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Sample records for acylated ghrelin concentrations

  1. Serum Acylated Ghrelin Concentrations in Response to Short-Term Overfeeding in Normal Weight, Overweight, and Obese Men

    PubMed Central

    Wadden, Danny; Cahill, Farrell; Amini, Peyvand; Randell, Edward; Vasdev, Sudesh; Yi, Yanqing; Zhang, Weizhen; Sun, Guang

    2012-01-01

    Background Ghrelin, an orexigenic gut hormone secreted primarily from the stomach, is involved in energy homeostasis. However, little data is available regarding its response to energy surplus and the development of human obesity. Objective The present study investigated the response of circulating acylated ghrelin to a 7-day positive energy challenge. Design A total of 68 healthy young men were overfed 70% more calories than required, for 1-week. Subjects were classified based on percent body fat (measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) as normal weight, overweight, and obese. Serum acylated ghrelin concentration was measured before and after the positive energy challenge. Additionally, the relationship between acylated ghrelin and obesity-related phenotypes including weight, body mass index, percent body fat, cholesterol, HDL-c, LDL-c, glucose, insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and β-cell function at baseline and change due to overfeeding, were assessed. Results Contrary to our expectations, serum acylated ghrelin was significantly increased in response to overfeeding and the increase was independent of obesity status. There was no significant difference in fasting acylated ghrelin between normal weight, overweight, and obese men at baseline. Acylated ghrelin was negatively correlated with weight and BMI for normal weight and with BMI in overweight men. Also ghrelin was correlated with change in weight and BMI in overweight (negative relationship) and obese (positive relationship) groups. Conclusion Our results showed that circulating acylated ghrelin was increased after a 7-day positive energy challenge regardless of adiposity status. However, acylated ghrelin was correlated with change in weight and BMI in opposing directions, in overweight and obese subjects respectively, thus dependent on obesity status. PMID:23029221

  2. Plasma concentrations of acyl-ghrelin are associated with average daily gain and feeding behavior in grow-finish pigs.

    PubMed

    Lents, C A; Brown-Brandl, T M; Rohrer, G A; Oliver, W T; Freking, B A

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of sex, sire line, and litter size on concentrations of acyl-ghrelin and total ghrelin in plasma of grow-finish pigs and to understand the relationship of plasma concentrations of ghrelin with feeding behavior, average daily gain (ADG), and back fat in grow-finish swine. Yorkshire-Landrace crossbred dams were inseminated with semen from Yorkshire, Landrace, or Duroc sires. Within 24 h of birth, pigs were cross-fostered into litter sizes of normal (N; >12 pigs/litter) or small (S; ≤ 9 pigs/litter). At 8 wk of age, pigs (n = 240) were blocked by sire breed, sex, and litter size and assigned to pens (n = 6) containing commercial feeders modified with a system to monitor feeding behavior. Total time eating, number of daily meals, and duration of meals were recorded for each individual pig. Body weight was recorded every 4 wk. Back fat and loin eye area were recorded at the conclusion of the 12-wk feeding study. A blood sample was collected at week 7 of the study to quantify concentrations of acyl- and total ghrelin in plasma. Pigs from small litters weighed more (P < 0.05) and tended (P = 0.07) to be fatter than pigs from normal litters. Postnatal litter size did not affect ADG, feeding behavior, or concentrations of ghrelin in plasma during the grow-finish phase. Barrows spent more time eating (P < 0.001) than gilts, but the number of meals and concentrations of ghrelin did not differ with sex of the pig. Pigs from Duroc and Yorkshire sires had lesser (P < 0.0001) concentrations of acyl-ghrelin than pigs from Landrace sires, but plasma concentrations of total ghrelin were not affected by sire breed. Concentrations of acyl-ghrelin were positively correlated with the number of meals and negatively correlated with meal length and ADG (P < 0.05). A larger number of short-duration meals may indicate that pigs with greater concentrations of acyl-ghrelin consumed less total feed, which likely explains why they were

  3. Plasma concentrations of acyl-ghrelin are associated with average daily gain and feeding behavior in grow-finish pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feeding behavior is an important component of growth and feed efficiency in swine. Acyl-ghrelin is a peptide produced in the stomach that is orexigenic. The role of ghrelin in regulating feeding behavior in swine under commercial conditions is unknown. The objectives of this study were to determine ...

  4. Increased peptide YY blood concentrations, not decreased acyl-ghrelin, are associated with reduced hunger and food intake in healthy older women: Preliminary evidence.

    PubMed

    Hickson, Mary; Moss, Charlotte; Dhillo, Waljit S; Bottin, Jeanne; Frost, Gary

    2016-10-01

    With ageing there is frequently a loss of appetite, termed anorexia of ageing, which can result in under-nutrition. We do not know how appetite control alters with ageing. The objective of this study was to investigate whether differences in the release of, and response to, gastrointestinal appetite hormones is altered in young compared to old healthy volunteers. We hypothesised that an increase in PYY and GLP-1 or a decrease ghrelin may result in a decreased appetite. A comparative experimental design, using a cross-sectional sample of ages from a healthy population, matched for sex and BMI was used. The study compared total ghrelin, acyl-ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1 and subjective appetite responses to ingestion of a standardised 2781kj (660 kcal) test meal. 31 female volunteers aged between 21 and 92yrs took part. Multiple linear regression showed that both age and sex had an independent effect on energy intake. Subjective appetite scores showed that hunger, pleasantness to eat, and prospective food intake were significantly lower in the older age groups. PYY incremental area under the curve (IAUC) was greater in the oldest old compared to younger ages f(3,27) = 2.9, p = 0.05. No differences in GLP-1, ghrelin or acyl-ghrelin were observed in the older compared to younger age groups. Our data suggest that there may be increases in postprandial PYY(3-36) levels in female octogenarians, potentially resulting in reduced appetite. There does not appear to be any change in ghrelin or acyl-ghrelin concentrations with ageing. PMID:27264721

  5. Effects of sire breed, gender, and postnatal litter size on plasma concentrations of acyl ghrelin and its relationship with growth traits and feeding behavior in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feeding behavior is an important component of growth and feed efficiency in swine. Acyl ghrelin is a peptide produced in the stomach that is orexigenic. The role of ghrelin in regulating feeding behavior in swine under commercial conditions is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine th...

  6. Effects of ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin on neurogenesis of the rat fetal spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Miho; Nakahara, Keiko; Goto, Shintaro; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Miyazato, Mikiya . E-mail: a0d201u@cc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp; Date, Yukari; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Kangawa, Kenji; Murakami, Noboru

    2006-11-24

    Expressions of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) mRNA and its protein were confirmed in rat fetal spinal cord tissues by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. In vitro, over 3 nM ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin induced significant proliferation of primary cultured cells from the fetal spinal cord. The proliferating cells were then double-stained using antibodies against the neuronal precursor marker, nestin, and the cell proliferation marker, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), and the nestin-positive cells were also found to be co-stained with antibody against GHS-R. Furthermore, binding studies using [{sup 125}I]des-acyl ghrelin indicated the presence of a specific binding site for des-acyl ghrelin, and confirmed that the binding was displaced with unlabeled des-acyl ghrelin or ghrelin. These results indicate that ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin induce proliferation of neuronal precursor cells that is both dependent and independent of GHS-R, suggesting that both ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin are involved in neurogenesis of the fetal spinal cord.

  7. Acylation Type Determines Ghrelin's Effects on Energy Homeostasis in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, Kristy M.; Chaudhary, Nilika; Müller, Timo D.; Kirchner, Henriette; Habegger, Kirk M.; Ottaway, Nickki; Smiley, David L.; DiMarchi, Richard; Hofmann, Susanna M.; Woods, Stephen C.; Sivertsen, Bjørn; Holst, Birgitte; Pfluger, Paul T.; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin is a gastrointestinal polypeptide that acts through the ghrelin receptor (GHSR) to promote food intake and increase adiposity. Activation of GHSR requires the presence of a fatty-acid (FA) side chain on amino acid residue serine 3 of the ghrelin molecule. However, little is known about the role that the type of FA used for acylation plays in the biological action of ghrelin. We therefore evaluated a series of differentially acylated peptides to determine whether alterations in length or stability of the FA side chain have an impact on the ability of ghrelin to activate GHSR in vitro or to differentially alter food intake, body weight, and body composition in vivo. Fatty acids principally available in the diet (such as palmitate C16) and therefore representing potential substrates for the ghrelin-activating enzyme ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) were used for dose-, time-, and administration/route-dependent effects of ghrelin on food intake, body weight, and body composition in rats and mice. Our data demonstrate that altering the length of the FA side chain of ghrelin results in the differential activation of GHSR. Additionally, we found that acylation of ghrelin with a long-chain FA (C16) delays the acute central stimulation of food intake. Lastly, we found that, depending on acylation length, systemic and central chronic actions of ghrelin on adiposity can be enhanced or reduced. Together our data suggest that modification of the FA side-chain length can be a novel approach to modulate the efficacy of pharmacologically administered ghrelin. PMID:22865372

  8. Abdominal surgery inhibits circulating acyl ghrelin and ghrelin-O-acyltransferase levels in rats: role of the somatostatin receptor subtype 2

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Shaikh, Almaas; Lambrecht, Nils W. G.; Rivier, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Clinical studies are evaluating the efficacy of synthetic ghrelin agonists in postoperative ileus management. However, the control of ghrelin secretion under conditions of postoperative gastric ileus is largely unknown. Peripheral somatostatin inhibits ghrelin secretion in animals and humans. We investigated the time course of ghrelin changes postsurgery in fasted rats and whether somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst2) signaling is involved. Abdominal surgery (laparotomy and 1-min cecal palpation) induced a rapid and long-lasting decrease in plasma acyl ghrelin levels as shown by the 64, 67, and 59% reduction at 0.5, 2, and 5 h postsurgery, respectively, compared with sham (anesthesia alone for 10 min, P < 0.05). Levels were partly recovered at 7 h and fully restored at 24 h. The percentage of acyl ghrelin reduction was significantly higher than that of desacyl ghrelin at 2 h postsurgery and not at any other time point. This was associated with a 48 and 23% decrease in gastric and plasma ghrelin-O-acyltransferase protein concentrations, respectively (P < 0.001). Ghrelin-positive cells in the oxyntic mucosa expressed sst2a receptor and the sst2 agonist S-346-011 inhibited fasting acyl ghrelin levels by 64 and 77% at 0.5 and 2 h, respectively. The sst2 antagonist S-406-028 prevented the abdominal surgery-induced decreased circulating acyl ghrelin but not the delayed gastric emptying assessed 0.5 h postinjection. These data show that activation of sst2 receptor located on gastric X/A-like cells plays a key role in the rapid inhibition of circulating acyl ghrelin induced by abdominal surgery while not being primarily involved in the early phase of postoperative gastric ileus. PMID:21636529

  9. Lipopolysaccharide differentially decreases plasma acyl and desacyl ghrelin levels in rats: potential role of the circulating ghrelin acylating enzyme GOAT

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Reeve, Joseph R.; Taché, Yvette; Lambrecht, Nils W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rodents is an established model for studying innate immune responses to gram-negative bacteria and mimicking symptoms of infections including reduced food intake associated with decreased circulating total ghrelin levels. The ghrelin-acylating enzyme, ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT) involved in the formation of acyl ghrelin (AG) was recently identified. We investigated changes in circulating AG, desacyl ghrelin (DG) and GOAT induced by intraperitoneal LPS (100μg/kg) and associated changes in food intake. Plasma AG and total ghrelin were assessed by radioimmunoassay, GOAT protein by Western blot and mRNA by RT-qPCR. DG was derived from total minus AG. Plasma AG and DG were decreased at 2h, 5h and 7h (p<0.01) post injection compared to vehicle and recovered at 24h. At 2h there was a significantly greater decrease of AG (-53%) than DG (-28%) resulting in a decreased AG/DG ratio (1:5, p <0.01), which thereafter returned to pre-injection values (1:3). This altered ratio was associated with a 38% decrease in plasma GOAT protein compared to vehicle (p <0.001), whereas gastric GOAT protein was slightly increased by 10% (p<0.05). GOAT mRNA expression was unchanged. Food intake was reduced by 58% measured during the 1.5-2h period post LPS injection. Decreased plasma AG and DG preceded the rise in rectal temperature and blood glucose that peaked at 7h. These data indicate that LPS induces a long-lasting reduction of AG and DG levels that may have a bearing with the decrease in food intake. The faster drop in AG than DG within 2h is associated with reduced circulating GOAT. PMID:20599577

  10. Jejunal administration of glucose enhances acyl ghrelin suppression in obese humans.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Robyn A; Sidani, Reem M; Garcia, Anna E; Antoun, Joseph; Isbell, James M; Albaugh, Vance L; Abumrad, Naji N

    2016-07-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that stimulates hunger and worsens glucose metabolism. Circulating ghrelin is decreased after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery; however, the mechanism(s) underlying this change is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that jejunal nutrient exposure plays a significant role in ghrelin suppression after RYGB. Feeding tubes were placed in the stomach or jejunum in 13 obese subjects to simulate pre-RYGB or post-RYGB glucose exposure to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, respectively, without the confounding effects of caloric restriction, weight loss, and surgical stress. On separate study days, the plasma glucose curves obtained with either gastric or jejunal administration of glucose were replicated with intravenous (iv) infusions of glucose. These "isoglycemic clamps" enabled us to determine the contribution of the GI tract and postabsorptive plasma glucose to acyl ghrelin suppression. Plasma acyl ghrelin levels were suppressed to a greater degree with jejunal glucose administration compared with gastric glucose administration (P < 0.05). Jejunal administration of glucose also resulted in a greater suppression of acyl ghrelin than the corresponding isoglycemic glucose infusion (P ≤ 0.01). However, gastric and isoglycemic iv glucose infusions resulted in similar degrees of acyl ghrelin suppression (P > 0.05). Direct exposure of the proximal jejunum to glucose increases acyl ghrelin suppression independent of circulating glucose levels. The enhanced suppression of acyl ghrelin after RYGB may be due to a nutrient-initiated signal in the jejunum that regulates ghrelin secretion. PMID:27279247

  11. Acyl ghrelin acts in the brain to control liver function and peripheral glucose homeostasis in male mice.

    PubMed

    Stark, Romana; Reichenbach, Alex; Lockie, Sarah H; Pracht, Corinna; Wu, Qunli; Tups, Alexander; Andrews, Zane B

    2015-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that peripheral ghrelin regulates glucose metabolism. Here, we designed experiments to examine how central acyl ghrelin infusion affects peripheral glucose metabolism under pair-fed or ad libitum feeding conditions. Mice received intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), ghrelin, and allowed to eat ad libitum (icv ghrelin ad lib) or ghrelin and pair-fed to the aCSF group (icv ghrelin pf). Minipumps delivered acyl ghrelin at a dose of 0.25 μg/h at 0.5 μL/h for 7 days. There was no difference in daily blood glucose, insulin, glucagon, triglycerides, or nonesterified fatty acids. Body weight gain and food intake was significantly higher in icv ghrelin ad lib mice. However, both icv ghrelin ad lib and icv ghrelin pf groups exhibited heavier white adipose mass. Icv ghrelin pf mice exhibited better glucose tolerance than aCSF or icv ghrelin ad lib mice during a glucose tolerance test, although both icv ghrelin ad lib and icv ghrelin pf increased insulin release during the glucose tolerance test. Central acyl ghrelin infusion and pair feeding also increased breakdown of liver glycogen and triglyceride, and regulated genes involved in hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism. Icv ghrelin pf mice had an increase in plasma blood glucose during a pyruvate tolerance test relative to icv ghrelin ad lib or aCSF mice. Our results suggest that under conditions of negative energy (icv ghrelin pf), central acyl ghrelin engages a neural circuit that influences hepatic glucose function. Metabolic status affects the ability of central acyl ghrelin to regulate peripheral glucose homeostasis. PMID:25535832

  12. Ghrelin O-Acyl Transferase in Zebrafish Is an Evolutionarily Conserved Peptide Upregulated During Calorie Restriction.

    PubMed

    Hatef, Azadeh; Yufa, Roman; Unniappan, Suraj

    2015-10-01

    Ghrelin is a multifunctional orexigenic hormone with a unique acyl modification enabled by ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT). Ghrelin is well-characterized in nonmammals, and GOAT sequences of several fishes are available in the GenBank. However, endogenous GOAT in non-mammals remains poorly understood. In this research, GOAT sequence comparison, tissue-specific GOAT expression, and its regulation by nutrient status and exogenous ghrelin were studied. It was found that the bioactive core of zebrafish GOAT amino acid sequence share high identity with that of mammals. GOAT mRNA was most abundant in the gut. GOAT-like immunoreactivity (i.r.) was found colocalized with ghrelin in the gastric mucosa. Food deprivation increased, and feeding decreased GOAT and preproghrelin mRNA expression in the brain and gut. GOAT and ghrelin peptides in the gut and brain showed corresponding decrease in food-deprived state. Intraperitoneal injection of acylated fish ghrelin caused a significant decrease in GOAT mRNA expression, suggesting a feedback mechanism regulating its abundance. Together, these results provide the first in-depth characterization of GOAT in a non-mammal. Our results demonstrate that endogenous GOAT expression is responsive to metabolic status and availability of acylated ghrelin, providing further evidences for GOAT in the regulation of feeding in teleosts. PMID:26226634

  13. Protective actions of des-acylated ghrelin on brain injury and blood-brain barrier disruption after stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Ku, Jacqueline M; Taher, Mohammadali; Chin, Kai Yee; Barsby, Tom; Austin, Victoria; Wong, Connie H Y; Andrews, Zane B; Spencer, Sarah J; Miller, Alyson A

    2016-09-01

    The major ghrelin forms, acylated ghrelin and des-acylated ghrelin, are novel gastrointestinal hormones. Moreover, emerging evidence indicates that these peptides may have other functions including neuro- and vaso-protection. Here, we investigated whether post-stroke treatment with acylated ghrelin or des-acylated ghrelin could improve functional and histological endpoints of stroke outcome in mice after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). We found that des-acylated ghrelin (1 mg/kg) improved neurological and functional performance, reduced infarct and swelling, and decreased apoptosis. In addition, it reduced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in vivo and attenuated the hyper-permeability of mouse cerebral microvascular endothelial cells after oxygen glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD + RO). By contrast, acylated ghrelin (1 mg/kg or 5 mg/kg) had no significant effect on these endpoints of stroke outcome. Next we found that des-acylated ghrelin's vasoprotective actions were associated with increased expression of tight junction proteins (occludin and claudin-5), and decreased cell death. Moreover, it attenuated superoxide production, Nox activity and expression of 3-nitrotyrosine. Collectively, these results demonstrate that post-stroke treatment with des-acylated ghrelin, but not acylated ghrelin, protects against ischaemia/reperfusion-induced brain injury and swelling, and BBB disruption, by reducing oxidative and/or nitrosative damage. PMID:27303049

  14. Dietary Caprylic Acid (C8:0) Does Not Increase Plasma Acylated Ghrelin but Decreases Plasma Unacylated Ghrelin in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lemarié, Fanny; Beauchamp, Erwan; Dayot, Stéphanie; Duby, Cécile; Legrand, Philippe; Rioux, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the caprylic acid (C8:0), this study aimed at investigating the discrepancy between the formerly described beneficial effects of dietary medium chain fatty acids on body weight loss and the C8:0 newly reported effect on food intake via ghrelin octanoylation. During 6 weeks, Sprague-Dawley male rats were fed with three dietary C8:0 levels (0, 8 and 21% of fatty acids) in three experimental conditions (moderate fat, caloric restriction and high fat). A specific dose-response enrichment of the stomach tissue C8:0 was observed as a function of dietary C8:0, supporting the hypothesis of an early preduodenal hydrolysis of medium chain triglycerides and a direct absorption at the gastric level. However, the octanoylated ghrelin concentration in the plasma was unchanged in spite of the increased C8:0 availability. A reproducible decrease in the plasma concentration of unacylated ghrelin was observed, which was consistent with a decrease in the stomach preproghrelin mRNA and stomach ghrelin expression. The concomitant decrease of the plasma unacylated ghrelin and the stability of its acylated form resulted in a significant increase in the acylated/total ghrelin ratio which had no effect on body weight gain or total dietary consumption. This enhanced ratio measured in rats consuming C8:0 was however suspected to increase (i) growth hormone (GH) secretion as an increase in the GH-dependent mRNA expression of the insulin like growth Factor 1 (IGF-1) was measured (ii) adipocyte diameters in subcutaneous adipose tissue without an increase in the fat pad mass. Altogether, these results show that daily feeding with diets containing C8:0 increased the C8:0 level in the stomach more than all the other tissues, affecting the acylated/total ghrelin plasma ratio by decreasing the concentration of circulating unacylated ghrelin. However, these modifications were not associated with increased body weight or food consumption. PMID:26196391

  15. Des-acyl ghrelin prevents heatstroke-like symptoms in rats exposed to high temperature and high humidity.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Hayashi, Yujiro; Kangawa, Kenji; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Murakami, Noboru; Nakahara, Keiko

    2016-02-26

    We have shown previously that des-acyl ghrelin decreases body temperature in rats through activation of the parasympathetic nervous system. Here we investigated whether des-acyl ghrelin ameliorates heatstroke in rats exposed to high temperature. Peripheral administration of des-acyl ghrelin significantly attenuated hyperthermia induced by exposure to high-temperature (35°C) together with high humidity (70-80%). Although biochemical analysis revealed that exposure to high temperature significantly increased hematocrit and the serum levels of aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine and electrolytes (Na(+), K(+), Cl(-)), most of these heatstroke-associated reactions were significantly reduced by treatment with des-acyl ghrelin. The level of des-acyl ghrelin in plasma was also found to be significantly increased under high-temperature conditions. These results suggest that des-acyl ghrelin could be useful for preventing heatstroke under high temperature condition. PMID:26773867

  16. Transitional change in rat fetal cell proliferation in response to ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin during the last stage of pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Nakahara, Keiko; Kangawa, Kenji; Murakami, Noboru

    2010-03-12

    Expression of mRNA for the ghrelin receptor, GHS-R1a, was detected in various peripheral and central tissues of fetal rats, including skin, bone, heart, liver, gut, brain and spinal cord, on embryonic day (ED)15 and ED17. However, its expression in skin, bone, heart and liver, but not in gut, brain and spinal cord, became relatively weak on ED19 and disappeared after birth (ND2). Ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin facilitated the proliferation of cultured fetal (ED17, 19), but not neonatal (ND2), skin cells. On the other hand, with regard to cells from the spinal cord and hypothalamus, the proliferative effect of ghrelin continued after birth, whereas the effect of des-acyl ghrelin on neurogenesis in these tissues was lost at the ED19 fetal and ND2 neonatal stages. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the cells in the hypothalamus induced to proliferate by ghrelin at the ND2 stage were positive for nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein. These results suggest that in the period immediately prior to, and after birth, rat fetal cells showing proliferation in response to ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin are at a transitional stage characterized by alteration of the expression of GHS-R1a and an undefined des-acyl ghrelin receptor, their responsiveness varying among different tissues.

  17. Des-Acyl Ghrelin Directly Targets the Arcuate Nucleus in a Ghrelin-Receptor Independent Manner and Impairs the Orexigenic Effect of Ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, G; Cabral, A; Cornejo, M P; De Francesco, P N; Garcia-Romero, G; Reynaldo, M; Perello, M

    2016-02-01

    Ghrelin is a stomach-derived octanoylated peptide hormone that plays a variety of well-established biological roles acting via its specific receptor known as growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). In plasma, a des-octanoylated form of ghrelin, named des-acyl ghrelin (DAG), also exists. DAG is suggested to be a signalling molecule that has specific targets, including the brain, and regulates some physiological functions. However, no specific receptor for DAG has been reported until now, and, consequently, the potential role of DAG as a hormone has remained a matter of debate. In the present study, we show that DAG specifically binds to and acts on a subset of arcuate nucleus (ARC) cells in a GHSR-independent manner. ARC cells labelled by a DAG fluorescent tracer include the neuropeptide Y (NPY) and non-NPY neurones. Given the well-established role of the ARC in appetite regulation, we tested the effect of centrally administered DAG on food intake. We found that DAG failed to affect dark phase feeding, as well as food intake, after a starvation period; however, it impaired the orexigenic actions of peripherally administered ghrelin. Thus, we conclude that DAG directly targets ARC neurones and antagonises the orexigenic effects of peripherally administered ghrelin. PMID:26661382

  18. The glucagon-like peptide-1 analog exendin-4 antagonizes the effect of acyl ghrelin on the respiratory exchange ratio.

    PubMed

    Abtahi, Shayan; VanderJagt, Hayley L; Currie, Paul J

    2016-09-01

    The present study investigated the interaction of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ArcN) ghrelin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) signaling on metabolic function. Using indirect calorimetry, we first showed that acylated ghrelin, administered into the ArcN, significantly increased the respiratory exchange ratio (RER) in male Sprague-Dawley rats, representing a shift in fuel utilization toward enhanced carbohydrate oxidation and reduced lipid utilization. In contrast, treatment with similar doses of des-acyl ghrelin failed to induce reliable changes in RER. We then examined the ability of exendin-4 (Ex4) to alter acyl ghrelin's energetic effects. Ex4 is a GLP-1 agonist and has been reported previously to suppress food intake in rodent models. Rats were treated with either systemic or direct ArcN Ex4, followed by acyl ghrelin. Our results indicated that both systemic and central injections of Ex4 alone significantly reduced RER and, importantly, Ex4 pretreatment reliably attenuated the impact of ghrelin on RER. Overall, these findings provide compelling evidence that ghrelin and GLP-1 signaling interact in the hypothalamic control of metabolic function. PMID:27454242

  19. Ghrelin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gut hormone ghrelin was discovered in 1999. In the last 15 years, ample data have been generated on ghrelin. Bedsides its hallmark function as an appetite stimulator, ghrelin also has many other important functions. In this review, we discussed ghrelin's functions in learning and memory, gut mov...

  20. Blunted Suppression of Acyl-Ghrelin in Response to Fructose Ingestion in Obese Adolescents: the Role of Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Van Name, Michelle; Giannini, Cosimo; Santoro, Nicola; Jastreboff, Ania; Kubat, Jessica; Li, Fangyong; Kursawe, Romy; Savoye, Mary; Duran, Elvira; Dziura, James; Sinha, Rajita; Sherwin, Robert; Cline, Gary; Caprio, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fructose consumption has risen alongside obesity and diabetes. Gut hormones involved in hunger and satiety (ghrelin and PYY) may respond differently to fructose compared to glucose ingestion. We evaluated the effects of glucose and fructose ingestion on ghrelin and PYY in lean and obese adolescents with differing insulin sensitivity. Methods Adolescents were divided into lean (n=14), obese insulin sensitive (n=12) (OIS), and obese insulin resistant (n=15) (OIR). In a double-blind, cross-over design, subjects drank 75g of glucose or fructose in random order, serum was obtained every 10 minutes for 60 minutes. Results Baseline acyl-ghrelin was highest in lean and lowest in OIR (p=0.02). After glucose ingestion acyl-ghrelin decreased similarly in lean and OIS, but appeared lower in OIR (vs lean p=0.03). Suppression differences were more pronounced after fructose (lean vs. OIS p=0.008, lean vs. OIR p<0.001). OIS became significantly hungrier after fructose (p=0.015). PYY was not significantly different at baseline, varied minimally after glucose, and rose after fructose. Conclusion Compared to lean, OIS adolescents have impaired acyl-ghrelin responses to fructose but not glucose, whereas OIR adolescents have blunted responses to both. Diminished suppression of acyl-ghrelin in childhood obesity, particularly if accompanied by insulin resistance, may promote hunger and overeating. PMID:25645909

  1. Ghrelin, ghrelin-O-acyl transferase, nucleobindin-2/nesfatin-1 and prohormone convertases in the pancreatic islets of Sprague Dawley rats during development.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Haneesha; Gasner, Michaela; Ramesh, Naresh; Unniappan, Suraj

    2016-06-01

    Ghrelin and nesfatin-1 are regulators of blood glucose and energy balance. Prohormone convertases (PCs) enable processing of ghrelin and nesfatin-1 from its precursors. An acylation, enabled by ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) is critical for many of the biological actions of ghrelin. To date, there is no research on the developmental expression of GOAT, and the co-expression of both NUCB2/nesfatin-1 and prohormone convertases in the pancreas. The objective of this research was to immunolocalize ghrelin, GOAT, NUCB2/nesfatin-1, PC1/3 and PC2 in the pancreas during fetal and postnatal periods of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats using immunohistochemical analysis. GOAT mRNA in the rat pancreas during development was also determined. In the pancreas, not all islet cells immunopositive for GOAT are immunoreactive for ghrelin on postnatal (P) days 20, 27 and adult. GOAT mRNA expression in the pancreas at P27 was higher than the expression levels in rest of the developmental stages tested. Both PC1/3 and PC2 are co-expressed with NUCB2/nesfatin-1 on embryonic (E) day E21, P13, P20. While similar co-localization was also found in P27 for NUCB2/nesfatin-1 and PC1/3, NUCB2/nesfatin-1 and PC2 were found in distinct populations of cells in P27. Some ghrelin and GOAT positive cells stained for nesfatin-1 as well. Meanwhile, no co-localization of somatostatin and glucaon with nesfatin-1 was found in the pancreas of SD rats. Our findings suggest that the endocrine pancreas can produce and process precursors of ghrelin and nesfatin-1 to make bioactive forms of both peptides. PMID:27071923

  2. An Evaluation of Acylated Ghrelin and Obestatin Levels in Childhood Obesity and Their Association with Insulin Resistance, Metabolic Syndrome, and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Razzaghy-Azar, Maryam; Nourbakhsh, Mitra; Pourmoteabed, Abdolreza; Nourbakhsh, Mona; Ilbeigi, Davod; Khosravi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide with an orexigenic property, which is predominantly produced by the stomach. Acylated ghrelin is the active form of this hormone. Obestatin is a 23-amino acid peptide which is produced by post-translational modification of a protein precursor that also produces ghrelin. Obestatin has the opposite effect of ghrelin on food intake. The aim of this study was to evaluate acylated ghrelin and obestatin levels and their ratio in obese and normal-weight children and adolescents, and their association with metabolic syndrome (MetS) parameters. Methods: Serum acyl-ghrelin, obestatin, leptin, insulin, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), lipid profile, and malondialdehyde (MDA) were evaluated in 73 children and adolescents (42 obese and 31 control). Insulin resistance was calculated by a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). MetS was determined according to IDF criteria. Results: Acyl-ghrelin levels were significantly lower in obese subjects compared to the control group and lower in obese children with MetS compared to obese subjects without MetS. Obestatin was significantly higher in obese subjects compared to that of the control, but it did not differ significantly among those with or without MetS. Acyl-ghrelin to obestatin ratio was significantly lower in obese subjects compared to that in normal subjects. Acyl-ghrelin showed significant negative and obestatin showed significant positive correlations with body mass index (BMI), BMI Z-score, leptin, insulin, and HOMA-IR. Acyl-ghrelin had a significant negative correlation with MDA as an index of oxidative stress. Conclusion: Ghrelin is decreased and obestatin is elevated in obesity. Both of these hormones are associated with insulin resistance, and ghrelin is associated with oxidative stress. The balance between ghrelin and obestatin seems to be disturbed in obesity. PMID:27348010

  3. Plasma acylated and plasma unacylated ghrelin: useful new biomarkers in patients with neuroendocrine tumors?

    PubMed

    van Adrichem, Roxanne C S; van der Lely, Aart Jan; Huisman, Martin; Kramer, Piet; Feelders, Richard A; Delhanty, Patric J D; de Herder, Wouter W

    2016-07-01

    To date, the value of fasting plasma acylated ghrelin (AG) and unacylated ghrelin (UAG) as potential novel biomarkers in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) is unknown. The aims of this study are to (i) compare fasting AG and UAG levels between nonobese, nondiabetic NET patients (N=28) and age- (±3 years) and sex-matched nonobese, nondiabetic controls (N=28); and (ii) study the relationship between AG, UAG, and AG/UAG ratios and biochemical (chromogranin-A (CgA) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels) and clinical parameters (age at diagnosis, sex, primary tumor location, carcinoid syndrome, ENETS TNM classification, Ki-67 proliferation index, grading, prior incomplete surgery) in NET patients. Fasting venous blood samples (N=56) were collected and directly stabilized with 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride after withdrawal. Plasma AG and UAG levels were determined by ELISA. Expression of ghrelin was examined in tumor tissue by immunohistochemistry. There were no significant differences between NET patients and controls in AG (median: 62.5 pg/mL, IQR: 33.1-112.8 vs median: 57.2pg/mL, IQR: 26.7-128.3, P=0.66) and UAG in levels (median: 76.6pg/mL, IQR: 35.23-121.7 vs median: 64.9, IQR: 27.5-93.1, P=0.44). No significant correlations were found between AG, UAG, and AG/UAG ratios versus biochemical and clinical parameters in NET patients with the exception of age at diagnosis (AG: ρ= -0.47, P=0.012; AG/UAG ratio: ρ= -0.50, P=0.007) and baseline chromogranin-A levels (AG/UAG ratio: ρ= -0.44, P=0.019). In our view, fasting plasma acylated and unacylated ghrelin appear to have no value as diagnostic biomarkers in the clinical follow-up of patients with NETs. PMID:27215920

  4. Ghrelin reverses experimental diabetic neuropathy in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kyoraku, Itaru; Shiomi, Kazutaka; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2009-11-20

    Ghrelin, an acylated peptide produced in the stomach, increases food intake and growth hormone secretion, suppresses inflammation and oxidative stress, and promotes cell survival and proliferation. We investigated the pharmacological potential of ghrelin in the treatment of polyneuropathy in uncontrolled streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in mice. Ghrelin or desacyl-ghrelin was administered daily for 4 weeks after STZ-induced diabetic polyneuropathy had developed. Ghrelin administration did not alter food intake, body weight gain, blood glucose levels, or plasma insulin levels when compared with mice given saline or desacyl-ghrelin administration. Ghrelin administration ameliorated reductions in motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities in diabetic mice and normalized their temperature sensation and plasma concentrations of 8-isoprostaglandin {alpha}, an oxidative stress marker. Desacyl-ghrelin failed to have any effect. Ghrelin administration in a mouse model of diabetes ameliorated polyneuropathy. Thus, ghrelin's effects represent a novel therapeutic paradigm for the treatment of this otherwise intractable disorder.

  5. Plasma acylated and plasma unacylated ghrelin: useful new biomarkers in patients with neuroendocrine tumors?

    PubMed Central

    van Adrichem, Roxanne C S; van der Lely, Aart Jan; Huisman, Martin; Kramer, Piet; Feelders, Richard A; Delhanty, Patric J D

    2016-01-01

    To date, the value of fasting plasma acylated ghrelin (AG) and unacylated ghrelin (UAG) as potential novel biomarkers in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) is unknown. The aims of this study are to (i) compare fasting AG and UAG levels between nonobese, nondiabetic NET patients (N=28) and age- (±3 years) and sex-matched nonobese, nondiabetic controls (N=28); and (ii) study the relationship between AG, UAG, and AG/UAG ratios and biochemical (chromogranin-A (CgA) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels) and clinical parameters (age at diagnosis, sex, primary tumor location, carcinoid syndrome, ENETS TNM classification, Ki-67 proliferation index, grading, prior incomplete surgery) in NET patients. Fasting venous blood samples (N=56) were collected and directly stabilized with 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride after withdrawal. Plasma AG and UAG levels were determined by ELISA. Expression of ghrelin was examined in tumor tissue by immunohistochemistry. There were no significant differences between NET patients and controls in AG (median: 62.5 pg/mL, IQR: 33.1–112.8 vs median: 57.2pg/mL, IQR: 26.7–128.3, P=0.66) and UAG in levels (median: 76.6pg/mL, IQR: 35.23–121.7 vs median: 64.9, IQR: 27.5–93.1, P=0.44). No significant correlations were found between AG, UAG, and AG/UAG ratios versus biochemical and clinical parameters in NET patients with the exception of age at diagnosis (AG: ρ= −0.47, P=0.012; AG/UAG ratio: ρ= −0.50, P=0.007) and baseline chromogranin-A levels (AG/UAG ratio: ρ= −0.44, P=0.019). In our view, fasting plasma acylated and unacylated ghrelin appear to have no value as diagnostic biomarkers in the clinical follow-up of patients with NETs. PMID:27215920

  6. Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Müller, T.D.; Nogueiras, R.; Andermann, M.L.; Andrews, Z.B.; Anker, S.D.; Argente, J.; Batterham, R.L.; Benoit, S.C.; Bowers, C.Y.; Broglio, F.; Casanueva, F.F.; D'Alessio, D.; Depoortere, I.; Geliebter, A.; Ghigo, E.; Cole, P.A.; Cowley, M.; Cummings, D.E.; Dagher, A.; Diano, S.; Dickson, S.L.; Diéguez, C.; Granata, R.; Grill, H.J.; Grove, K.; Habegger, K.M.; Heppner, K.; Heiman, M.L.; Holsen, L.; Holst, B.; Inui, A.; Jansson, J.O.; Kirchner, H.; Korbonits, M.; Laferrère, B.; LeRoux, C.W.; Lopez, M.; Morin, S.; Nakazato, M.; Nass, R.; Perez-Tilve, D.; Pfluger, P.T.; Schwartz, T.W.; Seeley, R.J.; Sleeman, M.; Sun, Y.; Sussel, L.; Tong, J.; Thorner, M.O.; van der Lely, A.J.; van der Ploeg, L.H.T.; Zigman, J.M.; Kojima, M.; Kangawa, K.; Smith, R.G.; Horvath, T.; Tschöp, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The gastrointestinal peptide hormone ghrelin was discovered in 1999 as the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor. Increasing evidence supports more complicated and nuanced roles for the hormone, which go beyond the regulation of systemic energy metabolism. Scope of review In this review, we discuss the diverse biological functions of ghrelin, the regulation of its secretion, and address questions that still remain 15 years after its discovery. Major conclusions In recent years, ghrelin has been found to have a plethora of central and peripheral actions in distinct areas including learning and memory, gut motility and gastric acid secretion, sleep/wake rhythm, reward seeking behavior, taste sensation and glucose metabolism. PMID:26042199

  7. Establishment of a gastric cell-based assay system for exploring inhibitors of octanoylated ghrelin production.

    PubMed

    Oiso, Shigeru; Nobe, Miyuki; Yamaguchi, Yuhei; Umemoto, Shigeru; Nakamura, Kazuo; Kariyazono, Hiroko

    2013-10-01

    Ghrelin, a gastric hormone, is a growth hormone-releasing peptide. Its serine-3 acylation with octanoic acid is essential for its orexigenic activity, and therefore, inhibition of the acylation of ghrelin may help in decreasing appetite and preventing obesity. This study aimed to establish a human gastric cell-based assay system to evaluate candidate inhibitors of octanoylated ghrelin production. In human gastric carcinoma AGS cells, obligatory factors for the posttranslational modification of ghrelin, such as certain prohormone convertases responsible for processing of proghrelin to the mature ghrelin and the enzyme-catalyzing acyl-modification of ghrelin, were well expressed, but ghrelin was expressed at low levels. Accordingly, we transfected a ghrelin-expressing vector into AGS cells and isolated a stable ghrelin-expressing cell line (AGS-GHRL8). AGS-GHRL8 cells secreted octanoylated ghrelin in accordance with the concentrations of octanoic acid in the culture medium. Given that ingested heptanoic acid is used for the acyl-modification of ghrelin, we evaluated whether heptanoic acid inhibits production of octanoylated ghrelin in AGS-GHRL8 cells. Butyric acid was used as a control. Indeed, heptanoic acid predictably decreased the secretion of octanoylated ghrelin, whereas butyric acid did not. The AGS-GHRL8 line established in this study will facilitate the screening of inhibitors of octanoylated ghrelin production. PMID:23704134

  8. Plasma ghrelin concentrations change with physiological state in a sciurid hibernator (Spermophilus lateralis)

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Jessica E.; Ostrom, Cara E.; Wilkerson, Gregory K.; Florant, Gregory L.

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin is a recently discovered hormone which has profound effects on food intake and lipogenesis in mammals. In all mammals studied thus far, plasma ghrelin concentrations are increased before a meal and decrease immediately following a meal; ghrelin levels increase with fasting. The golden-mantled ground squirrel Spermophilus lateralis (also known as Callospermophilus lateralis (see Helgen et al., 2009)) is a diurnal hibernator which has a robust annual cycle of body mass gain and loss that is primarily controlled by food intake. We hypothesized that in spring, summer, and autumn, the endogenous ghrelin concentrations of hibernators would be similar to those of non-hibernators, but that during the winter hibernation season, plasma ghrelin concentrations would be low or undetectable. We found that peripherally injected ghrelin significantly increased food intake in June. Plasma ghrelin concentrations were significantly increased through 5 days of fasting during a short-term fast in summer. Over a 24 hour period, ghrelin concentrations increased at night and decreased during the day with drops corresponding to times when squirrels were eating. In January, ghrelin concentrations are low but measurable even while animals are at low body temperature (Tb). The reason for the persistence of ghrelin in plasma at this time is unclear, but circulating ghrelin in hibernators may be involved with the control of sleep in these animals. This is the first report of ghrelin concentrations in a non-photoperiodic hibernator. We suggest that ghrelin may be important for the regulation of food intake and the body mass cycle in mammals that hibernate. PMID:20005230

  9. Evidence suggesting that ghrelin O-acyl transferase inhibitor acts at the hypothalamus to inhibit hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Szyszka, Marta; Hochol, Anna; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2012-06-01

    Production of n-octanoyl-modified ghrelin (GHREL), an active form of the peptide requires prohormone processing protease and GHREL O-acyltransferase (GOAT), as well as n-octanoic acid. Recently a selective GOAT antagonist (GO-CoA-Tat) was invented and this tool was used to study the possible role of endogenous GHREL in regulating HPA axis function in the rat. Administration of GOAT inhibitor (GOATi) resulted in a notable decrease in plasma ACTH, aldosterone and corticosterone concentrations at min 60 of experiment. Octanoic acid (OA) administration had no effect on levels of studied hormones. Plasma levels of unacylated and acylated GHREL remained unchanged for 60min after either GOATi or OA administration. Under experimental conditions applied, no significant changes were observed in the levels of GOAT mRNA in hypothalamus, pituitary, adrenal and stomach fundus. After GOATi injection hypothalamic CRH mRNA levels were elevated at 30 min and pituitary POMC mRNA levels at 60 min. Both GOATi and OA lowered basal, but not K(+)-stimulated CRH release by hypothalamic explants and had no effect on basal or CRH-stimulated ACTH release by pituitary slices. Neither GOATi nor OA affected corticosterone secretion by freshly isolated or cultured rat adrenocortical cells. Thus, results of our study suggest that in the rat endogenous GHREL exerts tonic stimulating effect on hypothalamic CRH release. This effect could be demonstrated by administering rats with selected inhibitor of ghrelin O-acyltransferase, the enzyme responsible for GHREL acylation, a process which is absolutely required for both GHSR-1a binding and its central endocrine activities. PMID:22543218

  10. Effects of prolonged nutrient restriction on baseline and periprandial plasma ghrelin concentrations of postpubertal Holstein heifers.

    PubMed

    Field, M E; Deaver, S E; Rhoads, R P; Collier, R J; Rhoads, M L

    2013-10-01

    Objectives of this study were to measure both daily and periprandial plasma ghrelin concentrations of postpubertal Holstein heifers during prolonged undernutrition. Following an acclimation period, Holstein heifers [n=10; 339.5 ± 8.6 kg of body weight (BW)] were fed ad libitum [well fed (WF); n=5] or restricted to 50% of ad libitum intake [underfed (UF); n=5) for 8 wk. Body condition scores (BCS) were recorded at the beginning and end of the treatment period, and weekly measurements of BW, plasma ghrelin, progesterone, and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentrations were obtained. Ovarian follicular and luteal structures were measured twice weekly via transrectal ultrasonography. Plasma ghrelin concentrations were also measured during a periprandial window bleed conducted at the end of the experiment. During the window bleed, samples were collected every 15 min between 0500 and 0900 h, with feed offered at 0700 h. Underfed heifers lost BW and BCS, whereas WF heifers gained weight and either increased or maintained BCS. Chronic underfeeding increased circulating ghrelin and NEFA concentrations. By wk 4 of the treatment period, circulating ghrelin concentrations of the UF heifers reached a plateau. Periprandial fluctuations in ghrelin concentrations were apparent as plasma ghrelin concentrations changed over time. Overall differences in periprandial plasma ghrelin concentrations were primarily due to prefeeding effects of plane of nutrition. Plasma ghrelin concentrations and change in BCS were negatively correlated such that heifers that lost the most BCS had the highest concentrations of circulating ghrelin. Two of the 5 UF heifers became anestrus by wk 3 of the treatment period. Despite being of similar age, the heifers that became anestrus had lower BW and plasma ghrelin concentrations than the UF heifers that continued to ovulate. In the current experiment, long-term undernutrition elicited ghrelin responses similar to those reported for shorter durations of

  11. Association of cord blood des-acyl ghrelin with birth weight, and placental GHS-R1 receptor expression in SGA, AGA, and LGA newborns.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Martha I; Lazo-de-la-Vega-Monroy, Maria-Luisa; Zaina, Silvio; Sabanero, Myrna; Daza-Benítez, Leonel; Malacara, Juan Manuel; Barbosa-Sabanero, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    Although ghrelin in cord blood has been associated to birth weight, its role in fetal and postnatal growth has not been elucidated. The aim of this study was to analyze total ghrelin, acyl ghrelin (AG), and des-acyl ghrelin (DAG) in cord blood of newborns with idiopathic birth weight alterations, and to evaluate protein expression of placental GHS-R1, in order to investigate their correlation with birth weight and placental weight. We performed a cross-sectional comparative study in umbilical cord blood and placentas from healthy mothers of SGA, AGA, and LGA (small, adequate and large for gestational age) term newborns (n = 20 per group). Cord blood total ghrelin, AG, and DAG were measured by ELISA, and placental GHS-R1 expression was evaluated by Western blot. Cord blood DAG was higher in SGA compared to AGA newborns (902.1 ± 109.1 and 597.4 ± 58.2 pg/ml, respectively, p = 0.01) while LGA and AGA showed similar values (627.2 ± 76.4 pg/ml for LGA, p = 0.80). DAG negatively correlated with birthweight (r = -0.31, p = 0.02) and placental weight (r = -0.33, p = 0.02). No differences in AG or total ghrelin were found. GHS-R1 protein in placenta was not differentially expressed among SGA, AGA, and LGA. Our results suggest a role of DAG in intrauterine growth. Further studies are needed in order to elucidate the mechanisms by which DAG participates in fetal growth. PMID:26754660

  12. Elevated ratio of acylated to unacylated ghrelin in children and young adults with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuppens, R J; Diène, G; Bakker, N E; Molinas, C; Faye, S; Nicolino, M; Bernoux, D; Delhanty, P J D; van der Lely, A J; Allas, S; Julien, M; Delale, T; Tauber, M; Hokken-Koelega, A C S

    2015-12-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by a switch from failure to thrive to excessive weight gain and hyperphagia in early childhood. Hyperghrelinemia may be involved in the underlying mechanisms of the switch. The purpose of this study is to evaluate acylated ghrelin (AG) and unacylated ghrelin (UAG) levels in PWS and investigate their associations with hyperphagia. This is a cross-sectional clinical study conducted in three PWS expert centers in the Netherlands and France. Levels of AG and UAG and the AG/UAG ratio were determined in 138 patients with PWS (0.2-29.4 years) and compared with 50 age-matched obese subjects (4.3-16.9 years) and 39 healthy controls (0.8-28.6 years). AEBSF was used to inhibit deacylation of AG. As a group, PWS patients had higher AG but similar UAG levels as healthy controls (AG 129.1 vs 82.4 pg/ml, p = 0.016; UAG 135.3 vs 157.3 pg/ml, resp.), resulting in a significantly higher AG/UAG ratio (1.00 vs 0.61, p = 0.001, resp.). Obese subjects had significantly lower AG and UAG levels than PWS and controls (40.3 and 35.3 pg/ml, resp.), but also a high AG/UAG ratio (1.16). The reason for the higher AG/UAG ratio in PWS and obese was, however, completely different, as PWS had a high AG and obese a very low UAG. PWS patients without weight gain or hyperphagia had a similar AG/UAG ratio as age-matched controls, in contrast to those with weight gain and/or hyperphagia who had an elevated AG/UAG ratio. The switch to excessive weight gain in PWS seems to coincide with an increase in the AG/UAG ratio, even prior to the start of hyperphagia. PMID:25989955

  13. Correlation of ghrelin concentration and ghrelin, ghrelin-O-acetyltransferase (GOAT) and growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a mRNAs expression in the proventriculus and brain of the growing chicken.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takio; Hiraga, Takeo; Teraoka, Hiroki; Yaosaka, Noriko; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    To determine mechanisms for age-related decrease of GHS-R1a expression in the chicken proventriculus, changes in mRNA expression of ghrelin and ghrelin-O-acetyltransferase (GOAT) as well as ghrelin concentrations in the proventriculus and plasma were examined in growing chickens. Changes in expression levels of ghrelin, GOAT and GHS-R1a mRNAs were also examined in different brain regions (pituitary, hypothalamus, thalamus, cerebellum, cerebral cortex, olfactory bulb, midbrain and medulla oblongata). Ghrelin concentrations in the proventriculus and plasma increased with aging and reached plateaus at 30-50 days after hatching. High level of ghrelin mRNA decreased at 3 days after hatching, and it became stable at half of the initial level. Expression levels of GHS-R1a and GOAT decreased 3 or 5 days after hatching and became stable at low levels. Significant negative correlations were found between plasma ghrelin and mRNA levels of GOAT and GHS-R1a. Expression levels of ghrelin mRNA were different in the brain regions, but a significant change was not seen with aging. GHS-R1a expression was detected in all brain regions, and age-dependent changes were observed in the pituitary and cerebellum. Different from the proventriculus, the expression of GOAT in the brain increased or did not change with aging. These results suggest that decreased GHS-R1a and GOAT mRNA expression in the proventriculus is due to endogenous ghrelin-induced down-regulation. Expression levels of ghrelin, GOAT and GHS-R1a in the brain were independently regulated from that in the proventriculus, and age-related and region-dependent regulation pattern suggests a local effect of ghrelin system in chicken brain. PMID:25435492

  14. The intestinal lymph fistula model--a novel approach to study ghrelin secretion.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jenny; Tschöp, Matthias H; Aulinger, Benedikt A; Davis, Harold W; Yang, Qing; Liu, Jianhua; Gaylinn, Bruce D; Thorner, Michael O; D'Alessio, David; Tso, Patrick

    2010-03-01

    The orexigenic hormone ghrelin is secreted from the stomach and has been implicated in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. We hypothesized that ghrelin, like other gastrointestinal (GI) hormones, is present in intestinal lymph, and sampling this compartment would provide advantages for studying ghrelin secretion in rodents. Blood and lymph were sampled from catheters in the jugular vein and mesenteric lymph duct before and after intraduodenal (ID) administration of isocaloric Ensure, dextrin, or Liposyn meals or an equal volume of saline in conscious Sprague-Dawley rats. Total ghrelin levels were measured using an established radioimmunoassay. Acyl and des-acyl ghrelin were measured using two-site ELISA. Fasting ghrelin levels in lymph were significantly higher than in plasma (means +/- SE: 3,307.9 +/- 272.9 vs. 2,127.1 +/- 115.0 pg/ml, P = 0.004). Postingestive acyl and des-acyl ghrelin levels were also significantly higher, whereas the ratio of acyl:des-acyl ghrelin was similar in lymph and plasma (0.91 +/- 0.28 vs. 1.20 +/- 0.36, P = 0.76). The principle enzymes responsible for deacylation of ghrelin were lower in lymph than in plasma. Following ID Ensure, maximum ghrelin suppression occurred at 2 h in lymph compared with at 1 h in plasma. The return of suppressed ghrelin levels to baseline was also delayed in lymph. Similarly, dextrin also induced significant suppression of ghrelin (two-way ANOVA: P = 0.02), whereas Liposyn did not (P = 0.32). On the basis of these findings, it appears that intestinal lymph, which includes drainage from the interstitium of the GI mucosa, is enriched in ghrelin. Despite reduced deacylating activity in lymph, there is not a disproportionate amount of acyl ghrelin in this pool. The postprandial dynamics of ghrelin are slower in lymph than plasma, but the magnitude of change is greater. Assessing ghrelin levels in the lymph may be advantageous for studying its secretion and concentrations in the gastric mucosa. PMID

  15. Central acylated ghrelin improves memory function and hippocampal AMPK activation and partly reverses the impairment of energy and glucose metabolism in rats infused with β-amyloid.

    PubMed

    Kang, Suna; Moon, Na Rang; Kim, Da Sol; Kim, Sung Hoon; Park, Sunmin

    2015-09-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric hormone released during the fasting state that targets the hypothalamus where it induces hunger; however, emerging evidence suggests it may also affect memory function. We examined the effect of central acylated-ghrelin and DES-acetylated ghrelin (native ghrelin) on memory function and glucose metabolism in an experimentally induced Alzheimer's disease (AD) rat model. AD rats were divided into 3 groups and Non-AD rats were used as a normal-control group. Each rat in the AD groups had intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of β-amyloid (25-35; 16.8nmol/day) into the lateral ventricle for 3 days, and then the pumps were changed to infuse either acylated-ghrelin (0.2nmol/h; AD-G), DES-acylated ghrelin (0.2nmol/h; AD-DES-G), or saline (control; AD-C) for 3 weeks. The Non-AD group had ICV infusion of β-amyloid (35-25) which does not deposit in the hippocampus. During the next 3 weeks memory function, food intake, body weight gain, body fat composition, and glucose metabolism were measured. AD-C exhibited greater β-amyloid deposition compared to Non-AD-C, and AD-G suppressed the increased β-amyloid deposition and potentiated the phosphorylation AMPK. In addition, AD-G increased the phosphorylation GSK and decreased the phosphorylation of Tau in comparison to AD-C and AD-DES-G. Cognitive function, measured by passive avoidance and water maze tests, was much lower in AD-C than Non-AD-C whereas AD-G but not AD-DES-G prevented the decrease (p<0.021). Body weight gain was lower in AD-C group than Non-AD-C group without changing epididymal fat mass. AD-G reversed the decrease in body weight which was due to increased energy intake and decreased energy expenditure. The AD-G group exhibited a decrease in the second part of serum glucose levels during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) compared to the AD-C and AD-DES-G group (p<0.009). However, area under the curve of insulin during the first part of OGTT was higher in AD-DES-G than other groups

  16. Plasma ghrelin is positively associated with body fat, liver fat and milk fat content but not with feed intake of dairy cows after parturition.

    PubMed

    Börner, Sabina; Derno, Michael; Hacke, Sandra; Kautzsch, Ulrike; Schäff, Christine; Thanthan, Sint; Kuwayama, Hideto; Hammon, Harald M; Röntgen, Monika; Weikard, Rosemarie; Kühn, Christa; Tuchscherer, Armin; Kuhla, Björn

    2013-02-01

    Ghrelin is a gastrointestinal peptide hormone that is present in blood mostly in a non-posttranslationally modified form, with a minor proportion acylated at Ser(3). Both ghrelin forms were initially assigned a role in the control of food intake but there is accumulating evidence for their involvement in fat allocation and utilization. We investigated changes in the ghrelin system in dairy cows, exhibiting differences in body fat mobilization and fatty liver, from late pregnancy to early lactation. Sixteen dairy cows underwent liver biopsy and were retrospectively grouped based on high (H) or low (L) liver fat content post-partum. Both groups had a comparable feed intake in week -6 (before parturition) and week 2 (after parturition). Only before parturition was preprandial total ghrelin concentration higher in L than in H cows and only after parturition was the basal plasma concentration of non-esterified fatty acids higher in H than in L cows. Both before and after parturition, H cows had higher preprandial plasma concentrations of acyl ghrelin, a higher acyl:total ghrelin ratio, lower plasma triacylglyceride concentrations and a lower respiratory quotient compared with L cows. These group differences could not be attributed to an allelic variant of the acyl ghrelin receptor. Rather, the ratio of acyl:total ghrelin correlated with several aspects of fat metabolism and with respiratory quotient but not with feed intake. These results show that endogenous ghrelin forms are associated with fat allocation, fatty liver, and utilization of fat during the periparturient period. PMID:23160961

  17. Plane of nutrition affects plasma ghrelin concentrations in neonatal calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Investigating different planes of nutrition on appetite-related hormones could provide knowledge into the role of these hormones on growth performance in neonatal calves. The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of feeding rates on ghrelin in plasma from preruminant calves....

  18. The opposing effects of ghrelin on hypothalamic and systemic inflammatory processes are modulated by its acylation status and food intake in male rats.

    PubMed

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Frago, Laura M; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Barrios, Vicente; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2014-08-01

    Ghrelin is an endogenous hormone that stimulates appetite and adipose tissue accrual. Both the acylated (AG) and non-acylated (DAG) isoforms of this hormone are also reported to exert anti-inflammatory and protective effects systemically and in the central nervous system. As inflammatory processes have been implicated in obesity-associated secondary complications, we hypothesized that this natural appetite stimulator may protect against negative consequences resulting from excessive food intake. Adult male Wistar rats were treated icv (5 μg/day) with AG, DAG, the ghrelin mimetic GH-releasing peptide (GHRP)-6, AG, and pair-fed with controls (AG-pf) or saline for 14 days. Regardless of food intake AG increased visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and decreased circulating cytokine levels. However, AG reduced cytokine production in VAT only in rats fed ad libitum. Hypothalamic cytokine production was increased in AG-treated rats fed ad libitum and by DAG, but intracellular inflammatory signaling pathways associated with insulin and leptin resistance were unaffected. Gliosis was not observed in response to any treatment as glial markers were either reduced or unaffected. AG, DAG, and GHRP-6 stimulated production of hypothalamic insulin like-growth factor I that is involved in cell protective mechanisms. In hypothalamic astrocyte cell cultures AG decreased tumor necrosis factorα and DAG decreased interleukin-1β mRNA levels, suggesting direct anti-inflammatory effects on astrocytes. Thus, whereas ghrelin stimulates food intake and weight gain, it may also induce mechanisms of cell protection that help to detour or delay systemic inflammatory responses and hypothalamic gliosis due to excess weight gain, as well as its associated pathologies. PMID:24848869

  19. Metabolic Benefit of Chronic Caloric Restriction and Activation of Hypothalamic AGRP/NPY Neurons in Male Mice Is Independent of Ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicole H; Walsh, Heidi; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Park, Seongjoon; Gaylinn, Bruce; Thorner, Michael O; Smith, Roy G

    2016-04-01

    Aging is associated with attenuated ghrelin signaling. During aging, chronic caloric restriction (CR) produces health benefits accompanied by enhanced ghrelin production. Ghrelin receptor (GH secretagogue receptor 1a) agonists administered to aging rodents and humans restore the young adult phenotype; therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the metabolic benefits of CR are mediated by endogenous ghrelin. Three month-old male mice lacking ghrelin (Ghrelin-/-) or ghrelin receptor (Ghsr-/-), and their wild-type (WT) littermates were randomly assigned to 2 groups: ad libitum (AL) fed and CR, where 40% food restriction was introduced gradually to allow Ghrelin-/- and Ghsr-/- mice to metabolically adapt and avoid severe hypoglycemia. Twelve months later, plasma ghrelin, metabolic parameters, ambulatory activity, hypothalamic and liver gene expression, as well as body composition were measured. CR increased plasma ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin concentrations in WT and Ghsr-/- mice. CR of WT, Ghsr-/-, and Ghrelin-/- mice markedly improved metabolic flexibility, enhanced ambulatory activity, and reduced adiposity. Inactivation of Ghrelin or Ghsr had no effect on AL food intake or food anticipatory behavior. In contrast to the widely held belief that endogenous ghrelin regulates food intake, CR increased expression of hypothalamic Agrp and Npy, with reduced expression of Pomc across genotypes. In the AL context, ablation of ghrelin signaling markedly inhibited liver steatosis, which correlated with reduced Pparγ expression and enhanced Irs2 expression. Although CR and administration of GH secretagogue receptor 1a agonists both benefit the aging phenotype, we conclude the benefits of chronic CR are a consequence of enhanced metabolic flexibility independent of endogenous ghrelin or des-acyl ghrelin signaling. PMID:26812158

  20. Ghrelin family of peptides and gut motility.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Akihiro; Ataka, Koji; Fujino, Kazunori; Chen, Chih-Yen; Kato, Ikuo; Fujimiya, Mineko; Inui, Akio

    2011-04-01

    Acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin, and obestatin are three peptides isolated from the gastrointestinal tract and encoded by the same preproghrelin gene. Three ghrelin gene products participate in modulating appetite, adipogenesis, glucose metabolism, cell proliferation, immune, sleep, memory, anxiety, cognition, and stress. We have investigated the effects of ghrelin family of peptides on fed and fasted motor activities in the stomach and duodenum of freely moving conscious rats by manometric method. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) and intravenous (IV) administration of acyl ghrelin induced fasted motor activity in the duodenum in fed rats. ICV and IV administration of des-acyl ghrelin disrupted fasted motor activity in the antrum. Changes in gastric motility induced by IV administration of des-acyl ghrelin were antagonized by ICV administration of a corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 2 receptor antagonist. IV administration of obestatin decreased the percentage motor index in the antrum and prolonged the time taken to return to fasted motility in the duodenum in fed rats. ICV administration of CRF 1 and 2 receptor antagonists prevented the effects of obestatin on gastroduodenal motility. Ghrelin gene products regulate feeding-associated gastroduodenal motility. Stomach may regulate various functions including gastrointestinal motility via acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin and obestatin as an endocrine organ. Increasing knowledge of the effects of ghrelin family of peptides on gastrointestinal motility could lead to innovative new therapies for functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:21443714

  1. Structure and Physiological Actions of Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric peptide hormone, discovered as being the endogenous ligand of growth hormone secretagogue receptor. Ghrelin is a 28 amino acid peptide presenting a unique n-octanoylation modification on its serine in position 3, catalyzed by ghrelin O-acyl transferase. Ghrelin is mainly produced by a subset of stomach cells and also by the hypothalamus, the pituitary, and other tissues. Transcriptional, translational, and posttranslational processes generate ghrelin and ghrelin-related peptides. Homo- and heterodimers of growth hormone secretagogue receptor, and as yet unidentified receptors, are assumed to mediate the biological effects of acyl ghrelin and desacyl ghrelin, respectively. Ghrelin exerts wide physiological actions throughout the body, including growth hormone secretion, appetite and food intake, gastric secretion and gastrointestinal motility, glucose homeostasis, cardiovascular functions, anti-inflammatory functions, reproductive functions, and bone formation. This review focuses on presenting the current understanding of ghrelin and growth hormone secretagogue receptor biology, as well as the main physiological effects of ghrelin. PMID:24381790

  2. Differential Roles for Octanoylated and Decanoylated Ghrelins in Regulating Appetite and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Schwandt, Sara E.; Peddu, Sarath C.; Riley, Larry G.

    2010-01-01

    Since its identification in 1999, ghrelin has been identified in all vertebrate groups. The “active core” of ghrelin is highly conserved among vertebrates, suggesting its biological activity to be also conserved. In fish, both acylated forms of ghrelin have been identified; however, the ratio of the ghrelin-C8 to ghrelin-C10 is not as great as observed in mammals. In the tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), ghrelin-C10 is the major form of ghrelin. Since fish are known to inhabit every ecological niche on earth, studies on fish have provided valuable insight into vertebrate physiology in general; it is likely that understanding the role of both acylated forms of ghrelin, in more detail, in fish will result into novel insights in the biology of ghrelin within vertebrates. In this paper we discuss ghrelin's role in regulating appetite and metabolism in fish, in general, and provide evidence that the two tilapia ghrelins exhibit different biological roles. PMID:20700399

  3. Maternal High-Fat Diet during Pregnancy and Lactation Influences Obestatin and Ghrelin Concentrations in Milk and Plasma of Wistar Rat Dams and Their Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Słupecka, Monika; Romanowicz, Katarzyna; Woliński, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to establish the effect of a maternal high-fat diet on obestatin concentration, total ghrelin, and ghrelin/obestatin ratio during pregnancy and lactation of Wistar rats and their offspring in the first 21 days of life. On the mating day, females were randomly allocated and fed either a high-fat diet (30% of fat; HF) or breeding diet (5% fat; BD) till the 21st day of lactation. Hormones were analyzed in the blood plasma and milk of rat dams as well as in the blood plasma of their offspring. HF resulted in a significant decrease in obestatin level on the 14th day of lactation and elevation on the 21st day. Plasma obestatin in HFD offspring was significantly higher than in BD ones. HF diet did not significantly affect dam plasma ghrelin until the 21st day of lactation. The ghrelin concentrations in milk after both diets were significantly lower than in blood plasma. Milk ghrelin in HF dams was significantly higher than in the BD ones. Plasma ghrelin from HF offspring was significantly higher than that from BD dams. Our results demonstrate that a maternal HF diet during pregnancy and lactation influences ghrelin and obestatin level in both dams and their offspring. PMID:27127509

  4. Active ghrelin and the postpartum.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jessica H; Pedersen, Cort; Leserman, Jane; Brownley, Kimberly A

    2016-06-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) occurs in 10-15 % of women. The appetite hormone ghrelin, which fluctuates during pregnancy, is associated with depression in nonpregnant samples. Here, we examine the association between PPD and active ghrelin from pregnancy to postpartum. We additionally examine whether ghrelin changes from pregnancy to postpartum and differs between breastfeeding and non-breastfeeding women. Sixty women who participated in a survey examining PPD and had information in regard to ghrelin concentrations were included in the study. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was used to assess symptoms of PPD. Raw ghrelin levels and ghrelin levels adjusted for creatinine were included as outcomes. Women screening positive for PPD at 12 weeks postpartum had higher pregnancy ghrelin concentrations. Ghrelin concentrations significantly decreased from pregnancy to 6 weeks postpartum and this change differed based on pregnancy depression status. Finally, ghrelin levels were lower in women who breastfed compared with women who were bottle-feeding. No significant findings remained once ghrelin levels were adjusted for creatinine. Although results do not suggest an association between PPD and ghrelin after adjusting for creatinine, future research should continue to explore this possibility extending further across the postpartum period with larger sample sizes. PMID:26424410

  5. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  6. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  7. Ghrelin and the growth hormone secretagogue receptor in growth and development.

    PubMed

    Chanoine, J-P; De Waele, K; Walia, P

    2009-04-01

    The pancreas is a major source of ghrelin in the perinatal period, whereas gastric production progressively increases after birth. Loss of function of the genes for ghrelin or for the constitutively activated growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) does not affect birth weight and early postnatal growth. However, ghrl(-/-) or ghsr(-/-) mice fed a high fat diet starting soon after weaning are resistant to diet-induced obesity, suggesting that ghrelin affects the maturation of the metabolic axes involved in energy balance. In addition, animal and human studies suggest that GHSR plays a physiological role in linear growth. In mice, absence of the GHSR gene is associated with lower insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations and lower body mass in adult animals, independently of food intake. In humans, a mutation of the GHSR gene that impairs the constitutive activity of the receptor was found in two families with short stature. Administration of acylated ghrelin to rat pups directly does not affect weight gain. In contrast, administration of ghrelin to pregnant or lactating rats results in greater fetal weight and postnatal weight gain, respectively, suggesting that maternal ghrelin may stimulate perinatal growth. These data point toward a physiological role for ghrelin and GHSR in growth and/or in the maturation of hormonal systems involved in the regulation of energy balance. PMID:19363508

  8. BODY COMPOSITION AND PLASMA ADIPOCYTOKINS, GHRELIN AND INSULIN BEFORE AND AFTER WEIGHT LOSS IN OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE WOMEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determine the relationships between changes in body composition, and plasma concentrations of hormones (acylation stimulating protein (ASP), adiponectin, leptin, insulin, and ghrelin), complement C3 and C-reactive protein (CRP). 35 overweight/obese (BMI 28-39 kg/m2), hyperlipidemic women aged 35-60 ...

  9. Rheological behavior of acylated pepsin-solubilized collagen solutions: Effects of concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Conghu; Duan, Lian; Tian, Zhenhua; Liu, Wentao; Li, Guoying; Huang, Xiaoping

    2015-11-01

    Effects of concentration on the rheological behavior of acylated pepsin-solubilized collagen solutions were investigated by steady shear tests, dynamic frequency sweep, creep tests and thixotropic loop measurements in this paper. The results showed that both acylated collagen and native collagen solutions exhibited the typical pseudoplastic behavior and displayed shear thinned behavior with the increase of shear rate. With the increase of acylated collagen concentrations from 5 to 10 mg/mL, shear viscosity, elasticity modulus ( G'), viscous modulus ( G″), complex viscosity ( η*), and the ability to resist deformation increased due to the physical entanglement, whilst loss tangent (tan δ) decreased. Additionally, with the increase of acylated collagen concentrations, the area of thixotropic loop increased from 6.94 to 44.40 watts/m3, indicating that the thixotropy of acylated collagen increased. Compared with native collagen solution, acylated collagen solution had stronger shear viscosity, η*, thixotropy, and ability to resist deformation. Furthermore, Power law model, Carreau model, Cross model, Leonov model and Burger model, were suitable for the fitting of the experimental data.

  10. Seasonal and parity effects on ghrelin levels throughout the estrous cycle in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Honig, Hen; Ofer, Lior; Elbaz, Michal; Kaim, Moshe; Shinder, Dima; Gershon, Eran

    2016-09-01

    In dairy cows, heat stress depresses appetite, leading to decreased food intake, a negative energy balance, and modifies ghrelin levels. Ghrelin is a gut-brain peptide with two major forms: acylated, with an O-n-octanoylated serine in position 3, and nonacylated. To date, the effect of heat stress and estrous cycle on ghrelin secretion in dairy cows has not been studied. We characterized ghrelin secretion during the estrous cycle in each, the winter and the summer seasons. We further examined the effects of parity on ghrelin secretion. Blood was collected from 10 primiparous or multiparous Israeli-Holstein dairy cows throughout the estrous cycle, in both, the hot and cold seasons. The levels of acylated and total ghrelin were measured in the blood samples. We found that both acylated and total ghrelin levels during heat stress were lower than their respective levels in the winter in both, primiparous and multiparous cows. No differences in acylated and total ghrelin levels were found between primiparous and multiparous cows in both seasons. We further found that in multiparous but not primiparous cows acylated ghrelin secretion oscillated during the estrous cycle in both seasons. Its levels peaked on the last days of the first follicular wave and on the days before and during ovulation. Interestingly, we found that elevated acylated ghrelin levels correlated with conception success and increased total ghrelin levels were associated with successful conception from first insemination. Our data is the first to demonstrate seasonal variation in ghrelin secretion. This study provides evidence for the yet unfamiliar link between heat stress, ghrelin and fertility. Increased circulating acylated ghrelin may contribute to improved fertility in dairy cows. It further raises the possibility of a link between ghrelin levels and successful inseminations. Further research is required to determine the effects of ghrelin on dairy cow performance. PMID:27288640

  11. WHEY PROTEIN SUPPRESSES PLASMA GHRELIN CONCENTRATIONS IN OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE MEN AND WOMEN.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most satiating macronutrient appears to be dietary protein; however, it is unclear if different dietary protein sources have differing effects on satiety. Few studies that have investigated the effects of whey protein on satiety hormones, such as plasma ghrelin, in overweight and obese men and w...

  12. Purification of rat and human ghrelins.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masayasu; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Kangawa, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Small synthetic molecules called growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) stimulate the release of growth hormone (GH) from the pituitary. They act through the GHS-R, a G-protein-coupled receptor highly expressed in the hypothalamus and pituitary. Using an orphan receptor strategy with a stable cell line expressing GHS-R, we purified endogenous ligands for GHS-R from rat and human stomach and named it "ghrelin," after a word root (ghre) in Proto-Indo-European languages meaning "grow." Ghrelin is a peptide hormone in which the third amino acid, usually a serine but in some species a threonine, is modified by a fatty acid; this modification is essential for ghrelin's activity. The main active form of rat ghrelin is 28-amino acid peptides with n-octanoyl modification. In rat stomach, a second type of ghrelin peptide was purified, identified as des-Gln14-ghrelin. With the exception of the deletion of Gln14, des-Gln14-ghrelin is identical to ghrelin, retaining the n-octanoic acid modification. Des-Gln14-ghrelin is encoded by an mRNA created by alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene. As in the rat, the major active form of human ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide with an n-octanoylated Ser3. However, in human stomach, several minor forms of human ghrelin peptides have been isolated. These can be classified into four groups by the type of acylation observed at Ser3 and into two groups by the amino acids in length. The discovery of ghrelin indicates that the release of GH from the pituitary and appetite stimulation might be regulated by ghrelin derived from the stomach. PMID:22975045

  13. Assessment of serum and urine ghrelin levels in patients with acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Seyhanli, Eyyup Sabri; Lok, Ugur; Gulacti, Umut; Buyukaslan, Hasan; Atescelik, Metin; Yildiz, Mustafa; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Goktekin, Mehmet Cagri; Aydın, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ghrelin is a novel brain-gut peptide hormone consisted of 28 amino-acid. In the plasma, it exists in two major molecular forms, acylated and des-acyled ghrelin, filtered in glomeruli or secreted by nephrons. Primary biological effects of hormones are regulating appetite, foods intake and energy metabolism. We investigated the changing and relationships between serum and urine ghrelin levels in acute stroke patients to provide more information whether diagnostic parameter. Methods: Thirty acute stroke patients and thirty consecutive volunteers included in study prospectively. To analyze serum and urine ghrelin levels, at the time of diagnose, all of participant blood and fresh urine (1 ml serum, 2 ml urine respectively) samples were obtained. Serum ghrelin levels analyzed ELISA technique, and urine ghrelin levels studied by validation technique. To compare quantitative data student’s t test, and for qualitative data chi-square and Fisher’s Exact Chi-square test was used. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Urine acyl ghrelin levels found statistically significant between patient and control groups (P=0.001), but there were no statistically significant differences between both groups (P>0.05) in serum acyl gherelin, des-acyl ghrelin and urine des-acyle ghrelin levels. Conclusions: The results indicate that urine acyl ghrelin levels may be considered as a diagnostic parameter in acute ischemic stroke patients. Further studies delineating the mechanism of these observed results are warranted. PMID:25785049

  14. Plasma ghrelin concentrations of beef cattle consuming a similar amount of dietary energy supplied by different ingredients.

