction of the traI-trb operon required for plasmid transfer. bisR also represses expression of cinI, which is chromosomally located and determines the level of production of 3OH-C14:1-HSL. The cloned bisR and triR genes conferred 3OH-C14:1-HSL sensitivity to strains of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae normally resistant to this AHL. Furthermore, bisR and triR made Agrobacterium tumefaciens sensitive to R. leguminosarum bv. viciae strains producing 3OH-C14:1-HSL. Analysis of patterns of growth inhibition using mutant strains and synthetic AHLs revealed that maximal growth inhibition required, in addition to 3OH-C14:1-HSL, the presence of other AHLs such as N-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactone and/or N-(3-oxo-octanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. In an attempt to identify the causes of growth inhibition, a strain of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae carrying cloned bisR and triR was treated with an AHL extract containing 3OH-C14:1-HSL. N-terminal sequencing of induced proteins revealed one with significant similarity to the protein

  18. Antipathogenic potential of marine Bacillus sp. SS4 on N-acyl-homoserine-lactone-mediated virulence factors production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1).

    PubMed

    Musthafa, K Syed; Saroja, V; Pandian, S Karutha; Ravi, A Veera

    2011-03-01

    Antipathogenic therapy is an outcome of the quorum-sensing inhibition (QSI) mechanism, which targets autoinducer-dependent virulent gene expression in bacterial pathogens. N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) acts as a key regulator in the production of virulence factors and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and violacein pigment production in Chromobacterium violaceum. In the present study, the marine bacterial strain SS4 showed potential QSI activity in a concentration-dependent manner (0.5-2 mg/ml) against the AHL-mediated violacein production in C. violaceum (33-86%) and biofilm formation (33-88%), total protease (20-65%), LasA protease (59-68%), LasB elastase (36-68%), pyocyanin (17-86%) and pyoverdin productions in PAO1. The light and confocal laser scanning microscopic analyses confirmed the reduction of the biofilm-forming ability of PAO1 when treated with SS4 extract. Furthermore, the antibiofilm potential was confirmed through static biofilm ring assay, in which ethyl acetate extract of SS4 showed concentration-dependent reduction in the biofilm-forming ability of PAO1. Thus, the result of this study clearly reveals the antipathogenic and antibiofilm properties of the bacterial isolate SS4. Through 16S rDNA analysis, the strain SS4 was identified as Bacillus sp. (GenBank Accession Number: GU471751). PMID:21451248

  19. Short Chain N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Production in Tropical Marine Vibrio sinaloensis Strain T47

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Pui-Wan; Tan, Wen-Si; Yunos, Nina Yusrina Muhamad; Mohamad, Nur Izzati; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS), acts as one of the gene regulatory systems that allow bacteria to regulate their physiological activities by sensing the population density with synchronization of the signaling molecules that they produce. Here, we report a marine isolate, namely strain T47, and its unique AHL profile. Strain T47 was identified using 16S rRNA sequence analysis confirming that it is a member of Vibrio closely clustered to Vibrio sinaloensis. The isolated V. sinaloensis strain T47 was confirmed to produce N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) by using high resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. V. sinaloensis strain T47 also formed biofilms and its biofilm formation could be affected by anti-QS compound (cathechin) suggesting this is a QS-regulated trait in V. sinaloensis strain T47. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of AHL and biofilm production in V. sinaloensis strain T47. PMID:25046018

  20. Genome sequencing-assisted identification and the first functional validation of N-acyl-homoserine-lactone synthases from the Sphingomonadaceae family

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Han Ming; Dailey, Lucas K.; Halliday, Nigel; Williams, Paul; Hudson, André O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Members of the genus Novosphingobium have been isolated from a variety of environmental niches. Although genomics analyses have suggested the presence of genes associated with quorum sensing signal production e.g., the N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) synthase (luxI) homologs in various Novosphingobium species, to date, no luxI homologs have been experimentally validated. Methods In this study, we report the draft genome of the N-(AHL)-producing bacterium Novosphingobium subterraneum DSM 12447 and validate the functions of predicted luxI homologs from the bacterium through inducible heterologous expression in Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain NTL4. We developed a two-dimensional thin layer chromatography bioassay and used LC-ESI MS/MS analyses to separate, detect and identify the AHL signals produced by the N. subterraneum DSM 12447 strain. Results Three predicted luxI homologs were annotated to the locus tags NJ75_2841 (NovINsub1), NJ75_2498 (NovINsub2), and NJ75_4146 (NovINsub3). Inducible heterologous expression of each luxI homologs followed by LC-ESI MS/MS and two-dimensional reverse phase thin layer chromatography bioassays followed by bioluminescent ccd camera imaging indicate that the three LuxI homologs are able to produce a variety of medium-length AHL compounds. New insights into the LuxI phylogeny was also gleemed as inferred by Bayesian inference. Discussion This study significantly adds to our current understanding of quorum sensing in the genus Novosphingobium and provide the framework for future characterization of the phylogenetically interesting LuxI homologs from members of the genus Novosphingobium and more generally the family Sphingomonadaceae.

  1. Genome sequencing-assisted identification and the first functional validation of N-acyl-homoserine-lactone synthases from the Sphingomonadaceae family

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Han Ming; Dailey, Lucas K.; Halliday, Nigel; Williams, Paul; Hudson, André O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Members of the genus Novosphingobium have been isolated from a variety of environmental niches. Although genomics analyses have suggested the presence of genes associated with quorum sensing signal production e.g., the N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) synthase (luxI) homologs in various Novosphingobium species, to date, no luxI homologs have been experimentally validated. Methods In this study, we report the draft genome of the N-(AHL)-producing bacterium Novosphingobium subterraneum DSM 12447 and validate the functions of predicted luxI homologs from the bacterium through inducible heterologous expression in Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain NTL4. We developed a two-dimensional thin layer chromatography bioassay and used LC-ESI MS/MS analyses to separate, detect and identify the AHL signals produced by the N. subterraneum DSM 12447 strain. Results Three predicted luxI homologs were annotated to the locus tags NJ75_2841 (NovINsub1), NJ75_2498 (NovINsub2), and NJ75_4146 (NovINsub3). Inducible heterologous expression of each luxI homologs followed by LC-ESI MS/MS and two-dimensional reverse phase thin layer chromatography bioassays followed by bioluminescent ccd camera imaging indicate that the three LuxI homologs are able to produce a variety of medium-length AHL compounds. New insights into the LuxI phylogeny was also gleemed as inferred by Bayesian inference. Discussion This study significantly adds to our current understanding of quorum sensing in the genus Novosphingobium and provide the framework for future characterization of the phylogenetically interesting LuxI homologs from members of the genus Novosphingobium and more generally the family Sphingomonadaceae. PMID:27635318

  2. LasR receptor for detection of long-chain quorum-sensing signals: identification of N-acyl-homoserine lactones encoded by the avsI locus of Agrobacterium vitis.

    PubMed

    Savka, Michael A; Le, Phuong T; Burr, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial biosensor strains have greatly facilitated the rapid discovery, isolation, and study of quorum-sensing systems. In this study, we determined the relative sensitivity of a LasR-based E. coli bacterial bioluminescence biosensor JM109 (pSB1075) for 13 diverse long-chain N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) including oxygen-substituted and -unsubstituted AHLs containing 14, 16, and 18 carbons and with and without double bonds. Furthermore, we show by bioassay, HPLC, and GC/MS that four long-chain AHLs of the C16-HSL family are encoded by the avsI gene of Agrobacterium vitis strain F2/5, a non-tumorigenic strain that inhibits pathogenic strains of A. vitis from causing crown gall on grape. The four C16-HSLs include: C16-HSL, N-hexadecanoyl homoserine lactone; 3-oxo-C16-HSL, N-(3-oxohexadecanoyl)homoserine lactone; C16:1-HSL, N-(cis-9-octadecenoyl)homoserine lactone; and 3-oxo-C16:1-HSL, N-(3-oxo-cis-11-hexadecenoyl)homoserine lactone. Thus, the LasR-based bioluminescent biosensor tested in this study should serve as a useful tool for the detection of various long-chain AHLs with and without double bonds as well as those oxylated at the third carbon from uninvestigated species. PMID:20514483

  3. Insights into the Quorum Sensing Regulon of the Acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Revealed by Transcriptomic in the Presence of an Acyl Homoserine Lactone Superagonist Analog.

    PubMed

    Mamani, Sigde; Moinier, Danielle; Denis, Yann; Soulère, Laurent; Queneau, Yves; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    While a functional quorum sensing system has been identified in the acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270(T) and shown to modulate cell adhesion to solid substrates, nothing is known about the genes it regulates. To address the question of how quorum sensing controls biofilm formation in A. ferrooxidans (T), the transcriptome of this organism in conditions in which quorum sensing response is stimulated by a synthetic superagonist AHL (N-acyl homoserine lactones) analog has been studied. First, the effect on biofilm formation of a synthetic AHL tetrazolic analog, tetrazole 9c, known for its agonistic QS activity, was assessed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. A fast adherence of A. ferrooxidans (T) cells on sulfur coupons was observed. Then, tetrazole 9c was used in DNA microarray experiments that allowed the identification of genes regulated by quorum sensing signaling, and more particularly, those involved in early biofilm formation. Interestingly, afeI gene, encoding the AHL synthase, but not the A. ferrooxidans quorum sensing transcriptional regulator AfeR encoding gene, was shown to be regulated by quorum sensing. Data indicated that quorum sensing network represents at least 4.5% (141 genes) of the ATCC 23270(T) genome of which 42.5% (60 genes) are related to biofilm formation. Finally, AfeR was shown to bind specifically to the regulatory region of the afeI gene at the level of the palindromic sequence predicted to be the AfeR binding site. Our results give new insights on the response of A. ferrooxidans to quorum sensing and on biofilm biogenesis.

  4. Insights into the Quorum Sensing Regulon of the Acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Revealed by Transcriptomic in the Presence of an Acyl Homoserine Lactone Superagonist Analog.

    PubMed

    Mamani, Sigde; Moinier, Danielle; Denis, Yann; Soulère, Laurent; Queneau, Yves; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    While a functional quorum sensing system has been identified in the acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270(T) and shown to modulate cell adhesion to solid substrates, nothing is known about the genes it regulates. To address the question of how quorum sensing controls biofilm formation in A. ferrooxidans (T), the transcriptome of this organism in conditions in which quorum sensing response is stimulated by a synthetic superagonist AHL (N-acyl homoserine lactones) analog has been studied. First, the effect on biofilm formation of a synthetic AHL tetrazolic analog, tetrazole 9c, known for its agonistic QS activity, was assessed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. A fast adherence of A. ferrooxidans (T) cells on sulfur coupons was observed. Then, tetrazole 9c was used in DNA microarray experiments that allowed the identification of genes regulated by quorum sensing signaling, and more particularly, those involved in early biofilm formation. Interestingly, afeI gene, encoding the AHL synthase, but not the A. ferrooxidans quorum sensing transcriptional regulator AfeR encoding gene, was shown to be regulated by quorum sensing. Data indicated that quorum sensing network represents at least 4.5% (141 genes) of the ATCC 23270(T) genome of which 42.5% (60 genes) are related to biofilm formation. Finally, AfeR was shown to bind specifically to the regulatory region of the afeI gene at the level of the palindromic sequence predicted to be the AfeR binding site. Our results give new insights on the response of A. ferrooxidans to quorum sensing and on biofilm biogenesis. PMID:27683573

  5. Insights into the Quorum Sensing Regulon of the Acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Revealed by Transcriptomic in the Presence of an Acyl Homoserine Lactone Superagonist Analog

    PubMed Central

    Mamani, Sigde; Moinier, Danielle; Denis, Yann; Soulère, Laurent; Queneau, Yves; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    While a functional quorum sensing system has been identified in the acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270T and shown to modulate cell adhesion to solid substrates, nothing is known about the genes it regulates. To address the question of how quorum sensing controls biofilm formation in A. ferrooxidansT, the transcriptome of this organism in conditions in which quorum sensing response is stimulated by a synthetic superagonist AHL (N-acyl homoserine lactones) analog has been studied. First, the effect on biofilm formation of a synthetic AHL tetrazolic analog, tetrazole 9c, known for its agonistic QS activity, was assessed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. A fast adherence of A. ferrooxidansT cells on sulfur coupons was observed. Then, tetrazole 9c was used in DNA microarray experiments that allowed the identification of genes regulated by quorum sensing signaling, and more particularly, those involved in early biofilm formation. Interestingly, afeI gene, encoding the AHL synthase, but not the A. ferrooxidans quorum sensing transcriptional regulator AfeR encoding gene, was shown to be regulated by quorum sensing. Data indicated that quorum sensing network represents at least 4.5% (141 genes) of the ATCC 23270T genome of which 42.5% (60 genes) are related to biofilm formation. Finally, AfeR was shown to bind specifically to the regulatory region of the afeI gene at the level of the palindromic sequence predicted to be the AfeR binding site. Our results give new insights on the response of A. ferrooxidans to quorum sensing and on biofilm biogenesis. PMID:27683573

  6. Insights into the Quorum Sensing Regulon of the Acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Revealed by Transcriptomic in the Presence of an Acyl Homoserine Lactone Superagonist Analog

    PubMed Central

    Mamani, Sigde; Moinier, Danielle; Denis, Yann; Soulère, Laurent; Queneau, Yves; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    While a functional quorum sensing system has been identified in the acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270T and shown to modulate cell adhesion to solid substrates, nothing is known about the genes it regulates. To address the question of how quorum sensing controls biofilm formation in A. ferrooxidansT, the transcriptome of this organism in conditions in which quorum sensing response is stimulated by a synthetic superagonist AHL (N-acyl homoserine lactones) analog has been studied. First, the effect on biofilm formation of a synthetic AHL tetrazolic analog, tetrazole 9c, known for its agonistic QS activity, was assessed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. A fast adherence of A. ferrooxidansT cells on sulfur coupons was observed. Then, tetrazole 9c was used in DNA microarray experiments that allowed the identification of genes regulated by quorum sensing signaling, and more particularly, those involved in early biofilm formation. Interestingly, afeI gene, encoding the AHL synthase, but not the A. ferrooxidans quorum sensing transcriptional regulator AfeR encoding gene, was shown to be regulated by quorum sensing. Data indicated that quorum sensing network represents at least 4.5% (141 genes) of the ATCC 23270T genome of which 42.5% (60 genes) are related to biofilm formation. Finally, AfeR was shown to bind specifically to the regulatory region of the afeI gene at the level of the palindromic sequence predicted to be the AfeR binding site. Our results give new insights on the response of A. ferrooxidans to quorum sensing and on biofilm biogenesis.

  7. Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Production Is More Common among Plant-Associated Pseudomonas spp. than among Soilborne Pseudomonas spp.†

    PubMed Central

    Elasri, Miena; Delorme, Sandrine; Lemanceau, Philippe; Stewart, Gordon; Laue, Bridget; Glickmann, Eric; Oger, Phil M.; Dessaux, Yves

    2001-01-01

    A total of 137 soilborne and plant-associated bacterial strains belonging to different Pseudomonas species were tested for their ability to synthesize N-acyl-homoserine lactones (NAHL). Fifty-four strains synthesized NAHL. Interestingly, NAHL production appears to be more common among plant-associated than among soilborne Pseudomonas spp. Indeed, 40% of the analyzed Pseudomonas syringae strains produced NAHL which were identified most often as the short-chain NAHL, N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone, N-(3-oxo-hexanoyl)-homoserine lactone, and N-(3-oxo-octanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (no absolute correlation between genomospecies of P. syringae and their ability to produce NAHL could be found). Six strains of fluorescent pseudomonads, belonging to the species P. chlororaphis, P. fluorescens, and P. putida, isolated from the plant rhizosphere produced different types of NAHL. In contrast, none of the strains isolated from soil samples were shown to produce NAHL. The gene encoding the NAHL synthase in P. syringae pv. maculicola was isolated by complementation of an NAHL-deficient Chromobacterium mutant. Sequence analysis revealed the existence of a luxI homologue that we named psmI. This gene is sufficient to confer NAHL synthesis upon its bacterial host and has strong homology to psyI and ahlI, two genes involved in NAHL production in P. syringae pv. tabaci and P. syringae pv. syringae, respectively. We identified another open reading frame that we termed psmR, transcribed convergently in relation to psmI and partly overlapping psmI; this gene encodes a putative LuxR regulatory protein. This gene organization, with luxI and luxR homologues facing each other and overlapping, has been found so far only in the enteric bacteria Erwinia and Pantoea and in the related species P. syringae pv. tabaci. PMID:11229911

  8. Two G-protein-coupled-receptor candidates, Cand2 and Cand7, are involved in Arabidopsis root growth mediated by the bacterial quorum-sensing signals N-acyl-homoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guoping; Liu, Fang; Ma, Hong; Hao, Shaoyan; Zhao, Qian; Bian, Zirui; Jia, Zhenhua; Song, Shuishan

    2012-01-20

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as quorum sensing (QS) signaling molecules to coordinate their group behavior. Recently, it was shown that plants can perceive and respond to these bacterial AHLs. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying the response of plants to bacterial QS signals. In this study, we show that the promotion of root elongation in wild type Arabidopsis thaliana induced by the AHLs N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone (3OC6-HSL) or N-3-oxo-octanoyl-homoserine lactone (3OC8-HSL) was completely abolished in plants with loss-of-function mutations in two candidate G-protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs), Cand2 and Cand7. Furthermore, real-time PCR analysis revealed that the expression levels of Cand2 and Cand7 were elevated in plants treated with 3OC6-HSL or 3OC8-HSL. These results suggest that Cand2 and Cand7 are involved in the regulation of root growth by bacterial AHLs and that GPCRs play a role in mediating interactions between plants and microbes.

  9. N-Acyl Homoserine Lactones in Diverse Pectobacterium and Dickeya Plant Pathogens: Diversity, Abundance, and Involvement in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Crépin, Alexandre; Beury-Cirou, Amélie; Barbey, Corinne; Farmer, Christine; Hélias, Valérie; Burini, Jean-François; Faure, Denis; Latour, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Soft-rot bacteria Pectobacterium and Dickeya use N-acyl homoserine lactones (NAHSLs) as diffusible signals for coordinating quorum sensing communication. The production of NAHSLs was investigated in a set of reference strains and recently-collected isolates, which belong to six species and share the ability to infect the potato host plant. All the pathogens produced different NAHSLs, among which the 3-oxo-hexanoyl- and the 3-oxo-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactones represent at least 90% of total produced NAHSL-amounts. The level of NAHSLs varied from 0.6 to 2 pg/cfu. The involvement of NAHSLs in tuber maceration was investigated by electroporating a quorum quenching vector in each of the bacterial pathogen strains. All the NAHSL-lactonase expressing strains produced a lower amount of NAHSLs as compared to those harboring the empty vector. Moreover, all except Dickeya dadantii 3937 induced a lower level of symptoms in potato tuber assay. Noticeably, aggressiveness appeared to be independent of both nature and amount of produced signals. This work highlights that quorum sensing similarly contributed to virulence in most of the tested Pectobacterium and Dickeya, even the strains had been isolated recently or during the past decades. Thus, these key regulatory-molecules appear as credible targets for developing anti-virulence strategies against these plant pathogens. PMID:22737020

  10. Non-antibiotic quorum sensing inhibitors acting against N-acyl homoserine lactone synthase as druggable target

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chien-Yi; Krishnan, Thiba; Wang, Hao; Chen, Ye; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chong, Yee-Meng; Tan, Li Ying; Chong, Teik Min; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS) is important for the regulation of proteobacterial virulence determinants. Thus, the inhibition of AHL synthases offers non-antibiotics-based therapeutic potentials against QS-mediated bacterial infections. In this work, functional AHL synthases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasI and RhlI were heterologously expressed in an AHL-negative Escherichia coli followed by assessments on their AHLs production using AHL biosensors and high resolution liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LCMS). These AHL-producing E. coli served as tools for screening AHL synthase inhibitors. Based on a campaign of screening synthetic molecules and natural products using our approach, three strongest inhibitors namely are salicylic acid, tannic acid and trans-cinnamaldehyde have been identified. LCMS analysis further confirmed tannic acid and trans-cinnemaldehyde efficiently inhibited AHL production by RhlI. We further demonstrated the application of trans-cinnemaldehyde inhibiting Rhl QS system regulated pyocyanin production in P. aeruginosa up to 42.06%. Molecular docking analysis suggested that trans-cinnemaldehyde binds to the LasI and EsaI with known structures mainly interacting with their substrate binding sites. Our data suggested a new class of QS-inhibiting agents from natural products targeting AHL synthase and provided a potential approach for facilitating the discovery of anti-QS signal synthesis as basis of novel anti-infective approach. PMID:25430794

  11. Non-antibiotic quorum sensing inhibitors acting against N-acyl homoserine lactone synthase as druggable target.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chien-Yi; Krishnan, Thiba; Wang, Hao; Chen, Ye; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chong, Yee-Meng; Tan, Li Ying; Chong, Teik Min; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS) is important for the regulation of proteobacterial virulence determinants. Thus, the inhibition of AHL synthases offers non-antibiotics-based therapeutic potentials against QS-mediated bacterial infections. In this work, functional AHL synthases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasI and RhlI were heterologously expressed in an AHL-negative Escherichia coli followed by assessments on their AHLs production using AHL biosensors and high resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LCMS). These AHL-producing E. coli served as tools for screening AHL synthase inhibitors. Based on a campaign of screening synthetic molecules and natural products using our approach, three strongest inhibitors namely are salicylic acid, tannic acid and trans-cinnamaldehyde have been identified. LCMS analysis further confirmed tannic acid and trans-cinnemaldehyde efficiently inhibited AHL production by RhlI. We further demonstrated the application of trans-cinnemaldehyde inhibiting Rhl QS system regulated pyocyanin production in P. aeruginosa up to 42.06%. Molecular docking analysis suggested that trans-cinnemaldehyde binds to the LasI and EsaI with known structures mainly interacting with their substrate binding sites. Our data suggested a new class of QS-inhibiting agents from natural products targeting AHL synthase and provided a potential approach for facilitating the discovery of anti-QS signal synthesis as basis of novel anti-infective approach. PMID:25430794

  12. N-ACYL HOMOSERINE LACTONe LACTONASE, AiiA, INACTIVATION OF QUORUM-SENSING AGONISTS PRODUCED BY CHLAMYDOMONAS REINHARDTII (CHLOROPHYTA) AND CHARACTERIZATION OF aiiA TRANSGENIC ALGAE(1).

    PubMed

    Rajamani, Sathish; Teplitski, Max; Kumar, Anil; Krediet, Cory J; Sayre, Richard T; Bauer, Wolfgang D

    2011-10-01

    Eukaryotes such as plants and the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii P. A. Dang. produce and secrete compounds that mimic N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) bacterial quorum-sensing (QS) signals and alter QS-regulated gene expression in the associated bacteria. Here, we show that the set of C. reinhardtii signal-mimic compounds that activate the CepR AHL receptor of Burkholderia cepacia are susceptible to inactivation by AiiA, an AHL lactonase enzyme of Bacillus. Inactivation of these algal mimics by AiiA suggests that the CepR-stimulatory class of mimics produced by C. reinhardtii may have a conserved lactone ring structure in common with AHL QS signals. To examine the role of AHL mimic compounds in the interactions of C. reinhardtii with bacteria, the aiiA gene codon optimized for Chlamydomonas was generated for the expression of AiiA as a chimeric fusion with cyan fluorescent protein (AimC). Culture filtrates of transgenic strains expressing the fusion protein AimC had significantly reduced levels of CepR signal-mimic activities. When parental and transgenic algae were cultured with a natural pond water bacterial community, a morphologically distinct, AHL-producing isolate of Aeromonas veronii was observed to colonize the transgenic algal cultures and form biofilms more readily than the parental algal cultures, indicating that secretion of the CepR signal mimics by the alga can significantly affect its interactions with bacteria it encounters in natural environments. The parental alga was also able to sequester and/or destroy AHLs in its growth media to further disrupt or manipulate bacterial QS.

  13. Acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated cross talk among epiphytic bacteria modulates behavior of Pseudomonas syringae on leaves.

    PubMed

    Dulla, Glenn F J; Lindow, Steven E

    2009-07-01

    The leaf surface harbors a host of bacterial epiphytes that are capable of influencing the quorum sensing (QS) system of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (Pss). Pss uses QS to regulate expression of genes conferring extracellular polysaccharide production, motility and factors contributing to virulence to plants. About 7% of bacterial epiphytes isolated in this study produce the Pss cognate signal, 3-oxohexanoyl-homoserine lactone (3OC6HSL), often in amounts more than 10-fold higher than Pss. Premature induction of QS in Pss by these 3OC6HSL-producing epiphytes suppressed swarming motility and subsequent disease of the leaf. Co-inoculation of 3OC6HSL-producing strains with Pss reduced the number of lesions when inoculated together onto leaves compared with that of plants inoculated with Pss alone. Strains in which 3OC6HSL accumulation was quenched by expression of an N-acyl-homoserine lactonase did not decrease disease when co-inoculated with Pss. Disease incidence caused by a nonmotile mutant of Pss was not affected by 3OC6HSL-producing bacteria, suggesting that exogenous 3OC6HSL signal that altered the motility of Pss was responsible for reducing the apparent virulence of this pathogen. Thus, considerable cross talk involving exogenous 3OC6HSL occurs on leaves and this process can be exploited for disease control.

  14. Hypersensitive response and acyl-homoserine lactone production of the fire blight antagonists Erwinia tasmaniensis and Erwinia billingiae.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Jock, Susanne; Du, Zhiqiang; Geider, Klaus

    2008-09-01

    Fire blight caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora can be controlled by antagonistic microorganisms. We characterized epiphytic bacteria isolated from healthy apple and pear trees in Australia, named Erwinia tasmaniensis, and the epiphytic bacterium Erwinia billingiae from England for physiological properties, interaction with plants and interference with growth of E. amylovora. They reduced symptom formation by the fire blight pathogen on immature pears and the colonization of apple flowers. In contrast to E. billingiae, E. tasmaniensis strains induced a hypersensitive response in tobacco leaves and synthesized levan in the presence of sucrose. With consensus primers deduced from lsc as well as hrpL, hrcC and hrcR of the hrp region of E. amylovora and of related bacteria, these genes were successfully amplified from E. tasmaniensis DNA and alignment of the encoded proteins to other Erwinia species supported a role for environmental fitness of the epiphytic bacterium. Unlike E. tasmaniensis, the epiphytic bacterium E. billingiae produced an acyl-homoserine lactone for bacterial cell-to-cell communication. Their competition with the growth of E. amylovora may be involved in controlling fire blight.

  15. Induction and Loss of Ti Plasmid Conjugative Competence in Response to the Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Quorum-Sensing Signal▿

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shengchang; Khan, Sharik R.; Farrand, Stephen K.

    2008-01-01

    Conjugative transfer of the Ti plasmids of Agrobacterium tumefaciens is controlled by a quorum-sensing system composed of TraR and its signal N-(3-oxo-octanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. This system is, in turn, controlled by the conjugative opines produced by crown gall tumors induced on plants by the bacteria. Using nonpolar traI mutants, we examined the kinetics of induction of conjugative transfer in response to exogenous acyl-homoserine lactone. In the absence of the antiactivator TraM, onset of induction of transfer requires about 30 min, 15 to 20 min of which is needed for expression and construction of the conjugative apparatus. TraM delays the onset of conjugation by 30 min. While the rate of development of conjugative competence was not significantly affected by levels of TraR, maximum efficiencies of transfer were correlated with amounts of the activator in the donors. Donors harboring Ti plasmids lacking TraM were fully induced by the quormone at concentrations as low as 100 pM. TraM raised the concentration of signal required for maximum activity to 1 nM. Donors grown in batch culture retained conjugative competence following signal removal, even when in stationary phase. However, donors kept in balanced growth rapidly lost transfer ability following signal removal. Loss of transfer was mirrored by a decrease in levels of active TraR. Decreases in TraR activity and conjugative competence could be accounted for by dilution associated with cell division, suggesting that while induction of Ti plasmid conjugation is an active process, the cells lack a mechanism for disassembling the conjugative apparatus when signals become limiting. PMID:18203831

  16. Characterisation of a Marine Bacterium Vibrio Brasiliensis T33 Producing N-acyl Homoserine Lactone Quorum Sensing Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wen-Si; Yunos, Nina Yusrina Muhamad; Tan, Pui-Wan; Mohamad, Nur Izzati; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHL) plays roles as signal molecules in quorum sensing (QS) in most Gram-negative bacteria. QS regulates various physiological activities in relation with population density and concentration of signal molecules. With the aim of isolating marine water-borne bacteria that possess QS properties, we report here the preliminary screening of marine bacteria for AHL production using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 as the AHL biosensor. Strain T33 was isolated based on preliminary AHL screening and further identified by using 16S rDNA sequence analysis as a member of the genus Vibrio closely related to Vibrio brasiliensis. The isolated Vibrio sp. strain T33 was confirmed to produce N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL) and N-(3-oxodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C10 HSL) through high resolution tandem mass spectrometry analysis. We demonstrated that this isolate formed biofilms which could be inhibited by catechin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that documents the production of these AHLs by Vibrio brasiliensis strain T33. PMID:25006994

  17. Insights into the Genome Sequences of an N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Molecule Producing Two Pseudomonas spp. Isolated from the Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Dharmaprakash, Akhilandeswarre; Reghunathan, Dinesh; Sivakumar, Krishnakutty C.; Prasannakumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    We report for the first time the draft genome sequence of two psychrotrophic Pseudomonas species, Pseudomonas simiae RGCB 73 and Pseudomonas brenneri RGCB 108, from the Arctic that produce more than one acyl homoserine lactone molecule of varied N-acyl length. The study confirms the presence of a LuxR-LuxI (type) mediated quorum-sensing system in both the Pseudomonas species and enables us to understand the role of quorum sensing in their survival in extremely cold environments. PMID:27491995

  18. Imidazolines as non-classical bioisosteres of N-acyl homoserine lactones and quorum sensing inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Arellano, Alicia; Bucio-Cano, Alejandro; Montenegro-Sustaita, Mabel; Curiel-Quesada, Everardo; Salgado-Zamora, Héctor

    2012-01-01

    A series of selected 2-substituted imidazolines were synthesized in moderate to excellent yields by a modification of protocols reported in the literature. They were evaluated as potential non-classical bioisosteres of AHL with the aim of counteracting bacterial pathogenicity. Imidazolines 18a, 18e and 18f at various concentrations reduced the violacein production by Chromobacterium violaceum, suggesting an anti-quorum sensing profile against Gram-negative bacteria. Imidazoline 18b did not affect the production of violacein, but had a bacteriostatic effect at 100 μM and a bactericidal effect at 1 mM. Imidazoline 18a bearing a hexyl phenoxy moiety was the most active compound of the series, rendering a 72% inhibitory effect of quorum sensing at 100 μM. Imidazoline 18f bearing a phenyl nonamide substituent presented an inhibitory effect on quorum sensing at a very low concentration (1 nM), with a reduction percentage of 28%. This compound showed an irregular performance, decreasing inhibition at concentrations higher than 10 μM, until reaching 100 μM, at which concentration it increased the inhibitory effect with a 49% reduction percentage. When evaluated on Serratia marcescens, compound 18f inhibited the production of prodigiosin by 40% at 100 μM.

  19. N-(3-oxo-acyl) homoserine lactone inhibits tumor growth independent of Bcl-2 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guoping; Neely, Aaron M.; Schwarzer, Christian; Lu, Huayi; Whitt, Aaron G.; Stivers, Nicole S.; Burlison, Joseph A.; White, Carl; Machen, Terry E.; Li, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-homoserine lactone (C12) as a quorum-sensing molecule for bacterial communication. C12 has also been reported to induce apoptosis in various types of tumor cells. However, the detailed molecular mechanism of C12-triggerred tumor cell apoptosis is still unclear. In addition, it is completely unknown whether C12 possesses any potential therapeutic effects in vivo. Our data indicate that, unlike most apoptotic inducers, C12 evokes a novel form of apoptosis in tumor cells through inducing mitochondrial membrane permeabilization independent of both pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. Importantly, C12 inhibits tumor growth in animals regardless of either pro- or anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. Furthermore, opposite to conventional chemotherapeutics, C12 requires paraoxonase 2 (PON2) to exert its cytotoxicity on tumor cells in vitro and its inhibitory effects on tumor growth in vivo. Overall, our results demonstrate that C12 inhibits tumor growth independent of both pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, and through inducing unique apoptotic signaling mediated by PON2 in tumor cells. PMID:26758417

  20. Endophytic Actinomycetes: A Novel Source of Potential Acyl Homoserine Lactone Degrading Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Chankhamhaengdecha, Surang; Hongvijit, Suphatra; Srichaisupakit, Akkaraphol; Charnchai, Pattra; Panbangred, Watanalai

    2013-01-01

    Several Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria employ N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (HSL) quorum sensing (QS) system to control their virulence traits. Degradation of acyl-HSL signal molecules by quorum quenching enzyme (QQE) results in a loss of pathogenicity in QS-dependent organisms. The QQE activity of actinomycetes in rhizospheric soil and inside plant tissue was explored in order to obtain novel strains with high HSL-degrading activity. Among 344 rhizospheric and 132 endophytic isolates, 127 (36.9%) and 68 (51.5%) of them, respectively, possessed the QQE activity. The highest HSL-degrading activity was at 151.30 ± 3.1 nmole/h/mL from an endophytic actinomycetes isolate, LPC029. The isolate was identified as Streptomyces based on 16S  rRNA gene sequence similarity. The QQE from LPC029 revealed HSL-acylase activity that was able to cleave an amide bond of acyl-side chain in HSL substrate as determined by HPLC. LPC029 HSL-acylase showed broad substrate specificity from C6- to C12-HSL in which C10HSL is the most favorable substrate for this enzyme. In an in vitro pathogenicity assay, the partially purified HSL-acylase efficiently suppressed soft rot of potato caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum ssp. carotovorum as demonstrated. To our knowledge, this is the first report of HSL-acylase activity derived from an endophytic Streptomyces. PMID:23484156

  1. Endophytic actinomycetes: a novel source of potential acyl homoserine lactone degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chankhamhaengdecha, Surang; Hongvijit, Suphatra; Srichaisupakit, Akkaraphol; Charnchai, Pattra; Panbangred, Watanalai

    2013-01-01

    Several Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria employ N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (HSL) quorum sensing (QS) system to control their virulence traits. Degradation of acyl-HSL signal molecules by quorum quenching enzyme (QQE) results in a loss of pathogenicity in QS-dependent organisms. The QQE activity of actinomycetes in rhizospheric soil and inside plant tissue was explored in order to obtain novel strains with high HSL-degrading activity. Among 344 rhizospheric and 132 endophytic isolates, 127 (36.9%) and 68 (51.5%) of them, respectively, possessed the QQE activity. The highest HSL-degrading activity was at 151.30 ± 3.1 nmole/h/mL from an endophytic actinomycetes isolate, LPC029. The isolate was identified as Streptomyces based on 16S  rRNA gene sequence similarity. The QQE from LPC029 revealed HSL-acylase activity that was able to cleave an amide bond of acyl-side chain in HSL substrate as determined by HPLC. LPC029 HSL-acylase showed broad substrate specificity from C6- to C12-HSL in which C10HSL is the most favorable substrate for this enzyme. In an in vitro pathogenicity assay, the partially purified HSL-acylase efficiently suppressed soft rot of potato caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum ssp. carotovorum as demonstrated. To our knowledge, this is the first report of HSL-acylase activity derived from an endophytic Streptomyces.

  2. Small-molecule inhibitor binding to an N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthase.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jiwoung; Goo, Eunhye; Yu, Sangheon; Choi, Okhee; Lee, Jeehyun; Kim, Jinwoo; Kim, Hongsup; Igarashi, Jun; Suga, Hiroaki; Moon, Jae Sun; Hwang, Ingyu; Rhee, Sangkee

    2011-07-19

    Quorum sensing (QS) controls certain behaviors of bacteria in response to population density. In gram-negative bacteria, QS is often mediated by N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs). Because QS influences the virulence of many pathogenic bacteria, synthetic inhibitors of acyl-HSL synthases might be useful therapeutically for controlling pathogens. However, rational design of a potent QS antagonist has been thwarted by the lack of information concerning the binding interactions between acyl-HSL synthases and their ligands. In the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia glumae, QS controls virulence, motility, and protein secretion and is mediated by the binding of N-octanoyl-L-HSL (C8-HSL) to its cognate receptor, TofR. C8-HSL is synthesized by the acyl-HSL synthase TofI. In this study, we characterized two previously unknown QS inhibitors identified in a focused library of acyl-HSL analogs. Our functional and X-ray crystal structure analyses show that the first inhibitor, J8-C8, binds to TofI, occupying the binding site for the acyl chain of the TofI cognate substrate, acylated acyl-carrier protein. Moreover, the reaction byproduct, 5'-methylthioadenosine, independently binds to the binding site for a second substrate, S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Closer inspection of the mode of J8-C8 binding to TofI provides a likely molecular basis for the various substrate specificities of acyl-HSL synthases. The second inhibitor, E9C-3oxoC6, competitively inhibits C8-HSL binding to TofR. Our analysis of the binding of an inhibitor and a reaction byproduct to an acyl-HSL synthase may facilitate the design of a new class of QS-inhibiting therapeutic agents.

  3. [Activation of the bioluminescence of the sensor Escherichia coli strains used for detecting N-acyl-homoserine lactones in the presence of nitrofurans and NO generators].

    PubMed

    Zaĭtseva, Iu V; Granik, V G; Belik, A S; Koksharova, O A; Khmel', I A

    2010-01-01

    Nitrofurans (nitrofurazone, nitrofurantoin, furazidin, nifuroxazide), and nitric oxide generators (sodium nitroprusside and isosorbide mononitrate) in subinhibitory concentrations were shown to significantly increase the bioluminescence of the sensor Escherichia coli strains used for detecting N-acyl-homoserine lactones, signaling molecules of Quorum Sensing (QS) regulatory systems. The highest activation of bioluminescence (up to 250-400 fold) was observed in the presence of nitrofurazone on E. coli DH5alpha biosensors containing lux-reporter plasmids pSB401 or pSB536. However, this activation was not specifically associated with the functioning of QS systems. We suggest that the effect observed results from a direct action of nitrofurans and NO donors on the process of bioluminescence. The data indicate the necessity of using the biosensors that make it possible to detect specific effects of substances tested on QS regulation. PMID:20540359

  4. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Triazole-Containing N-Acyl Homoserine Lactones as Quorum Sensing Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Danielle M.; Le Quement, Sebastian T.; Hansen, Casper L.; Clausen, Janie W.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Brummond, Jacob W.; Givskov, Michael; Nielsen, Thomas E.; Blackwell, Helen E.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacterial species are capable of assessing their local population densities through a cell-cell signaling mechanism termed quorum sensing (QS). This intercellular communication process is mediated by small molecule or peptide ligands and their cognate protein receptors. Numerous pathogens use QS to initiate virulence once they achieve a threshold cell number on a host. Consequently, approaches to intercept QS have attracted considerable attention as potential anti-infective therapies. Our interest in the development of small molecule tools to modulate QS pathways motivated us to evaluate triazole-containing analogs of natural N-acyl L-homoserine lactone (AHL) signals as non-native QS agonists and antagonists in Gram-negative bacteria. We synthesized 72 triazole derivatives of five broad structure types in high yields and purities using efficient Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne couplings. These compounds were evaluated for their ability to activate or inhibit two QS receptors from two prevalent pathogens – LasR from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and AbaR from Acinetobacter baumannii – using bacterial reporter strains. Several triazole derivatives were identified that were capable of strongly modulating the activity of LasR and AbaR. These compounds represent a new and synthetically accessible class of AHL analogs, and could find utility as chemical tools to study QS and its role in bacterial virulence. PMID:23258305

  5. N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone-Mediated Quorum Sensing with Special Reference to Use of Quorum Quenching Bacteria in Membrane Biofouling Control

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Diby

    2014-01-01

    Membrane biofouling remains a severe problem to be addressed in wastewater treatment systems affecting reactor performance and economy. The finding that many wastewater bacteria rely on N-acyl homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing to synchronize their activities essential for biofilm formations; the quenching bacterial quorum sensing suggests a promising approach for control of membrane biofouling. A variety of quorum quenching compounds of both synthetic and natural origin have been identified and found effective in inhibition of membrane biofouling with much less environmental impact than traditional antimicrobials. Work over the past few years has demonstrated that enzymatic quorum quenching mechanisms are widely conserved in several prokaryotic organisms and can be utilized as a potent tool for inhibition of membrane biofouling. Such naturally occurring bacterial quorum quenching mechanisms also play important roles in microbe-microbe interactions and have been used to develop sustainable nonantibiotic antifouling strategies. Advances in membrane fabrication and bacteria entrapment techniques have allowed the implication of such quorum quenching bacteria for better design of membrane bioreactor with improved antibiofouling efficacies. In view of this, the present paper is designed to review and discuss the recent developments in control of membrane biofouling with special emphasis on quorum quenching bacteria that are applied in membrane bioreactors. PMID:25147787

  6. N-acyl homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing with special reference to use of quorum quenching bacteria in membrane biofouling control.

    PubMed

    Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2014-01-01

    Membrane biofouling remains a severe problem to be addressed in wastewater treatment systems affecting reactor performance and economy. The finding that many wastewater bacteria rely on N-acyl homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing to synchronize their activities essential for biofilm formations; the quenching bacterial quorum sensing suggests a promising approach for control of membrane biofouling. A variety of quorum quenching compounds of both synthetic and natural origin have been identified and found effective in inhibition of membrane biofouling with much less environmental impact than traditional antimicrobials. Work over the past few years has demonstrated that enzymatic quorum quenching mechanisms are widely conserved in several prokaryotic organisms and can be utilized as a potent tool for inhibition of membrane biofouling. Such naturally occurring bacterial quorum quenching mechanisms also play important roles in microbe-microbe interactions and have been used to develop sustainable nonantibiotic antifouling strategies. Advances in membrane fabrication and bacteria entrapment techniques have allowed the implication of such quorum quenching bacteria for better design of membrane bioreactor with improved antibiofouling efficacies. In view of this, the present paper is designed to review and discuss the recent developments in control of membrane biofouling with special emphasis on quorum quenching bacteria that are applied in membrane bioreactors.

  7. Labrenzia sp. BM1: a quorum quenching bacterium that degrades N-acyl homoserine lactones via lactonase activity.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Norshazliza Ab; Norizan, Siti Nur Maisarah; Chan, Xin Yue; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    We report the degradation of quorum sensing N-acylhomoserine lactone molecules by a bacterium isolated from a Malaysian marine water sample. MALDI-TOF and phylogenetic analysis indicated this isolate BM1 clustered closely to Labrenzia sp. The quorum quenching activity of this isolate was confirmed by using a series of bioassays and rapid resolution liquid chromatography analysis. Labrenzia sp. degraded a wide range of N-acylhomoserine lactones namely N-(3-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL) and N-(3-hydroxyhexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-hydroxy-C6-HSL). Re-lactonisation bioassays confirmed Labrenzia sp. BM1 degraded these signalling molecules efficiently via lactonase activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation of a Labrenzia sp. capable of degrading N-acylhomoserine lactones and confirmation of its lactonase-based mechanism of action.

  8. Labrenzia sp. BM1: A Quorum Quenching Bacterium That Degrades N-acyl Homoserine Lactones via Lactonase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ghani, Norshazliza Ab; Norizan, Siti Nur Maisarah; Chan, Xin Yue; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    We report the degradation of quorum sensing N-acylhomoserine lactone molecules by a bacterium isolated from a Malaysian marine water sample. MALDI-TOF and phylogenetic analysis indicated this isolate BM1 clustered closely to Labrenzia sp. The quorum quenching activity of this isolate was confirmed by using a series of bioassays and rapid resolution liquid chromatography analysis. Labrenzia sp. degraded a wide range of N-acylhomoserine lactones namely N-(3-hexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL) and N-(3-hydroxyhexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-hydroxy-C6-HSL). Re-lactonisation bioassays confirmed Labrenzia sp. BM1 degraded these signalling molecules efficiently via lactonase activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation of a Labrenzia sp. capable of degrading N-acylhomoserine lactones and confirmation of its lactonase-based mechanism of action. PMID:24995373

  9. Acyl-homoserine lactone binding to and stability of the orphan Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signal receptor QscR.

    PubMed

    Oinuma, Ken-Ichi; Greenberg, E Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa transcription factor QscR responds to a variety of fatty acyl-homoserine lactones (HSLs), including N-3-oxododecanoyl-HSL (3OC12-HSL), which is produced and detected by the P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing circuit LasI and LasR. As is true for LasR and many other acyl-HSL-dependent transcription factors, production of soluble QscR in sufficient amounts for purification requires growth of recombinant bacteria in the presence of an appropriate acyl-HSL. QscR is thought to bind 3OC12-HSL relatively weakly compared to LasR, and unlike LasR, binding of purified QscR to target DNA was shown to strongly depend on exogenously added 3OC12-HSL. We show that purified QscR is dimeric at sufficiently high concentrations and monomeric at lower concentrations. Furthermore, QscR bound 3OC12-HSL more tightly than previously believed. Purified QscR retained 3OC12-HSL, and at sufficiently high concentrations, it bound target DNA in the absence of added 3OC12-HSL. We also obtained soluble QscR from recombinant Escherichia coli grown in the presence of N-3-oxohexanoyl-HSL (3OC6-HSL) instead of 3OC12-HSL, and because 3OC6-HSL bound much more loosely to QscR than other acyl-HSLs tested, we were able to exchange 3OC6-HSL with other acyl-HSLs in vitro and then estimate binding affinities of QscR for different acyl-HSLs and for target DNA. Our data support a model whereby QscR polypeptides fold properly in the absence of an acyl-HSL, but soluble, acyl-HSL-free QscR does not accumulate because it is subject to rapid aggregation or proteolysis.

  10. Draft Genome Perspective of Staphylococcus saprophyticus Strain SU8, an N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone-Degrading Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Sulaiman, Joanita; Yong, Delicia Ann; Tee, Kok Keng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Priya, Kumutha

    2015-09-24

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus strain SU8 was isolated from a pristine water source in Malaysia and it exhibited degradation of N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone. Here we report the draft genome sequence of S. saprophyticus strain SU8 to further understand its quorum quenching abilities.

  11. Draft Genome Perspective of Staphylococcus saprophyticus Strain SU8, an N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Joanita; Yong, Delicia Ann; Tee, Kok Keng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Priya, Kumutha

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus strain SU8 was isolated from a pristine water source in Malaysia and it exhibited degradation of N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone. Here we report the draft genome sequence of S. saprophyticus strain SU8 to further understand its quorum quenching abilities. PMID:26404582

  12. Draft Genome Perspective of Staphylococcus saprophyticus Strain SU8, an N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone-Degrading Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Sulaiman, Joanita; Yong, Delicia Ann; Tee, Kok Keng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Priya, Kumutha

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus strain SU8 was isolated from a pristine water source in Malaysia and it exhibited degradation of N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone. Here we report the draft genome sequence of S. saprophyticus strain SU8 to further understand its quorum quenching abilities. PMID:26404582

  13. Hierarchical autoinduction in Ralstonia solanacearum: control of acyl-homoserine lactone production by a novel autoregulatory system responsive to 3-hydroxypalmitic acid methyl ester.

    PubMed Central

    Flavier, A B; Ganova-Raeva, L M; Schell, M A; Denny, T P

    1997-01-01

    Bacteria employ autoinduction systems to sense the onset of appropriate cell density for expression of developmental genes. In many gram-negative bacteria, autoinduction involves the production of and response to diffusible acylated-homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs) and is mediated by members of the LuxR and LuxI families. Ralstonia (Pseudomonas) solanacearum, a phytopathogenic bacterium that appears to autoregulate its virulence genes, produces compounds that promote expression of several heterologous acyl-HSL-responsive reporter gene constructs. High-pressure liquid chromatography of highly concentrated ethyl acetate extracts revealed that culture supernatants of strain AW1 contained two compounds with retention times similar to N-hexanoyl- and N-octanoyl-HSL. To investigate the role of these acyl-HSLs in R. solanacearum virulence gene expression, transposon mutants that were deficient for inducing an acyl-HSL-responsive reporter in Agrobacterium tumefaciens were generated. Three loci involved in normal acyl-HSL production were identified, one of which was shown to contain the divergently transcribed solR and solI genes, the luxR and luxI homologs, respectively. A 4.1-kb fragment containing solR and solI enabled all of the mutants (regardless of the locus inactivated) and a naturally acyl-HSL-defective strain of R. solanacearum to produce acyl-HSLs. Inactivation of solI abolished production of all detectable acyl-HSLs but affected neither the expression of virulence genes in culture nor the ability to wilt tomato plants. AW1 has a functional autoinduction system, because (i) expression of solI required SolR and acyl-HSL and (ii) expression of a gene linked to solR and solI, designated aidA, was acyl-HSL dependent. Because AidA has no homologs in the protein databases, its discovery provided no clues as to the role of acyl-HSLs in R. solanacearum gene regulation. However, expression of solR and solI required the global LysR-type virulence regulator PhcA, and both

  14. Haloperoxidase Mediated Quorum Quenching by Nitzschia cf pellucida: Study of the Metabolization of N-Acyl Homoserine Lactones by a Benthic Diatom

    PubMed Central

    Syrpas, Michail; Ruysbergh, Ewout; Blommaert, Lander; Vanelslander, Bart; Sabbe, Koen; Vyverman, Wim; De Kimpe, Norbert; Mangelinckx, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are known to produce a variety of halogenated compounds, which were recently shown to have a role in allelopathic interactions between competing species. The production of these compounds is linked to haloperoxidase activity. This research, has shown that this system may also be involved in diatom-bacteria interactions via the H2O2 dependent inactivation of a type of quorum sensing (QS) molecule, i.e., N-β-ketoacylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), by a natural haloperoxidase system from the benthic diatom Nitzschia cf pellucida. The AHL degradation pathway towards corresponding halogenated derivatives was elucidated via HPLC-MS analysis and the synthesis of a broad series of novel halogenated AHL analogues as reference compounds. Furthermore, their biological activity as quorum sensing modulators was directly compared and evaluated against a series of naturally occurring β-keto-AHLs. It has been demonstrated that the loss of the QS activity results from the final cleavage of the halogenated N-acyl chain of the signal molecules. PMID:24445305

  15. MomL, a novel marine-derived N-acyl homoserine lactonase from Muricauda olearia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kaihao; Su, Ying; Brackman, Gilles; Cui, Fangyuan; Zhang, Yunhui; Shi, Xiaochong; Coenye, Tom; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) as quorum sensing (QS) signaling molecules for interspecies communication, and AHL-dependent QS is related with virulence factor production in many bacterial pathogens. Quorum quenching, the enzymatic degradation of the signaling molecule, would attenuate virulence rather than kill the pathogens, and thereby reduce the potential for evolution of drug resistance. In a previous study, we showed that Muricauda olearia Th120, belonging to the class Flavobacteriia, has strong AHL degradative activity. In this study, an AHL lactonase (designated MomL), which could degrade both short- and long-chain AHLs with or without a substitution of oxo-group at the C-3 position, was identified from Th120. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that MomL functions as an AHL lactonase catalyzing AHL degradation through lactone hydrolysis. MomL is an AHL lactonase belonging to the metallo-β-lactamase superfamily that harbors an N-terminal signal peptide. The overall catalytic efficiency of MomL for C6-HSL is ∼2.9 × 10(5) s(-1) M(-1). Metal analysis and site-directed mutagenesis showed that, compared to AiiA, MomL has a different metal-binding capability and requires the histidine and aspartic acid residues for activity, while it shares the "HXHXDH" motif with other AHL lactonases belonging to the metallo-β-lactamase superfamily. This suggests that MomL is a representative of a novel type of secretory AHL lactonase. Furthermore, MomL significantly attenuated the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model, which suggests that MomL has the potential to be used as a therapeutic agent.

  16. In vitro cytotoxic effects of gold nanoparticles coated with functional acyl homoserine lactone lactonase protein from Bacillus licheniformis and their antibiofilm activity against Proteus species.

    PubMed

    Vinoj, Gopalakrishnan; Pati, Rashmirekha; Sonawane, Avinash; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam

    2015-02-01

    N-acylated homoserine lactonases are known to inhibit the signaling molecules of the biofilm-forming pathogens. In this study, gold nanoparticles were coated with N-acylated homoserine lactonase proteins (AiiA AuNPs) purified from Bacillus licheniformis. The AiiA AuNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectra, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The synthesized AiiA AuNPs were found to be spherical in shape and 10 to 30 nm in size. Treatment with AiiA protein-coated AuNPs showed maximum reduction in exopolysaccharide production, metabolic activities, and cell surface hydrophobicity and potent antibiofilm activity against multidrug-resistant Proteus species compared to treatment with AiiA protein alone. AiiA AuNPs exhibited potent antibiofilm activity at 2 to 8 μM concentrations without being harmful to the macrophages. We conclude that at a specific dose, AuNPs coated with AiiA can kill bacteria without harming the host cells, thus representing a potential template for the design of novel antibiofilm and antibacterial protein drugs to decrease bacterial colonization and to overcome the problem of drug resistance. In summary, our data suggest that the combined effect of the lactonase and the gold nanoparticles of the AiiA AuNPs has promising antibiofilm activity against biofilm-forming and multidrug-resistant Proteus species.

  17. Suppressing Erwinia carotovora pathogenicity by projecting N-acyl homoserine lactonase onto the surface of Pseudomonas putida cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qianqian; Ni, Hong; Meng, Shan; He, Yan; Yu, Ziniu; Li, Lin

    2011-12-01

    N-Acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) serve as the vital quorum-sensing signals that regulate the virulence of the pathogenic bacterium Erwinia carotovora. In the present study, an approach to efficiently restrain the pathogenicity of E. carotovora-induced soft rot disease is described. Bacillus thuringiensis-derived N-acyl homoserine lactonase (AiiA) was projected onto the surface of Pseudomonas putida cells, and inoculation with both strains was challenged. The previously identified N-terminal moiety of the ice nucleation protein, InaQ-N, was applied as the anchoring motif. A surface display cassette with inaQ-N/ aiiA was constructed and expressed under the control of a constitutive promoter in P. putida AB92019. Surface localization of the fusion protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence microscopy. The antagonistic activity of P. putida MB116 expressing InaQ-N/AiiA toward E. carotovora ATCC25270 was evaluated by challenge inoculation in potato slices at different ratios. The results revealed a remarkable suppressing effect on E. carotovora infection. The active component was further analyzed using different cell fractions, and the cell surface-projected fusion protein was found to correspond to the suppressing effect. PMID:22210621

  18. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles based electrochemical sensor for the measurement of Gram-negative bacterial quorum signaling molecules (N-acyl-homoserine-lactones).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hui; Jiang, Donglei; Shao, Jingdong; Sun, Xiulan

    2016-01-15

    We have developed a novel and economical electrochemical sensor to measure Gram-negative bacterial quorum signaling molecules (AHLs) using magnetic nanoparticles and molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) technology. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) capable of selectively absorbing AHLs were successfully synthesized by surface polymerization. The particles were deposited onto a magnetic carbon paste electrode (MGCE) surface, and characterized by electrochemical measurements. Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV) was utilized to record the oxidative current signal that is characteristic of AHL. The detection limit of this assay was determined to be 8×10(-10)molL(-1) with a linear detection range of 2.5×10(-9)molL(-1) to 1.0×10(-7)molL(-1). This Fe3O4@SiO2-MIP-based electrochemical sensor is a valuable new tool that allows quantitative measurement of Gram-negative bacterial quorum signaling molecules. It has potential applications in the fields of clinical diagnosis or food analysis with real-time detection capability, high specificity, excellent reproducibility, and good stability.

  19. Construction of self-transmissible green fluorescent protein-based biosensor plasmids and their use for identification of N-acyl homoserine-producing bacteria in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Lumjiaktase, Putthapoom; Aguilar, Claudio; Battin, Tom; Riedel, Kathrin; Eberl, Leo

    2010-09-01

    Many bacteria utilize quorum sensing (QS) systems to communicate with each other by means of the production, release, and response to signal molecules. N-Acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based QS systems are particularly widespread among the Proteobacteria, in which they regulate various functions. It has become evident that AHLs can also serve as signals for interspecies communication. However, knowledge on the impact of AHLs for the ecology of bacteria in their natural habitat is scarce, due mainly to the lack of tools that allow the study of QS in bacterial communities in situ. Here, we describe the construction of self-mobilizable green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based AHL sensors that utilize the conjugation and replication properties of the broad-host-range plasmid RP4. We show that these novel AHL sensor plasmids can be easily transferred to different bacterial species by biparental mating and that they give rise to green fluorescent cells in case the recipient is an AHL producer. We also demonstrate that these sensor plasmids are capable of self-spreading within mixed biofilms and are a suitable tool for the identification of AHL-producing bacteria in lake sediment.

  20. Cloning and expression of quorum sensing N-acyl-homoserine synthase (LuxI) gene detected in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Modarresi, Farzan; Azizi, Omid; Shakibaie, Mohammad Reza; Motamedifar, Mohammad; Mansouri, Shahla

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In present study we aimed to clone the luxI gene encoding N-acyl-homoserine synthase detected in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii and study its expression in Escherichia coli transformants. Materials and Methods: Four A. baumannii hospital strains which demonstrated strong biofilm activity were selected in this investigation. The presence of luxI gene was detected using PCR technique. Purified PCR product DNA was initially cloned into pTG19 and transformed to E. coli DH5α. The gene was then recovered from agarose gel and ligated by T4 DNA ligase into pET28a expression vector using NdeI and XhoI enzymes. pET28a + luxI was transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3). The luxI putative gene was further detected in the transformants by colony PCR. Expression of the luxI gene in the recombinant E. coli BL21 cells was studied by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) and the presence of N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) was checked by colorimetric assay and Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Results: We successfully cloned AHL gene from A. baumannii strain 23 to pET28a expression vector. There was four fold increases in expression of luxI in the transformants (P ≤ 0.05). It was found that, strain 23 and the transformants showed highest amount of AHL activity (OD = 1.524). The FT-IR analysis indicated stretching C=O bond of the lactone ring and primary amides (N=H) at 1764.69 cm−1 and 1659.23 cm−1 respectively. Conclusion: From above results we concluded that, luxI in A. baumannii is indeed responsible for AHL production and not regulation and pET28a vector allows efficient AHL expression in E. coli BL21 transformants. PMID:27307980

  1. Identification of the Quorum-Sensing Target DNA Sequence and N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Responsiveness of the Brucella abortus virB promoter▿

    PubMed Central

    Arocena, Gastón M.; Sieira, Rodrigo; Comerci, Diego J.; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2010-01-01

    VjbR is a LuxR-type quorum-sensing (QS) regulator that plays an essential role in the virulence of the intracellular facultative pathogen Brucella, the causative agent of brucellosis. It was previously described that VjbR regulates a diverse group of genes, including the virB operon. The latter codes for a type IV secretion system (T4SS) that is central for the pathogenesis of Brucella. Although the regulatory role of VjbR on the virB promoter (PvirB) was extensively studied by different groups, the VjbR-binding site had not been identified so far. Here, we identified the target DNA sequence of VjbR in PvirB by DNase I footprinting analyses. Surprisingly, we observed that VjbR specifically recognizes a sequence that is identical to a half-binding site of the QS-related regulator MrtR of Mesorhizobium tianshanense. As shown by DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, generation of a palindromic MrtR-like-binding site in PvirB increased both the affinity and the stability of the VjbR-DNA complex, which confirmed that the QS regulator of Brucella is highly related to that of M. tianshanense. The addition of N-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone dissociated VjbR from the promoter, which confirmed previous reports that indicated a negative effect of this signal on the VjbR-mediated activation of PvirB. Our results provide new molecular evidence for the structure of the virB promoter and reveal unusual features of the QS target DNA sequence of the main regulator of virulence in Brucella. PMID:20400542

  2. Purification and antibiofilm activity of AHL-lactonase from endophytic Enterobacter aerogenes VT66.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P S; Rai, V Ravishankar

    2015-11-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses biofilm lifestyle to resist antibiotic treatment. In our study, endophytic bacterium Enterobacter aerogenes VT66 quenched the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) molecules produced by P. aeruginosa PAO1. The quorum quenching activity was attributed to the presence of AHL-lactonase. The AHL-lactonase was purified using column chromatography and purified AHL-lactonase was applied for the control of biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PAO1. The results showed that purified AHL-lactonase obtained with a molecular weight about 30kDa was able to inhibit more than 70% of biofilm in P. aeruginosa PAO1 (P<0.001). Antibiofilm activity of AHL-lactonase was correlated well with results from staining technique used to determine inhibition of biomass and viable cell activity. Therefore, results unambiguously confirm that the AHL-lactonase from E. aerogenes VT66 could be used as antibiofilm therapeutics in P. aeruginosa associated biomedical applications.

  3. Lack of AHL-based quorum sensing in Pseudomonas fluorescens isolated from milk

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Maurilio L.; Pinto, Uelinton M.; Riedel, Kathrin; Vanetti, Maria C.D.; Mantovani, Hilário C.; de Araújo, Elza F.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous bacteria coordinate gene expression in response to small signalling molecules in many cases known as acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), which accumulate as a function of cell density in a process known as quorum sensing. This work aimed to determine if phenotypes that are important to define microbial activity in foods such as biofilm formation, swarming motility and proteolytic activity of two Pseudomonas fluorescens strains, isolated from refrigerated raw milk, are influenced by AHL molecules. The tested P. fluorescens strains did not produce AHL molecules in none of the evaluated media. We found that biofilm formation was dependent on the culture media, but it was not influenced by AHLs. Our results indicate that biofilm formation, swarming motility and proteolytic activity of the tested P. fluorescens strains are not regulated by acyl-homoserine lactones. It is likely that AHL-dependent quorum sensing system is absent from these strains. PMID:25477941

  4. Lack of AHL-based quorum sensing in Pseudomonas fluorescens isolated from milk.

    PubMed

    Martins, Maurilio L; Pinto, Uelinton M; Riedel, Kathrin; Vanetti, Maria C D; Mantovani, Hilário C; de Araújo, Elza F

    2014-01-01

    Numerous bacteria coordinate gene expression in response to small signalling molecules in many cases known as acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), which accumulate as a function of cell density in a process known as quorum sensing. This work aimed to determine if phenotypes that are important to define microbial activity in foods such as biofilm formation, swarming motility and proteolytic activity of two Pseudomonas fluorescens strains, isolated from refrigerated raw milk, are influenced by AHL molecules. The tested P. fluorescens strains did not produce AHL molecules in none of the evaluated media. We found that biofilm formation was dependent on the culture media, but it was not influenced by AHLs. Our results indicate that biofilm formation, swarming motility and proteolytic activity of the tested P. fluorescens strains are not regulated by acyl-homoserine lactones. It is likely that AHL-dependent quorum sensing system is absent from these strains.

