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Sample records for ad brain tissue

  1. Photoacoustic Measurements in Brain Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Kasili, P.M.; Mobley, J.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    1999-09-19

    In this work, we develop and evaluate the photoacoustic technique for recording spectra of white and gray mammalian brain tissues. In addition to the experimental work, we also discuss the geometric aspects of photoacoustic signal generation using collimated light. Spectra constructed from the peak-to-peak amplitude of the photoacoustic waveforms indicate differences in the two tissue types at wavelengths between 620 and 695 nm. The potential of the technique for non-invasive diagnosis is discussed.

  2. Photon Entanglement Through Brain Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingyan; Galvez, Enrique J.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-12-01

    Photon entanglement, the cornerstone of quantum correlations, provides a level of coherence that is not present in classical correlations. Harnessing it by study of its passage through organic matter may offer new possibilities for medical diagnosis technique. In this work, we study the preservation of photon entanglement in polarization, created by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, after one entangled photon propagates through multiphoton-scattering brain tissue slices with different thickness. The Tangle-Entropy (TS) plots show the strong preservation of entanglement of photons propagating in brain tissue. By spatially filtering the ballistic scattering of an entangled photon, we find that its polarization entanglement is preserved and non-locally correlated with its twin in the TS plots. The degree of entanglement correlates better with structure and water content than with sample thickness.

  3. Photon Entanglement Through Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lingyan; Galvez, Enrique J.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    Photon entanglement, the cornerstone of quantum correlations, provides a level of coherence that is not present in classical correlations. Harnessing it by study of its passage through organic matter may offer new possibilities for medical diagnosis technique. In this work, we study the preservation of photon entanglement in polarization, created by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, after one entangled photon propagates through multiphoton-scattering brain tissue slices with different thickness. The Tangle-Entropy (TS) plots show the strong preservation of entanglement of photons propagating in brain tissue. By spatially filtering the ballistic scattering of an entangled photon, we find that its polarization entanglement is preserved and non-locally correlated with its twin in the TS plots. The degree of entanglement correlates better with structure and water content than with sample thickness. PMID:27995952

  4. Robotic multimodality stereotactic brain tissue identification: work in progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, R.; Mah, R.; Galvagni, A.; Guerrero, M.; Papasin, R.; Wallace, M.; Winters, J.

    1997-01-01

    Real-time identification of tissue would improve procedures such as stereotactic brain biopsy (SBX), functional and implantation neurosurgery, and brain tumor excision. To standard SBX equipment has been added: (1) computer-controlled stepper motors to drive the biopsy needle/probe precisely; (2) multiple microprobes to track tissue density, detect blood vessels and changes in blood flow, and distinguish the various tissues being penetrated; (3) neural net learning programs to allow real-time comparisons of current data with a normative data bank; (4) three-dimensional graphic displays to follow the probe as it traverses brain tissue. The probe can differentiate substances such as pig brain, differing consistencies of the 'brain-like' foodstuff tofu, and gels made to simulate brain, as well as detect blood vessels imbedded in these substances. Multimodality probes should improve the safety, efficacy, and diagnostic accuracy of SBX and other neurosurgical procedures.

  5. Bioengineered functional brain-like cortical tissue

    PubMed Central

    Tang-Schomer, Min D.; White, James D.; Tien, Lee W.; Schmitt, L. Ian; Valentin, Thomas M.; Graziano, Daniel J.; Hopkins, Amy M.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; Haydon, Philip G.; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The brain remains one of the most important but least understood tissues in our body, in part because of its complexity as well as the limitations associated with in vivo studies. Although simpler tissues have yielded to the emerging tools for in vitro 3D tissue cultures, functional brain-like tissues have not. We report the construction of complex functional 3D brain-like cortical tissue, maintained for months in vitro, formed from primary cortical neurons in modular 3D compartmentalized architectures with electrophysiological function. We show that, on injury, this brain-like tissue responds in vitro with biochemical and electrophysiological outcomes that mimic observations in vivo. This modular 3D brain-like tissue is capable of real-time nondestructive assessments, offering previously unidentified directions for studies of brain homeostasis and injury. PMID:25114234

  6. Mitochondrial DNA Rearrangement Spectrum in Brain Tissue of Alzheimer’s Disease: Analysis of 13 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yucai; Liu, Changsheng; Parker, William Davis; Chen, Hongyi; Beach, Thomas G.; Liu, Xinhua; Serrano, Geidy E.; Lu, Yanfen; Huang, Jianjun; Yang, Kunfang; Wang, Chunmei

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction may play a central role in the pathologic process of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but there is still a scarcity of data that directly links the pathology of AD with the alteration of mitochondrial DNA. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive assessment of mtDNA rearrangement events in AD brain tissue. Patients and Methods Postmortem frozen human brain cerebral cortex samples were obtained from the Banner Sun Health Research Institute Brain and Body Donation Program, Sun City, AZ. Mitochondria were isolated and direct sequence by using MiSeq®, and analyzed by relative software. Results Three types of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements have been seen in post mortem human brain tissue from patients with AD and age matched control. These observed rearrangements include a deletion, F-type rearrangement, and R-type rearrangement. We detected a high level of mtDNA rearrangement in brain tissue from cognitively normal subjects, as well as the patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The rate of rearrangements was calculated by dividing the number of positive rearrangements by the coverage depth. The rearrangement rate was significantly higher in AD brain tissue than in control brain tissue (17.9%versus 6.7%; p = 0.0052). Of specific types of rearrangement, deletions were markedly increased in AD (9.2% versus 2.3%; p = 0.0005). Conclusions Our data showed that failure of mitochondrial DNA in AD brain might be important etiology of AD pathology. PMID:27299301

  7. Toxicity of ad lib. overfeeding: effects on cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Faine, L A; Diniz, Y S; Almeida, J A; Novelli, E L B; Ribas, B O

    2002-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of ad lib. overfeeding and of dietary restriction (DR) on oxidative stress in cardiac tissue. Lipoperoxide concentrations were decreased and antioxidant enzymes were increased in moderate-DR-fed rats. Severe-DR induced increased lipoperoxide concentrations. Overfeeding increased lipoperoxide levels in cardiac tissue. Total superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn SOD) activities were decreased in cardiac tissue at 35 days of overfeeding. As no changes in glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were observed in overfed rats, while SOD and Cu-Zn SOD activities were decreased in these animals, it is assumed that superoxide anion is an important intermediate in the toxicity of ad lib. overfeeding. Overfeeding induced alterations in markers of oxidative stress in cardiac tissue.

  8. Terahertz spectroscopy of brain tissue from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingyan; Shumyatsky, Pavel; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Alfano, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) absorption and index of refraction of brain tissues from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a control wild-type (normal) mouse were compared using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). Three dominating absorption peaks associated to torsional-vibrational modes were observed in AD tissue, at about 1.44, 1.8, and 2.114 THz, closer to the peaks of free tryptophan molecules than in normal tissue. A possible reason is that there is more free tryptophan in AD brain tissue, while in normal brain tissue more tryptophan is attached to other molecules. Our study suggests that THz-absorption modes may be used as an AD biomarker fingerprint in brain, and that THz-TDS is a promising technique for early diagnosis of AD.

  9. Terahertz spectroscopy of brain tissue from a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lingyan; Shumyatsky, Pavel; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Alfano, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. The terahertz (THz) absorption and index of refraction of brain tissues from a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and a control wild-type (normal) mouse were compared using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). Three dominating absorption peaks associated to torsional–vibrational modes were observed in AD tissue, at about 1.44, 1.8, and 2.114 THz, closer to the peaks of free tryptophan molecules than in normal tissue. A possible reason is that there is more free tryptophan in AD brain tissue, while in normal brain tissue more tryptophan is attached to other molecules. Our study suggests that THz-absorption modes may be used as an AD biomarker fingerprint in brain, and that THz-TDS is a promising technique for early diagnosis of AD. PMID:26818714

  10. Brain Tissue Oxygen Monitoring in Neurocritical Care.

    PubMed

    De Georgia, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Brain injury results from ischemia, tissue hypoxia, and a cascade of secondary events. The cornerstone of neurocritical care management is optimization and maintenance of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen and substrate delivery to prevent or attenuate this secondary damage. New techniques for monitoring brain tissue oxygen tension (PtiO2) are now available. Brain PtiO2 reflects both oxygen delivery and consumption. Brain hypoxia (low brain PtiO2) has been associated with poor outcomes in patients with brain injury. Strategies to improve brain PtiO2 have focused mainly on increasing oxygen delivery either by increasing CBF or by increasing arterial oxygen content. The results of nonrandomized studies comparing brain PtiO2-guided therapy with intracranial pressure/cerebral perfusion pressure-guided therapy, while promising, have been mixed. More studies are needed including prospective, randomized controlled trials to assess the true value of this approach. The following is a review of the physiology of brain tissue oxygenation, the effect of brain hypoxia on outcome, strategies to increase oxygen delivery, and outcome studies of brain PtiO2-guided therapy in neurocritical care.

  11. Mature brain tissue in the sacrococcygeal region

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Binod Bade; Ghimire, Pradeep; Ghartimagar, Dilasma; Jwarchan, Bishnu; Lalchan, Subita; Karmacharya, Mikesh

    2016-01-01

    Complete mature brain tissue in sacrococcygeal region is a rare congenital anomaly in a newborn, which usually is misdiagnosed for sacrococcygeal teratoma. Glial tumor-like ependymoma is also common in sacrococcygeal area but mostly appears later in life. We present a case of complete heterotopic brain tissue in the sacrococcygeal region. The patient underwent total excision of mass with coccygectomy. To our knowledge it is the second case being reported. PMID:27194682

  12. Organization of brain tissue - Is the brain a noisy processor.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adey, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents some thoughts on functional organization in cerebral tissue. 'Spontaneous' wave and unit firing are considered as essential phenomena in the handling of information. Various models are discussed which have been suggested to describe the pseudorandom behavior of brain cells, leading to a view of the brain as an information processor and its role in learning, memory, remembering and forgetting.

  13. Brain sterol dys-regulation in sporadic AD and MCI: Relationship to heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Hascalovici, Jacob R.; Vaya, Jacob; Khatib, Soliman; Holcroft, Christina A.; Zukor, Hillel; Song, Wei; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Bennett, David A.; Schipper, Hyman M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the impact of aging and Alzheimer disease (AD) on brain cholesterol (CH), CH precursors and oxysterol homeostasis. Altered CH metabolism and up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) are characteristic of AD-affected neural tissues. We recently determined that HO-1 over-expression suppresses total CH levels by augmenting liver X receptor-mediated CH efflux and enhances oxysterol formation in cultured astroglia. Lipids and proteins were extracted from post-mortem human frontal cortex derived from subjects with sporadic AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and no cognitive impairment (NCI; n=17 per group) enrolled in the Religious Orders Study, an ongoing clinical-pathologic study of aging and AD. ELISA was used to quantify human HO-1 protein expression from brain tissue and GC-MS to quantify total CH, CH precursors and relevant oxysterols. The relationships of sterol/oxysterol levels to HO-1 protein expression and clinical/demographic variables were determined by multivariable regression and non-parametric statistical analyses. Decreased CH, increased oxysterol and increased CH precursors concentrations in the cortex correlated significantly with HO-1 levels in MCI and AD, but not NCI. Specific oxysterols correlated with disease state, increasing neuropathological burden, neuropsychological impairment and age. A model featuring compensated and de-compensated states of altered sterol homeostasis in MCI and AD are presented based on the current data set and our earlier in vitro work. PMID:19522732

  14. Oligomeric Neuronal Protein Aggregates as Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    as Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael Sierks CONTRACTING...Oligomeric Neuronal Protein Aggregates as Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 12109023 5c

  15. Organotypic slice culture of embryonic brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Daza, Ray A M; Englund, Chris; Hevner, Robert F

    2007-12-01

    INTRODUCTIONThis protocol describes how to dissect, assemble, and cultivate mouse embryonic (E) brain tissue from age E11.5 to E18.5 (days) for organotypic slice culture. These preparations can be used for a variety of assays and studies including coculture of different brain regions, cell migration assays, axon guidance assays, and DNA electroporation experiments. During electroporation, an electric current is applied to the surface of a specific target area of the brain slice in order to open holes in the plasma membrane and introduce a plasmid of coding DNA. The floating slice-on-membrane construct helps to preserve the structural integrity of the brain slices, while maintaining easy experimental access and optimal viability. Experiments can be monitored in living slices (e.g., with confocal imaging), and further studies can be completed using slices that have been fixed and cryosectioned at the end of the experiment. Any region of embryonic brain or spinal tissue can be used in this protocol.

  16. Toward effective needle steering in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Engh, J A; Podnar, G; Kondziolka, D; Riviere, C N

    2006-01-01

    Recent research has exploited the inherent bending of a bevel-tipped needle during insertion, accomplishing steering of the needle by rotating the needle shaft. Combining this technique with the observation that a straight trajectory can be accomplished by spinning the needle at a constant rate during insertion, this paper presents a novel technique for proportional control of the curvature of the trajectory via duty-cycled spinning of the needle. In order to accommodate this technique to very soft tissues such as the brain, several custom needle prototypes have also been designed in order to increase the steering versatility of the system by maximizing the attainable curvature. The paper describes the needle-steering system and the needle prototypes, and presents preliminary results from tests in an artificial brain tissue substitute.

  17. Distribution of lead in the brain tissues from DNTC patients using synchrotron radiation microbeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide-Ektessabi, Ari; Ota, Yukihide; Ishihara, Ryoko; Mizuno, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Tohru

    2005-12-01

    Diffuse neurofibrillary tangles with calcification (DNTC) is a form of dementia with certain characteristics. Its pathology is characterized by cerebrum atrophy, calcification on globus pallidus and dentate nucleus and diffuse neurofibrillary tangles without senile plaques. In the present study brain tissues were prepared from patients with patients DNTC, calcified and non-calcified Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The brain tissues were examined non-destructively by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation (SR) microbeams for trace metallic elements Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb. The XRF analysis showed that there were Pb concentrations in the calcified areas in the brain tissues with both DNTC and AD but there was none in those with non-calcified AD.

  18. Myelin staining of archival brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Sheaffer, S; Rosoklija, G; Dwork, A J

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of staining for myelin in archival materials, paraffin blocks were prepared from brain tissue that had been in formalin for intervals ranging from 7 months to over 53 years. Verhoeff and Luxol fast blue stains of the resulting sections yielded staining whose quality was unaffected by duration of fixation. Myelinated and unmyelinated areas were clearly distinguished, and the morphology of individual myelin sheaths was well-preserved. No changes to conventional protocols were required, but it was necessary carefully to monitor the progress of differentiation. With antigen retrieval, it was possible to display immunoreactivity for myelin basic protein. While this persisted even after prolonged fixation, fine detail was lost from the myelin sheaths, and there was staining of oligodendroglial cytoplasm and nuclei, which was not seen in recently fixed tissue. In contrast to this loss of detail in myelin sheaths, immunohistochemistry for glial fibrillary acidic protein displayed astrocytic morphology clearly, even in the oldest tissue. We conclude that archival, formalin-fixed material can be adequately examined for myelin loss and astrocytosis.

  19. Differential Impact of Whole-Brain Radiotherapy Added to Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Doo-Sik; Lee, Jung-Il; Im, Yong-Seok; Nam, Do-Hyun; Park, Kwan; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated whether the addition of whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) provided any therapeutic benefit according to recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-five patients with 1 to 10 metastases who underwent SRS between January 2002 and December 2007 were included in the study. Of those, 168 patients were treated with SRS alone and 77 patients received SRS followed by WBRT. Actuarial curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method regarding overall survival (OS), distant brain control (DC), and local brain control (LC) stratified by RPA class. Analyses for known prognostic variables were performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that control of the primary tumor, small number of brain metastases, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) > 70, and initial treatment modalities were significant predictors for survival. For RPA class 1, SRS plus WBRT was associated with a longer survival time compared with SRS alone (854 days vs. 426 days, p = 0.042). The SRS plus WBRT group also showed better LC rate than did the SRS-alone group (p = 0.021), although they did not show a better DC rate (p = 0.079). By contrast, for RPA class 2 or 3, no significant difference in OS, LC, or DC was found between the two groups. Conclusions: These results suggest that RPA classification should determine whether or not WBRT is added to SRS. WBRT may be recommended to be added to SRS for patients in whom long-term survival is expected on the basis of RPA classification.

  20. NMR imaging of cell phone radiation absorption in brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, David H.; Moeller, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    A method is described for measuring absorbed electromagnetic energy radiated from cell phone antennae into ex vivo brain tissue. NMR images the 3D thermal dynamics inside ex vivo bovine brain tissue and equivalent gel under exposure to power and irradiation time-varying radio frequency (RF) fields. The absorbed RF energy in brain tissue converts into Joule heat and affects the nuclear magnetic shielding and the Larmor precession. The resultant temperature increase is measured by the resonance frequency shift of hydrogen protons in brain tissue. This proposed application of NMR thermometry offers sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to characterize the hot spots from absorbed cell phone radiation in aqueous media and biological tissues. Specific absorption rate measurements averaged over 1 mg and 10 s in the brain tissue cover the total absorption volume. Reference measurements with fiber optic temperature sensors confirm the accuracy of the NMR thermometry. PMID:23248293

  1. NMR imaging of cell phone radiation absorption in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Gultekin, David H; Moeller, Lothar

    2013-01-02

    A method is described for measuring absorbed electromagnetic energy radiated from cell phone antennae into ex vivo brain tissue. NMR images the 3D thermal dynamics inside ex vivo bovine brain tissue and equivalent gel under exposure to power and irradiation time-varying radio frequency (RF) fields. The absorbed RF energy in brain tissue converts into Joule heat and affects the nuclear magnetic shielding and the Larmor precession. The resultant temperature increase is measured by the resonance frequency shift of hydrogen protons in brain tissue. This proposed application of NMR thermometry offers sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to characterize the hot spots from absorbed cell phone radiation in aqueous media and biological tissues. Specific absorption rate measurements averaged over 1 mg and 10 s in the brain tissue cover the total absorption volume. Reference measurements with fiber optic temperature sensors confirm the accuracy of the NMR thermometry.

  2. Amyloid structure exhibits polymorphism on multiple length scales in human brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiliang; Costantino, Isabel; Venugopalan, Nagarajan; Fischetti, Robert F.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Gomez-Isla, Teresa; Makowski, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of Aβ amyloid fibrils into plaques in the brain is a universal hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), but whether plaques in different individuals are equivalent is unknown. One possibility is that amyloid fibrils exhibit different structures and different structures may contribute differentially to disease, either within an individual brain or between individuals. However, the occurrence and distribution of structural polymorphisms of amyloid in human brain is poorly documented. Here we use X-ray microdiffraction of histological sections of human tissue to map the abundance, orientation and structural heterogeneities of amyloid. Our observations indicate that (i) tissue derived from subjects with different clinical histories may contain different ensembles of fibrillar structures; (ii) plaques harboring distinct amyloid structures can coexist within a single tissue section and (iii) within individual plaques there is a gradient of fibrillar structure from core to margins. These observations have immediate implications for existing theories on the inception and progression of AD. PMID:27629394

  3. Brain and Plasma Molecular Characterization of the Pathogenic TBI-AD Interrelationship in Mouse Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0253 TITLE: Brain and Plasma Molecular Characterization of the Pathogenic TBI-AD Interrelationship in Mouse Models ... brain and plasma responses in mouse models of TBI, AD and other neurodegenerative conditions (Abdullah et al., 2014; Abdullah et al., 2013; Crawford...identify age/time-dependent expression of brain proteins and lipids in mouse models of AD (PSAPP and hTau) and of mTBI (single and repetitive mTBI in hTau

  4. Biochemical and histochemical comparison of cholinesterases in normal and Alzheimer brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Darvesh, S; Reid, G A; Martin, E

    2010-08-01

    Cholinesterase activity associated with neuritic plaques (NPs) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains exhibit altered histochemical properties, such as requiring lower pH (6.8) for optimal cholinesterase staining compared to the pH (8.0) for best visualization of cholinesterases in neurons. Furthermore, visualization of NPs and NFTs can be prevented by agents like the peptidase inhibitor/metalloantibiotic bacitracin. The anomalous behavior of cholinesterases associated with pathological lesions needs to be elucidated because of the putative links between these enzymes and the disease process in AD. In this study, cholinesterases were extracted from AD and normal brain tissue to determine whether the differences observed in histochemical analyses in the two sources were reflected in kinetic properties measured in solubilized enzymes. Isolated brain enzymes from both these sources exhibited comparable kinetic parameters with respect to pH dependence, substrate affinity and inhibitor sensitivity and were not significantly affected by other agents that blocked cholinesterase histochemical visualization, such as the structurally diverse metal-chelating antibiotics bacitracin, doxycycline, minocycline and rifampicin. Although the cholinesterases from AD brain tissue examined here represented a total pool of these enzymes from AD brain, rather than enzymes specifically from NPs and NFTs, their kinetic behavior being comparable to cholinesterases isolated from normal brain tissues implies that these enzymes do not undergo disease-related modification in their primary structures. This suggests that the atypical histochemical behavior of cholinesterases in NPs and NFTs may result from interaction of cholinesterases with other molecules within these lesions, mediated by transition metal ions known to be present in AD pathology lesions.

  5. A New Antigen Retrieval Technique for Human Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Byne, William; Haroutunian, Vahram; García-Villanueva, Mercedes; Rábano, Alberto; García-Amado, María; Prensa, Lucía; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining of tissues is a powerful tool used to delineate the presence or absence of an antigen. During the last 30 years, antigen visualization in human brain tissue has been significantly limited by the masking effect of fixatives. In the present study, we have used a new method for antigen retrieval in formalin-fixed human brain tissue and examined the effectiveness of this protocol to reveal masked antigens in tissues with both short and long formalin fixation times. This new method, which is based on the use of citraconic acid, has not been previously utilized in brain tissue although it has been employed in various other tissues such as tonsil, ovary, skin, lymph node, stomach, breast, colon, lung and thymus. Thus, we reported here a novel method to carry out immunohistochemical studies in free-floating human brain sections. Since fixation of brain tissue specimens in formaldehyde is a commonly method used in brain banks, this new antigen retrieval method could facilitate immunohistochemical studies of brains with prolonged formalin fixation times. PMID:18852880

  6. Backscatter and attenuation properties of mammalian brain tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijekularatne, Pushpani Vihara

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a common category of brain injuries, which contributes to a substantial number of deaths and permanent disability all over the world. Ultrasound technology plays a major role in tissue characterization due to its low cost and portability that could be used to bridge a wide gap in the TBI diagnostic process. This research addresses the ultrasonic properties of mammalian brain tissues focusing on backscatter and attenuation. Orientation dependence and spatial averaging of data were analyzed using the same method resulting from insertion of tissue sample between a transducer and a reference reflector. Apparent backscatter transfer function (ABTF) at 1 to 10 MHz, attenuation coefficient and backscatter coefficient (BSC) at 1 to 5 MHz frequency ranges were measured on ovine brain tissue samples. The resulting ABTF was a monotonically decreasing function of frequency and the attenuation coefficient and BSC generally were increasing functions of frequency, results consistent with other soft tissues such as liver, blood and heart.

  7. Targeting modulates audiences' brain and behavioral responses to safe sex video ads.

    PubMed

    Wang, An-Li; Lowen, Steven B; Shi, Zhenhao; Bissey, Bryn; Metzger, David S; Langleben, Daniel D

    2016-10-01

    Video ads promoting condom use are a key component of media campaigns to stem the HIV epidemic. Recent neuroimaging studies in the context of smoking cessation, point to personal relevance as one of the key variables that determine the effectiveness of public health messages. While minority men who have sex with men (MSM) are at the highest risk of HIV infection, most safe-sex ads feature predominantly Caucasian actors in heterosexual scenarios. We compared brain respons of 45 African American MSM to safe sex ads that were matched (i.e. 'Targeted') to participants' sexual orientation and race, and 'Untargeted' ads that were un matched for these characteristics. Ad recall, perceived 'convincingness' and attitudes towards condom use were also assessed. We found that Targeted ads were better remembered than the Untargeted ads but perceived as equally convincing. Targeted ads engaged brain regions involved in self-referential processing and memory, including the amygdala, hippocampus, temporal and medial prefrontal cortices (MPFC) and the precuneus. Connectivity between MPFC and precuneus and middle temporal gyrus was stronger when viewing Targeted ads. Our results suggest that targeting may increase cognitive processing of safe sex ads and justify further prospective studies linking brain response to media public health interventions and clinical outcomes.

  8. Alzheimer's disease and the "Valley Of Death": not enough guidance from human brain tissue?

    PubMed

    Beach, Thomas G

    2013-01-01

    Medical science is currently perceived as underperforming. This is because of the relatively slow recent rate of development of new disease treatments. This has been blamed on cultural, regulatory, and economic factors that generate a so-called "Valley of Death", hindering new drug candidates from being moved into clinical trials and eventually approved for use. We propose, however, that for neurodegenerative diseases, a relative decline of human brain tissue research is also a contributor. The present pharmacological agents for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD) were identified through direct examination of postmortem human brain tissue more than 30 years ago. Since that time the percentage of research grants awarded to human brain tissue-using projects has dropped precipitously and publication rates have stagnated. As human brain tissue research has played a central and often initiating role in identifying most of the targets that have gone to AD clinical trials, it is proposed that the rate of discovery of new targets has been curtailed. Additionally, the continued rejection of cortical biopsy as a diagnostic method for AD has most probably depressed the perceived effect sizes of new medications and contributed to the high Phase II clinical trial failure rates. Despite the relative lack of funding, human brain discovery research has continued to make important contributions to our understanding of neurodegenerative disease, and brain banks have played an essential role. It is likely that the pace of discovery will dramatically accelerate over the coming decades as increasingly powerful tools including genomics, epigenetics, transcriptomics, regulatory RNA, gene expression profiling, proteomics, and metabolomics are applied. To optimize the promise of these new technologies, however, it is critical that brain banks are rejuvenated by enhanced governmental and/or private support.

  9. Alteration of mTOR signaling occurs early in the progression of Alzheimer disease (AD): analysis of brain from subjects with pre-clinical AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment and late-stage AD.

    PubMed

    Tramutola, Antonella; Triplett, Judy C; Di Domenico, Fabio; Niedowicz, Dana M; Murphy, Michael P; Coccia, Raffaella; Perluigi, Marzia; Butterfield, D Allan

    2015-06-01

    The clinical symptoms of Alzheimer disease (AD) include a gradual memory loss and subsequent dementia, and neuropathological deposition of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. At the molecular level, AD subjects present overt amyloid β (Aβ) production and tau hyperphosphorylation. Aβ species have been proposed to overactivate the phosphoinositide3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) axis, which plays a central role in proteostasis. The current study investigated the status of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in post-mortem tissue from the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) at three different stages of AD: late AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and pre-clinical AD (PCAD). Our findings suggest that the alteration of mTOR signaling and autophagy occurs at early stages of AD. We found a significant increase in Aβ (1-42) levels, associated with reduction in autophagy (Beclin-1 and LC-3) observed in PCAD, MCI, and AD subjects. Related to the autophagy impairment, we found a hyperactivation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in IPL of MCI and AD subjects, but not in PCAD, along with a significant decrease in phosphatase and tensin homolog. An increase in two mTOR downstream targets, p70S6K and 4EBP1, occurred in AD and MCI subjects. Both AD and MCI subjects showed increased, insulin receptor substrate 1, a candidate biomarker of brain insulin resistance, and GSK-3β, a kinase targeting tau phosphorylation. Nevertheless, tau phosphorylation was increased in the clinical groups. The results hint at a link between Aβ and the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis and provide further insights into the relationship between AD pathology and insulin resistance. In addition, we speculate that the alteration of mTOR signaling in the IPL of AD and MCI subjects, but not in PCAD, is due to the lack of substantial increase in oxidative stress. The figure represents the three different stages of Alzheimer Disease: Preclinical Alzheimer Disease (PCAD), Mild cognitive impairment (MCI

  10. Fungal Enolase, β-Tubulin, and Chitin Are Detected in Brain Tissue from Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Pisa, Diana; Alonso, Ruth; Rábano, Alberto; Horst, Michael N; Carrasco, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings provide evidence that fungal structures can be detected in brain tissue from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients using rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against whole fungal cells. In the present work, we have developed and tested specific antibodies that recognize the fungal proteins, enolase and β-tubulin, and an antibody that recognizes the fungal polysaccharide chitin. Consistent with our previous studies, a number of rounded yeast-like and hyphal structures were detected using these antibodies in brain sections from AD patients. Some of these structures were intracellular and, strikingly, some were found to be located inside nuclei from neurons, whereas other fungal structures were detected extracellularly. Corporya amylacea from AD patients also contained enolase and β-tubulin as revealed by these selective antibodies, but were devoid of fungal chitin. Importantly, brain sections from control subjects were usually negative for staining with the three antibodies. However, a few fungal structures can be observed in some control individuals. Collectively, these findings indicate the presence of two fungal proteins, enolase and β-tubulin, and the polysaccharide chitin, in CNS tissue from AD patients. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis that AD is caused by disseminated fungal infection.

  11. CARS microscopy of Alzheimer's diseased brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enejder, Annika; Kiskis, Juris; Fink, Helen; Nyberg, Lena; Thyr, Jakob; Li, Jia-Yi

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder currently without cure, characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques surrounded by dystrophic neurites. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanisms, biochemical analysis (protein immunoblot) of plaque extracts reveals that they consist of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides assembled as oligomers, protofibrils and aggregates. Their spatial distribution has been confirmed by Thioflavin-S or immuno-staining with fluorescence microscopy. However, it is increasingly understood that the protein aggregation is only one of several mechanism that causes neuronal dysfunction and death. This raises the need for a more complete biochemical analysis. In this study, we have complemented 2-photon fluorescence microscopy of Thioflavin-S and Aβ immuno-stained human AD plaques with CARS microscopy. We show that the chemical build-up of AD plaques is more complex and that Aβ staining does not provide the complete picture of the spatial distribution or the molecular composition of AD plaques. CARS images provide important complementary information to that obtained by fluorescence microscopy, motivating a broader introduction of CARS microscopy in the AD research field.

  12. Multimodality stereotactic brain tissue identification: the NASA smart probe project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, R.; Mah, R.; Aghevli, A.; Freitas, K.; Galvagni, A.; Guerrero, M.; Papsin, R.; Reed, C.; Stassinopoulos, D.

    1999-01-01

    Real-time tissue identification can benefit procedures such as stereotactic brain biopsy, functional neurosurgery and brain tumor excision. Optical scattering spectroscopy has been shown to be effective at discriminating cancer from noncancerous conditions in the colon, bladder and breast. The NASA Smart Probe extends the concept of 'optical biopsy' by using neural network techniques to combine the output from 3 microsensors contained within a cannula 2. 7 mm in diameter (i.e. the diameter of a stereotactic brain biopsy needle). Experimental data from 5 rats show the clear differentiation between tissues such as brain, nerve, fat, artery and muscle that can be achieved with optical scattering spectroscopy alone. These data and previous findings with other modalities such as (1) analysis of the image from a fiberoptic neuroendoscope and (2) the output from a microstrain gauge suggest the Smart Probe multiple microsensor technique shows promise for real-time tissue identification in neurosurgical procedures. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue.

  14. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue. PMID:27456312

  15. Intrinsic optical signals of brains in rats during loss of tissue viability: effect of brain temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Ooigawa, Hidetoshi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2007-07-01

    Noninvasive, real-time monitoring of brain tissue viability is crucial for the patients with stroke, traumatic brain injury, etc. For this purpose, measurement of intrinsic optical signal (IOS) is attractive because it can provide direct information about the viability of brain tissue noninvasively. We performed simultaneous measurements of IOSs that are related to morphological characteristics, i.e., light scattering, and energy metabolism for rat brains during saline infusion as a model with temporal loss of brain tissue viability. The results showed that the scattering signal was steady in an initial phase but showed a drastic, triphasic change in a certain range of infusion time, during which the reduction of CuA in cytochrome c oxidase started and proceeded rapidly. The start time of triphasic scattering change was delayed for about 100 s by lowering brain temperature from 29°C to 24°C, demonstrating the optical detection of cerebroprotection effect by brain cooling. Electron microscopic observation showed morphological changes of dendrite and mitochondria in the cortical surface tissue after the triphasic scattering change, which was thought to be associated with the change in light scattering we observed. These findings suggest that the simultaneous measurement of the intrinsic optical signals related to morphological characteristics and energy metabolism is useful for monitoring tissue viability in brain.

  16. Extraction of optical properties and prediction of light distribution in rat brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimipour, Mehdi; Baumgartner, Ryan; Liu, Yuming; Jacques, Steven L.; Eliceiri, Kevin; Pashaie, Ramin

    2014-07-01

    Predicting the distribution of light inside any turbid media, such as biological tissue, requires detailed information about the optical properties of the medium, including the absorption and scattering coefficients and the anisotropy factor. Particularly, in biophotonic applications where photons directly interact with the tissue, this information translates to system design optimization, precision in light delivery, and minimization of unintended consequences, such as phototoxicity or photobleaching. In recent years, optogenetics has opened up a new area in deep brain stimulation with light and the method is widely adapted by researchers for the study of the brain circuitries and the dynamics of neurological disorders. A key factor for a successful optogenetic stimulation is delivering an adequate amount of light to the targeted brain objects. The adequate amount of light needed to stimulate each brain object is identified by the tissue optical properties as well as the type of opsin expressed in the tissue, wavelength of the light, and the physical dimensions of the targeted area. Therefore, to implement a precise light delivery system for optogenetics, detailed information about the optical properties of the brain tissue and a mathematical model that incorporates all determining factors is needed to find a good estimation of light distribution in the brain. In general, three measurements are required to obtain the optical properties of any tissue, namely diffuse transmitted light, diffuse reflected light, and transmitted ballistic beam. In this report, these parameters were measured in vitro using intact rat brain slices of 500 μm thickness via a two-integrating spheres optical setup. Then, an inverse adding doubling method was used to extract the optical properties of the tissue from the collected data. These experiments were repeated to cover the whole brain tissue with high spatial resolution for the three different cuts (transverse, sagittal, and coronal

  17. Characterisation and modelling of brain tissue for surgical simulation.

    PubMed

    Mendizabal, A; Aguinaga, I; Sánchez, E

    2015-05-01

    Interactive surgical simulators capable of providing a realistic visual and haptic feedback to users are a promising technology for medical training and surgery planification. However, modelling the physical behaviour of human organs and tissues for surgery simulation remains a challenge. On the one hand, this is due to the difficulty to characterise the physical properties of biological soft tissues. On the other hand, the challenge still remains in the computation time requirements of real-time simulation required in interactive systems. Real-time surgical simulation and medical training must employ a sufficiently accurate and simple model of soft tissues in order to provide a realistic haptic and visual response. This study attempts to characterise the brain tissue at similar conditions to those that take place on surgical procedures. With this aim, porcine brain tissue is characterised, as a surrogate of human brain, on a rotational rheometer at low strain rates and large strains. In order to model the brain tissue with an adequate level of accuracy and simplicity, linear elastic, hyperelastic and quasi-linear viscoelastic models are defined. These models are simulated using the ABAQUS finite element platform and compared with the obtained experimental data.

  18. Random Walks in Model Brain Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Farida; Farrher, Ezequiel; Oros-Peusquens, Ana-Maria; Shah, N. Jon

    2011-03-01

    The propagation of water molecules in the brain and the corresponding NMR response are affected by many factors such as compartmentalization, restrictions and anisotropy imposed by the cellular microstructure. Interfacial interactions with cell membranes and exchange additionally come into play. Due to the complexity of the underlying factors, a differentiation between the various contributions to the average NMR signal in in vivo studies represents a difficult task. In this work we perform random-walk Monte Carlo simulations in well-defined model systems aiming at establishing quantitative relations between dynamics and microstructure. The results are compared with experimental data obtained for artificial anisotropic model systems.

  19. Three-dimensional assessment of brain tissue morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Germann, Marco; Jeanmonod, Daniel; Morel, Anne

    2006-08-01

    The microstructure of brain tissues becomes visible using different types of optical microscopy after the tissue sectioning. This preparation procedure introduces stress and strain in the anisotropic and inhomogeneous soft tissue slices, which are several 10 μm thick. Consequently, the three-dimensional dataset, generated out of the two-dimensional images with lateral submicrometer resolution, needs algorithms to correct the deformations, which can be significant for mellow tissue such as brain segments. The spatial resolution perpendicular to the slices is much worse with respect to the lateral sub-micrometer resolution. Therefore, we propose as complementary method the synchrotron-radiation-based micro computed tomography (SRμCT), which avoids any kind of preparation artifacts due to sectioning and histological processing and yields true micrometer resolution in the three orthogonal directions. The visualization of soft matter by the use of SRμCT, however, is often based on elaborate staining protocols, since the tissue exhibits (almost) the same x-ray absorption as the surrounding medium. Therefore, it is unexpected that human tissue from the pons and the medulla oblongata in phosphate buffer show several features such as the blood vessels and the inferior olivary nucleus without staining. The value of these tomograms lies especially in the precise non-rigid registration of the different sets of histological slices. Applications of this method to larger pieces of brain tissue, such as the human thalamus are planned in the context of stereotactic functional neurosurgery.

  20. Brain tissue banking for stem cells for our future

    PubMed Central

    Palmero, Emily; Palmero, Sheryl; Murrell, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    In our lab we study neurogenesis and the development of brain tumors. We work towards treatment strategies for glioblastoma and towards using autologous neural stem cells for tissue regeneration strategies for brain damage and neurodegenerative disorders. It has been our policy to try to establish living cell cultures from all human biopsy material that we obtain. We hypothesized that small pieces of brain tissue could be cryopreserved and that live neural stem cells could be recovered at a later time. DMSO has been shown to possess a remarkable ability to diffuse through cell membranes and pass into cell interiors. Its chemical properties prevent the formation of damaging ice crystals thus allowing cell storage at or below −180 C. We report here a protocol for successful freezing of small pieces of tissue derived from human brain and human brain tumours. Virtually all specimens could be successfully revived. Assays of phenotype and behaviour show that the cell cultures derived were equivalent to those cultures previously derived from fresh tissue. PMID:27991551

  1. Aluminium in brain tissue in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Ambreen; King, Andrew; Troakes, Claire; Exley, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    The genetic predispositions which describe a diagnosis of familial Alzheimer's disease can be considered as cornerstones of the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Essentially they place the expression and metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein as the main tenet of disease aetiology. However, we do not know the cause of Alzheimer's disease and environmental factors may yet be shown to contribute towards its onset and progression. One such environmental factor is human exposure to aluminium and aluminium has been shown to be present in brain tissue in sporadic Alzheimer's disease. We have made the first ever measurements of aluminium in brain tissue from 12 donors diagnosed with familial Alzheimer's disease. The concentrations of aluminium were extremely high, for example, there were values in excess of 10μg/g tissue dry wt. in 5 of the 12 individuals. Overall, the concentrations were higher than all previous measurements of brain aluminium except cases of known aluminium-induced encephalopathy. We have supported our quantitative analyses using a novel method of aluminium-selective fluorescence microscopy to visualise aluminium in all lobes of every brain investigated. The unique quantitative data and the stunning images of aluminium in familial Alzheimer's disease brain tissue raise the spectre of aluminium's role in this devastating disease.

  2. Investigation of elemental changes in brain tissues following excitotoxic injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegele, Rainer; Howell, Nicholas R.; Callaghan, Paul D.; Pastuovic, Zeljko

    2013-07-01

    Recently the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe has been used for elemental mapping of thin brain tissue sections. The fact that a very small portion of the proton energy is used for X-ray excitation combined with small variations of the major element concentrations makes μ-PIXE imaging and GeoPIXE analysis a challenging task. Excitotoxic brain injury underlies the pathology of stroke and various neurodegenerative disorders. Large fluxes in Ca+2 cytosolic concentrations are a key feature of the initiation of this pathophysiological process. In order to understand if these modifications are associated with changes in the elemental composition, several brain sections have been mapped with μ-PIXE. Increases in Ca+2 cytosolic concentrations were indicative of the pathophysiological process continuing 1 week after an initiating neural insult. We were able to measure significant variations in K and Ca concentration distribution across investigated brain tissue. These variations correlate very well with physiological changes visible in the brain tissue. Moreover, the obtained μ-PIXE results clearly demonstrate that the elemental composition changes significantly correlate with brain drauma.

  3. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling of implanted deep brain stimulation electrodes and brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Gabran, S R I; Saad, J H; Salama, M M A; Mansour, R R

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the electromagnetic modeling and simulation of an implanted Medtronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode using finite difference time domain (FDTD). The model is developed using Empire XCcel and represents the electrode surrounded with brain tissue assuming homogenous and isotropic medium. The model is created to study the parameters influencing the electric field distribution within the tissue in order to provide reference and benchmarking data for DBS and intra-cortical electrode development.

  4. Measuring the local electrical conductivity of human brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtari, M.; Emin, D.; Ellingson, B. M.; Woodworth, D.; Frew, A.; Mathern, G. W.

    2016-02-01

    The electrical conductivities of freshly excised brain tissues from 24 patients were measured. The diffusion-MRI of the hydrogen nuclei of water molecules from regions that were subsequently excised was also measured. Analysis of these measurements indicates that differences between samples' conductivities are primarily due to differences of their densities of solvated sodium cations. Concomitantly, the sample-to-sample variations of their diffusion constants are relatively small. This finding suggests that non-invasive in-vivo measurements of brain tissues' local sodium-cation density can be utilized to estimate its local electrical conductivity.

  5. Study of amyloid-β peptide functional brain networks in AD, MCI and HC.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiehui; Duan, Huoqiang; Huang, Zheming; Yu, Zhihua

    2015-01-01

    One medical challenge in studying the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide mechanism for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is exploring the law of beta toxic oligomers' diffusion in human brains in vivo. One beneficial means of solving this problem is brain network analysis based on graph theory. In this study, the characteristics of Aβ functional brain networks of Healthy Control (HC), Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and AD groups were compared by applying graph theoretical analyses to Carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography (11C PiB-PET) data. 120 groups of PiB-PET images from the ADNI database were analyzed. The results showed that the small-world property of MCI and AD were lost as compared to HC. Furthermore, the local clustering of networks was higher in both MCI and AD as compared to HC, whereas the path length was similar among the three groups. The results also showed that there could be four potential Aβ toxic oligomer seeds: Frontal_Sup_Medial_L, Parietal_Inf_L, Frontal_Med_Orb_R, and Parietal_Inf_R. These four seeds are corresponding to Regions of Interests referred by physicians to clinically diagnose AD.

  6. High-Throughput Single-Cell Manipulation in Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Steinmeyer, Joseph D.; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of neurons and neuronal circuits in brain tissue requires the genetic manipulation, labeling, and tracking of single cells. However, current methods for manipulating cells in brain tissue are limited to either bulk techniques, lacking single-cell accuracy, or manual methods that provide single-cell accuracy but at significantly lower throughputs and repeatability. Here, we demonstrate high-throughput, efficient, reliable, and combinatorial delivery of multiple genetic vectors and reagents into targeted cells within the same tissue sample with single-cell accuracy. Our system automatically loads nanoliter-scale volumes of reagents into a micropipette from multiwell plates, targets and transfects single cells in brain tissues using a robust electroporation technique, and finally preps the micropipette by automated cleaning for repeating the transfection cycle. We demonstrate multi-colored labeling of adjacent cells, both in organotypic and acute slices, and transfection of plasmids encoding different protein isoforms into neurons within the same brain tissue for analysis of their effects on linear dendritic spine density. Our platform could also be used to rapidly deliver, both ex vivo and in vivo, a variety of genetic vectors, including optogenetic and cell-type specific agents, as well as fast-acting reagents such as labeling dyes, calcium sensors, and voltage sensors to manipulate and track neuronal circuit activity at single-cell resolution. PMID:22536416

  7. Optical properties of mouse brain tissue after optical clearing with FocusClear™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Austin J.; Capulong, Bernard V.; Saager, Rolf B.; Wiersma, Matthew P.; Lo, Patrick C.; Durkin, Anthony J.; Choi, Bernard

    2015-09-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is commonly used to investigate disease progression in biological tissues. Biological tissues, however, are strongly scattering in the visible wavelengths, limiting the application of fluorescence microscopy to superficial (<200 μm) regions. Optical clearing, which involves incubation of the tissue in a chemical bath, reduces the optical scattering in tissue, resulting in increased tissue transparency and optical imaging depth. The goal of this study was to determine the time- and wavelength-resolved dynamics of the optical scattering properties of rodent brain after optical clearing with FocusClear™. Light transmittance and reflectance of 1-mm mouse brain sections were measured using an integrating sphere before and after optical clearing and the inverse adding doubling algorithm used to determine tissue optical scattering. The degree of optical clearing was quantified by calculating the optical clearing potential (OCP), and the effects of differing OCP were demonstrated using the optical histology method, which combines tissue optical clearing with optical imaging to visualize the microvasculature. We observed increased tissue transparency with longer optical clearing time and an analogous increase in OCP. Furthermore, OCP did not vary substantially between 400 and 1000 nm for increasing optical clearing durations, suggesting that optical histology can improve ex vivo visualization of several fluorescent probes.

  8. Optical properties of mouse brain tissue after optical clearing with FocusClear™

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Austin J.; Capulong, Bernard V.; Saager, Rolf B.; Wiersma, Matthew P.; Lo, Patrick C.; Durkin, Anthony J.; Choi, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Fluorescence microscopy is commonly used to investigate disease progression in biological tissues. Biological tissues, however, are strongly scattering in the visible wavelengths, limiting the application of fluorescence microscopy to superficial (<200  μm) regions. Optical clearing, which involves incubation of the tissue in a chemical bath, reduces the optical scattering in tissue, resulting in increased tissue transparency and optical imaging depth. The goal of this study was to determine the time- and wavelength-resolved dynamics of the optical scattering properties of rodent brain after optical clearing with FocusClear™. Light transmittance and reflectance of 1-mm mouse brain sections were measured using an integrating sphere before and after optical clearing and the inverse adding doubling algorithm used to determine tissue optical scattering. The degree of optical clearing was quantified by calculating the optical clearing potential (OCP), and the effects of differing OCP were demonstrated using the optical histology method, which combines tissue optical clearing with optical imaging to visualize the microvasculature. We observed increased tissue transparency with longer optical clearing time and an analogous increase in OCP. Furthermore, OCP did not vary substantially between 400 and 1000 nm for increasing optical clearing durations, suggesting that optical histology can improve ex vivo visualization of several fluorescent probes. PMID:26388460

  9. Identification of N-terminally truncated pyroglutamate amyloid-β in cholesterol-enriched diet-fed rabbit and AD brain.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garmendia, Roxanna; Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Morales, Miguel Angel; Luna-Muñoz, José; Mena, Raul; Nava-Catorce, Miriam; Acero, Gonzalo; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Viramontes-Pintos, Amparo; Cribbs, David H; Gevorkian, Goar

    2014-01-01

    The main amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) variants detected in the human brain are Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42; however, a significant proportion of Aβ in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain also consists of N-terminal truncated/modified species. AβN3(pE), Aβ peptide bearing amino-terminal pyroglutamate at position 3, has been demonstrated to be a major N-truncated/modified constituent of intracellular, extracellular, and vascular Aβ deposits in AD and Down syndrome brain tissue. It has been previously demonstrated that rabbits fed a diet enriched in cholesterol and given water containing trace copper levels developed AD-like pathology including intraneuronal and extracellular Aβ accumulation, tau hyperphosphorylation, vascular inflammation, astrocytosis, microgliosis, reduced levels of acetylcholine, as well as learning deficits and thus, may be used as a non-transgenic animal model of sporadic AD. In the present study, we have demonstrated for the first time the presence of AβN3(pE) in blood vessels in cholesterol-enriched diet-fed rabbit brain. In addition, we detected AβN3(pE) immunoreactivity in all postmortem AD brain samples studied. We believe that our results are potentially important for evaluation of novel therapeutic molecules/strategies targeting Aβ peptides in a suitable non-transgenic animal model.

  10. Handling of solid brain tumor tissue for protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Christer; Nistér, Monica

    2011-01-01

    Optimal protein analysis requires unfixed tissue samples. We suggest handling the brain tumor tissue sterilely and coldly (on ice) for as short time as possible prior to processing, but for no more than 8 h. This simple protocol results in apparently intact morphology, immunoreactivity, protein integrity, and protein phosphorylation with the criteria we apply. Sample handling for Pathological Anatomical Diagnosis (PAD) and for protein analysis can be one and the same.

  11. Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin and its Receptors in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) Brain Regions: Differential Findings in AD with and without Depression

    PubMed Central

    Dekens, Doortje W.; Naudé, Petrus J.W.; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Vermeiren, Yannick; Van Dam, Debby; Oude Voshaar, Richard C.; Eisel, Ulrich L.M.; De Deyn, Peter P.