    PubMed

    Wertz-Lutz, A E; Jennings, J S; Clapper, J A

    2010-07-01

    Previous research demonstrated increased plasma ghrelin concentrations in beef cattle when intake of a high-grain diet was restricted. Two experiments were conducted to determine whether differences in DMI influenced plasma ghrelin concentrations when energy intake was similar but cattle were in either an anabolic or a catabolic state. In Exp. 1, five steers (BW = 592.6 +/- 9.3 kg) were offered dietary treatments of 1) 50:50 hay:concentrate (HY) to meet the NE(m) requirement and were supplied an additional 3.4 Mcal of NE(g) daily, 2) or a diet composed of 10:90 hay:concentrate but were limit-fed to achieve an energy intake similar to that of the HY steers (LFC). The LFC treatment met the NE(m) requirement of each steer and supplied 3.6 Mcal of NE(g) daily. The experiment was conducted as a crossover design composed of 2 21-d periods. In the first period, 2 steers were assigned to the HY treatment and 3 steers were assigned to the LFC treatment. On d 21 after initiation of the dietary treatment, serial blood samples were collected via indwelling jugular catheter, using periods of frequent sampling in which samples were collected at 15-min intervals. The periods of frequent sampling were spread throughout the beginning, middle, and end of the 12-h feeding interval. After the first period, steers were weighed, dietary treatments were switched between steer groups, and intake amounts were recalculated on the basis of the first-period ending BW. The second-period adaptation and sampling were repeated as described for the first period. Plasma samples were assayed for ghrelin, insulin, GH, and NEFA concentrations. Experiment 2 was conducted using the same methodology as Exp. 1, except that steers were in a catabolic state. Five steers (BW = 718.3 +/- 12.8 kg) were offered the HY or LFC diet at an amount that would supply 80% of the NE(m) required to maintain BW. For Exp. 1, energy intake was sufficient to result in similar (P = 0.14) BW gains between treatment groups

  15. Ghrelin stimulates myogenic differentiation in a mouse muscle satellite cell line and in primary cultures of bovine myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Montoya-Flores, D; Mora, O; Tamariz, E; González-Dávalos, L; González-Gallardo, A; Antaramian, A; Shimada, A; Varela-Echavarría, A; Romano-Muñoz, J L

    2012-08-01

    Ghrelin is an acylated hormone that influences food intake, energy metabolism and reproduction, among others. Ghrelin may also stimulate proliferating myoblast cell differentiation and multinucleated myotube fusion. The aim of this work was to assess the effect of human ghrelin (hGHRL) and human ghrelin fragment 1-18 (hGHRL1-18) on myoblast differentiation by means of mRNA expression and protein level. Two types of cells were tested, the cell line i28 obtained from mouse skeletal muscle and primary cultures of bovine myoblasts. Both ghrelin and its N-terminal fragment hGHRL1-18 were used at concentrations of 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 nm. Treatments were applied to pre-confluent cultures and were maintained for 4 days. We determined that between 0.1 and 100 nm, hGHRL and hGRHL1-18 had similar effects on myogenic differentiation of i28 cells (p < 0.01). On the other hand, only the higher concentrations (10 and 100 nm) of hGHRL stimulated bovine myoblast differentiation. These results could be attributed to the presence, in both i28 cells and in bovine myoblasts, of the mRNA for GHS-R1a and CD36 receptors. The use of ghrelin in livestock production is still questionable because of the limited effects shown in this study, and additional research is needed in this field. PMID:21777295

  16. Circulating ghrelin and leptin concentrations and growth hormone secretagogue receptor abundance in liver, muscle, and adipose tissue of beef cattle exhibiting differences in composition of gain.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J S; Wertz-Lutz, A E; Pritchard, R H; Weaver, A D; Keisler, D H; Bruns, K

    2011-12-01

    Data from species other than cattle indicate that ghrelin and GH secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) could play a key role in fat deposition, energy homeostasis, or glucose metabolism by directly affecting liver and adipose tissue metabolism. Beef steers (n = 72) were used to test the hypothesis that plasma ghrelin and leptin concentrations and abundance of the GHS-R in liver, muscle, and adipose tissues differ in steers exhibiting differences in composition of gain. At trial initiation (d 0), 8 steers were slaughtered for initial carcass composition. The remaining 64 steers were stratified by BW, allotted to pen, and treatment was assigned randomly to pen. Steers were not implanted with anabolic steroids. Treatments were 1) a low-energy (LE) diet fed during the growing period (0 to 111 d) followed by a high-energy (HE) diet during the finishing period (112 to 209 d; LE-HE) or 2) the HE diet for the duration of the trial (1 to 209 d; HE-HE). Eight steers per treatment were slaughtered on d 88, 111, 160, and 209. Carcass ninth, tenth, and eleventh rib sections were dissected for chemical composition and regression equations were developed to predict compositional gain. Liver, muscle, and subcutaneous adipose tissues were frozen in liquid nitrogen for subsequent Western blotting for GHS-R. Replicate blood samples collected before each slaughter were assayed for ghrelin and leptin concentrations. When compared at a common compositional fat end-point, the rate of carcass fat accretion (g·kg of shrunk BW(-1)) was greater (P < 0.001) in HE-HE steers whereas the rate of carcass protein accretion (g·kg of shrunk BW(-1)) was less (P < 0.001) compared with LE-HE steers. When compared at a common compositional fat end-point, plasma leptin, ghrelin, and insulin concentrations were greater (P < 0.05) for HE-HE compared with LE-HE steers. Abundance of the GHS-R, to which ghrelin binds, increased over time in liver and adipose tissue but did not differ as a result of treatment

  17. Influence of a long-term high-fat diet on ghrelin secretion and ghrelin-induced food intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Guillermo; Han, Song; Englander, Ella W; Greeley, George H

    2012-01-10

    The aims of this study were: (1) to define the extent to which a high-fat (HF) diet given on a long-term basis reduces resting plasma ghrelin (total [acyl+des-acyl]) levels and the plasma ghrelin (total) response to fasting, (2) to determine whether a chronic HF diet modifies the orexigenic activity of acyl-ghrelin, (3) whether insulin pretreatment inhibits the plasma ghrelin (total) response to fasting, and (4) the extent to which pioglitazone (PIO) treatment will increase stomach and plasma ghrelin (total) levels in rats fed a HF diet. PIO is a drug given to diabetics which improves insulin resistance. Our findings show that a chronic HF diet given for either 10 or 60 weeks exerts a persistent inhibitory effect on resting plasma ghrelin (total) levels. Additionally, the plasma ghrelin (total) elevation to overnight fasting is not altered in rats fed a HF diet on a long-term basis. A HF diet does not impair the ingestive response to acyl-ghrelin. Together, these results suggest that acyl-ghrelin serves as an important orexigenic factor. Results show that insulin pretreatment does not inhibit the plasma ghrelin (total) response to fasting suggesting that meal-induced insulin secretion does not have a role in reducing ghrelin (total) secretion. In rats fed a HF diet, PIO administration increases stomach ghrelin (total) levels. Because PIO can reduce systemic glucose and lipid levels, our findings suggest that elevated glucose and lipid levels are part of the inhibitory mechanism behind reduced ghrelin (total) secretion in rats fed a HF diet. PMID:21971115

  18. Impact of maternal BMI and sampling strategy on the concentration of leptin, insulin, ghrelin and resistin in breast milk across a single feed: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Nicholas J; Hyde, Matthew J; Herbert, Bronwen R; Jeffries, Suzan; Santhakumaran, Shalini; Mandalia, Sundhiya; Holmes, Elaine; Modi, Neena

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We tested the hypothesis that there is a positive association between maternal body mass index (BMI) and the concentration of appetite-regulating hormones leptin, insulin, ghrelin and resistin in breast milk. We also aimed to describe the change in breast milk hormone concentration within each feed, and over time. Setting Mothers were recruited from the postpartum ward at a university hospital in London. Breast milk samples were collected at the participants’ homes. Participants We recruited 120 healthy, primiparous, breastfeeding mothers, aged over 18 years. Mothers who smoked, had multiple births or had diabetes were excluded. Foremilk and hindmilk samples were collected from 105 women at 1 week postpartum and 92 women at 3 months postpartum. Primary and secondary outcome measures We recorded maternal and infant anthropometric measurements at each sample collection and measured hormone concentrations using a multiplex assay. Results The concentration of leptin in foremilk correlated with maternal BMI at the time of sample collection, at 7 days (r=0.31, p=0.02) and 3 months postpartum (r=0.30, p=<0.00). Foremilk insulin correlated with maternal BMI at 3 months postpartum (r=0.22, p=0.04). Breast milk ghrelin and resistin were not correlated with maternal BMI. Ghrelin concentrations at 3 months postpartum were increased in foremilk compared with hindmilk (p=0.01). Concentrations of ghrelin were increased in hindmilk collected at 1  week postpartum compared with samples collected at 3 months postpartum (p=0.03). A trend towards decreased insulin concentrations in hindmilk was noted. Concentrations of leptin and resistin were not seen to alter over a feed. Conclusions A positive correlation between maternal BMI and foremilk leptin concentration at both time points studied, and foremilk insulin at 3 months postpartum was observed. This may have implications for infant appetite regulation and obesity risk. PMID:27388351

  19. Daily supplementation with ghrelin improves in vitro bovine blastocysts formation rate and alters gene expression related to embryo quality.

    PubMed

    Dovolou, Eleni; Periquesta, Eva; Messinis, Ioannis E; Tsiligianni, Theodora; Dafopoulos, Konstantinos; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Amiridis, Georgios S

    2014-03-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric peptide having regulatory role in the reproductive system functionality, acting mainly at central level. Because the expression of ghrelin system (ghrelin and its receptor) has been detected in the bovine ovary, the objectives of the present study were to investigate whether ghrelin can affect the developmental potential of in vitro-produced embryos, and to test their quality in terms of relative abundance of various genes related to metabolism, apoptosis and oxidation. In the first experiment, in vitro-produced zygotes were cultured in the absence (control [C]) and in the presence of three concentrations of acylated ghrelin (200 pg/mL [Ghr200], 800 pg/mL [Ghr800]; and 2000 pg/mL [Ghr2000]); blastocyst formation rates were examined on Days 7, 8, and 9. In the second experiment, only the 800 pg/mL dose of ghrelin was used. Zygotes were produced as in experiment 1 and 24 hours post insemination they were divided into 4 groups; in two groups (C; without ghrelin; Ghr800 with ghrelin), embryos were cultured without medium replacement; in the remaining two groups (Control N and GhrN), the culture medium was daily renewed. A pool of Day-7 blastocysts were snap frozen for relative mRNA abundance of various genes related to metabolism, oxidation, implantation, and apoptosis. In experiment 3, embryos were produced as in experiment 2, but in the absence of serum (semi-defined culture medium). In experiment 1, no differences were detected between C, Ghr200, and Ghr2000, although fewer blastocysts were produced in group Ghr800 compared with C. In experiment 2, the lowest blastocysts yield was found in Ghr800, whereas daily renewal of ghrelin (Ghr800N) resulted to increased blastocysts formation rate, which on Day 7 was the highest among groups (P < 0.05). In experiment 3, ghrelin significantly suppressed blastocysts yield. Significant differences were detected in various relative mRNA abundance, giving an overall final notion that embryos produced in the

  20. What is the real relevance of endogenous ghrelin?

    PubMed

    Al Massadi, Omar; López, Miguel; Fernø, Johan; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2015-08-01

    Ghrelin is a pleiotropic and ubiquitous gastric hormone implicated in body physiology. Ghrelin exhibits potent orexigenic actions and increases body weight and adiposity. Ghrelin is also involved in other metabolic functions among which we can highlight the GH releasing activity and the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Ghrelin needs the enzyme GOAT to be acylated, a step essential for binding to the GHSR1a receptor to exert its functions. Genetic animal models emerge as important tools to delineate the physiological relevance of ghrelin on energy balance. Despite the numerous reports using different genetically engineered mouse models targeting the ghrelin system, its endogenous relevance in metabolism seems to be less important than its pharmaceutical options. PMID:26003396

  1. Ghrelin gene products and the regulation of food intake and gut motility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Yen; Asakawa, Akihiro; Fujimiya, Mineko; Lee, Shou-Dong; Inui, Akio

    2009-12-01

    A breakthrough using "reverse pharmacology" identified and characterized acyl ghrelin from the stomach as the endogenous cognate ligand for the growth hormone (GH) secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) 1a. The unique post-translational modification of O-n-octanoylation at serine 3 is the first in peptide discovery history and is essential for GH-releasing ability. Des-acyl ghrelin, lacking O-n-octanoylation at serine 3, is also produced in the stomach and remains the major molecular form secreted into the circulation. The third ghrelin gene product, obestatin, a novel 23-amino acid peptide identified from rat stomach, was found by comparative genomic analysis. Three ghrelin gene products actively participate in modulating appetite, adipogenesis, gut motility, glucose metabolism, cell proliferation, immune, sleep, memory, anxiety, cognition, and stress. Knockdown or knockout of acyl ghrelin and/or GHS-R1a, and overexpression of des-acyl ghrelin show benefits in the therapy of obesity and metabolic syndrome. By contrast, agonism of acyl ghrelin and/or GHS-R1a could combat human anorexia-cachexia, including anorexia nervosa, chronic heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, liver cirrhosis, chronic kidney disease, burn, and postsurgery recovery, as well as restore gut dysmotility, such as diabetic or neurogenic gastroparesis, and postoperative ileus. The ghrelin acyl-modifying enzyme, ghrelin O-Acyltransferase (GOAT), which attaches octanoate to serine-3 of ghrelin, has been identified and characterized also from the stomach. To date, ghrelin is the only protein to be octanylated, and inhibition of GOAT may have effects only on the stomach and is unlikely to affect the synthesis of other proteins. GOAT may provide a critical molecular target in developing novel therapeutics for obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:20038570

  2. Ghrelin and adipokines as circulating markers of disease activity in patients with Takayasu arteritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The current markers of disease activity in Takayasu arteritis (TA) are insufficient for proper assessment. We investigated circulating levels of unacylated and acylated ghrelin, leptin and adiponectin and their relationships with disease activity in patients with TA. Methods This study included 31 patients with TA and 32 sex-, age- and body mass index-matched healthy controls. Disease activity was assessed in TA patients using various tools, including Kerr's criteria, disease extent index-Takayasu, physician's global assessment, radiological parameters, and laboratory markers. Plasma unacylated and acylated ghrelin, and serum leptin and adiponectin levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Unacylated and acylated ghrelin levels were found to be significantly lower in TA patients than that in healthy controls. Patients with active disease had lower unacylated ghrelin levels than those with inactive disease and had lower acylated ghrelin levels than healthy controls. Ghrelin levels were negatively correlated with various parameters of disease activity. The leptin/ghrelin ratio was significantly higher in TA patients than controls. It was positively correlated with disease activity. There was a positive correlation between unacylated and acylated ghrelin and a negative correlation between leptin and ghrelin. There was no statistical difference in adiponectin levels between TA patients and controls. The radiological activity markers were positively correlated with other parameters of disease activity. Conclusions This study suggests that plasma unacylated and acylated ghrelin levels may be useful in monitoring disease activity and planning treatment strategies for patients with TA. The serum leptin level and leptin/ghrelin ratio may also be used to help assess the disease activity. PMID:23259466

  3. Interrelationships between ghrelin, insulin and glucose homeostasis: Physiological relevance

    PubMed Central

    Chabot, François; Caron, Alexandre; Laplante, Mathieu; St-Pierre, David H

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin is a 28 amino acid peptide mainly derived from the oxyntic gland of the stomach. Both acylated (AG) and unacylated (UAG) forms of ghrelin are found in the circulation. Initially, AG was considered as the only bioactive form of ghrelin. However, recent advances indicate that both AG and UAG exert distinct and common effects in organisms. Soon after its discovery, ghrelin was shown to promote appetite and adiposity in animal and human models. In response to these anabolic effects, an impressive number of elements have suggested the influence of ghrelin on the regulation of metabolic functions and the development of obesity-related disorders. However, due to the complexity of its biochemical nature and the physiological processes it governs, some of the effects of ghrelin are still debated in the literature. Evidence suggests that ghrelin influences glucose homeostasis through the modulation of insulin secretion and insulin receptor signaling. On the other hand, insulin was also shown to influence circulating levels of ghrelin. Here, we review the relationship between ghrelin and insulin and we describe the impact of this interaction on the modulation of glucose homeostasis. PMID:24936254

  4. Ghrelin ameliorates the human alveolar epithelial A549 cell apoptosis induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunrong; Zheng, Haichong; He, Wanmei; Lu, Guifang; Li, Xia; Deng, Yubin; Zeng, Mian

    2016-05-20

    Ghrelin is a gastric acyl-peptide that plays an inhibitory role in cell apoptosis. Herein we investigate the protective effects of ghrelin in LPS-induced apoptosis of human alveolar epithelial A549 cells, along with the possible molecular mechanisms. LPS exposure impaired cell viability and increased apoptosis of A549 cells significantly in concentration- and time-dependent manners embodied in increased Bax and cleaved caspase-3 production, coupled with decreased Bcl-2 levels. Simultaneously, LPS remarkably decreased the expression of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinas (ERK) in A549 cells. However, ghrelin'pretreatment ameliorated LPS-caused alterations in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 expression, whereas activated the PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling. These results demonstrate that ghrelin lightens LPS-induced apoptosis of human alveolar epithelial cells partly through activating the PI3K/Akt and ERK pathway and thereby might benefit alleviating septic ALI. PMID:27103436

  5. Dietary Mannoheptulose Increases Fasting Serum Glucagon Like Peptide-1 and Post-Prandial Serum Ghrelin Concentrations in Adult Beagle Dogs

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, Leslie L.; Eyre, Ryan; Gooding, Margaret A.; Davenport, Gary M.; Shoveller, Anna Kate

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary There is increased interest in the use of nutraceuticals for weight management in companion animals. A nutraceutical can broadly be considered a food (or a part of) that provides a health benefit. Mannoheptulose (MH), a sugar found in avocados, is being investigated as a nutraceutical for dogs. In this study, dogs fed a diet containing MH had increased concentrations of blood biomarkers related to energy intake. In addition, dogs fed MH were less physically active than dogs fed a control diet. These findings suggest that dietary MH has the ability to alter energy intake and lower daily energy expenditure. Abstract There is a growing interest in the use of nutraceuticals for weight management in companion animals. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of mannoheptulose (MH), a sugar in avocados that inhibits glycolysis, on energy metabolism in adult Beagle dogs. The study was a double-blind, randomized controlled trial where dogs were allocated to a control (CON, n = 10, 10.1 ± 0.4 kg) or MH containing diet (168 mg/kg, n = 10, 10.3 ± 0.4 kg). Blood was collected after an overnight fast and 1 h post-feeding (week 12) to determine serum satiety related hormones and biochemistry. Resting and post-prandial energy expenditure and respiratory quotient were determined by indirect calorimetry (weeks 4 and 8). Physical activity was measured using an accelerometer (weeks 3, 7, 11). Body composition was assessed using dual X-ray absorptiometry (week 12). MH significantly (p < 0.05) increased fasting serum glucagon-like peptide-1 and post-prandial serum ghrelin. MH tended (p < 0.1) to increase fasting serum gastric inhibitory peptide and decrease physical activity. Together, these findings suggest that dietary MH has the ability to promote satiation and lowers daily energy expenditure. PMID:26479244

  6. Effect of preduodenal lipase inhibition in suckling rats on dietary octanoic acid (C8:0) gastric absorption and plasma octanoylated ghrelin concentration.

    PubMed

    Lemarié, F; Cavalier, J-F; Garcia, C; Boissel, F; Point, V; Catheline, D; Legrand, P; Carrière, F; Rioux, V

    2016-09-01

    Part of medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) coming from dietary triglycerides (TGs) can be directly absorbed through the gastric mucosa after the action of preduodenal lipase (lingual lipase in the rat). MCFA gastric absorption, particularly that of octanoic acid (C8:0), may have a physiological importance in the octanoylation of ghrelin, the orexigenic gastric peptide acting as an endogenous ligand of the hypothalamic growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR-1a). However, the amount of C8:0 absorbed in the stomach and its metabolic fate still haven't been clearly characterized. The purpose of the present study was to further characterize and quantify the importance of preduodenal lipase activity on the release and gastric absorption of dietary C8:0 and on the subsequent ghrelin octanoylation in the stomach mucosa. Fifteen days old rats received fat emulsions containing triolein or [1,1,1-(13)C]-Tri-C8:0 and a specific inhibitor of preduodenal lipase, 5-(2-(benzyloxy)ethoxy)-3-(3-phenoxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2(3H)-one or BemPPOX. The fate of the (13)C-C8:0 was followed in rat tissues after 30 and 120min of digestion and octanoylated ghrelin was measured in the plasma. This work (1) demonstrates that part of C8:0 coming from Tri-C8:0 is directly absorbed at the gastric level, (2) allows the estimation of C8:0 gastric absorption level (1.3% of the (13)C-C8:0 in sn-3 position after 30min of digestion), as well as (3) the contribution of rat lingual lipase to total lipolysis and to duodenal absorption of dietary FAs (at least 30%), (4) shows no short-term effect of dietary Tri-C8:0 consumption and subsequent increase of C8:0 gastric tissue content on plasma octanoylated ghrelin concentration. PMID:27317984

  7. Translational research of ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroaki; Shiiya, Tomomi; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2010-07-01

    Gastrointestinal peptides play important roles regulating feeding and energy homeostasis. Most gastrointestinal peptides including glucagon like peptide-1, peptide YY, amylin, and oxytomodulin are anorectic, and only ghrelin is an orexigenic peptide. Ghrelin increases appetite, modulates energy balance, suppresses inflammation, and enhances growth hormone secretion. Given its diversity of functions, ghrelin is expected be an effective therapy for lean patients with cachexia caused by chronic heart failure, chronic respiratory disease, anorexia nervosa, functional dyspepsia, and cancer. Clinical trials have demonstrated that ghrelin effectively increases lean body mass and activity in cachectic patients. Ghrelin interrupts the vicious cycle of the cachectic paradigm through its orexigenic, anabolic, and anti-inflammatory effects, and ghrelin administration may improve the quality of life of cachectic patients. We discuss the significant roles of ghrelin in the pathophysiology of cachectic diseases and the possible clinical applications of ghrelin. PMID:20633140

  8. In1-ghrelin splicing variant is overexpressed in pituitary adenomas and increases their aggressive features.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Gahete, Manuel D; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Rincón-Fernández, David; Nelson, Richard; Beltrán, Manuel; de la Riva, Andrés; Japón, Miguel A; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Gálvez, Ma Ángeles; García-Arnés, Juan A; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Morgan, Jennifer; Tsomaia, Natia; Culler, Michael D; Dieguez, Carlos; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas comprise a heterogeneous subset of pathologies causing serious comorbidities, which would benefit from identification of novel, common molecular/cellular biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The ghrelin system has been linked to development of certain endocrine-related cancers. Systematic analysis of the presence and functional implications of some components of the ghrelin system, including native ghrelin, receptors and the recently discovered splicing variant In1-ghrelin, in human normal pituitaries (n = 11) and pituitary adenomas (n = 169) revealed that expression pattern of ghrelin system suffers a clear alteration in pituitary adenomasas compared with normal pituitary, where In1-ghrelin is markedly overexpressed. Interestingly, in cultured pituitary adenoma cells In1-ghrelin treatment (acylated peptides at 100 nM; 24-72 h) increased GH and ACTH secretion, Ca(2+) and ERK1/2 signaling and cell viability, whereas In1-ghrelin silencing (using a specific siRNA; 100 nM) reduced cell viability. These results indicate that an alteration of the ghrelin system, specially its In1-ghrelin variant, could contribute to pathogenesis of different pituitary adenomas types, and suggest that this variant and its related ghrelin system could provide new tools to identify novel, more general diagnostic, prognostic and potential therapeutic targets in pituitary tumors. PMID:25737012

  9. In1-ghrelin splicing variant is overexpressed in pituitary adenomas and increases their aggressive features

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Gahete, Manuel D.; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Rincón-Fernández, David; Nelson, Richard; Beltrán, Manuel; de la Riva, Andrés; Japón, Miguel A.; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Gálvez, Ma Ángeles; García-Arnés, Juan A.; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Morgan, Jennifer; Tsomaia, Natia; Culler, Michael D.; Dieguez, Carlos; Castaño, Justo P.; Luque, Raúl M.

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas comprise a heterogeneous subset of pathologies causing serious comorbidities, which would benefit from identification of novel, common molecular/cellular biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The ghrelin system has been linked to development of certain endocrine-related cancers. Systematic analysis of the presence and functional implications of some components of the ghrelin system, including native ghrelin, receptors and the recently discovered splicing variant In1-ghrelin, in human normal pituitaries (n = 11) and pituitary adenomas (n = 169) revealed that expression pattern of ghrelin system suffers a clear alteration in pituitary adenomasas comparedwith normal pituitary, where In1-ghrelin is markedly overexpressed. Interestingly, in cultured pituitary adenoma cells In1-ghrelin treatment (acylated peptides at 100 nM; 24–72 h) increased GH and ACTH secretion, Ca2+ and ERK1/2 signaling and cell viability, whereas In1-ghrelin silencing (using a specific siRNA; 100 nM) reduced cell viability. These results indicate that an alteration of the ghrelin system, specially its In1-ghrelin variant, could contribute to pathogenesis of different pituitary adenomas types, and suggest that this variant and its related ghrelin system could provide new tools to identify novel, more general diagnostic, prognostic and potential therapeutic targets in pituitary tumors. PMID:25737012

  10. The role of ghrelin in weight-regulation disorders: implications in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Solomou, Solomis; Korbonits, Márta

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic protein with a unique lipid chain modification, is considered to be an important gut-brain signal for appetite control and energy balance. The ghrelin receptor, growth-hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a, is able to bind acylated ghrelin. The first recognised effect of ghrelin was the induction of growth hormone release from the somatotroph cells of the anterior pituitary. Moreover, by acting on vagal afferents or centrally, ghrelin can activate hypothalamic arcuate neurons that secrete the orexigenic peptides neuropeptide Y and agouti-related peptide, and inhibit the anorexigenic neurons secreting pro-opiomelanocortin and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. The orexigenic signalling pathway of ghrelin involves adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase. It has been proposed that ghrelin can also increase dopaminergic transmission from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens, leading to augmentation of afferent reward signals. Present evidence suggests that ghrelin plays an important role in obesity, eating disorders, and cachexia, as well as in regulating appetite and energy balance in healthy individuals. In pathological states, ghrelin can be lower than normal as is seen in obese individuals, or can be higher than normal as has been reported for Prader-Willi syndrome, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and certain types of cachexia. In the future, the application of compounds targeting the ghrelin pathway could involve the use of pharmacotherapies of ghrelin agonists, antagonists or inverse agonists, neutralisation of ghrelin by vaccines and spiegelmers, desacyl ghrelin analogues, as well as inhibitors of the GOAT enzyme which attaches the lipid modification to desacyl ghrelin to synthetise ghrelin. PMID:25555181

  11. Concentrations of long-chain acyl-acyl carrier proteins during fatty acid synthesis by chloroplasts isolated from pea (Pisum sativum), safflower (Carthamus tinctoris), and amaranthus (Amaranthus lividus) leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Roughan, G.; Nishida, I. )

    1990-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis from (1-14C)acetate by chloroplasts isolated from peas and amaranthus was linear for at least 15 min, whereas incorporation of the tracer into long-chain acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) did not increase after 2-3 min. When reactions were transferred to the dark after 3-5 min, long-chain acyl-ACPs lost about 90% of their radioactivity and total fatty acids retained all of theirs. Half-lives of the long-chain acyl-ACPs were estimated to be 10-15 s. Concentrations of palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, and oleoyl-ACP as indicated by equilibrium labeling during steady-state fatty acid synthesis, ranged from 0.6-1.1, 0.2-0.7, and 0.4-1.6 microM, respectively, for peas and from 1.6-1.9, 1.3-2.6, and 0.6-1.4 microM, respectively, for amaranthus. These values are based on a chloroplast volume of 47 microliters/mg chlorophyll and varied according to the mode of the incubation. A slow increase in activity of the fatty acid synthetase in safflower chloroplasts resulted in long-chain acyl-ACPs continuing to incorporate labeled acetate for 10 min. Upon re-illumination following a dark break, however, both fatty acid synthetase activity and acyl-ACP concentrations increased very rapidly. Palmitoyl-ACP was present at concentrations up to 2.5 microM in safflower chloroplasts, whereas those of stearoyl- and oleoyl-ACPs were in the lower ranges measured for peas. Acyl-ACPs were routinely separated from extracts of chloroplasts that had been synthesising long-chain fatty acids from labeled acetate by a minor modification of the method of Mancha et al. The results compared favorably with those obtained using alternative analytical methods such as adsorption to filter paper and partition chromatography on silicic acid columns.

  12. Change in intrarenal Ghrelin expression in immune complex-mediated glomerular disease in dogs

    PubMed Central

    YABUKI, Akira; MIZUKAMI, Keijiro; TOKUNAGA, Satoshi; YAMATO, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is a peptide hormone that is mainly produced by the stomach. The kidney is a major source of local ghrelin, and maintaining body fluid balance is considered a critical role of renal ghrelin. However, there are no reports on renal ghrelin in small animal medicine. The present study investigated the intrarenal localization of and change in ghrelin expression in dogs with immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN). Ghrelin immunoreactivity (IR) was observed in the distal tubules of normal kidneys. Ghrelin IR was weak in ICGN kidneys, and the quantitative ghrelin IR score was significantly lower in ICGN kidneys than in normal kidneys. In cases of ICGN, plasma creatinine concentrations showed a positive correlation with the ghrelin IR score. PMID:26256231

  13. Mole ghrelin: cDNA cloning, gene expression, and diverse molecular forms in Mogera imaizumii.

    PubMed

    Satou, Motoyasu; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Yoshihiro; Shinohara, Akio; Kawada, Shin-Ichiro; Miyazato, Mikiya; Kangawa, Kenji; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Here, we describe cDNA cloning and purification of the ghrelin gene sequences and ghrelin peptides from the Japanese true mole, Mogera imaizumii. The gene spans >2.9kbp, has four exons and three introns, and shares structural similarity with those of terrestrial animals. Mature mole ghrelin peptide was predicted to be 28 amino acids long (GSSFLSPEHQKVQQRKESKKPPSKPQPR) and processed from a prepropeptide of 116 amino acids. To further elucidate molecular characteristics, we purified ghrelin peptides from mole stomach. By mass spectrometry, we found that the mole ghrelin peptides had higher ratios of the odd-number fatty acids (C9 and C11 as much as C8) attached to the third serine residue than other vertebrate ghrelin. Truncated forms of ghrelins such as [1-27], [1-19], [1-16] and [1-15], and that lacked the 14th glutamine residue (des-Gln14 ghrelin) were produced in the stomach. Marked expression of ghrelin mRNA in lung was observed as in stomach and brain. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the branch of M. imaizumii has slightly higher dN/dS ratios (the nucleotide substitution rates at non-synonymous and synonymous sites) than did other eulipotyphlans. Peptide length was positively correlated with human ghrelin receptor activation, whereas the length of fatty-acyl chains showed no obvious functional correlation. The basal higher luciferase activities of the 5'-proximal promoter region of mole ghrelin were detected in ghrelin-negative C2C12 cells and hypoxic culture conditions impaired transcriptional activity. These results indicated that moles have acquired diverse species of ghrelin probably through distinctive fatty acid metabolism because of their food preferences. The results provide a gateway to understanding ghrelin metabolism in fossorial animals. PMID:27102942

  14. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raul M; Sampedro-Nuñez, Miguel; Gahete, Manuel D; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D; Castaño, Justo P; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-08-14

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value. PMID:26124083

  15. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D.; Castaño, Justo P.; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value. PMID:26124083

  16. Ghrelin and reproductive disorders.

    PubMed

    Repaci, Andrea; Gambineri, Alessandra; Pagotto, Uberto; Pasquali, Renato

    2011-06-20

    Ghrelin is an important factor involved in most of the metabolic and hormonal signals which adapt the reproductive functions in conditions of altered energy balance. Moreover, the coordinated role of leptin and ghrelin appears in fact to have a specific role in the regulation of puberty. Systemic action of ghrelin on the reproductive axis involves the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gondal axis. In addition, it has been shown that ghrelin may directly act at a gonadal level in both females and males. Available data also demonstrate that sex steroid hormones and gonadotropins may in turn regulate the gonadal effect of ghrelin, as documented by studies performed in females with the polycystic ovary syndrome and in hypogonadal men. Notably, recent studies also confirm a potentially important role for ghrelin in fetal and neonatal energy balance, and specifically in allowing fetal adaptation to an adverse intrauterine environment. PMID:21453749

  17. Early onset of ghrelin production in a marsupial.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Brandon R; Shaw, Geoff; Fletcher, Terry P; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2009-02-27

    Ghrelin regulates appetite in mammals and can stimulate growth hormone (GH) release from the pituitary. In rats and humans, ghrelin cells appear in the stomach during late fetal life. Nevertheless, the role of ghrelin in early mammalian development is not well understood. Marsupials deliver highly altricial young that weigh less than 1g so they must feed and digest milk at a comparatively immature stage of development. Since they complete their growth and differentiation while in the pouch, they are accessible models in which to determine the time course of ghrelin production during development. We examined the distribution of gastric ghrelin cells, plasma ghrelin concentrations and pituitary expression of the ghrelin receptor (ghsr-1alpha) and GH in the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. There were ghrelin immunopositive cells in the developing mesenchyme of the stomach from day 10 post partum (pp) to day 150pp. Subsequently ghrelin protein in the fore-stomach declined and was absent by day 250pp but remained in the gastric cells of the hind-stomach. Ghrelin was detected in the developing pancreas from day 10pp but was absent by day 150pp and in the adult. Pituitary ghsr-1alpha expression and plasma concentrations of ghrelin increased significantly up to day 70-120pp while GH expression was also elevated, declining with GH to reach adult levels by day 180pp. These results demonstrate an early onset of gastric ghrelin expression in the tammar in concert with a functional stomach at a relatively earlier stage than that of developmentally more mature eutherian young. PMID:19026714

  18. Ghrelin protects infarcted myocardium by induction of autophagy and AMP-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ming-Jie; Kong, Bin; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xin; Huang, He; Maghsoudi, Taneen

    2016-08-01

    The majority of studies have reported that enhancing autophagy in the myocardium is cardioprotective. Here, we tested the hypothesis that ghrelin, a growth hormone-releasing peptide, will protect infarcted myocardium by inducing of autophagy. Myocardial infarction was induced in mice by left coronary artery ligation the surviving mice 24 h after surgical were started on 2 week treatments with one of the following: vehicle, acylated ghrelin(50 mg/kg per day) or acylated ghrelin plus 3-MA(an autophagy inhibitor, 15 mg/kg, per day). We found that ghrelin significantly improved the cardiac function, and autophagy was enhanced by elevated LC3-II/LC-I ratio and mRNA expression of autophagy related protein. In vitro, cultured neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were subjected to simulate ischemia/reperfusion, 3-MA significantly attenuated ghrelin-induced autophagy, which was associated with activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signal pathway. Moreover, ghrelin reduced cell death, and RNAi-mediated knockdown of autophagy protein 5 (Atg5) partly abolished ghrelin's cardioprotective effect. It is the first time to demonstrate that the cardioprotective effect of ghrelin on ischemia myocardium in part through regulating of autophagy signal pathway. PMID:27235554

  19. Abnormal ghrelin and pancreatic polypeptide responses in gastroparesis.

    PubMed

    Gaddipati, Kishore V; Simonian, Hrair P; Kresge, Karen M; Boden, Guenther H; Parkman, Henry P

    2006-08-01

    Vagal nerve dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic gastroparesis, but its role in idiopathic gastroparesis remains uncertain. The increase in pancreatic polypeptide with sham feeding is often used as a measure of vagal integrity. Ghrelin has been suggested to function as an appetite-stimulating hormone from the gut to the brain acting through vagal afferent pathways. Systemic ghrelin also rises in part due to vagal efferent pathways. Alterations in ghrelin and its effects on appetite could play a role in gastroparesis. In this study we aimed [1] to investigate the presence of vagal nerve dysfunction in patients with idiopathic and diabetic gastroparesis and [2] to determine if alterations in ghrelin concentrations occur in gastroparesis. Normal subjects and patients with diabetic, idiopathic, or postsurgical gastroparesis underwent a sham feeding protocol. Serial blood samples were obtained for plasma ghrelin and pancreatic polypeptide. Sham feeding was characterized by an increase in pancreatic polypeptide and ghrelin in normal controls and patients with idiopathic gastroparesis. The changes in pancreatic polypeptide and ghrelin levels in diabetic and postsurgical gastroparesis were significantly less than those in normal subjects. Vagal nerve dysfunction, as evidenced by an impaired pancreatic polypeptide response with sham feeding, is present in diabetic gastroparesis but not idiopathic gastroparesis. Systemic ghrelin concentrations increased with sham feeding in normal subjects and patients with idiopathic gastroparesis but not in diabetic or postsurgical gastroparesis. Vagal function and regulation of ghrelin levels are impaired in diabetic gastroparesis. PMID:16868831

  20. Malnutrition Markers and Serum Ghrelin Levels in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Montazerifar, Farzaneh; Karajibani, Mansour; Gorgij, Farnia; Akbari, Ommolbanin

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of study was to investigate the changes levels of serum ghrelin in HD patients and its relationship to some malnutrition markers compared with healthy controls. Methods. Forty-five patients on hemodialysis and forty healthy controls were studied. Biochemical parameters and serum ghrelin levels were measured. Both daily dietary intakes and body mass index (BMI) assessments were performed for evaluation of nutritional status. Results. Ghrelin concentrations were significantly reduced in patients undergoing hemodialysis when compared to healthy controls (5 ± 0.68 (1.1–18.5) pg/mL versus 7.8 ± 0.84 (2.4–18.3) pg/mL; P = 0.004). BMI and serum albumin in HD patients were markedly reduced compared to controls. The patients with an insufficient intake of energy and protein demonstrated slightly lower levels of serum ghrelin. A negative correlation between serum ghrelin concentration with age (r = −0.34, P = 0.02), BUN (r = −0.26, P < 0.01), and serum creatinine (r = −0.27, P < 0.01) was observed in HD patients. Conclusions. The findings suggest that decreased ghrelin levels in HD patients might be associated with anorexia. Further studies are needed to determine changes in serum ghrelin levels during dialysis and to clarify whether the decrease in ghrelin levels contributes to the malnutrition that is common in these patients.

  1. A link between FTO, ghrelin, and impaired brain food-cue responsivity.

    PubMed

    Karra, Efthimia; O'Daly, Owen G; Choudhury, Agharul I; Yousseif, Ahmed; Millership, Steven; Neary, Marianne T; Scott, William R; Chandarana, Keval; Manning, Sean; Hess, Martin E; Iwakura, Hiroshi; Akamizu, Takashi; Millet, Queensta; Gelegen, Cigdem; Drew, Megan E; Rahman, Sofia; Emmanuel, Julian J; Williams, Steven C R; Rüther, Ulrich U; Brüning, Jens C; Withers, Dominic J; Zelaya, Fernando O; Batterham, Rachel L

    2013-08-01

    Polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) are associated with human obesity and obesity-prone behaviors, including increased food intake and a preference for energy-dense foods. FTO demethylates N6-methyladenosine, a potential regulatory RNA modification, but the mechanisms by which FTO predisposes humans to obesity remain unclear. In adiposity-matched, normal-weight humans, we showed that subjects homozygous for the FTO "obesity-risk" rs9939609 A allele have dysregulated circulating levels of the orexigenic hormone acyl-ghrelin and attenuated postprandial appetite reduction. Using functional MRI (fMRI) in normal-weight AA and TT humans, we found that the FTO genotype modulates the neural responses to food images in homeostatic and brain reward regions. Furthermore, AA and TT subjects exhibited divergent neural responsiveness to circulating acyl-ghrelin within brain regions that regulate appetite, reward processing, and incentive motivation. In cell models, FTO overexpression reduced ghrelin mRNA N6-methyladenosine methylation, concomitantly increasing ghrelin mRNA and peptide levels. Furthermore, peripheral blood cells from AA human subjects exhibited increased FTO mRNA, reduced ghrelin mRNA N6-methyladenosine methylation, and increased ghrelin mRNA abundance compared with TT subjects. Our findings show that FTO regulates ghrelin, a key mediator of ingestive behavior, and offer insight into how FTO obesity-risk alleles predispose to increased energy intake and obesity in humans. PMID:23867619

  2. Serum inflammatory markers in obese mice: Effect of ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Khazaei, Majid; Tahergorabi, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ghrelin is involved in modulation of food intake and energy homeostasis; however, it may play a role in cardiovascular system and atherosclerosis process. This study aimed to investigate the effect of ghrelin on serum inflammatory markers in control and obese mice. Materials and Methods: Ghrelin (100 mg/kg/day, twice daily) was administered interaperitoneally to control and diet-induced obese mice. After 10 days, blood samples were taken. Results: Results showed that administration of ghrelin did not change serum hsCRP level; however, it reduced serum IL-6 concentration in obese mice (P < 0.05). Conclusion: It seems that the exact role and mechanism of ghrelin in prevention or treatment of atherosclerosis needs more studies. PMID:26322293

  3. Molecular evolution of GPCRs: Ghrelin/ghrelin receptors.

    PubMed

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2014-06-01

    After the discovery in 1996 of the GH secretagogue-receptor type-1a (GHS-R1a) as an orphan G-protein coupled receptor, many research groups attempted to identify the endogenous ligand. Finally, Kojima and colleagues successfully isolated the peptide ligand from rat stomach extracts, determined its structure, and named it ghrelin. The GHS-R1a is now accepted to be the ghrelin receptor. The existence of the ghrelin system has been demonstrated in many animal classes through biochemical and molecular biological strategies as well as through genome projects. Our work, focused on identifying the ghrelin receptor and its ligand ghrelin in laboratory animals, particularly nonmammalian vertebrates, has provided new insights into the molecular evolution of the ghrelin receptor. In mammals, it is assumed that the ghrelin receptor evolution is in line with the plate tectonics theory. In contrast, the evolution of the ghrelin receptor in nonmammalian vertebrates differs from that of mammals: multiplicity of the ghrelin receptor isoforms is observed in nonmammalian vertebrates only. This multiplicity is due to genome duplication and polyploidization events that particularly occurred in Teleostei. Furthermore, it is likely that the evolution of the ghrelin receptor is distinct from that of its ligand, ghrelin, because only one ghrelin isoform has been detected in all species examined so far. In this review, we summarize current knowledge related to the molecular evolution of the ghrelin receptor in mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrates. PMID:24353285

  4. Associations of ghrelin with eating behaviors, stress, metabolic factors, and telomere length among overweight and obese women: Preliminary evidence of attenuated ghrelin effects in obesity?

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Julia; Havel, Peter J.; Epel, Elissa; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Daubenmier, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin regulates homeostatic food intake, hedonic eating, and is a mediator in the stress response. In addition, ghrelin has metabolic, cardiovascular, and anti-aging effects. This cross-sectional study examined associations between total plasma ghrelin, caloric intake based on 3 day diet diaries, hedonic eating attitudes, stress-related and metabolic factors, and leukocyte telomere length in overweight (n=25) and obese women (n=22). We hypothesized associations between total plasma ghrelin and eating behaviors, stress, metabolic, cardiovascular, and cell aging factors among overweight women, but not among obese women due to lower circulating ghrelin levels and/or central resistance to ghrelin. Confirming previous studies demonstrating lowered plasma ghrelin in obesity, ghrelin levels were lower in the obese compared with overweight women. Among the overweight, ghrelin was positively correlated with caloric intake, giving in to cravings for highly palatable foods, and a flatter diurnal cortisol slope across 3 days. These relationships were non-significant among the obese group. Among overweight women, ghrelin was negatively correlated with insulin resistance, systolic blood pressure, and heart rate, and positively correlated with telomere length. Among the obese subjects, plasma ghrelin concentrations were negatively correlated with insulin resistance, but were not significantly correlated with blood pressure, heart rate or telomere length. Total plasma ghrelin and its associations with food intake, hedonic eating, and stress are decreased in obesity, providing evidence consistent with the theory that central resistance to ghrelin develops in obesity and ghrelin’s function in appetite regulation may have evolved to prevent starvation in food scarcity rather than cope with modern food excess. Furthermore, ghrelin is associated with metabolic and cardiovascular health, and may have anti-aging effects, but these effects may be attenuated in obesity. PMID:24462487

  5. High concentrations of aromatic acylated anthocyanins found in cauline hairs in Plectranthus ciliatus.

    PubMed

    Jordheim, Monica; Calcott, Kate; Gould, Kevin S; Davies, Kevin M; Schwinn, Kathy E; Andersen, Øyvind M

    2016-08-01

    Vegetative shoots of a naturalized population of purple-leaved plectranthus (Plectranthus ciliatus, Lamiaceae) were found to contain four main anthocyanins: peonidin 3-(6″-caffeoyl-β-glucopyranoside)-5-β-glucopyranoside, peonidin 3-(6″-caffeoyl-β-glucopyranoside)-5-(6‴-malonyl-β-glucopyranoside), peonidin 3-(6″-E-p-coumaroyl-β-glucopyranoside)-5-(6‴-malonyl-β-glucopyranoside), and peonidin 3-(6″-E-p-coumaroyl-β-glucopyranoside)-5-β-glucopyranoside. The first three of these pigments have not been reported previously from any plant. They all follow the typical anthocyanin pattern of Lamiaceae, with universal occurrence of anthocyanidin 3,5-diglucosides and aromatic acylation with p-coumaric and sometimes caffeic acids; however, they differ by being based on peonidin. The four anthocyanins were present in the leaves (22.2 mg g(-1) DW), and in the xylem and interfascicular parenchyma of the stem. They were exceptionally abundant, among the highest reported for any plant organ, in epidermal hairs on some of the stem internodes (101 mg g(-1) DW). Anthocyanin content in these hairs increased more than three-fold from the youngest to the fourth-youngest internodes. In situ absorbances (λmax ≈ 545 nm) were bathochromic in comparison to absorbances of the isolated anthocyanins in their flavylium form in acidified aqueous solutions (λmax = 525 nm), suggesting that the anthocyanins occur both in quinoidal and flavylium forms in constant proportions in the anthocyanic hair cells. The most distinctive observation with respect to relative proportions of individual anthocyanins was found in de-haired internodes, for which anthocyanin caffeoyl-derivatives decreased, and anthocyanin coumaroyl-derivatives increased, from the youngest to the fourth-youngest internode. PMID:27165277

  6. Ghrelin promotes oral tumor cell proliferation by modifying GLUT1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Dominik; Reckenbeil, Jan; Wenghoefer, Matthias; Stark, Helmut; Frentzen, Matthias; Allam, Jean-Pierre; Novak, Natalija; Frede, Stilla; Götz, Werner; Probstmeier, Rainer; Meyer, Rainer; Winter, Jochen

    2016-03-01

    In our study, ghrelin was investigated with respect to its capacity on proliferative effects and molecular correlations on oral tumor cells. The presence of all molecular components of the ghrelin system, i.e., ghrelin and its receptors, was analyzed and could be detected using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. To examine cellular effects caused by ghrelin and to clarify downstream-regulatory mechanisms, two different oral tumor cell lines (BHY and HN) were used in cell culture experiments. Stimulation of either cell line with ghrelin led to a significantly increased proliferation. Signal transduction occurred through phosphorylation of GSK-3β and nuclear translocation of β-catenin. This effect could be inhibited by blocking protein kinase A. Glucose transporter1 (GLUT1), as an important factor for delivering sufficient amounts of glucose to tumor cells having high requirements for this carbohydrate (Warburg effect) was up-regulated by exogenous and endogenous ghrelin. Silencing intracellular ghrelin concentrations using siRNA led to a significant decreased expression of GLUT1 and proliferation. In conclusion, our study describes the role for the appetite-stimulating peptide hormone ghrelin in oral cancer proliferation under the particular aspect of glucose uptake: (1) tumor cells are a source of ghrelin. (2) Ghrelin affects tumor cell proliferation through autocrine and/or paracrine activity. (3) Ghrelin modulates GLUT1 expression and thus indirectly enhances tumor cell proliferation. These findings are of major relevance, because glucose uptake is assumed to be a promising target for cancer treatment. PMID:26407611

  7. Ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) antagonism alters preference for ethanol and sucrose in a concentration-dependent manner in prairie voles.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J R; Francomacaro, L M; Bohidar, A E; Young, K A; Pesarchick, B F; Buirkle, J M; McMahon, E K; O'Bryan, C M

    2016-03-01

    Ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) activity has been implicated in reward for preferred foods and drugs; however, a recent study in our laboratory indicated that GHS-R1A antagonism reduces early (after only four exposures) preference for 20% ethanol, but not 10% sucrose in prairie voles, a genetically diverse high alcohol-consuming species. The purpose of the present study was to determine if these effects of GHS-R1A antagonism depend on the concentration of the rewarding solution being consumed. We first characterized preference for varying concentrations of ethanol and sucrose. Two bottle tests of each ethanol concentration versus water indicated that 10% and 20% ethanol are less preferred than 3% ethanol, and a follow-up direct comparison of 10% vs. 20% showed that 10% was preferred over 20%. Direct two-bottle comparisons of 2% vs. 5%, 2% vs. 10%, and 5% vs. 10% sucrose showed that 10% sucrose was most preferred, and 2% sucrose was least preferred. The effects of JMV 2959, a GHS-R1A antagonist, on preference for each concentration of ethanol and sucrose were then tested. In a between groups design prairie voles were given four two-hour drinking sessions in which animals had access to ethanol (3, 10, or 20%) versus water, or sucrose (2, 5, or 10%) versus water every other day. Saline habituation injections were given 30 min before the third drinking session. JMV 2959 (i.p.; 9 mg/kg), a GHS-R1A antagonist, or saline was administered 30 min before the fourth drinking session. JMV 2959 reduced preference for 20% ethanol and 2% sucrose, but had no significant effect on preference for the other ethanol and sucrose concentrations. These data identify constraints on the role of GHS-R1A in early preference for ethanol and sucrose, and the concentration-dependent effects suggest strong preference for a reward may limit the importance of GHS-R1A activity. PMID:26723269

  8. Ghrelin accelerates in vitro maturation of bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Dovolou, E; Messinis, I E; Periquesta, E; Dafopoulos, K; Gutierrez-Adan, A; Amiridis, G S

    2014-08-01

    Ghrelin, apart from its metabolic role, is nowadays considered as a basic regulator of reproductive functions of mammals, acting at central and gonadal levels. Here, we investigated for possible direct actions of ghrelin on in vitro maturation of bovine oocytes and for its effects on blastocyst yield and quality. In experiment 1, cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) were matured in the presence of four different concentrations of ghrelin (0, 200, 800 and 2000 pg/ml). In vitro fertilization and embryo culture were carried out in the absence of ghrelin, and blastocyst formation rates were examined on days 7, 8 and 9. In experiment 2, only the 800 pg/ml dose of ghrelin was used. Four groups of COCs were matured for 18 or 24 h (C18, Ghr18, C24 and Ghr24), and subsequently, they were examined for oocyte nuclear maturation and cumulus layer expansion; blastocysts were produced as in experiment 1. The relative mRNA abundance of various genes related to metabolism, oxidation, developmental competence and apoptosis was examined in snap-frozen cumulus cells, oocytes and day-7 blastocysts. In experiment 1, ghrelin significantly suppressed blastocyst formation rates. In experiment 2, more ghrelin-treated oocytes matured for 18 h reached MII compared with controls, while no difference was observed when maturation lasted for 24 h. At 18 and 24 h, the cumulus layer was more expanded in ghrelin-treated COCs than in the controls. The blastocyst formation rate was higher in Ghr18 (27.7 ± 2.4%) compared with Ghr24 (17.5 ± 2.4%). Differences were detected in various genes' expression, indicating that in the presence of ghrelin, incubation of COCs for 24 h caused over-maturation (induced ageing) of oocytes, but formed blastocysts had a higher hatching rate compared with the controls. We infer that ghrelin exerts a specific and direct role on the oocyte, accelerating its maturational process. PMID:24889518

  9. Periprandial changes and effects of short- and long-term fasting on ghrelin, GOAT, and ghrelin receptors in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Blanco, A M; Gómez-Boronat, M; Redondo, I; Valenciano, A I; Delgado, M J

    2016-08-01

    The periprandial profile and effects of short- (7 days) and long-term (30 days) fasting on the ghrelinergic system were studied in goldfish (Carassius auratus). Plasma levels of acyl-ghrelin, desacyl-ghrelin, and ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) were analyzed by enzymoimmunoassays, and expression of preproghrelin, goat and growth hormone secretagogue receptors (ghs-r) was quantified by real-time PCR. Circulating levels of acyl-ghrelin and GOAT rise preprandially, supporting the role of acyl-ghrelin as a meal initiator in this teleost. Consistently, preproghrelin and ghs-r1a1 expression increases 1 h before feeding time in intestinal bulb, suggesting that this receptor subtype might be involved in the preprandial action of ghrelin in this tissue. Significant postfeeding variations are detected for preproghrelin in telencephalon, goat in telencephalon and hypothalamus, ghs-r1a1 in vagal lobe, ghs-r1a2 and ghs-r2a1 in hypothalamus and ghs-r2a2 in telencephalon and vagal lobe, especially in unfed fish. Short- and long-term fasting significantly increase preproghrelin expression in telencephalon and gut. Goat expression is upregulated by short-term fasting in telencephalon and hypothalamus, and by both short- and long-term fasting in gut. Expression of ghs-r increases by fasting in telencephalon, while an upregulation of type 2, but not type 1, receptors is observed in vagal lobe. In intestinal bulb, ghs-r1a2 transcripts increase after both short- and long-term fasting. These results show a high dependence of the ghrelinergic system on feeding and nutritional status in fish, and demonstrate for the first time a differential implication of the various components of this system suggesting different roles for the four ghrelinergic receptor subtypes. PMID:27062032

  10. Longitudinal measures of circulating leptin and ghrelin concentrations are associated with the growth of young Peruvian children but are not affected by zinc supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Leptin, ghrelin and insulin are hormonal regulators of energy balance and, therefore, may be related to growth during infancy. Zinc is essential for growth and may have an effect on growth through these hormones. Objectives: To determine whether supplemental zinc affects plasma leptin an...

  11. Effects of rumen fill on short-term ingestive behavior and circulating concentrations of ghrelin, insulin, and glucose of dairy cows foraging vegetative micro-swards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of ruminal fill (RF) on foraging behaviour, intake rate and the levels of circulating ghrelin, insulin and glucose was measured with four rumen-cannulated lactating dairy cows foraging micro-swards of vegetative orchardgrass. The treatments compared were removal of 1.00 (RF0), 0.66 (RF33)...

  12. Low serum levels of ghrelin are associated with gallstone disease

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum; Ponciano-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Bermejo-Martínez, Luisa; Villa, Antonio R; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C; Zamora-Valdés, Daniel; Pichardo-Bahena, Raúl; Barredo-Prieto, Blanca; Uribe-Ramos, Martha H; Ramos, Martha H; Baptista-González, Héctor A; Uribe, Misael

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To explore the role of ghrelin in gallstone disease. METHODS: We carried out a cross-sectional study in 150 subjects, 38 with gallstones (cases) and 112 controls. We also did a real-time PCR-RT study in twenty gallbladder samples each. Body mass index (BMI), serum insulin, ghrelin, and serum lipids were measured. Logistic regression analyses (univariate and multivariate) were conducted to estimate the probability of gallstone disease associated with serum ghrelin concentrations. RESULTS: Cases were statistically different from controls in gender distribution (P = 0.01), age (53 vs 44 yr, P = 0.002), BMI (28 vs 25; P = 0.004), and glucose (5.26 vs 4.98 mmol/L; P = 0.05). The prevalence of ghrelin serum levels above the third tercile was lower in subjects without metabolic syndrome (P < 0.05). In a multivariate model, we found a protective effect, when ghrelin values were higher than the median value (OR = 0.27, 95%CI 0.09-0.82, P = 0.02). Twenty (20%) gallbladder specimens expressed ghrelin mRNA. CONCLUSION: Serum ghrelin concentrations are associated with a protective effect of GD. PMID:16718795

  13. Identification of a ghrelin-like peptide in two species of shark, Sphyrna lewini and Carcharhinus melanopterus.

    PubMed

    Kawakoshi, Akatsuki; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Riley, Larry G; Hirano, Tetsuya; Grau, E Gordon; Miyazato, Mikiya; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Kangawa, Kenji

    2007-05-01

    In this study, we identified a ghrelin-like peptide (ghrelin-LP) in two elasmobranchs. The peptide, isoforms and cDNA encoding its precursor were isolated from the stomach of two sharks, the hammerhead (HH) shark (Sphyrna lewini) and the black-tip reef (BTR) shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus). The ghrelin-LP isolated from each shark was found to be 25 amino acids in length and exhibit high sequence homology with each other; only three amino acids were different. As has been shown in tetrapod and teleost fish ghrelins, shark ghrelin-LPs possess two forms that are distinguished by having the third serine residue (Ser) acylated by either octanoic or decanoic acid. The N-terminal four residues (GVSF), known as the active core of ghrelin, are not identical to those of other species (GSSF). Nevertheless, shark ghrelin-LP elevated Ca(2+) levels in CHO cell line expressing the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Unlike teleosts ghrelin's, shark ghrelin-LPs are not amidated at the C-terminus. Messenger RNA of ghrelin-LP in the HH shark was predominantly expressed in the stomach as seen in other species, followed by the brain, intestine, gill, heart and liver. The nucleotide sequence of the ghrelin-LP gene in the HH shark was characterized to compare organization of the ghrelin gene with those in other species. The size of the HH ghrelin-LP gene was 8541 bp, two to ten times larger than that of other species studied to date. The HH ghrelin-LP gene is composed of five exons and four introns, which is the same as ghrelin genes in mammals, chicken and rainbow trout. In conclusion, the shark ghrelin-LPs identified in this study exhibit many characteristics for ghrelin in terms of peptide modifications, GHS-R activation, tissue distribution, and gene organization; however, it is necessary to further clarify their biological properties such as growth hormone-releasing or orexigenic activity before designating these peptides as ghrelin. PMID:17362948

  14. Serum Concentrations of Insulin, Ghrelin, Adiponectin, Leptin, Leptin Receptor and Lipocalin-2 in Children with Celiac Disease Who Do and Do Not Adhere to a Gluten-Free Diet

    PubMed Central

    Janas, Roman M.; Rybak, Anna; Wierzbicka-Rucińska, Aldona; Socha, Piotr; Śnitko, Rafał; Szaflarska-Popławska, Anna; Stolarczyk, Anna; Oralewska, Beata; Cytra-Jarocka, Elżbieta; Iwańczak, Barbara; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Cichy, Wojciech; Czaja-Bulsa, Grażyna; Socha, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The roles of the many bioactive peptides in the pathogenesis of celiac disease remain unclear. To evaluate the serum concentrations of insulin, ghrelin, adiponectin, leptin, leptin receptor, and lipocalin-2 in children with celiac disease who do and do not adhere to a gluten-free diet (GFD, intermittent adherence). Methods Prepubertal, pubertal, and adolescent celiac children were included in this study (74 girls and 53 boys on a GFD and 80 girls and 40 boys off of a GFD). Results Insulin levels in prepubertal (9.01±4.43 μIU/mL), pubertal (10.3±3.62 μIU/mL), and adolescent (10.8±4.73 μIU/mL) girls were higher than those in boys (5.88±2.02, 8.81±2.88, and 8.81±2.26 μIU/mL, respectively) and were neither age-dependent nor influenced by a GFD. Prepubertal children off of a GFD exhibited higher ghrelin levels than prepubertal children on a GFD. Adiponectin levels were not age-, sex- nor GFD-dependent. Adherence to a GFD had no effect on the expression of leptin, leptin receptor, and lipocalin-2. Conclusions Adherence to a GFD had no influence on the adiponectin, leptin, leptin receptor, and lipocalin-2 concentrations in celiac children, but a GFD decreased highly elevated ghrelin levels in prepubertal children. Further studies are required to determine whether increased insulin concentrations in girls with celiac disease is suggestive of an increased risk for hyperinsulinemia. PMID:27074817

  15. Ghrelin and gastric acid secretion

    PubMed Central

    Yakabi, Koji; Kawashima, Junichi; Kato, Shingo

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin, a novel growth hormone-releasing peptide, was originally isolated from rat and human stomach. Ghrelin has been known to increase the secretion of growth hormone (GH), food intake, and body weight gain when administered peripherally or centrally. Ghrelin is also known to stimulate the gastric motility and the secretion of gastric acid. In the previous studies, the action of ghrelin on acid secretion was shown to be as strong as that of histamine and gastrin in in-vivo experiment. In the studies, the mechanism for the action of ghrelin was also investigated. It was shown that vagotomy completely inhibited the action of ghrelin on the secretion of gastric acid suggesting that vagal nerve is involved in the mechanism for the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. As famotidine did not inhibit ghrelin-induced acid secretion in the study by Masuda et al, they concluded that histamine was not involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. However, we have shown that famotidine completely inhibited ghrelin-induced acid secretion and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) mRNA was increased in gastric mucosa by ghrelin injection which is inhibited by vagotomy Our results indicate that histamine is involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. Furthermore synergistic action of gastrin and ghrelin on gastric acid secretion was shown. Although gastrin has important roles in postprandial secretion of gastric acid, ghrelin may be related to acid secretion during fasting period or at night. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the physiological role of ghrelin in acid secretion. PMID:19009648

  16. Ghrelin, food intake, and botanical extracts: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rezaie, Peyman; Mazidi, Mohsen; Nematy, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    A kind of growth hormone secretagogue (GHS), ghrelin, was first isolated from the rat stomach and plays a major role in the activation of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) resulting the release of growth hormone (GH). The preproghrelin gene is placed on chromosome 3, at locus 3p25 –2 in humans and constitutes five exons and three introns. Ghrelin is most plentifully expressed in particular cells in the oxyntic glands of the gastric epithelium, initially named X/A-like cells. Almost 60-70% of circulating ghrelin is secreted by the stomach. Plasma ghrelin concentration alters throughout the day. Ghrelin has been suggested to act as a meal initiator because of its appetite-stimulating influences in free feeding rats in short period. In addition to ghrelin’s function as a meal motivator, it seems to contribute in long-term energy balance and nutritional status. In addition, many studies have been carried out in order to investigate the effects of natural and medicinal plants and botanical extracts on appetite, food intake, energy hemostasis, and the level of related hormones including ghrelin. Due to the importance of ghrelin in nutritional and medical sciences, this review was performed to understand new aspects of this hormone’s function. PMID:26445708

  17. Anti-ghrelin Spiegelmer inhibits exogenous ghrelin-induced increases in food intake, hoarding, and neural activation, but not food deprivation-induced increases

    PubMed Central

    Teubner, Brett J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Circulating concentrations of the stomach-derived “hunger-peptide” ghrelin increase in direct proportion to the time since the last meal. Exogenous ghrelin also increases food intake in rodents and humans, suggesting ghrelin may increase post-fast ingestive behaviors. Food intake after food deprivation is increased by laboratory rats and mice, but not by humans (despite dogma to the contrary) or by Siberian hamsters; instead, humans and Siberian hamsters increase food hoarding, suggesting the latter as a model of fasting-induced changes in human ingestive behavior. Exogenous ghrelin markedly increases food hoarding by ad libitum-fed Siberian hamsters similarly to that after food deprivation, indicating sufficiency. Here, we tested the necessity of ghrelin to increase food foraging, food hoarding, and food intake, and neural activation [c-Fos immunoreactivity (c-Fos-ir)] using anti-ghrelin Spiegelmer NOX-B11–2 (SPM), an l-oligonucleotide that specifically binds active ghrelin, inhibiting peptide-receptor interaction. SPM blocked exogenous ghrelin-induced increases in food hoarding the first 2 days after injection, and foraging and food intake at 1–2 h and 2–4 h, respectively, and inhibited hypothalamic c-Fos-ir. SPM given every 24 h across 48-h food deprivation inconsistently inhibited food hoarding after refeeding and c-Fos-ir, similarly to inabilities to do so in laboratory rats and mice. These results suggest that ghrelin may not be necessary for food deprivation-induced foraging and hoarding and neural activation. A possible compensatory response, however, may underlie these findings because SPM treatment led to marked increases in circulating ghrelin concentrations. Collectively, these results show that SPM can block exogenous ghrelin-induced ingestive behaviors, but the necessity of ghrelin for food deprivation-induced ingestive behaviors remains unclear. PMID:23804279

  18. Hesperidin potentiates ghrelin signaling.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hajime; Asakawa, Akihiro; Kawamura, Namiko; Yagi, Takakazu; Inui, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Hesperidin, a flavanone glycoside consisting of the flavone hesperitin bound to the disaccharide rutinose, is found in highly nutritious foods, such as oranges, tangelos, tangerines, grapefruits, and other citrus fruits. Exogenous hesperidin has been shown to influence a wide variety of biological functions, including induction of apoptosis and suppression of proliferation in human cancer cells; inhibition of tumor development in various tissues; and expression of antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal activities. Previous in vivo studies have revealed that hesperidin may play a role in ghrelin secretion from the stomach through antagonism of the serotonin receptors. Because ghrelin appears to be involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of several human disorders, hesperidin could be a promising target for the treatment of various diseases. This review addresses studies focused on the orexigenic and prokinetic activities of hesperidin in the context of ghrelin secretion. This article also presents some promising patents of hesperidin. PMID:25176345

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection and circulating ghrelin levels - A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The nature of the association between ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone produced mainly in the stomach, and Helicobacter pylori (H pylori), a bacterium that colonises the stomach, is still controversial. We examined available evidence to determine whether an association exists between the two; and if one exists, in what direction. Methods We reviewed original English language studies on humans reporting circulating ghrelin levels in H pylori infected and un-infected participants; and circulating ghrelin levels before and after H pylori eradication. Meta-analyses were conducted for eligible studies by combining study specific estimates using the inverse variance method with weighted average for continuous outcomes in a random effects model. Results Seventeen out of 27 papers that reported ghrelin levels in H pylori positive and negative subjects found lower circulating ghrelin levels in H pylori positive subjects; while 10 found no difference. A meta-analysis of 19 studies with a total of 1801 participants showed a significantly higher circulating ghrelin concentration in H pylori negative participants than in H pylori positive participants (Effect estimate (95%CI) = -0.48 (-0.60, -0.36)). However, eradicating H pylori did not have any significant effect on circulating ghrelin levels (Effect estimate (95% CI) = 0.08 (-0.33, 0.16); Test for overall effect: Z = 0.67 (P = 0.5)). Conclusions We conclude that circulating ghrelin levels are lower in H pylori infected people compared to those not infected; but the relationship between circulating ghrelin and eradication of H pylori is more complex. PMID:21269467

  20. Assessment of Serum Concentrations of Ghrelin, Obestatin, Omentin-1, and Apelin in Children with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Polkowska, Agnieszka; Szczepaniak, Izabela; Bossowski, Artur

    2016-01-01

    The increasing knowledge on the functions of gastric peptides and adipokines in the body allows the assumption of their major role linking the process of food intake, nutritional status, and body growth, largely through the regulation of glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. The aim of the study was the assessment of serum levels of selected gastric peptides and adipocytokines in children with type 1 diabetes, with respect to the disease duration. The study involved 80 children aged 4–18 years (M/F -37/43). Children with type 1 diabetes (n = 46) were compared to the control group (n = 34). The study group was divided into 4 subgroups: (I) patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, after an episode of ketoacidosis (n = 10), (II) patients with type 1 diabetes of duration no longer than 5 years (n = 9), (III) patients with 5 to 10 years of DT1 (n = 20), and (IV) patients with type 1 diabetes of duration longer than 10 years (n = 7). The concentrations of gastric peptide and adipocytokines across all subgroups were lower than in the control group. The differences were statistically significant (p < 0.0001), which may be of importance in the development of the disease complications. PMID:26904686

  1. Measurement of stable isotopic enrichment and concentration of long-chain fatty acyl-carnitines in tissue by HPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dayong; Cree, Melanie G; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Bøersheim, Elisabet; Wolfe, Robert R

    2006-02-01

    We have developed a new method for the simultaneous measurements of stable isotopic tracer enrichments and concentrations of individual long-chain fatty acyl-carnitines in muscle tissue using ion-pairing high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Long-chain fatty acyl-carnitines were extracted from frozen muscle tissue samples by acetonitrile/methanol. Baseline separation was achieved by reverse-phase HPLC in the presence of the volatile ion-pairing reagent heptafluorobutyric acid. The SIM capability of a single quadrupole mass analyzer allows further separation of the ions of interest from the sample matrixes, providing very clean total and selected ion chromatograms that can be used to calculate the stable isotopic tracer enrichment and concentration of long-chain fatty acyl-carnitines in a single analysis. The combination of these two separation techniques greatly simplifies the sample preparation procedure and increases the detection sensitivity. Applying this protocol to biological muscle samples proves it to be a very sensitive, accurate, and precise analytical tool. PMID:16301738

  2. Changes in the ghrelin hormone pathway maybe part of an unusual gastric system in monotremes.

    PubMed

    He, Chuan; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; Myers, Mark A; Forbes, Briony E; Grützner, Frank

    2013-09-15

    Ghrelin is a growth hormone (GH)-releasing and appetite-regulating peptide predominately released from the stomach. Ghrelin is evolutionarily highly conserved and known to have a wide range of functions including the regulation of metabolism by maintaining an insulin-glucose balance. The peptide is produced as a single proprotein, which is later proteolytically cleaved. Ghrelin exerts its biological function after O-n-octanoylation at residue serine 3, which is catalyzed by ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) and allows binding to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R 1a). Genes involved in the ghrelin pathway have been identified in a broad range of vertebrate species, however, little is known about this pathway in the basal mammalian lineage of monotremes (platypus and echidna). Monotremes are particularly interesting in this context, as they have undergone massive changes in stomach anatomy and physiology, accompanied by a striking loss of genes involved in gastric function. In this study, we investigated genes in the ghrelin pathway in monotremes. Using degenerate PCR, database searches and synteny analysis we found that genes encoding ghrelin and GOAT are missing in the platypus genome, whilst, as has been reported in other species, the GHSR is present and expressed in brain, pancreas, kidney, intestine, heart and stomach. This is the first report suggesting the loss of ghrelin in a mammal. The loss of this gene may be related to changes to the platypus digestive system and raises questions about the control of blood glucose levels and insulin response in monotreme mammals. In addition, the conservation of the ghrelin receptor gene in platypus indicates that another ligand(s) maybe acting via this receptor in monotremes. PMID:23770219

  3. Production of ghrelin by the stomach of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Junya; Aoyagi, Keishiro; Sato, Takahiro; Kojima, Masayasu; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Poor nutrition and weight loss are important factors contributing to poor quality of life (QOL) after gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer. Ghrelin is a hormone produced by the stomach that, plays a role in appetite increase and fat storage. The present study aims to clarify the location of ghrelin mRNA in the stomach, changes in blood ghrelin concentrations after gastrectomy and whether or not they are associated with the reconstruction method in patients with gastric cancer. We collected seven normal mucosa samples from different parts of six totally resected stomachs with gastric cancer. We extracted RNA from the normal mucosa, synthesized cDNA from total RNA (1 μg), and then quantified ghrelin mRNA using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Ghrelin blood concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits in 74 patients with gastric cancer (total gastrectomy (TG), n=23; distal gastrectomy (DG), n=30; proximal gastrectomy (PG), n=11; pylorus preserving gastrectomy (PPG), n=10). In order, the ghrelin gene was expressed most frequently in the gastric body, followed by the fornix, cardia, antrum and pylorus ring. Blood ghrelin concentrations after surgery similarly changed in all groups. The average blood ghrelin concentrations were significantly higher in the DG and PPG groups than in the TG group on postoperative days (POD) 1, 7, 30, 90 and 180. However, blood ghrelin concentrations did not significantly differ between the DG and TG groups on POD 270 and 360. Cells that produce ghrelin are supposed to be located mostly in the fundic gland of the stomach. We speculate that the production of ghrelin from other organs increases from around nine months after total gastrectomy. Therefore, evaluating the nutritional status and the weight of patients at nine months after total gastrectomy is important to help these patients improve their QOL. PMID:24858413

  4. Ghrelin receptor in Japanese fire belly newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster.

    PubMed

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2015-11-01

    We identified cDNA encoding a functional ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue-receptor 1a (GHS-R1a)) in a urodele amphibian, the Japanese fire belly newt (Cynops pyrrhogaster). Two functional receptor proteins, composed of 378- and 362-amino acids, were deduced from the identified cDNA because two candidate initiation methionine sites were found. The long-chain receptor protein shared 80%, 69%, and 59% identities with the bullfrog GHS-R1a, human GHS-R1a and tilapia GHS-R1a-like receptor, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the newt receptor is grouped to the clade of the tetrapod homologs, and very closed to anuran amphibians. In functional analyses, homologous newt ghrelin, heterologous bullfrog and rat ghrelin, and a GHS-R1a agonist, GHRP-6 increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells stably expressed newt GHS-R1a. The responsiveness was much greater in the short-chain receptor than in the long-chain receptor. Both receptors preferred to bind Ser(3)-ghrelin including newt and rat ghrelin than Thr(3)-ghrelin with bullfrog ghrelin. GHRP-6 has a similar affinity to bullfrog ghrelin. GHS-R1a mRNA was expressed in the brain, pituitary, intestine, pancreas, testis and fat body with high level, and eyes, heart, stomach, liver, gall bladder, kidney and dorsal skin with low level. In a fasting experiment, gene expression of GHS-R1a in the brain and pituitary increased 4days after fasting, and the increased level decreased to the initial level 2weeks after fasting. These changes are consistent with the change in ghrelin mRNA. In contrast, expression of ghrelin and GHS-R1a mRNA in the stomach decreased on day 4 after fasting, and increased 2weeks after fasting. These results indicate that ghrelin and its receptor system are present and altered by energy states in this newt. PMID:26172570

  5. Physiological roles revealed by ghrelin and ghrelin receptor deficient mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin is a hormone made in the stomach and known primarily for its growth hormone releasing and orexigenic properties. Nevertheless, ghrelin through its receptor, the GHS-R1a, has been shown to exert many roles including regulation of glucose homeostasis, memory & learning, food addiction and neur...