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel N-α-haloacylated homoserine lactones as quorum sensing modulators

    PubMed Central

    Syrpas, Michail; Ruysbergh, Ewout; Stevens, Christian V; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Novel N-α-haloacylated homoserine lactones, in which a halogen atom was introduced at the α-position of the carbonyl function of the N-acyl chain, have been studied as quorum sensing (QS) modulators and compared with a library of natural N-acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs). The series of novel analogues consists of α-chloro, α-bromo and α-iodo AHL analogues. Furthermore, the biological QS activity of the synthetic AHL analogues compared to the natural AHLs was evaluated. Halogenated analogues demonstrated a reduced activity in the Escherichia coli JB523 bioassay, with the α-iodo lactones being the less active ones and the α-chloro AHLs the most potent QS agonists. Most of the α-haloacylated analogues did not exhibit a significant reduction when tested in the QS inhibition test. Therefore, these novel analogues could be utilized as chemical probes for QS structure–activity studies. PMID:25383125

  6. Identification and analysis of the salt tolerant property of AHL lactonase (AiiATSAWB ) of Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Easwaran, Nalini; Karthikeyan, Sivashanmugam; Sridharan, Balasundaram; Gothandam, Kodiveri Muthukaliannan

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial biofilms communicate by a process called Quorum Sensing. Gram negative bacterial pathogens specifically talk through the production, detection, and response to the signal or autoinducer called Acyl Homoserine Lactones. Bacterial lactonases are important AHL hydrolysing or quorum quenching enzymes. The present study deals with ten endospore forming gram positive isolates of the saltern soil. Preliminary screening for Quorum Quenching activity with the QS Inhibition indicator strain Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472, showed positive activity in four isolates namely TS2, TS16, TSAWB, and TS53B. AHL lactonase (AiiA) specific primers amplified Acyl Homoserine Lactone lactonase gene in the TSAWB genome alone. Phylogenetic relationship of the identified AiiATSAWB confirmed its evolutionary relationship with bacterial AiiA like AHL lactonase of the metallo-beta-lactamase super family. Our in vitro AHL hydrolysis assay under wide percentage (0-5) of salt solutions with TSAWB isolate and also its intracellular soluble protein fraction showed halotolerant AHL hydrolysis ability of the AiiATSAWB enzyme. In silico determination of putative tertiary structure, the ESBRI derived conserved salt bridges, aminoacid residue characterization with high mole percent of acidic and hydrophobic residues reaffirmed the halotolerant ability of the enzyme. So we propound the future use of purified AiiATSAWB , as hypertonic suspension for inhalation to substitute the action of inactivated host's paraoxonase in treating Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:25041996

  7. Improvement of bioelectrochemical property and energy recovery by acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenzong; Cai, Weiwei; Ma, Anzhou; Ren, Ge; Li, Zhiling; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Wang, Aijie

    2015-06-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) has been extensively studied as a cell-cell communication system, where small chemical signal molecules (acylhomoserine lactones, AHLs) can regulate the bacterial communications in bioelectrochemical systems via chemical signaling and electric signaling. In this study, electrochemical activity of bio-anode is substantially promoted by adding two kinds of AHLs with different chain length at the stage of community formation in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). Hydrogen yield increase is observed by adding of two chain length AHLs, 3-oxo-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone (3OC6-HSL) and 3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL). A higher MEC current is acquired with addition of 3OC6-HSL than 3OC12-HSL at a fixed voltage of 0.8 V (vs. SHE). The highest yield is up to 3.8 ± 0.2 mol H2 mol-1 acetate at 10 μM 3OC6-HSL, which is increased 29% over control MECs. Evaluated on applied voltage, energy efficiency is increased to 171.6 ± 21.3% with short chain AHL, however, no significant improvement is performed on energy efficiency and coulombic efficiency with long-chain AHL. The study shows that bioelectrochemical characteristics of MECs varied on the chain length of AHL signal molecules and short-chain AHLs have a more positive effect on electron transfer and energy recovery in MECs.

  8. Non-thermal Plasma Exposure Rapidly Attenuates Bacterial AHL-Dependent Quorum Sensing and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Padrig B.; Busetti, Alessandro; Wielogorska, Ewa; Chevallier, Olivier P.; Elliott, Christopher T.; Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Graham, William G.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma has been exhaustively characterised, however elucidation of the interactions between biomolecules produced and utilised by bacteria and short plasma exposures are required for optimisation and clinical translation of cold plasma technology. This study characterizes the effects of non-thermal plasma exposure on acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum sensing (QS). Plasma exposure of AHLs reduced the ability of such molecules to elicit a QS response in bacterial reporter strains in a dose-dependent manner. Short exposures (30–60 s) produce of a series of secondary compounds capable of eliciting a QS response, followed by the complete loss of AHL-dependent signalling following longer exposures. UPLC-MS analysis confirmed the time-dependent degradation of AHL molecules and their conversion into a series of by-products. FT-IR analysis of plasma-exposed AHLs highlighted the appearance of an OH group. In vivo assessment of the exposure of AHLs to plasma was examined using a standard in vivo model. Lettuce leaves injected with the rhlI/lasI mutant PAO-MW1 alongside plasma treated N-butyryl-homoserine lactone and n-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-homoserine lactone, exhibited marked attenuation of virulence. This study highlights the capacity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma to modify and degrade AHL autoinducers thereby attenuating QS-dependent virulence in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27242335

  9. Non-thermal Plasma Exposure Rapidly Attenuates Bacterial AHL-Dependent Quorum Sensing and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Padrig B; Busetti, Alessandro; Wielogorska, Ewa; Chevallier, Olivier P; Elliott, Christopher T; Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P; Graham, William G; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2016-05-31

    The antimicrobial activity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma has been exhaustively characterised, however elucidation of the interactions between biomolecules produced and utilised by bacteria and short plasma exposures are required for optimisation and clinical translation of cold plasma technology. This study characterizes the effects of non-thermal plasma exposure on acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum sensing (QS). Plasma exposure of AHLs reduced the ability of such molecules to elicit a QS response in bacterial reporter strains in a dose-dependent manner. Short exposures (30-60 s) produce of a series of secondary compounds capable of eliciting a QS response, followed by the complete loss of AHL-dependent signalling following longer exposures. UPLC-MS analysis confirmed the time-dependent degradation of AHL molecules and their conversion into a series of by-products. FT-IR analysis of plasma-exposed AHLs highlighted the appearance of an OH group. In vivo assessment of the exposure of AHLs to plasma was examined using a standard in vivo model. Lettuce leaves injected with the rhlI/lasI mutant PAO-MW1 alongside plasma treated N-butyryl-homoserine lactone and n-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-homoserine lactone, exhibited marked attenuation of virulence. This study highlights the capacity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma to modify and degrade AHL autoinducers thereby attenuating QS-dependent virulence in P. aeruginosa.

  10. Non-thermal Plasma Exposure Rapidly Attenuates Bacterial AHL-Dependent Quorum Sensing and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Padrig B; Busetti, Alessandro; Wielogorska, Ewa; Chevallier, Olivier P; Elliott, Christopher T; Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P; Graham, William G; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma has been exhaustively characterised, however elucidation of the interactions between biomolecules produced and utilised by bacteria and short plasma exposures are required for optimisation and clinical translation of cold plasma technology. This study characterizes the effects of non-thermal plasma exposure on acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum sensing (QS). Plasma exposure of AHLs reduced the ability of such molecules to elicit a QS response in bacterial reporter strains in a dose-dependent manner. Short exposures (30-60 s) produce of a series of secondary compounds capable of eliciting a QS response, followed by the complete loss of AHL-dependent signalling following longer exposures. UPLC-MS analysis confirmed the time-dependent degradation of AHL molecules and their conversion into a series of by-products. FT-IR analysis of plasma-exposed AHLs highlighted the appearance of an OH group. In vivo assessment of the exposure of AHLs to plasma was examined using a standard in vivo model. Lettuce leaves injected with the rhlI/lasI mutant PAO-MW1 alongside plasma treated N-butyryl-homoserine lactone and n-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-homoserine lactone, exhibited marked attenuation of virulence. This study highlights the capacity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma to modify and degrade AHL autoinducers thereby attenuating QS-dependent virulence in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27242335

  11. Discovery of Pantoea rodasii Strain ND03 that Produces N-(3-Oxo-hexanoyl)-l-homoserine Lactone

    PubMed Central

    Yunos, Nina Yusrina Muhamad; Tan, Wen-Si; Mohamad, Nur Izzati; Tan, Pui-Wan; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Proteobacteria use quorum sensing to regulate target gene expression in response to population density. Quorum sensing (QS) is achieved via so-called signalling molecules and the best-studied QS signalling system uses N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). This study aimed to identify and characterize the production of AHLs by a bacterium ND03 isolated from a Malaysian tropical rainforest waterfall. Molecular identification showed that ND03 is a Pantoea sp. closely related to Pantoea rodasii. We used Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, an AHL biosensor for preliminary AHL production screening and then used high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, to confirm that P. rodasii strain ND03 produced N-(3-oxo-hexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report for such a discovery in P. rodasii strain ND03. PMID:24859023

  12. Discovery of Pantoea rodasii strain ND03 that produces N-(3-Oxo-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone.

    PubMed

    Yunos, Nina Yusrina Muhamad; Tan, Wen-Si; Mohamad, Nur Izzati; Tan, Pui-Wan; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Proteobacteria use quorum sensing to regulate target gene expression in response to population density. Quorum sensing (QS) is achieved via so-called signalling molecules and the best-studied QS signalling system uses N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). This study aimed to identify and characterize the production of AHLs by a bacterium ND03 isolated from a Malaysian tropical rainforest waterfall. Molecular identification showed that ND03 is a Pantoea sp. closely related to Pantoea rodasii. We used Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, an AHL biosensor for preliminary AHL production screening and then used high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, to confirm that P. rodasii strain ND03 produced N-(3-oxo-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report for such a discovery in P. rodasii strain ND03.

  13. Discovery of Pantoea rodasii strain ND03 that produces N-(3-Oxo-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone.

    PubMed

    Yunos, Nina Yusrina Muhamad; Tan, Wen-Si; Mohamad, Nur Izzati; Tan, Pui-Wan; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Proteobacteria use quorum sensing to regulate target gene expression in response to population density. Quorum sensing (QS) is achieved via so-called signalling molecules and the best-studied QS signalling system uses N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). This study aimed to identify and characterize the production of AHLs by a bacterium ND03 isolated from a Malaysian tropical rainforest waterfall. Molecular identification showed that ND03 is a Pantoea sp. closely related to Pantoea rodasii. We used Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, an AHL biosensor for preliminary AHL production screening and then used high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, to confirm that P. rodasii strain ND03 produced N-(3-oxo-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report for such a discovery in P. rodasii strain ND03. PMID:24859023

  14. Purification and antibiofilm activity of AHL-lactonase from endophytic Enterobacter aerogenes VT66.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P S; Rai, V Ravishankar

    2015-11-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses biofilm lifestyle to resist antibiotic treatment. In our study, endophytic bacterium Enterobacter aerogenes VT66 quenched the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) molecules produced by P. aeruginosa PAO1. The quorum quenching activity was attributed to the presence of AHL-lactonase. The AHL-lactonase was purified using column chromatography and purified AHL-lactonase was applied for the control of biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PAO1. The results showed that purified AHL-lactonase obtained with a molecular weight about 30kDa was able to inhibit more than 70% of biofilm in P. aeruginosa PAO1 (P<0.001). Antibiofilm activity of AHL-lactonase was correlated well with results from staining technique used to determine inhibition of biomass and viable cell activity. Therefore, results unambiguously confirm that the AHL-lactonase from E. aerogenes VT66 could be used as antibiofilm therapeutics in P. aeruginosa associated biomedical applications. PMID:26432367

  15. Uptake, degradation and chiral discrimination of N-acyl-D/L-homoserine lactones by barley (Hordeum vulgare) and yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus) plants.

    PubMed

    Götz, Christine; Fekete, Agnes; Gebefuegi, Istvan; Forczek, Sándor T; Fuksová, Kvetoslava; Li, Xiaojing; Englmann, Matthias; Gryndler, Milan; Hartmann, Anton; Matucha, Miroslav; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Schröder, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Bacterial intraspecies and interspecies communication in the rhizosphere is mediated by diffusible signal molecules. Many Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as autoinducers in the quorum sensing response. While bacterial signalling is well described, the fate of AHLs in contact with plants is much less known. Thus, adsorption, uptake and translocation of N-hexanoyl- (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl- (C8-HSL) and N-decanoyl-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) were studied in axenic systems with barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and the legume yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) Urban) as model plants using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) and tritium-labelled AHLs. Decreases in AHL concentration due to abiotic adsorption or degradation were tolerable under the experimental conditions. The presence of plants enhanced AHL decline in media depending on the compounds' lipophilicity, whereby the legume caused stronger AHL decrease than barley. All tested AHLs were traceable in root extracts of both plants. While all AHLs except C10-HSL were detectable in barley shoots, only C6-HSL was found in shoots of yam bean. Furthermore, tritium-labelled AHLs were used to determine short-term uptake kinetics. Chiral separation by GC-MS revealed that both plants discriminated D-AHL stereoisomers to different extents. These results indicate substantial differences in uptake and degradation of different AHLs in the plants tested.

  16. Uptake, degradation and chiral discrimination of N-acyl-D/L-homoserine lactones by barley (Hordeum vulgare) and yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus) plants.

    PubMed

    Götz, Christine; Fekete, Agnes; Gebefuegi, Istvan; Forczek, Sándor T; Fuksová, Kvetoslava; Li, Xiaojing; Englmann, Matthias; Gryndler, Milan; Hartmann, Anton; Matucha, Miroslav; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Schröder, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Bacterial intraspecies and interspecies communication in the rhizosphere is mediated by diffusible signal molecules. Many Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as autoinducers in the quorum sensing response. While bacterial signalling is well described, the fate of AHLs in contact with plants is much less known. Thus, adsorption, uptake and translocation of N-hexanoyl- (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl- (C8-HSL) and N-decanoyl-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) were studied in axenic systems with barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and the legume yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) Urban) as model plants using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) and tritium-labelled AHLs. Decreases in AHL concentration due to abiotic adsorption or degradation were tolerable under the experimental conditions. The presence of plants enhanced AHL decline in media depending on the compounds' lipophilicity, whereby the legume caused stronger AHL decrease than barley. All tested AHLs were traceable in root extracts of both plants. While all AHLs except C10-HSL were detectable in barley shoots, only C6-HSL was found in shoots of yam bean. Furthermore, tritium-labelled AHLs were used to determine short-term uptake kinetics. Chiral separation by GC-MS revealed that both plants discriminated D-AHL stereoisomers to different extents. These results indicate substantial differences in uptake and degradation of different AHLs in the plants tested. PMID:17899036

  17. AHL-priming functions via oxylipin and salicylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Sebastian T.; Schikora, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative action between the host plant and associated bacteria is crucial for the establishment of an efficient interaction. In bacteria, the synchronized behavior of a population is often achieved by a density-dependent communication called quorum sensing. This behavior is based on signaling molecules, which influence bacterial gene expression. N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are such molecules in many Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, some AHLs are responsible for the beneficial effect of bacteria on plants, for example the long chain N-3-oxo-tetradecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (oxo-C14-HSL) can prime Arabidopsis and barley plants for an enhanced defense. This AHL-induced resistance phenomenon, named AHL-priming, was observed in several independent laboratories during the last two decades. Very recently, the mechanism of priming with oxo-C14-HSL was shown to depend on an oxylipin and salicylic acid (SA). SA is a key element in plant defense, it accumulates during different plant resistance responses and is the base of systemic acquired resistance. In addition, SA itself can prime plants for an enhanced resistance against pathogen attack. On the other side, oxylipins, including jasmonic acid (JA) and related metabolites, are lipid-derived signaling compounds. Especially the oxidized fatty acid derivative cis-OPDA, which is the precursor of JA, is a newly described player in plant defense. Unlike the antagonistic effect of SA and JA in plant–microbe interactions, the recently described pathway functions through a synergistic effect of oxylipins and SA, and is independent of the JA signaling cascade. Interestingly, the oxo-C14-HSL-induced oxylipin/SA signaling pathway induces stomata defense responses and cell wall strengthening thus prevents pathogen invasion. In this review, we summarize the findings on AHL-priming and the related signaling cascade. In addition, we discuss the potential of AHL-induced resistance in new strategies of plant protection. PMID

  18. AHL signals induce rubrifacine production in a bruI mutant of Brenneria rubrifaciens.

    PubMed

    McClean, Ali E; Duerkop, Breck A; Greenberg, E Peter; Kluepfel, Daniel A

    2012-02-01

    Several members of the bacterial genus Brenneria are pathogenic on different tree species. Cell-free extracts from the bacterial phytopathogens Brenneria rubrifaciens, B. salicis, and B. nigrifluens induced production of the red pigment rubrifacine in the B. rubrifaciens bruI insertional mutant Br-212. Analysis of the bruI locus identified an adjacent open reading frame, designated bruR, with homology to luxR. High-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis of ethyl acetate extracts from wild-type B. rubrifaciens and Escherichia coli expressing the bruI gene identified two acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) peaks, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-homoserine lactone (3OC6HSL) and N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone (C6HSL). Addition of synthetic 3OC6HSL and C6HSL at 10 μM to the bruI mutant, strain Br-212, induced rubrifacine production and the ability to elicit a hypersensitive reaction (HR) in tobacco leaves. Synthetic C6HSL was less effective at inducing pigment production than 3OC6HSL at 10 μM. The bruI mutant Br-212 did not produce detectable AHLs, indicating that C6HSL and 3OC6HSL are the major AHLs produced by this species. The AHLs N-heptanoyl-DL-homoserine lactone (C7HSL), N-octanoyl-DL-homoserine lactone (C8HSL), and N-(3-oxooctanoyl)-DL-homoserine lactone (3OC8HSL) also induced pigment production in Br-212 and restored its ability to elicit an HR in tobacco, suggesting that cross-talk with other bacterial species may be possible.

  19. Toxicological safety assessment of genetically modified Bacillus thuringiensis with additional N-acyl homoserine lactonase gene.

    PubMed

    Peng, Donghai; Zhou, Chenfei; Chen, Shouwen; Ruan, Lifang; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the toxicology safety to mammals of a genetically modified (GM) Bacillus thuringiensis with an additional N-acyl homoserine lactones gene (aiiA), which possesses insecticidal activity together with restraint of bacterial pathogenicity and is intended for use as a multifunctional biopesticide. Safety assessments included an acute oral toxicity test and 28-d animal feeding study in Wistar rats, primary eye and dermal irritation in Zealand White rabbits, and delayed contact hypersensitivity in guinea pigs. Tests were conducted using spray-dried powder preparation. This GM product showed toxicity neither in oral acute toxicity test nor in 28-d animal feeding test at a dose of 5,000 mg/kg body weight. During the animal feeding test, there were no significant differences in growth, food and water consumption, hematology, blood biochemical indices, organ weights, and histopathology finding between rats in controls and tested groups. Tested animals in primary eye and dermal irritation and delayed contact hypersensitivity test were also devoid of any toxicity compared to controls. All the above results demonstrated that the GM based multifunctional B. thuringiensis has low toxicity and low eye and dermal irritation and would not cause hypersensitivity to laboratory mammals and therefore could be regarded as safe for use as a pesticide.

  20. Unravelling the genome of long chain N-acylhomoserine lactone-producing Acinetobacter sp. strain GG2 and identification of its quorum sensing synthase gene

    PubMed Central

    How, Kah Yan; Hong, Kar-Wai; Sam, Choon-Kook; Koh, Chong-Lek; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-01-01

    Myriad proteobacteria use N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) molecules as quorum sensing (QS) signals to regulate different physiological functions, including virulence, antibiotic production, and biofilm formation. Many of these proteobacteria possess LuxI/LuxR system as the QS mechanism. Recently, we reported the 3.89 Mb genome of Acinetobacter sp. strain GG2. In this work, the genome of this long chain AHL-producing bacterium was unravelled which led to the molecular characterization of luxI homologue, designated as aciI. This 552 bp gene was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The purified protein was ∼20.5 kDa and is highly similar to several autoinducer proteins of LuxI family among Acinetobacter species. To verify the AHL synthesis activity of this protein, high-resolution liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis revealed the production of 3-oxo-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone and 3-hydroxy-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone from induced E. coli harboring the recombinant AciI. Our data show for the first time, the cloning and characterization of the luxI homologue from Acinetobacter sp. strain GG2, and confirmation of its AHLs production. These data are of great significance as the annotated genome of strain GG2 has provided a valuable insight in the study of autoinducer molecules and its roles in QS mechanism of the bacterium. PMID:25926817

  1. Identification of Unanticipated and Novel N-Acyl L-Homoserine Lactones (AHLs) Using a Sensitive Non-Targeted LC-MS/MS Method

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nishaben M.; Moore, Joseph D.; Blackwell, Helen E.; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    N-acyl L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) constitute a predominant class of quorum-sensing signaling molecules used by Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we report a sensitive and non-targeted HPLC-MS/MS method based on parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) to identify and quantitate known, unanticipated, and novel AHLs in microbial samples. Using a hybrid quadrupole-high resolution mass analyzer, this method integrates MS scans and all-ion fragmentation MS/MS scans to allow simultaneous detection of AHL parent-ion masses and generation of full mass spectra at high resolution and high mass accuracy in a single chromatographic run. We applied this method to screen for AHL production in a variety of Gram-negative bacteria (i.e. B. cepacia, E. tarda, E. carotovora, E. herbicola, P. stewartii, P. aeruginosa, P. aureofaciens, and R. sphaeroides) and discovered that nearly all of them produce a larger set of AHLs than previously reported. Furthermore, we identified production of an uncommon AHL (i.e. 3-oxo-C7-HL) in E. carotovora and P. stewartii, whose production has only been previously observed within the genera Serratia and Yersinia. Finally, we used our method to quantitate AHL degradation in B. cepacia, E. carotovora, E. herbicola, P. stewartii, P. aeruginosa, P. aureofaciens, the non-AHL producer E. coli, and the Gram-positive bacterium B. subtilis. We found that AHL degradation ability varies widely across these microbes, of which B. subtilis and E. carotovora are the best degraders, and observed that there is a general trend for AHLs containing long acyl chains (≥10 carbons) to be degraded at faster rates than AHLs with short acyl chains (≤6 carbons). PMID:27706219

  2. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia responds to exogenous AHL signals through the LuxR solo SmoR (Smlt1839).

    PubMed

    Martínez, Paula; Huedo, Pol; Martinez-Servat, Sònia; Planell, Raquel; Ferrer-Navarro, Mario; Daura, Xavier; Yero, Daniel; Gibert, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Quorum Sensing (QS) mediated by Acyl Homoserine Lactone (AHL) molecules are probably the most widespread and studied among Gram-negative bacteria. Canonical AHL systems are composed by a synthase (LuxI family) and a regulator element (LuxR family), whose genes are usually adjacent in the genome. However, incomplete AHL-QS machinery lacking the synthase LuxI is frequently observed in Proteobacteria, and the regulator element is then referred as LuxR solo. It has been shown that certain LuxR solos participate in interspecific communication by detecting signals produced by different organisms. In the case of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, a preliminary genome sequence analysis revealed numerous putative luxR genes, none of them associated to a luxI gene. From these, the hypothetical LuxR solo Smlt1839, here designated SmoR, presents a conserved AHL binding domain and a helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. Its genomic organization-adjacent to hchA gene-indicate that SmoR belongs to the new family "LuxR regulator chaperone HchA-associated." AHL-binding assays revealed that SmoR binds to AHLs in-vitro, at least to oxo-C8-homoserine lactone, and it regulates operon transcription, likely by recognizing a conserved palindromic regulatory box in the hchA upstream region. Supplementation with concentrated supernatants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which contain significant amounts of AHLs, promoted swarming motility in S. maltophilia. Contrarily, no swarming stimulation was observed when the P. aeruginosa supernatant was treated with the lactonase AiiA from Bacillus subtilis, confirming that AHL contributes to enhance the swarming ability of S. maltophilia. Finally, mutation of smoR resulted in a swarming alteration and an apparent insensitivity to the exogenous AHLs provided by P. aeruginosa. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that S. maltophilia senses AHLs produced by neighboring bacteria through the LuxR solo SmoR, regulating population behaviors such as swarming

  3. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia responds to exogenous AHL signals through the LuxR solo SmoR (Smlt1839)

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Paula; Huedo, Pol; Martinez-Servat, Sònia; Planell, Raquel; Ferrer-Navarro, Mario; Daura, Xavier; Yero, Daniel; Gibert, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Quorum Sensing (QS) mediated by Acyl Homoserine Lactone (AHL) molecules are probably the most widespread and studied among Gram-negative bacteria. Canonical AHL systems are composed by a synthase (LuxI family) and a regulator element (LuxR family), whose genes are usually adjacent in the genome. However, incomplete AHL-QS machinery lacking the synthase LuxI is frequently observed in Proteobacteria, and the regulator element is then referred as LuxR solo. It has been shown that certain LuxR solos participate in interspecific communication by detecting signals produced by different organisms. In the case of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, a preliminary genome sequence analysis revealed numerous putative luxR genes, none of them associated to a luxI gene. From these, the hypothetical LuxR solo Smlt1839, here designated SmoR, presents a conserved AHL binding domain and a helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. Its genomic organization—adjacent to hchA gene—indicate that SmoR belongs to the new family “LuxR regulator chaperone HchA-associated.” AHL-binding assays revealed that SmoR binds to AHLs in-vitro, at least to oxo-C8-homoserine lactone, and it regulates operon transcription, likely by recognizing a conserved palindromic regulatory box in the hchA upstream region. Supplementation with concentrated supernatants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which contain significant amounts of AHLs, promoted swarming motility in S. maltophilia. Contrarily, no swarming stimulation was observed when the P. aeruginosa supernatant was treated with the lactonase AiiA from Bacillus subtilis, confirming that AHL contributes to enhance the swarming ability of S. maltophilia. Finally, mutation of smoR resulted in a swarming alteration and an apparent insensitivity to the exogenous AHLs provided by P. aeruginosa. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that S. maltophilia senses AHLs produced by neighboring bacteria through the LuxR solo SmoR, regulating population behaviors such as swarming

  4. Functional characterization of a soybean growth stimulator Bradyrhizobium sp. strain SR-6 showing acylhomoserine lactone production.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amanat; Ayesha; Hameed, Sohail; Imran, Asma; Iqbal, Mazhar; Iqbal, Javed; Oresnik, Ivan J

    2016-09-01

    A soybean nodule endophytic bacterium Bradyrhizobium sp. strain SR-6 was characterized for production of acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) as quorum sensing molecules. Mass spectrometry analysis of AHLs revealed the presence of C6-HSL, 3OH-C6-HSL, C8-HSL, C10-HSL, 3oxoC10-HSL, 3oxo-C12-HSL and 3OH-C12-HSL which are significantly different from those reported earlier in soybean symbionts. Purified AHL extracts significantly improved wheat and soybean seedling growth and root hair development along with increased soybean nodulation under axenic conditions. A positive correlation was observed among in vivo nitrogenase and catalase enzyme activities of the strain SR-6. Transmission electron microscopic analysis showed the cytochemical localization of catalase activity within the bacteroids, specifically attached to the peribacteroidal membrane. Root and nodule colonization proved rhizosphere competence of SR-6. The inoculation of SR-6 resulted in increased shoot length (13%), plant dry matter (50%), grain weight (16%), seed yield (20%) and N-uptake (14%) as compared to non-inoculated soybean plants. The symbiotic bacterium SR-6 has potential to improve soybean growth and yield in sub-humid climate of Azad Jammu and Kashmir region of Pakistan. The production and mass spectrometric profiling of AHLs as well as in vivo cytochemical localization of catalase enzyme activity in soybean Bradyrhizobium sp. have never been reported earlier elsewhere before our these investigations.

  5. Sub-MICs of Mentha piperita essential oil and menthol inhibits AHL mediated quorum sensing and biofilm of Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Husain, Fohad M; Ahmad, Iqbal; Khan, Mohammad S; Ahmad, Ejaz; Tahseen, Qudisa; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Alshabib, Nasser A

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) is a density dependent communication system that regulates the expression of certain genes including production of virulence factors in many pathogens. Bioactive plant extract/compounds inhibiting QS regulated gene expression may be a potential candidate as antipathogenic drug. In this study anti-QS activity of peppermint (Mentha piperita) oil was first tested using the Chromobacterium violaceum CVO26 biosensor. Further, the findings of the present investigation revealed that peppermint oil (PMO) at sub-Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (sub-MICs) strongly interfered with acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas hydrophila. The result of molecular docking analysis attributed the QS inhibitory activity exhibited by PMO to menthol. Assessment of ability of menthol to interfere with QS systems of various Gram-negative pathogens comprising diverse AHL molecules revealed that it reduced the AHL dependent production of violacein, virulence factors, and biofilm formation indicating broad-spectrum anti-QS activity. Using two Escherichia coli biosensors, MG4/pKDT17 and pEAL08-2, we also confirmed that menthol inhibited both the las and pqs QS systems. Further, findings of the in vivo studies with menthol on nematode model Caenorhabditis elegans showed significantly enhanced survival of the nematode. Our data identified menthol as a novel broad spectrum QS inhibitor.

  6. Sub-MICs of Mentha piperita essential oil and menthol inhibits AHL mediated quorum sensing and biofilm of Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Fohad M.; Ahmad, Iqbal; Khan, Mohammad S.; Ahmad, Ejaz; Tahseen, Qudisa; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Alshabib, Nasser A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) is a density dependent communication system that regulates the expression of certain genes including production of virulence factors in many pathogens. Bioactive plant extract/compounds inhibiting QS regulated gene expression may be a potential candidate as antipathogenic drug. In this study anti-QS activity of peppermint (Mentha piperita) oil was first tested using the Chromobacterium violaceum CVO26 biosensor. Further, the findings of the present investigation revealed that peppermint oil (PMO) at sub-Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (sub-MICs) strongly interfered with acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas hydrophila. The result of molecular docking analysis attributed the QS inhibitory activity exhibited by PMO to menthol. Assessment of ability of menthol to interfere with QS systems of various Gram-negative pathogens comprising diverse AHL molecules revealed that it reduced the AHL dependent production of violacein, virulence factors, and biofilm formation indicating broad-spectrum anti-QS activity. Using two Escherichia coli biosensors, MG4/pKDT17 and pEAL08-2, we also confirmed that menthol inhibited both the las and pqs QS systems. Further, findings of the in vivo studies with menthol on nematode model Caenorhabditis elegans showed significantly enhanced survival of the nematode. Our data identified menthol as a novel broad spectrum QS inhibitor. PMID:26029178

  7. Disruption of N-Αcyl Homoserine Lactone-Mediated Cell Signaling and Iron Acquisition in Epiphytic Bacteria by Leaf Surface Compounds▿

    PubMed Central

    Karamanoli, Katerina; Lindow, Steven E.

    2006-01-01

    Since N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are key mediators of cell density-dependent regulation of traits involved in virulence and epiphytic fitness in gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas syringae, a variety of plant species were examined to determine their production of leaf surface compounds that could interact with these signaling systems. Leaf washings of 17 of 52 plant species tested stimulated or inhibited AHL-dependent traits in at least one of the bacterial reporter strains used. The active compounds from most plants could be distinguished from known AHLs due to different patterns of mobility during C8 and C18 reverse-phase thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and normal-phase TLC compared to the patterns for authentic bacterial AHLs. All plant extracts were also tested to determine their abilities to sequester iron and trigger bacterial siderophore synthesis on a medium containing abundant iron. Leaf washings from 16 of the 52 plant species, as well as tannic acid solutions, stimulated pyoverdine synthesis in P. syringae in a high-iron medium. These preparations also inhibited the growth of a P. syringae mutant unable to produce pyoverdine siderophores but not the growth of the wild-type bacterium. The stimulation of siderophore production and the growth inhibition by plant extracts and purified tannins were both reversed by addition of ferric chloride to culture media, indicating that iron was made unavailable by the compounds released onto the leaf surface. PMID:16997987

  8. Involvement of calmodulin in regulation of primary root elongation by N-3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Zhang, Chao; Jia, Zhenhua; Huang, Yali; Li, Haili; Song, Shuishan

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria use signal molecules of low molecular weight to monitor their local population density and to coordinate their collective behavior in a process called “quorum sensing” (QS). N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are the primary QS signals among Gram-negative bacteria. AHL-mediated QS plays an essential role in diverse bacterial physiological processes. Recent evidence shows that plants are able to sense bacterial AHLs and respond to them appropriately. However, little is known about the mechanism by which plants perceive and transduce the bacterial AHLs within cells. In this study, we found that the stimulatory effect of N-3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC6-HSL) on primary root elongation of Arabidopsis was abolished by the calmodulin (CaM) antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W-7) and trifluoperazine (TFP). Western-blot and ELISA analysis revealed that the concentration of CaM protein in Arabidopsis roots increased after treatment with 1 μM 3OC6-HSL. Results from quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that the transcription of all nine CaM genes in Arabidopsis genome was up-regulated in the plants treated with 3OC6-HSL. The loss-of-function mutants of each AtCaM gene (AtCaM1-9) were insensitive to 3OC6-HSL-stimulation of primary root elongation. On the other hand, the genetic evidence showed that CaM may not participates the inhibition of primary root length caused by application of long-chained AHLs such as C10-HSL and C12-HSL. Nevertheless, our results suggest that CaM is involved in the bacterial 3OC6-HSL signaling in plant cells. These data offer new insight into the mechanism of plant response to bacterial QS signals. PMID:25628641

  9. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signal molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone has immunomodulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Telford, G; Wheeler, D; Williams, P; Tomkins, P T; Appleby, P; Sewell, H; Stewart, G S; Bycroft, B W; Pritchard, D I

    1998-01-01

    Diverse gram-negative bacterial cells communicate with each other by using diffusible N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules to coordinate gene expression with cell population density. Accumulation of AHLs above a threshold concentration renders the population "quorate," and the appropriate target gene is activated. In pathogenic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, AHL-mediated quorum sensing is involved in the regulation of multiple virulence determinants. We therefore sought to determine whether the immune system is capable of responding to these bacterial signal molecules. Consequently the immunomodulatory properties of the AHLs N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (OdDHL) and N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (OHHL) were evaluated in murine and human leukocyte immunoassays in vitro. OdDHL, but not OHHL, inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and tumor necrosis factor alpha production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. Furthermore, OdDHL simultaneously and potently down-regulated the production of IL-12, a Th-1-supportive cytokine. At high concentrations (>7 x 10(-5) M) OdDHL inhibited antibody production by keyhole limpet hemocyanin-stimulated spleen cells, but at lower concentrations (<7 x 10(-5) M), antibody production was stimulated, apparently by increasing the proportion of the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) isotype. OdDHL also promoted IgE production by interleukin-4-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These data indicate that OdDHL may influence the Th-1-Th-2 balance in the infected host and suggest that, in addition to regulating the expression of virulence determinants, OdDHL may contribute to the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infections by functioning as a virulence determinant per se.

  10. Interference of Quorum Sensing by Delftia sp. VM4 Depends on the Activity of a Novel N-Acylhomoserine Lactone-Acylase

    PubMed Central

    Maisuria, Vimal B.; Nerurkar, Anuradha S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Turf soil bacterial isolate Delftia sp. VM4 can degrade exogenous N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL), hence it effectively attenuates the virulence of bacterial soft rot pathogen Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum strain BR1 (Pcc BR1) as a consequence of quorum sensing inhibition. Methodology/Principal Findings Isolated Delftia sp. VM4 can grow in minimal medium supplemented with AHL as a sole source of carbon and energy. It also possesses the ability to degrade various AHL molecules in a short time interval. Delftia sp. VM4 suppresses AHL accumulation and the production of virulence determinant enzymes by Pcc BR1 without interference of the growth during co-culture cultivation. The quorum quenching activity was lost after the treatment with trypsin and proteinase K. The protein with quorum quenching activity was purified by three step process. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and Mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis revealed that the AHL degrading enzyme (82 kDa) demonstrates homology with the NCBI database hypothetical protein (Daci_4366) of D. acidovorans SPH-1. The purified AHL acylase of Delftia sp. VM4 demonstrated optimum activity at 20–40°C and pH 6.2 as well as AHL acylase type mode of action. It possesses similarity with an α/β-hydrolase fold protein, which makes it unique among the known AHL acylases with domains of the N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn)-hydrolase superfamily. In addition, the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for hydrolysis of the different AHL substrates by purified AHL-acylase were estimated. Here we present the studies that investigate the mode of action and kinetics of AHL-degradation by purified AHL acylase from Delftia sp. VM4. Significance We characterized an AHL-inactivating enzyme from Delftia sp. VM4, identified as AHL acylase showing distinctive similarity with α/β-hydrolase fold protein, described its biochemical and thermodynamic properties for the first time and

  11. Aii20J, a wide-spectrum thermostable N-acylhomoserine lactonase from the marine bacterium Tenacibaculum sp. 20J, can quench AHL-mediated acid resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mayer, C; Romero, M; Muras, A; Otero, A

    2015-11-01

    Acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are produced by many Gram-negative bacteria to coordinate gene expression in cellular density dependent mechanisms known as quorum sensing (QS). Since the disruption of the communication systems significantly reduces virulence, the inhibition of quorumsensing processes or quorum quenching (QQ) represents an interesting anti-pathogenic strategy to control bacterial infections. Escherichia coli does not produce AHLs but possesses an orphan AHL receptor, SdiA, which is thought to be able to sense the QS signals produced by other bacteria and controls important traits as the expression of glutamate-dependent acid resistance mechanism, therefore constituting a putative target for QQ. A novel AHL-lactonase, named Aii20J, has been identified, cloned and over expressed from the marine bacterium Tenacibaculum sp. strain 20 J presenting a wide-spectrum QQ activity. The enzyme, belonging to the metallo-β-lactamase family, shares less than 31 % identity with the lactonase AiiA from Bacillus spp. Aii20J presents a much higher specific activity than the Bacillus enzyme, maintains its activity after incubation at 100 ºC for 10 minutes, is resistant to protease K and α-chymotrypsin, and is unaffected by wide ranges of pH. The addition of Aii20J (20 μg/mL) to cultures of E. coli K-12 to which OC6-HSL was added resulted in a significant reduction in cell viability in comparison with the acidresistant cultures derived from the presence of the signal. Results confirm the interaction between AHLs and SdiA in E. coli for the expression of virulence-related genes and reveal the potential use of Aii20J as anti-virulence strategy against important bacterial pathogens and in other biotechnological applications.

  12. Aii20J, a wide-spectrum thermostable N-acylhomoserine lactonase from the marine bacterium Tenacibaculum sp. 20J, can quench AHL-mediated acid resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mayer, C; Romero, M; Muras, A; Otero, A

    2015-11-01

    Acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are produced by many Gram-negative bacteria to coordinate gene expression in cellular density dependent mechanisms known as quorum sensing (QS). Since the disruption of the communication systems significantly reduces virulence, the inhibition of quorumsensing processes or quorum quenching (QQ) represents an interesting anti-pathogenic strategy to control bacterial infections. Escherichia coli does not produce AHLs but possesses an orphan AHL receptor, SdiA, which is thought to be able to sense the QS signals produced by other bacteria and controls important traits as the expression of glutamate-dependent acid resistance mechanism, therefore constituting a putative target for QQ. A novel AHL-lactonase, named Aii20J, has been identified, cloned and over expressed from the marine bacterium Tenacibaculum sp. strain 20 J presenting a wide-spectrum QQ activity. The enzyme, belonging to the metallo-β-lactamase family, shares less than 31 % identity with the lactonase AiiA from Bacillus spp. Aii20J presents a much higher specific activity than the Bacillus enzyme, maintains its activity after incubation at 100 ºC for 10 minutes, is resistant to protease K and α-chymotrypsin, and is unaffected by wide ranges of pH. The addition of Aii20J (20 μg/mL) to cultures of E. coli K-12 to which OC6-HSL was added resulted in a significant reduction in cell viability in comparison with the acidresistant cultures derived from the presence of the signal. Results confirm the interaction between AHLs and SdiA in E. coli for the expression of virulence-related genes and reveal the potential use of Aii20J as anti-virulence strategy against important bacterial pathogens and in other biotechnological applications. PMID:26092757

  13. Gene Flow Across Genus Barriers – Conjugation of Dinoroseobacter shibae’s 191-kb Killer Plasmid into Phaeobacter inhibens and AHL-mediated Expression of Type IV Secretion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Patzelt, Diana; Michael, Victoria; Päuker, Orsola; Ebert, Matthias; Tielen, Petra; Jahn, Dieter; Tomasch, Jürgen; Petersen, Jörn; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Rhodobacteraceae harbor a conspicuous wealth of extrachromosomal replicons (ECRs) and therefore the exchange of genetic material via horizontal transfer has been supposed to be a major evolutionary driving force. Many plasmids in this group encode type IV secretion systems (T4SS) that are expected to mediate transfer of proteins and/or DNA into host cells, but no experimental evidence of either has yet been provided. Dinoroseobacter shibae, a species of the Roseobacter group within the Rhodobacteraceae family, contains five ECRs that are crucial for anaerobic growth, survival under starvation and the pathogenicity of this model organism. Here we tagged two syntenous but compatible RepABC-type plasmids of 191 and 126-kb size, each encoding a T4SS, with antibiotic resistance genes and demonstrated their conjugational transfer into a distantly related Roseobacter species, namely Phaeobacter inhibens. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis showed transfer of those replicons into the recipient both individually but also together documenting the efficiency of conjugation. We then studied the influence of externally added quorum sensing (QS) signals on the expression of the T4SS located on the sister plasmids. A QS deficient D. shibae null mutant (ΔluxI1) lacking synthesis of N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) was cultivated with a wide spectrum of chemically diverse long-chain AHLs. All AHLs with lengths of the acid side-chain ≥14 reverted the ΔluxI1 phenotype to wild-type. Expression of the T4SS was induced up to log2 ∼3fold above wild-type level. We hypothesize that conjugation in roseobacters is QS-controlled and that the QS system may detect a wide array of long-chain AHLs at the cell surface. PMID:27303368

  14. A proteomic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling responses to 3-oxo-octanoyl-homoserine lactone, a bacterial quorum-sensing signal

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Chunjuan; Liu, Fang; Zhao, Qian; Jia, Zhenhua; Song, Shuishan

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3OC8-HSL can change the expression of diverse proteins in Arabidopsis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3OC8-HSL responsive proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF-MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plant could have an extensive range of functional responses to bacterial AHL. -- Abstract: N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are a class of bacterial quorum-sensing (QS) signals that are commonly used by Gram-negative bacteria for cell-to-cell communication. Recently, it has become evident that AHLs can regulate plant root growth and trigger plant defense responses; however, little is known about the plant response mechanisms to bacterial QS signals. In this study, we used a proteomic approach to investigate the responses of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings to N-3-oxo-octanoyl-homoserine lactone (3OC8-HSL), a bacterial QS signal. The results revealed that the abundance of 53 protein spots was significantly altered; two thirds of these proteins were found to be up-regulated after 3OC8-HSL treatment. Thirty-four proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF-MS. These 3OC8-HSL-responsive proteins, in addition to one protein of unknown function, are implicated in a variety of physiological processes, including metabolism of carbohydrate and energy, protein biosynthesis and quality control systems, defense response and signal transduction and cytoskeleton remodeling. Our bioinformatic analysis indicated that the chloroplasts are the intracellular organelles most influenced by the exposure to 3OC8-HSL. Our data indicate that plants have an extensive range of functional responses to bacterial AHLs that may play important roles in the interaction between plants and bacteria.

  15. A genetically engineered whole-cell pigment-based bacterial biosensing system for quantification of N-butyryl homoserine lactone quorum sensing signal.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yang-Chun; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2009-09-15

    N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) is a widely conserved quorum sensing (QS) signal of gram-negative bacteria and has received attention in fighting against human diseases and environmental pollution. However, a method for quantifying AHL is lacking although it is urgently required for diagnosis and bioprocess manipulation. This work screened out an aromatics degrader Pseudomonas aeruginosa for biosensing system development, which produced a blue-green pigment regulated by the RhlI-RhlR QS system. By taking advantage of the recognition of N-butyryl homoserine lactone (BHL, the signal molecule of RhlI-RhlR QS system and an AHL) by the product of rhlR, a new whole-cell biosensor P. aeruginosa Delta rhlIR/pYC-rhlR (rhlI(-)rhlR(++)) was developed. It was constructed through abolishing its BHL production by in-frame deletion of rhlIR and over-expressing rhlR by introducing a multi-copy plasmid pYC-rhlR into Delta rhlIR. By using the pigment production which responded to exogenous BHL as biosensor output, BHL quantification in samples was simply done spectrophotometrically. Under optimum conditions, the calibration curve had the limit of detection (LOD), the 50% activation/effect concentration, the limit of quantification (LOQ), and the quantitative detection range of 1.3 nM, 2.77+/-0.45 microM, 5.7 nM and 0.11-49.7 microM, respectively. The biosensor output was stable, culture samples could be stored 10 days under -20 degrees C, and this sensing system was resistant to interferences by toxic aromatic pollutants. It was successfully applied to environmental samples even without extraction. The new whole-cell biosensing system provided a simple, stable, toxic pollutants-tolerant, and cost-effective tool for quantitative investigation of the QS signals' role in environmental processes.

  16. Paraoxonase 2 modulates a proapoptotic function in LS174T cells in response to quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shiyu; Luo, Yanwen; Bin He; Liu, Jie; Qian, Xi; Ni, Yingdong; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-07-01

    A mucus layer coats the gastrointestinal tract and serves as the first line of intestinal defense against infection. N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing molecules produced by gram-negative bacteria in the gut can influence the homeostasis of intestinal epithelium. In this study, we investigated the effects of two representative long- and short-chain AHLs, N-3-(oxododecanoyl)-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL) and N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), on cell viability and mucus secretion in LS174T cells. C12-HSL but not C4-HSL significantly decreased cell viability by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and activating cell apoptosis which led to a decrease in mucin expression. Pretreatment with lipid raft disruptor (Methyl-β-cyclodextrin, MβCD) and oxidative stress inhibitor (N-acetyl-L-cysteine, NAC) slightly rescued the viability of cells damaged by C12-HSL exposure, while the paraoxonase 2 (PON2) inhibitor (Triazolo[4,3-a]quinolone, TQ416) significantly affected recovering cells viability and mucin secretion. When LS174T cells were treated with C12-HSL and TQ416 simultaneously, TQ416 showed the maximal positive effect on cells viability. However, if cells were first treated with C12-HSL for 40 mins, and then TQ46 was added, the TQ416 had no effect on cell viability. These results suggest that the C12-HSL-acid process acts at an early step to activate apoptosis as part of C12-HSL's effect on intestinal mucus barrier function.

  17. Paraoxonase 2 modulates a proapoptotic function in LS174T cells in response to quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shiyu; Luo, Yanwen; Bin He; Liu, Jie; Qian, Xi; Ni, Yingdong; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-01

    A mucus layer coats the gastrointestinal tract and serves as the first line of intestinal defense against infection. N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing molecules produced by gram-negative bacteria in the gut can influence the homeostasis of intestinal epithelium. In this study, we investigated the effects of two representative long- and short-chain AHLs, N-3-(oxododecanoyl)-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL) and N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), on cell viability and mucus secretion in LS174T cells. C12-HSL but not C4-HSL significantly decreased cell viability by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and activating cell apoptosis which led to a decrease in mucin expression. Pretreatment with lipid raft disruptor (Methyl-β-cyclodextrin, MβCD) and oxidative stress inhibitor (N-acetyl-L-cysteine, NAC) slightly rescued the viability of cells damaged by C12-HSL exposure, while the paraoxonase 2 (PON2) inhibitor (Triazolo[4,3-a]quinolone, TQ416) significantly affected recovering cells viability and mucin secretion. When LS174T cells were treated with C12-HSL and TQ416 simultaneously, TQ416 showed the maximal positive effect on cells viability. However, if cells were first treated with C12-HSL for 40 mins, and then TQ46 was added, the TQ416 had no effect on cell viability. These results suggest that the C12-HSL-acid process acts at an early step to activate apoptosis as part of C12-HSL's effect on intestinal mucus barrier function. PMID:27364593

  18. Paraoxonase 2 modulates a proapoptotic function in LS174T cells in response to quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shiyu; Luo, Yanwen; Bin He; Liu, Jie; Qian, Xi; Ni, Yingdong; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-01

    A mucus layer coats the gastrointestinal tract and serves as the first line of intestinal defense against infection. N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing molecules produced by gram-negative bacteria in the gut can influence the homeostasis of intestinal epithelium. In this study, we investigated the effects of two representative long- and short-chain AHLs, N-3-(oxododecanoyl)-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL) and N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), on cell viability and mucus secretion in LS174T cells. C12-HSL but not C4-HSL significantly decreased cell viability by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and activating cell apoptosis which led to a decrease in mucin expression. Pretreatment with lipid raft disruptor (Methyl-β-cyclodextrin, MβCD) and oxidative stress inhibitor (N-acetyl-L-cysteine, NAC) slightly rescued the viability of cells damaged by C12-HSL exposure, while the paraoxonase 2 (PON2) inhibitor (Triazolo[4,3-a]quinolone, TQ416) significantly affected recovering cells viability and mucin secretion. When LS174T cells were treated with C12-HSL and TQ416 simultaneously, TQ416 showed the maximal positive effect on cells viability. However, if cells were first treated with C12-HSL for 40 mins, and then TQ46 was added, the TQ416 had no effect on cell viability. These results suggest that the C12-HSL-acid process acts at an early step to activate apoptosis as part of C12-HSL’s effect on intestinal mucus barrier function. PMID:27364593

  19. Combined Effects of Curcumin and (-)-Epigallocatechin Gallate on Inhibition of N-Acylhomoserine Lactone-Mediated Biofilm Formation in Wastewater Bacteria from Membrane Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2015-11-01

    This work investigated the potential of curcumin (CCM) and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to inhibit N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated biofilm formation in gramnegative bacteria from membrane bioreactor (MBR) activated sludge. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of CCM alone against all the tested bacteria were 200-350 μg/ml, whereas those for EGCG were 300-600 μg/ml. Biofilm formation at one-half MICs indicated that CCM and EGCG alone respectively inhibited 52-68% and 59-78% of biofilm formation among all the tested bacteria. However, their combination resulted in 95-99% of biofilm reduction. Quorum sensing inhibition (QSI) assay with known biosensor strains demonstrated that CCM inhibited the expression of C4 and C6 homoserine lactones (HSLs)-mediated phenotypes, whereas EGCG inhibited C4, C6, and C10 HSLs-based phenotypes. The Center for Disease Control biofilm reactor containing a multispecies culture of nine bacteria with onehalf MIC of CCM (150 μg/ml) and EGCG (275 μg/ml) showed 17 and 14 μg/cm(2) of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on polyvinylidene fluoride membrane surface, whereas their combination (100 μg/ml of each) exhibited much lower EPS content (3 μg/cm(2)). Confocal laser scanning microscopy observations also illustrated that the combination of compounds tremendously reduced the biofilm thickness. The combined effect of CCM with EGCG clearly reveals for the first time the enhanced inhibition of AHL-mediated biofilm formation in bacteria from activated sludge. Thus, such combined natural QSI approach could be used for the inhibition of membrane biofouling in MBRs treating wastewaters.

  20. Mucin 3 is involved in intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis via N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone-induced suppression of Akt phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Ryoko; Tanaka, Shinya; Joe, Ga-Hyun; Maseda, Hideaki; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Ohnishi, Junji; Ishizuka, Satoshi; Shimizu, Hidehisa; Miyazaki, Hitoshi

    2014-07-15

    N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL) are quorum-sensing molecules in bacteria that play important roles in regulating virulence gene expression in pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The present study compared responses between undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells to N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL). A low concentration of 3-oxo-C12-HSL (30 μM) is sufficient to reduce viability accompanied by apoptosis via the suppression of phosphorylation by Akt in undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. The suppression of Akt phosphorylation appears specific in 3-oxo-C12-HSL, because other AHLs did not influence the phosphorylation status of Akt. The reduced viability induced by 3-oxo-C12-HSL was partially recovered by constitutively active Akt overexpression in undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Since mucin is considered a vital component of the gut barrier, we investigated whether mucin protects cellular functions induced by 3-oxo-C12-HSL in undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. The results showed that mucin protected undifferentiated Caco-2 cells from apoptosis induced by 3-oxo-C12-HSL. 3-Oxo-C12-HSL did not induce cell death in differentiated Caco-2 cells that expressed higher levels of mucin 3 (MUC3) than undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. In addition, 3-oxo-C12-HSL promoted cell death in undifferentiated Caco-2 cells transfected with MUC3 siRNA and reduced MUC3 expression in undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Therefore, MUC3 might be responsible for the survival of undifferentiated intestinal epithelial cells in the presence of 3-oxo-C12-HSL through regulating Akt phosphorylation. In conclusion, 3-oxo-C12-HSL might influence the survival of undifferentiated intestinal epithelial cells as well as interactions between these cells and pathogens.

  1. Influence and mechanism of N-(3-oxooxtanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (C8-oxo-HSL) on biofilm behaviors at early stage.

    PubMed

    Xia, Siqing; Zhou, Lijie; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Li, Jixiang

    2012-01-01

    N-acyl-homoserines quenching, enzymatic quenching of bacterial quorum sensing, has recently applied to mitigate biofilm in membrane bioreactor. However, the effect of AHLs on the behavior of biofilm formation is still sparse. In this study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm was formed on ultra-filtration membrane under a series of N-(3-oxooxtanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (Cs-oxo-HSL) concentrations. Diffusing C8-oxo-HSL increased the growth rate of cells on biofilm where the concentration of C8-oxo-HSL was over 10(-7) g/L. The C8-oxo-HSL gradient had no observable influence on cell density and extracellular polymeric substances of biofilm with over 10(-7) g/L C8-oxo-HSL. Surprisingly, 10(-11)-10(-8) g/L of C8-oxo-HSL had no effect on cell growth in liquid culture. The cell analysis demonstrated that the quorum sensing system might enhance the growth of neighboring cells in contact with surfaces into biofilm and may influence the structure and organization of biofilm.

  2. Chania multitudinisentens gen. nov., sp. nov., an N-acyl-homoserine-lactone-producing bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae isolated from landfill site soil.

    PubMed

    Ee, Robson; Madhaiyan, Munusamy; Ji, Lianghui; Lim, Yan-Lue; Nor, Nuruddin Muhammad; Tee, Kok-Keng; Chen, Jian-Woon; Yin, Wai-Fong

    2016-06-01

    Phylogenetic and taxonomic characterization was performed for bacterium RB-25T, which was isolated from a soil sample collected in a former municipal landfill site in Puchong, Malaysia. Growth occurred at 20-37 °C at pH 5-8 but not in the presence of 9 % (w/v) NaCl or higher. The principal fatty acids were C16:0, C18:1ω7c and summed feature 3 (C16:1ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH). Ubiquinone-8 was the only isoprenoid quinone detected. Polar lipid analysis revealed the presence of phospholipid, phosphoaminolipid, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and one unidentified aminolipid. DNA G+C content was 50.9 mol% phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain RB-25T formed a distinct lineage within the family Enterobacteriaceae of the class Gammaproteobacteria. It exhibited a low level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with its phylogenetic neighbours Pantoea rwandensis LMG 26275T (96.6 %), Rahnella aquatilis CIP 78.65T (96.5 %), Pectobacterium betavasculorum ATCC 43762T (96.4 %), Pantoea rodasii LMG 26273T (96.3 %), Gibbsiella dentisursi NUM 1720T (96.3 %) and Serratia glossinae C1T (96.2 %). Multilocus sequence analyses based on fusA, pyrG, rplB, rpoB and sucA sequences showed a clear distinction of strain RB-25T from the most closely related genera. Isolate RB-25T could also be distinguished from members of these genera by a combination of the DNA G+C content, respiratory quinone system, fatty acid profile, polar lipid composition and other phenotypic features. Strain RB-25T represents a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Chaniamultitudinisentens gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RB-25T (=DSM 28811T=LMG 28304T). PMID:26978486

  3. Genome sequence of Novosphingobium sp. strain Rr 2-17, a nopaline crown gall-associated bacterium isolated from Vitis vinifera L. grapevine.

    PubMed

    Gan, Han Ming; Chew, Teong Han; Hudson, André O; Savka, Michael A

    2012-09-01

    Novosphingobium sp. strain Rr 2-17 is an N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-producing bacterium isolated from the crown gall tumor of a grapevine. To our knowledge, this is the first draft genome announcement of a plant-associated strain from the genus Novosphingobium. PMID:22933764

  4. Dynamics of AHL mediated quorum sensing under flow and non-flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Andrea; Megerle, Judith A.; Kuttler, Christina; Müller, Johannes; Aguilar, Claudio; Eberl, Leo; Hense, Burkhard A.; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2012-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) describes the capability of microbes to communicate with each other by the aid of small molecules. Here we investigate the dynamics of QS-regulated gene expression induced by acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) in Pseudomonas putida IsoF containing a green fluorescent protein-based AHL reporter. The fluorescence time course of individual colonies is monitored following the external addition of a defined AHL concentration to cells which had previously reached the QS-inactive state in AHL-free medium. Using a microfluidic setup the experiment is performed both under flow and non-flow conditions. We find that without supplying external AHL gene expression is induced without flow while flow suppresses the induction. Both without and with flow, at a low AHL concentration the fluorescence onset is significantly delayed while fluorescence starts to increase directly upon the addition of AHL at a high concentration. The differences between no flow and flow can be accounted for using a two-compartment model. This indicates AHL accumulation in a volume which is not affected by the flow. The experiments furthermore show significant cell-to-cell and colony-to-colony variability which is discussed in the context of a compartmentalized QS mechanism.

  5. Identification of extracellular N-acylhomoserine lactone acylase from a Streptomyces sp. and its application to quorum quenching.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Yang; Kang, Hye-Ok; Jang, Hak-Sun; Lee, Jung-Kee; Koo, Bon-Tag; Yum, Do-Young

    2005-05-01

    N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) play an important role in regulating virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. Recently, the enzymatic inactivation of AHLs, which can be used as antibacterial targets, has been identified in several soil bacteria. In this study, strain M664, identified as a Streptomyces sp., was found to secrete an AHL-degrading enzyme into a culture medium. The ahlM gene for AHL degradation from Streptomyces sp. strain M664 was cloned, expressed heterologously in Streptomyces lividans, and purified. The enzyme was found to be a heterodimeric protein with subunits of approximately 60 kDa and 23 kDa. A comparison of AhlM with known AHL-acylases, Ralstonia strain XJ12B AiiD and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 PvdQ, revealed 35% and 32% identities in the deduced amino acid sequences, respectively. However, AhlM was most similar to the cyclic lipopeptide acylase from Streptomyces sp. strain FERM BP-5809, exhibiting 93% identity. A mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that AhlM hydrolyzed the amide bond of AHL, releasing homoserine lactone. AhlM exhibited a higher deacylation activity toward AHLs with long acyl chains rather than short acyl chains. Interestingly, AhlM was also found to be capable of degrading penicillin G by deacylation, showing that AhlM has a broad substrate specificity. The addition of AhlM to the growth medium reduced the accumulation of AHLs and decreased the production of virulence factors, including elastase, total protease, and LasA, in P. aeruginosa. Accordingly, these results suggest that AHL-acylase, AhlM could be effectively applied to the control of AHL-mediated pathogenicity. PMID:15870355

  6. Characterization of N-Acylhomoserine Lactones Produced by Bacteria Isolated from Industrial Cooling Water Systems

    PubMed Central

    Okutsu, Noriya; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Xie, Xiaonan; Kato, Norihiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2015-01-01

    The cooling water systems are used to remove heat generated in the various industries. Biofouling of the cooling water systems causes blocking of condenser pipes and the heat exchanger tubes. In many Gram-negative bacteria, N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) are used as quorum-sensing signal molecule and associated with biofilm formation. To investigate the relationship between quorum sensing and biofouling in the cooling water system, we isolated a total of 192 bacterial strains from the five cooling water systems, and screened for AHL production. Seven isolates stimulated AHL-mediated purple pigment production in AHL reporter strain Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 or VIR07. Based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences, AHL-producing isolates were assigned to Aeromonas hydrophila, Lysobacter sp., Methylobacterium oryzae, and Bosea massiliensis. To the best of our knowledge, B. massiliensis and Lysobacter sp. have not been reported as AHL-producing species in the previous researches. AHLs extracted from the culture supernatants of B. massiliensis and Lysobacter sp. were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. AHLs produced by B. massiliensis were assigned as N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL), and N-(3-oxooctanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C8-HSL). AHLs produced by Lysobacter sp. were assigned as N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) and N-(3-oxodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C10-HSL). This is the first report of identification of AHLs produced by B. massiliensis and Lysobacter sp. isolated from the cooling water system. PMID:26729121

  7. Characterization of N-Acylhomoserine Lactones Produced by Bacteria Isolated from Industrial Cooling Water Systems.

    PubMed

    Okutsu, Noriya; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Xie, Xiaonan; Kato, Norihiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2015-01-01

    The cooling water systems are used to remove heat generated in the various industries. Biofouling of the cooling water systems causes blocking of condenser pipes and the heat exchanger tubes. In many Gram-negative bacteria, N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) are used as quorum-sensing signal molecule and associated with biofilm formation. To investigate the relationship between quorum sensing and biofouling in the cooling water system, we isolated a total of 192 bacterial strains from the five cooling water systems, and screened for AHL production. Seven isolates stimulated AHL-mediated purple pigment production in AHL reporter strain Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 or VIR07. Based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences, AHL-producing isolates were assigned to Aeromonas hydrophila, Lysobacter sp., Methylobacterium oryzae, and Bosea massiliensis. To the best of our knowledge, B. massiliensis and Lysobacter sp. have not been reported as AHL-producing species in the previous researches. AHLs extracted from the culture supernatants of B. massiliensis and Lysobacter sp. were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. AHLs produced by B. massiliensis were assigned as N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL), and N-(3-oxooctanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C8-HSL). AHLs produced by Lysobacter sp. were assigned as N-decanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) and N-(3-oxodecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C10-HSL). This is the first report of identification of AHLs produced by B. massiliensis and Lysobacter sp. isolated from the cooling water system.

  8. Quorum Sensing Activity of Mesorhizobium sp. F7 Isolated from Potable Water

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Pei-Ling; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    We isolated a bacterial isolate (F7) from potable water. The strain was identified as Mesorhizobium sp. by 16S rDNA gene phylogenetic analysis and screened for N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) production by an AHL biosensor. The AHL profile of the isolate was further analyzed using high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) which confirmed the production of multiple AHLs, namely, N-3-oxo-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C8-HSL) and N-3-oxo-decanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C10-HSL). These findings will open the perspective to study the function of these AHLs in plant-microbe interactions. PMID:25177734

  9. Tandem Mass Spectrometry Detection of Quorum Sensing Activity in Multidrug Resistant Clinical Isolate Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Cheng, Huey Jia; Chen, Jian Woon; Yin, Wai-Fong; Ngeow, Yun Fong

    2014-01-01

    Many Proteobacteria communicate via production followed by response of quorum sensing molecules, namely, N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). These molecules consist of a lactone moiety with N-acyl side chain with various chain lengths and degrees of saturation at C-3 position. AHL-dependent QS is often associated with regulation of diverse bacterial phenotypes including the expression of virulence factors. With the use of biosensor and high resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, the AHL production of clinical isolate A. baumannii 4KT was studied. Production of short chain AHL, namely, N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL) and N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL), was detected. PMID:25101326

  10. Detection of N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone in mice infected with Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O8.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Christoph A; Bach, Alexandra; Eberl, Leo; Steidle, Anette; Heesemann, Jürgen

    2003-11-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica synthesizes N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules via the LuxR-LuxI homologues YenR-YenI. In this study we checked two prototypes of mouse-virulent Y. enterocolitica serotype O8 strains WA-314 and 8081 for AHL production in vitro and in vivo (mouse infection model). We used thin-layer chromatography in combination with the Escherichia coli AHL biosensor to identify the AHL species produced. We detected only OHHL [N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone] and not HHL (N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone) produced by Y. enterocolitica O8 in culture supernatant or infected mouse tissue. This is the first report demonstrating AHL production by yersiniae during infection.