    2016-01-01

    Co-existing depression worsens Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a newly identified (neuro)inflammatory mediator in the pathophysiologies of both AD and depression. This study aimed to compare NGAL levels in healthy controls, AD without depression (AD–D), and AD with co-existing depression (AD+D) patients. Protein levels of NGAL and its receptors, 24p3R and megalin, were assessed in nine brain regions from healthy controls (n = 19), AD–D (n = 19), and AD+D (n = 21) patients. NGAL levels in AD–D patients were significantly increased in brain regions commonly associated with AD. In the hippocampus, NGAL levels were even further increased in AD+D subjects. Unexpectedly, NGAL levels in the prefrontal cortex of AD+D patients were comparable to those in controls. Megalin levels were increased in BA11 and amygdala of AD+D patients, while no changes in 24p3R were detected. These findings indicate significant differences in neuroimmunological regulation between AD patients with and without co-existing depression. Considering its known effects, elevated NGAL levels might actively promote neuropathological processes in AD with and without depression. PMID:27716662

  12. Constitutive modelling of brain tissue: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Miller, K; Chinzei, K

    1997-01-01

    Recent developments in computer-integrated and robot-aided surgery--in particular, the emergence of automatic surgical tools and robots--as well as advances in virtual reality techniques, call for closer examination of the mechanical properties of very soft tissues (such as brain, liver, kidney, etc.). The ultimate goal of our research into the biomechanics of these tissues is the development of corresponding, realistic mathematical models. This paper contains experimental results of in vitro, uniaxial, unconfined compression of swine brain tissue and discusses a single-phase, non-linear, viscoelastic tissue model. The experimental results obtained for three loading velocities, ranging over five orders of magnitude, are presented. The applied strain rates have been much lower than those applied in previous studies, focused on injury modelling. The stress-strain curves are concave upward for all compression rates containing no linear portion from which a meaningful elastic modulus might be determined. The tissue response stiffened as the loading speed increased, indicating a strong stress-strain rate dependence. The use of the single-phase model is recommended for applications in registration, surgical operation planning and training systems as well as a control system of an image-guided surgical robot. The material constants for the brain tissue are evaluated. Agreement between the proposed theoretical model and experiment is good for compression levels reaching 30% and for loading velocities varying over five orders of magnitude.

  13. Injury Response of Resected Human Brain Tissue In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Verwer, Ronald W H; Sluiter, Arja A; Balesar, Rawien A; Baaijen, Johannes C; de Witt Hamer, Philip C; Speijer, Dave; Li, Yichen; Swaab, Dick F

    2015-07-01

    Brain injury affects a significant number of people each year. Organotypic cultures from resected normal neocortical tissue provide unique opportunities to study the cellular and neuropathological consequences of severe injury of adult human brain tissue in vitro. The in vitro injuries caused by resection (interruption of the circulation) and aggravated by the preparation of slices (severed neuronal and glial processes and blood vessels) reflect the reaction of human brain tissue to severe injury. We investigated this process using immunocytochemical markers, reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Essential features were rapid shrinkage of neurons, loss of neuronal marker expression and proliferation of reactive cells that expressed Nestin and Vimentin. Also, microglia generally responded strongly, whereas the response of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes appeared to be more variable. Importantly, some reactive cells also expressed both microglia and astrocytic markers, thus confounding their origin. Comparison with post-mortem human brain tissue obtained at rapid autopsies suggested that the reactive process is not a consequence of epilepsy.

  14. Vascular risk and Aβ interact to reduce cortical thickness in AD vulnerable brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Bruce R.; Madison, Cindee M.; Wirth, Miranka; Marchant, Natalie L.; Kriger, Stephen; Mack, Wendy J.; Sanossian, Nerses; DeCarli, Charles; Chui, Helena C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Jagust, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to define whether vascular risk factors interact with β-amyloid (Aβ) in producing changes in brain structure that could underlie the increased risk of Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: Sixty-six cognitively normal and mildly impaired older individuals with a wide range of vascular risk factors were included in this study. The presence of Aβ was assessed using [11C]Pittsburgh compound B–PET imaging, and cortical thickness was measured using 3-tesla MRI. Vascular risk was measured with the Framingham Coronary Risk Profile Index. Results: Individuals with high levels of vascular risk factors have thinner frontotemporal cortex independent of Aβ. These frontotemporal regions are also affected in individuals with Aβ deposition, but the latter show additional thinning in parietal cortices. Aβ and vascular risk were found to interact in posterior (especially in parietal) brain regions, where Aβ has its greatest effect. In this way, the negative effect of Aβ in posterior regions is increased by the presence of vascular risk. Conclusion: Aβ and vascular risk interact to enhance cortical thinning in posterior brain regions that are particularly vulnerable to AD. These findings give insight concerning the mechanisms whereby vascular risk increases the likelihood of developing AD and supports the therapeutic intervention of controlling vascular risk for the prevention of AD. PMID:24907234

  15. A Novel Three-Phase Model of Brain Tissue Microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Gevertz, Jana L.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2008-01-01

    We propose a novel biologically constrained three-phase model of the brain microstructure. Designing a realistic model is tantamount to a packing problem, and for this reason, a number of techniques from the theory of random heterogeneous materials can be brought to bear on this problem. Our analysis strongly suggests that previously developed two-phase models in which cells are packed in the extracellular space are insufficient representations of the brain microstructure. These models either do not preserve realistic geometric and topological features of brain tissue or preserve these properties while overestimating the brain's effective diffusivity, an average measure of the underlying microstructure. In light of the highly connected nature of three-dimensional space, which limits the minimum diffusivity of biologically constrained two-phase models, we explore the previously proposed hypothesis that the extracellular matrix is an important factor that contributes to the diffusivity of brain tissue. Using accurate first-passage-time techniques, we support this hypothesis by showing that the incorporation of the extracellular matrix as the third phase of a biologically constrained model gives the reduction in the diffusion coefficient necessary for the three-phase model to be a valid representation of the brain microstructure. PMID:18704170

  16. Nitrotyrosine in brain tissue of neonates after perinatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Groenendaal, F; Lammers, H; Smit, D; Nikkels, P G J

    2006-01-01

    Hypothesis Nitrotyrosine, a reaction product of peroxynitrite and proteins, could be demonstrated in the postmortem examination of brain tissue of full‐term neonates who had severe perinatal asphyxia. Methods The brain tissue of 22 full‐term neonates who died after severe perinatal asphyxia was examined, including cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, hippocampus, brain stem, olives and cerebellum. Median age at death was 52 h. Routine histopathological examination and additional immunohistological staining were carried out with anti‐cysteine protease protein 32 antibodies to detect activated caspase 3, anti‐nitrotyrosine antibodies to detect nitrotyrosine and anti‐CD68 antibodies to detect activated microglia and macrophages, which might be associated with the production of nitric oxide. Staining was scored as none, weak (1–25% positive cells), moderate (26–75% positive cells) or severe (>75% positive cells). Results 14 patients showed global injury, 4 showed injury of the basal ganglia and thalamus, and 4 showed predominantly parasagittal brain injury. One neonate without perinatal asphyxia served as a control. Nitrotyrosine staining of neurones was shown in all neonates with asphyxia, mostly in the thalamus (70%) and inferior olives (68%). Total nitrotyrosine staining tended to be less in the base of the pons and inferior olives of neonates with parasagittal brain injury. Activated caspase 3 was found mostly in the thalamus (60%) and hippocampus (53%). Positive CD68 staining was mainly present in the thalamus (70% positive). Conclusion Nitrotyrosine was found in brain tissue of full‐term neonates, suggesting that nitric oxide toxicity might have a role in hypoxic–ischaemic brain injury at term. This may be relevant for neuroprotective strategies in full‐term neonates with perinatal asphyxia. PMID:16835259

  17. Comparison of histological techniques to visualize iron in paraffin-embedded brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    van Duijn, Sara; Nabuurs, Rob J A; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Natté, Remco

    2013-11-01

    Better knowledge of the distribution of iron in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients may facilitate the development of an in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) marker for AD and may cast light on the role of this potentially toxic molecule in the pathogenesis of AD. Several histological iron staining techniques have been used in the past but they have not been systematically tested for sensitivity and specificity. This article compares three histochemical techniques and ferritin immunohistochemistry to visualize iron in paraffin-embedded human AD brain tissue. The specificity of the histochemical techniques was tested by staining sections after iron extraction. Iron was demonstrated in the white matter, in layers IV/V of the frontal neocortex, in iron containing plaques, and in microglia. In our hands, these structures were best visualized using the Meguro iron stain, a method that has not been described for iron staining in human brain or AD in particular. Ferritin immunohistochemistry stained microglia and iron containing plaques similar to the Meguro method but was less intense in myelin-associated iron. The Meguro method is most suitable for identifying iron-positive structures in paraffin-embedded human AD brain tissue.

  18. Iron biomineralization of brain tissue and neurodegenerative disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylova (Mikhailova), Albina

    The brain is an organ with a high concentration of iron in specific areas, particularly in the globus pallidus, the substantia nigra, and the red nucleus. In certain pathological states, such as iron overload disease and neurodegenerative disorders, a disturbed iron metabolism can lead to increased accumulation of iron not only in these areas, but also in the brain regions that are typically low in iron content. Recent studies of the physical and magnetic properties of metalloproteins, and in particular the discovery of biogenic magnetite in human brain tissue, have raised new questions about the role of biogenic iron formations in living organisms. Further investigations revealed the presence of magnetite-like crystalline structures in human ferritin, and indicated that released ferritin iron might act as promoter of oxidative damage to tissue, therefore contributing to pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. The purpose of this work was to examine the elemental composition and structure of iron deposits in normal brain tissue as well as tissue affected by neurodegenerative disorders. Employing the methods of X-ray microfocus fluorescence mapping, X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (XAFS), and light and electron microscopic examinations allows one to obtain qualitative as well as quantitative data with respect to the cellular distribution and chemical state of iron at levels not detected previously. The described tissue preparation technique allows not only satisfactory XAS iron elemental imaging in situ but also multimodal examination with light and electron microscopes of the same samples. The developed protocol has assured consistent and reproducible results on relatively large sections of flat-embedded tissue. The resulting tissue samples were adequate for XAS examination as well as sufficiently well-preserved for future microscopy studies

  19. Segmenting and validating brain tissue definitions in the presence of varying tissue contrast.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ravi; Hao, Xuejun; Peterson, Bradley S

    2017-01-01

    We propose a method for segmenting brain tissue as either gray matter or white matter in the presence of varying tissue contrast, which can derive from either differential changes in tissue water content or increasing myelin content of white matter. Our method models the spatial distribution of intensities as a Markov Random Field (MRF) and estimates the parameters for the MRF model using a maximum likelihood approach. Although previously described methods have used similar models to segment brain tissue, accurate model of the conditional probabilities of tissue intensities and adaptive estimates of tissue properties to local intensities generates tissue definitions that are accurate and robust to variations in tissue contrast with age and across illnesses. Robustness to variations in tissue contrast is important to understand normal brain development and to identify the brain bases of neurological and psychiatric illnesses. We used simulated brains of varying tissue contrast to compare both visually and quantitatively the performance of our method with the performance of prior methods. We assessed validity of the cortical definitions by associating cortical thickness with various demographic features, clinical measures, and medication use in our three large cohorts of participants who were either healthy or who had Bipolar Disorder (BD), Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), or familial risk for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). We assessed validity of the tissue definitions using synthetic brains and data for three large cohort of individuals with various neuropsychiatric disorders. Visual inspection and quantitative analyses showed that our method accurately and robustly defined the cortical mantle in brain images with varying contrast. Furthermore, associating the thickness with various demographic and clinical measures generated findings that were novel and supported by histological analyses or were supported by previous MRI studies, thereby validating the cortical

  20. Neonatal Brain Tissue Classification with Morphological Adaptation and Unified Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Beare, Richard J.; Chen, Jian; Kelly, Claire E.; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Smyser, Christopher D.; Rogers, Cynthia E.; Loh, Wai Y.; Matthews, Lillian G.; Cheong, Jeanie L. Y.; Spittle, Alicia J.; Anderson, Peter J.; Doyle, Lex W.; Inder, Terrie E.; Seal, Marc L.; Thompson, Deanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the distribution of brain tissue types (tissue classification) in neonates is necessary for studying typical and atypical brain development, such as that associated with preterm birth, and may provide biomarkers for neurodevelopmental outcomes. Compared with magnetic resonance images of adults, neonatal images present specific challenges that require the development of specialized, population-specific methods. This paper introduces MANTiS (Morphologically Adaptive Neonatal Tissue Segmentation), which extends the unified segmentation approach to tissue classification implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software to neonates. MANTiS utilizes a combination of unified segmentation, template adaptation via morphological segmentation tools and topological filtering, to segment the neonatal brain into eight tissue classes: cortical gray matter, white matter, deep nuclear gray matter, cerebellum, brainstem, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), hippocampus and amygdala. We evaluated the performance of MANTiS using two independent datasets. The first dataset, provided by the NeoBrainS12 challenge, consisted of coronal T2-weighted images of preterm infants (born ≤30 weeks' gestation) acquired at 30 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5), coronal T2-weighted images of preterm infants acquired at 40 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5) and axial T2-weighted images of preterm infants acquired at 40 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5). The second dataset, provided by the Washington University NeuroDevelopmental Research (WUNDeR) group, consisted of T2-weighted images of preterm infants (born <30 weeks' gestation) acquired shortly after birth (n = 12), preterm infants acquired at term-equivalent age (n = 12), and healthy term-born infants (born ≥38 weeks' gestation) acquired within the first 9 days of life (n = 12). For the NeoBrainS12 dataset, mean Dice scores comparing MANTiS with manual segmentations were all above 0.7, except for the cortical gray

  1. Laser-induced autofluorescence measurements on brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Pascu, Alexandru; Romanitan, Mihaela Oana; Delgado, Josè-Maria; Danaila, Leon; Pascu, Mihail-Lucian

    2009-12-01

    It was demonstrated that comparison of the autofluorescence spectra induced with laser radiation in ultraviolet and visible allows the identification of brain tumor tissues and normal tissues as well as the difference between them. The measurements were performed on homogenates to ensure an optimal reproducibility of the results. We conclude that the autofluorescence spectra of the tumor samples are close to those measured for normal tissues, but there are differences between them that allow distinguishing the tumor from the normal tissue. One difference is that for each pair of tumor/normal tissue samples, the peak autofluorescence for the normal tissue is shifted with respect to that for the tumor-typically between 10 and 20 nm; overall autofluorescence intensity is also different for the components of the same pair, the difference being in the range 15%-30%. A parameter that can also be used is the variation of the ratio of some fluorescence intensity peaks between normal and tumor tissue samples. Measurements of this parameter yielded variations ranging between 10% and 40%. Another conclusion of the study is that in vitro experiments show that it is mandatory to use pairs of samples (normal/tumor tissue) taken from the same patient. The results show that, after further experimental in vitro tests, the method may be adapted to real-time intraoperative conditions by measuring the autofluorescence of the tumor and of the adjacent normal tissue.

  2. Transistor needle chip for recording in brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felderer, Florian; Fromherz, Peter

    2011-07-01

    We report on a proof-of-principle experiment for the direct interfacing of transistors with intact brain tissue. A transistor needle chip (TNC) with a TiO2 surface is fabricated from a silicon-on-insulator wafer and impaled into an acute brain slice cut from hippocampus of the rat. While stimulating the Schaffer collateral, a local field potential is recorded in stratum radiatum of the CA1 region with field-effect transistors in the central part of the slice where the tissue is not damaged by the cutting process. After the impalement, the signal amplitude is small. Within an hour, it increases to a stable level around -2 mV as is recorded with a conventional micropipette electrode. The recovery indicates that the tissue is able to adapt to the impaled chip. Upon repeated impalements at the same position, the large signal is observed without delay. A profile of the transistor signal across the slice is due to the boundary conditions of a brain slice with both surfaces held near ground potential. The experiments with the TNC prototype are a basis for the development of silicon needle chips with a large multi-transistor array (MTA) for applications in brain-computer interfacing.

  3. Functional tissue pulsatility imaging of the brain during visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kucewicz, John C; Dunmire, Barbrina; Leotta, Daniel F; Panagiotides, Heracles; Paun, Marla; Beach, Kirk W

    2007-05-01

    Functional tissue pulsatility imaging is a new ultrasonic technique being developed to map brain function by measuring changes in tissue pulsatility as a result of changes in blood flow with neuronal activation. The technique is based in principle on plethysmography, an older, nonultrasound technology for measuring expansion of a whole limb or body part as a result of perfusion. Perfused tissue expands by a fraction of a percent early in each cardiac cycle when arterial inflow exceeds venous outflow, and it relaxes later in the cardiac cycle when venous drainage dominates. Tissue pulsatility imaging (TPI) uses tissue Doppler signal processing methods to measure this pulsatile "plethysmographic" signal from hundreds or thousands of sample volumes in an ultrasound image plane. A feasibility study was conducted to determine if TPI could be used to detect regional brain activation during a visual contrast-reversing checkerboard block paradigm study. During a study, ultrasound data were collected transcranially from the occipital lobe as a subject viewed alternating blocks of a reversing checkerboard (stimulus condition) and a static, gray screen (control condition). Multivariate analysis of variance was used to identify sample volumes with significantly different pulsatility waveforms during the control and stimulus blocks. In 7 of 14 studies, consistent regions of activation were detected from tissue around the major vessels perfusing the visual cortex.

  4. Magnetic resonance electric property imaging of brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Zhu, Shanan; He, Bin

    2009-01-01

    The electric properties (EPs) of brain tissues, i.e., the electric conductivity and permittivity, can provide important information for diagnosis of various brain disorders. A high-field MRI system is accompanied by significant wave propagation effects, and the radio frequency (RF) radiation is dependent on EPs of the biological tissue. Based on the measurement of the active transverse magnetic component of the applied RF field (known as B1-mapping technique), we have developed a dual-excitation algorithm, which uses two sets of measured B1 data, to noninvasively reconstruct the biological tissue's electric properties. A series of computer simulations were conducted to evaluate the feasibility and performance of the proposed method on a 3-D head model within a birdcage coil and a transverse electromagnetic coil. Compared with other B1-mapping based reconstruction algorithms, our approach provides superior performance without the need for iterative computations. The present simulation results indicate good reconstruction of electric properties of brain tissues from noninvasive MRI B1 mapping.

  5. Using autopsy brain tissue to study alcohol-related brain damage in the genomic age.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Greg T; Sheedy, Donna; Kril, Jillian J

    2014-01-01

    The New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre at the University of Sydney, Australia, is one of the few human brain banks dedicated to the study of the effects of chronic alcoholism. The bank was affiliated in 1994 as a member of the National Network of Brain Banks and also focuses on schizophrenia and healthy control tissue. Alcohol abuse is a major problem worldwide, manifesting in such conditions as fetal alcohol syndrome, adolescent binge drinking, alcohol dependency, and alcoholic neurodegeneration. The latter is also referred to as alcohol-related brain damage (ARBD). The study of postmortem brain tissue is ideally suited to determining the effects of long-term alcohol abuse, but it also makes an important contribution to understanding pathogenesis across the spectrum of alcohol misuse disorders and potentially other neurodegenerative diseases. Tissue from the bank has contributed to 330 peer-reviewed journal articles including 120 related to alcohol research. Using the results of these articles, this review chronicles advances in alcohol-related brain research since 2003, the so-called genomic age. In particular, it concentrates on transcriptomic approaches to the pathogenesis of ARBD and builds on earlier reviews of structural changes (Harper et al. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 2003;27:951) and proteomics (Matsumoto et al. Expert Rev Proteomics 2007;4:539).

  6. Cerebral Apolipoprotein-D Is Hypoglycosylated Compared to Peripheral Tissues and Is Variably Expressed in Mouse and Human Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyun; Ruberu, Kalani; Karl, Tim; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cerebral apoD levels increase with age and in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In addition, loss of cerebral apoD in the mouse increases sensitivity to lipid peroxidation and accelerates AD pathology. Very little data are available, however, regarding the expression of apoD protein levels in different brain regions. This is important as both brain lipid peroxidation and neurodegeneration occur in a region-specific manner. Here we addressed this using western blotting of seven different regions (olfactory bulb, hippocampus, frontal cortex, striatum, cerebellum, thalamus and brain stem) of the mouse brain. Our data indicate that compared to most brain regions, the hippocampus is deficient in apoD. In comparison to other major organs and tissues (liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal gland, heart and skeletal muscle), brain apoD was approximately 10-fold higher (corrected for total protein levels). Our analysis also revealed that brain apoD was present at a lower apparent molecular weight than tissue and plasma apoD. Utilising peptide N-glycosidase-F and neuraminidase to remove N-glycans and sialic acids, respectively, we found that N-glycan composition (but not sialylation alone) were responsible for this reduction in molecular weight. We extended the studies to an analysis of human brain regions (hippocampus, frontal cortex, temporal cortex and cerebellum) where we found that the hippocampus had the lowest levels of apoD. We also confirmed that human brain apoD was present at a lower molecular weight than in plasma. In conclusion, we demonstrate apoD protein levels are variable across different brain regions, that apoD levels are much higher in the brain compared to other tissues and organs, and that cerebral apoD has a lower molecular weight than peripheral apoD; a phenomenon that is due to the N-glycan content of the protein. PMID:26829325

  7. Isatin, regional distribution in rat brain and tissues.

    PubMed

    Watkins, P; Clow, A; Glover, V; Halket, J; Przyborowska, A; Sandler, M

    1990-01-01

    Isatin has recently been identified in rat tissues and normal human urine, where it forms the major proportion of the endogenous monoamine oxidase inhibitor, tribulin. In this paper, we show that isatin, measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, has a distinct regional distribution in rat tissues, with highest concentrations in seminal vesicles (1.6 ?g/g) and vas deferens (3.4 ?g/g). There was also a discontinuous distribution within rat brain, concentrations being highest in the hippocampus (0.13 ?g/g).

  8. Chemoselective imaging of mouse brain tissue via multiplex CARS microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pohling, Christoph; Buckup, Tiago; Pagenstecher, Axel; Motzkus, Marcus

    2011-08-01

    The fast and reliable characterization of pathological tissue is a debated topic in the application of vibrational spectroscopy in medicine. In the present work we apply multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (MCARS) to the investigation of fresh mouse brain tissue. The combination of imaginary part extraction followed by principal component analysis led to color contrast between grey and white matter as well as layers of granule and Purkinje cells. Additional quantitative information was obtained by using a decomposition algorithm. The results perfectly agree with HE stained references slides prepared separately making multiplex CARS an ideal approach for chemoselective imaging.

  9. QSAR analysis of blood-brain distribution: the influence of plasma and brain tissue binding.

    PubMed

    Lanevskij, Kiril; Dapkunas, Justas; Juska, Liutauras; Japertas, Pranas; Didziapetris, Remigijus

    2011-06-01

    The extent of brain delivery expressed as steady-state brain/blood distribution ratio (log BB) is the most frequently used parameter for characterizing central nervous system exposure of drugs and drug candidates. The aim of the current study was to propose a physicochemical QSAR model for log BB prediction. Model development involved the following steps: (i) A data set consisting of 470 experimental log BB values determined in rodents was compiled and verified to ensure that selected data represented drug disposition governed by passive diffusion across blood-brain barrier. (ii) Available log BB values were corrected for unbound fraction in plasma to separate the influence of drug binding to brain and plasma constituents. (iii) The resulting ratios of total brain to unbound plasma concentrations reflecting brain tissue binding were described by a nonlinear ionization-specific model in terms of octanol/water log P and pK(a). The results of internal and external validation demonstrated good predictive power of the obtained model as both log BB and brain tissue binding strength were predicted with residual mean square error of 0.4 log units. The statistical parameters were similar among training and validation sets, indicating that the model is not likely to be overfitted.

  10. Distribution of opiate alkaloids in brain tissue of experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Djurendic-Brenesel, Maja; Pilija, Vladimir; Mimica-Dukic, Neda; Budakov, Branislav; Cvjeticanin, Stanko

    2012-12-01

    The present study examined regional distribution of opiate alkaloids from seized heroin in brain regions of experimental animals in order to select parts with the highest content of opiates. Their analysis should contribute to resolve causes of death due to heroin intake. The tests were performed at different time periods (5, 15, 45 and 120 min) after male and female Wistar rats were treated with seized heroin. Opiate alkaloids (codeine, morphine, acetylcodeine, 6-acetylmorphine and 3,6-diacetylmorphine) were quantitatively determined in brain regions known for their high concentration of µ-opiate receptors: cortex, brainstem, amygdala and basal ganglia, by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The highest content of opiate alkaloids in the brain tissue of female animals was found 15 min and in male animals 45 min after treatment. The highest content of opiates was determined in the basal ganglia of the animals of both genders, indicating that this part of brain tissue presents a reliable sample for identifying and assessing contents of opiates after heroin intake.

  11. In vitro bioengineered model of cortical brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chwalek, Karolina; Tang-Schomer, Min D.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-01-01

    A bioengineered model of three-dimensional (3D) brain-like tissue was developed using silk-collagen protein scaffolds seeded with primary cortical neurons. The scaffold design provides compartmentalized control for spatial separation of neuronal cell bodies and neural projections, resembling the layered structure of the brain (cerebral cortex). Neurons seeded in a donut-shaped porous silk sponge grow robust neuronal projections within a collagen-filled central region, generating 3D neural networks with structural and functional connectivity. The silk scaffold preserves the mechanical stability of the engineered tissues, allowing for ease of handling, long-term culture in vitro, anchoring of the central collagen gel to avoid shrinkage, and neural network maturation. This protocol describes the preparation and manipulation of silk-collagen constructs, including the isolation and seeding of primary rat cortical neurons. This 3D technique is useful for mechanical injury studies, as a drug screening tool and could serve as a foundation for brain-related disease models. The protocol of construct assembly takes 2 days and the resulting tissues can be maintained in culture for several weeks. PMID:26270395

  12. Expression analysis of BACE2 in brain and peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Bennett, B D; Babu-Khan, S; Loeloff, R; Louis, J C; Curran, E; Citron, M; Vassar, R

    2000-07-07

    Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme (BACE) is a novel transmembrane aspartic protease that possesses all the known characteristics of the beta-secretase involved in Alzheimer's disease (Vassar, R., Bennett, B. D., Babu-Khan, S., Kahn, S., Mendiaz, E. A., Denis, P., Teplow, D. B., Ross, S., Amarante, P., Loeloff, R., Luo, Y., Fisher, S., Fuller, J., Edenson, S., Lile, J., Jarosinski, M. A., Biere, A. L., Curran, E., Burgess, T., Louis, J. -C., Collins, F., Treanor, J., Rogers, G., and Citron, M. (1999) Science 286, 735-741). We have analyzed the sequence and expression pattern of a BACE homolog termed BACE2. BACE and BACE2 are unique among aspartic proteases in that they possess a carboxyl-terminal extension with a predicted transmembrane region and together they define a new family. Northern analysis reveals that BACE2 mRNA is expressed at low levels in most human peripheral tissues and at higher levels in colon, kidney, pancreas, placenta, prostate, stomach, and trachea. Human adult and fetal whole brain and most adult brain subregions express very low or undetectable levels of BACE2 mRNA. In addition, in situ hybridization of adult rat brain shows that BACE2 mRNA is expressed at very low levels in most brain regions. The very low or undetectable levels of BACE2 mRNA in the brain are not consistent with the expression pattern predicted for beta-secretase.

  13. Effects of tissue susceptibility on brain temperature mapping.

    PubMed

    Maudsley, Andrew A; Goryawala, Mohammed Z; Sheriff, Sulaiman

    2017-02-01

    A method for mapping of temperature over a large volume of the brain using volumetric proton MR spectroscopic imaging has been implemented and applied to 150 normal subjects. Magnetic susceptibility-induced frequency shifts in gray- and white-matter regions were measured and included as a correction in the temperature mapping calculation. Additional sources of magnetic susceptibility variations of the individual metabolite resonance frequencies were also observed that reflect the cellular-level organization of the brain metabolites, with the most notable differences being attributed to changes of the N-Acetylaspartate resonance frequency that reflect the intra-axonal distribution and orientation of the white-matter tracts with respect to the applied magnetic field. These metabolite-specific susceptibility effects are also shown to change with age. Results indicate no change of apparent brain temperature with age from 18 to 84 years old, with a trend for increased brain temperature throughout the cerebrum in females relative for males on the order of 0.1°C; slightly increased temperatures in the left hemisphere relative to the right; and a lower temperature of 0.3°C in the cerebellum relative to that of cerebral white-matter. This study presents a novel acquisition method for noninvasive measurement of brain temperature that is of potential value for diagnostic purposes and treatment monitoring, while also demonstrating limitations of the measurement due to the confounding effects of tissue susceptibility variations.

  14. Microscopy and chemical imaging of Behcet brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranyosiova, Monika; Michalka, Miroslav; Kopani, Martin; Rychly, Boris; Jakubovsky, Jan; Velic, Dusan

    2008-12-01

    Chemical composition and distribution of molecules and elements in a human brain tissue of Behcet diseased patient are of interest. Behcet disease is a multi-system disorder of which pathogenesis and chemical causality are still uncertain. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry is used along with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis providing complex composition in Behcet disease and control tissues. Determined organic compounds are represented by fragments of carbohydrates, phospholipids, amino acids, and peptides. The distributions of inorganic species are well represented by heavy trace elements and by oxides in positive and negative polarities of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, respectively. Organic and inorganic compounds are qualitatively determined in both samples, Behcet and control, providing complementary chemical images. The complementary chemical images interestingly change with the quantitative regression of organic compounds distribution, characteristic for the healthy control, towards inorganic compounds distribution, characteristic for Behcet tissue.

  15. Imaging Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Smith, Jordan N.; Timchalk, Charles; Laskin, Julia

    2013-01-15

    Imaging mass spectrometry offers simultaneous detection of drugs, drug metabolites and endogenous substances in a single experiment. This is important when evaluating effects of a drug on a complex organ system such as the brain, where there is a need to understand how regional drug distribution impacts function. Nicotine is an addictive drug and its action in the brain is of high interest. Here we use nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, nano-DESI, imaging to discover the localization of nicotine in rat brain tissue after in vivo administration of nicotine. Nano-DESI is a new ambient technique that enables spatially-resolved analysis of tissue samples without special sample pretreatment. We demonstrate high sensitivity of nano-DESI imaging that enables detection of only 0.7 fmole nicotine per pixel in the complex brain matrix. Furthermore, by adding deuterated nicotine to the solvent, we examined how matrix effects, ion suppression, and normalization affect the observed nicotine distribution. Finally, we provide preliminary results suggesting that nicotine localizes to the hippocampal substructure called dentate gyrus.

  16. Diffusion MRI at 25: Exploring brain tissue structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Bihan, Denis Le; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion MRI (or dMRI) came into existence in the mid-1980s. During the last 25 years, diffusion MRI has been extraordinarily successful (with more than 300,000 entries on Google Scholar for diffusion MRI). Its main clinical domain of application has been neurological disorders, especially for the management of patients with acute stroke. It is also rapidly becoming a standard for white matter disorders, as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can reveal abnormalities in white matter fiber structure and provide outstanding maps of brain connectivity. The ability to visualize anatomical connections between different parts of the brain, non-invasively and on an individual basis, has emerged as a major breakthrough for neurosciences. The driving force of dMRI is to monitor microscopic, natural displacements of water molecules that occur in brain tissues as part of the physical diffusion process. Water molecules are thus used as a probe that can reveal microscopic details about tissue architecture, either normal or in a diseased state. PMID:22120012

  17. VEGF expression in human brain tissue after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mărgăritescu, Otilia; Pirici, D; Mărgăritescu, Cl

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the third most common cause of death in humans, requiring further studies to elucidate its pathophysiological background. One potential mechanism to increase oxygen delivery to the affected tissue is induction of angiogenesis. The most potent proangiogenic factor is VEGF. For this reason, our study investigated immunohistochemically VEGF reactivity in different cellular brain compartments from 15 ischemic stroke patients, as well as from 2 age control cases. By enzymatic immunohistochemistry, we investigate VEGF expression in different brain cell compartments and then we quantified its signal intensity by assessing integrated optical densities (IOD). To establish the exact cellular brain topography of VEGF immunoreactivity we performed double fluorescent immunohistochemistry series (VEGF÷NeuN, GFAP, CD68, CD105). In control samples, VEGF reactivity was observed especially in neurons from the Brodmann cortical layers IV to VI and in protoplasmic astrocytes from the deeper layers of gray matter and in endothelial cells from normal blood vessels because of systemic hypoxia generated after death. In acute ischemic stroke samples, this reactivity was noticed in all brain cellular compartments but with different intensities. The most reactive compartment was the neurons, the intensity of VEGF reaction decreasing with the lesional age from the core infarct toward intact adjacent brain cortex. With a lower intensity, VEGF reaction was noticed in astrocytes compartments, especially in gemistocytic astrocytes adjacent to the liquefaction zone. We also noticed a weak reaction in activated non-phagocytic microglia from the periphery of liquefaction zones, and high VEGF-CD105 colocalization values at the level of microvessels that surround the infarcted brain area. In conclusion, this reactivity could suggest that VEGF might exhibit neuronal and glial protective effects and also a neoangiogenic property in acute ischemic stroke, facts that may have

  18. Fungal Enolase, β-Tubulin, and Chitin Are Detected in Brain Tissue from Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pisa, Diana; Alonso, Ruth; Rábano, Alberto; Horst, Michael N.; Carrasco, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings provide evidence that fungal structures can be detected in brain tissue from Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients using rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against whole fungal cells. In the present work, we have developed and tested specific antibodies that recognize the fungal proteins, enolase and β-tubulin, and an antibody that recognizes the fungal polysaccharide chitin. Consistent with our previous studies, a number of rounded yeast-like and hyphal structures were detected using these antibodies in brain sections from AD patients. Some of these structures were intracellular and, strikingly, some were found to be located inside nuclei from neurons, whereas other fungal structures were detected extracellularly. Corporya amylacea from AD patients also contained enolase and β-tubulin as revealed by these selective antibodies, but were devoid of fungal chitin. Importantly, brain sections from control subjects were usually negative for staining with the three antibodies. However, a few fungal structures can be observed in some control individuals. Collectively, these findings indicate the presence of two fungal proteins, enolase and β-tubulin, and the polysaccharide chitin, in CNS tissue from AD patients. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis that AD is caused by disseminated fungal infection. PMID:27872620

  19. Brain Tissue Compartment Density Estimated Using Diffusion-Weighted MRI Yields Tissue Parameters Consistent With Histology

    PubMed Central

    Sepehrband, Farshid; Clark, Kristi A.; Ullmann, Jeremy F.P.; Kurniawan, Nyoman D.; Leanage, Gayeshika; Reutens, David C.; Yang, Zhengyi

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether quantitative density measures of cerebral tissue consistent with histology can be obtained from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By incorporating prior knowledge of myelin and cell membrane densities, absolute tissue density values were estimated from relative intra-cellular and intra-neurite density values obtained from diffusion MRI. The NODDI (neurite orientation distribution and density imaging) technique, which can be applied clinically, was used. Myelin density estimates were compared with the results of electron and light microscopy in ex vivo mouse brain and with published density estimates in a healthy human brain. In ex vivo mouse brain, estimated myelin densities in different sub-regions of the mouse corpus callosum were almost identical to values obtained from electron microscopy (Diffusion MRI: 42±6%, 36±4% and 43±5%; electron microscopy: 41±10%, 36±8% and 44±12% in genu, body and splenium, respectively). In the human brain, good agreement was observed between estimated fiber density measurements and previously reported values based on electron microscopy. Estimated density values were unaffected by crossing fibers. PMID:26096639

  20. Experimental studies with selected light sources for NIRS of brain tissue: quantifying tissue chromophore concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myllylä, Teemu; Korhonen, Vesa; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Tuchin, Valery

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) based techniques are utilised in quantifying changes of chromophore concentrations in tissue. Particularly, non-invasive in vivo measurements of tissue oxygenation in the cerebral cortex are of interest. The measurement method is based on illuminating tissue and measuring the back-scattered light at wavelengths of interest. Tissue illumination can be realised using different techniques and various light sources. Commonly, lasers and laser diodes (LD) are utilised, but also high-power light emitting diodes (HPLED) are becoming more common. At the moment, a wide range of available narrow-band light sources exists, covering basically the entire spectrum of interest in brain tissue NIRS measurements. In this paper, in the centre of our interest are LDs and HPLEDs, because of their affordability, efficiency in terms of radiant flux versus size and easiness to adopt in in vivo medical applications. We compare characteristics of LDs and HPLEDs at specific wavelengths and their suitability for in vivo quantifying of different tissue chromophore concentration, particularly in cerebral blood flow (CBF). A special focus is on shape and width of the wavelength bands of interest, generated by the LDs and HPLEDs. Moreover, we experimentally study such effects as, spectroscopy cross talk, separability and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when quantifying tissue chromophore concentration. Chromophores of our interest are cytochrome, haemoglobin and water. Various LDs and HPLEDs, producing narrow-band wavelengths in the range from 500 nm to 1000 nm are tested.

  1. Inhibitory effect of added adenosine diphosphate on palmitate oxidation in mitochondria from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, N.

    1986-05-01

    It is generally accepted that fatty acids are poor substrates for the oxidation in brain because plasma fatty acids do not traverse the blood-brain barrier. However, a regional difference in the barrier suggests that fatty acids are available for oxidation. Why most of fatty acids are not oxidized is not certain. For this reason, regulation of oxidation of (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate (pal) in rat brain has been studied in nonsynaptic mitochondria (mit) prepared by use of Ficoll/sucrose density gradient. The authors found two contrasting oxidations with respect to ATP concentration; Type A at 2 mM and Type B at 0.5 mM. The rate of Type A was 50% of the level of B. Type A was inhibited by high levels of L-carnitine (car) and Mg/sup 2 +/. Added ADP inhibited Type A, but stimulated B. Addition of carboxyatractyloside was stimulatory for Type A, but inhibitory for B. The rate of Type A showed a downward curvature with increasing protein concentration while that of B showed a linear relationship. Addition of NH/sub 4//sup +/ to Type A stimulated the rate and reduced the inhibitory effects of both added ADP and high levels of car. These results suggest that under the normal level of ATP, the carnitine-dependent transport of pal is inhibited (thereby resulting in the inhibition in pal oxidation) by the transport of ADP into mit mediated by the ATP-ADP translocase, but that the inhibition is not observed under the specified conditions or regions where ATP levels are low or ammonia levels are high.

  2. Comparative Tissue Stainability of Lawsonia inermis (Henna) and Eosin as Counterstains to Hematoxylin in Brain Tissues.

    PubMed

    Alawa, Judith N; Gideon, Gbenga O; Adetiba, Bamidele; Alawa, Clement B

    2015-04-01

    We hyposthesized that henna staining could provide an alternative to eosin when used as a counterstain to hematoxylin for understanding basic neurohistological principles. Therefore, this study was aimed at investigating the suitability of henna as counterstain to hematoxylin for the demonstration of the layer stratification and cellular distribution in the brain tissue. Henna stained nervous tissue by reacting with the basic elements in proteins via its amino groups. It stained the neuropil and connective tissue membranes brown and effectively outlined the perikarya of neurons with no visible nuclei demonstrating that it is an acidic dye. Henna as a counterstain to hematoxylin demonstrated reliability as a new neurohistological stain. It facilitated identification of cortical layer stratification and cellular distribution in brain tissue sections from Wistar rats. This was comparable to standard hematoxylin and eosin staining as morphological and morphometrical analyses of stained cells did not show significant differences in size or number. This study presents a method for staining with henna and demonstrates that although henna and eosin belong to different dye groups (anthraquinone and xanthenes, respectively) based on their chromophores, they share similar staining techniques and thus could be used interchangeably in neurohistology.

  3. Brain tissue pressure measurements in perinatal and adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hornig, G W; Lorenzo, A V; Zavala, L M; Welch, K

    1987-12-01

    Brain tissue pressure (BTP) in pre- and post-natal anesthetized rabbits, held in a stereotactic head holder, was measured with a fluid filled 23 gauge open-ended cannula connected distally to a pressure transducer. By advancing the cannula step wise through a hole in the cranium it was possible to sequentially measure pressure from the cranial subarachnoid space, cortex, ventricle and basal ganglia. Separate cannulas and transducers were used to measure CSFP from the cisterna magna and arterial and/or venous pressure. Pressure recordings obtained when the tip of the BTP cannula was located in the cranial subarachnoid space or ventricle exhibited respiratory and blood pressure pulsations equivalent to and in phase with CSF pulsations recorded from the cisterna magna. When the tip was advanced into brain parenchymal sites such pulsations were suppressed or non-detectable unless communication with a CSF compartment had been established inadvertently. Although CSF pressures in the three spinal fluid compartments were equivalent, in most animals BTP was higher than CSFP. However, after momentary venting of the system BTP equilibrated at a pressure below that of CSFP. We speculate that venting of the low compliance system (1.20 x 10(-5) ml/mmHg) relieves the isometric pressure build-up due to insertion of the cannula into brain parenchyma. Under these conditions, and at all ages examined, BTP in the rabbit is consistently lower than CSFP and, as with CSFP, it increases as the animal matures.

  4. 3-D brain MRI tissue classification on FPGAs.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jahyun J; Evans, Alan C; Gross, Warren J

    2009-12-01

    Many automatic algorithms have been proposed for analyzing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets. With the increasingly large data sets being used in brain mapping, there has been a significant rise in the need for accelerating these algorithms. Partial volume estimation (PVE), a brain tissue classification algorithm for MRI, was implemented on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based high performance reconfigurable computer using the Mitrion-C high-level language (HLL). This work develops on prior work in which we conducted initial studies on accelerating the prior information estimation algorithm. In this paper, we extend the work to include probability density estimation and present new results and additional analysis. We used several simulated and real human brain MR images to evaluate the accuracy and performance improvement of the proposed algorithm. The FPGA-based probability density estimation and prior information estimation implementation achieved an average speedup over an Itanium 2 CPU of 2.5 x and 9.4 x , respectively. The overall performance improvement of the FPGA-based PVE algorithm was 5.1 x with four FPGAs.

  5. Edaravone-Encapsulated Agonistic Micelles Rescue Ischemic Brain Tissue by Tuning Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qu; Cai, Yu; Li, Sihan; Liu, Haoran; Zhou, Xingyu; Lu, Chunqiang; Gao, Xihui; Qian, Jun; Zhang, Jun; Ju, Shenghong; Li, Cong

    2017-01-01

    Thrombolysis has been a standard treatment for ischemic stroke. However, only 2-7% patients benefit from it because the thrombolytic agent has to be injected within 4.5 h after the onset of symptoms to avoid the increasing risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. As the only clinically approved neuroprotective drug, edaravone (EDV) rescues ischemic brain tissues by eradicating over-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) without the limitation of therapeutic time-window. However, EDV's short circulation half-life and inadequate cerebral uptake attenuate its therapeutic efficacy. Here we developed an EDV-encapsulated agonistic micelle (EDV-AM) to specifically deliver EDV into brain ischemia by actively tuning blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. The EDV-AM actively up-regulated endothelial monolayer permeability in vitro. HPLC studies showed that EDV-AM delivered more EDV into brain ischemia than free EDV after intravenous injection. Magnetic resonance imaging also demonstrated that EDV-AM more rapidly salvaged ischemic tissue than free EDV. Diffusion tensor imaging indicated the highest efficiency of EDV-AM in accelerating axonal remodeling in the ipsilesional white matter and improving functional behaviors of ischemic stroke models. The agonistic micelle holds promise to improve the therapeutic efficiency of ischemic stroke patients who miss the thrombolytic treatment. PMID:28382161

  6. Systemic Delivery of Blood-Brain Barrier Targeted Polymeric Nanoparticles Enhances Delivery to Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Saucier-Sawyer, Jennifer K.; Deng, Yang; Seo, Young-Eun; Cheng, Christopher J.; Zhang, Junwei; Quijano, Elias; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic agents to the central nervous system is a significant challenge, hindering progress in the treatment of diseases such as glioblastoma. Due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), therapeutic agents do not readily transverse the brain endothelium to enter the parenchyma. Previous reports suggest that surface modification of polymer nanoparticles can improve their ability to cross the BBB, but it is unclear whether the observed enhancements in transport are large enough to enhance therapy. In this study, we synthesized two degradable polymer nanoparticle systems surface-modified with ligands previously suggested to improve BBB transport, and tested their ability to cross the BBB after intravenous injection in mice. All nanoparticle preparations were able to cross the BBB, although generally in low amounts (<0.5% of the injected dose), which was consistent with prior reports. One nanoparticle produced significantly higher brain uptake (~0.8% of the injected dose): a block copolymer of polylactic acid and hyperbranched polyglycerol, surface modified with adenosine (PLA-HPG-Ad). PLA-HPG-Ad nanoparticles provided controlled release of camptothecin, killing U87 glioma cells in culture. When administered intravenously in mice with intracranial U87 tumors, they failed to increase survival. These results suggest that enhancing nanoparticle transport across the BBB does not necessarily yield proportional pharmacological effects. PMID:26453169

  7. Advanced biomaterial strategies to transplant preformed micro-tissue engineered neural networks into the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. P.; Struzyna, L. A.; Murphy, P. L.; Adewole, D. O.; Kuo, E.; Cullen, D. K.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Connectome disruption is a hallmark of many neurological diseases and trauma with no current strategies to restore lost long-distance axonal pathways in the brain. We are creating transplantable micro-tissue engineered neural networks (micro-TENNs), which are preformed constructs consisting of embedded neurons and long axonal tracts to integrate with the nervous system to physically reconstitute lost axonal pathways. Approach. We advanced micro-tissue engineering techniques to generate micro-TENNs consisting of discrete populations of mature primary cerebral cortical neurons spanned by long axonal fascicles encased in miniature hydrogel micro-columns. Further, we improved the biomaterial encasement scheme by adding a thin layer of low viscosity carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) to enable needle-less insertion and rapid softening for mechanical similarity with brain tissue. Main results. The engineered architecture of cortical micro-TENNs facilitated robust neuronal viability and axonal cytoarchitecture to at least 22 days in vitro. Micro-TENNs displayed discrete neuronal populations spanned by long axonal fasciculation throughout the core, thus mimicking the general systems-level anatomy of gray matter—white matter in the brain. Additionally, micro-columns with thin CMC-coating upon mild dehydration were able to withstand a force of 893 ± 457 mN before buckling, whereas a solid agarose cylinder of similar dimensions was predicted to withstand less than 150 μN of force. This thin CMC coating increased the stiffness by three orders of magnitude, enabling needle-less insertion into brain while significantly reducing the footprint of previous needle-based delivery methods to minimize insertion trauma. Significance. Our novel micro-TENNs are the first strategy designed for minimally invasive implantation to facilitate nervous system repair by simultaneously providing neuronal replacement and physical reconstruction of long-distance axon pathways in the brain

  8. Brain Tissue Oxygen Monitoring and the Intersection of Brain and Lung: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, Laura B; Burke, John F; Manley, Geoffrey T

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a problem that affects millions of Americans yearly and for which there is no definitive treatment that improves outcome. Continuous brain tissue oxygen (PbtO2 ) monitoring is a complement to traditional brain monitoring techniques, such as intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure. PbtO2 monitoring has not yet become a clinical standard of care, due to several unresolved questions. In this review, we discuss the rationale and technology of PbtO2 monitoring. We review the literature, both historic and current, and show that continuous PbtO2 monitoring is feasible and useful in patient management. PbtO2 numbers reflect cerebral blood flow and oxygen diffusion. Thus, continuous monitoring of PbtO2 yields important information about both the brain and the lung. The preclinical and clinical studies demonstrating these findings are discussed. In this review, we demonstrate that patient management in a PbtO2 -directed fashion is not the sole answer to the problem of treating traumatic brain injury but is an important adjunct to the armamentarium of multimodal neuromonitoring.

  9. Magnetic resonance brain tissue segmentation based on sparse representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Segmentation or delineation of specific organs and structures in medical images is an important task in the clinical diagnosis and treatment, since it allows to characterize pathologies through imaging measures (biomarkers). In brain imaging, segmentation of main tissues or specific structures is challenging, due to the anatomic variability and complexity, and the presence of image artifacts (noise, intensity inhomogeneities, partial volume effect). In this paper, an automatic segmentation strategy is proposed, based on sparse representations and coupled dictionaries. Image intensity patterns are singly related to tissue labels at the level of small patches, gathering this information in coupled intensity/segmentation dictionaries. This dictionaries are used within a sparse representation framework to find the projection of a new intensity image onto the intensity dictionary, and the same projection can be used with the segmentation dictionary to estimate the corresponding segmentation. Preliminary results obtained with two publicly available datasets suggest that the proposal is capable of estimating adequate segmentations for gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) tissues, with an average overlapping of 0:79 for GM and 0:71 for WM (with respect to original segmentations).