  6. Ghrelin attenuates the growth of HO-8910 ovarian cancer cells through the ERK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bai, R.X.; Wang, W.P.; Zhao, P.W.; Li, C.B.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most common causes of death from gynecologic tumors and is an important public health issue. Ghrelin is a recently discovered bioactive peptide that acts as a natural endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Several studies have identified the protective effects of ghrelin on the mammalian reproductive system. However, little research has been done on the effects of ghrelin on ovarian cancer cells, and the underlying mechanisms of these effects. We sought to understand the potential involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in ghrelin-mediated inhibition of growth of the ovarian line HO-8910. We applied different concentrations of ghrelin and an inhibitor of the ghrelin receptor (D-Lys3-GHRP-6) to HO-8910 cells and observed the growth rate of cells and changes in phosphorylation of the MAPKs ERK1/2, JNK and p38. We discovered that ghrelin-induced apoptosis of HO-8910 cells was though phosphorylated ERK1/2, and that this phosphorylation (as well as p90rsk phosphorylation) was mediated by the GHSR. The ERK1/2 pathway is known to play an essential part in the ghrelin-mediated apoptosis of HO-8910 cells. Hence, our study suggests that ghrelin inhibits the growth of HO-8910 cells primarily through the GHSR/ERK pathway. PMID:26840702

  7. Meal anticipation potentiates postprandial ghrelin suppression in humans.

    PubMed

    Ott, Volker; Friedrich, Monique; Zemlin, Janna; Lehnert, Hendrik; Schultes, Bernd; Born, Jan; Hallschmid, Manfred

    2012-07-01

    Circulating concentrations of the orexigenic hormone ghrelin show a postprandial decrease in dependence on meal size and composition. Cognitive determinants of postprandial ghrelin suppression in humans are largely unexplored. We assessed the effects of cued meal anticipation on pre- and postprandial concentrations of total plasma ghrelin, pancreatic polypeptide and leptin as well as on markers of glucose metabolism in healthy men. In a between-subject comparison, meal anticipation was induced in 14 fasted men at 08:00 h by the announcement and subsequent presentation of a breakfast buffet. Fifteen fasted control subjects were informed that they would remain fasted until noon. At 10:00 h, both groups were served a rich free-choice breakfast. At 12:00 h, all subjects underwent a snack test assessing casual cookie intake. Circulating concentrations of ghrelin, pancreatic polypeptide, glucose, insulin and leptin were frequently assessed. Preprandial endocrine parameters as well as breakfast intake (all p>0.23) and subsequent snack consumption (p>0.83) were comparable between groups. The postprandial suppression of ghrelin levels observed in both groups was markedly stronger in subjects who had anticipated breakfast intake (p<0.03) while pancreatic polypeptide concentrations did not differ between groups (p>0.56). Results indicate that meal anticipation is a critical determinant of postprandial ghrelin suppression that, as suggested by unaltered pancreatic polypeptide levels, appears to be mediated independent of vagal activation. Our findings highlight the role of subtle cognitive factors in the postprandial regulation of ghrelin secretion, suggesting that neurobehavioral approaches to improved food intake control should take into account meal anticipatory mechanisms. PMID:22094111

  8. Expression of ghrelin receptor (GHSR-1a) in rat epididymal spermatozoa and the effects of its activation.

    PubMed

    Łukaszyk, Andrzej; Kotwicka, Małgorzata; Jankowska, Anna; Kasprzak, Aldona; Ruciński, Marcin; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Ziółkowska, Agnieszka; Sawiński, Piotr; Ruchala, Marek

    2012-11-01

    In this study we demonstrated the expression of the ghrelin receptor GHSR-1a in rat spermatids and epididymal spermatozoa, as well as some effects of ghrelin on the spermatozoa in vitro. For the demonstration of GHSR-1a the immunocytochemical, immunofluorescence and Western blotting techniques were applied using three different types of antibodies. The response of spermatozoa to ghrelin was tested in a series of in vitro experiments and their effects were evaluated using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. GHSR-1a protein was found as expressed in the Golgi and acrosomes of spermatids and acrosome regions or the head cell membrane of epididymal spermatozoa. The GHSR-1a expression in spermatozoa was also confirmed by Western blot. No differences were found in percentage of spermatozoa showing annexin-V binding and expression of active form caspase-3 between control and ghrelin-treated spermatozoa. This result may indicate no pro-apoptotic effects of ghrelin neither at 10(-9) nor 10(-6)mol/L concentration. Ghrelin (10(-6)mol/L) increased free intracellular calcium ion concentration in the rat spermatozoa. Moreover, stimulation with 10(-6)mol/L ghrelin increased, while 10(-4)mol/L ghrelin decreased the number of spermatozoa showing progressive motility. In conclusion, the expression of the GHSR-1a receptor in spermatozoa, as well as ghrelin influences on sperm motility and intracellular calcium ion concentration suggest that such biological effects of ghrelin may be produced under in vivo conditions. PMID:23153700

  9. Rhythms of ghrelin, leptin, and sleep in rats: effects of the normal diurnal cycle, restricted feeding, and sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Bodosi, B; Gardi, J; Hajdu, I; Szentirmai, E; Obal, F; Krueger, J M

    2004-11-01

    To determine the relationships among plasma ghrelin and leptin concentrations and hypothalamic ghrelin contents, and sleep, cortical brain temperature (Tcrt), and feeding, we determined these parameters in rats in three experimental conditions: in free-feeding rats with normal diurnal rhythms, in rats with feeding restricted to the 12-h light period (RF), and in rats subjected to 5-h of sleep deprivation (SD) at the beginning of the light cycle. Plasma ghrelin and leptin displayed diurnal rhythms with the ghrelin peak preceding and the leptin peak following the major daily feeding peak in hour 1 after dark onset. RF reversed the diurnal rhythm of these hormones and the rhythm of rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) and significantly altered the rhythm of Tcrt. In contrast, the duration and intensity of non-REMS (NREMS) were hardly responsive to RF. SD failed to change leptin concentrations, but it promptly stimulated plasma ghrelin and induced eating. SD elicited biphasic variations in the hypothalamic ghrelin contents. SD increased plasma corticosterone, but corticosterone did not seem to influence either leptin or ghrelin. The results suggest a strong relationship between feeding and the diurnal rhythm of leptin and that feeding also fundamentally modulates the diurnal rhythm of ghrelin. The variations in hypothalamic ghrelin contents might be associated with sleep-wake activity in rats, but, unlike the previous observations in humans, obvious links could not be detected between sleep and the diurnal rhythms of plasma concentrations of either ghrelin or leptin in the rat. PMID:15475503

  10. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase knockout mice show resistance to obesity when fed high-sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Kouno, Tetsuya; Akiyama, Nobuteru; Ito, Takahito; Okuda, Tomohiko; Nanchi, Isamu; Notoya, Mitsuru; Oka, Shogo; Yukioka, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Ghrelin is an appetite-stimulating hormone secreted from stomach. Since the discovery that acylation of the serine-3 residue by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is essential for exerting its functions, GOAT has been regarded as an therapeutic target for attenuating appetite, and thus for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. However, contrary to the expectations, GOAT-knockout (KO) mice have not shown meaningful body weight reduction, under high-fat diet. Here, in this study, we sought to determine whether GOAT has a role in body weight regulation and glucose metabolism with a focus on dietary sucrose, because macronutrient composition of diet is important for appetite regulation. We found that peripherally administered acylated-ghrelin, but not unacylated one, stimulated sucrose consumption in a two-bottle-drinking test. The role of acylated-ghrelin in sucrose preference was further supported by the finding that GOAT KO mice consumed less sucrose solution compared with WT littermates. Then, we investigated the effect of dietary composition of sucrose on food intake and body weight in GOAT KO and WT mice. As a result, when fed on high-fat diet, food intake and body weight were similar between GOAT KO and WT mice. However, when fed on high-fat, high-sucrose diet, GOAT KO mice showed significantly reduced food intake and marked resistance to obesity, leading to amelioration of glucose metabolism. These results suggest that blockade of acylated-ghrelin production offers therapeutic potential for obesity and metabolic disorders caused by overeating of palatable food. PMID:26645250

  11. Integrating Solid-State NMR and Computational Modeling to Investigate the Structure and Dynamics of Membrane-Associated Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Chollet, Constance; Scheidt, Holger A.; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Meiler, Jens; Huster, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin activates the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a, also known as the ghrelin receptor. This 28-residue peptide is acylated at Ser3 and is the only peptide hormone in the human body that is lipid-modified by an octanoyl group. Little is known about the structure and dynamics of membrane-associated ghrelin. We carried out solid-state NMR studies of ghrelin in lipid vesicles, followed by computational modeling of the peptide using Rosetta. Isotropic chemical shift data of isotopically labeled ghrelin provide information about the peptide’s secondary structure. Spin diffusion experiments indicate that ghrelin binds to membranes via its lipidated Ser3. Further, Phe4, as well as electrostatics involving the peptide’s positively charged residues and lipid polar headgroups, contribute to the binding energy. Other than the lipid anchor, ghrelin is highly flexible and mobile at the membrane surface. This observation is supported by our predicted model ensemble, which is in good agreement with experimentally determined chemical shifts. In the final ensemble of models, residues 8–17 form an α-helix, while residues 21–23 and 26–27 often adopt a polyproline II helical conformation. These helices appear to assist the peptide in forming an amphipathic conformation so that it can bind to the membrane. PMID:25803439

  12. Pulmonary lung surfactant synthetic peptide concentration-dependent modulation of DPPC and POPG acyl chain order in a DPPC:POPG:palmitic acid lipid mixture.

    PubMed

    Krill, S L; Gupta, S L; Smith, T

    1994-05-01

    Lung surfactant-associated protein interaction with lipid matrices and the effects on lipid thermotropic phase behavior are areas of active research. Many studies limit the lipids to a single or two-component system. The current investigation utilizes a three-lipid component matrix (DPPC:POPG:palmitic acid) to investigate the impact of a synthetic surfactant protein B fragment (SP-B 53-78 DiACM) on the dynamic surface activity of the lipid admixture as measured by a Wilhelmy surface balance. Also, the modulation of the individual lipid acyl chain order by the peptide within the lipid matrix is studied through the use of thermal perturbation FTIR spectroscopy. The data clearly demonstrate a concentration-dependent effect of the peptide on the surface activity with an improvement in the dynamic surface tension diagram characteristics (decreased surface tension and increased collapse plateau) especially at low, 0.36 M%, peptide concentrations. These effects are diminished upon further addition of the peptide. FTIR spectral data demonstrate that the peptide addition results in a significant increase in the acyl chain order of the DPPC and POPG components as measured by the position of the methylene stretching vibrational bands. DPPC is most sensitive to the peptide presence, while the palmitic acid is least affected. The transition temperatures of the individual lipids are also increased with the addition of the peptide. The presence of POPG in the matrix achieves the surface activity similarly seen with natural lung surfactant relative to a DPPC/palmitic acid lipid matrix alone. Its presence increases the sensitivity of the DPPC acyl chains to the presence of the peptide. These effects on the chain order are most probably related to the increased acyl chain fluidity which POPG imparts to the lipid matrix because of the presence of the cis double bond. The phosphatidylglycerol headgroup also adds a negative charge to the lipid matrix which enhances the peptide

  13. Assessment of ghrelin and leptin receptor levels in postmenopausal women who received oral or transdermal menopausal hormonal therapy*

    PubMed Central

    Ruszkowska, Barbara; Sokup, Alina; Kulwas, Arleta; Socha, Maciej W.; Góralczyk, Krzysztof; Góralczyk, Barbara; Rość, Danuta

    2012-01-01

    Objective: In postmenopausal women, an increased leptin concentration and reduced levels of ghrelin and adiponectin were observed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentrations of the active form of ghrelin, total ghrelin, leptin receptor, lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)), and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) in postmenopausal women who received oral or transdermal menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT). Methods: The study involved 76 healthy women: 46 women aged from 44 to 58 years who received oral (26) or transdermal (20) MHT; the control group consisted of 30 women aged from 44 to 54 years who did not receive MHT. The plasma concentrations of total ghrelin, the active form of ghrelin, Lp(a), and PAI-1:Ag were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The concentration of the leptin receptor was measured by enzyme immunometric assay (EIA). Results: We observed a significantly higher concentration of total ghrelin and the active form of ghrelin in women who received transdermal MHT in comparison with those who took oral MHT. We also found a significantly lower concentration of total ghrelin in women who received oral MHT compared with the control group. A higher concentration of PAI-1:Ag was found in the group of women who took transdermal MHT in comparison with those who took oral MHT and with the control group. The differences were statistically significant. Additionally, we found a significant negative correlation between the concentrations of total ghrelin and PAI-1:Ag and a positive correlation between the concentrations of total ghrelin and leptin receptor in women who received transdermal MHT. Conclusions: The study showed that women who used transdermal MHT had higher levels of total ghrelin than women who took oral MHT. This indicates a beneficial effect of the transdermal route of MHT. However, transdermal therapy was associated with adverse effects with regard to the observed higher levels of PAI-1:Ag, which in turn, can lead to

  14. The Influence of Ghrelin on the Development of Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Fyderek, Krzysztof; Gałązka, Krystyna; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Pihut, Małgorzata; Dembiński, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin has protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present studies was to investigate the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the development of colitis evoked by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Methods. Studies have been performed on rats. Colitis was induced by adding 5% DSS to the drinking water for 5 days. During this period animals were treated intraperitoneally twice a day with saline or ghrelin given at the dose of 8 nmol/kg/dose. On the sixth day, animals were anesthetized and the severity of colitis was assessed. Results. Treatment with ghrelin during administration of DSS reduced the development of colitis. Morphological features of colonic mucosa exhibited a reduction in the area and deep of mucosal damage. Ghrelin reversed the colitis-induced decrease in blood flow, DNA synthesis, and superoxide dismutase activity in colonic mucosa. These effects were accompanied by a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal concentration of interleukin-1β and malondialdehyde. Treatment with ghrelin reversed the DSS-induced reduction in body weight gain. Conclusions. Administration of ghrelin exhibits the preventive effect against the development of DSS-induced colitis. This effect seems to be related to ghrelin's anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. PMID:26713317

  15. Ghrelin Promotes Functional Angiogenesis in a Mouse Model of Critical Limb Ischemia Through Activation of Proangiogenic MicroRNAs.

    PubMed

    Katare, Rajesh; Rawal, Shruti; Munasinghe, Pujika Emani; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Fujii, Yutaka; Dixit, Parul; Umetani, Keiji; Kangawa, Kenji; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Schwenke, Daryl O

    2016-02-01

    Current therapeutic strategies for the treatment of critical limb ischemia (CLI) have only limited success. Recent in vitro evidence in the literature, using cell lines, proposes that the peptide hormone ghrelin may have angiogenic properties. In this study, we aim to investigate if ghrelin could promote postischemic angiogenesis in a mouse model of CLI and, further, identify the mechanistic pathway(s) that underpin ghrelin's proangiogenic properties. CLI was induced in male CD1 mice by femoral artery ligation. Animals were then randomized to receive either vehicle or acylated ghrelin (150 μg/kg sc) for 14 consecutive days. Subsequently, synchrotron radiation microangiography was used to assess hindlimb perfusion. Subsequent tissue samples were collected for molecular and histological analysis. Ghrelin treatment markedly improved limb perfusion by promoting the generation of new capillaries and arterioles (internal diameter less than 50 μm) within the ischemic hindlimb that were both structurally and functionally normal; evident by robust endothelium-dependent vasodilatory responses to acetylcholine. Molecular analysis revealed that ghrelin's angiogenic properties were linked to activation of prosurvival Akt/vascular endothelial growth factor/Bcl-2 signaling cascade, thus reducing the apoptotic cell death and subsequent fibrosis. Further, ghrelin treatment activated proangiogenic (miR-126 and miR-132) and antifibrotic (miR-30a) microRNAs (miRs) while inhibiting antiangiogenic (miR-92a and miR-206) miRs. Importantly, in vitro knockdown of key proangiogenic miRs (miR-126 and miR-132) inhibited the angiogenic potential of ghrelin. These results therefore suggest that clinical use of ghrelin for the early treatment of CLI may be a promising and potent inducer of reparative vascularization through modulation of key molecular factors. PMID:26672806

  16. Unexpected Reaction Pathway for butyrylcholinesterase-catalyzed inactivation of “hunger hormone” ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Yuan, Yaxia; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Extensive computational modeling and simulations have been carried out, in the present study, to uncover the fundamental reaction pathway for butyrylcholinesterase (BChE)-catalyzed hydrolysis of ghrelin, demonstrating that the acylation process of BChE-catalyzed hydrolysis of ghrelin follows an unprecedented single-step reaction pathway and the single-step acylation process is rate-determining. The free energy barrier (18.8 kcal/mol) calculated for the rate-determining step is reasonably close to the experimentally-derived free energy barrier (~19.4 kcal/mol), suggesting that the obtained mechanistic insights are reasonable. The single-step reaction pathway for the acylation is remarkably different from the well-known two-step acylation reaction pathway for numerous ester hydrolysis reactions catalyzed by a serine esterase. This is the first time demonstrating that a single-step reaction pathway is possible for an ester hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by a serine esterase and, therefore, one no longer can simply assume that the acylation process must follow the well-known two-step reaction pathway. PMID:26922910

  17. Acylated and unacylated ghrelin impair skeletal muscle atrophy in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome associated with cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis, and several other disease states. It is characterized by weight loss, fatigue, loss of appetite, and skeletal muscle atrophy and is associated with poor patient prognosis, making it an important treatment target. Ghreli...

  18. Thermogenic characterization of ghrelin receptor null mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin is the only known circulating orexigenic hormone that increases food intake and promotes adiposity, and these physiological functions of ghrelin are mediated through its receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin/GHS-R signaling plays a crucial role in energy homeostasis....

  19. Lipopolysaccharide increases gastric and circulating NUCB2/nesfatin-1 concentrations in rats

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Jawien, Janusz; Kobelt, Peter; Taché, Yvette; Lambrecht, Nils W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an established animal model to study the innate immune response to Gram-negative bacteria mimicking symptoms of infection including reduction of food intake. LPS decreases acyl ghrelin associated with decreased concentrations of circulating ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT) likely contributing to the anorexigenic effect. We also recently described the prominent expression of the novel anorexigenic hormone, nucleobindin2 (NUCB2)/nesfatin-1 in gastric X/A-like cells co-localized with ghrelin in different pools of vesicles. To investigate whether LPS would affect gastric and circulating NUCB2/nesfatin-1 concentration, ad libitum fed rats were equipped with an intravenous (iv) catheter. LPS was injected intraperitoneally (ip, 100 μg/kg) and blood was withdrawn before and at 2, 5, 7 and 24 h post injection and processed for NUCB2/nesfatin-1 radioimmunoassay. Gastric corpus was collected to measure NUCB2 mRNA expression by RT-qPCR and NUCB2/nesfatin-1 protein concentration by Western blot. Injection of LPS increased plasma NUCB2/nesfatin-1 concentrations by 43%, 78% and 62% compared to vehicle at 2 h, 5 h and 7 h post injection respectively (p < 0.05) and returned to baseline at 24 h. The plasma NUCB2/nesfatin-1 increase at 2 h was associated with increased corpus NUCB2 mRNA expression (p < 0.01), whereas NUCB2 mRNA was not detectable in white blood cells. Likewise, gastric NUCB2 protein concentration was increased by 62% after LPS compared to vehicle (p < 0.01). These data show that gastric NUCB2 production and release are increased in response to LPS. These changes are opposite to those of ghrelin in response to LPS supporting a differential gastric regulation of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 and ghrelin expression derived from the same cell by immune challenge. PMID:21782869

  20. Ghrelin and ghrelin receptor modulation of psychostimulant action

    PubMed Central

    Wellman, Paul J.; Clifford, P. Shane; Rodriguez, Juan A.

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin (GHR) is an orexigenic gut peptide that modulates multiple homeostatic functions including gastric emptying, anxiety, stress, memory, feeding, and reinforcement. GHR is known to bind and activate growth-hormone secretagogue receptors (termed GHR-Rs). Of interest to our laboratory has been the assessment of the impact of GHR modulation of the locomotor activation and reward/reinforcement properties of psychostimulants such as cocaine and nicotine. Systemic GHR infusions augment cocaine stimulated locomotion and conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats, as does food restriction (FR) which elevates plasma ghrelin levels. Ghrelin enhancement of psychostimulant function may occur owing to a direct action on mesolimbic dopamine function or may reflect an indirect action of ghrelin on glucocorticoid pathways. Genomic or pharmacological ablation of GHR-Rs attenuates the acute locomotor-enhancing effects of nicotine, cocaine, amphetamine and alcohol and blunts the CPP induced by food, alcohol, amphetamine and cocaine in mice. The stimulant nicotine can induce CPP and like amphetamine and cocaine, repeated administration of nicotine induces locomotor sensitization in rats. Inactivation of ghrelin circuit function in rats by injection of a ghrelin receptor antagonist (e.g., JMV 2959) diminishes the development of nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization. These results suggest a key permissive role for GHR-R activity for the induction of locomotor sensitization to nicotine. Our finding that GHR-R null rats exhibit diminished patterns of responding for intracranial self-stimulation complements an emerging literature implicating central GHR circuits in drug reward/reinforcement. Finally, antagonism of GHR-Rs may represent a smoking cessation modality that not only blocks nicotine-induced reward but that also may limit weight gain after smoking cessation. PMID:24093007

  1. Exenatide Treatment Causes Suppression of Serum Ghrelin Levels following Mixed Meal Test in Obese Diabetic Women

    PubMed Central

    Topyildiz, Figen; Kiyici, Sinem; Gul, Zulfiye; Sigirli, Deniz; Guclu, Metin; Kisakol, Gurcan; Cavun, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the effect of exenatide treatment on serum ghrelin levels in obese female patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods. Fourteen female patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus being treated with metformin and exenatide were enrolled. A mixed meal test was applied to the patients while continuing with their daily medications. Blood samples were taken before and at 60, 120, and 180 minutes following mixed meal test to measure serum total ghrelin, glucose, and insulin levels. The following week, exenatide treatment of the patients was paused for 24 hours and the same experimental procedures were repeated. Results. Serum ghrelin levels were suppressed significantly at 180 minutes with exenatide treatment compared with baseline (294.4 ± 57.5 versus 234.5 ± 59.4 pg/mL) (p < 0.001). Serum ghrelin levels at 180 minutes were statistically different when percentage change in serum ghrelin levels after mixed meal tests with and without exenatide usage were compared (p = 0.001). Estimated total area under the curve values for serum ghrelin concentrations was also significantly lower with exenatide compared with omitted treatment (p = 0.035). Conclusion. These results suggest that the effect of exenatide on weight loss may be related with the suppression of serum ghrelin levels, which is an orexigenic peptide. PMID:26998491

  2. Preprandial ghrelin is not affected by macronutrient intake, energy intake or energy expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Paul, David R; Kramer, Matthew; Rhodes, Donna G; Rumpler, William V

    2005-01-01

    Background Ghrelin, a peptide secreted by endocrine cells in the gastrointestinal tract, is a hormone purported to have a significant effect on food intake and energy balance in humans. The influence of factors related to energy balance on ghrelin, such as daily energy expenditure, energy intake, and macronutrient intake, have not been reported. Secondly, the effect of ghrelin on food intake has not been quantified under free-living conditions over a prolonged period of time. To investigate these effects, 12 men were provided with an ad libitum cafeteria-style diet for 16 weeks. The macronutrient composition of the diets were covertly modified with drinks containing 2.1 MJ of predominantly carbohydrate (Hi-CHO), protein (Hi-PRO), or fat (Hi-FAT). Total energy expenditure was measured for seven days on two separate occasions (doubly labeled water and physical activity logs). Results Preprandial ghrelin concentrations were not affected by macronutrient intake, energy expenditure or energy intake (all P > 0.05). In turn, daily energy intake was significantly influenced by energy expenditure, but not ghrelin. Conclusion Preprandial ghrelin does not appear to be influenced by macronutrient composition, energy intake, or energy expenditure. Similarly, ghrelin does not appear to affect acute or chronic energy intake under free-living conditions. PMID:15745452

  3. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis. PMID:27598133

  4. Expression and localization of ghrelin and its receptor in ovarian follicles during different stages of development and the modulatory effect of ghrelin on granulosa cells function in buffalo.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M; Dangi, S S; Singh, G; Sarkar, M

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, a hormone predominantly found in the stomach, was recently described as a factor that controls female reproductive function. The aim of our study was to investigate the expression and localization of ghrelin and its active receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a) in buffalo ovarian follicles of different follicular size and to investigate role of ghrelin on estradiol (E2) secretion, aromatase (CYP19A1), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and apoptosis regulator Bax gene expression on granulosa cell culture. Using real time PCR and western blot, we measured gene and protein expression of examined factors. Localization was done with immunofluorescence method. Expression of ghrelin increased with follicle size with significantly highest in dominant or pre-ovulatory follicle (P<0.05). Expression of GHS-R1a was comparable in medium and large follicle but was higher than small follicles (P<0.05). Both the factors were localized in granulosa and theca cells. Pattern of intensity of immunofluorescence was similar with mRNA and protein expression. In the in vitro study granulosa cells (GCs) were cultured and treated with ghrelin each at 1, 10 and 100ng/ml concentrations for two days after obtaining 75-80 per cent confluence. Ghrelin treatment significantly (P<0.05) inhibited E2 secretion, CYP19A1 expression, apoptosis and promoted cell proliferation. In conclusion, this study provides novel evidence for the presence of ghrelin and receptor GHS-R1a in ovarian follilcles and modulatory role of ghrelin on granulosa cell function in buffalo. PMID:25275756

  5. Is there an effect of ghrelin/ghrelin analogs on cancer? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sever, Sakine; White, Donna L; Garcia, José M

    2016-09-01

    Ghrelin is a hormone with multiple physiologic functions, including promotion of growth hormone release, stimulation of appetite and regulation of energy homeostasis. Treatment with ghrelin/ghrelin-receptor agonists is a prospective therapy for disease-related cachexia and malnutrition. In vitro studies have shown high expression of ghrelin in cancer tissue, although its role including its impact in cancer risk and progression has not been established. We performed a systematic literature review to identify peer-reviewed human or animal in vivo original research studies of ghrelin, ghrelin-receptor agonists, or ghrelin genetic variants and the risk, presence, or growth of cancer using structured searches in PubMed database as well as secondary searches of article reference lists, additional reviews and meta-analyses. Overall, 45 (73.8%) of the 61 studies reviewed, including all 11 involving exogenous ghrelin/ghrelin-receptor agonist treatment, reported either a null (no statistically significant difference) or inverse association of ghrelin/ghrelin-receptor agonists or ghrelin genetic variants with cancer risk, presence or growth; 10 (16.7%) studies reported positive associations; and 6 (10.0%) reported both negative or null and positive associations. Differences in serum ghrelin levels in cancer cases vs controls (typically lower) were reported for some but not all cancers. The majority of in vivo studies showed a null or inverse association of ghrelin with risk and progression of most cancers, suggesting that ghrelin/ghrelin-receptor agonist treatment may have a favorable safety profile to use for cancer cachexia. Additional large-scale prospective clinical trials as well as basic bioscientific research are warranted to further evaluate the safety and benefits of ghrelin treatment in patients with cancer. PMID:27552970

  6. Are hungry sheep more pessimistic? The effects of food restriction on cognitive bias and the involvement of ghrelin in its regulation.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Else; Ferguson, Drewe; Lee, Caroline

    2014-01-17

    Food restriction is considered to be a welfare issue in extensively reared animals. However, the effects of food restriction on the affective state, and its physiological regulation, are unknown. In Experiment 1, we aimed to assess the effects of increased plasma concentrations of acyl-ghrelin on judgement bias (an indicator of affective states) by fasting sheep for 24h or by ghrelin administration. In Experiment 2, we aimed to assess the effects of chronic food restriction on judgement bias and attention bias towards a food-related cue. For the judgement bias test, sheep were trained in an arena to approach a positive location cue associated with conspecifics and not approach a negative location cue associated with a dog. Three non-trained, non-reinforced ambiguous location cues were situated between the positive and negative locations. Attention bias towards a food-related cue was assessed by placing an empty food bucket against the wall of the arena halfway between the entry point and the positive location. In Experiment 1, sheep were divided into three treatments; 24h fast, ghrelin administration or control. Judgement bias, locomotor activity and plasma cortisol concentrations were assessed. The ghrelin treated group tended to express a more pessimistic bias compared to the control group (P<0.1), and plasma cortisol concentrations tended to be increased (P<0.1). In Experiment 2, sheep were subjected to a high feeding level (HF) or low feeding level (LF) for 7days. The LF group tended to show a more optimistic judgement bias (P<0.1). When the food-related cue was presented, LF ewes took longer to reach the positive location (P<0.001), spent longer with their head inside the bucket (P<0.001) and more time interacting with the bucket (P<0.01). This study provides preliminary evidence that food restriction alters judgement bias and attention bias towards a food-related cue which may indicate altered affective states of sheep. PMID:24096007

  7. Role of ghrelin in fertilization, early embryo development, and implantation periods.

    PubMed

    Luque, Eugenia Mercedes; Torres, Pedro Javier; de Loredo, Nicolás; Vincenti, Laura María; Stutz, Graciela; Santillán, María Emilia; Ruiz, Rubén Daniel; de Cuneo, Marta Fiol; Martini, Ana Carolina

    2014-08-01

    In order to clarify the physiological role of ghrelin in gestation, we evaluated the effects of administration of exogenous ghrelin (2 or 4 nmol/animal per day) or its antagonist (6 nmol/animal per day of (d-Lys3)GHRP6) on fertilization, early embryo development, and implantation periods in mice. Three experiments were performed, treating female mice with ghrelin or its antagonist: i) starting from 1 week before copulation to 12 h after copulation, mice were killed at day 18 of gestation; ii) since ovulation induction until 80 h later, when we retrieved the embryos from oviducts/uterus, and iii) starting from days 3 to 7 of gestation (peri-implantation), mice were killed at day 18. In experiments 1 and 3, the antagonist and/or the highest dose of ghrelin significantly increased the percentage of atrophied fetuses and that of females exhibiting this finding or a higher amount of corpora lutea compared with fetuses (nCL/nF) (experiment 3: higher nCL/nF-atrophied fetuses: ghrelin 4, 71.4-71.4% and antagonist, 75.0-62.5% vs ghrelin 2, 46.2-15.4% and control, 10-0.0%; n=7-13 females/group; P<0.01). In experiment 2, the antagonist diminished the fertilization rate, and both, ghrelin and the antagonist, delayed embryo development (blastocysts: ghrelin 2, 62.5%; ghrelin 4, 50.6%; and antagonist, 61.0% vs control 78.4%; n=82-102 embryos/treatment; P<0.0001). In experiment 3, additionally, ghrelin (4 nmol/day) and the antagonist significantly diminished the weight gain of fetuses and dams during pregnancy. Our results indicate that not only hyperghrelinemia but also the inhibition of the endogenous ghrelin effects exerts negative effects on the fertilization, implantation, and embryo/fetal development periods, supporting the hypothesis that ghrelin (in 'adequate' concentrations) has a physiological role in early gestational events. PMID:24821833

  8. Hepatic changes in metabolic gene expression in old ghrelin and ghrelin receptor knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin knockout (GKO) and ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor) knockout (GHSRKO) mice exhibit enhanced insulin sensitivity, but the mechanism is unclear. Insulin sensitivity declines with age and is inversely associated with accumulation of lipid in liver, a key glucoregulatory ...

  9. Steady-state concentrations of coenzyme A, acetyl-coenzyme A and long-chain fatty acyl-coenzyme A in rat-liver mitochondria oxidizing palmitate

    PubMed Central

    Garland, P. B.; Shepherd, D.; Yates, D. W.

    1965-01-01

    1. Fluorimetric assays are described for CoASH, acetyl-CoA and long-chain fatty acyl-CoA, and are sensitive to at least 50μμmoles of each. 2. Application of these assays to rat-liver mitochondria oxidizing palmitate in the absence and presence of carnitine indicated two pools of intramitochondrial CoA. One pool could be acylated by palmitate and ATP, and the other pool acylated by palmitate with ATP and carnitine, or by palmitoylcarnitine alone. 3. The intramitochondrial content of acetyl-CoA is increased by the oxidation of palmitate both in the absence and presence of l-malate. 4. The conversion of palmitoyl-CoA into acetyl-CoA by β-oxidation takes place without detectable accumulation of acyl-CoA intermediates. PMID:16749169

  10. Revisiting the metabolism and physiological functions of caprylic acid (C8:0) with special focus on ghrelin octanoylation.

    PubMed

    Lemarié, Fanny; Beauchamp, Erwan; Legrand, Philippe; Rioux, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Caprylic acid (octanoic acid, C8:0) belongs to the class of medium-chain saturated fatty acids (MCFAs). Dairy products and specific oils like coconut oil are natural sources of dietary C8:0 but higher intakes of this fatty acid can be provided with MCT (Medium-Chain Triglycerides) oil that consists in 75% of C8:0. MCFAs have physical and metabolic properties that are distinct from those of long-chain saturated fatty acids (LCFAs ≥ 12 carbons). Beneficial physiological effects of dietary C8:0 have been studied for a long time and MCT oil has been used as a special energy source for patients suffering from pancreatic insufficiency, impaired lymphatic chylomicron transport and fat malabsorption. More recently, caprylic acid was also shown to acylate ghrelin, the only known peptide hormone with an orexigenic effect. Through its covalent binding to the ghrelin peptide, caprylic acid exhibits an emerging and specific role in modulating physiological functions themselves regulated by octanoylated ghrelin. Dietary caprylic acid is therefore now suspected to provide the ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) enzyme with octanoyl-CoA co-substrates necessary for the acyl modification of ghrelin. This review tries to highlight the discrepancy between the formerly described beneficial effects of dietary MCFAs on body weight loss and the C8:0 newly reported effect on appetite stimulation via ghrelin octanoylation. The subsequent aim of this review is to demonstrate the relevance of carrying out further studies to better understand the physiological functions of this particular fatty acid. PMID:26253695

  11. Characterization of adult ghrelin and ghrelin receptor knockout mice under positive and negative energy balance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin and the ghrelin receptor (GH secretagogue receptor, GHS-R) are believed to have important roles in energy homeostasis. We describe results from the first studies to be conducted in congenic (N10) adult ghrelin(-/-) and Ghsr(-/-) mice under conditions of both positive (high-fat diet) and nega...

  12. Ghrelin Receptors in Non-Mammalian Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue-receptor (GHS-R) was discovered in humans and pigs in 1996. The endogenous ligand, ghrelin, was discovered 3 years later, in 1999, and our understanding of the physiological significance of the ghrelin system in vertebrates has grown steadily since then. Although the ghrelin system in non-mammalian vertebrates is a subject of great interest, protein sequence data for the receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates has been limited until recently, and related biological information has not been well organized. In this review, we summarize current information related to the ghrelin receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates. PMID:23882259

  13. Pituitary immunoexpression of ghrelin in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Rotondo, Fabio; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Syro, Luis V; Rotondo, Angelo; Kovacs, Kalman

    2012-12-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone, is known to occur in the normal anterior pituitary where its physiologic role is uncertain but may include promotion of appetite. We sought to investigate anticipated differences in adenohypophysial and neurohypophysial ghrelin immunoexpression between normal subjects and patients with anorexia nervosa who had succumbed to complications of the disease. We hypothesized that the glands of anorexia nervosa patients would show relative diminished action in ghrelin content. The study included 12 autopsy-derived pituitaries of anorexia nervosa and 10 control glands. The streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method and double immunohistochemical staining method were used to determine which cell types expressed both ghrelin and adenohypophysial hormones. Nontumorous control pituitaries were also obtained at autopsy. In anorexia nervosa and control adenohypophyses, ghrelin was mainly localized in somatotrophs and to a lesser extent in corticotrophs and gonadotrophs. Ghrelin accumulated within nerve fibers and Herring bodies in the neurohypophysis and pituitary stalk. In the controls, ghrelin expression was apparent in only a few cases. It was mild and only along few nerve fibers. In the adenohypophyses of anorexia nervosa patients, ghrelin was not depleted. It appears that in these patients, ghrelin is transported in excess from the hypothalamic neurohypophysial tract to the neurohypophysis. PMID:22081273

  14. 1 Peripheral ghrelin stimulates feeding behavior and positive energy balance in a sciurid hibernator

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Jessica E.; Bateman, Jenna L.; Ostrom, Cara E.; Florant, Gregory L.

    2011-01-01

    Hibernators exhibit a robust circannual cycle of body mass gain and loss primarily mediated by food intake, but the pathways controlling food intake in these animals have not been fully elucidated. Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone that increases feeding in all mammals studied so far, but has not until recently been studied in hibernators. In other mammals, ghrelin stimulates feeding through phosphorylation and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of AMPK phosphorylates and deactivates acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC), a committed step in fatty acid synthesis. In order to determine the effects of exogenous ghrelin on food intake and metabolic factors (i.e. non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs), and hypothalamic AMPK and ACC) in hibernators, ghrelin was peripherally injected into ground squirrels in all four seasons. Changes in food intake and body mass were recorded over a 2–6 hour period post injections, and squirrels were euthanized. Brains and blood were removed, and Western blots were performed to determine changes in phosphorylation of hypothalamic AMPK and ACC. A colorimetric assay was used to determine changes in concentration of serum NEFAs. We found that food intake, body mass, and locomotor activity significantly increased with ghrelin injections versus saline-injected controls, even in animals injected during their aphagic winter season. Injected ghrelin was correlated with increased phosphorylation of AMPK, but didn’t have an effect on ACC in winter. Ghrelin-injected animals also had increased levels of serum NEFAs compared with saline controls. This study is the first to show an effect of injected ghrelin on a hibernator. PMID:21310157

  15. Methyl Donor Deficiency Affects Fetal Programming of Gastric Ghrelin Cell Organization and Function in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Blaise, Sébastien; Pourié, Grégory; Tomasetto, Catherine; Audonnet, Sandra; Ortiou, Sandrine; Koziel, Violette; Rio, Marie-Christine; Daval, Jean-Luc; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Beck, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Methyl donor deficiency (MDD) during pregnancy influences intrauterine development. Ghrelin is expressed in the stomach of fetuses and influences fetal growth, but MDD influence on gastric ghrelin is unknown. We examined the gastric ghrelin system in MDD-induced intrauterine growth retardation. By using specific markers and approaches (such as periodic acid–Schiff, bromodeoxyuridine, homocysteine, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling, immunostaining, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction), we studied the gastric oxyntic mucosa cellular organization and ghrelin gene expression in the mucosa in 20-day-old fetuses and weanling pups, and plasma ghrelin concentration in weanling rat pups of dams either normally fed or deprived of choline, folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 during gestation and suckling periods. MDD fetuses weighed less than controls; the weight deficit reached 57% at weaning (P < 0.001). Both at the end of gestation and at weaning, they presented with an aberrant gastric oxyntic mucosa formation with loss of cell polarity, anarchic cell migration, abnormal progenitor differentiation, apoptosis, and signs of surface layer erosion. Ghrelin cells were abnormally located in the pit region of oxyntic glands. At weaning, plasma ghrelin levels were decreased (−28%; P < 0.001) despite unchanged mRNA expression in the stomach. This decrease was associated with lower body weight. Taken together, these data indicate that one mechanism through which MDD influences fetal programming is the remodeling of gastric cellular organization, leading to dysfunction of the ghrelin system and dramatic effects on growth. PMID:19948829

  16. Ghrelin protects alveolar macrophages against lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis through growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a-dependent c-Jun N-terminal kinase and Wnt/β-catenin signaling and suppresses lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zeng, Mian; He, Wanmei; Huang, Xubin; Luo, Liang; Zhang, Hongwu; Deng, David Y B

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) undergo increased apoptosis during sepsis-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Ghrelin exhibits an antiapoptotic effect in several cell types and protects against sepsis-induced ARDS in rats; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this antiapoptotic effect remain poorly understood. In this study, we first examined the antiapoptotic effect of ghrelin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated AMs in vitro. In AMs, GH secretagogue receptor-1a (GHSR-1a), the ghrelin receptor, was expressed, and treatment of AMs with ghrelin markedly reduced LPS-induced apoptosis, mitochondrial transmembrane potential decrease, and cytochrome c release. These effects of ghrelin were mediated by GHSR-1a because a GHSR-1a-targeting small interfering RNA abolished the antiapoptotic action of ghrelin. LPS treatment activated the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway but inhibited the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Interestingly, combined LPS-ghrelin treatment reduced JNK activation and increased Wnt/β-catenin activation. Furthermore, like ghrelin treatment, the addition of the JNK inhibitor SP600125 or the glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitor SB216763 rescued AMs from apoptosis. We also demonstrated that ghrelin altered the balance of Bcl-2-family proteins and inhibited caspase-3 activity. Next, we investigated whether ghrelin protected against septic ARDS in vivo. Sepsis was induced in male rats by performing cecal ligation and puncture; administration of ghrelin reduced sepsis-induced AMs apoptosis, pulmonary injury, protein concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the lung neutrophil infiltration, and wet to dry weight ratio. However, administration of a specific ghrelin-receptor antagonist, [D-Lys-3]-GH-releasing peptide-6, abolished the beneficial effects of ghrelin. Collectively our results suggest that ghrelin exerts an antiapoptotic effect on AMs at least partly by inhibiting JNK and activating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway

  17. Ghrelin receptor controls obesity by fat burning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging evidence show that brown fat in the body produces heat to burn energy, thus prompting weight loss. Ghrelin is the only known hormone which increases appetite and promotes weight gain. We have reported that mice that lack the receptor which mediates the functions of ghrelin are lean. Our fu...

  18. The effect of H. pylori eradication on meal-associated changes in plasma ghrelin and leptin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Appetite and energy expenditure are regulated in part by ghrelin and leptin produced in the gastric mucosa, which may be modified by H. pylori colonization. We prospectively evaluated the effect of H. pylori eradication on meal-associated changes in serum ghrelin and leptin levels, and body weight. Methods Veterans referred for upper GI endoscopy were evaluated at baseline and ≥8 weeks after endoscopy, and H. pylori status and body weight were ascertained. During the first visit in all subjects, and during subsequent visits in the initially H. pylori-positive subjects and controls, blood was collected after an overnight fast and 1 h after a standard high protein meal, and levels of eight hormones determined. Results Of 92 enrolled subjects, 38 were H. pylori-negative, 44 H. pylori-positive, and 10 were indeterminate. Among 23 H. pylori-positive subjects who completed evaluation after treatment, 21 were eradicated, and 2 failed eradication. After a median of seven months following eradication, six hormones related to energy homeostasis showed no significant differences, but post-prandial acylated ghrelin levels were nearly six-fold higher than pre-eradication (p = 0.005), and median integrated leptin levels also increased (20%) significantly (p < 0.001). BMI significantly increased (5 ± 2%; p = 0.008) over 18 months in the initially H. pylori-positive individuals, but was not significantly changed in those who were H. pylori-negative or indeterminant at baseline. Conclusions Circulating meal-associated leptin and ghrelin levels and BMI changed significantly after H. pylori eradication, providing direct evidence that H. pylori colonization is involved in ghrelin and leptin regulation, with consequent effects on body morphometry. PMID:21489301

  19. Characterization of a Novel Ghrelin Cell Reporter Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Ichiro; Nakano, Yoshihide; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Rovinsky, Sherry A.; Lee, Charlotte E.; Perello, Mario; Anderson, Jason G.; Coppari, Roberto; Xiao, Guanghua; Lowell, Bradford B.; Elmquist, Joel K.; Zigman, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin is a hormone that influences many physiological processes and behaviors, such as food intake, insulin and growth hormone release, and a coordinated response to chronic stress. However, little is known about the molecular pathways governing ghrelin release and ghrelin cell function. To better study ghrelin cell physiology, we have generated several transgenic mouse lines expressing humanized Renilla reniformis green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) under the control of the mouse ghrelin promoter. hrGFP expression was especially abundant in the gastric oxyntic mucosa, in a pattern mirroring that of ghrelin immunoreactivity and ghrelin mRNA. hrGFP expression also was observed in the duodenum, but not in the brain, pancreatic islet, or testis. In addition, we used fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS) to collect and partially characterize highly enriched populations of gastric ghrelin cells. We suggest that these novel ghrelin-hrGFP transgenic mice will serve as useful tools to better understand ghrelin cell physiology. PMID:19361544

  20. Effects of exercise intensity on plasma concentrations of appetite-regulating hormones: Potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hazell, Tom J; Islam, Hashim; Townsend, Logan K; Schmale, Matt S; Copeland, Jennifer L

    2016-03-01

    The physiological control of appetite regulation involves circulating hormones with orexigenic (appetite-stimulating) and anorexigenic (appetite-inhibiting) properties that induce alterations in energy intake via perceptions of hunger and satiety. As the effectiveness of exercise to induce weight loss is a controversial topic, there is considerable interest in the effect of exercise on the appetite-regulating hormones such as acylated ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP). Research to date suggests short-term appetite regulation following a single exercise session is likely affected by decreases in acylated ghrelin and increases in PYY, GLP-1, and PP. Further, this exercise-induced response may be intensity-dependent. In an effort to guide future research, it is important to consider how exercise alters the circulating concentrations of these appetite-regulating hormones. Potential mechanisms include blood redistribution, sympathetic nervous system activity, gastrointestinal motility, cytokine release, free fatty acid concentrations, lactate production, and changes in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. This review of relevant research suggests blood redistribution during exercise may be important for suppressing ghrelin, while other mechanisms involving cytokine release, changes in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, SNS activity, and muscle metabolism likely mediate changes in the anorexigenic signals PYY and GLP-1. Overall, changes in appetite-regulating hormones following acute exercise appear to be intensity-dependent, with increasing intensity leading to a greater suppression of orexigenic signals and greater stimulation of anorexigenic signals. However, there is less research on how exercise-induced responses in appetite-regulating hormones differ between sexes or different age groups. A better understanding of how exercise intensity and workload affect appetite across the sexes and life

  1. Carbohydrate-rich breakfast attenuates glycaemic, insulinaemic and ghrelin response to ad libitum lunch relative to morning fasting in lean adults.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Enhad A; Richardson, Judith D; Tsintzas, Kostas; Thompson, Dylan; Betts, James A

    2015-07-14

    Breakfast omission is associated with obesity and CVD/diabetes, but the acute effects of extended morning fasting upon subsequent energy intake and metabolic/hormonal responses have received less attention. In a randomised cross-over design, thirty-five lean men (n 14) and women (n 21) extended their overnight fast or ingested a typical carbohydrate-rich breakfast in quantities relative to RMR (i.e. 1963 (sd 238) kJ), before an ad libitum lunch 3 h later. Blood samples were obtained hourly throughout the day until 3 h post-lunch, with subjective appetite measures assessed. Lunch intake was greater following extended fasting (640 (sd 1042) kJ, P< 0.01) but incompletely compensated for the omitted breakfast, with total intake lower than the breakfast trial (3887 (sd 1326) v. 5213 (sd 1590) kJ, P< 0.001). Systemic concentrations of peptide tyrosine-tyrosine and leptin were greater during the afternoon following breakfast (both P< 0.05) but neither acylated/total ghrelin concentrations were suppressed by the ad libitum lunch in the breakfast trial, remaining greater than the morning fasting trial throughout the afternoon (all P< 0.05). Insulin concentrations were greater during the afternoon in the morning fasting trial (all P< 0.01). There were no differences between trials in subjective appetite during the afternoon. In conclusion, morning fasting caused incomplete energy compensation at an ad libitum lunch. Breakfast increased some anorectic hormones during the afternoon but paradoxically abolished ghrelin suppression by the second meal. Extending morning fasting until lunch altered subsequent metabolic and hormonal responses but without greater appetite during the afternoon. The present study clarifies the impact of acute breakfast omission and adds novel insights into second-meal metabolism. PMID:26004166

  2. Relationship between Serum Leptin, Ghrelin and Dietary Macronutrients in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pourghassem Gargari, Bahram; Houjeghani, Shiva; Farzadi, Laya; Houjeghani, Sheyda; Safaeiyan, Abdolrasoul

    2015-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy in women. It may involve an impairment in physiologic regulation of leptin and ghrelin. There is limited, controversial data on the relation of dietary components with leptin and ghrelin in PCOS, so the current study has been conducted to explore the effects of different macronutrients on serum levels of leptin and ghrelin in PCOS and healthy subjects. Materials and Methods In this case-control study, we randomly choose 30 PCOS pa- tients and 30 healthy age and body mass index (BMI) matched controls. Intake of macronutrients [protein, total fat, saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), carbohydrate, dietary fiber] and energy were assessed using 3-day, 24-hour food recall and food frequency questionnaires (FFQ). Fasting hormonal status was measured for each participant. Results PCOS women had higher levels of serum leptin, insulin, testosterone, and luteinizing hormone (LH), whereas sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) was lower compared to healthy women. There was no significant difference in mean ghrelin concentrations between the groups. Among PCOS women, independent of BMI and total energy intake, we observed an inverse association between leptin concentration and total dietary fat (β=-0.16, P<0.05) and saturated fatty acid (SFA) intake (β=-0.58, P<0.05). This relationship was not seen in the healthy subjects. There was no significant association between ghrelin and macronutrients in PCOS and healthy participants. Conclusion Certain habitual dietary components such as fat and SFA may decrease serum leptin, whereas ghrelin is not influenced by these in PCOS women. More studies are needed to better clarify the effects of dietary macronutrients on serum leptin and ghrelin. PMID:26644854

  3. Dietary supplementation with zinc oxide stimulates ghrelin secretion from the stomach of young pigs.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jingdong; Li, Xilong; Li, Defa; Yue, Tao; Fang, Qian; Ni, Jianjun; Zhou, Xuan; Wu, Guoyao

    2009-10-01

    Dietary supplementation with zinc is known to enhance food intake and growth in young children. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Ghrelin, a peptide derived mainly from stomach, plays an important role in food-intake regulation. The present study was conducted with the piglet model to test the hypothesis that zinc may increase gastric ghrelin secretion. In Experiment 1 (Exp. 1) , thirty-six 28-day-old weaned pigs were assigned to two groups (18 pigs/group), receiving four-week supplementation of 0 or 2000 mg/kg Zn (as ZnO) to the basal diet containing 100 mg/kg Zn. In Experiment (Exp. 2), sixteen 28-day-old piglets were assigned to the same treatments (n=8/group) as in Exp. 1, except that they were pair-fed an equal amount of diet. At the end of the experiments, blood, stomach and duodenum samples were obtained for biochemical analysis, including assays of ghrelin protein and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in plasma, as well as quantification of ghrelin and IGF-I mRNA levels in the duodenum and gastric mucosa. Further, gastric mucosal cells from unsupplemented piglets were cultured with 0-0.5 mM ZnO for 2-24 h for assays of ghrelin production and gene expression. Dietary Zn supplementation increased plasma concentrations of ghrelin, IGF-I and cholecystokinin; IGF-I gene expression in the duodenum as well as food intake and piglet growth (Exp. 1). The effects of ZnO on plasma levels of ghrelin, intestinal IGF-I expression and piglet growth were independent of food intake. Addition of ZnO to culture medium enhanced ghrelin production from gastric mucosal cells without affecting ghrelin mRNA levels. Collectively, our results indicate that ZnO stimulates ghrelin secretion from the stomach at the post-transcriptional level. This novel finding aids in elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanism for a role of zinc in promoting food intake and growth of young children. PMID:18926680

  4. Relamorelin: A Novel Gastrocolokinetic Synthetic Ghrelin Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Acosta, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic ghrelin agonists, predominantly small molecules, are being developed as prokinetic agents that may prove useful in the treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders. Relamorelin (RM-131) is a pentapeptide synthetic ghrelin analog that activates the growth hormone secretagogue (GHS)-1a (also called the ghrelin) receptor with approximately 6-fold greater potency than natural ghrelin. The ability of relamorelin to stimulate growth hormone (GH) release is comparable to that of native ghrelin. Relamorelin has enhanced efficacy and plasma stability compared to native ghrelin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and potential indications for relamorelin. Relamorelin is administered subcutaneously, dosed daily or twice daily. Relamorelin is being studied for the treatment of patients with gastrointestinal motility disorders. Phase IIA pharmacodynamic studies have demonstrated acceleration of gastric emptying in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 DM (T2DM) and upper gastrointestinal symptoms. In a phase IIA study in patients with diabetic gastroparesis, relamorelin accelerated gastric emptying and significantly improved vomiting frequency compared to placebo and improved other symptoms of gastroparesis in a pre-specified subgroup of patients with vomiting at baseline. In patients with chronic idiopathic constipation with defined transit profile at baseline, relamorelin relieved constipation and accelerated colonic transit compared to placebo. These characteristics suggest that this new ghrelin analog shows great promise to relieve patients with upper or lower gastrointestinal motility disorders. PMID:25545036

  5. New insights in ghrelin orexigenic effect.

    PubMed

    Diéguez, Carlos; da Boit, Kátia; Novelle, Marta G; Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Nogueiras, Rubén; López, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Ghrelin, a peptide hormone first discovered as the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), is predominantly produced and released into the circulation by ghrelin cells (X/A-like) of the stomach fundus cells. Ghrelin has multiple actions in multiple tissues. In particular, it is the most potent known endogenous orexigenic peptide, and plays a significant role in glucose homeostasis: deletion of the genes encoding ghrelin and/or its receptor prevents high-fat diet from inducing obesity, increases insulin levels, enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and improves peripheral insulin sensitivity. In addition to its already mentioned roles, ghrelin has other activities including stimulation of pituitary hormones secretion, regulation of gastric and pancreatic activity, modulation of fatty acid metabolism via specific control of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and cardiovascular and hemodynamic activities. In addition, modulation of cartilage and bone homeostasis, sleep and behavioral influences, and modulation of the immune system, as well as effects on cell proliferation, are other relevant actions of ghrelin. In this review, we summarize several aspects of ghrelin effects at hypothalamic level and their implications in the control of food intake and energy balance. PMID:20616512

  6. LIGNIN ACYLATION IN GRASSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acylation of lignin during growth and development is a commonly found among some plant species. Grasses form unique acylated lignins involving p-coumarate (pCA). In corn rind tissue, it is exclusively attached to the gamma-carbon of lignin monomers, with a strong preference (over 90%) for attachment...

  7. Hypotensive effects of ghrelin receptor agonists mediated through a novel receptor

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Brid; Kosari, Samin; Pustovit, Ruslan V; Sartor, Daniela M; Ferens, Dorota; Ban, Kung; Baell, Jonathan; Nguyen, Trung V; Rivera, Leni R; Brock, James A; Furness, John B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Some agonists of ghrelin receptors cause rapid decreases in BP. The mechanisms by which they cause hypotension and the pharmacology of the receptors are unknown. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of ligands of ghrelin receptors were investigated in rats in vivo, on isolated blood vessels and on cells transfected with the only molecularly defined ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR1a). KEY RESULTS Three agonists of GHSR1a receptors, ulimorelin, capromorelin and CP464709, caused a rapid decrease in BP in the anaesthetized rat. The effect was not reduced by either of two GHSR1a antagonists, JMV2959 or YIL781, at doses that blocked effects on colorectal motility, in vivo. The rapid hypotension was not mimicked by ghrelin, unacylated ghrelin or the unacylated ghrelin receptor agonist, AZP531. The early hypotension preceded a decrease in sympathetic nerve activity. Early hypotension was not reduced by hexamethonium or by baroreceptor (sino-aortic) denervation. Ulimorelin also relaxed isolated segments of rat mesenteric artery, and, less potently, relaxed aorta segments. The vascular relaxation was not reduced by JMV2959 or YIL781. Ulimorelin, capromorelin and CP464709 activated GHSR1a in transfected HEK293 cells at nanomolar concentrations. JMV2959 and YIL781 both antagonized effects in these cells, with their pA2 values at the GHSR1a receptor being 6.55 and 7.84. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results indicate a novel vascular receptor or receptors whose activation by ulimorelin, capromorelin and CP464709 lowered BP. This receptor is activated by low MW GHSR1a agonists, but is not activated by ghrelin. PMID:24670149

  8. Oxidative acylation using thioacids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1997-01-01

    Several important prebiotic reactions, including the coupling of amino acids into polypeptides by the formation of amide linkages, involve acylation. Theae reactions present a challenge to the understanding of prebiotic synthesis. Condensation reactions relying on dehydrating agents are either inefficient in aqueous solution or require strongly acidic conditions and high temperatures. Activated amino acids such as thioester derivatives have therefore been suggested as likely substrates for prebiotic peptide synthesis. Here we propose a closely related route to amide bond formation involving oxidative acylation by thioacids. We find that phenylalanine, leucine and phenylphosphate are acylated efficiently in aqueous solution by thioacetic acid and an oxidizing agent. From a prebiotic point of view, oxidative acylation has the advantage of proceeding efficiently in solution and under mild conditions. We anticipate that oxidative acylation should prove to be a general method for activating carboxylic acids, including amino acids.

  9. Radiometric assay of ghrelin hydrolase activity and 3H-ghrelin distribution into mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Vicky Ping; Gao, Yang; Geng, Liyi; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2015-12-15

    A high-throughput radiometric assay was developed to characterize enzymatic hydrolysis of ghrelin and to track the peptide's fate in vivo. The assay is based on solvent partitioning of [(3)H]-octanoic acid liberated from [(3)H]-octanoyl ghrelin during enzymatic hydrolysis. This simple and cost-effective method facilitates kinetic analysis of ghrelin hydrolase activity of native and mutated butyrylcholinesterases or carboxylesterases from multiple species. In addition, the assay's high sensitivity facilitates ready evaluation of ghrelin's pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution in mice after i.v. bolus administration of radiolabeled peptide. PMID:26514871

  10. Ghrelin acts as energy status sensor of male reproduction by modulating Sertoli cells glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Martins, A D; Sá, R; Monteiro, M P; Barros, A; Sousa, M; Carvalho, R A; Silva, B M; Oliveira, P F; Alves, M G

    2016-10-15

    Ghrelin is a growth hormone-releasing peptide that has been suggested to interfere with spermatogenesis, though the underling mechanisms remain unknown. We studied the effect of ghrelin in human Sertoli cells (hSCs) metabolic phenotype. For that, hSCs were exposed to increasing concentrations of ghrelin (20, 100 and 500 pM) mimicking the levels reported in obese, normal weight, and severely undernourished individuals. The metabolite production/consumption was determined. The protein levels of key glycolysis-related transporters and enzymes were assessed. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was measured. Mitochondrial complexes protein levels and mitochondria membrane potential were also measured. We showed that hSCs express the growth hormone secretagogue receptor. At the concentration present in the plasma of normal weight men, ghrelin caused a decrease of glucose consumption and mitochondrial membrane potential in hSCs, though LDH activity and lactate production remained unchanged, illustrating an alteration of glycolytic flux efficiency. Exposure of hSCs to levels of ghrelin found in the plasma of severely undernourished individuals decreased pyruvate consumption and mitochondrial complex III protein expression. All concentrations of ghrelin decreased alanine and acetate production by hSCs. Notably, the effects of ghrelin levels found in severely undernourished individuals were more pronounced in hSCs metabolic phenotype highlighting the importance of a proper eating behavior to maintain male reproductive potential. In conclusion, ghrelin acts as an energy status sensor for hSCs in a dose-dependent manner, showing an inverse association with the production of lactate, thus controlling the nutritional support of spermatogenesis. PMID:27392494

  11. Differential distribution of ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT) immunoreactive cells in the mouse and rat gastric oxyntic mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette; Sachs, George; Lambrecht, Nils W.G.

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme that acylates ghrelin was recently identified in mice as the fourth member of the membrane-bound O-acyltransferases superfamily (MBOAT4) and named ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT). Only one report showed GOAT mRNA expression in ghrelin-expressing cells of the mouse stomach. We investigated the distribution of GOAT protein in peripheral tissues and co-expression with endocrine markers in the gastric mucosa using a custom-made anti-GOAT antibody. Tissues were collected from male Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice. Western blot revealed two immunoreactive bands in rat and mouse gastric corpus mucosal proteins, a 50 kDa band corresponding to the GOAT protein and a 100 kDa band likely corresponding to a dimer. Western blot also detected GOAT in the plasma and levels were strongly increased after 24-h fasting in mice and slightly in rats. GOAT-immunoreactive cells were located in the gastric corpus mucosa and the anterior pituitary gland, whereas other peripheral tissues of rats and mice examined were negative. In mice, GOAT-immunoreactive cells were mainly distributed throughout the middle portion of the oxyntic glands, whereas in rats they were localized mainly in the lower portion of the glands. Double labeling showed that 95±1% of GOAT-immunoreactive cells in mice co-labeled with ghrelin, whereas in rats only 56±4% of GOAT-positive cells showed co-expression of ghrelin. The remainder of the GOAT-immunopositive cells in rats co-expressed histidine decarboxylase (44±3%). No co-localization was observed with somatostatin in rats or mice. These data suggest species differences between rats and mice in gastric GOAT expression perhaps resulting in a different role of the MBOAT4 enzyme in the rat stomach. Detection of GOAT in the plasma raises the possibility that ghrelin octanoylation may occur in the circulation and the fasting-induced increase in GOAT may contribute to the increase of acylated ghrelin after fasting. PMID:20059966

  12. Fetuin-A and Ghrelin Levels in Children with End Stage Renal Disease and the Effect of a Single Hemodialysis Session on Them

    PubMed Central

    Shouman, Mohamed Gamal; Ismail, Nagwa Abdallah; Badr, Ahmed; Abdelrahman, Safaa Mohamed; Ragab, Shadia; Farouk, Hebatallah

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fetuin-A and ghrelin have been implicated in cardiovascular diseases and mortality among end stage renal disease patients. The exact mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. There is robust data supporting an association between ghrelin and various cardiovascular conditions, and some common processes such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress have been implicated. AIM: This study was conducted to assay serum fetuin-A and ghrelin in chronic renal failure pediatric patients and to study changes in their level that may occur after a single hemodialysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty nine pediatric patients suffering from ESRD on maintenance hemodialysis (HD), 20 patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) not on dialysis and 35 healthy subjects as control group were included. The mean age of the study population was 10.58 ± 3.94, 10.62 ± 3.24 and 10.61 ± 3.97 years respectively. Serum fetuin-A and plasma acyl ghrelin levels were measured by using ELISA method. RESULTS: The present study revealed that predialysis serum fetuin-A level was significantly increased in pediatric HD patients compared with the normal population, while ghrelin levels were significantly reduced. Furthermore, serum levels of fetuin-A decreased significantly after a single HD session. CONCLUSION: Our study concluded that fetuin-A and acyl ghrelin may play a role in inflammatory process among HD pediatric patients which may account for cardiovascular insults and mortality but their use as biochemical markers among ESRD pediatric patients have limitations due to wide fluctuations.

  13. Fatty acylation of proteins: The long and the short of it.

    PubMed

    Resh, Marilyn D

    2016-07-01

    Long, short and medium chain fatty acids are covalently attached to hundreds of proteins. Each fatty acid confers distinct biochemical properties, enabling fatty acylation to regulate intracellular trafficking, subcellular localization, protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. Myristate and palmitate represent the most common fatty acid modifying groups. New insights into how fatty acylation reactions are catalyzed, and how fatty acylation regulates protein structure and function continue to emerge. Myristate is typically linked to an N-terminal glycine, but recent studies reveal that lysines can also be myristoylated. Enzymes that remove N-terminal myristoyl-glycine or myristate from lysines have now been identified. DHHC proteins catalyze S-palmitoylation, but the mechanisms that regulate substrate recognition by individual DHHC family members remain to be determined. New studies continue to reveal thioesterases that remove palmitate from S-acylated proteins. Another area of rapid expansion is fatty acylation of the secreted proteins hedgehog, Wnt and Ghrelin, by Hhat, Porcupine and GOAT, respectively. Understanding how these membrane bound O-acyl transferases recognize their protein and fatty acyl CoA substrates is an active area of investigation, and is punctuated by the finding that these enzymes are potential drug targets in human diseases. PMID:27233110

  14. Effect of Ghrelin on Hepatic IGF-Binding Protein-1 Production

    PubMed Central

    Lewitt, Moira S.

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin plays key roles in energy homeostasis by central and peripheral actions that include effects on insulin signalling pathways in liver. Insulin is an important inhibitor of production by hepatocytes of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) which has an endocrine role to inhibit IGF availability. The effects of ghrelin, insulin, an AMPK activator, and an AMPK inhibitor on IGFBP-1 secretion were studied in H4-II-E rat liver cells. Ghrelin (100 nM) blocked the inhibitory effect of a maximally effective concentration of insulin (10 ng/mL) on IGFBP-1 secretion during a 5 h incubation period (P < 0.001) in the absence and presence of an AMPK inhibitor. Ghrelin, alone, had no effect on IGFBP-1 production, but enhanced secretion independently of insulin under conditions of AMPK activation (P < 0.001). In conclusion, IGFBP-1 is identified as a novel target of ghrelin action in liver that may contribute to its metabolic effects in obesity. PMID:24555152

  15. Evaluation of the hormones responsible for the gastrointestinal motility in cattle with displacement of the abomasum; ghrelin, motilin and gastrin.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, A S; Guzel, M; Askar, T K; Aytekin, I

    2013-06-15

    This study provides the evidence of increased serum gastrointestinal motility hormone concentrations including ghrelin, motilin and gastrin in cattle with displacement of abomasum (DA). In this study, 38 cows with DA (21 left DA (LDA) and 17 right DA (RDA)) and 15 healthy controls were included. All cattle with DA were at the stage of postpartum one to eight weeks, and had clinical signs including anorexia, decreased milk yield and scanty, pasty faeces. Serum ghrelin, motilin and gastrin concentrations, and leptin concentration which is a functional antagonist of ghrelin, were determined by ELISA. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), Na, K, Cl, Ca and P concentrations were measured by spectrophotometer. In serum biochemical analysis, increases were seen on the serum ALT, AST and GGT activities; however, serum Na, K, Cl and P concentrations decreased in abomasal displacement compared with the control animals. The serum ghrelin, motilin and gastrin concentrations increased in the cattle with LDA and RDA, as compared with those in the healthy controls. On the other hand, serum leptin concentration decreased in the cattle with DA compared with the controls. Increases in the serum ghrelin, motilin and gastrin concentrations might be attributed to activation of gastrointestinal motility hormones to enhance of gastric emptying in impaired gastric motility and/or outlet occlusion in displaced abomasum. PMID:23723101

  16. Ghrelin- and serotonin-producing gastric carcinoid.

    PubMed

    Latta, Eleanor; Rotondo, Fabio; Leiter, Lawrence A; Horvath, Eva; Kovacs, Kalman

    2012-06-01

    We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with gastric carcinoid. The tumor was surgically removed and immunohistochemical investigation demonstrated a rare combination: ghrelin and serotonin in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. The functional significance of simultaneous production of ghrelin and serotonin is not clear. It may be that an autocrine/paracrine interaction exists between these two different hormones. PMID:21424696

  17. Pseudo-enzymatic S-acylation of a myristoylated yes protein tyrosine kinase peptide in vitro may reflect non-enzymatic S-acylation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bañó, M C; Jackson, C S; Magee, A I

    1998-01-01

    Covalent attachment of a variety of lipid groups to proteins is now recognized as a major group of post-translational modifications. S-acylation of proteins at cysteine residues is the only modification considered dynamic and thus has the potential for regulating protein function and/or localization. The activities that catalyse reversible S-acylation have not been well characterized and it is not clear whether both the acylation and the deacylation steps are regulated, since in principle it would be sufficient to control only one of them. Both apparently enzymatic and non-enzymatic S-acylation of proteins have previously been reported. Here we show that a synthetic myristoylated c-Yes protein tyrosine kinase undecapeptide undergoes spontaneous S-acylation in vitro when using a long chain acyl-CoA as acyl donor in the absence of any protein. The S-acylation was dependent on myristoylation of the substrate, the length of the incubation period, temperature and substrate concentration. When COS cell fractions were added to the S-acylation reaction no additional peptide:S-acyltransferase activity was detected. These results are consistent with the possibility that membrane-associated proteins may undergo S-acylation in vivo by non-enzymatic transfer of acyl groups from acyl-CoA. In this case, the S-acylation-deacylation process could be controlled by a regulated depalmitoylation mechanism. PMID:9480882

  18. Imbalance Between Postprandial Ghrelin and Insulin Responses to an Ad Libitum Meal in Obese Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Japur, Camila Cremonezi; Diez-Garcia, Rosa Wanda; de Oliveira Penaforte, Fernanda Rodrigues; de Sá, Marcos Felipe Silva

    2014-02-11

    Obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) may have impairment in the regulation of food intake associated with ghrelin and insulin. In order to compare postprandial ghrelin and insulin responses to an ad libitum meal, we assessed 30 obese women with PCOS and 23 obese women without PCOS (control group). Blood samples were taken under fasting conditions, preprandially, and 15, 45, 75, and 135 minutes after the beginning of an ad libitum meal and ghrelin and insulin concentrations were analyzed. Insulin resistance (IR) was classified using basal insulin, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, and homeostasis model assessment index. Mean ad libitum food intake was similar between the groups (468 ± 150 vs 444 ± 165 g, P = .60). The IR was found in 56.6% in PCOS group compared with 30.4% in the control group (P < .01). The postprandial ghrelin response was similar in both the groups but the insulin area under the curve (AUC) tend to be greater in the PCOS group (12807 ± 8149.4 vs 8654.4 ± 7232.3 μIU/mL/min; P = .057). The ghrelin AUC was negatively correlated with the insulin AUC (r = -.5138; P = .01) only in the control group. The imbalance in the feedback mechanisms between insulin and ghrelin, present in obese women, especially those with IR, may affect food intake throughout the day and that could be a mechanism for the development of obesity in PCOS. PMID:24520086

  19. Progress in Small Molecule and Biologic Therapeutics Targeting Ghrelin Signaling.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Kayleigh R; Darling, Joseph E; Hougland, James L

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is a circulating peptide hormone involved in regulation of a wide array of physiological processes. As an endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a), ghrelin is responsible for signaling involved in energy homeostasis, including appetite stimulation, glucose metabolism, insulin signaling, and adiposity. Ghrelin has also been implicated in modulation of several neurological processes. Dysregulation of ghrelin signaling is implicated in diseases related to these pathways, including obesity, type II diabetes, and regulation of appetite and body weight in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome. Multiple steps in the ghrelin signaling pathway are available for targeting in the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Agonists and antagonists of GHS-R1a have been widely studied and have shown varying levels of effectiveness within ghrelin-related physiological pathways. Agents targeting ghrelin directly, either through depletion of ghrelin levels in circulation or inhibitors of ghrelin O-acyltransferase whose action is required for ghrelin to become biologically active, are receiving increasing attention as potential therapeutic options. We discuss the approaches utilized to target ghrelin signaling and highlight the current challenges toward developing small-molecule agents as potential therapeutics for ghrelin-related diseases. PMID:26202202

  20. Human Ghrelin: A Gastric Hormone with Cardiovascular Properties.

    PubMed

    Virdis, Agostino; Lerman, Lilach O; Regoli, Francesco; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Lerman, Amir; Taddei, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is a growth hormone-releasing peptide, isolated from the stomach. Researches in progress documented that ghrelin participates in the stimulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis at the hypothalamic level and in the regulation of energy balance. Growth hormone-independent functions have been ascribed to ghrelin. Among others, a large body of literature demonstrated the presence of specific receptors for ghrelin, distributed at the level of cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. Therefore, a link between ghrelin and cardiovascular system has been hypothesized and, then, demonstrated in both experimental and clinical studies. Ghrelin has largely documented cardiac beneficial effects, including protection from ischemia/reperfusion injury, attenuation of left ventricular remodeling following myocardial infarction, and improvement of left ventricular function. Exercise level in patients with chronic heart failure had also been seen. Ghrelin exerts these effects through several mechanisms, including the inhibition of apoptosis. At the level of blood vessels, ghrelin exerts a significant impact on vascular function. In particular, acutely infused, ghrelin reverses endothelial dysfunction by increasing NO availability and restores the endothelin-1/nitric oxide imbalance in the peripheral microcirculation of patients with metabolic syndrome. Antioxidant/anti-inflammatory effects, and-or an ameliorated insulin sensitivity are proposed mechanisms whereby ghrelin exerts its vascular protective actions. At higher doses, ghrelin also decreases blood pressure, by mechanisms that involve the modulation of sympathetic nervous system. This finding highlights the ghrelin system as a promising candidate for cardiovascular drug discovery. PMID:26581223

  1. Ghrelin and feeding behaviour in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Savino, Francesco; Lupica, Maria Maddalena; Liguori, Stefania Alfonsina; Fissore, Maria Francesca; Silvestro, Leandra

    2012-03-01

    The importance of early life events in the development of metabolic diseases is well recognized. Early postnatal environment, including nutrition, is key to future health, and this is particularly true for preterm infants. It is important that these infants receive sufficient nutrients to prevent growth restriction and promote neurodevelopment, while minimizing predisposition to metabolic diseases later in life. Feeding habits are the fundamental elements of nutrition and are influenced by many factors, including personal and familial habits, socioeconomic status, and cultural environment. In the last decades, there has been an important scientific interest toward the comprehension of the molecular and neural mechanisms regulating appetite. In these networks, act many peptide hormones produced in brain or gut, among which ghrelin is important because of its action in the short-term regulation of food intake and the long-term regulation of body weight. Ghrelin stimulates appetite and plays a role in regulating feeding behaviour. Ghrelin levels vary from fetal life through to early adulthood, with the highest levels observed in the very early years. Cord ghrelin levels have been evaluated in term and preterm newborns and high ghrelin levels have been observed in small-for-gestational age newborns and in newborns with intrauterine growth restriction. Moreover, ghrelin has been detected in term and preterm human breast milk, suggesting that it may play a role in the development of neuroendocrine pathways regulating appetite and energy homeostasis in early life. However, more research is required to better define ghrelin's role in breast milk and on feeding behaviour. PMID:22285781

  2. Ghrelin Suppression and Fat Loss after Left Gastric Artery Embolization in Canine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bawudun, Dilmurat; Xing Yan; Liu Wenya Huang Yujie; Ren Weixin; Ma Mei; Xu Xiaodong; Teng Gaojun

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of left gastric artery embolization (LGAE) on plasma ghrelin levels, abdominal fat, and body weight in beagles. Methods: The institutional animal care and use committee approved this study. Fifteen healthy adult beagles (12 male and three female animals) were randomly divided into three experimental groups: LGAE was proceeded with mixed emulsion of bleomycin A{sub 5} hydrochloride and lipiodol (group A), and polyvinyl alcohol particles (group B). Transcatheter saline injections in the left gastric artery were performed as a control. Weight and fasting plasma ghrelin levels were obtained at baseline and at weekly intervals for 8 weeks after the procedure in all animals. All animals were scanned and measured by multidetector computed tomography at baseline and at week 8 for evaluation of abdominal fat. Results: In LGAE-treated animals, plasma ghrelin and body weight significantly decreased compared to control animals (group A: P = 0.007 and P = 0.000; group B: P = 0.004 and P = 0.000, respectively). Subcutaneous fat size was also significantly reduced (P = 0.011 and P = 0.027 for groups A and B, respectively). The decreasing percentage in ghrelin levels at week 6 (peak of recovery) of LGAE-treated animals were negatively correlated with the size of area supplied by left gastric artery (r = -0.693, P = 0.026). Conclusion: LGAE could suppress the plasma concentration of ghrelin, which results in subcutaneous fat size reduction and weight loss. Compensatory ghrelin production might occur in the remnant gastric fundus after LGAE.