  11. In vitro quenching of fish pathogen Edwardsiella tarda AHL production using marine bacterium Tenacibaculum sp. strain 20J cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Romero, Manuel; Muras, Andrea; Mayer, Celia; Buján, Noemí; Magariños, Beatriz; Otero, Ana

    2014-04-01

    Quorum quenching (QQ) has become an interesting alternative for solving the problem of bacterial antibiotic resistance, especially in the aquaculture industry, since many species of fish-pathogenic bacteria control their virulence factors through quorum sensing (QS) systems mediated by N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). In a screening for bacterial strains with QQ activity in different marine environments, Tenacibaculum sp. strain 20J was identified and selected for its high degradation activity against a wide range of AHLs. In this study, the QQ activity of live cells and crude cell extracts (CCEs) of strain 20J was characterized and the possibilities of the use of CCEs of this strain to quench the production of AHLs in cultures of the fish pathogen Edwardsiella tarda ACC35.1 was explored. E. tarda ACC35.1 produces N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL) and N-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (OC6-HSL). This differs from profiles registered for other E. tarda strains and indicates an important intra-specific variability in AHL production in this species. The CCEs of strain 20J presented a wide-spectrum QQ activity and, unlike Bacillus thuringiensis serovar Berliner ATCC10792 CCEs, were effective in eliminating the AHLs produced in E. tarda ACC35.1 cultures. The fast and wide-spectrum AHL-degradation activity shown by this member of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroidetes group consolidates this strain as a promising candidate for the control of AHL-based QS pathogens, especially in the marine fish farming industry.

  12. Effects of dietary Lactobacillus plantarum and AHL lactonase on the control of Aeromonas hydrophila infection in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenshu; Ran, Chao; Liu, Zhi; Gao, Qian; Xu, Shude; Ringø, Einar; Myklebust, Reidar; Gu, Zemao; Zhou, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    This study addressed the effects of dietary Lactobacillus plantarum or/and N-acylated homoserine lactonase (AHL lactonase) on controlling Aeromonas  hydrophila infection in juvenile hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus♀ × O. aureus ♂). Fish were fed Lb. plantarum subsp. plantarum strain JCM1149 (10(8)  CFU/g feed) or/and AHL lactonase AIO6 (4 U/g) and were exposed to a chronic challenge of A. hydrophila NJ-1 (10(5)  cells/mL) for 14 days. Intestinal (foregut) alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activities were evaluated 1 day post challenge to reflect the resistance of fish against A. hydrophila infection. Parallel groups of fish with the same dietary assignments while unchallenged were also included to investigate the effect of dietary Lb. plantarum or/and AIO6 supplementation on gut health of tilapia. The results showed that IAP activity was significantly lower in fish fed with diets supplemented with Lb. plantarum JCM1149 or the combination of Lb. plantarum JCM1149 and AIO6, indicating enhanced resistance against A. hydrophila. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images of foregut revealed damage caused by A. hydrophila NJ-1, but dietary Lb. plantarumJCM1149 or/and AIO6 significantly alleviated the damages. Compared to the fish immersed in A. hydrophila NJ-1, dietary Lb. plantarum JCM1149 or AIO6 could maintain the microvilli length in the foregut of tilapia. However, among the unchallenged groups of fish, the microvilli length in the foregut of tilapia fed AIO6 (singly or combination) and the microvilli density of tilapia fed AIO6 (singly) were significantly lower than those of the control, though the microvilli density in the combination treatment was significantly improved. Additionally, the dietary Lb. plantarum JCM1149 could down-regulate the expression of stress-related gene in the gut after the acute phase. In conclusion, the dietary Lb. plantarum JCM1149 is recommended to control the A. hydrophila infection in

  13. Isolation of AHL-degrading bacteria from micro-algal cultures and their impact on algal growth and on virulence of Vibrio campbellii to prawn larvae.

    PubMed

    Pande, Gde Sasmita Julyantoro; Natrah, Fatin Mohd Ikhsan; Flandez, Ace Vincent Bravo; Kumar, Uday; Niu, Yufeng; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-12-01

    Inactivation of quorum sensing (QS) signal molecules, such as acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) of pathogenic bacteria, has been proposed as a novel method to combat bacterial diseases in aquaculture. Despite the importance of micro-algae for aquaculture, AHL degradation by bacteria associated with micro-algal cultures has thus far not been investigated. In this study, we isolated Pseudomonas sp. NFMI-T and Bacillus sp. NFMI-C from open cultures of the micro-algae Tetraselmis suecica and Chaetoceros muelleri, respectively. An AHL degradation assay showed that either monocultures or co-cultures of the isolates were able to degrade the AHL N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone. In contrast, only Bacillus sp. NFMI-C was able to inactivate N-hydroxybutanoyl-L-homoserine lactone, the AHL produced by Vibrio campbellii. The isolated bacteria were able to persist for up to 3 weeks in conventionalized micro-algal cultures, indicating that they were able to establish and maintain themselves within open algal cultures. Using gnotobiotic algal cultures, we found that the isolates did not affect growth of the micro-algae from which they were isolated, whereas a mixture of both isolates increased the growth of Tetraselmis and decreased the growth of Chaetoceros. Finally, addition of Bacillus sp. NFMI-C to the rearing water of giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) larvae significantly improved survival of the larvae when challenged with pathogenic V. campbellii, whereas it had no effect on larval growth. PMID:26344339

  14. Crystallization and rhenium MAD phasing of the acyl-homoserinelactone synthase EsaI

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.T.; Murphy IV, Frank V.; Gould, Ty A.; Jambeck, Per; Val, Dale L.; Cronan, Jr., John E.; Beck von Bodman, Susan; Churchill, Mair E.A.

    2009-04-22

    Acyl-homoserine-L-lactones (AHLs) are diffusible chemical signals that are required for virulence of many Gram-negative bacteria. AHLs are produced by AHL synthases from two substrates, S-adenosyl-L-methionine and acyl-acyl carrier protein. The AHL synthase EsaI, which is homologous to the AHL synthases from other pathogenic bacterial species, has been crystallized in the primitive tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.40, c = 47.33 {angstrom}. The structure was solved by multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction with a novel use of the rhenium anomalous signal. The rhenium-containing structure has been refined to a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom} and the perrhenate ion binding sites and liganding residues have been identified.

  15. Molecular identification of aiiA homologous gene from endophytic Enterobacter species and in silico analysis of putative tertiary structure of AHL-lactonase.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P S; Rai, V Ravishankar

    2014-01-01

    The aiiA homologous gene known to encode AHL- lactonase enzyme which hydrolyze the N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) quorum sensing signaling molecules produced by Gram negative bacteria. In this study, the degradation of AHL molecules was determined by cell-free lysate of endophytic Enterobacter species. The percentage of quorum quenching was confirmed and quantified by HPLC method (p<0.0001). Amplification and sequence BLAST analysis showed the presence of aiiA homologous gene in endophytic Enterobacter asburiae VT65, Enterobacter aerogenes VT66 and Enterobacter ludwigii VT70 strains. Sequence alignment analysis revealed the presence of two zinc binding sites, "HXHXDH" motif as well as tyrosine residue at the position 194. Based on known template available at Swiss-Model, putative tertiary structure of AHL-lactonase was constructed. The result showed that novel endophytic strains of Enterobacter genera encode the novel aiiA homologous gene and its structural importance for future study.

  16. Quorum Sensing Signal Synthesis May Represent a Selective Advantage Independent of Its Role in Regulation of Bioluminescence in Vibrio fischeri

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Grace; Kimyon, Önder; Manefield, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of biological signalling systems and apparently altruistic or cooperative traits in diverse organisms has required selection against the subversive tendencies of self-interested biological entities. The bacterial signalling and response system known as quorum sensing or Acylated Homoserine Lactone (AHL) mediated gene expression is thought to have evolved through kin selection. In this in vitro study on the model quorum sensing bioluminescent marine symbiont Vibrio fischeri, competition and long-term sub culturing experiments suggest that selection for AHL synthesis (encoded by the AHL synthase gene luxI) is independent of the quorum sensing regulated phenotype (bioluminescence encoded by luxCDABE). Whilst results support the hypothesis that signal response (AHL binding and transcriptional activation encoded by the luxR gene) is maintained through indirect fitness benefits (kin selection), signal synthesis is maintained in the V. fischeri genome over evolutionary time through direct fitness benefits at the individual level from an unknown function. PMID:23825662

  17. Draft genome sequence of Citrobacter freundii strain ST2, a γ-proteobacterium that produces N-acylhomoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhou, Jin

    2015-12-01

    Citrobacter freundii strain ST2, isolated from the algae bloom sample, possesses an N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) production activity that secretes short-chain AHL molecules. In this study, we sequenced the complete genome of C. freundii strain ST2 to understand the molecular regulation of the AHL system and to search for the AHL gene in this bacterium. The results show that the genome size is 4.89 Mb with a G + C content of 51.96%. 4626 function proteins were predicted and 3647 proteins were assigned to COG functional categories. A predicted AHL-coding gene LuxR was found at contig 4 and the length was 1541 bp. The strain temporary deposited at Shenzhen Public Platform of Screening & Application of Marine Microbial Resources (Shenzhen, China), and the genome sequence can be accessed at GenBank under the accession no. LJSQ00000000.

  18. Whole-Genome Analysis of Quorum-Sensing Burkholderia sp. Strain A9

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian Woon; Tee, Kok Keng; Chang, Chien-Yi; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Xin-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia spp. rely on N-acyl homoserine lactone as quorum-sensing signal molecules which coordinate their phenotype at the population level. In this work, we present the whole genome of Burkholderia sp. strain A9, which enables the discovery of its N-acyl homoserine lactone synthase gene. PMID:25745000

  19. AmiE, a Novel N-Acylhomoserine Lactone Acylase Belonging to the Amidase Family, from the Activated-Sludge Isolate Acinetobacter sp. Strain Ooi24

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Seiji; Yasumoto, Sera; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2014-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as quorum-sensing signal molecules. We have reported that Acinetobacter strains isolated from activated sludge have AHL-degrading activity. In this study, we cloned the amiE gene as an AHL-degradative gene from the genomic library of Acinetobacter sp. strain Ooi24. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that AmiE functions as an AHL acylase, which hydrolyzes the amide bond of AHL. AmiE showed a high level of degrading activity against AHLs with long acyl chains but no activity against AHLs with acyl chains shorter than eight carbons. AmiE showed homology with a member of the amidases (EC 3.5.1.4) but not with any known AHL acylase enzymes. An amino acid sequence of AmiE from Ooi24 showed greater than 99% identities with uncharacterized proteins from Acinetobacter ursingii CIP 107286 and Acinetobacter sp. strain CIP 102129, but it was not found in the draft or complete genome sequences of other Acinetobacter strains. The presence of transposase-like genes around the amiE genes of these three Acinetobacter strains suggests that amiE is transferred by a putative transposon. Furthermore, the expression of AmiE in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 reduced AHL accumulation and elastase activity, which were regulated by AHL-mediated quorum sensing. PMID:25172868

  20. A simple, rapid, sensitive method detecting homoserine lactone (HSL)-related compounds in microbial extracts.

    PubMed

    Singh, Maya Prakash; Greenstein, Michael

    2006-04-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive microtiter plate method detecting N-acyl homoserine lactone (HSL)-related compounds was established using an Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain harboring a traG::lacZ/traR reporter gene responsive to HSLs. This strain did not produce its own HSL, but the traG::lacZ reporter gene was induced only when its transcription activator TraR detected a cognate exogenous HSL. Therefore, the assay was expected to be highly specific for HSL-related compounds. Induction of the reporter gene, leading to production of beta-galactosidase enzyme, was measured by using two different beta-galactosidase substrates, X-gal and Galacton-Star, for colorimetric and chemiluminometric detection, respectively. The screen was validated in both the 96-well and 384-well plate formats, and extracts derived from 696 different microbial isolates, mostly unidentified actinomycetes isolated from diverse locations, were tested. Crude extracts of 81 (11.64%) cultures tested positive for HSL-related compounds, and an additional 34 (4.8%) crude extracts showed a moderate to weak signal for HSLs. Data from the fractionated samples, however, suggested a much higher prevalence of HSL signals in these extracts. Of 144 crude extracts fractionated into 10 individual samples at a 10x concentration, 72 (50%) cultures tested positive for HSLs. Six cultures were active only in the crude extract, 18 were active both in crude and one or more of their fractions, and an additional 48 were active in just one or more of their fractions. This finding may be the first to suggest such a high prevalence of HSL-signals found in nature, and a large number of actinomycetes in our collection appeared to produce HSL-related compounds.

  1. Structural and Mechanistic Roles of Novel Chemical Ligands on the SdiA Quorum-Sensing Transcription Regulator

    DOE PAGES

    Nguyen, Y.; Nguyen, Nam X.; Rogers, Jamie L.; Liao, Jun; MacMillan, John B.; Jiang, Youxing; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2015-05-19

    Bacteria engage in chemical signaling, termed quorum sensing (QS), to mediate intercellular communication, mimicking multicellular organisms. The LuxR family of QS transcription factors regulates gene expression, coordinating population behavior by sensing endogenous acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). However, some bacteria (such as Escherichia coli) do not produce AHLs. These LuxR orphans sense exogenous AHLs but also regulate transcription in the absence of AHLs. Importantly, this AHL-independent regulatory mechanism is still largely unknown. Here we present several structures of one such orphan LuxR-type protein, SdiA, from enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), in the presence and absence of AHL. SdiA is actually not inmore » an apo state without AHL but is regulated by a previously unknown endogenous ligand, 1-octanoyl-rac-glycerol (OCL), which is ubiquitously found throughout the tree of life and serves as an energy source, signaling molecule, and substrate for membrane biogenesis. While exogenous AHL renders to SdiA higher stability and DNA binding affinity, OCL may function as a chemical chaperone placeholder that stabilizes SdiA, allowing for basal activity. Structural comparison between SdiA-AHL and SdiA-OCL complexes provides crucial mechanistic insights into the ligand regulation of AHL-dependent and -independent function of LuxR-type proteins. Importantly, in addition to its contribution to basic science, this work has implications for public health, inasmuch as the SdiA signaling system aids the deadly human pathogen EHEC to adapt to a commensal lifestyle in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of cattle, its main reservoir. These studies open exciting and novel avenues to control shedding of this human pathogen in the environment. IMPORTANCE Quorum sensing refers to bacterial chemical signaling. The QS acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals are recognized by LuxR-type receptors that regulate gene transcription. However, some bacteria have orphan Lux

  2. Structural and Mechanistic Roles of Novel Chemical Ligands on the SdiA Quorum-Sensing Transcription Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Y.; Nguyen, Nam X.; Rogers, Jamie L.; Liao, Jun; MacMillan, John B.; Jiang, Youxing; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2015-05-19

    Bacteria engage in chemical signaling, termed quorum sensing (QS), to mediate intercellular communication, mimicking multicellular organisms. The LuxR family of QS transcription factors regulates gene expression, coordinating population behavior by sensing endogenous acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). However, some bacteria (such as Escherichia coli) do not produce AHLs. These LuxR orphans sense exogenous AHLs but also regulate transcription in the absence of AHLs. Importantly, this AHL-independent regulatory mechanism is still largely unknown. Here we present several structures of one such orphan LuxR-type protein, SdiA, from enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), in the presence and absence of AHL. SdiA is actually not in an apo state without AHL but is regulated by a previously unknown endogenous ligand, 1-octanoyl-rac-glycerol (OCL), which is ubiquitously found throughout the tree of life and serves as an energy source, signaling molecule, and substrate for membrane biogenesis. While exogenous AHL renders to SdiA higher stability and DNA binding affinity, OCL may function as a chemical chaperone placeholder that stabilizes SdiA, allowing for basal activity. Structural comparison between SdiA-AHL and SdiA-OCL complexes provides crucial mechanistic insights into the ligand regulation of AHL-dependent and -independent function of LuxR-type proteins. Importantly, in addition to its contribution to basic science, this work has implications for public health, inasmuch as the SdiA signaling system aids the deadly human pathogen EHEC to adapt to a commensal lifestyle in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of cattle, its main reservoir. These studies open exciting and novel avenues to control shedding of this human pathogen in the environment. IMPORTANCE Quorum sensing refers to bacterial chemical signaling. The QS acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals are recognized by LuxR-type receptors that regulate gene transcription. However, some bacteria have orphan LuxR-type receptors and

  3. Quorum sensing in Serratia.

    PubMed

    Van Houdt, Rob; Givskov, Michael; Michiels, Chris W

    2007-07-01

    Many bacteria use cell-cell communication to monitor their population density, synchronize their behaviour and socially interact. This communication results in a coordinated gene regulation and is generally called quorum sensing. In gram-negative bacteria, the most common quorum signal molecules are acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), although other low-molecular-mass signalling molecules have been described such as Autoinducer-2 (AI-2). The phenotypes that are regulated in Serratia species by means of AHLs are remarkably diverse and of profound biological and ecological significance, and often interconnected with other global regulators. Furthermore, AHL- and AI-2-mediated systems (less profoundly studied) are continuously being discovered and explored in Serratia spp., many having interesting twists on the basic theme. Therefore, this review will highlight the current known quorum sensing systems in Serratia spp., including the important nosocomial pathogen Serratia marcescens.

  4. Novel linear polymers able to inhibit bacterial quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Cavaleiro, Eliana; Duarte, Ana Sofia; Esteves, Ana Cristina; Correia, António; Whitcombe, Michael J; Piletska, Elena V; Piletsky, Sergey A; Chianella, Iva

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial phenotypes, such as biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance and virulence expression, are associated with quorum sensing. Quorum sensing is a density-dependent regulatory system of gene expression controlled by specific signal molecules, such as N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), produced and released by bacteria. This study reports the development of linear polymers capable to attenuate quorum sensing by adsorption of AHLs. Linear polymers were synthesized using MMA as backbone monomer and methacrylic acid and itaconic acid as functional monomers. Two different quorum sensing-controlled phenotypes, Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence and Aeromonas hydrophila biofilm formation, were evaluated to test the polymers' efficiency. Results showed that both phenotypes were significantly affected by the polymers, with the itaconic acid-containing material being more effective than the methacrylic acid one. The polymer inhibitory effects were reverted by the addition of lactones, confirming attenuation of quorum sensing through sequestration of signal molecules. The polymers also showed no cytotoxicity when tested using a mammalian cell line.

  5. The plant pathogen Pantoea ananatis produces N-acylhomoserine lactone and causes center rot disease of onion by quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Yuta; Yamazaki, Go; Ishida, Akio; Kato, Norihiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2007-11-01

    A number of gram-negative bacteria have a quorum-sensing system and produce N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL) that they use them as a quorum-sensing signal molecule. Pantoea ananatis is reported as a common colonist of wheat heads at ripening and causes center rot of onion. In this study, we demonstrated that P. ananatis SK-1 produced two AHLs, N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL) and N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL). We cloned the AHL-synthase gene (eanI) and AHL-receptor gene (eanR) and revealed that the deduced amino acid sequence of EanI/EanR showed high identity to those of EsaI/EsaR from P. stewartii. EanR repressed the ean box sequence and the addition of AHLs resulted in derepression of ean box. Inactivation of the chromosomal eanI gene in SK-1 caused disruption of exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis, biofilm formation, and infection of onion leaves, which were recovered by adding exogenous 3-oxo-C6-HSL. These results demonstrated that the quorum-sensing system involved the biosynthesis of EPS, biofilm formation, and infection of onion leaves in P. ananatis SK-1.

  6. Classifying the Topology of AHL-Driven Quorum Sensing Circuits in Proteobacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gelencsér, Zsolt; Choudhary, Kumari Sonal; Coutinho, Bruna Goncalves; Hudaiberdiev, Sanjarbek; Galbáts, Borisz; Venturi, Vittorio; Pongor, Sándor

    2012-01-01

    Virulence and adaptability of many Gram-negative bacterial species are associated with an N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) gene regulation mechanism called quorum sensing (QS). The arrangement of quorum sensing genes is variable throughout bacterial genomes, although there are unifying themes that are common among the various topological arrangements. A bioinformatics survey of 1,403 complete bacterial genomes revealed characteristic gene topologies in 152 genomes that could be classified into 16 topological groups. We developed a concise notation for the patterns and show that the sequences of LuxR regulators and LuxI autoinducer synthase proteins cluster according to the topological patterns. The annotated topologies are deposited online with links to sequences and genome annotations at http://bacteria.itk.ppke.hu/QStopologies/. PMID:22778593

  7. A Novel Metagenomic Short-Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase Attenuates Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation and Virulence on Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Bijtenhoorn, Patrick; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Müller-Dieckmann, Jochen; Utpatel, Christian; Schipper, Christina; Hornung, Claudia; Szesny, Matthias; Grond, Stephanie; Thürmer, Andrea; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Daniel, Rolf; Dierking, Katja; Schulenburg, Hinrich; Streit, Wolfgang R.

    2011-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the expression of a number of virulence factors, as well as biofilm formation, are controlled by quorum sensing (QS). N-Acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) are an important class of signaling molecules involved in bacterial QS and in many pathogenic bacteria infection and host colonization are AHL-dependent. The AHL signaling molecules are subject to inactivation mainly by hydrolases (Enzyme Commission class number EC 3) (i.e. N-acyl-homoserine lactonases and N-acyl-homoserine-lactone acylases). Only little is known on quorum quenching mechanisms of oxidoreductases (EC 1). Here we report on the identification and structural characterization of the first NADP-dependent short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) involved in inactivation of N-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) and derived from a metagenome library. The corresponding gene was isolated from a soil metagenome and designated bpiB09. Heterologous expression and crystallographic studies established BpiB09 as an NADP-dependent reductase. Although AHLs are probably not the native substrate of this metagenome-derived enzyme, its expression in P. aeruginosa PAO1 resulted in significantly reduced pyocyanin production, decreased motility, poor biofilm formation and absent paralysis of Caenorhabditis elegans. Furthermore, a genome-wide transcriptome study suggested that the level of lasI and rhlI transcription together with 36 well known QS regulated genes was significantly (≥10-fold) affected in P. aeruginosa strains expressing the bpiB09 gene in pBBR1MCS-5. Thus AHL oxidoreductases could be considered as potent tools for the development of quorum quenching strategies. PMID:22046268

  8. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone enhances keratinocyte migration and induces Mmp13 gene expression in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Paes, Camila

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An evidence of the positive effect of AHL on epithelialization process is provided. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AHL enhances keratinocyte's ability to migrate in an in vitro scratch wound model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AHL induces the expression of Mmp13. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Topical application of AHL represents a possible strategy to treat chronic wounds. -- Abstract: Re-epithelialization is an essential step of wound healing involving three overlapping keratinocyte functions: migration, proliferation and differentiation. While quorum sensing (QS) is a cell density-dependent signaling system that enables bacteria to regulate the expression of certain genes, the QS molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone (AHL) exerts effects also on mammalian cells in a process called inter-kingdom signaling. Recent studies have shown that AHL improves epithelialization in in vivo wound healing models but detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms are needed. The present study focused on the AHL as a candidate reagent to improve wound healing through direct modulation of keratinocyte's activity in the re-epithelialization process. Results indicated that AHL enhances the keratinocyte's ability to migrate in an in vitro scratch wound healing model probably due to the high Mmp13 gene expression analysis after AHL treatment that was revealed by real-time RT-PCR. Inhibition of activator protein 1 (AP-1) signaling pathway completely prevented the migration of keratinocytes, and also resulted in a diminished Mmp13 gene expression, suggesting that AP-1 might be essential in the AHL-induced migration. Taken together, these results imply that AHL is a promising candidate molecule to improve re-epithelialization through the induction of migration of keratinocytes. Further investigation is needed to clarify the mechanism of action and molecular pathway of AHL on the keratinocyte migration process.

  9. Quorum-sensing effects in the antagonistic rhizosphere bacterium Serratia plymuthica HRO-C48.

    PubMed

    Müller, Henry; Westendorf, Christian; Leitner, Erich; Chernin, Leonid; Riedel, Kathrin; Schmidt, Silvia; Eberl, Leo; Berg, Gabriele

    2009-03-01

    The rhizosphere-associated bacterium Serratia plymuthica HRO-C48 is not only able to suppress symptoms caused by soil-borne pathogens but is also able to stimulate growth of plants. Detailed knowledge about the underlying mechanisms and regulation are crucial for the application in biocontrol strategies. To analyse the influence of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated communication on the biocontrol activity, the AHL-degrading lactonase AiiA was heterologously expressed in the strain, resulting in abolished AHL production. The comparative analysis of the wild type and AHL negative mutants led to the identification of new AHL-regulated phenotypes. In the pathosystem Verticillium dahliae-oilseed rape, the essential role of AHL-mediated signaling for disease suppression was demonstrated. In vitro, the regulatory function of AHLs in the synthesis of the plant growth hormone indole-3-acetic acid is shown for the first time. Additionally, swimming motility was found to be negatively AHL regulated. In contrast, production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes is shown to be positively AHL-regulated. HRO-C48 emits a broad spectrum of volatile organic compounds that are involved in antifungal activity and, interestingly, whose relative abundances are influenced by quorum sensing (QS). This study shows that QS is crucial for biocontrol activity of S. plymuthica and discusses the impact for the application of the strain as a biocontrol agent. PMID:19220861

  10. Investigating a possible role for the bacterial signal molecules N-acylhomoserine lactones in Balanus improvisus cyprid settlement.

    PubMed

    Tait, Karen; Havenhand, Jon

    2013-05-01

    Increased settlement on bacterial biofilms has been demonstrated for a number of marine invertebrate larvae, but the nature of the cue(s) responsible is not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that the bay barnacle Balanus improvisus utilizes the bacterial signal molecules N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) as a cue for the selection of sites for permanent attachment. Single species biofilms of the AHL-producing bacteria Vibrio anguillarum, Aeromonas hydrophila and Sulfitobacter sp. BR1 were attractive to settling cypris larvae of B. improvisus. However, when AHL production was inactivated, either by mutation of the AHL synthetic genes or by expression of an AHL-degrading gene (aiiA), the ability of the bacteria to attract cyprids was abolished. In addition, cyprids actively explored biofilms of E. coli expressing the recombinant AHL synthase genes luxI from Vibrio fischeri (3-oxo-C6-HSL), rhlI from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (C4-HSL/C6-HSL), vanI from V. anguillarum (3-oxo-C10-HSL) and sulI from Sulfitobacter sp. BR1 (C4-HSL, 3-hydroxy-C6-HSL, C8-HSL and 3-hydroxy-C10-HSL), but not E. coli that did not produce AHLs. Finally, synthetic AHLs (C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C10-HSL and C12-HSL) at concentrations similar to those found within natural biofilms (5 μm) resulted in increased cyprid settlement. Thus, B. improvisus cypris exploration of and settlement on biofilms appears to be mediated by AHL-signalling bacteria in the laboratory. This adds to our understanding of how quorum sensing inhibition may be used as for biofouling control. Nonetheless, the significance of our results for larvae settling naturally in the field, and the mechanisms that underlay the observed responses to AHLs, is as yet unknown.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Jeotgalibacillus soli DSM 23228, a Bacterium Isolated from Alkaline Sandy Soil

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Yaakop, Amira Suriaty; Chan, Chia Sing; Ee, Robson; Tan, Wen-Si; Gan, Han Ming

    2015-01-01

    Jeotgalibacillus soli, a bacterium capable of degrading N-acyl homoserine lactone, was isolated from a soil sample in Portugal. J. soli constitutes the only Jeotgalibacillus species isolated from a non-marine source. Here, the draft genome, several interesting glycosyl hydrolases, and its putative N-acyl homoserine lactonases are presented. PMID:25999554

  12. SdiA, an N-Acylhomoserine Lactone Receptor, Becomes Active during the Transit of Salmonella enterica through the Gastrointestinal Tract of Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Jitesh A.; Ellermeier, Craig D.; Altier, Craig; Lawhon, Sara D.; Adams, L. Garry; Konjufca, Vjollca; Curtiss, Roy; Slauch, James M.; Ahmer, Brian M. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background LuxR-type transcription factors are typically used by bacteria to determine the population density of their own species by detecting N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). However, while Escherichia and Salmonella encode a LuxR-type AHL receptor, SdiA, they cannot synthesize AHLs. In vitro, it is known that SdiA can detect AHLs produced by other bacterial species. Methodology/Principal Findings In this report, we tested the hypothesis that SdiA detects the AHL-production of other bacterial species within the animal host. SdiA did not detect AHLs during the transit of Salmonella through the gastrointestinal tract of a guinea pig, a rabbit, a cow, 5 mice, 6 pigs, or 12 chickens. However, SdiA was activated during the transit of Salmonella through turtles. All turtles examined were colonized by the AHL-producing species Aeromonas hydrophila. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the normal gastrointestinal microbiota of most animal species do not produce AHLs of the correct type, in an appropriate location, or in sufficient quantities to activate SdiA. However, the results obtained with turtles represent the first demonstration of SdiA activity in animals. PMID:18665275

  13. A novel and sensitive method for the quantification of N-3-oxoacyl homoserine lactones using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: application to a model bacterial biofilm.

    PubMed

    Charlton, T S; de Nys, R; Netting, A; Kumar, N; Hentzer, M; Givskov, M; Kjelleberg, S

    2000-10-01

    A method is reported for the quantification of 3-oxoacyl homoserine lactones (3-oxo AHLs), a major class of quorum-sensing signals found in Gram-negative bacteria. It is based on the conversion of 3-oxo AHLs to their pentafluorobenzyloxime derivatives followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (electron capture-negative ion). The method used [13C16]-N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone ([13C16]-OdDHL) as the internal standard, and its validity was tested by spiking the supernatant and cell fractions with three levels of 3-oxo AHLs, i.e. 1, 10 and 100 ng per sample. These showed the method to be both sensitive (S/N ratio >10:1 for 1 ng) and accurate. The assay was applied to the biofilm and effluent of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (6294) culture grown in flow cells. Biofilm volume was determined for three replicate flow cells by confocal scanning laser microscopy. OdDHL was detected in the biofilm at 632 +/- 381 microM and the effluent at 14 +/- 3 nM. The biofilm concentration is the highest level so far reported for an AHL in a wild-type bacterial system. The next most abundant 3-oxo AHL in the biofilm and effluent was N-3-oxo-tetradecanoyl homoserine lactone (OtDHL) at 40 +/- 15 microM and 1.5 +/- 0.7 nM respectively. OtDHL is unreported for P. aeruginosa and has an activity equivalent to OdDHL in a lasR bioassay. Two other 3-oxo AHLs were detected at lower concentrations: N3-oxo-decanoyl homoserine lactone (ODHL) in the biofilm (3 +/- 2 microM) and effluent (1 +/- 0.1 nM); and N-3-oxo-octanoyl homoserine lactone (OOHL) in the effluent (0.1 +/- 0.1 nM).

  14. Isovaleryl-homoserine lactone, an unusual branched-chain quorum-sensing signal from the soybean symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Andrea; Pessi, Gabriella; Schaefer, Amy L; Mattmann, Margrith E; Christensen, Quin H; Kessler, Aline; Hennecke, Hauke; Blackwell, Helen E; Greenberg, E Peter; Harwood, Caroline S

    2011-10-01

    Many species of Proteobacteria communicate by using LuxI-LuxR-type quorum-sensing systems that produce and detect acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) signals. Most of the known signals are straight-chain fatty acyl-HSLs, and evidence indicates that LuxI homologs prefer fatty acid-acyl carrier protein (ACP) over fatty acyl-CoA as the acyl substrate for signal synthesis. Two related LuxI homologs, RpaI and BtaI from Rhodopseudomonas palustris and photosynthetic stem-nodulating bradyrhizobia, direct production of the aryl-HSLs p-coumaroyl-HSL and cinnamoyl-HSL, respectively. Here we report that BjaI from the soybean symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 is closely related to RpaI and BtaI and catalyzes the synthesis of isovaleryl-HSL (IV-HSL), a branched-chain fatty acyl-HSL. We show that IV-HSL induces expression of bjaI, and in this way IV-HSL functions like many other acyl-HSL quorum-sensing signals. Purified histidine-tagged BjaI was an IV-HSL synthase, which was active with isovaleryl-CoA but not detectably so with isovaleryl-ACP. This suggests that the RpaI-BtaI-BjaI subfamily of acyl-HSL synthases may use CoA- rather than ACP-linked substrates for acyl-HSL synthesis. The bjaI-linked bjaR(1) gene is involved in the response to IV-HSL, and BjaR(1) is sensitive to IV-HSL at concentrations as low as 10 pM. Low but sufficient levels of IV-HSL (about 5 nM) accumulate in B. japonicum culture fluid. The low levels of IV-HSL synthesis have likely contributed to the fact that the quorum-sensing signal from this bacterium has not been described elsewhere.

  15. Extensive and specific responses of a eukaryote to bacterial quorum-sensing signals

    PubMed Central

    Mathesius, Ulrike; Mulders, Susan; Gao, Mengsheng; Teplitski, Max; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Rolfe, Barry G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    2003-01-01

    Many bacteria use N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals to coordinate the behavior of individual cells in a local population. The successful infection of eukaryotic hosts by bacteria seems to depend particularly on such AHL-mediated “quorum-sensing” regulation. We have used proteome analysis to show that a eukaryotic host, the model legume Medicago truncatula, is able to detect nanomolar to micromolar concentrations of bacterial AHLs from both symbiotic (Sinorhizobium meliloti) and pathogenic (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria, and that it responds in a global manner by significant changes in the accumulation of over 150 proteins, 99 of which have been identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. The accumulation of specific proteins and isoforms depended on AHL structure, concentration, and time of exposure. AHLs were also found to induce tissue-specific activation of β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter fusions to an auxin-responsive and three chalcone synthase promoters, consistent with AHL-induced changes in the accumulation of auxin-responsive and flavonoid synthesis proteins. In addition, exposure to AHLs was found to induce changes in the secretion of compounds by the plants that mimic quorum-sensing signals and thus have the potential to disrupt quorum sensing in associated bacteria. Our results indicate that eukaryotes have an extensive range of functional responses to AHLs that may play important roles in the beneficial or pathogenic outcomes of eukaryote–prokaryote interactions. PMID:12511600

  16. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Biofouling Bacteria and Profiling of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules from Membrane Bioreactor Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2014-01-01

    The formation of biofilm in a membrane bioreactor depends on the production of various signaling molecules like N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). In the present study, a total of 200 bacterial strains were isolated from membrane bioreactor activated sludge and screened for AHLs production using two biosensor systems, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. A correlation between AHLs production and biofilm formation has been made among screened AHLs producing strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed the dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in AHLs production; however few a species of Serratia, Leclercia, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Raoultella and Citrobacter were also identified. The chromatographic characterization of sludge extract showed the presence of a broad range of quorum sensing signal molecules. Further identification of sludge AHLs by thin layer chromatography bioassay and high performance liquid chromatography confirms the presence of C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL, 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C14-HSL. The occurrence of AHLs in sludge extract and dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in activated sludge suggests the key role of these bacterial strains in AHLs production and thereby membrane fouling. PMID:24499972

  17. The role of quorum sensing signalling in EPS production and the assembly of a sludge community into aerobic granules

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chuan Hao; Koh, Kai Shyang; Xie, Chao; Tay, Martin; Zhou, Yan; Williams, Rohan; Ng, Wun Jern; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) signalling has been extensively studied in single species populations. However, the ecological role of QS in complex, multi-species communities, particularly in the context of community assembly, has neither been experimentally explored nor theoretically addressed. Here, we performed a long-term bioreactor ecology study to address the links between QS, organization and composition of complex microbial communities. The conversion of floccular biomass to highly structured granules was found to be non-random, but strongly and positively correlated with N-acyl-homoserine-lactone (AHL)-mediated QS. Specific AHLs were elevated up to 100-fold and were strongly associated with the initiation of granulation. Similarly, the levels of particular AHLs decreased markedly during the granular disintegration phase. Metadata analysis indicated that granulation was accompanied by changes in extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) production and AHL add-back studies also resulted in increased EPS synthesis. In contrast to the commonly reported nanomolar to micromolar signal concentrations in pure culture laboratory systems, QS signalling in the granulation ecosystem occurred at picomolar to nanomolar concentrations of AHLs. Given that low concentrations of AHLs quantified in this study were sufficient to activate AHL bioreporters in situ in complex granular communities, AHL mediated QS may be a common feature in many natural and engineered ecosystems, where it coordinates community behaviour. PMID:24430488

  18. Isolation and molecular characterization of biofouling bacteria and profiling of quorum sensing signal molecules from membrane bioreactor activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2014-02-04

    The formation of biofilm in a membrane bioreactor depends on the production of various signaling molecules like N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). In the present study, a total of 200 bacterial strains were isolated from membrane bioreactor activated sludge and screened for AHLs production using two biosensor systems, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. A correlation between AHLs production and biofilm formation has been made among screened AHLs producing strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed the dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in AHLs production; however few a species of Serratia, Leclercia, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Raoultella and Citrobacter were also identified. The chromatographic characterization of sludge extract showed the presence of a broad range of quorum sensing signal molecules. Further identification of sludge AHLs by thin layer chromatography bioassay and high performance liquid chromatography confirms the presence of C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL, 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C14-HSL. The occurrence of AHLs in sludge extract and dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in activated sludge suggests the key role of these bacterial strains in AHLs production and thereby membrane fouling.

  19. Homoserine Lactones, Methyl Oligohydroxybutyrates, and Other Extracellular Metabolites of Macroalgae-Associated Bacteria of the Roseobacter Clade: Identification and Functions.

    PubMed

    Ziesche, Lisa; Bruns, Hilke; Dogs, Marco; Wolter, Laura; Mann, Florian; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Schulz, Stefan

    2015-09-21

    Twenty-four strains of marine Roseobacter clade bacteria were isolated from macroalgae and investigated for the production of quorum-sensing autoinducers, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). GC/MS analysis of the extracellular metabolites allowed us to evaluate the release of other small molecules as well. Nineteen strains produced AHLs, ranging from 3-OH-C10:0-HSL (homoserine lactone) to (2E,11Z)-C18:2-HSL, but no specific phylogenetic or ecological pattern of individual AHL occurrence was observed when cluster analysis was performed. Other identified compounds included indole, tropone, methyl esters of oligomers of 3-hydroxybutyric acid, and various amides, such as N-9-hexadecenoylalanine methyl ester (9-C16:1-NAME), a structural analogue of AHLs. Several compounds were tested for their antibacterial and antialgal activity on marine isolates likely to occur in the habitat of the macroalgae. Both AHLs and 9-C16:1-NAME showed high antialgal activity against Skeletonema costatum, whereas their antibacterial activity was low. PMID:26212108

  20. Quorum sensing signals are produced by Aeromonas salmonicida and quorum sensing inhibitors can reduce production of a potential virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Rasch, Maria; Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin; Dalsgaard, Inger; Givskov, Michael; Gram, Lone

    2007-12-13

    Many pathogens control production of virulence factors by self-produced signals in a process called quorum sensing (QS). We demonstrate that acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals, which enable bacteria to express certain phenotypes in relation to cell density, are produced by a wide spectrum of Aeromonas salmonicida strains. All 31 typical strains were AHL producers as were 21 of 26 atypical strains, but on a strain population basis, production of virulence factors such as protease, lipase, A-layer or pigment did not correlate with the production and accumulation of AHLs in the growth medium. Pigment production was only observed in broth under highly aerated conditions. Quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) are compounds that specifically block QS systems without affecting bacterial growth and 2 such compounds, sulphur-containing AHL-analogues, reduced production of protease in a typical strain of Aeromonas salmonicida. The most efficient compound N-(heptylsulfanylacetyl)-L-homoserine lactone (HepS-AHL), reduced protease production by a factor of 10. Five extracellular proteases were detected on gelatin-containing sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gels and 3 of these were completely down regulated by HepS-AHL. Hence, QSIs can curb virulence in some strains and could potentially be pursued as bacterial disease control measures in aquaculture.

  1. Whole genome sequencing enables the characterization of BurI, a LuxI homologue of Burkholderia cepacia strain GG4

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kar Wai; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a mechanism for regulating proteobacterial gene expression in response to changes in cell population. In proteobacteria, N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) appears to be the most widely used signalling molecules in mediating, among others, the production of extracellular virulence factors for survival. In this work, the genome of B. cepacia strain GG4, a plasmid-free strain capable of AHL synthesis was explored. In silico analysis of the 6.6 Mb complete genome revealed the presence of a LuxI homologue which correspond to Type I quorum sensing. Here, we report the molecular cloning and characterization of this LuxI homologue, designated as BurI. This 609 bp gene was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The purified protein was approximately 25 kDa and is highly similar to several autoinducer proteins of the LuxI family among Burkholderia species. To verify the AHL synthesis activity of this protein, high resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed the production of 3-oxo-hexanoylhomoserine lactone, N-octanoylhomoserine lactone and 3-hydroxy-octanoylhomoserine lactone from induced E. coli BL21 harboring the recombinant BurI. Our data show, for the first time, the cloning and characterization of the LuxI homologue from B. cepacia strain GG4 and confirmation of its AHL synthesis activity. PMID:26290785

  2. Arabidopsis growth and defense are modulated by bacterial quorum sensing molecules

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Sebastian T.; Stein, Elke; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Schikora, Adam

    2012-01-01

    N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) play an important role in the communication within the rhizosphere; they serve as a chemical base for interactions within and between different species of Gram-negative bacteria. Not only bacteria, also plants perceive and react to AHLs with diverse responses. Here we describe a negative correlation between the length of AHLs’ lipid chains and the observed growth promotion in Arabidopsis thaliana. Moreover, we speculate on a positive correlation between the reinforcement of defense mechanisms and the length of the lipid moieties. Observation presented here may be of great importance for understanding of the complex interplay between plants and their environment, as well as for agronomic applications. PMID:22307043

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth inhibition on medical plastic materials by immobilized esterases and acylase.

    PubMed

    Kisch, Johannes Martin; Utpatel, Christian; Hilterhaus, Lutz; Streit, Wolfgang R; Liese, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Biofilms are matrix-encapsulated cell aggregates that cause problems in technical and health-related areas; for example, 65 % of all human infections are biofilm associated. This is mainly due to their ameliorated resistance against antimicrobials and immune systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a biofilm-forming organism, is commonly responsible for nosocomial infections. Biofilm development is partly mediated by signal molecules, such as acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) in Gram-negative bacteria. We applied horse liver esterase, porcine kidney acylase, and porcine liver esterase; these can hydrolyze AHLs, thereby inhibiting biofilm formation. As biofilm infections are often related to foreign material introduced into the human body, we immobilized the enzymes on medical plastic materials. Biofilm formation was quantified by Crystal Violet staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy, revealing up to 97 % (on silicone), 54 % (on polyvinyl chloride), and 77 % (on polyurethane) reduced biomass after 68 h growth.

  4. Turing Patterning Using Gene Circuits with Gas-Induced Degradation of Quorum Sensing Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Hasty, Jeff; Tsimring, Lev

    2016-01-01

    The Turing instability was proposed more than six decades ago as a mechanism leading to spatial patterning, but it has yet to be exploited in a synthetic biology setting. Here we characterize the Turing instability in a specific gene circuit that can be implemented in vitro or in populations of clonal cells producing short-range activator N-Acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) and long-range inhibitor hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) gas. Slowing the production rate of the AHL-degrading enzyme, AiiA, generates stable fixed states, limit cycle oscillations and Turing patterns. Further tuning of signaling parameters determines local robustness and controls the range of unstable wavenumbers in the patterning regime. These findings provide a roadmap for optimizing spatial patterns of gene expression based on familiar quorum and gas sensitive E. coli promoters. The circuit design and predictions may be useful for (re)programming spatial dynamics in synthetic and natural gene expression systems. PMID:27148743

  5. Broad Spectrum Anti-Quorum Sensing Activity of Tannin-Rich Crude Extracts of Indian Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Varsha; Bhathena, Zarine

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms have been demonstrated to have significance in expression of pathogenicity in infectious bacteria. In Gram negative bacteria the autoinducer molecules that mediate QS are acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) and in Gram positive bacteria they are peptides called autoinducing peptides (AIP). A screening of tannin-rich medicinal plants was attempted to identify extracts that could interrupt the QS mechanisms in both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria over a wide range of concentrations and therefore potentially be potent agents that could act as broad spectrum QS inhibitors. Six out of the twelve Indian medicinal plant extracts that were analyzed exhibited anti-QS activity in Chromobacterium violaceum 12472 and in S. aureus strain with agr:blaZ fusion over a broad range of subinhibitory concentrations, indicating that the extracts contain high concentration of molecules that can interfere with the QS mechanisms mediated by AHL as well as AIP. PMID:27190686

  6. Substrate specificity and function of the pheromone receptor AinR in Vibrio fischeri ES114.

    PubMed

    Kimbrough, John H; Stabb, Eric V

    2013-11-01

    Two distinct but interrelated pheromone-signaling systems, LuxI/LuxR and AinS/AinR, positively control bioluminescence in Vibrio fischeri. Although each system generates an acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal, the protein sequences of LuxI/LuxR and AinS/AinR are unrelated. AinS and LuxI generate the pheromones N-octanoyl-AHL (C8-AHL) and N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-AHL (3OC6-AHL), respectively. LuxR is a transcriptional activator that responds to 3OC6-AHL, and to a lesser extent to C8-AHL. AinR is hypothesized to respond to C8-AHL and, based on homology to Vibrio harveyi LuxN, to mediate the repression of a Qrr regulatory RNA. However, a ΔainR mutation decreased luminescence, which was not predicted based on V. harveyi LuxN, raising the possibility of a distinct regulatory mechanism for AinR. Here we show that ainR can complement a luxN mutant, suggesting functional similarity. Moreover, in V. fischeri, we observed ainR-dependent repression of a Pqrr-lacZ transcriptional reporter in the presence of C8-AHL, consistent with its hypothesized regulatory role. The system appears quite sensitive, with a half-maximal effect on a Pqrr reporter at 140 pM C8-AHL. Several other AHLs with substituted and unsubstituted acyl chains between 6 and 10 carbons also displayed an AinR-dependent effect on Pqrr-lacZ; however, AHLs with acyl chains of four carbons or 12 or more carbons lacked activity. Interestingly, 3OC6-AHL also affected expression from the qrr promoter, but this effect was largely luxR dependent, indicating a previously unknown connection between these systems. Finally, we propose a preliminary explanation for the unexpected luminescence phenotype of the ΔainR mutant.

  7. Substrate Specificity and Function of the Pheromone Receptor AinR in Vibrio fischeri ES114

    PubMed Central

    Kimbrough, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Two distinct but interrelated pheromone-signaling systems, LuxI/LuxR and AinS/AinR, positively control bioluminescence in Vibrio fischeri. Although each system generates an acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal, the protein sequences of LuxI/LuxR and AinS/AinR are unrelated. AinS and LuxI generate the pheromones N-octanoyl-AHL (C8-AHL) and N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-AHL (3OC6-AHL), respectively. LuxR is a transcriptional activator that responds to 3OC6-AHL, and to a lesser extent to C8-AHL. AinR is hypothesized to respond to C8-AHL and, based on homology to Vibrio harveyi LuxN, to mediate the repression of a Qrr regulatory RNA. However, a ΔainR mutation decreased luminescence, which was not predicted based on V. harveyi LuxN, raising the possibility of a distinct regulatory mechanism for AinR. Here we show that ainR can complement a luxN mutant, suggesting functional similarity. Moreover, in V. fischeri, we observed ainR-dependent repression of a Pqrr-lacZ transcriptional reporter in the presence of C8-AHL, consistent with its hypothesized regulatory role. The system appears quite sensitive, with a half-maximal effect on a Pqrr reporter at 140 pM C8-AHL. Several other AHLs with substituted and unsubstituted acyl chains between 6 and 10 carbons also displayed an AinR-dependent effect on Pqrr-lacZ; however, AHLs with acyl chains of four carbons or 12 or more carbons lacked activity. Interestingly, 3OC6-AHL also affected expression from the qrr promoter, but this effect was largely luxR dependent, indicating a previously unknown connection between these systems. Finally, we propose a preliminary explanation for the unexpected luminescence phenotype of the ΔainR mutant. PMID:24056099

  8. Quorum sensing in Vibrio anguillarum: characterization of the vanI/vanR locus and identification of the autoinducer N-(3-oxodecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone.

    PubMed Central

    Milton, D L; Hardman, A; Camara, M; Chhabra, S R; Bycroft, B W; Stewart, G S; Williams, P

    1997-01-01

    Certain gram-negative pathogens are known to control virulence gene expression through cell-cell communication via small diffusible signal molecules termed autoinducers. This intercellular signal transduction mechanism termed quorum sensing depends on the interaction of an N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) auto-inducer molecule with a receptor protein belonging to the LuxR family of positive transcriptional activators. Vibrio anguillarum is a gram-negative pathogen capable of causing a terminal hemorrhagic septicemia known as vibriosis in fish such as rainbow trout. In this study, we sought to determine whether V. anguillarum employs AHLs to regulate virulence gene expression. Spent V. anguillarum culture supernatants stimulated bioluminescence in a recombinant lux-based Escherichia coli AHL biosensor strain, whereas they both stimulated and inhibited AHL-mediated violacein pigment production in Chromobacterium violaceum. This finding suggested that V. anguillarum may produce multiple AHL signal molecules. Using high-performance liquid chromatography and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, we identified the major V. anguillarum AHL as N-(3-oxodecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (ODHL), a structure which was unequivocally confirmed by chemical synthesis. The gene (vanI) responsible for ODHL synthesis was cloned and sequenced and shown to belong to the LuxI family of putative AHL synthases. Further sequencing downstream of vanI revealed a second gene (vanR) related to the LuxR family of transcriptional activators. Although deletion of vanI abolished ODHL synthesis, no reduction of either metalloprotease production or virulence in a fish infection model was observed. However, the vanI mutant remained capable of weakly activating both bioluminescence and violacein in the E. coli and C. violaceum biosensors, respectively, indicating the existence of additional layers of AHL-mediated regulatory complexity. PMID:9139920

  9. Crystal Structures of a Quorum-Quenching Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Debler, Erik W.; Kaufmann, Gunnar F.; Kirchdoerfer, Robert N.; Mee, Jenny M.; Janda, Kim D.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary A large number of Gram-negative bacteria employ N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signaling molecules in quorum sensing, which is a population density-dependent mechanism to coordinate gene expression. Antibody RS2-1G9 was elicited against a lactam mimetic of the N-acyl homoserine lactone and represents the only reported monoclonal antibody that recognizes the naturally-occuring N-acyl homoserine lactone with high affinity. Due to its high cross-reactivity, RS2-1G9 showed remarkable inhibition of quorum sensing signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common opportunistic pathogen in humans. The crystal structure of Fab RS2-1G9 in complex with a lactam analog revealed complete encapsulation of the polar lactam moiety in the antibody combining site. This mode of recognition provides an elegant immunological solution for tight binding to an aliphatic, lipid-like ligand with a small head group lacking typical haptenic features, such as aromaticity or charge, which are often incorporated into hapten design to generate high-affinity antibodies. The ability of RS2-1G9 to discriminate between closely-related AHLs is conferred by six hydrogen bonds to the ligand. Conversely, cross-reactivity of RS2-1G9 towards the lactone is likely to originate from conservation of these hydrogen bonds as well as an additional hydrogen bond to the oxygen of the lactone ring. A short and narrow tunnel exiting at the protein surface harbors a portion of the acyl chain and would not allow for entry of the head group. The crystal structure of the antibody without its cognate lactam or lactone ligands revealed a considerably altered antibody combining site with a closed binding pocket, suggestive of an induced fit mechanism for ligand binding. Curiously, a completely buried ethylene glycol molecule mimics the lactam ring and, thus, serves as a surrogate ligand. The detailed structural delineation of this quorum-quenching antibody will now aid in further development of an antibody

  10. Crystal Structures of a Quorum-Quenching Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Debler, E.W.; Kaufmann, G.F.; Kirchdoerfer, R.N.; Mee, J.M.; Janda, K.D.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Skaggs Inst. /WIRM, La Jolla

    2007-07-09

    A large number of Gram-negative bacteria employ N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signaling molecules in quorum sensing, which is a population density-dependent mechanism to coordinate gene expression. Antibody RS2-1G9 was elicited against a lactam mimetic of the N-acyl homoserine lactone and represents the only reported monoclonal antibody that recognizes the naturally-occuring N-acyl homoserine lactone with high affinity. Due to its high cross-reactivity, RS2-1G9 showed remarkable inhibition of quorum sensing signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common opportunistic pathogen in humans. The crystal structure of Fab RS2-1G9 in complex with a lactam analog revealed complete encapsulation of the polar lactam moiety in the antibody-combining site. This mode of recognition provides an elegant immunological solution for tight binding to an aliphatic, lipid-like ligand with a small head group lacking typical haptenic features, such as aromaticity or charge, which are often incorporated into hapten design to generate high-affinity antibodies. The ability of RS2-1G9 to discriminate between closely related AHLs is conferred by six hydrogen bonds to the ligand. Conversely, cross-reactivity of RS2-1G9 towards the lactone is likely to originate from conservation of these hydrogen bonds as well as an additional hydrogen bond to the oxygen of the lactone ring. A short, narrow tunnel exiting at the protein surface harbors a portion of the acyl chain and would not allow entry of the head group. The crystal structure of the antibody without its cognate lactam or lactone ligands revealed a considerably altered antibody-combining site with a closed binding pocket. Curiously, a completely buried ethylene glycol molecule mimics the lactam ring and, thus, serves as a surrogate ligand. The detailed structural delineation of this quorum-quenching antibody will aid further development of an antibody-based therapy against bacterial pathogens by interference with quorum sensing.

  11. Quorum sensing activity of Aeromonas caviae strain YL12, a bacterium isolated from compost.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yan-Lue; Ee, Robson; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-04-22

    Quorum sensing is a well-studied cell-to-cell communication method that involves a cell-density dependent regulation of genes expression mediated by signalling molecules. In this study, a bacterium isolated from a plant material compost pile was found to possess quorum sensing activity based on bioassay screening. Isolate YL12 was identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and molecular typing using rpoD gene which identified the isolate as Aeromonas caviae. High resolution tandem mass spectrometry was subsequently employed to identify the N-acyl homoserine lactone profile of Aeromonas caviae YL12 and confirmed that this isolate produced two short chain N-acyl homoserine lactones, namely C4-HSL and C6, and the production was observed to be cell density-dependent. Using the thin layer chromatography (TLC) bioassay, both AHLs were found to activate C. violaceum CV026, whereas only C6-HSL was revealed to induce bioluminescence expression of E. coli [pSB401]. The data presented in this study will be the leading steps in understanding the role of quorum sensing in Aeromonas caviae strain YL12.

  12. Enterobacter asburiae strain L1: complete genome and whole genome optical mapping analysis of a quorum sensing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yin Yin; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacter asburiae L1 is a quorum sensing bacterium isolated from lettuce leaves. In this study, for the first time, the complete genome of E. asburiae L1 was sequenced using the single molecule real time sequencer (PacBio RSII) and the whole genome sequence was verified by using optical genome mapping (OpGen) technology. In our previous study, E. asburiae L1 has been reported to produce AHLs, suggesting the possibility of virulence factor regulation which is quorum sensing dependent. This evoked our interest to study the genome of this bacterium and here we present the complete genome of E. asburiae L1, which carries the virulence factor gene virK, the N-acyl homoserine lactone-based QS transcriptional regulator gene luxR and the N-acyl homoserine lactone synthase gene which we firstly named easI. The availability of the whole genome sequence of E. asburiae L1 will pave the way for the study of the QS-mediated gene expression in this bacterium. Hence, the importance and functions of these signaling molecules can be further studied in the hope of elucidating the mechanisms of QS-regulation in E. asburiae. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation of both a complete genome sequence and the establishment of the molecular basis of QS properties of E. asburiae.

  13. The vitamin riboflavin and its derivative lumichrome activate the LasR bacterial quorum-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Rajamani, Sathish; Bauer, Wolfgang D; Robinson, Jayne B; Farrow, John M; Pesci, Everett C; Teplitski, Max; Gao, Mengsheng; Sayre, Richard T; Phillips, Donald A

    2008-09-01

    Many bacteria use quorum sensing (QS) as an intercellular signaling mechanism to regulate gene expression in local populations. Plant and algal hosts, in turn, secrete compounds that mimic bacterial QS signals, allowing these hosts to manipulate QS-regulated gene expression in bacteria. Lumichrome, a derivative of the vitamin riboflavin, was purified and chemically identified from culture filtrates of the alga Chlamydomonas as a QS signal-mimic compound capable of stimulating the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasR QS receptor. LasR normally recognizes the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signal, N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone. Authentic lumichrome and riboflavin stimulated the LasR receptor in bioassays and lumichrome activated LasR in gel shift experiments. Amino acid substitutions in LasR residues required for AHL binding altered responses to both AHLs and lumichrome or riboflavin. These results and docking studies indicate that the AHL binding pocket of LasR recognizes both AHLs and the structurally dissimilar lumichrome or riboflavin. Bacteria, plants, and algae commonly secrete riboflavin or lumichrome, raising the possibility that these compounds could serve as either QS signals or as interkingdom signal mimics capable of manipulating QS in bacteria with a LasR-like receptor.

  14. The vitamin riboflavin and its derivative lumichrome activate the LasR bacterial quorum sensing receptor

    PubMed Central

    Rajamani, Sathish; Bauer, Wolfgang D.; Robinson, Jayne B.; Farrow, John M.; Pesci, Everett C.; Teplitski, Max; Gao, Mengsheng; Sayre, Richard T.; Phillips, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria use quorum sensing (QS) as an intercellular signaling mechanism to regulate gene expression in local populations. Plant and algal hosts, in turn, secrete compounds that mimic bacterial QS signals, allowing these hosts to manipulate QS-regulated gene expression in bacteria. Lumichrome, a derivative of the vitamin riboflavin, was purified and chemically identified from culture filtrates of the alga Chlamydomonas as a QS signal-mimic compound capable of stimulating the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasR QS receptor. LasR normally recognizes the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signal, N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL). Authentic lumichrome and riboflavin stimulated the LasR receptor in bioassays, and lumichrome activated LasR in gel shift experiments. Amino acid substitutions in LasR residues required for AHL binding altered responses to both AHLs and lumichrome/riboflavin. These results and docking studies indicate that the AHL binding pocket of LasR recognizes both AHLs and the structurally dissimilar lumichrome/riboflavin. Bacteria, plants and algae commonly secrete riboflavin and/or lumichrome, raising the possibility that these compounds could serve as either QS signals or as interkingdom signal-mimics capable of manipulating QS in bacteria with a LasR-like receptor. PMID:18700823

  15. N-acylhomoserine lactone-dependent cell-to-cell communication and social behavior in the genus Serratia.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jun-Rong; Lai, Hsin-Chih

    2006-04-01

    Members of the genus Serratia are increasingly responsible for nosocomial infections, the treatment of which may be complicated by the appearance of multi-antibiotic-resistant strains. Some but not all Serratia strains and species produce N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), and possess luxR and luxI homologous genes. Phylogenetic comparisons have provided evidence for the lateral transfer of these quorum-sensing systems, and in at least one strain of S. marcescens, transfer via a complex transposon has been experimentally demonstrated. AHL-dependent quorum sensing in Serratia controls population surface migration, biofilm development, the biosynthesis of a carbapenem antibiotic and production of the red pigment, prodigiosin. Serratia also possesses LuxS and produces autoinducer-2 (AI-2) which appears to function as a second quorum-sensing system controlling many of the same phenotypes as the LuxR/AHL systems.

  16. A solo luxI-type gene directs acylhomoserine lactone synthesis and contributes to motility control in the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11.

    PubMed

    Zan, Jindong; Choi, Okhee; Meharena, Hiruy; Uhlson, Charis L; Churchill, Mair E A; Hill, Russell T; Fuqua, Clay

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges harbour abundant and diverse bacterial communities, providing an ideal environment for bacterial cell-density-dependent cell-cell signalling, termed quorum sensing. The marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11 produces mainly long chain acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) and has been developed as a quorum sensing model for roseobacterial sponge symbionts. Two pairs of luxR/I homologues were identified by genetic screening and were designated ssaRI and ssbRI (sponge-associated symbiont locus A or B, luxR/luxI homologue). In this study, we identified a third luxI-type gene, named sscI. The sscI gene does not have a cognate luxR homologue present at an adjacent locus and thus sscI is an AHL synthase solo. The sscI gene is required for production of long-chain hydroxylated AHLs, contributes to AHL pools and modestly influences flagellar motility in KLH11. A triple mutant for all luxI-type genes cannot produce AHLs, but still synthesizes para-coumaroyl-homoserine lactone.

  17. Quorum sensing in marine snow and its possible influence on production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes in marine snow bacterium Pantoea ananatis B9.

    PubMed

    Jatt, Abdul Nabi; Tang, Kaihao; Liu, Jiwen; Zhang, Zenghu; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Marine snow is a continuous shower of organic and inorganic detritus, and plays a crucial role in transporting materials from the sea surface to the deep ocean. The aims of the current study were to identify N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS) signaling molecules directly from marine snow particles and to investigate the possible regulatory link between QS signals and extracellular hydrolytic enzymes produced by marine snow bacteria. The marine snow samples were collected from the surface water of China marginal seas. Two AHLs, i.e. 3OC6-HSL and C8-HSL, were identified directly from marine snow particles, while six different AHL signals, i.e. C4-HSL, 3OC6-HSL, C6-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL and C14-HSL were produced by Pantoea ananatis B9 inhabiting natural marine snow particles. Of the extracellular hydrolytic enzymes produced by P. ananatis B9, alkaline phosphatase activity was highly enhanced in growth medium supplemented with exogenous AHL (C10-HSL), while quorum quenching enzyme (AiiA) drastically reduced the enzyme activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report revealing six different AHL signals produced by P. ananatis B9 and AHL-based QS system enhanced the extracellular hydrolytic enzyme in P. ananatis B9. Furthermore, this study first time revealing 3OC6-HSL production by Paracoccus carotinifaciens affiliated with Alphaproteobacteria. PMID:25764555

  18. Quorum sensing in marine snow and its possible influence on production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes in marine snow bacterium Pantoea ananatis B9.

    PubMed

    Jatt, Abdul Nabi; Tang, Kaihao; Liu, Jiwen; Zhang, Zenghu; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Marine snow is a continuous shower of organic and inorganic detritus, and plays a crucial role in transporting materials from the sea surface to the deep ocean. The aims of the current study were to identify N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS) signaling molecules directly from marine snow particles and to investigate the possible regulatory link between QS signals and extracellular hydrolytic enzymes produced by marine snow bacteria. The marine snow samples were collected from the surface water of China marginal seas. Two AHLs, i.e. 3OC6-HSL and C8-HSL, were identified directly from marine snow particles, while six different AHL signals, i.e. C4-HSL, 3OC6-HSL, C6-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL and C14-HSL were produced by Pantoea ananatis B9 inhabiting natural marine snow particles. Of the extracellular hydrolytic enzymes produced by P. ananatis B9, alkaline phosphatase activity was highly enhanced in growth medium supplemented with exogenous AHL (C10-HSL), while quorum quenching enzyme (AiiA) drastically reduced the enzyme activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report revealing six different AHL signals produced by P. ananatis B9 and AHL-based QS system enhanced the extracellular hydrolytic enzyme in P. ananatis B9. Furthermore, this study first time revealing 3OC6-HSL production by Paracoccus carotinifaciens affiliated with Alphaproteobacteria.