  10. Enrichment of single neurons and defined brain regions from human brain tissue samples for subsequent proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Molina, Mariana; Steinbach, Simone; Park, Young Mok; Yun, Su Yeong; Di Lorenzo Alho, Ana Tereza; Heinsen, Helmut; Grinberg, Lea T; Marcus, Katrin; Leite, Renata E Paraizo; May, Caroline

    2015-07-01

    Brain function in normal aging and neurological diseases has long been a subject of interest. With current technology, it is possible to go beyond descriptive analyses to characterize brain cell populations at the molecular level. However, the brain comprises over 100 billion highly specialized cells, and it is a challenge to discriminate different cell groups for analyses. Isolating intact neurons is not feasible with traditional methods, such as tissue homogenization techniques. The advent of laser microdissection techniques promises to overcome previous limitations in the isolation of specific cells. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for isolating and analyzing neurons from postmortem human brain tissue samples. We describe a workflow for successfully freezing, sectioning and staining tissue for laser microdissection. This protocol was validated by mass spectrometric analysis. Isolated neurons can also be employed for western blotting or PCR. This protocol will enable further examinations of brain cell-specific molecular pathways and aid in elucidating distinct brain functions.

  11. Predicting conversion from MCI to AD with FDG-PET brain images at different prodromal stages.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Carlos; Morgado, Pedro M; Campos Costa, Durval; Silveira, Margarida

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD), while still at the stage known as mild cognitive impairment (MCI), is important for the development of new treatments. However, brain degeneration in MCI evolves with time and differs from patient to patient, making early diagnosis a very challenging task. Despite these difficulties, many machine learning techniques have already been used for the diagnosis of MCI and for predicting MCI to AD conversion, but the MCI group used in previous works is usually very heterogeneous containing subjects at different stages. The goal of this paper is to investigate how the disease stage impacts on the ability of machine learning methodologies to predict conversion. After identifying the converters and estimating the time of conversion (TC) (using neuropsychological test scores), we devised 5 subgroups of MCI converters (MCI-C) based on their temporal distance to the conversion instant (0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months before conversion). Next, we used the FDG-PET images of these subgroups and trained classifiers to distinguish between the MCI-C at different stages and stable non-converters (MCI-NC). Our results show that MCI to AD conversion can be predicted as early as 24 months prior to conversion and that the discriminative power of the machine learning methods decreases with the increasing temporal distance to the TC, as expected. These findings were consistent for all the tested classifiers. Our results also show that this decrease arises from a reduction in the information contained in the regions used for classification and by a decrease in the stability of the automatic selection procedure.

  12. Microwave irradiation of human brain tissue: production of microscopic slides within one day.

    PubMed Central

    Boon, M E; Marani, E; Adriolo, P J; Steffelaar, J W; Bots, G T; Kok, L P

    1988-01-01

    A three step method using microwave irradiation enabled microscopic slides of human brain tissue to be obtained within one working day: steps 1 and 2 hardened and solidified brain tissue; step 3 completed formalin fixation. The efficacy and precision of the method was compared with slides of conventionally processed brain tissue that had been fixed in formalin for six weeks. The microscopic quality of the sections was excellent with good presentation of brain tissue and equalled that of conventionally processed slides. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 PMID:3290268

  13. Corpora Amylacea of Brain Tissue from Neurodegenerative Diseases Are Stained with Specific Antifungal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pisa, Diana; Alonso, Ruth; Rábano, Alberto; Carrasco, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The origin and potential function of corpora amylacea (CA) remains largely unknown. Low numbers of CA are detected in the aging brain of normal individuals but they are abundant in the central nervous system of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we show that CA from patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) contain fungal proteins as detected by immunohistochemistry analyses. Accordingly, CA were labeled with different anti-fungal antibodies at the external surface, whereas the central portion composed of calcium salts contain less proteins. Detection of fungal proteins was achieved using a number of antibodies raised against different fungal species, which indicated cross-reactivity between the fungal proteins present in CA and the antibodies employed. Importantly, these antibodies do not immunoreact with cellular proteins. Additionally, CNS samples from patients diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson's disease (PD) also contained CA that were immunoreactive with a range of antifungal antibodies. However, CA were less abundant in ALS or PD patients as compared to CNS samples from AD. By contrast, CA from brain tissue of control subjects were almost devoid of fungal immunoreactivity. These observations are consistent with the concept that CA associate with fungal infections and may contribute to the elucidation of the origin of CA. PMID:27013948

  14. Corpora Amylacea of Brain Tissue from Neurodegenerative Diseases Are Stained with Specific Antifungal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pisa, Diana; Alonso, Ruth; Rábano, Alberto; Carrasco, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The origin and potential function of corpora amylacea (CA) remains largely unknown. Low numbers of CA are detected in the aging brain of normal individuals but they are abundant in the central nervous system of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we show that CA from patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) contain fungal proteins as detected by immunohistochemistry analyses. Accordingly, CA were labeled with different anti-fungal antibodies at the external surface, whereas the central portion composed of calcium salts contain less proteins. Detection of fungal proteins was achieved using a number of antibodies raised against different fungal species, which indicated cross-reactivity between the fungal proteins present in CA and the antibodies employed. Importantly, these antibodies do not immunoreact with cellular proteins. Additionally, CNS samples from patients diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson's disease (PD) also contained CA that were immunoreactive with a range of antifungal antibodies. However, CA were less abundant in ALS or PD patients as compared to CNS samples from AD. By contrast, CA from brain tissue of control subjects were almost devoid of fungal immunoreactivity. These observations are consistent with the concept that CA associate with fungal infections and may contribute to the elucidation of the origin of CA.

  15. Microwave dielectric measurements and tissue characteristics of the human brain: potential in localizing intracranial tissues.

    PubMed

    Axer, Hubertus; Grässel, David; Steinhauer, Matthias; Stöhr, Peter; John, Andreas; Coenen, Volker A; Jansen, Rolf H; von Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf

    2002-05-21

    This study describes the measurements of dielectric properties in the microwave range to differentiate various human central nervous structures. Using a vector network analyser transmission and reflection coefficients were measured from 500 MHz to 18 GHz in four human formalin fixed human brains. The positions of the electrodes were marked, and the tissue was histologically stained to visualize the myelo- and the cytoarchitecture as well as the nerve fibre orientation at the electrodes. The profiles of the transmission coefficients showed a characteristic minimum peak. In order to describe this peak, a mathematical function was fitted. Parameters derived from digital image processing were used to characterize the myelo- and cytoarchitecure of the tissue at the electrodes. A multiple regression model, with the frequency at the transmission peak minimum as a dependent variable and two tissue characteristics at the two electrodes as independent variables, showed a multiple regression coefficient of 0.765. A neural network model was able to estimate the frequency at the transmission peak minimum from the tissue characteristics at the electrode. The measurements of dielectric properties are well suited to differentiate distinct intracerebral structures. The method could be used for online monitoring of the needle's position during a stereotactic intervention in neurosurgery.

  16. Discriminating healthy from tumor and necrosis tissue in rat brain tissue samples by Raman spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Amharref, Nadia; Beljebbar, Abdelilah; Dukic, Sylvain; Venteo, Lydie; Schneider, Laurence; Pluot, Michel; Manfait, Michel

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate molecular changes associated with glioma tissues by Raman microspectroscopy in order to develop its use in clinical practice. Spectroscopic markers obtained from C6 glioma tissues were compared to conventional histological and histochemical techniques. Cholesterol and phospholipid contents were highest in corpus callosum and decreased gradually towards the cortex surface as well as in the tumor. Two different necrotic areas have been identified: a fully necrotic zone characterized by the presence of plasma proteins and a peri-necrotic area with a high lipid content. This result was confirmed by Nile Red staining. Additionally, one structure was detected in the periphery of the tumor. Invisible with histopathological hematoxylin and eosin staining, it was revealed by immunohistochemical Ki-67 and MT1-MMP staining used to visualize the proliferative and invasive activities of glioma, respectively. Hierarchical cluster analysis on the only cluster averaged spectra showed a clear distinction between normal, tumoral, necrotic and edematous tissues. Raman microspectroscopy can discriminate between healthy and tumoral brain tissue and yield spectroscopic markers associated with the proliferative and invasive properties of glioblastoma. Development of in vivo Raman spectroscopy could thus accurately define tumor margins, identify tumor remnants, and help in the development of novel therapies for glioblastoma.

  17. Brain Tissue Oxygenation and Cerebral Metabolic Patterns in Focal and Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Purins, Karlis; Lewén, Anders; Hillered, Lars; Howells, Tim; Enblad, Per

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Neurointensive care of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients is currently based on intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) targeted protocols. There are reasons to believe that knowledge of brain tissue oxygenation (BtipO2) would add information with the potential of improving patient outcome. The aim of this study was to examine BtipO2 and cerebral metabolism using the Neurovent-PTO probe and cerebral microdialysis (MD) in TBI patients. Methods: Twenty-three severe TBI patients with monitoring of physiological parameters, ICP, CPP, BtipO2, and MD for biomarkers of energy metabolism (glucose, lactate, and pyruvate) and cellular distress (glutamate, glycerol) were included. Patients were grouped according to injury type (focal/diffuse) and placement of the Neurovent-PTO probe and MD catheter (injured/non-injured hemisphere). Results: We observed different patterns in BtipO2 and MD biomarkers in diffuse and focal injury where placement of the probe also influenced the results (ipsilateral/contralateral). In all groups, despite fairly normal levels of ICP and CPP, increased MD levels of glutamate, glycerol, or the L/P ratio were observed at BtipO2 <5 mmHg, indicating increased vulnerability of the brain at this level. Conclusion: Monitoring of BtipO2 adds important information in addition to traditional ICP and CPP surveillance. Because of the different metabolic responses to very low BtipO2 in the individual patient groups we submit that brain tissue oximetry is a complementary tool rather than an alternative to MD monitoring. PMID:24817863

  18. Early alterations in blood and brain RANTES and MCP-1 expression and the effect of exercise frequency in the 3xTg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Morgan; Jones, Terry E; Lu, Qun; Bareiss, Sonja K

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to protect against cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression, however the dose of exercise required to protect against AD is unknown. Recent studies show that the pathological processes leading to AD cause characteristic alterations in blood and brain inflammatory proteins that are associated with the progression of AD, suggesting that these markers could be used to diagnosis and monitor disease progression. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of exercise frequency on AD blood chemokine profiles, and correlate these findings with chemokine brain expression changes in the triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mouse model. Three month old 3xTg-AD mice were subjected to 12 weeks of moderate intensity wheel running at a frequency of either 1×/week or 3×/week. Blood and cortical tissue were analyzed for expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and regulated and normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES). Alterations in blood RANTES and MCP-1 expression were evident at 3 and 6 month old animals compared to WT animals. Three times per week exercise but not 1×/week exercise was effective at reversing serum and brain RANTES and MCP-1 expression to the levels of WT controls, revealing a dose dependent response to exercise. Analysis of these chemokines showed a strong negative correlation between blood and brain expression of RANTES. The results indicate that alterations in serum and brain inflammatory chemokines are evident as early signs of Alzheimer's disease pathology and that higher frequency exercise was necessary to restore blood and brain inflammatory expression levels in this AD mouse model.

  19. Relations between brain tissue loss, CSF biomarkers and the ApoE genetic profile: A longitudinal MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Tosun, Duygu; Schuff, Norbert; Truran-Sacrey, Diana; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Aisen, Paul; Peterson, Ronald; Weiner, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Previously it was reported that Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients have reduced amyloid (Aβ1-42) and elevated total tau (t-tau) and phosphorylated tau (p-tau181p) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), suggesting that these same measures could be used to detect early AD pathology in healthy elderly (CN) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that there would be an association among rates of regional brain atrophy, the CSF biomarkers Aβ1-42, t-tau, and p-tau181p and ApoE ε4 status, and that the pattern of this association would be diagnosis specific. Our findings primarily showed that lower CSF Aβ1-42 and higher tau concentrations were associated with increased rates of regional brain tissue loss and the patterns varied across the clinical groups. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that CSF biomarker concentrations are associated with the characteristic patterns of structural brain changes in CN and MCI that resemble to a large extent the pathology seen in AD. Therefore, the finding of faster progression of brain atrophy in the presence of lower Aβ1-42 levels and higher p-tau levels supports the hypothesis that CSF Aβ1-42 and tau are measures of early AD pathology. Moreover, the relationship among CSF biomarkers, ApoE ε4 status, and brain atrophy rates are regionally varying, supporting the view that the genetic predisposition of the brain to amyloid and tau mediated pathology is regional and disease stage specific. PMID:20570401

  20. Building Biocompatible Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering of the Brain and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Aurand, Emily R.; Wagner, Jennifer; Lanning, Craig; Bjugstad, Kimberly B.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies employing biomaterials have made great progress in the last few decades. However, the tissues of the brain and spinal cord pose unique challenges due to a separate immune system and their nature as soft tissue. Because of this, neural tissue engineering for the brain and spinal cord may require re-establishing biocompatibility and functionality of biomaterials that have previously been successful for tissue engineering in the body. The goal of this review is to briefly describe the distinctive properties of the central nervous system, specifically the neuroimmune response, and to describe the factors which contribute to building polymer hydrogels compatible with this tissue. These factors include polymer chemistry, polymerization and degradation, and the physical and mechanical properties of the hydrogel. By understanding the necessities in making hydrogels biocompatible with tissue of the brain and spinal cord, tissue engineers can then functionalize these materials for repairing and replacing tissue in the central nervous system. PMID:24955749

  1. Amyloid structure exhibits polymorphism on multiple length scales in human brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jiliang; Costantino, Isabel; Venugopalan, Nagarajan; Fischetti, Robert F.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Gomez-Isla, Teresa; Makowski, Lee

    2016-09-15

    Although aggregation of Aβ amyloid fibrils into plaques in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), the correlation between amyloid burden and severity of symptoms is weak. One possible reason is that amyloid fibrils are structurally polymorphic and different polymorphs may contribute differentially to disease. However, the occurrence and distribution of amyloid polymorphisms in human brain is poorly documented. Here we seek to fill this knowledge gap by using X-ray microdiffraction of histological sections of human tissue to map the abundance, orientation and structural heterogeneities of amyloid within individual plaques; among proximal plaques and in subjects with distinct clinical histories. A 5 µ x-ray beam was used to generate diffraction data with each pattern arising from a scattering volume of only ~ 450 µ3 , making possible collection of dozens to hundreds of diffraction patterns from a single amyloid plaque. X-ray scattering from these samples exhibited all the properties expected for scattering from amyloid. Amyloid distribution was mapped using the intensity of its signature 4.7 Å reflection which also provided information on the orientation of amyloid fibrils across plaques. Margins of plaques exhibited a greater degree of orientation than cores and orientation around blood vessels frequently appeared tangential. Variation in the structure of Aβ fibrils is reflected in the shape of the 4.7 Å peak which usually appears as a doublet. Variations in this peak correspond to differences between the structure of amyloid within cores of plaques and at their periphery. Examination of tissue from a mismatch case - an individual with high plaque burden but no overt signs of dementia at time of death - revealed a diversity of structure and spatial distribution of amyloid that is distinct from typical AD cases. As a result, we demonstrate the existence of structural polymorphisms among amyloid within and among plaques of a single individual and

  2. Pre-treatment of rats with ad-hepcidin prevents iron-induced oxidative stress in the brain.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jing; Du, Fang; Qian, Zhong Ming; Luo, Qian Qian; Sheng, Yuan; Yung, Wing-Ho; Xu, Yan Xin; Ke, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Our recent investigation showed that hepcidin can reduce iron in the brain of iron-overloaded rat by down-regulating iron-transport proteins. It has also been demonstrated that iron is a major generator of reactive oxygen species. We therefore hypothesized that hepcidin could prevent iron accumulation and thus reduce iron-mediated oxidative stress in iron-overloaded rats. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of pre-treatment of rats with recombinant-hepcidin-adenovirus (ad-hepcidin) on the contents of iron, dichlorofluorescein and 8-isoprostane in the brain. Hepcidin expression was detected by real-time PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Iron contents were measured using Perl's staining as well as graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Dichlorofluorescein and 8-isoprostane were determined using a fluorescence spectrophotometer and an ELISA kit, respectively. We found that hepcidin contents in the cortex, hippocampus, striatum and substantia nigra of rats treated with ad-hepcidin are 3.50, 2.98, 2.93 and 4.07 fold of those of the control rats respectively. Also, we demonstrated that the increased iron as well as dichlorofluorescein and 8-isoprostane levels in all four brain regions, induced by injection of iron dextran, could be effectively prevented by pre-treatment of the rats with ad-hepcidin. We concluded that pre-treatment with ad-hepcidin could increase hepcidin expression and prevent the increase in iron and reduce reactive oxygen species in the brain of iron-overloaded rats.

  3. Cavitation Induced Structural and Neural Damage in Live Brain Tissue Slices: Relevance to TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-29

    test cell filled with artificial CSF and a brain (or a surrogate) slices which is subjected to high pressure rapid loading with a polymer split...region following cavitation. e. Brain tissue mechanical properties: Brain tissues are super soft (Gə kPa) and challenging to characterize. Baseline...Schematic of the fluid filled test cell assembly with the piston rod and pressure sensor. 5.1.2 PSHPB System Polymer split Hopkinson pressure

  4. Quantitative measurement of [Na+] and [K+] in postmortem human brain tissue indicates disturbances in subjects with Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Graham, Stewart F; Nasarauddin, Muhammad Bin; Carey, Manus; McGuinness, Bernadette; Holscher, Christian; Kehoe, Patrick G; Love, Seth; Passmore, Anthony P; Elliott, Christopher T; Meharg, Andrew; Green, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with significant disturbances in the homeostasis of Na+ and K+ ions as well as reduced levels of Na+/K+ ATPase in the brain. This study used ICP-MS to accurately quantify Na+ and K+ concentrations in human postmortem brain tissue. We analyzed parietal cortex (Brodmann area 7) from 28 cognitively normal age-matched controls, 15 cases of moderate AD, 30 severe AD, and 15 dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Associations were investigated between [Na+] and [K+] and a number of variables including diagnosis, age, gender, Braak tangle stage, amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque load, tau load, frontal tissue pH, and APOE genotype. Brains from patients with severe AD had significantly higher (26%; p < 0.001) [Na+] (mean 65.43 ± standard error 2.91 mmol/kg) than controls, but the concentration was not significantly altered in moderate AD or DLB. [Na+] correlated positively with Braak stage (r = 0.45; p < 0.0001), indicating association with disease severity. [K+] in tissue was 10% lower (p < 0.05) in moderate AD than controls. However, [K+] in severe AD and DLB (40.97 ± 1.31 mmol/kg) was not significantly different from controls. There was a significant positive correlation between [K+] and Aβ plaque load (r = 0.46; p = 0.035), and frontal tissue pH (r = 0.35; p = 0.008). [Na+] was not associated with [K+] across the groups, and neither ion was associated with tau load or APOE genotype. We have demonstrated disturbances of both [Na+] and [K+] in relation to the severity of AD and markers of AD pathology, although it is possible that these relate to late-stage secondary manifestations of the disease pathology.

  5. In vivo multiphoton microscopy of deep brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Levene, Michael J; Dombeck, Daniel A; Kasischke, Karl A; Molloy, Raymond P; Webb, Watt W

    2004-04-01

    Although fluorescence microscopy has proven to be one of the most powerful tools in biology, its application to the intact animal has been limited to imaging several hundred micrometers below the surface. The rest of the animal has eluded investigation at the microscopic level without excising tissue or performing extensive surgery. However, the ability to image with subcellular resolution in the intact animal enables a contextual setting that may be critical for understanding proper function. Clinical applications such as disease diagnosis and optical biopsy may benefit from minimally invasive in vivo approaches. Gradient index (GRIN) lenses with needle-like dimensions can transfer high-quality images many centimeters from the object plane. Here, we show that multiphoton microscopy through GRIN lenses enables minimally invasive, subcellular resolution several millimeters in the anesthetized, intact animal, and we present in vivo images of cortical layer V and hippocampus in the anesthetized Thy1-YFP line H mouse. Microangiographies from deep capillaries and blood vessels containing fluorescein-dextran and quantum dot-labeled serum in wild-type mouse brain are also demonstrated.

  6. Experimental research of mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue under rotational shear stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Jianhua; Wang, Kan; Wang, Mingyu; Gao, Changqing; Ma, Chao

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue with a series of rotational shear stress control experiments. To this end, several experiments including stress sweep tests, frequency sweep tests and quasi-static creep tests were designed and conducted with a standard rheometer (HAAKE RheoStress6000). The effects of the loading stress rates to mechanical properties of brain tissue were also studied in stress sweep tests. The results of stress sweep tests performed on the same brain showed that brain tissue had an obvious regional inhomogeneity and the mechanical damage occurred at the rotational shear stress of 10-15Pa. The experimental data from three different loading stress rates demonstrated that the mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue was loading stress rate dependent. With the decrease of loading stress rate, a stiffer mechanical characteristic of brain tissue was observed and the occurrence of mechanical damage can be delayed to a higher stress. From the results of frequency sweep tests we found that brain tissue had almost completely elastic properties at high frequency area. The nonlinear creep response under the rotational shear stress of 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9Pa was shown in results of creep tests. A new nonlinear viscoelastic solid model was proposed for creep tests and matched well with the test data. Considering the regional differences, loading stress rates and test conditions effects, loss tangent tan δ in porcine brain tissue showed a high uniformity of 0.25-0.45.

  7. Synchrotron FTIR microspectroscopy of Alzheimer's diseased brain tissue at the SRC beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberg, Pam S.; Gough, Kathleen M.; Ogg, Mandy; Del Bigio, M. R.; Julian, Robert

    1999-10-01

    Alzheimer's Disease is a neurodegenerative disorder marked by progressive cognitive decline. AD presents with many of the same clinical symptoms as senile dementia, but the diagnosis of AD must be confirmed by post-mortem examination of the morphological and histopathological features of the brain. The two classical lesions found in the cortical and hippocampal regions of the brain are the (beta) -amyloid- bearing neuritic plaques and the intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles.

  8. Age-dependent effect of static magnetic field on brain tissue hydration.

    PubMed

    Deghoyan, Anush; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Heqimyan, Armenuhi; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2014-01-01

    Age-dependent effect of Static Magnetic Field (SMF) on rats in a condition of active and inactive Na(+)/K(+) pump was studied for comparison of brain tissues hydration state changes and magnetic sensitivity. Influence of 15 min 0, 2 Tesla (T) SMF on brain tissue hydration of three aged groups of male albino rats was studied. Tyrode's physiological solution and 10(-4) M ouabain was used for intraperitoneal injections. For animal immobilization, the liquid nitrogen was used and the definition of tissue water content was performed by tissue drying method. Initial water content in brain tissues of young animals is significantly higher than in those of adult and aged ones. SMF exposure leads to decrease of water content in brain tissues of young animals and increase in brain tissues of adult and aged ones. In case of ouabain-poisoned animals, SMF gives reversal effects on brain tissue's hydration both in young and aged animals, while no significant effect on adults is observed. It is suggested that initial state of tissue hydration could play a crucial role in animal age-dependent magnetic sensitivity and the main reason for this could be age-dependent dysfunction of Na(+)/K(+) pump.

  9. Spatial cluster analysis of nanoscopically mapped serotonin receptors for classification of fixed brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sams, Michael; Silye, Rene; Göhring, Janett; Muresan, Leila; Schilcher, Kurt; Jacak, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    We present a cluster spatial analysis method using nanoscopic dSTORM images to determine changes in protein cluster distributions within brain tissue. Such methods are suitable to investigate human brain tissue and will help to achieve a deeper understanding of brain disease along with aiding drug development. Human brain tissue samples are usually treated postmortem via standard fixation protocols, which are established in clinical laboratories. Therefore, our localization microscopy-based method was adapted to characterize protein density and protein cluster localization in samples fixed using different protocols followed by common fluorescent immunohistochemistry techniques. The localization microscopy allows nanoscopic mapping of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor groups within a two-dimensional image of a brain tissue slice. These nanoscopically mapped proteins can be confined to clusters by applying the proposed statistical spatial analysis. Selected features of such clusters were subsequently used to characterize and classify the tissue. Samples were obtained from different types of patients, fixed with different preparation methods, and finally stored in a human tissue bank. To verify the proposed method, samples of a cryopreserved healthy brain have been compared with epitope-retrieved and paraffin-fixed tissues. Furthermore, samples of healthy brain tissues were compared with data obtained from patients suffering from mental illnesses (e.g., major depressive disorder). Our work demonstrates the applicability of localization microscopy and image analysis methods for comparison and classification of human brain tissues at a nanoscopic level. Furthermore, the presented workflow marks a unique technological advance in the characterization of protein distributions in brain tissue sections.

  10. Spatial cluster analysis of nanoscopically mapped serotonin receptors for classification of fixed brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Sams, Michael; Silye, Rene; Göhring, Janett; Muresan, Leila; Schilcher, Kurt; Jacak, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    We present a cluster spatial analysis method using nanoscopic dSTORM images to determine changes in protein cluster distributions within brain tissue. Such methods are suitable to investigate human brain tissue and will help to achieve a deeper understanding of brain disease along with aiding drug development. Human brain tissue samples are usually treated postmortem via standard fixation protocols, which are established in clinical laboratories. Therefore, our localization microscopy-based method was adapted to characterize protein density and protein cluster localization in samples fixed using different protocols followed by common fluorescent immunohistochemistry techniques. The localization microscopy allows nanoscopic mapping of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor groups within a two-dimensional image of a brain tissue slice. These nanoscopically mapped proteins can be confined to clusters by applying the proposed statistical spatial analysis. Selected features of such clusters were subsequently used to characterize and classify the tissue. Samples were obtained from different types of patients, fixed with different preparation methods, and finally stored in a human tissue bank. To verify the proposed method, samples of a cryopreserved healthy brain have been compared with epitope-retrieved and paraffin-fixed tissues. Furthermore, samples of healthy brain tissues were compared with data obtained from patients suffering from mental illnesses (e.g., major depressive disorder). Our work demonstrates the applicability of localization microscopy and image analysis methods for comparison and classification of human brain tissues at a nanoscopic level. Furthermore, the presented workflow marks a unique technological advance in the characterization of protein distributions in brain tissue sections.

  11. Characterisation of element profile changes induced by long-term dietary supplementation of zinc in the brain and cerebellum of 3xTg-AD mice by alternated cool and normal plasma ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Ciavardelli, Domenico; Consalvo, Ada; Caldaralo, Valentina; Di Vacri, Maria Laura; Nisi, Stefano; Corona, Carlo; Frazzini, Valerio; Sacchetta, Paolo; Urbani, Andrea; Di Ilio, Carmine; Sensi, Stefano L

    2012-12-01

    Metal dyshomeostasis plays a crucial role in promoting several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), a condition that has been linked to deregulation of brain levels of Al, Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn. Thus, quantitative multi-element profiling of brain tissues from AD models can be of great value in assessing the pathogenic role of metals as well as the value of therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring metal homeostasis in the brain. In this study, we employed low resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to evaluate levels of ultra-trace, trace, and major elements in brains and cerebella of 3xTg-AD mice, a well characterized transgenic (Tg) AD model. This method is based on alternated cool and hot plasma ICP-MS. The essay fulfilled analytical requirements for the quantification of 14 elements in the Central Nervous System (CNS) of our Tg model. Quantification of Li, Al, Cr, and Co, a procedure that requires a pre-concentration step, was validated by high resolution ICP-MS. Changes in element profiles occurring in 3xTg-AD mice were compared to the ones observed in wild type (WT) mice. We also investigated variations in element profiles in 3xTg-AD mice receiving a long-term (17 months) dietary supplementation of Zn. Our data indicate that, compared to WT animals, 3xTg-AD mice displayed signs of altered brain metal homeostasis. We also found that long-term Zn administration promoted decreased brain levels of some metals (K, Ca, and Fe) and restored levels of Al, Cr, and Co to values found in WT mice.

  12. Temperature-dependent elastic properties of brain tissues measured with the shear wave elastography method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Lin; Li, Guo-Yang; He, Ping; Mao, Ze-Qi; Cao, Yanping

    2017-01-01

    Determining the mechanical properties of brain tissues is essential in such cases as the surgery planning and surgical training using virtual reality based simulators, trauma research and the diagnosis of some diseases that alter the elastic properties of brain tissues. Here, we suggest a protocol to measure the temperature-dependent elastic properties of brain tissues in physiological saline using the shear wave elastography method. Experiments have been conducted on six porcine brains. Our results show that the shear moduli of brain tissues decrease approximately linearly with a slope of -0.041±0.006kPa/°C when the temperature T increases from room temperature (~23°C) to body temperature (~37°C). A case study has been further conducted which shows that the shear moduli are insensitive to the temperature variation when T is in the range of 37 to 43°C and will increase when T is higher than 43°C. With the present experimental setup, temperature-dependent elastic properties of brain tissues can be measured in a simulated physiological environment and a non-destructive manner. Thus the method suggested here offers a unique tool for the mechanical characterization of brain tissues with potential applications in brain biomechanics research.

  13. Temporal dynamics and determinants of whole brain tissue volume changes during recovery from alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Gazdzinski, Stefan; Durazzo, Timothy C; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2005-06-01

    Brain shrinkage and its partial reversibility with abstinence is a common neuroimaging finding in alcohol dependent individuals. We used an automated three-dimensional whole brain magnetic resonance imaging method (boundary shift integral) in 23 alcohol dependent individuals to measure the temporal dynamics of cerebral tissue and spinal fluid volume changes over a 12-month interval and to examine the major determinants of brain tissue change rates during abstinence and non-abstinence. We found more rapid brain tissue gain during the first month of sobriety than in the following months. The most rapid volume recovery was observed in abstinent individuals with the greatest baseline brain shrinkage and drinking severity. The rapid reversal of brain volume gains in non-abstinent individuals and tissue volume changes are modulated by duration of abstinence and non-abstinence periods, as well as recency of non-abstinence. Age, family history density of alcoholism, relapse severity, and duration or age of onset of heavy drinking were not major determinants of brain shrinkage and brain volume recovery rates. Treatment providers may use this tangible information to reinforce the biomedical benefits of sobriety. Previous quantitative measurements of brain volumes in alcohol dependent individuals performed after several weeks of abstinence likely underestimated the full extent of chronic alcohol-associated brain shrinkage.

  14. Sustained deep-tissue pain alters functional brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jieun; Loggia, Marco L; Edwards, Robert R; Wasan, Ajay D; Gollub, Randy L; Napadow, Vitaly

    2013-08-01

    Recent functional brain connectivity studies have contributed to our understanding of the neurocircuitry supporting pain perception. However, evoked-pain connectivity studies have employed cutaneous and/or brief stimuli, which induce sensations that differ appreciably from the clinical pain experience. Sustained myofascial pain evoked by pressure cuff affords an excellent opportunity to evaluate functional connectivity change to more clinically relevant sustained deep-tissue pain. Connectivity in specific networks known to be modulated by evoked pain (sensorimotor, salience, dorsal attention, frontoparietal control, and default mode networks: SMN, SLN, DAN, FCN, and DMN) was evaluated with functional-connectivity magnetic resonance imaging, both at rest and during a sustained (6-minute) pain state in healthy adults. We found that pain was stable, with no significant changes of subjects' pain ratings over the stimulation period. Sustained pain reduced connectivity between the SMN and the contralateral leg primary sensorimotor (S1/M1) representation. Such SMN-S1/M1 connectivity decreases were also accompanied by and correlated with increased SLN-S1/M1 connectivity, suggesting recruitment of activated S1/M1 from SMN to SLN. Sustained pain also increased DAN connectivity to pain processing regions such as mid-cingulate cortex, posterior insula, and putamen. Moreover, greater connectivity during pain between contralateral S1/M1 and posterior insula, thalamus, putamen, and amygdala was associated with lower cuff pressures needed to reach the targeted pain sensation. These results demonstrate that sustained pain disrupts resting S1/M1 connectivity by shifting it to a network known to process stimulus salience. Furthermore, increased connectivity between S1/M1 and both sensory and affective processing areas may be an important contribution to interindividual differences in pain sensitivity.

  15. Protective Role of Endogenous Ovarian Hormones Against Learning and Memory Impairments and Brain Tissues Oxidative Damage Induced by Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Pourganji, Masoume; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Zabihi, Hoda; Hadjzadeh, Mosa Al-reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: The contribution of neuroinflammation in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been widely reported. The effects of female gonadal hormones in both neuroinflammation and brain cognitive functions have also been well considered. Objectives: In the present study, the possible protective role for endogenous ovarian hormones against learning and memory impairment as well as brain tissues oxidative damage induced by lipopolysachride (LPS) was investigated in rats. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided into four groups: Sham-LPS, Ovariectomized (OVX)-LPS, Sham, and OVX. The animals of sham group were in proestrous phase in which the serum concentration of estradiol is high. The Sham-LPS and OVX-LPS groups were treated with LPS (250 µg/kg) before acquisition. The animals were examined using passive avoidance (PA) test. The brains were then removed and malondialdehyde (MDA) and total thiol groups concentrations were measured. Results: The time latency to enter the dark compartment by OVX-LPS group was shorter than that of OVX at both first and 24th hours after the shock (P < 0.05 - P < 0.001). In Sham-LPS and OVX-LPS groups, total thiol concentration in hippocampal and cortical tissues were significantly lower while MDA concentrations were higher than that of Sham and OVX groups (P < 0.05 - P < 0.001). ). The hippocampal MDA concentration in OVX-LPS group was higher than Sham- LPS group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Brain tissue oxidative damage contributed in deleterious effects of LPS on learning and memory. Some protective effects for the endogenous ovarian hormones against damaging effects of LPS on learning and memory function, as well as brain tissues oxidative damage could be postulated; however, it needs more investigation. PMID:24829769

  16. Ageing and chronic intermittent hypoxia mimicking sleep apnea do not modify local brain tissue stiffness in healthy mice.

    PubMed

    Jorba, Ignasi; Menal, Maria José; Torres, Marta; Gozal, David; Piñol-Ripoll, Gerard; Colell, Anna; Montserrat, Josep M; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon; Almendros, Isaac

    2017-03-06

    Recent evidence suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may increase the risk of Alzheimer´s disease (AD), with the latter promoting alterations in brain tissue stiffness, a feature of ageing. Here, we assessed the effects of age and intermittent hypoxia (IH) on brain tissue stiffness in a mouse model of OSA. Two-month-old and 18-month-old mice (N=10 each) were subjected to IH (20% O2 40s - 6% O2 20s) for 8 weeks (6h/day). Corresponding control groups for each age were kept under normoxic conditions in room air (RA). After sacrifice, the brain was excised and 200-micron coronal slices were cut with a vibratome. Local stiffness of the cortex and hippocampus were assessed in brain slices placed in an Atomic Force Microscope. For both brain regions, the Young's modulus (E) in each animal was computed as the average values from 9 force-indentation curves. Cortex E mean (±SE) values were 442±122Pa (RA) and 455±120 (IH) for young mice and 433±44 (RA) and 405±101 (IH) for old mice. Hippocampal E values were 376±62 (RA) and 474±94 (IH) for young mice and 486±93 (RA) and 521±210 (IH) for old mice. For both cortex and hippocampus, 2-way ANOVA indicated no statistically significant effects of age or challenge (IH vs. RA) on E values. Thus, neither chronic IH mimicking OSA nor ageing up to late middle age appear to modify local brain tissue stiffness in otherwise healthy mice.

  17. Quantitative assessment of brain microvascular and tissue oxygenation during cardiac arrest and resuscitation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Ramadeen, A; Tsui, A K Y; Hu, X; Zou, L; Wilson, D F; Esipova, T V; Vinogradov, S A; Leong-Poi, H; Zamiri, N; Mazer, C D; Dorian, P; Hare, G M T

    2013-07-01

    Cardiac arrest is associated with a very high rate of mortality, in part due to inadequate tissue perfusion during attempts at resuscitation. Parameters such as mean arterial pressure and end-tidal carbon dioxide may not accurately reflect adequacy of tissue perfusion during cardiac resuscitation. We hypothesised that quantitative measurements of tissue oxygen tension would more accurately reflect adequacy of tissue perfusion during experimental cardiac arrest. Using oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence, we made measurements of oxygen in the microcirculation and in the interstitial space of the brain and muscle in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Measurements were performed at baseline, during untreated ventricular fibrillation, during resuscitation and after return of spontaneous circulation. After achieving stable baseline brain tissue oxygen tension, as measured using an Oxyphor G4-based phosphorescent microsensor, ventricular fibrillation resulted in an immediate reduction in all measured parameters. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, brain oxygen tension remained unchanged. After the return of spontaneous circulation, all measured parameters including brain oxygen tension recovered to baseline levels. Muscle tissue oxygen tension followed a similar trend as the brain, but with slower response times. We conclude that measurements of brain tissue oxygen tension, which more accurately reflect adequacy of tissue perfusion during cardiac arrest and resuscitation, may contribute to the development of new strategies to optimise perfusion during cardiac resuscitation and improve patient outcomes after cardiac arrest.

  18. Ionic charge transport between blockages: Sodium cation conduction in freshly excised bulk brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Emin, David; Akhtari, Massoud; Ellingson, B. M.; Mathern, G. W.

    2015-08-15

    We analyze the transient-dc and frequency-dependent electrical conductivities between blocking electrodes. We extend this analysis to measurements of ions’ transport in freshly excised bulk samples of human brain tissue whose complex cellular structure produces blockages. The associated ionic charge-carrier density and diffusivity are consistent with local values for sodium cations determined non-invasively in brain tissue by MRI (NMR) and diffusion-MRI (spin-echo NMR). The characteristic separation between blockages, about 450 microns, is very much shorter than that found for sodium-doped gel proxies for brain tissue, >1 cm.

  19. Expression profiles of cytokines in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients, compared to the brains of non-demented patients with and without increasing AD pathology

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Kaori; Horio, Juri; Satoh, Haruhisa; Sue, Lucia; Beach, Thomas; Arita, Seizaburo; Tooyama, Ikuo; Konishi, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is involved in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology. Our major focus was to clarify whether neuroinflammation plays important roles in AD pathogenesis, particularly prior to the manifestation of overt dementia. We analyzed cytokine expression profiles of the brain, with focus on non-demented patients with increasing AD pathology, referred to as high pathology control (HPC) patients, who provide an intermediate subset between AD and normal control subjects, referred to as low pathology control (LPC) patients. With real-time PCR techniques, we found significant differences in interleukin (IL)-1β, 10, 13, 18, and 33, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α converting enzyme (TACE), and transforming growth factor (TGF)β1 mRNA expression ratios between HPC and AD patients, while no significant differences in the expression ratios of any cytokine tested here were observed between LPC and HPC patients. The cytokine mRNA expression ratios were determined as follows: first, cytokine mRNA levels were normalized to mRNA levels of a housekeeping gene, peptidyl-prolyl isomerase A (PPIA), which showed the most stable expression among ten housekeeping genes tested here; then, the normalized data of cytokine levels in the temporal cortex were divided by those in the cerebellum, which is resistant to AD pathology. Subsequently, the expression ratios of the temporal cortex to cerebellum were compared among LPC, HPC and AD patient groups. Our results indicate that cytokines are more mobilized and implicated in the later AD stage when a significant cognitive decline occurs and develops than in the developmental course of AD pathology prior to the manifestation of overt dementia. PMID:21368376

  20. PAK Inactivation Impairs Social Recognition in 3xTg-AD Mice without Increasing Brain Deposition of Tau and Aβ

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Dany; Dal-Pan, Alexandre; Tremblay, Cyntia; Bennett, David A.; Guitton, Matthieu J.; De Koninck, Yves; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    Defects in p21-activated kinase (PAK) are suspected to play a role in cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Dysfunction in PAK leads to cofilin activation, drebrin displacement from its actin-binding site, actin depolymerization/severing, and, ultimately, defects in spine dynamics and cognitive impairment in mice. To determine the role of PAK in AD, we first quantified PAK by immunoblotting in homogenates from the parietal neocortex of subjects with a clinical diagnosis of no cognitive impairment (n = 12), mild cognitive impairment (n = 12), or AD (n = 12). A loss of total PAK, detected in the cortex of AD patients (−39% versus controls), was correlated with cognitive impairment (r2 = 0.148, p = 0.027) and deposition of total and phosphorylated tau (r2 = 0.235 and r2 = 0.206, respectively), but not with Aβ42 (r2 = 0.056). Accordingly, we found a decrease of total PAK in the cortex of 12- and 20-month-old 3xTg-AD mice, an animal model of AD-like Aβ and tau neuropathologies. To determine whether PAK dysfunction aggravates AD phenotype, 3xTg-AD mice were crossed with dominant-negative PAK mice. PAK inactivation led to obliteration of social recognition in old 3xTg-AD mice, which was associated with a decrease in cortical drebrin (−25%), but without enhancement of Aβ/tau pathology or any clear electrophysiological signature. Overall, our data suggest that PAK decrease is a consequence of AD neuropathology and that therapeutic activation of PAK may exert symptomatic benefits on high brain function. PMID:23804095

  1. Correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain exposed to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Light scattering signal is a potential indicator of tissue viability in brain because cellular and subcellular structural integrity should be associated with cell viability in brain tissue. We previously performed multiwavelength diffuse reflectance measurement for a rat global ischemic brain model and observed a unique triphasic change in light scattering at a certain time after oxygen and glucose deprivation. This triphasic scattering change (TSC) was shown to precede cerebral ATP exhaustion, suggesting that loss of brain tissue viability can be predicted by detecting scattering signal. In the present study, we examined correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain in vivo. We performed transcranial diffuse reflectance measurement for rat brain; under spontaneous respiration, hypoxia was induced for the rat by nitrogen gas inhalation and reoxygenation was started at various time points. We observed a TSC, which started at 140 +/- 15 s after starting nitrogen gas inhalation (mean +/- SD, n=8). When reoxygenation was started before the TSC, all rats survived (n=7), while no rats survived when reoxygenation was started after the TSC (n=8). When reoxygenation was started during the TSC, rats survived probabilistically (n=31). Disability of motor function was not observed for the survived rats. These results indicate that TSC can be used as an indicator of loss of tissue reversibility in brains, providing useful information on the critical time zone for treatment to rescue the brain.

  2. Noninvasive in vivo optical assessment of blood brain barrier permeability and brain tissue drug deposition in rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergin, Aysegul; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Jane; Bigio, Irving; Joshi, Shailendra

    2012-05-01

    Osmotic disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB) by intraarterial mannitol injection is sometimes the key step for the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to brain tissue. BBB disruption (BBBD) with mannitol, however, can be highly variable and could impact local drug deposition. We use optical pharmacokinetics, which is based on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, to track in vivo brain tissue concentrations of indocyanine green (ICG), an optical reporter used to monitor BBBD, and mitoxantrone (MTX), a chemotherapy agent that does not deposit in brain tissue without BBBD, in anesthetized New Zealand white rabbits. Results show a significant increase in the tissue ICG concentrations with BBBD, and our method is able to track the animal-to-animal variation in tissue ICG and MTX concentrations after BBBD. The tissue concentrations of MTX increase with barrier disruption and are found to be correlated to the degree of disruption, as assessed by the ICG prior to the injection of the drug. These findings should encourage the development of tracers and optical methods capable of quantifying the degree of BBBD, with the goal of improving drug delivery.

  3. Plasticity of Nonneuronal Brain Tissue: Roles in Developmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Willie K.; Greenough, William T.

    2004-01-01

    Neuronal and nonneuronal plasticity are both affected by environmental and experiential factors. Remodeling of existing neurons induced by such factors has been observed throughout the brain, and includes alterations in dendritic field dimensions, synaptogenesis, and synaptic morphology. The brain loci affected by these plastic neuronal changes…

  4. A new system for cutting brain tissue preserving vessels: water jet cutting.

    PubMed

    Terzis, A J; Nowak, G; Rentzsch, O; Arnold, H; Diebold, J; Baretton, G

    1989-01-01

    The water jet cutting system allows transaction and dissection of biological structures with little bleeding. Structures of higher tissue rigidity remain unchanged while softer tissues are mechanically dissected. In brain tissue, all vessels larger than 20 microns are left intact after the passage of the jet stream with a pressure of up to 5 bar, and therefore vessels can be isolated selectively from the surrounding tissue. Oedema is present adjacent to the cut and no increase of temperature occurs.

  5. The Identification of Aluminum in Human Brain Tissue Using Lumogallion and Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Ambreen; King, Andrew; Troakes, Claire; Exley, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum in human brain tissue is implicated in the etiologies of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease. While methods for the accurate and precise measurement of aluminum in human brain tissue are widely acknowledged, the same cannot be said for the visualization of aluminum. Herein we have used transversely-heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry to measure aluminum in the brain of a donor with Alzheimer’s disease, and we have developed and validated fluorescence microscopy and the fluor lumogallion to show the presence of aluminum in the same tissue. Aluminum is observed as characteristic orange fluorescence that is neither reproduced by other metals nor explained by autofluorescence. This new and relatively simple method to visualize aluminum in human brain tissue should enable more rigorous testing of the aluminum hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease (and other neurological conditions) in the future. PMID:27472886

  6. A Spatio-Temporal Atlas of the Human Fetal Brain with Application to Tissue Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A.; Barkovich, A. James; Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Modeling and analysis of MR images of the early developing human brain is a challenge because of the transient nature of different tissue classes during brain growth. To address this issue, a statistical model that can capture the spatial variation of structures over time is needed. Here, we present an approach to building a spatio-temporal model of tissue distribution in the developing brain which can incorporate both developed tissues as well as transient tissue classes such as the germinal matrix by using constrained higher order polynomial models. This spatio-temporal model is created from a set of manual segmentations through groupwise registration and voxelwise non-linear modeling of tissue class membership, that allows us to represent the appearance as well as disappearance of the transient brain structures over time. Applying this model to atlas-based segmentation, we generate age-specific tissue probability maps and use them to initialize an EM segmentation of the fetal brain tissues. The approach is evaluated using clinical MR images of young fetuses with gestational ages ranging from 20.57 to 24.71 weeks. Results indicate improvement in performance of atlas-based EM segmentation provided by higher order temporal models that capture the variation of tissue occurrence over time. PMID:20425999

  7. Acute hypertension induces oxidative stress in brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Poulet, Roberta; Gentile, Maria T; Vecchione, Carmine; Distaso, Maria; Aretini, Alessandra; Fratta, Luigi; Russo, Giovanni; Echart, Cinara; Maffei, Angelo; De Simoni, Maria G; Lembo, Giuseppe

    2006-02-01

    Arterial hypertension is not only a major risk factor for cerebrovascular accidents, such as stroke and cerebral hemorrhage, but is also associated to milder forms of brain injury. One of the main causes of neurodegeneration is the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) that is also a common trait of hypertensive conditions, thus suggesting that such a mechanism could play a role even in the onset of hypertension-evoked brain injury. To investigate this issue, we have explored the effect of acute-induced hypertensive conditions on cerebral oxidative stress. To this aim, we have developed a mouse model of transverse aortic coarctation (TAC) between the two carotid arteries, which imposes acutely on the right brain hemisphere a dramatic increase in blood pressure. Our results show that hypertension acutely induced by aortic coarctation induces a breaking of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and reactive astrocytosis through hyperperfusion, and evokes trigger factors of neurodegeneration such as oxidative stress and inflammation, similar to that observed in cerebral hypoperfusion. Moreover, the derived brain injury is mainly localized in selected brain areas controlling cognitive functions, such as the cortex and hippocampus, and could be a consequence of a defect in the BBB permeability. It is noteworthy to emphasize that, even if these latter events are not enough to produce ischemic/hemorrhagic injury, they are able to alter mechanisms fundamental for maintaining normal brain function, such as protein synthesis, which has a prominent role for memory formation and cortical plasticity.

  8. Mimicking brain tissues by doping scatterers into gelatin tissue phantoms and determination of chemical species responsible for NMPPAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Sudhir; Cullum, Brian M.

    2012-06-01

    It has been shown that non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS) has a great potential to be used as a high resolution surgical guidance technique during brain tumor surgery due to its ability of non-invasive or minimally invasive tumor differentiation. However, for experimental purposes associated with method validation, the use of real tissues is not always ideal because of issues such as availability, safety, storage, chemical doping, necessary control of size and shape, etc. To overcome these issues, tissue phantoms made from animal tissues and/or biochemical constituents, are often employed for such analyses. This work demonstrates the ability to develop and characterize gelatin based tissue phantoms with comparable optical and acoustic properties to real tissues by doping the phantoms with a scattering substance, 0.3 μm diameter Al2O3 particles. Using these phantoms, light scattering coefficients (μs) of 39 cm-1 have been generated, which are comparable to real brain tissue, thus making them a great alternative to real tissue for validation studies. In addition, this work also investigates the non-fluorescent species NAD+ found in the tissues, to evaluate its potential for being detected by NMPPAS. NMPPAS spectra of NAD+ shows a very promising beginning to determine other chemical species such as flavins, collagen, tryptophan, etc responsible for NMPPAS spectral signatures, associated with tumorogenesis.