  3. Perinatal Oxidative Stress May Affect Fetal Ghrelin Levels in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhong-Cheng; Bilodeau, Jean-François; Monique Nuyt, Anne; Fraser, William D.; Julien, Pierre; Audibert, Francois; Xiao, Lin; Garofalo, Carole; Levy, Emile

    2015-01-01

    In vitro cell model studies have shown that oxidative stress may affect beta-cell function. It is unknown whether oxidative stress may affect metabolic health in human fetuses/newborns. In a singleton pregnancy cohort (n = 248), we studied maternal (24–28 weeks gestation) and cord plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress [malondialdehyde (MDA), F2-isoprostanes] in relation to fetal metabolic health biomarkers including cord plasma glucose-to-insulin ratio (an indicator of insulin sensitivity), proinsulin-to-insulin ratio (an indicator of beta-cell function), insulin, IGF-I, IGF-II, leptin, adiponectin and ghrelin concentrations. Strong positive correlations were observed between maternal and cord plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress (r = 0.33 for MDA, r = 0.74 for total F2-isoprostanes, all p < 0.0001). Adjusting for gestational age at blood sampling, cord plasma ghrelin concentrations were consistently negatively correlated to oxidative stress biomarkers in maternal (r = −0.32, p < 0.0001 for MDA; r = −0.31, p < 0.0001 for F2-isoprostanes) or cord plasma (r = −0.13, p = 0.04 for MDA; r = −0.32, p < 0.0001 for F2-isoprostanes). Other fetal metabolic health biomarkers were not correlated to oxidative stress. Adjusting for maternal and pregnancy characteristics, similar associations were observed. Our study provides the first preliminary evidence suggesting that oxidative stress may affect fetal ghrelin levels in humans. The implications in developmental “programming” the vulnerability to metabolic syndrome related disorders remain to be elucidated. PMID:26643495

  4. The role of ghrelin in the regulation of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Alamri, Bader N; Shin, Kyungsoo; Chappe, Valerie; Anini, Younes

    2016-04-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid (aa) stomach-derived peptide discovered in 1999 as the endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue-receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin-producing cells constitute a distinct group of endocrine cells dispersed throughout the gastric mucosa and to a lesser extent in the small intestine and the endocrine pancreas. Ghrelin plasma levels rise during fasting and chronic caloric restriction to stimulate food intake and fat storage and to prevent life-threatening falls in blood glucose. Plasma ghrelin levels decrease after a meal is consumed and in conditions of energy surplus (such as obesity). Ghrelin has emerged as a key player in the regulation of appetite and energy homeostasis. Ghrelin achieves these functions through binding the ghrelin receptor GHS-R in appetite-regulating neurons and in peripheral metabolic organs including the endocrine pancreas. Ghrelin levels are negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance. In addition, ghrelin secretion is impaired in obesity and insulin resistance. Several studies highlight an important role for ghrelin in glucose homeostasis. Genetic, immunological, and pharmacological blockade of ghrelin signaling resulted in improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, exogenous ghrelin administration was shown to decrease glucose-induced insulin release and increase glucose level in both humans and rodents. GHS-R was shown to be expressed in pancreatic β-cells and ghrelin suppressed insulin release via a Ca2+-mediated pathway. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of recent advances in the field that focuses on the role of insulin and insulin resistance in the regulation of ghrelin secretion and on the role of ghrelin in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). PMID:27235674

  5. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, and the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Hieu Sy; Roth, Mary R.; Tamura, Pamela; Samarakoon, Thilani; Shiva, Sunitha; Honey, Samuel; Lowe, Kaleb; Schmelz, Eric A.; Williams, Todd D.; Welti, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Formation of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols has been shown to be induced by leaf homogenization, mechanical wounding, avirulent bacterial infection, and thawing after snap-freezing. Here, lipidomic analysis using mass spectrometry showed that galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols, formed in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves upon wounding, have acyl-galactose profiles that differ from those of wounded Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating that different plant species accumulate different acyl-galactose components in response to the same stress. Additionally, the composition of the acyl-galactose component of Arabidopsis acMGDG depends on the stress treatment. After sub-lethal freezing treatment, acMGDG contained mainly non-oxidized fatty acids esterified to galactose, whereas mostly oxidized fatty acids accumulated on galactose after wounding or bacterial infection. Compositional data are consistent with acMGDG being formed in vivo by transacylation with fatty acids from digalactosyldiacylglycerols. Oxophytodienoic acid, an oxidized fatty acid, was more concentrated on the galactosyl ring of acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols than in galactolipids in general. Also, oxidized fatty acid-containing acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols increased cumulatively when wounded Arabidopsis leaves were wounded again. These findings suggest that, in Arabidopsis, the pool of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols may serve to sequester oxidized fatty acids during stress responses. PMID:24286212

  6. Enzymatic acylation of starch.

    PubMed

    Alissandratos, Apostolos; Halling, Peter J

    2012-07-01

    Starch a cheap, abundant and renewable natural material has been chemically modified for many years. The popular modification acylation has been used to adjust rheological properties as well as deliver polymers with internal plasticizers and other potential uses. However the harsh reaction conditions required to produce these esters may limit their use, especially in sensitive applications (foods, pharmaceuticals, etc.). The use of enzymes to catalyse acylation may provide a suitable alternative due to high selectivities and mild reaction conditions. Traditional hydrolase-catalysed synthesis in non-aqueous apolar media is hard due to lack of polysaccharide solubility. However, acylated starch derivatives have recently been successfully produced in other non-conventional systems: (a) surfactant-solubilised subtilisin and suspended amylose in organic media; (b) starch nanoparticles dispersed in organic medium with immobilised lipase; (c) aqueous starch gels with lipase and dispersed fatty acids. We attempt a systematic review that draws parallels between the seemingly unrelated approaches described. PMID:22138593

  7. Role of ghrelin in the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Cynthia K; Wu, Justin Che-Yuen

    2013-09-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid peptide that plays multiple roles in humans and other mammals. The functions of ghrelin include food intake regulation, gastrointestinal (GI) motility, and acid secretion by the GI tract. Many GI disorders involving infection, inflammation, and malignancy are also correlated with altered ghrelin production and secretion. Although suppressed ghrelin responses have already been observed in various GI disorders, such as chronic gastritis, Helicobacter pylori infection, irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, and cachexia, elevated ghrelin responses have also been reported in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Moreover, we recently reported that decreased fasting and postprandial ghrelin levels were observed in female patients with functional dyspepsia compared with healthy subjects. These alterations of ghrelin responses were significantly correlated with meal-related symptoms (bloating and early satiation) in female functional dyspepsia patients. We therefore support the notion that abnormal ghrelin responses may play important roles in various GI disorders. Furthermore, human clinical trials and animal studies involving the administration of ghrelin or its receptor agonists have shown promising improvements in gastroparesis, anorexia, and cancer. This review summarizes the impact of ghrelin, its family of peptides, and its receptors on GI diseases and proposes ghrelin modulation as a potential therapy. PMID:24073306

  8. The Antidepressant-like Effects of Estrogen-mediated Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Liu, Changhong; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xingyi; Ren, Bingzhong; Li, Bingjin

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, one of the brain-gut peptides, stimulates food-intake. Recently, ghrelin has also shown to play an important role in depression treatment. However, the mechanism of ghrelin’s antidepressant-like actions is unknown. On the other hand, sex differences in depression, and the fluctuation of estrogens secretion have been proved to play a key role in depression. It has been reported that women have higher level of ghrelin expression, and ghrelin can stimulate estrogen secretion while estrogen acts as a positive feedback mechanism to up-regulate ghrelin level. Ghrelin may be a potential regulator of reproductive function, and estrogen may have additional effect in ghrelin’s antidepressantlike actions. In this review, we summarize antidepressant-like effects of ghrelin and estrogen in basic and clinical studies, and provide new insight on ghrelin’s effect in depression. PMID:26412072

  9. Elevation of Fasting Ghrelin in Healthy Human Subjects Consuming a High-Salt Diet: A Novel Mechanism of Obesity?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Fenxia; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Chu, Chao; Wang, Yang; Wang, Dan; Guo, Tong-Shuai; Wang, Jun-Kui; Guan, Gong-Chang; Ren, Ke-Yu; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Overweight/obesity is a chronic disease that carries an increased risk of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and premature death. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated a clear relationship between salt intake and obesity, but the pathophysiologic mechanisms remain unknown. We hypothesized that ghrelin, which regulates appetite, food intake, and fat deposition, becomes elevated when one consumes a high-salt diet, contributing to the progression of obesity. We, therefore, investigated fasting ghrelin concentrations during a high-salt diet. Thirty-eight non-obese and normotensive subjects (aged 25 to 50 years) were selected from a rural community in Northern China. They were sequentially maintained on a normal diet for three days at baseline, a low-salt diet for seven days (3 g/day, NaCl), then a high-salt diet for seven days (18 g/day). The concentration of plasma ghrelin was measured using an immunoenzyme method (ELISA). High-salt intake significantly increased fasting ghrelin levels, which were higher during the high-salt diet (320.7 ± 30.6 pg/mL) than during the low-salt diet (172.9 ± 8.9 pg/mL). The comparison of ghrelin levels between the different salt diets was statistically-significantly different (p < 0.01). A positive correlation between 24-h urinary sodium excretion and fasting ghrelin levels was demonstrated. Our data indicate that a high-salt diet elevates fasting ghrelin in healthy human subjects, which may be a novel underlying mechanism of obesity. PMID:27240398

  10. Ghrelin and its correlation with leptin, energy related metabolites and thyroidal hormones in dairy cows in transitional period.

    PubMed

    Nowroozi-Asl, A; Aarabi, N; Rowshan-Ghasrodashti, A

    2016-01-01

    The transition from late gestation to early lactation is a critical period in a dairy cow's life so that dairy cows undergo tremendous changes during this period. The aim of this study was to determine blood levels of ghrelin, leptin, glucose, β-ydroxybutyrate (BHB), non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), triglycerides (TG), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) in dairy Holstein cows (n=20) and their correlations during the transition period. Blood samples were collected weekly from 3 wk antepartum to 6 wk postpartum from 20 high-yielding Holstein-Friesian cows. Ghrelin and leptin of plasma and glucose, BHB, NEFA, TG, T3, T4 of serum were then measured. Early lactation cows showed significantly higher (p<0.05) values of ghrelin, BHB and NEFA, and lower levels of leptin, TG, T3 and T4 (p<0.05) compared to late dry cows. Serum concentrations of glucose did not differ significantly at any time (P>0.05). Plasma ghrelin concentrations showed positive correlations with the serum BHB and NEFA (p<0.01), while plasma ghrelin had negative correlations (p<0.01) with leptin, TG, T3 and T4. In addition, no significant correlation (p>0.05) was found between ghrelin and glucose. The results of the study showed that blood ghrelin, leptin, BHB and NEFA levels are sensitive indicators of the energy balance during the peri-partum period in dairy cows and glucose values may not be considered as a precise indicator of negative energy balance in dairy cows. PMID:27096804

  11. Ghrelin Receptor Mutations and Human Obesity.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Tao, Y-X

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) was originally identified as an orphan receptor in porcine and rat anterior pituitary membranes. In 1999, GHSR was deorphanized and shown to be a receptor for ghrelin, a peptide hormone secreted from the stomach. Therefore, GHSR is also called ghrelin receptor. In addition to regulating growth hormone secretion, ghrelin receptor regulates various physiological processes, including food intake and energy expenditure, glucose metabolism, cardiovascular functions, gastric acid secretion and motility, and immune function. Several human genetic studies conducted in populations originated from Europe, Africa, South America, and East Asia identified rare mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms that might be associated with human obesity and short stature. Functional analyses of mutant GHSRs reveal multiple defects, including cell surface expression, ligand binding, and basal and stimulated signaling. With growing understanding in the functionality of naturally occurring GHSR mutations, potential therapeutic strategies including pharmacological chaperones and novel ligands could be used to correct the GHSR mutants. PMID:27288828

  12. The Stomach-Derived Hormone Ghrelin Increases Impulsive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Hansson, Caroline; Fenander, Maya; Richard, Jennifer E; Dickson, Suzanne L; Nissbrandt, Hans; Bergquist, Filip; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as impaired decision making, is associated with many psychiatric and behavioral disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder as well as eating disorders. Recent data indicate that there is a strong positive correlation between food reward behavior and impulsivity, but the mechanisms behind this relationship remain unknown. Here we hypothesize that ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach and known to increase food reward behavior, also increases impulsivity. In order to assess the impact of ghrelin on impulsivity, rats were trained in three complementary tests of impulsive behavior and choice: differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL), go/no-go, and delay discounting. Ghrelin injection into the lateral ventricle increased impulsive behavior, as indicated by reduced efficiency of performance in the DRL test, and increased lever pressing during the no-go periods of the go/no-go test. Central ghrelin stimulation also increased impulsive choice, as evidenced by the reduced choice for large rewards when delivered with a delay in the delay discounting test. In order to determine whether signaling at the central ghrelin receptors is necessary for maintenance of normal levels of impulsive behavior, DRL performance was assessed following ghrelin receptor blockade with central infusion of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. Central ghrelin receptor blockade reduced impulsive behavior, as reflected by increased efficiency of performance in the DRL task. To further investigate the neurobiological substrate underlying the impulsivity effect of ghrelin, we microinjected ghrelin into the ventral tegmental area, an area harboring dopaminergic cell bodies. Ghrelin receptor stimulation within the VTA was sufficient to increase impulsive behavior. We further evaluated the impact of ghrelin on dopamine-related gene expression and dopamine turnover in brain areas key in impulsive behavior control. This study provides the first

  13. The Stomach-Derived Hormone Ghrelin Increases Impulsive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Hansson, Caroline; Fenander, Maya; Richard, Jennifer E; Dickson, Suzanne L; Nissbrandt, Hans; Bergquist, Filip; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-04-01

    Impulsivity, defined as impaired decision making, is associated with many psychiatric and behavioral disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder as well as eating disorders. Recent data indicate that there is a strong positive correlation between food reward behavior and impulsivity, but the mechanisms behind this relationship remain unknown. Here we hypothesize that ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach and known to increase food reward behavior, also increases impulsivity. In order to assess the impact of ghrelin on impulsivity, rats were trained in three complementary tests of impulsive behavior and choice: differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL), go/no-go, and delay discounting. Ghrelin injection into the lateral ventricle increased impulsive behavior, as indicated by reduced efficiency of performance in the DRL test, and increased lever pressing during the no-go periods of the go/no-go test. Central ghrelin stimulation also increased impulsive choice, as evidenced by the reduced choice for large rewards when delivered with a delay in the delay discounting test. In order to determine whether signaling at the central ghrelin receptors is necessary for maintenance of normal levels of impulsive behavior, DRL performance was assessed following ghrelin receptor blockade with central infusion of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. Central ghrelin receptor blockade reduced impulsive behavior, as reflected by increased efficiency of performance in the DRL task. To further investigate the neurobiological substrate underlying the impulsivity effect of ghrelin, we microinjected ghrelin into the ventral tegmental area, an area harboring dopaminergic cell bodies. Ghrelin receptor stimulation within the VTA was sufficient to increase impulsive behavior. We further evaluated the impact of ghrelin on dopamine-related gene expression and dopamine turnover in brain areas key in impulsive behavior control. This study provides the first

  14. Anti‐ghrelin Spiegelmer NOX‐B11 inhibits neurostimulatory and orexigenic effects of peripheral ghrelin in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kobelt, P; Helmling, S; Stengel, A; Wlotzka, B; Andresen, V; Klapp, B F; Wiedenmann, B; Klussmann, S; Mönnikes, H

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims Ghrelin, the natural ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a, is the most powerful peripherally active orexigenic agent known. In rodents, ghrelin administration stimulates growth hormone release, food intake, and adiposity. Because of these effects, blocking of ghrelin has been widely discussed as a potential treatment for obesity. Spiegelmer NOX‐B11 is a synthetic l‐oligonucleotide, which was previously shown to bind ghrelin. We examined the effects of NOX‐B11 on ghrelin induced neuronal activation and food intake in non‐fasted rats. Methods Animals received various doses of NOX‐B11, inactive control Spiegelmer, or vehicle intravenously. Ghrelin or vehicle was administered intraperitoneally 12 hours later and food intake was measured over four hours. Neuronal activation was assessed as c‐Fos‐like immunoreactivity in the arcuate nucleus. Results Treatment with NOX‐B11 30 nmol suppressed ghrelin induced c‐Fos‐like immunoreactivity in the arcuate nucleus and blocked the ghrelin induced increase in food intake within the first half hour after ghrelin injection (mean 1.13 (SEM 0.59) g/kg body weight; 4.94 (0.63) g/kg body weight versus 0.58 (0.58) g/kg body weight; p<0.0001). Treatment with NOX‐B11 1 nmol or control Spiegelmer had no effect whereas treatment with NOX‐B11 10 nmol showed an intermediate effect on ghrelin induced food intake. Conclusions Spiegelmer NOX‐B11 suppresses ghrelin induced food intake and c‐Fos induction in the arcuate nucleus in rats. The use of an anti‐ghrelin Spiegelmer could be an innovative new approach to inhibit the biological action of circulating ghrelin. This may be of particular relevance to conditions associated with elevated plasma ghrelin, such as the Prader‐Willi syndrome. PMID:15994217

  15. Acyl-lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; Debono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P; Franke, Rochus B; Graham, Ian A; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  16. Acyl-lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; Debono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P; Franke, Rochus B; Graham, Ian A; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  17. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  18. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  19. Fluorescently labelled bovine acyl-CoA-binding protein acting as an acyl-CoA sensor: interaction with CoA and acyl-CoA esters and its use in measuring free acyl-CoA esters and non-esterified fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Wadum, Majken C T; Villadsen, Jens K; Feddersen, Søren; Møller, Rikke S; Neergaard, Thomas B F; Kragelund, Birthe B; Højrup, Peter; Faergeman, Nils J; Knudsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA esters are key metabolites in lipid synthesis and beta-oxidation but, at the same time, are important regulators of intermediate metabolism, insulin secretion, vesicular trafficking and gene expression. Key tools in studying the regulatory functions of acyl-CoA esters are reliable methods for the determination of free acyl-CoA concentrations. No such method is presently available. In the present study, we describe the synthesis of two acyl-CoA sensors for measuring free acyl-CoA concentrations using acyl-CoA-binding protein as a scaffold. Met24 and Ala53 of bovine acyl-CoA-binding protein were replaced by cysteine residues, which were covalently modified with 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene to make the two fluorescent acyl-CoA indicators (FACIs) FACI-24 and FACI-53. FACI-24 and FACI-53 showed fluorescence emission maximum at 510 and 525 nm respectively, in the absence of ligand (excitation 387 nm). Titration of FACI-24 and FACI-53 with hexadecanoyl-CoA and dodecanoyl-CoA increased the fluorescence yield 5.5-and 4.7-fold at 460 and 495 nm respectively. FACI-24 exhibited a high, and similar increase in, fluorescence yield at 460 nm upon binding of C14-C20 saturated and unsaturated acyl-CoA esters. Both indicators bind long-chain (>C14) acyl-CoA esters with high specificity and affinity (K(d)=0.6-1.7 nM). FACI-53 showed a high fluorescence yield for C8-C12 acyl chains. It is shown that FACI-24 acts as a sensitive acyl-CoA sensor for measuring the concentration of free acyl-CoA, acyl-CoA synthetase activity and the concentrations of free fatty acids after conversion of the fatty acid into their respective acyl-CoA esters. PMID:12071849

  20. Ghrelin and reproduction: ghrelin as novel regulator of the gonadotropic axis.

    PubMed

    Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Identification of ghrelin in late 1999, as the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), opened up a new era in our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of several neuroendocrine systems, including growth and energy homeostasis. Based on similarities with other endocrine integrators and its proposed role as signal for energy insufficiency, it appeared tempting to hypothesize that ghrelin might also operate as regulator of reproductive function. Yet, contrary to other of its biological actions the reproductive "dimension" of ghrelin has remained largely unexplored. Nonetheless, experimental evidence, coming mostly from animal studies, have been gathered during the last years suggesting that ghrelin may actually function as a metabolic modulator of the gonadotropic axis, with predominant inhibitory effects in line with its role as signal of energy deficit. These effects likely include inhibition of luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion (which has been reported in different species and developmental stages), as well as partial suppression of normal puberty onset. In addition, expression and/or direct gonadal actions of ghrelin have been reported in the human, rat, and chicken. Altogether, those findings document a novel reproductive facet of ghrelin, which may cooperate with other neuroendocrine integrators, as leptin, in the joint control of energy balance and reproduction. PMID:17983861

  1. A comparison of ghrelin, glucose, alpha-amylase and protein levels in saliva from diabetics.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Suleyman

    2007-01-31

    During the past decade, many salivary parameters have been used to characterize disease states. Ghrelin (GAH) is recently-discovered peptide hormone secreted mainly from the stomach but also produced in a number of other tissues including salivary glands. The aim of this work was to examine the relationship between active (aGAH) and inactive (dGAH) ghrelin in the saliva and other salivary parameters in type II diabetic patients and healthy controls. Salivary parameters were assessed in a single measurement of unstimulated whole saliva from 20 obese and 20 non-obese type II diabetes patients, and in 22 healthy controls. Total protein and alpha-amylase were determined by colorimetric methods, and glucose by the glucose-oxidase method. Saliva aGAH and dGAH levels were measured using a commercial radioimmunoassay (RIA) kit. Salivary concentrations of aGAH and dGAH ghrelin were more markedly decreased in obese diabetic subjects than in the two other groups. Glucose and alpha-amylase levels were higher in diabetic subjects than in controls. Furthermore, there were correlations between GAH levels and BMI, and between GAH and blood pressure. However, there was no marked variability in saliva flow rates among the groups. These results indicate that measurement of salivary GAH and its relationship to other salivary parameters might help to provide insight into the role of ghrelin in diabetes. PMID:17244479

  2. Ghrelin and motilin receptors as drug targets for gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Sanger, Gareth J; Furness, John B

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the major source of the related hormones ghrelin and motilin, which act on structurally similar G protein-coupled receptors. Nevertheless, selective receptor agonists are available. The primary roles of endogenous ghrelin and motilin in the digestive system are to increase appetite or hedonic eating (ghrelin) and initiate phase III of gastric migrating myoelectric complexes (motilin). Ghrelin and motilin also both inhibit nausea. In clinical trials, the motilin receptor agonist camicinal increased gastric emptying, but at lower doses reduced gastroparesis symptoms and improved appetite. Ghrelin receptor agonists have been trialled for the treatment of diabetic gastroparesis because of their ability to increase gastric emptying, but with mixed results; however, relamorelin, a ghrelin agonist, reduced nausea and vomiting in patients with this disorder. Treatment of postoperative ileus with a ghrelin receptor agonist proved unsuccessful. Centrally penetrant ghrelin receptor agonists stimulate defecation in animals and humans, although ghrelin itself does not seem to control colorectal function. Thus, the most promising uses of motilin receptor agonists are the treatment of gastroparesis or conditions with slow gastric emptying, and ghrelin receptor agonists hold potential for the reduction of nausea and vomiting, and the treatment of constipation. Therapeutic, gastrointestinal roles for receptor antagonists or inverse agonists have not been identified. PMID:26392067

  3. Ghrelin treatment prevents development of activity based anorexia in mice.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Romain; Lucas, Nicolas; Breton, Jonathan; Azhar, Saïda; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2016-06-01

    Stimulation of feeding is necessary for treatment of pathological conditions of chronic malnutrition due to anorexia. Ghrelin, a hunger hormone, is one of the candidate for pharmacological treatments of anorexia, but because of its instability in plasma has limited efficacy. We previously showed that plasmatic IgG protect ghrelin from degradation and that IgG from obese subjects and mice may increase ghrelin׳s orexigenic effect. In this study we tested if ghrelin alone or combined with IgG may improve feeding in chronically food-restricted mice with or without physical activity-based anorexia (ABA) induced by free access to a running wheel. Mice received a single daily intraperitoneal injection of ghrelin (1nM) together or not with total IgG (1nM) from obese ob/ob or lean mice before access to food during 8 days of 3h/day feeding time. We found that both ghrelin and ghrelin combined with IgG from obese, but not lean mice, prevented ABA, however, they were not able to diminish body weight loss. Physical activity was lower during the feeding period and was increased shortly after feeding in mice receiving ghrelin together with IgG from obese mice. In food-restricted mice without ABA, ghrelin treatments did not have significant effects on food intake. Thus, this study supports pharmacological use of ghrelin or ghrelin combined with IgG from obese animals for treatment of anorexia accompanied by elevated physical activity. The utility of combining ghrelin with protective IgG should be further determined in animal models of anorexia with unrestricted access to food. PMID:27052473

  4. Leptin, ghrelin, and endocannabinoids: potential therapeutic targets in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Støving, René Klinkby; Andries, Alin; Brixen, Kim; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Hørder, Kirsten; Frystyk, Jan

    2009-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) has the highest mortality rate between psychiatric disorders, and evidence for managing it is still very limited. So far, pharmacological treatment has focused on a narrow range of drugs and only a few controlled studies have been performed. Furthermore, the studies have been of short duration and included a limited number of subjects, often heterogenic with regard to stage and acute nutritive status. Thus, novel approaches are urgently needed. Body weight homeostasis is tightly regulated throughout life. With the discovery of orexigenic and anorectic signals, an array of new molecular targets to control eating behavior has emerged. This review focuses on recent advances in three important signal systems: leptin, ghrelin, and endocannabinoids toward the identification of potential therapeutical breakthroughs in AN. Our review of the current literature shows that leptin may have therapeutic potentials in promoting restoration of menstrual cycles in weight restored patients, reducing motor restlessness in severely hyperactive patients, and preventing osteoporosis in chronic patients. Ghrelin and endocannabinoids exert orexigenic effects which may facilitate nutritional restoration. Leptin and endocannabinoids may exert antidepressive and anxiolytic effects. Finally, monitoring serum concentration of leptin may be useful in order to prevent refeeding syndrome. PMID:18926548

  5. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants encoding a truncated ghrelin peptide.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Thomas, Patrick B; Walpole, Carina M; Maugham, Michelle; Fung, Jenny N T; Yap, Pei-Yi; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Lai, John; Whiteside, Eliza J; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2016-06-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is a potent orexigen produced predominantly in the stomach. It has a number of other biological actions, including roles in appetite stimulation, energy balance, the stimulation of growth hormone release and the regulation of cell proliferation. Recently, several ghrelin gene splice variants have been described. Here, we attempted to identify conserved alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene by cross-species sequence comparisons. We identified a novel human exon 2-deleted variant and provide preliminary evidence that this splice variant and in1-ghrelin encode a C-terminally truncated form of the ghrelin peptide, termed minighrelin. These variants are expressed in humans and mice, demonstrating conservation of alternative splicing spanning 90 million years. Minighrelin appears to have similar actions to full-length ghrelin, as treatment with exogenous minighrelin peptide stimulates appetite and feeding in mice. Forced expression of the exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant mirrors the effect of the canonical preproghrelin, stimulating cell proliferation and migration in the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. This is the first study to characterise an exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant and to demonstrate sequence conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants that encode a truncated ghrelin peptide. This adds further impetus for studies into the alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene and the function of novel ghrelin peptides in vertebrates. PMID:26792793

  6. Comparative effects of intraduodenal protein and lipid on ghrelin, peptide YY, and leptin release in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Sina S; Otto, Bärbel; Hutchison, Amy T; Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie D; Horowitz, Michael; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2015-02-15

    Intraduodenal infusion of lipid or protein potently reduces subsequent energy intake. There is evidence that the underlying mechanisms differ significantly between the two nutrients. While intraduodenal lipid stimulates glucagon-like peptide-1 and CCK much more than protein, the release of insulin and glucagon is substantially greater in response to protein. Ghrelin and PYY are both involved in short-term regulation, while leptin is a long-term regulator, of energy balance; the acute effects of nutrients on leptin release are unclear. We investigated the comparative effects of intraduodenal lipid and protein on plasma ghrelin, PYY, and leptin concentrations. Thirteen lean, young men received 90-min intraduodenal infusions of protein (whey hydrolysate) or lipid (long-chain triglyceride emulsion) at a rate of 3 kcal/min, or saline control, on three separate days. Blood samples were collected at baseline and regularly during infusions. Both lipid and protein potently suppressed plasma ghrelin compared with control (both P < 0.001), with no difference between them. While both lipid and protein stimulated plasma PYY (P < 0.001), the effect of lipid was substantially greater than that of protein (P < 0.001). Neither intraduodenal lipid nor protein affected plasma leptin. In conclusion, intraduodenal lipid and protein have discrepant effects on the release of PYY, but not ghrelin. When considered with our previous findings, it appears that, with the exception of ghrelin, the energy intake-suppressant effects of lipid and protein are mediated by different mechanisms. PMID:25568079

  7. Acyl-acyl carrier protein: Lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol acyl transferase in Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol was produced when membranes isolated from the cyanobacterium, Anabaena variabilis, and washed free of soluble endogenous constituents, were incubated with ({sup 14}C)acyl-acyl carrier protein. This enzymatic synthesis of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol localized in the membranes was not dependent on any added cofactors, such as ATP, coenzyme A, and dithiothreitol. Palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, and oleoyl-acyl carrier proteins were approximately equally active as substrates with Km of 0.37, 0.36, and 0.23 {mu}M, respectively. The ({sup 14}C)acyl group was exclusively transferred to the sn-1 hydroxyl of the glycerol backbone of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol as demonstrated by hydrolysis of all incorporated acyl groups by the lipase from Rhizopus arrhizus delamar. Using a double labelled ({sup 14}C)acyl-({sup 14}C)acyl carrier protein, this enzyme catalyzed the direct transfer of the acyl group from acyl-acyl carrier protein to an endogenous lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol to form monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. The transfer reaction mechanism was also confirmed by the increased activity with the addition of the lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol suspension. A specific galactolipid acyl hydrolase activity was released into the soluble protein fraction when the membranes of Anabaena variabilis were treated with 2% Triton X-100. The positional specificity of this acyl hydrolase was demonstrated to be similar to that of Rhizopus lipase, i.e. only the acyl group at the sn-1 position was hydrolyzed. The acyl hydrolase which was also localized in the membrane fraction of Anabaena variabilis was presumably responsible for producing endogenous lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol used by the acyltransferase.

  8. Effects of hypothyroidism and high-fat feeding on mRNA concentrations for the low-density-lipoprotein receptor and on acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase activities in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Salter, A M; Hayashi, R; al-Seeni, M; Brown, N F; Bruce, J; Sorensen, O; Atkinson, E A; Middleton, B; Bleackley, R C; Brindley, D N

    1991-01-01

    1. Induction of hypothyroidism in rats by feeding propylthiouracil (PTU) significantly increased serum cholesterol concentrations, and the effect was more pronounced for cholesterol in low-density lipoproteins (LDL) rather than high-density lipoproteins (HDL). The concentrations of serum triacylglycerol were decreased in hypothyroidism. These effects on serum lipids were also seen when the normal rats were pair-fed with the PTU-treated group. 2. Feeding a diet rich in saturated fat and cholesterol further increased cholesterol concentrations in LDL and also elevated that in very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) of hypothyroid rats. In euthyroid rats such a diet resulted in a relatively small increase in VLDL cholesterol, whereas LDL cholesterol was decreased. 3. Steady-state concentrations of mRNA for the hepatic LDL receptor were significantly decreased in the livers of hypothyroid rats, but were not significantly changed by high-fat feeding in euthyroid or hypothyroid rats. 4. The expression of the LDL receptor in hepatocytes cultured from hypothyroid rats was decreased relative to the euthyroid controls. 5. Whereas the esterification of cholesterol with oleate in hepatocytes cultured from hypothyroid rats was decreased, the activity of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) in the livers of these animals was not changed. 6. High-fat feeding increased the hepatic ACAT activity in normal and hypothyroid rats. 7. Incubation of rat hepatocytes with 10 nM-tri-iodothyronine for 4 h increased the relative concentration of the mRNA for the LDL receptor by 25%. 8. It is therefore concluded that thyroid hormones stimulate the synthesis and expression of the hepatic LDL receptor. Elevated cholesterol concentrations in LDL in hypothyroidism probably result from a primary defect in the expression of the hepatic receptor, rather than indirectly via changes in ACAT activity. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2064617

  9. Centrally Administered Ghrelin Acutely Influences Food Choice in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Schéle, Erik; Bake, Tina; Rabasa, Cristina; Dickson, Suzanne L

    2016-01-01

    We sought to determine whether the orexigenic hormone, ghrelin, is involved in the intrinsic regulation of food choice in rats. Ghrelin would seem suited to serve such a role given that it signals hunger information from the stomach to brain areas important for feeding control, including the hypothalamus and reward system (e.g. ventral tegmental area, VTA). Thus, in rats offered a choice of palatable foods (sucrose pellets and lard) superimposed on regular chow for 2 weeks, we explored whether acute central delivery of ghrelin (intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intra-VTA) is able to redirect their dietary choice. The major unexpected finding is that, in rats with high baseline lard intake, acute ICV ghrelin injection increased their chow intake over 3-fold, relative to vehicle-injected controls, measured at both 3 hr and 6 hr after injection. Similar effects were observed when ghrelin was delivered to the VTA, thereby identifying the VTA as a likely contributing neurobiological substrate for these effects. We also explored food choice after an overnight fast, when endogenous ghrelin levels are elevated, and found similar effects of dietary choice to those described for ghrelin. These effects of fasting on food choice were suppressed in models of suppressed ghrelin signaling (i.e. peripheral injection of a ghrelin receptor antagonist to rats and ghrelin receptor (GHSR) knock-out mice), implicating a role for endogenous ghrelin in the changes in food choice that occur after an overnight fast. Thus, in line with its role as a gut-brain hunger hormone, ghrelin appears to be able to acutely alter food choice, with notable effects to promote "healthy" chow intake, and identify the VTA as a likely contributing neurobiological substrate for these effects. PMID:26925974

  10. Centrally Administered Ghrelin Acutely Influences Food Choice in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Schéle, Erik; Bake, Tina; Rabasa, Cristina; Dickson, Suzanne L.

    2016-01-01

    We sought to determine whether the orexigenic hormone, ghrelin, is involved in the intrinsic regulation of food choice in rats. Ghrelin would seem suited to serve such a role given that it signals hunger information from the stomach to brain areas important for feeding control, including the hypothalamus and reward system (e.g. ventral tegmental area, VTA). Thus, in rats offered a choice of palatable foods (sucrose pellets and lard) superimposed on regular chow for 2 weeks, we explored whether acute central delivery of ghrelin (intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intra-VTA) is able to redirect their dietary choice. The major unexpected finding is that, in rats with high baseline lard intake, acute ICV ghrelin injection increased their chow intake over 3-fold, relative to vehicle-injected controls, measured at both 3 hr and 6 hr after injection. Similar effects were observed when ghrelin was delivered to the VTA, thereby identifying the VTA as a likely contributing neurobiological substrate for these effects. We also explored food choice after an overnight fast, when endogenous ghrelin levels are elevated, and found similar effects of dietary choice to those described for ghrelin. These effects of fasting on food choice were suppressed in models of suppressed ghrelin signaling (i.e. peripheral injection of a ghrelin receptor antagonist to rats and ghrelin receptor (GHSR) knock-out mice), implicating a role for endogenous ghrelin in the changes in food choice that occur after an overnight fast. Thus, in line with its role as a gut-brain hunger hormone, ghrelin appears to be able to acutely alter food choice, with notable effects to promote “healthy” chow intake, and identify the VTA as a likely contributing neurobiological substrate for these effects. PMID:26925974

  11. Effect of chronic hyperghrelinemia on ingestive action of ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Qi, Xiang; Reed, Jason; Ceci, Jeff; Wang, Hui-Qun; Wang, Guiyun; Englander, Ella W; Greeley, George H

    2006-03-01

    The stomach hormone ghrelin is the endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Systemic administration of ghrelin will cause elevations in growth hormone (GH) secretion, food intake, adiposity, and body growth. Ghrelin also affects insulin secretion, gastric acid secretion, and gastric motility. Several reports indicate that repeated or continuous activation of GHS-R by exogenous GHSs or ghrelin results in a diminished GH secretory response. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which the acute stimulation of food intake by exogenous ghrelin is altered by chronic hyperghrelinemia in transgenic mice that overexpress the human ghrelin gene. The present findings show that the orexigenic action of exogenous ghrelin is not diminished by a chronic hyperghrelinemia and indicate that the food ingestive pathway of the GHS-R is not susceptible to desensitization. In contrast, the epididymal fat pad growth response, like the GH response, to exogenous ghrelin is blunted in ghrelin transgenic mice with chronic hyperghrelinemia. PMID:16210421

  12. Clinical application of ghrelin in the field of surgery.

    PubMed

    Takiguchi, Shuji; Murakami, Kohei; Yanagimoto, Yoshitomo; Takata, Akihiro; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2015-07-01

    Ghrelin was discovered as an intrinsic ligand for the growth hormone (GH)-secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) in 1999. The endogenous production of ghrelin occurs mainly in the stomach. Ghrelin has multiple functions; it has orexigenic action, stimulates GH secretion, has anti-inflammatory activities, stimulates gastrointestinal activity, stabilizes heart function and has other metabolic roles. Moreover, ghrelin is the only gastrointestinal hormone known to stimulate appetite. In the past decade, clinical applications of ghrelin have been attempted for various pathologies, based on its anabolic function, including applications for patients with anorexia nervosa and cachexia due to chronic heart, renal or pulmonary diseases. In the field of surgery, we have conducted several clinical trials using exogenous ghrelin in patients undergoing total gastrectomy, esophagectomy and neoadjuvant chemotherapy, including cisplatin treatment, and consistently obtained unique and striking benefits in these patients. Ghrelin comprehensively improves the patients' general conditions and quality of life via its pleiotropic physiological functions. This characteristic is unique and different from the existing drugs; therefore, ghrelin may be an indispensable supplement to prevent surgical stress and postoperative sequelae. This review summarizes the recent advances toward the clinical application of ghrelin. PMID:25366350

  13. Purification and characterization of fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase from Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed Central

    Fice, D; Shen, Z; Byers, D M

    1993-01-01

    A Vibrio harveyi enzyme which catalyzes the ATP-dependent ligation of fatty acids to acyl carrier protein (ACP) has been purified 6,000-fold to apparent homogeneity by anion-exchange, gel filtration, and ACP-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Purified acyl-ACP synthetase migrated as a single 62-kDa band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and as an 80-kDa protein by gel filtration under reducing conditions. Activity of the purified enzyme was lost within hours in the absence of glycerol and low concentrations of Triton X-100. Acyl-ACP synthetase exhibited Kms for myristic acid, ACP, and ATP of 7 microM, 18 microM, and 0.3 mM, respectively. The enzyme was specific for adenine-containing nucleotides, and AMP was the product of the reaction. No covalent acyl-enzyme intermediate was observed. Enzyme activity was stimulated up to 50% by iodoacetamide but inhibited > 80% by N-ethylmaleimide: inhibition by the latter was prevented by ATP and ACP but not myristic acid. Dithiothreitol and sulfhydryl-directed reagents also influenced enzyme size, activity, and elution pattern on anion-exchange resins. The function of acyl-ACP synthetase has not been established, but it may be related to the capacity of V. harveyi to elongate exogenous fatty acids by an ACP-dependent mechanism. Images PMID:8384617

  14. Estradiol and testosterone modulate the tissue-specific expression of ghrelin, ghs-r, goat and nucb2 in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Juan Ignacio; Blanco, Ayelén Melisa; Canosa, Luis Fabián; Unniappan, Suraj

    2016-03-01

    Ghrelin, and nesfatin-1 (encoded by nucleobindin2/nucb2) are two metabolic peptides with multiple biological effects in vertebrates. While sex steroids are known to regulate endogenous ghrelin and NUCB2 in mammals, such actions by steroids in fish remain unknown. This study aimed to determine whether estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) affects the expression of preproghrelin, ghrelin/growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) and NUCB2 in goldfish (Carassius auratus). First, a dose-response assay was performed in which fish were intraperitoneally (ip) implanted with pellets containing 25, 50 or 100 μg/g body weight (BW) of E2 or T. It was found that sex steroids (100 μg/g BW) administered for 2.5 days achieved the highest E2 or T in circulation. In a second experiment, fish were ip implanted with pellets containing 100 μg/g BW of E2, T or without hormone (control). RT-qPCR analyses at 2.5 days post-administration show that gut preproghrelin and GOAT expression was upregulated by both E2 and T treatments, while the same effect was observed for GHS-R only in the pituitary. Both treatments also reduced hypothalamic preproghrelin mRNA expression. NUCB2 expression was increased in the forebrain of T treated group and reduced in the gut and pituitary under both treatments. These results show for the first time a modulation of preproghrelin and nucb2/nesfatin-1 by sex steroids in fish. The interaction between sex steroids and genes implicated in both metabolism and reproduction might help meeting the reproduction dependent energy demands in fish. PMID:26773340

  15. Brain Mapping of Ghrelin O-Acyltransferase in Goldfish (Carassius Auratus): Novel Roles for the Ghrelinergic System in Fish?

    PubMed

    Blanco, Ayelén M; Sánchez-Bretaño, Aída; Delgado, María J; Valenciano, Ana I

    2016-06-01

    Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is the enzyme responsible for acylation of ghrelin, a gut-brain hormone with important roles in many physiological functions in vertebrates. Many aspects of GOAT remain to be elucidated, especially in fish, and particularly its anatomical distribution within the different brain areas has never been reported to date. The present study aimed to characterize the brain mapping of GOAT using RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry in a teleost, the goldfish (Carassius auratus). Results show that goat transcripts are expressed in different brain areas of the goldfish, with the highest levels in the vagal lobe. Using immunohistochemistry, we also report the presence of GOAT immunoreactive cells in different encephalic areas, including the telencephalon, some hypothalamic nuclei, pineal gland, optic tectum and cerebellum, although they are especially abundant in the hindbrain. Particularly, an important signal is observed in the vagal lobe and some fiber tracts of the brainstem, such as the medial longitudinal fasciculus, Mauthneri fasciculus, secondary gustatory tract and spinothalamic tract. Most of the forebrain areas where GOAT is detected, particularly the hypothalamic nuclei, also express the ghs-r1a ghrelin receptor and other appetite-regulating hormones (e.g., orexin and NPY), supporting the role of ghrelin as a modulator of food intake and energy balance in fish. Present results are the first report on the presence of GOAT in the brain using imaging techniques. The high presence of GOAT in the hindbrain is a novelty, and point to possible new functions for the ghrelinergic system in fish. Anat Rec, 299:748-758, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27064922

  16. Expression of Ghrelin in gastrointestinal tract and the effect of early weaning on Ghrelin expression in lambs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weimin; Cheng, Liang; Guo, Jiangpeng; Ma, Youji; Li, Fadi

    2014-02-01

    Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue receptor, plays an important role in stimulating hormone secretion, development of gastrointestinal tract, food intake and regulating energy balance of animals. In this study we isolated the cDNA sequence of ovine Ghrelin from the abomasums of 7-day-aged lambs. Real-time PCR was used to determine the abundance of Ghrelin mRNA in lamb gastrointestinal tract, and analyze the development changes of abomasums Ghrelin mRNA expression in 0-56 days lambs, as well as find the effects of 42-day weaning on Ghrelin mRNA expression in lamb abomasums. The results showed that: (1) Ghrelin mRNA was expressed widely in gastrointestinal tract and was significantly higher in the abomasums than in other tissues (rumen, reticulum, omasum, duodenum, jejunum, ileum) (P < 0.01); (2) The expression of abomasums Ghrelin mRNA in lamb increased with the growth of age, it reached a plateau at the age of 49 days, however, got a slightly decrease at the age of 56 days; (3) The expression of abomasums Ghrelin mRNA of the 42 days-weaned groups were significantly lower than the no-weaned groups (P < 0.05), and the Ghrelin mRNA expression of the two treatments reached a maximum at the age of 49 days; (4) Correlation analysis indicated that the linear correlativity between abomasums Ghrelin mRNA expression and abomasums weight was very prominent (R(2) = 0.647, P = 0.009). Our results suggested that ovine Ghrelin gene may play an important role in the development of lamb abomasums and 42-day weaning could down regulate the expression of abomasum Ghrelin mRNA, but the mechanism of these needs further research. PMID:24385298

  17. Ghrelin inhibits AngII -induced expression of TNF-α, IL-8, MCP-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Bin; Fang, Fang; Yang, Tianlu; Yu, Zaixin; Zhang, Bin; Xie, Xiumei

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Ghrelin, a gastric peptide, is involved in several metabolic and cardiovascular processes. Emerging evidence indicates the potential involvement of ghrelin in low-grade inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis and hypertension. Cytokine-induced inflammation is critical in these pathological states. The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) has been identified in blood vessels, so we predict that ghrelin might inhibit proinflammatory responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The aim of this study is to examine the effect of ghrelin on angiotension II (AngII)-induced expression of TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-8 in HUVECs. Method: HUVECs were pretreated with ghrelin, with or without the specific antagonist of GHSR [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6, the selective inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) PDTC, and the selective inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) PD98059. The cells were finally treated with AngII. The expression of TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-8 was examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The activity of ERK1/2 and NF-κB was analyzed by Western blot. Result: our study showed that ghrelin inhibited AngII -induced expression of IL-8, TNF-α and MCP-1 in the HUVECs via GHSR pathway in concentration- and time-dependent manners. We also found that ghrelin inhibited AngII -induced activation of ERK1/2 and NF-κB. Conclusions: these results suggest that Ghrelin may play novel antiinflammatory and immunoregulatory roles in HUVECs. PMID:25785032

  18. Identification, tissue distribution and functional characterization of the ghrelin receptor in West African lungfish, Protopterus annectens.

    PubMed

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Norifumi; Kangawa, Kenji; Uchiyama, Minoru; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2014-12-01

    We identified two ghrelin receptor isoforms, the ghrelin receptor type-1a (GHS-R1a) and its alternative splice form (GHS-R1b) for West African lungfish, Protopterus annectens. Lungfish GHS-R1a and 1b comprised 361 and 281 amino acids, respectively. Lungfish GHS-R1a showed the highest identity to coelacanth GHS-R1a (80.4%). The highest expression of GHS-R1a mRNAs was seen in the brain, liver, ovary, heart, intestine, and gills. GHS-R1b mRNAs were also detected in the same tissues with GHS-R1a, but their expression level was 1/20 that of GHS-R1a. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells transiently expressing lungfish GHS-R1a, rat and bullfrog ghrelin, and two GHS-R1a agonists, GHRP-6 and hexarelin, increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. The intensity of the Ca(2+) increases induced by GHS-R1a agonists was twice when compared to that induced by ghrelin, although the median effective doses (ED50) were similar, suggesting a long-lasting effect of GHS-R1a agonists with similar affinity. We also examined changes in the GHS-R gene expression during an eight-week estivation. Body weight was slightly lowered, but plasma sodium and glucose concentrations decreased; plasma urea concentration increased significantly 4weeks after the start of estivation. Overall, expression of GHS-R1a mRNA decreased, but changes in GHS-R1b mRNA expression were inconsistent with those of GHS-R1a during estivation, suggesting an involvement of GHS-R in energy homeostasis, as seen in mammals. Our results suggest that the ghrelin-GHS-R1a system is present in this lungfish although ghrelin has not yet been found. The structure of GHS-R1a is closer to that of tetrapods than Actinopterygian fish, indicating a process of evolution that follows the Crossopterygii such as coelacanth. PMID:25093625

  19. The atypical antipsychotic, olanzapine, potentiates ghrelin-induced receptor signaling: An in vitro study with cells expressing cloned human growth hormone secretagogue receptor.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Keita; Kashiwase, Yohei; Yokoyama, Akinobu; Nishimura, Hitomi; Miyano, Kanako; Suzuki, Masami; Shiraishi, Seiji; Matoba, Motohiro; Ohe, Yuichiro; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-08-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) belongs to Gαq-coupled G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates growth hormone release, food intake, appetite, glucose metabolism and body composition. Ghrelin has been identified as an endogenous ligand for GHS-R, and it is the only orexigenic peptide found in the peripheral organs. Olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic agent that binds to and inhibits the activation of GPCR for several neurotransmitters, has metabolic side effects such as excessive appetite and weight gain. Recently, studies have revealed that the orexigenic mechanism of olanzapine is mediated via GHS-R signaling, although the precise mechanisms have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the effect of olanzapine on ghrelin-mediated GHS-R signaling by using an electrical impedance-based receptor biosensor assay system (CellKey™). Olanzapine at concentrations of 10(-7) and 10(-6)mol/L enhanced ghrelin-induced (10(-10)-10(-8)mol/L) GHS-R activation. A Ca(2+) imaging assay revealed that olanzapine (10(-7) and 10(-6)mol/L) enhanced ghrelin (10(-7) M)-induced GHS-R activity. In contrast, haloperidol (an antipsychotic agent) failed to enhance this ghrelin-mediated GHS-R activation, as demonstrated by both the CellKey™ and Ca(2+) imaging assays. Together, these results suggest that olanzapine, but not haloperidol, promotes appetite by enhancing ghrelin-mediated GHS-R signaling. PMID:26775231

  20. Novel approach in LC-MS/MS using MRM to generate a full profile of acyl-CoAs: discovery of acyl-dephospho-CoAs[S

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingling; Zhang, Shenghui; Berthiaume, Jessica M.; Simons, Brigitte; Zhang, Guo-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A metabolomic approach to selectively profile all acyl-CoAs was developed using a programmed multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method in LC-MS/MS and was employed in the analysis of various rat organs. The programmed MRM method possessed 300 mass ion transitions with the mass difference of 507 between precursor ion (Q1) and product ion (Q3), and the precursor ion started from m/z 768 and progressively increased one mass unit at each step. Acyl-dephospho-CoAs resulting from the dephosphorylation of acyl-CoAs were identified by accurate MS and fragmentation. Acyl-dephospho-CoAs were also quantitatively scanned by the MRM method with the mass difference of 427 between Q1 and Q3 mass ions. Acyl-CoAs and dephospho-CoAs were assayed with limits of detection ranging from 2 to 133 nM. The accuracy of the method was demonstrated by assaying a range of concentrations of spiked acyl-CoAs with the results of 80–114%. The distribution of acyl-CoAs reflects the metabolic status of each organ. The physiological role of dephosphorylation of acyl-CoAs remains to be further characterized. The methodology described herein provides a novel strategy in metabolomic studies to quantitatively and qualitatively profile all potential acyl-CoAs and acyl-dephospho-CoAs. PMID:24367045

  1. Integrating GHS into the Ghrelin System

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Bowers, Cyril Y.

    2010-01-01

    Oligopeptide derivatives of metenkephalin were found to stimulate growth-hormone (GH) release directly by pituitary somatotrope cells in vitro in 1977. Members of this class of peptides and nonpeptidyl mimetics are referred to as GH secretagogues (GHSs). A specific guanosine triphosphatate-binding protein-associated heptahelical transmembrane receptor for GHS was cloned in 1996. An endogenous ligand for the GHS receptor, acylghrelin, was identified in 1999. Expression of ghrelin and homonymous receptor occurs in the brain, pituitary gland, stomach, endothelium/vascular smooth muscle, pancreas, placenta, intestine, heart, bone, and other tissues. Principal actions of this peptidergic system include stimulation of GH release via combined hypothalamopituitary mechanisms, orexigenesis (appetitive enhancement), insulinostasis (inhibition of insulin secretion), cardiovascular effects (decreased mean arterial pressure and vasodilation), stimulation of gastric motility and acid secretion, adipogenesis with repression of fat oxidation, and antiapoptosis (antagonism of endothelial, neuronal, and cardiomyocyte death). The array of known and proposed interactions of ghrelin with key metabolic signals makes ghrelin and its receptor prime targets for drug development. PMID:20798846

  2. Ghrelin receptor regulates adipose tissue inflammation in aging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aging is commonly associated with low-grade adipose inflammation, which is closely linked to insulin resistance. Ghrelin is the only circulating orexigenic hormone which is known to increase obesity and insulin resistance. We previously reported that the expression of the ghrelin receptor, growth ho...

  3. Ghrelin reduces hepatic mitochondrial fatty acid beta oxidation.

    PubMed

    Rigault, C; Le Borgne, F; Georges, B; Demarquoy, J

    2007-04-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid peptide secreted during starvation by gastric cells. Ghrelin physiologically induces food intake and seems to alter lipid and glucid metabolism in several tissues such as adipose tissue and liver. Liver has a key position in lipid metabolism as it allows the metabolic orientation of fatty acids between oxidation and esterification. We investigated the effects of peripheral ghrelin administration on 2 crucial parameters of fatty acid oxidation: the levocarnitine (L-carnitine)-dependent entry of the fatty acids in the mitochondria and the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Ghrelin was either given to rats prior to the hepatocyte preparation and culture or used to treat hepatocytes prepared from control animals. Direct incubation of ghrelin to raw hepatocytes did not induce any change in the studied parameters. In hepatocytes prepared from 3 nmol ghrelin-treated rats, a 44% reduction of the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation while no alteration of the L-carnitine-related parameters were observed. These results suggested (a) that ghrelin has no direct effect on liver, and (b) that when administrated to a whole organism, ghrelin may alter the lipid metabolism and the energy balance through a marked decrease in liver fatty acid oxidation. PMID:17556859

  4. Diurnal intermittent fasting during Ramadan: the effects on leptin and ghrelin levels.

    PubMed

    Alzoghaibi, Mohammed A; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Sharif, Munir M; BaHammam, Ahmed S

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to assess the effect of Islamic intermittent fasting, during and outside of Ramadan, on plasma levels of leptin and ghrelin while controlling for several potential confounding variables. Eight healthy male volunteers with a mean age of 26.6±4.9 years reported to the sleep disorders center (SDC) at King Saud University on four occasions: 1) adaptation; 2) 4 weeks before Ramadan while performing Islamic fasting for 1 week (baseline fasting) (BLF); 3) 1 week before Ramadan (non-fasting baseline) (BL); and 4) during the second week of Ramadan while fasting. Plasma leptin and ghrelin levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunoassays at 22:00, 02:00, 04:00, 06:00, and 11:00. During BLF, there were significant reductions in plasma leptin concentrations at 22:00 and 02:00 compared with the baseline concentrations (at 22:00: 194.2±177.2 vs. 146.7±174.5; at 02:00: 203.8±189.5 vs. 168.1±178.1; p<0.05). During Ramadan, there was a significant reduction in plasma leptin levels at 22:00 (194.2±177.2 vs. 132.6±130.4, p<0.05). No significant difference in plasma ghrelin concentrations was detected during the BL, BLF, or Ramadan periods. Cosinor analyses of leptin and ghrelin plasma levels revealed no significant changes in the acrophases of the hormones during the three periods. The nocturnal reduction in plasma leptin levels during fasting may be the result of the changes in meal times during fasting. PMID:24637892

  5. Ghrelin suppresses the GnRH-induced preovulatory gonadotropin surge in dairy heifers.

    PubMed

    Chouzouris, T M; Dovolou, E; Dafopoulos, K; Georgoulias, P; Vasileiou, N G; Fthenakis, G C; Anifandis, G; Amiridis, G S

    2016-10-01

    Ghrelin, a known growth hormone (GH) secretagogue, alters gonadotropin secretion in many species. Our objectives were to study the effects of ghrelin, on GH, LH, FSH secretion, and on luteal function of the ensuing estrous cycle in cattle. The estrous cycles of eight heifers were synchronized with progesteron releasing intravaginal device, and ovulation was induced with GnRH. Eight animals were treated with 1.5 μg kg(-1) bovine ghrelin (group Ghr, n = 4) or saline (group C, n = 4). Starting with the first ghrelin injection, 13 blood samples were collected over a 4-hour period for the determination of ghrelin, GH, LH, and FSH concentration. Progesterone levels were measured in samples collected every other day after estrus expression. Data were analyzed by repeated measures of ANOVA followed by Bonferroni post hoc testing and t test. In group Ghr, ghrelin concentration increased significantly 15 minutes after the first injection and remained in elevated levels until the 90th minute after the last injection. At the time of third ghrelin injection, GH was significantly higher in the Ghr group compared with C (17.1 ± 1.3 vs. 2.6 ± 0.3 ng mL(-1), P < 0.0001). Similar differences were found for the next three samples collected 15, 30, and 60 minutes later; no difference was evident after 90 minutes. In group Ghr, the area under the curve for LH and FSH were significantly reduced compared with the ones of group C (266 ± 10.3 vs. 331.9 ± 7.3, P = 0.007 and 102.3 ± 2.0 vs. 134.9 ± 5.5, P < 0.005 for LH and FSH respectively). At particular time points the concentration of the two gonadotrophins in group Ghr was significantly lower than those of group C (15, 30, 45, 75, and 90 and 60, 75, 90, 120, and 150 minutes after GnRH administration for LH and FSH respectively). The duration of the following estrous cycle was shorter (P = 0.004) in group Ghr (19.0 ± 0.4 days) compared with C (21.8 ± 0.5 days). In days 4, 6, 8, 10, and 14

  6. Hyperosmolarity in the small intestine contributes to postprandial ghrelin suppression

    PubMed Central

    Overduin, Joost; Tylee, Tracy S.; Frayo, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Plasma levels of the orexigenic hormone ghrelin are suppressed by meals with an efficacy dependent on their macronutrient composition. We hypothesized that heterogeneity in osmolarity among macronutrient classes contributes to these differences. In three studies, the impact of small intestinal hyperosmolarity was examined in Sprague-Dawley rats. In study 1, isotonic, 2.5×, and 5× hypertonic solutions of several agents with diverse absorption and metabolism properties were infused duodenally at a physiological rate (3 ml/10 min). Jugular vein blood was sampled before and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, and 300 min after infusion. Plasma ghrelin was suppressed dose dependently and most strongly by glucose. Hyperosmolar infusions of lactulose, which transits the small intestine unabsorbed, and 3-O-methylglucose (3-O-MG), which is absorbed like glucose but remains unmetabolized, also suppressed ghrelin. Glucose, but not lactulose or 3-O-MG, infusions increased plasma insulin. In study 2, intestinal infusions of hyperosmolar NaCl suppressed ghrelin, a response that was not attenuated by coinfusion with the neural blocker lidocaine. In study 3, we reconfirmed that the low-osmolar lipid emulsion Intralipid suppresses ghrelin more weakly than isocaloric (but hypertonic) glucose. Importantly, raising Intralipid's osmolarity to that of the glucose solution by nonabsorbable lactulose supplementation enhanced ghrelin suppression to that seen after glucose. Hyperosmolar ghrelin occurred particularly during the initial 3 postinfusion hours. We conclude that small intestinal hyperosmolarity 1) is sufficient to suppress ghrelin, 2) may combine with other postprandial mechanisms to suppress ghrelin, 3) might contribute to altered ghrelin regulation after gastric bypass surgery, and 4) may inform dietary modifications for metabolic health. PMID:24789208

  7. Influence of ghrelin on interdigestive gastrointestinal motility in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tack, J; Depoortere, I; Bisschops, R; Delporte, C; Coulie, B; Meulemans, A; Janssens, J; Peeters, T

    2006-01-01

    Background Recent studies in animals have shown that ghrelin stimulates upper gastrointestinal motility through the vagus and enteric nervous system. The aim of the present study therefore was to simultaneously investigate the effect of administration of ghrelin on upper gastrointestinal motility and to elucidate its mode of action by measuring plasma levels of gastrointestinal hormones in humans. Materials and methods Nine healthy volunteers (four males; aged 22–35 years) underwent combined antroduodenal manometry and proximal stomach barostat study on two separate occasions at least one week apart. Twenty minutes after the occurrence of phase III of the migrating motor complex (MMC), saline or ghrelin 40 μg was administered intravenously over 30 minutes in a double blind, randomised, crossover fashion. Ghrelin, motilin, pancreatic polypeptide, glucagon, and somatostatin were measured by radioimmunoassay in blood samples obtained at 15–30 minute intervals. The influence of ghrelin or saline on MMC phases, hormone levels, and intraballoon volume was compared using paired t test, ANOVA, and χ2 testing. Results Spontaneous phase III occurred in all subjects, with a gastric origin in four. Administration of ghrelin induced a premature phase III (12 (3) minutes, p<0.001; gastric origin in nine, p<0.05), compared with saline (95 (13) minutes, gastric origin in two). Intraballoon volumes before infusion were similar (135 (13) v 119 (13) ml; NS) but ghrelin induced a longlasting decrease in intraballoon volume (184 (31) v 126 (21) ml in the first 60 minutes; p<0.05). Administration of ghrelin increased plasma levels of pancreatic polypeptide and ghrelin but motilin, somatostatin, and glucagon levels were not altered. Conclusions In humans, administration of ghrelin induces a premature gastric phase III of the MMC, which is not mediated through release of motilin. This is accompanied by prolonged increased tone of the proximal stomach. PMID:16216827

  8. Ablations of ghrelin and ghrelin receptor exhibit differential metabolic phenotypes and thermogenic capacity during aging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is a hallmark of aging in many Western societies, and is a precursor to numerous serious age-related diseases. Ghrelin ("Ghrl"), via its receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor, GHS-R), is shown to stimulate GH secretion and appetite. Surprisingly, our previous studies showed that "Gh...

  9. Dietary intake and ghrelin and leptin changes after sleeve gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zavadilová, Vladislava; Holéczy, Pavol; Švagera, Zdeněk; Švorc, Pavol; Foltys, Aleš; Zonča, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Surgical intervention in obesity is today the most effective treatment method in high level obesity management. Bariatric interventions not only ensure body weight reduction, but may influence dietary habits. Aim To assess changes in adipose hormones and dietary habits in obese patients after sleeve gastrectomy. Material and methods The study set comprised 37 subjects (29 females and 8 males) 24 to 68 years old with body mass index 43.0 ±4.9 kg/m2. Pre-operative examination included baseline measurements of body composition. Dietary habits and intake frequency were monitored by a questionnaire method. Follow-up examinations were carried out in a scope identical to the pre-operative examination, 6 and 12 months after surgery, respectively. Results The average patient weight loss 12 months after surgery was 31.7 kg. Excess weight loss was 55.2 ±20.6%. Patients reported reduced appetite (p < 0.001), increasingly regular food intake (p < 0.001), intake of more meal portions per day (p = 0.003) and a decrease in consuming the largest portions during the afternoon and evening (p = 0.030). Plasma levels of fasting glucose, leptin and ghrelin significantly decreased (p = 0.006; p = 0.0.043); in contrast, the level of adiponectin significantly increased (p < 0.001). Conclusions Sleeve gastrectomy and follow-up nutritional therapy resulted in a significant body weight reduction within 1 year after surgery. An improvement of certain dietary habits in patients was registered. At 12 months after surgery, there were no statistically significant differences in decreases in ghrelin and leptin concentrations between patients without changed appetite and those reporting decreased appetite. PMID:25561993

  10. Menstrual irregularities and energy deficiency in physically active women: the role of ghrelin, PYY and adipocytokines.

    PubMed

    Scheid, Jennifer L; De Souza, Mary Jane

    2010-01-01

    Menstrual cycle irregularities are often observed among physically active women and athletes who participate in physical activity ranging from recreational to competitive exercise training. Further, such irregularities have been casually linked to an energy deficiency where caloric intake is inadequate for exercise energy expenditure resulting in a suppressive effect on growth and reproduction. Adaptations consistent with chronic energy deficiency, including reductions in resting energy expenditure and total triiodothyronine, have been observed in exercising women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA). Gut peptides and adipocytokines also appear to be altered in exercising women with FHA and have been hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of FHA. Ghrelin concentrations are elevated in exercising women with FHA. Interestingly, while fasting ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, is elevated in women with FHA, PYY, an orexigenic peptide, is paradoxically also elevated in women with anorexia nervosa and exercising women with FHA. Leptin, an adipocytokine, is also suppressed in FHA associated with exercise and anorexia. A critical leptin concentration threshold is suggested to be necessary for regular menses to occur. Ghrelin, PYY, and leptin all have the ability to cross the blood brain barrier and, in the hypothalamus, can modulate appetite and food intake, and are hypothesized to affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Future studies are needed to determine if ghrelin, PYY, or leptin play a direct role in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, and if these signals can be altered by improving energy status secondary to increasing caloric intake and initiate the reversal of amenorrhea. PMID:20956862

  11. Ghrelin system in alcohol-dependent subjects: role of plasma ghrelin levels in alcohol drinking and craving

    PubMed Central

    Leggio, Lorenzo; Ferrulli, Anna; Cardone, Silvia; Nesci, Antonio; Miceli, Antonio; Malandrino, Noemi; Capristo, Esmeralda; Canestrelli, Benedetta; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kenna, George A.; Swift, Robert M.; Addolorato, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that the gut-brain peptide ghrelin plays an important role in the neurobiology of alcohol dependence (AD). Human studies show an effect of alcohol on ghrelin levels and a correlation between ghrelin levels and alcohol craving in alcoholics. This investigation consisted of two studies. Study 1 was a 12-week study with alcohol-dependent subjects, where plasma ghrelin determinations were assessed four times (T0-T3) and related to alcohol intake and craving [Penn Alcohol Craving Score (PACS) and Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS)]. Serum growth hormone (GH) levels and assessment of the nutritional/metabolic status were also performed. Study 2 was a pilot case-control study to assess ghrelin gene polymorphisms (Arg51Gln and Leu72Met) in alcohol-dependent individuals. Study 1 showed no significant differences in ghrelin levels in the whole sample, while there was a statistical difference for ghrelin between non-abstinent and abstinent subjects. Baseline ghrelin levels were significantly and positively correlated with the PACS score at T1 and with all craving scores both at T2 and T3 (PACS, OCDS, obsessive and compulsive OCDS subscores). In Study 2, although there was a higher frequency of the Leu72Met ghrelin gene polymorphism in alcohol-dependent individuals, the distribution between healthy controls and alcohol dependent individuals was not statistically significant. This investigation suggests that ghrelin is potentially able to affect alcohol-seeking behaviors, such as alcohol drinking and craving, representing a new potential neuropharmacological target for AD. PMID:21392177

  12. Novel expression and functional role of ghrelin in chicken ovary.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, A V; Grossmann, R; María-Peon, M T; Roa, J; Tena-Sempere, M; Klein, S

    2006-09-26

    Ghrelin has recently emerged as pleiotropic regulator of a wide array of endocrine and non-endocrine functions. The former likely includes the control of gonadal function, as expression of ghrelin and its putative receptor, the GH secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a), has been described in mammalian gonads, and direct effects of ghrelin in the control of testicular secretion and cell proliferation have been reported. Yet, the expression and/or functional role of ghrelin in gonads from non-mammalian species remain to be analyzed. The present study aimed to evaluate the expression of ghrelin and GHS-R genes in the chicken ovary, and to assess the potential involvement of ghrelin in the direct control of chick ovarian function. To this end, RT-PCR assays for ghrelin and GHS-R1a mRNAs were performed in ovarian tissue, and cultures of chicken ovarian cells were conducted in the presence of increasing doses (1, 10 or 100 ng/ml) of the ghrelin analog, ghrelin 1-18. Our results demonstrate that both ghrelin and GHS-R1a mRNAs are expressed in chick ovarian tissue. Moreover, challenge of ovarian granulosa cells with ghrelin 1-18 was able to induce markers of proliferation (i.e. expression of both PCNA and cyclin), and to modulate markers of apoptosis (i.e. decreased expression of caspase-3, bax, bcl-2 and TUNEL-positive cells). Moreover, ghrelin 1-18 increased the expression of PCNA, cyclin, bax and p53 in cultures of ovarian follicular fragments, where it also stimulated the release of progesterone, estradiol, arginine-vasotocin (AVT) and IGF-I, but not of testosterone. In conclusion, our study provides novel evidence for the gonadal expression of the genes encoding ghrelin and its cognate receptor in a non-mammalian species, i.e. the chicken ovary, and unravels the potential involvement of this newly discovered molecule in the control of key gonadal functions in the chick, such as proliferation, apoptosis, and hormone release. PMID:16891055

  13. Acylation of Ferrocene: A Greener Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.; Nguyen, Andy; Ramos, Eric J.; Kobelja, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The acylation of ferrocene is a common reaction used in organic laboratories to demonstrate Friedel-Crafts acylation and the purification of compounds using column chromatography. This article describes an acylation of ferrocene experiment that is more eco-friendly than the conventional acylation experiment. The traditional experiment was modified…

  14. Current and potential roles of ghrelin in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Angelidis, G; Valotassiou, V; Georgoulias, P

    2010-12-01

    Ghrelin is a novel GH-releasing peptide, which has been identified as an endogenous ligand for GH-secretagogue receptor. Ghrelin is mainly secreted by the stomach and plays a critical role in a variety of physiological processes including endocrine, metabolic, cardiovascular, immunological, and other actions. Ghrelin stimulates food intake via hypothalamic neurons and causes a positive energy balance and body weight gain by decreasing fat utilization and promoting adiposity. Given the multiple effects of ghrelin, its potential clinical applications have been evaluated in various conditions. Preliminary trials have shown that it may prove valuable in the management of disease-induced cachexia. Ghrelin may improve the wasting syndrome through GH-dependent or GH-independent effects. Moreover, ghrelin may play a role in the management of disorders of gut motility and obesity. Finally, other potential clinical applications of ghrelin include the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus, infections, rheumatological diseases or GH deficiency and the diagnosis of this hormonal disorder. PMID:21293171

  15. Mechanistic analysis of ghrelin-O-acyltransferase using substrate analogs.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Martin S; Dempsey, Daniel R; Hwang, Yousang; Chen, Zan; Chu, Nam; Boeke, Jef D; Cole, Philip A

    2015-10-01

    Ghrelin-O-Acyltransferase (GOAT) is an 11-transmembrane integral membrane protein that octanoylates the metabolism-regulating peptide hormone ghrelin at Ser3 and may represent an attractive target for the treatment of type II diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Protein octanoylation is unique to ghrelin in humans, and little is known about the mechanism of GOAT or of related protein-O-acyltransferases HHAT or PORC. In this study, we explored an in vitro microsomal ghrelin octanoylation assay to analyze its enzymologic features. Measurement of Km for 10-mer, 27-mer, and synthetic Tat-peptide-containing ghrelin substrates provided evidence for a role of charge interactions in substrate binding. Ghrelin substrates with amino-alanine in place of Ser3 demonstrated that GOAT can catalyze the formation of an octanoyl-amide bond at a similar rate compared with the natural reaction. A pH-rate comparison of these substrates revealed minimal differences in acyltransferase activity across pH 6.0-9.0, providing evidence that these reactions may be relatively insensitive to the basicity of the substrate nucleophile. The conserved His338 residue was required both for Ser3 and amino-Ala3 ghrelin substrates, suggesting that His338 may have a key catalytic role beyond that of a general base. PMID:26246082

  16. Ghrelin action in the brain controls adipocyte metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Theander-Carrillo, Claudia; Wiedmer, Petra; Cettour-Rose, Philippe; Nogueiras, Ruben; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul; Castaneda, Tamara R.; Muzzin, Patrick; Schürmann, Annette; Szanto, Ildiko; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise

    2006-01-01

    Many homeostatic processes, including appetite and food intake, are controlled by neuroendocrine circuits involving the CNS. The CNS also directly regulates adipocyte metabolism, as we have shown here by examining central action of the orexigenic hormone ghrelin. Chronic central ghrelin infusion resulted in increases in the glucose utilization rate of white and brown adipose tissue without affecting skeletal muscle. In white adipocytes, mRNA expression of various fat storage–promoting enzymes such as lipoprotein lipase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase α, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase–1 was markedly increased, while that of the rate-limiting step in fat oxidation, carnitine palmitoyl transferase–1α, was decreased. In brown adipocytes, central ghrelin infusion resulted in lowered expression of the thermogenesis-related mitochondrial uncoupling proteins 1 and 3. These ghrelin effects were dose dependent, occurred independently from ghrelin-induced hyperphagia, and seemed to be mediated by the sympathetic nervous system. Additionally, the expression of some fat storage enzymes was decreased in ghrelin-deficient mice, which led us to conclude that central ghrelin is of physiological relevance in the control of cell metabolism in adipose tissue. These results unravel the existence of what we believe to be a new CNS-based neuroendocrine circuit regulating metabolic homeostasis of adipose tissue. PMID:16767221

  17. Spontaneous sleep and homeostatic sleep regulation in ghrelin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Szentirmai, Eva; Kapás, Levente; Sun, Yuxiang; Smith, Roy G; Krueger, James M

    2007-07-01

    Ghrelin is well known for its feeding and growth hormone-releasing actions. It may also be involved in sleep regulation; intracerebroventricular administration and hypothalamic microinjections of ghrelin stimulate wakefulness in rats. Hypothalamic ghrelin, together with neuropeptide Y and orexin form a food intake-regulatory circuit. We hypothesized that this circuit also promotes arousal. To further investigate the role of ghrelin in the regulation of sleep-wakefulness, we characterized spontaneous and homeostatic sleep regulation in ghrelin knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Both groups of mice exhibited similar diurnal rhythms with more sleep and less wakefulness during the light period. In ghrelin KO mice, spontaneous wakefulness and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) were slightly elevated, and non-rapid-eye-movement sleep (NREMS) was reduced. KO mice had more fragmented NREMS than WT mice, as indicated by the shorter and greater number of NREMS episodes. Six hours of sleep deprivation induced rebound increases in NREMS and REMS and biphasic changes in electroencephalographic slow-wave activity (EEG SWA) in both genotypes. Ghrelin KO mice recovered from NREMS and REMS loss faster, and the delayed reduction in EEG SWA, occurring after sleep loss-enhanced increases in EEG SWA, was shorter-lasting compared with WT mice. These findings suggest that the basic sleep-wake regulatory mechanisms in ghrelin KO mice are not impaired and they are able to mount adequate rebound sleep in response to a homeostatic challenge. It is possible that redundancy in the arousal systems of the brain or activation of compensatory mechanisms during development allow for normal sleep-wake regulation in ghrelin KO mice. PMID:17409264

  18. Ghrelin Inhibits Oligodendrocyte Cell Death by Attenuating Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Youn

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, we reported the antiapoptotic effect of ghrelin in spinal cord injury-induced apoptotic cell death of oligodendrocytes. However, how ghrelin inhibits oligodendrocytes apoptosis, is still unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we examined whether ghrelin inhibits microglia activation and thereby inhibits oligodendrocyte apoptosis. Methods Using total cell extracts prepared from BV-2 cells activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with or without ghrelin, the levels of p-p38 phosphor-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38MAPK), phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (pJNK), p-c-Jun, and pro-nerve growth factor (proNGF) were examined by Western blot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was investigated by using dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. To examine the effect of ghrelin on oligodendrocyte cell death, oligodendrocytes were cocultured in transwell chambers of 24-well plates with LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. After 48 hours incubation, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase 2'-deoxyuridine, 5'-triphosphate nick end labeling staining were assessed. Results Ghrelin treatment significantly decreased levels of p-p38MAPK, p-JNK, p-c-Jun, and proNGF in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. ROS production increased in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells was also significantly inhibited by ghrelin treatment. In addition, ghrelin significantly inhibited oligodendrocyte cell death when cocultured with LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. Conclusion Ghrelin inhibits oligodendrocyte cell death by decreasing proNGF and ROS production as well as p38MAPK and JNK activation in activated microglia as an anti-inflammatory hormone. PMID:25309797

  19. A twin study of differences in the response of plasma ghrelin to a milkshake preload in restrained eaters

    PubMed Central

    Myhre, Rachel; Kratz, Mario; Goldberg, Jack; Polivy, Janet; Melhorn, Susan; Buchwald, Dedra; Cummings, David E.; Schur, Ellen A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic, physiological, and psychological factors can affect food intake, but twin studies can distinguish inherited from environmental contributors. We examined the influence of attempted cognitive control of eating (“restrained eating”) on levels of appetite-regulating hormones. Methods Sixteen female, monozygotic twin pairs, discordant for Restraint Scale score (i.e., one twin a restrained eater with score > 15 whereas the co-twin was unrestrained), were selected from the University of Washington Twin Registry. Serial plasma ghrelin concentrations were monitored during meals and a preload study paradigm involving intake of a milkshake followed by an ad libitum ice cream “taste test.” Results Body weight, body mass index, resting energy expenditure, and fasting leptin levels were very similar between restrained and unrestrained twins. In a preload study, twins ate similar amounts of ice cream shortly after drinking identical milkshakes (mean ±SD; restrained 239 ±158 vs. unrestrained 228 ±132 kilocalories; P = 0.83). However, ghrelin concentrations during the preload study were significantly higher (P = 0.03) in restrained twins than in their unrestrained co-twins. Regardless of restraint status, ghrelin levels prior to the preload study were prospectively and positively associated with ice cream intake (P = 0.001). Conclusions Compared to their unrestrained co-twins, restrained twins had higher endogenous ghrelin levels during a preload study, but ate similar amounts. This finding is consistent with exertion of cognitive control relative to the state of physiologic appetite stimulation. Moreover, these findings in twins suggest that higher ghrelin levels result from restrained eating behavior and not from genetic predisposition. PMID:24534168

  20. Effects of ghrelin and its analogues on chicken ovarian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, A V; Grossmann, R

    2008-02-01

    The aim of these in vitro experiments was (1) to examine the effects of ghrelin on the basic functions of ovarian cells (proliferation, apoptosis, secretory activity); (2) to determine the possible involvement of the GHS-R1a receptor and PKA- and MAPK-dependent post-receptor intracellular signalling cascades; (3) to identify the active part of the 28-amino acid molecule responsible for the effects of ghrelin on ovarian cells. We compared the effect of full-length ghrelin 1-28, a synthetic activator of GHS-R1a, GHRP6, and ghrelin molecular fragments 1-18 and 1-5 on cultured chicken ovarian cells. Indices of cell apoptosis (expression of the apoptotic peptide bax and the anti-apoptotic peptide bcl-2), proliferation (expression of proliferation-associated peptide PCNA), and expression of protein kinases (PKA and MAPK) within ovarian granulosa cells were analysed by immunocytochemistry. The secretion of progesterone (P(4)), testosterone (T), estradiol (E(2)) and arginine-vasotocin (AVT) by isolated ovarian follicular fragments was evaluated by RIA/EIA. It was observed that accumulation of bax was increased by ghrelin 1-28, GHRP6 and ghrelin 1-18, but not by ghrelin 1-5. Expression of bcl-2 was suppressed by addition of ghrelin 1-28, GHRP6 and ghrelin 1-5, but promoted by ghrelin 1-18. The occurrence of PCNA was reduced by ghrelin 1-28, GHRP6, ghrelin 1-18 and ghrelin 1-5. An increase in the expression of MAPK/ERK1, 2 was observed after addition of ghrelin 1-28, GHRP6 and ghrelin 1-18, but not ghrelin 1-5. The accumulation of PKA decreased after treatment with ghrelin 1-28 and increased after treatment with GHRP6 and ghrelin 1-18 but not ghrelin 1-5. Secretion of P(4) by ovarian follicular fragments was decreased after addition of ghrelin 1-28 or ghrelin 1-5 but stimulated by GHRP6 and ghrelin 1-18. Testosterone secretion was inhibited by ghrelins 1-28 and 1-18, but not by GHRP6 or ghrelin 1-5. Estradiol secretion was reduced after treatment with ghrelin 1-28 but

  1. Influence of Aging and Gender Differences on Feeding Behavior and Ghrelin-Related Factors during Social Isolation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Chihiro; Saegusa, Yayoi; Nahata, Miwa; Sadakane, Chiharu; Hattori, Tomohisa; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Psychological stress due to social isolation is known to cause abnormal feeding behaviors, but the influences of gender and aging on subchronic stress-induced changes in feeding behaviors are unknown. Thus, we examined the changes in body weight, food intake, and orexigenic ghrelin-related factors during 2 weeks of isolation stress in young and aged mice. Food intake increased significantly in young mice in the isolation group compared with the group-housed control throughout the experimental period. This isolation-induced increase in food intake was not observed in aged mice. In young mice, there were no significant differences in body weight between the isolated group and group-housed control up to 2 weeks. However, aged male mice exhibited significant weight loss at 2 weeks and a similar tendency was observed in aged female mice. Young male mice, but not female mice, had significantly increased (2.2-fold) plasma acylated ghrelin levels after 1 week of isolation compared with the group-housed control. A significant but lower increase (1.3-fold) was also observed in aged male mice. Hypothalamic preproghrelin gene expression decreased significantly with isolation in young male mice, whereas it increased significantly in female mice. The expression levels of NPY and AGRP in the hypothalamus, which are transmitted by elevated peripheral ghrelin signals, increased significantly in isolated young male mice, whereas the AGRP expression levels decreased significantly in young female mice. Isolation caused no significant differences in the expression levels of these genes in aged mice. In isolation, young female mice exhibited markedly increased dark- and light-phase locomotor activities compared with male mice, whereas male and female aged mice exhibited no obvious increases in activity immediately after the dark phase started. We conclude that the gender-specific homeostatic regulatory mechanisms required to maintain body weight operated during subchronic psychological

  2. Interactions of Gastrointestinal Peptides: Ghrelin and Its Anorexigenic Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Wisser, Anna-Sophia; Habbel, Piet; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F.; Mönnikes, Hubert; Kobelt, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Food intake behaviour and energy homeostasis are strongly regulated by a complex system of humoral factors and nerval structures constituting the brain-gut-axis. To date the only known peripherally produced and centrally acting peptide that stimulates food intake is ghrelin, which is mainly synthesized in the stomach. Recent data indicate that the orexigenic effect of ghrelin might be influenced by other gastrointestinal peptides such as cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin, desacyl ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), as well as glucagon-like peptide (GLP). Therefore, we will review on the interactions of ghrelin with several gastrointestinal factors known to be involved in appetite regulation in order to elucidate the interdependency of peripheral orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides in the control of appetite. PMID:20798884

  3. Ghrelin as a target for gastrointestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Kriegsman, Michael; Nelson, Richard

    2011-11-01

    The therapeutic potential of ghrelin and synthetic ghrelin receptor (GRLN-R) agonists for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorders is based on their ability to stimulate coordinated patterns of propulsive GI motility. This review focuses on the latest findings that support the therapeutic potential of GRLN-R agonists for the treatment of GI motility disorders. The review highlights the preclinical and clinical prokinetic effects of ghrelin and a series of novel ghrelin mimetics to exert prokinetic effects on the GI tract. We build upon a series of excellent reviews to critically discuss the evidence that supports the potential of GRLN-R agonists to normalize GI motility in patients with GI hypomotility disorders such as gastroparesis, post-operative ileus (POI), idiopathic chronic constipation and functional bowel disorders. PMID:21453735

  4. The ɛ-Amino Group of Protein Lysine Residues Is Highly Susceptible to Nonenzymatic Acylation by Several Physiological Acyl-CoA Thioesters.