  19. Biofilm Formation and Quorum-Sensing-Molecule Production by Clinical Isolates of Serratia liquefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Lázaro-Díez, María; Mayer, Celia; Aranzamendi-Zaldumbide, Maitane; Padilla, Daniel; Calvo, Jorge; Marco, Francesc; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Icardo, José Manuel; Otero, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Serratia spp. are opportunistic human pathogens responsible for an increasing number of nosocomial infections. However, little is known about the virulence factors and regulatory circuits that may enhance the establishment and long-term survival of Serratia liquefaciens in the hospital environment. In this study, two reporter strains, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and VIR24, and high-resolution triple-quadrupole liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were used to detect and to quantify N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing signals in 20 S. liquefaciens strains isolated from clinical samples. Only four of the strains produced sufficient amounts of AHLs to activate the sensors. Investigation of two of the positive strains by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS confirmed the presence of significant amounts of short-acyl-chain AHLs (N-butyryl-l-homoserine lactone [C4-HSL] and N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone [C6-HSL]) in both strains, which exhibited a complex and strain-specific signal profile that included minor amounts of other short-acyl-chain AHLs (N-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactone [C8-HSL] and N-3-oxohexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone [OC6-HSL]) and long-acyl-chain (C10, C12, and C14) AHLs. No correlation between biofilm formation and the production of large amounts of AHLs could be established. Fimbria-like structures were observed by transmission electron microscopy, and the presence of the type 1 fimbrial adhesin gene fimH in all strains was confirmed by PCR. The ability of S. liquefaciens to adhere to abiotic surfaces and to form biofilms likely contributes to its persistence in the hospital environment, increasing the probability of causing nosocomial infections. Therefore, a better understanding of the adherence properties of this species will provide greater insights into the diseases it causes. PMID:25746999

  20. Biofilm Formation and Quorum-Sensing-Molecule Production by Clinical Isolates of Serratia liquefaciens.

    PubMed

    Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Lázaro-Díez, María; Mayer, Celia; Aranzamendi-Zaldumbide, Maitane; Padilla, Daniel; Calvo, Jorge; Marco, Francesc; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Icardo, José Manuel; Otero, Ana; Ramos-Vivas, José

    2015-05-15

    Serratia spp. are opportunistic human pathogens responsible for an increasing number of nosocomial infections. However, little is known about the virulence factors and regulatory circuits that may enhance the establishment and long-term survival of Serratia liquefaciens in the hospital environment. In this study, two reporter strains, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and VIR24, and high-resolution triple-quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were used to detect and to quantify N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing signals in 20 S. liquefaciens strains isolated from clinical samples. Only four of the strains produced sufficient amounts of AHLs to activate the sensors. Investigation of two of the positive strains by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS confirmed the presence of significant amounts of short-acyl-chain AHLs (N-butyryl-l-homoserine lactone [C4-HSL] and N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone [C6-HSL]) in both strains, which exhibited a complex and strain-specific signal profile that included minor amounts of other short-acyl-chain AHLs (N-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactone [C8-HSL] and N-3-oxohexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone [OC6-HSL]) and long-acyl-chain (C10, C12, and C14) AHLs. No correlation between biofilm formation and the production of large amounts of AHLs could be established. Fimbria-like structures were observed by transmission electron microscopy, and the presence of the type 1 fimbrial adhesin gene fimH in all strains was confirmed by PCR. The ability of S. liquefaciens to adhere to abiotic surfaces and to form biofilms likely contributes to its persistence in the hospital environment, increasing the probability of causing nosocomial infections. Therefore, a better understanding of the adherence properties of this species will provide greater insights into the diseases it causes.

  1. The LuxR family protein SpnR functions as a negative regulator of N-acylhomoserine lactone-dependent quorum sensing in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Horng, Yu-Tze; Deng, Su-Chen; Daykin, Mavis; Soo, Po-Chi; Wei, Jun-Rong; Luh, Kwen-Tay; Ho, Shen-Wu; Swift, Simon; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Williams, Paul

    2002-09-01

    Serratia marcescens SS-1 produces at least four N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) which were identified using high-resolution mass spectrometry and chemical synthesis, as N-(3-oxohexanoyl) homo-serine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL), N-hexanoyl- (C6-HSL), N-heptanoyl (C7-HSL) and N-octanoyl- (C8-HSL) homoserine lactone. These AHLs are synthesized via the LuxI homologue SpnI, and regulate via the LuxR homologue SpnR, the production of the red pigment, prodigiosin, the nuclease, NucA, and a biosurfactant which facilitates surface translocation. spnR overexpression and spnR gene deletion show that SpnR, in contrast to most LuxR homologues, acts as a negative regulator. spnI overexpression, the provision of exogenous AHLs and spnI gene deletion suggest that SpnR is de-repressed by 3-oxo-C6-HSL. In addition, long chain AHLs antagonize the biosurfactant-mediated surface translocation of S. marcescens SS-1. Upstream of spnI there is a gene which we have termed spnT. spnI and spnT form an operon and although database searches failed to reveal any spnT homologues, overexpression of this novel gene negatively affected both sliding motility and prodigiosin production.

  2. Involvement of bacterial quorum-sensing signals in spoilage of bean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Rasch, Maria; Andersen, Jens Bo; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Flodgaard, Lars Ravn; Christensen, Henrik; Givskov, Michael; Gram, Lone

    2005-06-01

    Bacterial communication signals, acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), were extracted from samples of commercial bean sprouts undergoing soft-rot spoilage. Bean sprouts produced in the laboratory did not undergo soft-rot spoilage and did not contain AHLs or AHL-producing bacteria, although the bacterial population reached levels similar to those in the commercial sprouts, 10(8) to 10(9) CFU/g. AHL-producing bacteria (Enterobacteriaceae and pseudomonads) were isolated from commercial sprouts, and strains that were both proteolytic and pectinolytic were capable of causing soft-rot spoilage in bean sprouts. Thin-layer chromatography and liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry revealed the presence of N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone in spoiled bean sprouts and in extracts from pure cultures of bacteria. During normal spoilage, the pH of the sprouts increased due to proteolytic activity, and the higher pH probably facilitated the activity of pectate lyase. The AHL synthetase gene (I gene) from a spoilage Pectobacterium was cloned, sequenced, and inactivated in the parent strain. The predicted amino acid sequence showed 97% homology to HslI and CarI in Erwinia carotovora. Spoilage of laboratory bean sprouts inoculated with the AHL-negative mutant was delayed compared to sprouts inoculated with the wild type, and the AHL-negative mutant did not cause the pH to rise. Compared to the wild-type strain, the AHL-negative mutant had significantly reduced protease and pectinase activities and was negative in an iron chelation (siderophore) assay. This is the first study demonstrating AHL regulation of iron chelation in Enterobacteriaceae. The present study clearly demonstrates that the bacterial spoilage of some food products is influenced by quorum-sensing-regulated phenotypes, and understanding these processes may be useful in the development of novel food preservation additives that specifically block the quorum-sensing systems.

  3. Discovery of novel AHLs as potent antiproliferative agents.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing-Li; Zhang, Xu-Yao; Yu, Bin; Wang, Xi-Xin; Shao, Kun-Peng; Zhu, Xiao-Ge; Liu, Hong-Min

    2015-03-26

    Three series of novel AHL analogs were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxic activity against four human cancer cell lines. The SARs investigation indicated that AHLs with a terminal phenyl group, especially those with the chalcone scaffold had remarkably enhanced cytotoxicity than those with the hydrophobic side chains. Besides, some of these compounds were much more potent than 5-Fu and natural OdDHL. Through the detailed SARs discussions, we found that compounds 10a-k and 14 with the 4-amino chalcone scaffold showed excellent inhibition against all the tested cancer cell lines and were much more potent than 5-Fu and AHLs. Such scaffold may act as a template for further lead optimization. Compound 10i with a 3, 4, 5-trimethoxy group was the most potent one against all the tested cancer cell lines. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that analog 11e induced the cellular apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of MCF-7 cells at G2/M phase in a concentration-and time-dependent manner. PMID:25707012

  4. Quorum sensing: How bacteria can coordinate activity and synchronize their response to external signals?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Nair, Satish K

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing is used by a large variety of bacteria to regulate gene expression in a cell-density-dependent manner. Bacteria can synchronize population behavior using small molecules called autoinducers that are produced by cognate synthases and recognized by specific receptors. Quorum sensing plays critical roles in regulating diverse cellular functions in bacteria, including bioluminescence, virulence gene expression, biofilm formation, and antibiotic resistance. The best-studied autoinducers are acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) molecules, which are the primary quorum sensing signals used by Gram-negative bacteria. In this review we focus on the AHL-dependent quorum sensing system and highlight recent progress on structural and mechanistic studies of AHL synthases and the corresponding receptors. Crystal structures of LuxI-type AHL synthases provide insights into acyl-substrate specificity, but the current knowledge is still greatly limited. Structural studies of AHL receptors have facilitated a more thorough understanding of signal perception and established the molecular framework for the development of quorum sensing inhibitors. PMID:22825856

  5. Marine Microbiological Enzymes: Studies with Multiple Strategies and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Song, Qinghao; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Marine microorganisms produce a series of promising enzymes that have been widely used or are potentially valuable for our daily life. Both classic and newly developed biochemistry technologies have been broadly used to study marine and terrestrial microbiological enzymes. In this brief review, we provide a research update and prospects regarding regulatory mechanisms and related strategies of acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL) lactonase, which is an important but largely unexplored enzyme. We also detail the status and catalytic mechanism of the main types of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes that broadly exist among marine microorganisms but have been poorly explored. In order to facilitate understanding, the regulatory and synthetic biology strategies of terrestrial microorganisms are also mentioned in comparison. We anticipate that this review will provide an outline of multiple strategies for promising marine microbial enzymes and open new avenues for the exploration, engineering and application of various enzymes. PMID:27669268

  6. Marine Microbiological Enzymes: Studies with Multiple Strategies and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Song, Qinghao; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-09-22

    Marine microorganisms produce a series of promising enzymes that have been widely used or are potentially valuable for our daily life. Both classic and newly developed biochemistry technologies have been broadly used to study marine and terrestrial microbiological enzymes. In this brief review, we provide a research update and prospects regarding regulatory mechanisms and related strategies of acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL) lactonase, which is an important but largely unexplored enzyme. We also detail the status and catalytic mechanism of the main types of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes that broadly exist among marine microorganisms but have been poorly explored. In order to facilitate understanding, the regulatory and synthetic biology strategies of terrestrial microorganisms are also mentioned in comparison. We anticipate that this review will provide an outline of multiple strategies for promising marine microbial enzymes and open new avenues for the exploration, engineering and application of various enzymes.

  7. Two quorum sensing systems control biofilm formation and virulence in members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    PubMed Central

    Suppiger, Angela; Schmid, Nadine; Aguilar, Claudio; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo

    2013-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) consists of 17 closely related species that are problematic opportunistic bacterial pathogens for cystic fibrosis patients and immunocompromised individuals. These bacteria are capable of utilizing two different chemical languages: N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and cis-2-unsaturated fatty acids. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the underlying molecular architectures of these communication systems, showing how they are interlinked and discussing how they regulate overlapping as well as specific sets of genes. A particular focus is laid on the role of these signaling systems in the formation of biofilms, which are believed to be highly important for chronic infections. We review genes that have been implicated in the sessile lifestyle of this group of bacteria. The new emerging role of the intracellular second messenger cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) as a downstream regulator of the fatty acid signaling cascade and as a key factor in biofilm formation is also discussed. PMID:23799665

  8. Marine Microbiological Enzymes: Studies with Multiple Strategies and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Song, Qinghao; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Marine microorganisms produce a series of promising enzymes that have been widely used or are potentially valuable for our daily life. Both classic and newly developed biochemistry technologies have been broadly used to study marine and terrestrial microbiological enzymes. In this brief review, we provide a research update and prospects regarding regulatory mechanisms and related strategies of acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL) lactonase, which is an important but largely unexplored enzyme. We also detail the status and catalytic mechanism of the main types of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes that broadly exist among marine microorganisms but have been poorly explored. In order to facilitate understanding, the regulatory and synthetic biology strategies of terrestrial microorganisms are also mentioned in comparison. We anticipate that this review will provide an outline of multiple strategies for promising marine microbial enzymes and open new avenues for the exploration, engineering and application of various enzymes. PMID:27669268

  9. LuxR- and LuxI-Type Quorum-Sensing Circuits Are Prevalent in Members of the Populus deltoides Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Amy L.; Lappala, Colin R.; Morlen, Ryan P.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Lankford, Patricia K.; Harwood, Caroline S.

    2013-01-01

    We are interested in the root microbiome of the fast-growing Eastern cottonwood tree, Populus deltoides. There is a large bank of bacterial isolates from P. deltoides, and there are 44 draft genomes of bacterial endophyte and rhizosphere isolates. As a first step in efforts to understand the roles of bacterial communication and plant-bacterial signaling in P. deltoides, we focused on the prevalence of acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing-signal production and reception in members of the P. deltoides microbiome. We screened 129 bacterial isolates for AHL production using a broad-spectrum bioassay that responds to many but not all AHLs, and we queried the available genome sequences of microbiome isolates for homologs of AHL synthase and receptor genes. AHL signal production was detected in 40% of 129 strains tested. Positive isolates included members of the Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria. Members of the luxI family of AHL synthases were identified in 18 of 39 proteobacterial genomes, including genomes of some isolates that tested negative in the bioassay. Members of the luxR family of transcription factors, which includes AHL-responsive factors, were more abundant than luxI homologs. There were 72 in the 39 proteobacterial genomes. Some of the luxR homologs appear to be members of a subfamily of LuxRs that respond to as-yet-unknown plant signals rather than bacterial AHLs. Apparently, there is a substantial capacity for AHL cell-to-cell communication in proteobacteria of the P. deltoides microbiota, and there are also Proteobacteria with LuxR homologs of the type hypothesized to respond to plant signals or cues. PMID:23851092

  10. Prevalence of LuxR- and LuxI-type quorum sensing circuits in members of the Populus deltoides microbiome

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Amy L; Lappala, Colin; Morlen, Ryan; Pelletier, Dale A; Lu, Tse-Yuan; Lankford, Patricia K; Harwood, Caroline S; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We are interested in the root microbiome of the fast-growing Eastern cottonwood tree, Populus 25 deltoides. There is a large bank of bacterial isolates from P. deltoides and there are 44 draft 26 genomes of bacterial endophyte and rhizosphere isolates. As a first step in efforts to understand 27 the roles of bacterial communication and plant-bacterial signaling in P. deltoides we focused on 28 the prevalence of acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum sensing signal production and 29 reception in members of the P. deltoides microbiome. We screened 129 bacterial isolates for 30 AHL production using a broad-spectrum bioassay that responds to many but not all AHLs, and 31 we queried the available genome sequences of microbiome isolates for homologs of AHL 32 synthase and receptor genes. AHL signal production was detected in 40% of 129 strains tested. 33 Positive isolates included -, - and -Proteobacteria. Members of the luxI family of AHL 34 synthases were identified in 18 of 39 Proteobacteria genomes including genomes of some 35 isolates that tested negative in the bioassay. Members of the luxR family of transcription factors, 36 that include AHL-responsive factors, were more abundant than luxI homologs. There were 72 in 37 the 39 Proteobacteria genomes. Some of the luxR homologs appear to be members of a 38 subfamily of LuxRs that respond to as yet unknown plant signals rather than bacterial AHLs. 39 Apparently, there is a substantial capacity for AHL cell-to-cell communication in Proteobacteria 40 of the P. deltoides microbiota and there are also Proteobacteria with LuxR homologs of the type 41 hypothesized to respond to plant signals or cues.

  11. N-acylated alanine methyl esters (NAMEs) from Roseovarius tolerans, structural analogs of quorum-sensing autoinducers, N-acylhomoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Hilke; Thiel, Verena; Voget, Sonja; Patzelt, Diana; Daniel, Rolf; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Schulz, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    The Roseobacter clade is one of the most important bacteria group living in the ocean. Liquid cultures of Roseovarius tolerans EL 164 were investigated for the production of autoinducers such as N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) and other secondary metabolites. The XAD extracts were analyzed by GC/MS. Two AHLs, Z7-C14 : 1-homoserine lactone (HSL) and C15 : 1-HSL, were identified. Additionally, the extract contained five compounds with molecular-ion peaks at m/z 104, 145, and 158, thus exhibiting mass spectra similar to those of AHLs with corresponding peaks at m/z 102, 143, and 156. Isolation of the main compound by column chromatography, NMR analysis, dimethyl disulfide derivatization for the determination of the location of the CC bond and finally synthesis of the compound with the proposed structure confirmed the compound to be (Z)-N-(hexadec-9-enoyl)alanine methyl ester. Four additional minor compounds were identified as C14 : 0-, C15 : 0-, C16 : 0-, and C17 : 1-N-acylated alanine methyl esters (NAMEs). All NAMEs have not been described from natural sources before. A BLASTp search showed the presence of AHL-producing luxI genes, but no homologous genes potentially responsible for the structurally closely related NAMEs were found. The involvement of the NAMEs in chemical communication processes of the bacteria is discussed.

  12. Plant Responses to Bacterial N-Acyl l-Homoserine Lactones are Dependent on Enzymatic Degradation to l-Homoserine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria use quorum sensing (QS) to regulate phenotypes that ultimately benefit the bacterial population at high cell densities. These QS-dependent phenotypes are diverse and can have significant impacts on the bacterial host, including virulence factor production, motility, biofilm formation, bioluminescence, and root nodulation. As bacteria and their eukaryotic hosts have coevolved over millions of years, it is not surprising that certain hosts appear to be able to sense QS signals, potentially allowing them to alter QS outcomes. Recent experiments have established that eukaryotes have marked responses to the N-acyl l-homoserine lactone (AHL) signals used by Gram-negative bacteria for QS, and the responses of plants to AHLs have received considerable scrutiny to date. However, the molecular mechanisms by which plants, and eukaryotes in general, sense bacterial AHLs remain unclear. Herein, we report a systematic analysis of the responses of the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula to a series of native AHLs and byproducts thereof. Our results establish that AHLs can significantly alter seedling growth in an acyl-chain length dependent manner. Based upon A. thaliana knockout studies and in vitro biochemical assays, we conclude that the observed growth effects are dependent upon AHL amidolysis by a plant-derived fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) to yield l-homoserine. The accumulation of l-homoserine appears to encourage plant growth at low concentrations by stimulating transpiration, while higher concentrations inhibit growth by stimulating ethylene production. These results offer new insights into the mechanisms by which plant hosts can respond to QS signals and the potential role of QS in interkingdom associations. PMID:24918118

  13. Degradation of Bacterial Quorum Sensing Signaling Molecules by the Microscopic Yeast Trichosporon loubieri Isolated from Tropical Wetland Waters

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Cheng-Siang; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Chen, Jian Woon; Chong, Yee Meng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Proteobacteria produce N-acylhomoserine lactones as signaling molecules, which will bind to their cognate receptor and activate quorum sensing-mediated phenotypes in a population-dependent manner. Although quorum sensing signaling molecules can be degraded by bacteria or fungi, there is no reported work on the degradation of such molecules by basidiomycetous yeast. By using a minimal growth medium containing N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine lactone as the sole source of carbon, a wetland water sample from Malaysia was enriched for microbial strains that can degrade N-acylhomoserine lactones, and consequently, a basidiomycetous yeast strain WW1C was isolated. Morphological phenotype and molecular analyses confirmed that WW1C was a strain of Trichosporon loubieri. We showed that WW1C degraded AHLs with N-acyl side chains ranging from 4 to 10 carbons in length, with or without oxo group substitutions at the C3 position. Re-lactonisation bioassays revealed that WW1C degraded AHLs via a lactonase activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of degradation of N-acyl-homoserine lactones and utilization of N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine as carbon and nitrogen source for growth by basidiomycetous yeast from tropical wetland water; and the degradation of bacterial quorum sensing molecules by an eukaryotic yeast. PMID:24072030

  14. Inhibition by chestnut honey of N-Acyl-L-homoserine lactones and biofilm formation in Erwinia carotovora, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Truchado, Pilar; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco; Allende, Ana

    2009-12-01

    Bacteria are able to communicate and coordinate certain processes using small secreted signaling molecules called autoinducers. This phenomenon, known as "quorum sensing" (QS), may be essential for the synchronization of virulence factors as well as biofilm development. The interruption of bacterial QS is acknowledged to attenuate virulence and considered to be a potential new therapy to treat infections caused by pathogenic bacteria. N-Acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) have been identified as the main bacterial signaling molecules in Gram-negative bacteria. This study evaluates the capacity of chestnut honey and its aqueous and methanolic extracts to inhibit bacterial AHL-controlled processes in Erwinia carotovora , Yersinia enterocolitica , and Aeromonas hydrophila . This study is the first in applying liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry to determine the QS inhibitory activity of honey against pathogenic bacteria. The tandem mass spectrometry analysis of culture supernatants confirmed the presence of three main AHLs: N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL) and N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL) in E. carotovora and Y. enterocolitica and N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) in A. hydrophila. The effect of chestnut honey and its aqueous and methanolic extracts (0.2 g/mL) on AHL concentration and biofilm formation in bacterial cultures was determined. The obtained results revealed their potential use as QS inhibitors or regulators of the degradation of QS signals, with the methanolic extract showing less inhibitory capacity. Thus, the QS inhibitory activity of chestnut honey seems to be related to the aqueous phase, suggesting that the carbohydrate fraction contains an antipathogenic substance responsible for the inhibitory activity.

  15. A novel gene OsAHL1 improves both drought avoidance and drought tolerance in rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liguo; Liu, Zaochang; Liu, Yunhua; Kong, Deyan; Li, Tianfei; Yu, Shunwu; Mei, Hanwei; Xu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Hongyan; Chen, Liang; Luo, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    A novel gene, OsAHL1, containing an AT-hook motif and a PPC domain was identified through genome-wide profiling and analysis of mRNAs by comparing the microarray of drought-challenged versus normally watered rice. The results indicated OsAHL1 has both drought avoidance and drought tolerance that could greatly improve drought resistance of the rice plant. Overexpression of OsAHL1 enhanced multiple stress tolerances in rice plants during both seedling and panicle development stages. Functional studies revealed that OsAHL1 regulates root development under drought condition to enhance drought avoidance, participates in oxidative stress response and also regulates the content of chlorophyll in rice leaves. OsAHL1 specifically binds to the A/T rich sequence region of promoters or introns, and hence directly regulates the expression of many stress related downstream genes. PMID:27453463

  16. In silico and experimental methods revealed highly diverse bacteria with quorum sensing and aromatics biodegradation systems--a potential broad application on bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yili; Zeng, Yanhua; Yu, Zhiliang; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Hao; Lin, Xiuchun

    2013-11-01

    Phylogenetic overlaps between aromatics-degrading bacteria and acyl-homoserine-lactone (AHL) or autoinducer (AI) based quorum-sensing (QS) bacteria were evident in literatures; however, the diversity of bacteria with both activities had never been finely described. In-silico searching in NCBI genome database revealed that more than 11% of investigated population harbored both aromatic ring-hydroxylating-dioxygenase (RHD) gene and AHL/AI-synthetase gene. These bacteria were distributed in 10 orders, 15 families, 42 genus and 78 species. Horizontal transfers of both genes were common among them. Using enrichment and culture dependent method, 6 Sphingomonadales and 4 Rhizobiales with phenanthrene- or pyrene-degrading ability and AHL-production were isolated from marine, wetland and soil samples. Thin-layer-chromatography and gas-chromatography-mass-spectrum revealed that these Sphingomonads produced various AHL molecules. This is the first report of highly diverse bacteria that harbored both aromatics-degrading and QS systems. QS regulation may have broad impacts on aromatics biodegradation, and would be a new angle for developing bioremediation technology.

  17. Antiquorum from freshwater zoosporic isolated fungi: maximization of some ameliorative factors.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Essam Mohamed; Ammar, Mohamed Ibrahim Farag

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria detect their critical cell numbers through a mechanism known as quorum sensing (QS). Acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) mediated QS systems have been shown to operate in important human pathogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect generated by zoosporic freshwater fungi on AHLs production. A potent strain of zoosporic fungi, Leptolegniella keratinophilum, was isolated after extended screening study. A new cheap medium was used to support the anti-AHLs activities. Statistical strategy depending on two levels factorial model and three levels quadratic model were applied to guide a production maximization process. The three levels Box-Behnken model possessed the ability to optimize the significant nutritional and cultural conditions and to predict the maximum that can be achieved. In the course of study, we reached 88% anti-AHLs activity, while the initial activity was 63%. There was no previous maximization methodology for either the experimental medium, or the fungi. The results suggest that freshwater zoosporic fungi can be potentially used against bacterial infections.

  18. Mouse nasal epithelial innate immune responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing molecules require taste signaling components

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert J.; Chen, Bei; Redding, Kevin M.; Margolskee, Robert F.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2016-01-01

    We previously observed that the human bitter taste receptor T2R38 is an important component of upper respiratory innate defense because it detects acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum sensing molecules secreted by gram-negative bacteria. T2R38 activation in human sinonasal epithelial cells stimulates calcium and nitric oxide signals that increase mucociliary clearance, the major physical respiratory defense against inhaled pathogens. While mice do not have a clear T2R38 orthologue, they do have bitter taste receptors capable of responding to T2R38 agonists, suggesting that T2R-mediated innate immune mechanisms may be conserved in mice. We examined whether AHLs activate calcium and nitric oxide signaling in mouse nasal epithelial cells and utilized pharmacology as well as cells from knockout mice lacking important components of canonical taste signal transduction pathways to determine if AHL-stimulated responses require taste signaling molecules. We found that AHLs stimulate calcium-dependent NO production that increases mucociliary clearance and thus likely serves an innate immune role against gram-negative bacteria. These responses require PLCβ2 and TRPM5 taste signaling components, but not α-gustducin. These data suggest the mouse may be a useful model for further studies of T2R-mediated innate immunity. PMID:24045336

  19. Inhibition of quorum sensing in Serratia marcescens AS-1 by synthetic analogs of N-acylhomoserine lactone.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Shiono, Toshitaka; Takidouchi, Kiyomi; Kato, Masashi; Kato, Norihiro; Kato, Junichi; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2007-10-01

    Quorum sensing is a regulatory system for controlling gene expression in response to increasing cell density. N-Acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) is produced by gram-negative bacteria, which use it as a quorum-sensing signal molecule. Serratia marcescens is a gram-negative opportunistic pathogen which is responsible for an increasing number of serious nosocomial infections. S. marcescens AS-1 produces N-hexanoyl homoserine lactone (C(6)-HSL) and N-(3-oxohexanoyl) homoserine lactone and regulates prodigiosin production, swarming motility, and biofilm formation by AHL-mediated quorum sensing. We synthesized a series of N-acyl cyclopentylamides with acyl chain lengths ranging from 4 to 12 and estimated their inhibitory effects on prodigiosin production in AS-1. One of these molecules, N-nonanoyl-cyclopentylamide (C(9)-CPA), had a strong inhibitory effect on prodigiosin production. C(9)-CPA also inhibited the swarming motility and biofilm formation of AS-1. A competition assay revealed that C(9)-CPA was able to inhibit quorum sensing at four times the concentration of exogenous C(6)-HSL and was more effective than the previously reported halogenated furanone. Our results demonstrated that C(9)-CPA was an effective quorum-sensing inhibitor for S. marcescens AS-1.

  20. The quorum-quenching lactonase from Geobacillus caldoxylosilyticus: purification, characterization, crystallization and crystallographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergonzi, Celine; Schwab, Michael; Elias, Mikael

    2016-09-01

    Lactonases are enzymes that are capable of hydrolyzing various lactones such as aliphatic lactones or acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), with the latter being used as chemical signaling molecules by numerous Gram-negative bacteria. Lactonases therefore have the ability to quench the chemical communication, also known as quorum sensing, of numerous bacteria, and in particular to inhibit behaviors that are regulated by this system, such as the expression of virulence factors or the production of biofilms. A novel representative from the metallo-β-lactamase superfamily, dubbed GcL, was isolated from the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus caldoxylosilyticus. Because of its thermophilic origin, GcL may constitute an interesting candidate for the development of biocontrol agents. Here, we show that GcL is a thermostable enzyme with a half-life at 75°C of 152.5 ± 10 min. Remarkably, it is also shown that GcL is among the most active lactonases characterized to date, with catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) against AHLs of greater than 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). The structure of GcL is expected to shed light on the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme and the molecular determinants for the substrate specificity in this class of lactonases. Here, the expression, purification, characterization, crystallization and X-ray diffraction data collection to 1.6 Å resolution of GcL are reported. PMID:27599858

  1. Structural and Enzymatic characterization of the lactonase SisLac from Sulfolobus islandicus

    PubMed Central

    Chabriere, Eric; Elias, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Background A new member of the Phosphotriesterase-Like Lactonases (PLL) family from the hyperthermophilic archeon Sulfolobus islandicus (SisLac) has been characterized. SisLac is a native lactonase that exhibits a high promiscuous phosphotriesterase activity. SisLac thus represents a promising target for engineering studies, exhibiting both detoxification and bacterial quorum quenching abilities, including human pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we describe the substrate specificity of SisLac, providing extensive kinetic studies performed with various phosphotriesters, esters, N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) and other lactones as substrates. Moreover, we solved the X-ray structure of SisLac and structural comparisons with the closely related SsoPox structure highlighted differences in the surface salt bridge network and the dimerization interface. SisLac and SsoPox being close homologues (91% sequence identity), we undertook a mutational study to decipher these structural differences and their putative consequences on the stability and the catalytic properties of these proteins. Conclusions/Significance We show that SisLac is a very proficient lactonase against aroma lactones and AHLs as substrates. Hence, data herein emphasize the potential role of SisLac as quorum quenching agent in Sulfolobus. Moreover, despite the very high sequence homology with SsoPox, we highlight key epistatic substitutions that influence the enzyme stability and activity. PMID:23071703

  2. A bioinformatic survey of distribution, conservation, and probable functions of LuxR solo regulators in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Subramoni, Sujatha; Florez Salcedo, Diana Vanessa; Suarez-Moreno, Zulma R

    2015-01-01

    LuxR solo transcriptional regulators contain both an autoinducer binding domain (ABD; N-terminal) and a DNA binding Helix-Turn-Helix domain (HTH; C-terminal), but are not associated with a cognate N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) synthase coding gene in the same genome. Although a few LuxR solos have been characterized, their distributions as well as their role in bacterial signal perception and other processes are poorly understood. In this study we have carried out a systematic survey of distribution of all ABD containing LuxR transcriptional regulators (QS domain LuxRs) available in the InterPro database (IPR005143), and identified those lacking a cognate AHL synthase. These LuxR solos were then analyzed regarding their taxonomical distribution, predicted functions of neighboring genes and the presence of complete AHL-QS systems in the genomes that carry them. Our analyses reveal the presence of one or multiple predicted LuxR solos in many proteobacterial genomes carrying QS domain LuxRs, some of them harboring genes for one or more AHL-QS circuits. The presence of LuxR solos in bacteria occupying diverse environments suggests potential ecological functions for these proteins beyond AHL and interkingdom signaling. Based on gene context and the conservation levels of invariant amino acids of ABD, we have classified LuxR solos into functionally meaningful groups or putative orthologs. Surprisingly, putative LuxR solos were also found in a few non-proteobacterial genomes which are not known to carry AHL-QS systems. Multiple predicted LuxR solos in the same genome appeared to have different levels of conservation of invariant amino acid residues of ABD questioning their binding to AHLs. In summary, this study provides a detailed overview of distribution of LuxR solos and their probable roles in bacteria with genome sequence information.

  3. A bioinformatic survey of distribution, conservation, and probable functions of LuxR solo regulators in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Subramoni, Sujatha; Florez Salcedo, Diana Vanessa; Suarez-Moreno, Zulma R.

    2015-01-01

    LuxR solo transcriptional regulators contain both an autoinducer binding domain (ABD; N-terminal) and a DNA binding Helix-Turn-Helix domain (HTH; C-terminal), but are not associated with a cognate N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) synthase coding gene in the same genome. Although a few LuxR solos have been characterized, their distributions as well as their role in bacterial signal perception and other processes are poorly understood. In this study we have carried out a systematic survey of distribution of all ABD containing LuxR transcriptional regulators (QS domain LuxRs) available in the InterPro database (IPR005143), and identified those lacking a cognate AHL synthase. These LuxR solos were then analyzed regarding their taxonomical distribution, predicted functions of neighboring genes and the presence of complete AHL-QS systems in the genomes that carry them. Our analyses reveal the presence of one or multiple predicted LuxR solos in many proteobacterial genomes carrying QS domain LuxRs, some of them harboring genes for one or more AHL-QS circuits. The presence of LuxR solos in bacteria occupying diverse environments suggests potential ecological functions for these proteins beyond AHL and interkingdom signaling. Based on gene context and the conservation levels of invariant amino acids of ABD, we have classified LuxR solos into functionally meaningful groups or putative orthologs. Surprisingly, putative LuxR solos were also found in a few non-proteobacterial genomes which are not known to carry AHL-QS systems. Multiple predicted LuxR solos in the same genome appeared to have different levels of conservation of invariant amino acid residues of ABD questioning their binding to AHLs. In summary, this study provides a detailed overview of distribution of LuxR solos and their probable roles in bacteria with genome sequence information. PMID:25759807

  4. Plant phenolic acids affect the virulence of Pectobacterium aroidearum and P. carotovorum ssp. brasiliense via quorum sensing regulation.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Janak Raj; Burdman, Saul; Lipsky, Alexander; Yariv, Shaked; Yedidia, Iris

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have reported effects of the plant phenolic acids cinnamic acid (CA) and salicylic acid (SA) on the virulence of soft rot enterobacteria. However, the mechanisms involved in these processes are not yet fully understood. Here, we investigated whether CA and SA interfere with the quorum sensing (QS) system of two Pectobacterium species, P. aroidearum and P. carotovorum ssp. brasiliense, which are known to produce N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) QS signals. Our results clearly indicate that both phenolic compounds affect the QS machinery of the two species, consequently altering the expression of bacterial virulence factors. Although, in control treatments, the expression of QS-related genes increased over time, the exposure of bacteria to non-lethal concentrations of CA or SA inhibited the expression of QS genes, including expI, expR, PC1_1442 (luxR transcriptional regulator) and luxS (a component of the AI-2 system). Other virulence genes known to be regulated by the QS system, such as pecS, pel, peh and yheO, were also down-regulated relative to the control. In agreement with the low levels of expression of expI and expR, CA and SA also reduced the level of the AHL signal. The effects of CA and SA on AHL signalling were confirmed in compensation assays, in which exogenous application of N-(β-ketocaproyl)-l-homoserine lactone (eAHL) led to the recovery of the reduction in virulence caused by the two phenolic acids. Collectively, the results of gene expression studies, bioluminescence assays, virulence assays and compensation assays with eAHL clearly support a mechanism by which CA and SA interfere with Pectobacterium virulence via the QS machinery.

  5. Involvement of quorum sensing genes in biofilm development and degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a marine bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa N6P6.

    PubMed

    Mangwani, Neelam; Kumari, Supriya; Das, Surajit

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm-forming and acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) synthase-positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa N6P6 was isolated from seawater after selective enrichment with two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), viz. phenanthrene and pyrene. AHL synthesis was detected qualitatively using bioreporter strains. This marine bacterium putatively synthesized N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone and N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone, which were identified by TLC, GC-MS, and HPLC. Two quorum sensing (QS) genes coding for AHL synthase, i.e., lasI and rhlI, were identified in the bacterium. lasI and rhlI gene expression was studied during biofilm mode of growth at different phases using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The expression of lasI increased with increase in biofilm growth. In contrast, the expression of rhlI decreased during log phase of biofilm growth. The changes in lasI/rhlI expression level had significant effects (P<0.05) on biofilm architecture and subsequent PAH degradation rate. Degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene by P. aeruginosa N6P6 was affected by biofilm growth and lasI expression. The respective phenanthrene degradation for 15, 24, 48, and 72 h old biofilm after 7 days was 21.5, 54.2, 85.6, and 85.7%. However, the corresponding pyrene degradation was 15, 18.28, 47.56, and 46.48%, respectively, after 7 days. A significant positive correlation (P<0.05) was observed between lasI expression and PAHs degradation. However, in the presence of tannic acid, a QS inhibitor (QSI), PAHs degradation, biofilm formation, and pyocyanin production reduced significantly which confirmed the pivotal role of QS in biodegradation of PAHs. The findings suggest that AHLs play a pivotal role during biofilm development and subsequent bioremediation of PAHs.

  6. Effects of AiiA-mediated quorum quenching in Sinorhizobium meliloti on quorum-sensing signals, proteome patterns, and symbiotic interactions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mengsheng; Chen, Hancai; Eberhard, Anatol; Gronquist, Matthew R; Robinson, Jayne B; Connolly, Mary; Teplitski, Max; Rolfe, Barry G; Bauer, Wolfgang D

    2007-07-01

    Many behaviors in bacteria, including behaviors important to pathogenic and symbiotic interactions with eukaryotic hosts, are regulated by a mechanism called quorum sensing (QS). A "quorum-quenching" approach was used here to identify QS-regulated behaviors in the N-fixing bacterial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. The AiiA lactonase from Bacillus produced in S. meliloti was shown to enzymatically inactivate S. meliloti's N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) QS signals, thereby disrupting normal QS regulation. Sixty proteins were differentially accumulated in the AiiA-producing strain versus the control in early log or early stationary phase cultures. Fifty-two of these QS-regulated proteins, with putative functions that include cell division, protein processing and translation, metabolite transport, oxidative stress, and amino acid metabolism, were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. Transcription of representative genes was reduced significantly in the AiiA-producing strain, although the effects of AiiA on protein accumulation did not always correspond to effects on transcription. The QS signal-deficient strain was reduced significantly in nodule initiation during the first 12 h after inoculation onto Medicago truncatula host plants. The AiiA lactonase also was found to substantially inactivate two of the AHL mimic compounds secreted by M. truncatula. This suggests some structural similarity between bacterial AHLs and these mimic compounds. It also indicates that quorum quenching could be useful in identifying Sinorhizobium genes that are affected by such host QS mimics in planta.

  7. Effect of quorum sensing signals produced by seaweed-associated bacteria on carpospore liberation from Gracilaria dura

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ravindra Pal; Baghel, Ravi S.; Reddy, C. R. K.; Jha, Bhavanath

    2015-01-01

    Epiphytic and endophytic bacteria associated with green macroalgae Ulva (U. fasciata and U. lactuca) and red macroalgae Gracilaria (G. corticata and G. dura) have been identified from three different seasons to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing (QS) molecules on carpospores liberation from Gracilaria dura. The bacterial isolates belonging to the orders Bacillales, Pseudomonadales, Alteromonadales, and Vibrionales were present in all seasons, whereas Actinomycetales and Enterobacteriales were confined to pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. Among all the Gram-negative bacteria, seven isolates were found to produce different types of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). Interestingly, Shewanella algae produced five types of AHL: C4-HSL, HC4-HSL, C6-HSL, 3-oxo-C6-HSL, and 3-oxo-C12-HSL. Subsequently, the AHLs producing bacterial isolates were screened for carpospore liberation from G. dura and these isolates were found to positively induce carpospore liberation over the control. Also, observed that carpospore liberation increased significantly in C4- and C6-HSL treated cystocarps. Sodium dodecyl sulfate and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the total protein of the C4- and C6-HSL treated cystocarps showed two specific peptide bands of different molecular weights (50 kDa and 60 kDa) as compared to the control, confirming their indirect effect on carpospore liberation. PMID:25788899

  8. Quorum sensing signalling and biofilm formation of brewery-derived bacteria, and inhibition of signalling by natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Priha, O; Virkajärvi, V; Juvonen, R; Puupponen-Pimiä, R; Nohynek, L; Alakurtti, S; Pirttimaa, M; Storgårds, E

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria use quorum sensing signalling in various functions, e.g. while forming biofilms, and inhibition of this signalling could be one way to control biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of signalling molecules and its correlation with the biofilm formation capability of bacteria isolated from brewery filling process. A further aim was to study berry extracts and wood-derived terpenes for their possible quorum sensing inhibitory effects. Out of the twenty bacteria studied, five produced short-chain and five long-chain AHL (acyl homoserine lactone) signalling molecules when tested with the Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 reporter bacterium. Production of AI-2 (autoinducer-2) signalling molecules was detected from nine strains with the Vibrio harveyi BB170 bioassay. Over half of the strains produced biofilm in the microtitre plate assay, but the production of AHL and AI-2 signalling molecules and biofilm formation capability did not directly correlate with each other. Out of the 13 berry extracts and wood-derived terpenes screened, four compounds decreased AHL signalling without effect on growth. These were betulin, raspberry extract and two cloudberry extracts. The effect of these compounds on biofilm formation of the selected six bacterial strains varied. The phenolic extract of freeze-dried cloudberry fruit caused a statistically significant reduction of biofilm formation of Obesumbacterium proteus strain. Further experiments should aim at identifying the active compounds and revealing whether quorum sensing inhibition causes structural changes in the biofilms formed. PMID:24944110

  9. Unravelling the interactions among microbial populations found in activated sludge during biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Liébana, Raquel; Arregui, Lucía; Santos, Antonio; Murciano, Antonio; Marquina, Domingo; Serrano, Susana

    2016-09-01

    Microorganisms colonize surfaces and develop biofilms through interactions that are not yet thoroughly understood, with important implications for water and wastewater systems. This study investigated the interactions between N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-producing bacteria, yeasts and protists, and their contribution to biofilm development. Sixty-one bacterial strains were isolated from activated sludge and screened for AHL production, with Aeromonas sp. found to be the dominant AHL producer. Shewanella xiamenensis, Aeromonas allosaccharophila, Acinetobacter junii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa recorded the highest adherence capabilities, with S. xiamenensis being the most effective in surface colonization. Additionally, highly significant interactions (i.e. synergic or antagonistic) were described for dual and multistrain mixtures of bacterial strains (P. aeruginosa, S. xiamenensis, A. junii and Pseudomonas stutzeri), as well as for strongly adherent bacteria co-cultured with yeasts. In this last case, the adhered biomass in co-cultures was lower than the monospecific biofilms of bacteria and yeast, with biofilm observations by microscopy suggesting that bacteria had an antagonist effect on the whole or part of the yeast population. Finally, protist predation by Euplotes sp. and Paramecium sp. on Aeromonas hydrophila biofilms not only failed to reduce biofilm formation, but also recorded unexpected results leading to the development of aggregates of high density and complexity. PMID:27306553

  10. Quorum vs. diffusion sensing: a quantitative analysis of the relevance of absorbing or reflecting boundaries.

    PubMed

    Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Zanardo, Marina; Alberghini, Sara; Tondello, Alessandra; Squartini, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    The consequences of the boundary conditions (signal reflecting vs. signal adsorbing) on bacterial intercellular communication were addressed by a combined physics and microbiology approach. A predictive biophysical model was devised that considered system size, diffusion from given points, signal molecule decay and boundary properties. The theoretical predictions were tested with two experimental agarose-gel-based set-ups for reflecting or absorbing boundaries. N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) concentration profiles were measured using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 bioassay and found to agree with model predictions. The half-life of AHL was estimated to be 7 days. The absorbing vs. reflecting nature of the boundaries drastically changed AHL concentration profiles. The effect of a single nonreflecting boundary side was equivalent to a 100-fold lower cell concentration. Results suggest that the kinetics of signal accumulation vs. signal removal and their threshold-mediated phenotypic consequences are directly linked to the properties of biofilm boundaries, stressing the relevance of the diffusion sensing component in bacterial communication. PMID:24484313

  11. Quorum Sensing in Some Representative Species of Halomonadaceae

    PubMed Central

    Tahrioui, Ali; Schwab, Melanie; Quesada, Emilia; Llamas, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication, or quorum-sensing (QS), systems are employed by bacteria for promoting collective behaviour within a population. An analysis to detect QS signal molecules in 43 species of the Halomonadaceae family revealed that they produced N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), which suggests that the QS system is widespread throughout this group of bacteria. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis of crude AHL extracts, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 (pZLR4) as biosensor strain, resulted in different profiles, which were not related to the various habitats of the species in question. To confirm AHL production in the Halomonadaceae species, PCR and DNA sequencing approaches were used to study the distribution of the luxI-type synthase gene. Phylogenetic analysis using sequence data revealed that 29 of the species studied contained a LuxI homolog. Phylogenetic analysis showed that sequences from Halomonadaceae species grouped together and were distinct from other members of the Gammaproteobacteria and also from species belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. PMID:25371343

  12. Quorum vs. diffusion sensing: a quantitative analysis of the relevance of absorbing or reflecting boundaries.

    PubMed

    Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Zanardo, Marina; Alberghini, Sara; Tondello, Alessandra; Squartini, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    The consequences of the boundary conditions (signal reflecting vs. signal adsorbing) on bacterial intercellular communication were addressed by a combined physics and microbiology approach. A predictive biophysical model was devised that considered system size, diffusion from given points, signal molecule decay and boundary properties. The theoretical predictions were tested with two experimental agarose-gel-based set-ups for reflecting or absorbing boundaries. N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) concentration profiles were measured using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 bioassay and found to agree with model predictions. The half-life of AHL was estimated to be 7 days. The absorbing vs. reflecting nature of the boundaries drastically changed AHL concentration profiles. The effect of a single nonreflecting boundary side was equivalent to a 100-fold lower cell concentration. Results suggest that the kinetics of signal accumulation vs. signal removal and their threshold-mediated phenotypic consequences are directly linked to the properties of biofilm boundaries, stressing the relevance of the diffusion sensing component in bacterial communication.

  13. Effect of quorum sensing signals produced by seaweed-associated bacteria on carpospore liberation from Gracilaria dura.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravindra Pal; Baghel, Ravi S; Reddy, C R K; Jha, Bhavanath

    2015-01-01

    Epiphytic and endophytic bacteria associated with green macroalgae Ulva (U. fasciata and U. lactuca) and red macroalgae Gracilaria (G. corticata and G. dura) have been identified from three different seasons to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing (QS) molecules on carpospores liberation from Gracilaria dura. The bacterial isolates belonging to the orders Bacillales, Pseudomonadales, Alteromonadales, and Vibrionales were present in all seasons, whereas Actinomycetales and Enterobacteriales were confined to pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. Among all the Gram-negative bacteria, seven isolates were found to produce different types of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). Interestingly, Shewanella algae produced five types of AHL: C4-HSL, HC4-HSL, C6-HSL, 3-oxo-C6-HSL, and 3-oxo-C12-HSL. Subsequently, the AHLs producing bacterial isolates were screened for carpospore liberation from G. dura and these isolates were found to positively induce carpospore liberation over the control. Also, observed that carpospore liberation increased significantly in C4- and C6-HSL treated cystocarps. Sodium dodecyl sulfate and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the total protein of the C4- and C6-HSL treated cystocarps showed two specific peptide bands of different molecular weights (50 kDa and 60 kDa) as compared to the control, confirming their indirect effect on carpospore liberation.

  14. Unravelling the interactions among microbial populations found in activated sludge during biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Liébana, Raquel; Arregui, Lucía; Santos, Antonio; Murciano, Antonio; Marquina, Domingo; Serrano, Susana

    2016-09-01

    Microorganisms colonize surfaces and develop biofilms through interactions that are not yet thoroughly understood, with important implications for water and wastewater systems. This study investigated the interactions between N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-producing bacteria, yeasts and protists, and their contribution to biofilm development. Sixty-one bacterial strains were isolated from activated sludge and screened for AHL production, with Aeromonas sp. found to be the dominant AHL producer. Shewanella xiamenensis, Aeromonas allosaccharophila, Acinetobacter junii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa recorded the highest adherence capabilities, with S. xiamenensis being the most effective in surface colonization. Additionally, highly significant interactions (i.e. synergic or antagonistic) were described for dual and multistrain mixtures of bacterial strains (P. aeruginosa, S. xiamenensis, A. junii and Pseudomonas stutzeri), as well as for strongly adherent bacteria co-cultured with yeasts. In this last case, the adhered biomass in co-cultures was lower than the monospecific biofilms of bacteria and yeast, with biofilm observations by microscopy suggesting that bacteria had an antagonist effect on the whole or part of the yeast population. Finally, protist predation by Euplotes sp. and Paramecium sp. on Aeromonas hydrophila biofilms not only failed to reduce biofilm formation, but also recorded unexpected results leading to the development of aggregates of high density and complexity.

  15. Inhibition of Quorum Sensing Mediated Virulence Factors Production in Urinary Pathogen Serratia marcescens PS1 by Marine Sponges.

    PubMed

    Annapoorani, Angusamy; Jabbar, Abdul Karim Kamil Abdul; Musthafa, Syed Khadar Syed; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Ravi, Arumugam Veera

    2012-06-01

    The focal intent of this study was to find out an alternative strategy for the antibiotic usage against bacterial infections. The quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activity of marine sponges collected from Palk Bay, India was evaluated against acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) mediated violacein production in Chromobacterium violaceum (ATCC 12472), CV026 and virulence gene expressions in clinical isolate Serratia marcescens PS1. Out of 29 marine sponges tested, the methanol extracts of Aphrocallistes bocagei (TS 8), Haliclona (Gellius) megastoma (TS 25) and Clathria atrasanguinea (TS 27) inhibited the AHL mediated violacein production in C. violaceum (ATCC 12472) and CV026. Further, these sponge extracts inhibited the AHL dependent prodigiosin pigment, virulence enzymes such as protease, hemolysin production and biofilm formation in S. marcescens PS1. However, these sponge extracts were not inhibitory to bacterial growth, which reveals the fact that the QSI activity of these extracts was not related to static or killing effects on bacteria. Based on the obtained results, it is envisaged that the marine sponges could pave the way to prevent quorum sensing (QS) mediated bacterial infections.

  16. Insights of biosurfactant producing Serratia marcescens strain W2.3 isolated from diseased tilapia fish: a draft genome analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen with broad range of host ranging from vertebrates, invertebrates and plants. S. marcescens strain W2.3 was isolated from a diseased tilapia fish and it was suspected to be the causal agent for the fish disease as virulence genes were found within its genome. In this study, for the first time, the genome sequences of S. marcescens strain W2.3 were sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. Result Several virulent factors of S. marcescens such as serrawettin, a biosurfactant, has been reported to be regulated by N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS). In our previous studies, an unusual AHL with long acyl side chain was detected from this isolate suggesting the possibility of novel virulence factors regulation. This evokes our interest in the genome of this bacterial strain and hereby we present the draft genome of S. marcescens W2.3, which carries the serrawettin production gene, swrA and the AHL-based QS transcriptional regulator gene, luxR which is an orphan luxR. Conclusion With the availability of the whole genome sequences of S. marcescens W2.3, this will pave the way for the study of the QS-mediated genes expression in this bacterium. PMID:24148830

  17. Inhibition of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm bacteria by a halogenated furanone compound.

    PubMed

    Hentzer, Morten; Riedel, Kathrin; Rasmussen, Thomas B; Heydorn, Arne; Andersen, Jens Bo; Parsek, Matthew R; Rice, Scott A; Eberl, Leo; Molin, Søren; Høiby, Niels; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Givskov, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Novel molecular tools have been constructed which allow for in situ detection of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The reporter responds to AHL activation of LasR by expression of an unstable version of the green-fluorescent protein (Gfp). Gfp-based reporter technology has been applied for non-destructive, single-cell-level detection of quorum sensing in laboratory-based P. aeruginosa biofilms. It is reported that a synthetic halogenated furanone compound, which is a derivative of the secondary metabolites produced by the Australian macroalga Delisea pulchra, is capable of interfering with AHL-mediated quorum sensing in P. aeruginosa. It is demonstrated that the furanone compound specifically represses expression of a PlasB-gfp reporter fusion without affecting growth or protein synthesis. In addition, it reduces the production of important virulence factors, indicating a general effect on target genes of the las quorum sensing circuit. The furanone was applied to P. aeruginosa biofilms established in biofilm flow chambers. The Gfp-based analysis reveals that the compound penetrates microcolonies and blocks cell signalling and quorum sensing in most biofilm cells. The compound did not affect initial attachment to the abiotic substratum. It does, however, affect the architecture of the biofilm and enhances the process of bacterial detachment, leading to a loss of bacterial biomass from the substratum.

  18. Comparative analysis of two classes of quorum-sensing signaling systems that control production of extracellular proteins and secondary metabolites in Erwinia carotovora subspecies.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Asita; Cui, Yaya; Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Leigh, Nathan; Dixit, Vaishali; Chatterjee, Arun K

    2005-12-01

    In Erwinia carotovora subspecies, N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) controls the expression of various traits, including extracellular enzyme/protein production and pathogenicity. We report here that E. carotovora subspecies possess two classes of quorum-sensing signaling systems defined by the nature of the major AHL analog produced as well as structural and functional characteristics of AHL synthase (AhlI) and AHL receptor (ExpR). Class I strains represented by E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica strain Eca12 and E. carotovora subsp. carotovora strains EC153 and SCC3193 produce 3-oxo-C8-HL (N-3-oxooctanoyl-l-homoserine lactone) as the major AHL analog as well as low but detectable levels of 3-oxo-C6-HL (N-3-oxohexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone). In contrast, the members of class II (i.e., E. carotovora subsp. betavasculorum strain Ecb168 and E. carotovora subsp. carotovora strains Ecc71 and SCRI193) produce 3-oxo-C6-HL as the major analog. ExpR species of both classes activate rsmA (Rsm, repressor of secondary metabolites) transcription and bind rsmA DNA. Gel mobility shift assays with maltose-binding protein (MBP)-ExpR(71) and MBP-ExpR(153) fusion proteins show that both bind a 20-mer sequence present in rsmA. The two ExpR functions (i.e., expR-mediated activation of rsmA expression and ExpR binding with rsmA DNA) are inhibited by AHL. The AHL effects are remarkably specific in that expR effect of EC153, a strain belonging to class I, is counteracted by 3-oxo-C8-HL but not by 3-oxo-C6-HL. Conversely, the expR effect of Ecc71, a strain belonging to class II, is neutralized by 3-oxo-C6-HL but not by 3-oxo-C8-HL. The AHL responses correlated with expR-mediated inhibition of exoprotein and secondary metabolite production.

  19. Quorum Sensing Signal Production and Microbial Interactions in a Polymicrobial Disease of Corals and the Coral Surface Mucopolysaccharide Layer

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Beth L.; May, Amanda L.; Bhedi, Chinmayee D.; Dearth, Stephen P.; Prevatte, Carson W.; Pratte, Zoe; Campagna, Shawn R.; Richardson, Laurie L.

    2014-01-01

    Black band disease (BBD) of corals is a complex polymicrobial disease considered to be a threat to coral reef health, as it can lead to mortality of massive reef-building corals. The BBD community is dominated by gliding, filamentous cyanobacteria with a highly diverse population of heterotrophic bacteria. Microbial interactions such as quorum sensing (QS) and antimicrobial production may be involved in BBD disease pathogenesis. In this study, BBD (whole community) samples, as well as 199 bacterial isolates from BBD, the surface mucopolysaccharide layer (SML) of apparently healthy corals, and SML of apparently healthy areas of BBD-infected corals were screened for the production of acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and for autoinducer-2 (AI-2) activity using three bacterial reporter strains. AHLs were detected in all BBD (intact community) samples tested and in cultures of 5.5% of BBD bacterial isolates. Over half of a subset (153) of the isolates were positive for AI-2 activity. AHL-producing isolates were further analyzed using LC-MS/MS to determine AHL chemical structure and the concentration of (S)-4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD), the biosynthetic precursor of AI-2. C6-HSL was the most common AHL variant detected, followed by 3OC4-HSL. In addition to QS assays, 342 growth challenges were conducted among a subset of the isolates, with 27% of isolates eliciting growth inhibition and 2% growth stimulation. 24% of BBD isolates elicited growth inhibition as compared to 26% and 32% of the bacteria from the two SML sources. With one exception, only isolates that exhibited AI-2 activity or produced DPD inhibited growth of test strains. These findings demonstrate for the first time that AHLs are present in an active coral disease. It is possible that AI-2 production among BBD and coral SML bacteria may structure the microbial communities of both a polymicrobial infection and the healthy coral microbiome. PMID:25268348

  20. Regulon studies and in planta role of the BraI/R quorum-sensing system in the plant-beneficial Burkholderia cluster.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Bruna G; Mitter, Birgit; Talbi, Chouhra; Sessitsch, Angela; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Halliday, Nigel; James, Euan K; Cámara, Miguel; Venturi, Vittorio

    2013-07-01

    The genus Burkholderia is composed of functionally diverse species, and it can be divided into several clusters. One of these, designated the plant-beneficial-environmental (PBE) Burkholderia cluster, is formed by nonpathogenic species, which in most cases have been found to be associated with plants. It was previously established that members of the PBE group share an N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing (QS) system, designated BraI/R, that produces and responds to 3-oxo-C14-HSL (OC14-HSL). Moreover, some of them also possess a second AHL QS system, designated XenI2/R2, producing and responding to 3-hydroxy-C8-HSL (OHC8-HSL). In the present study, we performed liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis to determine which AHL molecules are produced by each QS system of this group of bacteria. The results showed that XenI2/R2 is mainly responsible for the production of OHC8-HSL and that the BraI/R system is involved in the production of several different AHLs. This analysis also revealed that Burkholderia phymatum STM815 produces greater amounts of AHLs than the other species tested. Further studies showed that the BraR protein of B. phymatum is more promiscuous than other BraR proteins, responding equally well to several different AHL molecules, even at low concentrations. Transcriptome studies with Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 and B. phymatum STM815 revealed that the BraI/R regulon is species specific, with exopolysaccharide production being the only common phenotype regulated by this system in the PBE cluster. In addition, BraI/R was shown not to be important for plant nodulation by B. phymatum strains or for endophytic colonization and growth promotion of maize by B. phytofirmans PsJN. PMID:23686262

  1. You are what you talk: quorum sensing induces individual morphologies and cell division modes in Dinoroseobacter shibae

    PubMed Central

    Patzelt, Diana; Wang, Hui; Buchholz, Ina; Rohde, Manfred; Gröbe, Lothar; Pradella, Silke; Neumann, Alexander; Schulz, Stefan; Heyber, Steffi; Münch, Karin; Münch, Richard; Jahn, Dieter; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Tomasch, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Dinoroseobacter shibae, a member of the Roseobacter clade abundant in marine environments, is characterized by a pronounced pleomorphism. Cell shapes range from variable-sized ovoid rods to long filaments with a high copy number of chromosomes. Time-lapse microscopy shows cells dividing either by binary fission or by budding from the cell poles. Here we demonstrate that this morphological heterogeneity is induced by quorum sensing (QS). D. shibae utilizes three acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) synthases (luxI1–3) to produce AHLs with unsaturated C18 side chains. A ΔluxI1-knockout strain completely lacking AHL biosynthesis was uniform in morphology and divided by binary fission only. Transcriptome analysis revealed that expression of genes responsible for control of cell division was reduced in this strain, providing the link between QS and the observed phenotype. In addition, flagellar biosynthesis and type IV secretion system (T4SS) were downregulated. The wild-type phenotype and gene expression could be restored through addition of synthetic C18-AHLs. Their effectiveness was dependent on the number of double bonds in the acyl side chain and the regulated trait. The wild-type expression level of T4SS genes was fully restored even by an AHL with a saturated C18 side chain that has not been detected in D. shibae. QS induces phenotypic individualization of D. shibae cells rather than coordinating the population. This strategy might be beneficial in unpredictably changing environments, for example, during algal blooms when resource competition and grazing exert fluctuating selective pressures. A specific response towards non-native AHLs might provide D. shibae with the capacity for complex interspecies communication. PMID:23823498

  2. You are what you talk: quorum sensing induces individual morphologies and cell division modes in Dinoroseobacter shibae.

    PubMed

    Patzelt, Diana; Wang, Hui; Buchholz, Ina; Rohde, Manfred; Gröbe, Lothar; Pradella, Silke; Neumann, Alexander; Schulz, Stefan; Heyber, Steffi; Münch, Karin; Münch, Richard; Jahn, Dieter; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Tomasch, Jürgen

    2013-12-01

    Dinoroseobacter shibae, a member of the Roseobacter clade abundant in marine environments, is characterized by a pronounced pleomorphism. Cell shapes range from variable-sized ovoid rods to long filaments with a high copy number of chromosomes. Time-lapse microscopy shows cells dividing either by binary fission or by budding from the cell poles. Here we demonstrate that this morphological heterogeneity is induced by quorum sensing (QS). D. shibae utilizes three acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) synthases (luxI1-3) to produce AHLs with unsaturated C18 side chains. A ΔluxI1-knockout strain completely lacking AHL biosynthesis was uniform in morphology and divided by binary fission only. Transcriptome analysis revealed that expression of genes responsible for control of cell division was reduced in this strain, providing the link between QS and the observed phenotype. In addition, flagellar biosynthesis and type IV secretion system (T4SS) were downregulated. The wild-type phenotype and gene expression could be restored through addition of synthetic C18-AHLs. Their effectiveness was dependent on the number of double bonds in the acyl side chain and the regulated trait. The wild-type expression level of T4SS genes was fully restored even by an AHL with a saturated C18 side chain that has not been detected in D. shibae. QS induces phenotypic individualization of D. shibae cells rather than coordinating the population. This strategy might be beneficial in unpredictably changing environments, for example, during algal blooms when resource competition and grazing exert fluctuating selective pressures. A specific response towards non-native AHLs might provide D. shibae with the capacity for complex interspecies communication. PMID:23823498

  3. LuxR solos in Photorhabdus species

    PubMed Central

    Brameyer, Sophie; Kresovic, Darko; Bode, Helge B.; Heermann, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria communicate via small diffusible molecules to mediate group-coordinated behavior, a process designated as quorum sensing. The basic molecular quorum sensing system of Gram-negative bacteria consists of a LuxI-type autoinducer synthase producing acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signaling molecules, and a LuxR-type receptor detecting the AHLs to control expression of specific genes. However, many proteobacteria possess one or more unpaired LuxR-type receptors that lack a cognate LuxI-like synthase, referred to as LuxR solos. The enteric and insect pathogenic bacteria of the genus Photorhabdus harbor an extraordinarily high number of LuxR solos, more than any other known bacteria, and all lack a LuxI-like synthase. Here, we focus on the presence and the different types of LuxR solos in the three known Photorhabdus species using bioinformatics analyses. Generally, the N-terminal signal-binding domain (SBD) of LuxR-type receptors sensing AHLs have a motif of six conserved amino acids that is important for binding and specificity of the signaling molecule. However, this motif is altered in the majority of the Photorhabdus-specific LuxR solos, suggesting the use of other signaling molecules than AHLs. Furthermore, all Photorhabdus species contain at least one LuxR solo with an intact AHL-binding motif, which might allow the ability to sense AHLs of other bacteria. Moreover, all three species have high AHL-degrading activity caused by the presence of different AHL-lactonases and AHL-acylases, revealing a high quorum quenching activity against other bacteria. However, the majority of the other LuxR solos in Photorhabdus have a N-terminal so-called PAS4-domain instead of an AHL-binding domain, containing different amino acid motifs than the AHL-sensors, which potentially allows the recognition of a highly variable range of signaling molecules that can be sensed apart from AHLs. These PAS4-LuxR solos are proposed to be involved in host sensing, and therefore in

  4. Identification and Characterization of an N-Acylhomoserine Lactone-Dependent Quorum-Sensing System in Pseudomonas putida Strain IsoF

    PubMed Central

    Steidle, Anette; Allesen-Holm, Marie; Riedel, Kathrin; Berg, Gabriele; Givskov, Michael; Molin, Søren; Eberl, Leo

    2002-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that several strains of Pseudomonas putida produce N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). These signal molecules enable bacteria to coordinately express certain phenotypic traits in a density-dependent manner in a process referred to as quorum sensing. In this study we have cloned a genomic region of the plant growth-promoting P. putida strain IsoF that, when present in trans, provoked induction of a bioluminescent AHL reporter plasmid. Sequence analysis identified a gene cluster consisting of four genes: ppuI and ppuR, whose predicted amino acid sequences are highly similar to proteins of the LuxI-LuxR family, an open reading frame (ORF) located in the intergenic region between ppuI and ppuR with significant homology to rsaL from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a gene, designated ppuA, present upstream of ppuR, the deduced amino acid sequence of which shows similarity to long-chain fatty acid coenzyme A ligases from various organisms. Using a transcriptional ppuA::luxAB fusion we demonstrate that expression of ppuA is AHL dependent. Furthermore, transcription of the AHL synthase ppuI is shown to be subject to quorum-sensing regulation, creating a positive feedback loop. Sequencing of the DNA regions flanking the ppu gene cluster indicated that the four genes form an island in the suhB-PA3819 intergenic region of the currently sequenced P. putida strain KT2440. Moreover, we provide evidence that the ppu genes are not present in other AHL-producing P. putida strains, indicating that this gene cluster is so far unique for strain IsoF. While the wild-type strain formed very homogenous biofilms, both a ppuI and a ppuA mutant formed structured biofilms with characteristic microcolonies and water-filled channels. These results suggest that the quorum-sensing system influences biofilm structural development. PMID:12450862

  5. Inhibition of quorum sensing in Serratia marcescens H30 by molecular regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Shen, Y L; Wei, D Z; Zhu, J W

    2008-06-01

    Quorum sensing in Serratia marcescens, which uses two types of signaling molecules-N-acyl homoserine lactones and furanosyl borate diester-play important regulatory roles in the synthesis of 2,3-butanediol and prodigiosin. In the hope of understanding the effect of quorum sensing on physiologic metabolism, we established two molecular strategies, one to express acyl-homoserine lactone hydrolase to inactivate AI-1 signaling molecule using an expression vector with lactose as the inducer and the other to mutate luxS gene with a suicide plasmid pUTKm2 to inhibit the synthesis of AI-2 signaling molecule.