  9. Brief Report: The Role of National Brain and Tissue Banks in Research on Autism and Developmental Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zielke, H. Ronald; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the establishment and work of two brain and tissue banks, which collect brain and other tissues from newly deceased individuals with autism and make these tissues available to researchers. Issues in tissue collection are identified, including the importance of advance planning, religious concerns of families, and the need for…

  10. Differentiation of cancerous and normal brain tissue using label free fluorescence and Stokes shift spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Wang, Leana; Liu, Cheng-hui; He, Yong; Yu, Xinguang; Cheng, Gangge; Wang, Peng; Shu, Cheng; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    In this report, optical biopsy was applied to diagnose human brain cancer in vitro for the identification of brain cancer from normal tissues by native fluorescence and Stokes shift spectra (SSS). 77 brain specimens including three types of human brain tissues (normal, glioma and brain metastasis of lung cancers) were studied. In order to observe spectral changes of fluorophores via fluorescence, the selected excitation wavelength of UV at 300 and 340 nm for emission spectra and a different Stokes Shift spectra with intervals Δλ = 40 nm were measured. The fluorescence spectra and SSS from multiple key native molecular markers, such as tryptophan, collagen, NADH, alanine, ceroid and lipofuscin were observed in normal and diseased brain tissues. Two diagnostic criteria were established based on the ratios of the peak intensities and peak position in both fluorescence and SSS spectra. It was observed that the ratio of the spectral peak intensity of tryptophan (340 nm) to NADH (440 nm) increased in glioma, meningioma (benign), malignant meninges tumor, and brain metastasis of lung cancer tissues in comparison with normal tissues. The ratio of the SS spectral peak (Δλ = 40 nm) intensities from 292 nm to 366 nm had risen similarly in all grades of tumors.

  11. A Dense Poly(ethylene glycol) Coating Improves Penetration of Large Polymeric Nanoparticles within Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nance, Elizabeth A.; Woodworth, Graeme F.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Shih, Ting-Yu; Xu, Qingguo; Swaminathan, Ganesh; Xiang, Dennis; Eberhart, Charles; Hanes, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Prevailing opinion suggests that only substances up to 64 nm in diameter can move at appreciable rates through the brain extracellular space (ECS). This size range is large enough to allow diffusion of signaling molecules, nutrients, and metabolic waste products, but too small to allow efficient penetration of most particulate drug delivery systems and viruses carrying therapeutic genes, thereby limiting effectiveness of many potential therapies. We analyzed the movements of nanoparticles of various diameters and surface coatings within fresh human and rat brain tissue ex vivo and mouse brain in vivo. Nanoparticles as large as 114-nm in diameter diffused within the human and rat brain, but only if they were densely coated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Using these minimally adhesive PEG-coated particles, we estimated that human brain tissue ECS has some pores larger than 200 nm, and that more than one-quarter of all pores are ≥100 nm. These findings were confirmed in vivo in mice, where 40- and 100-nm, but not 200-nm, nanoparticles, spread rapidly within brain tissue, only if densely coated with PEG. Similar results were observed in rat brain tissue with paclitaxel-loaded biodegradable nanoparticles of similar size (85 nm) and surface properties. The ability to achieve brain penetration with larger nanoparticles is expected to allow more uniform, longer-lasting, and effective delivery of drugs within the brain, and may find use in the treatment of brain tumors, stroke, neuroinflammation, and other brain diseases where the blood-brain barrier is compromised or where local delivery strategies are feasible. PMID:22932224

  12. Isolation and Functional Assessment of Mitochondria from Small Amounts of Mouse Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Zhang, Steven F.; Thomas, Bobby; Ten, Vadim; Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries have brought mitochondria functions in focus of the neuroscience research community and greatly stimulated the demand for approaches to study mitochondria dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases. Many mouse disease models have been generated, but studying mitochondria isolated from individual mouse brain regions is a challenge because of small amount of the available brain tissue. Conventional techniques for isolation and purification of mitochondria from mouse brain subregions, such as ventral midbrain, hippocampus, or striatum, require pooling brain tissue from six to nine animals for a single mitochondrial preparation. Working with pooled tissue significantly decreases the quality of data because of the time required to dissect several brains. It also greatly increases the labor intensity and the cost of experiments as several animals are required per single data point. We describe a method for isolation of brain mitochondria from mouse striata or other 7–12 mg brain samples. The method utilizes a refrigerated table-top microtube centrifuge, and produces research grade quality mitochondria in amounts sufficient for performing multiple enzymatic and functional assays, thereby eliminating the necessity for pooling mouse brain tissue. We also include a method of measuring ADP-ATP exchange rate as a function of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in small amounts of isolated mitochondria, adapted to a plate reader format. PMID:21913109

  13. Isolation and functional assessment of mitochondria from small amounts of mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Zhang, Steven F; Thomas, Bobby; Ten, Vadim; Starkov, Anatoly A

    2011-01-01

    Recent discoveries have brought mitochondria functions in focus of the neuroscience research community and greatly stimulated the demand for approaches to study mitochondria dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases. Many mouse disease models have been generated, but studying mitochondria isolated from individual mouse brain regions is a challenge because of small amount of the available brain tissue. Conventional techniques for isolation and purification of mitochondria from mouse brain subregions, such as ventral midbrain, hippocampus, or striatum, require pooling brain tissue from six to nine animals for a single mitochondrial preparation. Working with pooled tissue significantly decreases the quality of data because of the time required to dissect several brains. It also greatly increases the labor intensity and the cost of experiments as several animals are required per single data point. We describe a method for isolation of brain mitochondria from mouse striata or other 7-12 mg brain samples. The method utilizes a refrigerated table-top microtube centrifuge, and produces research grade quality mitochondria in amounts sufficient for performing multiple enzymatic and functional assays, thereby eliminating the necessity for pooling mouse brain tissue. We also include a method of measuring ADP-ATP exchange rate as a function of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in small amounts of isolated mitochondria, adapted to a plate reader format.

  14. Frequency of brain tissue embolism associated with captive bolt gun stunning of sheep.

    PubMed

    Coore, R R; Love, S; Helps, C R; Anil, M H

    2004-01-01

    In accordance with controls instituted to protect the consumer from meat potentially infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), brain tissue emboli caused by the use of captive bolt gun (CBG) stunning have been identified as a potential public health risk that requires further investigation. As the natural occurrence of BSE in sheep remains uncertain we have investigated the frequency of brain tissue embolism associated with stunning by two types of CBG that are in commercial use in the United Kingdom. Blood samples collected from sheep following stunning were analysed by ELISA as well as by a combination of microscopy and immunocytochemistry. The combined positive results from each method of sample analysis were used to determine the frequency of brain tissue embolism in the sample population. The frequency of brain tissue embolism was found to be 23% in sheep stunned with a cartridge-activated CBG (95% confidence interval of 15.8-32.2%) and 14% in those stunned with a pneumatically activated CBG (95% confidence interval of 8.5-22%). The frequency of brain tissue embolism associated with the use of CBG stunning may represent a significant source of carcass contamination with brain tissue.

  15. Zika Virus RNA Replication and Persistence in Brain and Placental Tissue.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Julu; Rabeneck, Demi B; Martines, Roosecelis B; Reagan-Steiner, Sarah; Ermias, Yokabed; Estetter, Lindsey B C; Suzuki, Tadaki; Ritter, Jana; Keating, M Kelly; Hale, Gillian; Gary, Joy; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Lambert, Amy; Lanciotti, Robert; Oduyebo, Titilope; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Bolaños, Fernando; Saad, Edgar Alberto Parra; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Zaki, Sherif R

    2017-03-01

    Zika virus is causally linked with congenital microcephaly and may be associated with pregnancy loss. However, the mechanisms of Zika virus intrauterine transmission and replication and its tropism and persistence in tissues are poorly understood. We tested tissues from 52 case-patients: 8 infants with microcephaly who died and 44 women suspected of being infected with Zika virus during pregnancy. By reverse transcription PCR, tissues from 32 (62%) case-patients (brains from 8 infants with microcephaly and placental/fetal tissues from 24 women) were positive for Zika virus. In situ hybridization localized replicative Zika virus RNA in brains of 7 infants and in placentas of 9 women who had pregnancy losses during the first or second trimester. These findings demonstrate that Zika virus replicates and persists in fetal brains and placentas, providing direct evidence of its association with microcephaly. Tissue-based reverse transcription PCR extends the time frame of Zika virus detection in congenital and pregnancy-associated infections.

  16. Amyloid structure exhibits polymorphism on multiple length scales in human brain tissue

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Jiliang; Costantino, Isabel; Venugopalan, Nagarajan; ...

    2016-09-15

    Although aggregation of Aβ amyloid fibrils into plaques in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), the correlation between amyloid burden and severity of symptoms is weak. One possible reason is that amyloid fibrils are structurally polymorphic and different polymorphs may contribute differentially to disease. However, the occurrence and distribution of amyloid polymorphisms in human brain is poorly documented. Here we seek to fill this knowledge gap by using X-ray microdiffraction of histological sections of human tissue to map the abundance, orientation and structural heterogeneities of amyloid within individual plaques; among proximal plaques and in subjects with distinctmore » clinical histories. A 5 µ x-ray beam was used to generate diffraction data with each pattern arising from a scattering volume of only ~ 450 µ3 , making possible collection of dozens to hundreds of diffraction patterns from a single amyloid plaque. X-ray scattering from these samples exhibited all the properties expected for scattering from amyloid. Amyloid distribution was mapped using the intensity of its signature 4.7 Å reflection which also provided information on the orientation of amyloid fibrils across plaques. Margins of plaques exhibited a greater degree of orientation than cores and orientation around blood vessels frequently appeared tangential. Variation in the structure of Aβ fibrils is reflected in the shape of the 4.7 Å peak which usually appears as a doublet. Variations in this peak correspond to differences between the structure of amyloid within cores of plaques and at their periphery. Examination of tissue from a mismatch case - an individual with high plaque burden but no overt signs of dementia at time of death - revealed a diversity of structure and spatial distribution of amyloid that is distinct from typical AD cases. As a result, we demonstrate the existence of structural polymorphisms among amyloid within and among plaques of a single

  17. Rhein lysinate decreases the generation of β-amyloid in the brain tissues of Alzheimer's disease model mice by inhibiting inflammatory response and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Hu, Gang; Xu, Rong; Qiao, Yue; Wu, He-Ping; Ding, Xun; Duan, Peng; Tu, Ping; Lin, Ya-Jun

    2013-07-01

    The protective effect of rhein lysinate (RHL) on Alzheimer's disease (AD) was explored in senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8 (SAMP8) mice. SAMP8 mice without treatment were used as the AD-positive control, and senescence-accelerated-resistant mice were used as the AD-negative control. In this study, 4-month-old male SAMP8 mice were orally administered 25 and 50 mg/kg RHL in drinking water for 6 months. The results of brain tissue enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunohistochemistry, and Western blot were demonstrated that compared with SAMP8 group, β-amyloid1-40 and β-amyloid1-42 were reduced; the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin 6 of brain tissues were also significantly decreased; however, the level of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) was increased in the RHL-treated group. Compared with SAMP8 group, the ROS levels and malondialdehyde levels were decreased; however, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase levels were increased in the brain tissues of SAMP8 25 and 50 mg/kg RHL-treated groups. In conclusion, the reduction of Aβ induced by RHL was related to the increase of SIRT1 and the inhibition of the inflammatory response and oxidative stress in SAMP8 mice. It might be a promising biological therapeutic drug for AD.

  18. Quantifying and modelling tissue maturation in the living human fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Studholme, Colin; Rousseau, François

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in medical imaging are beginning to allow us to quantify brain tissue maturation in the growing human brain prior to normal term age, and are beginning to shed new light on early human brain growth. These advances compliment the work already done in cellular level imaging in animal and post mortem studies of brain development. The opportunities for collaborative research that bridges the gap between macroscopic and microscopic windows on the developing brain are significant. The aim of this paper is to provide a review of the current research into MR imaging of the living fetal brain with the aim of motivating improved interfaces between the two fields. The review begins with a description of faster MRI techniques that are capable of freezing motion of the fetal head during the acquisition of a slice, and how these have been combined with advanced post-processing algorithms to build 3D images from motion scattered slices. Such rich data has motivated the development of techniques to automatically label developing tissue zones within MRI data allowing their quantification in 3D and 4D within the normally growing fetal brain. These methods have provided the basis for later work that has created the first maps of tissue growth rate and cortical folding in normally developing brains in-utero. These measurements provide valuable findings that compliment those derived from post-mortem anatomy, and additionally allow for the possibility of larger population studies of the influence of maternal environmental and genes on early brain development.

  19. Automatic recognition and analysis of synapses. [in brain tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungerleider, J. A.; Ledley, R. S.; Bloom, F. E.

    1976-01-01

    An automatic system for recognizing synaptic junctions would allow analysis of large samples of tissue for the possible classification of specific well-defined sets of synapses based upon structural morphometric indices. In this paper the three steps of our system are described: (1) cytochemical tissue preparation to allow easy recognition of the synaptic junctions; (2) transmitting the tissue information to a computer; and (3) analyzing each field to recognize the synapses and make measurements on them.

  20. Imaging of Cells and Tissues with Mass Spectrometry: Adding Chemical Information to Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Tyler A.; Monroe, Eric B.; Tucker, Kevin R.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2009-01-01

    Techniques that map the distribution of compounds in biological tissues can be invaluable in addressing a number of critical questions in biology and medicine. One of the newest methods, mass spectrometric imaging, has enabled investigation of spatial localization for a variety of compounds ranging from atomics to proteins. The ability of mass spectrometry to detect and differentiate a large number of unlabeled compounds makes the approach amenable to the study of complex biological tissues. This chapter focuses on recent advances in the instrumentation and sample preparation protocols that make mass spectrometric imaging of biological samples possible, including strategies for both tissue and single cell imaging using the following mass spectrometric ionization methods: matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, secondary ion, electrospray and desorption electrospray. PMID:19118682

  1. Intranasal insulin restores insulin signaling, increases synaptic proteins, and reduces Aβ level and microglia activation in the brains of 3xTg-AD mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanxing; Zhao, Yang; Dai, Chun-Ling; Liang, Zhihou; Run, Xiaoqin; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2014-11-01

    Decreased brain insulin signaling has been found recently in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Intranasal administration of insulin, which delivers the drug directly into the brain, improves memory and cognition in both animal studies and small clinical trials. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we treated 9-month-old 3xTg-AD mice, a commonly used mouse model of AD, with daily intranasal administration of insulin for seven days and then studied brain abnormalities of the mice biochemically and immunohistochemically. We found that intranasal insulin restored insulin signaling, increased the levels of synaptic proteins, and reduced Aβ40 level and microglia activation in the brains of 3xTg-AD mice. However, this treatment did not affect the levels of glucose transporters and O-GlcNAcylation or tau phosphorylation. Our findings provide a mechanistic insight into the beneficial effects of intranasal insulin treatment and support continuous clinical trials of intranasal insulin for the treatment of AD.

  2. Ad cerebrum per scientia: Ira Hirsh, psychoacoustics, and new approaches to understanding the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauter, Judith

    2002-05-01

    As Research Director of CID, Ira emphasized the importance of combining information from biology with rigorous studies of behavior, such as psychophysics, to better understand how the brain and body accomplish the goals of everyday life. In line with this philosophy, my doctoral dissertation sought to explain brain functional asymmetries (studied with dichotic listening) in terms of the physical dimensions of a library of test sounds designed to represent a speech-music continuum. Results highlighted individual differences plus similarities in terms of patterns of relative ear advantages, suggesting an organizational basis for brain asymmetries depending on physical dimensions of stimulus and gesture with analogs in auditory, visual, somatosensory, and motor systems. My subsequent work has employed a number of noninvasive methods (OAEs, EPs, qEEG, PET, MRI) to explore the neurobiological bases of individual differences in general and functional asymmetries in particular. This research has led to (1) the AXS test battery for assessing the neurobiology of human sensory-motor function; (2) the handshaking model of brain function, describing dynamic relations along all three body/brain axes; (3) the four-domain EPIC model of functional asymmetries; and (4) the trimodal brain, a new model of individual differences based on psychoimmunoneuroendocrinology.

  3. In vivo detection of epileptic brain tissue using static fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Nitin; Bhatia, Sanjiv; Ragheb, John; Mehta, Rupal; Jayakar, Prasanna; Yong, William; Lin, Wei-Chiang

    2013-02-01

    Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy are used to detect histopathological abnormalities of an epileptic brain in a human subject study. Static diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra are acquired from normal and epileptic brain areas, defined by electrocorticography (ECoG), from pediatric patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. Biopsy specimens are taken from the investigated sites within an abnormal brain. Spectral analysis reveals significant differences in diffuse reflectance spectra and the ratio of fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra from normal and epileptic brain areas defined by ECoG and histology. Using these spectral differences, tissue classification models with accuracy above 80% are developed based on linear discriminant analysis. The differences between the diffuse reflectance spectra from the normal and epileptic brain areas observed in this study are attributed to alterations in the static hemodynamic characteristics of an epileptic brain, suggesting a unique association between the histopathological and the hemodynamic abnormalities in an epileptic brain.

  4. Uniform polarity microtubule assemblies imaged in native brain tissue by second-harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dombeck, Daniel A; Kasischke, Karl A; Vishwasrao, Harshad D; Ingelsson, Martin; Hyman, Bradley T; Webb, Watt W

    2003-06-10

    Microtubule (MT) ensemble polarity is a diagnostic determinant of the structure and function of neuronal processes. Here, polarized MT structures are selectively imaged with second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy in native brain tissue. This SHG is found to colocalize with axons in both brain slices and cultured neurons. Because SHG arises only from noninversion symmetric structures, the uniform polarity of axonal MTs leads to the observed signal, whereas the mixed polarity in dendrites leads to destructive interference. SHG imaging provides a tool to investigate the kinetics and function of MT ensemble polarity in dynamic native brain tissue structures and other subcellular motility structures based on polarized MTs.

  5. Polyploidization of glia in neural development links tissue growth to blood-brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Unhavaithaya, Yingdee; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2012-01-01

    Proper development requires coordination in growth of the cell types composing an organ. Many plant and animal cells are polyploid, but how these polyploid tissues contribute to organ growth is not well understood. We found the Drosophila melanogaster subperineurial glia (SPG) to be polyploid, and ploidy is coordinated with brain mass. Inhibition of SPG polyploidy caused rupture of the septate junctions necessary for the blood-brain barrier. Thus, the increased SPG cell size resulting from polyploidization is required to maintain the SPG envelope surrounding the growing brain. Polyploidization likely is a conserved strategy to coordinate tissue growth during organogenesis, with potential vertebrate examples.

  6. Compliant intracortical implants reduce strains and strain rates in brain tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Arati; Nguyen, Jessica K.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2015-06-01

    Objective. The objective of this research is to characterize the mechanical interactions of (1) soft, compliant and (2) non-compliant implants with the surrounding brain tissue in a rodent brain. Understanding such interactions will enable the engineering of novel materials that will improve stability and reliability of brain implants. Approach. Acute force measurements were made using a load cell in n = 3 live rats, each with 4 craniotomies. Using an indentation method, brain tissue was tested for changes in force using established protocols. A total of 4 non-compliant, bare silicon microshanks, 3 non-compliant polyvinyl acetate (PVAc)-coated silicon microshanks, and 6 compliant, nanocomposite microshanks were tested. Stress values were calculated by dividing the force by surface area and strain was estimated using a linear stress-strain relationship. Micromotion effects from breathing and vascular pulsatility on tissue stress were estimated from a 5 s interval of steady-state measurements. Viscoelastic properties were estimated using a second-order Prony series expansion of stress-displacement curves for each shank. Main results. The distribution of strain values imposed on brain tissue for both compliant nanocomposite microshanks and PVAc-coated, non-compliant silicon microshanks were significantly lower compared to non-compliant bare silicon shanks. Interestingly, step-indentation experiments also showed that compliant, nanocomposite materials significantly decreased stress relaxation rates in the brain tissue at the interface (p < 0.05) compared to non-compliant silicon and PVAc-coated silicon materials. Furthermore, both PVAc-coated non-compliant silicon and compliant nanocomposite shanks showed significantly reduced (by 4-5 fold) stresses due to tissue micromotion at the interface. Significance. The results of this study showed that soft, adaptive materials reduce strains and strain rates and micromotion induced stresses in the surrounding brain tissue

  7. Comparison of brain tissue and local cerebral venous gas tensions and pH.

    PubMed

    Edelman, G J; Hoffman, W E; Rico, C; Ripper, R

    2000-09-01

    Neurosurgical monitoring devices have recently become available which are capable of measuring cerebral tissue gas tensions and pH. Brain tissue sensors have not been conclusively demonstrated to correlate with other measurements of regional cerebral gas tensions or pH. The present study was undertaken to correlate sensor values for pO2, pCO2 and pH with blood samples taken concurrently from local cerebral veins. Adult mongrel dogs were anesthetized and a craniotomy was performed. A small gyral vein was isolated and cannulated. Adjacent to the venous catheter tip, a Neurotrend brain tissue probe was inserted in an intracortical location. Each subject received a sequence of manipulations in inspired oxygen and end tidal carbon dioxide conditions. Under each experimental condition, samples of arterial and gyral venous blood were obtained and blood gas analysis performed. Concurrent brain probe measurements of tissue pO2, pCO2 and pH were recorded. Statistical analysis determined that local tissue and cerebral venous blood values for pO2, pCO2 and pH were highly correlated (R(s) = 0.62-0.82; p < 0.001). This indicates that there exists a confirmable monotonic relationship between tissue values and conditions in the post-capillary venous bed. Tissue sensors such as the Neurotrend probe can offer reliable trend indications in brain tissue gas tensions and pH.

  8. In vivo multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Kalasauskas, Darius; König, Karsten; Kim, Ella; Weinigel, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; Giese, Alf

    2016-05-01

    High resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging differentiates glioma from adjacent brain in native tissue samples ex vivo. Presently, multiphoton tomography is applied in clinical dermatology and experimentally. We here present the first application of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in vivo imaging on humans during a neurosurgical procedure. We used a MPTflex™ Multiphoton Laser Tomograph (JenLab, Germany). We examined cultured glioma cells in an orthotopic mouse tumor model and native human tissue samples. Finally the multiphoton tomograph was applied to provide optical biopsies during resection of a clinical case of glioblastoma. All tissues imaged by multiphoton tomography were sampled and processed for conventional histopathology. The multiphoton tomograph allowed fluorescence intensity- and fluorescence lifetime imaging with submicron spatial resolution and 200 picosecond temporal resolution. Morphological fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging of tumor-bearing mouse brains and native human tissue samples clearly differentiated tumor and adjacent brain tissue. Intraoperative imaging was found to be technically feasible. Intraoperative image quality was comparable to ex vivo examinations. To our knowledge we here present the first intraoperative application of high resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumors in situ. It allowed in vivo identification and determination of cell density of tumor tissue on a cellular and subcellular level within seconds. The technology shows the potential of rapid intraoperative identification of native glioma tissue without need for tissue processing or staining.

  9. Evaluation of three-dimensional anisotropic head model for mapping realistic electromagnetic fields of brain tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Wi, Hun; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-08-01

    Electromagnetic fields provide fundamental data for the imaging of electrical tissue properties, such as conductivity and permittivity, in recent magnetic resonance (MR)-based tissue property mapping. The induced voltage, current density, and magnetic flux density caused by externally injected current are critical factors for determining the image quality of electrical tissue conductivity. As a useful tool to identify bio-electromagnetic phenomena, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subject to an injected currents. In this study, we provide the numerical simulation results of electromagnetic field mapping of brain tissues using a MR-based conductivity imaging method. First, we implemented a realistic three-dimensional human anisotropic head model using high-resolution anatomical and diffusion tensor MR images. The voltage, current density, and magnetic flux density of brain tissues were imaged by injecting 1 mA of current through pairs of electrodes on the surface of our head model. The current density map of anisotropic brain tissues was calculated from the measured magnetic flux density based on the linear relationship between the water diffusion tensor and the electrical conductivity tensor. Comparing the current density to the previous isotropic model, the anisotropic model clearly showed the differences between the brain tissues. This originates from the enhanced signals by the inherent conductivity contrast as well as the actual tissue condition resulting from the injected currents.

  10. Characterisation of two antibodies to oligomeric Abeta and their use in ELISAs on human brain tissue homogenates.

    PubMed

    van Helmond, Zoë; Heesom, Kate; Love, Seth

    2009-01-30

    Oligomeric forms of Abeta are believed to be the major toxic species of this peptide in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although the characterisation of oligomer-specific antibodies has been reported, these have not been successfully incorporated into an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and measurement of the levels of oligomeric Abeta in brain tissue has remained problematic. We have examined the specificity of two monoclonal antibodies, 7 A1a and 1G5, for synthetic oligomers of Abeta(1-42) and for oligomeric Abeta(1-42) in human brain homogenates, and the utility of these two antibodies for measuring oligomeric Abeta(1-42) by sandwich ELISA. Both antibodies were found to recognise a range of synthetic oligomers of Abeta(1-42) but to cross-react in Western blots with a 34 kDa protein, shown by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to be tropomyosin. However, by using 7A1a and 1 G5 in combination with an Abeta(1-42) capture antibody, we were able specifically to detect and to measure the levels of oligomeric Abeta(1-42) in brain homogenates by ELISA. The development of a simple ELISA for measurement of oligomeric Abeta should facilitate further studies of the role of oligomeric species of Abeta in AD.

  11. A comprehensive experimental study on material properties of human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Zhu, Feng; Mao, Haojie; Shen, Ming; Yang, King H

    2013-11-15

    A comprehensive study on the biomechanical response of human brain tissue is necessary to investigate traumatic brain injury mechanisms. Published brain material property studies have been mostly performed under a specific type of loading, which is insufficient to develop accurate brain tissue constitutive equations. In addition, inconsistent or contradictory data in the literature made it impossible for computational model developers to create a single brain material model that can fit most, if not all, experimental results. In the current study, a total of 240 brain tissue specimens were tested under tension (n=72), compression (n=72), and shear (n=96) loading modes at varying strain rates. Gray-white matter difference, regional difference, and directional difference within white matter were also investigated. Stress-strain relationships of human brain tissue were obtained up to 50% of engineering strain. Strain rate dependency was observed under all three loading modes. White matter was stiffer than gray matter in compression and shear. Corona radiata was found to be stiffer than cortex, thalamus, and corpus callosum in tension and compression. Directional dependency of white matter was observed under shear loading.

  12. Computational methods for predicting drug transport in anisotropic and heterogeneous brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Linninger, Andreas A; Somayaji, Mahadevabharath R; Erickson, Terrianne; Guo, Xiaodong; Penn, Richard D

    2008-07-19

    Effective drug delivery for many neurodegenerative diseases or tumors of the central nervous system is challenging. Targeted invasive delivery of large macromolecules such as trophic factors to desired locations inside the brain is difficult due to anisotropy and heterogeneity of the brain tissue. Despite much experimental research, prediction of bio-transport phenomena inside the brain remains unreliable. This article proposes a rigorous computational approach for accurately predicting the fate of infused therapeutic agents inside the brain. Geometric and physiological properties of anisotropic and heterogeneous brain tissue affecting drug transport are accounted for by in-vivo diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging data. The three-dimensional brain anatomy is reconstructed accurately from subject-specific medical images. Tissue anisotropy and heterogeneity are quantified with the help of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Rigorous first principles physical transport phenomena are applied to predict the fate of a high molecular weight trophic factor infused into the midbrain. Computer prediction of drug distribution in humans accounting for heterogeneous and anisotropic brain tissue properties have not been adequately researched in open literature before.

  13. Long-Term Implanted cOFM Probe Causes Minimal Tissue Reaction in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Hochmeister, Sonja; Asslaber, Martin; Kroath, Thomas; Pieber, Thomas R.; Sinner, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the histological tissue reaction to long-term implanted cerebral open flow microperfusion (cOFM) probes in the frontal lobe of the rat brain. Most probe-based cerebral fluid sampling techniques are limited in application time due to the formation of a glial scar that hinders substance exchange between brain tissue and the probe. A glial scar not only functions as a diffusion barrier but also alters metabolism and signaling in extracellular brain fluid. cOFM is a recently developed probe-based technique to continuously sample extracellular brain fluid with an intact blood-brain barrier. After probe implantation, a 2 week healing period is needed for blood-brain barrier reestablishment. Therefore, cOFM probes need to stay in place and functional for at least 15 days after implantation to ensure functionality. Probe design and probe materials are optimized to evoke minimal tissue reaction even after a long implantation period. Qualitative and quantitative histological tissue analysis revealed no continuous glial scar formation around the cOFM probe 30 days after implantation and only a minor tissue reaction regardless of perfusion of the probe. PMID:24621608

  14. HIV-1 Phylogenetic analysis shows HIV-1 transits through the meninges to brain and peripheral tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, Susanna L.; Gray, Rebecca R.; Salemi, Marco; Huysentruyt, Leanne C.; McGrath, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Brain infection by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been investigated in many reports with a variety of conclusions concerning the time of entry and degree of viral compartmentalization. To address these diverse findings, we sequenced HIV-1 gp120 clones from a wide range of brain, peripheral and meningeal tissues from five patients who died from several HIV-1 associated disease pathologies. High-resolution phylogenetic analysis confirmed previous studies that showed a significant degree of compartmentalization in brain and peripheral tissue subpopulations. Some intermixing between the HIV-1 subpopulations was evident, especially in patients that died from pathologies other than HIV-associated dementia. Interestingly, the major tissue harboring virus from both the brain and peripheral tissues was the meninges. These results show that 1) HIV-1 is clearly capable of migrating out of the brain, 2) the meninges are the most likely primary transport tissues, and 3) infected brain macrophages comprise an important HIV reservoir during highly active antiretroviral therapy. PMID:21055482

  15. Characterization of a Raman spectroscopy probe system for intraoperative brain tissue classification

    PubMed Central

    Desroches, Joannie; Jermyn, Michael; Mok, Kelvin; Lemieux-Leduc, Cédric; Mercier, Jeanne; St-Arnaud, Karl; Urmey, Kirk; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Marple, Eric; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    A detailed characterization study is presented of a Raman spectroscopy system designed to maximize the volume of resected cancer tissue in glioma surgery based on in vivo molecular tissue characterization. It consists of a hand-held probe system measuring spectrally resolved inelastically scattered light interacting with tissue, designed and optimized for in vivo measurements. Factors such as linearity of the signal with integration time and laser power, and their impact on signal to noise ratio, are studied leading to optimal data acquisition parameters. The impact of ambient light sources in the operating room is assessed and recommendations made for optimal operating conditions. In vivo Raman spectra of normal brain, cancer and necrotic tissue were measured in 10 patients, demonstrating that real-time inelastic scattering measurements can distinguish necrosis from vital tissue (including tumor and normal brain tissue) with an accuracy of 87%, a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 89%. PMID:26203368

  16. Stress response of bovine artery and rat brain tissue due to combined translational shear and fixed unconfined compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Lauren

    During trauma resulting from impacts and blast waves, sinusoidal waves permeate the brain and cranial arterial tissue, both non-homogeneous biological tissues with high fluid contents. The experimental shear stress response to sinusoidal translational shear deformation at 1 Hz and 25% strain amplitude and either 0% or 33% compression is compared for rat brain tissue and bovine aortic tissue. Both tissues exhibit Mullins effect in shear. Harmonic wavelet decomposition, a novel application to the mechanical response of these tissues, shows significant 1 Hz and 3 Hz components. The 3 Hz component magnitude in brain tissue, which is much larger than in aortic tissue, may correlate to interstitial fluid induced drag forces that decrease on subsequent cycles perhaps because of damage resulting in easier fluid movement. The fluid may cause the quasiperiodic, viscoelastic behavior of brain tissue. The mechanical response differences under impact may cause shear damage between arterial and brain connections.

  17. Blood flow in an experimental rat brain tumor by tissue equilibration and indicator fractionation.

    PubMed

    Graham, M M; Spence, A M; Abbott, G L; O'Gorman, L; Muzi, M

    1987-01-01

    The tissue equilibration technique (Kety) was compared with the indicator fractionation technique for the measurement of blood flow to normal brain and an experimental brain tumor in the rat. The tumor was a cloned astrocytic glioma implanted in the cerebral hemisphere of F-344 rats. I-125 Iodoantipyrine, using a rising infusion for one minute, was used for the tissue equilibration technique. C-14 butanol, injected as a bolus 8 seconds before sacrifice, was used for the indicator fractionation technique. Samples were assayed using liquid scintillation counting and the iodoantipyrine results were regressed against the butanol results. For normal tissue R = 0.832, SEE = 0.115 ml/g/min, and Slope = 0.626. For tumor R = 0.796, SEE = 0.070 ml/g/min, and Slope = 0.441. The iodoantipyrine tissue/blood partition coefficient for normal hemisphere (gray and white matter) was 0.861 +/-0.037 (SD) and for tumor was 0.876 +/-0.042. The indicator fractionation technique with C-14 butanol underestimated blood flow in a consistent manner, probably because of incomplete extraction, early washout of activity from tissue and from evaporation of butanol during processing. Our experiments revealed no differences between tumor and normal brain tissue that might invalidate the comparison of iodoantipyrine blood flow results in brain tumors and surrounding normal brain.

  18. Correspondence of DNA Methylation Between Blood and Brain Tissue and Its Application to Schizophrenia Research.

    PubMed

    Walton, Esther; Hass, Johanna; Liu, Jingyu; Roffman, Joshua L; Bernardoni, Fabio; Roessner, Veit; Kirsch, Matthias; Schackert, Gabriele; Calhoun, Vince; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Given the difficulty of procuring human brain tissue, a key question in molecular psychiatry concerns the extent to which epigenetic signatures measured in more accessible tissues such as blood can serve as a surrogate marker for the brain. Here, we aimed (1) to investigate the blood-brain correspondence of DNA methylation using a within-subject design and (2) to identify changes in DNA methylation of brain-related biological pathways in schizophrenia.We obtained paired blood and temporal lobe biopsy samples simultaneously from 12 epilepsy patients during neurosurgical treatment. Using the Infinium 450K methylation array we calculated similarity of blood and brain DNA methylation for each individual separately. We applied our findings by performing gene set enrichment analyses (GSEA) of peripheral blood DNA methylation data (Infinium 27K) of 111 schizophrenia patients and 122 healthy controls and included only Cytosine-phosphate-Guanine (CpG) sites that were significantly correlated across tissues.Only 7.9% of CpG sites showed a statistically significant, large correlation between blood and brain tissue, a proportion that although small was significantly greater than predicted by chance. GSEA analysis of schizophrenia data revealed altered methylation profiles in pathways related to precursor metabolites and signaling peptides.Our findings indicate that most DNA methylation markers in peripheral blood do not reliably predict brain DNA methylation status. However, a subset of peripheral data may proxy methylation status of brain tissue. Restricting the analysis to these markers can identify meaningful epigenetic differences in schizophrenia and potentially other brain disorders.

  19. Experimental study on the toxicity of povidone-iodine solution in brain tissues of rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Hua; Wang, Yu; Gao, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Kun; Hou, Yu-Chen; Sun, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether Povidone-iodine was toxic to brain tissues by rinsing the cerebral cortex of New Zealand rabbits with Povidone-iodine Solution of different concentrations. Methods: 12 New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups (Group A, B, C and D, 3 rabbits each group). In each group, the left cerebral cortex of rabbits was rinsed with physiological saline after the craniotomy; in Group A and B, the right cerebral cortex of rabbits was also locally rinsed with Povidone-iodine Solution (0.01%), in Group C and D, the right cerebral cortex of rabbits was also locally rinsed with Povidone-iodine Solution (0.05%). In Group A and C, the rabbits were sacrificed at D3 after the operation, and the brain was taken out; and in Group B and D, the rabbits were sacrificed at D7 after the operation, and the brain was taken out. Under the optical and electron microscope, the change in micro-structure of brain tissues was observed in each group. Results: In each group, there was no epilepsy or paralysis during and after the operation. At the treatment side of physiological saline, there was no significant cell damage in the local brain tissues. At the treatment side of Povidone-iodine Solution, there was no cell apoptosis or degeneration in the local brain tissues. Conclusion: The Povidone-iodine Solution (0.05% and 0.01%) was toxic to brain tissues, with a more obvious damage of brain tissues for the former concentration. The histological sign was more serious at D7 than that at D3. PMID:26628968

  20. Numerical analysis of the diffusive mass transport in brain tissues with applications to optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neculae, Adrian P.; Otte, Andreas; Curticapean, Dan

    2013-03-01

    In the brain-cell microenvironment, diffusion plays an important role: apart from delivering glucose and oxygen from the vascular system to brain cells, it also moves informational substances between cells. The brain is an extremely complex structure of interwoven, intercommunicating cells, but recent theoretical and experimental works showed that the classical laws of diffusion, cast in the framework of porous media theory, can deliver an accurate quantitative description of the way molecules are transported through this tissue. The mathematical modeling and the numerical simulations are successfully applied in the investigation of diffusion processes in tissues, replacing the costly laboratory investigations. Nevertheless, modeling must rely on highly accurate information regarding the main parameters (tortuosity, volume fraction) which characterize the tissue, obtained by structural and functional imaging. The usual techniques to measure the diffusion mechanism in brain tissue are the radiotracer method, the real time iontophoretic method and integrative optical imaging using fluorescence microscopy. A promising technique for obtaining the values for characteristic parameters of the transport equation is the direct optical investigation using optical fibers. The analysis of these parameters also reveals how the local geometry of the brain changes with time or under pathological conditions. This paper presents a set of computations concerning the mass transport inside the brain tissue, for different types of cells. By measuring the time evolution of the concentration profile of an injected substance and using suitable fitting procedures, the main parameters characterizing the tissue can be determined. This type of analysis could be an important tool in understanding the functional mechanisms of effective drug delivery in complex structures such as the brain tissue. It also offers possibilities to realize optical imaging methods for in vitro and in vivo

  1. Dental Fluorosis and Catalase Immunoreactivity of the Brain Tissues in Rats Exposed to High Fluoride Pre- and Postnatally.

    PubMed

    Güner, Şirin; Uyar-Bozkurt, Süheyla; Haznedaroğlu, Eda; Menteş, Ali

    2016-11-01

    This study evaluated dental fluorosis of the incisors and immunoreactivity in the brain tissues of rats given chronic fluoride doses pre- and postnatally. Female rats were given drinking water with 0, 30 or 100 ppm fluoride ad libitum throughout gestation and the nursing period. In addition, 63 male offspring were treated with the same water regimens as the mothers after weaning and were followed for 1, 3 or 5 months. The upper and lower incisors were collected, and all teeth were examined under a stereomicroscope and scored by two blinded examiners using a modified rodent enamel fluorosis index. Cortical, hippocampal and cerebellar brain samples were evaluated morphologically and immunohistochemically. All fluoride-treated pups were born with low body weight (p = 0.001). All animals from the fluoride groups had enamel fluorosis with defects of various degrees. The increase in the dental fluorosis scores in the fluoride treatment groups was significant (p < 0.01). The catalase immunoreactivity in the 30- and 100-ppm fluoride groups was significantly higher than that in the controls after 1, 3 and 5 months (p < 0.001). In conclusion, this study showed that rats with dental fluorosis had catalase immunoreactivity in the brain tissues, which may reflect the neurobehavioral toxicity of fluoride.

  2. One-step labeling of degenerative neurons in unfixed brain tissue samples using Fluoro-Jade C.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qiang; Schmued, Larry C; Sarkar, Sumit; Paule, Merle G; Raymick, Bryan

    2012-06-30

    Neurodegeneration is the underlying cause of a vast majority of neurological disorders and often a result of brain trauma, stroke, or neurotoxic insult. Here we describe a simple method for labeling degenerating neurons in unfixed brain tissue samples. This method could provide a new avenue for identifying and harvesting degenerative neurons from unfixed brain tissues for subsequent molecular analyses.

  3. EEG abnormalities in clinically diagnosed brain death organ donors in Iranian tissue bank.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Seyed Amir Hossein; Khodadadi, Abbas; Azimi Saein, Amir Reza; Bahrami-Nasab, Hasan; Hashemi, Behnam; Tirgar, Niloufar; Nozary Heshmati, Behnaz

    2012-01-01

    Brain death is defined as the permanent, irreversible and concurrent loss of all brain and brain stem functions. Brain death diagnosis is based on clinical criteria and it is not routine to use paraclinical studies. In some countries, electroencephalogram (EEG) is performed in all patients for the determination of brain death while there is some skepticism in relying on EEG as a confirmatory test for brain death diagnosis. In this study, we assessed the validity of EEG and its abnormalities in brain death diagnosis. In this retrospective study, we used 153 EEGs from medical records of 89 brain death patients in organ procurement unit of the Iranian Tissue Bank admitted during 2002-2008. We extracted and analyzed information including EEGs, which were examined by a neurologist for waves, artifacts and EEG abnormalities. The mean age of the patients was 27.2±12.7 years. The most common cause of brain death was multiple traumas due to accident (65%). The most prevalent artifact was electrical transformer. 125 EEGs (82%) were isoelectric (ECS) and seven EEGs (5%) were depictive of some cerebral activity which upon repeat EEGs, they showed ECS patterns too. There was no relationship between cause of brain death and cerebral activity in EEGs of the patients. In this study, we could confirm ECS patterns in all brain death patients whose status had earlier been diagnosed clinically. Considering the results of this study, it seems sensible to perform EEG as a final confirmatory test as an assurance to the patients' families.

  4. Adding chemo after radiation treatment improves survival for adults with a type of brain tumor

    Cancer.gov

    Adults with low-grade gliomas, a form of brain tumor, who received chemotherapy following completion of radiation therapy lived longer than patients who received radiation therapy alone, according to long-term follow-up results from a NIH-supported random

  5. Carcinoma cells misuse the host tissue damage response to invade the brain.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Han-Ning; van Rossum, Denise; Sieger, Dirk; Siam, Laila; Klemm, Florian; Bleckmann, Annalen; Bayerlová, Michaela; Farhat, Katja; Scheffel, Jörg; Schulz, Matthias; Dehghani, Faramarz; Stadelmann, Christine; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Binder, Claudia; Pukrop, Tobias

    2013-08-01

    The metastatic colonization of the brain by carcinoma cells is still barely understood, in particular when considering interactions with the host tissue. The colonization comes with a substantial destruction of the surrounding host tissue. This leads to activation of damage responses by resident innate immune cells to protect, repair, and organize the wound healing, but may distract from tumoricidal actions. We recently demonstrated that microglia, innate immune cells of the CNS, assist carcinoma cell invasion. Here we report that this is a fatal side effect of a physiological damage response of the brain tissue. In a brain slice coculture model, contact with both benign and malignant epithelial cells induced a response by microglia and astrocytes comparable to that seen at the interface of human cerebral metastases. While the glial damage response intended to protect the brain from intrusion of benign epithelial cells by inducing apoptosis, it proved ineffective against various malignant cell types. They did not undergo apoptosis and actually exploited the local tissue reaction to invade instead. Gene expression and functional analyses revealed that the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) and WNT signaling were involved in this process. Furthermore, CXCR4-regulated microglia were recruited to sites of brain injury in a zebrafish model and CXCR4 was expressed in human stroke patients, suggesting a conserved role in damage responses to various types of brain injuries. Together, our findings point to a detrimental misuse of the glial damage response program by carcinoma cells resistant to glia-induced apoptosis.

  6. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, N.B.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Alpen, E.L.

    1988-12-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. This study concerns the cell population and cell cycle kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain, and the effects of charged particle irradiations on this cell population. Quantitative high resolution autoradiography was used to study the kinetic parameters in this cell layer. This study should help in understanding the effects of these high-energy heavy ions on normal mammalian brain tissue. The response of the mammalian brain exposure to charged particle ionizing radiation may be extremely variable. It varies from minimal physiological changes to overt tissue necrosis depending on a number of factors such as: the administered dose, dose-rate, the volume of the irradiated tissue, and the biological end-point being examined.

  7. Effects of Microwave Irradiation on Embryonic Brain Tissue.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-01

    deeply staining cells did not extend into the 3rd ventricle, aqueduct, etc., which were lined by a wel. - organized layer of large ependymal cells . The...brains showed the typical cell types and distribution. The cranial nerve nuclei were distinct, the cerebellum was well developed, and the large fiber...systems (pyramids, medial lemnisci, brachia conjunctiva, brachia pontis, restiform bodies, and so on) could be readily delineated. The different cell

  8. Transport of a hyaluronan-binding protein in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Kappler, Joachim; Hegener, Oliver; Baader, Stephan L; Franken, Sebastian; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Häberlein, Hanns; Rauch, Uwe

    2009-09-01

    Hyaluronan is an unsulfated linear glycosaminoglycan with the ability to nucleate extracellular matrices by the formation of aggregates with lecticans. These matrices are essential during development of the central nervous system. In the prospective white matter of the developing brain hyaluronan is organized into fiber-like structures according to confocal microscopy of fixed slices which may guide the migration of neural precursor cells [Baier, C., S.L. Baader, J. Jankowski, V. Gieselmann, K. Schilling, U. Rauch, and J. Kappler. 2007. Hyaluronan is organized into fiber-like structures along migratory pathways in the developing mouse cerebellum. Matrix Biol. 26: 348-58]. By using plasmon surface resonance, microinjection into brain slices and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we show that the brain-specific lecticans bind to, but also dissociate rather rapidly from hyaluronan. After microinjection into native cerebellar slices a GFP-tagged hyaluronan-binding neurocan fragment was enriched at binding sites in the prospective white matter, which had a directional orientation and formed local stationary concentration gradients in areas where binding sites are abundant. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements at fixed brain slices revealed that fiber-bound neurocan-GFP was mobile with D(fiber(neurocan-GFP))=4x10(-10)cm(2)/s. Therefore, we propose that hyaluronan-rich fibers in the prospective white matter of the developing mouse cerebellum can guide the diffusion of lecticans. Since lecticans bind a variety of growth and mobility factors, their guided diffusion may contribute to the transport of these polypeptides and to the formation of concentration gradients. This mechanism could serve to encode positional information during development.

  9. Roles of microglia in brain development, tissue maintenance and repair.

    PubMed

    Michell-Robinson, Mackenzie A; Touil, Hanane; Healy, Luke M; Owen, David R; Durafourt, Bryce A; Bar-Or, Amit; Antel, Jack P; Moore, Craig S

    2015-05-01

    The emerging roles of microglia are currently being investigated in the healthy and diseased brain with a growing interest in their diverse functions. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that microglia are not only immunocentric, but also neurobiological and can impact neural development and the maintenance of neuronal cell function in both healthy and pathological contexts. In the disease context, there is widespread consensus that microglia are dynamic cells with a potential to contribute to both central nervous system damage and repair. Indeed, a number of studies have found that microenvironmental conditions can selectively modify unique microglia phenotypes and functions. One novel mechanism that has garnered interest involves the regulation of microglial function by microRNAs, which has therapeutic implications such as enhancing microglia-mediated suppression of brain injury and promoting repair following inflammatory injury. Furthermore, recently published articles have identified molecular signatures of myeloid cells, suggesting that microglia are a distinct cell population compared to other cells of myeloid lineage that access the central nervous system under pathological conditions. Thus, new opportunities exist to help distinguish microglia in the brain and permit the study of their unique functions in health and disease.

  10. Brain slice on a chip: opportunities and challenges of applying microfluidic technology to intact tissues.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Williams, Justin C; Johnson, Stephen M

    2012-06-21

    Isolated brain tissue, especially brain slices, are valuable experimental tools for studying neuronal function at the network, cellular, synaptic, and single channel levels. Neuroscientists have refined the methods for preserving brain slice viability and function and converged on principles that strongly resemble the approach taken by engineers in developing microfluidic devices. With respect to brain slices, microfluidic technology may 1) overcome the traditional limitations of conventional interface and submerged slice chambers and improve oxygen/nutrient penetration into slices, 2) provide better spatiotemporal control over solution flow/drug delivery to specific slice regions, and 3) permit successful integration with modern optical and electrophysiological techniques. In this review, we highlight the unique advantages of microfluidic devices for in vitro brain slice research, describe recent advances in the integration of microfluidic devices with optical and electrophysiological instrumentation, and discuss clinical applications of microfluidic technology as applied to brain slices and other non-neuronal tissues. We hope that this review will serve as an interdisciplinary guide for both neuroscientists studying brain tissue in vitro and engineers as they further develop microfluidic chamber technology for neuroscience research.