    PubMed

    Simic, Zeljko; Weiwad, Matthias; Schierhorn, Angelika; Steegborn, Clemens; Schutkowski, Mike

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial enzymes implicated in the pathophysiology of diabetes, cancer, and metabolic syndrome are highly regulated by acetylation. However, mitochondrial acetyltransferases have not been identified. Here, we show that acetylation and also other acylations are spontaneous processes that depend on pH value, acyl-CoA concentration and the chemical nature of the acyl residue. In the case of a peptide derived from carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1, the rates of succinylation and glutarylation were up to 150 times than for acetylation. These results were confirmed by using the protein substrate cyclophilin A (CypA). Deacylation experiments revealed that SIRT3 exhibits deacetylase activity but is not able to remove any of the succinyl groups from CypA, whereas SIRT5 is an effective protein desuccinylase. Thus, the acylation landscape on lysine residues might largely depend on the enzymatic activity of specific sirtuins, and the availability and reactivity of acyl-CoA compounds. PMID:26382620

  5. Characterization and regulation of the rat and human ghrelin promoters.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Guiyun; Qi, Xiang; Englander, Ella W; Greeley, George H

    2005-03-01

    Ghrelin is a recently discovered stomach hormone and endogenous ligand for the GH secretagogue receptor. The aim of these studies is to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of the ghrelin gene. Distal and proximal transcription initiation sites are present. A short transcript, a product of the proximal site, showed a more widespread distribution. Two sets of 5'-upstream segments of the rat and human ghrelin genes were cloned and sequenced. Rat promoter segments upstream of the distal site showed highest activity in kidney (COS-7) and stomach (AGS) cells, whereas human promoter segments upstream of the proximal site showed highest activity in AGS and pituitary (GH3) cells in transient transfection assays. For the human, the core promoter spanned -667 to -468 bp, including the noncoding exon 1 and a short 5' sequence of intron 1. For the rat, the core promoter spanned -581 to -469 bp, and inclusion of exon 1 and a short 5'-sequence of intron 1 reduced activity by 67%. Mutation of initiator-like elements in the rat lowered activity by 20-50%, whereas in the human, all activity was abolished. Overexpression of upstream stimulatory factors increased ghrelin core promoter activity. Fasting increases stomach ghrelin expression, glucagon-a fasting-induced hormone, increased ghrelin expression in vivo in rats, and promoter activity by approximately 25-50%. Together, these findings indicate that structural differences between the rat and human ghrelin core promoters may account in part for the differences in their transcriptional regulation. Nonetheless, upstream stimulatory factor and glucagon exert similar effects on regulation of rat and human ghrelin promoters. PMID:15604212

  6. Ghrelin Influences Novelty Seeking Behavior in Rodents and Men

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Caroline; Shirazi, Rozita H.; Näslund, Jakob; Vogel, Heike; Neuber, Corinna; Holm, Göran; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Eriksson, Elias; Skibicka, Karolina P.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discoveries indicate an important role for ghrelin in drug and alcohol reward and an ability of ghrelin to regulate mesolimbic dopamine activity. The role of dopamine in novelty seeking, and the association between this trait and drug and alcohol abuse, led us to hypothesize that ghrelin may influence novelty seeking behavior. To test this possibility we applied several complementary rodent models of novelty seeking behavior, i.e. inescapable novelty-induced locomotor activity (NILA), novelty-induced place preference and novel object exploration, in rats subjected to acute ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor; GHSR) stimulation or blockade. Furthermore we assessed the possible association between polymorphisms in the genes encoding ghrelin and GHSR and novelty seeking behavior in humans. The rodent studies indicate an important role for ghrelin in a wide range of novelty seeking behaviors. Ghrelin-injected rats exhibited a higher preference for a novel environment and increased novel object exploration. Conversely, those with GHSR blockade drastically reduced their preference for a novel environment and displayed decreased NILA. Importantly, the mesolimbic ventral tegmental area selective GHSR blockade was sufficient to reduce the NILA response indicating that the mesolimbic GHSRs might play an important role in the observed novelty responses. Moreover, in untreated animals, a striking positive correlation between NILA and sucrose reward behavior was detected. Two GHSR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs2948694 and rs495225, were significantly associated with the personality trait novelty seeking, as assessed using the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), in human subjects. This study provides the first evidence for a role of ghrelin in novelty seeking behavior in animals and humans, and also points to an association between food reward and novelty seeking in rodents. PMID:23227170

  7. Ghrelin maintains the cardiovascular stability in severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rongqian; Chaung, Wayne W.; Dong, Weifeng; Ji, Youxin; Barrera, Rafael; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Molmenti, Ernesto P.; Coppa, Gene F.; Wang, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular dysfunction, characterized by reduced cardiac contractility and depressed endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation, is common in severe sepsis. Although it is known that ghrelin produces beneficial effects following various adverse circulatory conditions, it remains unknown whether ghrelin increases cardiac contractility and improves vascular responsiveness to vasoactive agents in severe sepsis. Methods Male adult rats were subjected to sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). At 5 h after CLP, a bolus intravenous injection of 2 nmol ghrelin was followed by a continuous infusion of 12 nmol ghrelin via a primed mini-pump over 15 h. At 20 h after CLP (i.e., severe sepsis), the maximal rates of ventricular pressure increase (+dP/dtmax) and decrease (−dP/dtmax) were determined in vivo. In additional groups of animals, the thoracic aortae were isolated at 20 h after CLP. The aortae were cut into rings, and placed in organ chambers. Norepinephrine (NE) was used to induce vascular contraction. Dose responses for an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, acetylcholine (ACh), and an endothelium-independent vasodilator, nitroglycerine (NTG) were carried out. Results +dP/dtmax and −dP/dtmax decreased significantly at 20 h after CLP. Treatment with ghrelin significantly increased +dP/dtmax and −dP/dtmax by 36% (P<0.05) and 35% (P<0.05), respectively. Moreover, NE-induced vascular contraction and endothelium-dependent (ACh-induced) vascular relaxation decreased significantly at 20 h after CLP. Administration of ghrelin, however, increased NE-induced vascular contraction and ACh-induced vascular relaxation. In contrast, no significant reduction in NTG-induced vascular relaxation was seen in rats with severe sepsis irrespective of ghrelin treatment. Conclusions Ghrelin may be further developed as a useful agent for maintaining cardiovascular stability in severe sepsis. PMID:22459289

  8. Adiponectin, ghrelin, and leptin differentially influence human platelet and human vascular endothelial cell functions: implication in obesity-associated cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Elbatarny, Hisham S; Netherton, Stuart J; Ovens, Jeffrey D; Ferguson, Alastair V; Maurice, Donald H

    2007-03-01

    A very strong epidemiological link exists between obesity, the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and diabetes-associated cardiovascular pathologies. For this reason the peripheral effects of the centrally-acting satiety adipokines, adiponectin and leptin, and of non-adipose-derived hormones with similar effects, like ghrelin, have received considerable attention. In this report, we have extended our previous studies of the pro-thrombotic effects of leptin and determined the effects of adiponectin or ghrelin on human platelet activation. Thus, while leptin stimulated human platelet aggregation and adhesion, addition of adiponectin or of ghrelin did not affect either aggregation or adhesion of these cells; even at supra-physiological concentrations. In addition, we compared the impact of these three important hormones on microvascular endothelial cell permeability, an important parameter of endothelial function that when impaired contributes to several vascular pathologies. While physiologically relevant concentrations of either leptin or adiponectin increased the integrity of the diffusion barrier formed by a monolayer of human microvascular endothelial cells, only supra-physiological concentrations of ghrelin had this effect. None of these agents reduced microvascular endothelial barrier function. Taken together, our data are consistent with the ideas that leptin activates human platelets and limits transendothelial cell diffusion but that adiponectin only influences endothelial cell permeability. In contrast, ghrelin had neither of these effects. We propose that these data identify important differences in the effects of leptin, adiponectin or ghrelin on microvascular endothelial cells and platelets and may provide a basis on which to pharmacologically manipulate the selective effects of these peptides on these cell types in human cardiovascular or thrombotic diseases associated with obesity. PMID:17207790

  9. Elevated ghrelin predicts food intake during experimental sleep restriction

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Josiane L.; Kilkus, Jennifer M.; Delebecque, Fanny; Abraham, Varghese; Day, Andrew; Whitmore, Harry R.; Tasali, Esra

    2015-01-01

    Objective Sleep curtailment has been linked to obesity, but underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. We assessed whether sleep restriction alters 24-hour profiles of appetite-regulating hormones ghrelin, leptin and pancreatic polypeptide during a standardized diet, and whether these hormonal alterations predict food intake during ad libitum feeding. Methods Nineteen healthy, lean men were studied under normal sleep and sleep restriction in a randomized crossover design. Blood samples were collected for 24-hours during standardized meals. Subsequently, participants had an ad libitum feeding opportunity (buffet meals and snacks) and caloric intake was measured. Results Ghrelin levels were increased after sleep restriction as compared to normal sleep (p<0.01). Overall, sleep restriction did not alter leptin or pancreatic polypeptide profiles. Sleep restriction was associated with an increase in total calories from snacks by 328 ± 140 Kcal (p=0.03), primarily from carbohydrates (p=0.02). The increase in evening ghrelin during sleep restriction was correlated with higher consumption of calories from sweets (r=0.48, p=0.04). Conclusions Sleep restriction as compared to normal sleep significantly increases ghrelin levels. The increase in ghrelin is associated with more consumption of calories. Elevated ghrelin may be a mechanism by which sleep loss leads to increased food intake and the development of obesity. PMID:26467988

  10. Ghrelin and eating behavior: evidence and insights from genetically-modified mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Aki; Zigman, Jeffrey M.; Perelló, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin is an octanoylated peptide hormone, produced by endocrine cells of the stomach, which acts in the brain to increase food intake and body weight. Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying ghrelin's effects on eating behaviors has been greatly improved by the generation and study of several genetically manipulated mouse models. These models include mice overexpressing ghrelin and also mice with genetic deletion of ghrelin, the ghrelin receptor [the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR)] or the enzyme that post-translationally modifies ghrelin [ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT)]. In addition, a GHSR-null mouse model in which GHSR transcription is globally blocked but can be cell-specifically reactivated in a Cre recombinase-mediated fashion has been generated. Here, we summarize findings obtained with these genetically manipulated mice, with the aim to highlight the significance of the ghrelin system in the regulation of both homeostatic and hedonic eating, including that occurring in the setting of chronic psychosocial stress. PMID:23882175

  11. Role of calcium and EPAC in norepinephrine-induced ghrelin secretion.

    PubMed

    Mani, Bharath K; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Kjalarsdottir, Lilja; Sakata, Ichiro; Walker, Angela K; Kuperman, Anna; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Repa, Joyce J; Zigman, Jeffrey M

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone secreted principally from a distinct population of gastric endocrine cells. Molecular mechanisms regulating ghrelin secretion are mostly unknown. Recently, norepinephrine (NE) was shown to enhance ghrelin release by binding to β1-adrenergic receptors on ghrelin cells. Here, we use an immortalized stomach-derived ghrelin cell line to further characterize the intracellular signaling pathways involved in NE-induced ghrelin secretion, with a focus on the roles of Ca(2+) and cAMP. Several voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) family members were found by quantitative PCR to be expressed by ghrelin cells. Nifedipine, a selective L-type VGCC blocker, suppressed both basal and NE-stimulated ghrelin secretion. NE induced elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels both in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Ca(2+)-sensing synaptotagmins Syt7 and Syt9 were also highly expressed in ghrelin cell lines, suggesting that they too help mediate ghrelin secretion. Raising cAMP with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine also stimulated ghrelin secretion, although such a cAMP-mediated effect likely does not involve protein kinase A, given the absence of a modulatory response to a highly selective protein kinase A inhibitor. However, pharmacological inhibition of another target of cAMP, exchange protein-activated by cAMP (EPAC), did attenuate both basal and NE-induced ghrelin secretion, whereas an EPAC agonist enhanced basal ghrelin secretion. We conclude that constitutive ghrelin secretion is primarily regulated by Ca(2+) influx through L-type VGCCs and that NE stimulates ghrelin secretion predominantly through release of intracellular Ca(2+). Furthermore, cAMP and its downstream activation of EPAC are required for the normal ghrelin secretory response to NE. PMID:24189139

  12. Acylated flavonol glycosides from the forage legume, Onobrychis viciifolia (sainfoin).

    PubMed

    Veitch, Nigel C; Regos, Ionela; Kite, Geoffrey C; Treutter, Dieter

    2011-04-01

    Ten acylated flavonol glycosides were isolated from aqueous acetone extracts of the aerial parts of the forage legume, Onobrychis viciifolia, and their structures determined using spectroscopic methods. Among these were eight previously unreported examples which comprised either feruloylated or sinapoylated derivatives of 3-O-di- and 3-O-triglycosides of kaempferol (3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxyflavone) or quercetin (3,5,7,3',4'-pentahydroxyflavone). The diglycosides were acylated at the primary Glc residue of O-α-Rhap(1→6)-β-Glcp (rutinose), whereas the triglycosides were acylated at the terminal Rha residues of the branched trisaccharides, O-α-Rhap(1→2)[α-Rhap(1→6)]-β-Galp or O-α-Rhap(1→2)[α-Rhap(1→6)]-β-Glcp. Identification of the primary 3-O-linked hexose residues as either Gal or Glc was carried out by negative ion electrospray and serial MS, and cryoprobe NMR spectroscopy. Analysis of UV and MS spectra of the acylated flavonol glycosides provided additional diagnostic features relevant to direct characterisation of these compounds in hyphenated analyses. Quantitative analysis of the acylated flavonol glycosides present in different aerial parts of sainfoin revealed that the highest concentrations were in mature leaflets. PMID:21292287

  13. Ablation of ghrelin receptor in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice has paradoxical effects on glucose homeostasis when compared with ablation of ghrelin in ob/ob mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The orexigenic hormone ghrelin is important in diabetes because it has an inhibitory effect on insulin secretion. Ghrelin ablation in leptin-deficient ob/ob (Ghrelin(-/-):ob/ob) mice increases insulin secretion and improves hyperglycemia. The physiologically relevant ghrelin receptor is the growth ...

  14. Rise of plasma ghrelin with weight loss is not sustained during weight maintenance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin is postulated to be an orexigenic signal that promotes weight regain after weight loss (WL). However, it is not known whether this putative effect of ghrelin is sustained after weight stabilization. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of plasma ghrelin concentrati...

  15. Neuronal deletion of ghrelin receptor almost completely prevents diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin signaling has major effects on energy- and glucose-homeostasis, but it is unknown whether ghrelin's functions are centrally and/or peripherally mediated. The ghrelin receptor, Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor (GHS-R), is highly expressed in brain and detectable in some peripheral tissues...

  16. Alterations of ghrelin with weights and correlation among ghrelin, cytokine and survival in patients receiving chemoradiotherapy for gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Feryal; Afsar, Cigdem Usul; Gunaldi, Meral; Erkurt, Erkut; Ercolak, Vehbi; Sertdemir, Yasar; Paydas, Semra

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study involved 30 patients (16 had gastric, 9 pancreatic and 5 gall bladder cancer) who had received concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Blood ghrelin and IL-6 values were compared before, in the last week of, and 3 months after CRT. Meanwhile, changes in body weight of patients were also investigated with changes in ghrelin and IL-6 levels before, in the last week of, and after radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Informed consent of the patients and the ethical committee approval from Cukurova University Medical Faculty were taken. Blood ghrelin and IL-6 levels were measured by using the ELISA method. Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan Maier method, and data were evaluated by using the SPSS 19.0 package. Categorical measurements were calculated as numbers and percentages, whereas numerical data were summarized as mean and standard deviation. Results: The correlation between ghrelin and IL-6 values at the baseline of RT and overall survival rates at the end of the 30-month follow up was analyzed. Accordingly, ghrelin values were also changed in line with changes in patients’ weights (P < 0.001). Patients with ghrelin values above 35 pg/ml before RT had longer survival rates at the end of the 30-month follow up (P = 0.001). Overall survival rates in patients with IL-6 value at or below 3.9 pg/ml before RT were longer than patients with IL-6 value above 3.9 pg/ml (P = 0.021). Conclusion: Therefore, the initiation of ghrelin analogue prophylactically in patients receiving chemoradiotherapy with gastrointestinal system malignancies can both prevent weight loss by increasing appetite and decrease severity of inflammation, thereby increasing survival. PMID:25785069

  17. Anxiolytic-Like Effects of Increased Ghrelin Receptor Signaling in the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Morten; Ratner, Cecilia; Rudenko, Olga; Christiansen, Søren H.; Skov, Louise J.; Hundahl, Cecilie; Woldbye, David P.D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Besides the well-known effects of ghrelin on adiposity and food intake regulation, the ghrelin system has been shown to regulate aspects of behavior including anxiety and stress. However, the effect of virus-mediated overexpression of the ghrelin receptor in the amygdala has not previously been addressed directly. Methods: First, we examined the acute effect of peripheral ghrelin administration on anxiety- and depression-like behavior using the open field, elevated plus maze, forced swim, and tail suspension tests. Next, we examined the effect of peripheral ghrelin administration and ghrelin receptor deficiency on stress in a familiar and social environment using the Intellicage system. Importantly, we also used a novel approach to study ghrelin receptor signaling in the brain by overexpressing the ghrelin receptor in the amygdala. We examined the effect of ghrelin receptor overexpression on anxiety-related behavior before and after acute stress and measured the modulation of serotonin receptor expression. Results: We found that ghrelin caused an anxiolytic-like effect in both the open field and elevated plus maze tests. Additionally, it attenuated air-puff–induced stress in the social environment, while the opposite was shown in ghrelin receptor deficient mice. Finally, we found that overexpression of the ghrelin receptor in the basolateral division of the amygdala caused an anxiolytic-like effect and decreased the 5HT1a receptor expression. Conclusions: Ghrelin administration and overexpression of the ghrelin receptor in the amygdala induces anxiolytic-like behavior. Since the ghrelin receptor has high constitutive activity, ligand-independent signaling in vivo may be important for the observed anxiolytic-like effects. The anxiolytic effects seem to be mediated independently from the HPA axis, potentially engaging the central serotonin system. PMID:26578081

  18. An Integrative Review on Role and Mechanisms of Ghrelin in Stress, Anxiety and Depression.

    PubMed

    Bali, Anjana; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is orexigenic hormone primarily synthesized by endocrine X/A-like cells of gastric oxyntic mucosa to stimulate appetite and food intake along with regulation of growth hormone and insulin secretion; glucose and lipid metabolism; gastrointestinal motility; blood pressure, heart rate and neurogenesis. Furthermore, peripherally (after crossing the blood brain barrier) as well as centrally synthesized ghrelin (in the hypothalamus) regulates diverse functions of central nervous system including stress-associated behavioral functions. Exposure to stress alters the ghrelin levels and alteration in ghrelin levels significantly affects neuro-endocrinological parameters; metabolism-related physiology, behavior and mood. Studies have shown both anxiolytic and anxiogenic role of ghrelin suggesting its dual role in modulating anxiety-related behavior. However, it is proposed that increase in ghrelin levels during stress condition is an endogenous stress coping behavior and increased ghrelin levels may be required to prevent excessive anxiety. In preclinical and clinical studies, an elevation in ghrelin levels during depression has been correlated with their antidepressant activities. Ghrelin-induced modulation of stress and associated conditions has been linked to alteration in hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis; autonomic nervous system (mainly sympathetic nervous system and serotonergic neurotransmission. A reciprocal relationship has been reported between corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and ghrelin as ghrelin increases the release of CRH, ACTH and corticosteroids; while CRH decreases the expression of ghrelin. Similarly, ghrelin increases the serotonin turnover and in turn, serotonin controls ghrelin signaling to modulate anxietyrelated behavior. The present review discusses the dual role of ghrelin in stress and related behavioral disorders along with possible mechanisms. PMID:25981609

  19. Loneliness predicts postprandial ghrelin and hunger in women.

    PubMed

    Jaremka, Lisa M; Fagundes, Christopher P; Peng, Juan; Belury, Martha A; Andridge, Rebecca R; Malarkey, William B; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2015-04-01

    Loneliness is strongly linked to poor health. Recent research suggests that appetite dysregulation provides one potential pathway through which loneliness and other forms of social disconnection influence health. Obesity may alter the link between loneliness and appetite-relevant hormones, one unexplored possibility. We examined the relationships between loneliness and both postmeal ghrelin and hunger, and tested whether these links differed for people with a higher versus lower body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2)). During this double-blind randomized crossover study, women (N=42) ate a high saturated fat meal at the beginning of one full-day visit and a high oleic sunflower oil meal at the beginning of the other. Loneliness was assessed once with a commonly used loneliness questionnaire. Ghrelin was sampled before the meal and postmeal at 2 and 7h. Self-reported hunger was measured before the meal, immediately postmeal, and then 2, 4, and 7h later. Lonelier women had larger postprandial ghrelin and hunger increases compared with less lonely women, but only among participants with a lower BMI. Loneliness and postprandial ghrelin and hunger were unrelated among participants with a higher BMI. These effects were consistent across both meals. These data suggest that ghrelin, an important appetite-regulation hormone, and hunger may link loneliness to weight gain and its corresponding negative health effects among non-obese people. PMID:25725426

  20. Hippocampus ghrelin signaling mediates appetite through lateral hypothalamic orexin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ted M; Hahn, Joel D; Konanur, Vaibhav R; Noble, Emily E; Suarez, Andrea N; Thai, Jessica; Nakamoto, Emily M; Kanoski, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    Feeding behavior rarely occurs in direct response to metabolic deficit, yet the overwhelming majority of research on the biology of food intake control has focused on basic metabolic and homeostatic neurobiological substrates. Most animals, including humans, have habitual feeding patterns in which meals are consumed based on learned and/or environmental factors. Here we illuminate a novel neural system regulating higher-order aspects of feeding through which the gut-derived hormone ghrelin communicates with ventral hippocampus (vHP) neurons to stimulate meal-entrained conditioned appetite. Additional results show that the lateral hypothalamus (LHA) is a critical downstream substrate for vHP ghrelin-mediated hyperphagia and that vHP ghrelin activated neurons communicate directly with neurons in the LHA that express the neuropeptide, orexin. Furthermore, activation of downstream orexin-1 receptors is required for vHP ghrelin-mediated hyperphagia. These findings reveal novel neurobiological circuitry regulating appetite through which ghrelin signaling in hippocampal neurons engages LHA orexin signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11190.001 PMID:26745307

  1. RNA SHAPE chemistry with aromatic acylating reagents.

    PubMed

    Nodin, Laura; Noël, Olivier; Chaminade, Françoise; Maskri, Ouerdia; Barbier, Vincent; David, Olivier; Fossé, Philippe; Xie, Juan

    2015-02-01

    As chemical methods for RNA secondary structure determination, SHAPE chemistry (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) has been developed to specifically target flexible nucleotides (often unpaired nucleotides) independently to their purine or pyrimidine nature. In order to improve the specificity of acylating reagents towards unpaired nucleotides, we have explored the reactivity of symmetric anhydrides, acyl fluorides, active esters like succinimidyl ester and cyanomethyl esters for 2'-O-acylation reaction. Among the tested compounds, only the acyl fluoride 4 showed a low reactivity (compared to NMIA). However, this study is the first to show that nucleophilic catalysts like DMAP greatly improved the selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation by symmetric anhydrides, acyl fluorides and succinimidyl ester, with the 2-fluorobenzoic anhydride 5 being the most reactive. PMID:25557357

  2. Ghrelin modulates the activity and synaptic input organization of midbrain dopamine neurons while promoting appetite

    PubMed Central

    Abizaid, Alfonso; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Andrews, Zane B.; Shanabrough, Marya; Borok, Erzsebet; Elsworth, John D.; Roth, Robert H.; Sleeman, Mark W.; Picciotto, Marina R.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Gao, Xiao-Bing; Horvath, Tamas L.

    2006-01-01

    The gut hormone ghrelin targets the brain to promote food intake and adiposity. The ghrelin receptor growth hormone secretagogue 1 receptor (GHSR) is present in hypothalamic centers controlling energy metabolism as well as in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a region important for motivational aspects of multiple behaviors, including feeding. Here we show that in mice and rats, ghrelin bound to neurons of the VTA, where it triggered increased dopamine neuronal activity, synapse formation, and dopamine turnover in the nucleus accumbens in a GHSR-dependent manner. Direct VTA administration of ghrelin also triggered feeding, while intra-VTA delivery of a selective GHSR antagonist blocked the orexigenic effect of circulating ghrelin and blunted rebound feeding following fasting. In addition, ghrelin- and GHSR-deficient mice showed attenuated feeding responses to restricted feeding schedules. Taken together, these data suggest that the mesolimbic reward circuitry is targeted by peripheral ghrelin to influence physiological mechanisms related to feeding. PMID:17060947

  3. Ghrelin and obestatin levels in type 2 diabetic patients with and without delayed gastric emptying.

    PubMed

    Harsch, Igor A; Koebnick, Corinna; Tasi, Atingwa M; Hahn, Eckhart Georg; Konturek, Peter C

    2009-10-01

    Alterations in the neurohumoral regulation of the upper intestine may change rhythmicity and pattern of ghrelin and obestatin, the latter presumably antagonizing ghrelin effects. Five nongastroparetic diabetic patients and five with gastroparesis were investigated. Over 390 min including breakfast and lunch, ghrelin was significantly lower in patients with gastroparesis compared with in those without (P = 0.015). Ghrelin subsequent to lunch decreased significantly (P = 0.011) in patients without gastroparesis, but not in gastroparetic patients (P = 0.669). Obestatin was similar in both groups and unchanged. No significant differences in ghrelin-to-obestatin ratio were observed (P = 0.530). Loss of rhythmicity in the ghrelin levels of gastroparetic diabetics highlights the importance of integrity of the neurohumoral-intestinal axis. Stable diurnal obestatin levels do not support the concept of interaction between ghrelin and obestatin in terms of regulation of food intake and gastric emptying. PMID:19082715

  4. IMPLICATIONS OF GHRELIN AXIS IN BREAST CANCER--REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Armasu, Ioana; Volovăt, C; Drug, V L; Crumpei, Iulia; Vasiliu, Ioana; Tofan, Mariana; Preda, Cristina; Serban, Ionela Lacrămioara; Vulpoi, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is, by far, the most frequent cancer among women and many factors influence the physiological and pathological growth and development of the mammary gland. There is developing evidence that the hormone ghrelin, known for the growth hormone releasing effect and food intake modulator, could also play a role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer and may represent a new diagnostic marker and a potential therapeutic target. We performed a PubMed Database search of relevant studies and ten papers were included in our systematic review. Ghrelin axis seems to be definitely involved in the pathogenesis of breast cancer, although a precise role has not been yet established. In order to verify the precise role of ghrelin axis in breast cancer further studies with larger populations are necessary that should include the analysis of metabolic, genetic and environmental factors which are expected to influence the results. PMID:26204629

  5. Effects of ciprofibrate and 2-[5-(4-chlorophenyl)pentyl]oxirane-2-carboxylate (POCA) on the distribution of carnitine and CoA and their acyl-esters and on enzyme activities in rats. Relation between hepatic carnitine concentration and carnitine acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiyan, A K; Bartlett, K; Sherratt, H S; Agius, L

    1988-01-01

    The effects of feeding the peroxisome proliferators ciprofibrate (a hypolipidaemic analogue of clofibrate) or POCA (2-[5-(4-chlorophenyl)pentyl]oxirane-2-carboxylate) (an inhibitor of CPT I) to rats for 5 days on the distribution of carnitine and acylcarnitine esters between liver, plasma and muscle and on hepatic CoA concentrations (free and acylated) and activities of carnitine acetyltransferase and acyl-CoA hydrolases were determined. Ciprofibrate and POCA increased hepatic [total CoA] by 2 and 2.5 times respectively, and [total carnitine] by 4.4 and 1.9 times respectively, but decreased plasma [carnitine] by 36-46%. POCA had no effect on either urinary excretion of acylcarnitine esters or [acylcarnitine] in skeletal muscle. By contrast, ciprofibrate decreased [acylcarnitine] and [total carnitine] in muscle. In liver, ciprofibrate increased the [carnitine]/[CoA] ratio and caused a larger increase in [acylcarnitine] (7-fold) than in [carnitine] (4-fold), thereby increasing the [short-chain acylcarnitine]/[carnitine] ratio. POCA did not affect the [carnitine]/[CoA] and the [short-chain acylcarnitine]/[carnitine] ratios, but it decreased the [long-chain acylcarnitine]/[carnitine] ratio. Ciprofibrate and POCA increased the activities of acyl-CoA hydrolases, and carnitine acetyltransferase activity was increased 28-fold and 6-fold by ciprofibrate and POCA respectively. In cultures of hepatocytes, ciprofibrate caused similar changes in enzyme activity to those observed in vivo, although [carnitine] decreased with time. The results suggest that: (1) the reactions catalysed by the short-chain carnitine acyltransferases, but not by the carnitine palmitoyltransferases, are near equilibrium in liver both before and after modification of metabolism by administration of ciprofibrate or POCA; (2) the increase in hepatic [carnitine] after ciprofibrate or POCA feeding can be explained by redistribution of carnitine between tissues; (3) the activity of carnitine

  6. Sickness behaviour after lipopolysaccharide treatment in ghrelin deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Szentirmai, Éva; Krueger, James M

    2014-02-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone produced mainly by the gastrointestinal system and the brain. Much evidence also indicates a role for ghrelin in sleep and thermoregulation. Further, ghrelin was recently implicated in immune system modulation. Administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces fever, anorexia, and increased non-rapid-eye movement sleep (NREMS) and these actions are mediated primarily by proinflammatory cytokines. Ghrelin reduces LPS-induced fever, suppresses circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and reduces the severity and mortality of various models of experimental endotoxemia. In the present study, we determined the role of intact ghrelin signaling in LPS-induced sleep, feeding, and thermoregulatory responses in mice. Sleep-wake activity was determined after intraperitoneal, dark onset administration of 0.4, 2 and 10 μg LPS in preproghrelin knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. In addition, body temperature, motor activity and changes in 24-h food intake and body weight were measured. LPS induced dose-dependent increases in NREMS, and suppressed rapid-eye movement sleep, electroencephalographic slow-wave activity, motor activity, food intake and body weight in both Ppg KO and WT mice. Body temperature changes showed a biphasic pattern with a decrease during the dark period followed by an increase in the light phase. The effects of the low and middle doses of LPS were indistinguishable between the two genotypes. Administration of 10 μg LPS, however, induced significantly larger changes in NREMS and wakefulness amounts, body temperature, food intake and body weight in the Ppg KO mice. These findings support a role for ghrelin as an endogenous modulator of inflammatory responses and a central component of arousal and feeding circuits. PMID:24309634

  7. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, Edgar B.; Shanklin, John; Lindgvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed is a methods for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity.

  8. Modified Acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, Edgar B.; Shanklin, John; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter

    1999-03-30

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity.

  9. Ghrelin stimulates angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells: Implications beyond GH release

    SciTech Connect

    Li Aihua; Cheng Guangli; Zhu Genghui; Tarnawski, Andrzej S. . E-mail: atarnawski@yahoo.com

    2007-02-09

    Ghrelin, a peptide hormone isolated from the stomach, releases growth hormone and stimulates appetite. Ghrelin is also expressed in pancreas, kidneys, cardiovascular system and in endothelial cells. The precise role of ghrelin in endothelial cell functions remains unknown. We examined the expression of ghrelin and its receptor (GHSR1) mRNAs and proteins in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) and determined whether ghrelin affects in these cells proliferation, migration and in vitro angiogenesis; and whether MAPK/ERK2 signaling is important for the latter action. We found that ghrelin and GHSR1 are constitutively expressed in HMVEC. Treatment of HMVEC with exogenous ghrelin significantly increased in these cells proliferation, migration, in vitro angiogenesis and ERK2 phosphorylation. MEK/ERK2 inhibitor, PD 98059 abolished ghrelin-induced in vitro angiogenesis. This is First demonstration that ghrelin and its receptor are expressed in human microvascular endothelial cells and that ghrelin stimulates HMVEC proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis through activation of ERK2 signaling.

  10. Ghrelin secretion is not reduced by increased fat mass during diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiang; Reed, Jason T; Wang, Guiyun; Han, Song; Englander, Ella W; Greeley, George H

    2008-08-01

    Ghrelin is a stomach hormone that stimulates growth hormone (GH) secretion, adiposity, and food intake. Gastric ghrelin production and secretion are regulated by caloric intake; ghrelin secretion increases during fasting, decreases with refeeding, and is reduced by diet-induced obesity. The aim of the present study was to test the hypotheses that 1) an increase in body adiposity will play an inhibitory role in the reduction of gastric ghrelin synthesis and secretion during chronic ingestion of a high-fat (HF) diet and 2) chronic ingestion of an HF diet will suppress the rise in circulating ghrelin levels in response to acute fasting. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a standard AIN-76A (approximately 5-12% of calories from fat) or an HF (approximately 45% of calories from fat) diet. The effect of increased adiposity on gastric ghrelin homeostasis was assessed by comparison of stomach ghrelin production and plasma ghrelin levels in obese and nonobese rats fed the HF diet. HF diet-fed, nonobese rats were generated by administration of triiodothyronine to lower body fat accumulation. Our findings indicate that an increased fat mass per se does not exert an inhibitory effect on ghrelin homeostasis during ingestion of the HF diet. Additionally, the magnitude of change in plasma ghrelin in response to fasting was not blunted, indicating that a presumed, endogenous signal for activation of ingestive behavior remains intact, despite excess stored calories in HF-fed rats. PMID:18495830

  11. CRF Type 2 Receptors Mediate the Metabolic Effects of Ghrelin in C2C12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Eran; Vale, Wylie W

    2014-01-01

    Objective Ghrelin is known to regulate appetite control and cellular metabolism. The Corticotropin-Releasing Factor (CRF) family is also known to regulate energy balance. In this study, we investigated the links between ghrelin and the CRF family in C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line. Design and methods C2C12 cells were treated with ghrelin in the presence or absence of CRF receptor antagonists and then subjected to different metabolic analyses. Results Ghrelin enhanced glucose uptake by C2C12 cells, induced GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface and decreased RBP4 expression. A CRF-R2 selective antagonist, anti-sauvagine-30, blocked ghrelin-induced glucose uptake, Ghrelin upregulated CRF-R2 but not CRF-R1 levels. Moreover, ghrelin-treated C2C12 cells displayed a cAMP and pERK activation in response to Ucn3, a CRF-R2 specific ligand, but not in response to CRF or stressin, CRF-R1 specific ligands. Ghrelin also induced UCP2 and UCP3 expression, which were blocked by anti-sauvagine-30. Ghrelin did not induce fatty acids uptake by C2C12 cells or ACC expression. Even though C2C12 cells clearly exhibited responses to ghrelin, the known ghrelin receptor, GHSR1a, was not detectable in C2C12 cells. Conclusion Our results suggest that, ghrelin plays a role in regulating muscle glucose and, raise the possibility that suppression of the CRF-R2 pathway might provide benefits in high ghrelin states. PMID:23804489

  12. Reduced ghrelin production induced anorexia after rat gastric ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Mogami, Sachiko; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Fukuhara, Seiichiro; Matsuzaki, Juntaro; Kangawa, Kenji; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2012-02-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is one of the most susceptible organs to ischemia. We previously reported altered gastric motility after gastric ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). However, there have also been few reports of alterations in the eating behavior after gastric I/R. Ghrelin is a GI peptide that stimulates food intake and GI motility. Although ghrelin itself has been demonstrated to attenuate the mucosal injuries induced by gastric I/R, the endogenous ghrelin dynamics after I/R has not yet been elucidated. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between food intake and the ghrelin dynamics after gastric I/R. Wistar rats were exposed to 80-min gastric ischemia, followed by 12-h or 48-h reperfusion. The food intake, plasma ghrelin levels, gastric preproghrelin mRNA expression levels, and the histological localization of ghrelin-immunoreactive cells were evaluated. The effect of exogenous ghrelin on the food intake after I/R was also examined. Food intake, the plasma ghrelin levels, the count of ghrelin-immunoreactive cells corrected by the percentage areas of the remaining mucosa, and the expression levels of preproghrelin mRNA in the stomach were significantly reduced at 12 h and 48 h after I/R compared with the levels in the sham-operated rats. Intraperitoneal administration of ghrelin significantly reversed the decrease of food intake after I/R. These data show that gastric I/R evoked anorexia with decreased plasma ghrelin levels and ghrelin production, which appears to be attributable to the I/R-induced gastric mucosal injuries. The decrease in the plasma ghrelin levels may have been responsible for the decreased food intake after gastric I/R. PMID:22114115

  13. The Physiology of Protein S-acylation

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Luke H.; Shipston, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein S-acylation, the only fully reversible posttranslational lipid modification of proteins, is emerging as a ubiquitous mechanism to control the properties and function of a diverse array of proteins and consequently physiological processes. S-acylation results from the enzymatic addition of long-chain lipids, most typically palmitate, onto intracellular cysteine residues of soluble and transmembrane proteins via a labile thioester linkage. Addition of lipid results in increases in protein hydrophobicity that can impact on protein structure, assembly, maturation, trafficking, and function. The recent explosion in global S-acylation (palmitoyl) proteomic profiling as a result of improved biochemical tools to assay S-acylation, in conjunction with the recent identification of enzymes that control protein S-acylation and de-acylation, has opened a new vista into the physiological function of S-acylation. This review introduces key features of S-acylation and tools to interrogate this process, and highlights the eclectic array of proteins regulated including membrane receptors, ion channels and transporters, enzymes and kinases, signaling adapters and chaperones, cell adhesion, and structural proteins. We highlight recent findings correlating disruption of S-acylation to pathophysiology and disease and discuss some of the major challenges and opportunities in this rapidly expanding field. PMID:25834228

  14. Expression of prepro-ghrelin and related receptor genes in the rat adrenal gland and evidences that ghrelin exerts a potent stimulating effect on corticosterone secretion by cultured rat adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Tyczewska, Marianna; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2009-08-01

    The orexigenic peptide ghrelin (GHREL) and obestatin (OBS) originate from the same peptide precursor, preproghrelin (ppGHREL). Apart from orexigenic effect, GHREL also regulates neuroendocrine function. We investigated GHREL and OBS effects on corticosterone secretion by freshly isolated and cultured rat adrenocortical cells. Classic RT-PCR revealed the presence of ppGHREL, GHS-R1a, GPR39v1 and GPR39v2 and GOAT4 (ghrelin O-acyl transferase) mRNAs in rat adrenals and cultured for 4 days rat adrenocortical cells. Expression of ppGHREL, GHS-R1a, and GOAT genes was notably higher in the cortex than in medulla. High expression level of GOAT gene was found in the zona glomerulosa, while expression level of both GPR39v1 and GPR39v2 genes was similar in adrenal cortical zones and in medulla. In freshly isolated cells neither GHREL nor OBS had an effect on corticosteroid output. Prolonged exposure of cultured cells to GHREL resulted in a potent, comparable to ACTH, stimulating effect of GHREL on corticosterone secretion. Prolonged exposure to OBS was ineffective. Neither GHREL nor OBS had any effect on proliferation of studied cells, while ACTH notably lowered it. GHREL down regulated GHS-R1a gene expression while both ACTH and GHREL stimulated expression level of GPR39v1 gene. Expression of CYP11A1 gene was notably stimulated and that of StAR gene remained unaffected by ACTH or GHREL. Thus, our study is the first to demonstrate direct stimulating effect of GHREL on corticosterone output by cultured rat adrenocortical cells. This stimulating action differs from that evoked by ACTH and is not dependent on the presence of functional ACTH receptor. PMID:19416745

  15. Abalation of Ghrelin receptor in leptin-deficient mice has paradoxical effects on glucose homeostasis compared to Ghrelin-abalated Leptin-deficient mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin is produced predominantly in stomach and is known to be the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Ghrelin is a GH stimulator and an orexigenic hormone. In contrast, leptin is an anorexic hormone, and leptin-deficient ob/ob mice are obese and diabetic. To study...

  16. Fatty acyl donor selectivity in membrane bound O-acyltransferases and communal cell fate decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Tuladhar, Rubina; Lum, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins with lipid moieties confers spatial and temporal control of protein function by restricting their subcellular distribution or movement in the extracellular milieu. Yet, little is known about the significance of lipid selectivity to the activity of proteins targeted for such modifications. Membrane bound O-acyl transferases (MBOATs) are a superfamily of multipass enzymes that transfer fatty acids on to lipid or protein substrates. Three MBOATs constitute a subfamily with secreted signalling molecules for substrates, the Wnt, Hedgehog (Hh) and Ghrelin proteins. Given their important roles in adult tissue homoeostasis, all three molecules and their respective associated acyltransferases provide a framework for interrogating the role of extracellular acylation events in cell-to-cell communication. Here, we discuss how the preference for a fatty acyl donor in the Wnt acyltransferase porcupine (Porcn) and possibly in other protein lipidation enzymes may provide a means for coupling metabolic health at the single cell level to communal cell fate decision-making in complex multicellular organisms. PMID:25849923

  17. Fatty acyl donor selectivity in membrane bound O-acyltransferases and communal cell fate decision-making.

    PubMed

    Tuladhar, Rubina; Lum, Lawrence

    2015-04-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins with lipid moieties confers spatial and temporal control of protein function by restricting their subcellular distribution or movement in the extracellular milieu. Yet, little is known about the significance of lipid selectivity to the activity of proteins targeted for such modifications. Membrane bound O-acyl transferases (MBOATs) are a superfamily of multipass enzymes that transfer fatty acids on to lipid or protein substrates. Three MBOATs constitute a subfamily with secreted signalling molecules for substrates, the Wnt, Hedgehog (Hh) and Ghrelin proteins. Given their important roles in adult tissue homoeostasis, all three molecules and their respective associated acyltransferases provide a framework for interrogating the role of extracellular acylation events in cell-to-cell communication. Here, we discuss how the preference for a fatty acyl donor in the Wnt acyltransferase porcupine (Porcn) and possibly in other protein lipidation enzymes may provide a means for coupling metabolic health at the single cell level to communal cell fate decision-making in complex multicellular organisms. PMID:25849923

  18. Preparation of fatty-acylated derivatives of acyl carrier protein using Vibrio harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z; Fice, D; Byers, D M

    1992-07-01

    A simple two-step purification of Vibrio harveyi fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) synthetase, which is useful for the quantitative preparation and analysis of fatty-acylated derivatives of ACP, is described. Acyl-ACP synthetase can be partially purified from extracts of this bioluminescent bacterium by Cibacron blue chromatography and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration and is stable for months at -20 degrees C in the presence of glycerol. Incubation of ACP from Escherichia coli with ATP and radiolabeled fatty acids (6 to 16 carbons in length) in the presence of the enzyme resulted in quantitative conversion to biologically active acylated derivatives. The enzyme reaction can be monitored by a filter disk assay to quantitate levels of ACP or by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography to detect ACP in cell extracts. With its broad fatty acid chain length specificity and optimal activity in mild nondenaturing buffers, the soluble V. harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase provides an attractive alternative to current chemical and enzymatic methods of acyl-ACP preparation and analysis. PMID:1514693

  19. Modified Acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Lindqvist, Y.; Schneider, G.

    1999-03-30

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity. 2 figs.

  20. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Lindgvist, Y.; Schneider, G.

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity. 1 fig.

  1. Inotropic and lusitropic effects of ghrelin and their modulation by the endocardial endothelium, NO, prostaglandins, GHS-R1a and KCa channels.

    PubMed

    Soares, João-Bruno; Rocha-Sousa, Amândio; Castro-Chaves, Paulo; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F

    2006-07-01

    Contractile effects of ghrelin (10(-9) to 10(-6) M) were tested in rat papillary muscles of normal (n = 50) and hypertrophic (n = 16) right ventricles (RV). RV hypertrophy was induced by pulmonary hypertension using monocrotaline. In normal muscles, ghrelin was added either alone (n = 9) or after pre-treatment with indomethacin (cycloxygenase inhibitor, 10(-5) M; n = 10), L-nitro-L-arginin (NO synthase inhibitor, 10(-4) M; n = 9), D-Lys(3)-GHRP-6 (GHS-R1a antagonist; 10(-4) M; n = 8) or apamin+charybdotoxin (KCa channels blockers; 10(-6) M, n =7 ), as well as after damaging the endocardial endothelium (n = 7). In hypertrophic muscles, ghrelin was added either alone (n = 9) or after pre-treatment with apamin+charybdotoxin (10(-6 M, n=7). Ghrelin concentration-dependently decreased active tension (AT) and maximal velocity of tension rise (negative inotropic effect), as well as, maximal velocity of tension decay (negative lusitropic effect) and time to AT (onset of relaxation). These effects were maximal at 10(-6) M, similar in normal and hypertrophic muscles and were significantly altered only by apamin+charybdotoxin, indomethacin and L-nitro-L-arginin. Apamin+charybdotoxin attenuated the negative inotropic effect, while indomethacin and L-nitro-L-arginin, respectively, blunted and exacerbated the premature onset of relaxation. In conclusion, ghrelin induces negative inotropic and lusitropic effects and an earlier onset of relaxation in normal and hypertrophic myocardium, which are independent of GHS-R1a, since they were not affected by D-Lys(3)-GHRP-6. The negative inotropic effect is partly mediated by KCa channels, while the earlier onset of relaxation is modulated by prostaglandins and NO. PMID:16417945

  2. Human Ghrelin Mitigates Intestinal Injury and Mortality after Whole Body Irradiation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhimin; Yang, Weng Lang; Jacob, Asha; Aziz, Monowar; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Widespread use of ionizing radiation has led to the realization of the danger associated with radiation exposure. Although studies in radiation countermeasures were initiated a half century ago, an effective therapy for a radiomitigator has not been identified. Ghrelin is a gastrointestinal hormone, and administration of ghrelin is protective in animal models of injuries including radiation combined injury. To test whether ghrelin can be protective in whole body irradiaton (WBI) alone, male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were treated with human ghrelin (20 nmol/rat) daily for 6 days starting at either 24 h or 48 h after 10 Gray (Gy) WBI and survival outcome was examined. The 10 Gy WBI produced a LD70/30 model in SD rats (30% survival in 30 days). The survival rate in rats treated with ghrelin starting at 24 h was significantly improved to 63% and when treatment was initiated at 48 h, the survival remained at 61%. At 7 days post WBI, plasma ghrelin was significantly reduced from the control value. Ghrelin treatment starting at 24 h after WBI daily for 6 days improved histological appearance of the intestine, reduced gut permeability, serum endotoxin levels and bacterial translocation to the liver by 38%, 42% and 61%, respectively at day 7 post WBI. Serum glucose and albumin were restored to near control levels with treatment. Ghrelin treatment also attenuated WBI-induced intestinal apoptosis by 62% as evidenced by TUNEL staining. The expression of anti-apoptotic cell regulator Bcl-xl was decreased by 38% in the vehicle and restored to 75% of the control with ghrelin treatment. Increased expression of intestinal CD73 and pAkt were observed with ghrelin treatment, indicating protection of the intestinal epithelium after WBI. These results indicate that human ghrelin attenuates intestinal injury and mortality after WBI. Thus, human ghrelin can be developed as a novel mitigator for radiation injury. PMID:25671547

  3. Plasma ghrelin levels in association with left ventricular function and nutritional status in dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    XU, LIBIN; YU, LEI; CHI, NING; WANG, WENHAO; LIU, GUOPING; SHI, WEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the association between ghrelin levels and the cardiac function and malnutrition of dialysis patients. The aim was to examine the conducive use of exogenous ghrelin to improve the malnutrition, protect the cardiovascular function with dialysis patients in the future. The study included 30 continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients and 30 hemodialysis (HD) patients undertaking treatment between March 2013 and March 2014. The control group included a total of 30 healthy physical examinees. The plasma ghrelin levels were measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to collect the clinical materials and biochemical parameters. The plasma ghrelin levels were 4.28±1.07, 4.63±1.08 and 2.00±0.48 ng/ml in the CAPD, HD and control groups, respectively, and statistical significance was identified between the three groups; F=75.106, P<0.0001. The plasma ghrelin levels in the CAPD group were positively correlated with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (r=0.506, P=0.004) and were negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI) (r=−0.556, P=0.001). The plasma ghrelin levels in the CAPD and HD groups were positively correlated with serum creatinine (Scr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). In conclusion, the plasma ghrelin levels of patients in the CAPD and HD groups were higher compared to those of the control group, which demonstrated that dialysis patients could not effectively remove the plasma ghrelin. The present study found that the plasma ghrelin levels were positively correlated with LVEF, and high levels of ghrelin will exhibit protective effects on the cardiovascular function of CAPD patients. Plasma ghrelin levels were positively correlated with Scr and BUN levels in CAPD and HD patients, and were negatively correlated with BMI in CAPD patients, which showed that ghrelin was correlated with malnutrition of dialysis patients. PMID:27347404

  4. Diversification and coevolution of the ghrelin/growth hormone secretagogue receptor system in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Tine, Mbaye; Kuhl, Heiner; Teske, Peter R; Tschöp, Matthias H; Jastroch, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The gut hormone ghrelin is involved in numerous metabolic functions, such as the stimulation of growth hormone secretion, gastric motility, and food intake. Ghrelin is modified by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) or membrane-bound O-acyltransferase domain-containing 4 (MBOAT4) enabling action through the growth hormone secretagogue receptors (GHS-R). During the course of evolution, initially strong ligand/receptor specificities can be disrupted by genomic changes, potentially modifying physiological roles of the ligand/receptor system. Here, we investigated the coevolution of ghrelin, GOAT, and GHS-R in vertebrates. We combined similarity search, conserved synteny analyses, phylogenetic reconstructions, and protein structure comparisons to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the ghrelin system. Ghrelin remained a single-gene locus in all vertebrate species, and accordingly, a single GHS-R isoform was identified in all tetrapods. Similar patterns of the nonsynonymous (dN) and synonymous (dS) ratio (dN/dS) in the vertebrate lineage strongly suggest coevolution of the ghrelin and GHS-R genes, supporting specific functional interactions and common physiological pathways. The selection profiles do not allow confirmation as to whether ghrelin binds specifically to GOAT, but the ghrelin dN/dS patterns are more similar to those of GOAT compared to MBOAT1 and MBOAT2 isoforms. Four GHS-R isoforms were identified in teleost genomes. This diversification of GHS-R resulted from successive rounds of duplications, some of which remained specific to the teleost lineage. Coevolution signals are lost in teleosts, presumably due to the diversification of GHS-R but not the ghrelin gene. The identification of the GHS-R diversity in teleosts provides a molecular basis for comparative studies on ghrelin's physiological roles and regulation, while the comparative sequence and structure analyses will assist translational medicine to determine structure-function relationships of the

  5. Lipid Acyl Chain Remodeling in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Renne, Mike F.; Bao, Xue; De Smet, Cedric H.; de Kroon, Anton I. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane lipid homeostasis is maintained by de novo synthesis, intracellular transport, remodeling, and degradation of lipid molecules. Glycerophospholipids, the most abundant structural component of eukaryotic membranes, are subject to acyl chain remodeling, which is defined as the post-synthetic process in which one or both acyl chains are exchanged. Here, we review studies addressing acyl chain remodeling of membrane glycerophospholipids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model organism that has been successfully used to investigate lipid synthesis and its regulation. Experimental evidence for the occurrence of phospholipid acyl chain exchange in cardiolipin, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine is summarized, including methods and tools that have been used for detecting remodeling. Progress in the identification of the enzymes involved is reported, and putative functions of acyl chain remodeling in yeast are discussed. PMID:26819558

  6. Stability-increasing effects of anthocyanin glycosyl acylation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chang-Ling; Yu, Yu-Qi; Chen, Zhong-Jian; Wen, Guo-Song; Wei, Fu-Gang; Zheng, Quan; Wang, Chong-De; Xiao, Xing-Lei

    2017-01-01

    This review comprehensively summarizes the existing knowledge regarding the chemical implications of anthocyanin glycosyl acylation, the effects of acylation on the stability of acylated anthocyanins and the corresponding mechanisms. Anthocyanin glycosyl acylation commonly refers to the phenomenon in which the hydroxyl groups of anthocyanin glycosyls are esterified by aliphatic or aromatic acids, which is synthetically represented by the acylation sites as well as the types and numbers of acyl groups. Generally, glycosyl acylation increases the in vitro and in vivo chemical stability of acylated anthocyanins, and the mechanisms primarily involve physicochemical, stereochemical, photochemical, biochemical or environmental aspects under specific conditions. Additionally, the acylation sites as well as the types and numbers of acyl groups influence the stability of acylated anthocyanins to different degrees. This review could provide insight into the optimization of the stability of anthocyanins as well as the application of suitable anthocyanins in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. PMID:27507456

  7. Gastrointestinal uptake of nasunin, acylated anthocyanin in eggplant.

    PubMed

    Ichiyanagi, Takashi; Terahara, Norihiko; Rahman, M Mamunur; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2006-07-26

    We previously showed that nasunin, acylated anthocyanins in eggplant peel, comprises two isomers, cis-nasunin and trans-nasunin. In this study, gastrointestinal absorption of cis- and trans-nasunins was studied in rats. Orally administered nasunins were quickly absorbed in their original acylated forms and maximally appeared in blood plasma after 15 min. When the maximum plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration curve were normalized by orally administered dose (micromoles per kilogram), there was no significant difference in the uptake efficiency between two isomers and both exhibited a plasma level almost identical to that of delphinidin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside. However, metabolites such as 4'-O-methyl analogues and extended glucuronides which were observed for delphinidin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside and cyanidin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside metabolisms were not detected in urine or blood plasma. Moreover, deacylated and glycolytic products of nasunins such as delphinidin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside or delphinidin (aglycone) were also not detected in blood plasma even after oral administration for 8 h. These results indicated that nasunins were absorbed in their original acylated forms and exhibit a bioavailability almost identical to that of nonacylated anthocyanins. PMID:16848510

  8. Alkylation and acylation of cyclotriphosphazenes.

    PubMed

    Benson, Mark A; Zacchini, Stefano; Boomishankar, Ramamoorthy; Chan, Yuri; Steiner, Alexander

    2007-08-20

    Phosphazenes (RNH)6P3N3 (R = n-propyl, isobutyl, isopropyl, cyclohexyl, tert-butyl, benzyl) are readily alkylated at ring N sites by alkyl halides forming N-alkyl phosphazenium cations. Alkylation of two ring N sites occurred after prolonged heating in the presence of methyl iodide or immediately at room temperature with methyl triflate yielding N,N'-dimethyl phosphazenium dications. Geminal dichloro derivatives Cl2(RNH)4P3N3 are methylated by methyl iodide at the ring N site adjacent to both P centers carrying four RNH groups. X-ray crystal structures showed that the alkylation of ring N sites leads to substantial elongation of the associated P-N bonds. Both N-alkyl and N,N'-dialkyl phosphazenium salts form complex supramolecular networks in the solid state via NH...X interactions. Systems carrying less-bulky RNH groups show additional NH...N bonds between N-alkyl phosphazenium ions. N-Alkyl phosphazenium halides form complexes with silver ions upon treatment with silver nitrate. Depending on the steric demand of RNH substituents, either one or both of the vacant ring N sites engage in coordination to silver ions. Treatment of (RNH)6P3N3 (R = isopropyl) with acetyl chloride and benzoyl chloride, respectively, yielded N-acyl phosphazenium ions. X-ray crystal structures revealed that elongation of P-N bonds adjacent to the acylated ring N site is more pronounced than it is in the case of N-alkylated species. Salts containing N-alkyl phosphazenium ions are stable toward water and other mild nucleophiles, while N,N'-dialkyl and N-acyl phosphazenium salts are readily hydrolyzed. The reaction of (RNH)6P3N3 with bromoacetic acid led to N-alkylation at one ring N site in addition to formation of an amide via condensation of an adjacent RNH substituent with the carboxylic acid group. The resulting bromide salt contains mono cations of composition (RNH)5P3N3CH2CONR in which a CH2-C(O) unit is embedded between a ring N and an exocyclic N site of the phosphazene. PMID

  9. Neuroprotective Actions of Ghrelin and Growth Hormone Secretagogues

    PubMed Central

    Frago, Laura M.; Baquedano, Eva; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    The brain incorporates and coordinates information based on the hormonal environment, receiving information from peripheral tissues through the circulation. Although it was initially thought that hormones only acted on the hypothalamus to perform endocrine functions, it is now known that they in fact exert diverse actions on many different brain regions including the hypothalamus. Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that stimulates growth hormone secretion and food intake to regulate energy homeostasis and body weight by binding to its receptor, growth hormone secretagogues–GH secretagogue-receptor, which is most highly expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus. In addition, ghrelin has effects on learning and memory, reward and motivation, anxiety, and depression, and could be a potential therapeutic agent in neurodegenerative disorders where excitotoxic neuronal cell death and inflammatory processes are involved. PMID:21994488

  10. Molecular characterization and expression profile of ghrelin gene during different reproductive phases in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, S; Jain, A; Baviskar, P; Kumar, R; Joshi, P; Agarwal, S K; Mitra, A

    2013-08-01

    Ghrelin, a novel motilin-related endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagouge receptor, is implicated in various biological functions, including regulation of female reproduction. But the presence of ghrelin and its role in reproductive functions in buffalo, a species with poor reproductive efficiency, is not known. In the present study full-length ghrelin cDNA was isolated from bubaline abomasum, which encodes the entire prepropeptide of 116 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of ghrelin of buffalo showed >95% and 31% identity with that of ruminants (cattle, sheep, and goat) and humans, respectively. Analysis of synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions in the coding region of ghrelin indicated that these sequences of different species have been under purifying selection. The 3995-bp amplicon of ghrelin gene consisting of 4 exons and 3 introns was cloned with genomic DNA from buffalo. Further, ghrelin expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry in bubaline endometrial tissues at different stages of the estrous cycle and early pregnancy. Our results indicated the persistent expression of ghrelin mRNA and protein in the endometrium during stage I (day 3-5), stage II (day 6-15), and stage III (day 16-21) of the estrous cycle and also during early (~day 30-40) pregnancy. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR experiments indicated the relatively higher expression of ghrelin in the endometrium during stage II (day 6-15) of the estrous cycle and early pregnancy than during stage I (day 3-5) and stage III (day 16-21) of the estrous cycle, but no statistically significant difference in ghrelin expression was observed among stages. To conclude, the results of the present study indicate the persistent expression of ghrelin in the uterine endometrium throughout the estrous cycle and in early pregnancy which might be helpful in determining its role in buffalo reproduction. PMID

  11. Ghrelin regulates cell cycle-related gene expression in cultured hippocampal neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyunju; Park, Seungjoon

    2016-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that ghrelin stimulates the cellular proliferation of cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which ghrelin regulates cell cycle progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of ghrelin on cell cycle regulatory molecules in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Ghrelin treatment increased proliferation assessed by CCK-8 proliferation assay. The expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell division control 2, well-known cell-proliferating markers, were also increased by ghrelin. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed that ghrelin promoted progression of cell cycle from G0/G1 to S phase, whereas this progression was attenuated by the pretreatment with specific inhibitors of MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, and janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Ghrelin-induced proliferative effect was associated with increased expression of E2F1 transcription factor in the nucleus, as determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. We also found that ghrelin caused an increase in protein levels of positive regulators of cell cycle, such as cyclin A and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2. Moreover, p27(KIP1) and p57(KIP2) protein levels were reduced when cell were exposed to ghrelin, suggesting downregulation of CDK inhibitors may contribute to proliferative effect of ghrelin. Our data suggest that ghrelin targets both cell cycle positive and negative regulators to stimulate proliferation of cultured hippocampal NSCs. PMID:27325242

  12. Motilin Stimulates Gastric Acid Secretion in Coordination with Ghrelin in Suncus murinus.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Chayon; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Makoto; Mondal, Anupom; Oda, Sen-ichi; Tanaka, Toru; Sakai, Takafumi; Sakata, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Motilin and ghrelin constitute a peptide family, and these hormones are important for the regulation of gastrointestinal motility. In this study, we examined the effect of motilin and ghrelin on gastric acid secretion in anesthetized suncus (house musk shrew, Suncus murinus), a ghrelin- and motilin-producing mammal. We first established a gastric lumen-perfusion system in the suncus and confirmed that intravenous (i.v.) administration of histamine (1 mg/kg body weight) stimulated acid secretion. Motilin (0.1, 1.0, and 10 μg/kg BW) stimulated the acid output in a dose-dependent manner in suncus, whereas ghrelin (0.1, 1.0, and 10 μg/kg BW) alone did not induce acid output. Furthermore, in comparison with the vehicle administration, the co-administration of low-dose (1 μg/kg BW) motilin and ghrelin significantly stimulated gastric acid secretion, whereas either motilin (1 μg/kg BW) or ghrelin (1 μg/kg BW) alone did not significantly induce gastric acid secretion. This indicates an additive role of ghrelin in motilin-induced gastric acid secretion. We then investigated the pathways of motilin/motilin and ghrelin-stimulated acid secretion using receptor antagonists. Treatment with YM 022 (a CCK-B receptor antagonist) and atropine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) had no effect on motilin or motilin-ghrelin co-administration-induced acid output. In contrast, famotidine (a histamine H2 receptor antagonist) completely inhibited motilin-stimulated acid secretion and co-administration of motilin and ghrelin induced gastric acid output. This is the first report demonstrating that motilin stimulates gastric secretion in mammals. Our results also suggest that motilin and co-administration of motilin and ghrelin stimulate gastric acid secretion via the histamine-mediated pathway in suncus. PMID:26115342

  13. Motilin Stimulates Gastric Acid Secretion in Coordination with Ghrelin in Suncus murinus

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Chayon; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Makoto; Mondal, Anupom; Oda, Sen-ichi; Tanaka, Toru; Sakai, Takafumi; Sakata, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Motilin and ghrelin constitute a peptide family, and these hormones are important for the regulation of gastrointestinal motility. In this study, we examined the effect of motilin and ghrelin on gastric acid secretion in anesthetized suncus (house musk shrew, Suncus murinus), a ghrelin- and motilin-producing mammal. We first established a gastric lumen-perfusion system in the suncus and confirmed that intravenous (i.v.) administration of histamine (1 mg/kg body weight) stimulated acid secretion. Motilin (0.1, 1.0, and 10 μg/kg BW) stimulated the acid output in a dose-dependent manner in suncus, whereas ghrelin (0.1, 1.0, and 10 μg/kg BW) alone did not induce acid output. Furthermore, in comparison with the vehicle administration, the co-administration of low-dose (1 μg/kg BW) motilin and ghrelin significantly stimulated gastric acid secretion, whereas either motilin (1 μg/kg BW) or ghrelin (1 μg/kg BW) alone did not significantly induce gastric acid secretion. This indicates an additive role of ghrelin in motilin-induced gastric acid secretion. We then investigated the pathways of motilin/motilin and ghrelin-stimulated acid secretion using receptor antagonists. Treatment with YM 022 (a CCK-B receptor antagonist) and atropine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) had no effect on motilin or motilin-ghrelin co-administration-induced acid output. In contrast, famotidine (a histamine H2 receptor antagonist) completely inhibited motilin-stimulated acid secretion and co-administration of motilin and ghrelin induced gastric acid output. This is the first report demonstrating that motilin stimulates gastric secretion in mammals. Our results also suggest that motilin and co-administration of motilin and ghrelin stimulate gastric acid secretion via the histamine-mediated pathway in suncus. PMID:26115342

  14. Hormonal protection in acute pancreatitis by ghrelin, leptin and melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Jaworek, Jolanta; Konturek, Stanisław Jan

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a nonbacterial disease of the pancreas. The severe form of this ailment is characterized by high mortality. Whether acute pancreatitis develops as the severe type or resolves depends on the intensity of the inflammatory process which is counteracted by the recruitment of innate defense mechanisms. It has been shown that the hormones ghrelin, leptin and melatonin are able to modulate the immune function of the organism and to protect the pancreas against inflammatory damage. Experimental studies have demonstrated that the application of these substances prior to the induction of acute pancreatitis significantly attenuated the intensity of the inflammation and reduced pancreatic tissue damage. The pancreatic protective mechanisms of the above hormones have been related to the mobilization of non-specific immune defense, to the inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B and modulation of cytokine production, to the stimulation of heat shock proteins and changes of apoptotic processes in the acinar cells, as well as to the activation of antioxidant system of the pancreatic tissue. The protective effect of ghrelin seems to be indirect and perhaps dependent on the release of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1. Leptin and ghrelin, but not melatonin, employ sensory nerves in their beneficial action on acute pancreatitis. It is very likely that ghrelin, leptin and melatonin could be implicated in the natural protection of the pancreatic gland against inflammatory damage because the blood levels of these substances increase in the initial phase of pancreatic inflammation. The above hormones could be a part of the innate resistance system which might remove noxious factors and could suppress or attenuate the inflammatory process in the pancreas. PMID:25493003

  15. Ghrelin: central and peripheral implications in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Méquinion, Mathieu; Langlet, Fanny; Zgheib, Sara; Dickson, Suzanne; Dehouck, Bénédicte; Chauveau, Christophe; Viltart, Odile

    2013-01-01

    Increasing clinical and therapeutic interest in the neurobiology of eating disorders reflects their dramatic impact on health. Chronic food restriction resulting in severe weight loss is a major symptom described in restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, and they also suffer from metabolic disturbances, infertility, osteopenia, and osteoporosis. Restrictive AN, mostly observed in young women, is the third largest cause of chronic illness in teenagers of industrialized countries. From a neurobiological perspective, AN-linked behaviors can be considered an adaptation that permits the endurance of reduced energy supply, involving central and/or peripheral reprograming. The severe weight loss observed in AN patients is accompanied by significant changes in hormones involved in energy balance, feeding behavior, and bone formation, all of which can be replicated in animals models. Increasing evidence suggests that AN could be an addictive behavior disorder, potentially linking defects in the reward mechanism with suppressed food intake, heightened physical activity, and mood disorder. Surprisingly, the plasma levels of ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone that drives food-motivated behavior, are increased. This increase in plasma ghrelin levels seems paradoxical in light of the restrained eating adopted by AN patients, and may rather result from an adaptation to the disease. The aim of this review is to describe the role played by ghrelin in AN focusing on its central vs. peripheral actions. In AN patients and in rodent AN models, chronic food restriction induces profound alterations in the « ghrelin » signaling that leads to the development of inappropriate behaviors like hyperactivity or addiction to food starvation and therefore a greater depletion in energy reserves. The question of a transient insensitivity to ghrelin and/or a potential metabolic reprograming is discussed in regard of new clinical treatments currently investigated. PMID:23549309