  6. Selective imaging of quorum sensing receptors in bacteria using fluorescent Au nanocluster probes surface functionalized with signal molecules.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Ruchira; Samanta, Anupam; Illathvalappil, Rajith; Chowdhury, Somak; Prabhune, Asmita; Devi, R Nandini

    2013-12-26

    Fluorescent ultrasmall gold clusters decorated with bacterial quorum sensing signal molecules, acyl homoserine lactone, are synthesized. These fluorescent probes are found to have emission in the near-infrared spectral region advantageous for bioimaging. Imaging studies using different strains of bacteria with and without acyl homoserine lactone receptors with the aid of confocal microscopy have shown that the probe interacts preferentially with cells possessing these receptors. This indicates that, with appropriate surface functionalization, the Au clusters can be used for receptor specific detection with enhanced selectivity.

  7. Arabidopsis thaliana AHL family modulates hypocotyl growth redundantly by interacting with each other via the PPC/DUF296 domain

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianfei; Favero, David S.; Peng, Hao; Neff, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes 29 AT-HOOK MOTIF CONTAINING NUCLEAR LOCALIZED (AHL) genes, which evolved into two phylogenic clades. The AHL proteins contain one or two AT-hook motif(s) and one plant and prokaryote conserved (PPC)/domain of unknown function #296 (DUF296) domain. Seedlings lacking both SOB3/AHL29 and ESC/AHL27 confer a subtle long-hypocotyl phenotype compared with the WT or either single-null mutant. In contrast, the missense allele sob3-6 confers a dramatic long-hypocotyl phenotype in the light. In this study, we examined the dominant-negative feature of sob3-6 and found that it encodes a protein with a disrupted AT-hook motif that abolishes binding to AT-rich DNA. A loss-of-function approach demonstrated different, yet redundant, contributions of additional AHL genes in suppressing hypocotyl elongation in the light. We showed that AHL proteins interact with each other and themselves via the PPC/DUF296 domain. AHLs also share interactions with other nuclear proteins, such as transcription factors, suggesting that these interactions also contribute to the functional redundancy within this gene family. The coordinated action of AHLs requires an AT-hook motif capable of binding AT-rich DNA, as well as a PPC/DUF296 domain containing a conserved Gly-Arg-Phe-Glu-Ile-Leu region. Alteration of this region abolished SOB3/AHL29’s physical interaction with transcription factors and resulted in a dominant-negative allele in planta that was phenotypically similar to sob3-6. We propose a molecular model where AHLs interact with each other and themselves, as well as other nuclear proteins, to form complexes which modulate plant growth and development. PMID:24218605

  8. Biochar and microbial signaling: production conditions determine effects on microbial communication

    PubMed Central

    Masiello, Caroline A.; Chen, Ye; Gao, Xiaodong; Liu, Shirley; Cheng, Hsiao-Ying; Bennett, Matthew R.; Rudgers, Jennifer A.; Wagner, Daniel S.; Zygourakis, Kyriacos; Silberg, Jonathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Charcoal has a long soil residence time, which has resulted in its production and use as a carbon sequestration technique (biochar). A range of biological effects can be triggered by soil biochar that can positively and negatively influence carbon storage, such as changing the decomposition rate of organic matter and altering plant biomass production. Sorption of cellular signals has been hypothesized to underlie some of these effects, but it remains unknown whether the binding of biochemical signals occurs, and if so, on time scales relevant to microbial growth and communication. We examined biochar sorption of N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone, an acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) intercellular signaling molecule used by many gram-negative soil microbes to regulate gene expression. We show that wood biochars disrupt communication within a growing multicellular system that is made up of sender cells that synthesize AHL and receiver cells that express green fluorescent protein in response to an AHL signal. However, biochar inhibition of AHL-mediated cell-cell communication varied, with the biochar prepared at 700°C (surface area of 301 m2/g) inhibiting cellular communication 10-fold more than an equivalent mass of biochar prepared at 300°C (surface area of 3 m2/g). These findings provide the first direct evidence that biochars elicit a range of effects on gene expression dependent on intercellular signaling, implicating the method of biochar preparation as a parameter that could be tuned to regulate microbial-dependent soil processes, like nitrogen fixation and pest attack of root crops. PMID:24066613

  9. The Arabidopsis thaliana DNA-binding protein AHL19 mediates verticillium wilt resistance.

    PubMed

    Yadeta, Koste A; Hanemian, Mathieu; Smit, Patrick; Hiemstra, Jelle A; Pereira, Andy; Marco, Yves; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2011-12-01

    Verticillium spp. are destructive soilborne fungal pathogens that cause vascular wilt diseases in a wide range of plant species. Verticillium wilts are particularly notorious, and genetic resistance in crop plants is the most favorable means of disease control. In a gain-of-function screen using an activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutant collection, we identified four mutants, A1 to A4, which displayed enhanced resistance toward the vascular wilt species Verticillium dahliae, V. albo-atrum and V. longisporum but not to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. raphani. Further testing revealed that mutant A2 displayed enhanced Ralstonia solanacearum resistance, while mutants A1 and A3 were more susceptible toward Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Identification of the activation tag insertion site in the A1 mutant revealed an insertion in close proximity to the gene encoding AHL19, which was constitutively expressed in the mutant. AHL19 knock-out alleles were found to display enhanced Verticillium susceptibility whereas overexpression of AHL19 resulted in enhanced Verticillium resistance, showing that AHL19 acts as a positive regulator of plant defense. PMID:21864046

  10. An Interview with Mark Ahlness and Jean Carmody about the Earth Day Groceries Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strangman, Nicole

    2002-01-01

    Outlines an interview with Mark Ahlness, a third-grade teacher at Arbor Heights Elementary School in Seattle, Washington, and Jean Carmody, an art teacher at two elementary schools in Cranston, Rhode Island. Describes their collaborative project called the Earth Day Groceries Project. Explains that in this Internet project, students decorate…

  11. Synergistic effect of quorum sensing genes in biofilm development and PAHs degradation by a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Supriya; Mangwani, Neelam; Das, Surajit

    2016-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a prevalently found intercellular signaling system in bacteria. QS system bestows behavioral coordination ability in bacteria at high population density. QS via acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) is extensively conserved in Gram-negative bacteria and plays crucial role in regulating many biological processes. The role of QS genes coding for AHL synthase enzyme (lasI and rhlI) was established in bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) viz. phenanthrene and pyrene. AHL producing biofilm forming marine bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa N6P6 was isolated by selective enrichment on PAHs. AHL production was confirmed using AHL bioreporters and GC-MS analysis. Biofilm development and its architecture was significantly (P < 0.05) affected by alterations in lasI/rhlI expression. The lasI/rhlI gene expression pattern significantly influences biofilm formation and subsequent degradation of PAHs. The integrated density of Pseudomonas aeruginosa N6P6 biofilm was highest for 48 h old biofilm and the PAHs (phenanthrene and pyrene) degradation was also found maximum (85.6 % and 47.56 %) with this biofilm. A significant positive correlation (P < 0.05) was observed between lasI expression and PAHs degradation. The role of QS genes in biofilm formation and degradation of PAHs was validated by blocking the transcription of lasI/rhlI by a QS inhibitor (QSI) tannic acid. Further, application of such QS positive isolates in PAHs contaminated sites could be a promising strategy to improve the PAHs bioremediation.

  12. Effects of an inducible aiiA gene on disease resistance in Eucalyptus urophylla × Eucalyptus grandis.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, L J; Li, L M

    2016-08-01

    N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are metabolites of mostly gram-negative bacteria and are critical signaling molecules in bacterial quorum-sensing systems. At threshold concentrations, AHLs can activate the expression of pathogenic genes and induce diseases. Therefore, reducing AHL concentrations is a key point of disease control in plants. AHL-lactonase, which is expressed by aiiA, is widespread in Bacillus sp and can hydrolyze AHLs. In the present study, we cloned aiiA from Bacillus subtilis by PCR. A plant expression vector of aiiA was constructed and name Pcam-PPP3-aiiA, in which expression of aiiA was controlled by the pathogen-inducible plant promoter PPP3. The recombinant plasmid was transferred into Eucalyptus × urophylla × E. grandis by an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. PCR and Southern blotting showed that aiiA was successfully integrated into the E. urophylla × E. grandis genome and its expression was induced by Ralstonia solanacearum 12 h after inoculation, as shown by reverse transcription-PCR. The transcription efficacy of aiiA increased 43.88-, 30.65-, and 18.95-fold after inoculation with R. solanacearum, Erwinia carotovora ssp. zeae (Sabet) and Cylindrocladium quinqueseptatum, respectively as shown by RT-real-time PCR. Transgenic E.urophylla × E.grandis expressing the AIIA protein exhibited significantly enhanced disease resistance compared to non-transgenic plants by delaying the onset of wilting and reducing the disease index. PMID:26905275

  13. Where are signal molecules likely to be located in anaerobic granular sludge?

    PubMed

    Feng, Huajun; Ding, Yangcheng; Wang, Meizhen; Zhou, Guanglan; Zheng, Xin; He, Hongzhen; Zhang, Xueqin; Shen, Dongsheng; Shentu, Jiali

    2014-03-01

    Quorum sensing is a concentration-sensing mechanism that plays a vital role in sludge granulation. In this study, the regularities of distribution of different signal molecules, including intra- and interspecific signal molecules (diffusible signal factor, DSF), interspecific signal molecules (autoinducter-2, AI-2) and intraspecific signal molecules (acyl-homoserine lactones, AHLs), from three types of anaerobic granular sludge were investigated. The results showed that 70-90% of DSF was distributed in sludge, while AI-2 in the Water phase accounted for over 80% of the total content. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation between DSF and AI-2, which played opposite roles in granulation. Moreover, more than 55% of short and medium acyl chain AHLs tended to spread in aqueous water, while the long acyl chain AHLs were closer to granular sludge than the short and medium acyl chain AHLs. With the exception of one type of sludge, the percentage of long acyl chain AHLs in the sludge phase was greater than 70%. The different distributions of signal molecules were primarily determined based on their physicochemical properties, including molecular weight and solubility in water or organic solutions. In addition, the basic properties of sludge, such as the granular level or the production of EPS, were closely related to the diversity, distribution and concentration of signal molecules. As a medium in granulation, extracellular polymeric substances production was regulated by different signal molecules from different parts of anaerobic granular sludge. This study provides a foundation for investigation of quorum sensing in the system of anaerobic granular sludge.

  14. Inhibition of biofilm formation by T7 bacteriophages producing quorum-quenching enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pei, Ruoting; Lamas-Samanamud, Gisella R

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial growth in biofilms is the major cause of recalcitrant biofouling in industrial processes and of persistent infections in clinical settings. The use of bacteriophage treatment to lyse bacteria in biofilms has attracted growing interest. In particular, many natural or engineered phages produce depolymerases to degrade polysaccharides in the biofilm matrix and allow access to host bacteria. However, the phage-produced depolymerases are highly specific for only the host-derived polysaccharides and may have limited effects on natural multispecies biofilms. In this study, an engineered T7 bacteriophage was constructed to encode a lactonase enzyme with broad-range activity for quenching of quorum sensing, a form of bacterial cell-cell communication via small chemical molecules (acyl homoserine lactones [AHLs]) that is necessary for biofilm formation. Our results demonstrated that the engineered T7 phage expressed the AiiA lactonase to effectively degrade AHLs from many bacteria. Addition of the engineered T7 phage to mixed-species biofilms containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli resulted in inhibition of biofilm formation. Such quorum-quenching phages that can lyse host bacteria and express quorum-quenching enzymes to affect diverse bacteria in biofilm communities may become novel antifouling and antibiofilm agents in industrial and clinical settings. PMID:24951790

  15. Detection of Quorum Sensing Molecules and Biofilm Formation in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Kumar, J Shiva; Umesha, S; Prasad, K Shiva; Niranjana, P

    2016-03-01

    Many bacteria use small diffusible signaling molecules to communicate each other termed as quorum sensing (QS). Most Gram-negative bacteria use acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) as QS signal molecules. Using these signaling molecules, bacteria are able to express specific genes in response to population density. This work aimed to detect the production of QS signal molecules and biofilm formation in Ralstonia solanacearum isolated from various diseased tomato plants with symptoms of bacterial wilt. A total of 30 R. solanacearum strains were investigated for the production of QS signal molecules using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens NT1 (pZLR4) biosensor systems. All 30 bacterial isolates from various bacterial wilt-affected tomato plants produced AHL molecules that induced the biosensor. The microtiter plate assay demonstrated that of the 30 bacterial isolates, 60 % formed biofilm, among which four isolates exhibited a higher degree of biofilm formation. The biofilm-inducing factor was purified from these four culture supernatants. The structure of the responsible molecule was solved using nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy and was determined to be 2-hydroxy-4-((methylamino)(phenyl)methyl) cyclopentanone (HMCP), which was confirmed by chemical synthesis and NMR. The Confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis showed well-developed biofilm architecture of bacteria when treated with HMCP. The knowledge we obtained from this study will be useful for further researcher on the role of HMCP molecule in biofilm formation. PMID:26620535

  16. Investigation of quorum sensing-dependent gene expression in Burkholderia gladioli BSR3 through RNA-seq analyses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunyoung; Park, Jungwook; Choi, Okhee; Kim, Jinwoo; Seo, Young-Su

    2014-12-28

    The plant pathogen Burkholderia gladioli, which has a broad host range that includes rice and onion, causes bacterial panicle blight and sheath rot. Based on the complete genome sequence of B. gladioli BSR3 isolated from infected rice sheaths, the genome of B. gladioli BSR3 contains the luxI/luxR family of genes. Members of this family encode N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum sensing (QS) signal synthase and the LuxR-family AHL signal receptor, which are similar to B. glumae BGR1. In B. glumae, QS has been shown to play pivotal roles in many bacterial behaviors. In this study, we compared the QS-dependent gene expression between B. gladioli BSR3 and a QS-defective B. gladioli BSR3 mutant in two different culture states (10 and 24 h after incubation, corresponding to an exponential phase and a stationary phase) using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). RNA-seq analyses including gene ontology and pathway enrichment revealed that the B. gladioli BSR3 QS system regulates genes related to motility, toxin production, and oxalogenesis, which were previously reported in B. glumae. Moreover, the uncharacterized polyketide biosynthesis is activated by QS, which was not detected in B. glumae. Thus, we observed not only common QS-dependent genes between B. glumae BGR1 and B. gladioli BSR3, but also unique QS-dependent genes in B. gladioli BSR3. PMID:25223327

  17. Methylobacterium-plant interaction genes regulated by plant exudate and quorum sensing molecules.

    PubMed

    Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega; Bogas, Andrea Cristina; Pomini, Armando M; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Marsaioli, Anita J; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria from the genus Methylobacterium interact symbiotically (endophytically and epiphytically) with different plant species. These interactions can promote plant growth or induce systemic resistance, increasing plant fitness. The plant colonization is guided by molecular communication between bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-plants, where the bacteria recognize specific exuded compounds by other bacteria (e.g. homoserine molecules) and/or by the plant roots (e.g. flavonoids, ethanol and methanol), respectively. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing molecules (N-acyl-homoserine lactones) and plant exudates (including ethanol) in the expression of a series of bacterial genes involved in Methylobacterium-plant interaction. The selected genes are related to bacterial metabolism (mxaF), adaptation to stressful environment (crtI, phoU and sss), to interactions with plant metabolism compounds (acdS) and pathogenicity (patatin and phoU). Under in vitro conditions, our results showed the differential expression of some important genes related to metabolism, stress and pathogenesis, thereby AHL molecules up-regulate all tested genes, except phoU, while plant exudates induce only mxaF gene expression. In the presence of plant exudates there is a lower bacterial density (due the endophytic and epiphytic colonization), which produce less AHL, leading to down regulation of genes when compared to the control. Therefore, bacterial density, more than plant exudate, influences the expression of genes related to plant-bacteria interaction.

  18. Methylobacterium-plant interaction genes regulated by plant exudate and quorum sensing molecules

    PubMed Central

    Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega; Bogas, Andrea Cristina; Pomini, Armando M.; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Marsaioli, Anita J.; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria from the genus Methylobacterium interact symbiotically (endophytically and epiphytically) with different plant species. These interactions can promote plant growth or induce systemic resistance, increasing plant fitness. The plant colonization is guided by molecular communication between bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-plants, where the bacteria recognize specific exuded compounds by other bacteria (e.g. homoserine molecules) and/or by the plant roots (e.g. flavonoids, ethanol and methanol), respectively. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing molecules (N-acyl-homoserine lactones) and plant exudates (including ethanol) in the expression of a series of bacterial genes involved in Methylobacterium-plant interaction. The selected genes are related to bacterial metabolism (mxaF), adaptation to stressful environment (crtI, phoU and sss), to interactions with plant metabolism compounds (acdS) and pathogenicity (patatin and phoU). Under in vitro conditions, our results showed the differential expression of some important genes related to metabolism, stress and pathogenesis, thereby AHL molecules up-regulate all tested genes, except phoU, while plant exudates induce only mxaF gene expression. In the presence of plant exudates there is a lower bacterial density (due the endophytic and epiphytic colonization), which produce less AHL, leading to down regulation of genes when compared to the control. Therefore, bacterial density, more than plant exudate, influences the expression of genes related to plant-bacteria interaction. PMID:24688531

  19. The acylase PvdQ has a conserved function among fluorescent Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed

    Koch, Gudrun; Nadal Jimenez, Pol; Muntendam, Remco; Chen, Yixi; Papaioannou, Evelina; Heeb, Stephan; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Cool, Robbert H; Quax, Wim J

    2010-06-01

    Pyoverdine biosynthesis in fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. and especially in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been extensively studied. The acylase PvdQ is required for a maturation step in pyoverdine biosynthesis but also has been proven to be effective in degrading long-chain N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). These molecules are used as quorum-sensing molecules by Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonads themselves. Interestingly, the pvdQ gene is part of a pyoverdine cluster in P. aeruginosa and P. syringae but not in other fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. In this study we have compared the activities of PvdQ orthologues from various species and provide evidence for conserved functions in Pseudomonas fluorescens PfO-1, P. putida KT2440 and P. aeruginosa PA14. Despite large differences in genomic organization, expression of each of these pvdQ orthologues is regulated by iron availability. Moreover, PvdQ and its orthologues have conserved substrate specificity for AHLs and play a role in pyoverdine production in all tested Pseudomonas species. These data strongly suggest that the role of PvdQ in pyoverdine biosynthesis is conserved among Pseudomonas spp., while the control that PvdQ exerts in P. aeruginosa over its own quorum-sensing signals seems to be unique to this bacterium. PMID:23766117

  20. Structural insights into a novel interkingdom signaling circuit by cartography of the ligand-binding sites of the homologous quorum sensing LuxR-family.

    PubMed

    Covaceuszach, Sonia; Degrassi, Giuliano; Venturi, Vittorio; Lamba, Doriano

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have identified a novel interkingdom signaling circuit, via plant signaling molecules, and a bacterial sub-family of LuxR proteins, bridging eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Indeed pivotal plant-bacteria interactions are regulated by the so called Plant Associated Bacteria (PAB) LuxR solo regulators that, although closely related to the quorum sensing (QS) LuxR family, do not bind or respond to canonical quorum sensing N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), but only to specific host plant signal molecules. The large body of structural data available for several members of the QS LuxR family complexed with different classes of ligands (AHLs and other compounds), has been exploited to dissect the cartography of their regulatory domains through structure-based multiple sequence alignments, structural superimposition and a comparative analysis of the contact residues involved in ligand binding. In the absence of experimentally determined structures of members of the PAB LuxR solos subfamily, an homology model of its prototype OryR is presented, aiming to elucidate the architecture of its ligand-binding site. The obtained model, in combination with the cartography of the regulatory domains of the homologous QS LuxRs, provides novel insights into the 3D structure of its ligand-binding site and unveils the probable molecular determinants responsible for differences in selectivity towards specific host plant signal molecules, rather than to canonical QS compounds.

  1. Adjuvant effect of cranberry proanthocyanidin active fraction on antivirulent property of ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Vadekeetil, Anitha; Alexandar, V; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) act as antivirulent agents since quorum sensing (QS) plays a vital role in regulating pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, application of single QSI may not be effective as pathogen is vulnerable to successful mutations. In such conditions, combination of QSIs can be exploited as there can be synergistic or adjuvant action. In the present study, we evaluated the antivirulence efficacy of combination of Vaccinium macrocarpon proanthocyanidin active fraction (PAF) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) at their sub-MICs using standard methods followed by analysis of their mode of action on QS using TLC and molecular docking. There was significant improvement in action of CIP when it was combined with PAF in reducing the QS controlled virulence factors (p < 0.05), motilities and biofilm of P. aeruginosa. TLC profiles of QS signals [(Acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS)] indicated that CIP in combination with PAF, besides showing inhibitory action on production of AHLs, also modulated production and inactivation of PQS. Docking scores also supported the observation. We therefore hypothesize that PAF-CIP combination, having improved anti-virulence property; can be exploited as a potent drug pairing against P. aeruginosa. PMID:26620081

  2. The effects of different seeding ratios on nitrification performance and biofilm formation in marine recirculating aquaculture system biofilter.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Songming; Shen, Jiazheng; Ruan, Yunjie; Guo, Xishan; Ye, Zhangying; Deng, Yale; Shi, Mingming

    2016-07-01

    Rapid start-up of biofilter is essential for intensive marine recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) production. This study evaluated the nitrifying biofilm formation using mature biofilm as an inoculum to accelerate the process in RAS practice. The effects of inoculation ratios (0-15 %) on the reactor performance and biofilm structure were investigated. Complete nitrification was achieved rapidly in reactors with inoculated mature biofilm (even in 32 days when 15 % seeding ratio was applied). However, the growth of target biofilm on blank carrier was affected by the mature biofilm inoculated through substrate competition. The analysis of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and nitrification rates confirmed the divergence of biofilm cultivation among reactors. Besides, three N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) were found in the process, which might regulate the activities of biofilm. Multivariate analysis based on non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) also indicated the great roles of AHLs and substrate supply which might fundamentally determine varied cultivation performance on target biofilm.

  3. A New Class of Quorum Quenching Molecules from Staphylococcus Species Affects Communication and Growth of Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ya-Yun; Nega, Mulugeta; Wölfle, Martina; Plener, Laure; Grond, Stephanie; Jung, Kirsten; Götz, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge that many pathogens rely on cell-to-cell communication mechanisms known as quorum sensing, opens a new disease control strategy: quorum quenching. Here we report on one of the rare examples where Gram-positive bacteria, the ‘Staphylococcus intermedius group’ of zoonotic pathogens, excrete two compounds in millimolar concentrations that suppress the quorum sensing signaling and inhibit the growth of a broad spectrum of Gram-negative beta- and gamma-proteobacteria. These compounds were isolated from Staphylococcus delphini. They represent a new class of quorum quenchers with the chemical formula N-[2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl]-urea and N-(2-phenethyl)-urea, which we named yayurea A and B, respectively. In vitro studies with the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) responding receptor LuxN of V. harveyi indicated that both compounds caused opposite effects on phosphorylation to those caused by AHL. This explains the quorum quenching activity. Staphylococcal strains producing yayurea A and B clearly benefit from an increased competitiveness in a mixed community. PMID:24098134

  4. Inhibition of Biofilm Formation by T7 Bacteriophages Producing Quorum-Quenching Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lamas-Samanamud, Gisella R.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial growth in biofilms is the major cause of recalcitrant biofouling in industrial processes and of persistent infections in clinical settings. The use of bacteriophage treatment to lyse bacteria in biofilms has attracted growing interest. In particular, many natural or engineered phages produce depolymerases to degrade polysaccharides in the biofilm matrix and allow access to host bacteria. However, the phage-produced depolymerases are highly specific for only the host-derived polysaccharides and may have limited effects on natural multispecies biofilms. In this study, an engineered T7 bacteriophage was constructed to encode a lactonase enzyme with broad-range activity for quenching of quorum sensing, a form of bacterial cell-cell communication via small chemical molecules (acyl homoserine lactones [AHLs]) that is necessary for biofilm formation. Our results demonstrated that the engineered T7 phage expressed the AiiA lactonase to effectively degrade AHLs from many bacteria. Addition of the engineered T7 phage to mixed-species biofilms containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli resulted in inhibition of biofilm formation. Such quorum-quenching phages that can lyse host bacteria and express quorum-quenching enzymes to affect diverse bacteria in biofilm communities may become novel antifouling and antibiofilm agents in industrial and clinical settings. PMID:24951790

  5. Analyzing the Transcriptomes of Two Quorum-Sensing Controlled Transcription Factors, RcsA and LrhA, Important for Pantoea stewartii Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Roderick V.; Stevens, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative proteobacterium Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii causes wilt disease in corn plants. Wilting is primarily due to bacterial exopolysaccharide (EPS) production that blocks water transport in the xylem during the late stages of infection. EsaR, the master quorum-sensing (QS) regulator in P. stewartii, modulates EPS levels. At low cell densities EsaR represses or activates expression of a number of genes in the absence of its acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) ligand. At high cell densities, binding of AHL inactivates EsaR leading to derepression or deactivation of its direct targets. Two of these direct targets are the key transcription regulators RcsA and LrhA, which in turn control EPS production and surface motility/adhesion, respectively. In this study, RNA-Seq was used to further examine the physiological impact of deleting the genes encoding these two second-tier regulators. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to validate the regulation observed in the RNA-Seq data. A GFP transcriptional fusion reporter confirmed the existence of a regulatory feedback loop in the system between LrhA and RcsA. Plant virulence assays carried out with rcsA and lrhA deletion and complementation strains demonstrated that both transcription factors play roles during establishment of wilt disease in corn. These efforts further define the hierarchy of the QS-regulated network controlling plant virulence in P. stewartii. PMID:26699719

  6. New properties of wheat bran: anti-biofilm activity and interference with bacteria quorum-sensing systems.

    PubMed

    González-Ortiz, Gemma; Quarles Van Ufford, H C; Halkes, S Bart A; Cerdà-Cuéllar, Marta; Beukelman, Cees J; Pieters, Roland J; Liskamp, Rob M J; Pérez, José F; Martín-Orue, Susana M

    2014-05-01

    Some plant extracts, have been demonstrated to interfere with the microbial metabolism of several pathogenic bacteria. Within this antimicrobial properties it has been described the potential to inhibit or destroy biofilms or to interfere in quorum-sensing (QS) systems. However, to our knowledge, no study exploring this potential of wheat-bran (WB) has been published. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the anti-biofilm activity of WB against a cow mastitis strain of Staphylococcus aureus and also its possible interference with bacterial QS systems. The potential of inhibition and destruction of the biofilm was studied by different in vitro assays. Also, we tested the ability of WB to interfere in bacterial QS by degrading acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL) as one of the most studied QS signal molecules for Gram-negative bacteria. The soluble extract of WB at 0.5% showed anti-biofilm activity, inhibiting biofilm formation and also destroying it. Similarly, the > 300 kDa fraction from WB had significant anti-biofilm activity in both in vitro assays. The WB also showed a potential to interfere with bacterial QS systems, as it was demonstrated to contain certain lactonase activity able to reduce AHL concentration in the medium. The present study reveals two additional beneficial properties of WB extract never explored before, which may be related to the presence of defence compounds in the plant extract able to interfere with microbial biofilms and also QS systems. PMID:24588934

  7. Bacterial quorum sensing and nitrogen cycling in rhizosphere soil

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Lindow, S.E.; Firestone, M.K.

    2008-10-01

    Plant photosynthate fuels carbon-limited microbial growth and activity, resulting in increased rhizosphere nitrogen (N)-mineralization. Most soil organic N is macromolecular (chitin, protein, nucleotides); enzymatic depolymerization is likely rate-limiting for plant N accumulation. Analyzing Avena (wild oat) planted in microcosms containing sieved field soil, we observed increased rhizosphere chitinase and protease specific activities, bacterial cell densities, and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) compared to bulk soil. Low-molecular weight DON (<3000 Da) was undetectable in bulk soil but comprised 15% of rhizosphere DON. Extracellular enzyme production in many bacteria requires quorum sensing (QS), cell-density dependent group behavior. Because proteobacteria are considered major rhizosphere colonizers, we assayed the proteobacterial QS signals acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), which were significantly increased in the rhizosphere. To investigate the linkage between soil signaling and N cycling, we characterized 533 bacterial isolates from Avena rhizosphere: 24% had chitinase or protease activity and AHL production; disruption of QS in 7 of 8 eight isolates disrupted enzyme activity. Many {alpha}-Proteobacteria were newly found with QS-controlled extracellular enzyme activity. Enhanced specific activities of N-cycling enzymes accompanied by bacterial density-dependent behaviors in rhizosphere soil gives rise to the hypothesis that QS could be a control point in the complex process of rhizosphere N-mineralization.

  8. Quorum sensing triggers the stochastic escape of individual cells from Pseudomonas putida biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Lumjiaktase, Putthapoom; Kümmerli, Rolf; Eberl, Leo

    2015-01-01

    The term ‘quorum sensing’ (QS) is generally used to describe the phenomenon that bacteria release and perceive signal molecules to coordinate cooperative behaviour in response to their population size. QS-based communication has therefore been considered a social trait. Here we show that QS signals (N-acyl-homoserine lactones, AHLs) are stochastically produced in young biofilms of Pseudomonas putida and act mainly as self-regulatory signals rather than inducing neighbouring cells. We demonstrate that QS induces the expression of putisolvin biosurfactants that are not public goods, thereby triggering asocial motility of induced cells out of microcolonies. Phenotypic heterogeneity is most prominent in the early stages of biofilm development, whereas at later stages behaviour patterns across cells become more synchronized. Our findings broaden our perspective on QS by showing that AHLs can control the expression of asocial (self-directed) traits, and that heterogeneity in QS can serve as a mechanism to drive phenotypic heterogeneity in self-directed behaviour. PMID:25592773

  9. Autoinducer-2 of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora and other plant-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Geider, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Autoinducers are important for cellular communication of bacteria. The luxS gene has a central role in the synthesis of autoinducer-2 (AI-2). The gene was identified in a shotgun library of Erwinia amylovora and primers designed for PCR amplification from bacterial DNA. Supernatants of several Erwinia amylovora strains were assayed for AI-2 activity with a Vibrio harveyi mutant and were positive. Many other plant-associated bacteria also showed AI-2 activity such as Erwinia pyrifoliae and Erwinia tasmaniensis. The luxS genes of several bacteria were cloned, sequenced, and complemented Escherichia coli strain DH5alpha and a Salmonella typhimurium mutant, both defective in luxS, for synthesis of AI-2. Assays to detect AI-2 activity in culture supernatants of several Pseudomonas syringae pathovars failed, which may indicate the absence of AI-2 or synthesis of another type. Several reporter strains did not detect synthesis of an acyl homoserine lactone (AHL, AI-1) by Erwinia amylovora, but confirmed AHL-synthesis for Erwinia carotovora ssp. atroseptica and Pantoea stewartii.

  10. Freshwater-borne bacteria isolated from a Malaysian rainforest waterfall exhibiting quorum sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen-Si; Yunos, Nina Yusrina Muhamad; Tan, Pui-Wan; Mohamad, Nur Izzati; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-06-13

    One obvious requirement for concerted action by a bacterial population is for an individual to be aware of and respond to the other individuals of the same species in order to form a response in unison. The term "quorum sensing" (QS) was coined to describe bacterial communication that is able to stimulate expression of a series of genes when the concentration of the signaling molecules has reached a threshold level. Here we report the isolation from aquatic environment of a bacterium that was later identified as Enterobacter sp.. Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Escherichia coli [pSB401] were used for preliminary screening of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) production. The Enterobacter sp. isolated was shown to produce two types of AHLs as confirmed by analysis using high resolution tandem mass spectrometry. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation of an Enterobacter sp. that produced both 3-oxo-C6-HSL and 3-oxo-C8-HSL as QS signaling molecules.

  11. Identification and characterization of a GDSL esterase gene located proximal to the swr quorum-sensing system of Serratia liquefaciens MG1.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Kathrin; Talker-Huiber, Daniela; Givskov, Michael; Schwab, Helmut; Eberl, Leo

    2003-07-01

    Serratia liquefaciens MG1 employs the swr quorum-sensing system to control various functions, including production of extracellular enzymes and swarming motility. Here we report the sequencing of the swr flanking DNA regions. We identified a gene upstream of swrR and transcribed in the same direction, designated estA, which encodes an esterase that belongs to family II of lipolytic enzymes. EstA was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the substrate specificity of the enzyme was determined in crude extracts. With the aid of zymograms visualizing EstA on polyacrylamide gels and by the analysis of a transcriptional fusion of the estA promoter to the promoterless luxAB genes, we showed that expression of the esterase is not regulated by the swr quorum-sensing system. An estA mutant was generated and was found to exhibit growth defects on minimal medium containing Tween 20 or Tween 80 as the sole carbon source. Moreover, we show that the mutant produces greatly reduced amounts of N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules on Tween-containing medium compared with the wild type, suggesting that under certain growth conditions EstA may be important for providing the cell with precursors required for AHL biosynthesis.

  12. Quorum-sensing inhibitors as anti-pathogenic drugs.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Thomas B; Givskov, Michael

    2006-04-01

    Quorum-sensing (QS) signalling systems of pathogens are central regulators for the expression of virulence factors and represent highly attractive targets for the development of novel therapeutics. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, QS systems are also involved in elevated antibiotic tolerance of biofilms as well as elevated tolerance to the activity of the innate immune system. Gram-negative bacteria commonly use N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) as QS signal molecules. The use of signal molecule based drugs to attenuate bacterial pathogenecity rather than bacterial growth is attractive for several reasons, particularly considering the emergence of increasingly antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Compounds capable of this type of interference have been termed anti-pathogenic drugs. A large variety of synthetic AHL analogues and natural products libraries have been screened and a number of QS inhibitors (QSI) have been identified. Promising QSI compounds have been shown to make biofilms more susceptible to antimicrobial treatments, and are capable of reducing mortality and virulence as well as promoting clearance of bacteria in experimental animal models of infection.

  13. Freshwater-borne bacteria isolated from a Malaysian rainforest waterfall exhibiting quorum sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen-Si; Yunos, Nina Yusrina Muhamad; Tan, Pui-Wan; Mohamad, Nur Izzati; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    One obvious requirement for concerted action by a bacterial population is for an individual to be aware of and respond to the other individuals of the same species in order to form a response in unison. The term "quorum sensing" (QS) was coined to describe bacterial communication that is able to stimulate expression of a series of genes when the concentration of the signaling molecules has reached a threshold level. Here we report the isolation from aquatic environment of a bacterium that was later identified as Enterobacter sp.. Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Escherichia coli [pSB401] were used for preliminary screening of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) production. The Enterobacter sp. isolated was shown to produce two types of AHLs as confirmed by analysis using high resolution tandem mass spectrometry. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation of an Enterobacter sp. that produced both 3-oxo-C6-HSL and 3-oxo-C8-HSL as QS signaling molecules. PMID:24932870

  14. Bacillus pumilus of Palk Bay origin inhibits quorum-sensing-mediated virulence factors in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nithya, Chari; Aravindraja, Chairman; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to inhibit quoring-sensing(QS)-mediated virulence factors of representative Gram-negative bacteria by marine bacterial isolates. Bacteria isolated from Palk Bay sediments were screened for anti-QS activity. Eleven strains inhibited QS signals in Chromobacterium violaceum (ATCC 12472) and C. violaceum CV026. The marine bacterial strain S8-07 reduced the accumulation of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHLs) and showed significant inhibition of LasA protease(76%), LasB elastase(84%), caseinase(70%), pyocyanin (84%), pyoverdin and biofilm formation(87%) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Strain S8-07 also showed highly significant reduction (90%) in prodigiosin, secreted casienase (92%), hemolytic activity (73%) and biofilm formation (61%) in Serratia marcescens. Strain S8-07, identified as Bacillus pumilus (accession number FJ584416), showed distinct profiles of inhibition against the virulence factors of both P. aeruginosa PAO1 (las, rhl) and S. marcescens (shl). Polar extraction and proteinase K treatment of the culture supernatant confirmed that the anti-QS activity of S8-07 was indeed due to a protein molecule. Acidification assay and HPLC analysis revealed that the degradation of AHL was not due to lactonase activity, but rather, was due to acylase activity of S8-07. Thus, novel anti-QS acylase activity is reported for the first time from a B. pumilus strain of marine origin.

  15. Selection of the N-Acylhomoserine Lactone-Degrading Bacterium Alteromonas stellipolaris PQQ-42 and of Its Potential for Biocontrol in Aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Torres, Marta; Rubio-Portillo, Esther; Antón, Josefa; Ramos-Esplá, Alfonso A; Quesada, Emilia; Llamas, Inmaculada

    2016-01-01

    The production of virulence factors by many pathogenic microorganisms depends on the intercellular communication system called quorum sensing, which involves the production and release of signal molecules known as autoinducers. Based on this, new-therapeutic strategies have emerged for the treatment of a variety of infections, such as the enzymatic degradation of signaling molecules, known as quorum quenching (QQ). In this study, we present the screening of QQ activity amongst 450 strains isolated from a bivalve hatchery in Granada (Spain), and the selection of the strain PQQ-42, which degrades a wide range of N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). The selected strain, identified as Alteromonas stellipolaris, degraded the accumulation of AHLs and reduced the production of protease and chitinase and swimming motility of a Vibrio species in co-cultivation experiments in vitro. In the bio-control experiment, strain PQQ-42 significantly reduced the pathogenicity of Vibrio mediterranei VibC-Oc-097 upon the coral Oculina patagonica showing a lower degree of tissue damage (29.25 ± 14.63%) in its presence, compared to when the coral was infected with V. mediterranei VibC-Oc-097 alone (77.53 ± 13.22%). Our results suggest that this AHL-degrading bacterium may have biotechnological applications in aquaculture.

  16. Selection of the N-Acylhomoserine Lactone-Degrading Bacterium Alteromonas stellipolaris PQQ-42 and of Its Potential for Biocontrol in Aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Marta; Rubio-Portillo, Esther; Antón, Josefa; Ramos-Esplá, Alfonso A.; Quesada, Emilia; Llamas, Inmaculada

    2016-01-01

    The production of virulence factors by many pathogenic microorganisms depends on the intercellular communication system called quorum sensing, which involves the production and release of signal molecules known as autoinducers. Based on this, new-therapeutic strategies have emerged for the treatment of a variety of infections, such as the enzymatic degradation of signaling molecules, known as quorum quenching (QQ). In this study, we present the screening of QQ activity amongst 450 strains isolated from a bivalve hatchery in Granada (Spain), and the selection of the strain PQQ-42, which degrades a wide range of N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). The selected strain, identified as Alteromonas stellipolaris, degraded the accumulation of AHLs and reduced the production of protease and chitinase and swimming motility of a Vibrio species in co-cultivation experiments in vitro. In the bio-control experiment, strain PQQ-42 significantly reduced the pathogenicity of Vibrio mediterranei VibC-Oc-097 upon the coral Oculina patagonica showing a lower degree of tissue damage (29.25 ± 14.63%) in its presence, compared to when the coral was infected with V. mediterranei VibC-Oc-097 alone (77.53 ± 13.22%). Our results suggest that this AHL-degrading bacterium may have biotechnological applications in aquaculture. PMID:27242684

  17. 14-Methylpentadecano-15-lactone (muscolide): a new macrocyclic lactone from the oil of Angelica archangelica L.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Daíse; Strobl, Herbert; Kolodziejczyk, Paul

    2004-12-01

    The chemical composition of seed and root oils from Angelica archangelica L. was investigated. Analyses were performed by GC/MS and GC using two columns of different polarities (polyethylene glycol (DB-Wax) and 5% phenyl/95% polydimethylsiloxane (HP-5)), for the separation of several co-eluting components. A total of 58 compounds were identified, accounting for 96.3% (seed) and 93.5% (root) of the oils, respectively. A high content of beta-phellandrene (74.7%) was found in Angelica seed oil. Root oil contained a larger amount of macrocyclic lactones (1.3%) in comparison to the seed oil (0.4%). Different harvest dates produced only slight changes in the root-oil composition. In root oil harvested in summer, the beta-phellandrene content increased by ca. 36%, but no significant changes in the relative compositions of other components were observed. Fresh root oils were collected in five fractions (constant time intervals) during steam distillation (see Table). The highest-boiling fraction contained 9.3% of macrocyclic lactones such as tridecano-13-lactone (5.0%), 12-methyltridecano-13-lactone (0.4%), tetradecano-14-lactone (0.1%), pentadecano-15-lactone (3.5%), 14-methylpentadecano-15-lactone (1; trace), hexadecano-16-lactone (trace), and heptadecano-17-lactone (0.2%). This is the first report of the occurrence of 14-methylpentadecano-15-lactone (muscolide; 1) in a natural product.

  18. 14-Methylpentadecano-15-lactone (muscolide): a new macrocyclic lactone from the oil of Angelica archangelica L.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Daíse; Strobl, Herbert; Kolodziejczyk, Paul

    2004-12-01

    The chemical composition of seed and root oils from Angelica archangelica L. was investigated. Analyses were performed by GC/MS and GC using two columns of different polarities (polyethylene glycol (DB-Wax) and 5% phenyl/95% polydimethylsiloxane (HP-5)), for the separation of several co-eluting components. A total of 58 compounds were identified, accounting for 96.3% (seed) and 93.5% (root) of the oils, respectively. A high content of beta-phellandrene (74.7%) was found in Angelica seed oil. Root oil contained a larger amount of macrocyclic lactones (1.3%) in comparison to the seed oil (0.4%). Different harvest dates produced only slight changes in the root-oil composition. In root oil harvested in summer, the beta-phellandrene content increased by ca. 36%, but no significant changes in the relative compositions of other components were observed. Fresh root oils were collected in five fractions (constant time intervals) during steam distillation (see Table). The highest-boiling fraction contained 9.3% of macrocyclic lactones such as tridecano-13-lactone (5.0%), 12-methyltridecano-13-lactone (0.4%), tetradecano-14-lactone (0.1%), pentadecano-15-lactone (3.5%), 14-methylpentadecano-15-lactone (1; trace), hexadecano-16-lactone (trace), and heptadecano-17-lactone (0.2%). This is the first report of the occurrence of 14-methylpentadecano-15-lactone (muscolide; 1) in a natural product. PMID:17191826

  19. Genome analysis of quorum sensing Cedecea neteri SSMD04 leads to identification of its novel signaling synthase (cneI), cognate receptor (cneR) and an orphan receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kian-Hin; Tan, Jia-Yi; Yin, Wai-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Cedecea neteri is a very rare human pathogen. We have isolated a strain of C. neteri SSMD04 from pickled mackerel sashimi identified using molecular and phenotypics approaches. Using the biosensor Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, we have demonstrated the presence of short chain N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) type quorum sensing (QS) activity in C. neteri SSMD04. Triple quadrupole LC/MS analysis revealed that C. neteri SSMD04 produced short chain N-butyryl-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL). With the available genome information of C. neteri SSMD04, we went on to analyse and identified a pair of luxI/R homologues in this genome that share the highest similarity with croI/R homologues from Citrobacter rodentium. The AHL synthase, which we named cneI(636 bp), was found in the genome sequences of C. neteri SSMD04. At a distance of 8bp from cneI is a sequence encoding a hypothetical protein, potentially the cognate receptor, a luxR homologue which we named it as cneR. Analysis of this protein amino acid sequence reveals two signature domains, the autoinducer-binding domain and the C-terminal effector which is typical characteristic of luxR. In addition, we found that this genome harboured an orphan luxR that is most closely related to easR in Enterobacter asburiae. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the AHL production activity in C. neteri, and the discovery of its luxI/R homologues, the orphan receptor and its whole genome sequence. PMID:26355540

  20. Crystal structure of VmoLac, a tentative quorum quenching lactonase from the extremophilic crenarchaeon Vulcanisaeta moutnovskia.

    PubMed

    Hiblot, Julien; Bzdrenga, Janek; Champion, Charlotte; Chabriere, Eric; Elias, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    A new representative of the Phosphotriesterase-Like Lactonases (PLLs) family from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Vulcanisaeta moutnovskia has been characterized and crystallized. VmoLac is a native, proficient lactonase with promiscuous, low phosphotriesterase activity. VmoLac therefore represents an interesting candidate for engineering studies, with the aim of developing an efficient bacterial quorum-quenching agent. Here, we provide an extensive biochemical and kinetic characterization of VmoLac and describe the X-ray structures of the enzyme bound to a fatty acid and to its cognate substrate 3-oxo-C10 AHL (Acyl-Homoserine Lactone). The structures highlight possible structural determinants that may be involved in its extreme thermal stability (Tm = 128 °C). Moreover, the structure reveals that the substrate binding mode of VmoLac significantly differs from those of its close homologues, possibly explaining the substrate specificity of the enzyme. Finally, we describe the specific interactions between the enzyme and its substrate, and discuss the possible lactone hydrolysis mechanism of VmoLac. PMID:25670483

  1. Sesquiterpenoids Lactones: Benefits to Plants and People

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Martin; Trewin, Harriet; Gawthrop, Frances; Wagstaff, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Sesquiterpenoids, and specifically sesquiterpene lactones from Asteraceae, may play a highly significant role in human health, both as part of a balanced diet and as pharmaceutical agents, due to their potential for the treatment of cardiovascular disease and cancer. This review highlights the role of sesquiterpene lactones endogenously in the plants that produce them, and explores mechanisms by which they interact in animal and human consumers of these plants. Several mechanisms are proposed for the reduction of inflammation and tumorigenesis at potentially achievable levels in humans. Plants can be classified by their specific array of produced sesquiterpene lactones, showing high levels of translational control. Studies of folk medicines implicate sesquiterpene lactones as the active ingredient in many treatments for other ailments such as diarrhea, burns, influenza, and neurodegradation. In addition to the anti-inflammatory response, sesquiterpene lactones have been found to sensitize tumor cells to conventional drug treatments. This review explores the varied ecological roles of sesquiterpenes in the plant producer, depending upon the plant and the compound. These include allelopathy with other plants, insects, and microbes, thereby causing behavioural or developmental modification to these secondary organisms to the benefit of the sesquiterpenoid producer. Some sesquiterpenoid lactones are antimicrobial, disrupting the cell wall of fungi and invasive bacteria, whereas others protect the plant from environmental stresses that would otherwise cause oxidative damage. Many of the compounds are effective due to their bitter flavor, which has obvious implications for human consumers. The implications of sesquiterpenoid lactone qualities for future crop production are discussed. PMID:23783276

  2. Sesquiterpenoids lactones: benefits to plants and people.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Martin; Trewin, Harriet; Gawthrop, Frances; Wagstaff, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Sesquiterpenoids, and specifically sesquiterpene lactones from Asteraceae, may play a highly significant role in human health, both as part of a balanced diet and as pharmaceutical agents, due to their potential for the treatment of cardiovascular disease and cancer. This review highlights the role of sesquiterpene lactones endogenously in the plants that produce them, and explores mechanisms by which they interact in animal and human consumers of these plants. Several mechanisms are proposed for the reduction of inflammation and tumorigenesis at potentially achievable levels in humans. Plants can be classified by their specific array of produced sesquiterpene lactones, showing high levels of translational control. Studies of folk medicines implicate sesquiterpene lactones as the active ingredient in many treatments for other ailments such as diarrhea, burns, influenza, and neurodegradation. In addition to the anti-inflammatory response, sesquiterpene lactones have been found to sensitize tumor cells to conventional drug treatments. This review explores the varied ecological roles of sesquiterpenes in the plant producer, depending upon the plant and the compound. These include allelopathy with other plants, insects, and microbes, thereby causing behavioural or developmental modification to these secondary organisms to the benefit of the sesquiterpenoid producer. Some sesquiterpenoid lactones are antimicrobial, disrupting the cell wall of fungi and invasive bacteria, whereas others protect the plant from environmental stresses that would otherwise cause oxidative damage. Many of the compounds are effective due to their bitter flavor, which has obvious implications for human consumers. The implications of sesquiterpenoid lactone qualities for future crop production are discussed. PMID:23783276

  3. Census of solo LuxR genes in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Hudaiberdiev, Sanjarbek; Choudhary, Kumari S; Vera Alvarez, Roberto; Gelencsér, Zsolt; Ligeti, Balázs; Lamba, Doriano; Pongor, Sándor

    2015-01-01

    luxR genes encode transcriptional regulators that control acyl homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing (AHL QS) in Gram negative bacteria. On the bacterial chromosome, luxR genes are usually found next or near to a luxI gene encoding the AHL signal synthase. Recently, a number of luxR genes were described that have no luxI genes in their vicinity on the chromosome. These so-called solo luxR genes may either respond to internal AHL signals produced by a non-adjacent luxI in the chromosome, or can respond to exogenous signals. Here we present a survey of solo luxR genes found in complete and draft bacterial genomes in the NCBI databases using HMMs. We found that 2698 of the 3550 luxR genes found are solos, which is an unexpectedly high number even if some of the hits may be false positives. We also found that solo LuxR sequences form distinct clusters that are different from the clusters of LuxR sequences that are part of the known luxR-luxI topological arrangements. We also found a number of cases that we termed twin luxR topologies, in which two adjacent luxR genes were in tandem or divergent orientation. Many of the luxR solo clusters were devoid of the sequence motifs characteristic of AHL binding LuxR proteins so there is room to speculate that the solos may be involved in sensing hitherto unknown signals. It was noted that only some of the LuxR clades are rich in conserved cysteine residues. Molecular modeling suggests that some of the cysteines may be involved in disulfide formation, which makes us speculate that some LuxR proteins, including some of the solos may be involved in redox regulation.

  4. Anti-quorum sensing activity of Psidium guajava L. flavonoids against Chromobacterium violaceum and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Vasavi, Halkare Suryanarayana; Arun, Ananthapadmanabha Bhagwath; Rekha, Punchapady-Devasya

    2014-05-01

    Psidium guajava L., which has been used traditionally as a medicinal plant, was explored for anti-quorum sensing (QS) activity. The anti-QS activity of the flavonoid (FL) fraction of P. guajava leaves was determined using a biosensor bioassay with Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Detailed investigation of the effects of the FL-fraction on QS-regulated violacein production in C. violaceum ATCC12472 and pyocyanin production, proteolytic, elastolytic activities, swarming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was performed using standard methods. Possible mechanisms of QS-inhibition were studied by assessing violacein production in response to N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) synthesis in the presence of the FL-fraction in C. violaceum ATCC31532 and by evaluating the induction of violacein in the mutant C. violaceum CV026 by AHL extracted from the culture supernatants of C. violaceum 31532. Active compounds in the FL-fraction were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Inhibition of violacein production by the FL-fraction in a C. violaceum CV026 biosensor bioassay indicated possible anti-QS activity. The FL-fraction showed concentration-dependent decreases in violacein production in C. violaceum 12472 and inhibited pyocyanin production, proteolytic and elastolytic activities, swarming motility and biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Interestingly, the FL-fraction did not inhibit AHL synthesis; AHL extracted from cultures of C. violaceum 31532 grown in the presence of the FL-fraction induced violacein in the mutant C. violaceum CV026. LC-MS analysis revealed the presence of quercetin and quercetin-3-O-arabinoside in the FL-fraction. Both quercetin and quercetin-3-O-arabinoside inhibited violacein production in C. violaceum 12472, at 50 and 100 μg/mL, respectively. Results of this study provide scope for further research to exploit these active molecules as anti-QS agents. PMID:24698116

  5. Whole genome sequencing and analysis reveal insights into the genetic structure, diversity and evolutionary relatedness of luxI and luxR homologs in bacteria belonging to the Sphingomonadaceae family

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Han Ming; Gan, Huan You; Ahmad, Nurul H.; Aziz, Nazrin A.; Hudson, André O.; Savka, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the draft genomes and annotation of four N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-producing members from the family Sphingomonadaceae. Comparative genomic analyses of 62 Sphingomonadaceae genomes were performed to gain insights into the distribution of the canonical luxI/R-type quorum sensing (QS) network within this family. Forty genomes contained at least one luxR homolog while the genome of Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1 contained seven Open Reading Frames (ORFs) that have significant homology to that of luxR. Thirty-three genomes contained at least one luxI homolog while the genomes of Sphingobium sp. SYK6, Sphingobium japonicum, and Sphingobium lactosutens contained four luxI. Using phylogenetic analysis, the sphingomonad LuxR homologs formed five distinct clades with two minor clades located near the plant associated bacteria (PAB) LuxR solo clade. This work for the first time shows that 13 Sphingobium and one Sphingomonas genome(s) contain three convergently oriented genes composed of two tandem luxR genes proximal to one luxI (luxR-luxR-luxI). Interestingly, luxI solos were identified in two Sphingobium species and may represent species that contribute to AHL-based QS system by contributing AHL molecules but are unable to perceive AHLs as signals. This work provides the most comprehensive description of the luxI/R circuitry and genome-based taxonomical description of the available sphingomonad genomes to date indicating that the presence of luxR solos and luxI solos are not an uncommon feature in members of the Sphingomonadaceae family. PMID:25621282

  6. Quorum sensing-modulated AND-gate promoters control gene expression in response to a combination of endogenous and exogenous signals.

    PubMed

    Shong, Jasmine; Collins, Cynthia H

    2014-04-18

    We have constructed and characterized two synthetic AND-gate promoters that require both a quorum-sensing (QS) signal and an exogenously added inducer to turn on gene expression. The engineered promoters, LEE and TTE, contain binding sites for the QS-dependent repressor, EsaR, and either LacI or TetR, and they are induced by an acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal and IPTG or aTc. Although repression of both LEE and TTE by wild-type EsaR was observed, induction of gene expression at physiologically relevant concentrations of AHL required the use of an EsaR variant with higher signal sensitivity. Gene expression from both LEE and TTE was shown to require both signal molecules, and gene expression above background levels was not observed with either signal alone. We added endogenous production of AHL to evaluate the ability of the promoters to function in a QS-dependent manner and observed that gene expression increased as a function of cell density only in the presence of exogenously added IPTG or aTc. Cell-cell communication-dependent AND-gate behaviors were demonstrated using an agar plate assay, where cells containing the engineered promoters were shown to respond to AHL produced by a second E. coli strain only in the presence of exogenously added IPTG or aTc. The promoters described in this work demonstrate that EsaR and its target DNA sequence can be used to engineer new promoters to respond to cell density or cell-cell communication. Further, the AND-gate promoters described here may serve as a template for new regulatory systems that integrate QS and the presence of key metabolites or other environmental cues to enable dynamic changes in gene expression for metabolic engineering applications.

  7. Anti-quorum sensing activity of Psidium guajava L. flavonoids against Chromobacterium violaceum and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Vasavi, Halkare Suryanarayana; Arun, Ananthapadmanabha Bhagwath; Rekha, Punchapady-Devasya

    2014-05-01

    Psidium guajava L., which has been used traditionally as a medicinal plant, was explored for anti-quorum sensing (QS) activity. The anti-QS activity of the flavonoid (FL) fraction of P. guajava leaves was determined using a biosensor bioassay with Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Detailed investigation of the effects of the FL-fraction on QS-regulated violacein production in C. violaceum ATCC12472 and pyocyanin production, proteolytic, elastolytic activities, swarming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was performed using standard methods. Possible mechanisms of QS-inhibition were studied by assessing violacein production in response to N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) synthesis in the presence of the FL-fraction in C. violaceum ATCC31532 and by evaluating the induction of violacein in the mutant C. violaceum CV026 by AHL extracted from the culture supernatants of C. violaceum 31532. Active compounds in the FL-fraction were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Inhibition of violacein production by the FL-fraction in a C. violaceum CV026 biosensor bioassay indicated possible anti-QS activity. The FL-fraction showed concentration-dependent decreases in violacein production in C. violaceum 12472 and inhibited pyocyanin production, proteolytic and elastolytic activities, swarming motility and biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Interestingly, the FL-fraction did not inhibit AHL synthesis; AHL extracted from cultures of C. violaceum 31532 grown in the presence of the FL-fraction induced violacein in the mutant C. violaceum CV026. LC-MS analysis revealed the presence of quercetin and quercetin-3-O-arabinoside in the FL-fraction. Both quercetin and quercetin-3-O-arabinoside inhibited violacein production in C. violaceum 12472, at 50 and 100 μg/mL, respectively. Results of this study provide scope for further research to exploit these active molecules as anti-QS agents.

  8. sinI- and expR-dependent quorum sensing in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mengsheng; Chen, Hancai; Eberhard, Anatol; Gronquist, Matthew R; Robinson, Jayne B; Rolfe, Barry G; Bauer, Wolfgang D

    2005-12-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) in Sinorhizobium meliloti, the N-fixing bacterial symbiont of Medicago host plants, involves at least half a dozen different N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals and perhaps an equal number of AHL receptors. The accumulation of 55 proteins was found to be dependent on SinI, the AHL synthase, and/or on ExpR, one of the AHL receptors. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry identified 3-oxo-C(14)-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C(14)-HSL), C(16)-HSL, 3-oxo-C(16)-HSL, C(16:1)-HSL, and 3-oxo-C(16:1)-HSL as the sinI-dependent AHL QS signals accumulated by the 8530 expR(+) strain under the conditions used for proteome analysis. The 8530 expR(+) strain secretes additional, unidentified QS-active compounds. Addition of 200 nM C(14)-HSL or C(16:1)-HSL, two of the known SinI AHLs, affected the levels of 75% of the proteins, confirming that their accumulation is QS regulated. A number of the QS-regulated proteins have functions plausibly related to symbiotic interactions with the host, including ExpE6, IdhA, MocB, Gor, PckA, LeuC, and AglE. Seven of 10 single-crossover beta-glucuronidase (GUS) transcriptional reporters in genes corresponding to QS-regulated proteins showed significantly different activities in the sinI and expR mutant backgrounds and in response to added SinI AHLs. The sinI mutant and several of the single-crossover strains were significantly delayed in the ability to initiate nodules on the primary root of the host plant, Medicago truncatula, indicating that sinI-dependent QS regulation and QS-regulated proteins contribute importantly to the rate or efficiency of nodule initiation. The sinI and expR mutants were also defective in surface swarming motility. The sinI mutant was restored to normal swarming by 5 nM C(16:1)-HSL.

  9. sinI- and expR-Dependent Quorum Sensing in Sinorhizobium meliloti†

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mengsheng; Chen, Hancai; Eberhard, Anatol; Gronquist, Matthew R.; Robinson, Jayne B.; Rolfe, Barry G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    2005-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) in Sinorhizobium meliloti, the N-fixing bacterial symbiont of Medicago host plants, involves at least half a dozen different N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals and perhaps an equal number of AHL receptors. The accumulation of 55 proteins was found to be dependent on SinI, the AHL synthase, and/or on ExpR, one of the AHL receptors. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry identified 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C14-HSL), C16-HSL, 3-oxo-C16-HSL, C16:1-HSL, and 3-oxo-C16:1-HSL as the sinI-dependent AHL QS signals accumulated by the 8530 expR+ strain under the conditions used for proteome analysis. The 8530 expR+ strain secretes additional, unidentified QS-active compounds. Addition of 200 nM C14-HSL or C16:1-HSL, two of the known SinI AHLs, affected the levels of 75% of the proteins, confirming that their accumulation is QS regulated. A number of the QS-regulated proteins have functions plausibly related to symbiotic interactions with the host, including ExpE6, IdhA, MocB, Gor, PckA, LeuC, and AglE. Seven of 10 single-crossover β-glucuronidase (GUS) transcriptional reporters in genes corresponding to QS-regulated proteins showed significantly different activities in the sinI and expR mutant backgrounds and in response to added SinI AHLs. The sinI mutant and several of the single-crossover strains were significantly delayed in the ability to initiate nodules on the primary root of the host plant, Medicago truncatula, indicating that sinI-dependent QS regulation and QS-regulated proteins contribute importantly to the rate or efficiency of nodule initiation. The sinI and expR mutants were also defective in surface swarming motility. The sinI mutant was restored to normal swarming by 5 nM C16:1-HSL. PMID:16291666

  10. Bioinspired, releasable quorum sensing modulators.

    PubMed

    Gomes, José; Grunau, Alexander; Lawrence, Adrien K; Eberl, Leo; Gademann, Karl

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis and immobilization of natural product hybrids featuring an acyl-homoserine lactone and a nitrodopamine onto biocompatible TiO(2) surfaces through an operationally simple dip-and-rinse procedure. The resulting immobilized hybrids were shown to be powerful quorum sensing (QS) activators in Pseudomonas strains acting by slow release from the surface. PMID:23169441

  11. Whole-Genome Sequencing Reveals a New Genospecies of Methylobacterium sp. GXS13, Isolated from Vitis vinifera L. Xylem Sap

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wan Xin; Gan, Han Ming; Hudson, André O.