  11. Three-dimensional structure of brain tissue at submicrometer resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiga, Rino; Mizutani, Ryuta; Inomoto, Chie; Takekoshi, Susumu; Nakamura, Naoya; Tsuboi, Akio; Osawa, Motoki; Arai, Makoto; Oshima, Kenichi; Itokawa, Masanari; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Terada, Yasuko; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Biological objects are composed of submicrometer structures such as cells and organelles that are essential for their functions. Here, we report on three-dimensional X-ray visualization of cells and organelles at resolutions up to 100 nm by imaging microtomography (micro-CT) equipped with Fresnel zone plate optics. Human cerebral tissue, fruit fly cephalic ganglia, and Escherichia coli bacteria labeled with high atomic-number elements were embedded in epoxy resin and subjected to X-ray microtomography at the BL37XU and BL47XU beamlines of the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The obtained results indicated that soft tissue structures can be visualized with the imaging microtomography.

  12. Cutaneous Heterotopic Brain Tissue (Neuroglial Choristoma) with Dysplastic Features in a Kitten.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, G A; Ressel, L; Altimira, J; Vilafranca, M

    2016-07-01

    A 3-month-old, male European shorthair kitten exhibited an ill-defined, soft mass on the skin of the frontal head, which was present since birth. The surgically resected tissue was representative of a discrete dermal and subcutaneous mass comprising islands of neurons, glial and meningothelial elements, sometimes atypical or dysplastic, separated by dense collagenous connective tissue. There was no evident connection between this tissue and the brain. Immunohistochemical examination confirmed the presence of neurons and a pleocellular glial population, supporting a diagnosis of cutaneous neuroglial choristoma believed to be secondary to sequestered (resolved) meningoencephalocoele. Ectopic brain tissue is very rare in small animals. Some atypical features displayed by this tissue may be misdiagnosed as neoplasia. Communication between surgeon and pathologist to clarify the relationship of the lesion to surrounding structures is helpful to avoid misdiagnosis.

  13. Protein-energy malnutrition during pregnancy alters caffeine's effect on brain tissue of neonate rats.

    PubMed

    Mori, M; Wilber, J F; Nakamoto, T

    1984-12-17

    We studied whether protein-energy malnutrition changed brain susceptibility to a small dose of caffeine in newborn rats. Since we had demonstrated previously that caffeine intake during lactation increased the brain neuropeptide on newborns, we investigated further the effects of the prenatal administration of caffeine on TRH and cyclo (His-Pro). From day 13 of gestation to delivery day, pregnant rats in one group were fed either a 20% or a 6% protein diet ad libitum, and those in the other group were pair-fed with each protein diet supplemented with caffeine at an effective dose of 2 mg/100 g body weight. Upon delivery, brain weight, brain protein, RNA, DNA and the neuropeptides thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and cyclo (His-Pro) were measured in the newborn rats. A 6% protein without caffeine diet caused reductions in brain weights and brain protein, RNA and DNA contents, but did not alter brain TRH and cyclo (His-Pro) concentrations in the newborn animals. In the offspring from dams fed a 6% protein diet, caffeine administration significantly elevated brain weights and brain contents of protein, RNA and DNA. In contrast, these values were similar between noncaffeine and caffeine-supplemented animals in a 20% protein diet group. Brain TRH and cyclo (His-Pro) concentrations were not changed by caffeine administration. These data suggest that caffeine augments protein synthesis in the newborn rat brain when malnourished, but that the same dose of caffeine did not affect protein synthesis in brains of newborn rats from normally nourished dams. Therefore, the present findings indicate that the nutritional status of mothers during pregnancy has important implication in the impact of caffeine on their offspring's brains.

  14. Tissue motion and strain in the human brain assessed by intraoperative ultrasound in glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Selbekk, Tormod; Brekken, Reidar; Solheim, Ole; Lydersen, Stian; Hernes, Toril A N; Unsgaard, Geirmund

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate tissue motion and strain imposed by cardiovascular pulsation in pathologic and normal brain parenchyma, as quantified from in vivo ultrasound data. Ultrasound acquired during surgery of 16 patients with glial tumors was retrospectively processed and analyzed. The tissue velocity was quantified at depths of 1cm, 2cm and 3cm from brain cortex to investigate spatial dependency with depth. Comparison of strain and velocity in tumor and adjacent normal parenchyma was performed by selecting two regions-of-interest in the hyperechoic tumor and two regions in the low-echogenic areas interpreted as mainly normal tissue with some degree of tumor cell infiltration. The absolute maximum tissue velocity is seen to increase with increasing depths in 14 of 16 cases (87.5%). The maximum tissue velocities in the four regions close to the ultrasound visible tumor border are not statistically different (p=0.163 to p=0.975). The strain magnitudes are significantly higher in the regions with expected normal brain parenchyma than in regions with expected glial tumor tissue, both for the two regions being closest to the tumor border (p=0.0004) and for the two regions further away from the tumor border (p=0.0009). We conclude that the velocity of the brain parenchyma imposed by arterial pulsation during a cardiac cycle is generally increasing with increasing depth from cortex. The maximum velocity appears to be similar in regions with expected normal brain and tumor tissue, thus, does not seem to be affected by pathology. Strain magnitude is, however, a suitable parameter for discrimination of glial tumor and normal brain parenchyma. (E-mail: Tormod.Selbekk@sintef.no).

  15. Long-term changes in the material properties of brain tissue at the implant-tissue interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Arati; Rajan, Subramaniam D.; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Brain tissue undergoes dramatic molecular and cellular remodeling at the implant-tissue interface that evolves over a period of weeks after implantation. The biomechanical impact of such remodeling on the interface remains unknown. In this study, we aim to assess the changes in the mechanical properties of the brain-electrode interface after chronic implantation of a microelectrode. Approach. Microelectrodes were implanted in the rodent cortex at a depth of 1 mm for different durations—1 day (n = 4), 10-14 days (n = 4), 4 weeks (n = 4) and 6-8 weeks (n = 7). After the initial duration of implantation, the microelectrodes were moved an additional 1 mm downward at a constant speed of 10 µm s-1. Forces experienced by the microelectrode were measured during movement and after termination of movement. The biomechanical properties of the interfacial brain tissue were assessed from measured force-displacement curves using two separate models—a two-parameter Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic model and a viscoelastic model with a second-order Prony series. Main results. Estimated shear moduli using a second-order viscoelastic model increased from 0.5-2.6 kPa (day 1 of implantation) to 25.7-59.3 kPa (after 4 weeks of implantation) and subsequently decreased to 0.8-7.9 kPa after 6-8 weeks of implantation in 6 of the 7 animals. The estimated elastic modulus increased from 4.1-7.8 kPa on the day of implantation to 24-44.9 kPa after 4 weeks. The elastic modulus was estimated to be 6.8-33.3 kPa in 6 of the 7 animals after 6-8 weeks of implantation. The above estimates suggest that the brain tissue surrounding the microelectrode evolves from a stiff matrix with maximal shear and elastic modulus after 4 weeks of implantation into a composite of two different layers with different mechanical properties—a stiff compact inner layer surrounded by softer brain tissue that is biomechanically similar to brain tissue—during the first week of implantation. Tissue micromotion

  16. Gene Expression Profiling during Pregnancy in Rat Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Phyllis E.

    2014-01-01

    The neurophysiological changes that occur during pregnancy in the female mammal have led to the coining of the phrases “expectant brain” and “maternal brain”. Although much is known of the hormonal changes during pregnancy, alterations in neurotransmitter gene expression have not been well-studied. We examined gene expression in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) during pregnancy based on the fact that this nucleus not only modulates the physiological changes that occur during pregnancy but is also involved in the development of maternal behavior. This study was designed to identify genes that are differentially expressed between mid- and late-pregnancy in order to determine which genes may be associated with the onset and display of maternal behavior and the development of the maternal brain. A commercially available PCR array containing 84 neurotransmitter receptor and regulator genes (RT2 Profiler PCR array) was used. Brains were harvested from rats on days 12 and 21 of gestation, frozen, and micropunched to obtain the VMH. Total RNA was extracted, cDNA prepared, and SYBR Green qPCR was performed. In the VMH, expression of five genes were reduced on day 21 of gestation compared to day 12 (Chrna6, Drd5, Gabrr2, Prokr2, and Ppyr1) whereas Chat, Chrm5, Drd4, Gabra5, Gabrg2, LOC289606, Nmu5r2, and Npy5r expression was elevated. Five genes were chosen to be validated in an additional experiment based on their known involvement in maternal behavior onset. This experiment confirmed that gene expression for both the CCK-A receptor and the GABAAR γ2 receptor increases at the end of pregnancy. In general, these results identify genes possibly involved in the establishment of the maternal brain in rats and indicate possible new genes to be investigated. PMID:24961703

  17. Partial volume effect modeling for segmentation and tissue classification of brain magnetic resonance images: A review.

    PubMed

    Tohka, Jussi

    2014-11-28

    Quantitative analysis of magnetic resonance (MR) brain images are facilitated by the development of automated segmentation algorithms. A single image voxel may contain of several types of tissues due to the finite spatial resolution of the imaging device. This phenomenon, termed partial volume effect (PVE), complicates the segmentation process, and, due to the complexity of human brain anatomy, the PVE is an important factor for accurate brain structure quantification. Partial volume estimation refers to a generalized segmentation task where the amount of each tissue type within each voxel is solved. This review aims to provide a systematic, tutorial-like overview and categorization of methods for partial volume estimation in brain MRI. The review concentrates on the statistically based approaches for partial volume estimation and also explains differences to other, similar image segmentation approaches.

  18. Significance of Brain Tissue Oxygenation and the Arachidonic Acid Cascade in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rink, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The significance of the hypoxia component of stroke injury is highlighted by hypermetabolic brain tissue enriched with arachidonic acid (AA), a 22:6n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid. In an ischemic stroke environment in which cerebral blood flow is arrested, oxygen-starved brain tissue initiates the rapid cleavage of AA from the membrane phospholipid bilayer. Once free, AA undergoes both enzyme-independent and enzyme-mediated oxidative metabolism, resulting in the formation of number of biologically active metabolites which themselves contribute to pathological stroke outcomes. This review is intended to examine two divergent roles of molecular dioxygen in brain tissue as (1) a substrate for life-sustaining homeostatic metabolism of glucose and (2) a substrate for pathogenic metabolism of AA under conditions of stroke. Recent developments in research concerning supplemental oxygen therapy as an intervention to correct the hypoxic component of stroke injury are discussed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1889–1903. PMID:20673202

  19. Some observations on the estimation of 3-methoxytyramine in brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Guldberg, H. C.; Sharman, D. F.; Tegerdine, P. R.

    1971-01-01

    1. A new method for the estimation of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylethylamine (3-methoxytyramine) in brain tissue is described. This is based on the formation of a fluorescent derivative by oxidation with potassium ferricyanide in ammonium hydroxide solution. 2. The effects of some drugs on the concentration of 3-methoxytyramine in the brain are reported. 3. The significance of changes in the striatal concentration of 3-methoxytyramine is discussed. PMID:4398930

  20. Three-dimensional structure of brain tissue at submicrometer resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Saiga, Rino; Mizutani, Ryuta; Inomoto, Chie; Takekoshi, Susumu; Nakamura, Naoya; Tsuboi, Akio; Osawa, Motoki; Arai, Makoto; Oshima, Kenichi; Itokawa, Masanari; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Terada, Yasuko; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2016-01-28

    Biological objects are composed of submicrometer structures such as cells and organelles that are essential for their functions. Here, we report on three-dimensional X-ray visualization of cells and organelles at resolutions up to 100 nm by imaging microtomography (micro-CT) equipped with Fresnel zone plate optics. Human cerebral tissue, fruit fly cephalic ganglia, and Escherichia coli bacteria labeled with high atomic-number elements were embedded in epoxy resin and subjected to X-ray microtomography at the BL37XU and BL47XU beamlines of the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The obtained results indicated that soft tissue structures can be visualized with the imaging microtomography.

  1. Effect of microcirculation changes on brain tissue oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Bicher, H. I.; Bruley, D.; Knisely, M. H.; Reneau, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    1. A new, 2 μ tip, oxygen micro-electrode and a constantly circulated Beckman oxygen gas analyser were used to measure tissue and blood PO2 in anaesthetized, curarized cats under positive pressure breathing. As a parameter for the ability of the circulation to oxygenate tissue, the `reoxygenation time' (defined as the time required to reach the previous PO2 level after a short period of anoxic anoxia) was determined on blood and cerebral cortex. 2. First, it was found that haemorrhage (from 15-25 c.c./kg) alone or haemorrhage combined with sludging of the blood (by the I.V. administration of high molecular weight Dextran, 1 g/kg) markedly diminished PO2 levels in blood and tissue. 3. Further, the reoxygenation time was significantly affected by these procedures. Sludging markedly prolonged the reoxygenation time, an effect counteracted by the use of an anti-adhesive drug breaking up the red cell aggregates. 4. Bleeding prolonged the reoxygenation time up to four times that found in the same animals previous to the bleeding. PMID:5098086

  2. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collingwood, J. F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M. R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W. J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R. S.; Dobson, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (<5 microns). Recent progress in developing the technique is reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterise anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution ~5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  3. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Collingwood, J.F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W.J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R.S.; Dobson, J.

    2008-06-16

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (< 5 microns). Recent progress in developing the technique is reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterize anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution {approx} 5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  4. Quantifying and Modelling Tissue Maturation in the Living Human Fetal Brain

    PubMed Central

    Studholme, Colin; Rousseau, François

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in medical imaging are beginning to allow us to quantify brain tissue maturation in the growing human brain prior to normal term age, and are beginning to shed new light on early human brain growth. These advances compliment the work already done in cellular level imaging in animal and post mortem studies of brain development. The opportunities for collaborative research that bridges the gap between macroscopic and microscopic windows on the developing brain are significant. The aim of this paper is to provide a review of the current research into MR imaging of the living fetal brain with the aim of motivating improved interfaces between the two fields. The review begins with a description of faster MRI techniques that are capable of freezing motion of the fetal head during the acquisition of a slice, and how these have been combined with advanced post-processing algorithms to build 3D images from motion scattered slices. Such rich data has motivated the development of techniques to automatically label developing tissue zones within MRI data allowing their quantification in 3D and 4D within the normally growing fetal brain. These methods have provided the basis for later work that has created the first maps of tissue growth rate and cortical folding in normally developing brains in-utero. These measurements provide valuable findings that compliment those derived from post-mortem anatomy, and additionally allow for the possibility of larger population studies of the influence of maternal environmental and genes on early brain development. PMID:23831076

  5. Segmenting Brain Tissues from Chinese Visible Human Dataset by Deep-Learned Features with Stacked Autoencoder.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangjun; Wang, Xuchu; Niu, Yanmin; Tan, Liwen; Zhang, Shao-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Cryosection brain images in Chinese Visible Human (CVH) dataset contain rich anatomical structure information of tissues because of its high resolution (e.g., 0.167 mm per pixel). Fast and accurate segmentation of these images into white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid plays a critical role in analyzing and measuring the anatomical structures of human brain. However, most existing automated segmentation methods are designed for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging data, and they may not be applicable for cryosection images due to the imaging difference. In this paper, we propose a supervised learning-based CVH brain tissues segmentation method that uses stacked autoencoder (SAE) to automatically learn the deep feature representations. Specifically, our model includes two successive parts where two three-layer SAEs take image patches as input to learn the complex anatomical feature representation, and then these features are sent to Softmax classifier for inferring the labels. Experimental results validated the effectiveness of our method and showed that it outperformed four other classical brain tissue detection strategies. Furthermore, we reconstructed three-dimensional surfaces of these tissues, which show their potential in exploring the high-resolution anatomical structures of human brain.

  6. Epigenetic dysregulation of SHANK3 in brain tissues from individuals with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li; Wang, Xiaoming; Li, Xin-Lei; Towers, Aaron; Cao, Xinyu; Wang, Ping; Bowman, Rachel; Yang, Hyuna; Goldstein, Jennifer; Li, Yi-Ju; Jiang, Yong-Hui

    2014-01-01

    The molecular basis for the majority of cases of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that ASD have an epigenetic cause by performing DNA methylation profiling of five CpG islands (CGI-1 to CGI-5) in the SHANK3 gene in postmortem brain tissues from 54 ASD patients and 43 controls. We found significantly increased overall DNA methylation (epimutation) in three intragenic CGIs (CGI-2, CGI-3 and CGI-4). The increased methylation was clustered in the CGI-2 and CGI-4 in ∼15% of ASD brain tissues. SHANK3 has an extensive array of mRNA splice variants resulting from combinations of five intragenic promoters and alternative splicing of coding exons. Altered expression and alternative splicing of SHANK3 isoforms were observed in brain tissues with increased methylation of SHANK3 CGIs in ASD brain tissues. A DNA methylation inhibitor modified the methylation of CGIs and altered the isoform-specific expression of SHANK3 in cultured cells. This study is the first to find altered methylation patterns in SHANK3 in ASD brain samples. Our finding provides evidence to support an alternative approach to investigating the molecular basis of ASD. The ability to alter the epigenetic modification and expression of SHANK3 by environmental factors suggests that SHANK3 may be a valuable biomarker for dissecting the role of gene and environment interaction in the etiology of ASD. PMID:24186872

  7. Segmenting Brain Tissues from Chinese Visible Human Dataset by Deep-Learned Features with Stacked Autoencoder

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangjun; Wang, Xuchu; Niu, Yanmin; Tan, Liwen; Zhang, Shao-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Cryosection brain images in Chinese Visible Human (CVH) dataset contain rich anatomical structure information of tissues because of its high resolution (e.g., 0.167 mm per pixel). Fast and accurate segmentation of these images into white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid plays a critical role in analyzing and measuring the anatomical structures of human brain. However, most existing automated segmentation methods are designed for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging data, and they may not be applicable for cryosection images due to the imaging difference. In this paper, we propose a supervised learning-based CVH brain tissues segmentation method that uses stacked autoencoder (SAE) to automatically learn the deep feature representations. Specifically, our model includes two successive parts where two three-layer SAEs take image patches as input to learn the complex anatomical feature representation, and then these features are sent to Softmax classifier for inferring the labels. Experimental results validated the effectiveness of our method and showed that it outperformed four other classical brain tissue detection strategies. Furthermore, we reconstructed three-dimensional surfaces of these tissues, which show their potential in exploring the high-resolution anatomical structures of human brain. PMID:27057543

  8. Brain tissue properties differentiate between motor and limbic basal ganglia circuits

    PubMed Central

    Accolla, Ettore A; Dukart, Juergen; Helms, Gunther; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Kherif, Ferath; Lutti, Antoine; Chowdhury, Rumana; Hetzer, Stefan; Haynes, John-Dylan; Kühn, Andrea A; Draganski, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in understanding basic organizational principles of the human basal ganglia, accurate in vivo assessment of their anatomical properties is essential to improve early diagnosis in disorders with corticosubcortical pathology and optimize target planning in deep brain stimulation. Main goal of this study was the detailed topological characterization of limbic, associative, and motor subdivisions of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in relation to corresponding corticosubcortical circuits. To this aim, we used magnetic resonance imaging and investigated independently anatomical connectivity via white matter tracts next to brain tissue properties. On the basis of probabilistic diffusion tractography we identified STN subregions with predominantly motor, associative, and limbic connectivity. We then computed for each of the nonoverlapping STN subregions the covariance between local brain tissue properties and the rest of the brain using high-resolution maps of magnetization transfer (MT) saturation and longitudinal (R1) and transverse relaxation rate (R2*). The demonstrated spatial distribution pattern of covariance between brain tissue properties linked to myelin (R1 and MT) and iron (R2*) content clearly segregates between motor and limbic basal ganglia circuits. We interpret the demonstrated covariance pattern as evidence for shared tissue properties within a functional circuit, which is closely linked to its function. Our findings open new possibilities for investigation of changes in the established covariance pattern aiming at accurate diagnosis of basal ganglia disorders and prediction of treatment outcome. PMID:24777915

  9. Impact of Markov Random Field Optimizer on MRI-based Tissue Segmentation in the Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Christopher G.; Tsui, Alex; Fletcher, Evan; Singh, Baljeet; DeCarli, Charles; Carmichael, Owen

    2013-01-01

    Automatically segmenting brain magnetic resonance images into grey matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid compartments is a fundamentally important neuroimaging problem whose difficulty is heightened in the presence of aging and neurodegenerative disease. Current methods overlap greatly in terms of identifiable algorithmic components, and the impact of specific components on performance is generally unclear in important real-world scenarios involving serial scanning, multiple scanners, and neurodegenerative disease. Therefore we evaluated the impact that one such component, the Markov Random Field (MRF) optimizer that encourages spatially-smooth tissue labelings, has on brain tissue segmentation performance. Two challenging elderly sets were used to test segmentation consistency across scanners and biological plausibility of tissue change estimates; and a simulated young brain data set was used to test accuracy against ground truth. Comparisons among Graph Cuts (GC), Belief Propagation (BP), and Iterative Conditional Modes (ICM) suggested that in the elderly brain, BP and GC provide the highest segmentation performance, with a slight advantage to BP, and that performance is often superior to that provided by popular methods SPM and FAST. Conversely, SPM and FAST excelled in the young brain, thus emphasizing the unique challenges involved in imaging the aging brain. PMID:22256150

  10. Rheological regional properties of brain tissue studied under cyclic creep/ recovery shear stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjema, F.; Lounis, M.; Khelidj, B.; Bessai, N.

    2015-04-01

    The rheological properties of brain tissue were studied by repeated creep-recovery shear tests under static conditions for different regions. Corpus callosum CC, Thalamus Th and Corona radiata CR. Non-linear viscoelastic model was also proposed to characterize the transient/steady states of shear creep results. From the creep-recovery data it was obvious that the brain tissues show high regional anisotropy. However. the both samples exhibit fluid viscoelastic properties in the first shear stress cycle of 100 Pa, while this behaviour evolutes to solid viscoelastic with cyclic effect.

  11. ICI 182,780 penetrates brain and hypothalamic tissue and has functional effects in the brain after systemic dosing.

    PubMed

    Alfinito, Peter D; Chen, Xiaohong; Atherton, James; Cosmi, Scott; Deecher, Darlene C

    2008-10-01

    Previous reports suggest the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 (ICI) does not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, this hypothesis has never been directly tested. In the present study, we tested whether ICI crosses the BBB, penetrates into brain and hypothalamic tissues, and affects known neuroendocrine functions in ovariectomized rats. Using HPLC with mass spectrometry, ICI (1.0 mg/kg.d, 3 d) was detected in plasma and brain and hypothalamic tissues for up to 24 h with maximum concentrations of 43.1 ng/ml, and 31.6 and 38.8 ng/g, respectively. To evaluate antiestrogenic effects of ICI in the brain after systemic dosing, we tested its ability to block the effect of 17 alpha-ethinyl estradiol (EE) (0.3 mg/kg, 8 d) on tail-skin temperature abatement in the morphine-dependent model of hot flush and on body weight change. In the morphine-dependent model, EE abated 64% of the naloxone-induced tail-skin temperature increase. ICI pretreatment (1.0, 3.0 mg/kg.d) dose dependently inhibited this effect. ICI (3.0 mg/kg.d) alone showed estrogenic-like actions, abating 30% the naloxone-induced flush. In body weight studies, EE-treated rats weighed 58.5 g less than vehicle-treated rats after 8 d dosing. This effect was partially blocked by ICI (3.0 mg/kg.d) pretreatment. Similar to EE treatment, rats receiving 1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg.d ICI alone showed little weight gain compared with vehicle-treated controls. Thus, ICI crosses the BBB, penetrates into brain and hypothalamic tissues, and has both antiestrogenic and estrogenic-like actions on neuroendocrine-related functions.

  12. Brain banks: benefits, limitations and cautions concerning the use of post-mortem brain tissue for molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Isidre; Martinez, Anna; Boluda, Susana; Parchi, Piero; Barrachina, Marta

    2008-09-01

    Brain banks are facilities providing an interface between generous donation of nervous tissues and research laboratories devoted to increase our understanding of the diseases of the nervous system, discover new diagnostic targets, and develop new strategies. Considering this crucial role, it is important to learn about the suitabilities, limitations and proper handling of individual brain samples for particular studies. Several factors may interfere with preservation of DNA, RNA, proteins and lipids, and, therefore, special care must be taken first to detect sub-optimally preserved tissues and second to provide adequate material for each specific purpose. Basic aspects related with DNA, RNA and protein preservation include agonal state, post-mortem delay, temperature of storage and procedures of tissue preservation. Examination of DNA and RNA preservation is best done by using bioanalyzer technologies instead of less sensitive methods such as agarose gels. Adequate RNA preservation is mandatory in RNA microarray studies and adequate controls are necessary for proper PCR validation. Like for RNA, the preservation of proteins is not homogeneous since some molecules are more vulnerable than others. This aspect is crucial in the study of proteins including expression levels and possible post-translational modifications. Similarly, the reliability of functional and enzymatic studies in human post-mortem brain largely depends on protein preservation. Much less is known about other aspects, such as the effects of putative deleterious factors on epigenetic events such as methylation of CpGs in gene promoters, nucleosome preservation, histone modifications, and conservation of microRNA species. Most brains are appropriate for morphological approaches but not all brains are useful for certain biochemical and molecular studies.

  13. Management of traumatic brain injury: nursing practice guidelines for cerebral perfusion and brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO2) systems.

    PubMed

    Hession, Diane

    2008-01-01

    Traditional modes of preventing brain cell death in traumatic brain injury (TBI) focus on the enhancement of cerebral perfusion pressure and control of intracranial pressure. Brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO2) monitoring systems are currently available to provide early detection of diminished cerebral oxygenation, and ultimately, ischemia. Research has demonstrated that early detection in PbtO2 is a more delicate measurement of cerebral blood flow and oxygenation. Monitoring PbtO2, in conjunction with cerebral perfusion pressure and intracranial pressure, has been shown to be a better guide to the prevention and treatment of secondary cerebral ischemia. This article reviews TBI, a PbtO2 monitor system description and indications for use, and the importance of nursing practice guidelines and education. With proper guidelines and education, this new technology can be used effectively by bedside clinicians and educators in adult and pediatric intensive care units.

  14. Low-frequency dielectric dispersion of brain tissue due to electrically long neurites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monai, Hiromu; Inoue, Masashi; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Aonishi, Toru

    2012-12-01

    The dielectric properties of brain tissue are important for understanding how neural activity is related to local field potentials and electroencephalograms. It is known that the permittivity of brain tissue exhibits strong frequency dependence (dispersion) and that the permittivity is very large in the low-frequency region. However, little is known with regard to the cause of the large permittivity in the low-frequency region. Here, we postulate that the dielectric properties of brain tissue can be partially accounted for by assuming that neurites are of sufficient length to be “electrically long.” To test this idea, we consider a model in which a neurite is treated as a long, narrow body, and it is subjected to a stimulus created by electrodes situated in the region external to it. With regard to this electric stimulus, the neurite can be treated as a passive cable. Assuming adequate symmetry so that the tissue packed with multiple cables is equivalent to an isolated system consisting of a single cable and a surrounding extracellular resistive medium, we analytically calculate the extracellular potential of the tissue in response to such an externally created alternating-current electric field using a Green's function that we obtained previously. Our results show that brain tissue modeled by such a cable existing within a purely resistive extracellular medium exhibits a large effective permittivity in the low-frequency region. Moreover, we obtain results suggesting that an extremely large low-frequency permittivity can coexist with weak low-pass filter characteristics in brain tissue.

  15. Detection of AIDS Virus in Macrophages in Brain Tissue from AIDS Patients with Encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Scott; Gendelman, Howard E.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Canto, Mauro C.; Pezeshkpour, Gholam H.; Yungbluth, Margaret; Janotta, Frank; Aksamit, Allen; Martin, Malcolm A.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    1986-09-01

    One of the common neurological complications in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a subacute encephalopathy with progressive dementia. By using the techniques of cocultivation for virus isolation, in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy, the identity of an important cell type that supports replication of the AIDS retrovirus in brain tissue was determined in two affected individuals. These cells were mononucleated and multinucleated macrophages that actively synthesized viral RNA and produced progeny virions in the brains of the patients. Infected brain macrophages may serve as a reservoir for virus and as a vehicle for viral dissemination in the infected host.

  16. Brain tissue segmentation in 4D CT using voxel classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Boom, R.; Oei, M. T. H.; Lafebre, S.; Oostveen, L. J.; Meijer, F. J. A.; Steens, S. C. A.; Prokop, M.; van Ginneken, B.; Manniesing, R.

    2012-02-01

    A method is proposed to segment anatomical regions of the brain from 4D computer tomography (CT) patient data. The method consists of a three step voxel classification scheme, each step focusing on structures that are increasingly difficult to segment. The first step classifies air and bone, the second step classifies vessels and the third step classifies white matter, gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid. As features the time averaged intensity value and the temporal intensity change value were used. In each step, a k-Nearest-Neighbor classifier was used to classify the voxels. Training data was obtained by placing regions of interest in reconstructed 3D image data. The method has been applied to ten 4D CT cerebral patient data. A leave-one-out experiment showed consistent and accurate segmentation results.

  17. Microsensors for in vivo Measurement of Glutamate in Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Si; van der Zeyden, Miranda; Oldenziel, Weite H.; Cremers, Thomas I.F.H.; Westerink, Ben H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Several immobilized enzyme-based electrochemical biosensors for glutamate detection have been developed over the last decade. In this review, we compare first and second generation sensors. Structures, working mechanisms, interference prevention, in vitro detection characteristics and in vivo performance are summarized here for those sensors that have successfully detected brain glutamate in vivo. In brief, first generation sensors have a simpler structure and are faster in glutamate detection. They also show a better sensitivity to glutamate during calibration in vitro. For second generation sensors, besides their less precise detection, their fabrication is difficult to reproduce, even with a semi-automatic dip-coater. Both generations of sensors can detect glutamate levels in vivo, but the reported basal levels are different. In general, second generation sensors detect higher basal levels of glutamate compared with the results obtained from first generation sensors. However, whether the detected glutamate is indeed from synaptic sources is an issue that needs further attention. PMID:27873904

  18. Infiltrating cells from host brain restore the microglial population in grafted cortical tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cong; Tao, Sijue; Fang, Yukun; Guo, Jing; Zhu, Lirui; Zhang, Shengxiang

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of embryonic cortical tissue is considered as a promising therapy for brain injury. Grafted neurons can reestablish neuronal network and improve cortical function of the host brain. Microglia is a key player in regulating neuronal survival and plasticity, but its activation and dynamics in grafted cortical tissue remain unknown. Using two-photon intravital imaging and parabiotic model, here we investigated the proliferation and source of microglia in the donor region by transplanting embryonic cortical tissue into adult cortex. Live imaging showed that the endogenous microglia of the grafted tissue were rapidly lost after transplantation. Instead, host-derived microglia infiltrated and colonized the graft. Parabiotic model suggested that the main source of infiltrating cells is the parenchyma of the host brain. Colonized microglia proliferated and experienced an extensive morphological transition and eventually differentiated into resting ramified morphology. Collectively, these results demonstrated that donor tissue has little contribution to the activated microglia and host brain controls the microglial population in the graft. PMID:27615195

  19. A new use for long-term frozen brain tissue: Golgi impregnation

    PubMed Central

    Melendez-Ferro, Miguel; Perez-Costas, Emma; Roberts, Rosalinda C.

    2009-01-01

    The study of dendritic spine shape and number has become a standard in the analysis of synaptic transmission anomalies since a considerable number of neuropsychiatric and neurological diseases have their foundation in alterations in these structures. One of the best ways to study possible alterations of dendritic spines is the use of Golgi impregnation. Although usually the Golgi method implies the use of fresh or fixed tissue, here we report the use of Golgi-Cox for the staining of human and animal brain tissue kept frozen for long periods of time. We successfully applied the Golgi-Cox method to human brain tissue stored for up to 15 years in a freezer. The technique produced reliable and reproducible impregnation of dendrites and dendritic spines in different cortical areas. We also applied the same technique to rat brain frozen for up to one year, obtaining the same satisfactory results. The fact that Golgi-Cox can be successfully applied to this type of tissue adds a new value for hundreds of frozen human or animal brains kept in the freezers of the laboratories, that otherwise would not be useful for anything else. Researchers other than neuroanatomists, i.e. in fields such as biochemistry and molecular biology can also benefit from a simple and reliable technique that can be applied to tissue left from their primary experiments. PMID:18789970

  20. Mitochondrial Respiration Chain Enzymatic Activities in the Human Brain: Methodological Implications for Tissue Sampling and Storage.

    PubMed

    Ronsoni, Marcelo Fernando; Remor, Aline Pertile; Lopes, Mark William; Hohl, Alexandre; Troncoso, Iris H Z; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Boos, Gustavo Luchi; Kondageski, Charles; Nunes, Jean Costa; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Lin, Kátia; Latini, Alexandra Susana; Walz, Roger

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes enzymatic (MRCCE) activities were successfully evaluated in frozen brain samples. Epilepsy surgery offers an ethical opportunity to study human brain tissue surgically removed to treat drug resistant epilepsies. Epilepsy surgeries are done with hemodynamic and laboratory parameters to maintain physiology, but there are no studies analyzing the association among these parameters and MRCCE activities in the human brain tissue. We determined the intra-operative parameters independently associated with MRCCE activities in middle temporal neocortex (Cx), amygdala (AMY) and head of hippocampus (HIP) samples of patients (n = 23) who underwent temporal lobectomy using multiple linear regressions. MRCCE activities in Cx, AMY and HIP are differentially associated to trans-operative mean arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, hemoglobin, and anesthesia duration to time of tissue sampling. The time-course between the last seizure occurrence and tissue sampling as well as the sample storage to biochemical assessments were also associated with enzyme activities. Linear regression models including these variables explain 13-17 % of MRCCE activities and show a moderate to strong effect (r = 0.37-0.82). Intraoperative hemodynamic and laboratory parameters as well as the time from last seizure to tissue sampling and storage time are associated with MRCCE activities in human samples from the Cx, AMYG and HIP. Careful control of these parameters is required to minimize confounding biases in studies using human brain samples collected from elective neurosurgery.

  1. Profile analysis of hepatic porcine and murine brain tissue slices obtained with a vibratome.

    PubMed

    Mattei, G; Cristiani, I; Magliaro, C; Ahluwalia, A

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at characterizing soft tissue slices using a vibratome. In particular, the effect of two sectioning parameters (i.e., step size and sectioning speed) on resultant slice thickness was investigated for fresh porcine liver as well as for paraformaldehyde-fixed (PFA-fixed) and fresh murine brain. A simple framework for embedding, sectioning and imaging the slices was established to derive their thickness, which was evaluated through a purposely developed graphical user interface. Sectioning speed and step size had little effect on the thickness of fresh liver slices. Conversely, the thickness of PFA-fixed murine brain slices was found to be dependent on the step size, but not on the sectioning speed. In view of these results, fresh brain tissue was sliced varying the step size only, which was found to have a significant effect on resultant slice thickness. Although precision-cut slices (i.e., with regular thickness) were obtained for all the tissues, slice accuracy (defined as the match between the nominal step size chosen and the actual slice thickness obtained) was found to increase with tissue stiffness from fresh liver to PFA-fixed brain. This quantitative investigation can be very helpful for establishing the most suitable slicing setup for a given tissue.

  2. 65zinc uptake from blood into brain and other tissues in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Pullen, R.G.; Franklin, P.A.; Hall, G.H. )

    1990-10-01

    Zinc is essential for normal growth, development and brain function although little is known about brain zinc homeostasis. Therefore, in this investigation we have studied 65Zn uptake from blood into brain and other tissues and have measured the blood-brain barrier permeability to 65Zn in the anaesthetized rat in vivo. Adult male Wistar rats within the weight range 500-600 g were used. 65ZnCl2 and (125I)albumin, the latter serving as a vascular marker, were injected in a bolus of normal saline I.V. Sequential arterial blood samples were taken during experiments that lasted between 5 min and 5 hr. At termination, samples from the liver, spleen, pancreas, lung, heart, muscle, kidney, bone, testis, ileum, blood cells, csf, and whole brain were taken and analysed for radio-isotope activity. Data have been analysed by Graphical Analysis which suggests 65Zn uptake from blood by all tissues sampled was unidirectional during this experimental period except brain, where at circulation times less than 30 min, 65Zn fluxes were bidirectional. In addition to the blood space, the brain appears to contain a rapidly exchanging compartment(s) for 65Zn of about 4 ml/100g which is not csf.

  3. Effects of tissue fixation on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering images of brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Roberta; Uckermann, Ortrud; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias; Steiner, Gerald

    2014-07-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is an emerging multiphoton technique for the label-free histopathology of the central nervous system, by imaging the lipid content within the tissue. In order to apply the technique on standard histology sections, it is important to know the effects of tissue fixation on the CARS image. Here, we report the effects of two common fixation methods, namely with formalin and methanol-acetone, on mouse brain and human glioblastoma tissue. The variations induced by fixation on the CARS contrast and intensity were compared and interpreted using Raman microspectroscopy. The results show that, whenever unfixed cryosections cannot be used, fixation with formalin constitutes an alternative which does not deteriorate substantially the contrast generated by the different brain structures in the CARS image. Fixation with methanol-acetone strongly modifies the tissue lipid content and is therefore incompatible with the CARS imaging.

  4. Changes in brain tissue and behavior patterns induced by single short-term fasting in mice.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Yuko; Asakura, Kyo; Kugino, Kenji; Kurokawa, Mamoru; Asakura, Tomiko; Nakata, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    In humans, emaciation from long-term dietary deficiencies, such as anorexia, reportedly increases physical activity and brain atrophy. However, the effects of single short-term fasting on brain tissue or behavioral activity patterns remain unclear. To clarify the impact of malnutrition on brain function, we conducted a single short-term fasting study as an anorexia model using male adult mice and determined if changes occurred in migratory behavior as an expression of brain function and in brain tissue structure. Sixteen-week-old C57BL/6J male mice were divided into either the fasted group or the control group. Experiments were conducted in a fixed indoor environment. We examined the effects of fasting on the number of nerve cells, structural changes in the myelin and axon density, and brain atrophy. For behavior observation, the amount of food and water consumed, ingestion time, and the pattern of movement were measured using a time-recording system. The fasted mice showed a significant increase in physical activity and their rhythm of movement was disturbed. Since the brain was in an abnormal state after fasting, mice that were normally active during the night became active regardless of day or night and performed strenuous exercise at a high frequency. The brain weight did not change by a fast, and brain atrophy was not observed. Although no textural change was apparent by fasting, the neuronal neogenesis in the subventricular zone and hippocampus was inhibited, causing disorder of the brain function. A clear association between the suppression of encephalic neuropoiesis and overactivity was not established. However, it is interesting that the results of this study suggest that single short-term fasting has an effect on encephalic neuropoiesis.

  5. Gene expression changes with age in skin, adipose tissue, blood and brain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that gene expression levels change with age. These changes are hypothesized to influence the aging rate of an individual. We analyzed gene expression changes with age in abdominal skin, subcutaneous adipose tissue and lymphoblastoid cell lines in 856 female twins in the age range of 39-85 years. Additionally, we investigated genotypic variants involved in genotype-by-age interactions to understand how the genomic regulation of gene expression alters with age. Results Using a linear mixed model, differential expression with age was identified in 1,672 genes in skin and 188 genes in adipose tissue. Only two genes expressed in lymphoblastoid cell lines showed significant changes with age. Genes significantly regulated by age were compared with expression profiles in 10 brain regions from 100 postmortem brains aged 16 to 83 years. We identified only one age-related gene common to the three tissues. There were 12 genes that showed differential expression with age in both skin and brain tissue and three common to adipose and brain tissues. Conclusions Skin showed the most age-related gene expression changes of all the tissues investigated, with many of the genes being previously implicated in fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial activity, cancer and splicing. A significant proportion of age-related changes in gene expression appear to be tissue-specific with only a few genes sharing an age effect in expression across tissues. More research is needed to improve our understanding of the genetic influences on aging and the relationship with age-related diseases. PMID:23889843

  6. Magnetic resonance microscopy at 14 Tesla and correlative histopathology of human brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Segura, Ana; Morales, Jose Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose Manuel; Cardona-Marsal, Ramon; Lopez-Gines, Concepcion; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) can provide high microstructural detail in excised human lesions. Previous MRM images on some experimental models and a few human samples suggest the large potential of the technique. The aim of this study was the characterization of specific morphological features of human brain tumor samples by MRM and correlative histopathology. We performed MRM imaging and correlative histopathology in 19 meningioma and 11 glioma human brain tumor samples obtained at surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first MRM direct structural characterization of human brain tumor samples. MRM of brain tumor tissue provided images with 35 to 40 µm spatial resolution. The use of MRM to study human brain tumor samples provides new microstructural information on brain tumors for better classification and characterization. The correlation between MRM and histopathology images allowed the determination of image parameters for critical microstructures of the tumor, like collagen patterns, necrotic foci, calcifications and/or psammoma bodies, vascular distribution and hemorrhage among others. Therefore, MRM may help in interpreting the Clinical Magnetic Resonance images in terms of cell biology processes and tissue patterns. Finally, and most importantly for clinical diagnosis purposes, it provides three-dimensional information in intact samples which may help in selecting a preferential orientation for the histopathology slicing which contains most of the informative elements of the biopsy. Overall, the findings reported here provide a new and unique microstructural view of intact human brain tumor tissue. At this point, our approach and results allow the identification of specific tissue types and pathological features in unprocessed tumor samples.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy at 14 Tesla and Correlative Histopathology of Human Brain Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Segura, Ana; Morales, Jose Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose Manuel; Cardona-Marsal, Ramon; Lopez-Gines, Concepcion; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) can provide high microstructural detail in excised human lesions. Previous MRM images on some experimental models and a few human samples suggest the large potential of the technique. The aim of this study was the characterization of specific morphological features of human brain tumor samples by MRM and correlative histopathology. We performed MRM imaging and correlative histopathology in 19 meningioma and 11 glioma human brain tumor samples obtained at surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first MRM direct structural characterization of human brain tumor samples. MRM of brain tumor tissue provided images with 35 to 40 µm spatial resolution. The use of MRM to study human brain tumor samples provides new microstructural information on brain tumors for better classification and characterization. The correlation between MRM and histopathology images allowed the determination of image parameters for critical microstructures of the tumor, like collagen patterns, necrotic foci, calcifications and/or psammoma bodies, vascular distribution and hemorrhage among others. Therefore, MRM may help in interpreting the Clinical Magnetic Resonance images in terms of cell biology processes and tissue patterns. Finally, and most importantly for clinical diagnosis purposes, it provides three-dimensional information in intact samples which may help in selecting a preferential orientation for the histopathology slicing which contains most of the informative elements of the biopsy. Overall, the findings reported here provide a new and unique microstructural view of intact human brain tumor tissue. At this point, our approach and results allow the identification of specific tissue types and pathological features in unprocessed tumor samples. PMID:22110653

  8. Bimodal Spectroscopy of Formalin Fixed Samples to Discriminate Dysplastic and Tumor Brain Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, S.; Cicchi, R.; Giordano, F.; Buccoliero, A. M.; Guerrini, R.; Pavone, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    Biomedical spectroscopy has gained attention in the past few years for disease diagnosis. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopies provide finger-print information related to biochemical and morphological alterations when tissues progress from the normal to a malignant stage. Usually, freshly excised tissue specimens are preferred for bio-spectroscopic studies. However, ethical issues, sample availability and distance between the surgery room and the laboratory provide an impelling restriction for in-vitro spectroscopic studies using freshly excised samples. After surgical resection tissues are fixed in 4% formalin for histological studies under a light microscope. The process of fixation prevents degradation of tissues. In this study, we probe the use of formalin fixed sample for differentiating normal and dysplastic brain tissues using fluorescence and Raman spectroscopies. It was found that fluorescence spectral profile changes in the wavelength range from 550-750 nm between dysplastic and tumor samples. Also, significant differences were found in the Raman spectral profiles of such samples. The results indicate a potential diagnostic application of spectroscopy in formalin fixed brain samples for differentiating dysplastic and tumor brain tissues.

  9. High-molecular weight Aβ oligomers and protofibrils are the predominant Aβ species in the native soluble protein fraction of the AD brain.

    PubMed

    Upadhaya, Ajeet Rijal; Lungrin, Irina; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Fändrich, Marcus; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf

    2012-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the aggregation and deposition of amyloid β protein (Aβ) in the brain. Soluble Aβ oligomers are thought to be toxic. To investigate the predominant species of Aβ protein that may play a role in AD pathogenesis, we performed biochemical analysis of AD and control brains. Sucrose buffer-soluble brain lysates were characterized in native form using blue native (BN)-PAGE and also in denatured form using SDS-PAGE followed by Western blot analysis. BN-PAGE analysis revealed a high-molecular weight smear (>1000 kD) of Aβ(42) -positive material in the AD brain, whereas low-molecular weight and monomeric Aβ species were not detected. SDS-PAGE analysis, on the other hand, allowed the detection of prominent Aβ monomer and dimer bands in AD cases but not in controls. Immunoelectron microscopy of immunoprecipitated oligomers and protofibrils/fibrils showed spherical and protofibrillar Aβ-positive material, thereby confirming the presence of high-molecular weight Aβ (hiMWAβ) aggregates in the AD brain. In vitro analysis of synthetic Aβ(40) - and Aβ(42) preparations revealed Aβ fibrils, protofibrils, and hiMWAβ oligomers that were detectable at the electron microscopic level and after BN-PAGE. Further, BN-PAGE analysis exhibited a monomer band and less prominent low-molecular weight Aβ (loMWAβ) oligomers. In contrast, SDS-PAGE showed large amounts of loMWAβ but no hiMWAβ(40) and strikingly reduced levels of hiMWAβ(42) . These results indicate that hiMWAβ aggregates, particularly Aβ(42) species, are most prevalent in the soluble fraction of the AD brain. Thus, soluble hiMWAβ aggregates may play an important role in the pathogenesis of AD either independently or as a reservoir for release of loMWAβ oligomers.

  10. Injury of myocardial conduction tissue and coronary artery smooth muscle following brain death in the baboon.

    PubMed

    Novitzky, D; Rose, A G; Cooper, D K

    1988-05-01

    Experimental brain death was induced in 36 chacma baboons. In group A (n = 17), brain death was induced with no pharmacologic or surgical manipulation. Group B (n = 7) underwent bilateral vagotomy, unilateral left cardiac sympathectomy, or bilateral adrenalectomy before induction of brain death. Group C (n = 7) underwent total cardiac sympathectomy. Group D (n = 5) was pretreated with verapamil hydrochloride. Following induction of brain death, group A animals were maintained on a ventilator for a mean of 12 hr and 6 hr for the remaining groups. At the end of the experiment, the heart was excised, and tissue blocks were examined with light microscopy at (A) the atriaventricular node-bundle of His; (B) the major coronary arteries; and (C) myocardial tissue from the ventricular septum or left ventricular wall. In group A, 41% of the hearts showed histologic features of injury to the conduction tissue, 70% presented contraction band necrosis of the smooth muscle of the coronary arteries, and an incidence of 100% of the groups showed myocyte injury, more evident in the subendocardial area. In group B animals, conduction tissue injury was seen in 6 animals; the coronary arteries were not examined in this group; the incidence of myocyte injury was seen in 80% of the animals. Animals in groups C and D show no histopathologic injury in the conduction tissue (group A vs. C P less than 0.04), nor in the coronary arteries (group A vs. C P less than 0.002; group A vs. D P less than 0.01), preserving the myocytes (P less than 0.001). The catecholamine storm associated to acute increment of the endocranial pressure at the time of induction of brain death induces major histopathologic changes in the myocardium, as a result of endogenous catecholamines released inducing calcium overflow injury, affecting the conduction tissue, the smooth muscle of the coronary arteries, and the contractile myocardium. This can be prevented by calcium blockers or cardiac denervation.

  11. Study into penetration speed during laser cutting of brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Yilbas, Z; Sami, M; Patiroglu, T

    1998-01-01

    The applications of CO2 continuous-wave lasers in neurosurgery have become important in recent years. Theoretical considerations of laser applicability in medicine are subsequently confirmed experimentally. To obtain precision operation in the laser cutting process, further theoretical developments and experimental studies need to be conducted. Consequently, in the present study, the heat transfer mechanism taking place during laser-tissue interaction is introduced using Fourier theory. The results obtained from the theoretical model are compared with the experimental results. In connection with this, an experiment is designed to measure the penetration speed during the laser cutting process. The measurement is carried out using an optical method. It is found that both results for the penetration speed obtained from the theory and experiment are in a good agreement.