  16. Ghrelin signaling in heart remodeling of adult obese mice.

    PubMed

    Lacerda-Miranda, Glauciane; Soares, Vivian M; Vieira, Anatalia K G; Lessa, Juliana G; Rodrigues-Cunha, Alessandra C S; Cortez, Erika; Garcia-Souza, Erica P; Moura, Anibal S

    2012-05-01

    Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), has been suggested to be associated to obesity, insulin secretion, cardiovascular growth and homeostasis. GHS-R has been found in most of the tissues, and among the hormone action it is included the regulation of heart energy metabolism. Therefore, hypernutrition during early life leads to obesity, induces cardiac hypertrophy, compromises myocardial function, inducing heart failure in adulthood. We examined ghrelin signaling process in cardiac remodeling in these obese adult mice. The cardiomyocytes (cmy) of left ventricle were analyzed by light microscopy and stereology, content and phosphorilation of cardiac proteins: ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a, GHSR-1a), protein kinase B (AKT and pAKT), phosphatidil inositol 3 kinase (PI3K), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and pAMPK) and actin were achieved by Western blotting. GHSR-1a gene expression was analyzed by Real Time-PCR. We observed hyperglycemia and higher liver and visceral fat weight in obese when compared to control group. Obese mice presented a marked increase in heart weight/tibia length, indicating an enlarged heart size or a remodeling process. Obese mice had increased GHSR-1a content and expression in the heart associated to PI3K content and increased AKT content and phosphorylation. In contrast, AMPK content and phosphorylation in heart was not different between experimental groups. Ghrelin plasma levels in obese group were decreased when compared to control group. Our data suggest that remodeled myocardial in adult obese mice overnourished in early life are associated with higher phosphorylation of GHSR-1a, PI3K and AKT but not with AMPK. PMID:22407166

  17. Ghrelin: Central and Peripheral Implications in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Méquinion, Mathieu; Langlet, Fanny; Zgheib, Sara; Dickson, Suzanne; Dehouck, Bénédicte; Chauveau, Christophe; Viltart, Odile

    2012-01-01

    Increasing clinical and therapeutic interest in the neurobiology of eating disorders reflects their dramatic impact on health. Chronic food restriction resulting in severe weight loss is a major symptom described in restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, and they also suffer from metabolic disturbances, infertility, osteopenia, and osteoporosis. Restrictive AN, mostly observed in young women, is the third largest cause of chronic illness in teenagers of industrialized countries. From a neurobiological perspective, AN-linked behaviors can be considered an adaptation that permits the endurance of reduced energy supply, involving central and/or peripheral reprograming. The severe weight loss observed in AN patients is accompanied by significant changes in hormones involved in energy balance, feeding behavior, and bone formation, all of which can be replicated in animals models. Increasing evidence suggests that AN could be an addictive behavior disorder, potentially linking defects in the reward mechanism with suppressed food intake, heightened physical activity, and mood disorder. Surprisingly, the plasma levels of ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone that drives food-motivated behavior, are increased. This increase in plasma ghrelin levels seems paradoxical in light of the restrained eating adopted by AN patients, and may rather result from an adaptation to the disease. The aim of this review is to describe the role played by ghrelin in AN focusing on its central vs. peripheral actions. In AN patients and in rodent AN models, chronic food restriction induces profound alterations in the « ghrelin » signaling that leads to the development of inappropriate behaviors like hyperactivity or addiction to food starvation and therefore a greater depletion in energy reserves. The question of a transient insensitivity to ghrelin and/or a potential metabolic reprograming is discussed in regard of new clinical treatments currently investigated. PMID:23549309

  18. Friedel-Crafts Acylation with Amides

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Erum K.; DeSchepper, Daniel J.; Nilsson Lill, Sten O.; Klumpp, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    Friedel-Crafts acylation has been known since the 1870s and it is an important organic synthetic reaction leading to aromatic ketone products. Friedel-Crafts acylation is usually done with carboxylic acid chlorides or anhydrides while amides are generally not useful substrates in these reactions. Despite being the least reactive carboxylic acid derivative, we have found a series of amides capable of providing aromatic ketones in good yields (55–96%, 17 examples). We propose a mechanism involving diminished C-N resonance through superelectrophilic activation and subsequent cleavage to acyl cations. PMID:22690740

  19. Ghrelin receptor regulates adipose tissue inflammation in aging

    PubMed Central

    Buras, Eric D.; Yu, Kaijiang; Wang, Ruitao; Smith, C. Wayne; Wu, Huaizhu; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Sun, Yuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Aging is commonly associated with low-grade adipose inflammation, which is closely linked to insulin resistance. Ghrelin is the only circulating orexigenic hormone which is known to increase obesity and insulin resistance. We previously reported that the expression of the ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), increases in adipose tissues during aging, and old Ghsr−/− mice exhibit a lean and insulin-sensitive phenotype. Macrophages are major mediators of adipose tissue inflammation, which consist of pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 subtypes. Here, we show that in aged mice, GHS-R ablation promotes macrophage phenotypical shift toward anti-inflammatory M2. Old Ghsr−/− mice have reduced macrophage infiltration, M1/M2 ratio, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in white and brown adipose tissues. We also found that peritoneal macrophages of old Ghsr−/− mice produce higher norepinephrine, which is in line with increased alternatively-activated M2 macrophages. Our data further reveal that GHS-R has cell-autonomous effects in macrophages, and GHS-R antagonist suppresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that ghrelin signaling has an important role in macrophage polarization and adipose tissue inflammation during aging. GHS-R antagonists may serve as a novel and effective therapeutic option for age-associated adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:26837433

  20. Therapeutic potential of ghrelin in restricting-type anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Mari; Ohwada, Rina; Akamizu, Takashi; Shibasaki, Tamotsu; Kangawa, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an eating disorder characterized by a decrease in caloric intake and malnutrition. It is associated with a variety of medical morbidities as well as significant mortality. Nutritional support is of paramount importance to prevent impaired quality of life later in life in affected patients. Some patients with restricting-type AN who are fully motivated to gain body weight cannot increase their food intake because of malnutrition-induced gastrointestinal dysfunction. Chronicity of AN prevents participation in social activities and leads to increased medical expenses. Therefore, there is a pressing need for effective appetite-stimulating therapies for patients with AN. Ghrelin is the only orexigenic hormone that can be given intravenously. Intravenous infusion of ghrelin is reported to increase food intake and body weight in healthy subjects as well as in patients with poor nutritional status. Here, we introduce the results of a pilot study that investigated the effects of ghrelin on appetite, energy intake, and nutritional parameters in five patients with restricting-type AN, who are fully motivated to gain body weight but could not increase their food intake because of malnutrition-induced gastrointestinal dysfunction. PMID:22975066

  1. Ghrelin: A link between memory and ingestive behavior.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ted M; Suarez, Andrea N; Kanoski, Scott E

    2016-08-01

    Feeding is a highly complex behavior that is influenced by learned associations between external and internal cues. The type of excessive feeding behavior contributing to obesity onset and metabolic deficit may be based, in part, on conditioned appetitive and ingestive behaviors that occur in response to environmental and/or interoceptive cues associated with palatable food. Therefore, there is a critical need to understand the neurobiology underlying learned aspects of feeding behavior. The stomach-derived "hunger" hormone, ghrelin, stimulates appetite and food intake and may function as an important biological substrate linking mnemonic processes with feeding control. The current review highlights data supporting a role for ghrelin in mediating the cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms that underlie conditioned feeding behavior. We discuss the role of learning and memory on food intake control (with a particular focus on hippocampal-dependent memory processes) and provide an overview of conditioned cephalic endocrine responses. A neurobiological framework is provided through which conditioned cephalic ghrelin secretion signals in neurons in the hippocampus, which then engage orexigenic neural circuitry in the lateral hypothalamus to express learned feeding behavior. PMID:27072509

  2. Ghrelin, Sleep Reduction and Evening Preference: Relationships to CLOCK 3111 T/C SNP and Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Garaulet, Marta; Sánchez-Moreno, Carmen; Smith, Caren E.; Lee, Yu-Chi; Nicolás, Francisco; Ordovás, Jose M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (CLOCK), an essential element of the positive regulatory arm in the human biological clock, is involved in metabolic regulation. The aim was to investigate the behavioral (sleep duration, eating patterns and chronobiological characteristics) and hormonal (plasma ghrelin and leptin concentrations) factors which could explain the previously reported association between the CLOCK 3111T/C SNP and weight loss. Methodology/Principal Findings We recruited 1495 overweight/obese subjects (BMI: 25–40 kg/m2) of 20–65 y. who attended outpatient obesity clinics in Murcia, in southeastern Spain. We detected an association between the CLOCK 3111T/C SNP and weight loss, which was particularly evident after 12–14 weeks of treatment (P = 0.038). Specifically, carriers of the minor C allele were more resistant to weight loss than TT individuals (Mean±SEM) (8.71±0.59 kg vs 10.4±0.57 kg) C and TT respectively. In addition, our data show that minor C allele carriers had: 1. shorter sleep duration Mean ± SEM (7.0±0.05 vs 7.3±0.05) C and TT respectively (P = 0.039), 2. higher plasma ghrelin concentrations Mean ± SEM (pg/ml) (1108±49 vs 976±47)(P = 0.034); 3. delayed breakfast time; 4. evening preference and 5. less compliance with a Mediterranean Diet pattern, as compared with TT homozygotes. Conclusions/Significance Sleep reduction, changes in ghrelin values, alterations of eating behaviors and evening preference that characterized CLOCK 3111C carriers could be affecting weight loss. Our results support the hypothesis that the influence of the CLOCK gene may extend to a broad range of variables linked with human behaviors. PMID:21386998

  3. Sex biased expression of ghrelin and GHSR associated with sexual size dimorphism in yellow catfish.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Ma, Wenge; He, Yan; Wu, Junjie; Dawar, Farman Ullah; Ren, Fan; Zhao, Xiaohan; Mei, Jie

    2016-03-10

    Sexual size dimorphism has been observed in many cultivable fish species including yellow catfish, in which male fish grow much faster than female fish. Ghrelin is a potent stimulator of pituitary growth hormone (GH) release and known to potentially promote food intake and body weight gain. In order to investigate the molecular mechanism of sexual size dimorphism in yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco), ghrelin and its functional receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) cDNAs were cloned. Real-time PCR indicated that both ghrelin and GHSR were more highly expressed in hypothalamus and gut of male fish than female. During normal larval development, expression of ghrelin and GHSR genes was significantly higher in males than in females. 17a-Methyltestosterone (MT) treatment enhanced the expression of ghrelin in female larval fish and GHSR in both sexes, whereas the expression of ghrelin in male larval fish increased in the beginning, then decreased as the treatment time prolonged. Furthermore, the expression of ghrelin and GHSR in male juvenile was significantly increased compared with female juvenile, in short and long term fasting periods, suggesting that male fish may have a better appetite than female during fasting. Our results demonstrate that sex difference in the expression of ghrelin and GHSR may be involved in sexual size dimorphism by regulating feeding and GH/IGF signaling in yellow catfish. PMID:26692148

  4. Caloric restriction stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons through neuropeptide Y and ghrelin receptors activation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Marques, Marisa; Aveleira, Célia A; Carmo-Silva, Sara; Botelho, Mariana; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-07-01

    Caloric restriction is an anti-aging intervention known to extend lifespan in several experimental models, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy. Caloric restriction increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus and plasma ghrelin, a peripheral gut hormone that acts in hypothalamus to modulate energy homeostasis. NPY and ghrelin have been shown to be neuroprotective in different brain areas and to induce several physiological modifications similar to those induced by caloric restriction. However, the effect of NPY and ghrelin in autophagy in cortical neurons is currently not known. Using a cell culture of rat cortical neurons we investigate the involvement of NPY and ghrelin in caloric restriction-induced autophagy. We observed that a caloric restriction mimetic cell culture medium stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons and NPY or ghrelin receptor antagonists blocked this effect. On the other hand, exogenous NPY or ghrelin stimulate autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Moreover, NPY mediates the stimulatory effect of ghrelin on autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Since autophagy impairment occurs in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, NPY and ghrelin synergistic effect on autophagy stimulation may suggest a new strategy to delay aging process. PMID:27441412

  5. The Anti-apoptotic Effect of Ghrelin on Restraint Stress-Induced Thymus Atrophy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Jie Wan; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2016-08-01

    Thymic atrophy is a complication that results from exposure to many environmental stressors, disease treatments, and microbial challenges. Such acute stress-associated thymic loss can have a dramatic impact on the host's ability to replenish the necessary naïve T cell output to reconstitute the peripheral T cell numbers and repertoire to respond to new antigenic challenges. We have previously reported that treatment with the orexigenic hormone ghrelin results in an increase in the number and proliferation of thymocytes after dexamethasone challenge, suggesting a role for ghrelin in restraint stress-induced thymic involution and cell apoptosis and its potential use as a thymostimulatory agent. In an effort to understand how ghrelin suppresses thymic T cell apoptosis, we have examined the various signaling pathways induced by receptor-specific ghrelin stimulation using a restraint stress mouse model. In this model, stress-induced apoptosis in thymocytes was effectively blocked by ghrelin. Western blot analysis demonstrated that ghrelin prevents the cleavage of pro-apoptotic proteins such as Bim, Caspase-3, and PARP. In addition, ghrelin stimulation activates the Akt and Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways in a time/dose-dependent manner. Moreover, we also revealed the involvement of the FoxO3a pathway in the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2. Together, these findings suggest that ghrelin inhibits apoptosis by modulating the stress-induced apoptotic signal pathway in the restraint-induced thymic apoptosis. PMID:27574503

  6. Caloric restriction stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons through neuropeptide Y and ghrelin receptors activation

    PubMed Central

    Carmo-Silva, Sara; Botelho, Mariana; de Almeida, Luís Pereira; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction is an anti-aging intervention known to extend lifespan in several experimental models, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy. Caloric restriction increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus and plasma ghrelin, a peripheral gut hormone that acts in hypothalamus to modulate energy homeostasis. NPY and ghrelin have been shown to be neuroprotective in different brain areas and to induce several physiological modifications similar to those induced by caloric restriction. However, the effect of NPY and ghrelin in autophagy in cortical neurons is currently not known. Using a cell culture of rat cortical neurons we investigate the involvement of NPY and ghrelin in caloric restriction-induced autophagy. We observed that a caloric restriction mimetic cell culture medium stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons and NPY or ghrelin receptor antagonists blocked this effect. On the other hand, exogenous NPY or ghrelin stimulate autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Moreover, NPY mediates the stimulatory effect of ghrelin on autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Since autophagy impairment occurs in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, NPY and ghrelin synergistic effect on autophagy stimulation may suggest a new strategy to delay aging process. PMID:27441412

  7. Exogenous ghrelin regulates proliferation and apoptosis in the hypotrophic gut mucosa of the rat.

    PubMed

    de Segura, Ignacio A Gómez; Vallejo-Cremades, María Teresa; Lomas, Jesús; Sánchez, Miriam F; Caballero, María Isabel; Largo, Carlota; De Miguel, Enrique

    2010-04-01

    Ghrelin is the natural endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue receptors. This peptide regulates energy homeostasis and expenditure and is a potential link between gut absorptive function and growth. We hypothesized that ghrelin may induce a proliferative and antiapoptotic action promoting the recovery of the hypotrophic gut mucosa. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the action of exogenous ghrelin following gut mucosal hypotrophia in rats fed an elemental diet. An elemental diet provides readily absorbable simple nutrients and is usually given to patients with absorptive dysfunction. Male Wistar rats (n = 48) were fed the elemental diet for one week to induce mucosal hypotrophy and then treated for another week with systemic ghrelin and pair-fed with either a normoproteic or hyperproteic isocaloric liquid diet. Another group received a standard diet instead of the elemental diet and served as control (normotrophy). The elemental diet induced intestinal hypotrophia characterized by decreased proliferation in the ileum and increased apoptosis in jejunum and ileum. Ghrelin administration restored normal levels of proliferation in the ileum and apoptosis in the jejunum, with partial apoptosis restoration in the ileum. Ghrelin levels in plasma and fundus were increased in all groups, although the highest levels were found in rats treated with exogenous ghrelin. Ghrelin administration has a positive effect in the hypotrophic gut, regulating both proliferation and apoptosis towards a physiological balance counteracting the negative changes induced by an elemental diet in the intestines. PMID:20407078

  8. Chemosensory signalling pathways involved in sensing of amino acids by the ghrelin cell.

    PubMed

    Vancleef, L; Van Den Broeck, T; Thijs, T; Steensels, S; Briand, L; Tack, J; Depoortere, I

    2015-01-01

    Taste receptors on enteroendocrine cells sense nutrients and transmit signals that control gut hormone release. This study aimed to investigate the amino acid (AA) sensing mechanisms of the ghrelin cell in a gastric ghrelinoma cell line, tissue segments and mice. Peptone and specific classes of amino acids stimulate ghrelin secretion in the ghrelinoma cell line. Sensing of L-Phe occurs via the CaSR, monosodium glutamate via the TAS1R1-TAS1R3 while L-Ala and peptone act via 2 different amino acid taste receptors: CaSR &TAS1R1-TAS1R3 and CaSR &GPRC6A, respectively. The stimulatory effect of peptone on ghrelin release was mimicked ex vivo in gastric but not in jejunal tissue segments, where peptone inhibited ghrelin release. The latter effect could not be blocked by receptor antagonists for CCK, GLP-1 or somatostatin. In vivo, plasma ghrelin levels were reduced both upon intragastric (peptone or L-Phe) or intravenous (L-Phe) administration, indicating that AA- sensing is not polarized and is due to inhibition of ghrelin release from the stomach or duodenum respectively. In conclusion, functional AA taste receptors regulate AA-induced ghrelin release in vitro. The effects differ between stomach and jejunum but these local nutrient sensing mechanisms are overruled in vivo by indirect mechanisms inhibiting ghrelin release. PMID:26510380

  9. Ghrelin stimulates milk intake by affecting adult type feeding behaviour in postnatal rats.

    PubMed

    Piao, H; Hosoda, H; Kangawa, K; Murata, T; Narita, K; Higuchi, T

    2008-03-01

    The influence of ghrelin on feeding behaviour during infancy is unknown. To determine whether ghrelin influences milk intake in rat pups, newborn rats received a single i.p. injection of either rat ghrelin (100 microg/kg) or rabbit anti-ghrelin immunoglobulin G (100 microg/kg) every 5 days from postpartum day 5 to day 30 (P5-P30). Milk intake was then assessed by body weight gain following a 2-h suckling period. Ghrelin significantly increased weight gain relative to vehicle-injected controls in P20, P25 and P30 pups, but not in younger animals. Similarly, after 8 h of milk restriction, anti-ghrelin injections significantly decreased weight gain in P25 and P30, but not in younger pups. Interestingly, however, ghrelin did increase independent feeding in P10 and P15 pups using a paradigm in which pups consumed milk from a milk-soaked paper towel. We therefore conclude that ghrelin stimulates milk intake at an early postnatal stage, primarily by affecting adult-type feeding behaviour. PMID:18194428

  10. Ghrelin and leptin interplay in prevention of testicular damage due to cryptochidism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin, the endogenous ligand to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (ghsr), is centrally implicated in body weight homeostasis. A novel murine model for ghrelin and its physiologic antagonist, leptin, was developed at this institution. Mice with a deletion of ghsr (ghsr -/-) or a targeted dis...

  11. Chemosensory signalling pathways involved in sensing of amino acids by the ghrelin cell

    PubMed Central

    Vancleef, L.; Van Den Broeck, T.; Thijs, T.; Steensels, S.; Briand, L.; Tack, J.; Depoortere, I.

    2015-01-01

    Taste receptors on enteroendocrine cells sense nutrients and transmit signals that control gut hormone release. This study aimed to investigate the amino acid (AA) sensing mechanisms of the ghrelin cell in a gastric ghrelinoma cell line, tissue segments and mice. Peptone and specific classes of amino acids stimulate ghrelin secretion in the ghrelinoma cell line. Sensing of L-Phe occurs via the CaSR, monosodium glutamate via the TAS1R1-TAS1R3 while L-Ala and peptone act via 2 different amino acid taste receptors: CaSR & TAS1R1-TAS1R3 and CaSR & GPRC6A, respectively. The stimulatory effect of peptone on ghrelin release was mimicked ex vivo in gastric but not in jejunal tissue segments, where peptone inhibited ghrelin release. The latter effect could not be blocked by receptor antagonists for CCK, GLP-1 or somatostatin. In vivo, plasma ghrelin levels were reduced both upon intragastric (peptone or L-Phe) or intravenous (L-Phe) administration, indicating that AA- sensing is not polarized and is due to inhibition of ghrelin release from the stomach or duodenum respectively. In conclusion, functional AA taste receptors regulate AA-induced ghrelin release in vitro. The effects differ between stomach and jejunum but these local nutrient sensing mechanisms are overruled in vivo by indirect mechanisms inhibiting ghrelin release. PMID:26510380

  12. An age-dependent interaction with leptin unmasks ghrelin's bone-protective effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mutual interplay between energy homeostasis and bone metabolism is an important emerging concept. Ghrelin and leptin antagonize each other in regulating energy balance, but the role of this interaction in bone metabolism is unknown. Using ghrelin receptor and leptin-deficient mice, we show that ...

  13. The Anti-apoptotic Effect of Ghrelin on Restraint Stress-Induced Thymus Atrophy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Jie Wan; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Kim, Hyuk Soon

    2016-01-01

    Thymic atrophy is a complication that results from exposure to many environmental stressors, disease treatments, and microbial challenges. Such acute stress-associated thymic loss can have a dramatic impact on the host's ability to replenish the necessary naïve T cell output to reconstitute the peripheral T cell numbers and repertoire to respond to new antigenic challenges. We have previously reported that treatment with the orexigenic hormone ghrelin results in an increase in the number and proliferation of thymocytes after dexamethasone challenge, suggesting a role for ghrelin in restraint stress-induced thymic involution and cell apoptosis and its potential use as a thymostimulatory agent. In an effort to understand how ghrelin suppresses thymic T cell apoptosis, we have examined the various signaling pathways induced by receptor-specific ghrelin stimulation using a restraint stress mouse model. In this model, stress-induced apoptosis in thymocytes was effectively blocked by ghrelin. Western blot analysis demonstrated that ghrelin prevents the cleavage of pro-apoptotic proteins such as Bim, Caspase-3, and PARP. In addition, ghrelin stimulation activates the Akt and Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways in a time/dose-dependent manner. Moreover, we also revealed the involvement of the FoxO3a pathway in the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2. Together, these findings suggest that ghrelin inhibits apoptosis by modulating the stress-induced apoptotic signal pathway in the restraint-induced thymic apoptosis. PMID:27574503

  14. The effect of ingested macronutrients on postprandial ghrelin response: a critical review of existing literature data.

    PubMed

    Koliaki, Chrysi; Kokkinos, Alexander; Tentolouris, Nicholas; Katsilambros, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Ghrelin is a powerful orexigenic gut hormone with growth hormone releasing activity. It plays a pivotal role for long-term energy balance and short-term food intake. It is also recognized as a potent signal for meal initiation. Ghrelin levels rise sharply before feeding onset, and are strongly suppressed by food ingestion. Postprandial ghrelin response is totally macronutrient specific in normal weight subjects, but is rather independent of macronutrient composition in obese. In rodents and lean individuals, isoenergetic meals of different macronutrient content suppress ghrelin to a variable extent. Carbohydrate appears to be the most effective macronutrient for ghrelin suppression, because of its rapid absorption and insulin-secreting effect. Protein induces prolonged ghrelin suppression and is considered to be the most satiating macronutrient. Fat, on the other hand, exhibits rather weak and insufficient ghrelin-suppressing capacity. The principal mediators involved in meal-induced ghrelin regulation are glucose, insulin, gastrointestinal hormones released in the postabsorptive phase, vagal activity, gastric emptying rate, and postprandial alterations in intestinal osmolarity. PMID:20798765

  15. Naphthalene Derivatives Induce Acyl Chain Interdigitation in Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Md Arif; Raghunathan, V A

    2016-01-14

    The interdigitated phase of the lipid bilayer results when acyl chains from opposing monolayers fully interpenetrate such that the terminal methyl groups of the respective lipid chains are located at the interfacial region on the opposite sides of the bilayer. Usually, chain interdigitation is not encountered in a symmetric chain phosphatidylcholine (PC) membrane but can be induced under certain special conditions. In this article, we elucidate the contribution of small amphiphatic molecules in altering the physical properties of a symmetric chain PC bilayer membrane, which results in acyl chain interdigitation. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we have carried out a systematic investigation of the physical interactions of three naphthalene derivatives containing hydroxyl groups: β-naphthol, 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene, and 2,7-dihydroxynaphthalene, with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. On the basis of the diffraction patterns, we have determined the temperature-composition phase diagrams of these binary mixtures. The present study not only enables us to gain insight into the role played by small molecules in altering the packing arrangement of the acyl chains of the constituting PC lipids of the bilayer but also brings to light some important features that have not yet been reported hitherto. One such feature is the stabilization of the enigmatic asymmetric ripple phase over a wide temperature and concentration range. The results presented here strongly point toward a clear correlation between chain interdigitation and the stability of the ripple phase. PMID:26687052

  16. Leptin, ghrelin and calprotectin: inflammatory markers in childhood asthma?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Appetite-modulating hormones ghrelin and leptin might be relevant to asthma with their pro-inflammatory effects, and calprotectin has been recognized as a promising marker of inflammation. The purpose of this study was to explore whether asthma, atopy and lung functions has a relation with serum levels of leptin, ghrelin and calprotectin as inflammatory markers in children. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed by searching the doctor diagnosed asthma through questionnaires filled in by parents who were phoned, and children were invited to supply fasting blood samples in order to measure serum levels of leptin, ghrelin and calprotectin, and to perform skin prick test and spirometry. Participants were divided into Group 1, children with previous diagnosis of asthma, and Group 2, children without previous diagnosis of asthma. Results One thousand and two hundred questionnaires were distributed and 589 of them were returned filled in. Out of 74 children whose parents accepted to participate in the study, 23 were in Group 1 and 51 were in Group 2. There was no statistical difference in serum levels of leptin, ghrelin, calprotectin, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), peak expiratory flow (PEF) , forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% of vital capacity (FEF25-75) values , and skin prick test results between the two groups (p values are 0.39, 0.72, 0.5, 0.17, 0.5, 0.27, 0.18, and 0.81 respectively). Conclusion In this study the inflammation in asthmatic children could not be shown by using serum leptin, ghrelin and calprotectin levels and this is possibly due to the low number of children with ever asthma and equal skin prick test positivity in both groups. This study is the first study aimed to show the relation between serum calprotectin levels and inflammation in asthma. As this study was a cross-sectional study, further prospectively designed randomized controlled studies are necessary to show the

  17. Attenuating the effect of Ghrelin on memory storage via bilateral reversible inactivation of the basolateral amygdale.

    PubMed

    Goshadrou, Fatemeh; Ronaghi, Abdolaziz

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that Ghrelin increases memory retention. They have also indicated that amygdale is involved in memory storage. The present study examined the role of basolateral amygdala (BLA) in Ghrelin-induced retention improvement, using reversible inactivation of this region with lidocaine. Rats were bilaterally implanted with cannulae at the BLA. One week later, they received intra-BLA injection of lidocaine, saline or Ghrelin with 5 min interval immediately after training. 24-72 h after training, step-through latency (STL) was measured as learning and memory index. The results showed that injection of Ghrelin into the BLA produced a significant enhancement in retention, which was attenuated by injection of lidocaine into BLA. These finding indicate that the BLA is involved in mediating the memory-modulating effect of Ghrelin. PMID:22487248

  18. Comparative analysis reveals loss of the appetite-regulating peptide hormone ghrelin in falcons.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2015-05-15

    Ghrelin and leptin are key peripherally secreted appetite-regulating hormones in vertebrates. Here we consider the ghrelin gene (GHRL) of birds (class Aves), where it has been reported that ghrelin inhibits rather than augments feeding. Thirty-one bird species were compared, revealing that most species harbour a functional copy of GHRL and the coding region for its derived peptides ghrelin and obestatin. We provide evidence for loss of GHRL in saker and peregrine falcons, and this is likely to result from the insertion of an ERVK retrotransposon in intron 0. We hypothesise that the loss of anorexigenic ghrelin is a predatory adaptation that results in increased food-seeking behaviour and feeding in falcons. PMID:25500363

  19. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  20. The Amygdala as a Neurobiological Target for Ghrelin in Rats: Neuroanatomical, Electrophysiological and Behavioral Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Crespo, Mayte; Skibicka, Karolina P.; Farkas, Imre; Molnár, Csilla S.; Egecioglu, Emil; Hrabovszky, Erik; Liposits, Zsolt; Dickson, Suzanne L.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we sought to demonstrate that the orexigenic circulating hormone, ghrelin, is able to exert neurobiological effects (including those linked to feeding control) at the level of the amygdala, involving neuroanatomical, electrophysiological and behavioural studies. We found that ghrelin receptors (GHS-R) are densely expressed in several subnuclei of the amygdala, notably in ventrolateral (LaVL) and ventromedial (LaVM) parts of the lateral amygdaloid nucleus. Using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology to record from cells in the lateral amygdaloid nucleus, we found that ghrelin reduced the frequency of mEPSCs recorded from large pyramidal-like neurons, an effect that could be blocked by co-application of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. In ad libitum fed rats, intra-amygdala administration of ghrelin produced a large orexigenic response that lasted throughout the 4 hr of testing. Conversely, in hungry, fasted rats ghrelin receptor blockade in the amygdala significantly reduced food intake. Finally, we investigated a possible interaction between ghrelin's effects on feeding control and emotional reactivity exerted at the level of the amygdala. In rats allowed to feed during a 1-hour period between ghrelin injection and anxiety testing (elevated plus maze and open field), intra-amygdala ghrelin had no effect on anxiety-like behavior. By contrast, if the rats were not given access to food during this 1-hour period, a decrease in anxiety-like behavior was observed in both tests. Collectively, these data indicate that the amygdala is a valid target brain area for ghrelin where its neurobiological effects are important for food intake and for the suppression of emotional (anxiety-like) behaviors if food is not available. PMID:23071554

  1. Protective effects of ghrelin on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Kimura, Toru; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Takabatake, Hiroyuki; Miyazato, Mikiya; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Cisplatin is a potent chemotherapeutic agent that has activity against malignant tumors. However, cisplatin causes various adverse effects, such as nephrotoxicity, which are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Recent studies have revealed that the mechanism of cisplatin nephrotoxicity includes a robust inflammatory response. Since ghrelin has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, we hypothesized that ghrelin might have protective effects against cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, cisplatin with vehicle, and cisplatin with ghrelin. Ghrelin (0.8μg/kg/min via osmotic-pump, subcutaneously) or vehicle administration was started one day before cisplatin injection. At 72h after cisplatin administration (20mg/kg, intraperitoneally), we measured serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, urine albumin/creatinine, renal mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, kidney injury molecule-1, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and histological changes. Ghrelin significantly attenuated the increase in serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine induced by cisplatin. Ghrelin tended to attenuate the increase in urine albumin/creatinine, although not significantly. Cisplatin-induced renal tubular injury and apoptosis were significantly attenuated by ghrelin pretreatment. Consequently, ghrelin significantly attenuated renal mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-6, kidney injury molecule-1, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. In conclusion, ghrelin produces protective effects in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through inhibition of inflammatory reactions. Pretreatment with ghrelin may become a new prophylactic candidate for cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:27298204

  2. Seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor repertoire of gastric ghrelin cells★

    PubMed Central

    Engelstoft, Maja S.; Park, Won-mee; Sakata, Ichiro; Kristensen, Line V.; Husted, Anna Sofie; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Piper, Paul K.; Walker, Angela K.; Pedersen, Maria H.; Nøhr, Mark K.; Pan, Jie; Sinz, Christopher J.; Carrington, Paul E.; Akiyama, Taro E.; Jones, Robert M.; Tang, Cong; Ahmed, Kashan; Offermanns, Stefan; Egerod, Kristoffer L.; Zigman, Jeffrey M.; Schwartz, Thue W.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating secretion of the orexigenic-glucoregulatory hormone ghrelin remain unclear. Based on qPCR analysis of FACS-purified gastric ghrelin cells, highly expressed and enriched 7TM receptors were comprehensively identified and functionally characterized using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo methods. Five Gαs-coupled receptors efficiently stimulated ghrelin secretion: as expected the β1-adrenergic, the GIP and the secretin receptors but surprisingly also the composite receptor for the sensory neuropeptide CGRP and the melanocortin 4 receptor. A number of Gαi/o-coupled receptors inhibited ghrelin secretion including somatostatin receptors SSTR1, SSTR2 and SSTR3 and unexpectedly the highly enriched lactate receptor, GPR81. Three other metabolite receptors known to be both Gαi/o- and Gαq/11-coupled all inhibited ghrelin secretion through a pertussis toxin-sensitive Gαi/o pathway: FFAR2 (short chain fatty acid receptor; GPR43), FFAR4 (long chain fatty acid receptor; GPR120) and CasR (calcium sensing receptor). In addition to the common Gα subunits three non-common Gαi/o subunits were highly enriched in ghrelin cells: GαoA, GαoB and Gαz. Inhibition of Gαi/o signaling via ghrelin cell-selective pertussis toxin expression markedly enhanced circulating ghrelin. These 7TM receptors and associated Gα subunits constitute a major part of the molecular machinery directly mediating neuronal and endocrine stimulation versus metabolite and somatostatin inhibition of ghrelin secretion including a series of novel receptor targets not previously identified on the ghrelin cell. PMID:24327954

  3. Ghrelin-Derived Peptides: A Link between Appetite/Reward, GH Axis, and Psychiatric Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Labarthe, Alexandra; Fiquet, Oriane; Hassouna, Rim; Zizzari, Philippe; Lanfumey, Laurence; Ramoz, Nicolas; Grouselle, Dominique; Epelbaum, Jacques; Tolle, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are often associated with metabolic and hormonal alterations, including obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome as well as modifications in several biological rhythms including appetite, stress, sleep–wake cycles, and secretion of their corresponding endocrine regulators. Among the gastrointestinal hormones that regulate appetite and adapt the metabolism in response to nutritional, hedonic, and emotional dysfunctions, at the interface between endocrine, metabolic, and psychiatric disorders, ghrelin plays a unique role as the only one increasing appetite. The secretion of ghrelin is altered in several psychiatric disorders (anorexia, schizophrenia) as well as in metabolic disorders (obesity) and in animal models in response to emotional triggers (psychological stress …) but the relationship between these modifications and the physiopathology of psychiatric disorders remains unclear. Recently, a large literature showed that this key metabolic/endocrine regulator is involved in stress and reward-oriented behaviors and regulates anxiety and mood. In addition, preproghrelin is a complex prohormone but the roles of the other ghrelin-derived peptides, thought to act as functional ghrelin antagonists, are largely unknown. Altered ghrelin secretion and/or signaling in psychiatric diseases are thought to participate in altered appetite, hedonic response and reward. Whether this can contribute to the mechanism responsible for the development of the disease or can help to minimize some symptoms associated with these psychiatric disorders is discussed in the present review. We will thus describe (1) the biological actions of ghrelin and ghrelin-derived peptides on food and drugs reward, anxiety and depression, and the physiological consequences of ghrelin invalidation on these parameters, (2) how ghrelin and ghrelin-derived peptides are regulated in animal models of psychiatric diseases and in human psychiatric disorders in relation with the GH axis

  4. Ghrelin-Derived Peptides: A Link between Appetite/Reward, GH Axis, and Psychiatric Disorders?

    PubMed

    Labarthe, Alexandra; Fiquet, Oriane; Hassouna, Rim; Zizzari, Philippe; Lanfumey, Laurence; Ramoz, Nicolas; Grouselle, Dominique; Epelbaum, Jacques; Tolle, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are often associated with metabolic and hormonal alterations, including obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome as well as modifications in several biological rhythms including appetite, stress, sleep-wake cycles, and secretion of their corresponding endocrine regulators. Among the gastrointestinal hormones that regulate appetite and adapt the metabolism in response to nutritional, hedonic, and emotional dysfunctions, at the interface between endocrine, metabolic, and psychiatric disorders, ghrelin plays a unique role as the only one increasing appetite. The secretion of ghrelin is altered in several psychiatric disorders (anorexia, schizophrenia) as well as in metabolic disorders (obesity) and in animal models in response to emotional triggers (psychological stress …) but the relationship between these modifications and the physiopathology of psychiatric disorders remains unclear. Recently, a large literature showed that this key metabolic/endocrine regulator is involved in stress and reward-oriented behaviors and regulates anxiety and mood. In addition, preproghrelin is a complex prohormone but the roles of the other ghrelin-derived peptides, thought to act as functional ghrelin antagonists, are largely unknown. Altered ghrelin secretion and/or signaling in psychiatric diseases are thought to participate in altered appetite, hedonic response and reward. Whether this can contribute to the mechanism responsible for the development of the disease or can help to minimize some symptoms associated with these psychiatric disorders is discussed in the present review. We will thus describe (1) the biological actions of ghrelin and ghrelin-derived peptides on food and drugs reward, anxiety and depression, and the physiological consequences of ghrelin invalidation on these parameters, (2) how ghrelin and ghrelin-derived peptides are regulated in animal models of psychiatric diseases and in human psychiatric disorders in relation with the GH axis

  5. Self-structuring foods based on acid-sensitive low and high acyl mixed gellan systems to impact on satiety.

    PubMed

    Bradbeer, Jennifer F; Hancocks, Robin; Spyropoulos, Fotios; Norton, Ian T

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the in vitro acid-induced gelation of mixed systems of two biopolymers; low acyl and high acyl gellan gum. Rheological and texture analysis showed that these mixed gels displayed textures that lay between the material properties exhibited for the low and high acyl variants. DSC analysis showed that mixtures of the low acyl and high acyl forms exhibit two separate conformational transitions at temperatures coincident with each of the individual biopolymers. Various metabolically relevant pH environments and hydrocolloid concentrations were investigated. These resulted in very different acid gelled structures, which were characterised by texture analysis. The structures of the acid gels were shown to depend upon the pH, hydrocolloid concentration and proportion of each biopolymer used during their production. A selection of these mixed gellan structures were assessed post-production in terms of their response to prolonged exposure to an acidic (pH 1), stomach-like, environment. This resulted in a significant increase in the gel strength, regardless of the biopolymer proportions. The high acyl gellan was less acid-sensitive, and subsequently no evidence of acid gelation was observed with high acyl gellan at a proportion greater than 60% of the total biopolymer. The findings presented here demonstrate that structuring as well as de-structuring of mixed gellan acid gels can be controlled in acidic environments similar to those that are present in the stomach after food consumption. PMID:24882914

  6. Self-structuring foods based on acid-sensitive low and high acyl mixed gellan systems to impact on satiety

    PubMed Central

    Bradbeer, Jennifer F.; Hancocks, Robin; Spyropoulos, Fotios; Norton, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the in vitro acid-induced gelation of mixed systems of two biopolymers; low acyl and high acyl gellan gum. Rheological and texture analysis showed that these mixed gels displayed textures that lay between the material properties exhibited for the low and high acyl variants. DSC analysis showed that mixtures of the low acyl and high acyl forms exhibit two separate conformational transitions at temperatures coincident with each of the individual biopolymers. Various metabolically relevant pH environments and hydrocolloid concentrations were investigated. These resulted in very different acid gelled structures, which were characterised by texture analysis. The structures of the acid gels were shown to depend upon the pH, hydrocolloid concentration and proportion of each biopolymer used during their production. A selection of these mixed gellan structures were assessed post-production in terms of their response to prolonged exposure to an acidic (pH 1), stomach-like, environment. This resulted in a significant increase in the gel strength, regardless of the biopolymer proportions. The high acyl gellan was less acid-sensitive, and subsequently no evidence of acid gelation was observed with high acyl gellan at a proportion greater than 60% of the total biopolymer. The findings presented here demonstrate that structuring as well as de-structuring of mixed gellan acid gels can be controlled in acidic environments similar to those that are present in the stomach after food consumption. PMID:24882914

  7. Impact of food restriction and cocaine on locomotion in ghrelin- and ghrelin-receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Shane; Zeckler, Rosie Albarran; Buckman, Sam; Thompson, Jeff; Hart, Nigel; Wellman, Paul J; Smith, Roy G

    2011-07-01

    Food restriction (FR) augments the behavioral and reinforcing effects of psychomotor stimulants such as cocaine or amphetamine; effects that may be related to the capacity of FR to increase plasma levels of ghrelin (GHR), a 28-amino acid orexigenenic peptide linked to activation of brain dopamine systems. The present study used wild-type (WT) mice or mutant mice sustaining knockout of either GHR [GHR((-/-)) ] or of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor [GHS-R((-/-)) ] and subjected to FR or not to evaluate the role of GHR and GHS-R in cocaine-stimulated locomotion. WT, GHR((-/-)) , and GHS-R((-/-)) mice were either restricted to 60% of baseline caloric intake or allowed to free-feed (FF). Mice were treated with 0, 1.25, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg cocaine on separate test days (in random dose order) and forward locomotion was recorded on each drug day for 45 minutes after drug dosing. Food (and water) was available immediately after (but not during) each activity test. For FF mice, there was no interaction between cocaine and GHR status on locomotion. FR-WT mice treated with saline exhibited significant increases in anticipatory locomotion (relative to FF-WT mice), whereas FR-GHS-R((-/-)) mice did not. Cocaine significantly increased locomotion in FR-GHR((-/-)) and FR-GHS-R((-/-)) mice to the levels noted in FR-WT mice. These results suggest that GHS-R activity, but not GHR activity, is required for FR to augment food-associated anticipatory locomotion, but do not support the contention that GHR pathways are required for the capacity of FR to augment the acute effect of cocaine on locomotion. PMID:21054685

  8. Enhanced Ghrelin Levels and Hypothalamic Orexigenic AgRP and NPY Neuropeptide Expression in Models of Jejuno-Colonic Short Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Laura; Billiauws, Lore; Stan-Iuga, Bogdan; Ribeiro-Parenti, Lara; Jarry, Anne-Charlotte; Cavin, Jean-Baptiste; Cluzeaud, Françoise; Mayeur, Camille; Thomas, Muriel; Freund, Jean-Noël; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Le Gall, Maude; Bado, André; Joly, Francisca; Le Beyec, Johanne

    2016-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients developing hyperphagia have a better outcome. Gastrointestinal endocrine adaptations help to improve intestinal functions and food behaviour. We investigated neuroendocrine adaptations in SBS patients and rat models with jejuno-ileal (IR-JI) or jejuno-colonic (IR-JC) anastomosis with and without parenteral nutrition. Circulating levels of ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1, and GLP-2 were determined in SBS rat models and patients. Levels of mRNA for proglucagon, PYY and for hypothalamic neuropeptides were quantified by qRT-PCR in SBS rat models. Histology and immunostaining for Ki67, GLP-1 and PYY were performed in SBS rats. IR-JC rats, but not IR-JI, exhibited significantly higher crypt depths and number of Ki67-positive cells than sham. Fasting and/or postprandial plasma ghrelin and PYY concentrations were higher, or tend to be higher, in IR-JC rats and SBS-JC patients than in controls. Proglucagon and Pyy mRNA levels were significantly enhanced in IR-JC rats. Levels of mRNA coding hypothalamic orexigenic NPY and AgRP peptides were significantly higher in IR-JC than in sham rats. We demonstrate an increase of plasma ghrelin concentrations, major changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides levels and greater induction of PYY in SBS-JC rats and patients suggesting that jejuno-colonic continuity creates a peculiar environment promoting further gut-brain adaptations. PMID:27323884

  9. Enhanced Ghrelin Levels and Hypothalamic Orexigenic AgRP and NPY Neuropeptide Expression in Models of Jejuno-Colonic Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gillard, Laura; Billiauws, Lore; Stan-Iuga, Bogdan; Ribeiro-Parenti, Lara; Jarry, Anne-Charlotte; Cavin, Jean-Baptiste; Cluzeaud, Françoise; Mayeur, Camille; Thomas, Muriel; Freund, Jean-Noël; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Le Gall, Maude; Bado, André; Joly, Francisca; Le Beyec, Johanne

    2016-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients developing hyperphagia have a better outcome. Gastrointestinal endocrine adaptations help to improve intestinal functions and food behaviour. We investigated neuroendocrine adaptations in SBS patients and rat models with jejuno-ileal (IR-JI) or jejuno-colonic (IR-JC) anastomosis with and without parenteral nutrition. Circulating levels of ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1, and GLP-2 were determined in SBS rat models and patients. Levels of mRNA for proglucagon, PYY and for hypothalamic neuropeptides were quantified by qRT-PCR in SBS rat models. Histology and immunostaining for Ki67, GLP-1 and PYY were performed in SBS rats. IR-JC rats, but not IR-JI, exhibited significantly higher crypt depths and number of Ki67-positive cells than sham. Fasting and/or postprandial plasma ghrelin and PYY concentrations were higher, or tend to be higher, in IR-JC rats and SBS-JC patients than in controls. Proglucagon and Pyy mRNA levels were significantly enhanced in IR-JC rats. Levels of mRNA coding hypothalamic orexigenic NPY and AgRP peptides were significantly higher in IR-JC than in sham rats. We demonstrate an increase of plasma ghrelin concentrations, major changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides levels and greater induction of PYY in SBS-JC rats and patients suggesting that jejuno-colonic continuity creates a peculiar environment promoting further gut-brain adaptations. PMID:27323884

  10. A Significant Role of the Truncated Ghrelin Receptor GHS-R1b in Ghrelin-induced Signaling in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Gemma; Aguinaga, David; Angelats, Edgar; Medrano, Mireia; Moreno, Estefanía; Mallol, Josefa; Cortés, Antonio; Canela, Enric I; Casadó, Vicent; McCormick, Peter J; Lluís, Carme; Ferré, Sergi

    2016-06-17

    The truncated non-signaling ghrelin receptor growth hormone secretagogue R1b (GHS-R1b) has been suggested to simply exert a dominant negative role in the trafficking and signaling of the full and functional ghrelin receptor GHS-R1a. Here we reveal a more complex modulatory role of GHS-R1b. Differential co-expression of GHS-R1a and GHS-R1b, both in HEK-293T cells and in striatal and hippocampal neurons in culture, demonstrates that GHS-R1b acts as a dual modulator of GHS-R1a function: low relative GHS-R1b expression potentiates and high relative GHS-R1b expression inhibits GHS-R1a function by facilitating GHS-R1a trafficking to the plasma membrane and by exerting a negative allosteric effect on GHS-R1a signaling, respectively. We found a preferential Gi/o coupling of the GHS-R1a-GHS-R1b complex in HEK-293T cells and, unexpectedly, a preferential Gs/olf coupling in both striatal and hippocampal neurons in culture. A dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) antagonist blocked ghrelin-induced cAMP accumulation in striatal but not hippocampal neurons, indicating the involvement of D1R in the striatal GHS-R1a-Gs/olf coupling. Experiments in HEK-293T cells demonstrated that D1R co-expression promotes a switch in GHS-R1a-G protein coupling from Gi/o to Gs/olf, but only upon co-expression of GHS-R1b. Furthermore, resonance energy transfer experiments showed that D1R interacts with GHS-R1a, but only in the presence of GHS-R1b. Therefore, GHS-R1b not only determines the efficacy of ghrelin-induced GHS-R1a-mediated signaling but also determines the ability of GHS-R1a to form oligomeric complexes with other receptors, promoting profound qualitative changes in ghrelin-induced signaling. PMID:27129257

  11. Des-acyl-ghrelin (DAG) normalizes hyperlactacidemia and improves survival in a lethal rat model of burn trauma.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Sulaiman; Kadeer, Nijiati; Friend, Lou Ann; James, J Howard; Alexander, J Wesley; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan

    2014-10-01

    Critical illness, including burn injury, results in elevated plasma lactate levels. Dysregulation of PI3K/Akt signaling has been shown to play a predominant role in the inactivation of skeletal muscle PDC and, hence, in hyperlactacidemia in rat models of sepsis and endotoxemia. This observation, and our previous finding that DAG can reverse burn-induced skeletal muscle proteolysis through the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway, led us to hypothesize that DAG may also attenuate hyperlactacidemia in burn injury. Our investigations revealed that burn injury significantly elevated both skeletal muscle lactate production and plasma lactate levels. Moreover, this was accompanied in skeletal muscle by a 5-7 fold increase in mRNA expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK) 2 and 4, and a ∼30% reduction in PDC activity. DAG treatment of burn rats completely normalized not only the mRNA expression of the PDKs and PDC activity, but also hyperlactacidemia within 24h of burn injury. DAG also normalized epinephrine-induced lactate production by isolated skeletal muscles from normal rats. Moreover, DAG also improved survival in a lethal rat model of burn trauma. These findings with DAG may have clinical implications because chances of survival for critically ill patients are greatly improved if plasma lactate levels are normalized within 24h of injury. PMID:25063053

  12. Effects of Dietary Fibers on Weight Gain, Carbohydrate Metabolism and Gastric Ghrelin Gene Expression in High Fat Diet Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhong Q.; Zuberi, Aamir; Zhang, Xian H.; Macgowan, Jacalyn; Qin, Jianhua; Ye, Xin; Son, Leslie; Wu, Qinglin; Lian, Kun; Cefalu, William T.

    2009-01-01

    Diets that are high in dietary fiber are reported to have substantial health benefits. We sought to compare the metabolic effects for three types of dietary fibers, i.e. sugar cane fiber (SCF), psyllium (PSY) and cellulose (CEL) on body weight, carbohydrate metabolism and stomach ghrelin gene expression in a high-fat diet fed mouse model. Thirty-six male mice (C57BL/6) were randomly divided into four groups that consumed high fat-diets or high fat diet containing 10% SCF, PSY, and CEL respectively. After baseline measurements were assessed for body weight, plasma insulin, glucose, leptin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), animals were treated for 12 weeks. Parameters were re-evaluated at end of study. Whereas there was no difference at the baseline, body weight gains in the PSY and SCF groups were significantly lower than in CEL group at end of study, No difference in body weight was observed between the PSY and SCF animals. Body composition analysis demonstrated that fat mass in the SCF group was considerably lower than in the CEL and HFD groups. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin and areas under curve of IPGTT were also significantly lower in the SCF and PSY groups than in the CEL and HFD groups. Moreover, fasting plasma concentrations of leptin were significantly lower and GLP-1 level was two-fold higher in the SCF and PSY mice than in the HFD and CEL mice. Ghrelin mRNA levels of stomach in SCF groups were significantly lower than in CEL and HFD groups as well. These results suggest differences in response to dietary fiber intake in this animal model as high fat diets incorporating dietary fibers such as SCF and PSY appeared to attenuate weight gain, enhance insulin sensitivity, and modulate leptin and GLP-1 secretion and gastric ghrelin gene expression. PMID:17998014

  13. Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol biosynthesis by direct acyl transfer in Anabaene variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H.; Wickrema, A.; Jaworski, J.

    1987-04-01

    The authors previously reported the direct acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) by an enzyme in the membranes of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis. The enzyme requires acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) as substrate, but had no other additional cofactor requirements. Palmitoyl-, stearoyl- and oleoyl-ACP were all effective substrates. The A. variabilis membranes also had a hydrolase activity which metabolized the acyl-ACP to yield free fatty acid and ACP. Possible mechanisms for the acylation reaction include either acyl exchange with existing MGDG or direct acyl transfer to a lyso-MGDG, with concomitant release of free ACP. The mechanism of this reaction has been resolved using a double labelled (/sup 14/C)acyl-(/sup 14/)ACP substrate prepared with E. coli acyl-ACP synthetase. Following incubation with the enzyme, the unreacted (/sup 14/)acyl-(/sup 14/)ACP was isolated and the (/sup 14/)acyl/(/sup 14/)ACP ratio determined. Comparison of this ratio to that of the original substrate indicated no change and eliminated acyl exchange as a possible mechanism. Therefore, the direct acylation of lyso-MGDG is the proposed mechanism for this enzyme.

  14. Aberrant protein acylation is a common observation in inborn errors of acyl-CoA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pougovkina, Olga; Te Brinke, Heleen; Wanders, Ronald J A; Houten, Sander M; de Boer, Vincent C J

    2014-09-01

    Inherited disorders of acyl-CoA metabolism, such as defects in amino acid metabolism and fatty acid oxidation can present with severe clinical symptoms either neonatally or later in life, but the pathophysiological mechanisms are often incompletely understood. We now report the discovery of a novel biochemical mechanism that could contribute to the pathophysiology of these disorders. We identified increased protein lysine butyrylation in short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficient mice as a result of the accumulation of butyryl-CoA. Similarly, in SCAD deficient fibroblasts, lysine butyrylation was increased. Furthermore, malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD) deficient patient cells had increased levels of malonylated lysines and propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) deficient patient cells had increased propionylation of lysines. Since lysine acylation can greatly impact protein function, aberrant lysine acylation in inherited disorders associated with acyl-CoA accumulation may well play a role in their disease pathophysiology. PMID:24531926

  15. Microbial Tailoring of Acyl Peptidic Siderophores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Marine bacteria produce an abundance of suites of acylated siderophores characterized by a unique, species-dependent headgroup that binds iron(III) and one of a series of fatty acid appendages. Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 produces a suite of seven acylated marinobactins, with fatty acids ranging from saturated and unsaturated C12–C18 fatty acids. In the present study, we report that in the late log phase of growth, the fatty acids are hydrolyzed by an amide hydrolase producing the peptidic marinobactin headgroup. Halomonas aquamarina str. DS40M3, another marine bacterium isolated originally from the same sample of open ocean water as Marinobacter sp. DS40M6, produces the acyl aquachelins, also as a suite composed of a peptidic headgroup distinct from that of the marinobactins. In contrast to the acyl marinobactins, hydrolysis of the suite of acyl aquachelins is not detected, even when H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 is grown into the stationary phase. The Marinobacter cell-free extract containing the acyl amide hydrolase is active toward exogenous acyl-peptidic siderophores (e.g., aquachelin C, loihichelin C, as well as octanoyl homoserine lactone used in quorum sensing). Further, when H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 is cultured together with Marinobacter sp. DS40M6, the fatty acids of both suites of siderophores are hydrolyzed, and the aquachelin headgroup is also produced. The present study demonstrates that coculturing bacteria leads to metabolically tailored metabolites compared to growth in a single pure culture, which is interesting given the importance of siderophore-mediated iron acquisition for bacterial growth and that Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 and H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 were isolated from the same sample of seawater. PMID:24735218

  16. Microbial tailoring of acyl peptidic siderophores.

    PubMed

    Gauglitz, Julia M; Iinishi, Akira; Ito, Yusai; Butler, Alison

    2014-04-29

    Marine bacteria produce an abundance of suites of acylated siderophores characterized by a unique, species-dependent headgroup that binds iron(III) and one of a series of fatty acid appendages. Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 produces a suite of seven acylated marinobactins, with fatty acids ranging from saturated and unsaturated C12-C18 fatty acids. In the present study, we report that in the late log phase of growth, the fatty acids are hydrolyzed by an amide hydrolase producing the peptidic marinobactin headgroup. Halomonas aquamarina str. DS40M3, another marine bacterium isolated originally from the same sample of open ocean water as Marinobacter sp. DS40M6, produces the acyl aquachelins, also as a suite composed of a peptidic headgroup distinct from that of the marinobactins. In contrast to the acyl marinobactins, hydrolysis of the suite of acyl aquachelins is not detected, even when H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 is grown into the stationary phase. The Marinobacter cell-free extract containing the acyl amide hydrolase is active toward exogenous acyl-peptidic siderophores (e.g., aquachelin C, loihichelin C, as well as octanoyl homoserine lactone used in quorum sensing). Further, when H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 is cultured together with Marinobacter sp. DS40M6, the fatty acids of both suites of siderophores are hydrolyzed, and the aquachelin headgroup is also produced. The present study demonstrates that coculturing bacteria leads to metabolically tailored metabolites compared to growth in a single pure culture, which is interesting given the importance of siderophore-mediated iron acquisition for bacterial growth and that Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 and H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 were isolated from the same sample of seawater. PMID:24735218

  17. Effect of Treatment with Metformin on Omentin-1, Ghrelin and other Biochemical, Clinical Features in PCOS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shaker, Mahmud; Mashhadani, Zohair I. AL; Mehdi, Atheer A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Polycystic ovary syndrome is associated with insulin resistance and obesity. Previous studies suggest that metformin by reducing hyperinsulinemia is clinically useful in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome. This study’s Objective is to observe the role of metformin in omentin1, ghrelin, and other biochemical, clinical features within three months in hyperinsulinemic women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Another aim is to assess the decrease in hyperinsulinemia and body weight by metformin in the population. Methods This study was carried out at the Kamal AL-Samarai Hospital between June 2007 and March 2008. 60 women fulfilling the clinical and biochemical criteria for polycystic ovary syndrome and hyperinsulinemia were enrolled. Metformin was started at an oral dose of 850 mg/day for 3 months. Besides Body Mass Index (BMI), Waist Hip Ratio (WHR), serum omentin1, ghrelin, fasting insulin, fasting blood sugar and lipid profile levels were performed. After three months, all these parameters were assessed. Omentin1, ghrelin and insulin were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, fasting blood glucose and lipid profile were measured by colorimetric methods. Results Mean Body Mass Index and Waist Hip Ratio had significantly decreased in the 60 polycystic ovary syndrome patients after three months of Metformin therapy. Serum levels of omentin1, ghrelin and HDL-cholesterol were increased while the total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio was decreased significantly. Serum concentrations of insulin, Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA) and HOMA ß-cell % were also decreased significantly, the present study showed a significant increase in omentin1: insulin ratio, omentin1: HOMA ratio and omentin1: HOMA ß-cell% ratio. Conclusion There was a significant an increase in omentin1: insulin ratio, omentin1: HOMA ratio and omentin1: HOMA ß-cell% ratio. These results in the present study are shown the first time, these factors may be useful in following

  18. Roles of ghrelin in left-ventricular remodelling after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hideyuki; Hojo, Yukihiro; Takahashi, Nozomu; Ikemoto, Tomokazu; Aoki, Hirotaka; Dezaki, Katsuya; Kario, Kazuomi; Katsuki, Takaaki; Yada, Toshihiko; Shimada, Kazuyuki

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of ghrelin after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in left ventricular (LV) remodelling. Design Prospective observational study. Setting Jichi Medical University Hospital. Patients Fifty consecutive patients experiencing their first AMI. Interventions Ghrelin was measured on the day of admission, day 7, day 14 and 6 months after AMI. Patients were treated by percutaneous coronary intervention, and successful myocardial reperfusion was accomplished within 12 h after onset. To analyse LV remodelling, the authors performed left ventriculographies on the day of admission and 6 months after AMI. Main outcome measures Changes in LV volume. Results Plasma ghrelin increased significantly after AMI (admission: 40.9±7.3; day 7: 89.5±11.0; day 14: 92.6±11.8 fmol/ml, p<0.0001). There was a significant correlation between ghrelin on day 14 and changes in LV volume over 6 months (r=+0.46, p<0.001). Multivariate regression analysis showed that ghrelin on day 14 is a significant predictor of LV remodelling after AMI (β=+0.44, p=0.001). Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report that shows a relation between circulating ghrelin after AMI and the progression of LV remodelling in the chronic phase. The elevation of ghrelin after AMI might be a compensatory mechanism to attenuate LV remodelling.

  19. Genetic determination of the cellular basis of the ghrelin-dependent bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chengshan; Fukuda, Toru; Ochi, Hiroki; Sunamura, Satoko; Xu, Cheng; Xu, Ren; Okawa, Atsushi; Takeda, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Objective Bone mass is maintained through a balance of bone formation and resorption. This homeostatic balance is regulated by various systems involving humoral and local factors. The discovery that the anorexigenic hormone leptin regulates bone mass via neuronal pathways revealed that neurons and neuropeptides are intimately involved in bone homeostasis. Ghrelin is a stomach-derived orexigenic hormone that counteracts leptin's action. However, the physiological role of ghrelin in bone homeostasis remains unknown. In this study, through the global knockout of ghrelin receptor (Ghsr) followed by tissue-specific re-expression, we addressed the molecular basis of the action of ghrelin in bone remodeling in vivo. Methods We performed molecular, genetic and cell biological analyses of Ghsr-null mice and Ghsr-null mice with tissue specific Ghsr restoration. Furthermore, we evaluated the molecular mechanism of ghrelin by molecular and cell-based assays. Results Ghsr-null mice showed a low bone mass phenotype with poor bone formation. Restoring the expression of Ghsr specifically in osteoblasts, and not in osteoclasts or the central nervous system, ameliorated bone abnormalities in Ghsr-null mice. Cell-based assays revealed ghrelin induced the phosphorylation of CREB and the expression of Runx2, which in turn accelerated osteoblast differentiation. Conclusions Our data show that ghrelin regulates bone remodeling through Ghsr in osteoblasts by modulating the CREB and Runx2 pathways. PMID:25737953

  20. Ghrelin-AMPK Signaling Mediates the Neuroprotective Effects of Calorie Restriction in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Jacqueline A; Lemus, Moyra B; Stark, Romana; Santos, Vanessa V; Thompson, Aiysha; Rees, Daniel J; Galic, Sandra; Elsworth, John D; Kemp, Bruce E; Davies, Jeffrey S; Andrews, Zane B

    2016-03-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is neuroprotective in Parkinson's disease (PD) although the mechanisms are unknown. In this study we hypothesized that elevated ghrelin, a gut hormone with neuroprotective properties, during CR prevents neurodegeneration in an 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of PD. CR attenuated the MPTP-induced loss of substantia nigra (SN) dopamine neurons and striatal dopamine turnover in ghrelin WT but not KO mice, demonstrating that ghrelin mediates CR's neuroprotective effect. CR elevated phosphorylated AMPK and ACC levels in the striatum of WT but not KO mice suggesting that AMPK is a target for ghrelin-induced neuroprotection. Indeed, exogenous ghrelin significantly increased pAMPK in the SN. Genetic deletion of AMPKβ1 and 2 subunits only in dopamine neurons prevented ghrelin-induced AMPK phosphorylation and neuroprotection. Hence, ghrelin signaling through AMPK in SN dopamine neurons mediates CR's neuroprotective effects. We consider targeting AMPK in dopamine neurons may recapitulate neuroprotective effects of CR without requiring dietary intervention. PMID:26961958

  1. Ligand binding to the ACBD6 protein regulates the acyl-CoA transferase reactions in membranes.

    PubMed

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A

    2015-10-01

    The binding determinants of the human acyl-CoA binding domain-containing protein (ACBD) 6 and its function in lipid renewal of membranes were investigated. ACBD6 binds acyl-CoAs of a chain length of 6 to 20 carbons. The stoichiometry of the association could not be fitted to a 1-to-1 model. Saturation of ACBD6 by C16:0-CoA required higher concentration than less abundant acyl-CoAs. In contrast to ACBD1 and ACBD3, ligand binding did not result in the dimerization of ACBD6. The presence of fatty acids affected the binding of C18:1-CoA to ACBD6, dependent on the length, the degree of unsaturation, and the stereoisomeric conformation of their aliphatic chain. ACBD1 and ACBD6 negatively affected the formation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine in the red blood cell membrane. The acylation rate of lysophosphatidylcholine into PC catalyzed by the red cell lysophosphatidylcholine-acyltransferase 1 protein was limited by the transfer of the acyl-CoA substrate from ACBD6 to the acyltransferase enzyme. These findings provide evidence that the binding properties of ACBD6 are adapted to prevent its constant saturation by the very abundant C16:0-CoA and protect membrane systems from the detergent nature of free acyl-CoAs by controlling their release to acyl-CoA-utilizing enzymes. PMID:26290611

  2. Ghrelin protects musculocutaneous tissue from ischemic necrosis by improving microvascular perfusion.

    PubMed

    Rezaeian, F; Wettstein, R; Scheuer, C; Bäumker, K; Bächle, A; Vollmar, B; Menger, M D; Harder, Y

    2012-02-01

    Persistent ischemia in musculocutaneous tissue may lead to wound breakdown and necrosis. The objective of this experimental study was to analyze, whether the gastric peptide ghrelin prevents musculocutaneous tissue from necrosis and to elucidate underlying mechanisms. Thirty-two C57BL/6 mice equipped with a dorsal skinfold chamber containing ischemic musculocutaneous tissue were allocated to four groups: 1) ghrelin; 2) N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME); 3) ghrelin and l-NAME; and 4) control. Microcirculation, inflammation, angiogenesis, and tissue survival were assessed by fluorescence microscopy. Inducible and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (iNOS I and eNOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as well as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) were assessed by Western blot analysis. Ghrelin-treated animals showed an increased expression of iNOS and eNOS in critically perfused tissue compared with controls. This was associated with arteriolar dilation, increased arteriolar perfusion, and a sustained functional capillary density. Ghrelin further upregulated NF-κB and VEGF and induced angiogenesis. Finally, ghrelin reduced microvascular leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions, apoptosis, and overall tissue necrosis (P < 0.05 vs. control). Inhibition of nitric oxide by l-NAME did not affect the anti-inflammatory and angiogenic action of ghrelin but completely blunted the ghrelin-induced tissue protection by abrogating the arteriolar dilation, the improved capillary perfusion, and the increased tissue survival. Ghrelin prevents critically perfused tissue from ischemic necrosis. Tissue protection is the result of a nitric oxide synthase-mediated improvement of the microcirculation but not due to induction of angiogenesis or attenuation of inflammation. This might represent a promising, noninvasive, and clinically applicable approach to protect musculocutaneous tissue from ischemia. PMID:22159999

  3. Immunization against active ghrelin using virus-like particles for obesity treatment.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Sara; Pinho, Filipa; Ribeiro, Andreia M; Carreira, Marcos; Casanueva, Felipe F; Roy, Polly; Monteiro, Mariana P

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin is a gut hormone that stimulates food intake. In physiological conditions, ghrelin plasma levels rise with fasting and decrease after meals. Obese individuals have low fasting ghrelin levels that rise after food restriction, which is pointed out as a reason for the difficulty in maintaining weight loss. Some bariatric surgery procedures prevent rise in ghrelin levels with weight loss and this has been hypothesised to contribute to the long-term success of the treatment. The main goal of this study was to develop a safe and effective anti-ghrelin vaccine for obesity, through the chemical conjugation of ghrelin with a virus like particle, namely NS1 protein tubules from the Bluetongue Virus (BTV) using a hetero-bifunctional cross linker. Male adult C57BL/6 mice, with a normal weight and with diet-induced obesity (DIO), were randomized into six weight matched groups (n=6/group) and each group of mice received three intra-peritoneal injections with two weeks intervals, containing either 75 μg of ghrelin- NS1 immunoconjugate, 75 μg of NS1 or PBS. Our data show that immunized animals present increasing titres of anti-ghrelin antibodies, while their cumulative food intake significantly decreased and energy expenditure was significantly enhanced, although there were no significative changes in body weight.Vaccinated DIO mice also displayed significant decrease of NPY gene expression in the basal hypothalamus reflecting a decrease in central orexigenic signals. This study suggests that this anti-ghrelin vaccine has a positive impact on energy homeostasis and may be an additional therapeutical tool to be used with diet and exercise for obesity treatment. PMID:23859551

  4. Rapid acyl-homoserine lactone quorum signal biodegradation in diverse soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Juan; Leadbetter, Jared Renton

    2005-03-01

    Signal degradation impacts all communications. Although acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) quorum-sensing signals are known to be degraded by defined laboratory cultures, little is known about their stability in nature. Here, we show that acyl-HSLs are biodegraded in soils sampled from diverse U.S. sites and by termite hindgut contents. When amended to samples at physiologically relevant concentrations, 14C-labeled acyl-HSLs were mineralized to 14CO2 rapidly and, at most sites examined, without lag. A lag-free turf soil activity was characterized in further detail. Heating or irradiation of the soil prior to the addition of radiolabel abolished mineralization, whereas protein synthesis inhibitors did not. Mineralization exhibited an apparent Km of 1.5 microM acyl-HSL, ca. 1,000-fold lower than that reported for a purified acyl-HSL lactonase. Under optimal conditions, acyl-HSL degradation proceeded at a rate of 13.4 nmol x h(-1) x g of fresh weight soil(-1). Bioassays established that the final extent of signal inactivation was greater than for its full conversion to CO2 but that the two processes were well coupled kinetically. A most probable number of 4.6 x 10(5) cells . g of turf soil(-1) degraded physiologically relevant amounts of hexanoyl-[1-14C]HSL to 14CO2. It would take chemical lactonolysis months to match the level of signal decay achieved in days by the observed biological activity. Rapid decay might serve either to quiet signal cross talk that might otherwise occur between spatially separated microbial aggregates or as a full system reset. Depending on the context, biological signal decay might either promote or complicate cellular communications and the accuracy of population density-based controls on gene expression in species-rich ecosystems. PMID:15746331

  5. Ghrelin immunohistochemistry of gastric adenocarcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma of salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Aydin, S; Ozercan, I H; Dagli, F; Aydin, S; Dogru, O; Celebi, S; Akin, O; Guzel, S P

    2005-01-01

    Ghrelin (G-HH) synthesized in several tissues including salivary and stomach glands stimulates appetite in humans by modulating neuropeptide Y neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. Loss of appetite is one of the most important symptoms of stomach cancer. We conducted a study using immunohistochemistry to determine whether salivary glands and stomach cancer tissues produce ghrelin. We determined that negative ghrelin immunohistochemistry discriminates tumors from normal tissues and may therefore further our understanding of the clinically important problem of reduced food intake and anorexia in cancer patients. Radioimmunoassay analyses confirmed that cancer cells do not produce a G-HH peptide, whereas normal cells yield this peptide. PMID:16298902

  6. The Pentapeptide RM-131 Promotes Food Intake and Adiposity in Wildtype Mice but Not in Mice Lacking the Ghrelin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Katrin; Finan, Brian; Clemmensen, Christoffer; van der Ploeg, Lex H. T.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Müller, Timo D.

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal peptide hormone ghrelin is the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (a.k.a. ghrelin receptor, GHR). Currently, ghrelin is the only circulating peripheral hormone with the ability to promote a positive energy balance by stimulating food intake while decreasing energy expenditure and body fat utilization, as defined in rodents. Based on these and additional, beneficial effects on metabolism, the endogenous ghrelin system is considered an attractive target to treat diverse pathological conditions including those associated with eating/wasting disorders and cachexia. As the pharmacological potential of ghrelin is hampered by its relatively short half-life, ghrelin analogs with enhanced pharmacokinetics offer the potential to sustainably improve metabolism. One of these ghrelin analogs is the pentapeptide RM-131, which promotes food intake and adiposity with higher potency as compared to native ghrelin in rodents. Whereas, the effect of RM-131 on energy metabolism is solidly confirmed in rodents, it remains elusive whether RM-131 exerts its effect solely via the ghrelin receptor. Accordingly, we assessed the receptor specificity of RM-131 to promote food intake and adiposity in mice lacking the GHR. Our data show that in wildtype mice RM-131 potently promotes weight gain and adiposity through stimulation of food intake. However, RM-131 fails to affect food intake and body weight in mice lacking the GHR, underlining that the anabolic effects of RM-131 are mediated via the ghrelin receptor in mice. PMID:25988130

  7. Regulation of oxidative stress and somatostatin, cholecystokinin, apelin gene expressions by ghrelin in stomach of newborn diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Zeynep Mine; Sacan, Ozlem; Karatug, Ayse; Turk, Neslihan; Yanardag, Refiye; Bolkent, Sehnaz; Bolkent, Sema

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether ghrelin treatment has a protective effect on gene expression and biochemical changes in the stomach of newborn streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. In this study, four groups of Wistar rats were used: control, ghrelin control, diabetic and diabetic+ghrelin. The rats were sacrificed after four weeks of treatment for diabetes. The gene expressions of: somatostatin, cholecystokinin, apelin and the altered active caspase-3, active caspase-8, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, were investigated in the pyloric region of the stomach and antioxidant parameters were measured in all the stomach. Although ghrelin treatment to diabetic rats lowered the stomach lipid peroxidation levels, the stomach glutathione levels were increased. Exogenous ghrelin caused an increased activities of stomach catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase in diabetic rats. Numbers of somatostatin, cholecystokinin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunoreactive cells decreased in the diabetic+ghrelin group compared to the diabetic group. Apelin mRNA expressions were remarkably less in the diabetic+ghrelin rats than in diabetic rats. The results may indicate that ghrelin treatment has a protective effect to some extent on the diabetic rats. This protection is possibly accomplished through the antioxidant activity of ghrelin observed in type 2 diabetes. Consequently exogenous ghrelin may be a candidate for therapeutic treatment of diabetes. PMID:23566555

  8. The role of NPY and ghrelin in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yagi, Miyuki; Herzog, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Complex mechanisms have evolved that control feeding and energy homeostasis in mammals. Centrally, particularly in the hypothalamus, numerous neurotransmitters have been identified that regulate appetite and energy homeostasis. On the other hand, hormones released from the gut signal states of hunger and satiety to the brain. From the large number of players involved in this interplay, peptides from the neuropeptide Y (NPY) family are unique, with the predominantly neuronally expressed NPY being one of the most strongly stimulating agents for food intake while its two other closely related family members peptide YY (PYY) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) released from the gut induce satiety. Another major player in this circuitry is ghrelin, which is released from the stomach and is the only known hormone that signals hunger to the brain. It is doing this by stimulating hypothalamic NPY production and release, subsequently leading to increased appetite and feeding behaviour. Deregulation of these processes can lead to either the development of obesity or the other extreme, anorexia. The aim of this review is to summarize the recent literature on NPY and ghrelin and its involvement in anorexia nervosa. PMID:22632858

  9. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ta-Yuan; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C. Y.; Urano, Yasuomi

    2009-01-01

    The enzymes acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs) are membrane-bound proteins that utilize long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and cholesterol as substrates to form cholesteryl esters. In mammals, two isoenzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2, encoded by two different genes, exist. ACATs play important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis in various tissues. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge on ACAT-related research in two areas: 1) ACAT genes and proteins and 2) ACAT enzymes as drug targets for atherosclerosis and for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19141679

  10. Acyl silicates and acyl aluminates as activated intermediates in peptide formation on clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Kennedy, R. M.; Macklin, J.