    2016-01-01

    The whole-genome sequence of a new genospecies of Methylobacterium sp., named GXS13 and isolated from grapevine xylem sap, is reported and demonstrates potential for methylotrophy, cytokinin synthesis, and cell wall modification. In addition, biosynthetic gene clusters were identified for cupriachelin, carotenoid, and acyl-homoserine lactone using the antiSMASH server. PMID:26847900

  12. Quorum-Sensing-Regulated Bactobolin Production by Burkholderia thailandensis E264

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial acyl-homoserine lactones upregulated an uncharacterized gene cluster (bta) in Burkholderia thailandensis E264 to produce an uncharacterized polar antibiotic. The antibiotic is identified as a mixture of four bactobolins. Annotation of the bta cluster allows us to propose a biosynthetic scheme for bactobolin and reveals unusual enzymatic reactions for further study. PMID:20095633

  13. The Stringent Response Modulates 4-Hydroxy-2-Alkylquinoline Biosynthesis and Quorum-Sensing Hierarchy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Schafhauser, James; Lepine, Francois; McKay, Geoffrey; Ahlgren, Heather G.; Khakimova, Malika

    2014-01-01

    As a ubiquitous environmental organism and an important human pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa readily adapts and responds to a wide range of conditions and habitats. The intricate regulatory networks that link quorum sensing and other global regulators allow P. aeruginosa to coordinate its gene expression and cell signaling in response to different growth conditions and stressors. Upon nutrient transitions and starvation, as well as other environmental stresses, the stringent response is activated, mediated by the signal (p)ppGpp. P. aeruginosa produces a family of molecules called HAQ (4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines), some of which exhibit antibacterial and quorum-sensing signaling functions and regulate virulence genes. In this study, we report that (p)ppGpp negatively regulates HAQ biosynthesis: in a (p)ppGpp-null (ΔSR) mutant, HHQ (4-hydroxyl-2-heptylquinoline) and PQS (3,4-dihydroxy-2-heptylquinoline) levels are increased due to upregulated pqsA and pqsR expression and reduced repression by the rhl system. We also found that (p)ppGpp is required for full expression of both rhl and las AHL (acyl-homoserine lactone) quorum-sensing systems, since the ΔSR mutant has reduced rhlI, rhlR, lasI, and lasR expression, butanoyl-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) and 3-oxo-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) levels, and rhamnolipid and elastase production. Furthermore, (p)ppGpp significantly modulates the AHL and PQS quorum-sensing hierarchy, as the las system no longer has a dominant effect on HAQ biosynthesis when the stringent response is inactivated. PMID:24509318

  14. Use of aiiA gene amplification for AHL-lactonase production from endophytic bacterium Enterobacter species.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P S; Rai, V Ravishankar

    2015-01-01

    AHL-lactonase has gained renewed interest due to biotechnological applications such as antiquorum sensing, antibiofilm strategies, biofouling, etc. In our study, the production of AHL-lactonase from endophytic bacteria Enterobacter aerogenes VT66 was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) using central composite design (CCD) for four different cultural conditions. The relative activity of AHL-lactonase was correlated with amplification of aiiA homologous gene amplification with respect to cultural conditions. Statistical analysis by ANOVA of the quadratic regression model showed that the RSM model constructed is highly significant, as indicated by F-test with a low probability value (p(model) < 0.0001) and high regression coefficient (0.9997) as well as lower coefficient of variation (1.86%) indicate that suitability of variable parameters. The quadratic regression model of AHL-lactonase production in terms of relative activity was built and the optimal cultural conditions for maximum enzyme production were determined as 32.5 °C temperature, pH 7.0, 350 μM of substrate concentration and 33 h of incubation time. The enhanced AHL-lactonase yielded 1.33 fold increases in relative activity and it positively correlated with the amplification of aiiA gene. PMID:25451751

  15. Characterization of Quorum Sensing and Quorum Quenching Soil Bacteria Isolated from Malaysian Tropical Montane Forest

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Teik-Min; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Choo, Yeun-Mun; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2012-01-01

    We report the production and degradation of quorum sensing N-acyl-homoserine lactones by bacteria isolated from Malaysian montane forest soil. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these isolates clustered closely to the genera of Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Pseudomonas. Quorum quenching activity was detected in six isolates of these three genera by using a series of bioassays and rapid resolution liquid chromatography analysis. Biosensor screening and high resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed the production of N-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL) by Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis (isolate BT9). In addition to degradation of a wide range of N-acyl-homoserine lactones, Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas spp. also degraded p-coumaroyl-homoserine lactone. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation of Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas spp. capable of degrading p-coumaroyl-homoserine lactone and the production of C12-HSL by P. frederiksbergensis. PMID:22666062

  16. Identification of hydroxyl radical oxidation products of N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yiling; Frey, Rebecca L; Ferry, John L; Ferguson, P Lee

    2009-04-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for the characterization of hydroxyl radical oxidation products of N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL), a member of the N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) class of microbial quorum-sensing signaling molecules identified in many Gram-negative strains of bacteria. Six products were identified: four with molecular weight (MW) of 213 and two with MW of 260. The characteristic product ions formed through collision-induced dissociation (CID) provided diagnostic structural information. One of the photolysis products was determined to be N-(3-oxohexanoyl)homoserine lactone (3OC6-HSL), a highly active quorum-sensing signal, by comparison with a reference standard. Three structural isomers with the same mass as 3OC6-HSL were identified as acyl side chain oxidized C6-HSL (keto/enol functionalized) by accurate mass measurement and the structures of these products were proposed from CID spectral interpretation. Two structural isomers formed from concurrent oxidation and nitration of C6-HSL were also observed and their structures were postulated based on CID spectra. In addition to the six hydroxyl radical oxidation products formed from the C6-HSL precursor, five additional compounds generated from combined oxidation and lactonolysis of C6-HSL were identified and structures were postulated.

  17. Modulation of Quorum Sensing in Acylhomoserine Lactone-Producing or -Degrading Tobacco Plants Leads to Alteration of Induced Systemic Resistance Elicited by the Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens 90-166

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Choong-Min; Choi, Hye Kyung; Lee, Chi-Ho; Murphy, John F.; Lee, Jung-Kee; Kloepper, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous root-associated bacteria (rhizobacteria) are known to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) in plants. Bacterial cell-density-dependent quorum sensing (QS) is thought to be important for ISR. Here, we investigated the role of QS in the ISR elicited by the rhizobacterium, Serratia marcescens strain 90–166, in tobacco. Since S. marcescens 90–166 produces at least three QS signals, QS-mediated ISR in strain 90–166 has been difficult to understand. Therefore, we investigated the ISR capacity of two transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants that contained either bacterial acylhomoserine lactone-producing (AHL) or -degrading (AiiA) genes in conjunction with S. marcescens 90–166 to induce resistance against bacterial and viral pathogens. Root application of S. marcescens 90–166 increased ISR to the bacterial pathogens, Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, in AHL plants and decreased ISR in AiiA plants. In contrast, ISR to Cucumber mosaic virus was reduced in AHL plants treated with S. marcescens 90–166 but enhanced in AiiA plants. Taken together, these data indicate that QS-dependent ISR is elicited by S. marcescens 90–166 in a pathogen-dependent manner. This study provides insight into QS-dependent ISR in tobacco elicited by S. marcescens 90–166. PMID:25288945

  18. The effects of N-acylhomoserine lactones, β-lactam antibiotics and adenosine on biofilm formation in the multi-β-lactam antibiotic-resistant bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain MR-S7.

    PubMed

    Kusada, Hiroyuki; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Kimura, Nobutada

    2014-07-01

    Bacteria in the natural ecosystem frequently live as adherent communities called biofilms. Some chemical compounds are known to affect biofilm formation. We investigated the effect of exogenous small molecules, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), β-lactam antibiotics, and adenosine, on biofilm formation in the β-lactam antibiotic-resistant bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain MR-S7. Biofilm formation was induced by the addition of various types of AHL isomers and β-lactam antibiotics, whereas the addition of adenosine strongly interfered with the biofilm formation. A gene (macP) encoding adenosine deaminase (that converts adenosine to inosine controlling intracellular adenosine concentration) was successfully cloned from MR-S7 genome and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified MacP protein clearly catalyzed the deamination of adenosine to produce inosine. A transcriptional analysis revealed that biofilm-inducing molecules, an AHL and a β-lactam antibiotic, strongly induced not only biofilm formation but also adenosine deaminase gene expression, suggesting that an elaborate gene regulation network for biofilm formation is present in the β-lactam antibiotic-resistant bacterium studied here.

  19. Modulation of Quorum Sensing in Acylhomoserine Lactone-Producing or -Degrading Tobacco Plants Leads to Alteration of Induced Systemic Resistance Elicited by the Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens 90-166.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Choong-Min; Choi, Hye Kyung; Lee, Chi-Ho; Murphy, John F; Lee, Jung-Kee; Kloepper, Joseph W

    2013-06-01

    Numerous root-associated bacteria (rhizobacteria) are known to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) in plants. Bacterial cell-density-dependent quorum sensing (QS) is thought to be important for ISR. Here, we investigated the role of QS in the ISR elicited by the rhizobacterium, Serratia marcescens strain 90-166, in tobacco. Since S. marcescens 90-166 produces at least three QS signals, QS-mediated ISR in strain 90-166 has been difficult to understand. Therefore, we investigated the ISR capacity of two transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants that contained either bacterial acylhomoserine lactone-producing (AHL) or -degrading (AiiA) genes in conjunction with S. marcescens 90-166 to induce resistance against bacterial and viral pathogens. Root application of S. marcescens 90-166 increased ISR to the bacterial pathogens, Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, in AHL plants and decreased ISR in AiiA plants. In contrast, ISR to Cucumber mosaic virus was reduced in AHL plants treated with S. marcescens 90-166 but enhanced in AiiA plants. Taken together, these data indicate that QS-dependent ISR is elicited by S. marcescens 90-166 in a pathogen-dependent manner. This study provides insight into QS-dependent ISR in tobacco elicited by S. marcescens 90-166.

  20. A LuxR homolog in a cottonwood tree endophyte that activates gene expression in response to a plant signal or specific peptides

    DOE PAGES

    Schaefer, Amy L.; Oda, Yasuhiro; Coutinho, Bruna Goncalves; Pelletier, Dale A.; Weiburg, Justin; Venturi, Vittorio; Greenberg, E. Peter; Harwood, Caroline S.

    2016-08-02

    Homologs of the LuxR acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing signal receptor are prevalent in Proteobacteria isolated from roots of the Eastern cottonwood tree, Populus deltoides. Many of these isolates possess an orphan LuxR homolog, closely related to OryR from the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae. OryR does not respond to AHL signals but, instead, responds to an unknown plant compound. We discovered an OryR homolog, PipR, in the cottonwood endophyte Pseudomonas sp. strain GM79. The genes adjacent to pipR encode a predicted ATP-binding cassette (ABC) peptide transporter and peptidases. We purified the putative peptidases, PipA and AapA, and confirmed their predicted activities.more » A transcriptional pipA-gfp reporter was responsive to PipR in the presence of plant leaf macerates, but it was not influenced by AHLs, similar to findings with OryR. We found that PipR also responded to protein hydrolysates to activate pipA-gfp expression. Among many peptides tested, the tripeptide Ser-His-Ser showed inducer activity but at relatively high concentrations. An ABC peptide transporter mutant failed to respond to leaf macerates, peptone, or Ser-His-Ser, while peptidase mutants expressed higher-than-wild-type levels of pipA-gfp in response to any of these signals. Our studies are consistent with a model where active transport of a peptidelike signal is required for the signal to interact with PipR, which then activates peptidase gene expression. As a result, the identification of a peptide ligand for PipR sets the stage to identify plant-derived signals for the OryR family of orphan LuxR proteins.« less

  1. Quorum Quenching of Nitrobacter winogradskyi Suggests that Quorum Sensing Regulates Fluxes of Nitrogen Oxide(s) during Nitrification

    PubMed Central

    Giguere, Andrew T.; Bottomley, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread process in bacteria used to coordinate gene expression with cell density, diffusion dynamics, and spatial distribution through the production of diffusible chemical signals. To date, most studies on QS have focused on model bacteria that are amenable to genetic manipulation and capable of high growth rates, but many environmentally important bacteria have been overlooked. For example, representatives of proteobacteria that participate in nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, produce QS signals called acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs). Nitrification emits nitrogen oxide gases (NO, NO2, and N2O), which are potentially hazardous compounds that contribute to global warming. Despite considerable interest in nitrification, the purpose of QS in the physiology/ecology of nitrifying bacteria is poorly understood. Through a quorum quenching approach, we investigated the role of QS in a well-studied AHL-producing nitrite oxidizer, Nitrobacter winogradskyi. We added a recombinant AiiA lactonase to N. winogradskyi cultures to degrade AHLs to prevent their accumulation and to induce a QS-negative phenotype and then used mRNA sequencing (mRNA-Seq) to identify putative QS-controlled genes. Our transcriptome analysis showed that expression of nirK and nirK cluster genes (ncgABC) increased up to 19.9-fold under QS-proficient conditions (minus active lactonase). These data led to us to query if QS influenced nitrogen oxide gas fluxes in N. winogradskyi. Production and consumption of NOx increased and production of N2O decreased under QS-proficient conditions. Quorum quenching transcriptome approaches have broad potential to identify QS-controlled genes and phenotypes in organisms that are not genetically tractable. PMID:27795404

  2. Quorum-Sensing Regulation of Adhesion in Serratia marcescens MG1 Is Surface Dependent▿

    PubMed Central

    Labbate, Maurizio; Zhu, Hua; Thung, Leena; Bandara, Rani; Larsen, Martin R.; Willcox, Mark D. P.; Givskov, Michael; Rice, Scott A.; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2007-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic pathogen and a major cause of ocular infections. In previous studies of S. marcescens MG1, we showed that biofilm maturation and sloughing were regulated by N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS). Because of the importance of adhesion in initiating biofilm formation and infection, the primary goal of this study was to determine whether QS is important in adhesion to both abiotic and biotic surfaces, as assessed by determining the degree of attachment to hydrophilic tissue culture plates and human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells. Our results demonstrate that while adhesion to the abiotic surface was AHL regulated, adhesion to the HCE cell biotic surface was not. Type I fimbriae were identified as the critical adhesin for non-QS-mediated attachment to the biotic HCE cell surface but played no role in adhesion to the abiotic surface. While we were not able to identify a single QS-regulated adhesin essential for attachment to the abiotic surface, four AHL-regulated genes involved in adhesion to the abiotic surface were identified. Interestingly, two of these genes, bsmA and bsmB, were also shown to be involved in adhesion to the biotic surface in a non-QS-controlled fashion. Therefore, the expression of these two genes appears to be cocontrolled by regulators other than the QS system for mediation of attachment to HCE cells. We also found that QS in S. marcescens regulates other potential cell surface adhesins, including exopolysaccharide and the outer membrane protein OmpX. We concluded that S. marcescens MG1 utilizes different regulatory systems and adhesins in attachment to biotic and abiotic surfaces and that QS is a main regulatory pathway in adhesion to an abiotic surface but not in adhesion to a biotic surface. PMID:17237163

  3. Comparative genomics of Roseobacter clade bacteria isolated from the accessory nidamental gland of Euprymna scolopes

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Andrew J.; Fullmer, Matthew S.; Gogarten, Johann P.; Nyholm, Spencer V.

    2015-01-01

    The accessory nidamental gland (ANG) of the female Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, houses a consortium of bacteria including members of the Flavobacteriales, Rhizobiales, and Verrucomicrobia but is dominated by members of the Roseobacter clade (Rhodobacterales) within the Alphaproteobacteria. These bacteria are deposited into the jelly coat of the squid’s eggs, however, the function of the ANG and its bacterial symbionts has yet to be elucidated. In order to gain insight into this consortium and its potential role in host reproduction, we cultured 12 Rhodobacterales isolates from ANGs of sexually mature female squid and sequenced their genomes with Illumina sequencing technology. For taxonomic analyses, the ribosomal proteins of 79 genomes representing both roseobacters and non-roseobacters along with a separate MLSA analysis of 33 housekeeping genes from Roseobacter organisms placed all 12 isolates from the ANG within two groups of a single Roseobacter clade. Average nucelotide identity analysis suggests the ANG isolates represent three genera (Leisingera, Ruegeria, and Tateyamaria) comprised of seven putative species groups. All but one of the isolates contains a predicted Type VI secretion system, which has been shown to be important in secreting signaling and/or effector molecules in host–microbe associations and in bacteria–bacteria interactions. All sequenced genomes also show potential for secondary metabolite production, and are predicted to be involved with the production of acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and/or siderophores. An AHL bioassay confirmed AHL production in three tested isolates and from whole ANG homogenates. The dominant symbiont, Leisingera sp. ANG1, showed greater viability in iron-limiting conditions compared to other roseobacters, possibly due to higher levels of siderophore production. Future comparisons will try to elucidate novel metabolic pathways of the ANG symbionts to understand their putative role in host

  4. Signal-amplifying genetic circuit enables in vivo observation of weak promoter activation in the Rhl quorum sensing system.

    PubMed

    Karig, David; Weiss, Ron

    2005-03-20

    Small changes in transcriptional activity often significantly affect phenotype but are not detectable in vivo by conventional means. To address this problem, we present a technique for detecting weak transcriptional responses using signal-amplifying genetic circuits. We apply this technique to reveal previously undetectable log phase responses of several Rhl quorum sensing controlled (qsc) promoters from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Genetic circuits with Rhl promoters and transcriptional amplification components were built and tested in Escherichia coli. This enabled us to isolate the behavior of the promoters under study from Las and quinolone interactions. To amplify qsc promoter responses to acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL), the highly efficient lambda repressor gene was placed downstream of several Rhl promoters and coupled to a fluorescent reporter under the control of the lambda P(R) promoter. With amplification, up to approximately 100-fold differences in fluorescence levels between AHL induced and noninduced cultures were observed for promoters whose responses were otherwise not detectable. In addition, the combination of using signal amplification and performing experiments in E. coli simplified the analysis of AHL signal crosstalk. For example, we discovered that while a C4HSL/RhlR complex activates both qscrhlA and qscphzA1, a 3OC12HSL/RhlR complex activates qscphzA1 but not qscrhlA in our system. This crosstalk information is particularly important since one of the potential uses of amplification constructs is for the detection of specific quorum sensing signals in environmental and clinical isolates. Furthermore, the process of decomposing networks into basic parts, isolating these components in a well-defined background, and using amplification to characterize both crosstalk and cognate signal responses embodies an important approach to understanding complex genetic networks.

  5. SdiA aids enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli carriage by cattle fed a forage or grain diet.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Haiqing; Nguyen, Y N; Hovde, Carolyn J; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2013-09-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) causes hemorrhagic colitis and life-threatening complications. The main reservoirs for EHEC are healthy ruminants. We reported that SdiA senses acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) in the bovine rumen to activate expression of the glutamate acid resistance (gad) genes priming EHEC's acid resistance before they pass into the acidic abomasum. Conversely, SdiA represses expression of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) genes, whose expression is not required for bacterial survival in the rumen but is necessary for efficient colonization at the rectoanal junction (RAJ) mucosa. Our previous studies show that SdiA-dependent regulation was necessary for efficient EHEC colonization of cattle fed a grain diet. Here, we compared the SdiA role in EHEC colonization of cattle fed a forage hay diet. We detected AHLs in the rumen of cattle fed a hay diet, and these AHLs activated gad gene expression in an SdiA-dependent manner. The rumen fluid and fecal samples from hay-fed cattle were near neutrality, while the same digesta samples from grain-fed animals were acidic. Cattle fed either grain or hay and challenged with EHEC orally carried the bacteria similarly. EHEC was cleared from the rumen within days and from the RAJ mucosa after approximately one month. In competition trials, where animals were challenged with both wild-type and SdiA deletion mutant bacteria, diet did not affect the outcome that the wild-type strain was better able to persist and colonize. However, the wild-type strain had a greater advantage over the SdiA deletion mutant at the RAJ mucosa among cattle fed the grain diet.

  6. Quorum-sensing regulation of adhesion in Serratia marcescens MG1 is surface dependent.

    PubMed

    Labbate, Maurizio; Zhu, Hua; Thung, Leena; Bandara, Rani; Larsen, Martin R; Willcox, Mark D P; Givskov, Michael; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2007-04-01

    Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic pathogen and a major cause of ocular infections. In previous studies of S. marcescens MG1, we showed that biofilm maturation and sloughing were regulated by N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS). Because of the importance of adhesion in initiating biofilm formation and infection, the primary goal of this study was to determine whether QS is important in adhesion to both abiotic and biotic surfaces, as assessed by determining the degree of attachment to hydrophilic tissue culture plates and human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells. Our results demonstrate that while adhesion to the abiotic surface was AHL regulated, adhesion to the HCE cell biotic surface was not. Type I fimbriae were identified as the critical adhesin for non-QS-mediated attachment to the biotic HCE cell surface but played no role in adhesion to the abiotic surface. While we were not able to identify a single QS-regulated adhesin essential for attachment to the abiotic surface, four AHL-regulated genes involved in adhesion to the abiotic surface were identified. Interestingly, two of these genes, bsmA and bsmB, were also shown to be involved in adhesion to the biotic surface in a non-QS-controlled fashion. Therefore, the expression of these two genes appears to be cocontrolled by regulators other than the QS system for mediation of attachment to HCE cells. We also found that QS in S. marcescens regulates other potential cell surface adhesins, including exopolysaccharide and the outer membrane protein OmpX. We concluded that S. marcescens MG1 utilizes different regulatory systems and adhesins in attachment to biotic and abiotic surfaces and that QS is a main regulatory pathway in adhesion to an abiotic surface but not in adhesion to a biotic surface.

  7. A LuxR Homolog in a Cottonwood Tree Endophyte That Activates Gene Expression in Response to a Plant Signal or Specific Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Amy L.; Oda, Yasuhiro; Coutinho, Bruna Goncalves; Pelletier, Dale A.; Weiburg, Justin; Venturi, Vittorio; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Homologs of the LuxR acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing signal receptor are prevalent in Proteobacteria isolated from roots of the Eastern cottonwood tree, Populus deltoides. Many of these isolates possess an orphan LuxR homolog, closely related to OryR from the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae. OryR does not respond to AHL signals but, instead, responds to an unknown plant compound. We discovered an OryR homolog, PipR, in the cottonwood endophyte Pseudomonas sp. strain GM79. The genes adjacent to pipR encode a predicted ATP-binding cassette (ABC) peptide transporter and peptidases. We purified the putative peptidases, PipA and AapA, and confirmed their predicted activities. A transcriptional pipA-gfp reporter was responsive to PipR in the presence of plant leaf macerates, but it was not influenced by AHLs, similar to findings with OryR. We found that PipR also responded to protein hydrolysates to activate pipA-gfp expression. Among many peptides tested, the tripeptide Ser-His-Ser showed inducer activity but at relatively high concentrations. An ABC peptide transporter mutant failed to respond to leaf macerates, peptone, or Ser-His-Ser, while peptidase mutants expressed higher-than-wild-type levels of pipA-gfp in response to any of these signals. Our studies are consistent with a model where active transport of a peptidelike signal is required for the signal to interact with PipR, which then activates peptidase gene expression. The identification of a peptide ligand for PipR sets the stage to identify plant-derived signals for the OryR family of orphan LuxR proteins. PMID:27486195

  8. Abietane lactones and iridoids from Goldfussia yunnanensis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong-Wei; Li, Bo-Gang; Li, Guo-You; Li, Chang-Song; Fang, Dong-Mei; Zhang, Guo-Lin

    2007-12-01

    Two new abietane diterpene lactones (1--2), three new abietane diterpene lactone glycosides (3--5) and a new iridoid glycoside (6), together with five known compounds, were isolated from the aerial parts of Goldfussia yunnanensis. The new compounds were determined to be 18-hydroxyhelioscopinolide A (1), 18-oxohelioscopinolide A (2), 18-hydroxy-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylhelioscopinolide A (3), 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylhelioscopinolide A (4), 3-O-beta-D-galactopyranosylhelioscopinolide A (5), and 6-O-trans-cinnamoyl E-harpagoside (6) on the basis of spectral data and chemical evidence.

  9. Proteomic Analysis of the Quorum-Sensing Regulon in Pantoea stewartii and Identification of Direct Targets of EsaR

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Revathy

    2013-01-01

    The proteobacterium Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii causes Stewart's wilt disease in maize when it colonizes the xylem and secretes large amounts of stewartan, an exopolysaccharide. The success of disease pathogenesis lies in the timing of bacterial virulence factor expression through the different stages of infection. Regulation is achieved through a quorum-sensing (QS) system consisting of the acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) synthase, EsaI, and the transcription regulator EsaR. At low cell densities, EsaR represses transcription of itself and of rcsA, an activator of the stewartan biosynthesis operon; it also activates esaS, which encodes a small RNA (sRNA). Repression or activation ceases at high cell densities when EsaI synthesizes sufficient levels of the AHL ligand N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone to bind and inactivate EsaR. This study aims to identify other genes activated or repressed by EsaR during the QS response. Proteomic analysis identified a QS regulon of more than 30 proteins. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays of promoters of genes encoding differentially expressed proteins distinguished direct targets of EsaR from indirect targets. Additional quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and DNA footprinting analysis established that EsaR directly regulates the promoters of dkgA, glpF, and lrhA. The proteins encoded by dkgA, glpF, and lrhA are a 2,5-diketogluconate reductase, glycerol facilitator, and transcriptional regulator of chemotaxis and motility, respectively, indicating a more global QS response in P. stewartii than previously recognized. PMID:23913428

  10. Exploiting Quorum Sensing Interfering Strategies in Gram-Negative Bacteria for the Enhancement of Environmental Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiwei; Li, Chenghua

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread intercellular form of communication to coordinate physiological processes and cooperative activities of bacteria at the population level, and it depends on the production, secretion, and detection of small diffusible autoinducers, such as acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), auto-inducing oligo-peptides (AIPs) and autoinducer 2. In this review, the function of QS autoinducers of gram-negative bacteria in different aspects of wastewater treatment systems is examined. Based on research primarily performed over the past 10 years, QS involvement in the formation of biofilm and aerobic granules and changes of the microbial community and degradation/transformation pathways is discussed. In particular, the QS pathway in the role of bacterial infections and disease prevention in aquaculture is addressed. Interference of QS autoinducer-regulated pathways is considered potential treatment for a variety of environmentally related problems. This review is expected to serve as a stepping stone for further study and development strategies based on the mediation of QS-regulated pathways to enhance applications in both wastewater treatment systems and aquaculture. PMID:26779175

  11. Volatiles from Subtropical Convolvulaceae That Interfere with Bacterial Cell-to-Cell Communication as Potential Antipathogenic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Luciardi, María C.; Pérez Hernández, María V.; Muruaga, Nora; Bardón, Alicia; Arena, Mario E.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing chronic bacterial infections create an urgent need for new antimicrobial agents or strategies for their control. Targeting virulence is one of the alternative approaches to find new medicines to treat persistent infections due to bacteria with biofilm-phenotype which are more resistant to antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts having an extreme capacity for evading the host defences. A bioguided study of sixteen extracts from flowers and leaves of four subtropical Convolvulaceae species provided evidence of the occurrence of antipathogenic natural products active against Gram positive and negative bacteria. Particularly, volatile metabolites from Merremia dissecta creeper, a food and medicinal plant, were able to interfere with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing system by a strong decrease of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) biosynthesis (63–75%), which attenuated the virulence factor expression like biofilm (55%) and elastase activity (up to 27%), key factors that enable the colonization and dissemination of the infection in the host. Control of the P. aeruginosa biofilm and the QS process by phytochemicals, such as (+) spathulenol, isolated from a bioactive extract of M. dissecta leaves would be a good strategy for the development of new and effective antipathogenic drugs. PMID:27313653

  12. SigMol: repertoire of quorum sensing signaling molecules in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Akanksha; Kaur, Karambir; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a widespread phenomenon in prokaryotes that helps them to communicate among themselves and with eukaryotes. It is driven through quorum sensing signaling molecules (QSSMs) in a density dependent manner that assists in numerous biological functions like biofilm formation, virulence factors secretion, swarming motility, bioluminescence, etc. Despite immense implications, dedicated resources of QSSMs are lacking. Therefore, we have developed SigMol (http://bioinfo.imtech.res.in/manojk/sigmol), a specialized repository of these molecules in prokaryotes. SigMol harbors information on QSSMs pertaining to different quorum sensing signaling systems namely acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), diketopiperazines (DKPs), 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs), diffusible signal factors (DSFs), autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and others. Database contains 1382: entries of 182: unique signaling molecules from 215: organisms. It encompasses biological as well as chemical aspects of signaling molecules. Biological information includes genes, preliminary bioassays, identification assays and applications, while chemical detail comprises of IUPAC name, SMILES and structure. We have provided user-friendly browsing and searching facilities for easy data retrieval and comparison. We have gleaned information of diverse QSSMs reported in literature at a single platform 'SigMol'. This comprehensive resource will assist the scientific community in understanding intraspecies, interspecies or interkingdom networking and further help to unfold different facets of quorum sensing and related therapeutics. PMID:26490957

  13. Volatiles from Subtropical Convolvulaceae That Interfere with Bacterial Cell-to-Cell Communication as Potential Antipathogenic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Luciardi, María C; Pérez Hernández, María V; Muruaga, Nora; Bardón, Alicia; Arena, Mario E; Cartagena, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Increasing chronic bacterial infections create an urgent need for new antimicrobial agents or strategies for their control. Targeting virulence is one of the alternative approaches to find new medicines to treat persistent infections due to bacteria with biofilm-phenotype which are more resistant to antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts having an extreme capacity for evading the host defences. A bioguided study of sixteen extracts from flowers and leaves of four subtropical Convolvulaceae species provided evidence of the occurrence of antipathogenic natural products active against Gram positive and negative bacteria. Particularly, volatile metabolites from Merremia dissecta creeper, a food and medicinal plant, were able to interfere with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing system by a strong decrease of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) biosynthesis (63-75%), which attenuated the virulence factor expression like biofilm (55%) and elastase activity (up to 27%), key factors that enable the colonization and dissemination of the infection in the host. Control of the P. aeruginosa biofilm and the QS process by phytochemicals, such as (+) spathulenol, isolated from a bioactive extract of M. dissecta leaves would be a good strategy for the development of new and effective antipathogenic drugs.

  14. Involvement of multiple loci in quorum quenching of autoinducer I molecules in the nitrogen-fixing symbiont Rhizobium (Sinorhizobium) sp. strain NGR234.

    PubMed

    Krysciak, D; Schmeisser, C; Preuss, S; Riethausen, J; Quitschau, M; Grond, S; Streit, W R

    2011-08-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 is a unique alphaproteobacterium (order Rhizobiales) that forms nitrogen-fixing nodules with more legumes than any other microsymbiont. Since we have previously described the complete genome sequence of NGR234, we now report on a genome-wide functional analysis of the genes and enzymes involved in autoinducer I hydrolysis in this microbe. Altogether we identified five cosmid clones that repeatedly gave a positive result in our function-based approach for the detection of autoinducer I hydrolase genes. Of these five cosmid clones, two were located on pNGR234b and three were on cNGR234. Subcloning and in vitro mutagenesis in combination with BLAST analyses identified the corresponding open reading frames (ORFs) of all cosmid clones: dlhR, qsdR1, qsdR2, aldR, and hitR-hydR. Analyses of recombinant DlhR and QsdR1 proteins by using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) demonstrate that these enzymes function as acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) lactonases. Furthermore, we showed that these enzymes inhibited biofilm formation and other quorum-sensing-dependent processes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Chromobacterium violaceum, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Finally, our experimental data suggest that competitive colonization of roots in the rhizospheres of cowpea plants is affected by DlhR and QsdR1.

  15. Interference of Lactobacillus plantarum with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in infected burns: the potential use of probiotics in wound treatment.

    PubMed

    Valdéz, J C; Peral, M C; Rachid, M; Santana, M; Perdigón, G

    2005-06-01

    This study evaluated the ability of the probiotic organism Lactobacillus plantarum to inhibit the pathogenic activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, both in vitro and in vivo, and investigated the mechanisms involved in such protection. L. plantarum whole cultures, culture filtrates (acid filtrate and neutralised acid filtrate) and isolated, washed cells were tested in vitro for their effects on the production of the P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing signal molecules, acyl-homoserine-lactones (AHLs), and two virulence factors controlled by these signal molecules, elastase and biofilm. All were inhibited by L. plantarum cultures and filtrates, but not by isolated, washed cells. The acid L. plantarum growth medium itself had some inhibitory activity, but the greatest activity was exerted by the whole culture. To test the in-vivo activity of L. plantarum, a burned-mouse model was used in which burns infected with P. aeruginosa were treated with L. plantarum at 3, 4, 5, 7 and 9 days post-infection. Samples from skin, liver and spleen taken after 5, 10 and 15 days demonstrated inhibition of P. aeruginosa colonisation by L. plantarum. There was also an improvement in tissue repair, enhanced phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa by tissue phagocytes, and a decrease in apoptosis at 10 days. These results indicate that L. plantarum and/or its by-products are potential therapeutic agents for the local treatment of P. aeruginosa burn infections.

  16. Chemical Composition and Disruption of Quorum Sensing Signaling in Geographically Diverse United States Propolis

    PubMed Central

    Savka, Michael A.; Dailey, Lucas; Popova, Milena; Mihaylova, Ralitsa; Merritt, Benjamin; Masek, Marissa; Le, Phuong; Nor, Sharifah Radziah Mat; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hudson, André O.; Bankova, Vassya

    2015-01-01

    Propolis or bee glue has been used for centuries for various purposes and is especially important in human health due to many of its biological and pharmacological properties. In this work we showed quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activity of ten geographically distinct propolis samples from the United States using the acyl-homoserine lactone- (AHL-) dependent Chromobacterium violaceum strain CV026. Based on GC-MS chemical profiling the propolis samples can be classified into several groups that are as follows: (1) rich in cinnamic acid derivatives, (2) rich in flavonoids, and (3) rich in triterpenes. An in-depth analysis of the propolis from North Carolina led to the isolation and identification of a triterpenic acid that was recently isolated from Hondurian propolis (Central America) and ethyl ether of p-coumaric alcohol not previously identified in bee propolis. QSI activity was also observed in the second group US propolis samples which contained the flavonoid pinocembrin in addition to other flavonoid compounds. The discovery of compounds that are involved in QSI activity has the potential to facilitate studies that may lead to the development of antivirulence therapies that can be complementary and/or alternative treatments against antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens and/or emerging pathogens that have yet to be identified. PMID:25960752

  17. Towards Predictive Modeling of Information Processing in Microbial Ecosystems With Quorum-Sensing Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufaly, Tahir; Boedicker, James

    Bacteria communicate using external chemical signals in a process known as quorum sensing. However, the efficiency of this communication is reduced by both limitations on the rate of diffusion over long distances and potential interference from neighboring strains. Therefore, having a framework to quantitatively predict how spatial structure and biodiversity shape information processing in bacterial colonies is important, both for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of natural microbial ecosystems, and for the rational design of synthetic ecosystems with desired computational properties. As a first step towards these goals, we implement a reaction-diffusion model to study the dynamics of a LuxI/LuxR quorum sensing circuit in a growing bacterial population. The spatiotemporal concentration profile of acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signaling molecules is analyzed, and used to define a measure of physical and functional signaling network connectivity. From this, we systematically investigate how different initial distributions of bacterial populations influence the subsequent efficiency of collective long-range signal propagation in the population. We compare our results with known experimental data, and discuss limitations and extensions to our modeling framework.-/abstract-

  18. Volatiles from Subtropical Convolvulaceae That Interfere with Bacterial Cell-to-Cell Communication as Potential Antipathogenic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Luciardi, María C; Pérez Hernández, María V; Muruaga, Nora; Bardón, Alicia; Arena, Mario E; Cartagena, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Increasing chronic bacterial infections create an urgent need for new antimicrobial agents or strategies for their control. Targeting virulence is one of the alternative approaches to find new medicines to treat persistent infections due to bacteria with biofilm-phenotype which are more resistant to antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts having an extreme capacity for evading the host defences. A bioguided study of sixteen extracts from flowers and leaves of four subtropical Convolvulaceae species provided evidence of the occurrence of antipathogenic natural products active against Gram positive and negative bacteria. Particularly, volatile metabolites from Merremia dissecta creeper, a food and medicinal plant, were able to interfere with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing system by a strong decrease of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) biosynthesis (63-75%), which attenuated the virulence factor expression like biofilm (55%) and elastase activity (up to 27%), key factors that enable the colonization and dissemination of the infection in the host. Control of the P. aeruginosa biofilm and the QS process by phytochemicals, such as (+) spathulenol, isolated from a bioactive extract of M. dissecta leaves would be a good strategy for the development of new and effective antipathogenic drugs. PMID:27313653

  19. SigMol: repertoire of quorum sensing signaling molecules in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Akanksha; Kaur, Karambir; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a widespread phenomenon in prokaryotes that helps them to communicate among themselves and with eukaryotes. It is driven through quorum sensing signaling molecules (QSSMs) in a density dependent manner that assists in numerous biological functions like biofilm formation, virulence factors secretion, swarming motility, bioluminescence, etc. Despite immense implications, dedicated resources of QSSMs are lacking. Therefore, we have developed SigMol (http://bioinfo.imtech.res.in/manojk/sigmol), a specialized repository of these molecules in prokaryotes. SigMol harbors information on QSSMs pertaining to different quorum sensing signaling systems namely acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), diketopiperazines (DKPs), 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs), diffusible signal factors (DSFs), autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and others. Database contains 1382: entries of 182: unique signaling molecules from 215: organisms. It encompasses biological as well as chemical aspects of signaling molecules. Biological information includes genes, preliminary bioassays, identification assays and applications, while chemical detail comprises of IUPAC name, SMILES and structure. We have provided user-friendly browsing and searching facilities for easy data retrieval and comparison. We have gleaned information of diverse QSSMs reported in literature at a single platform 'SigMol'. This comprehensive resource will assist the scientific community in understanding intraspecies, interspecies or interkingdom networking and further help to unfold different facets of quorum sensing and related therapeutics.

  20. SigMol: repertoire of quorum sensing signaling molecules in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Akanksha; Kaur, Karambir; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a widespread phenomenon in prokaryotes that helps them to communicate among themselves and with eukaryotes. It is driven through quorum sensing signaling molecules (QSSMs) in a density dependent manner that assists in numerous biological functions like biofilm formation, virulence factors secretion, swarming motility, bioluminescence, etc. Despite immense implications, dedicated resources of QSSMs are lacking. Therefore, we have developed SigMol (http://bioinfo.imtech.res.in/manojk/sigmol), a specialized repository of these molecules in prokaryotes. SigMol harbors information on QSSMs pertaining to different quorum sensing signaling systems namely acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), diketopiperazines (DKPs), 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs), diffusible signal factors (DSFs), autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and others. Database contains 1382 entries of 182 unique signaling molecules from 215 organisms. It encompasses biological as well as chemical aspects of signaling molecules. Biological information includes genes, preliminary bioassays, identification assays and applications, while chemical detail comprises of IUPAC name, SMILES and structure. We have provided user-friendly browsing and searching facilities for easy data retrieval and comparison. We have gleaned information of diverse QSSMs reported in literature at a single platform ‘SigMol’. This comprehensive resource will assist the scientific community in understanding intraspecies, interspecies or interkingdom networking and further help to unfold different facets of quorum sensing and related therapeutics. PMID:26490957

  1. Chicory cultivars differ in sesquiterpene lactone composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) is a valuable forage species for small ruminants because it is nutritious and contains sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) that have anthelmintic activity. Three SLs, lactucin (lac), 8-deoxylactucin (dol), and lactucopicrin (lpic), occur in chicory leaves. Comprehensive dat...

  2. Triacetic acid lactone production from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triacetic acid lactone (TAL) is a potential platform chemical produced from acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA by the Gerbera hybrida 2-pyrone synthase (2PS) gene. Studies are ongoing to optimize production, purification, and chemical modification of TAL, which can be used to create the commercial chemicals...

  3. Pyrogenic organic matter can alter microbial communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, Caroline; Gao, Xiaodong; Cheng, Hsiao-Ying; Silberg, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Soil microbes communicate with each other to manage a large range of processes that occur more efficiently when microbes are able to act simultaneously. This coordination occurs through the continuous production of signaling compounds that are easily diffused into and out of cells. As the number of microbes in a localized environment increases, the internal cellular concentration of these signaling compounds increases, and when a threshold concentration is reached, gene expression shifts, leading to altered (and coordinated) microbial behaviors. Many of these coordinated behaviors have biogeochemically important outcomes. For example, methanogenesis, denitrification, biofilm formation, and the development of plant-rhizobial symbioses are all regulated by a simple class of cell-cell signaling molecules known as acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). Pyrogenic organic matter in soils can act to disrupt microbial communication through multiple pathways. In the case of AHLs, charcoal's very high surface area can sorb these signaling compounds, preventing microbes from detecting each others' presence (Masiello et al., 2014). In addition, the lactone ring in AHLs is vulnerable to pH increases accompanying PyOM inputs, with soil pH values higher than 7-8 leading to ring opening and compound destabilization. Different microbes use different classes of signaling compounds, and not all microbial signaling compounds are pH-vulnerable. This implies that PyOM-driven pH increases may trigger differential outcomes for Gram negative bacteria vs fungi, for example. A charcoal-driven reduction in microbes' ability to detect cell-cell communication compounds may lead to a shift in the ability of microbes to participate in key steps of C and N cycling. For example, an increase in an archaeon-specific AHL has been shown to lead to a cascade of metabolic processes that eventually results in the upregulation of CH4 production (Zhang et al., 2012). Alterations in similar AHL compounds leads to

  4. Non-Native N-Aroyl L-Homoserine Lactones Are Potent Modulators of the Quorum Sensing Receptor RpaR in Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    PubMed Central

    McInnis, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process by which bacteria use low molecular weight signaling molecules (or autoinducers) to assess their local population densities and alter gene expression levels at high cell numbers. Many Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) with aliphatic acyl groups as signaling molecules for QS. However, bacteria that utilize AHLs with aroyl acyl groups have been recently discovered, including the metabolically versatile soil bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris, which uses p-coumaroyl HL (p-cAHL) as its QS signal. This autoinducer is especially unusual because its acyl group is believed to originate from a monolignol (i.e., p-coumarate) produced exogenously by plants in the R. palustris environment, rather than through the endogenous fatty acid biosynthesis pathway like other native AHLs. As such, p-cAHL could signal not only bacterial density but also the availability of an exogenous plant-derived substrate, and may even constitute an interkingdom signal. Similar to other Gram-negative bacteria, QS in R. palustris is controlled by the p-cAHL signal binding its cognate LuxR-type receptor, RpaR. We sought to determine if non-native aroyl HLs (ArHLs) could potentially activate or inhibit RpaR in R. palustris, and thereby modulate QS in this soil bacterium. Herein, we report the testing of a set of synthetic ArHLs for RpaR agonism and antagonism using a R. palustris reporter strain. Several potent non-native RpaR agonists and antagonists were identified. Additionally, the screening data revealed that lower concentrations of ArHL are required to strongly agonize RpaR relative to antagonizing RpaR. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) analyses of the active ArHLs indicated that potent RpaR agonists tend to have sterically small substituents on their aryl groups, most notably in the ortho position. In turn, the strong RpaR antagonists were based on either the phenylpropionyl HL (PPHL) or the phenoxyacetyl HL (POHL) scaffold, and

  5. Thermodynamic properties of sesquiterpene lactone grossheimin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasenova, Sh. B.; Atazhanova, G. A.; Sagintaeva, Zh. I.; Kasenov, B. K.; Kishkentaeva, A. S.; Adekenov, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    The enthalpy of dissolution of sesquiterpene lactone grossheimin C15H18O4 is measured using a DAK-I-IA calorimeter at a lactone/ethanol (96%) molar ratios equal to 1 : 18000, 1 : 36000, and 1 : 72000. The standard enthalpy of dissolution of grossheimin in a 96% ethanol solution is calculated based on the resulting data. The temperature dependence of the heat capacity of grossheimin C p ° ˜ f ( T) is studied by means of dynamic calorimetry using a IT-C-400 device in the temperature range of 298.15-423 K. An equation describing this dependence is derived. The standard enthalpies of combustion, melting, and formation of grossheimin are calculated using approximate methods.

  6. Genome-wide association study for age-related hearing loss (AHL) in the mouse: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ohmen, Jeffrey; Kang, Eun Yong; Li, Xin; Joo, Jong Wha; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Zheng, Qing Yin; Davis, Richard C; Lusis, Aldons J; Eskin, Eleazar; Friedman, Rick A

    2014-06-01

    Age-related hearing loss (AHL) is characterized by a symmetric sensorineural hearing loss primarily in high frequencies and individuals have different levels of susceptibility to AHL. Heritability studies have shown that the sources of this variance are both genetic and environmental, with approximately half of the variance attributable to hereditary factors as reported by Huag and Tang (Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 267(8):1179-1191, 2010). Only a limited number of large-scale association studies for AHL have been undertaken in humans, to date. An alternate and complementary approach to these human studies is through the use of mouse models. Advantages of mouse models include that the environment can be more carefully controlled, measurements can be replicated in genetically identical animals, and the proportion of the variability explained by genetic variation is increased. Complex traits in mouse strains have been shown to have higher heritability and genetic loci often have stronger effects on the trait compared to humans. Motivated by these advantages, we have performed the first genome-wide association study of its kind in the mouse by combining several data sets in a meta-analysis to identify loci associated with age-related hearing loss. We identified five genome-wide significant loci (<10(-6)). One of these loci confirmed a previously identified locus (ahl8) on distal chromosome 11 and greatly narrowed the candidate region. Specifically, the most significant associated SNP is located 450 kb upstream of Fscn2. These data confirm the utility of this approach and provide new high-resolution mapping information about variation within the mouse genome associated with hearing loss.

  7. Unusual lactones from Cananga odorata (Annonaceae).

    PubMed

    Caloprisco, Eric; Fourneron, Jean-Dominique; Faure, Robert; Demarne, Frédéric-Emmanuel

    2002-01-01

    Two lactone compounds have been isolated from the leaves and branches of ylang-ylang (Cananga odorata forma genuina Hook. f. et Thomson, Annonaceae). One was already known as isosiphonodin 1. The other, canangone 2, is a new terpenoid spirolactone with an unusual backbone. Its structure has been established as 6-hydroxy-1-oxo-2-oxaspiro[4.5]dec-7-ene-8-carbaldehyde by using 1-D and 2-D NMR. PMID:11754546

  8. Fragrance material review on 16-hydroxy-7-hexadecenoic acid lactone.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2011-12-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 16-hydroxy-7-hexadecenoic acid lactone when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 16-Hydroxy-7-hexadecenoic acid lactone is a member of the fragrance structural group macrocyclic lactone and lactide derivatives. The fragrance ingredient described herein is one of 12 structurally diverse C14, C15 and C16 compounds that include (1) saturated mono-and (2) saturated di-ester lactones and (3) unsaturated lactones. For the latter, the double bond is not adjacent to (in conjugation with) the ester group. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to 16-hydroxy-7-hexadecenoic acid lactone and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data were evaluated, then summarized, and include physical properties data. A safety assessment of the entire macrocyclic lactone and lactide derivatives will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al., 2011 for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all macrocyclic lactone and lactide derivatives in fragrances. Belsito, D., Bickers, D., Bruze, M., Calow, P., Dagli, M., Fryer, A.D., Greim, H., Hanifin, J.H., Miyachi, Y., Saurat, J.H., Sipes, I.G., 2011. A toxicologic and dermatologic assessment of macrocylic lactones and lactide derivatives when used as fragrance ingredients.

  9. Purification and characterization of a novel lactonohydrolase, catalyzing the hydrolysis of aldonate lactones and aromatic lactones, from Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, S; Kataoka, M; Shimizu, K; Hirakata, M; Sakamoto, K; Yamada, H

    1992-10-01

    A novel lactonohydrolase, an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of aldonate lactones to the corresponding aldonic acids, was purified 10-fold to apparent homogeneity, with a 61% overall recovery, from Fusarium oxysporum AKU 3702, through a purification procedure comprising DEAE-Sephacel, octyl-Sepharose CL-4B and hydroxyapatite chromatographies and crystallization. The molecular mass of the native enzyme, as estimated by high-performance gel-permeation chromatography, is 125 kDa, and the subunit molecular mass is 60 kDa. The enzyme contains 15.4% (by mass) glucose equivalent of carbohydrate, and about 1 mol calcium/subunit. The enzyme hydrolyzes aldonate lactones, such as D-galactono-gamma-lactone and L-mannono-gamma-lactone, stereospecifically. Furthermore, it can catalyze the asymmetric hydrolysis of D-pantoyl lactone, which is a promising chiral building block for the chemical synthesis of D-pantothenate. These reactions are reversible, and the reaction equilibrium at pH 6.0 has a molar ratio of nearly 1:1 with D-pantoyl lactone and D-pantoic acid. The Km and Vmax for D-galactono-gamma-lactone are 3.6 mM and 1440 U/mg, respectively, and those for D-galactonate are 52.6 mM and 216 U/mg, respectively. The enzyme also irreversibly hydrolyzes several aromatic lactones, such as dihydrocoumarin and homogentisic-acid lactone. PMID:1396712

  10. Characterization of N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) deficient clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Boşgelmez-Tinaz, Gülgün; Ulusoy, Seyhan

    2008-01-01

    In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the production of several virulence factors such as elastase, rhamnolipids and pyocyanin depends on cell-to-cell signaling or quorum sensing (QS) involving N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules. In vitro studies with laboratory strains and virulence studies in animals with these same strains have demonstrated the contribution of QS to the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. However, the importance of P. aeruginosa QS systems in the development of human infections is not clearly known. In order to determine if deficiency within the QS system compromises the ability of P. aeruginosa to cause infections in humans, we collected 50 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Phenotypic characterization showed that isolates I-457, I-458, I-459 and I-461 were defective in the production of N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) signaling molecule and virulence factors elastase, protease, pyocyanin and rhamnolipids. Analysis of the sequences of the lasR, lasI, rhlR and rhlI genes of these four isolates showed that two of the four isolates had mutational defects in both rhlR and rhlI genes while other two isolates were only mutated in the rhlI gene. The combination of rhlR and rhlI mutations or only rhlI mutation probably explains their C4-HSL and virulence factors deficiencies. These observations suggest that QS deficient P. aeruginosa clinical isolates are able to cause infections and that in addition to known virulence factors, factors yet unidentified may contribute to the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa.

  11. Colostrum hexasaccharide, a novel Staphylococcus aureus quorum-sensing inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Singh, B N; Deepak, D; Rawat, A K S; Singh, B R

    2015-04-01

    The discovery of quorum-sensing (QS) systems regulating antibiotic resistance and virulence factors (VFs) has afforded a novel opportunity to prevent bacterial pathogenicity. Dietary molecules have been demonstrated to attenuate QS circuits of bacteria. But, to our knowledge, no study exploring the potential of colostrum hexasaccharide (CHS) in regulating QS systems has been published. In this study, we analyzed CHS for inhibiting QS signaling in Staphylococcus aureus. We isolated and characterized CHS from mare colostrum by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography evaporative light-scattering detection (RP-HPLC-ELSD), (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Antibiofilm activity of CHS against S. aureus and its possible interference with bacterial QS systems were determined. The inhibition and eradication potentials of the biofilms were studied by microscopic analyses and quantified by 96-well-microtiter-plate assays. Also, the ability of CHS to interfere in bacterial QS by degrading acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), one of the most studied signal molecules for Gram-negative bacteria, was evaluated. The results revealed that CHS exhibited promising inhibitory activities against QS-regulated secretion of VFs, including spreading ability, hemolysis, protease, and lipase activities, when applied at a rate of 5 mg/ml. The results of biofilm experiments indicated that CHS is a strong inhibitor of biofilm formation and also has the ability to eradicate it. The potential of CHS to interfere with bacterial QS systems was also examined by degradation of AHLs. Furthermore, it was documented that CHS decreased antibiotic resistance in S. aureus. The results thus give a lead that mare colostrum can be a promising source for isolating a next-generation antibacterial. PMID:25645850

  12. Studies on synthetic LuxR solo hybrids.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Daniel Passos; Patel, Hitendra K; González, Juan F; Devescovi, Giulia; Meng, Xianfa; Covaceuszach, Sonia; Lamba, Doriano; Subramoni, Sujatha; Venturi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    A sub-group of LuxR family of proteins that plays important roles in quorum sensing, a process of cell-cell communication, is widespread in proteobacteria. These proteins have a typical modular structure consisting of N-ter autoinducer binding and C-ter helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA binding domains. The autoinducer binding domain recognizes signaling molecules which are most often N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) but could also be other novel and yet unidentified molecules. In this study we carried out a series of specific domain swapping and promoter activation experiments as a first step to engineer synthetic signaling modules, taking advantage of the modularity and the versatile/diverse signal specificities of LuxR proteins. In our experiments the N-ter domains from different LuxR homologs were either interchanged or placed in tandem followed by a C-ter domain. The rational design of the hybrid proteins was supported by a structure-based homology modeling studies of three members of the LuxR family (i.e., LasR, RhlR, and OryR being chosen for their unique ligand binding specificities) and of selected chimeras. Our results reveal that these LuxR homologs were able to activate promoter elements that were not their usual targets; we also show that hybrid LuxR proteins retained the ability to recognize the signal specific for their N- ter autoinducer binding domain. However, the activity of hybrid LuxR proteins containing two AHL binding domains in tandem appears to depend on the organization and nature of the introduced domains. This study represents advances in the understanding of the modularity of LuxR proteins and provides additional possibilities to use hybrid proteins in both basic and applied synthetic biology based research.

  13. Studies on synthetic LuxR solo hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Passos da Silva, Daniel; Patel, Hitendra K.; González, Juan F.; Devescovi, Giulia; Meng, Xianfa; Covaceuszach, Sonia; Lamba, Doriano; Subramoni, Sujatha; Venturi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    A sub-group of LuxR family of proteins that plays important roles in quorum sensing, a process of cell-cell communication, is widespread in proteobacteria. These proteins have a typical modular structure consisting of N-ter autoinducer binding and C-ter helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA binding domains. The autoinducer binding domain recognizes signaling molecules which are most often N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) but could also be other novel and yet unidentified molecules. In this study we carried out a series of specific domain swapping and promoter activation experiments as a first step to engineer synthetic signaling modules, taking advantage of the modularity and the versatile/diverse signal specificities of LuxR proteins. In our experiments the N-ter domains from different LuxR homologs were either interchanged or placed in tandem followed by a C-ter domain. The rational design of the hybrid proteins was supported by a structure-based homology modeling studies of three members of the LuxR family (i.e., LasR, RhlR, and OryR being chosen for their unique ligand binding specificities) and of selected chimeras. Our results reveal that these LuxR homologs were able to activate promoter elements that were not their usual targets; we also show that hybrid LuxR proteins retained the ability to recognize the signal specific for their N- ter autoinducer binding domain. However, the activity of hybrid LuxR proteins containing two AHL binding domains in tandem appears to depend on the organization and nature of the introduced domains. This study represents advances in the understanding of the modularity of LuxR proteins and provides additional possibilities to use hybrid proteins in both basic and applied synthetic biology based research. PMID:26151032

  14. Signaling-mediated cross-talk modulates swarming and biofilm formation in a coral pathogen Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Alagely, Ali; Krediet, Cory J; Ritchie, Kim B; Teplitski, Max

    2011-10-01

    Interactions within microbial communities associated with marine holobionts contribute importantly to the health of these symbiotic organisms formed by invertebrates, dinoflagellates and bacteria. However, mechanisms that control invertebrate-associated microbiota are not yet fully understood. Hydrophobic compounds that were isolated from surfaces of asymptomatic corals inhibited biofilm formation by the white pox pathogen Serratia marcescens PDL100, indicating that signals capable of affecting the associated microbiota are produced in situ. However, neither the origin nor structures of these signals are currently known. A functional survey of bacteria recovered from coral mucus and from cultures of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium spp. revealed that they could alter swarming and biofilm formation in S. marcescens. As swarming and biofilm formation are inversely regulated, the ability of some native α-proteobacteria to affect both behaviors suggests that the α-proteobacterial signal(s) target a global regulatory switch controlling the behaviors in the pathogen. Isolates of Marinobacter sp. inhibited both biofilm formation and swarming in S. marcescens PDL100, without affecting growth of the coral pathogen, indicative of the production of multiple inhibitors, likely targeting lower level regulatory genes or functions. A multi-species cocktail containing these strains inhibited progression of a disease caused by S. marcescens in a model polyp Aiptasia pallida. An α-proteobacterial isolate 44B9 had a similar effect. Even though ∼4% of native holobiont-associated bacteria produced compounds capable of triggering responses in well-characterized N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) biosensors, there was no strong correlation between the production of AHL-like signals and disruption of biofilms or swarming in S. marcescens.

  15. New insights into the binding and catalytic mechanisms of Bacillus thuringiensis lactonase: insights into B. thuringiensis AiiA mechanism.

    PubMed

    Charendoff, Marc N; Shah, Halie P; Briggs, James M

    2013-01-01

    The lactonase enzyme (AiiA) produced by Bacillus thuringiensis serves to degrade autoinducer-1 (AI-1) signaling molecules in what is an evolved mechanism by which to compete with other bacteria. Bioassays have been previously performed to determine whether the AI-1 aliphatic tail lengths have any effect on AiiA's bioactivity, however, data to date are conflicting. Additionally, specific residue contributions to the catalytic activity of AiiA provide for some interesting questions. For example, it has been proposed that Y194 serves to provide an oxyanion hole to AI-1 which is curious given the fact the substrate spans two Zn(2+) ions. These ions might conceivably provide enough charge to promote both ligand stability and the carbonyl activation necessary to drive a nucleophilic attack. To investigate these questions, multiple molecular dynamics simulations were performed across a family of seven acylated homoserine lactones (AHL) along with their associated intermediate and product states. Distance analyses and interaction energy analyses were performed to investigate current bioassay data. Our simulations are consistent with experimental studies showing that AiiA degrades AHLs in a tail length independent manner. However, the presence of the tail is required for activity. Also, the putative oxyanion hole function of Y194 toward the substrate is not observed in any of the reactant or product state simulation trajectories, but does seem to show efficacy in stabilizing the intermediate state. Last, we argue through ionization state analyses, that the proton shuttling necessary for catalytic activity might be mediated by both water and substrate-based intra-molecular proton transfer. Based on this argument, an alternate catalytic mechanism is proposed.

  16. Interference of bacterial cell-to-cell communication: a new concept of antimicrobial chemotherapy breaks antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Hidetada; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria use a cell-to-cell communication activity termed “quorum sensing” to coordinate group behaviors in a cell density dependent manner. Quorum sensing influences the expression profile of diverse genes, including antibiotic tolerance and virulence determinants, via specific chemical compounds called “autoinducers”. During quorum sensing, Gram-negative bacteria typically use an acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) called autoinducer 1. Since the first discovery of quorum sensing in a marine bacterium, it has been recognized that more than 100 species possess this mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. In addition to being of interest from a biological standpoint, quorum sensing is a potential target for antimicrobial chemotherapy. This unique concept of antimicrobial control relies on reducing the burden of virulence rather than killing the bacteria. It is believed that this approach will not only suppress the development of antibiotic resistance, but will also improve the treatment of refractory infections triggered by multi-drug resistant pathogens. In this paper, we review and track recent progress in studies on AHL inhibitors/modulators from a biological standpoint. It has been discovered that both natural and synthetic compounds can disrupt quorum sensing by a variety of means, such as jamming signal transduction, inhibition of signal production and break-down and trapping of signal compounds. We also focus on the regulatory elements that attenuate quorum sensing activities and discuss their unique properties. Understanding the biological roles of regulatory elements might be useful in developing inhibitor applications and understanding how quorum sensing is controlled. PMID:23720655

  17. Colostrum Hexasaccharide, a Novel Staphylococcus aureus Quorum-Sensing Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, A.; Deepak, D.; Singh, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of quorum-sensing (QS) systems regulating antibiotic resistance and virulence factors (VFs) has afforded a novel opportunity to prevent bacterial pathogenicity. Dietary molecules have been demonstrated to attenuate QS circuits of bacteria. But, to our knowledge, no study exploring the potential of colostrum hexasaccharide (CHS) in regulating QS systems has been published. In this study, we analyzed CHS for inhibiting QS signaling in Staphylococcus aureus. We isolated and characterized CHS from mare colostrum by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography evaporative light-scattering detection (RP-HPLC-ELSD), 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Antibiofilm activity of CHS against S. aureus and its possible interference with bacterial QS systems were determined. The inhibition and eradication potentials of the biofilms were studied by microscopic analyses and quantified by 96-well-microtiter-plate assays. Also, the ability of CHS to interfere in bacterial QS by degrading acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), one of the most studied signal molecules for Gram-negative bacteria, was evaluated. The results revealed that CHS exhibited promising inhibitory activities against QS-regulated secretion of VFs, including spreading ability, hemolysis, protease, and lipase activities, when applied at a rate of 5 mg/ml. The results of biofilm experiments indicated that CHS is a strong inhibitor of biofilm formation and also has the ability to eradicate it. The potential of CHS to interfere with bacterial QS systems was also examined by degradation of AHLs. Furthermore, it was documented that CHS decreased antibiotic resistance in S. aureus. The results thus give a lead that mare colostrum can be a promising source for isolating a next-generation antibacterial. PMID:25645850

  18. Highly Effective Inhibition of Biofilm Formation by the First Metagenome-Derived AI-2 Quenching Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Weiland-Bräuer, Nancy; Kisch, Martin J.; Pinnow, Nicole; Liese, Andreas; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell–cell communication (quorum sensing, QS) represents a fundamental process crucial for biofilm formation, pathogenicity, and virulence allowing coordinated, concerted actions of bacteria depending on their cell density. With the widespread appearance of antibiotic-resistance of biofilms, there is an increasing need for novel strategies to control harmful biofilms. One attractive and most likely effective approach is to target bacterial communication systems for novel drug design in biotechnological and medical applications. In this study, metagenomic large-insert libraries were constructed and screened for QS interfering activities (quorum quenching, QQ) using recently established reporter strains. Overall, 142 out of 46,400 metagenomic clones were identified to interfere with acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), 13 with autoinducer-2 (AI-2). Five cosmid clones with highest simultaneous interfering activities were further analyzed and the respective open reading frames conferring QQ activities identified. Those showed homologies to bacterial oxidoreductases, proteases, amidases and aminotransferases. Evaluating the ability of the respective purified QQ-proteins to prevent biofilm formation of several model systems demonstrated highest inhibitory effects of QQ-2 using the crystal violet biofilm assay. This was confirmed by heterologous expression of the respective QQ proteins in Klebsiella oxytoca M5a1 and monitoring biofilm formation in a continuous flow cell system. Moreover, QQ-2 chemically immobilized to the glass surface of the flow cell effectively inhibited biofilm formation of K. oxytoca as well as clinical K. pneumoniae isolates derived from patients with urinary tract infections. Indications were obtained by molecular and biochemical characterizations that QQ-2 represents an oxidoreductase most likely reducing the signaling molecules AHL and AI-2 to QS-inactive hydroxy-derivatives. Overall, we propose that the identified novel QQ-2 protein

  19. Signaling-mediated cross-talk modulates swarming and biofilm formation in a coral pathogen Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Alagely, Ali; Krediet, Cory J; Ritchie, Kim B; Teplitski, Max

    2011-01-01

    Interactions within microbial communities associated with marine holobionts contribute importantly to the health of these symbiotic organisms formed by invertebrates, dinoflagellates and bacteria. However, mechanisms that control invertebrate-associated microbiota are not yet fully understood. Hydrophobic compounds that were isolated from surfaces of asymptomatic corals inhibited biofilm formation by the white pox pathogen Serratia marcescens PDL100, indicating that signals capable of affecting the associated microbiota are produced in situ. However, neither the origin nor structures of these signals are currently known. A functional survey of bacteria recovered from coral mucus and from cultures of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium spp. revealed that they could alter swarming and biofilm formation in S. marcescens. As swarming and biofilm formation are inversely regulated, the ability of some native α-proteobacteria to affect both behaviors suggests that the α-proteobacterial signal(s) target a global regulatory switch controlling the behaviors in the pathogen. Isolates of Marinobacter sp. inhibited both biofilm formation and swarming in S. marcescens PDL100, without affecting growth of the coral pathogen, indicative of the production of multiple inhibitors, likely targeting lower level regulatory genes or functions. A multi-species cocktail containing these strains inhibited progression of a disease caused by S. marcescens in a model polyp Aiptasia pallida. An α-proteobacterial isolate 44B9 had a similar effect. Even though ∼4% of native holobiont-associated bacteria produced compounds capable of triggering responses in well-characterized N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) biosensors, there was no strong correlation between the production of AHL-like signals and disruption of biofilms or swarming in S. marcescens. PMID:21509042

  20. Highly Effective Inhibition of Biofilm Formation by the First Metagenome-Derived AI-2 Quenching Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Weiland-Bräuer, Nancy; Kisch, Martin J; Pinnow, Nicole; Liese, Andreas; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell-cell communication (quorum sensing, QS) represents a fundamental process crucial for biofilm formation, pathogenicity, and virulence allowing coordinated, concerted actions of bacteria depending on their cell density. With the widespread appearance of antibiotic-resistance of biofilms, there is an increasing need for novel strategies to control harmful biofilms. One attractive and most likely effective approach is to target bacterial communication systems for novel drug design in biotechnological and medical applications. In this study, metagenomic large-insert libraries were constructed and screened for QS interfering activities (quorum quenching, QQ) using recently established reporter strains. Overall, 142 out of 46,400 metagenomic clones were identified to interfere with acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), 13 with autoinducer-2 (AI-2). Five cosmid clones with highest simultaneous interfering activities were further analyzed and the respective open reading frames conferring QQ activities identified. Those showed homologies to bacterial oxidoreductases, proteases, amidases and aminotransferases. Evaluating the ability of the respective purified QQ-proteins to prevent biofilm formation of several model systems demonstrated highest inhibitory effects of QQ-2 using the crystal violet biofilm assay. This was confirmed by heterologous expression of the respective QQ proteins in Klebsiella oxytoca M5a1 and monitoring biofilm formation in a continuous flow cell system. Moreover, QQ-2 chemically immobilized to the glass surface of the flow cell effectively inhibited biofilm formation of K. oxytoca as well as clinical K. pneumoniae isolates derived from patients with urinary tract infections. Indications were obtained by molecular and biochemical characterizations that QQ-2 represents an oxidoreductase most likely reducing the signaling molecules AHL and AI-2 to QS-inactive hydroxy-derivatives. Overall, we propose that the identified novel QQ-2 protein

  1. Design, synthesis and evaluation of N-aryl-glyoxamide derivatives as structurally novel bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nizalapur, Shashidhar; Kimyon, Önder; Biswas, Nripendra Nath; Gardner, Christopher R; Griffith, Renate; Rice, Scott A; Manefield, Mike; Willcox, Mark; Black, David StC; Kumar, Naresh

    2016-01-14

    Bacteria cooperatively regulate the expression of many phenotypes through a mechanism called quorum sensing (QS). Many Gram-negative bacteria use an N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated QS system to control biofilm formation and virulence factor production. In recent years, quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) have become attractive tools to overcome antimicrobial resistance exhibited by various pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, we report the design and synthesis of novel N-arylisatin-based glyoxamide derivatives via the ring-opening reaction of N-aryl isatins with cyclic and acylic amines, and amino acid esters. The QSI activity of the synthesized compounds was determined in the LasR-expressing Pseudomonas aeruginosa MH602 and LuxR-expressing Escherichia coli MT102 reporter strains. Compounds 31 and 32 exhibited the greatest QSI activity in P. aeruginosa MH602, with 48.7% and 42.7% reduction in QS activity at 250 μM, respectively, while compounds 31 and 34 showed 73.6% and 43.7% QSI activity in E. coli MT102. In addition, the ability of these compounds to inhibit the production of pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa (PA14) was also determined, with compound 28 showing 47% inhibition at 250 μM. Furthermore, computational docking studies were performed on the LasR receptor protein of P. aeruginosa, which showed that formation of a hydrogen bonding network played a major role in influencing the QS inhibitory activity. We envisage that these novel non-AHL glyoxamide derivatives could become a new tool for the study of QS and potentially for the treatment of bacterial infections.