  12. Mercury speciation in brain tissue of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from the Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Krey, Anke; Kwan, Michael; Chan, Hing Man

    2012-04-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxicant that has been found at elevated concentrations in the Arctic ecosystem. Little is known about its internal dose in wildlife such as polar bears. We measured concentrations of mercury (Hg) in three different brain regions (cerebellum, frontal lobe and brain stem) of 24 polar bears collected from the Nunavik, Canada between 2000 and 2003. Speciation of Hg was measured by High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (HPLC-ICP-MS). Concentrations of mean total Hg in brain tissue were up to 625 times lower (0.28 ± 0.07 mg kg(-1) dry weight (dw) in frontal lobe, 0.23 ± 0.07 mg kg(-1) dw in cerebellum and 0.12 ± 0.0 3mg kg(-1) dw in brain stem) than the mean total Hg concentration previously reported in polar bear liver collected from Eastern Baffin Island. Methylmercury (MeHg) accounted for 100% of the Hg found in all three brain regions analyzed. These results suggest that polar bear might reduce the toxic effects of Hg by limiting the uptake into the brain and/or decrease the rate of demethylation so that Hg can be excreted from the brain more easily. The toxicokinetics and the blood-brain-barrier mechanisms of polar bears are still unknown and further research is required.

  13. Local tissue growth patterns underlying normal fetal human brain gyrification quantified in utero

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia; Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Corbett-Detig, James; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Existing knowledge of growth patterns in the living fetal human brain is based upon in utero imaging studies by MRI and ultrasound, which describe overall growth and provided mainly qualitative findings. However, formation of the complex folded cortical structure of the adult brain requires, in part, differential rates of regional tissue growth. To better understand these local tissue growth patterns, we applied recent advances in fetal MRI motion correction and computational image analysis techniques to 40 normal fetal human brains covering a period of primary sulcal formation (20-28 gestational weeks). Growth patterns were mapped by quantifying tissue locations that were expanding more or less quickly than the overall cerebral growth rate, which reveal increasing structural complexity. We detected increased local relative growth rates in the formation of the pre- and post-central gyri, right superior temporal gyrus and opercula, which differentiated between the constant growth rate in underlying cerebral mantle and the accelerating rate in the cortical plate undergoing folding. Analysis focused on the cortical plate revealed greater volume increases in parietal and occipital regions compared to the frontal lobe. Cortical plate growth patterns constrained to narrower age ranges showed that gyrification, reflected by greater growth rates, was more pronounced after 24 gestational weeks. Local hemispheric volume asymmetry was located in the posterior peri-Sylvian area associated with structural lateralization in the mature brain. These maps of fetal brain growth patterns construct a spatially specific baseline of developmental biomarkers with which to correlate abnormal development in the human. PMID:21414909

  14. Light-scattering signal may indicate critical time zone to rescue brain tissue after hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2011-02-01

    A light-scattering signal, which is sensitive to cellular/subcellular structural integrity, is a potential indicator of brain tissue viability because metabolic energy is used in part to maintain the structure of cells. We previously observed a unique triphasic scattering change (TSC) at a certain time after oxygen/glucose deprivation for blood-free rat brains; TSC almost coincided with the cerebral adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion. We examine whether such TSC can be observed in the presence of blood in vivo, for which transcranial diffuse reflectance measurement is performed for rat brains during hypoxia induced by nitrogen gas inhalation. At a certain time after hypoxia, diffuse reflectance intensity in the near-infrared region changes in three phases, which is shown by spectroscopic analysis to be due to scattering change in the tissue. During hypoxia, rats are reoxygenated at various time points. When the oxygen supply is started before TSC, all rats survive, whereas no rats survive when the oxygen supply is started after TSC. Survival is probabilistic when the oxygen supply is started during TSC, indicating that the period of TSC can be regarded as a critical time zone for rescuing the brain. The results demonstrate that light scattering signal can be an indicator of brain tissue reversibility.

  15. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Based Tissue Segmentation: Validation and Application to the Developing Child and Adolescent Brain

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Khader M.; Halphen, Christopher; Sankar, Ambika; Eluvathingal, Thomas J.; Kramer, Larry; Stuebing, Karla K.; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2007-01-01

    We present and validate a novel diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) approach for segmenting the human whole-brain into partitions representing grey matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The approach utilizes the contrast among tissue types in the DTI anisotropy vs. diffusivity rotational invariant space. The DTI-based whole-brain GM and WM fractions (GMf and WMf) are contrasted with the fractions obtained from conventional magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) tissue segmentation (or clustering) methods that utilized dual echo (proton density-weighted (PDw), and spin-spin relaxation-weighted (T2w) contrast, in addition to spin-lattice relaxation weighted (T1w) contrasts acquired in the same imaging session and covering the same volume. In addition to good correspondence with cMRI estimates of brain volume, the DTI-based accurately depicts expected age vs. WM and GM volume-to-total intracranial brain volume percentage trends on the rapidly developing brains of a cohort of 29 children (6–18 years). This approach promises to extend DTI utility to both micro and macrostructural aspects of tissue organization. PMID:17166746

  16. Diazepam binding inhibitor gene expression: Location in brain and peripheral tissues of rate

    SciTech Connect

    Alho, H.; Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Tiedge, H.; Wilcox, J.; Bovolin, P.; Brosius, J.; Roberts, J.L.; Costa, E.

    1988-09-01

    Diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI), an endogenous 10-kDa polypeptide was isolated from rat and human brain by monitoring displacement of radioactive diazepam bound to specific recognition sites in brain synaptic and mitochondrial membranes. The cellular location of DBI mRNA was studied in rat brain and selected peripheral tissues by in situ hybridization histochemistry with a /sup 35/S-labeled single-stranded complementary RNA probe. DBI mRNA was heterogeneously distributed in rat brain, with particularly high levels in the area postrema, the cerebellar cortex, and ependyma of the third ventricle. Intermediate levels were found in the olfactory bulb, pontine nuclei, inferior colliculi, arcuate nucleus, and pineal gland. Relatively low but significant levels of silver grains were observed overlying many mesencephalic and telencephalic areas that have previously been shown to contain numerous DBI-immunoreactive neurons and a high density of central benzodiazepine receptors. In situ hybridizations also revealed high levels of DBI mRNA in the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland, liver, and germinal center of the white pulp of spleen, all tissues that are rich in peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. The tissue-specific pattern of DBI gene expression described here could be exploited to further understand the physiological function of DBI in the brain and periphery.

  17. Light-scattering signal may indicate critical time zone to rescue brain tissue after hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2011-02-01

    A light-scattering signal, which is sensitive to cellular/subcellular structural integrity, is a potential indicator of brain tissue viability because metabolic energy is used in part to maintain the structure of cells. We previously observed a unique triphasic scattering change (TSC) at a certain time after oxygen/glucose deprivation for blood-free rat brains; TSC almost coincided with the cerebral adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion. We examine whether such TSC can be observed in the presence of blood in vivo, for which transcranial diffuse reflectance measurement is performed for rat brains during hypoxia induced by nitrogen gas inhalation. At a certain time after hypoxia, diffuse reflectance intensity in the near-infrared region changes in three phases, which is shown by spectroscopic analysis to be due to scattering change in the tissue. During hypoxia, rats are reoxygenated at various time points. When the oxygen supply is started before TSC, all rats survive, whereas no rats survive when the oxygen supply is started after TSC. Survival is probabilistic when the oxygen supply is started during TSC, indicating that the period of TSC can be regarded as a critical time zone for rescuing the brain. The results demonstrate that light scattering signal can be an indicator of brain tissue reversibility.

  18. Elderly depression diagnostic of diabetic patients by brain tissue pulsatility imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachemi, Mélouka Elkateb; Remeniéras, Jean-pierre; Desmidt, Thomas; Camus, Vincent; Tranquart, François

    2010-01-01

    Pulsatile motion of brain parenchyma results from cardiac and breathing cycles and consists in a rapid displacement in systole, with slow diastolic recovery. Based on the vascular depression concept and recent studies where a correlation was found between cerebral haemodynamics and depression in the elderly, we emitted the hypothesis that tissue brain motion due to perfusion is correlated to elderly depression associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Tissue Pulsatlity Imaging (TPI) is a new ultrasound technique developed firstly at the University of Washington to assess the brain tissue motion. We used TPI technique to measure the brain displacement of two groups of elderly patients with diabetes as a vascular risk factor. The first group is composed of 11 depressed diabetic patients. The second group is composed of 12 diabetic patients without depressive symptoms. Transcranial acquisitions were performed with a 1.8 MHz ultrasound phased array probe through the right temporal bone window. The acquisition of six cardiac cycles was realized on each patient with a frame rate of 23 frames/s. Displacements estimation was performed by off-line analysis. A significant decrease in brain pulsatility was observed in the group of depressed patients compared to the group of non depressed patients. Mean displacement magnitude was about 44±7 μm in the first group and 68±13 μm in the second group.

  19. Tissue structure of rat brain after microwave irradiation using maximum magnetic field component.

    PubMed

    Ikarashi, Y; Okada, M; Maruyama, Y

    1986-05-14

    A novel microwave instrument has recently been designed by New Japan Radio Co. Ltd., to provide more homogeneous distribution of the rapidly deposited heat in the rodent brain. Being the first commercial unit which concentrates the maximum magnetic field component of irradiation, rather than the usual electric field, it provides complete enzymatic inactivation in a typical rat brain when a power of 9 kW (90% of maximum) is applied for 0.80 s at the standard operating frequency of 2450 MHz. Tissue structural integrity was investigated in animals sacrificed by this approach or by the usual decapitation to see if any tissue disruption or pressure-induced spreading, a major problem with other microwave devices, might also be of concern for this new unit. Histological examination of tissue samples employed both light and electron microscopy. Using Luxol Fast Blue in the light microscopy, the microwave irradiated tissues exhibited a decreased affinity for the staining agent, an appearance of slight vacuoles, and the disappearance of fine fibrils in the parenchyma. However, the interfacial areas between distinct brain regions remained well preserved. Electron microscopic observation indicated that microwave irradiated tissue caused protein denaturation accompanied by the aggregation of nuclear chromatin, the disappearance of Nissl bodies, ribosomes and neurofilaments, and noticeably irregular myelin sheaths. However, the essential structure of nerve cell membranes and synaptic membranes were maintained, and synaptic vesicles were clearly defined. These results indicated that the rapid heating of brain tissue with maximal magnetic field concentration of the irradiation does not result in significant tissue disruption, pressure-induced spreading or cell breakdown.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Efficient Cargo Delivery into Adult Brain Tissue Using Short Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kizil, Caghan; Iltzsche, Anne; Thomas, Alvin Kuriakose; Bhattarai, Prabesh; Zhang, Yixin; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish brains can regenerate lost neurons upon neurogenic activity of the radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs) that reside at the ventricular region. Understanding the molecular events underlying this ability is of great interest for translational studies of regenerative medicine. Therefore, functional analyses of gene function in RGCs and neurons are essential. Using cerebroventricular microinjection (CVMI), RGCs can be targeted efficiently but the penetration capacity of the injected molecules reduces dramatically in deeper parts of the brain tissue, such as the parenchymal regions that contain the neurons. In this report, we tested the penetration efficiency of five known cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and identified two- polyR and Trans - that efficiently penetrate the brain tissue without overt toxicity in a dose-dependent manner as determined by TUNEL staining and L-Plastin immunohistochemistry. We also found that polyR peptide can help carry plasmid DNA several cell diameters into the brain tissue after a series of coupling reactions using DBCO-PEG4-maleimide-based Michael's addition and azide-mediated copper-free click reaction. Combined with the advantages of CVMI, such as rapidness, reproducibility, and ability to be used in adult animals, CPPs improve the applicability of the CVMI technique to deeper parts of the central nervous system tissues.

  1. Effects of Tannic Acid on the Ischemic Brain Tissue of Rats.

    PubMed

    Sen, Halil Murat; Ozkan, Adile; Guven, Mustafa; Akman, Tarık; Aras, Adem Bozkurt; Sehitoglu, Ibrahim; Alacam, Hasan; Silan, Coskun; Cosar, Murat; Ozisik Karaman, Handan Isın

    2015-08-01

    Many studies of brain ischemia have shown the role played by massive ischemia-induced production of reactive oxygen species, the main mechanism of neuronal death. However, currently, there is no treatment choice to prevent cell death triggered by reactive oxygen species. In our study, we researched the effects of tannic acid, an antioxidant, on the ischemic tissue of rats with induced middle cerebral artery occlusion. The animals were divided into three groups of eight animals. The sham group were only administered 10 % ethanol intraperitoneally, the second group had middle cerebral artery occlusion induced and were given 10 % ethanol intraperitoneally, while the third group had middle cerebral artery occlusion with 10 mg/kg dose tannic acid dissolved in 10 % ethanol administered within half an hour intraperitoneally. The rats were sacrificed 24 h later, and brain tissue was examined biochemically and histopathologically. Biochemical evaluation of brain tissue found that comparing the ischemic group with no treatment with the tannic acid-treated ischemia group; the superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were higher, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were lower, and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) was higher in the tannic acid-treated group. Histopathological examination showed that the histopathological results of the tannic acid group were better than the group not given tannic acid. Biochemical and histopathological results showed that tannic acid administration had an antioxidant effect on the negative effects of ischemia in brain tissue.

  2. Control tissue in brain banking: the importance of thorough neuropathological assessment.

    PubMed

    Nolan, M; Troakes, C; King, A; Bodi, I; Al-Sarraj, S

    2015-07-01

    Historically, control brain tissue was classified as such mainly by clinical history, and underwent limited neuropathological analysis. Significant progress has been made in recent years with the collection of more extensive clinical information and more specific classifications of neurodegenerative disease, aided by advances in histological processing and increasingly sensitive detection methods. We hypothesised that this may have resulted in certain pathologies previously going unidentified, due to insufficient block sampling and an inadequate range of stains, resulting in the disease not being recognised. We therefore investigated the significance of changes to our own protocols for examining control brain tissue before and after 2007. Control cases that were originally assessed before 2007 were re-assessed using our current staining protocol and antibodies, and compared with age-matched cases post-2007. We found that almost all cases that were originally described as neuropathologically normal displayed some level of pathology after re-analysis, with four cases displaying what we have termed 'major' pathology that previously went unidentified, emphasising on a small scale the importance of accurate neuropathological analysis of control tissue, and highlighting the inherent difficulty of traditionally classifying tissue simply as 'disease' or 'control'. We hope our findings will stimulate debate within the brain banking community, with the eventual aim being standardisation of protocols for assessing controls across brain banks.

  3. Efficient Cargo Delivery into Adult Brain Tissue Using Short Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alvin Kuriakose; Bhattarai, Prabesh; Zhang, Yixin; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish brains can regenerate lost neurons upon neurogenic activity of the radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs) that reside at the ventricular region. Understanding the molecular events underlying this ability is of great interest for translational studies of regenerative medicine. Therefore, functional analyses of gene function in RGCs and neurons are essential. Using cerebroventricular microinjection (CVMI), RGCs can be targeted efficiently but the penetration capacity of the injected molecules reduces dramatically in deeper parts of the brain tissue, such as the parenchymal regions that contain the neurons. In this report, we tested the penetration efficiency of five known cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and identified two– polyR and Trans – that efficiently penetrate the brain tissue without overt toxicity in a dose-dependent manner as determined by TUNEL staining and L-Plastin immunohistochemistry. We also found that polyR peptide can help carry plasmid DNA several cell diameters into the brain tissue after a series of coupling reactions using DBCO-PEG4-maleimide-based Michael’s addition and azide-mediated copper-free click reaction. Combined with the advantages of CVMI, such as rapidness, reproducibility, and ability to be used in adult animals, CPPs improve the applicability of the CVMI technique to deeper parts of the central nervous system tissues. PMID:25894337

  4. Brain tissue deforms similarly to filled elastomers and follows consolidation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschini, G.; Bigoni, D.; Regitnig, P.; Holzapfel, G. A.

    2006-12-01

    Slow, large deformations of human brain tissue—accompanying cranial vault deformation induced by positional plagiocephaly, occurring during hydrocephalus, and in the convolutional development—has surprisingly received scarce mechanical investigation. Since the effects of these deformations may be important, we performed a systematic series of in vitro experiments on human brain tissue, revealing the following features. (i) Under uniaxial (quasi-static), cyclic loading, brain tissue exhibits a peculiar nonlinear mechanical behaviour, exhibiting hysteresis, Mullins effect and residual strain, qualitatively similar to that observed in filled elastomers. As a consequence, the loading and unloading uniaxial curves have been found to follow the Ogden nonlinear elastic theory of rubber (and its variants to include Mullins effect and permanent strain). (ii) Loaded up to failure, the "shape" of the stress/strain curve qualitatively changes, evidencing softening related to local failure. (iii) Uniaxial (quasi-static) strain experiments under controlled drainage conditions provide the first direct evidence that the tissue obeys consolidation theory involving fluid migration, with properties similar to fine soils, but having much smaller volumetric compressibility. (iv) Our experimental findings also support the existence of a viscous component of the solid phase deformation. Brain tissue should, therefore, be modelled as a porous, fluid-saturated, nonlinear solid with very small volumetric (drained) compressibility.

  5. Autonomous control for mechanically stable navigation of microscale implants in brain tissue to record neural activity.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sindhu; Kumar, Swathy Sampath; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2016-08-01

    Emerging neural prosthetics require precise positional tuning and stable interfaces with single neurons for optimal function over a lifetime. In this study, we report an autonomous control to precisely navigate microscale electrodes in soft, viscoelastic brain tissue without visual feedback. The autonomous control optimizes signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of single neuronal recordings in viscoelastic brain tissue while maintaining quasi-static mechanical stress conditions to improve stability of the implant-tissue interface. Force-displacement curves from microelectrodes in in vivo rodent experiments are used to estimate viscoelastic parameters of the brain. Using a combination of computational models and experiments, we determined an optimal movement for the microelectrodes with bidirectional displacements of 3:2 ratio between forward and backward displacements and a inter-movement interval of 40 s for minimizing mechanical stress in the surrounding brain tissue. A regulator with the above optimal bidirectional motion for the microelectrodes in in vivo experiments resulted in significant reduction in the number of microelectrode movements (0.23 movements/min) and longer periods of stable SNR (53 % of the time) compared to a regulator using a conventional linear, unidirectional microelectrode movement (with 1.48 movements/min and stable SNR 23 % of the time).

  6. Changes in Rat Brain Tissue Microstructure and Stiffness during the Development of Experimental Obstructive Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Jugé, Lauriane; Pong, Alice C.; Bongers, Andre; Sinkus, Ralph; Bilston, Lynne E.; Cheng, Shaokoon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding neural injury in hydrocephalus and how the brain changes during the course of the disease in-vivo remain unclear. This study describes brain deformation, microstructural and mechanical properties changes during obstructive hydrocephalus development in a rat model using multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Hydrocephalus was induced in eight Sprague-Dawley rats (4 weeks old) by injecting a kaolin suspension into the cisterna magna. Six sham-injected rats were used as controls. MR imaging (9.4T, Bruker) was performed 1 day before, and at 3, 7 and 16 days post injection. T2-weighted MR images were collected to quantify brain deformation. MR elastography was used to measure brain stiffness, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was conducted to observe brain tissue microstructure. Results showed that the enlargement of the ventricular system was associated with a decrease in the cortical gray matter thickness and caudate-putamen cross-sectional area (P < 0.001, for both), an alteration of the corpus callosum and periventricular white matter microstructure (CC+PVWM) and rearrangement of the cortical gray matter microstructure (P < 0.001, for both), while compression without gross microstructural alteration was evident in the caudate-putamen and ventral internal capsule (P < 0.001, for both). During hydrocephalus development, increased space between the white matter tracts was observed in the CC+PVWM (P < 0.001), while a decrease in space was observed for the ventral internal capsule (P < 0.001). For the cortical gray matter, an increase in extracellular tissue water was significantly associated with a decrease in tissue stiffness (P = 0.001). To conclude, this study characterizes the temporal changes in tissue microstructure, water content and stiffness in different brain regions and their association with ventricular enlargement. In summary, whilst diffusion changes were larger and statistically significant for majority of the brain regions studied

  7. Changes in Rat Brain Tissue Microstructure and Stiffness during the Development of Experimental Obstructive Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Jugé, Lauriane; Pong, Alice C; Bongers, Andre; Sinkus, Ralph; Bilston, Lynne E; Cheng, Shaokoon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding neural injury in hydrocephalus and how the brain changes during the course of the disease in-vivo remain unclear. This study describes brain deformation, microstructural and mechanical properties changes during obstructive hydrocephalus development in a rat model using multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Hydrocephalus was induced in eight Sprague-Dawley rats (4 weeks old) by injecting a kaolin suspension into the cisterna magna. Six sham-injected rats were used as controls. MR imaging (9.4T, Bruker) was performed 1 day before, and at 3, 7 and 16 days post injection. T2-weighted MR images were collected to quantify brain deformation. MR elastography was used to measure brain stiffness, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was conducted to observe brain tissue microstructure. Results showed that the enlargement of the ventricular system was associated with a decrease in the cortical gray matter thickness and caudate-putamen cross-sectional area (P < 0.001, for both), an alteration of the corpus callosum and periventricular white matter microstructure (CC+PVWM) and rearrangement of the cortical gray matter microstructure (P < 0.001, for both), while compression without gross microstructural alteration was evident in the caudate-putamen and ventral internal capsule (P < 0.001, for both). During hydrocephalus development, increased space between the white matter tracts was observed in the CC+PVWM (P < 0.001), while a decrease in space was observed for the ventral internal capsule (P < 0.001). For the cortical gray matter, an increase in extracellular tissue water was significantly associated with a decrease in tissue stiffness (P = 0.001). To conclude, this study characterizes the temporal changes in tissue microstructure, water content and stiffness in different brain regions and their association with ventricular enlargement. In summary, whilst diffusion changes were larger and statistically significant for majority of the brain regions studied

  8. PIXE analysis of low concentration aluminum in brain tissues of an Alzheimer's disease patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, R.; Hanaichi, T.; Takeuchi, T.; Ektessabi, A. M.

    1999-06-01

    An excess accumulation and presence of metal ions may significantly alter a brain cell's normal functions. There have been increasing efforts in recent years to measure and quantify the density and distribution of excessive accumulations of constituent elements (such as Fe, Zn, Cu, and Ca) in the brain, as well as the presence and distribution of contaminating elements (such as Al). This is particularly important in cases of neuropathological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and ALS. The aim of this paper was to measure the Al present in the temporal cortex of the brain of an Alzheimer's disease patient. The specimens were taken from an unfixed autopsy brain which has been preserved for a period of 4 years in the deep freezer at -80 °C. Proton Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy was used for the measurement of Al concentration in this brain tissue. A tandem accelerator with 2 MeV of energy was also used. In order to increase the sensitivity of the signals in the low energy region of the spectra, the absorbers were removed. The results show that the peak height depends on the measurement site. However, in certain cases an extremely high concentration of Al was observed in the PIXE spectra, with an intensity higher than those in the other major elements of the brain's matrix element. Samples from tissues affected by the same disease were analyzed using the EDX analyzer. The results are quantitatively in very good agreement with those of the PIXE analysis.

  9. PIXE analysis of low concentration aluminum in brain tissues of an Alzheimer's disease patient

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, R.; Takeuchi, T.; Hanaichi, T.; Ektessabi, A. M.

    1999-06-10

    An excess accumulation and presence of metal ions may significantly alter a brain cell's normal functions. There have been increasing efforts in recent years to measure and quantify the density and distribution of excessive accumulations of constituent elements (such as Fe, Zn, Cu, and Ca) in the brain, as well as the presence and distribution of contaminating elements (such as Al). This is particularly important in cases of neuropathological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and ALS. The aim of this paper was to measure the Al present in the temporal cortex of the brain of an Alzheimer's disease patient. The specimens were taken from an unfixed autopsy brain which has been preserved for a period of 4 years in the deep freezer at -80 degree sign C. Proton Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy was used for the measurement of Al concentration in this brain tissue. A tandem accelerator with 2 MeV of energy was also used. In order to increase the sensitivity of the signals in the low energy region of the spectra, the absorbers were removed. The results show that the peak height depends on the measurement site. However, in certain cases an extremely high concentration of Al was observed in the PIXE spectra, with an intensity higher than those in the other major elements of the brain's matrix element. Samples from tissues affected by the same disease were analyzed using the EDX analyzer. The results are quantitatively in very good agreement with those of the PIXE analysis.

  10. A method for monitoring of oxygen saturation changes in brain tissue using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rejmstad, Peter; Johansson, Johannes D; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Wårdell, Karin

    2017-03-01

    Continuous measurement of local brain oxygen saturation (SO2 ) can be used to monitor the status of brain trauma patients in the neurocritical care unit. Currently, micro-oxygen-electrodes are considered as the "gold standard" in measuring cerebral oxygen pressure (pO2 ), which is closely related to SO2 through the oxygen dissociation curve (ODC) of hemoglobin, but with the drawback of slow in response time. The present study suggests estimation of SO2 in brain tissue using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) for finding an analytical relation between measured spectra and the SO2 for different blood concentrations. The P3 diffusion approximation is used to generate a set of spectra simulating brain tissue for various levels of blood concentrations in order to estimate SO2 . The algorithm is evaluated on optical phantoms mimicking white brain matter (blood volume of 0.5-2%) where pO2 and temperature is controlled and on clinical data collected during brain surgery. The suggested method is capable of estimating the blood fraction and oxygen saturation changes from the spectroscopic signal and the hemoglobin absorption profile.

  11. Joining microelectronics and microionics: Nerve cells and brain tissue on semiconductor chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromherz, Peter

    2008-09-01

    The direct electrical interfacing of semiconductor chips with individual nerve cells and with brain tissue is considered. At first, the structure of the cell-chip contact is described and then the electrical coupling is characterized between ion channels, the electrical elements of nerve cells, and transistors and capacitors of silicon chips. On that basis, the signal transmission between microelectronics and microionics is implemented in both directions. Simple hybrid systems are assembled with neuron pairs and with small neuronal networks. Finally, the interfacing with capacitors and transistors is extended to brain tissue on silicon. The application of CMOS chips with capacitively coupled recording sites allows an imaging of neuronal activity with high spatiotemporal resolution. Goal of the work is an integration of neuronal network dynamics and digital electronics on a microscopic level for applications in brain research, medical prosthetics and information technology.

  12. Computational Assessment of Neural Probe and Brain Tissue Interface under Transient Motion

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, Michael; Bawab, Sebastian; Yoon, Hargsoon

    2016-01-01

    The functional longevity of a neural probe is dependent upon its ability to minimize injury risk during the insertion and recording period in vivo, which could be related to motion-related strain between the probe and surrounding tissue. A series of finite element analyses was conducted to study the extent of the strain induced within the brain in an area around a neural probe. This study focuses on the transient behavior of neural probe and brain tissue interface with a viscoelastic model. Different stages of the interface from initial insertion of neural probe to full bonding of the probe by astro-glial sheath formation are simulated utilizing analytical tools to investigate the effects of relative motion between the neural probe and the brain while friction coefficients and kinematic frequencies are varied. The analyses can provide an in-depth look at the quantitative benefits behind using soft materials for neural probes. PMID:27322338

  13. Computational Assessment of Neural Probe and Brain Tissue Interface under Transient Motion.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Michael; Bawab, Sebastian; Yoon, Hargsoon

    2016-06-16

    The functional longevity of a neural probe is dependent upon its ability to minimize injury risk during the insertion and recording period in vivo, which could be related to motion-related strain between the probe and surrounding tissue. A series of finite element analyses was conducted to study the extent of the strain induced within the brain in an area around a neural probe. This study focuses on the transient behavior of neural probe and brain tissue interface with a viscoelastic model. Different stages of the interface from initial insertion of neural probe to full bonding of the probe by astro-glial sheath formation are simulated utilizing analytical tools to investigate the effects of relative motion between the neural probe and the brain while friction coefficients and kinematic frequencies are varied. The analyses can provide an in-depth look at the quantitative benefits behind using soft materials for neural probes.

  14. Dynamical properties of the brain tissue under oscillatory shear stresses at large strain range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjema, F.; Khelidj, B.; Lounis, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this experimental work, we study the viscoelastic behaviour of in vitro brain tissue, particularly the white matter, under oscillatory shear strain. The selective vulnerability of this tissue is the anisotropic mechanical properties of theirs different regions lead to a sensitivity to the angular shear rate and magnitude of strain. For this aim, shear storage modulus (G‧) and loss modulus (G″) were measured over a range of frequencies (1 to 100 Hz), for different levels of strain (1 %, to 50 %). The mechanical responses of the brain matter samples showed a viscoelastic behaviour that depend on the correlated strain level and frequency range and old age sample. The samples have been showed evolution behaviour by increasing then decreasing the strain level. Also, the stiffness anisotropy of brain matter was showed between regions and species.

  15. Adaptive optics confocal fluorescence microscopy with direct wavefront sensing for brain tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xiaodong; Fernandez, Bautista; Chen, Diana C.; Azucena, Oscar; Fu, Min; Zuo, Yi; Kubby, Joel

    2011-03-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in deep tissue imaging for the study of neurons. Unfortunately, because of the inhomogeneous refractive index of the tissue, the aberrations degrade the resolution and brightness of the final image. In this paper, we describe an adaptive optics confocal fluorescence microscope (AOCFM) which can correct aberrations based on direct wavefront measurements using a point source reference beacon and a Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor (SHWS). Mouse brain tissues with different thicknesses are tested. After correction, both the signal intensity and contrast of the image are improved.

  16. All-optical in situ histology of brain tissue with femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Philbert S; Blinder, Pablo; Squier, Jeffrey A; Kleinfeld, David

    2013-04-01

    This protocol describes the application of laser pulses to image and ablate neuronal tissue for the purpose of automated histology. The histology is accomplished in situ using serial two-photon imaging of labeled tissue and removal of the imaged tissue with amplified, femtosecond pulses. Together with the use of endogenous fluorescent indicators and/or deep penetration of antibody labels and organic dyes, this method may be used to automatically image, reconstruct, and vectorize structures of interest across millimeter to centimeter regions of brain with micrometer resolution.

  17. Exercise induces autophagy in peripheral tissues and in the brain.

    PubMed

    He, Congcong; Sumpter, Rhea; Levine, Beth

    2012-10-01

    We recently identified physical exercise as a newly defined inducer of autophagy in vivo. Exercise induced autophagy in multiple organs involved in metabolic regulation, such as muscle, liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. To study the physiological role of exercise-induced autophagy, we generated mice with a knock-in nonphosphorylatable mutation in BCL2 (Thr69Ala, Ser70Ala and Ser84Ala) (BCL2 AAA) that are defective in exercise- and starvation-induced autophagy but not in basal autophagy. We found that BCL2 AAA mice could not run on a treadmill as long as wild-type mice, and did not undergo exercise-mediated increases in skeletal glucose muscle uptake. Unlike wild-type mice, the BCL2 AAA mice failed to reverse high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance after 8 weeks of exercise training, possibly due to defects in signaling pathways that regulate muscle glucose uptake and metabolism during exercise. Together, these findings suggested a hitherto unknown important role of autophagy in mediating exercise-induced metabolic benefits. In the present addendum, we show that treadmill exercise also induces autophagy in the cerebral cortex of adult mice. This observation raises the intriguing question of whether autophagy may in part mediate the beneficial effects of exercise in neurodegeneration, adult neurogenesis and improved cognitive function.

  18. Analysis of glutathione levels in the brain tissue samples from HIV-1-positive individuals and subject with Alzheimer's disease and its implication in the pathophysiology of the disease process.

    PubMed

    Saing, Tommy; Lagman, Minette; Castrillon, Jeffery; Gutierrez, Eutiquio; Guilford, Frederick T; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2016-12-01

    HIV-1 positive individuals are at high risk for susceptibility to both pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and extra-pulmonary TB, including TB meningitis (TBM) which is an extreme form of TB. The goals of this study are to determine the mechanisms responsible for compromised levels of glutathione (GSH) in the brain tissue samples derived from HIV-1-infected individuals and individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD), investigate the possible underlying mechanisms responsible for GSH deficiency in these pathological conditions, and establish a link between GSH levels and pathophysiology of the disease processes. We demonstrated in the autopsied human brain tissues that the levels of total and reduced forms of GSH were significantly compromised in HIV-1 infected individuals compared to in healthy subjects and individuals with AD. Brain tissue samples derived from HIV-1-positive individuals had substantially higher levels of free radicals than that derived from healthy and AD individuals. Enzymes that are responsible for the de novo synthesis of GSH such as γ-glutamate cysteine-ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC-rate limiting step enzyme) and glutathione synthetase (GSS-enzyme involved in the second step reaction) were significantly decreased in the brain tissue samples derived from HIV-1-positive individuals with low CD4 + T-cells (< 200 cells/mm(3)) compared to healthy and AD individuals. Levels of glutathione reductase (GSR) were also decreased in the brain tissue samples derived from HIV-1 infected individuals. Overall, our findings demonstrate causes for GSH deficiency in the brain tissue from HIV-1 infected individuals explaining the possible reasons for increased susceptibility to the most severe form of extra-pulmonary TB, TBM.

  19. The distribution of methionine-enkephalin and leucine-enkephalin in the brain and peripheral tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J.; Kosterlitz, H.W.; Smith, T.W.

    1977-01-01

    1 A method is described for the rapid extraction of opioid peptides from the brain and other tissues. The method is based on acid extraction of tissues followed by adsorption of the extract onto Amberlite XAD-2 resin. Elution with methanol separates the enkephalins and α-endorphin from β-endorphin. 2 Over 90% of the opioid peptide activity isolated from brain and gut of several species by our method was due to methionine- and leucine-enkephalin. In contrast, the major opioid peptide activity recovered from the pituitary was due to peptides of much greater mol. wt. than the enkephalins. 3 An opioid peptide with properties unlike those of the known endorphins or enkephalins was present in brain extracts. This peptide, termed ε-endorphin, has an apparent mol. wt. of 700 to 1200; it constituted between 5 to 10% of the total opioid activity in our extracts. 4 A differential assay of methionine- and leucine-enkephalin was made either by destroying methionine-enkephalin activity with cyanogen bromide or by separating the peptides by thin layer chromatography. 5 The ratio of methionine-enkephalin to leucine-enkephalin varied greatly in different brain regions. The highest proportions of leucine-enkephalin were found in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. 6 Formaldehyde perfusion and fixation of the brain in vivo had no significant effect on the brain content of enkephalin, indicating that proteolytic breakdown is not a major problem in the extraction of these peptides. 7 It is suggested that the enkephalins may have a neurotransmitter role in both brain and peripheral tissues and that methionine- and leucine-enkephalin may subserve separate neuronal functions. PMID:597668

  20. THE DISTRIBUTION OF METHIONINE-ENKEPHALIN AND LEUCINE-ENKEPHALIN IN THE BRAIN AND PERIPHERAL TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J; Kosterlitz, HW; Smith, TW

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for the rapid extraction of opioid peptides from the brain and other tissues. The method is based on acid extraction of tissues followed by adsorption of the extract onto Amberlite XAD-2 resin. Elution with methanol separates the enkephalins and α-endorphin from β-endorphin. Over 90% of the opioid peptide activity isolated from brain and gut of several species by our method was due to methionine- and leucine-enkephalin. In contrast, the major opioid peptide activity recovered from the pituitary was due to peptides of much greater mol. wt. than the enkephalins. An opioid peptide with properties unlike those of the known endorphins or enkephalins was present in brain extracts. This peptide, termed ∈-endorphin, has an apparent mol. wt. of 700 to 1200; it constituted between 5 to 10% of the total opioid activity in our extracts. A differential assay of methionine- and leucine-enkephalin was made either by destroying methionine-enkephalin activity with cyanogen bromide or by separating the peptides by thin layer chromatography. The ratio of methionine-enkephalin to leucine-enkephalin varied greatly in different brain regions. The highest proportions of leucine-enkephalin were found in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Formaldehyde perfusion and fixation of the brain in vivo had no significant effect on the brain content of enkephalin, indicating that proteolytic breakdown is not a major problem in the extraction of these peptides. It is suggested that the enkephalins may have a neurotransmitter role in both brain and peripheral tissues and that methionine- and leucine-enkephalin may subserve separate neuronal functions. PMID:9142421

  1. Susceptibility Contrast in High Field MRI of Human Brain as a Function of Tissue Iron Content

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Bing; Li, Tie-Qiang; van Gelderen, Peter; Shmueli, Karin; de Zwart, Jacco A.; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility provides an important contrast mechanism for MRI. Increasingly, susceptibility-based contrast is being exploited to investigate brain tissue microstructure and to detect abnormal levels of brain iron as these have been implicated in a variety of neuro-degenerative diseases. However, it remains unclear to what extent magnetic susceptibility-related contrast at high field relates to actual brain iron concentrations. In this study, we performed susceptibility weighted imaging as a function of field strength on healthy brains in vivo and post-mortem brain tissues at 1.5T, 3T and 7T. Iron histology was performed on the tissue samples for comparison. The calculated susceptibility-related parameters R2* and signal frequency shift in four iron-rich regions (putamen, globus pallidus, caudate, and thalamus) showed an almost linear dependence (r=0.90 for R2*; r=0.83 for phase, p<0.01) on field strength, suggesting that potential ferritin saturation effects are not relevant to susceptibility-weighted contrast for field strengths up to 7T. The R2* dependence on the putative (literature-based) iron concentration was 0.048 Hz/Tesla/ppm. The histological data from brain samples confirmed the linear dependence of R2* on field strength and showed a slope against iron concentration of 0.0099 Hz/Tesla/ppm dry-weight, which is equivalent to 0.05 Hz/Tesla/ppm wet-weight and closely matched the calculated value in vivo. These results confirm the validity of using susceptibility-weighted contrast as an indicator of iron content in iron-rich brain regions. The absence of saturation effects opens the way to exploit the benefits of MRI at high field strengths for the detection of iron distributions with high sensitivity and resolution. PMID:19027861

  2. Brain tissue volumes in the general population of the elderly: the AGES-Reykjavik study.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Aspelund, Thor; Forsberg, Lars; Fredriksson, Jesper; Kjartansson, Olafur; Oskarsdottir, Bryndis; Jonsson, Palmi V; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B; Zijdenbos, Alex; van Buchem, Mark A; Launer, Lenore J; Gudnason, Vilmundur

    2012-02-15

    Imaging studies have reported conflicting findings on how brain structure differs with age and sex. This may be explained by discrepancies and limitations in study population and study design. We report a study on brain tissue volumes in one of the largest cohorts of individuals studied to date of subjects with high mean age (mean ± standard deviation (SD) 76 ± 6 years). These analyses are based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans acquired at baseline on 4303 non-demented elderly, and 367 who had a second MRI, on average 2.5 ± 0.2 years later. Tissue segmentation was performed with an automatic image analysis pipeline. Total brain parenchymal (TBP) volume decreased with increasing age while there was an increase in white matter hyperintensities (WMH) in both sexes. A reduction in both normal white matter (NWM)- and gray matter (GM) volume contributed to the brain shrinkage. After adjusting for intra-cranial volume, women had larger brain volumes compared to men (3.32%, p < 0.001) for TBP volume in the cross-sectional analysis. The longitudinal analysis showed a significant age-sex interaction in TBP volume with a greater rate of annual change in men (-0.70%, 95%CI: -0.78% to -0.63%) than women (-0.55%, 95%CI: -0.61% to -0.49%). The annual change in the cross-sectional data was approximately 40% less than the annual change in the longitudinal data and did not show significant age-sex interaction. The findings indicate that the cross-sectional data underestimate the rate of change in tissue volumes with age as the longitudinal data show greater rate of change in tissue volumes with age for all tissues.

  3. Fitted hyperelastic parameters for Human brain tissue from reported tension, compression, and shear tests.

    PubMed

    Moran, Richard; Smith, Joshua H; García, José J

    2014-11-28

    The mechanical properties of human brain tissue are the subject of interest because of their use in understanding brain trauma and in developing therapeutic treatments and procedures. To represent the behavior of the tissue, we have developed hyperelastic mechanical models whose parameters are fitted in accordance with experimental test results. However, most studies available in the literature have fitted parameters with data of a single type of loading, such as tension, compression, or shear. Recently, Jin et al. (Journal of Biomechanics 46:2795-2801, 2013) reported data from ex vivo tests of human brain tissue under tension, compression, and shear loading using four strain rates and four different brain regions. However, they do not report parameters of energy functions that can be readily used in finite element simulations. To represent the tissue behavior for the quasi-static loading conditions, we aimed to determine the best fit of the hyperelastic parameters of the hyperfoam, Ogden, and polynomial strain energy functions available in ABAQUS for the low strain rate data, while simultaneously considering all three loading modes. We used an optimization process conducted in MATLAB, calling iteratively three finite element models developed in ABAQUS that represent the three loadings. Results showed a relatively good fit to experimental data in all loading modes using two terms in the energy functions. Values for the shear modulus obtained in this analysis (897-1653Pa) are in the range of those presented in other studies. These energy-function parameters can be used in brain tissue simulations using finite element models.

  4. Bioengineered sequential growth factor delivery stimulates brain tissue regeneration after stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanfei; Cooke, Michael J; Sachewsky, Nadia; Morshead, Cindi M; Shoichet, Molly S

    2013-11-28

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability with no effective regenerative treatment. One promising strategy for achieving tissue repair involves the stimulation of endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells through sequential delivery of epidermal growth factor (EGF) followed by erythropoietin (EPO). Yet currently available delivery strategies such as intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion cause significant tissue damage. We designed a novel delivery system that circumvents the blood brain barrier and directly releases growth factors to the brain. Sequential release of the two growth factors is a key in eliciting tissue repair. To control release, we encapsulate pegylated EGF (EGF-PEG) in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles and EPO in biphasic microparticles comprised of a PLGA core and a poly(sebacic acid) coating. EGF-PEG and EPO polymeric particles are dispersed in a hyaluronan methylcellulose (HAMC) hydrogel which spatially confines the particles and attenuates the inflammatory response of brain tissue. Our composite-mediated, sequential delivery of EGF-PEG and EPO leads to tissue repair in a mouse stroke model and minimizes damage compared to ICV infusion.

  5. Measurement of small mechanical vibrations of brain tissue exposed to extremely-low-frequency electric fields.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, R J; Ali, J S; Peoples, J F; Joines, W T

    1986-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields can interact with biological tissue both electrically and mechanically. This study investigated the mechanical interaction between brain tissue and an extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electric field by measuring the resultant vibrational amplitude. The exposure cell is a section of X-band waveguide that was modified by the addition of a center conductor to form a small TEM cell within the waveguide structure. The ELF signal is applied to the center conductor of the TEM cell. The applied ELF electric field generates an electrostrictive force on the surface of the brain tissue. This force causes the tissue to vibrate at a frequency equal to twice the frequency of the applied sinusoidal signal. An X-band signal is fed through the waveguide, scattered by the vibrating sample, and detected by a phase-sensitive receiver. Using a time-averaging spectrum analyzer, a vibration sensitivity of approximately 0.2 nmp-p can be achieved. The amplitude of the brain tissue vibrational response is constant for vibrational frequencies below 50 Hz; between 50 and 200 Hz resonant phenomena were observed; and above 200 Hz the amplitude fall-off is rapid.

  6. Measurement of small mechanical vibrations of brain tissue exposed to extremely-low-frequency electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, R.J.; Ali, J.S.; Peoples, J.F.; Joines, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields can interact with biological tissue both electrically and mechanically. This study investigated the mechanical interaction between brain tissue and an extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electric field by measuring the resultant vibrational amplitude. The exposure cell is a section of X-band waveguide that was modified by the addition of a center conductor to form a small TEM cell within the waveguide structure. The ELF signal is applied to the center conductor of the TEM cell. The applied ELF electric field generates an electrostrictive force on the surface of the brain tissue. This force causes the tissue to vibrate at a frequency equal to twice the frequency of the applied sinusoidal signal. An X-band signal is fed through the waveguide, scattered by the vibrating sample, and detected by a phrase-sensitive receiver. Using a time-averaging spectrum analyzer, a vibration sensitivity of approximately 0.2 nmpp can be achieved. The amplitude of the brain tissue vibrational frequencies below 50 Hz; between 50 and 200 Hz resonant phenomena were observed; and above 200 Hz the amplitude fall-off is rapid.

  7. A Device for Long-Term Perfusion, Imaging, and Electrical Interfacing of Brain Tissue In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Killian, Nathaniel J.; Vernekar, Varadraj N.; Potter, Steve M.; Vukasinovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Distributed microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from consistent, viable, ≥500 μm thick tissue preparations over time periods from days to weeks may aid in studying a wide range of problems in neurobiology that require in vivo-like organotypic morphology. Existing tools for electrically interfacing with organotypic slices do not address necrosis that inevitably occurs within thick slices with limited diffusion of nutrients and gas, and limited removal of waste. We developed an integrated device that enables long-term maintenance of thick, functionally active, brain tissue models using interstitial perfusion and distributed recordings from thick sections of explanted tissue on a perforated multi-electrode array. This novel device allows for automated culturing, in situ imaging, and extracellular multi-electrode interfacing with brain slices, 3-D cell cultures, and potentially other tissue culture models. The device is economical, easy to assemble, and integrable with standard electrophysiology tools. We found that convective perfusion through the culture thickness provided a functional benefit to the preparations as firing rates were generally higher in perfused cultures compared to their respective unperfused controls. This work is a step toward the development of integrated tools for days-long experiments with more consistent, healthier, thicker, and functionally more active tissue cultures with built-in distributed electrophysiological recording and stimulation functionality. The results may be useful for the study of normal processes, pathological conditions, and drug screening strategies currently hindered by the limitations of acute (a few hours long) brain slice preparations. PMID:27065793

  8. Spatial mapping of drug delivery to brain tissue using hyperspectral spatial frequency-domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder P.; Roblyer, Darren M.; Bigio, Irving J.; Joshi, Shailendra

    2014-09-01

    We present an application of spatial frequency-domain imaging (SFDI) to the wide-field imaging of drug delivery to brain tissue. Measurements were compared with values obtained by a previously validated variation of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, the method of optical pharmacokinetics (OP). We demonstrate a cross-correlation between the two methods for absorption extraction and drug concentration determination in both experimental tissue phantoms and freshly extracted rodent brain tissue. These methods were first used to assess intra-arterial (IA) delivery of cationic liposomes to brain tissue in Sprague Dawley rats under transient cerebral hypoperfusion. Results were found to be in agreement with previously published experimental data and pharmacokinetic models of IA drug delivery. We then applied the same scheme to evaluate IA mitoxantrone delivery to glioma-bearing rats. Good correlation was seen between OP and SFDI determined concentrations taken from normal and tumor averaged sites. This study shows the feasibility of mapping drug/tracer distributions and encourages the use of SFDI for spatial imaging of tissues for drug/tracer-tagged carrier deposition and pharmacokinetic studies.

  9. DNA extraction from fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Hua; Gouda-Vossos, Amany; Dzamko, Nicolas; Halliday, Glenda; Huang, Yue

    2013-10-01

    Both fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human brain tissues are invaluable resources for molecular genetic studies of central nervous system diseases, especially neurodegenerative disorders. To identify the optimal method for DNA extraction from human brain tissue, we compared methods on differently-processed tissues. Fragments of LRRK2 and MAPT (257 bp and 483 bp/245 bp) were amplified for evaluation. We found that for FFPE samples, the success rate of DNA extraction was greater when using a commercial kit than a laboratory-based method (successful DNA extraction from 76% versus 33% of samples). PCR amplicon size and storage period were key factors influencing the success rate of DNA extraction from FFPE samples. In the fresh-frozen samples, the DNA extraction success rate was 100% using either a commercial kit (QIAamp DNA Micro) or a laboratory-based method (sample boiling in 0.1 mol/L NaOH, followed by proteinase K digestion, and then DNA extraction using Chelex-100) regardless of PCR amplicon length or tissue storage time. Although the present results demonstrate that PCR-amplifiable genomic DNA can be extracted from both fresh-frozen and FFPE samples, fresh brain tissue is recommended for DNA extraction in future neuropathological studies.