    1984-01-01

    Glycine reacts with heating on dried clays and other minerals to give peptides in much better yield than in the absence of mineral. This reaction was proposed to occur by way of an activated intermediate such as an acyl silicate or acyl aluminate analogous to acyl phosphates involved in several biochemical reactions including peptide bond synthesis. The proposed mechanism has been confirmed by trapping the intermediate, as well as by direct spectroscopic observation of a related intermediate. The reaction of amino acids on periodically dried mineral surfaces represents a widespead, geologically realistic setting for prebiotic peptide formation via in situ activation.

  11. A novel sodium N-fatty acyl amino acid surfactant using silkworm pupae as stock material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Min-Hui; Wan, Liang-Ze; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2014-03-01

    A novel sodium N-fatty acyl amino acid (SFAAA) surfactant was synthesized using pupa oil and pupa protein hydrolysates (PPH) from a waste product of the silk industry. The aliphatic acids from pupa oil were modified into N-fatty acyl chlorides by thionyl chloride (SOCl2). SFAAA was synthesized using acyl chlorides and PPH. GC-MS analysis showed fatty acids from pupa oil consist mainly of unsaturated linolenic and linoleic acids and saturated palmitic and stearic acids. SFAAA had a low critical micelle concentration, great efficiency in lowering surface tension and strong adsorption at an air/water interface. SFAAA had a high emulsifying power, as well as a high foaming power. The emulsifying power of PPH and SFAAA in an oil/water emulsion was better with ethyl acetate as the oil phase compared to n-hexane. The environment-friendly surfactant made entirely from silkworm pupae could promote sustainable development of the silk industry.

  12. Identification of N-Acyl Phosphatidylserine Molecules in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ziqiang; Li, Shengrong; Smith, Dale C.; Shaw, Walter A.; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2008-01-01

    While profiling the lipidome of the mouse brain by mass spectrometry, we discovered a novel family of N-acyl phosphatidylserine (N-acyl-PS) molecules. These N-acyl-PS species were enriched by DEAE-cellulose column chromatography, and they were then characterized by accurate mass measurements, tandem mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and comparison to an authentic standard. Mouse brain N-acyl-PS molecules are heterogeneous and constitute about 0.1 % of the total lipid. In addition to various ester-linked fatty acyl chains on their glycerol backbones, the complexity of the N-acyl-PS series is further increased by the presence of diverse amide-linked N-acyl chains, which include saturated, mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated species. N-acyl-PS molecular species were also detected in the lipids of pig brain, mouse RAW264.7 macrophage tumor cells and yeast, but not E. coli. N-acyl-PSs may be biosynthetic precursors of N-acyl serine molecules, such as the recently reported signaling lipid N-arachidonoyl serine from bovine brain. We suggest that a phospholipase D might cleave N-acyl-PS to generate N-acyl serine, in analogy to the biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anadamide) from N-arachidonoyl phosphatidylethanolamine. PMID:18031065

  13. 2-Aminoalkyl nicotinamide derivatives as pure inverse agonists of the ghrelin receptor.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Bitoku; Funami, Hideaki; Iwaki, Takehiko; Maruoka, Hiroshi; Nagahira, Asako; Koyama, Makoto; Kamiide, Yoshiyuki; Matsuo, Tsuyoshi; Muto, Tsuyoshi; Annoura, Hirokazu

    2015-07-01

    New inverse agonists of the ghrelin receptor (ghrelinR) were obtained through high-throughput screening and subsequent structural modification of 2-aminoalkyl nicotinamide derivatives. The key structural feature to improve in vitro activity was the introduction of a diazabicyclo ring at the 5-position of the pyridine ring. The final product showed potent inverse agonist activity and, despite its low brain permeability, reduced food intake in both normal and obese mice. These results implied that peripheral ghrelinR activity is important for appetite control and that a peripheral ghrelinR inverse agonist could be an anti-obesity drug with reduced risk of central nervous system (CNS)-related side effects. PMID:25981690

  14. Potent achiral agonists of the ghrelin (growth hormone secretagogue) receptor. Part I: Lead identification.

    PubMed

    Heightman, Tom D; Scott, Jackie S; Longley, Mark; Bordas, Vincent; Dean, David K; Elliott, Richard; Hutley, Gail; Witherington, Jason; Abberley, Lee; Passingham, Barry; Berlanga, Manuela; de Los Frailes, Maite; Wise, Alan; Powney, Ben; Muir, Alison; McKay, Fiona; Butler, Sharon; Winborn, Kim; Gardner, Christopher; Darton, Jill; Campbell, Colin; Sanger, Gareth

    2007-12-01

    High throughput screening combined with efficient datamining and parallel synthesis led to the discovery of a novel series of indolines showing potent in vitro ghrelin receptor agonist activity and acceleration of gastric emptying in rats. PMID:17942309

  15. The Central Nervous System Sites Mediating the Orexigenic Actions of Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Mason, B.L.; Wang, Q.; Zigman, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is important for both homeostatic and hedonic eating behaviors, and its orexigenic actions occur mainly via binding to the only known ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). GHSRs are located in several distinct regions of the central nervous system. This review discusses those central nervous system sites that have been found to play critical roles in the orexigenic actions of ghrelin, including hypothalamic nuclei, the hippocampus, the amygdala, the caudal brain stem, and midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Hopefully, this review can be used as a stepping stone for the reader wanting to gain a clearer understanding of the central nervous system sites of direct ghrelin action on feeding behavior, and as inspiration for future studies to provide an even-more-detailed map of the neurocircuitry controlling eating and body weight. PMID:24111557

  16. The central nervous system sites mediating the orexigenic actions of ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Mason, B L; Wang, Q; Zigman, J M

    2014-01-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is important for both homeostatic and hedonic eating behaviors, and its orexigenic actions occur mainly via binding to the only known ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). GHSRs are located in several distinct regions of the central nervous system. This review discusses those central nervous system sites that have been found to play critical roles in the orexigenic actions of ghrelin, including hypothalamic nuclei, the hippocampus, the amygdala, the caudal brain stem, and midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Hopefully, this review can be used as a stepping stone for the reader wanting to gain a clearer understanding of the central nervous system sites of direct ghrelin action on feeding behavior, and as inspiration for future studies to provide an even-more-detailed map of the neurocircuitry controlling eating and body weight. PMID:24111557

  17. Aryl sulphonyl amides as potent agonists of the growth hormone secretagogue (ghrelin) receptor.

    PubMed

    Witherington, Jason; Abberley, Lee; Bellenie, Benjamin R; Boatman, Rio; Collis, Katharine; Dean, David K; Gaiba, Alessandra; King, N Paul; Shuker, Nicola; Steadman, Jon G A; Takle, Andrew K; Sanger, Gareth; Butler, Sharon; McKay, Fiona; Muir, Alison; Winborn, Kim; Ward, Robert W; Heightman, Tom D

    2009-02-01

    As part of an on-going lead optimisation effort, a cross screening exercise identified an aryl sulphonyl amide hit that was optimised to afford a highly potent series of ghrelin receptor agonists. PMID:19128969

  18. Ghrelin agonist does not foster insulin resistance but improves cognition in an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kunath, Nicolas; van Groen, Thomas; Allison, David B.; Kumar, Ashish; Dozier-Sharpe, Monique; Kadish, Inga

    2015-01-01

    The orexigenic hormone ghrelin, a potential antagonist of the insulin system, ensures sufficient serum glucose in times of fasting. In the race for new therapeutics for diabetes, one focus of study has been antagonizing the ghrelin system in order to improve glucose tolerance. We provide evidence for a differential role of a ghrelin agonist on glucose homeostasis in an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model fed a high–glycemic index diet as a constant challenge for glucose homeostasis. The ghrelin agonist impaired glucose tolerance immediately after administration but not in the long term. At the same time, the ghrelin agonist improved spatial learning in the mice, raised their activity levels, and reduced their body weight and fat mass. Immunoassay results showed a beneficial impact of long-term treatment on insulin signaling pathways in hippocampal tissue. The present results suggest that ghrelin might improve cognition in Alzheimer’s disease via a central nervous system mechanism involving insulin signaling. PMID:26090621

  19. Ghrelin modulates testicular germ cells apoptosis and proliferation in adult normal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kheradmand, Arash; Dezfoulian, Omid; Alirezaei, Masoud; Rasoulian, Bahram

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spermatogenesis is closely associated with the balance between germ cells proliferation and apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerous studies have documented the direct action of ghrelin in the modulation of apoptosis in different cell types. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ghrelin may be considered as a modulator of spermatogenesis in normal adult rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ghrelin may be potentially implicated for abnormal spermatogenesis in some testicular germ cell tumors. -- Abstract: Under normal condition in the most mammals, spermatogenesis is closely associated with the balance between germ cells proliferation and apoptosis. The present study was designed to determine the effects of ghrelin treatment on in vivo quality and quantity expression of apoptosis and proliferation specific indices in rat testicular germ cells. Twenty eight adult normal rats were subdivided into equal control and treatment groups. Treatment group received 3 nmol of ghrelin as subcutaneous injection for 30 consecutive days or vehicle to the control animals. The rats from each group (n = 7) were killed on days 10 and 30 and their testes were taken for immunocytochemical evaluation and caspase-3 assay. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that the accumulations of Bax and PCNA peptides are generally more prominent in spermatocytes and spermatogonia of both groups. Likewise, the mean percentage of immunoreactive spermatocytes against Bax increased (P < 0.01) in the ghrelin-treated group on day 10, while despite of 30% increment in the Bax level of spermatocytes in the treated rats on day 30, however, it was not statistically significant. During the experimental period, only a few spermatogonia represented Bax expression and the changes of Bax immunolabling cells were negligible upon ghrelin treatment. Likewise, there were immunostaining cells against Bcl-2 in each germ cell neither in the control nor in the treated animals. In fact

  20. Unacylated Ghrelin Promotes Skeletal Muscle Regeneration Following Hindlimb Ischemia via SOD‐2–Mediated miR‐221/222 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Togliatto, Gabriele; Trombetta, Antonella; Dentelli, Patrizia; Cotogni, Paolo; Rosso, Arturo; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Granata, Riccarda; Ghigo, Ezio; Brizzi, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment of peripheral artery disease, even if successful, does not prevent reoccurrence. Under these conditions, increased oxidative stress is a crucial determinant of tissue damage. Given its reported antioxidant effects, we investigated the potential of unacylated‐ghrelin (UnAG) to reduce ischemia‐induced tissue damage in a mouse model of peripheral artery disease. Methods and Results We show that UnAG but not acylated ghrelin (AG) induces skeletal muscle regeneration in response to ischemia via canonical p38/mitogen‐actived protein kinase signaling UnAG protected against reactive oxygen species–induced cell injuries by inducing the expression of superoxide dismutase‐2 (SOD‐2) in satellite cells. This led to a reduced number of infiltrating CD68+ cells and was followed by induction of the myogenic process and a reduction in functional impairment. Moreover, we found that miR‐221/222, previously linked to muscle regeneration processes, was up‐regulated and negatively correlated with p57Kip2 expression in UnAG‐treated mice. UnAG, unlike AG, promoted cell‐cycle entry in satellite cells of mice lacking the genes for ghrelin and its receptor (GHSR1a). UnAG‐induced p38/mitogen‐actived protein kinase phosphorylation, leading to activation of the myogenic process, was prevented in SOD‐2–depleted SCs. By siRNA technology, we also demonstrated that SOD‐2 is the antioxidant enzyme involved in the control of miR‐221/222–driven posttranscriptional p57Kip2 regulation. Loss‐of‐function experiments targeting miR‐221/222 and local pre–miR‐221/222 injection in vivo confirmed a role for miR‐221/222 in driving skeletal muscle regeneration after ischemia. Conclusions These results indicate that UnAG‐induced skeletal muscle regeneration after ischemia depends on SOD‐2–induced miR‐221/222 expression and highlight its clinical potential for the treatment of reactive oxygen species–mediated skeletal muscle

  1. Identification of neurons that express ghrelin receptors in autonomic pathways originating from the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Furness, John B; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Hunne, Billie; Hirayama, Haruko; Callaghan, Brid P; Lomax, Alan E; Brock, James A

    2012-06-01

    Functional studies have shown that subsets of autonomic preganglionic neurons respond to ghrelin and ghrelin mimetics and in situ hybridisation has revealed receptor gene expression in the cell bodies of some preganglionic neurons. Our present goal has been to determine which preganglionic neurons express ghrelin receptors by using mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the promoter for the ghrelin receptor (also called growth hormone secretagogue receptor). The retrograde tracer Fast Blue was injected into target organs of reporter mice under anaesthesia to identify specific functional subsets of postganglionic sympathetic neurons. Cryo-sections were immunohistochemically stained by using anti-EGFP and antibodies to neuronal markers. EGFP was detected in nerve terminal varicosities in all sympathetic chain, prevertebral and pelvic ganglia and in the adrenal medulla. Non-varicose fibres associated with the ganglia were also immunoreactive. No postganglionic cell bodies contained EGFP. In sympathetic chain ganglia, most neurons were surrounded by EGFP-positive terminals. In the stellate ganglion, neurons with choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity, some being sudomotor neurons, lacked surrounding ghrelin-receptor-expressing terminals, although these terminals were found around other neurons. In the superior cervical ganglion, the ghrelin receptor terminals innervated subgroups of neurons including neuropeptide Y (NPY)-immunoreactive neurons that projected to the anterior chamber of the eye. However, large NPY-negative neurons projecting to the acini of the submaxillary gland were not innervated by EGFP-positive varicosities. In the celiaco-superior mesenteric ganglion, almost all neurons were surrounded by positive terminals but the VIP-immunoreactive terminals of intestinofugal neurons were EGFP-negative. The pelvic ganglia contained groups of neurons without ghrelin receptor terminal innervation and other groups with

  2. The role of ghrelin signalling for sexual behaviour in male mice.

    PubMed

    Egecioglu, Emil; Prieto-Garcia, Luna; Studer, Erik; Westberg, Lars; Jerlhag, Elisabet

    2016-03-01

    Ghrelin, a gut-brain signal, is well known to regulate energy homeostasis, food intake and appetite foremost via hypothalamic ghrelin receptors (GHS-R1A). In addition, ghrelin activates the reward systems in the brain, namely the mesolimbic dopamine system, and regulates thereby the rewarding properties of addictive drugs as well as of palatable foods. Given that the mesolimbic dopamine system mandates the reinforcing properties of addictive drugs and natural rewards, such as sexual behaviour, we hypothesize that ghrelin plays an important role for male sexual behaviour, a subject for the present studies. Herein we show that ghrelin treatment increases, whereas pharmacological suppression (using the GHSR-1A antagonist JMV2959) or genetic deletion of the GHS-R1A in male mice decreases the sexual motivation for as well as sexual behaviour with female mice in oestrus. Pre-treatment with L-dopa (a dopamine precursor) prior to treatment with JMV2959 significantly increased the preference for female mouse compared with vehicle treatment. On the contrary, treatment with 5-hydroxythyptohan (a precursor for serotonin) prior to treatment with JMV2959 decreased the sexual motivation compared to vehicle. In separate experiments, we show that ghrelin and GHS-R1A antagonism do not affect the time spent over female bedding as measured in the androgen-dependent bedding test. Collectively, these data show that the hunger hormone ghrelin and its receptor are required for normal sexual behaviour in male mice and that the effects of the ghrelin signalling system on sexual behaviour involve dopamine neurotransmission. PMID:25475101

  3. Gastric motor effects of ghrelin and growth hormone releasing peptide 6 in diabetic mice with gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wen-Cai; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Wei-Gang; Yan, Jun; Zheng, Qi

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential therapeutic significance of ghrelin and growth hormone releasing peptide 6 (GHRP-6) in diabetic mice with gastric motility disorders. METHODS: A diabetic mouse model was established by intraperitoneal (ip) injection of alloxan. Diabetic mice were injected ip with ghrelin or GHRP-6 (20-200 μg/kg), and the effects on gastric emptying were measured after intragastric application of phenol red. The effect of atropine, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) or D-Lys3-GHRP-6 (a growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) antagonist) on the gastroprokinetic effect of ghrelin or GHRP-6 (100 μg/kg) was also investigated. The effects of ghrelin or GHRP-6 (0.01-10 μmol/L) on spontaneous or carbachol-induced contractile amplitude were also investigated in vitro, in gastric fundic circular strips taken from diabetic mice. The presence of growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a transcripts in the fundic strips of diabetic mice was detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: We established a diabetic mouse model with delayed gastric emptying. Ghrelin and GHRP-6 accelerated gastric emptying in diabetic mice with gastroparesis. In the presence of atropine or L-NAME, which delayed gastric emptying, ghrelin and GHRP-6 (100 μg/kg) failed to accelerate gastric emptying. D-Lys3-GHRP-6 also delayed gastric emptying induced by the GHS-R agonist. Ghrelin and GHRP-6 increased the carbachol-induced contractile amplitude in gastric fundic strips taken from diabetic mice. RT-PCR confirmed the presence of GHS-R mRNA in the strip preparations. CONCLUSION: Ghrelin and GHRP-6 increase gastric emptying in diabetic mice with gastroparesis, perhaps by activating peripheral cholinergic pathways in the enteric nervous system. PMID:18322959

  4. Endogenous ghrelin attenuates pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy via a cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuanjie; Tokudome, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Otani, Kentaro; Nishimura, Hirohito; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Otsu, Kinya; Miyazato, Mikiya; Kangawa, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy, which is commonly caused by hypertension, is a major risk factor for heart failure and sudden death. Endogenous ghrelin has been shown to exert a beneficial effect on cardiac dysfunction and postinfarction remodeling via modulation of the autonomic nervous system. However, ghrelin's ability to attenuate cardiac hypertrophy and its potential mechanism of action are unknown. In this study, cardiac hypertrophy was induced by transverse aortic constriction in ghrelin knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. After 12 weeks, the ghrelin knockout mice showed significantly increased cardiac hypertrophy compared with wild-type mice, as evidenced by their significantly greater heart weight/tibial length ratios (9.2±1.9 versus 7.9±0.8 mg/mm), left ventricular anterior wall thickness (1.3±0.2 versus 1.0±0.2 mm), and posterior wall thickness (1.1±0.3 versus 0.9±0.1 mm). Furthermore, compared with wild-type mice, ghrelin knockout mice showed suppression of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, as indicated by reduced parasympathetic nerve activity and higher plasma interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 levels. The administration of either nicotine or ghrelin activated the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy in ghrelin knockout mice. In conclusion, our results show that endogenous ghrelin plays a crucial role in the progression of pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy via a mechanism that involves the activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. PMID:25870195

  5. High acyl gellan as an emulsion stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Joice Aline Pires; da Cunha, Rosiane Lopes

    2016-03-30

    High acyl gellan (0.01-0.2% w/w) was used as stabilizer in oil in water emulsions containing 30% (w/w) of sunflower oil and prepared under different process conditions. Stable emulsions to phase separation could be obtained using high acyl gellan (HA) content above 0.05% (w/w), while low acyl gellan (LA) prepared at the same conditions could not stabilize emulsions. Emulsions properties depended on the process used to mix the oil and gellan dispersion since high pressure homogenization favored stabilization while very high energy density applied by ultrasound led to systems destabilization. Emulsions prepared using high pressure homogenization showed zeta potential values ranging from -50 up to -59 mV, suggesting that electrostatic repulsion could be contributing to the systems stability. Rheological properties of continuous phase were also responsible for emulsions stabilization, since HA gellan dispersions showed high viscosity and gel-like behavior. The high viscosity of the continuous phase could be associated to the presence of high acyl gellan microgels/aggregates. Disentanglement of these aggregates performed by ultrasound strongly decreased the viscosity and consequently affected the emulsions behavior, reducing the stability to phase separation. PMID:26794954

  6. Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis by inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jian; Zhang, Lin; Dai, Weiqi; Mao, Yuqing; Li, Sainan; Wang, Jingjie; Li, Huanqing; Guo, Chuanyong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2015-02-27

    Aim: This study aimed to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of ghrelin on intestinal barrier dysfunction in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Methods and results: Acute colitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by administering 2.5% DSS. Saline or 25, 125, 250 μg/kg ghrelin was administrated intraperitoneally (IP) to mice 1 day before colitis induction and on days 4, 5, and 6 after DSS administration. IP injection of a ghrelin receptor antagonist, [D-lys{sup 3}]-GHRP-6, was performed immediately prior to ghrelin injection. Ghrelin (125 or 250 μg/kg) could reduce the disease activity index, histological score, and myeloperoxidase activities in experimental colitis, and also prevented shortening of the colon. Ghrelin could prevent the reduction of transepithelial electrical resistance and tight junction expression, and bolstered tight junction structural integrity and regulated cytokine secretion. Ultimately, ghrelin inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory κB-α, myosin light chain kinase, and phosphorylated myosin light chain 2 activation. Conclusions: Ghrelin prevented the breakdown of intestinal barrier function in DSS-induced colitis. The protective effects of ghrelin on intestinal barrier function were mediated by its receptor GHSR-1a. The inhibition of NF-κB activation might be part of the mechanism underlying the effects of ghrelin that protect against barrier dysfunction. - Highlights: • Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis. • The effect of ghrelin is mediated by GHSR-1a. • Inhibition of NF-κB activation.

  7. Ghrelin Enhances Olfactory Sensitivity and Exploratory Sniffing in Rodents and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jenny; Mannea, Erica; Aime, Pascaline; Pfluger, Paul T.; Yi, Chun-Xia; Castaneda, Tamara R.; Davis, Harold W.; Ren, Xueying; Pixley, Sarah; Benoit, Stephen; Julliard, Karyne; Woods, Stephen C; Horvath, Tamas L.; Sleeman, Mark M.; D’Alessio, David; Obici, Silvana; Frank, Robert; Tschöp, Matthias H.

    2011-01-01

    Olfaction is an integral part of feeding providing predictive cues that anticipate ingestion. Although olfactory function is modulated by factors such as prolonged fasting, the underlying neural mechanisms remain poorly understood. We recently identified ghrelin receptors in olfactory circuits in the brain. We therefore investigated the role of the appetite-stimulating hormone ghrelin in olfactory processing in rodents and humans, testing the hypothesis that ghrelin lowers olfactory detection thresholds and enhances exploratory sniffing, both being related to food-seeking. In rats, intracerebroventricular ghrelin decreased odor detection thresholds and increased sniffing frequency. In humans, systemic ghrelin infusions significantly enhanced sniff magnitudes in response to both food and non-food odorants and air in comparison to control saline infusions but did not affect the pleasantness ratings of odors. This is consistent with a specific effect on odor detection and not the hedonic value of odors. Collectively, our findings indicate that ghrelin stimulates exploratory sniffing and increases olfactory sensitivity, presumably enhancing the ability to locate, identify and select foods. This novel role is consistent with ghrelin’s overall function as a signal amplifier at the molecular interface between environmental and nutritional cues and neuroendocrine circuits controlling energy homeostasis. PMID:21490225

  8. The suppression of ghrelin signaling mitigates age-associated thermogenic impairment

    PubMed Central

    Bongmba, Odelia Y. N.; Ma, Xiaojun; Zhu, Xiongwei; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Sun, Yuxiang

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with severe thermogenic impairment, which contributes to obesity and diabetes in aging. We previously reported that ablation of the ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), attenuates age-associated obesity and insulin resistance. Ghrelin and obestatin are derived from the same preproghrelin gene. Here we showed that in brown adipocytes, ghrelin decreases the expression of thermogenic regulator but obestatin increases it, thus showing the opposite effects. We also found that during aging, plasma ghrelin and GHS-R expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT) are increased, but plasma obestatin is unchanged. Increased plasma ghrelin and unchanged obestatin during aging may lead to an imbalance of thermogenic regulation, which may in turn exacerbate thermogenic impairment in aging. Moreover, we found that GHS-R ablation activates thermogenic signaling, enhances insulin activation, increases mitochondrial biogenesis, and improves mitochondrial dynamics of BAT. In addition, we detected increased norepinephrine in the circulation, and observed that GHS-R knockdown in brown adipocytes directly stimulates thermogenic activity, suggesting that GHS-R regulates thermogenesis via both central and peripheral mechanisms. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that ghrelin signaling is an important thermogenic regulator in aging. Antagonists of GHS-R may serve as unique anti-obesity agents, combating obesity by activating thermogenesis. PMID:25543537

  9. Signaling through the ghrelin receptor modulates hippocampal function and meal anticipation in mice.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jon F; Choi, Derrick L; Clegg, Deborah J; Benoit, Stephen C

    2011-04-18

    The ability to predict a particular meal is achieved in part by learned associations with stimuli that predict nutrient availability. Ghrelin is an orexigenic peptide produced by both the gut and brain that rises before anticipated meals and it has been suggested that pre-prandial ghrelin increases may act as a signal to predict meal delivery. Here, we used wild type and ghrelin receptor deficient mice to test the hypothesis that ghrelin signaling is necessary for the processing of emotionally relevant stimuli, spatial learning and habituated feeding responses. We tested spatial and fear-related memory with the Morris water maze and step through passive avoidance tests, respectively and utilized food anticipatory activity to monitor habituated feeding responses following two weeks of a meal feeding paradigm. Our results indicate that ghrelin signaling modulates spatial memory performance and is necessary for the development of food anticipatory activity. Collectively, these results suggest that ghrelin receptor signaling is necessary for adaptations in the anticipatory responses that accompany restricted feeding. PMID:21036184

  10. Beyond the metabolic role of ghrelin: a new player in the regulation of reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Muccioli, Giampiero; Lorenzi, Teresa; Lorenzi, Maria; Ghè, Corrado; Arnoletti, Elisa; Raso, Giuseppina Mattace; Castellucci, Mario; Gualillo, Oreste; Meli, Rosaria

    2011-12-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric peptide, discovered by Kojima et al. (1999) [55] as a result of the search for an endogenous ligand interacting with the "orphan receptor" GHS-R1a (growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a). Ghrelin is composed of 28 aminoacids and is produced mostly by specific cells of the stomach, by the hypothalamus and hypophysis, even if its presence, as well as that of its receptors, has been demonstrated in many other tissues, not least in gonads. Ghrelin potently stimulates GH release and participates in the regulation of energy homeostasis, increasing food intake, decreasing energy output and exerting a lipogenetic effect. Furthermore, ghrelin influences the secretion and motility of the gastrointestinal tract, especially of the stomach, and, above all, profoundly affects pancreatic functions. Despite of these previously envisaged activities, it has recently been hypothesized that ghrelin regulates several aspects of reproductive physiology and pathology. In conclusion, ghrelin not only cooperates with other neuroendocrine factors, such as leptin, in the modulation of energy homeostasis, but also has a crucial role in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis. In the current review we summarize the main targets of this gastric peptide, especially focusing on the reproductive system. PMID:22074955

  11. The alcohol-induced locomotor stimulation and accumbal dopamine release is suppressed in ghrelin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Jerlhag, Elisabet; Landgren, Sara; Egecioglu, Emil; Dickson, Suzanne L; Engel, Jörgen A

    2011-06-01

    Ghrelin, the first endogenous ligand for the type 1A growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1A), plays a role in energy balance, feeding behavior, and reward. Previously, we showed that pharmacologic and genetic suppression of the GHS-R1A attenuates the alcohol-induced stimulation, accumbal dopamine release, and conditioned place preference as well as alcohol consumption in mice, implying that the GHS-R1A is required for alcohol reward. The present study further elucidates the role of ghrelin for alcohol-induced dopamine release in nucleus accumbens and locomotor stimulation by means of ghrelin knockout mice. We found that the ability of alcohol to increase accumbal dopamine release in wild-type mice is not observed in ghrelin knockout mice. Furthermore, alcohol induced a locomotor stimulation in the wild-type mice and ghrelin knockout mice; however, the locomotor stimulation in homozygote mice was significantly lower than in the wild-type mice. The present series of experiments suggest that endogenous ghrelin may be required for the ability of alcohol to activate the mesolimbic dopamine system. PMID:21145690

  12. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of indolinone derivatives as novel ghrelin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Puleo, Letizia; Marini, Pietro; Avallone, Roberta; Zanchet, Marco; Bandiera, Silvio; Baroni, Marco; Croci, Tiziano

    2012-09-15

    The ghrelin receptor is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) widely expressed in the brain, stomach and the intestine. It was firstly identified during studies aimed to find synthetic modulators of growth hormone (GH) secretion. GHSR and its endogenous ligand ghrelin were found to be involved in hunger response. Through food intake regulation, they could affect body weight and adiposity. Thus GHSR antagonists rapidly became an attractive target to treat obesity and feeding disorders. In this study we describe the biological properties of new indolinone derivatives identified as a new, chiral class of ghrelin antagonists. Their synthesis as well as the structure-activity relationship will be discussed herein. The in vitro identified compound 14f was a potent GHSR1a antagonist (IC(50) = 7 nM). When tested in vivo, on gastric emptying model, 14f showed an inhibitory intrinsic effect when given alone and it dose dependently inhibited ghrelin stimulation. Compound 14f also reduced food intake stimulated both by fasting condition (high level of endogenous ghrelin) and by icv ghrelin. Moreover this compound improved glucose tolerance in ipGTT test. PMID:22901671

  13. Ghrelin Decreases Angiogenesis, HIF-1α and VEGF Protein Levels in Chronic Hypoxia in Lung Tissue of Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei Bavil, Fariba; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Keyhanmanesh, Rana; Alihemmati, Alireza; Ghiyasi, Rafigheh; Mohaddes, Gisou

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia is a condition of decreased availability of oxygen. When cells are exposed to a low oxygen environment, they impel the hypoxia responses to adapt to new situation. The hypoxia response leads to the activation of various cellular signaling pathways. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ghrelin on angiogenesis, Hypoxia-Inducible-Factor-1α (HIF-1) and Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in normobaric hypoxia situation. Methods: Twenty four animals were divided into 4 groups (n=6): control (C), ghrelin (Gh), hypoxia (H), and hypoxic animals that received ghrelin (H+Gh). Hypoxia (11%) was induced by an Environmental Chamber System GO2 Altitude. Animals in ghrelin groups received a subcutaneous injection of ghrelin (150 μg/kg/day) for 14 days. Results: Our results showed that hypoxia significantly (p<0.05) increased angiogenesis without any significant changes on HIF-1 and VEGF levels, whereas ghrelin significantly (p<0.05) decreased angiogenesis, expression of HIF-1 and VEGF in this condition. Ghrelin administration did not show any significant changes in normal conditions. Conclusion: Ghrelin had no effect on angiogenesis, expression of HIF-1 and VEGF in normal oxygen conditions but it reduced angiogenesis process in lung tissue with reducing the level of HIF and VEGF in hypoxic condition. Therefore, effect of ghrelin on angiogenesis could be related to blood oxygen level. PMID:26504752

  14. The ghrelin receptor agonist HM01 mimics the neuronal effects of ghrelin in the arcuate nucleus and attenuates anorexia-cachexia syndrome in tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Borner, Tito; Loi, Laura; Pietra, Claudio; Giuliano, Claudio; Lutz, Thomas A; Riediger, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The gastric hormone ghrelin positively affects energy balance by increasing food intake and reducing energy expenditure. Ghrelin mimetics are a possible treatment against cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS). This study aimed to characterize the action of the nonpeptidergic ghrelin receptor agonist HM01 on neuronal function, energy homeostasis and muscle mass in healthy rats and to evaluate its possible usefulness for the treatment of CACS in a rat tumor model. Using extracellular single-unit recordings, we tested whether HM01 mimics the effects of ghrelin on neuronal activity in the arcuate nucleus (Arc). Furthermore, we assessed the effect of chronic HM01 treatment on food intake (FI), body weight (BW), lean and fat volumes, and muscle mass in healthy rats. Using a hepatoma model, we investigated the possible beneficial effects of HM01 on tumor-induced anorexia, BW loss, muscle wasting, and metabolic rate. HM01 (10(-7)-10(-6) M) mimicked the effect of ghrelin (10(-8) M) by increasing the firing rate in 76% of Arc neurons. HM01 delivered chronically for 12 days via osmotic minipumps (50 μg/h) increased FI in healthy rats by 24%, paralleled by increased BW, higher fat and lean volumes, and higher muscle mass. Tumor-bearing rats treated with HM01 had 30% higher FI than tumor-bearing controls and were protected against BW loss. HM01 treatment resulted in higher muscle mass and fat mass. Moreover, tumor-bearing rats reduced their metabolic rate following HM01 treatment. Our studies substantiate the possible therapeutic usefulness of ghrelin receptor agonists like HM01 for the treatment of CACS and possibly other forms of disease-related anorexia and cachexia. PMID:27147616

  15. Remodeling of host phosphatidylcholine by Chlamydia acyltransferase is regulated by acyl-CoA binding protein ACBD6 associated with lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Soupene, Eric; Wang, Derek; Kuypers, Frans A

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis invades cells as an infectious elementary body (EB). The EB is internalized into a vacuole that is hidden from the host defense mechanism, and is modified to sustain the development of the replicative reticulate body (RB). Inside this parasitophorous compartment, called the inclusion, the pathogen survives supported by an active exchange of nutrients and proteins with the host cell. We show that host lipids are scavenged and modified into bacterial-specific lipids by the action of a shared human-bacterial acylation mechanism. The bacterial acylating enzymes for the essential lipids 1-acyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate and 1-acyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine were identified as CT453 and CT775, respectively. Bacterial CT775 was found to be associated with lipid droplets (LDs). During the development of C. trachomatis, the human acyl-CoA carrier hACBD6 was recruited to cytosolic LDs and translocated into the inclusion. hACBD6 protein modulated the activity of CT775 in an acyl-CoA dependent fashion and sustained the activity of the bacterial acyltransferase by buffering the concentration of acyl-CoAs. We propose that disruption of the binding activity of the acyl-CoA carrier might represent a new drug-target to prevent growth of C. trachomatis. PMID:25604091

  16. In Situ Localization and Rhythmic Expression of Ghrelin and ghs-r1 Ghrelin Receptor in the Brain and Gastrointestinal Tract of Goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    PubMed Central

    Unniappan, Suraj; Kah, Olivier; Gueguen, Marie-M.; Bertucci, Juan I.; Alonso-Gómez, Ángel L.; Valenciano, Ana I.; Isorna, Esther; Delgado, María J.

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is a gut-brain peptide hormone, which binds to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) to regulate a wide variety of biological processes in fish. Despite these prominent physiological roles, no studies have reported the anatomical distribution of preproghrelin transcripts using in situ hybridization in a non-mammalian vertebrate, and its mapping within the different encephalic areas remains unknown. Similarly, no information is available on the possible 24-h variations in the expression of preproghrelin and its receptor in any vertebrate species. The first aim of this study was to investigate the anatomical distribution of ghrelin and GHS-R1a ghrelin receptor subtype in brain and gastrointestinal tract of goldfish (Carassius auratus) using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Our second aim was to characterize possible daily variations of preproghrelin and ghs-r1 mRNA expression in central and peripheral tissues using real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Results show ghrelin expression and immunoreactivity in the gastrointestinal tract, with the most abundant signal observed in the mucosal epithelium. These are in agreement with previous findings on mucosal cells as the primary synthesizing site of ghrelin in goldfish. Ghrelin receptor was observed mainly in the hypothalamus with low expression in telencephalon, pineal and cerebellum, and in the same gastrointestinal areas as ghrelin. Daily rhythms in mRNA expression were found for preproghrelin and ghs-r1 in hypothalamus and pituitary with the acrophase occurring at nighttime. Preproghrelin, but not ghs-r1a, displayed a similar daily expression rhythm in the gastrointestinal tract with an amplitude 3-fold higher than the rest of tissues. Together, these results described for the first time in fish the mapping of preproghrelin and ghrelin receptor ghs-r1a in brain and gastrointestinal tract of goldfish, and provide the first evidence for a daily regulation of both genes

  17. In Situ Localization and Rhythmic Expression of Ghrelin and ghs-r1 Ghrelin Receptor in the Brain and Gastrointestinal Tract of Goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Bretaño, Aída; Blanco, Ayelén M; Unniappan, Suraj; Kah, Olivier; Gueguen, Marie-M; Bertucci, Juan I; Alonso-Gómez, Ángel L; Valenciano, Ana I; Isorna, Esther; Delgado, María J

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is a gut-brain peptide hormone, which binds to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) to regulate a wide variety of biological processes in fish. Despite these prominent physiological roles, no studies have reported the anatomical distribution of preproghrelin transcripts using in situ hybridization in a non-mammalian vertebrate, and its mapping within the different encephalic areas remains unknown. Similarly, no information is available on the possible 24-h variations in the expression of preproghrelin and its receptor in any vertebrate species. The first aim of this study was to investigate the anatomical distribution of ghrelin and GHS-R1a ghrelin receptor subtype in brain and gastrointestinal tract of goldfish (Carassius auratus) using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Our second aim was to characterize possible daily variations of preproghrelin and ghs-r1 mRNA expression in central and peripheral tissues using real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Results show ghrelin expression and immunoreactivity in the gastrointestinal tract, with the most abundant signal observed in the mucosal epithelium. These are in agreement with previous findings on mucosal cells as the primary synthesizing site of ghrelin in goldfish. Ghrelin receptor was observed mainly in the hypothalamus with low expression in telencephalon, pineal and cerebellum, and in the same gastrointestinal areas as ghrelin. Daily rhythms in mRNA expression were found for preproghrelin and ghs-r1 in hypothalamus and pituitary with the acrophase occurring at nighttime. Preproghrelin, but not ghs-r1a, displayed a similar daily expression rhythm in the gastrointestinal tract with an amplitude 3-fold higher than the rest of tissues. Together, these results described for the first time in fish the mapping of preproghrelin and ghrelin receptor ghs-r1a in brain and gastrointestinal tract of goldfish, and provide the first evidence for a daily regulation of both genes

  18. Regioselective enzymatic acylation of methyl shikimate. Influence of acyl chain length and solvent polarity on enzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Armesto, Nuria; Ferrero, Miguel; Fernández, Susana; Gotor, Vicente

    2002-07-12

    Candida antarctica lipase A (CAL-A) selectively catalyzes the acylation at the secondary C-4 hydroxyl group of methyl shikimate (2), which possesses three secondary hydroxyl groups, the C-3 allylic one being chemically more reactive. The effect both of the acyl group of the acylating agents and of the solvent polarity has been studied. The selectivity of CAL-A is almost complete with acyl donors that possess short chains. However, when acyl donors have longer chains, better results are obtained by C. antarctica lipase B (CAL-B). PMID:12098318

  19. Ghrelin and memory: differential effects on acquisition and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Valeria P; Ghersi, Marisa; Schiöth, Helgi B; de Barioglio, Susana R

    2010-06-01

    In a previous paper we have demonstrated that the orexigenic peptide Ghrelin (Ghr), increases memory retention in rats and mice. In the present work we evaluated the Ghr effect when it was administered previous the training session or previous the test session (24h after training) on the memory performance, using step-down test. The results showed that the intra-hippocampal Ghr administration previous the training session improved the long-term memory in this task, but did not modify the short-term memory. Nevertheless, when the Ghr was administrated previous the test session, no changes were observed in the memory performance. Taking into account these results and other previously published by our group, we could hypothesizes that Ghr may modulate specific molecular intermediates involved in memory acquisition/consolidation but not in the retrieval. PMID:20214944

  20. Ghrelin attenuates sepsis-associated acute lung injury oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Mian; He, Wanmei; Li, Lijun; Li, Bin; Luo, Liang; Huang, Xubin; Guan, Kaipan; Chen, Weiling

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of ghrelin on oxidative stress in septic rat lung tissue. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into sham-operation, sepsis, and ghrelin groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Ghrelin was administered intraperitoneally at 3 and 15 h post-operation. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed to collect alveolar macrophages (AMs). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in alveolar macrophages and iNOS protein levels were measured by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Pulmonary pathology was analyzed and nitrotyrosine expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. Plasma superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lung wet/dry weight were measured. In the sepsis group, iNOS mRNA expression in AMs was 1.33 ± 0.05, 1.44 ± 0.08, and 1.57 ± 0.11 at 6, 12, and 20 h post-surgery, respectively, and were higher compared with the sham-operation group (p<0.05). No increase was observed at longer time points. iNOS mRNA expression in the sepsis group was lower compared with the ghrelin group (2.27 ± 0.37) (p<0.05) at 20 h post-surgery. iNOS protein levels in the ghrelin group (0.87 ± 0.03, p<0.05) were lower than in the sepsis group at 20 h. Ghrelin group pathological scores were lower than in the sepsis group (p<0.05). Plasma SOD was slightly non-significantly decreased in the ghrelin group. No difference was observed in lung wet/dry weight ratios between sepsis and ghrelin groups. iNOS mRNA expression in AMs was elevated between 6 and 20 h after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), but did not progress. Ghrelin attenuated pulmonary iNOS protein expression and tended to increase plasma SOD activity. Ghrelin suppressed pulmonary nitrosative stress in septic rats, but did not improve lung wet/dry weight ratios. PMID:25037094

  1. Augmented cocaine conditioned place preference in rats pretreated with systemic ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kristina W; Wellman, Paul J; Clifford, P Shane

    2007-05-01

    The physiological mechanism through which food restriction (FR) enhances the biobehavioral actions of psychostimulants is unknown but may involve the gut peptide ghrelin. Plasma levels of ghrelin are increased by FR and reduced by eating. Moreover, systemically administered ghrelin crosses into the brain and is known to augment the locomotor-stimulating effects of cocaine [COC: Wellman et al., 2005]. This study sought to determine whether pretreatment with ghrelin (5 nmol) would enhance the rewarding properties of COC (0.0, 0.312, 0.625, or 1.25 mg/kg i.p.) as measured by conditioned place preference (CPP). Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to both sides of a CPP chamber to determine initial side preference. The rats were then confined for 30 min to either their preferred side or non-preferred side on 8 consecutive days. When rats were confined to the least preferred side, each was injected with 0.5 ml (i.p.) of either ghrelin (5 nmol) or saline 1 h before the conditioning trial and then injected (i.p.) with one of the COC doses immediately prior to the conditioning trial. On alternate days, rats were injected with vehicle one hour before and again immediately before the conditioning trial. Place preference scores were computed as the differences in time (min) spent on the least preferred side of the chamber for the pre-test and the postconditioning test, covaried by the initial degree of preference (% time spent on the black side during the pre-test). These analyses indicated a significant interaction between ghrelin pretreatment and COC dose on changes in preference scores. Significantly higher place preference scores were noted for rats treated with either 0.312 or 0.625 mg/kg COC doses, but only when these COC doses were preceded by administration of 5 nmol ghrelin. In contrast, saline pretreated rats exhibited significant CPP at the 1.25 mg/kg COC dose, but the ghrelin pretreated group did not. These results provide partial support for the

  2. Compartmentalized Acyl-CoA Metabolism in Skeletal Muscle Regulates Systemic Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei O.; Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Paul, David S.; Ilkayeva, Olga; Koves, Timothy R.; Pascual, Florencia; Newgard, Christopher B.; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    The impaired capacity of skeletal muscle to switch between the oxidation of fatty acid (FA) and glucose is linked to disordered metabolic homeostasis. To understand how muscle FA oxidation affects systemic glucose, we studied mice with a skeletal muscle–specific deficiency of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL)1. ACSL1 deficiency caused a 91% loss of ACSL-specific activity and a 60–85% decrease in muscle FA oxidation. Acsl1M−/− mice were more insulin sensitive, and, during an overnight fast, their respiratory exchange ratio was higher, indicating greater glucose use. During endurance exercise, Acsl1M−/− mice ran only 48% as far as controls. At the time that Acsl1M−/− mice were exhausted but control mice continued to run, liver and muscle glycogen and triacylglycerol stores were similar in both genotypes; however, plasma glucose concentrations in Acsl1M−/− mice were ∼40 mg/dL, whereas glucose concentrations in controls were ∼90 mg/dL. Excess use of glucose and the likely use of amino acids for fuel within muscle depleted glucose reserves and diminished substrate availability for hepatic gluconeogenesis. Surprisingly, the content of muscle acyl-CoA at exhaustion was markedly elevated, indicating that acyl-CoAs synthesized by other ACSL isoforms were not available for β-oxidation. This compartmentalization of acyl-CoAs resulted in both an excessive glucose requirement and severely compromised systemic glucose homeostasis. PMID:25071025

  3. Enzymatic Acylation of Anthocyanin Isolated from Black Rice with Methyl Aromatic Acid Ester as Donor: Stability of the Acylated Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng; Li, Chunyang; Zhang, Lixia; Liu, Qin; Ou, Shiyi; Zeng, Xiaoxiong

    2016-02-10

    The enzymatic acylation of anthocyanin from black rice with aromatic acid methyl esters as acyl donors and Candida antarctica lipase B was carried out under reduced pressure. The highest conversion of 91% was obtained with benzoic acid methyl ester as acyl donor; cyanidin 3-(6″-benzoyl)-glucoside, cyanidin 3-(6″-salicyloyl)-glucoside, and cyanidin 3-(6″-cinnamoyl)-glucoside were successfully synthesized. This is the first report on the enzymatic acylation of anthocyanin from black rice with methyl aromatic esters as acyl donors and lipase as biocatalyst. Furthermore, the acylation with aromatic carboxylic acids enhanced both the thermostability and light resistivity of anthocyanin. In particular, cyanidin 3-(6″-cinnamoyl)-glucoside was the most stable among the three acylated anthocyanins synthesized. PMID:26766135

  4. Ghrelin inhibits the apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells through ERK and AKT signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Qiu-Hua; Liu, Yuan; Wu, Shan-Shan; Cui, Rong-Rong; Yuan, Ling-Qing Liao, Er-Yuan

    2013-11-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid peptide that acts as a natural endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) and strongly stimulates the release of growth hormone from the hypothalamus–pituitary axis. Previous studies have identified the important physiological effects of ghrelin on bone metabolism, such as regulating proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts, independent of GH/IGF-1 axis. However, research on effects and mechanisms of ghrelin on osteoblast apoptosis is still rare. In this study, we identified expression of GHSR in MC3T3-E1 cells and determined the effects of ghrelin on the apoptosis of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and the mechanism involved. Our data demonstrated that ghrelin inhibited the apoptosis of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells induced by serum deprivation, as determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate nick end-labeling (TUNEL) and ELISA assays. Moreover, ghrelin upregulated Bcl-2 expression and downregulated Bax expression in a dose-dependent manner. Our study also showed decreased activated caspase-3 activity under the treatment of ghrelin. Further study suggested that ghrelin stimulated the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT. Pretreatment of cells with the ERK inhibitor PD98059, PI3K inhibitor LY294002, and GHSR-siRNA blocked the ghrelin-induced activation of ERK and AKT, respectively; however, ghrelin did not stimulate the phosphorylation of p38 or JNK. PD90859, LY294002 and GHSR-siRNA attenuated the anti-apoptosis effect of ghrelin in MC3T3-E1 cells. In conclusion, ghrelin inhibits the apoptosis of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells induced by serum deprivation, which may be mediated by activating the GHSR/ERK and GHSR/PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. - Highlights: • We explored the effects of ghrelin on serum deprivation-induced MC3T3-E1 cells apoptosis. • Both ELISA and TUNEL were used to detect the apoptosis. • The receptor of ghrelin, GHSR, was expressed in MC3T3-E1

  5. Ghrelin partially protects against cisplatin-induced male murine gonadal toxicity in a GHSR-1a-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Whirledge, Shannon D; Garcia, Jose M; Smith, Roy G; Lamb, Dolores J

    2015-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin causes a number of dose-dependent side effects, including cachexia and testicular damage. Patients receiving a high cumulative dose of cisplatin may develop permanent azoospermia and subsequent infertility. Thus, the development of chemotherapeutic regimens with the optimal postsurvival quality of life (fertility) is of high importance. This study tested the hypothesis that ghrelin administration can prevent or minimize cisplatin-induced testicular damage and cachexia. Ghrelin and its receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR-1a), are expressed and function in the testis. Targeted deletion of ghrelin, or its receptor, significantly increases the rate of cell death in the testis, suggesting a protective role. Intraperitoneal administration of vehicle, ghrelin, or cisplatin alone or in combination with ghrelin, in cycles of 9 or 18 days, to adult male C57Bl/6 mice was performed. Body weight was measured daily and testicular and epididymal weight, sperm density and motility, testicular histology, and testicular cell death were analyzed at the time of euthanization. Ghrelin coadministration decreased the severity of cisplatin-induced cachexia and gonadal toxicity. Body, testicular, and epididymal weights significantly increased as testicular cell death decreased with ghrelin coadministration. The widespread damage to the seminiferous epithelium induced by cisplatin administration was less severe in mice simultaneously treated with ghrelin. Furthermore, ghrelin diminished the deleterious effects of cisplatin on testis and body weight homeostasis in wild-type but not Ghsr(-/-) mice, showing that ghrelin's actions are mediated via GHSR. Ghrelin or more stable GHSR agonists potentially offer a novel therapeutic approach to minimize the testicular damage that occurs after gonadotoxin exposure. PMID:25631345

  6. Ghrelin Partially Protects Against Cisplatin-Induced Male Murine Gonadal Toxicity in a GHSR-1a-Dependent Manner1

    PubMed Central

    Whirledge, Shannon D.; Garcia, Jose M.; Smith, Roy G.; Lamb, Dolores J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin causes a number of dose-dependent side effects, including cachexia and testicular damage. Patients receiving a high cumulative dose of cisplatin may develop permanent azoospermia and subsequent infertility. Thus, the development of chemotherapeutic regimens with the optimal postsurvival quality of life (fertility) is of high importance. This study tested the hypothesis that ghrelin administration can prevent or minimize cisplatin-induced testicular damage and cachexia. Ghrelin and its receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR-1a), are expressed and function in the testis. Targeted deletion of ghrelin, or its receptor, significantly increases the rate of cell death in the testis, suggesting a protective role. Intraperitoneal administration of vehicle, ghrelin, or cisplatin alone or in combination with ghrelin, in cycles of 9 or 18 days, to adult male C57Bl/6 mice was performed. Body weight was measured daily and testicular and epididymal weight, sperm density and motility, testicular histology, and testicular cell death were analyzed at the time of euthanization. Ghrelin coadministration decreased the severity of cisplatin-induced cachexia and gonadal toxicity. Body, testicular, and epididymal weights significantly increased as testicular cell death decreased with ghrelin coadministration. The widespread damage to the seminiferous epithelium induced by cisplatin administration was less severe in mice simultaneously treated with ghrelin. Furthermore, ghrelin diminished the deleterious effects of cisplatin on testis and body weight homeostasis in wild-type but not Ghsr−/− mice, showing that ghrelin's actions are mediated via GHSR. Ghrelin or more stable GHSR agonists potentially offer a novel therapeutic approach to minimize the testicular damage that occurs after gonadotoxin exposure. PMID:25631345

  7. Effects of ghrelin on the apoptosis of human neutrophils in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Zeng, Mian; Zheng, Haichong; Huang, Chunrong; He, Wanmei; Lu, Guifang; Li, Xia; Chen, Yanzhu; Xie, Ruijie

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by lung inflammation and the diffuse infiltration of neutrophils into the alveolar space. Neutrophils are abundant, short-lived leukocytes that play a key role in immune defense against microbial infections. These cells die via apoptosis following the activation and uptake of microbes, and will also enter apoptosis spontaneously at the end of their lifespan if they do not encounter pathogens. Apoptosis is essential for the removal of neutrophils from inflamed tissues and for the timely resolution of neutrophilic inflammation. Ghrelin is an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone (GH) secretagogue receptor, produced and secreted mainly from the stomach. Previous studies have reported that ghrelin exerts anti-inflammatory effects in lung injury through the regulation of the apoptosis of different cell types; however, the ability of ghrelin to regulate alveolar neutrophil apoptosis remains largely undefined. We hypothesized that ghrelin may have the ability to modulate neutrophil apoptosis. In this study, to examine this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of ghrelin on freshly isolated neutrophils in vitro. Our findings demonstrated a decrease in the apoptotic ratio (as shown by flow cytometry), as well as in the percentage of cells with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and in the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling-positive rate, accompanied by an increased B-cell lymphoma 2/Bax ratio and the downregulation of cleaved caspase-3 in neutrophils following exposure to lipopolysaccharide (100 ng/ml). However, pre-treatment with ghrelin at a physiological level (100 nM) did not have a notable influence on the neutrophils in all the aforementioned tests. Our findings suggest that ghrelin may not possess the ability to modulate the neutrophil lifespan in vitro. PMID:27431014

  8. Anti-ghrelin antibodies in appetite suppression: recent advances in obesity pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Altabas, Velimir; Zjačić-Rotkvić, Vanja

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a medical condition caused by accumulated excess body fat with negative impact on patients’ health, including decreased life expectancy. It has become a major health problem in most developed and developing countries, since the worldwide prevalence of obesity nearly doubled during the last 30 years. Consequently, novel treatments focusing on obesity are being investigated. Potential targets include several pathophysiological mechanisms involved in appetite control affecting multiple organ systems, like adipose tissue; some cell types in the stomach and gut; pancreas; thyroid gland; several hypothalamic areas; and centers located in the brainstem. One of the most important orexigenic neuropeptides is ghrelin, which is produced and secreted primarily by ghrelin cells located in the stomach and duodenum. In humans, plasma ghrelin levels rise when the stomach is empty and fall shortly after meal ingestion. In fat tissue, ghrelin increases fat storage. In the brain, it exerts its orexigenic action through activation of NPY/AgRP neurons in the arcuate nucleus. From the pharmacological point of view, it seems that opposing ghrelin activity could be used as a therapeutic principle in treating obesity. The principal idea of antiobesity drugs is to augment anorexigenic and lipolytic signaling, or to block orexigenic and lipogenic mediators. Recent studies have shown that therapeutic vaccines could be a new approach in the development of antiobesity medications. A vaccine should provoke an immune response to a specific causal factor for a particular disease. Several types of anti-ghrelin vaccines have been developed so far, with significant immune response in terms of rising anti-ghrelin antibodies. However, in the only clinical trial performed yet, the results were disappointing, showing no additional weight loss in the study group. Until now, several studies have demonstrated the “proof of concept”, but more studies are required to develop prophylactic and

  9. The effect of ghrelin on MK-801 induced memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Goshadrou, Fatemeh; Kermani, Mojtaba; Ronaghi, Abdolaziz; Sajjadi, Samad

    2013-06-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the brain-gut peptide ghrelin which is expressed in hippocampus improves memory and learning processes. The MK-801, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, has also shown amnesic properties in animal model. The current study was to find out whether intracerebroventricular administration of ghrelin can prevent amnesia induced by MK-801 in rats. A week after the surgery, during which cannuals were implanted in the lateral ventricular, the animals were trained and tested in a step-through type passive avoidance task. Memory retrieval was measured by step-through latency (STL) and total time in dark compartments (TDC). In the first series of experiments, we established a dose-response relationship for ghrelin on the passive avoidance paradigm. In the second set of experiments, animals were divided to two groups. In the first group, MK-801 (0.075, 0.15 and 0.3mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) immediately after the acquisition session and in the second group MK-801 (same doses) was injected (i.p.) 30 min before the retention session. Analysis of data showed that in both groups, MK-801 impaired learning and memory. In the third set of experiments, administration of ghrelin (200 ng/rat) right after the acquisition session (i.e. before MK-801 injection) improved the MK-801 induced memory impairment, but administration of ghrelin before retrieval session did not affect the MK-801 induced memory impairment. These results show an interaction between ghrelin and glutamatergic system. A novel finding in this study is that ghrelin can prevent amnesia produced by NMDA antagonist in rats when injected in post-training phase. PMID:23538209

  10. Oligoclonal antibody targeting ghrelin increases energy expenditure and reduces food intake in fasted mice

    PubMed Central

    Zakhari, Joseph S.; Zorrilla, Eric P.; Zhou, Bin; Mayorov, Alexander V.; Janda, Kim D.

    2011-01-01

    Ghrelin, an enteric peptide hormone linked to the pathophysiology of obesity has been a therapeutic target of great interest over the past decade. Many research efforts have focused on the antagonism of ghrelin’s endogenous receptor GHSR1a, which is found along ascending vagal afferent fibers, as well as in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Additionally, peptidic inhibitors against ghrelin O-acyltransferase, the enzyme responsible for the paracrine activation of ghrelin, have recently been studied. Our research has taken an alternative immunological approach, studying both active and passive vaccination as a means to sequester ghrelin in the periphery, with the original discovery in rat of decreased feed efficiency and adiposity, as well as increased metabolic activity. Using our previous hapten designs as a stepping-stone, three monoclonal antibodies (JG2, JG3, and JG4) were procured against ghrelin and tested in vivo. While mAb JG4 had the highest affinity for ghrelin, it failed to attenuate the orexigenic effects of food deprivation on energy metabolism or food intake in mice. However, animals that were administered a combination of JG3:JG4, (termed a doublet), or JG2:JG3:JG4, (termed a triplet), demonstrated higher heat dispersion and rate of respiration (higher CO2 emission and O2 consumption) during a 24-hr fast refeed. Mice administered the triplet cocktail of JG2:JG3:JG4 also demonstrated decreased food intake upon refeeding as compared to control animals. Recently, Lu and colleagues reported that a passive approach using a single, high affinity N-terminally directed monoclonal antibody did not abrogate the effects of endogenous ghrelin. Our current report corroborates this finding, yet, refutes that a monoclonal antibody approach cannot be efficacious. Rather, we find that a multiple monoclonal antibody (oligoclonal) approach can reproduce the underlying logic to previously reported efficacies using active vaccinations. PMID:22149064

  11. Effects of ghrelin on the apoptosis of human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zeng, Mian; Zheng, Haichong; Huang, Chunrong; He, Wanmei; Lu, Guifang; Li, Xia; Chen, Yanzhu; Xie, Ruijie

    2016-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by lung inflammation and the diffuse infiltration of neutrophils into the alveolar space. Neutrophils are abundant, short-lived leukocytes that play a key role in immune defense against microbial infections. These cells die via apoptosis following the activation and uptake of microbes, and will also enter apoptosis spontaneously at the end of their lifespan if they do not encounter pathogens. Apoptosis is essential for the removal of neutrophils from inflamed tissues and for the timely resolution of neutrophilic inflammation. Ghrelin is an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone (GH) secretagogue receptor, produced and secreted mainly from the stomach. Previous studies have reported that ghrelin exerts anti-inflammatory effects in lung injury through the regulation of the apoptosis of different cell types; however, the ability of ghrelin to regulate alveolar neutrophil apoptosis remains largely undefined. We hypothesized that ghrelin may have the ability to modulate neutrophil apoptosis. In this study, to examine this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of ghrelin on freshly isolated neutrophils in vitro. Our findings demonstrated a decrease in the apoptotic ratio (as shown by flow cytometry), as well as in the percentage of cells with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and in the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP-biotin nick‑end labeling-positive rate, accompanied by an increased B-cell lymphoma 2/Bax ratio and the downregulation of cleaved caspase-3 in neutrophils following exposure to lipopolysaccharide (100 ng/ml). However, pre-treatment with ghrelin at a physiological level (100 nM) did not have a notable influence on the neutrophils in all the aforementioned tests. Our findings suggest that ghrelin may not possess the ability to modulate the neutrophil lifespan in vitro. PMID:27431014

  12. In vivo delivery of a peptide, ghrelin antagonist, with mesoporous silicon microparticles.

    PubMed

    Kilpeläinen, M; Riikonen, J; Vlasova, M A; Huotari, A; Lehto, V P; Salonen, J; Herzig, K H; Järvinen, K

    2009-07-20

    Peptides may represent potential treatment options for many severe illnesses. However, they need an effective delivery system to overcome rapid degradation after their administration. One possible way to prolong peptide action is to use particulate drug delivery systems. In the present study, thermally hydrocarbonized mesoporous silicon (THCPSi) microparticles (38-53 microm) were studied as a peptide delivery system in vivo. D-lys-GHRP6 (ghrelin antagonist, GhA) was used as a model peptide. The effects of GhA-loaded THCPSi microparticles on food intake (s.c., GhA dose 14 mg/kg) and on blood pressure (s.c., GhA dose 4 mg/kg) were examined in mice and rats, respectively. In addition, the effects of THCPSi microparticles (2 mg) on cytokine secretion in mice after single s.c. administration were examined by determining several cytokine plasma concentrations. The present results demonstrate that GhA can be loaded into THCPSi microparticles with a high loading degree (20% w/w). GhA loaded THCPSi microparticles inhibited food intake for a prolonged time, and increased blood pressure more slowly than encountered with a GhA solution. Furthermore, THCPSi microparticles did not increase cytokine activity. The present results suggest that THCPSi might be used as a drug delivery system for peptides. PMID:19345247

  13. The Association of Polymorphisms in Leptin/Leptin Receptor Genes and Ghrelin/Ghrelin Receptor Genes With Overweight/Obesity and the Related Metabolic Disturbances: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghalandari, Hamid; Hosseini-Esfahani, Firoozeh; Mirmiran, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Context: Leptin and ghrelin are two important appetite and energy balance-regulating peptides. Common polymorphisms in the genes coding these peptides and their related receptors are shown to be associated with body weight, different markers of obesity and metabolic abnormalities. This review article aims to investigate the association of common polymorphisms of these genes with overweight/obesity and the metabolic disturbances related to it. Evidence Acquisition: The keywords leptin, ghrelin, polymorphism, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), obesity, overweight, Body Mass Index, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (MeSH headings) were used to search in the following databases: Pubmed, Sciencedirect (Elsevier), and Google scholar. Overall, 24 case-control studies, relevant to our topic, met the criteria and were included in the review. Results: The most prevalent leptin/leptin receptor genes (LEP/LEPR) and ghrelin/ghrelin receptor genes (GHRL/GHSR) single nucleotide polymorphisms studied were LEP G-2548A, LEPR Q223R, and Leu72Met, respectively. Nine studies of the 17 studies on LEP/LEPR, and three studies of the seven studies on GHRL/GHSR showed significant relationships. Conclusions: In general, our study suggests that the association between LEP/LEPR and GHRL/GHSR with overweight/obesity and the related metabolic disturbances is inconclusive. These results may be due to unidentified gene-environment interactions. More investigations are needed to further clarify this association. PMID:26425125

  14. The effects of enteral ghrelin administration on the remodeling of the small intestinal mucosa in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Słupecka, Monika; Woliński, Jarosław; Pierzynowski, Stefan G

    2012-02-10

    Ghrelin is a multifunctional peptide produced predominantly in the stomach, however substantial amounts have also been found in colostrum and milk. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of exogenous ghrelin, administered intra-gastrically, on the processes of mitosis, apoptosis, autophagy, crypt fission and changes in histometry of the small intestine mucosa in neonatal pigs, fed with a milk formula. Three groups (n=6) of piglets were used in the study. The pigs were fed either milk formula (C7) or milk formula together with ghrelin, administered via a stomach tube (7.5 μg/kg body weight (BW), (LG)) and 15 μg/kg BW (HG), every 8h for 6 days. Compared to the control group (C7), feeding milk formula supplemented with ghrelin resulted in significant changes in the small intestinal morphometry and mucosa histometry. The observed changes were dependent on the dosage of hormone and the part of intestine investigated. Administration of ghrelin via the stomach tube (HG) significantly influenced epithelial cell renewal. Moreover, we demonstrated that autophagy is involved in the small intestine mucosa remodeling and ghrelin may be an important factor for its regulation. In conclusion, we found that enteral ghrelin influences the gut mucosa remodeling in a dose-related manner in the early postnatal period. Moreover in neonates, stomach activity does not interfere with the action of ghrelin in the small intestine. PMID:22137939

  15. Ghrelin inhibits high glucose-induced 16HBE cells apoptosis by regulating Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Dilong; Wu, Zhongjun; Li, Jing; Li, Jianqiang; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Tanzhen

    2016-09-01

    Ghrelin has a protective effect on diabetes and its complications. To expound its probable molecular mechanisms, we investigated the effects of ghrelin on high glucose (HG)-induced cell apoptosis and intracellular signaling pathways in cultured human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE). In this study, we firstly came to conclusion that HG-induced 16HBE apoptosis was significantly inhibited by co-treatment of ghrelin. The molecular mechanism of ghrelin-induced protective effects for lungs is still not understood. We reported here for the first time that ghrelin can not only eliminate apoptosis of 16HBE, but also regulate the disordered cell cycle caused by HG. We speculated here that ghrelin inhibits the apoptosis of 16HBE by regulating the abnormal cell cycle to some extent. The mechanism may be that ghrelin up-regulates the expression of cyclin D1 via regulating Wnt/β-catenin pathway, which has an intimate relationship with lung diseases. These results suggested the possible role of ghrelin in treating diabetic lung diseases, especially in view of its low toxicity in humans. PMID:27378423

  16. Blunted hypothalamic ghrelin signaling reduces diet intake in rats fed a low-protein diet in late pregnancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diet intake in pregnant rats fed a low-protein (LP) diet was significantly reduced during late pregnancy despite elevated plasma levels of ghrelin. In this study, we hypothesized that ghrelin signaling in the hypothalamus is blunted under a low-protein diet condition and therefore, it does not stimu...

  17. Profound Hypoglycemia in Starved, Ghrelin-deficient Mice Is Caused by Decreased Gluconeogenesis and Reversed by Lactate or Fatty Acids*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Robert Lin; Sherbet, Daniel P.; Elsbernd, Benjamin L.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.; Zhao, Tong-Jin

    2012-01-01

    When mice are subjected to 7-day calorie restriction (40% of normal food intake), body fat disappears, but blood glucose is maintained as long as the animals produce ghrelin, an octanoylated peptide that stimulates growth hormone secretion. Mice can be rendered ghrelin-deficient by knock-out of the gene encoding either ghrelin O-acyltransferase, which attaches the required octanoate, or ghrelin itself. Calorie-restricted, fat-depleted ghrelin O-acyltransferase or ghrelin knock-out mice fail to show the normal increase in growth hormone and become profoundly hypoglycemic when fasted for 18–23 h. Glucose production in Goat−/− mice was reduced by 60% when compared with similarly treated WT mice. Plasma lactate and pyruvate were also low. Injection of lactate, pyruvate, alanine, or a fatty acid restored blood glucose in Goat−/− mice. Thus, when body fat is reduced by calorie restriction, ghrelin stimulates growth hormone secretion, which allows maintenance of glucose production, even when food intake is eliminated. In humans with anorexia nervosa or kwashiorkor, ghrelin and growth hormone are known to be elevated, just as they are in fat-depleted mice. We suggest that these two hormones prolong survival in starved humans as they do in mice. PMID:22474325

  18. Seasonal response of ghrelin, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factor I in the free-ranging Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tighe, Rachel L; Bonde, Robert K.; Avery, Julie P.

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal changes in light, temperature, and food availability stimulate a physiological response in an animal. Seasonal adaptations are well studied in Arctic, Sub-Arctic, and hibernating mammals; however, limited studies have been conducted in sub-tropical species. The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris), a sub-tropical marine mammal, forages less during colder temperatures and may rely on adipose stores for maintenance energy requirements. Metabolic hormones, growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, and ghrelin influence growth rate, accretion of lean and adipose tissue. They have been shown to regulate seasonal changes in body composition. The objective of this research was to investigate manatee metabolic hormones in two seasons to determine if manatees exhibit seasonality and if these hormones are associated with seasonal changes in body composition. In addition, age related differences in these metabolic hormones were assessed in multiple age classes. Concentrations of GH, IGF-I, and ghrelin were quantified in adult manatee serum using heterologous radioimmunoassays. Samples were compared between short (winter) and long (summer) photoperiods (n = 22 male, 20 female) and by age class (adult, juvenile, and calf) in long photoperiods (n = 37). Short photoperiods tended to have reduced GH (p = 0.08), greater IGF-I (p = 0.01), and greater blubber depth (p = 0.03) compared with long photoperiods. No differences were observed in ghrelin (p = 0.66). Surprisingly, no age related differences were observed in IGF-I or ghrelin concentrations (p > 0.05). However, serum concentrations of GH tended (p = 0.07) to be greater in calves and juveniles compared with adults. Increased IGF-I, greater blubber thickness, and reduced GH during short photoperiod suggest a prioritization for adipose deposition. Whereas, increased GH, reduced blubber thickness, and decreased IGF-I in long photoperiod suggest prioritization of lean tissue

  19. Acyl Silicates and Acyl Aluminates as Activated Intermediates in Peptide Formation on Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, David H.; Kennedy, Robert M.; Macklin, John

    1984-12-01

    Glycine reacts with heating on dried clays and other minerals to give peptides in much better yield than in the absence of mineral. This reaction was proposed to occur by way of an activated intermediate such as an acyl silicate or acyl aluminate (i.e., the anhydride of a carboxylic acid with Si-OH or Al-OH), analogous to acyl phosphates involved in several biochemical reactions including peptide bond synthesis. We confirmed the proposed mechanism by trapping the intermediate, as well as by direct spectroscopic observation of a related intermediate. The reaction of amino acids on periodically dried mineral surfaces represents a widespread, geologically realistic setting for prebiotic peptide formation via in situ activation.