  2. Lactones 42. Stereoselective enzymatic/microbial synthesis of optically active isomers of whisky lactone.

    PubMed

    Boratyński, Filip; Smuga, Małgorzata; Wawrzeńczyk, Czesław

    2013-11-01

    Two different methods, enzyme-mediated reactions and biotrasformations with microorganisms, were applied to obtain optically pure cis- and trans-isomers of whisky lactone 4a and 4b. In the first method, eight alcohol dehydrogenases were investigated as biocatalysts to enantioselective oxidation of racemic erythro- and threo-3-methyloctane-1,4-diols (1a and 1b). Oxidation processes with three of them, alcohol dehydrogenases isolated from horse liver (HLADH) as well as recombinant from Escherichia coli and primary alcohol dehydrogenase (PADH I), were characterized by the highest degree of conversion with moderate enantioselectivity (ee=27-82%) of the reaction. In all enzymatic reactions enantiomerically enriched not naturally occurring isomers of trans-(-)-(4R,5S)-4b or cis-(+)-(4R,5R)-4a were formed preferentially. In the second strategy, based on microbial lactonization of γ-oxoacids, naturally occurring opposite isomers of whisky lactones were obtained. Trans-(+)-(4S,5R)-isomer (ee=99%) of whisky lactone 4b was stereoselectively formed as the only product of biotransformations of 3-methyl-4-oxooctanoic acid (5) catalyzed by Didimospheria igniaria KCH6651, Laetiporus sulphurens AM525, Chaetomium sp.1 KCH6670 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae AM464. Biotransformation of γ-oxoacid 5, in the culture of Beauveria bassiana AM278 and Pycnidiella resinae KCH50 afforded a mixtures of trans-(+)-(4S,5R)-4b with enantiomeric excess ee=99% and cis-(-)-(4S,5S)-4a with enantiomeric excesses ee=77% and ee=45% respectively.

  3. New sesquiterpene lactones from Ambrosia cumanensis Kunth.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Usuga, Nora Del Socorro; Malafronte, Nicola; Cotugno, Roberta; De Leo, Marinella; Osorio, Edison; De Tommasi, Nunziatina

    2016-09-01

    Eleven sesquiterpene lactones, including three new natural products (1-3), were isolated from the n-butanolic extract of Ambrosia cumanensis Kunth. aerial parts. The structure of all isolated compounds was elucidated by 1D- and 2D-NMR, and MS analyses. All compounds were tested for their antiproliferative activity on HeLa, Jurkat, and U937 cell lines. Compound 3, 2,3-dehydropsilostachyn C, showed cytotoxic activity with different potency in all cell lines. By means of flow cytometric studies, compound 3 was demonstrated to induce in Jurkat cells a G2/M cell cycle block, while in U937 elicited both cytostatic and cytotoxic responses. PMID:27491754

  4. Identification of quorum-sensing regulated proteins in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Arevalo-Ferro, Catalina; Hentzer, Morten; Reil, Gerold; Görg, Angelika; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Givskov, Michael; Riedel, Kathrin; Eberl, Leo

    2003-12-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen which is responsible for severe nosocomial infections in immunocompromised patients and is the major pathogen in cystic fibrosis. The bacterium utilizes two interrelated quorum-sensing (QS) systems, which rely on N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules, to control the expression of virulence factors and biofilm development. In this study, we compared the protein patterns of the intracellular, extracellular and surface protein fractions of the PAO1 parent strain with those of an isogenic lasI rhlI double mutant by means of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). This analysis showed that the intensities of 23.7% of all detected protein spots differed more than 2.5-fold between the two strains. We only considered those protein spots truly QS regulated that were changed in the mutant in the absence of signal molecules but were rescued to the wild-type situation when the medium was supplemented with AHLs. These protein spots were characterized by MALDI-TOF peptide mapping. Twenty-seven proteins were identified that were previously reported to be AHL controlled, among them several well-characterized virulence factors. For one of the identified proteins, the serine protease PrpL, a biochemical assay was established to verify that expression of this factor is indeed QS regulated. Furthermore, it is shown that the quorum-sensing blocker C-30 specifically interferes with the expression of 67% of the AHL-controlled protein spots of the surface fraction, confirming the high specificity of the compound. Importantly, 20 novel QS-regulated proteins were identified, many of which are involved in iron utilization, suggesting a link between quorum sensing and the iron regulatory system. Two of these proteins, PhuR and HasAp, are components of the two distinct haem-uptake systems present in P. aeruginosa. In agreement with the finding that both proteins are positively regulated by the

  5. Marine-Derived Metabolites of S-Adenosylmethionine as Templates for New Anti-Infectives

    PubMed Central

    Sufrin, Janice R.; Finckbeiner, Steven; Oliver, Colin M.

    2009-01-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) is a key biochemical co-factor whose proximate metabolites include methylated macromolecules (e.g., nucleic acids, proteins, phospholipids), methylated small molecules (e.g., sterols, biogenic amines), polyamines (e.g., spermidine, spermine), ethylene, and N-acyl-homoserine lactones. Marine organisms produce numerous AdoMet metabolites whose novel structures can be regarded as lead compounds for anti-infective drug design. PMID:19841722

  6. Trichodermaerin: a diterpene lactone from Trichoderma asperellum

    PubMed Central

    Chantrapromma, Suchada; Jeerapong, Chotika; Phupong, Worrapong; Quah, Ching Kheng; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2014-01-01

    The title compound, C20H28O3, known as ‘trichodermaerin’ [systematic name: (4E)-4,9,15,16,16-penta­methyl-6-oxa­tetra­cyclo­[10.3.1.01,10.05,9]hexa­dec-4-ene-7,13-dione], is a diterpene lactone which was isolated from Trichoderma asperellum. The structure has a tetra­cycic 6–5–7–5 ring system, with the cyclo­hexa­none ring adopting a twisted half-chair conformation and the cyclo­pentane ring adopting a half-chair conformation, whereas the cyclo­heptene and tetra­hydro­furan­anone rings are in chair and envelope (with the methyl-substituted C atom as the flap) conformations, respectively. The three-dimensional architecture is stabilized by C—H⋯O inter­actions. PMID:24826124

  7. A new fungicidal lactone from Xylocarpus granatum (Meliaceae).

    PubMed

    Du, Shijie; Wang, Mingan; Zhu, Wen; Qin, Zhaohai

    2009-01-01

    A new lactone was isolated from the leaves of Xylocarpus granatum, along with three known compounds: triacontanol, beta-sitosterol and kaempferol-3-O-beta-D-glucoside. Its structure was elucidated as 3-(1-hydroxyethyl)-4,4-dimethyl-4-butyrolactone (1) by infrared, (1)H and (13)C NMR and ESI-MS data. At a concentration of 20 microg mL(-1), the new lactone gave a 67.4% inhibition rate against wheat powdery mildew.

  8. Treatment of MDR1 Mutant Dogs with Macrocyclic Lactones

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Joachim; Janko, Christina

    2012-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, encoded by the multidrug resistance gene MDR1, is an ATP-driven drug efflux pump which is highly expressed at the blood-brain barrier of vertebrates. Drug efflux of macrocyclic lactones by P-glycoprotein is highly relevant for the therapeutic safety of macrocyclic lactones, as thereby GABA-gated chloride channels, which are confined to the central nervous system in vertebrates, are protected from high drug concentrations that otherwise would induce neurological toxicity. A 4-bp deletion mutation exists in the MDR1 gene of many dog breeds such as the Collie and the Australian Shepherd, which results in the expression of a non-functional P-glycoprotein and is associated with multiple drug sensitivity. Accordingly, dogs with homozygous MDR1 mutation are in general prone to neurotoxicity by macrocyclic lactones due to their increased brain penetration. Nevertheless, treatment of these dogs with macrocyclic lactones does not inevitably result in neurological symptoms, since, the safety of treatment highly depends on the treatment indication, dosage, route of application, and the individual compound used as outlined in this review. Whereas all available macrocyclic lactones can safely be administered to MDR1 mutant dogs at doses usually used for heartworm prevention, these dogs will experience neurological toxicity following a high dose regimen which is common for mange treatment in dogs. Here, we review and discuss the neurotoxicological potential of different macrocyclic lactones as well as their treatment options in MDR1 mutant dogs. PMID:22039792

  9. Herbicidal and Fungicidal Activities of Lactones in Kava (Piper methysticum).

    PubMed

    Xuan, T D; Elzaawely, A A; Fukuta, M; Tawata, S

    2006-02-01

    This is the first report showing that kava lactones are plant and plant fungus growth inhibitors. Aqueous extract of kava roots showed high allelopathic potential and strongly suppressed germination and growth of lettuce, radish, barnyardgrass, and monochoria. Nine kava lactones were detected using GC-MS including desmethoxyyagonin, kavain, 7,8-dihydrokavain, hydroxykavain, yagonin, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroxyyagonin, methysticin, dihydromethysticin, and 11-hydroxy-12-methoxydihydrokavain. Quantities of desmethoxyyagonin, kavain, 7,8-dihydrokavain, yagonin, methysticin, and dihydromethysticin detected were 4.3, 6.9, 18.6, 5.7, 1.4, and 5.4 mg/g of dry weight, respectively. These six major lactones in kava roots showed great herbicidal and antifungal activities. Growth of lettuce and barnyardgrass were significantly inhibited at 1-10 ppm, and four plant fungi including Colletotrichum gloeosporides, Fusarium solani, Fusarium oxysporum, and Trichoderma viride were significantly inhibited at 10-50 ppm. The biological activities of kava lactones were characterized by different double-bond linkage patterns in positions 5,6 and 7,8. The findings of this study suggest that kava lactones may be useful for the development of bioactive herbicides and fungicides.

  10. Seasonal variation in sesquiterpene lactone concentration and composition of forage chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) herbage contains sesquiterpene lactones that are believed to help control gastrointestinal nematodes in small ruminants. Because the anthelmintic effect could be related to both total sesquiterpene lactone concentration and the proportions of the principal constituent...

  11. Identification of crypto- and neochlorogenic lactones as potent xanthine oxidase inhibitors in roasted coffee beans.

    PubMed

    Honda, Sari; Miura, Yukari; Masuda, Akiko; Masuda, Toshiya

    2014-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity has been found in boiling water extracts from roasted coffee beans. Therefore, assay-guided purification of the extracts was performed using size-exclusion column chromatography, and subsequently with reversed phase HPLC to afford lactone derivatives of chlorogenic acids. Among the tested lactones, crypto- and neochlorogenic lactones showed potent XO inhibitory activities compared with three major chlorogenic acids found in coffee beans. These XO inhibitory lactones may ameliorate gout and hyperuricemia in humans who drink coffee.

  12. Relationship between Menthiafolic Acid and Wine Lactone in Wine.

    PubMed

    Giaccio, Joanne; Curtin, Chris D; Sefton, Mark A; Taylor, Dennis K

    2015-09-23

    Menthiafolic acid (6-hydroxy-2,6-dimethylocta-2,7-dienoic acid, 2a) was quantified by GC-MS in 28 white wines, 4 Shiraz wines, and for the first time in 6 white grape juice samples. Menthiafolic acid was detected in all but one of the wine samples at concentrations ranging from 26 to 342 μg/L and in the juice samples from 16 to 236 μg/L. Various model fermentation experiments showed that some menthiafolic acid in wine could be generated from the grape-derived menthiafolic acid glucose ester (2b) during alcoholic and malolactic fermentation. Samples containing high concentrations of menthiafolic acid were also analyzed by enantioselective GC-MS and were shown to contain this compound in predominantly the (S)-configuration. Enantioselective analysis of wine lactone (1) in one of these samples, a four-year-old Chardonnay wine showed, for the first time, the presence of the 3R,3aR,7aS isomer of wine lactone (1b), which is the enantiomer of the form previously reported as the sole isomer present in young wine samples. The weakly odorous 3R,3aR,7aS 1b form comprised 69% of the total wine lactone in the sample. On the basis of the enantioselectivity of the hydrolytic conversion of menthiafolic acid to wine lactone at pH 3.0 determined previously and the relative proportions of (R)- and (S)-menthiafolic acid in the Chardonnay wine, the predicted ratio of wine lactone enantiomers that would be formed from hydrolysis at ambient temperature of the menthiafolic acid present in this wine was close to the ratio measured, which was consistent with menthiafolic acid being the major or sole precursor to wine lactone in this sample. PMID:26321591

  13. Relationship between Menthiafolic Acid and Wine Lactone in Wine.

    PubMed

    Giaccio, Joanne; Curtin, Chris D; Sefton, Mark A; Taylor, Dennis K

    2015-09-23

    Menthiafolic acid (6-hydroxy-2,6-dimethylocta-2,7-dienoic acid, 2a) was quantified by GC-MS in 28 white wines, 4 Shiraz wines, and for the first time in 6 white grape juice samples. Menthiafolic acid was detected in all but one of the wine samples at concentrations ranging from 26 to 342 μg/L and in the juice samples from 16 to 236 μg/L. Various model fermentation experiments showed that some menthiafolic acid in wine could be generated from the grape-derived menthiafolic acid glucose ester (2b) during alcoholic and malolactic fermentation. Samples containing high concentrations of menthiafolic acid were also analyzed by enantioselective GC-MS and were shown to contain this compound in predominantly the (S)-configuration. Enantioselective analysis of wine lactone (1) in one of these samples, a four-year-old Chardonnay wine showed, for the first time, the presence of the 3R,3aR,7aS isomer of wine lactone (1b), which is the enantiomer of the form previously reported as the sole isomer present in young wine samples. The weakly odorous 3R,3aR,7aS 1b form comprised 69% of the total wine lactone in the sample. On the basis of the enantioselectivity of the hydrolytic conversion of menthiafolic acid to wine lactone at pH 3.0 determined previously and the relative proportions of (R)- and (S)-menthiafolic acid in the Chardonnay wine, the predicted ratio of wine lactone enantiomers that would be formed from hydrolysis at ambient temperature of the menthiafolic acid present in this wine was close to the ratio measured, which was consistent with menthiafolic acid being the major or sole precursor to wine lactone in this sample.

  14. Homeostatic Interplay between Bacterial Cell-Cell Signaling and Iron in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Hazan, Ronen; He, Jianxin; Xiao, Gaoping; Dekimpe, Valérie; Apidianakis, Yiorgos; Lesic, Biliana; Astrakas, Christos; Déziel, Eric; Lépine, François; Rahme, Laurence G.

    2010-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria use interconnected multi-layered regulatory networks, such as quorum sensing (QS) networks to sense and respond to environmental cues and external and internal bacterial cell signals, and thereby adapt to and exploit target hosts. Despite the many advances that have been made in understanding QS regulation, little is known regarding how these inputs are integrated and processed in the context of multi-layered QS regulatory networks. Here we report the examination of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa QS 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs) MvfR regulatory network and determination of its interaction with the QS acyl-homoserine-lactone (AHL) RhlR network. The aim of this work was to elucidate paradigmatically the complex relationships between multi-layered regulatory QS circuitries, their signaling molecules, and the environmental cues to which they respond. Our findings revealed positive and negative homeostatic regulatory loops that fine-tune the MvfR regulon via a multi-layered dependent homeostatic regulation of the cell-cell signaling molecules PQS and HHQ, and interplay between these molecules and iron. We discovered that the MvfR regulon component PqsE is a key mediator in orchestrating this homeostatic regulation, and in establishing a connection to the QS rhlR system in cooperation with RhlR. Our results show that P. aeruginosa modulates the intensity of its virulence response, at least in part, through this multi-layered interplay. Our findings underscore the importance of the homeostatic interplay that balances competition within and between QS systems via cell-cell signaling molecules and environmental cues in the control of virulence gene expression. Elucidation of the fine-tuning of this complex relationship offers novel insights into the regulation of these systems and may inform strategies designed to limit infections caused by P. aeruginosa and related human pathogens. PMID:20300606

  15. The Multiple Signaling Systems Regulating Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nadal Jimenez, Pol; Koch, Gudrun; Thompson, Jessica A.; Xavier, Karina B.; Cool, Robbert H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Cell-to-cell communication is a major process that allows bacteria to sense and coordinately react to the fluctuating conditions of the surrounding environment. In several pathogens, this process triggers the production of virulence factors and/or a switch in bacterial lifestyle that is a major determining factor in the outcome and severity of the infection. Understanding how bacteria control these signaling systems is crucial to the development of novel antimicrobial agents capable of reducing virulence while allowing the immune system of the host to clear bacterial infection, an approach likely to reduce the selective pressures for development of resistance. We provide here an up-to-date overview of the molecular basis and physiological implications of cell-to-cell signaling systems in Gram-negative bacteria, focusing on the well-studied bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All of the known cell-to-cell signaling systems in this bacterium are described, from the most-studied systems, i.e., N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), the 4-quinolones, the global activator of antibiotic and cyanide synthesis (GAC), the cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) systems, and the alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp), to less-well-studied signaling molecules, including diketopiperazines, fatty acids (diffusible signal factor [DSF]-like factors), pyoverdine, and pyocyanin. This overview clearly illustrates that bacterial communication is far more complex than initially thought and delivers a clear distinction between signals that are quorum sensing dependent and those relying on alternative factors for their production. PMID:22390972

  16. Marine-derived quorum-sensing inhibitory activities enhance the antibacterial efficacy of tobramycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Busetti, Alessandro; Shaw, George; Megaw, Julianne; Gorman, Sean P; Maggs, Christine A; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial epiphytes isolated from marine eukaryotes were screened for the production of quorum sensing inhibitory compounds (QSIs). Marine isolate KS8, identified as a Pseudoalteromonas sp., was found to display strong quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activity against acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based reporter strains Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 and CV026. KS8 supernatant significantly reduced biofilm biomass during biofilm formation (-63%) and in pre-established, mature P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms (-33%). KS8 supernatant also caused a 0.97-log reduction (-89%) and a 2-log reduction (-99%) in PAO1 biofilm viable counts in the biofilm formation assay and the biofilm eradication assay respectively. The crude organic extract of KS8 had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2 mg/mL against PAO1 but no minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was observed over the concentration range tested (MBC > 16 mg/mL). Sub-MIC concentrations (1 mg/mL) of KS8 crude organic extract significantly reduced the quorum sensing (QS)-dependent production of both pyoverdin and pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa PAO1 without affecting growth. A combinatorial approach using tobramycin and the crude organic extract at 1 mg/mL against planktonic P. aeruginosa PAO1 was found to increase the efficacy of tobramycin ten-fold, decreasing the MIC from 0.75 to 0.075 µg/mL. These data support the validity of approaches combining conventional antibiotic therapy with non-antibiotic compounds to improve the efficacy of current treatments. PMID:25546516

  17. Chemical mediation of ternary interactions between marine holobionts and their environment as exemplified by the red alga Delisea pulchra.

    PubMed

    Harder, Tilmann; Campbell, Alexandra H; Egan, Suhelen; Steinberg, Peter D

    2012-05-01

    The need for animals and plants to control microbial colonization is important in the marine environment with its high densities of microscopic propagules and seawater that provides an ideal medium for their dispersal. In contrast to the traditional emphasis on antagonistic interactions of marine organisms with microbes, emerging studies lend support to the notion that health and performance of many marine organisms are functionally regulated and assisted by associated microbes, an ecological concept defined as a holobiont. While antimicrobial activities of marine secondary metabolites have been studied in great depth ex-situ, we are beginning to understand how some of these compounds function in an ecological context to maintain the performance of marine holobionts. The present article reviews two decades of our research on the red seaweed Delisea pulchra by addressing: the defense chemistry of this seaweed; chemically-mediated interactions between the seaweed and its natural enemies; and the negative influence of elevated seawater temperature on these interactions. Our understanding of these defense compounds and the functional roles they play for D. pulchra extends from molecular interactions with bacterial cell signaling molecules, to ecosystem-scale consequences of chemically-controlled disease and herbivory. Delisea pulchra produces halogenated furanones that antagonize the same receptor as acylated homoserine lactones (AHL)-a group of widespread intercellular communication signals among bacteria. Halogenated furanones compete with and inhibit bacterial cell-to-cell communication, and thus interfere with important bacterial communication-regulated processes, such as biofilm formation. In a predictable pattern that occurs at the ecological level of entire populations, environmental stress interferes with the production of halogenated furanones, causing downstream processes that ultimately result in disease of the algal holobiont. PMID:22527059

  18. Antagonistic potential of Pseudomonas graminis 49M against Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight.

    PubMed

    Mikiciński, Artur; Sobiczewski, Piotr; Puławska, Joanna; Malusa, Eligio

    2016-08-01

    In a previous study (Mikiciński et al. in Eur J Plant Pathol, doi: 10.1007/s10658-015-0837-y , 2015), we described the characterization of novel strain 49M of Pseudomonas graminis, isolated from the phyllosphere of apple trees in Poland showing a good protective activity against fire blight on different organs of host plants. We now report investigations to clarify the basis for this activity. Strain 49M was found to produce siderophores on a medium containing complex CAS-Fe(3+) and HDTMA, but was not able to produce N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). Moreover, it formed a biofilm on polystyrene and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surfaces. Strain 49M gave a positive reaction in PCR with primers complementary to gacA, the regulatory gene influencing the production of several secondary metabolites including antibiotics. The genes prnD (encoding pyrrolnitrin), pltC, pltB (pyoluteorin), phlD (2,4-diacetyl-phloroglucinol) and phzC as well as phzD (and their homologs phzF and phzA encoding phenazine), described for antagonistic fluorescent pseudomonads, however, were not detected. Research into the biotic relationship between strain 49M and Erwinia amylovora strain Ea659 on five microbiological media showed that this strain clearly inhibited the growth of the pathogen on King's B and nutrient agar with glycerol media, to a very small extent on nutrient agar with sucrose, and not at all on Luria-Bertani agar. On medium 925, strain 49M even stimulated E. amylovora growth. The addition of ferric chloride to King's B resulted in the loss of its inhibitory ability. Testing the survival of 49M in vitro showed its resistance to drought, greater than that of E. amylovora. PMID:27002332

  19. Marine-Derived Quorum-Sensing Inhibitory Activities Enhance the Antibacterial Efficacy of Tobramycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Busetti, Alessandro; Shaw, George; Megaw, Julianne; Gorman, Sean P.; Maggs, Christine A.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial epiphytes isolated from marine eukaryotes were screened for the production of quorum sensing inhibitory compounds (QSIs). Marine isolate KS8, identified as a Pseudoalteromonas sp., was found to display strong quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activity against acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based reporter strains Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 and CV026. KS8 supernatant significantly reduced biofilm biomass during biofilm formation (−63%) and in pre-established, mature P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms (−33%). KS8 supernatant also caused a 0.97-log reduction (−89%) and a 2-log reduction (−99%) in PAO1 biofilm viable counts in the biofilm formation assay and the biofilm eradication assay respectively. The crude organic extract of KS8 had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2 mg/mL against PAO1 but no minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was observed over the concentration range tested (MBC > 16 mg/mL). Sub-MIC concentrations (1 mg/mL) of KS8 crude organic extract significantly reduced the quorum sensing (QS)-dependent production of both pyoverdin and pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa PAO1 without affecting growth. A combinatorial approach using tobramycin and the crude organic extract at 1 mg/mL against planktonic P. aeruginosa PAO1 was found to increase the efficacy of tobramycin ten-fold, decreasing the MIC from 0.75 to 0.075 µg/mL. These data support the validity of approaches combining conventional antibiotic therapy with non-antibiotic compounds to improve the efficacy of current treatments. PMID:25546516

  20. Determination of microbial diversity of Aeromonas strains on the basis of multilocus sequence typing, phenotype, and presence of putative virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Martino, Maria Elena; Fasolato, Luca; Montemurro, Filomena; Rosteghin, Marina; Manfrin, Amedeo; Patarnello, Tomaso; Novelli, Enrico; Cardazzo, Barbara

    2011-07-01

    The genus Aeromonas has been described as comprising several species associated with the aquatic environment, which represents their principal reservoir. Aeromonas spp. are commonly isolated from diseased and healthy fish, but the involvement of such bacteria in human infection and gastroenteritis has frequently been reported. The primary challenge in establishing an unequivocal link between the Aeromonas genus and pathogenesis in humans is the extremely complicated taxonomy. With the aim of clarifying taxonomic relationships among the strains and phenotypes, a multilocus sequencing approach was developed and applied to characterize 23 type and reference strains of Aeromonas spp. and a collection of 77 field strains isolated from fish, crustaceans, and mollusks. All strains were also screened for putative determinants of virulence by PCR (ast, ahh1, act, asa1, eno, ascV, and aexT) and the production of acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs). In addition, the phenotypic fingerprinting obtained from 29 biochemical tests was submitted to the nonparametric combination (NPC) test methodology to define the statistical differences among the identified genetic clusters. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) achieved precise strain genotyping, and the phylogenetic analysis of concatenated sequences delineated the relationship among the taxa belonging to the genus Aeromonas, providing a powerful tool for outbreak traceability, host range diffusion, and ecological studies. The NPC test showed the feasibility of phenotypic differentiation among the majority of the MLST clusters by using a selection of tests or the entire biochemical fingerprinting. A Web-based MLST sequence database (http://pubmlst.org/aeromonas) specific for the Aeromonas genus was developed and implemented with all the results.

  1. The influence of quorum sensing in compartment II of the MELiSSA loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condori, Sandra; Mastroleo, Felice; Wattiez, Ruddy; Leys, Natalie

    MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) has been conceived as a 5 compartments microorganisms and higher plants recycling system for long haul space flights. Rhodospirillum rubrum S1H colonizes compartment II. Previous work reported that continuous culture of the bacterium in a photobioreactor could lead to thick biofilm formation, leading to bioreactor arrest. Our aim is to investigate the unknown quorum sensing (QS) system of R. rubrum S1H, specifically under MELiSSA relevant culture conditions meaning light anaerobic (LAN) and using acetate as carbon source. In that purpose an autoinducer synthase gene (Rru_A3396) knockout mutant was constructed by allelic exchange generating strain M68. In addition phenotypic comparison between wild type (WT) and M68 was performed. Results of thin layer chromatography assay where Agrobacterium tumefaciens NT1 have been used as reporter strain showed that WT produces acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) from C4 to C12 acyl carbon chain length; however, in M68 no AHLs were detected confirming that gene Rru_A3396 (named rruI) encodes an autoinducer synthase. Interestingly under a low shear or static environment M68 showed cell aggregation similar as reported in a closely related bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (cerI mutant). In contrast to WT, M68 did not form biofilm and exhibited a decreased motility and pigment content. M68 vs wild type transcriptomics results showed that 326 genes were statistically significant differentially expressed. Downregulation of genes related to photosynthesis e.g., reaction center subunits, light harvesting complex and photosynthetic assembly proteins was observed. Similar results were obtained for preliminary proteomic analysis. Results obtained showed that in R. rubrum S1H the AHL-based QS system regulates almost 8% of the genome which is linked to biofilm formation among other biological processes described above. Since strain M68 could not be used in compartment II due to its less

  2. Quorum Sensing Is Accompanied by Global Metabolic Changes in the Opportunistic Human Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Peter W.; Griffin, Julian L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum sensing (QS) systems to control the expression of secreted effectors. These effectors can be crucial to the ecological fitness of the bacterium, playing roles in nutrient acquisition, microbial competition, and virulence. In this study, we investigated the metabolic consequences of AHL-dependent QS by monitoring the metabolic profile(s) of a lasI rhlI double mutant (unable to make QS signaling molecules) and its wild-type progenitor as they progressed through the growth curve. Analysis of culture supernatants by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy revealed that at the point where AHL concentrations peaked in the wild type, the metabolic footprints (i.e., extracellular metabolites) of the wild-type and lasI rhlI mutant diverged. Subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based analysis of the intracellular metabolome revealed QS-dependent perturbations in around one-third of all identified metabolites, including altered concentrations of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates, amino acids, and fatty acids. Further targeted fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) GC-MS-based profiling of the cellular total fatty acid pools revealed that QS leads to changes associated with decreased membrane fluidity and higher chemical stability. However, not all of the changes we observed were necessarily a direct consequence of QS; liquid chromatography (LC)-MS analyses revealed that polyamine levels were elevated in the lasI rhlI mutant, perhaps a response to the absence of QS-dependent adaptations. Our data suggest that QS leads to a global readjustment in central metabolism and provide new insight into the metabolic changes associated with QS during stationary-phase adaptation. IMPORTANCE Quorum sensing (QS) is a transcriptional regulatory mechanism that allows bacteria to coordinate their gene expression profile with the population cell density. The opportunistic

  3. Triacetic acid lactone production in industrial Saccharomyces yeast strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triacetic acid lactone (TAL) is a potential platform chemical that can be produced in yeast. To evaluate the potential for industrial yeast strains to produce TAL, the g2ps1 gene encoding 2-pyrone synthase was transformed into thirteen industrial yeast strains of varied genetic background. TAL produ...

  4. Statin Lactonization by Uridine 5'-Diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs).

    PubMed

    Schirris, Tom J J; Ritschel, Tina; Bilos, Albert; Smeitink, Jan A M; Russel, Frans G M

    2015-11-01

    Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that have proven to be effective in lowering the risk of major cardiovascular events. Although well tolerated, statin-induced myopathies are the most common side effects. Compared to their pharmacologically active acid form, statin lactones are more potent inducers of toxicity. They can be formed by glucuronidation mediated by uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), but a systematic characterization of subtype specificity and kinetics of lactonization is lacking. Here, we demonstrate for six clinically relevant statins that only UGT1A1, 1A3, and 2B7 contribute significantly to their lactonization. UGT1A3 appeared to have the highest lactonization capacity with marked differences in statin conversion rates: pitavastatin ≫ atorvastatin > cerivastatin > lovastatin > rosuvastatin (simvastatin not converted). Using in silico modeling we could identify a probable statin interaction region in the UGT binding pocket. Polymorphisms in these regions of UGT1A1, 1A3, and 2B7 may be a contributing factor in statin-induced myopathies, which could be used in personalization of statin therapy with improved safety.

  5. Natural Sesquiterpene Lactones Induce Oxidative Stress in Leishmania mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Patricia; Sülsen, Valeria P.; Lozano, Esteban; Rivera, Mónica; Beer, María Florencia; Tonn, Carlos; Martino, Virginia S.; Sosa, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a worldwide parasitic disease, caused by monoflagellate parasites of the genus Leishmania. In the search for more effective agents against these parasites, the identification of molecular targets has been attempted to ensure the efficiency of drugs and to avoid collateral damages on the host's cells. In this work, we have investigated some of the mechanisms of action of a group of natural sesquiterpene lactones that are effective against Leishmania mexicana mexicana promastigotes. We first observed that the antiproliferative effect of mexicanin I (Mxc), dehydroleucodine (DhL), psilostachyin (Psi), and, at lesser extent, psilostachyin C (Psi C) is blocked by 1.5 mM reduced glutathione. The reducing agent was also able to reverse the early effect of the compounds, suggesting that lactones may react with intracellular sulfhydryl groups. Moreover, we have shown that all the sesquiterpene lactones, except Psi C, significantly decreased the endogenous concentration of glutathione within the parasite. Consistent with these findings, the active sesquiterpene lactones increased between 2.7 and 5.4 times the generation of ROS by parasites. These results indicate that the induction of oxidative stress is at least one of the mechanisms of action of DhL, Mxc, and Psi on parasites while Psi C would act by another mechanism. PMID:23861697

  6. Toward understanding how the lactone moiety of discodermolide affects activity.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Simon J; Sundermann, Kurt F; Burlingame, Mark A; Myles, David C; Freeze, B Scott; Xian, Ming; Brouard, Ignacio; Smith, Amos B

    2005-05-11

    A series of simplified discodermolide analogues have been designed and synthesized in an attempt to understand the role of the lactone ring. These synthetic efforts have led to an unsubstituted butyrolactone 9 being generated, which shows improved activity over the natural product.

  7. Statin Lactonization by Uridine 5'-Diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs).

    PubMed

    Schirris, Tom J J; Ritschel, Tina; Bilos, Albert; Smeitink, Jan A M; Russel, Frans G M

    2015-11-01

    Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that have proven to be effective in lowering the risk of major cardiovascular events. Although well tolerated, statin-induced myopathies are the most common side effects. Compared to their pharmacologically active acid form, statin lactones are more potent inducers of toxicity. They can be formed by glucuronidation mediated by uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), but a systematic characterization of subtype specificity and kinetics of lactonization is lacking. Here, we demonstrate for six clinically relevant statins that only UGT1A1, 1A3, and 2B7 contribute significantly to their lactonization. UGT1A3 appeared to have the highest lactonization capacity with marked differences in statin conversion rates: pitavastatin ≫ atorvastatin > cerivastatin > lovastatin > rosuvastatin (simvastatin not converted). Using in silico modeling we could identify a probable statin interaction region in the UGT binding pocket. Polymorphisms in these regions of UGT1A1, 1A3, and 2B7 may be a contributing factor in statin-induced myopathies, which could be used in personalization of statin therapy with improved safety. PMID:26412035

  8. Lactonization-mediated glycosylations and their application to oligosaccharide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwan Soo; Jeon, Heung Bae

    2008-01-01

    The concept of lactonization-mediated and related glycosylations led us to develop new methods of glycosylation such as the 2'-carboxybenzyl (CB) glycoside method, the glycosyl pentenoate/phenylselenyl trifluoromethanesulfonate (PhSeOTf) method, and the glycosyl aryl phthalate method. Highly stereoselective beta-mannopyranosylations were achieved by employing the CB glycoside and the glycosyl pentenoate/PhSeOTf methods. The CB glycoside method was also utilized for stereoselective 2-deoxyglycosylation, beta-arabinofuranosylation, and alpha-galactofuranosylation. In addition, these lactonization-mediated methods of glycosylation were employed for the synthesis of complex oligosaccharides. In particular, the CB glycoside method was successfully applied to the synthesis of repeating oligosaccharide subunits of the O-polysaccharide of the lipopolysaccharide from Danish Helicobacter pylori strains and Escherichia coli 077, the synthesis of oligoarabinofuranosides in mycobacterial cell walls, and the total synthesis of antineoplastic agelagalastatin. PMID:18302265

  9. Biosynthesis of resorcylic acid lactone lasiodiplodin in Lasiodiplodia theobromae.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Takasumi; Takahashi, Kosaku; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Nabeta, Kensuke

    2009-05-01

    The biosynthesis of lasiodiplodin (1) and its (5S)-5-hydroxylated derivative (2) were investigated by the administration of (13)C-labeled acetates to Lasiodiplodia theobromae. The labeling patterns of biosynthetically (13)C-labeled 1 and 2 were determined by (13)C-NMR and INADEQUATE spectra, demonstrating the octaketide origins of 1 and 2. Taking into account the biosynthetic study of resorcylic acid lactones, the involvement of highly reduced acyl intermediates in the biosynthesis of lasiodiplodins was presumed; thus, we synthesized (2)H-labeled hypothetical acyl intermediates of 1, 9-hydroxydecanoic acid (4) and its N-acetylcysteamine thioester (SNAC, 5). When L. theobromae was incubated with 5 mM of a (2)H-labeled intermediate, the (2)H-label from the intermediate was incorporated at the expected position of 1. These incorporation studies revealed that 1 was produced via a pathway which closely resembles that of resorcylic acid lactone biosynthesis. PMID:19420710

  10. Dispersant additives derived from lactone modified amido-amine adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, A.; Lundberg, R.D.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a lactone modified dispersant additive. It comprises one adduct of a polyolefin of 300 to 10,000 number average molecular weight substituted with at least 0.8 (e.g., from about 1 to 4) dicarboxylic acid producing moieties (preferably acid or anhydride moieties) per polyolefin molecule, an amido-amine or thioamido-amine characterized by being a reaction product of at least a polyamine and an alpha, beta-unsaturated compound.

  11. Lactonic Sophorolipids Increase Tumor Burden in Apcmin+/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Breedge; Lydon, Helen; Roelants, Sophie L. K. W.; Van Bogaert, Inge N. A.; Marchant, Roger; Banat, Ibrahim M.; Mitchell, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Sophorolipids (SL) are amphiphilic biosurfactant molecules consisting of a disaccharide sophorose with one fatty acid at the C1 position and optional acetylation at the C6’and C6” positions. They exist in a closed ring lactonic (LSL) or open acidic (ASL) structure Sophorolipids are produced in crude mixtures in economically viable amounts by the yeast Starmerella bombicola and used in a variety of consumer products. Varying levels of anti- proliferative and anti-cancer activity of crude sophorolipid mixtures are described in a number of tumor cell lines in vitro. However, significant inter-study variation exists in the composition of sophorolipid species as well as other biologically active compounds in these mixtures, which makes interpretation of in vitro and in vivo studies difficult. We produced a 96% pure C18:1 lactonic sophorolipid that dose-dependently reduces the viability of colorectal cancer, as well as normal human colonic and lung cell lines in vitro. Oral administration of vehicle-only; or lactonic sophorolipids (50 mg/kg for 70 days), to Apcmin+/- mice resulted in an increase in the number (55.5 ± 3.3 vs 70.50 ± 7.8: p < 0.05) and size (modal size 2mm vs 4mm) of intestinal polyps. Lactonic administration resulted in a systematic effect via reduced hematocrit (49.5 ± 1.0 vs 28.2 ± 2.0 vs: p<0.03) and splenomegaly (0.56 ± 0.03g vs 0.71 ± 0.04g; p<0.01) confirming exacerbation of disease progression in this model. PMID:27271048

  12. Structurally modified natural sesquiterpene lactones constitute effective and less toxic schistosomicidal compounds.

    PubMed

    Sass, Daiane Cristina; Morais, Gustavo Oliveira; Miranda, Ricardo Augusto Crema; Magalhães, Lizandra Guidi; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; dos Santos, Raquel Alves; Arakawa, Nilton Syogo; Da Costa, Fernando Batista; Constantino, Mauricio Gomes; Heleno, Vladimir Constantino Gomes

    2014-10-28

    Sesquiterpene lactones are known to be active, but are also known to present high cytotoxicity. In the present work an evaluation of how slight structural alterations affect the cytotoxicity and the schistosomicidal activity of sesquiterpene lactones was undertaken. More specifically, we assessed the activity of budlein-A, a furanoheliangolide sesquiterpene lactone, and four of its derivatives. The structural modifications of budlein-A, presented in this work, diminished the cytotoxicity and changed the antiparasitary behavior of the molecule. They also provided data for a better understanding of the sesquiterpene lactone cytotoxicity. The establishment of the structures of three synthesized sesquiterpene lactones on the basis of NMR and HRESIMS data is also presented here. Complete and detailed (1)H and (13)C 1D and 2D NMR data, with measurements of all J values and all multiplicities clarified, are presented for five sesquiterpene lactones for the first time.

  13. Cytotoxic sesquiterpene lactones from the aerial parts of Inula aucheriana.

    PubMed

    Gohari, Ahmad Reza; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud; Naghibi, Farzaneh; Eslami-Tehrani, Bahara; Pirani, Atefeh; Hamzeloo-Moghadam, Maryam; Read, Roger W

    2015-01-01

    Inula aucheriana DC is a member of the family Asteraceae which is known to produce cytotoxic secondary metabolites noted as sesquiterpene lactones. In the present study, sesquiterpene lactones inuchinenolide B, 6-deoxychamissonolide (stevin) and 14-acetoxy-1β,5α,7αH-4β-hydroxy-guai-9(10),11(13)-dien-12,8α-olide were isolated from I. aucheriana. Inuchinenolide B and 14-acetoxy-1β,5α,7αH-4β-hydroxy-guai-9(10),11(13)-dien-12,8α-olide were further evaluated by the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay to demonstrate cytotoxic activity with IC50 values of (56.6, 19.0), (39.0, 11.8), and (55.7, 15.3) μg/mL against HepG-2, MCF-7 and A-549 cells, respectively. The cytotoxic activity of the two evaluated sesquiterpene lactones partly explains the cytotoxic activity that was previously observed for the extracts of Inula aucheriana. The isolated compounds could be further investigated in cancer research studies.

  14. Stereoselective synthesis of (+)-nephrosteranic acid, (+)-trans-cognac lactone, and (+)-trans-whisky lactone using a chiral cyclohexadienyl Ti compound.

    PubMed

    Schleth, Florian; Vogler, Thomas; Harms, Klaus; Studer, Armido

    2004-09-01

    We present the stereoselective transfer of cyclohexadienyl from 3-metalated 1,4-cyclohexadienes to various aldehydes. Lewis-acid-mediated "allylation" of aldehydes by treatment with 3-silylated and 3-stannylated 1,4-cyclohexadienes could not be achieved with high diastereoselectivity. In contrast, cyclohexadienyl titanium compounds reacted with both aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes with good-to-excellent diastereoselectivities. Reaction of a chiral TADDOL-derived (TADDOL, 2,2-dimethyl-alpha,alpha,alpha',alpha'-tetraphenyl-1,3-dioxolandimethanol) cyclohexadienyl Ti derivative with various aldehydes led to the corresponding homoallylic alcohols with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities. Lower selectivities were obtained with chiral B-cyclohexadienyldiisopinocampheylborane. The 1,3-cyclohexadienes are very useful building blocks for the preparation of biologically important gamma-butyrolactones. Short efficient syntheses of (+)-nephrosteranic acid, (+)-trans-whisky lactone, and (+)-trans-cognac lactone by desymmetrization of 1,4-cyclohexadiene are described.

  15. The fumigant and repellent activity of aliphatic lactones against Pediculus humanus capitis (Anoplura: Pediculidae).

    PubMed

    Toloza, Ariel Ceferino; Zygadlo, Julio; Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Zerba, Eduardo; Faillaci, Silvina; Picollo, María Inés

    2006-02-01

    New alternative insecticides are necessary for the chemical control of head lice. In this study the fumigant knockdown time 50% (KT50) and repellency index (RI) of three aliphatic lactones was compared with two essential oils and DDVP, against permethrin-resistance Pediculus humanus capitis from Argentina. In the fumigant assay, none of the lactones were effective compared to the highest activity of eucalyptus (KT50 15.53 m). In the repellency test, the three lactones were equally or more effective (RI ranging from 60.50 to 76.68) than the positive control (piperonal). These lactones are promising as head lice repellents. PMID:16699710

  16. Effect of salinity and incubation time of planktonic cells on biofilm formation, motility, exoprotease production, and quorum sensing of Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Jahid, Iqbal Kabir; Mizan, Md Furkanur Rahaman; Ha, Angela J; Ha, Sang-Do

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of salinity and age of cultures on quorum sensing, exoprotease production, and biofilm formation by Aeromonas hydrophila on stainless steel (SS) and crab shell as substrates. Biofilm formation was assessed at various salinities, from fresh (0%) to saline water (3.0%). For young and old cultures, planktonic cells were grown at 30 °C for 24 h and 96 h, respectively. Biofilm formation was assessed on SS, glass, and crab shell; viable counts were determined in R2A agar for SS and glass, but Aeromonas-selective media was used for crab shell samples to eliminate bacterial contamination. Exoprotease activity was assessed using a Fluoro™ protease assay kit. Quantification of acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) was performed using the bioreporter strain Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and the concentration was confirmed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The concentration of autoinducer-2 (AI-2) was determined with Vibrio harveyi BB170. The biofilm structure at various salinities (0-3 %) was assessed using field emission electron microscopy (FESEM). Young cultures of A. hydrophila grown at 0-0.25% salinity showed gradual increasing of biofilm formation on SS, glass and crab shell; swarming and swimming motility; exoproteases production, AHL and AI-2 quorum sensing; while all these phenotypic characters reduced from 0.5 to 3.0% salinity. The FESEM images also showed that from 0 to 0.25% salinity stimulated formation of three-dimensional biofilm structures that also broke through the surface by utilizing the chitin surfaces of crab, while 3% salinity stimulated attachment only for young cultures. However, in marked contrast, salinity (0.1-3%) had no effect on the stimulation of biofilm formation or on phenotypic characters for old cultures. However, all concentrations reduced biofilm formation, motility, protease production and quorum sensing for old culture. Overall, 0-0.25% salinity enhanced biofilm formation

  17. Effect of salinity and incubation time of planktonic cells on biofilm formation, motility, exoprotease production, and quorum sensing of Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Jahid, Iqbal Kabir; Mizan, Md Furkanur Rahaman; Ha, Angela J; Ha, Sang-Do

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of salinity and age of cultures on quorum sensing, exoprotease production, and biofilm formation by Aeromonas hydrophila on stainless steel (SS) and crab shell as substrates. Biofilm formation was assessed at various salinities, from fresh (0%) to saline water (3.0%). For young and old cultures, planktonic cells were grown at 30 °C for 24 h and 96 h, respectively. Biofilm formation was assessed on SS, glass, and crab shell; viable counts were determined in R2A agar for SS and glass, but Aeromonas-selective media was used for crab shell samples to eliminate bacterial contamination. Exoprotease activity was assessed using a Fluoro™ protease assay kit. Quantification of acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) was performed using the bioreporter strain Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and the concentration was confirmed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The concentration of autoinducer-2 (AI-2) was determined with Vibrio harveyi BB170. The biofilm structure at various salinities (0-3 %) was assessed using field emission electron microscopy (FESEM). Young cultures of A. hydrophila grown at 0-0.25% salinity showed gradual increasing of biofilm formation on SS, glass and crab shell; swarming and swimming motility; exoproteases production, AHL and AI-2 quorum sensing; while all these phenotypic characters reduced from 0.5 to 3.0% salinity. The FESEM images also showed that from 0 to 0.25% salinity stimulated formation of three-dimensional biofilm structures that also broke through the surface by utilizing the chitin surfaces of crab, while 3% salinity stimulated attachment only for young cultures. However, in marked contrast, salinity (0.1-3%) had no effect on the stimulation of biofilm formation or on phenotypic characters for old cultures. However, all concentrations reduced biofilm formation, motility, protease production and quorum sensing for old culture. Overall, 0-0.25% salinity enhanced biofilm formation

  18. Roles of the Gac-Rsm pathway in the regulation of phenazine biosynthesis in Pseudomonas chlororaphis 30-84

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongping; Lee, Sung-Hee; Seeve, Candace; Yu, Jun Myoung; Pierson, Leland S; Pierson, Elizabeth A

    2013-01-01

    The GacS/GacA two-component regulatory system activates the production of secondary metabolites including phenazines crucial for biological control activity in Pseudomonas chlororaphis 30-84. To better understand the role of the Gac system on phenazine regulation, transcriptomic analyses were conducted by comparing the wild-type strain to a gacA mutant. RNA-seq analysis identified 771 genes under GacA control, including many novel genes. Consistent with previous findings, phenazine biosynthetic genes were significantly downregulated in a gacA mutant. The transcript abundances of phenazine regulatory genes such as phzI, phzR, iopA, iopB, rpoS, and pip also were reduced. Moreover, the transcript abundance of three noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) including rsmX, rsmY, and rsmZ was significantly decreased by gacA mutation consistent with the presence of consensus GacA-binding sites associated with their promoters. Our results also demonstrated that constitutive expression of rsmZ from a non-gac regulated promoter resulted in complete restoration of N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) and phenazine production as well as the expression of other gac-dependent secondary metabolites in gac mutants. The role of RsmA and RsmE in phenazine production also was investigated. Overexpression of rsmE, but not rsmA, resulted in decreased AHL and phenazine production in P. chlororaphis, and only a mutation in rsmE bypassed the requirement for GacA in phenazine gene expression. In contrast, constitutive expression of the phzI/phzR quorum sensing system did not rescue phenazine production in the gacA mutant, indicating the direct posttranscriptional control by Gac on the phenazine biosynthetic genes. On the basis of these results, we propose a model to illustrate the hierarchic role of phenazine regulators modulated by Gac in the control of phenazine production. The transcriptomic analysis also was used to identify additional genes regulated by GacA that may contribute to the biological control

  19. Gracilone, a new sesquiterpene lactone from Tanacetum gracile (Tansies).

    PubMed

    Bhat, Gulzar; Masood, Akbar; Ganai, Bashir A; Hamza, Baseerat; Ganie, Showkat; Shafi, Tasfi; Idris, Ahmed; Shawl, Abdul S; Tantry, Mudasir A

    2016-10-01

    The methanolic extract of the Tanacetum gracile afforded the isolation of new sesquiterpene lactone, named gracilone (1) along with four known compounds as 14α-taraxeran-3-one (2), 14α-taraxeran-3-ol (3), apigenin (4) and β-sitosterol (5). The structure of compound 1 was elucidated on the basis of 1D, 2D NMR and MS spectroscopic analysis. Antimicrobial, antioxidant and anticancer activities of all compounds were evaluated, from which gracilone (1) showed a moderate antibacterial activity, while apigenin (4) showed comparatively more antibacterial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative tested strains. PMID:27018200

  20. Anti-inflammatory sesquiterpene lactones from Lourteigia ballotaefolia.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Romero, Alfredo; Manchado, Carlos Martinez; Crescente, Oscar; Acosta, Mercedes; Curini, Massimo; Epifano, Francesco; Marcotullio, Maria Carla; Rosati, Ornelio; Tubaro, Aurelia; Sosa, Silvio

    2002-09-01

    Three sesquiterpene lactones were isolated from Lourteigia ballotaefolia (H. B. K.). 9beta-hydroxy-atripliciolide-8- O-tiglate ( 1) was isolated for the first time from this plant and was previously reported in Conocliniopsis prasiifolia (DC) K. et R., 9beta-hydroxy-atripliciolide-8- O-(5'-acetoxytiglate) ( 2) had been already reported in this species. The minor component, 9beta-(tigloyloxy)-atripliciolide, is a new compound. The anti-inflammatory activity of compounds 1 and 2 was evaluated using the croton oil ear test in mice.

  1. Sesquiterpene lactone composition of wild and cultivated sunflowers and biological activity against an insect pest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sesquiterpene lactones in sunflowers, Helianthus spp., are important to interactions with pathogens, weeds and insects. Across a broad range of H. annuus, differences in composition of sesquiterpene lactones extracted from florets were found between wild and cultivated sunflowers, but also between d...

  2. Synthetic method and biological activities of cis-fused alpha-methylene gamma-lactones.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yohsuke; Shimoma, Fumito; Ando, Masayoshi

    2003-06-01

    A reliable method was developed for the synthesis of cis-fused alpha-methylene gamma-lactones via alpha-methyl gamma-lactones. Bromination of alpha-methyl gamma-lactones with LDA/CBr(4) or TMSOTf/PTAB and successive dehydrobromination with DBU or TBAF of the resulting alpha-bromo-alpha-methyl gamma-lactones gave the desired alpha-methylene gamma-lactones in high yield. This method was successfully applied to the synthesis of biologically active compounds. alpha-Methylene gamma-lactone derivatives 1c, 2c, 4c, and 17 showed cell growth inhibitory activity to P388 lymphocytic leukemia. They also showed significant activities to crop diseases. Thus, alpha-methylene gamma-lactone 1c showed preventive activity in controlling scab of apple caused by Venturia inaequalis. alpha-Methylene gamma-lactones 2c, 4c, 17, and 18 also showed significant preventive activities in controlling damping off of cucumber caused by Pythium aphanidermatum.

  3. Mechanism of the relaxant effect of rosuvastatin lactone on rat aortic rings.

    PubMed

    Ana Cecilia, Polanco-Ponce; Victor Manuel, Perez-Alvarez; Isabel, Wens-Flores; Enrique, Castillo-Henkel; Pedro, Lopez-Sanchez; Jorge Skiold, Lopez-Canales; Maria del Carmen, Castillo-Hernandez; Carlos, Castillo-Henkel

    2012-01-01

    The relaxant effect of the lactone of rosuvastatin was evaluated on aortic rings from male Wistar rats (250-300 g) with and without endothelium, precontracted with 1.0 microM phenylephrine. The lactone presented a greater potency than rosuvastatin in relaxing aortic rings. Unlike rosuvastatin, the effect of its lactone was endothelium-independent. Pretreatment with either indomethacin (10 microM) or mevalonate (1 mM) did not inhibit the relaxant effect of the lactone. L-NAME (10 microM), 1400 W (10 microM), or tetraethylammonium (TEA, 10 mM) partially inhibited the relaxant effect of the lactone on endothelium-denuded aortic rings. However, cycloheximide (10 microM) or the combination of TEA plus L-NAME completely inhibited the relaxant effect. The NOS-2 was only present in endothelium-denuded aortic rings, as demonstrated by immunoblot with lactone treated rings. In conclusion, rosuvastatin was associated with a relaxant effect dependent on both endothelium and HMG-CoA reductase in rat aorta, whereas the lactone exhibited an endothelium and HMG-CoA reductase-independent relaxant effect. Both nitric oxide produced by NOS-2 and K+ channels are involved in the relaxant effect of the lactone.

  4. A new 24-membered lactone and a new polyene delta-lactone from the marine bacterium Bacillus marinus.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chunmei; Tian, Li; Xu, Minjuan; Deng, Zhiwei; Lin, Wenhan

    2008-11-01

    A new 24-membered macrolide macrolactin T (1), and a new polyene delta-lactone macrolactin U (2), along with macrolactins A, B, D, O, and S, were isolated from the cultured broth of the bacterium Bacillus marinus, which was isolated from Suaeda salsa collected in the coastline of Bohai Sea of China. The structures of 1 and 2 were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic data analyses. The inhibitory activity of macrolactins T, B and D against fungi Pyricularia oryzae and Alternaria solani, and bacteria Staphylococcus aureus is reported. PMID:19168981

  5. Hologram QSAR studies of antiprotozoal activities of sesquiterpene lactones.

    PubMed

    Trossini, Gustavo H G; Maltarollo, Vinícius G; Schmidt, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases such as trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis are considered neglected tropical diseases due the lack for many years of research and development into new drug treatments besides the high incidence of mortality and the lack of current safe and effective drug therapies. Natural products such as sesquiterpene lactones have shown activity against T. brucei and L. donovani, the parasites responsible for these neglected diseases. To evaluate structure activity relationships, HQSAR models were constructed to relate a series of 40 sesquiterpene lactones (STLs) with activity against T. brucei, T. cruzi, L. donovani and P. falciparum and also with their cytotoxicity. All constructed models showed good internal (leave-one-out q2 values ranging from 0.637 to 0.775) and external validation coefficients (r2test values ranging from 0.653 to 0.944). From HQSAR contribution maps, several differences between the most and least potent compounds were found. The fragment contribution of PLS-generated models confirmed the results of previous QSAR studies that the presence of α,β-unsatured carbonyl groups is fundamental to biological activity. QSAR models for the activity of these compounds against T. cruzi, L. donovani and P. falciparum are reported here for the first time. The constructed HQSAR models are suitable to predict the activity of untested STLs.

  6. Lactone modified viscosity modifiers useful in oleaginous compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, A.; Lundberg, R.D.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a lactone modified reaction product useful as a viscosity index improver additive for lubricating oil compositions. It comprises: the reaction produce of: oil soluble ethylene copolymer comprising within the range of about 15 to 90 wt.% ethylene and about 10 to 85 wt.% of one or more C{sub 3} to C{sub 28} alpha-olefin, having a number average molecular weight within a range of about 15,000 to 500,000 and grafted with ethylenically unsaturated C{sub 4}--C{sub 10} monocarboxylic acid or anhydride or C{sub 4}--C{sub 0} dicarboxylic acid or anhydride wherein the carboxylic acid groups or anhydride groups are located on vicinal carbon atoms; amine selected from the group consisting of amines having at least two primary amine groups and amines having at least one primary amine group and at least one secondary amine group; long chain hydrocarbyl substituted succinic anhydride or acid having 25 to 400 carbon atoms; and lactone.

  7. Copolymerization of carbon dioxide and butadiene via a lactone intermediate.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ryo; Ito, Shingo; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2014-04-01

    Although carbon dioxide has attracted broad interest as a renewable carbon feedstock, its use as a monomer in copolymerization with olefins has long been an elusive endeavour. A major obstacle for this process is that the propagation step involving carbon dioxide is endothermic; typically, attempted reactions between carbon dioxide and an olefin preferentially yield olefin homopolymerization. Here we report a strategy to circumvent the thermodynamic and kinetic barriers for copolymerizations of carbon dioxide and olefins by using a metastable lactone intermediate, 3-ethylidene-6-vinyltetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-one, which is formed by the palladium-catalysed condensation of carbon dioxide and 1,3-butadiene. Subsequent free-radical polymerization of the lactone intermediate afforded polymers of high molecular weight with a carbon dioxide content of 33 mol% (29 wt%). Furthermore, the protocol was applied successfully to a one-pot copolymerization of carbon dioxide and 1,3-butadiene, and one-pot terpolymerizations of carbon dioxide, butadiene and another 1,3-diene. This copolymerization technique provides access to a new class of polymeric materials made from carbon dioxide.

  8. Potent Cytotoxic Arylnaphthalene Lignan Lactones from Phyllanthus poilanei

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two new (1 and 2) and four known arylnaphthalene lignan lactones (3–6) were isolated from different plant parts of Phyllanthus poilanei collected in Vietnam, with two further known analogues (7 and 8) being prepared from phyllanthusmin C (4). The structures of the new compounds were determined by interpretation of their spectroscopic data and by chemical methods, and the structure of phyllanthusmin D (1) was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Several of these arylnaphthalene lignan lactones were cytotoxic toward HT-29 human colon cancer cells, with compounds 1 and 7-O-[(2,3,4-tri-O-acetyl)-α-l-arabinopyranosyl)]diphyllin (7) found to be the most potent, exhibiting IC50 values of 170 and 110 nM, respectively. Compound 1 showed activity when tested in an in vivo hollow fiber assay using HT-29 cells implanted in immunodeficient NCr nu/nu mice. Mechanistic studies showed that this compound mediated its cytotoxic effects by inducing tumor cell apoptosis through activation of caspase-3, but it did not inhibit DNA topoisomerase IIα activity. PMID:24937209

  9. Towards the industrialization of new biosurfactants: Biotechnological opportunities for the lactone esterase gene from Starmerella bombicola.

    PubMed

    Roelants, Sophie L K W; Ciesielska, Katarzyna; De Maeseneire, Sofie L; Moens, Helena; Everaert, Bernd; Verweire, Stijn; Denon, Quenten; Vanlerberghe, Brecht; Van Bogaert, Inge N A; Van der Meeren, Paul; Devreese, Bart; Soetaert, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Although sophorolipids (SLs) produced by S. bombicola are a real showcase for the industrialization of microbial biosurfactants, some important drawbacks are associated with this efficient biological process, e.g., the simultaneous production of acidic and lactonic SLs. Depending on the application, there is a requirement for the naturally produced mixture to be manipulated to give defined ratios of the components. Recently, the enzyme responsible for the lactonization of SLs was discovered. The discovery of the gene encoding this lactone esterase (sble) enabled the development of promising S. bombicola strains producing either solely lactonic (using a sble overexpression strain described in this paper: oe sble) or solely acidic SLs (using a sble deletion strain, which was recently described, but not characterized yet: Δsble). The new S. bombicola strains were used to investigate the production processes (fermentation and purification) of either lactonic or acidic SLs. The strains maintain the high inherent productivities of the wild-type or even perform slightly better and thus represent a realistic industrial opportunity. 100% acidic SLs with a mixed acetylation pattern were obtained for the Δsble strain, while the inherent capacity to selectively produce lactonic SLs was significantly increased (+42%) for the oe sble strain (99% lactonic SLs). Moreover, the regulatory effect of citrate on lactone SL formation for the wild-type was absent in this new strain, which indicates that it is more robust and better suited for the industrial production of lactonic SLs. Basic parameters were determined for the purified SLs, which confirm that the two new strains produce molecules with distinctive properties of which the application potential can now easily be investigated independently.

  10. Synthesis of natural fragrant molecules cis-3-methyl-4-decanolide and aerangis lactone. General enantioselective routes to beta,gamma-cis-disubstituted gamma-lactones and gamma,delta-cis-disubstituted delta-lactones.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yikang; Shen, Xin; Tang, Chao-Jun; Chen, Zhi-Long; Hu, Qi; Shi, Wei

    2002-05-31

    General enantioselective routes to 3,4-cis-dialkyl substituted gamma-lactones and 4,5-cis-dialkyl substituted delta-lactones using TiCl(4)-mediated Evans asymmetric aldolization as the key step are reported. The syntheses are exemplified with two natural fragrant molecules, cis-3-methyl-4-decanolide (1) and aerangis lactone (2). The (R,R) steroegenic centers were established using (S)-phenylalanine-derived 2-oxazolidinone or thiazolidinethione as chiral auxiliary, whereas the (S,S) ones were constructed with auxiliary prepared from (R)-phenylglycine. NaBH(4)/CaCl(2)/THF in the presence of a small amount of EtOH was introduced as a new effective method for reductive cleavage of chiral oxazolidinone auxiliaries. Previously unknown, tricky concentration effects were observed during the monotosylation of diol 7 and BOM protection of Evans aldol 23.