  10. Spatial mapping of drug delivery to brain tissue using hyperspectral spatial frequency-domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder P.; Roblyer, Darren M.; Bigio, Irving J.; Joshi, Shailendra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We present an application of spatial frequency-domain imaging (SFDI) to the wide-field imaging of drug delivery to brain tissue. Measurements were compared with values obtained by a previously validated variation of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, the method of optical pharmacokinetics (OP). We demonstrate a cross-correlation between the two methods for absorption extraction and drug concentration determination in both experimental tissue phantoms and freshly extracted rodent brain tissue. These methods were first used to assess intra-arterial (IA) delivery of cationic liposomes to brain tissue in Sprague Dawley rats under transient cerebral hypoperfusion. Results were found to be in agreement with previously published experimental data and pharmacokinetic models of IA drug delivery. We then applied the same scheme to evaluate IA mitoxantrone delivery to glioma-bearing rats. Good correlation was seen between OP and SFDI determined concentrations taken from normal and tumor averaged sites. This study shows the feasibility of mapping drug/tracer distributions and encourages the use of SFDI for spatial imaging of tissues for drug/tracer-tagged carrier deposition and pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:25199058

  11. Zika Virus RNA Replication and Persistence in Brain and Placental Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rabeneck, Demi B.; Martines, Roosecelis B.; Reagan-Steiner, Sarah; Ermias, Yokabed; Estetter, Lindsey B.C.; Suzuki, Tadaki; Ritter, Jana; Keating, M. Kelly; Hale, Gillian; Gary, Joy; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Lambert, Amy; Lanciotti, Robert; Oduyebo, Titilope; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Bolaños, Fernando; Saad, Edgar Alberto Parra; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Zaki, Sherif R.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus is causally linked with congenital microcephaly and may be associated with pregnancy loss. However, the mechanisms of Zika virus intrauterine transmission and replication and its tropism and persistence in tissues are poorly understood. We tested tissues from 52 case-patients: 8 infants with microcephaly who died and 44 women suspected of being infected with Zika virus during pregnancy. By reverse transcription PCR, tissues from 32 (62%) case-patients (brains from 8 infants with microcephaly and placental/fetal tissues from 24 women) were positive for Zika virus. In situ hybridization localized replicative Zika virus RNA in brains of 7 infants and in placentas of 9 women who had pregnancy losses during the first or second trimester. These findings demonstrate that Zika virus replicates and persists in fetal brains and placentas, providing direct evidence of its association with microcephaly. Tissue-based reverse transcription PCR extends the time frame of Zika virus detection in congenital and pregnancy-associated infections. PMID:27959260

  12. A Device for Long-Term Perfusion, Imaging, and Electrical Interfacing of Brain Tissue In vitro.

    PubMed

    Killian, Nathaniel J; Vernekar, Varadraj N; Potter, Steve M; Vukasinovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Distributed microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from consistent, viable, ≥500 μm thick tissue preparations over time periods from days to weeks may aid in studying a wide range of problems in neurobiology that require in vivo-like organotypic morphology. Existing tools for electrically interfacing with organotypic slices do not address necrosis that inevitably occurs within thick slices with limited diffusion of nutrients and gas, and limited removal of waste. We developed an integrated device that enables long-term maintenance of thick, functionally active, brain tissue models using interstitial perfusion and distributed recordings from thick sections of explanted tissue on a perforated multi-electrode array. This novel device allows for automated culturing, in situ imaging, and extracellular multi-electrode interfacing with brain slices, 3-D cell cultures, and potentially other tissue culture models. The device is economical, easy to assemble, and integrable with standard electrophysiology tools. We found that convective perfusion through the culture thickness provided a functional benefit to the preparations as firing rates were generally higher in perfused cultures compared to their respective unperfused controls. This work is a step toward the development of integrated tools for days-long experiments with more consistent, healthier, thicker, and functionally more active tissue cultures with built-in distributed electrophysiological recording and stimulation functionality. The results may be useful for the study of normal processes, pathological conditions, and drug screening strategies currently hindered by the limitations of acute (a few hours long) brain slice preparations.

  13. Focally Elevated Creatine Detected in Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Transgenic Mice and Alzheimer Disease Brain Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Gallant,M.; Rak, M.; Szeghalmi, A.; Del Bigio, M.; Westaway, D.; Yang, J.; Julian, R.; Gough, K.

    2006-01-01

    The creatine/phosphocreatine system, regulated by creatine kinase, plays an important role in maintaining energy balance in the brain. Energy metabolism and the function of creatine kinase are known to be affected in Alzheimer diseased brain and in cells exposed to the {beta}-amyloid peptide. We used infrared microspectroscopy to examine hippocampal, cortical, and caudal tissue from 21-89-week-old transgenic mice expressing doubly mutant (K670N/M671L and V717F) amyloid precursor protein and displaying robust pathology from an early age. Microcrystalline deposits of creatine, suggestive of perturbed energetic status, were detected by infrared microspectroscopy in all animals with advanced plaque pathology. Relatively large creatine deposits were also found in hippocampal sections from post-mortem Alzheimer diseased human brain, compared with hippocampus from non-demented brain. We therefore speculate that this molecule is a marker of the disease process.

  14. Detection, identification and mapping of iron anomalies in brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.; Toastmann, H.; Channell, J.E.T.; Guyodo, Y.; Batich, C.; Dobson, J.

    2008-06-16

    This work describes a novel method for the detection, identification and mapping of anomalous iron compounds in mammalian brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have located and identified individual iron anomalies in an avian tissue model associated with ferritin, biogenic magnetite and haemoglobin with a pixel resolution of less than 5 {micro}m. This technique represents a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds in brain tissue. The potential for high-resolution iron mapping using microfocused X-ray beams has direct application to investigations of the location and structural form of iron compounds associated with human neurodegenerative disorders - a problem which has vexed researchers for 50 years.

  15. Evaluation of Raman spectra of human brain tumor tissue using the learning vector quantization neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tuo; Chen, Changshui; Shi, Xingzhe; Liu, Chengyong

    2016-05-01

    The Raman spectra of tissue of 20 brain tumor patients was recorded using a confocal microlaser Raman spectroscope with 785 nm excitation in vitro. A total of 133 spectra were investigated. Spectra peaks from normal white matter tissue and tumor tissue were analyzed. Algorithms, such as principal component analysis, linear discriminant analysis, and the support vector machine, are commonly used to analyze spectral data. However, in this study, we employed the learning vector quantization (LVQ) neural network, which is typically used for pattern recognition. By applying the proposed method, a normal diagnosis accuracy of 85.7% and a glioma diagnosis accuracy of 89.5% were achieved. The LVQ neural network is a recent approach to excavating Raman spectra information. Moreover, it is fast and convenient, does not require the spectra peak counterpart, and achieves a relatively high accuracy. It can be used in brain tumor prognostics and in helping to optimize the cutting margins of gliomas.

  16. Enhanced taupathy and AD-like pathology in aged primate brains decades after infantile exposure to lead (Pb).

    PubMed

    Bihaqi, Syed Waseem; Zawia, Nasser H

    2013-12-01

    Late Onset Alzheimer Disease (LOAD) constitutes the majority of AD cases (∼90%). Amyloidosis and tau pathology, which are present in AD brains, appear to be sporadic in nature. We have previously shown that infantile lead (Pb) exposure is associated with a change in the expression and regulation of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its beta amyloid (Aβ) products in old age. Here we report that infantile Pb exposure elevated the mRNA and protein levels of tau as well as its transcriptional regulators namely specificity protein 1 and 3 (Sp1 and Sp3) in aged primates. These changes were also accompanied by an enhancement in site-specific tau phosphorylation as well as an increase in the mRNA and protein levels of cyclin dependent kinase 5 (cdk5). There was also a change in the protein ratio of p35/p25 with more Serine/Threonine phosphatase activity present in aged primates exposed to Pb as infants. These molecular alterations favored abundant tau phosphorylation and immunoreactivity in the frontal cortex of aged primates with prior Pb exposure. These findings provide more evidence that neurodegenerative diseases may be products of environmental influences that occur during the development.

  17. Mapping drug distribution in brain tissue using liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Swales, John G; Tucker, James W; Spreadborough, Michael J; Iverson, Suzanne L; Clench, Malcolm R; Webborn, Peter J H; Goodwin, Richard J A

    2015-10-06

    Liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry (LESA-MS) is a surface sampling technique that incorporates liquid extraction from the surface of tissue sections with nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Traditional tissue analysis techniques usually require homogenization of the sample prior to analysis via high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), but an intrinsic weakness of this is a loss of all spatial information and the inability of the technique to distinguish between actual tissue penetration and response caused by residual blood contamination. LESA-MS, in contrast, has the ability to spatially resolve drug distributions and has historically been used to profile discrete spots on the surface of tissue sections. Here, we use the technique as a mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) tool, extracting points at 1 mm spatial resolution across tissue sections to build an image of xenobiotic and endogenous compound distribution to assess drug blood-brain barrier penetration into brain tissue. A selection of penetrant and "nonpenetrant" drugs were dosed to rats via oral and intravenous administration. Whole brains were snap-frozen at necropsy and were subsequently sectioned prior to analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) and LESA-MSI. MALDI-MSI, as expected, was shown to effectively map the distribution of brain penetrative compounds but lacked sufficient sensitivity when compounds were marginally penetrative. LESA-MSI was used to effectively map the distribution of these poorly penetrative compounds, highlighting its value as a complementary technique to MALDI-MSI. The technique also showed benefits when compared to traditional homogenization, particularly for drugs that were considered nonpenetrant by homogenization but were shown to have a measurable penetration using LESA-MSI.

  18. Fusion analysis of first episode depression: where brain shape deformations meet local composition of tissue.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Mahdi; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Tahmasebi, Amir; Bosma, Rachael; Tong, Ryan; Hollenstein, Tom; Harkness, Kate; Johnsrude, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Computational neuroanatomical techniques that are used to evaluate the structural correlates of disorders in the brain typically measure regional differences in gray matter or white matter, or measure regional differences in the deformation fields required to warp individual datasets to a standard space. Our aim in this study was to combine measurements of regional tissue composition and of deformations in order to characterize a particular brain disorder (here, major depressive disorder). We use structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data from young adults in a first episode of depression, and from an age- and sex-matched group of non-depressed individuals, and create population gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) tissue average templates using DARTEL groupwise registration. We obtained GM and WM tissue maps in the template space, along with the deformation fields required to co-register the DARTEL template and the GM and WM maps in the population. These three features, reflecting tissue composition and shape of the brain, were used within a joint independent-components analysis (jICA) to extract spatially independent joint sources and their corresponding modulation profiles. Coefficients of the modulation profiles were used to capture differences between depressed and non-depressed groups. The combination of hippocampal shape deformations and local composition of tissue (but neither shape nor local composition of tissue alone) was shown to discriminate reliably between individuals in a first episode of depression and healthy controls, suggesting that brain structural differences between depressed and non-depressed individuals do not simply reflect chronicity of the disorder but are there from the very outset.

  19. Fusion analysis of first episode depression: Where brain shape deformations meet local composition of tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Mahdi; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Tahmasebi, Amir; Bosma, Rachael; Tong, Ryan; Hollenstein, Tom; Harkness, Kate; Johnsrude, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Computational neuroanatomical techniques that are used to evaluate the structural correlates of disorders in the brain typically measure regional differences in gray matter or white matter, or measure regional differences in the deformation fields required to warp individual datasets to a standard space. Our aim in this study was to combine measurements of regional tissue composition and of deformations in order to characterize a particular brain disorder (here, major depressive disorder). We use structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data from young adults in a first episode of depression, and from an age- and sex-matched group of non-depressed individuals, and create population gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) tissue average templates using DARTEL groupwise registration. We obtained GM and WM tissue maps in the template space, along with the deformation fields required to co-register the DARTEL template and the GM and WM maps in the population. These three features, reflecting tissue composition and shape of the brain, were used within a joint independent-components analysis (jICA) to extract spatially independent joint sources and their corresponding modulation profiles. Coefficients of the modulation profiles were used to capture differences between depressed and non-depressed groups. The combination of hippocampal shape deformations and local composition of tissue (but neither shape nor local composition of tissue alone) was shown to discriminate reliably between individuals in a first episode of depression and healthy controls, suggesting that brain structural differences between depressed and non-depressed individuals do not simply reflect chronicity of the disorder but are there from the very outset. PMID:25610773

  20. Atlas-based Segmentation of Developing Tissues in the Human Brain with Quantitative Validation in Young Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A.; Barkovich, A. James; Studholme, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Imaging of the human fetus using magnetic resonance (MR) is an essential tool for quantitative studies of normal as well as abnormal brain development in utero. However, because of fundamental differences in tissue types, tissue properties and tissue distribution between the fetal and adult brain, automated tissue segmentation techniques developed for adult brain anatomy are unsuitable for this data. In this paper, we describe methodology for automatic atlas-based segmentation of individual tissue types in motion-corrected 3D volumes reconstructed from clinical MR scans of the fetal brain. To generate anatomically correct automatic segmentations, we create a set of accurate manual delineations and build an in utero 3D statistical atlas of tissue distribution incorporating developing grey and white matter as well as transient tissue types such as the germinal matrix. The probabilistic atlas is associated with an unbiased average shape and intensity template for registration of new subject images to the space of the atlas. Quantitative whole brain 3D validation of tissue labeling performed on a set of 14 fetal MR scans (20.57–22.86 weeks gestational age) demonstrates that this atlas-based EM segmentation approach achieves consistently high DSC performance for the main tissue types in the fetal brain. This work indicates that reliable measures of brain development can be automatically derived from clinical MR imaging and opens up possibility of further 3D volumetric and morphometric studies with multiple fetal subjects. PMID:20108226

  1. Multichannel optical brain imaging to separate cerebral vascular, tissue metabolic, and neuronal effects of cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hugang; Luo, Zhongchi; Yuan, Zhijia; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Characterization of cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation metabolic changes, as well neuronal function is of great importance to study of brain functions and the relevant brain disorders such as drug addiction. Compared with other neuroimaging modalities, optical imaging techniques have the potential for high spatiotemporal resolution and dissection of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV), and hemoglobing oxygenation and intracellular Ca ([Ca2+]i), which serves as markers of vascular function, tissue metabolism and neuronal activity, respectively. Recently, we developed a multiwavelength imaging system and integrated it into a surgical microscope. Three LEDs of λ1=530nm, λ2=570nm and λ3=630nm were used for exciting [Ca2+]i fluorescence labeled by Rhod2 (AM) and sensitizing total hemoglobin (i.e., CBV), and deoxygenated-hemoglobin, whereas one LD of λ1=830nm was used for laser speckle imaging to form a CBF mapping of the brain. These light sources were time-sharing for illumination on the brain and synchronized with the exposure of CCD camera for multichannel images of the brain. Our animal studies indicated that this optical approach enabled simultaneous mapping of cocaine-induced changes in CBF, CBV and oxygenated- and deoxygenated hemoglobin as well as [Ca2+]i in the cortical brain. Its high spatiotemporal resolution (30μm, 10Hz) and large field of view (4x5 mm2) are advanced as a neuroimaging tool for brain functional study.

  2. Analysis of the influence of handset phone position on RF exposure of brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Ghanmi, Amal; Varsier, Nadège; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; Conil, Emmanuelle; Picon, Odile; Wiart, Joe

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to mobile phone radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields depends on many different parameters. For epidemiological studies investigating the risk of brain cancer linked to RF exposure from mobile phones, it is of great interest to characterize brain tissue exposure and to know which parameters this exposure is sensitive to. One such parameter is the position of the phone during communication. In this article, we analyze the influence of the phone position on the brain exposure by comparing the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced in the head by two different mobile phone models operating in Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) frequency bands. To achieve this objective, 80 different phone positions were chosen using an experiment based on the Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) to select a representative set of positions. The averaged SAR over 10 g (SAR10 g) in the head, the averaged SAR over 1 g (SAR1 g ) in the brain, and the averaged SAR in different anatomical brain structures were estimated at 900 and 1800 MHz for the 80 positions. The results illustrate that SAR distributions inside the brain area are sensitive to the position of the mobile phone relative to the head. The results also show that for 5-10% of the studied positions the SAR10 g in the head and the SAR1 g in the brain can be 20% higher than the SAR estimated for the standard cheek position and that the Specific Anthropomorphic Mannequin (SAM) model is conservative for 95% of all the studied positions.

  3. Effects of dexamethasone on aquaporin-4 expression in brain tissue of rat with bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Kai-Xian; Dong, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Hou, Li-Wei; Fan, Dong-Xia; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Jia, Tian-Ming; Lou, Ji-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the most popular water channel protein expressed in brain tissue and plays a very important role in regulating the water balance in and outside of brain parenchyma. To investigate the expression of aquaporin-4 in the rat brain tissue after dexamethasone therapy of meningitis induced by Streptococcus pneumonia, total 40 of 3-week old Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into infection group (n=30) and normal control group (n=10). The meningitis groups were infected with 1×107 cfu/ml of Streptococcus pneumoniae and then randomized into no treatment (untreated group, n=10), treatment with ceftriaxone (CTRX group, n=10) and treatment with dexamethasone combined ceftriaxone (CTRX + DEXA group, n=10). The normal control group was established by using saline. The rats were euthanized when they reached terminal illness or five days after infection, followed by detection of AQP4 through using immunohistochemistry and Western blot methods. Data has showed that expression of AQP4 in model group remained higher than the control and treatment group (P<0.05). AQP4 expression in CTRX + DEXA group was lower than that in CTRX group (P<0.05). There was no statistical difference between CTRX + DEXA group and the control group (P>0.05). These data suggested that Dexamethasone could down-regulate the expression of AQP4 in the brain tissue of rats with meningitis and provides evidence for the mechanism of protective effect of Dexamethasone on central neurosystem. PMID:26045822

  4. Colorization and Automated Segmentation of Human T2 MR Brain Images for Characterization of Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Attique, Muhammad; Gilanie, Ghulam; Hafeez-Ullah; Mehmood, Malik S.; Naweed, Muhammad S.; Ikram, Masroor; Kamran, Javed A.; Vitkin, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of tissues like brain by using magnetic resonance (MR) images and colorization of the gray scale image has been reported in the literature, along with the advantages and drawbacks. Here, we present two independent methods; (i) a novel colorization method to underscore the variability in brain MR images, indicative of the underlying physical density of bio tissue, (ii) a segmentation method (both hard and soft segmentation) to characterize gray brain MR images. The segmented images are then transformed into color using the above-mentioned colorization method, yielding promising results for manual tracing. Our color transformation incorporates the voxel classification by matching the luminance of voxels of the source MR image and provided color image by measuring the distance between them. The segmentation method is based on single-phase clustering for 2D and 3D image segmentation with a new auto centroid selection method, which divides the image into three distinct regions (gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using prior anatomical knowledge). Results have been successfully validated on human T2-weighted (T2) brain MR images. The proposed method can be potentially applied to gray-scale images from other imaging modalities, in bringing out additional diagnostic tissue information contained in the colorized image processing approach as described. PMID:22479421

  5. Characterization of lipids from human brain tissues by multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tugnoli, V; Tosi, M R; Tinti, A; Trinchero, A; Bottura, G; Fini, G

    2001-01-01

    Multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C, and (31)P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy are applied to the biochemical characterization of the total lipid fraction of healthy and neoplastic human brain tissues. Lipid extracts from normal brains, glioblastomas, anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, oligodendrogliomas, and meningiomas are examined. Moreover, the unknown liquid content of a cyst adjacent to a meningioma is analyzed. Two biopsies from glioblastomas are directly studied by (1)H-NMR without any treatment (ex vivo NMR). The (1)H- and (13)C-NMR analysis allows full characterization of the lipid component of the cerebral tissues. In particular, the presence of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides in the extracts of high grade tumors is correlated to the vascular proliferation degree, which is different from normal brain tissue and low grade neoplasms. The (31)P spectra show that phosphatidylcholine is the prominent phospholipid and its relative amount, which is higher in gliomas, is correlated to the low grade of differentiation of tumor cells and an altered membrane turnover. The ex vivo (1)H-NMR data on the glioblastoma samples show the presence of mobile lipids that are correlated to cell necrotic phenomena. Our data allow a direct correlation between biochemical results obtained by NMR and the histopathological factors (vascular and cell proliferations, differentiation, and necrosis) that are prominent in determining brain tumor grading.

  6. The average baboon brain: MRI templates and tissue probability maps from 89 individuals.

    PubMed

    Love, Scott A; Marie, Damien; Roth, Muriel; Lacoste, Romain; Nazarian, Bruno; Bertello, Alice; Coulon, Olivier; Anton, Jean-Luc; Meguerditchian, Adrien

    2016-05-15

    The baboon (Papio) brain is a remarkable model for investigating the brain. The current work aimed at creating a population-average baboon (Papio anubis) brain template and its left/right hemisphere symmetric version from a large sample of T1-weighted magnetic resonance images collected from 89 individuals. Averaging the prior probability maps output during the segmentation of each individual also produced the first baboon brain tissue probability maps for gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid. The templates and the tissue probability maps were created using state-of-the-art, freely available software tools and are being made freely and publicly available: http://www.nitrc.org/projects/haiko89/ or http://lpc.univ-amu.fr/spip.php?article589. It is hoped that these images will aid neuroimaging research of the baboon by, for example, providing a modern, high quality normalization target and accompanying standardized coordinate system as well as probabilistic priors that can be used during tissue segmentation.

  7. Evidence for fungal infection in cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ruth; Pisa, Diana; Marina, Ana Isabel; Morato, Esperanza; Rábano, Alberto; Rodal, Izaskun; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Among neurogenerative diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal illness characterized by a progressive motor neuron dysfunction in the motor cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. ALS is the most common form of motor neuron disease; yet, to date, the exact etiology of ALS remains unknown. In the present work, we have explored the possibility of fungal infection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in brain tissue from ALS patients. Fungal antigens, as well as DNA from several fungi, were detected in CSF from ALS patients. Additionally, examination of brain sections from the frontal cortex of ALS patients revealed the existence of immunopositive fungal antigens comprising punctate bodies in the cytoplasm of some neurons. Fungal DNA was also detected in brain tissue using PCR analysis, uncovering the presence of several fungal species. Finally, proteomic analyses of brain tissue demonstrated the occurrence of several fungal peptides. Collectively, our observations provide compelling evidence of fungal infection in the ALS patients analyzed, suggesting that this infection may play a part in the etiology of the disease or may constitute a risk factor for these patients.

  8. Evidence for Fungal Infection in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Brain Tissue from Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Ruth; Pisa, Diana; Marina, Ana Isabel; Morato, Esperanza; Rábano, Alberto; Rodal, Izaskun; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Among neurogenerative diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal illness characterized by a progressive motor neuron dysfunction in the motor cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. ALS is the most common form of motor neuron disease; yet, to date, the exact etiology of ALS remains unknown. In the present work, we have explored the possibility of fungal infection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in brain tissue from ALS patients. Fungal antigens, as well as DNA from several fungi, were detected in CSF from ALS patients. Additionally, examination of brain sections from the frontal cortex of ALS patients revealed the existence of immunopositive fungal antigens comprising punctate bodies in the cytoplasm of some neurons. Fungal DNA was also detected in brain tissue using PCR analysis, uncovering the presence of several fungal species. Finally, proteomic analyses of brain tissue demonstrated the occurrence of several fungal peptides. Collectively, our observations provide compelling evidence of fungal infection in the ALS patients analyzed, suggesting that this infection may play a part in the etiology of the disease or may constitute a risk factor for these patients. PMID:25892962

  9. Automatic tissue segmentation of neonate brain MR Images with subject-specific atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherel, Marie; Budin, Francois; Prastawa, Marcel; Gerig, Guido; Lee, Kevin; Buss, Claudia; Lyall, Amanda; Zaldarriaga Consing, Kirsten; Styner, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Automatic tissue segmentation of the neonate brain using Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) is extremely important to study brain development and perform early diagnostics but is challenging due to high variability and inhomogeneity in contrast throughout the image due to incomplete myelination of the white matter tracts. For these reasons, current methods often totally fail or give unsatisfying results. Furthermore, most of the subcortical midbrain structures are misclassified due to a lack of contrast in these regions. We have developed a novel method that creates a probabilistic subject-specific atlas based on a population atlas currently containing a number of manually segmented cases. The generated subject-specific atlas is sharp and adapted to the subject that is being processed. We then segment brain tissue classes using the newly created atlas with a single-atlas expectation maximization based method. Our proposed method leads to a much lower failure rate in our experiments. The overall segmentation results are considerably improved when compared to using a non-subject-specific, population average atlas. Additionally, we have incorporated diffusion information obtained from Diffusion Tensor Images (DTI) to improve the detection of white matter that is not visible at this early age in structural MRI (sMRI) due to a lack of myelination. Although this necessitates the acquisition of an additional sequence, the diffusion information improves the white matter segmentation throughout the brain, especially for the mid-brain structures such as the corpus callosum and the internal capsule.

  10. Measurement of the optical properties of rat brain tissue using contact spatially resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gysbrechts, Barbara; Nguyen Do Trong, Nghia; Wang, Ling; Cabral, Henrique; Navratilova, Zaneta; Battaglia, Francesco P.; Saeys, Wouter; Bartic, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, biophotonics is widely used in neuroscience. The effectiveness of biophotonic techniques, such as fluorescence imaging and optogenetics, is affected by the optical properties of the examined tissue. Therefore, knowledge of these properties is essential to carefully plan experiments. Mice and rats are widely used in neuroscience studies. However, reports about optical properties of their brains are very rare. We measured optical absorption μa and reduced scattering μ's coefficients of native rat brain in the visible and near-infrared wavelength region, using contact spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS). In this study, we estimate μa and μ's for the rat cortex and discuss their stability in time. Additionally, variations in optical properties within and between samples were characterized. The results extend the range of known optical properties for the rat cortex, especially in the visible range, relevant to optogenetics. μa and μ's are stable within a time span of four hours, and show low variation in and between brain samples. This indicates that a suitable protocol was used to estimate optical properties of rodent brain tissue. Since contact SRS is a non-destructive method, this technique could be used also to measure μa and μ's in living animals. Moreover, the probe has small dimensions, allowing the characterization of optical properties in different structures of the brain.

  11. Chronic Tissue Response to Untethered Microelectrode Implants in the Rat Brain and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    ERSEN, Ali; ELKABES, Stella; FREEDMAN, David S.; SAHIN, Mesut

    2015-01-01

    Objective Microelectrodes implanted in the central nervous system (CNS) often fail in long term implants due to the immunological tissue response caused by tethering forces of the connecting wires. In addition to the tethering effect, there is a mechanical stress that occurs at the device-tissue interface simply because the microelectrode is a rigid body floating in soft tissue and it cannot reshape itself to comply with changes in the surrounding tissue. In the current study we evaluated the scar tissue formation to tetherless devices with two significantly different geometries in the rat brain and spinal cord in order to investigate the effects of device geometry. Approach One of the implant geometries resembled the wireless, floating microstimulators that we are currently developing in our laboratory and the other was a (shank only) Michigan probe for comparison. Both electrodes were implanted into either the cervical spinal cord or the motor cortices, one on each side. Main Results The most pronounced astroglial and microglial reactions occurred within 20 μm from the device and decreased sharply at larger distances. Both cell types displayed the morphology of non-activated cells past the 100 μm perimeter. Even though the aspect ratios of the implants were different, the astroglial and microglial responses to both microelectrode types were very mild in the brain, stronger and yet limited in the spinal cord. Significance These observations confirm previous reports and further suggest that tethering may be responsible for most of the tissue response in chronic implants and that the electrode size has a smaller contribution with floating electrodes. The electrode size may be playing primarily an amplifying role to the tethering forces in the brain whereas the size itself may induce chronic response in the spinal cord where the movement of surrounding tissues is more significant. PMID:25605679

  12. Chronic tissue response to untethered microelectrode implants in the rat brain and spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersen, Ali; Elkabes, Stella; Freedman, David S.; Sahin, Mesut

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Microelectrodes implanted in the central nervous system (CNS) often fail in long term implants due to the immunological tissue response caused by tethering forces of the connecting wires. In addition to the tethering effect, there is a mechanical stress that occurs at the device-tissue interface simply because the microelectrode is a rigid body floating in soft tissue and it cannot reshape itself to comply with changes in the surrounding tissue. In the current study we evaluated the scar tissue formation to tetherless devices with two significantly different geometries in the rat brain and spinal cord in order to investigate the effects of device geometry. Approach. One of the implant geometries resembled the wireless, floating microstimulators that we are currently developing in our laboratory and the other was a (shank only) Michigan probe for comparison. Both electrodes were implanted into either the cervical spinal cord or the motor cortices, one on each side. Main results. The most pronounced astroglial and microglial reactions occurred within 20 μm from the device and decreased sharply at larger distances. Both cell types displayed the morphology of non-activated cells past the 100 μm perimeter. Even though the aspect ratios of the implants were different, the astroglial and microglial responses to both microelectrode types were very mild in the brain, stronger and yet limited in the spinal cord. Significance. These observations confirm previous reports and further suggest that tethering may be responsible for most of the tissue response in chronic implants and that the electrode size has a smaller contribution with floating electrodes. The electrode size may be playing primarily an amplifying role to the tethering forces in the brain whereas the size itself may induce chronic response in the spinal cord where the movement of surrounding tissues is more significant.

  13. Double In situ Hybridization for MicroRNAs and mRNAs in Brain Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Atsushi; Kakihara, Sora; Miura, Hiroki; Okada, Ryo; Hayata-Takano, Atsuko; Hazama, Keisuke; Niu, Misaki; Shintani, Norihito; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Hashimoto, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) participate in a variety of functions in the brain. Understanding the in vivo localization of miRNAs is an important step for uncovering their roles in brain function. However, the in situ detection of low-abundance miRNAs in brain tissues remains difficult and requires extensive optimization of in situ hybridization (ISH) protocols in individual laboratories. Thus, detailed information regarding experimental conditions would serve as a useful reference for researchers in this field. Here, we investigated and summarized the effects of adjusting a series of critical steps, including tissue fixation, probe accessibility and hybridization stringency, to standardize the currently used miRNA ISH procedures. As a result, we successfully detected several low-abundance miRNAs by ISH using the following experimental conditions: (1) use of fresh brain tissues, (2) digestion of brain samples with proteinase K, (3) LNA-probe hybridization at a temperature 37°C below the melting temperature of the RNA, (4) performance of high-stringency wash steps using 50% formamide in 1 × standard saline citrate (SSC) buffer. RT-PCR of the punched-out tissues using TaqManTM primers confirmed the ISH results. Finally, double-fluorescence ISH successfully demonstrated the colocalization of miRNAs and mRNAs. Thus, the detailed information regarding the miRNA ISH procedures used in this study may help to resolve the technical hurdles observed in the in vivo localization of miRNAs, and the elucidation of the specific roles of miRNAs. PMID:27920667

  14. Transient cerebral hypoperfusion assisted intraarterial cationic liposome delivery to brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shailendra; Singh-Moon, Rajinder P.; Wang, Mei; Chaudhuri, Durba B.; Holcomb, Mark; Straubinger, Ninfa L.; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Bigio, Irving J.; Straubinger, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Object Transient cerebral hypoperfusion (TCH) has empirically been used to assist intraarterial (IA) drug delivery to brain tumors. Transient (< 3 min) reduction of cerebral blood flow (CBF) occurs during many neuro- and cardiovascular interventions and has recently been used to better target IA drugs to brain tumors. In the present experiments, we assessed whether the effectiveness of IA delivery of cationic liposomes could be improved by TCH. Methods Cationic liposomes composed of 1:1 DOTAP:PC (dioleoyl-trimethylammonium-propane:phosphatidylcholine) were administered to three groups of Sprague Dawley rats. In the first group, we tested the effect of blood flow reduction on IA delivery of cationic liposomes. In the second group, we compared TCH-assisted IA liposomal delivery vs. intravenous (IV) administration of the same dose. In the third group, we assessed retention of cationic liposomes in brain four hours after TCH assisted delivery. The liposomes contained a near infrared dye, DilC18(7), whose concentration could be measured in vivo by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Results IA injections of cationic liposomes during TCH increased their delivery approximately four-fold compared to injections during normal blood flow. Optical pharmacokinetic measurements revealed that relative to IV injections, IA injection of cationic liposomes during TCH produced tissue concentrations that were 100-fold greater. The cationic liposomes were retained in the brain tissue four hours after a single IA injection. There was no gross impairment of neurological functions in surviving animals. Conclusions Transient reduction in CBF significantly increased IA delivery of cationic liposomes in the brain. High concentrations of liposomes could be delivered to brain tissue after IA injections with concurrent TCH while none could be detected after IV injection. IA-TCH injections were well tolerated and cationic liposomes were retained for at least 4 hours after IA administration. These

  15. Determination of heroin and its main metabolites in small sample volumes of whole blood and brain tissue by reversed-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Karinen, Ritva; Andersen, Jannike Mørch; Ripel, Ase; Hasvold, Inger; Hopen, Anita Braute; Mørland, Jørg; Christophersen, Asbjørg S

    2009-09-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method has been developed for the quantitative analysis of heroin and its major metabolites 6-acetylmorphine, morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide in blood and brain tissue, using 0.1-mL samples. We evaluated this method for analysis of heroin and its metabolites in samples from heroin treated mice. Ice-cold acidic buffer containing sodium fluoride was immediately added to blood and brain homogenate samples. Sample preparation was achieved by protein precipitation on ice-bath, using a mixture of ice-cold acetonitrile and methanol. The supernatant was evaporated to dryness, reconstituted with mobile phase, and injected into the chromatographic system. Separation was performed on a Xterra C18 column with gradient elution. The MS analysis was performed in positive ion mode, and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was used for drug quantification. The limits of quantification for the different opiates varied from 0.0007 to 0.02 mg/L in blood and from 0.002 to 0.06 microg/g in brain tissue. Day-to-day relative standard deviation ranged from 3.1 to 14.5%, and within-day variation ranged from 2.1 to 11.4%. The recoveries were between 80 and 111%. The stability of heroin was tested, and the study showed that heroin is more stable in brain tissue than in blood.

  16. Development of hyaluronic acid-based scaffolds for brain tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Wei; Spector, Myron

    2009-09-01

    Three-dimensional biodegradable porous scaffolds play vital roles in tissue engineering. In this study, a hyaluronic acid-collagen (HA-Coll) sponge with an open porous structure and mechanical behavior comparable to brain tissue was developed. HA-Coll scaffolds with different mixing ratios were prepared by a freeze-drying technique and crosslinked with water-soluble carbodiimide to improve mechanical stability. The pore structure of the samples was evaluated by light and scanning electron microscopy, and the mechanical behavior was analyzed by mechanical compression and tension testing. The degree of crosslinking was determined by the water absorption and trinitrobenzene sulfonic assay, and the HA content was determined by a carbazole assay. The results showed that HA-Coll scaffolds containing an open porous structure with a homogeneous pore size distribution could be fabricated. Certain features of the mechanical properties of HA-Coll scaffolds prepared with a Coll:HA mixing ratio of 1:2, and pure HA sponges, were comparable with brain tissue. Neural stem cells (NSCs) were expanded in number in monolayer culture and then seeded onto the three-dimensional scaffolds in order to investigate the effects of the different types of scaffolds on neurogenic induction of the cells. This study contributes to the understanding of the effects of HA content and crosslink treatment on pore characteristics, and mechanical behavior essential for the design of HA-Coll scaffolds suitable for NSC growth and differentiation for brain tissue engineering.

  17. Neuropathological alterations in alcoholic brains. Studies arising from the New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre.

    PubMed

    Harper, Clive; Dixon, Gavin; Sheedy, Donna; Garrick, Therese

    2003-09-01

    Alcohol dependence and abuse are among the most costly health problems in the world from both social and economic points of view. Patterns of drinking appear to be changing throughout the world with more women and young people drinking heavily. Excessive drinking can lead to impairment of cognitive function and structural brain changes--some permanent, some reversible. Patterns of damage appear to relate to lifetime alcohol consumption but, more importantly, to associated medical complications. The most significant of these is the alcohol-related vitamin deficient state, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS), which is caused by thiamin deficiency but is seen most commonly in alcoholics. Careful selection and classification of alcoholic cases into those with and without these complications, together with detailed quantitative neuropathological analyses has provided data that gives clues to the most vulnerable regions and cells in the brain. Brain shrinkage is largely accounted for by loss of white matter. Some of this damage appears to be reversible. Alcohol-related neuronal loss has been documented in specific regions of the cerebral cortex (superior frontal association cortex), hypothalamus and cerebellum. No change is found in basal ganglia, nucleus basalis, or serotonergic raphe nuclei. Many of these regions which are normal in uncomplicated alcoholics are damaged in those with the WKS. Dendritic and synaptic changes have been documented in alcoholics and these, together with receptor and transmitter changes, may explain functional changes and cognitive deficits, which precede more severe structural neuronal changes. A resource to provide human brain tissues for these types of studies has been developed at the University of Sydney--the New South Wales Tissue Resource Centre. The aim of this facility is to provide research groups throughout the world with fresh and/or frozen tissues from well-characterized cases of alcohol-related brain damage and matched

  18. In vivo evidence of methamphetamine induced attenuation of brain tissue oxygenation as measured by EPR oximetry

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, John; Yang, Yirong; Purvis, Rebecca; Weatherwax, Theodore; Rosen, Gerald M.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-03-01

    Abuse of methamphetamine (METH) is a major and significant societal problem in the US, as a number of studies have suggested that METH is associated with increased cerebrovascular events, hemorrhage or vasospasm. Although cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in METH-induced toxicity are not completely understood, changes in brain O{sub 2} may play an important role and contribute to METH-induced neurotoxicity including dopaminergic receptor degradation. Given that O{sub 2} is the terminal electron acceptor for many enzymes that are important in brain function, the impact of METH on brain tissue pO{sub 2}in vivo remains largely uncharacterized. This study investigated striatal tissue pO{sub 2} changes in male C57BL/6 mice (16–20 g) following METH administration using EPR oximetry, a highly sensitive modality to measure pO{sub 2}in vivo, in situ and in real time. We demonstrate that 20 min after a single injection of METH (8 mg/kg i.v.), the striatal pO{sub 2} was reduced to 81% of the pretreatment level and exposure to METH for 3 consecutive days further attenuated striatal pO{sub 2} to 64%. More importantly, pO{sub 2} did not recover fully to control levels even 24 h after administration of a single dose of METH and continual exposure to METH exacerbates the condition. We also show a reduction in cerebral blood flow associated with a decreased brain pO{sub 2} indicating an ischemic condition. Our findings suggests that administration of METH can attenuate brain tissue pO{sub 2}, which may lead to hypoxic insult, thus a risk factor for METH-induced brain injury and the development of stroke in young adults. - Highlights: • Explored striatal tissue pO{sub 2}in vivo after METH administration by EPR oximetry. • pO{sub 2} was reduced by 81% after a single dose and 64% after 3 consecutive daily doses. • pO{sub 2} did not recover fully to control levels even 24 h after a single dose. • Decrease in brain tissue pO{sub 2} may be associated with a decrease in

  19. Moderated 252Cf neutron energy spectra in brain tissue and calculated boron neutron capture dose.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Mark J; Zamenhof, Robert G

    2004-11-01

    While there is significant clinical experience using both low- and high-dose (252)Cf brachytherapy, combination therapy using (10)B for neutron capture therapy-enhanced (252)Cf brachytherapy has not been performed. Monte Carlo calculations were performed in a brain phantom (ICRU 44 brain tissue) to evaluate the dose enhancement predicted for a range of (10)B concentrations over a range of distances from a clinical (252)Cf source. These results were compared to experimental measurements and calculations published in the literature. For (10)B concentrations

  20. Normal-appearing brain tissue analysis in radiologically isolated syndrome using 3 T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés; Mato-Abad, Virginia; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Ginés, María Luisa; Aladro, Yolanda; Ayuso, Lucía; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Benito-León, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To date, it remains largely unknown whether there is in radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS) brain damage beyond visible T2 white matter lesions. We used single- voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging (3 T MRI) to analyze normal-appearing brain tissue regions in 18 RIS patients and 18 matched healthy controls. T2-hyperintense lesion volumes and structural brain volumes were also measured. The absolute metabolite concentrations and ratios of total N-acetylaspartate+N-acetylaspartyl glutamate (NAA), choline-containing compounds, myoinositol, and glutamine-glutamate complex to creatine were calculated. Spectral analysis was performed by LCModel. Voxelwise morphometry analysis was performed to localize regions of brain tissue showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity. Compared with healthy controls, RIS patients did not show any significant differences in either the absolute concentration of NAA or NAA/Cr ratio in mid-parietal gray matter. A trend toward lower NAA concentrations (–3.35%) was observed among RIS patients with high risk for conversion to multiple sclerosis. No differences in the other metabolites or their ratios were observed. RIS patients showed lower fractional anisotropy only in clusters overlapping lesional areas, namely in the cingulate gyrus bilaterally and the frontal lobe subgyral bilaterally (P < 0.001). Normalized brain and cortical volumes were significantly lower in RIS patients than in controls (P = 0.01 and P = 0.03, respectively). Our results suggest that in RIS, global brain and cortical atrophy are not primarily driven by significant occult microstructural normal appearing brain damage. Longitudinal MRI studies are needed to better understand the pathological processes underlying this novel entity. PMID:27399108

  1. Changes of c-fos, malondialdehyde and lactate in brain tissue after global cerebral ischemia under different brain temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Li; Xu, Guo-ying; Mei, Yuan-wu; Zhang, Jun-jian; Murong, Shen-xing; Sun, Sheng-gang; Tong, E-tang

    2014-06-01

    Under global cerebral ischemia, the effect of different brain temperature on cerebral ischemic injury was studied. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into normothermic (37-38°C) ischemia, mild hypothermic (31-32°C) ischemia, hyperthermic (41-42°C) ischemia and sham-operated groups. Global cerebral ischemia was established using the Pulsinelli four-vessel occlusion model and brain temperature was maintained at defined level for 60 min after 20-min ischemia. The expression of c-fos protein and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and lactate in brain regions were detected by immunochemistry and spectrophotometrical methods, respectively. C-fos positive neurons were found in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex after cerebral ischemia reperfusion. Mild hypothermia increased the expression of c-fos protein in both areas, whereas hyperthermia decreased the expression of c-fos protein in the hippocampus at 24 h reperfusion, and the cerebral cortex at 48 h reperfusion when compared to normothermic conditions. In normothermic, mild hypothermic and hyperthermic ischemia groups, the levels of MDA and lactate in brain tissue were increased at 24, 48 and 72 h reperfusion following 20-min ischemia as compared with the sham-operated group (P<0.01). The levels of MDA and lactate in mild hypothermic group were significantly lower than those in normothermic group (P<0.01). It is suggested that brain temperature influences the translation of the immunoreactive protein product of c-fos after global cerebral ischemia, and MDA and lactate are also affected by hypothermia and hyperthermia.

  2. Effects of the Variation in Brain Tissue Mechanical Properties on the Intracranial Response of a 6-Year-Old Child.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shihai; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiangnan; Ruan, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue mechanical properties are of importance to investigate child head injury using finite element (FE) method. However, these properties used in child head FE model normally vary in a large range in published literatures because of the insufficient child cadaver experiments. In this work, a head FE model with detailed anatomical structures is developed from the computed tomography (CT) data of a 6-year-old healthy child head. The effects of brain tissue mechanical properties on traumatic brain response are also analyzed by reconstruction of a head impact on engine hood according to Euro-NCAP testing regulation using FE method. The result showed that the variations of brain tissue mechanical parameters in linear viscoelastic constitutive model had different influences on the intracranial response. Furthermore, the opposite trend was obtained in the predicted shear stress and shear strain of brain tissues caused by the variations of mentioned parameters.

  3. Effects of the Variation in Brain Tissue Mechanical Properties on the Intracranial Response of a 6-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shihai; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiangnan; Ruan, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue mechanical properties are of importance to investigate child head injury using finite element (FE) method. However, these properties used in child head FE model normally vary in a large range in published literatures because of the insufficient child cadaver experiments. In this work, a head FE model with detailed anatomical structures is developed from the computed tomography (CT) data of a 6-year-old healthy child head. The effects of brain tissue mechanical properties on traumatic brain response are also analyzed by reconstruction of a head impact on engine hood according to Euro-NCAP testing regulation using FE method. The result showed that the variations of brain tissue mechanical parameters in linear viscoelastic constitutive model had different influences on the intracranial response. Furthermore, the opposite trend was obtained in the predicted shear stress and shear strain of brain tissues caused by the variations of mentioned parameters. PMID:26495031

  4. Segmentation of tumor and edema along with healthy tissues of brain using wavelets and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Demirhan, Ayşe; Toru, Mustafa; Guler, Inan

    2015-07-01

    Robust brain magnetic resonance (MR) segmentation algorithms are critical to analyze tissues and diagnose tumor and edema in a quantitative way. In this study, we present a new tissue segmentation algorithm that segments brain MR images into tumor, edema, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The detection of the healthy tissues is performed simultaneously with the diseased tissues because examining the change caused by the spread of tumor and edema on healthy tissues is very important for treatment planning. We used T1, T2, and FLAIR MR images of 20 subjects suffering from glial tumor. We developed an algorithm for stripping the skull before the segmentation process. The segmentation is performed using self-organizing map (SOM) that is trained with unsupervised learning algorithm and fine-tuned with learning vector quantization (LVQ). Unlike other studies, we developed an algorithm for clustering the SOM instead of using an additional network. Input feature vector is constructed with the features obtained from stationary wavelet transform (SWT) coefficients. The results showed that average dice similarity indexes are 91% for WM, 87% for GM, 96% for CSF, 61% for tumor, and 77% for edema.

  5. Ablation of brain by erbium laser: study of dynamic behavior and tissue damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Sozzi, C.; Taroni, Paola; Valentini, Gianluca; Bottiroli, Giovanni F.; Croce, Anna C.

    1994-02-01

    In this work two aspects of the ablation of brain by Erbium laser have been mainly addressed: the time evolution of the phenomenon and the damages, both thermal and mechanical, produced in the tissues. The time resolved images acquired during the laser interaction revealed that deep lacerations develop in the tissue due to a mechanical stress. The damages have been evaluated by studying the changes in the autofluorescence emission properties and the reduction in enzymatic activities (NADH Oxidase and ATPase). The results obtained in this study indicate that the thermal alterations resulting from the exposure to Erbium laser are limited, whereas the mechanical damages can be very pronounced.

  6. Changes of amino acid gradients in brain tissues induced by microwave irradiation and other means

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, C.F.; Parsons, J.E.; Oh, C.C.; Wasterlain, C.G.; Baldwin, R.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Focused microwave irradiation to the head (FMI) has been used extensively by neurochemists for rapid inactivation of enzymatic activity in brain tissues and the preservation, for in vitro analysis, of in vivo substrate concentrations. Periodically the suitability of this technique for regional studies has been questioned. Evidence has now been obtained, on the basis of altered concentration gradients for GABA and taurine from the Substantia Nigra (SN) to an Adjacent Dorsal Area (ADJ), that FMI not only inactivates enzymes, but also facilitates rapid diffusion of small molecules from areas of high concentrations to adjacent areas of lower concentration. To a lesser extent, the implantation of plastic injection cannulas also decreased these concentration gradients. These results offer clear evidence that FMI is ill suited and unreliable for studies designed to map and compare the in vivo regional concentrations of diffusible organic molecules (such as amino acids) in brain tissues. Any invasive technique that compromises membrane barriers is likely to produce smaller similar effects.

  7. Cranial irradiation induces bone marrow-derived microglia in adult mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Okonogi, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Suto, Nana; Suzue, Kazutomo; Kaminuma, Takuya; Nakano, Takashi; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-07-01

    Postnatal hematopoietic progenitor cells do not contribute to microglial homeostasis in adult mice under normal conditions. However, previous studies using whole-body irradiation and bone marrow (BM) transplantation models have shown that adult BM cells migrate into the brain tissue and differentiate into microglia (BM-derived microglia; BMDM). Here, we investigated whether cranial irradiation alone was sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse brain. Transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of a murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter (MSCV-GFP mice) were used. MSCV-GFP mice express GFP in BM cells but not in the resident microglia in the brain. Therefore, these mice allowed us to detect BM-derived cells in the brain without BM reconstitution. MSCV-GFP mice, aged 8-12 weeks, received 13.0 Gy irradiation only to the cranium, and BM-derived cells in the brain were quantified at 3 and 8 weeks after irradiation. No BM-derived cells were detected in control non-irradiated MSCV-GFP mouse brains, but numerous GFP-labeled BM-derived cells were present in the brain stem, basal ganglia and cerebral cortex of the irradiated MSCV-GFP mice. These BM-derived cells were positive for Iba1, a marker for microglia, indicating that GFP-positive BM-derived cells were microglial in nature. The population of BMDM was significantly greater at 8 weeks post-irradiation than at 3 weeks post-irradiation in all brain regions examined. Our results clearly show that cranial irradiation alone is sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse.

  8. On the characterization of the heterogeneous mechanical response of human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Forte, Antonio E; Gentleman, Stephen M; Dini, Daniele

    2016-12-08

    The mechanical characterization of brain tissue is a complex task that scientists have tried to accomplish for over 50 years. The results in the literature often differ by orders of magnitude because of the lack of a standard testing protocol. Different testing conditions (including humidity, temperature, strain rate), the methodology adopted, and the variety of the species analysed are all potential sources of discrepancies in the measurements. In this work, we present a rigorous experimental investigation on the mechanical properties of human brain, covering both grey and white matter. The influence of testing conditions is also shown and thoroughly discussed. The material characterization performed is finally adopted to provide inputs to a mathematical formulation suitable for numerical simulations of brain deformation during surgical procedures.