  20. Hyperprolactinemia has no effect on plasma ghrelin levels in patients with prolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Delibaşı, Tuncay; Arslan, Müyesser Sayki; Çakal, Erman; Şahin, Mustafa; Topaloğlu, Oya; Tutal, Esra; Ünsal, İlknur Öztürk; Karbek, Başak; Uçan, Bekir; Güngüneş, Aşkın; Karaköse, Melia; Çalışkan, Mustafa; Demirci, Taner; Tabur, Gülfer; Özbek, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective Accumulating evidence suggests that prolactin is a modulator of body weight and composition and that it regulates some transporters in adipose tissue. It was demonstrated that hyperprolactinemia is associated with weight gain and obesity. Ghrelin is a novel hormone secreted from many organs including the pituitary gland. Ghrelin acts by regulating energy homeostasis and stimulating appetite. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ghrelin has a role in the case of weight gain in patients with prolactinoma. Material and Methods Forty-four patients with prolactinoma, both newly diagnosed and undergoing cabergoline treatment, were included in this study. Age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were included in the control group. Serum fasting glucose, insulin, lipid profile, and ghrelin levels were measured. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was also calculated. Body mass index (BMI) and total fat ratio (%) of all the participants were assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis using TBF-310GS™ (Tanita Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). Results Patients with prolactinoma demonstrated significantly higher serum levels of fasting insulin, triglyceride, and waist and hip circumference measurement. No significant difference was found between the fasting glucose, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and HOMA-IR levels. BMI was significantly higher in the patients with prolactinoma than that in the control group (p<0.05). Additionally, the total body fat percentage was higher in the patients with prolactinoma than that in the control group; however, the difference was not significant (p>0.05). Furthermore, there was no significant difference in terms of the ghrelin levels between these groups. There was a correlation with serum ghrelin and growth hormone levels (p<0.02, rho=0.489). However, no significant correlation was obtained between serum prolactin or ghrelin levels and body fat percentage

  1. Diet-Induced Obesity and Ghrelin Effects on Pituitary Gonadotrophs: Immunohistomorphometric Study in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ristic, Natasa; Stevanovic, Darko; Nesic, Dejan; Ajdzanovic, Vladimir; Rakocevic, Rastko; Jaric, Ivana; Milosevic, Verica

    2016-01-01

    Objective The close relationship between energy metabolism, nutritional state, and reproductive physiology suggests that nutritional and metabolic disorders can disrupt normal reproductive function and fertility. Considering the importance of leptin and ghrelin effects in regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, the objective of this study was to investigate the influence of obesity and centrally applied ghrelin on immunohistochemical appearance and quantitative morphology of the pituitary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) producing cells in adult male rats. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, animals were given two differ- ent diets: normal-fat (NF) and high-fat (HF), for 4 weeks, corresponding to normal and positive energy balance (n=2×14), respectively. Each group was subsequently divided into two subgroups (n=7) receiving intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of either ghrelin [G, 1 µg/5 µL phosphate buffered saline (PBS)] or vehicle (5 µL PBS, control group) every 24 hours for five consecutive days. Results Morphometric analyses showed that in HF control group, the percentage of FSH cells per unit volume of total pituitary gland tissue (in μm3), i.e. volume density (Vvc), was increased (P<0.05) by 9.1% in comparison with the NF controls. After ICV treatment with ghrelin, volume (Vc) and volume density (Vvc) of FSH cells in ghrelin+NF (GNF) and ghrelin+HF (GHF) groups remained unchanged in comparison with NF and HF controls. Volume of LH cells in HF control group was increased by 17% (P<0.05), but their Vvc was decreased by 8.3% (P<0.05) in comparison with NF controls. In GNF group, the volume of LH cells increased by 7% (P<0.05), in comparison with the NF controls, but in GHF group, the same parameter remained unchanged when compared with HF controls. The central application of ghrelin de- creased the Vvc of LH cells only in GNF group by 38.9% (P<0.05) in comparison with the NF control animals

  2. An acylated phloroglucinol with antimicrobial properties from Helichrysum caespititium.

    PubMed

    Mathekga, A D; Meyer, J J; Horn, M M; Drewes, S E

    2000-01-01

    A new acylated form of a phloroglucinol with significant antimicrobial properties was isolated by bioactivity guided fractionation from Helichrysum caespititium (Asteraceae). The structure elucidation, and conformation of the new phloroglucinol, 2-methyl-4-[2',4',6'-trihydroxy-3'-(2-methylpropanoyl) phenyl]but-2-enyl acetate, was established by high field NMR spectroscopic and MS data. The compound inhibited growth of Bacillus cereus, B. pumilus, B. subtilis and Micrococcus kristinae at the very low concentration of 0.5 microg/ml and Staphylococcus aureus at 5.0 microg/ml. Six fungi tested were similarly inhibited at low MICs, Aspergillus flavus and A. niger (1.0 microg/ml), Cladosporium chladosporioides (5 microg/ml), C. cucumerinum and C. sphaerospermum (0.5 microg/ml) and Phylophthora capsici at 1.0 microg/ml. PMID:10656414

  3. Behavioral satiety sequence in a genetic mouse model of obesity: effects of ghrelin receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Finger, Beate C; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2011-10-01

    Behavioral satiety sequence (BSS) is a useful paradigm to assess the effects of orexigenic and anorexigenic profiles of novel pharmacological and genetic manipulations in rodents. To date, no studies have described the satiety profile of leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, an important animal model of obesity in this task. Furthermore, no studies have described changes in the BSS after treatment with ghrelin receptor ligands, which have become an attractive therapeutic target in obesity drug discovery efforts. BSS testing was carried out in ob/ob mice and their lean controls. After baseline analysis, effects of ghrelin (2 nmol/10 g) and of the ghrelin receptor antagonist (D-Lys)-GHRP-6 (66.6 and 133.3 nmol/10 g) were studied in BSS in mice of both genotypes. The baseline BSS profile of ob/ob mice showed an increased eating and a decreased resting activity. Ob/ob mice presented with a decreased sensitivity to the stimulation with ghrelin and with the ghrelin receptor antagonist, which caused strong anorexic and adverse side effects in lean mice, thereby disrupting the BSS profile. BSS is an indispensable tool for parsing the role of the ghrelinergic system in satiety, to characterize transgenic mice and to elicit behavioral feeding profiles of novel anorectic agents. PMID:21897203

  4. Neuronal Deletion of Ghrelin Receptor Almost Completely Prevents Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Han; Lin, Ligen; Xu, Pingwen; Saito, Kenji; Wei, Qiong; Meadows, Adelina G; Bongmba, Odelia Y N; Pradhan, Geetali; Zheng, Hui; Xu, Yong; Sun, Yuxiang

    2016-08-01

    Ghrelin signaling has major effects on energy and glucose homeostasis, but it is unknown whether ghrelin's functions are centrally and/or peripherally mediated. The ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), is highly expressed in the brain and detectable in some peripheral tissues. To understand the roles of neuronal GHS-R, we generated a mouse line where Ghsr gene is deleted in all neurons using synapsin 1 (Syn1)-Cre driver. Our data showed that neuronal Ghsr deletion abolishes ghrelin-induced spontaneous food intake but has no effect on total energy intake. Remarkably, neuronal Ghsr deletion almost completely prevented diet-induced obesity (DIO) and significantly improved insulin sensitivity. The neuronal Ghsr-deleted mice also showed improved metabolic flexibility, indicative of better adaption to different fuels. In addition, gene expression analysis suggested that hypothalamus and/or midbrain might be the sites that mediate the effects of GHS-R in thermogenesis and physical activity, respectively. Collectively, our results indicate that neuronal GHS-R is a crucial regulator of energy metabolism and a key mediator of DIO. Neuronal Ghsr deletion protects against DIO by regulating energy expenditure, not by energy intake. These novel findings suggest that suppressing central ghrelin signaling may serve as a unique antiobesity strategy. PMID:27207529

  5. Effects of Toxoplasma gondii infection on anxiety, depression and ghrelin level in male rats.

    PubMed

    Parvin, Zareian; Iraj, Mirzaii Dizgah; Minoo, Shaddel; Fatemeh, Khodabandehloo

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection on anxiety, depression and ghrelin level in male rats. Twenty four male rats were assessed in two equal groups. T. gondii tachyzoite (ip) were injected in infected group and control group received (2 ml) physiological serum (ip). Elevated plus Maze and swimming tests were used to assess anxiety and depression in rats respectively. The ghrelin and T. gondii IgG serum levels were measured by enzyme immunoassay kits. The Student's t test and Pearson correlation coefficient were used. The ghrelin serum level was significantly lower in the infected rats than control (P = 0.03). There were no significant differences in the depression and anxiety behavior between two groups. However, here were no significant correlations between ghrelin level and anxiety or depression in rats. It seems that latent T. gondii infection decreases the ghrelin serum level but does not change anxiety and depression like behaviors. PMID:27605768

  6. Ghrelin modulates hypothalamic fatty acid-sensing and control of food intake in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Cristina; Librán-Pérez, Marta; Otero-Rodiño, Cristina; López-Patiño, Marcos A; Míguez, Jesús M; Cerdá-Reverter, José Miguel; Soengas, José L

    2016-01-01

    There is no information available on fish as far as the possible effects of ghrelin on hypothalamic fatty acid metabolism and the response of fatty acid-sensing systems, which are involved in the control of food intake. Therefore, we assessed in rainbow trout the response of food intake, hypothalamic fatty acid-sensing mechanisms and expression of neuropeptides involved in the control of food intake to the central treatment of ghrelin in the presence or absence of a long-chain fatty acid such as oleate. We observed that the orexigenic actions of ghrelin in rainbow trout are associated with changes in fatty acid metabolism in the hypothalamus and an inhibition of fatty acid-sensing mechanisms, which ultimately lead to changes in the expression of anorexigenic and orexigenic peptides resulting in increased orexigenic potential and food intake. Moreover, the response to increased levels of oleate of hypothalamic fatty acid-sensing systems (activation), expression of neuropeptides (enhanced anorexigenic potential) and food intake (decrease) were counteracted by the simultaneous treatment with ghrelin. These changes provide evidence for the first time in fish of a possible modulatory role of ghrelin on the metabolic regulation by fatty acid of food intake occurring in the hypothalamus. PMID:26459641

  7. Ghrelin signalling on food reward: a salient link between the gut and the mesolimbic system.

    PubMed

    Perello, M; Dickson, S L

    2015-06-01

    'Hunger is the best spice' is an old and wise saying that acknowledges the fact that almost any food tastes better when we are hungry. The neurobiological underpinnings of this lore include activation of the brain's reward system and the stimulation of this system by the hunger-promoting hormone ghrelin. Ghrelin is produced largely from the stomach and levels are higher preprandially. The ghrelin receptor is expressed in many brain areas important for feeding control, including not only the hypothalamic nuclei involved in energy balance regulation, but also reward-linked areas such as the ventral tegmental area. By targeting the mesoaccumbal dopamine neurones of the ventral tegmental area, ghrelin recruits pathways important for food reward-related behaviours that show overlap with but are also distinct from those important for food intake. We review a variety of studies that support the notion that ghrelin signalling at the level of the mesolimbic system is one of the key molecular substrates that provides a physiological signal connecting gut and reward pathways. PMID:25377898

  8. The Role of Ghrelin, Salivary Secretions, and Dental Care in Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Takakazu; Ueda, Hirotaka; Amitani, Haruka; Asakawa, Akihiro; Miyawaki, Shouichi; Inui, Akio

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders, including anorexia and bulimia nervosa, are potentially life-threatening syndromes characterized by severe disturbances in eating behavior. An effective treatment strategy for these conditions remains to be established, as patients with eating disorders tend to suffer from multiple relapses. Because ghrelin was originally discovered in the stomach mucosa, it has been widely studied over the past decade in an effort to uncover its potential roles; these studies have shed light on the mechanism by which ghrelin regulates food intake. Thus, studying ghrelin in the context of eating disorders could improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of eating disorders, possibly resulting in a promising new pharmacological treatment strategy for these patients. In addition, early detection and treatment of eating disorders are critical for ensuring recovery of young patients. Oral symptoms, including mucosal, dental, and saliva abnormalities, are typically observed in the early stages of eating disorders. Although oral care is not directly related to the treatment of eating disorders, knowledge of the oral manifestations of eating disorder patients may aid in early detection, resulting in earlier treatment; thus, oral care might contribute to overall patient management and prognosis. Moreover, ghrelin has also been found in saliva, which may be responsible for oral hygiene and digestion-related functions. This review discusses the pharmacological potential of ghrelin in regulating food-intake and the role of saliva and oral care in young patients with eating disorders. PMID:23016127

  9. Effects of Ghrelin on Sexual Behavior and Luteinizing Hormone Beta-subunit Gene Expression in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Babaei-Balderlou, Farrin; Khazali, Homayoun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The hormones of hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis have facilitative effects on reproductive behavior in mammals. Ghrelin as a starvation hormone has an inhibitory effect on HPG axis’ function. Hence, it is postulated that ghrelin may reduce the sexual behavior through inhibiting of HPG axis. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of ghrelin and its antagonist, [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6, on sexual behavior and LH beta-subunit gene expression in male rats. Methods: In this experimental study, 128 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups. Each group was further subdivided into eight subgroups (n=8 rats/subgroup) including the animals that received saline, ghrelin (2, 4 or 8 nmol), [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 (5 or 10 nmol) or co-administration of ghrelin (4 nmol) and [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 (5 or 10 nmol) through the stereotaxically implanted cannula into the third cerebral ventricle. The sexual behavior of male rats encountering with females and the hypo-physeal LH beta-subunit gene expression were evaluated at two different groups. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Ghrelin injection (4 and 8 nmol) significantly (p<0.01) increased the latencies to the first mount, intromission and ejaculation as well as the post-ejaculatory interval. Also, 4 and 8 nmol ghrelin significantly (p<0.05) increased the number of mount and decreased the number of ejaculation. In co-administrated groups, [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 antagonized the effects of ghrelin. Ghrelin injection (4 and 8 nmol) reduced the LH beta-subunit gene expression while pretreatment with [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 improved the gene expression. Conclusion: Ghrelin decreased the sexual behavior and LH beta-subunit gene expression in male rats, whereas [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 antagonizes these effects. PMID:27141463

  10. Effects of dietary fibers on weight gain, carbohydrate metabolism, and gastric ghrelin gene expression in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong Q; Zuberi, Aamir R; Zhang, Xian H; Macgowan, Jacalyn; Qin, Jianhua; Ye, Xin; Son, Leslie; Wu, Qinglin; Lian, Kun; Cefalu, William T

    2007-12-01

    Diets that are high in dietary fiber are reported to have substantial health benefits. We sought to compare the metabolic effects of 3 types of dietary fibers -- sugarcane fiber (SCF), psyllium (PSY), and cellulose (CEL) -- on body weight, carbohydrate metabolism, and stomach ghrelin gene expression in a high-fat diet-fed mouse model. Thirty-six male mice (C57BL/6) were randomly divided into 4 groups that consumed high-fat diet alone (HFD) or high-fat diet containing 10% SCF, PSY, and CEL, respectively. After baseline measurements were assessed for body weight, plasma insulin, glucose, leptin, and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), animals were treated for 12 weeks. Parameters were reevaluated at the end of study. Whereas there was no difference at the baseline, body weight gains in the PSY and SCF groups were significantly lower than in the CEL group at the end of study. No difference in body weight was observed between the PSY and SCF animals. Body composition analysis demonstrated that fat mass in the SCF group was considerably lower than in the CEL and HFD groups. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin and areas under the curve of intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test were also significantly lower in the SCF and PSY groups than in the CEL and HFD groups. Moreover, fasting plasma concentrations of leptin were significantly lower and GLP-1 level was 2-fold higher in the SCF and PSY mice than in the HFD and CEL mice. Ghrelin messenger RNA levels of stomach in the SCF group were significantly lower than in the CEL and HFD groups as well. These results suggest differences in response to dietary fiber intake in this animal model because high-fat diets incorporating dietary fibers such as SCF and PSY appeared to attenuate weight gain, enhance insulin sensitivity, and modulate leptin and GLP-1 secretion and gastric ghrelin gene expression. PMID:17998014

  11. Efficient production of di- and tri-acylated mannosylerythritol lipids as glycolipid biosurfactants by Pseudozyma parantarctica JCM 11752(T).

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Konishi, Masaaki; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Sakai, Hideki; Kitamoto, Dai

    2008-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are one of the most promising biosurfactants known, because of their multifunctionality and biocompatibility. In order to attain an efficient production of MELs, Pseudozyma parantarctica JCM 11752(T), which is a newly identified strain of the genus, was examined for the productivity of MELs at different culture conditions. The yeast strain showed significant cell growth and production of di-acylated MELs even at 36 degrees C. In contrast, on conventional high-level MEL producers including P. rugulosa, the MEL yield considerably decreased with an increase of the cultivation temperature at over 30 degrees C. On P. parantarctica, soybean oil and sodium nitrate were the best carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Under the optimal conditions on a shake-flask culture at 34 degrees C, the amount of di-acylated MELs reached over 100 g/L by intermittent feeding of only soybean oil. Interestingly, the yeast strain produced tri-acylated MELs as well as di-acylated ones when grown on the medium containing higher soybean oil concentrations than 8% (vol/vol). The production of tri-acylated MELs was significantly accelerated at between 34 and 36 degrees C. With 20 % (vol/vol) of soybean oil at 34 degrees C, the yield of tri-acylated MELs reached 22.7 g/L. The extracellular lipase activity considerably depended on the culture temperature, and became the maximum at 34 degrees C; this would bring the accelerated production of tri-acylated MELs. Accordingly, the present strain of P. parantarctica provided high efficiency in MEL production at elevated temperatures compared to conventional MEL producers, and would thus be highly advantageous for the commercial production of the promising biosurfactants. PMID:18781056

  12. Neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of ghrelin in an experimental glaucoma model

    PubMed Central

    Can, Nagehan; Catak, Onur; Turgut, Burak; Demir, Tamer; Ilhan, Nevin; Kuloglu, Tuncay; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanifi

    2015-01-01

    Damage to retinal ganglion cells due to elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP) is responsible for vision loss in glaucoma. Given that loss of these cells is irreversible, neuroprotection is crucial in the treatment of glaucoma. In this study, we investigated the possible antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of ghrelin on the retina in an experimental glaucoma model. Twenty-one Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups comprising seven rats each. The rats in the control group were not operated on and did not receive any treatment. In all rats in the other groups, IOP was increased by cauterization of the limbal veins. After creation of the IOP increase, saline 1 mL/kg or ghrelin 40 μg/kg was administered intraperitoneally every day for 14 days in the vehicle control group and ghrelin groups, respectively. On day 14 of the study, the eyes were enucleated. Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), and nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS2) in anterior chamber fluid were measured. The retinas were subjected to immunohistochemistry staining for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), S-100, and vimentin expression. Mean levels of MDA, NO, and NOS2 in the aqueous humor were higher in the vehicle control group than in the control group (P<0.05). Mean levels of MDA, NO, and NOS2 in the ghrelin group did not show a significant increase compared with levels in the control group (P>0.05). Retinal TUNEL and immunohistochemistry staining in the vehicle control group showed an increase in apoptosis and expression of GFAP, S-100, and vimentin compared with the control group (P<0.05). In the ghrelin group, apoptosis and expression of GFAP, S-100, and vimentin was significantly lower than in the vehicle control group (P<0.05). This study suggests that ghrelin has antioxidant and neuroprotective effects on the retina in an experimental glaucoma model. PMID:26082612

  13. Immunohistochemical and hybridocytochemical study on ghrelin signalling in the rat seminiferous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Łukaszyk, Andrzej; Rafińska, Ludmiła; Sawiński, Piotr; Kasprzak, Aldona; Olejniczak, Karolina; Ruciński, Marcin; Ruchała, Marek; Sowiński, Jerzy

    2009-01-01

    The results of presented study demonstrate expression of ghrelin, its functional receptor GHSR-1a and their genes in spermatogenic cells of rat testis suggesting their functioning within seminiferous epithelium. The immunohistochemical and hybrydocytochemical expression, of proteins and transcripts, was estimated taking into account the cycle of seminiferous epithelium and phases of spermatogenesis. Both transcripts and ghrelin was found to show nuclear expression and scarcely cytoplasmic. Expression of genes for ghrelin and GHSR-1a was shown in early spermatocytes and round spermatids representing transcriptional phases of meiosis and spermiogenesis. Ghrelin was evidenced to show nuclear expression in two stage-specific windows, in late spermatogonia, in spermatocytes up to early pachytenes, and again in spermatids of acrosome and early maturation phase of spermiogenesis. In late pachytenes, secondary spermatocytes, round spermatids, maturing spermatids and spermatozoa the reaction is lacking. With two types of antibodies against the GHSR-1a used the two different patterns of immunostaining was evidenced suggesting two isoforms of GHSR-1a. The first evidenced GHSR-1a in cytoplasm of spermatocytes, cell membrane and acrosomes of spermatids, Sertoli cell processes and heads of spermatozoa. With second type of antibodies the immunostaining marks all steps of evolution of acrosome in spermatids. It is believed that site of ghrelin expression in seminiferous epithelium may indicate its role in local regulations, not excepting the intracellular signalling. Immunostaining pattern for GHSR-1a seems to suggest both its participation in the cross-talk among the cells and also process of furnishing gametes with GHSR-1a for its response to ghrelin in seminal plasma or female reproductive tract. PMID:20164026

  14. Ghrelin Levels in Children with Constitutional Delay of Growth and Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Gökşen Şimşek, Damla; Darcan, Şükran; Çoker, Mahmut

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we aimed to show the role of ghrelin in growth delay in children with constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP). Methods: Thirty male children with CDGP constituted the study group and fifteen healthy children with normal growth of similar ages−the control group. In both groups, fasting and postprandial plasma ghrelin levels, serum insulin−like growth factor−1 (IGF−1) and IGF−binding protein−3 (IGFBP−3) levels were determined. Results: There were no differences in fasting and postprandial ghrelin levels (824.23±523.46 pg/mL and 447.26±259.92 pg/mL, respectively) in children with CDGP compared to the levels in the control group (687.38±481.43 pg/mL and 365.59±260.43 pg/mL, respectively; p>0.05). Differences in fasting and postprandial ghrelin levels were also similar in the two groups (394.44±369.10 pg/mL and 346.55±338.67 pg/mL, respectively; p>0.05). Serum IGF−1 levels were significantly depressed in children with CDGP compared to those in the control group (239.5±83.95 ng/mL and 339.20±63.08 ng/mL, respectively; p<0.05). Conclusion: Decreased appetite and feeding problems in children with CDGP were not related to depressed ghrelin levels. In addition, ghrelin levels did not increase to compensate for the decreased appetite and feeding problems in CDGP. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21274325

  15. Ghrelin Inhibits Post-Operative Adhesions via Blockage of the TGF-β Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Enrica; Boekelheide, Kim; Sigman, Mark; Lamb, Dolores J.; Hall, Susan J.; Hwang, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Post-operative adhesions are a critical problem in pelvic and abdominal surgery despite a multitude of studies dedicated to finding modalities to prevent their occurrence. Ghrelin administration promotes an anti-fibrotic response in a surgical mouse model of adhesion-induction, but the mechanisms mediating this effect have not been established. In the current study, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the anti-adhesion effect of ghrelin were investigated. Post-surgical adhesions were experimentally created in C57BL/6 wild-type mice via a combination of ischemic peritoneal buttons and cecal multiple abrasions. Ghrelin or saline intraperitoneal injections were given twice daily from two days before surgery to selected time points post-surgically to assess the phenotypic and molecular effects of treatment (1 day (n = 20), 4 days (n = 20) and 20 days (n = 40) after surgery). Endpoints included the scoring of adhesions and gene and protein expression analysis of pro-fibrogenic factors conducted on peritoneal ischemic tissue by quantitative PCR and Western blot. Ghrelin administration significantly reduced post-surgical adhesions and down-regulated pro-inflammatory gene and protein expression, including Tgfb3 and Tgfbr2. The up-regulation of inhibitory proteins Smad6 and Smad7 confirmed the ghrelin-induced blockage of TGF-β signaling. Ghrelin is a candidate therapeutic drug for post-operative adhesion prevention, inhibiting inflammatory responses via blockage of the TGF-β signaling pathway at the onset of surgery before the occurrence of the granulation-remodeling phase. PMID:27082244

  16. Novel bioluminescent receptor-binding assays for peptide hormones: using ghrelin as a model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Lei; Song, Ge; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2015-10-01

    Peptide hormones perform important biological functions by binding specific cell membrane receptors. For hormone-receptor interaction studies, receptor-binding assays are widely used. However, conventional receptor-binding assays rely on radioactive tracers that have drawbacks. In recent studies, we established novel non-radioactive receptor-binding assays for some recombinant protein hormones based on the ultrasensitive bioluminescence of a newly developed nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) reporter. In the present work, we extended the novel bioluminescent receptor-binding assay to peptide hormones that have small size and can be conveniently prepared by chemical synthesis. Human ghrelin, a 28-amino acid peptide hormone carrying a special O-fatty acid modification, was used as a model. To prepare a bioluminescent ghrelin tracer, a chemically synthesized ghrelin analog with a unique cysteine residue at the C-terminus was site-specifically conjugated with an engineered NanoLuc with a unique exposed cysteine residue at the C-terminus via a reversible disulfide linkage. The NanoLuc-conjugated ghrelin retained high binding affinity with the ghrelin receptor GHSR1a (K d = 1.14 ± 0.13 nM, n = 3) and was able to sensitively monitor the receptor-binding of various GHSR1a ligands. The novel bioluminescent receptor-binding assay will facilitate the interaction studies of ghrelin with its receptor. We also proposed general procedures for convenient conjugation of other peptide hormones with NanoLuc for novel bioluminescent receptor-binding assays. PMID:26002812

  17. Acyl-acyl carrier protein as a source of fatty acids for bacterial bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M.; Meighen, E.A.

    1985-09-01

    Pulse-chase experiments with (/sup 3/H)tetradecanoic acid and ATP showed that the bioluminescence-related 32-kDa acyltransferase from Vibrio harveyi can specifically catalyze the deacylation of a /sup 3/H-labeled 18-kDa protein observed in extracts of this bacterium. The 18-kDa protein has been partially purified and its physical and chemical properties strongly indicate that it is fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP). Both this V. harveyi (/sup 3/H)acylprotein and (/sup 3/H)palmitoyl-ACP from Escherichia coli were substrates in vitro for either the V. harveyi 32-kDa acyltransferase or the analogous enzyme (34K) from Photobacterium phosphoreum. TLC analysis indicated that the hexane-soluble product of the reaction is fatty acid. No significant cleavage of either E. coli or V. harveyi tetradecanoyl-ACP was observed in extracts of these bacteria unless the 32-kDa or 34K acyltransferase was present. Since these enzymes are believed to be responsible for the supply of fatty acids for reduction to form the aldehyde substrate of luciferase, the above results suggest that long-chain acyl-ACP is the source of fatty acids for bioluminescence.

  18. Upregulation of miR-21 by Ghrelin Ameliorates Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Kidney Injury by Inhibiting Inflammation and Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanzhe; Shu, Liliang

    2016-08-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury can be caused by cardiac surgery, renal vascular obstruction, and kidney transplantation, mainly leading to acute kidney injury (AKI), which is complicated by lack of effective preventative and therapeutic strategies. Ghrelin has recently been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties in several types of cells; however, little attention has been given to the role of ghrelin in I/R-induced AKI. The aim of this study is to explore the role of ghrelin in I/R-induced AKI. In this study, an I/R-induced rat AKI model and a hypoxia-induced NRK-52E cell I/R model were successfully constructed. Ghrelin expression was increased significantly in these rat and cell models. After enhancing ghrelin level by injecting exogenous ghrelin into rats or transfecting a ghrelin-pcDNA3.1 vector into renal tubular epithelial cells, we observed that I/R-induced AKI can be ameliorated by ghrelin, as shown by alterations in histology, as well as changes in serum creatinine (SCr) level, cell apoptosis, and the levels of inflammatory factors. Based on the importance of microRNA-21 (miR-21) in renal disease and the modulation effect of ghrelin on miR-21 in gastric epithelial cells, we tested whether miR-21 participates in the protective effect of ghrelin on I/R-induced AKI. Ghrelin could upregulate the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway by increasing the miR-21 level, which led to the protective effect of ghrelin on I/R-induced AKI by inhibiting the inflammatory response and renal tubular epithelial cell apoptosis. Our research identifies that ghrelin can ameliorate I/R-induced AKI by upregulating miR-21, which advances the understanding of mechanisms by which ghrelin ameliorates I/R-induced AKI. PMID:27152763

  19. Ion channel regulation by protein S-acylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Protein S-acylation, the reversible covalent fatty-acid modification of cysteine residues, has emerged as a dynamic posttranslational modification (PTM) that controls the diversity, life cycle, and physiological function of numerous ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels. S-acylation is enzymatically mediated by a diverse family of acyltransferases (zDHHCs) and is reversed by acylthioesterases. However, for most ion channels, the dynamics and subcellular localization at which S-acylation and deacylation cycles occur are not known. S-acylation can control the two fundamental determinants of ion channel function: (1) the number of channels resident in a membrane and (2) the activity of the channel at the membrane. It controls the former by regulating channel trafficking and the latter by controlling channel kinetics and modulation by other PTMs. Ion channel function may be modulated by S-acylation of both pore-forming and regulatory subunits as well as through control of adapter, signaling, and scaffolding proteins in ion channel complexes. Importantly, cross-talk of S-acylation with other PTMs of both cysteine residues by themselves and neighboring sites of phosphorylation is an emerging concept in the control of ion channel physiology. In this review, I discuss the fundamentals of protein S-acylation and the tools available to investigate ion channel S-acylation. The mechanisms and role of S-acylation in controlling diverse stages of the ion channel life cycle and its effect on ion channel function are highlighted. Finally, I discuss future goals and challenges for the field to understand both the mechanistic basis for S-acylation control of ion channels and the functional consequence and implications for understanding the physiological function of ion channel S-acylation in health and disease. PMID:24821965

  20. Reaction of /alpha/,/beta/-unsaturated acyl isothiocyanates with salts of dithiocarbamic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Krus, K.; Masias, A.; Beletskaya, I.P.

    1989-01-10

    The reaction of unsaturated isothiocyanates with the sodium and calcium salts of N-alkyl- and N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamic acids was studied. Depending on the structure of the dithiocarbamate, the reaction products are thiazines or acyl dithiocarbamates. For the salts of methyldithiocarbamic acid the effect of the concentration and the nature of the metal on the relative yields of 6-phenyl-3-methylpropiorhodanine and 6-phenylpropiorhodanine was studied. A method is proposed for the synthesis of 3-substituted propiorhodanines.

  1. Dissociating ghrelin-dependent G protein from β-arrestin-2 signaling in transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, Roy G

    2016-01-01

    The gut-derived hormone ghrelin regulates growth hormone release, appetite, metabolism, and immune function through its receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR1a). In this issue ofScience Signaling, Chebaniet al decode GHSR1a signaling by using transgenic rats with a mutation in GHSR1a that prevents its interaction with β-arrestin. These mutant rats are more responsive to endogenous ghrelin, resulting in increased fat deposition and insulin resistance without affecting food intake. PMID:27095592

  2. Ghrelin and hypothalamic development: too little and too much of a good thing.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jenny; D'Alessio, David

    2015-02-01

    Neural centers in the hypothalamus regulate food intake and body weight in response to hormones and other neural stimuli, and dysfunctional communication between the brain and gut underlies metabolic disorders, including obesity. In this issue of the JCI, Steculorum and colleagues present evidence that the gastric peptide ghrelin mediates neural fiber growth in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus during the neonatal period. Neonatal mice subjected to either increased or decreased ghrelin action during this developmental period had an increased risk of obesity in adulthood. Together, the results of this study support a model whereby neural organization at key stages of development sets the foundation for metabolic health later in life. PMID:25607837

  3. Interactions of the acyl chain with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae acyl carrier protein.

    PubMed

    Perez, Daniel R; Leibundgut, Marc; Wider, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) domains are critical integral components of multifunctional type I fatty acid synthases (FAS I) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), where they shuttle the growing adducts of the synthesis between the catalytic domains. In contrast to ACP of mammalian FAS I, PKSs, and the dissociated fatty acid synthase type II systems (FAS II) of bacteria, fungal FAS I ACP consists of two subdomains, one comprising the canonical ACP fold observed in all FAS systems and the other representing an extra structural subdomain. While ACPs of dissociated FAS II are able to sequester the reaction intermediates during substrate shuttling, such a transport mechanism has not been observed in ACP domains of multifunctional FAS I and PKS systems. For a better understanding of the interaction between the canonical subdomain of fungal ACP with the growing acyl chain and the role of the structural subdomain, we determined the structure of the isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae acyl carrier protein (ScACP) domain by NMR spectroscopy and investigated the interactions between ScACP and covalently attached substrate acyl chains of varying length by monitoring chemical shift perturbations. The interactions were mapped to the hydrophobic core of the canonical subdomain, while no perturbations were detected in the structural subdomain. A population analysis revealed that only approximately 15% of covalently attached decanoyl chains are sequestered by the ACP core, comparable to the mammalian FAS I and multifunctional PKS systems, which do not sequester their substrates. Finally, denaturation experiments show that both ScACP subdomains unfold cooperatively and that the weak interaction of the acyl chain with the hydrophobic core does not significantly affect the ACP stability. PMID:25774789

  4. Acyl-ACP Substrate Recognition in Burkholderia mallei BmaI1 Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) autoinducer mediated quorum sensing regulates virulence in several pathogenic bacteria. The hallmark of an efficient quorum sensing system relies on the tight specificity in the signal generated by each bacterium. Since AHL signal specificity is derived from the acyl-chain of the acyl-ACP (ACP = acyl carrier protein) substrate, AHL synthase enzymes must recognize and react with the native acyl-ACP with high catalytic efficiency while keeping reaction rates with non-native acyl-ACPs low. The mechanism of acyl-ACP substrate recognition in these enzymes, however, remains elusive. In this study, we investigated differences in catalytic efficiencies for shorter and longer chain acyl-ACP substrates reacting with an octanoyl-homoserine lactone synthase Burkholderia mallei BmaI1. With the exception of two-carbon shorter hexanoyl-ACP, the catalytic efficiencies of butyryl-ACP, decanoyl-ACP, and octanoyl-CoA reacting with BmaI1 decreased by greater than 20-fold compared to the native octanoyl-ACP substrate. Furthermore, we also noticed kinetic cooperativity when BmaI1 reacted with non-native acyl-donor substrates. Our kinetic data suggest that non-native acyl-ACP substrates are unable to form a stable and productive BmaI1·acyl-ACP·SAM ternary complex and are thus effectively discriminated by the enzyme. These results offer insights into the molecular basis of substrate recognition for the BmaI1 enzyme. PMID:25215658

  5. Understanding Acyl Chain and Glycerolipid Metabolism in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlrogge, John B.

    2013-11-05

    Progress is reported in these areas: acyl-editing in initial eukaryotic lipid assembly in soybean seeds; identification and characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana lysophosphatidyl acyltransferases with preference for lysophosphatidylethanolamine; and characterization and subcellular distribution of lysolipid acyl transferase activity of pea leaves.

  6. Characterization of the "Escherichia Coli" Acyl Carrier Protein Phosphodiesterase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a small essential protein that functions as a carrier of the acyl intermediates of fatty acid synthesis. ACP requires the posttranslational attachment of a 4'phosphopantetheine functional group, derived from CoA, in order to perform its metabolic function. A Mn[superscript 2+] dependent enzymatic activity that removes…

  7. Ghrelin Protects against Dexamethasone-Induced INS-1 Cell Apoptosis via ERK and p38MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid excess induces apoptosis of islet cells, which may result in diabetes. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of ghrelin on dexamethasone-induced INS-1 cell apoptosis. Our data showed that ghrelin (0.1 μM) inhibited dexamethasone-induced (0.1 μM) apoptosis of INS-1 cells and facilitated cell proliferation. Moreover, ghrelin upregulated Bcl-2 expression, downregulated Bax expression, and decreased caspase-3 activity. The protective effect of ghrelin against dexamethasone-induced INS-1 cell apoptosis was mediated via growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a. Further studies revealed that ghrelin increased ERK activation and decreased p38MAPK expression after dexamethasone treatment. Ghrelin-mediated protection of dexamethasone-induced apoptosis of INS-1 cells was attenuated using the ERK inhibitor U0126 (10 μM), and cell viability increased using the p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 (10 μM). In conclusion, ghrelin could protect against dexamethasone-induced INS-1 cell apoptosis, at least partially via GHS-R1a and the signaling pathway of ERK and p38MAPK. PMID:27190513

  8. Acyl peptidic siderophores: structures, biosyntheses and post-assembly modifications.

    PubMed

    Kem, Michelle P; Butler, Alison

    2015-06-01

    Acyl peptidic siderophores are produced by a variety of bacteria and possess unique amphiphilic properties. Amphiphilic siderophores are generally produced in a suite where the iron(III)-binding headgroup remains constant while the fatty acid appendage varies by length and functionality. Acyl peptidic siderophores are commonly synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases; however, the method of peptide acylation during biosynthesis can vary between siderophores. Following biosynthesis, acyl siderophores can be further modified enzymatically to produce a more hydrophilic compound, which retains its ferric chelating abilities as demonstrated by pyoverdine from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the marinobactins from certain Marinobacter species. Siderophore hydrophobicity can also be altered through photolysis of the ferric complex of certain β-hydroxyaspartic acid-containing acyl peptidic siderophores. PMID:25677460

  9. Lysine fatty acylation promotes lysosomal targeting of TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lin, Hening

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a proinflammation cytokine secreted by various cells. Understanding its secretive pathway is important to understand the biological functions of TNF-α and diseases associated with TNF-α. TNF-α is one of the first proteins known be modified by lysine fatty acylation (e.g. myristoylation). We previously demonstrated that SIRT6, a member of the mammalian sirtuin family of enzymes, can remove the fatty acyl modification on TNF-α and promote its secretion. However, the mechanistic details about how lysine fatty acylation regulates TNF-α secretion have been unknown. Here we present experimental data supporting that lysine fatty acylation promotes lysosomal targeting of TNF-α. The result is an important first step toward understanding the biological functions of lysine fatty acylation. PMID:27079798

  10. Anticipation of a psychosocial stressor differentially influences ghrelin, cortisol and food intake among emotional and non-emotional eaters.

    PubMed

    Raspopow, Kate; Abizaid, Alfonso; Matheson, Kimberly; Anisman, Hymie

    2014-03-01

    Negative emotions trigger eating in some individuals (emotional eaters) possibly by influencing stress hormones that contribute to eating regulation (e.g., cortisol), or eating-related peptides (e.g., ghrelin) signaling food initiation. The present study assessed whether stressor-elicited cortisol and ghrelin changes would differ between emotional and non-emotional eaters, and whether eating would influence these neuroendocrine responses. Undergraduate women (N=103) who completed measures of emotional eating, were assigned to anticipate either a stressful (public speaking) or non-stressful event. During this period, participants were or were not offered food. Blood samples were taken continuously over a 40-min period to assess changes of cortisol and ghrelin levels, and mood was assessed after the anticipation period. Baseline ghrelin levels were lower in emotional than non-emotional eaters, and this relation was mediated by percent body fat. Ghrelin levels were elevated among women anticipating a stressor, compared to those in the control condition. Additionally, the normal decline of ghrelin following food consumption was not apparent among emotional eaters. Although food intake was not tied to hormone responses, reported hunger was associated with greater food intake for women in the stressor condition. It was suggested that emotional eating coupled with subjective feelings of hunger, might contribute to eating in response to an acute stressor. Additionally, feedback mechanisms controlling the normalization of ghrelin levels might be disturbed in emotional eaters. The similarity of the ghrelin profile of emotional eaters to that of binge eaters and obese individuals, raises the possibility that disturbed ghrelin response might be a risk factor for such conditions. PMID:24295926

  11. Impact of [d-Lys(3)]-GHRP-6 and feeding status on hypothalamic ghrelin-induced stress activation.

    PubMed

    Brockway, Emma T; Krater, Katherine R; Selva, Joaquín A; Wauson, Shelby E R; Currie, Paul J

    2016-05-01

    Ghrelin administration directly into hypothalamic nuclei, including the arcuate nucleus (ArcN) and the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), alters the expression of stress-related behaviors. In the present study we investigated the effect of feeding status on the ability of ghrelin to induce stress and anxiogenesis. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were implanted with guide cannula targeting either the ArcN or PVN. In the first experiment we confirmed that ArcN and PVN ghrelin treatment produced anxiety-like behavior as measured using the elevated plus maze (EPM) paradigm. Ghrelin was administered during the early dark cycle. Immediately after microinjections rats were placed in the EPM for 5min. Both ArcN and PVN treatment reduced open arm exploration. The effect was attenuated by pretreatment with the ghrelin 1a receptor antagonist [d-Lys(3)]-GHRP-6. In a separate group of animals ghrelin was injected into either nucleus and rats were returned to their home cages for 60min with free access to food. An additional group of rats was returned to home cages with no food access. After 60min with or without food access all rats were tested in the EPM. Results indicated that food consumption just prior to EPM testing reversed the avoidance of the open arms of the EPM. In contrast, rats injected with ghrelin, placed in their home cage for 60min without food, and subsequently tested in the EPM, exhibited an increased avoidance of the open arms, consistent with stress activation. Overall, our findings demonstrate that ghrelin 1a receptor blockade and feeding status appear to impact the ability of ArcN and PVN ghrelin to elicit stress and anxiety-like behaviors. PMID:27020248

  12. Evidence that diet-induced hyperleptinemia, but not hypothalamic gliosis, causes ghrelin resistance in NPY/AgRP neurons of male mice.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Dana I; Lockie, Sarah H; Benzler, Jonas; Wu, Qunli; Stark, Romana; Reichenbach, Alex; Hoy, Andrew J; Lemus, Moyra B; Coleman, Harold A; Parkington, Helena C; Tups, Alex; Andrews, Zane B

    2014-07-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) feeding causes ghrelin resistance in arcuate neuropeptide Y (NPY)/Agouti-related peptide neurons. In the current study, we investigated the time course over which this occurs and the mechanisms responsible for ghrelin resistance. After 3 weeks of HFD feeding, neither peripheral nor central ghrelin increased food intake and or activated NPY neurons as demonstrated by a lack of Fos immunoreactivity or whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. Pair-feeding studies that matched HFD calorie intake with chow calorie intake show that HFD exposure does not cause ghrelin resistance independent of body weight gain. We observed increased plasma leptin in mice fed a HFD for 3 weeks and show that leptin-deficient obese ob/ob mice are still ghrelin sensitive but become ghrelin resistant when central leptin is coadministered. Moreover, ob/ob mice fed a HFD for 3 weeks remain ghrelin sensitive, and the ability of ghrelin to induce action potential firing in NPY neurons was blocked by leptin. We also examined hypothalamic gliosis in mice fed a chow diet or HFD, as well as in ob/ob mice fed a chow diet or HFD and lean controls. HFD-fed mice exhibited increased glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells compared with chow-fed mice, suggesting that hypothalamic gliosis may underlie ghrelin resistance. However, we also observed an increase in hypothalamic gliosis in ob/ob mice fed a HFD compared with chow-fed ob/ob and lean control mice. Because ob/ob mice fed a HFD remain ghrelin sensitive, our results suggest that hypothalamic gliosis does not underlie ghrelin resistance. Further, pair-feeding a HFD to match the calorie intake of chow-fed controls did not increase body weight gain or cause central ghrelin resistance; thus, our evidence suggests that diet-induced hyperleptinemia, rather than diet-induced hypothalamic gliosis or HFD exposure, causes ghrelin resistance. PMID:24742194

  13. Friedel-Craft acylation of ar-himachalene: synthesis of acyl-ar-himachalene and a new acyl-hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Hossini, Issam; Harrad, Mohamed Anoir; Ait Ali, Mustapha; El Firdoussi, Larbi; Karim, Abdallah; Valerga, Pedro; Puerta, M Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Friedel-Craft acylation at 100 °C of 2,5,9,9-tetramethyl-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5H-benzocycloheptene [ar-himachalene], a sesquiterpenic hydrocarbon obtained by catalytic dehydrogenation of α-, β- and γ-himachalenes, produces a mixture of two compounds: (3,5,5,9-tetramethyl-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5H-benzocyclohepten-2-yl)-ethanone (2, in 69% yield), with a conserved reactant backbone, and 3, with a different skeleton, in 21% yield. The crystal structure of 3 reveals it to be 1-(8-ethyl-8-hydroperoxy-3,5,5-trimethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-yl)-ethanone. In this compound O-H…O bonds form dimers. These hydrogen-bonds, in conjunction with weaker C-H…O interactions, form a more extended supramolecular arrangement in the crystal. PMID:21760570

  14. Effects of Ghrelin on the Proteolytic Pathways of Alzheimer's Disease Neuronal Cells.

    PubMed

    Cecarini, Valentina; Bonfili, Laura; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Keller, Jeffrey N; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Eleuteri, Anna Maria

    2016-07-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone with a role in the onset and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. It has been recently associated to Alzheimer's disease (AD) for its neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic activity. In the present study, we dissected the effect of ghrelin treatment on the two major intracellular proteolytic pathways, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy, in cellular models of AD (namely SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells stably transfected with either the wild-type AβPP gene or the 717 valine-to-glycine AβPP-mutated gene). Ghrelin showed a growth-promoting effect on neuronal cells inducing also time-dependent modifications of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1 (GHS-R1) expression. Interestingly, we demonstrated for the first time that ghrelin was able to activate the proteasome in neural cells playing also a role in the interplay between the UPS and autophagy. Our data provide a novel mechanism by which circulating hormones control neural homeostasis through the regulation of proteolytic pathways implicated in AD. PMID:26033219

  15. Case Study: The Hunger Pains--Ghrelin, Weight Loss, and Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diener, Lynn M.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a case study regarding healthy weight loss and the role of the hormone ghrelin in maintaining a lower body weight. This study was designed specifically for use in an introductory college-level physiology course. It addresses the use of the case study in teaching digestion and metabolism, exploring the role of hormones in…

  16. Ghrelin Is an Essential Factor for Motilin-Induced Gastric Contraction in Suncus murinus.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kayuri; Hequing, Huang; Mondal, Anupom; Yoshimura, Makoto; Ito, Kazuma; Mikami, Takashi; Takemi, Shota; Jogahara, Takamichi; Sakata, Ichiro; Sakai, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    Motilin was discovered in the 1970s as the most important hormone for stimulating strong gastric contractions; however, the mechanisms by which motilin causes gastric contraction are not clearly understood. Here, we determined the coordinated action of motilin and ghrelin on gastric motility during fasted and postprandial contractions by using house musk shrew (Suncus murinus; order: Insectivora, suncus named as the laboratory strain). Motilin-induced gastric contractions at phases I and II of the migrating motor complex were inhibited by pretreatment with (D-Lys(3))-GHRP-6 (6 mg/kg/h), a ghrelin receptor antagonist. Administration of the motilin receptor antagonist MA-2029 (0.1 mg/kg) and/or (D-Lys(3))-GHRP-6 (0.6 mg/kg) at the peak of phase III abolished the spontaneous gastric phase III contractions in vivo. Motilin did not stimulate gastric contractions in the postprandial state. However, in the presence of a low dose of ghrelin, motilin evoked phase III-like gastric contractions even in the postprandial state, and postprandial gastric emptying was accelerated. In addition, pretreatment with (D-Lys(3))-GHRP-6 blocked the motilin-induced gastric contraction in vitro and in vivo, and a γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) antagonist reversed this block in gastric contraction. These results indicate that blockade of the GABAergic pathway by ghrelin is essential for motilin-induced gastric contraction. PMID:26441238

  17. Appetite-related peptides in childhood and adolescence: role of ghrelin, PYY, and GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Horner, Katy; Lee, SoJung

    2015-11-01

    During childhood and adolescence, a number of factors, including age, puberty, sex, race, and body composition, may contribute to differences in satiety, food intake, and appetite-related peptides. These peptides include the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and anorexigenic gut peptides peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). For example, lower fasting ghrelin levels, lower postprandial ghrelin suppression, and blunted PYY and GLP-1 responses to food intake could contribute to a dysregulation of appetite in already obese children and adolescents. Whereas, changes in these peptides observed during puberty could facilitate growth. A greater understanding of the major moderating factors of appetite-related peptides in the pediatric population is essential to improve interpretation of study findings and for effective tailoring of strategies targeting appetite control to individuals. While more studies are needed, there is some evidence to suggest that exercise-based lifestyle interventions could be a potential therapeutic strategy to improve appetite-peptide profiles in overweight and obese children and adolescents. The aim of this review is (i) to discuss the potential moderating factors of ghrelin, PYY, and GLP-1, including age and puberty, sex, race and body composition; and (ii) to examine the effects of exercise interventions on these appetite-related gut peptides in children and adolescents. PMID:26466085

  18. Roles of ghrelin and leptin in the control of reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Reproductive function in mammals, defined as the capacity to generate viable male and female gametes, and to support pregnancy and lactation selectively in the female, is sensitive to the metabolic state of the organism. This contention, long assumed on the basis of intuitive knowledge, became formulated on a scientific basis only recently, with the identification of a number of neuroendocrine signals which crucially participate in the joint control of energy balance and reproduction. A paradigmatic example in this context is the adipocyte-derived hormone, leptin; a satiety factor which signals the amount of body energy (fat) stores not only to the circuits controlling food intake but also to a number of neuroendocrine axes, including the reproductive system. More recently, the reproductive dimension of another metabolic hormone, namely the orexigenic stomach-secreted peptide, ghrelin, has been disclosed by observations on its putative roles in the control of gonadal function and gonadotropin secretion. Of note, leptin and ghrelin have been proposed to act as reciprocal regulators of energy homeostasis. However, their potential interplay in the control of reproduction remains largely unexplored. Based on the comparison of the biological actions of leptin and ghrelin at different levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, reviewed in detail herein, we propose that, through concurrent or antagonistic actions, the leptin-ghrelin pair is likely to operate also as modulator of different reproductive functions, thereby contributing to the physiological integration of reproduction and energy balance. PMID:17851226

  19. The antagonism of ghrelin alters the appetitive response to learned cues associated with food.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Megan J; Moran, Timothy H; Holland, Peter C; Johnson, Alexander W

    2016-04-15

    The rapid increase in obesity may be partly mediated by an increase in the exposure to cues for food. Food-paired cues play a role in food procurement and intake under conditions of satiety. The mechanism by which this occurs requires characterization, but may involve ghrelin. This orexigenic peptide alters the response to food-paired conditioned stimuli, and neural responses to food images in reward nuclei. Therefore, we tested whether a ghrelin receptor antagonist alters the influence of food-paired cues on the performance of instrumental responses that earn food and the consumption of food itself using tests of Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer (PIT) and cue potentiated feeding (CPF), respectively. Food-deprived rats received Pavlovian conditioning where an auditory cue was paired with delivery of sucrose solution followed by instrumental conditioning to lever press for sucrose. Following training, rats were given ad libitum access to chow. On test day, rats were injected with the ghrelin receptor antagonist GHRP-6 [D-Lys3] and then tested for PIT or CPF. Disrupting ghrelin signaling enhanced expression of PIT. In addition, GHRP-6 [D-Lys3] impaired the initiation of feeding behavior in CPF without influencing overall intake of sucrose. Finally, in PIT tested rats, enhanced FOS immunoreactivity was revealed following the antagonist in regions thought to underlie PIT; however, the antagonist had no effect on FOS immunoreactivity in CPF tested rats. PMID:26802728

  20. TNF-alpha and ghrelin: opposite effects on immune system, metabolism and mental health.

    PubMed

    Himmerich, Hubertus; Sheldrick, Abigail J

    2010-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a glycoprotein hormone with important functions in inflammation and apoptosis. It plays a significant role as a pro-inflammatory cytokine in the defense against viral, bacterial and parasitic infections and autoimmune disorders. Furthermore, it influences energy homeostasis and has an anorexigenic effect on the hypothalamus. TNF-alpha has also been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders such as depression or narcolepsy. Ghrelin is a peptide hormone which primarily regulates eating behavior through modulation of expression of orexigenic peptides in the hypothalamus. Ghrelin administration increases food intake and body weight, while weight loss in turn increases ghrelin levels. Secondly, it posesses anti-inflammatory properties. It also seems to have an impact on mental health as it is has been suggested to have antidepressant and anxiolytic properties. Therefore, TNF-alpha and ghrelin seem to have opposite effects regarding the hypothalamic regulation of eating behavior, modulation of the immune response and the state of mental health. PMID:20214644

  1. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol O-acyltransferase is not identical to liver microsomal carboxylesterase.

    PubMed

    Diczfalusy, M A; Björkhem, I; Einarsson, K; Alexson, S E

    1996-04-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):cholesterol O-acyltransferase (ACAT) is responsible for esterification of cholesterol in the cell. The enzyme has never been purified, but two cDNA sequences coding for this enzyme were recently reported. One of the sequences was identical to human liver carboxylesterase. We have used inhibitors to elucidate the relation between microsomal carboxylesterase, acyl-CoA hydrolase (ACH), and ACAT activities in rat liver. Low concentrations of serine esterase inhibitors strongly inhibited carboxylesterase and acyl-CoA hydrolase activities but stimulated ACAT activity. At higher concentrations, ACAT activity was also inhibited. A sulfhydryl-modifying agent was found to be a potent inhibitor of ACAT without affecting carboxylesterase activity. Similarly, two specific ACAT inhibitors, DL-melinamide and PD 138142-15, inhibited ACAT activity but did not affect carboxylesterase or ACH activities. Our data thus exclude ACAT as a liver microsomal carboxylesterase. The complex inhibition patterns observed with serine esterase inhibitors indicate that carboxylesterases and ACHs may interfere with ACAT activity by competing for the substrate. It is obvious that final identification of ACAT requires demonstration of an active homogenous protein. PMID:8624784

  2. [Antibacterial Activity of Alkylated and Acylated Derivatives of Low-Molecular Weight Chitosan].

    PubMed

    Shagdarova, B Ts; Il'ina, A V; Varlamov, V P

    2016-01-01

    A number of alkylated (quaternized) and acylated derivatives of low-molecular weight chitosan were obtained. The structure and composition of the compounds were confirmed by the results of IR and PMR spectroscopy, as well as conductometric titration. The effect of the acyl substituent and the degree of substitution of N-(2-hydroxy-3-trimethylammonium) with the propyl fragment appended to amino groups of the C2 atom of polymer chains on antibacterial activity against typical representatives of gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms (Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli) was studied. The highest activity was in the case of N-[(2-hydroxy-3-trimethylammonium)propyl]chitosan chloride with the maximal substitution (98%). The minimal inhibitory concentration of the derivative was 0.48 µg/mL and 3.90 µg/mL for S. epidermis and E. coli, respectively. PMID:27266254

  3. Changes in leptin, ghrelin, growth hormone and neuropeptide-Y after an acute model of MDMA and methamphetamine exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Kobeissy, Firas H; Jeung, Jennifer A; Warren, Matthew W; Geier, Jacqueline E; Gold, Mark S

    2008-03-01

    Club drug abuse is a growing problem in the United States. Beyond addiction and toxicity are endocrine effects which are not well characterized. Specifically, the changes in appetite following exposure to drugs of abuse are an interesting but poorly understood phenomenon. Serum hormones such as leptin, ghrelin, growth hormone (GH), and neuropeptide-Y (NP-Y) are known to affect appetite, but have not been studied extensively with drugs of abuse. In this work, we examine the effects of club drugs 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) (ecstasy) and methamphetamine (METH) (doses of 5, 20 and 40 mg/kg) on serum concentrations of these hormones in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours after drug administration. In a dose-dependent manner, MDMA was shown to cause transient significant decreases in serum leptin and GH followed by a base line recovery after 24 hours. Conversely, serum ghrelin increased and normalized after 24 hours. Interestingly, serum NP-Y showed a steady decrease in both treatment of MDMA and METH at different time points and dosages. In humans, abuse of these drugs reduces eating. As evident from these data, acute administration of METH and MDMA had significant effects on different serum hormone levels involved in appetite regulation. Future studies should be performed to see how chronic, low dose drug administration would affect hormone levels and try to answer questions about the physiological mechanisms involved in the anorexic paradigm observed in drug use. PMID:17910739

  4. Taking two to tango: a role for ghrelin receptor heterodimerization in stress and reward

    PubMed Central

    Schellekens, Harriët; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2013-01-01

    The gut hormone, ghrelin, is the only known peripherally derived orexigenic signal. It activates its centrally expressed receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a), to stimulate food intake. The ghrelin signaling system has recently been suggested to play a key role at the interface of homeostatic control of appetite and the hedonic aspects of food intake, as a critical role for ghrelin in dopaminergic mesolimbic circuits involved in reward signaling has emerged. Moreover, enhanced plasma ghrelin levels are associated with conditions of physiological stress, which may underline the drive to eat calorie-dense “comfort-foods” and signifies a role for ghrelin in stress-induced food reward behaviors. These complex and diverse functionalities of the ghrelinergic system are not yet fully elucidated and likely involve crosstalk with additional signaling systems. Interestingly, accumulating data over the last few years has shown the GHS-R1a receptor to dimerize with several additional G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) involved in appetite signaling and reward, including the GHS-R1b receptor, the melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3), dopamine receptors (D1 and D2), and more recently, the serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2C). GHS-R1a dimerization was shown to affect downstream signaling and receptor trafficking suggesting a potential novel mechanism for fine-tuning GHS-R1a receptor mediated activity. This review summarizes ghrelin's role in food reward and stress and outlines the GHS-R1a dimer pairs identified to date. In addition, the downstream signaling and potential functional consequences of dimerization of the GHS-R1a receptor in appetite and stress-induced food reward behavior are discussed. The existence of multiple GHS-R1a heterodimers has important consequences for future pharmacotherapies as it significantly increases the pharmacological diversity of the GHS-R1a receptor and has the potential to enhance specificity of novel ghrelin-targeted drugs. PMID

  5. Palladium-Catalyzed Environmentally Benign Acylation.

    PubMed

    Suchand, Basuli; Satyanarayana, Gedu

    2016-08-01

    Recent trends in research have gained an orientation toward developing efficient strategies using innocuous reagents. The earlier reported transition-metal-catalyzed carbonylations involved either toxic carbon monoxide (CO) gas as carbonylating agent or functional-group-assisted ortho sp(2) C-H activation (i.e., ortho acylation) or carbonylation by activation of the carbonyl group (i.e., via the formation of enamines). Contradicting these methods, here we describe an environmentally benign process, [Pd]-catalyzed direct carbonylation starting from simple and commercially available iodo arenes and aldehydes, for the synthesis of a wide variety of ketones. Moreover, this method comprises direct coupling of iodoarenes with aldehydes without activation of the carbonyl and also without directing group assistance. Significantly, the strategy was successfully applied to the synthesis n-butylphthalide and pitofenone. PMID:27377566

  6. Ghrelin signaling is not essential for sugar or fat conditioned flavor preferences in mice.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Touzani, Khalid; Ackroff, Karen

    2015-10-01

    The oral and post-oral actions of sugar and fat stimulate intake and condition flavor preferences in rodents through a process referred to as appetition. Ghrelin is implicated in food reward processing, and this study investigated its involvement in nutrient conditioning in mice. In Exp. 1 ghrelin receptor-null (GHSR-null) and C57BL/6 wildtype (WT) mice learned to prefer a flavor (CS+) mixed into 8% glucose over another flavor (CS-) mixed into a "sweeter" but non-nutritive 0.1% sucralose+saccharin (S+S) solution. In Exp. 2 treating WT mice with a ghrelin receptor antagonist [(D-Lys3)-GHRP-6] during flavor training did not prevent them from learning to prefer the CS+ glucose over the CS-S+S flavor. GHSR-null and WT mice were trained in Exp. 3 to drink a CS+ paired with intragastric (IG) infusion of 16% glucose and a CS- paired with IG water. Both groups drank more CS+ than CS- in training and preferred the CS+ to CS- in a choice test. The same (Exp. 4) and new (Exp. 5) GHSR-null and WT mice learned to prefer a CS+ flavor paired with IG fat (Intralipid) over a CS- flavor paired with IG water. GHSR-null and WT mice also learned to prefer a CS+ flavor added to 8% fructose over a CS- added to water. Together, these results indicate that ghrelin receptor signaling is not required for flavor preferences conditioned by the oral or post-oral actions of sugar and fat. This contrasts with other findings implicating ghrelin signaling in food reward processing and food-conditioned place preferences. PMID:26003495

  7. Short Sleep Duration Is Associated with Reduced Leptin, Elevated Ghrelin, and Increased Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Background Sleep duration may be an important regulator of body weight and metabolism. An association between short habitual sleep time and increased body mass index (BMI) has been reported in large population samples. The potential role of metabolic hormones in this association is unknown. Methods and Findings Study participants were 1,024 volunteers from the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study, a population-based longitudinal study of sleep disorders. Participants underwent nocturnal polysomnography and reported on their sleep habits through questionnaires and sleep diaries. Following polysomnography, morning, fasted blood samples were evaluated for serum leptin and ghrelin (two key opposing hormones in appetite regulation), adiponectin, insulin, glucose, and lipid profile. Relationships among these measures, BMI, and sleep duration (habitual and immediately prior to blood sampling) were examined using multiple variable regressions with control for confounding factors. A U-shaped curvilinear association between sleep duration and BMI was observed. In persons sleeping less than 8 h (74.4% of the sample), increased BMI was proportional to decreased sleep. Short sleep was associated with low leptin (p for slope = 0.01), with a predicted 15.5% lower leptin for habitual sleep of 5 h versus 8 h, and high ghrelin (p for slope = 0.008), with a predicted 14.9% higher ghrelin for nocturnal (polysomnographic) sleep of 5 h versus 8 h, independent of BMI. Conclusion Participants with short sleep had reduced leptin and elevated ghrelin. These differences in leptin and ghrelin are likely to increase appetite, possibly explaining the increased BMI observed with short sleep duration. In Western societies, where chronic sleep restriction is common and food is widely available, changes in appetite regulatory hormones with sleep curtailment may contribute to obesity. PMID:15602591

  8. Increased Carbohydrate Induced Ghrelin Secretion in Obese vs. Normal-weight Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Madhusmita; Tsai, Patrika M.; Mendes, Nara; Miller, Karen K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Orexigenic and anorexigenic pathways mediate food intake and may be affected by meal composition. Our objective was to determine whether changes in levels of active ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY) differ in obese vs. normal-weight adolescent girls following specific macronutrient intake and predict hunger and subsequent food intake. We enrolled 26 subjects: 13 obese and 13 normal-weight girls, 12–18 years old, matched for maturity (as assessed by bone age) and race. Subjects were assigned a high-carbohydrate, high-protein, and high-fat breakfast in random order. Active ghrelin and PYY were assessed for 4 h after breakfast and 1 h after intake of a standardized lunch. Hunger was assessed using a standardized visual analog scale (VAS). No suppression in active ghrelin levels was noted following macronutrient intake in obese or normal-weight girls. Contrary to expectations, active ghrelin increased in obese girls following the high-carbohydrate breakfast, and the percent increase was higher than in controls (P = 0.046). Subsequent food intake at lunch was also higher (P = 0.03). Following the high-fat breakfast, but not other breakfasts, percent increase in PYY was lower (P = 0.01) and subsequent lunch intake higher (P = 0.005) in obese compared with normal-weight girls. In obese adolescents, specific intake of high-carbohydrate and high-fat breakfasts is associated with greater increases in ghrelin, lesser increases in PYY, and higher intake at a subsequent meal than in controls. Changes in anorexigenic and orexigenic hormones in obese vs. normal-weight adolescents following high-carbohydrate and high-fat meals may influence hunger and satiety signals and subsequent food intake. PMID:19325538

  9. Serum Levels of Acyl-Carnitines along the Continuum from Normal to Alzheimer's Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sapere, Nadia; La Marca, Giancarlo; Angiolillo, Antonella; Vitale, Michela; Corbi, Graziamaria; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Intrieri, Mariano; Russo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the serum levels of free L-carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine and 34 acyl-L-carnitine in healthy subjects and in patients with or at risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Twenty-nine patients with probable Alzheimer’s disease, 18 with mild cognitive impairment of the amnestic type, 24 with subjective memory complaint and 46 healthy subjects were enrolled in the study, and the levels of carnitine and acyl-carnitines were measured by tandem mass spectrometry. The concentrations of acetyl-L-carnitine progressively decreased passing from healthy subjects group (mean±SD, 5.6±1.3 μmol/L) to subjective memory complaint (4.3±0.9 μmol/L), mild cognitive impairment (4.0±0.53 μmol/L), up to Alzheimer’s disease (3.5±0.6 μmol/L) group (p<0.001). The differences were significant for the comparisons: healthy subjects vs. subjective memory complaint, mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer’s disease group; and subjective memory complaint vs. Alzheimer’s disease group. Other acyl-carnitines, such as malonyl-, 3-hydroxyisovaleryl-, hexenoyl-, decanoyl-, dodecanoyl-, dodecenoyl-, myristoyl-, tetradecenoyl-, hexadecenoyl-, stearoyl-, oleyl- and linoleyl-L-carnitine, showed a similar decreasing trend, passing from healthy subjects to patients at risk of or with Alzheimer’s disease. These results suggest that serum acetyl-L-carnitine and other acyl-L-carnitine levels decrease along the continuum from healthy subjects to subjective memory complaint and mild cognitive impairment subjects, up to patients with Alzheimer’s disease, and that the metabolism of some acyl-carnitines is finely connected among them. These findings also suggest that the serum levels of acetyl-L-carnitine and other acyl-L-carnitines could help to identify the patients before the phenotype conversion to Alzheimer’s disease and the patients who would benefit from the treatment with acetyl-L-carnitine. However, further validation on a larger number of samples in a longitudinal

  10. Direct Acylation of Carrier Proteins with Functionalized β-Lactones

    PubMed Central

    Amoroso, Jon W.; Borketey, Lawrence S.; Prasad, Gitanjeli

    2014-01-01

    As the key component of many biosynthetic assemblies, acyl-carrier proteins offer a robust entry point for introduction of small molecule probes and pathway intermediates. Current labeling strategies primarily rely on modifications to the phosphopantetheine cofactor or its biosynthetic precursors followed by attachment to the apo form of a given carrier protein. As a greatly simplified alternative, direct and selective acylation of holo-acyl-carrier proteins using readily accessible β-lactones as electrophilic partners for the phosphopantetheine-thiol has been demonstrated. PMID:20433156

  11. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Although acyl carrier protein (ACP) is the best studied protein in plant fatty acid biosynthesis, the in vivo forms of ACPs and their steady state pools have not been examined previously in either seed or leaf. Information about the relative pool sizes of free ACP and its acyl-ACP intermediates is essential for understanding regulation of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in plants. In this study we utilized antibodies directed against spinach ACP as a sensitive assay to analyze the acyl groups while they were still covalently attached to ACPs. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Modulation of FadR binding capacity for acyl-CoA fatty acids through structure-guided mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Bacik, John-Paul; Yeager, Chris M; Twary, Scott N; Martí-Arbona, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    FadR is a versatile global regulator in Escherichia coli that controls fatty acid metabolism and thereby modulates the ability of this bacterium to grow using fatty acids or acetate as the sole carbon source. FadR regulates fatty acid metabolism in response to intra-cellular concentrations of acyl-CoA lipids. The ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids is thus of significant interest for the engineering of biosynthetic pathways for the production of lipid-based biofuels and commodity chemicals. Based on the available crystal structure of E. coli bound to myristoyl-CoA, we predicted amino acid positions within the effector binding pocket that would alter the ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids without affecting DNA binding. We utilized fluorescence polarization to characterize the in vitro binding properties of wild type and mutant FadR. We found that a Leu102Ala mutant enhanced binding of the effector, likely by increasing the size of the binding pocket for the acyl moiety of the molecule. Conversely, the elimination of the guanidine side chain (Arg213Ala and Arg213Met mutants) of the CoA moiety binding site severely diminished the ability of FadR to bind the acyl-CoA effector. These results demonstrate the ability to fine tune FadR binding capacity. The validation of an efficient method to fully characterize all the binding events involved in the specific activity (effector and DNA operator binding) of FadR has allowed us to increase our understanding of the role of specific amino acids in the binding and recognition of acyl-CoA fatty acids and will greatly facilitate efforts aimed at engineering tunable FadR regulators for synthetic biology. PMID:26385696

  13. Modulation of FadR Binding Capacity for Acyl-CoA Fatty Acids Through Structure-Guided Mutagenesis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bacik, John-Paul; Yeager, Chris M.; Twary, Scott N.; Martí-Arbona, Ricardo

    2015-09-18

    FadR is a versatile global regulator in Escherichia coli that controls fatty acid metabolism and thereby modulates the ability of this bacterium to grow using fatty acids or acetate as the sole carbon source. FadR regulates fatty acid metabolism in response to intra-cellular concentrations of acyl-CoA lipids. The ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids is hence of significant interest for the engineering of biosynthetic pathways for the production of lipid-based biofuels and commodity chemicals. Based on the available crystal structure of E. coli bound to myristoyl- CoA, we predicted amino acid positions within the effector binding pocket thatmore » would alter the ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids without affecting DNA binding. We utilized fluorescence polarization to characterize the in-vitro binding properties of wild type and mutant FadR. We found that a Leu102Ala mutant enhanced binding of the effector, likely by increasing the size of the binding pocket for the acyl moiety of the molecule. Conversely, the elimination of the guanidine side chain (Arg213Ala and Arg213Met mutants) of the CoA moiety binding site severely diminished the ability of FadR to bind the acyl-CoA effector. These results demonstrate the ability to fine tune FadR binding capacity. The validation of an efficient method to fully characterize all the binding events involved in the specific activity (effector and DNA operator binding) of FadR has allowed us to increase our understanding of the role of specific amino acids in the binding and recognition of acyl-CoA fatty acids and will greatly facilitate efforts aimed at engineering tunable FadR regulators for synthetic biology.« less

  14. Modulation of FadR Binding Capacity for Acyl-CoA Fatty Acids Through Structure-Guided Mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bacik, John-Paul; Yeager, Chris M.; Twary, Scott N.; Martí-Arbona, Ricardo

    2015-09-18

    FadR is a versatile global regulator in Escherichia coli that controls fatty acid metabolism and thereby modulates the ability of this bacterium to grow using fatty acids or acetate as the sole carbon source. FadR regulates fatty acid metabolism in response to intra-cellular concentrations of acyl-CoA lipids. The ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids is hence of significant interest for the engineering of biosynthetic pathways for the production of lipid-based biofuels and commodity chemicals. Based on the available crystal structure of E. coli bound to myristoyl- CoA, we predicted amino acid positions within the effector binding pocket that would alter the ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids without affecting DNA binding. We utilized fluorescence polarization to characterize the in-vitro binding properties of wild type and mutant FadR. We found that a Leu102Ala mutant enhanced binding of the effector, likely by increasing the size of the binding pocket for the acyl moiety of the molecule. Conversely, the elimination of the guanidine side chain (Arg213Ala and Arg213Met mutants) of the CoA moiety binding site severely diminished the ability of FadR to bind the acyl-CoA effector. These results demonstrate the ability to fine tune FadR binding capacity. The validation of an efficient method to fully characterize all the binding events involved in the specific activity (effector and DNA operator binding) of FadR has allowed us to increase our understanding of the role of specific amino acids in the binding and recognition of acyl-CoA fatty acids and will greatly facilitate efforts aimed at engineering tunable FadR regulators for synthetic biology.

  15. Effects of ghrelin on protein expression of antioxidative enzymes and iNOS in the rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Dobutovic, Branislava; Sudar, Emina; Tepavcevic, Snezana; Djordjevic, Jelena; Djordjevic, Ana; Radojcic, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the effects of ghrelin on protein expression of the liver antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutases (SODs), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR), nuclear factor κB (NFκB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Furthermore, we aimed to investigate whether extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B (Akt) are involved in ghrelin-regulated liver antioxidant enzymes and iNOS protein expression. Material and methods Male Wistar rats were treated with ghrelin (0.3 nmol/5 µl) injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle every 24 h for 5 days, and 2 h after the last treatment the animals were sacrificed and the liver excised. The Western blot method was used to determine expression of antioxidant enzymes, iNOS, phosphorylation of Akt, ERK1/2 and nuclear factor κB (NFκB) subunits 50 and 65. Results There was significantly higher protein expression of CuZnSOD (p < 0.001), MnSOD (p < 0.001), CAT (p < 0.001), GPx, (p < 0.001), and GR (p < 0.01) in the liver isolated from ghrelin-treated animals compared with control animals. In contrast, ghrelin significantly (p < 0.01) reduced protein expression of iNOS. In addition, phosphorylation of NFκB subunits p65 and p50 was significantly (p < 0.001 for p65; p < 0.05 for p50) reduced by ghrelin when compared with controls. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and of Akt was significantly higher in ghrelin-treated than in control animals (p < 0.05 for ERK1/2; p < 0.01 for Akt). Conclusions The results show that activation of Akt and ERK1/2 is involved in ghrelin-mediated regulation of protein expression of antioxidant enzymes and iNOS in the rat liver. PMID:25276168

  16. Site-specific analysis of protein S-acylation by resin-assisted capture[S

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Michael T.; Hess, Douglas T.; Thompson, J. Will; Hultman, Rainbo; Moseley, M. Arthur; Stamler, Jonathan S.; Casey, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Protein S-acylation is a major posttranslational modification whereby a cysteine thiol is converted to a thioester. A prototype is S-palmitoylation (fatty acylation), in which a protein undergoes acylation with a hydrophobic 16 carbon lipid chain. Although this modification is a well-recognized determinant of protein function and localization, current techniques to study cellular S-acylation are cumbersome and/or technically demanding. We recently described a simple and robust methodology to rapidly identify S-nitrosylation sites in proteins via resin-assisted capture (RAC) and provided an initial description of the applicability of the technique to S-acylated proteins (acyl-RAC). Here we expand on the acyl-RAC assay, coupled with mass spectrometry-based proteomics, to characterize both previously reported and novel sites of endogenous S-acylation. Acyl-RAC should therefore find general applicability in studies of both global and individual protein S-acylation in mammalian cells. PMID:21044946

  17. Ghrelin-induced food intake and adiposity depend on central mTORC1/S6K1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Stevanovic, Darko; Trajkovic, Vladimir; Müller-Lühlhoff, Sabrina; Brandt, Elisabeth; Abplanalp, William; Bumke-Vogt, Christiane; Liehl, Beate; Wiedmer, Petra; Janjetovic, Kristina; Starcevic, Vesna; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Al-Hasani, Hadi; Tschöp, Matthias H; Castañeda, Tamara R

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and its effectors the S6-kinases (S6K) in the hypothalamus is thought to be involved in nutrient sensing and control of food intake. Given the anatomical proximity of this pathway to circuits for the hormone ghrelin, we investigated the potential role of the mTORC1/S6K pathway in mediating the metabolic effects of ghrelin. We found that ghrelin promoted phosphorylation of S6K1 in the mouse hypothalamic cell line N-41 and in the rat hypothalamus after intracerebroventricular administration. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, suppressed ghrelin-induced phosphorylation of hypothalamic S6K1 and increased food intake and insulin in rats. Chronic peripheral administration of ghrelin induced a significant increase in body weight, fat mass and food efficiency in wild-type and S6K2-knockout but not in S6K1-knockout mice. We therefore propose that ghrelin-induced hyperphagia, adiposity and insulin secretion are controlled by a central nervous system involving the mTORC1/S6K1 pathway. PMID:23994018

  18. Synthesis, Surface Active Properties and Cytotoxicity of Sodium N-Acyl Prolines.

    PubMed

    Sreenu, Madhumanchi; Narayana Prasad, Rachapudi Badari; Sujitha, Pombala; Kumar, Chityal Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Sodium N-acyl prolines (NaNAPro) were synthesized using mixture of fatty acids obtained from coconut, palm, karanja, Sterculia foetida and high oleic sunflower oils via Schotten-Baumann reaction in 58-75% yields to study the synergetic effect of mixture of hydrophobic fatty acyl functionalities like saturation, unsaturation and cyclopropene fatty acids with different chain lengths and aliphatic hetero cyclic proline head group on their surface and cytotoxicity activities. The products were characterized by chromatographic and spectral techniques. The synthesized products were evaluated for their surface active properties such as surface tension, wetting power, foaming characteristics, emulsion stability, calcium tolerance, critical micelle concentration (CMC) and thermodynamic properties. The results revealed that all the products exhibited superior surface active properties like CMC, calcium tolerance and emulsion stability as compared to the standard surfactant, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS). In addition, palm, Sterculia foetida and high oleic sunflower fatty N-acyl prolines exhibited promising cytotoxicity against different tumor cell lines. PMID:26521810

  19. Trans-unsaturated lipid dynamics: modulation of dielaidoylphosphatidylcholine acyl chain motion by ethanol.

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, L A; Miller, K W

    1993-01-01

    Acyl chain dynamics of the trans-unsaturated lipid, dielaidoylphosphatidylcholine (DEPC), were studied by conventional and saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of aqueous dispersions of DEPC spin labeled with lecithins having doxyl groups at positions 5, 10, and 14 on the sn-2 chain. The gel to liquid crystalline transition is concerted with simultaneous increases in rotational motion about the long axis of the acyl chain (libration) and in gauche-trans conformational interconversions (wobble). Relative to saturated lecithins at similar reduced temperatures the double bond (a) slowed libration by an order of magnitude in both phases, while wobble motions were several times slower, and (b)-produced a pronounced stiffness of the acyl chain near the double bond. Ethanol (0-1.6 M), in addition to its well-known colligative effect on the phase transition, was found to decrease the bilayer order in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was smaller in the gel than in the liquid crystalline phase, most pronounced next to the double bond, and weakest deep in the bilayer. Ethanol affected slow motions little in the gel phase but wobble and libration correlation times were markedly decreased in the liquid crystalline phase. PMID:8274650

  20. Acyl chain length and charge effect on Tamoxifen-lipid model membrane interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilge, Duygu; Kazanci, Nadide; Severcan, Feride

    2013-05-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM), which is an antiestrogenic agent, is widely used during chemotherapy of breast, pancreas, brain and liver cancers. In this study, TAM and model membrane interactions in the form of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) were studied for lipids containing different acyl chain length and different charge status as a function of different TAM (1, 6, 9 and 15 mol%) concentrations. Zwitterionic lipids namely dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipids were used to see the acyl chain length effect and anionic dipalmitoyl phosphtidylglycerol (DPPG) lipid was used to see the charge effect. For this purpose Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) techniques have been conducted. For zwitterionic lipid, concentration dependent different action of TAM was observed both in the gel and liquid crystalline phases by significantly increasing the lipid order and decreasing the dynamics for 1 mol% TAM, while decreasing the lipid order and increasing the dynamics of the lipids for higher concentrations (6, 9 and 15 mol%). However, different than neutral lipids, the dynamics and disorder of DPPG liposome increased for all TAM concentrations. The interactions between TAM and head group of multilamellar liposomes was monitored by analyzing the Cdbnd O stretching and PO2- antisymmetric double bond stretching bands. Increasing Tamoxifen concentrations led to a dehydration around these functional groups in the polar part of the lipids. DSC studies showed that for all types of lipids, TAM eliminates the pre-transition, shifts the main phase transition to lower temperatures and broadened the phase transition curve. The results indicate that not the acyl chain length but the charge status of the polar head group induces different effects on lipid membranes order and dynamics.

  1. Effects of ghrelin and motilin on smooth muscle contractility of the isolated gastrointestinal tract from the bullfrog and Japanese fire belly newt.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takio; Shimazaki, Misato; Kikuta, Ayumi; Yaosaka, Noriko; Teraoka, Hiroki; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Ghrelin has been identified in some amphibians and is known to stimulate growth hormone release and food intake as seen in mammals. Ghrelin regulates gastrointestinal motility in mammals and birds. The aim of this study was to determine whether ghrelin affects gastrointestinal smooth muscle contractility in bullfrogs (anuran) and Japanese fire belly newts (urodelian) in vitro. Neither bullfrog ghrelin nor rat ghrelin affected longitudinal smooth muscle contractility of gastrointestinal strips from the bullfrog. Expression of growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) mRNA was confirmed in the bullfrog