  11. How do the macrocyclic lactones kill filarial nematode larvae?

    PubMed

    Wolstenholme, Adrian J; Maclean, Mary J; Coates, Ruby; McCoy, Ciaran J; Reaves, Barbara J

    2016-09-01

    The macrocyclic lactones (MLs) are one of the few classes of drug used in the control of the human filarial infections, onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis, and the only one used to prevent heartworm disease in dogs and cats. Despite their importance in preventing filarial diseases, the way in which the MLs work against these parasites is unclear. In vitro measurements of nematode motility have revealed a large discrepancy between the maximum plasma concentrations achieved after drug administration and the amounts required to paralyze worms. Recent evidence has shed new light on the likely functions of the ML target, glutamate-gated chloride channels, in filarial nematodes and supports the hypothesis that the rapid clearance of microfilariae that follows treatment involves the host immune system. PMID:27279086

  12. Antiplasmodial activities of sesquiterpene lactone from Carpesium cernum.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Moon, Hyung-In

    2009-02-01

    The whole plant of genus Carpesium is used in traditional medicine as an anti-pyretic, analgesic and vermifugic, including a topical application for sores and inflammation. Previous experiments on Carpesium rosulatum suggested that the antiplasmodial effect was due to the existence of ineupatorolide A. In present paper, screening of Carpesium species from South Korea showed that this plant refers to which species had promising antiplasmodial activity. Subsequently, this species was selected for bioassay-guided fractionation in order to identify the active principles. Fractionation of the ethyl acetate extract of the whole plants by chromatographic techniques yielded four characterised sesquiterpenoid lactones which exhibited antiplasmodial activity against Plasmodium falciparum. This being the first time that this has been reported from Carpesium cernum. The antiplasmodial activity of the isolated compounds was determined against the Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:18608786

  13. Sesquiterpene Lactone Composition of Wild and Cultivated Sunflowers and Biological Activity against an Insect Pest.

    PubMed

    Prasifka, Jarrad R; Spring, Otmar; Conrad, Jürgen; Cook, Leonard W; Palmquist, Debra E; Foley, Michael E

    2015-04-29

    Sesquiterpene lactones in sunflowers, Helianthus spp., are important to interactions with pathogens, weeds, and insects. Across a broad range of Helianthus annuus, differences in composition of sesquiterpene lactones extracted from disc florets were found between wild and cultivated sunflowers and also between distinct groups of inbreds used to produce sunflower hybrids. Discriminant function analysis showed the presence and relative abundance of argophyllone B, niveusin B, and 15-hydroxy-3-dehydrodesoxyfruticin were usually (75%) effective at classifying wild sunflowers, cultivated inbreds, and hybrids. Argophyllone B reduced the larval mass of the sunflower moth, Homeosoma electellum, by >30%, but only at a dose greater than that found in florets. Low doses of mixed extracts from cultivated florets produced a similar (≈40%) reduction in larval mass, suggesting combinations of sesquiterpene lactones act additively. Although the results support a role for sesquiterpene lactones in herbivore defense of cultivated sunflowers, additional information is needed to use these compounds purposefully in breeding.

  14. [Kinetics of the lactone-carboxylate transition of hybrid camptothecin-netropsin molecules].

    PubMed

    Oleĭnikov, V A; Ustinova, O A; Mochalov, K E; Ermishov, M A; Grokhovskiĭ, S L; Zhuze, A L; Sukhanova, A V; Nabiev, I R

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of the hydrolysis of the lactone ring of a hybrid molecule containing the molecules of the antitumor drug camptothecin and a derivative of the antibiotic netropsines, which is highly affine and specific to the DNA A-T sequences was investigated. It was shown that intramolecular interaction significantly slows down the rate of hydrolysis but does not change the equilibrium ratio of concentrations of the lactone and carboxylate forms of the camptothecin fragment of the hybrid molecule, which corresponds to the pH value. The use of intramolecular interaction for controlling the kinetics of the lactone/carboxylate transition makes it possible to create the drugs of the camptothecin family, which preserve the biologically active lactone form under the physiological conditions for a longer time and, therefore, are more effective as anticancer agents. PMID:12815854

  15. Variecolactol: A New Sesterterpene Lactone from the Sclerotia of Aspergillus auricomus (Guegen) Saito

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variecolactol (1), a new sesterterpene lactone related to variecolin (2), has been isolated from the organic extracts of Aspergillus auricomus. Structure determination of this compound was achieved primarily through HMQC, HMBC, and NOESY experiments. The known compounds dihydropenicillic acid (3) ...

  16. Sesquiterpene lactones derived from Saussurea lappa induce apoptosis and inhibit invasion and migration in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Keiichi; Nishimura, Yuki; Takeda, Taiji; Kurita, Masahiro; Uchiyama, Taketo; Suzuki, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    Neuroblastoma is among the most fatal of solid tumors in the pediatric age group, even when treated aggressively. Therefore, a new effective therapeutic drug(s) for neuroblastoma is urgently needed. To clarify the anticancer effects of the sesquiterpene lactones dehydrocostus lactone and costunolide, derived from Saussurea lappa, we examined the cytotoxic and migration/invasion-inhibitory effects of these compounds against neuroblastoma cell lines. Both the compounds exerted significant cytotoxicity against the neuroblastoma cell lines IMR-32, NB-39, SK-N-SH, and LA-N-1. Evidence of cellular apoptosis, such as nuclear condensation and membrane inversion, were observed after treatment with these compounds. Both compounds induced caspase-7 activation and PARP cleavage as confirmed by Western blotting. Furthermore, the sesquiterpene lactones also suppressed invasion and migration of the neuroblastoma cells. These results suggest that dehydrocostus lactone and costunolide are promising candidates for being developed into novel anticancer drugs effective against neuroblastoma.

  17. Organocatalytic alpha-hydroxymethylation of cyclopentanone with aqueous formaldehyde: easy access to chiral delta-lactones.

    PubMed

    Mase, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Azusa; Nishio, Masaki; Takabe, Kunihiko

    2009-07-15

    Optically active lactones are important synthons in perfume and aroma manufacturing. Therefore, developments of efficient asymmetric syntheses are desired. Organocatalytic asymmetric alpha-hydroxymethylations of cyclopentanone with aqueous formaldehyde have been developed, to furnish the corresponding alpha-(hydroxymethyl)cyclopentanone with high enantioselectivity. Further chemical transformation of alpha-(hydroxymethyl)cyclopentanone gave the key intermediate for jasmine lactone, which is widely found in fruits and flowers.

  18. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and the lactone/carboxylate equilibrium of hydroxycamptothecin delivered via aerosol in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Wenjin; Fang, Yun; Hou, Wenjie

    2012-10-01

    Aerosol delivery is a route which is advantageous to the therapy of pulmonary diseases, such as lung cancer. The pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution after aerosol delivery of carboxylate form of hydroxycamptothecin (C-HCPT) were investigated. The concentrations of the three different types (lactone, carboxylate and the total of both forms) of HCPT were measured by HPLC analysis. The initial experiment showed no evident difference between lactone and carboxylate in the lungs during the aerosol treatment, compared with the HCPT content in plasma. The AUC(inf) value of lactone in the lungs was higher than that of carboxylate, which was 138,176.00 min ng g⁻¹ and 128,460.00 min ng g⁻¹, respectively. Meanwhile, AUC(inf) in the plasma during the entire treatment indicated that the lactone content was always at a lower level, and the carboxylate form tended to predominate, as shown by the lactone/carboxylate (L/C) equilibrium. The tissue distribution results showed that the lactone proportion in the liver increased up to the maximum value of 69.69% after aerosol administration, whereas the mean L/C equilibrium index for the liver was 2.07±1.06, and the C(max) and AUC(0-∞) values of the total HCPT were highest in the tissues. Based on these results we speculated that the initial wholly carboxylate form of the HCPT atomized liquid did not influence the transformation to lactone form. Moreover, the deposition of the total HCPT and lactone was higher in the lungs and other tissues than in the plasma after the aerosol treatment. This study will be beneficial to the therapy of pulmonary carcinoma. PMID:22858157

  19. Versatile Enantioselective Synthesis of Functionalized Lactones via Copper-Catalyzed Radical Oxyfunctionalization of Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rong; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-07-01

    A versatile method for the rapid synthesis of diverse enantiomerically enriched lactones has been developed based on Cu-catalyzed enantioselective radical oxyfunctionalization of alkenes. The scope of this strategy encompasses a series of enantioselective difunctionalization reactions: oxyazidation, oxysulfonylation, oxyarylation, diacyloxylation, and oxyalkylation. These reactions provide straightforward access to a wide range of useful chiral lactone building blocks containing tetrasubstituted stereogenic centers, which are hard to access traditionally.

  20. Lactonization and protonation of gluconic acid: a thermodynamicand kinetic study by potentiometry, nmr and esi-ms

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Gibson, P.; Clark, S.B.; Tian, G.; Zanonato, P.; Rao, L.

    2007-01-10

    In acidic aqueous solutions, gluconate protonation is coupled with lactonization of gluconic acid. With the decrease of pC{sub H}, two lactones ({delta}/{gamma}) are sequentially formed. The {delta}-lactone forms more readily than the {gamma}-lactone. In 0.1 M gluconate solutions, if pC{sub H} is above 2.5, only the {delta}-lactone is generated. When pC{sub H} is decreased below 2.0, the formation of the {gamma}-lactone is observable although the {delta}-lactone predominates. At I = 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} and room temperature, the deprotonation constant of the carboxylic group, using the NMR technique, was determined to be log K{sub a} = 3.30 {+-} 0.02; the {delta}-lactonization constant, by the batch potentiometric titrations, was obtained to be log K{sub L} = - (0.54 {+-} 0.04). Using ESI-MS, the rate constants of the {delta}-lactonization and the hydrolysis at pC{sub H} {approx} 5.0 were estimated to be k{sub 1} = 3.2 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1} and k{sup -1} = 1.1 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}, respectively.

  1. Precursor-directed biosynthesis of novel triketide lactones.

    PubMed

    Regentin, Rika; Kennedy, Jonathan; Wu, Nicholas; Carney, John R; Licari, Peter; Galazzo, Jorge; Desai, Ruchir

    2004-01-01

    Precursor-directed biosynthesis was used to produce different triketide lactones (R-TKLs) in a fermentation process. Plasmids expressing engineered versions of the first subunit of 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase (DEBS1) fused to the terminal DEBS thioesterase (TE) were introduced into three different Streptomyces strains. The DEBS1 protein fused to TE had either an inactivated ketosynthase domain (KS1 degrees ) or a partial DEBS1 lacking module 1 but containing module 2 (M2+TE). Different synthetic precursors were examined for their effect on R-TKL production. An overproducing strain of S. coelicolor expressing the M2+TE protein was found to be best for production of R-TKLs. Racemic precursors were as effective as enantiomerically pure precursors in the fermentation process. The R group on the precursor significantly affected titer (propyl > chloromethyl > vinyl). The R-TKLs were unstable in fermentation broth at pH 6-8. A two-phase fermentation with a pH shift was implemented to stabilize the products. The fermentation pH initially was controlled at optimal values for cell growth (pH 6.5) and then shifted to 5.5 during production. This doubled peak titers and stabilized the product. Finally, the concentration of synthetic precursor in the fermentation was optimized to improve production. A maximum titer of 500 mg/L 5-chloromethyl-TKL was obtained using 3.5 g/L precursor. PMID:14763833

  2. Short communication: Macrocyclic lactone residues in butter from Brazilian markets.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Fabio; Marsico, Eliane Teixeira; Conte-Júnior, Carlos Adam; de Almeida Furtado, Leonardo; Brasil, Taila Figueredo; Pereira Netto, Annibal Duarte

    2015-06-01

    Macrocyclic lactones (ML) are commonly used in drug formulations for the treatment of parasites in cattle. In Brazil, except for drugs (or formulations) with long-term (half-life) effects, ML are registered for use in bovines. Indiscriminate use of ML may result in the presence of residues in milk and dairy products due to their lipophilic properties and thermal stability. This study applied a method of liquid chromatography with fluorimetric detection, recently developed and validated for the determination of residues of abamectin, doramectin, ivermectin, and moxidectin in butter. The method was applied to 38 samples of commercial butter purchased in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between June and September 2013, analyzed in triplicate. Ivermectin was detected in 89.5% of the samples, with concentrations between 0.3 and 119.4 µg/kg; 76.3% of the samples contained doramectin (0.6 to 64.7 µg/kg) and 55.2% contained abamectin (0.7 to 4.5 µg/kg). Most butter samples (76.3%) contained residues of more than 1 ML; however, no residues of moxidectin were detected. The results showed a high incidence of the presence of avermectins in butter samples. Butter is not included in the Brazilian National Plan for Control of Residues and Contaminants in Animal Products. As ML residues concentrate in lipophilic compounds, butter and other fatty dairy products should be screened for the presence of ML residues. PMID:25864054

  3. Bioactive sesquiterpene lactones and other compounds isolated from Vernonia cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Ui Joung; Miklossy, Gabriella; Chai, Xingyun; Wongwiwatthananukit, Supakit; Toyama, Onoomar; Songsak, Thanapat; Turkson, James; Chang, Leng Chee

    2014-01-01

    Four new sesquiterpene lactones, 8α-(2′Z-tigloyloxy)-hirsutinolide (1), 8α-(2′Z-tigloyloxy)-hirsutinolide-13-O-acetate (2), 8α-(4-hydroxytigloyloxy)-hirsutinolide (3), and 8α-hydroxy-13-O-tigloyl-hirsutinolide (4), along with seven known derivatives (5–11), three norisoprenoids (12–14), a flavonoid (15), and a linoleic acid derivative (16), were isolated from the chloroform partition of a methanol extract from the combined leaves and stems of Vernonia cinerea. Their structures were established by 1D and 2D NMR, UV, and MS analyses. Compounds 1–16 were evaluated for their inhibitory effects against the viability of U251MG glioblastoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that harbour aberrantly-active STAT3, compared to normal NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts that show no evidence of activated STAT3. Among the isolates, compounds 2 and 7 inhibited the aberrant STAT3 activity in glioblastoma or breast cancer cells. Further, compounds 7 and 8 inhibited viability of all three cell lines, compounds 2, 4, and 9 predominantly inhibited the viability of the U251MG glioblastoma cell line. PMID:24370662

  4. Short communication: Macrocyclic lactone residues in butter from Brazilian markets.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Fabio; Marsico, Eliane Teixeira; Conte-Júnior, Carlos Adam; de Almeida Furtado, Leonardo; Brasil, Taila Figueredo; Pereira Netto, Annibal Duarte

    2015-06-01

    Macrocyclic lactones (ML) are commonly used in drug formulations for the treatment of parasites in cattle. In Brazil, except for drugs (or formulations) with long-term (half-life) effects, ML are registered for use in bovines. Indiscriminate use of ML may result in the presence of residues in milk and dairy products due to their lipophilic properties and thermal stability. This study applied a method of liquid chromatography with fluorimetric detection, recently developed and validated for the determination of residues of abamectin, doramectin, ivermectin, and moxidectin in butter. The method was applied to 38 samples of commercial butter purchased in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between June and September 2013, analyzed in triplicate. Ivermectin was detected in 89.5% of the samples, with concentrations between 0.3 and 119.4 µg/kg; 76.3% of the samples contained doramectin (0.6 to 64.7 µg/kg) and 55.2% contained abamectin (0.7 to 4.5 µg/kg). Most butter samples (76.3%) contained residues of more than 1 ML; however, no residues of moxidectin were detected. The results showed a high incidence of the presence of avermectins in butter samples. Butter is not included in the Brazilian National Plan for Control of Residues and Contaminants in Animal Products. As ML residues concentrate in lipophilic compounds, butter and other fatty dairy products should be screened for the presence of ML residues.

  5. Unifying mechanism for bacterial cell signalers (4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione, lactones and oligopeptides): electron transfer and reactive oxygen species. Practical medical features.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Cell signaling has attracted much attention involving higher organisms, and more recently is of considerable interest concerning involvement in the bacterial realm. Many aspects can apply, including quorum sensing. Of the participating molecules, designated autoinducers, 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD) is one of the most important. It is in equilibrium with a furanone and a furanosyl-borate diester (AI-2). A prior hypothesis for cell signaling in higher organisms invoked a key role for electron transfer (ET) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as conduits, relays and electrical effects. The principal ET functionalities are quinones, metal complexes, ArNO(2), and iminium species. A lesser known type is the alpha-dicarbonyl class. Diacetyl, a member, as well as its imine derivatives, can serve as a model for DPD, since the parent possesses a reduction potential amenable to ET in the biological domain. Hence, it is conceivable that DPD and its imine derivatives may be involved in ET-ROS processes. Presence of hydroxy groups should facilitate ET by DPD vs. diacetyl. Extensive prior literature supports participation of ET functionalities in action of therapeutic drugs, toxins and various illnesses. This biochemical behavior also applies to the alpha-dicarbonyl parent models. A second important bacterial autoinducer is the lactone category. Although ET functionality is lacking, the presence of the 1,3-dicarbonyl structure can provide a site for avid chelation with redox metal, e.g., iron or copper, followed by ET-ROS. Findings with added iron furnish support for the proposal. Oligopeptides comprise the third principal type of bacterial signaling agent. A prior review incorporates these within the theoretical framework based on ET by redox amino acids and redox enzymes. In recent years there has been a rapid increase in resistance to antibiotics by pathogenic bacteria. Infectious diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide and the third leading cause in

  6. Characterisation of D-arabinono-1,4-lactone oxidase from Candida albicans ATCC 10231.

    PubMed

    Huh, W K; Kim, S T; Yang, K S; Seok, Y J; Hah, Y C; Kang, S O

    1994-11-01

    D-Erythroascorbic acid was detected from the cell extracts of a dimorphic fungus, Candida albicans. Its concentration in yeast cells grown at 25 degrees C was estimated to be about 0.45 mumol/ml cell water. D-Arabinono-1,4-lactone oxidase, which catalyses the final step in the biosynthesis of D-erythroascorbic acid, was purified 639-fold from the mitochondrial fraction of C. albicans to apparent homogeneity, with an overall yield of 21.2%, by a purification procedure consisting of Triton X-100 solubilisation, ammonium sulphate precipitation, anion-exchange, hydrophobic-interaction, gel-filtration and dye-ligand chromatographies. Gel-filtration chromatography and polyacrylamide-gradient gel electrophoresis in the presence of deoxycholate gave apparent molecular masses of 110 kDa and 84.4 kDa, respectively. SDS/PAGE showed only one protein band corresponding to a molecular mass of 66.7 kDa. Considering the binding of detergents, the enzyme is suggested to be a single polypeptide. The enzyme showed a typical fluorescence excitation spectrum of a flavin-containing enzyme. The flavin was not released by treatment with SDS, CCl3CO2H or boiling, indicating that it may be covalently bound to the enzyme protein. The enzyme was optimally active at 40 degrees C and at pH 6.1. The enzyme was stable in the range pH 7.5-10. An apparent Km value for D-arabinono-1,4-lactone was 44.1 mM. L-Galactono-1,4-lactone, L-gulono-1,4-lactone and L-xylono-1,4-lactone could also serve as substrates. Competitive inhibition was demonstrated with D-glucono-1,5-lactone, L-arabinono-1,4-lactone, D-galactono-1,4-lactone and D-gulono-1,4-lactone. p-Chloromercuribenzoate, N-ethylmaleimide, iodoacetic acid, iodoacetamide and divalent metal ions such as Cd2+, Hg2+, Mn2+ and Zn2+ exhibited inhibitory effects on the enzyme.

  7. First identification of three p-menthane lactones and their potential precursor, menthofuran, in red wines.

    PubMed

    Picard, Magali; de Revel, Gilles; Marchand, Stéphanie

    2017-02-15

    The p-menthane lactones constitute a family of powerful odorants, including the isomers of mintlactone and menthofurolactone that occur naturally in peppermint oil, known for their potent, mint-like olfactory properties. These lactones are closely related to the monoterpene-limonene secondary biotransformation and menthofuran has been identified as their common precursor in Mentha species. Using targeted GC-olfactometry and GC-MS analyses, together with quantification methods, we were able to demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of the diastereoisomers of these p-menthane lactones, as well as their common precursor, menthofuran, in red wines. In addition, we linked the presence of those lactones to interesting odorant zones, reminiscent of mint, detected in the studied wine. Although these p-menthane lactones may contribute individually to mint and coconut odors, sensory studies suggested for the first time that their combination at the levels found in the red wine studied resulted in a significant accentuation of freshness and mint notes. PMID:27664637

  8. Sesquiterpene Lactones from Artemisia Genus: Biological Activities and Methods of Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ivanescu, Bianca; Miron, Anca; Corciova, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones are a large group of natural compounds, found primarily in plants of Asteraceae family, with over 5000 structures reported to date. Within this family, genus Artemisia is very well represented, having approximately 500 species characterized by the presence of eudesmanolides and guaianolides, especially highly oxygenated ones, and rarely of germacranolides. Sesquiterpene lactones exhibit a wide range of biological activities, such as antitumor, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antiulcer, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antiparasitic, and insect deterrent. Many of the biological activities are attributed to the α-methylene-γ-lactone group in their molecule which reacts through a Michael-addition with free sulfhydryl or amino groups in proteins and alkylates them. Due to the fact that most sesquiterpene lactones are thermolabile, less volatile compounds, they present no specific chromophores in the molecule and are sensitive to acidic and basic mediums, and their identification and quantification represent a difficult task for the analyst. Another problematic aspect is represented by the complexity of vegetal samples, which may contain compounds that can interfere with the analysis. Therefore, this paper proposes an overview of the methods used for the identification and quantification of sesquiterpene lactones found in Artemisia genus, as well as the optimal conditions for their extraction and separation. PMID:26495156

  9. Sesquiterpene lactones induce distinct forms of cell death that modulate human monocyte-derived macrophage responses.

    PubMed

    López-Antón, Nancy; Hermann, Corinna; Murillo, Renato; Merfort, Irmgard; Wanner, Gerhard; Vollmar, Angelika M; Dirsch, Verena M

    2007-01-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SQTLs) are shown to possess anti-inflammatory as well as cytotoxic activity. No study, however, links both activities. We, therefore, hypothesized that SQTL-treated, dying cells might induce an anti-inflammatory response in cocultured THP-1 macrophages. Here we show that SQTLs bearing either an alpha,beta-unsaturated cyclopentenone or an alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone induce different forms of cell death. Whereas the cyclopentenone SQTL induced typical apoptosis, the alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone SQTLs-induced cell death lacked partly classical signs of apoptosis, such as DNA fragmentation. All SQTLs, however, activated caspases and the nuclear morphology of cell death was dependent on caspase activation. Most interestingly, alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone SQTLs induced a more pronounced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure than the cyclopentenone SQTL. Especially, 7-hydroxycostunolide (HC), with an alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone substituted with a hydroxyl group, showed a striking fast and pronounced PS translocation. This result was in agreement with a strong activation of phagocytosis in cocultured THP-1 macrophages. Interestingly, HC-treated Jurkat cells led to an early (3.5 h) but transient increase in TNF-alpha levels in macrophage coculture. Release of TGF-beta remained unaffected after 18 h. We propose that this type of SQTL may influence local inflammation by transiently activating the immune system and help to clear cells by inducing a form of cell death that promotes phagocytosis.

  10. First identification of three p-menthane lactones and their potential precursor, menthofuran, in red wines.

    PubMed

    Picard, Magali; de Revel, Gilles; Marchand, Stéphanie

    2017-02-15

    The p-menthane lactones constitute a family of powerful odorants, including the isomers of mintlactone and menthofurolactone that occur naturally in peppermint oil, known for their potent, mint-like olfactory properties. These lactones are closely related to the monoterpene-limonene secondary biotransformation and menthofuran has been identified as their common precursor in Mentha species. Using targeted GC-olfactometry and GC-MS analyses, together with quantification methods, we were able to demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of the diastereoisomers of these p-menthane lactones, as well as their common precursor, menthofuran, in red wines. In addition, we linked the presence of those lactones to interesting odorant zones, reminiscent of mint, detected in the studied wine. Although these p-menthane lactones may contribute individually to mint and coconut odors, sensory studies suggested for the first time that their combination at the levels found in the red wine studied resulted in a significant accentuation of freshness and mint notes.

  11. In vitro analysis of the anthelmintic activity of forage chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) sesquiterpene lactones against a predominatly Haemonchus contortus egg population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The anthelmintic activity of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) herbage has been attributed to sesquiterpene lactones. Chicory leaves contain significant amounts of lactucin (LAC), 8-deoxylactucin (DOL), and lactucopicrin (LPIC), but the proportions of these three sesquiterpene lactones vary among fora...

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the lactonase VmoLac from Vulcanisaeta moutnovskia

    PubMed Central

    Hiblot, Julien; Gotthard, Guillaume; Champion, Charlotte; Chabriere, Eric; Elias, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Phosphotriesterase-like lactonases (PLLs) are native lactonases that are capable of hydrolyzing lactones such as aliphatic lactones or acyl-homoserine lactones, which are involved in bacterial quorum sensing. Previously characterized PLLs are moreover endowed with a promiscuous phosphotriesterase activity and are therefore able to detoxify organophosphate insecticides. A novel PLL representative, dubbed VmoLac, has been identified from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Vulcanisaeta moutnovskia. Because of its intrinsic high thermal stability, VmoLac may constitute an appealing candidate for engineering studies with the aim of producing an efficient biodecontaminant for organophosphorus compounds and a bacterial antivirulence agent. In combination with biochemical studies, structural information will allow the identification of the residues involved in substrate specificity and an understanding of the enzymatic catalytic mechanisms. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray data collection at 2.4 Å resolution of VmoLac are reported. PMID:24192357

  13. Identification of potential genetic components involved in the deviant quorum-sensing signaling pathways of Burkholderia glumae through a functional genomics approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruoxi; Barphagha, Inderjit K; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae is the chief causal agent for bacterial panicle blight of rice. The acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum-sensing (QS) system dependent on a pair of luxI and luxR homologs, tofI and tofR, is the primary cell-to-cell signaling mechanism determining the virulence of this bacterium. Production of toxoflavin, a major virulence factor of B. glumae, is known to be dependent on the tofI/tofR QS system. In our previous study, however, it was observed that B. glumae mutants defective in tofI or tofR produced toxoflavin if they grew on the surface of a solid medium, suggesting that alternative signaling pathways independent of tofI or tofR are activated in that growth condition for the production of toxoflavin. In this study, potential genetic components involved in the tofI- and tofR-independent signaling pathways for toxoflavin production were sought through screening random mini-Tn5 mutants of B. glumae to better understand the intercellular signaling pathways of this pathogen. Fifteen and three genes were initially identified as the potential genetic elements of the tofI- and tofR-independent pathways, respectively. Especially, the ORF (bglu_2g06320) divergently transcribed from toxJ, which encodes an orphan LuxR protein and controls toxoflavin biosynthesis, was newly identified in this study as a gene required for the tofR-independent toxoflavin production and named as toxK. Among those genes, flhD, dgcB, and wzyB were further studied to validate their functions in the tofI-independent toxoflavin production, and similar studies were also conducted with qsmR and toxK for their functions in the tofR-independent toxoflavin production. This work provides a foundation for future comprehensive studies of the intercellular signaling systems of B. glumae and other related pathogenic bacteria.

  14. Macrocyclic lactones: A versatile source for omega radiohalogenated fatty acid analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Dougan, A.H.; Lyster, D.M.; Robertson, K.A.; Vincent, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    For each omega halogenated fatty acid there exists a potential omega hydroxy fatty acid and the corresponding macrocyclic lactone. The authors have utilized such lactones as starting materials for omega /sup 123/I fatty acid analogs intended for myocardial imaging. Macrocyclic musk lactones are industrially available; 120 analogs are described in the literature. The preparation requires saponification, tosylation, and radio-iodide substitution. Iodo-fatty acids are readily separated from tosylate fatty acids on TLC. While providing a secure source of 16-iodo-hexadecanoic acid and 17-iodo-heptadecanoic acid, the scheme allows ready access to a large number of untried fatty acid analogs. Examples presented are 16-iodo-hexadecanoic acid, 16-iodo-7-hexadecanoic acid, 16-iodo-12-oxa-hexadecanoic acid, 15-iodo-pentadecanoic acid, and 15-iodo-12-keto-pentadecanoic acid. Metabolic studies are in progress in mice and dogs to assess the utility of these analogs for myocardial imaging.

  15. Lipase-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of lactones to polyesters and its mechanistic aspects.

    PubMed

    Namekawa, S; Suda, S; Uyama, H; Kobayashi, S

    1999-01-01

    Lipase catalysis induced a ring-opening polymerization of lactones with different ring-sizes. Small-size (four-membered) and medium-size lactones (six- and seven-membered) as well as macrolides (12-, 13-, 16-, and 17-membered) were subjected to lipase-catalyzed polymerization. The polymerization behaviors depended primarily on the lipase origin and the monomer structure. The macrolides showing much lower anionic polymerizability were enzymatically polymerized faster than epsilon-caprolactone. The granular immobilized lipase derived from Candida antartica showed extremely efficient catalysis in the polymerization of epsilon-caprolactone. Single-step terminal functionalization of the polyester was achieved by initiator and terminator methods. The enzymatic polymerizability of lactones was quantitatively evaluated by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. PMID:10416661

  16. Lipase-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of lactones to polyesters and its mechanistic aspects.

    PubMed

    Namekawa, S; Suda, S; Uyama, H; Kobayashi, S

    1999-01-01

    Lipase catalysis induced a ring-opening polymerization of lactones with different ring-sizes. Small-size (four-membered) and medium-size lactones (six- and seven-membered) as well as macrolides (12-, 13-, 16-, and 17-membered) were subjected to lipase-catalyzed polymerization. The polymerization behaviors depended primarily on the lipase origin and the monomer structure. The macrolides showing much lower anionic polymerizability were enzymatically polymerized faster than epsilon-caprolactone. The granular immobilized lipase derived from Candida antartica showed extremely efficient catalysis in the polymerization of epsilon-caprolactone. Single-step terminal functionalization of the polyester was achieved by initiator and terminator methods. The enzymatic polymerizability of lactones was quantitatively evaluated by Michaelis-Menten kinetics.

  17. Total assignment of 1H and 13C NMR data for the sesquiterpene lactone 15-deoxygoyazensolide.

    PubMed

    Heleno, Vladimir Constantino Gomes; Crotti, Antônio Eduardo Miller; Constantino, Mauricio Gomes; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Lopes, João Luis Callegari

    2004-03-01

    We describe a complete analysis of the 1H and 13C spectra of the anti-inflamatory, schistossomicidal and trypanosomicidal sesquiterpene lactone 15-deoxygoyazensolide. This lactone, with a structure similar to other important ones, was studied by NMR techniques such as COSY, HMQC, HMBC, Jres and NOE experiments. The comparison of the data with some computational results led to an unequivocal assignment of all hydrogen and carbon chemical shifts, even eliminating some previous ambiguities. We were able to determine all hydrogen coupling constants (J) and signal multiplicities and to confirm the stereochemistry. A new method for the determination of the relative position of the lactonization and the position of the ester group on a medium-sized ring by NMR was developed.

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of homoserine lactone derived ureas as antagonists of bacterial quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Frezza, Marine; Castang, Sandra; Estephane, Jane; Soulère, Laurent; Deshayes, Christian; Chantegrel, Bernard; Nasser, William; Queneau, Yves; Reverchon, Sylvie; Doutheau, Alain

    2006-07-15

    A series of 15 racemic alkyl- and aryl-N-substituted ureas, derived from homoserine lactone, were synthesized and tested for their ability to competitively inhibit the action of 3-oxohexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone, the natural inducer of bioluminescence in the bacterium Vibrio fischeri. N-alkyl ureas with an alkyl chain of at least 4 carbon atoms, as well as certain ureas bearing a phenyl group at the extremity of the alkyl chain, were found to be significant antagonists. In the case of N-butyl urea, it has been shown that the antagonist activity was related to the inhibition of the dimerisation of the N-terminal domain of ExpR, a protein of the receptor LuxR family. Molecular modelling suggested that this would result from the formation of an additional hydrogen bond in the protein acylhomoserine lactone binding cavity.

  19. Quantitative analysis of sesquiterpene lactones in extract of Arnica montana L. by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Staneva, Jordanka; Denkova, Pavletta; Todorova, Milka; Evstatieva, Ljuba

    2011-01-01

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used as a method for quantitative analysis of sesquiterpene lactones present in a crude lactone fraction isolated from Arnica montana. Eight main components - tigloyl-, methacryloyl-, isobutyryl- and 2-methylbutyryl-esters of helenalin (H) and 11α,13-dihydrohelenalin (DH) were identified in the studied sample. The method allows the determination of the total amount of sesquiterpene lactones and the quantity of both type helenalin and 11α,13-dihydrohelenalin esters separately. Furthermore, 6-O-tigloylhelenalin (HT, 1), 6-O-methacryloylhelenalin (HM, 2), 6-O-tigloyl-11α,13-dihydrohelenalin (DHT, 5), and 6-O-methacryloyl-11α,13-dihydrohelenalin (DHM, 6) were quantified as individual components.

  20. Benzenediol lactones: a class of fungal metabolites with diverse structural features and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weiyun; Mao, Hongqiang; Huang, Qian; Dong, Jinyan

    2015-06-01

    Benzenediol lactones are a structurally variable family of fungal polyketide metabolites possessing a macrolide core structure fused into a resorcinol aromatic ring. These compounds are widespread in fungi mainly in the genera such as Aigialus, Cochliobolus, Curvularia, Fusarium, Humicola, Lasiodiplodia, Penicillium and Pochonia etc. Most of these fungal metabolites were reported to possess several interesting biological activities, such as cytotoxicities, nematicidal properties, inhibition of various kinases, receptor agonists, anti-inflammatory activities, heat shock response and immune system modulatory activities etc. This review summarizes the research on the isolation, structure elucidation, and biological activities of the benzenediol lactones, along with some available structure-activity relationships, biosynthetic studies, first syntheses, and syntheses that lead to the revision of structure or stereochemistry, published up to the year of 2014. More than 190 benzenediol lactones are described, and over 300 references cited. PMID:25559850

  1. Neocosmospora sp.-derived resorcylic acid lactones with in vitro binding capacity for human opioid and cannabinoid receptors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of a fungus Neocosmospora sp. (UM-031509) resulted in the isolation of three new resorcyclic acid lactones, neocosmosin A (2), neocosmosin B (3) and neocosmosin C (4). Three known resorcylic acid lactones, monocillin IV (1), monocillin II (5) and monorden (6) were also ...

  2. Mechanistic analysis of a synthetic inhibitor of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasI quorum-sensing signal synthase

    PubMed Central

    Lidor, O.; Al-Quntar, A.; Pesci, E. C.; Steinberg, D.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen responsible for many human infections. LasI is an acyl-homoserine lactone synthase that produces a quorum-sensing (QS) signal that positively regulates numerous P. aeruginosa virulence determinants. The inhibition of the LasI protein is therefore an attractive drug target. In this study, a novel in silico to in vitro complementation was applied to screen thiazolidinedione-type compounds for their ability to inhibit biofilm formation at concentrations not affecting bacterial growth. The compound (z)-5-octylidenethiazolidine-2, 4-dione (TZD-C8) was a strong inhibitor of biofilm formation and chosen for further study. Structural exploration of in silico docking predicted that the compound had high affinity for the LasI activity pocket. The TZD-C8 compound was also predicted to create hydrogen bonds with residues Arg30 and Ile107. Site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) of these two sites demonstrated that TZD-C8 inhibition was abolished in the lasI double mutant PAO-R30D, I107S. In addition, in vitro swarming motility and quorum sensing signal production were affected by TZD-C 8, confirming this compound alters the cell to cell signalling circuitry. Overall, this novel inhibitor of P. aeruginosa quorum sensing shows great promise and validates our mechanistic approach to discovering inhibitors of LuxI-type acyl-homoserine lactone synthases. PMID:26593271

  3. Synthesis and Antifeedant Activity of Racemic and Optically Active Hydroxy Lactones with the p-Menthane System.

    PubMed

    Grudniewska, Aleksandra; Kłobucki, Marek; Dancewicz, Katarzyna; Szczepanik, Maryla; Gabryś, Beata; Wawrzeńczyk, Czesław

    2015-01-01

    Two racemic and two enantiomeric pairs of new δ-hydroxy-γ-lactones based on the p-menthane system were prepared from racemic and optically active cis- and trans-piperitols. The Johnson-Claisen rearrangement of the piperitols, epoxidation of the γδ-unsaturated esters, and acidic lactonization of the epoxy esters were described. The structures of the compounds were confirmed spectroscopically. The antifeedant activities of the hydroxy lactones and racemic piperitone were evaluated against three insect pests: lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer); Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say); and peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulz.). The chemical transformation of piperitone by the introduction of a lactone moiety and a hydroxy group changed its antifeedant properties. Behavioral bioassays showed that the feeding deterrent activity depended on the insect species and the structure of the compounds. All hydroxy lactones deterred the settling of M. persicae. Among chewing insects, the highest sensitivity showed A. diaperinus adults. PMID:26132506

  4. Studies on the mechanism, selectivity, and synthetic utility of lactone reduction using SmI(2) and H(2)O.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Dixit; Duffy, Lorna A; Sadasivam, Dhandapani V; Matsubara, Hiroshi; Bradley, Paul A; Flowers, Robert A; Procter, David J

    2009-10-28

    Although simple aliphatic esters and lactones have long been thought to lie outside the reducing range of SmI(2), activation of the lanthanide reagent by H(2)O allows some of these substrates to be manipulated in an unprecedented fashion. For example, the SmI(2)-H(2)O reducing system shows complete selectivity for the reduction of 6-membered lactones over other classes of lactones and esters. The kinetics of reduction has been studied using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. Experimental and computational studies suggest that the origin of the selectivity lies in the initial electron-transfer to the lactone carbonyl. The radical intermediates formed during lactone reduction with SmI(2)-H(2)O can be exploited in cyclizations to give cyclic ketone (or ketal) products with high diastereoselectivity. The cyclizations constitute the first examples of ester-alkene radical cyclizations in which the ester carbonyl acts as an acyl radical equivalent.

  5. Activation of antioxidant response element in mouse primary cortical cultures with sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Tanacetum parthenium

    PubMed Central

    Fischedick, Justin T; Standiford, Miranda; Johnson, Delinda A.; De Vos, Ric C.H.; Todorović, Slađana; Banjanac, Tijana; Verpoorte, Rob; Johnson, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Tanacetum parthenium (Asteraceae) produces biologically active sesquiterpene lactones (SL). Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor known to activate a series of genes termed the antioxidant response element (ARE). Activation of the Nrf2/ARE may be useful for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. In this study we isolated 11 sesquiterpene lactones from T. parthenium with centrifugal partition chromatography and semi-preparative HPLC. Compounds were screened in-vitro for their ability to activate the ARE on primary mouse cortical cultures as well as for their toxicity towards the cultures. All sesquiterpene lactones containing the α-methylene-γ-lactone moiety were able to activate the ARE although a number of compounds displayed significant cellular toxicity towards the cultures. The structure activity relationship of the sesquiterpene lactones indicate that the guaianolides isolated were more active and less toxic then the germacranolides. PMID:22923197

  6. Synthesis and Antifeedant Activity of Racemic and Optically Active Hydroxy Lactones with the p-Menthane System

    PubMed Central

    Grudniewska, Aleksandra; Kłobucki, Marek; Dancewicz, Katarzyna; Szczepanik, Maryla; Gabryś, Beata; Wawrzeńczyk, Czesław

    2015-01-01

    Two racemic and two enantiomeric pairs of new δ-hydroxy-γ-lactones based on the p-menthane system were prepared from racemic and optically active cis- and trans-piperitols. The Johnson-Claisen rearrangement of the piperitols, epoxidation of the γδ-unsaturated esters, and acidic lactonization of the epoxy esters were described. The structures of the compounds were confirmed spectroscopically. The antifeedant activities of the hydroxy lactones and racemic piperitone were evaluated against three insect pests: lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer); Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say); and peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulz.). The chemical transformation of piperitone by the introduction of a lactone moiety and a hydroxy group changed its antifeedant properties. Behavioral bioassays showed that the feeding deterrent activity depended on the insect species and the structure of the compounds. All hydroxy lactones deterred the settling of M. persicae. Among chewing insects, the highest sensitivity showed A. diaperinus adults. PMID:26132506

  7. [Effects of ginkgo diterpene lactones meglumine injection's activated carbon adsorption technology on officinal components].

    PubMed

    Zhou, En-li; Wang, Ren-jie; Li, Miao; Wang, Wei; Xu, Dian-hong; Hu, Yang; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Bi, Yu-an; Xiao, Wei

    2015-10-01

    With the diversion rate of ginkgolide A, B, K as comprehensive evaluation indexes, the amount of activated carbon, ad- sorption time, mix rate, and adsorption temperature were selected as factors, orthogonal design which based on the evaluation method of information entropy was used to optimize activated carbon adsorption technology of ginkgo diterpene lactones meglumine injection. Opti- mized adsorption conditions were as follows: adsorbed 30 min with 0.2% activated carbon in 25 °C, 40 r ·min⁻¹, validation test re- sult display. The optimum extraction condition was stable and feasible, it will provide a basis for ginkgo diterpene lactone meglumine injection' activated carbon adsorption process.

  8. Short Flow-Photochemistry Enabled Synthesis of the Cytotoxic Lactone (+)-Goniofufurone.

    PubMed

    Ralph, Michael; Ng, Sean; Booker-Milburn, Kevin I

    2016-03-01

    A photochemical approach to the cytotoxic lactone (+)-goniofufurone (1) is reported. Paternò-Büchi [2 + 2] photocycloaddition from known enol ether 4, derived from the readily available sugar d-isosorbide, yielded oxetane 7. This slow, dilute reaction was scaled up by using flow photochemistry to yield >40 g of 7. Installation of the key lactone ring was achieved via a unique Wacker-style oxidation of an enol-ether bond. Acid-catalyzed aqueous ring opening provided 1 in five steps from 4 (11.5% overall).

  9. 1,5-glucono-δ-lactone-induced gelation of myofibrillar protein at chilled temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ngapo, T M; Wilkinson, B H; Chong, R

    1996-01-01

    In this study 1,5-glucono-δ-lactone was used to achieve acid-induced gelation of myofibrillar proteins at 4 °C. The characteristics of the myofibrillar gels were investigated by measuring Young's modulus and springiness. The effects of addition of sodium chloride and tetrasodium pyrophosphate on gel characteristics were also studied. Sodium chloride increased the Young's modulus of myofibrillar protein gels in the presence and absence of 1,5-glucono-δ-lactone, while tetrasodium pyrophosphate had no observable effect on the gels until the pH decreased to 4.1, when the Young's modulus was enhanced.

  10. [Effects of ginkgo diterpene lactones meglumine injection's activated carbon adsorption technology on officinal components].

    PubMed

    Zhou, En-li; Wang, Ren-jie; Li, Miao; Wang, Wei; Xu, Dian-hong; Hu, Yang; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Bi, Yu-an; Xiao, Wei

    2015-10-01

    With the diversion rate of ginkgolide A, B, K as comprehensive evaluation indexes, the amount of activated carbon, ad- sorption time, mix rate, and adsorption temperature were selected as factors, orthogonal design which based on the evaluation method of information entropy was used to optimize activated carbon adsorption technology of ginkgo diterpene lactones meglumine injection. Opti- mized adsorption conditions were as follows: adsorbed 30 min with 0.2% activated carbon in 25 °C, 40 r ·min⁻¹, validation test re- sult display. The optimum extraction condition was stable and feasible, it will provide a basis for ginkgo diterpene lactone meglumine injection' activated carbon adsorption process. PMID:27062815

  11. N-Sulfonyl homoserine lactones as antagonists of bacterial quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Castang, Sandra; Chantegrel, Bernard; Deshayes, Christian; Dolmazon, René; Gouet, Patrice; Haser, Richard; Reverchon, Sylvie; Nasser, William; Hugouvieux-Cotte-Pattat, Nicole; Doutheau, Alain

    2004-10-18

    A series of 11 new analogues of N-acylhomoserine lactones in which the carboxamide bond was replaced by a sulfonamide one, has been synthesised. These compounds were evaluated for their ability to competitively inhibit the action of 3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone, the natural ligand of the quorum sensing transcriptional regulator LuxR, which in turn activates expression of bioluminescence in the model bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Several compounds were found to display antagonist activity. Molecular modeling suggests that the latter prevent a cascade of structural rearrangements necessary for the formation of the active LuxR dimer.

  12. Does structural commonality of metal complex formation by PAC-1 (anticancer), DHBNH (anti-HIV), AHL (autoinducer), and UCS1025A (anticancer) denote mechanistic similarity? Signal transduction and medical aspects.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter

    2008-01-01

    There is an urgent need of novel approaches to drugs in the cancer, HIV, and bacterial areas. Increasing resistance to conventional therapies is observed. This minireview provides novel insights for drugs in these three areas. The agents PAC-1 (anticancer), DHBNH (anti-HIV), AHL (autoinducer), and UCS1025A (anticancer) have recently attracted attention due to considerable potential based on new approaches. PAC-1 activates procaspase-3 to caspase-3, resulting in induction of apoptosis in tumor cells. DHBNH binds to a newly revealed site on HIV reverse transcriptase. The drug mainly inhibits RNase H (RNA-cleaving). AHLs comprise an important class that participates in bacterial cell communication. UCS1025A is a fungus-derived inhibitor of the enzyme telomerase, present in cancer cells, which is crucially involved in tumor cell immortality. All four agents possess chelating sites for metal binding, which has not been appreciated. In PAC-1 and DHBNH, the coordinating portion is similar to salicylaldehyde semicarbazone. For AHL and UCS1025A, the metal-binding moiety is a beta -ketoamide. Metal complexes of heavier metals are well-known electron transfer (ET) functionalities that can generate reactive oxygen species. Hence, it is reasonable to hypothesize a commonality in mechanism based on metal ET. Differences in receptor binding can result, in part, in diverse physiological responses. There is considerable literature that addresses involvement of signal transduction with the various physiologically active agents discussed herein. Thus, cell communication appears to play an important role in the biochemistry of these endogenous and exogenous substances. Details of cell signaling are presented for complexes of metals (Fe, Cu, Ni, and As), telomerase, caspase-3, and RNase. In addition, practical medical aspects are discussed.

  13. Concurrent and supercritical fluid chromatographic analysis of Terpene Lactones and ginkolic acids in Ginko biloba.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supercritical fluid chromatography was used to resolve and determine ginkgolic acids (GAs) and terpene lactones concurrently in ginkgo plant materials and commercial dietary supplements. Analysis of GAs (C13:0, C15:0, C15:1 and C17:1) was carried out by ESI (-) mass detection. The ESI (-) spectra of...

  14. 12-Membered Resorcylic Acid Lactones Isolated from Saccharicola bicolor, an Endophytic Fungi from Bergenia purpurascens.

    PubMed

    Guo, Da-Le; Zhao, Min; Xiao, Shi-Ji; Xia, Bing; Wan, Bo; Gu, Yu-Cheng; Ding, Li-Sheng; Zhou, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Two new resorcylic acid lactones, 13-hydroxyhidroresorcylide (1) and 12-hydroxyhidroresorcylide (2), along with four known congeners (3-6) were isolated from Saccharicola bicolor, an endophytic fungus from Bergenia purpurascens. Their structures were elucidated by interpretation of the spectroscopic evidence.

  15. Anthelmintic potential of chicory forage is influenced by sesquiterpene lactone composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The anthelmintic activity of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) herbage has been attributed to sesquiterpene lactones (SLs). Chicory leaves contain lactucin (LAC), 8-deoxylactucin (DOL), and lactucopicrin (LPIC), but the amounts of these three SLs vary among cultivars. The objective of this study was...

  16. Haemonchus contortus P-glycoprotein-2: in situ localisation and characterisation of macrocyclic lactone transport.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Pablo; Lian, Jing; Beech, Robin N; Prichard, Roger K

    2015-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus is a veterinary nematode that infects small ruminants, causing serious decreases in animal production worldwide. Effective control through anthelmintic treatment has been compromised by the development of resistance to these drugs, including the macrocyclic lactones. The mechanisms of resistance in H. contortus have yet to be established but may involve efflux of the macrocyclic lactones by nematode ATP-binding-cassette transporters such as P-glycoproteins. Here we report the expression and functional activity of H. contortus P-glycoprotein 2 expressed in mammalian cells and characterise its interaction with the macrocyclic lactones, ivermectin, abamectin and moxidectin. The ability of H. contortus P-glycoprotein 2 to transport different fluorophore substrates was markedly inhibited by ivermectin and abamectin in a dose-dependent and saturable way. The profile of transport inhibition by moxidectin was markedly different. H. contortus P-glycoprotein 2 was expressed in the pharynx, the first portion of the worm's intestine and perhaps in adjacent nervous tissue, suggesting a role for this gene in regulating the uptake of avermectins and in protecting nematode tissues from the effects of macrocyclic lactone anthelmintic drugs. H. contortus P-glycoprotein 2 may thus contribute to resistance to these drugs in H. contortus.

  17. SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF ANHYDRIDES TO LACTONES UNDER SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selective Hydrogenation of Anhydrides to Lactones Under Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Medium

    Endalkachew Sahle-Demessie Unnikrishnan R Pillai
    U.S. EPA , 26 W. Martin Luther King Dr. Cincinnati, OH 45268 Phone: 513-569-7739
    Fax: 513-569-7677
    Abstract:
    Hydrogenat...

  18. Structure-hepatoprotective activity relationship study of sesquiterpene lactones: A QSAR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukku, Yuliya; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Syrov, Vladimir; Khushbaktova, Zainab; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    This study has been carried out using quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis (QSAR) for 22 sesquiterpene lactones to correlate and predict their hepatoprotective activity. Sesquiterpenoids, the largest class of terpenoids, are a widespread group of substances occurring in various plant organisms. QSAR analysis was carried out using methods such as genetic algorithm for variables selection among generated and calculated descriptors and multiple linear regression analysis. Quantum-chemical calculations have been performed by density functional theory at B3LYP/6-311G(d, p) level for evaluation of electronic properties using reference geometries optimized by semi-empirical AM1 approach. Three models describing hepatoprotective activity values for series of sesquiterpene lactones are proposed. The obtained models are useful for description of sesquiterpene lactones hepatoprotective activity and can be used to estimate the hepatoprotective activity of new substituted sesquiterpene lactones. The models obtained in our study show not only statistical significance, but also good predictive ability. The estimated predictive ability (rtest2) of these models lies within 0.942-0.969.

  19. Alkene Dioxygenation with Malonoyl Peroxides: Synthesis of γ-Lactones, Isobenzofuranones, and Tetrahydrofurans.

    PubMed

    Alamillo-Ferrer, Carla; Karabourniotis-Sotti, Marianna; Kennedy, Alan R; Campbell, Matthew; Tomkinson, Nicholas C O

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of homoallylic alcohols or carboxylic acids with malonoyl peroxide 1 provides a stereoselective method for the preparation of tetrahydrofurans, γ-lactones, and isobenzofuranones in 44-82% yield and up to 27:1 trans selectivity. Application of this simple and effective heterocyclization in the synthesis of the antidepressant citalopram is also described. PMID:27314605

  20. In vitro leishmanicidal activities of sesquiterpene lactones from Tithonia diversifolia against Leishmania braziliensis promastigotes and amastigotes.

    PubMed

    de Toledo, Juliano S; Ambrósio, Sergio R; Borges, Carly H G; Manfrim, Viviane; Cerri, Daniel G; Cruz, Angela K; Da Costa, Fernando B

    2014-01-01

    Natural compounds represent a rich and promising source of novel, biologically active chemical entities for treating leishmaniasis. Sesquiterpene lactones are a recognized class of terpenoids with a wide spectrum of biological activities, including activity against Leishmania spp. In this work, a sesquiterpene lactone-rich preparation-a leaf rinse extract (LRE) from Tithonia diversifolia-was tested against promastigote forms of L. braziliensis. The results revealed that the LRE is a rich source of potent leishmanicidal compounds, with an LD50 value 1.5 ± 0.50 µg·mL-1. Therefore, eight sesquiterpene lactones from the LRE were initially investigated against promastigote forms of L. braziliensis. One of them did not present any significant leishmanicidal effect (LD50 > 50 µg·mL-1). Another had a cytotoxic effect against macrophages (4.5 µg·mL-1). The five leishmanicidal compounds with the highest level of selectivity were further evaluated against intracellular parasites (amastigotes) using peritoneal macrophages. Tirotundin 3-O-methyl ether, tagitinin F, and a guaianolide reduced the internalization of parasites after 48 h, in comparison with the negative control. This is the first report on sesquiterpene lactones that have potent leishmanicidal effects on both developmental stages of L. braziliensis. PMID:24830711

  1. Developmental and Environmental Effects on Sesquiterpene Lactones in Cultivated Arnica montana L.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Milka; Trendafilova, Antoaneta; Vitkova, Antonina; Petrova, Maria; Zayova, Ely; Antonova, Daniela

    2016-08-01

    The amount of sesquiterpene lactones and the lactone profile of Arnica montana L. in flowering and seed formation stages in vitro and in vivo propagated from seeds of German, Ukrainian, and Austrian origin and grown in two experimental fields were studied. It was found that in vitro propagated 2-year plants in full flowering stage accumulated higher amount of lactones in comparison to in vivo propagated 3-year plants and to the seed formation stage, respectively. Helenalins predominated in in vivo propagated 2-year or in vitro propagated 3-year plants. 2-Methylbutyrate (2MeBu) was the principal ester in the samples with prevalence of helenalins, while isobutyrate (iBu) was the major one in the samples with predominance of 11,13-dihydrohelenalins. The results revealed that the environmental conditions on Vitosha Mt. are more suitable for cultivation of A. montana giving higher content of lactones.

  2. 12-Membered Resorcylic Acid Lactones Isolated from Saccharicola bicolor, an Endophytic Fungi from Bergenia purpurascens.

    PubMed

    Guo, Da-Le; Zhao, Min; Xiao, Shi-Ji; Xia, Bing; Wan, Bo; Gu, Yu-Cheng; Ding, Li-Sheng; Zhou, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Two new resorcylic acid lactones, 13-hydroxyhidroresorcylide (1) and 12-hydroxyhidroresorcylide (2), along with four known congeners (3-6) were isolated from Saccharicola bicolor, an endophytic fungus from Bergenia purpurascens. Their structures were elucidated by interpretation of the spectroscopic evidence. PMID:26882683

  3. Structural and Sensory Characterization of Novel Sesquiterpene Lactones from Iceberg Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Mai, Franziska; Glomb, Marcus A

    2016-01-13

    Lactuca sativa var. capitate (iceberg lettuce) is a delicious vegetable and popular for its mild taste. Nevertheless, iceberg lettuce is a source of bitter substances, such as the sesquiterpene lactones. Chemical investigations on the n-butanol extract led to the isolation of three novel sesquiterpene lactones. All compounds were isolated by multilayer countercurrent chromatography followed by preparative high-performance liquid chromatography. The structures were verified by means of spectroscopic methods, including NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. For the first time 11ß,13-dihydrolactucin-8-O-sulfate (jaquinelin-8-O-sulfate) was structurally elucidated and identified in plants. In addition, the sesquiterpene lactones cichorioside B and 8-deacetylmatricarin-8-O-sulfate were identified as novel ingredients of iceberg lettuce. Further flowering plants in the daisy family Asteraceae were examined for the above three compounds. At least one of the compounds was identified in nine plants. The comparison between the lettuce butt end and the leaves of five types of the Cichorieae tribe showed an accumulation of the compounds in the butt end. Further experiments addressed the impact of sesquiterpene lactones on color formation and bitter taste. PMID:26727458

  4. Structural and Sensory Characterization of Novel Sesquiterpene Lactones from Iceberg Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Mai, Franziska; Glomb, Marcus A

    2016-01-13

    Lactuca sativa var. capitate (iceberg lettuce) is a delicious vegetable and popular for its mild taste. Nevertheless, iceberg lettuce is a source of bitter substances, such as the sesquiterpene lactones. Chemical investigations on the n-butanol extract led to the isolation of three novel sesquiterpene lactones. All compounds were isolated by multilayer countercurrent chromatography followed by preparative high-performance liquid chromatography. The structures were verified by means of spectroscopic methods, including NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. For the first time 11ß,13-dihydrolactucin-8-O-sulfate (jaquinelin-8-O-sulfate) was structurally elucidated and identified in plants. In addition, the sesquiterpene lactones cichorioside B and 8-deacetylmatricarin-8-O-sulfate were identified as novel ingredients of iceberg lettuce. Further flowering plants in the daisy family Asteraceae were examined for the above three compounds. At least one of the compounds was identified in nine plants. The comparison between the lettuce butt end and the leaves of five types of the Cichorieae tribe showed an accumulation of the compounds in the butt end. Further experiments addressed the impact of sesquiterpene lactones on color formation and bitter taste.

  5. Self-Assembly and Lipid Interactions of Diacylglycerol Lactone Derivatives Studied at the Air/Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Philosof-Mazor, Liron; Volinsky, Roman; Comin, Maria J.; Lewin, Nancy E.; Kedei, Noemi; Blumberg, Peter M.; Marquez, Victor E.; Jelinek, Raz

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic diacylglycerol lactones (DAG-lactones) have been shown to be effective modulators of critical cellular signaling pathways. The biological activity of these amphiphilic molecules depends in part upon their lipid interactions within the cellular plasma membrane. This study explores the thermodynamic and structural features of DAG-lactone derivatives and their lipid interactions at the air/water interface. Surface-pressure/area isotherms and Brewster angle microscopy revealed the significance of specific side-groups attached to the terminus of a very rigid 4-(2-phenylethynyl) benzoyl chain of the DAG-lactones, which affected both the self-assembly of the molecules and their interactions with phospholipids. The experimental data highlight the formation of different phases within mixed DAG-lactone/phospholipid monolayers and underscore the relationship between the two components in binary mixtures of different mole ratios. Importantly, the results suggest that DAG-lactones are predominantly incorporated within fluid phospholipid phases rather than in the condensed phases that form, for example, by cholesterol. Moreover, the size and charge of the phospholipid headgroups do not seem to affect DAG-lactone interactions with lipids. PMID:18788772

  6. Mode of Action of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Psilostachyin and Psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Sülsen, Valeria P; Puente, Vanesa; Papademetrio, Daniela; Batlle, Alcira; Martino, Virginia S; Frank, Fernanda M; Lombardo, María E

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease, which is a major endemic disease in Latin America and is recognized by the WHO as one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases in the world. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C, two sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Ambrosia spp., have been demonstrated to have trypanocidal activity. Considering both the potential therapeutic targets present in the parasite, and the several mechanisms of action proposed for sesquiterpene lactones, the aim of this work was to characterize the mode of action of psilostachyin and psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi and to identify the possible targets for these molecules. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C were isolated from Ambrosia tenuifolia and Ambrosia scabra, respectively. Interaction of sesquiterpene lactones with hemin, the induction of oxidative stress, the inhibition of cruzipain and trypanothione reductase and their ability to inhibit sterol biosynthesis were evaluated. The induction of cell death by apoptosis was also evaluated by analyzing phosphatidylserine exposure detected using annexin-V/propidium iodide, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, assessed with Rhodamine 123 and nuclear DNA fragmentation evaluated by the TUNEL assay. Both STLs were capable of interacting with hemin. Psilostachyin increased about 5 times the generation of reactive oxygen species in Trypanosoma cruzi after a 4h treatment, unlike psilostachyin C which induced an increase in reactive oxygen species levels of only 1.5 times. Only psilostachyin C was able to inhibit the biosynthesis of ergosterol, causing an accumulation of squalene. Both sesquiterpene lactones induced parasite death by apoptosis. Upon evaluating the combination of both compounds, and additive trypanocidal effect was observed. Despite their structural similarity, both sesquiterpene lactones exerted their anti-T. cruzi activity through interaction with different targets. Psilostachyin accomplished its antiparasitic

  7. Mode of Action of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Psilostachyin and Psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Papademetrio, Daniela; Batlle, Alcira; Martino, Virginia S.; Frank, Fernanda M.; Lombardo, María E.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas’ disease, which is a major endemic disease in Latin America and is recognized by the WHO as one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases in the world. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C, two sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Ambrosia spp., have been demonstrated to have trypanocidal activity. Considering both the potential therapeutic targets present in the parasite, and the several mechanisms of action proposed for sesquiterpene lactones, the aim of this work was to characterize the mode of action of psilostachyin and psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi and to identify the possible targets for these molecules. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C were isolated from Ambrosia tenuifolia and Ambrosia scabra, respectively. Interaction of sesquiterpene lactones with hemin, the induction of oxidative stress, the inhibition of cruzipain and trypanothione reductase and their ability to inhibit sterol biosynthesis were evaluated. The induction of cell death by apoptosis was also evaluated by analyzing phosphatidylserine exposure detected using annexin-V/propidium iodide, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, assessed with Rhodamine 123 and nuclear DNA fragmentation evaluated by the TUNEL assay. Both STLs were capable of interacting with hemin. Psilostachyin increased about 5 times the generation of reactive oxygen species in Trypanosoma cruzi after a 4h treatment, unlike psilostachyin C which induced an increase in reactive oxygen species levels of only 1.5 times. Only psilostachyin C was able to inhibit the biosynthesis of ergosterol, causing an accumulation of squalene. Both sesquiterpene lactones induced parasite death by apoptosis. Upon evaluating the combination of both compounds, and additive trypanocidal effect was observed. Despite their structural similarity, both sesquiterpene lactones exerted their anti-T. cruzi activity through interaction with different targets. Psilostachyin accomplished its

  8. Antisocial luxO Mutants Provide a Stationary-Phase Survival Advantage in Vibrio fischeri ES114

    PubMed Central

    Kimbrough, John H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The squid light organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri controls bioluminescence using two acyl-homoserine lactone pheromone-signaling (PS) systems. The first of these systems to be activated during host colonization, AinS/AinR, produces and responds to N-octanoyl homoserine lactone (C8-AHL). We screened activity of a PainS-lacZ transcriptional reporter in a transposon mutant library and found three mutants with decreased reporter activity, low C8-AHL output, and other traits consistent with low ainS expression. However, the transposon insertions were unrelated to these phenotypes, and genome resequencing revealed that each mutant had a distinct point mutation in luxO. In the wild type, LuxO is phosphorylated by LuxU and then activates transcription of the small RNA (sRNA) Qrr, which represses ainS indirectly by repressing its activator LitR. The luxO mutants identified here encode LuxU-independent, constitutively active LuxO* proteins. The repeated appearance of these luxO mutants suggested that they had some fitness advantage during construction and/or storage of the transposon mutant library, and we found that luxO* mutants survived better and outcompeted the wild type in prolonged stationary-phase cultures. From such cultures we isolated additional luxO* mutants. In all, we isolated LuxO* allelic variants with the mutations P41L, A91D, F94C, P98L, P98Q, V106A, V106G, T107R, V108G, R114P, L205F, H319R, H324R, and T335I. Based on the current model of the V. fischeri PS circuit, litR knockout mutants should resemble luxO* mutants; however, luxO* mutants outcompeted litR mutants in prolonged culture and had much poorer host colonization competitiveness than is reported for litR mutants, illustrating additional complexities in this regulatory circuit. IMPORTANCE Our results provide novel insight into the function of LuxO, which is a key component of pheromone signaling (PS) cascades in several members of the Vibrionaceae. Our results also contribute to an

  9. I. Enabling Single-Chain Surfactants to Form Vesicles by Nonamphiphilic Liquid Crystals in Water II. Controlling Attachment and Ligand-Mediated Adherence of Candida albicans on Monolayers