  9. Effect of nicotine and cocaine on neurofilaments and receptors in whole brain tissue and synaptoneurosome preparations.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, K; Lajtha, A; Sershen, H

    2010-04-29

    The present study examined the effect of repeated nicotine and cocaine administration on the expression of neurofilament proteins (NF-L, -M, and -H), actin, and on alpha-7 nicotinic, dopamine D1 and NMDA NR1 receptors in brain. Whole tissue homogenate and synaptoneurosomal preparations from hippocampus, striatum and cortex were assayed. C57BL/6By mice were treated for 2 weeks with a daily injection of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg) or cocaine (25mg/kg). The mice were killed 60 min after the last injection and tissue prepared for Western blot analysis of expression of NFs and receptor expression. Actin protein was affected by cocaine and nicotine treatment, decreasing in homogenate fraction (striatum and cortex) and showing an increase in the synaptoneurosome preparation (hippocampus and cortex). NF expression was affected; with regional and response differences dependent on tissue preparation. NF-M increased in all three brain regions; NF-L increased in the cortex and NF-H increased in the striatum in the synaptoneurosomal preparations. Change in nicotinic and dopamine receptor expression was dependent on region and tissue preparation. NMDA NR1 expression increased in the three brain regions in the synaptoneurosomal preparation. The results suggest that specific brain protein levels are affected by repeated drug administration. Drug effects on cytoskeletal elements are selective, regionally heterogeneous, and change with time after drug administration. Changes in cytoskeletal proteins maybe part of the mechanism in drug-induced neurotransmitter changes. We have found previously that drug-induced changes in neurotransmitters are regionally heterogeneous and are drug specific. We now found similar regional heterogeneity and drug specificity in drug-induced changes in cytoskeletal and receptor proteins.

  10. Proteomic profiling of brain cortex tissues in a Tau transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Seong-Hun; Jung, In-Soo; Han, Gi-Yeon; Kim, Nam-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A transgenic mouse model expressing NSE-htau23 was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D-gel electrophoresis to analyze the cortex proteins of transgenic mice was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentially expressed spots in different stages of AD were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GSTP1 and CAII were downregulated with the progression of AD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SCRN1 and ATP6VE1 were up regulated and down regulated differentially. -- Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves regionalized neuronal death, synaptic loss, and an accumulation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular senile plaques. Although there have been numerous studies on tau proteins and AD in various stages of neurodegenerative disease pathology, the relationship between tau and AD is not yet fully understood. A transgenic mouse model expressing neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-controlled human wild-type tau (NSE-htau23), which displays some of the typical Alzheimer-associated pathological features, was used to analyze the brain proteome associated with tau tangle deposition. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was performed to compare the cortex proteins of transgenic mice (6- and 12-month-old) with those of control mice. Differentially expressed spots in different stages of AD were identified with ESI-Q-TOF (electrospray ionization quadruple time-of-flight) mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Among the identified proteins, glutathione S-transferase P 1 (GSTP1) and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) were down-regulated with the progression of AD, and secerin-1 (SCRN1) and V-type proton ATPase subunit E 1 (ATP6VE1) were up-regulated only in the early stages, and down-regulated in the later stages of AD. The proteins, which were further confirmed by RT-PCR at the mRNA level and with western blotting at the protein level, are expected to be good candidates as drug targets for AD. The study

  11. Ethanol increases HSP70 concentrations in honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Hranitz, John M; Abramson, Charles I; Carter, Richard P

    2010-05-01

    Previous research on the honeybee ethanol model established how acute ethanol exposure altered function at different levels of organization: behavior and learning, ecology, and physiology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether ethanol doses that affect honeybee behavior also induce a significant stress response, measured by heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) concentrations, in honeybee brain tissues. Experiment 1 examined how pretreatment handling influenced brain HSP70 concentrations in three pretreatment groups of bees; immediately after being collected, after being harnessed and fed, and after 22-24h in a harness. HSP70 concentrations did not differ among pretreatment groups within replicates, although we observed significantly different HSP70 concentrations between the two replicates. Experiment 2 investigated the relationship between ethanol dose and brain HSP70 concentrations. Bees were placed in seven experimental groups, the three pretreatment groups as in Experiment 1 and four ethanol-fed groups. Bees in ethanol treatments were fed 1.5M sucrose (control) and 1.5M sucrose-ethanol solutions containing 2.5, 5, and 10% ethanol, allowed to sit for 4h, and dissected brains were assayed for HSP70. We observed ethanol-induced increases in honeybee brain HSP70 concentrations from the control group through the 5% ethanol group. Only bees in the 5% ethanol group had HSP70 concentrations significantly higher than the control group. The inverted U-shaped ethanol dose-HSP70 concentration response curve indicated that ingestion of 2.5% ethanol and 5% ethanol stimulated the stress response, whereas ingestion of 10% ethanol inhibited the stress response. Doses that show maximum HSP70 concentration (5% ethanol) or HSP70 inhibition (10% ethanol) correspond to those (> or =5% ethanol) that also impaired honeybees in previous studies. We conclude that acute ethanol intoxication by solutions containing > or =5% ethanol causes significant ethanol-induced stress in brain

  12. PDT-induced apoptosis in brain tissue in vivo: a retrospective study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilge, Lothar D.; Portnoy, Michelle; Wilson, Brian C.

    1999-07-01

    The apoptotic response of normal brain and intracranial VX2 tumor following photodynamic therapy mediated by five different photodynamic drugs, Photofrin, ALA, AlClPc, SnET2 and mTHPC, was evaluated in a preliminary retrospective analysis. Rabbit brain, with or without tumor, was treated by PDT with interstitial light delivery. Histological sections at 24 h post PDT were assessed by the TUNEL assay. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to determine the total apoptotic cell count and the spatial distribution of apoptotic bodies within the tissue. The data were confirmed qualitatively by light microscopy on adjacent H&E-stained sections. Light-only and drug-only controls produced background levels. The highest apoptotic count was seen with Photofrin. The counts in AlClPc-treated animals were not above the background level, while the other 3 photosensitizers gave intermediate levels. With some, but not all, drugs the spatial distribution of apoptotic bodies correlated well with the light fluence distribution. Apoptosis was seen outside the zone of frank coagulative necrosis. There was not apparent drug-dose dependency at the relatively high doses used here. The retrospective nature of this study did not allow optimization of the treatment parameters. Nevertheless, the findings have potentially significant implications, both for understanding the mechanisms of apoptosis in brain tissue and for improving the clinical use of PDT for treatment of patients with malignant brain tumors.

  13. Super Resolution Imaging of Genetically Labeled Synapses in Drosophila Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Spühler, Isabelle A.; Conley, Gaurasundar M.; Scheffold, Frank; Sprecher, Simon G.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding synaptic connectivity and plasticity within brain circuits and their relationship to learning and behavior is a fundamental quest in neuroscience. Visualizing the fine details of synapses using optical microscopy remains however a major technical challenge. Super resolution microscopy opens the possibility to reveal molecular features of synapses beyond the diffraction limit. With direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, dSTORM, we image synaptic proteins in the brain tissue of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Super resolution imaging of brain tissue harbors difficulties due to light scattering and the density of signals. In order to reduce out of focus signal, we take advantage of the genetic tools available in the Drosophila and have fluorescently tagged synaptic proteins expressed in only a small number of neurons. These neurons form synapses within the calyx of the mushroom body, a distinct brain region involved in associative memory formation. Our results show that super resolution microscopy, in combination with genetically labeled synaptic proteins, is a powerful tool to investigate synapses in a quantitative fashion providing an entry point for studies on synaptic plasticity during learning and memory formation. PMID:27303270

  14. Simultaneously multiparametric spectroscopic monitoring of tissue viability in the brain and small intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolmasov, Michael; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Mayevsky, Avraham

    2007-02-01

    Under body O II imbalance, the Autonomic Nervous System is responsible for redistribution of blood flow with preference to the most vital organs (brain, heart), while the less vital organs (intestine, GI tract) are hypoperfused. The aim of this study was to develop and use an animal model for real time monitoring of tissue viability in the brain, and the small intestine, under various levels of oxygen and blood supply. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized, the brain cortex and intestinal serosa were exposed and connected by optical fibers to the Multi-Site Multi-Parametric (MSMP) monitoring system. Tissue blood flow (TBF) and mitochondrial NADH redox state were monitored simultaneously in the two organs. The rats were subjected to short anoxia, 20 minutes hypoxia or epinephrine (2& 8μg/kg I.V.). Under oxygen deficiency, cerebral blood flow (CBF) was elevated, whereas intestinal TBF was reduced. Mitochondrial NADH was significantly elevated in both organs. Systemic injection of Adrenaline showed a dose-depended increase in systemic blood pressure and CBF response whereas, intestinal TBF similarly decreased in both doses. In addition, NADH was elevated (reduced form) in the intestine whereas oxidation was observed in the brain. In conclusion, our preliminary results may imply the ability of using of the MSMP for monitoring non-vital organs in order to detect early changes in the balance between oxygen supply and demand in the body.

  15. Effect of ginkgolide B on brain metabolism and tissue oxygenation in severe haemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chun-Ling; Shen, Dong-Fang; Wang, Peng-Jun; Li, Hu-Lun; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgolide B, a diterpene, is an herbal constituent isolated from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba tree. The present study demonstrates the effect of ginkgolide B in osmotherapy on brain metabolism and tissue oxygenation. Multimodality monitoring including intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), partial pressure of brain tissue oxygen (PbtO2), lactate/pyruvate ratio (LPR) and microdialysis were employed to study the effect of ginkgolide B osmotherapy. The results demonstrated that administration of 15% solution of ginkgolide B to the comatose patients with raised ICP (> 20 mm Hg) and resistant to standard therapy led to a significant decrease in ICP. The cerebral microdialysis was used to compare mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), ICP, CPP, PbtO2, brain lactate, pyruvate and glucose level after hourly intervals starting 3 h before and up to 4 h after hyperosmolar therapy. There was a decrease in ICP in 45 min from 23 ± 14 mm Hg (P < 0.001) to 18 ± 24 mm Hg and increase in CPP after 1 h of gingkolide B infusion from 74 ± 18 to 85 ± 22 mm Hg (P < 0.002). However there was no significant effect on MAP but PbtO2 was maintained in the range of 22-26. The peak lactate/pyruvate ratio was recorded at the time of initiation of osmotherapy (44 ± 20) with an 18% decrease over 2 h following gingkolide B therapy. Also the brain glucose remained unaffected. PMID:26064244

  16. Multigrid Nonlocal Gaussian Mixture Model for Segmentation of Brain Tissues in Magnetic Resonance Images.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjie; Zhan, Tianming; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Hongyuan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel segmentation method based on regional and nonlocal information to overcome the impact of image intensity inhomogeneities and noise in human brain magnetic resonance images. With the consideration of the spatial distribution of different tissues in brain images, our method does not need preestimation or precorrection procedures for intensity inhomogeneities and noise. A nonlocal information based Gaussian mixture model (NGMM) is proposed to reduce the effect of noise. To reduce the effect of intensity inhomogeneity, the multigrid nonlocal Gaussian mixture model (MNGMM) is proposed to segment brain MR images in each nonoverlapping multigrid generated by using a new multigrid generation method. Therefore the proposed model can simultaneously overcome the impact of noise and intensity inhomogeneity and automatically classify 2D and 3D MR data into tissues of white matter, gray matter, and cerebral spinal fluid. To maintain the statistical reliability and spatial continuity of the segmentation, a fusion strategy is adopted to integrate the clustering results from different grid. The experiments on synthetic and clinical brain MR images demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed model comparing with several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  17. Realistic Numerical and Analytical Modeling of Light Scattering in Brain Tissue for Optogenetic Applications123

    PubMed Central

    Meitav, Nizan; Shoham, Shy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In recent years, optogenetics has become a central tool in neuroscience research. Estimating the transmission of visible light through brain tissue is of crucial importance for controlling the activation levels of neurons in different depths, designing optical systems, and avoiding lesions from excessive power density. The Kubelka–Munk model and Monte Carlo simulations have previously been used to model light propagation through rodents' brain tissue, however, these prior attempts suffer from fundamental shortcomings. Here, we introduce and study two modified approaches for modeling the distributions of light emanating from a multimode fiber and scattering through tissue, using both realistic numerical Monte Carlo simulations and an analytical approach based on the beam-spread function approach. We demonstrate a good agreement of the new methods' predictions both with recently published data, and with new measurements in mouse brain cortical slices, where our results yield a new cortical scattering length estimate of ∼47 µm at λ = 473 nm, significantly shorter than ordinarily assumed in optogenetic applications. PMID:26866055

  18. Optical vortex beam transmission with different OAM in scattering beads and brain tissue media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. B.; Shi, Lingyan; Lindwasser, Lukas; Marque, Paulo; Lavery, M. P. J.; Alfano, R. R.

    2016-03-01

    Light transmission of Laguerre Gaussian (LG) vortex beams with different orbital angular momentum (OAM) values (L) in scattering beads and mouse brain tissue media were experimentally investigated for the first time in comparison with Gaussian (G) beams. The LG beams with different OAM were generated using a spatial light modulator (SLM) in reflection mode. The scattering beads media consist of various sizes and concentrations of latex beads in water solutions. The transmissions of LG and G beams through scattering beads and brain tissue media were measured with different ratios of sample thicknesses (z) to scattering mean free path (ls) of the turbid media, z/ls. The results indicate that within the ballistic region where z/ls is small, the LG and G beams show no significant difference, while in the diffusive region where z/ls is higher, the vortex beams show higher transmission than G beams. In the diffusive region, the LG beams with higher L values show higher transmission than the beams with lower L values due to the eigen channels in the media. The transition points from the ballistic to diffusive regions for different scattering beads and brain tissue media were studied.

  19. Influence of heterogeneous and anisotropic tissue conductivity on electric field distribution in deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aström, Mattias; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Wårdell, Karin

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to quantify the influence of heterogeneous isotropic and heterogeneous anisotropic tissue on the spatial distribution of the electric field during deep brain stimulation (DBS). Three finite element tissue models were created of one patient treated with DBS. Tissue conductivity was modelled as (I) homogeneous isotropic, (II) heterogeneous isotropic based on MRI, and (III) heterogeneous anisotropic based on diffusion tensor MRI. Modelled DBS electrodes were positioned in the subthalamic area, the pallidum, and the internal capsule in each tissue model. Electric fields generated during DBS were simulated for each model and target-combination and visualized with isolevels at 0.20 (inner), and 0.05 V mm(-1) (outer). Statistical and vector analysis was used for evaluation of the distribution of the electric field. Heterogeneous isotropic tissue altered the spatial distribution of the electric field by up to 4% at inner, and up to 10% at outer isolevel. Heterogeneous anisotropic tissue influenced the distribution of the electric field by up to 18 and 15% at each isolevel, respectively. The influence of heterogeneous and anisotropic tissue on the electric field may be clinically relevant in anatomic regions that are functionally subdivided and surrounded by multiple fibres of passage.

  20. FTIR imaging of brain tissue reveals crystalline creatine deposits are an ex vivo marker of localized ischemia during murine cerebral malaria: general implications for disease neurochemistry.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Mark J; Lee, Joonsup; El-Assaad, Fatima; McQuillan, James A; Carter, Elizabeth A; Grau, Georges E; Hunt, Nicholas H; Lay, Peter A

    2012-12-19

    Phosphocreatine is a major cellular source of high energy phosphates, which is crucial to maintain cell viability under conditions of impaired metabolic states, such as decreased oxygen and energy availability (i.e., ischemia). Many methods exist for the bulk analysis of phosphocreatine and its dephosphorylated product creatine; however, no method exists to image the distribution of creatine or phosphocreatine at the cellular level. In this study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging has revealed the ex vivo development of creatine microdeposits in situ in the brain region most affected by the disease, the cerebellum of cerebral malaria (CM) diseased mice; however, such deposits were also observed at significantly lower levels in the brains of control mice and mice with severe malaria. In addition, the number of deposits was observed to increase in a time-dependent manner during dehydration post tissue cutting. This challenges the hypotheses in recent reports of FTIR spectroscopic imaging where creatine microdeposits found in situ within thin sections from epileptic, Alzheimer's (AD), and amlyoid lateral sclerosis (ALS) diseased brains were proposed to be disease specific markers and/or postulated to contribute to the brain pathogenesis. As such, a detailed investigation was undertaken, which has established that the creatine microdeposits exist as the highly soluble HCl salt or zwitterion and are an ex-vivo tissue processing artifact and, hence, have no effect on disease pathogenesis. They occur as a result of creatine crystallization during dehydration (i.e., air-drying) of thin sections of brain tissue. As ischemia and decreased aerobic (oxidative metabolism) are common to many brain disorders, regions of elevated creatine-to-phosphocreatine ratio are likely to promote crystal formation during tissue dehydration (due to the lower water solubility of creatine relative to phosphocreatine). The results of this study have demonstrated that

  1. [A study of brain inner tissue water molecule self-diffusion model based on Monte Carlo simulation].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhanxiong; Zhu, Shanan; Bin, He

    2010-06-01

    The study of water molecule self-diffusion process is of importance not only for getting anatomical information of brain inner tissue, but also for shedding light on the diffusion process of some medicine in brain tissue. In this paper, we summarized the self-diffusion model of water molecule in brain inner tissue, and calculated the self-diffusion coefficient based on Monte Carlo simulation under different conditions. The comparison between this result and that of Latour model showed that the two self-diffusion coefficients were getting closer when the diffusion time became longer, and that the Latour model was a long time-depended self-diffusion model.

  2. New tissue priors for improved automated classification of subcortical brain structures on MRI☆

    PubMed Central

    Lorio, S.; Fresard, S.; Adaszewski, S.; Kherif, F.; Chowdhury, R.; Frackowiak, R.S.; Ashburner, J.; Helms, G.; Weiskopf, N.; Lutti, A.; Draganski, B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the constant improvement of algorithms for automated brain tissue classification, the accurate delineation of subcortical structures using magnetic resonance images (MRI) data remains challenging. The main difficulties arise from the low gray-white matter contrast of iron rich areas in T1-weighted (T1w) MRI data and from the lack of adequate priors for basal ganglia and thalamus. The most recent attempts to obtain such priors were based on cohorts with limited size that included subjects in a narrow age range, failing to account for age-related gray-white matter contrast changes. Aiming to improve the anatomical plausibility of automated brain tissue classification from T1w data, we have created new tissue probability maps for subcortical gray matter regions. Supported by atlas-derived spatial information, raters manually labeled subcortical structures in a cohort of healthy subjects using magnetization transfer saturation and R2* MRI maps, which feature optimal gray-white matter contrast in these areas. After assessment of inter-rater variability, the new tissue priors were tested on T1w data within the framework of voxel-based morphometry. The automated detection of gray matter in subcortical areas with our new probability maps was more anatomically plausible compared to the one derived with currently available priors. We provide evidence that the improved delineation compensates age-related bias in the segmentation of iron rich subcortical regions. The new tissue priors, allowing robust detection of basal ganglia and thalamus, have the potential to enhance the sensitivity of voxel-based morphometry in both healthy and diseased brains. PMID:26854557

  3. Comparison and validation of tissue modelization and statistical classification methods in T1-weighted MR brain images.

    PubMed

    Cuadra, Meritxell Bach; Cammoun, Leila; Butz, Torsten; Cuisenaire, Olivier; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents a validation study on statistical nonsupervised brain tissue classification techniques in magnetic resonance (MR) images. Several image models assuming different hypotheses regarding the intensity distribution model, the spatial model and the number of classes are assessed. The methods are tested on simulated data for which the classification ground truth is known. Different noise and intensity nonuniformities are added to simulate real imaging conditions. No enhancement of the image quality is considered either before or during the classification process. This way, the accuracy of the methods and their robustness against image artifacts are tested. Classification is also performed on real data where a quantitative validation compares the methods' results with an estimated ground truth from manual segmentations by experts. Validity of the various classification methods in the labeling of the image as well as in the tissue volume is estimated with different local and global measures. Results demonstrate that methods relying on both intensity and spatial information are more robust to noise and field inhomogeneities. We also demonstrate that partial volume is not perfectly modeled, even though methods that account for mixture classes outperform methods that only consider pure Gaussian classes. Finally, we show that simulated data results can also be extended to real data.

  4. Neuroproteomic profiling of human brain tissue using multidimensional separation techniques and selective enrichment of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Musunuri, Sravani; Shevchenko, Ganna; Bergquist, Jonas

    2012-12-01

    Hydrophobic membrane proteins (MPs) occupy a unique niche in the brain proteome research due to their important physiological roles. Therefore, the extraction, separation, and identification of MPs are of great interest in proteomic analysis. We applied various proteomic techniques to enrich, separate, and analyze the human brain proteome, including membrane proteome. Temperature-induced phase fractionation with the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 was used to simultaneously extract, separate, and concentrate low abundant hydrophobic and high abundant hydrophilic proteins from human brain tissue. The extracted and delipidated proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). Approximately 600 spots were detected in the gels. In-solution digestion was performed on 3 kDa spin filters. Tryptic peptides were separated using RP nano-LC and analyzed using two different high performance mass spectrometers, linear ion trap-Fourier transform and a linear ion trap-Orbitrap to reveal the low abundant MPs. In total, 837 and 780 unique proteins were identified by using linear ion trap-Fourier transform and linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometers, respectively. More than 29% of the identified proteins were classified as MPs with significant biological functions such as ion channels and transporters. Our study establishes a simple and rapid shotgun approach for the characterization of the brain proteome, and allows comprehensive analysis of brain membrane proteomes.

  5. Expression of defective measles virus genes in brain tissues of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    SciTech Connect

    Baczko, K.; Liebert, U.G.; Billeter, M.; Cattaneo, R.; Budka, H.; Ter Meulen, V.

    1986-08-01

    The persistence of measles virus in selected areas of the brains of four patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) was characterized by immunohistological and biochemical techniques. The five measles virus structural proteins were never simultaneously detectable in any of the bran sections. Nucleocapsid proteins and phosphoproteins were found in every diseased brain area, whereas hemagglutinin protein was detected in two cases, fusion protein was detected in three cases, and matrix protein was detected in only one case. Also, it could be shown that the amounts of measles virus RNA in the brains differed from patient to patient and in the different regions investigated. In all patients, plus-strand RNAs specific for these five viral genes could be detected. However, the amounts of fusion and hemagglutinin mRNAs were low compared with the amounts in lytically infected cells. The presence of particular measles virus RNAs in SSPE-infected brains did not always correlate with mRNA activity. In in vitro translations, the matrix protein was produced in only one case, and the hemagglutinin protein was produced in none. These results indicate that measles virus persistence in SSPE is correlated with different defects of several genes which probably prevent assembly of viral particles in SSPE-infected brain tissue.

  6. The Relationship of 3D Human Skull Motion to Brain Tissue Deformation in Magnetic Resonance Elastography Studies.

    PubMed

    Badachhape, Andrew A; Okamoto, Ruth J; Durham, Ramona S; Efron, Brent D; Nadell, Sam J; Johnson, Curtis L; Bayly, Philip V

    2017-03-07

    In traumatic brain injury (TBI), membranes such as the dura mater, arachnoid mater, and pia mater play a vital role in transmitting motion from the skull to brain tissue. Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) is an imaging technique developed for non-invasive estimation of soft tissue material parameters. In MRE, dynamic deformation of brain tissue is induced by skull vibrations; however skull motion and its mode of transmission to the brain remain largely uncharacterized. In this study, displacements of points in the skull, reconstructed using data from an array of MRI-safe accelerometers, were compared to displacements of neighboring material points in brain tissue, estimated from MRE measurements. Comparison of the relative amplitudes, directions, and temporal phases of harmonic motion in the skulls and brains of six human subjects shows that the skull-brain interface significantly attenuates and delays transmission of motion from skull to brain. In contrast, in a cylindrical gelatin "phantom", displacements of the rigid case (reconstructed from accelerometer data) were transmitted to the gelatin inside (estimated from MRE data) with little attenuation or phase lag. This quantitative characterization of the skull-brain interface will be valuable in the parameterization and validation of computer models of TBI.

  7. Elevated-temperature-induced acceleration of PACT clearing process of mouse brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tingting; Qi, Yisong; Zhu, Jingtan; Xu, Jianyi; Gong, Hui; Luo, Qingming; Zhu, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Tissue optical clearing technique shows a great potential for neural imaging with high resolution, especially for connectomics in brain. The passive clarity technique (PACT) is a relative simple clearing method based on incubation, which has a great advantage on tissue transparency, fluorescence preservation and immunostaining compatibility for imaging tissue blocks. However, this method suffers from long processing time. Previous studies indicated that increasing temperature can speed up the clearing. In this work, we aim to systematacially and quantitatively study this influence based on PACT with graded increase of temperatures. We investigated the process of optical clearing of brain tissue block at different temperatures, and found that elevated temperature could accelerate the clearing process and also had influence on the fluorescence intensity. By balancing the advantages with drawbacks, we conclude that 42–47 °C is an alternative temperature range for PACT, which can not only produce faster clearing process, but also retain the original advantages of PACT by preserving endogenous fluorescence well, achieving fine morphology maintenance and immunostaining compatibility.

  8. A comparison of hyperelastic constitutive models applicable to brain and fat tissues

    PubMed Central

    Mihai, L. Angela; Chin, LiKang; Janmey, Paul A.; Goriely, Alain

    2015-01-01

    In some soft biological structures such as brain and fat tissues, strong experimental evidence suggests that the shear modulus increases significantly under increasing compressive strain, but not under tensile strain, whereas the apparent Young's elastic modulus increases or remains almost constant when compressive strain increases. These tissues also exhibit a predominantly isotropic, incompressible behaviour. Our aim is to capture these seemingly contradictory mechanical behaviours, both qualitatively and quantitatively, within the framework of finite elasticity, by modelling a soft tissue as a homogeneous, isotropic, incompressible, hyperelastic material and comparing our results with available experimental data. Our analysis reveals that the Fung and Gent models, which are typically used to model soft tissues, are inadequate for the modelling of brain or fat under combined stretch and shear, and so are the classical neo-Hookean and Mooney–Rivlin models used for elastomers. However, a subclass of Ogden hyperelastic models are found to be in excellent agreement with the experiments. Our findings provide explicit models suitable for integration in large-scale finite-element computations. PMID:26354826

  9. Elevated-temperature-induced acceleration of PACT clearing process of mouse brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tingting; Qi, Yisong; Zhu, Jingtan; Xu, Jianyi; Gong, Hui; Luo, Qingming; Zhu, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Tissue optical clearing technique shows a great potential for neural imaging with high resolution, especially for connectomics in brain. The passive clarity technique (PACT) is a relative simple clearing method based on incubation, which has a great advantage on tissue transparency, fluorescence preservation and immunostaining compatibility for imaging tissue blocks. However, this method suffers from long processing time. Previous studies indicated that increasing temperature can speed up the clearing. In this work, we aim to systematacially and quantitatively study this influence based on PACT with graded increase of temperatures. We investigated the process of optical clearing of brain tissue block at different temperatures, and found that elevated temperature could accelerate the clearing process and also had influence on the fluorescence intensity. By balancing the advantages with drawbacks, we conclude that 42–47 °C is an alternative temperature range for PACT, which can not only produce faster clearing process, but also retain the original advantages of PACT by preserving endogenous fluorescence well, achieving fine morphology maintenance and immunostaining compatibility. PMID:28139694

  10. A comparison of hyperelastic constitutive models applicable to brain and fat tissues.

    PubMed

    Mihai, L Angela; Chin, LiKang; Janmey, Paul A; Goriely, Alain

    2015-09-06

    In some soft biological structures such as brain and fat tissues, strong experimental evidence suggests that the shear modulus increases significantly under increasing compressive strain, but not under tensile strain, whereas the apparent Young's elastic modulus increases or remains almost constant when compressive strain increases. These tissues also exhibit a predominantly isotropic, incompressible behaviour. Our aim is to capture these seemingly contradictory mechanical behaviours, both qualitatively and quantitatively, within the framework of finite elasticity, by modelling a soft tissue as a homogeneous, isotropic, incompressible, hyperelastic material and comparing our results with available experimental data. Our analysis reveals that the Fung and Gent models, which are typically used to model soft tissues, are inadequate for the modelling of brain or fat under combined stretch and shear, and so are the classical neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin models used for elastomers. However, a subclass of Ogden hyperelastic models are found to be in excellent agreement with the experiments. Our findings provide explicit models suitable for integration in large-scale finite-element computations.

  11. Hemodynamic measurements in deep brain tissues of humans by near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Oda, Motoki; Yamaki, Etsuko; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Yamashita, Daisuke; Yoshimoto, Kenji; Homma, Shu; Yamashita, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    Using near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS), we measured the human head in transmittance mode to obtain the optical properties, tissue oxygenation, and hemodynamics of deep brain tissues in 50 healthy adult volunteers. The right ear canal was irradiated with 3-wavelengths of pulsed light (760, 795, and 835nm), and the photons passing through the human head were collected at the left ear canal. Optical signals with sufficient intensity could be obtained from 46 of the 50 volunteers. By analyzing the temporal profiles based on the photon diffusion theory, we successfully obtained absorption coefficients for each wavelength. The levels of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2), deoxygenated hemoglobin (Hb), total hemoglobin (tHb), and tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) were then determined by referring to the hemoglobin spectroscopic data. Compared with the SO2 values for the forehead measurements in reflectance mode, the SO2 values of the transmittance measurements of the human head were approximately 10% lower, and tHb values of the transmittance measurements were always lower than those of the forehead reflectance measurements. Moreover, the level of hemoglobin and the SO2 were strongly correlated between the human head measurements in transmittance mode and the forehead measurements in the reflectance mode, respectively. These results demonstrated a potential application of this TRS system in examining deep brain tissues of humans.

  12. X-ray diffraction from intact tau aggregates in human brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Landahl, Eric C.; Antipova, Olga; Bongaarts, Angela; Barrea, Raul; Berry, Robert; Binder, Lester I.; Irving, Thomas; Orgel, Joseph; Vana, Laurel; Rice, Sarah E.

    2011-09-15

    We describe an instrument to record X-ray diffraction patterns from diseased regions of human brain tissue by combining an in-line visible light fluorescence microscope with an X-ray diffraction microprobe. We use thiazine red fluorescence to specifically label and detect the filamentous tau protein pathology associated with Pick's disease, as several laboratories have done previously. We demonstrate that thiazine red-enhanced regions within the tissue show periodic structure in X-ray diffraction, which is not observed in healthy tissue. One observed periodicity (4.2 {angstrom}) is characteristic of cross-beta sheet structure, consistent with previous results from powder diffraction studies performed on purified, dried tau protein.

  13. Three-dimensional cellular and subcellular structures of human brain tissue determined by microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Ryuta; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Takekoshi, Susumu; Yoshiyuki Osamura, R.; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2009-09-01

    We report here x-ray microtomographic studies of human cerebral cortex stained with high-Z elements. Brain tissues were stained with metal elements by the Golgi and Bodian impregnation methods and subjected to x-ray microtomographic analysis. Axons and dendrites arising from cell bodies were visualized as three-dimensional networks. Spherical structures of cellular nuclei were observed in the interiors of cell bodies, indicating that hard x-ray microtomography can reveal the intracellular structure. High-Z element microcontrasting in conjunction with microtomographic analysis can be applied to any soft tissues. Our results show that the metal contrasting facilitates the three-dimensional microtomographic visualization of cellular and subcellular structures of soft tissues.

  14. d-Amino Acid Levels in Perfused Mouse Brain Tissue and Blood: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Weatherly, Choyce A; Du, Siqi; Parpia, Curran; Santos, Polan T; Hartman, Adam L; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2017-02-16

    The l-enantiomer is the predominant type of amino acid in all living systems. However, d-amino acids, once thought to be "unnatural", have been found to be indigenous even in mammalian systems and increasingly appear to be functioning in essential biological and neurological roles. Both d- and l-amino acid levels in the hippocampus, cortex, and blood samples from NIH Swiss mice are reported. Perfused brain tissues were analyzed for the first time, thereby eliminating artifacts due to endogenous blood, and decreased the mouse-to-mouse variability in amino acid levels. Total amino acid levels (l- plus d-enantiomers) in brain tissue are up to 10 times higher than in blood. However, all measured d-amino acid levels in brain tissue are typically ∼10 to 2000 times higher than blood levels. There was a 13% reduction in almost all measured d-amino acid levels in the cortex compared to those in the hippocampus. There is an approximate inverse relationship between the prevalence of an amino acid and the percentage of its d-enantiomeric form. Interestingly, glutamic acid, unlike all other amino acids, had no quantifiable level of its d-antipode. The bioneurological reason for the unique and conspicuous absence/removal of this d-amino acid is yet unknown. However, results suggest that d-glutamate metabolism is likely a unidirectional process and not a cycle, as per the l-glutamate/glutamine cycle. The results suggest that there might be unreported d-amino acid racemases in mammalian brains. The regulation and function of specific other d-amino acids are discussed.

  15. New aspects in fenestrated capillary and tissue dynamics in the sensory circumventricular organs of adult brains.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) generally consists of endothelial tight junction barriers that prevent the free entry of blood-derived substances, thereby maintaining the extracellular environment of the brain. However, the circumventricular organs (CVOs), which are located along the midlines of the brain ventricles, lack these endothelial barriers and have fenestrated capillaries; therefore, they have a number of essential functions, including the transduction of information between the blood circulation and brain. Previous studies have demonstrated the extensive contribution of the CVOs to body fluid and thermal homeostasis, energy balance, the chemoreception of blood-derived substances, and neuroinflammation. In this review, recent advances have been discussed in fenestrated capillary characterization and dynamic tissue reconstruction accompanied by angiogenesis and neurogliogenesis in the sensory CVOs of adult brains. The sensory CVOs, including the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), subfornical organ (SFO), and area postrema (AP), have size-selective and heterogeneous vascular permeabilities. Astrocyte-/tanycyte-like neural stem cells (NSCs) sense blood- and cerebrospinal fluid-derived information through the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, a mechanical/osmotic receptor, Toll-like receptor 4, a lipopolysaccharide receptor, and Nax, a Na-sensing Na channel. They also express tight junction proteins and densely and tightly surround mature neurons to protect them from blood-derived neurotoxic substances, indicating that the NSCs of the CVOs perform BBB functions while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into new neurons and glial cells. In addition to neurogliogenesis, the density of fenestrated capillaries is regulated by angiogenesis, which is accompanied by the active proliferation and sprouting of endothelial cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling may be involved in angiogenesis and neurogliogenesis, both of

  16. Spatially pathogenic forms of tau detected in Alzheimer's disease brain tissue by fluorescence lifetime-based Förster resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Larionov, Sergey; Wielgat, Przemyslaw; Wang, Yiner; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Neumann, Harald

    2010-09-30

    In tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease (AD) tau molecules have lost their normal spatial distance to each other and appear in oligomeric or aggregated forms. Conventional immunostaining methods allow detection of abnormally phosphorylated or conformationally altered aggregated tau proteins, but fail to visualize oligomeric forms of tau. Here we show that tau molecules that lost their normal spatial localization can be detected on a subcellular level in postmortem central nervous system (CNS) tissue sections of AD patients by fluorescence lifetime-based Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Paraffin sections were co-immunostained with two tau-specific monoclonal antibodies recognizing the same epitope, but labeled with distinct fluorescence dyes suitable for spatial resolution at a nanometer scale by lifetime-based FRET. A FRET signal was detected in neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles of CNS tissue sections of AD patients, showing associated tau proteins typically reflecting either fibrillary, oligomeric or aggregated tau. The 'pretangle-like' structures within the neuronal perikarya did not contain spatially pathogenic forms of tau accordingly to this method. Data demonstrate that fluorescence lifetime-based FRET can be applied to human brain tissue sections to detect pathogenic forms of tau molecules that lost their normal spatial distance.

  17. Enhanced Dentin-Like Mineralized Tissue Formation by AdShh-Transfected Human Dental Pulp Cells and Porous Calcium Phosphate Cement

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Lizhen; Zeng, Deliang; Zhang, Xiuli; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Jiang, Xinquan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) on human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) and the potential of complexes with Shh gene modified hDPCs and porous calcium phosphate cement (CPC) for mineralized tissue formation. hDPCs were cultured and transfected with adenoviral mediated human Shh gene (AdShh). Overexpression of Shh and cell proliferation was tested by real-time PCR analysis, western blotting analysis, and MTT analysis, respectively. The odontoblastic differentiation was assessed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and real-time PCR analysis on markers of Patched-1 (Ptc-1), Smoothened (Smo), Gli 1, Gli 2, Gli 3, osteocalcin (OCN), dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP). Finally, AdShh-transfected hDPCs were combined with porous CPC and placed subcutaneously in nude mice for 8 and 12 weeks, while AdEGFP-transfected and untransfected hDPCs were treated as control groups. Results indicated that Shh could promote proliferation and odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs, while Shh/Gli 1 signaling pathway played a key role in this process. Importantly, more mineralized tissue formation was observed in combination with AdShh transfected hDPCs and porous CPC, moreover, the mineralized tissue exhibited dentin-like features such as structures similar to dentin-pulp complex and the positive staining for DSPP protein similar to the tooth tissue. These results suggested that the constructs with AdShh-transfected hDPCs and porous CPC might be a better alternative for dental tissue regeneration. PMID:23675415

  18. Brain investigation and brain conceptualization

    PubMed Central

    Redolfi, Alberto; Bosco, Paolo; Manset, David; Frisoni, Giovanni B.

    Summary The brain of a patient with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) undergoes changes starting many years before the development of the first clinical symptoms. The recent availability of large prospective datasets makes it possible to create sophisticated brain models of healthy subjects and patients with AD, showing pathophysiological changes occurring over time. However, these models are still inadequate; representations are mainly single-scale and they do not account for the complexity and interdependence of brain changes. Brain changes in AD patients occur at different levels and for different reasons: at the molecular level, changes are due to amyloid deposition; at cellular level, to loss of neuron synapses, and at tissue level, to connectivity disruption. All cause extensive atrophy of the whole brain organ. Initiatives aiming to model the whole human brain have been launched in Europe and the US with the goal of reducing the burden of brain diseases. In this work, we describe a new approach to earlier diagnosis based on a multimodal and multiscale brain concept, built upon existing and well-characterized single modalities. PMID:24139654

  19. The natural xanthone alpha-mangostin reduces oxidative damage in rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Valadez, Berenice; Lugo-Huitrón, Rafael; Valdivia-Cerda, Verónica; Miranda-Ramírez, Luis Rubén; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; González-Cuahutencos, Octavio; Rivero-Cruz, Isabel; Mata, Rachel; Santamaría, Abel; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José

    2009-02-01

    The antiperoxidative properties of alpha-mangostin, a xanthone isolated from mangosteen fruit, were tested for the first time in nerve tissue exposed to different toxic insults. Two reliable biological preparations (rat brain homogenates and synaptosomal P2 fractions) were exposed to the toxic actions of a free radical generator (ferrous sulfate), an excitotoxic agent (quinolinate), and a mitochondrial toxin (3-nitropropionate). alpha-Mangostin decreased the lipoperoxidative action of FeSO(4) in both preparations in a concentration-dependent manner, and completely abolished the peroxidative effects of quinolinate, 3-nitropropionate and FeSO(4) + quinolinate at all concentrations tested. Interestingly, when tested alone in brain homogenates, alpha-mangostin significantly decreased the lipoperoxidation even below basal levels. alpha-Mangostin also prevented the decreased reductant capacity of mitochondria in synaptosomal fractions. Our results suggest that alpha-mangostin exerts a robust antiperoxidative effect in brain tissue preparations probably through its properties as a free radical scavenger. In light of these findings, this antioxidant should be tested in other neurotoxic models involving oxidative stress.

  20. Unified model of brain tissue microstructure dynamically binds diffusion and osmosis with extracellular space geometry.

    PubMed

    Yousefnezhad, Mohsen; Fotouhi, Morteza; Vejdani, Kaveh; Kamali-Zare, Padideh

    2016-09-01

    We present a universal model of brain tissue microstructure that dynamically links osmosis and diffusion with geometrical parameters of brain extracellular space (ECS). Our model robustly describes and predicts the nonlinear time dependency of tortuosity (λ=sqrt[D/D^{*}]) changes with very high precision in various media with uniform and nonuniform osmolarity distribution, as demonstrated by previously published experimental data (D = free diffusion coefficient, D^{*} = effective diffusion coefficient). To construct this model, we first developed a multiscale technique for computationally effective modeling of osmolarity in the brain tissue. Osmolarity differences across cell membranes lead to changes in the ECS dynamics. The evolution of the underlying dynamics is then captured by a level set method. Subsequently, using a homogenization technique, we derived a coarse-grained model with parameters that are explicitly related to the geometry of cells and their associated ECS. Our modeling results in very accurate analytical approximation of tortuosity based on time, space, osmolarity differences across cell membranes, and water permeability of cell membranes. Our model provides a unique platform for studying ECS dynamics not only in physiologic conditions such as sleep-wake cycles and aging but also in pathologic conditions such as stroke, seizure, and neoplasia, as well as in predictive pharmacokinetic modeling such as predicting medication biodistribution and efficacy and novel biomolecule development and testing.

  1. Antioxidant response and histopathological changes in brain tissue of pigeon exposed to avermectin.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; You, Tian-Zi; Zhu, Wen-Jun; Qu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Ci; Zhao, Bing; Xu, Shi-Wen; Li, Shu

    2013-10-01

    Avermectins (AVMs) are the active components of some insecticidal and nematicidal products used in agriculture and veterinary medicine for the prevention of parasitic diseases. Residues of AVM drugs or their metabolites in livestock feces have toxic effects on non-target aquatic and terrestrial organisms. In this study, oxidative stress responses and pathological changes on pigeon brain tissues and serum after subchronic exposure to AVM for 30, 60 and 90 days were investigated. The decrease in antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase, SOD and glutathione peroxidase, GSH-Px) activities and increase in methane dicarboxylic aldehyde content in a dose-time-dependent manner in the brain and serum of pigeon were observed. The protein carbonyl content, an indicator of protein oxidation, and DNA-protein crosslink coefficient were significantly augmented with dose-time-dependent properties. The microscopic structures of the cerebrum, cerebellum and optic lobe altered obviously, the severity of which increased with the concentration of AVM and exposure time. The results imply that AVM could induce oxidative damage to the brain tissue and serum of pigeon. The information presented in this study is helpful to understand the mechanism of AVM-induced oxidative stress in birds.

  2. Unified model of brain tissue microstructure dynamically binds diffusion and osmosis with extracellular space geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefnezhad, Mohsen; Fotouhi, Morteza; Vejdani, Kaveh; Kamali-Zare, Padideh

    2016-09-01

    We present a universal model of brain tissue microstructure that dynamically links osmosis and diffusion with geometrical parameters of brain extracellular space (ECS). Our model robustly describes and predicts the nonlinear time dependency of tortuosity (λ =√{D /D* } ) changes with very high precision in various media with uniform and nonuniform osmolarity distribution, as demonstrated by previously published experimental data (D = free diffusion coefficient, D* = effective diffusion coefficient). To construct this model, we first developed a multiscale technique for computationally effective modeling of osmolarity in the brain tissue. Osmolarity differences across cell membranes lead to changes in the ECS dynamics. The evolution of the underlying dynamics is then captured by a level set method. Subsequently, using a homogenization technique, we derived a coarse-grained model with parameters that are explicitly related to the geometry of cells and their associated ECS. Our modeling results in very accurate analytical approximation of tortuosity based on time, space, osmolarity differences across cell membranes, and water permeability of cell membranes. Our model provides a unique platform for studying ECS dynamics not only in physiologic conditions such as sleep-wake cycles and aging but also in pathologic conditions such as stroke, seizure, and neoplasia, as well as in predictive pharmacokinetic modeling such as predicting medication biodistribution and efficacy and novel biomolecule development and testing.

  3. Scattering of Sculpted Light in Intact Brain Tissue, with implications for Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Favre-Bulle, Itia A.; Preece, Daryl; Nieminen, Timo A.; Heap, Lucy A.; Scott, Ethan K.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics uses light to control and observe the activity of neurons, often using a focused laser beam. As brain tissue is a scattering medium, beams are distorted and spread with propagation through neural tissue, and the beam’s degradation has important implications in optogenetic experiments. To address this, we present an analysis of scattering and loss of intensity of focused laser beams at different depths within the brains of zebrafish larvae. Our experimental set-up uses a 488 nm laser and a spatial light modulator to focus a diffraction-limited spot of light within the brain. We use a combination of experimental measurements of back-scattered light in live larvae and computational modelling of the scattering to determine the spatial distribution of light. Modelling is performed using the Monte Carlo method, supported by generalised Lorenz–Mie theory in the single-scattering approximation. Scattering in areas rich in cell bodies is compared to that of regions of neuropil to identify the distinct and dramatic contributions that cell nuclei make to scattering. We demonstrate the feasibility of illuminating individual neurons, even in nucleus-rich areas, at depths beyond 100 μm using a spatial light modulator in combination with a standard laser and microscope optics. PMID:26108566

  4. Micromotion-induced dynamic effects from a neural probe and brain tissue interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanco, Michael; Yoon, Hargsoon; Bawab, Sebastian

    2014-04-01

    Neural probes contain the potential to cause injury to surrounding neural cells due to a discrepancy in stiffness values between them and the surrounding brain tissue when subjected to mechanical micromotion of the brain. To evaluate the effects of the mechanical mismatch, a series of dynamic simulations are conducted to better understand the design enhancements required to improve the feasibility of the neuron probe. The simulations use a nonlinear transient explicit finite element code, LS-DYNA. A three-dimensional quarter-symmetry finite element model is utilized for the transient analysis to capture the time-dependent dynamic deformations on the brain tissue from the implant as a function of different frequency shapes and stiffness values. When micromotion-induced pulses are applied, reducing the neuron probe stiffness by three orders of magnitude leads up to a 41.6% reduction in stress and 39.1% reduction in strain. The simulation conditions assume a case where sheath bonding has begun to take place around the probe implantation site, but no full bond to the probe has occurred. The analyses can provide guidance on the materials necessary to design a probe for injury reduction.

  5. Brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen predicts the outcome of severe traumatic brain injury under mild hypothermia treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongtao; Zheng, Maohua; Wang, Yanmin; Diao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Wanyong; Wei, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance and changes of brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen (PbtO2) in the course of mild hypothermia treatment (MHT) for treating severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). Methods There were 68 cases with sTBI undergoing MHT. PbtO2, intracranial pressure (ICP), jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were continuously monitored, and clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Results Of 68 patients with sTBI, PbtO2, SjvO2, and CPP were obviously increased, but decreased ICP level was observed throughout the MHT. PbtO2 and ICP were negatively linearly correlated, while there was a positive linear correlation between PbtO2 and SjvO2. Monitoring CPP and SjvO2 was performed under normal circumstances, and a large proportion of patients were detected with low PbtO2. Decreased PbtO2 was also found after MHT. Conclusion Continuous PbtO2 monitoring could be introduced to evaluate the condition of regional cerebral oxygen metabolism, thereby guiding the clinical treatment and predicting the outcome. PMID:27601907

  6. Effects of formalin fixation on tissue optical properties of in-vitro brain samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Martelli, Fabrizio; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Guerrini, Renzo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-03-01

    Application of light spectroscopy based techniques for the detection of cancers have emerged as a promising approach for tumor diagnostics. In-vivo or freshly excised samples are normally used for point spectroscopic studies. However, ethical issues related to in-vivo studies, rapid decay of surgically excised tissues and sample availability puts a limitation on in-vivo and in-vitro studies. There has been a few studies reported on the application of formalin fixed samples with good discrimination capability. Usually formalin fixation is performed to prevent degradation of tissues after surgical resection. Fixing tissues in formalin prevents cell death by forming cross-linkages with proteins. Previous investigations have revealed that washing tissues fixed in formalin using phosphate buffered saline is known to reduce the effects of formalin during spectroscopic measurements. But this could not be the case with reflectance measurements. Hemoglobin is a principal absorbing medium in biological tissues in the visible range. Formalin fixation causes hemoglobin to seep out from red blood cells. Also, there could be alterations in the refractive index of tissues when fixed in formalin. In this study, we propose to investigate the changes in tissue optical properties between freshly excised and formalin fixed brain tissues. The results indicate a complete change in the spectral profile in the visible range where hemoglobin has its maximum absorption peaks. The characteristic bands of oxy-hemoglobin at 540, 580 nm and deoxy-hemoglobin at 555 nm disappear in the case of samples fixed in formalin. In addition, an increased spectral intensity was observed for the wavelengths greater than 650 nm where scattering phenomena are presumed to dominate.

  7. Integration and relative value of biomarkers for prediction of MCI to AD progression: spatial patterns of brain atrophy, cognitive scores, APOE genotype and CSF biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Da, Xiao; Toledo, Jon B; Zee, Jarcy; Wolk, David A; Xie, Sharon X; Ou, Yangming; Shacklett, Amanda; Parmpi, Paraskevi; Shaw, Leslie; Trojanowski, John Q; Davatzikos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the individual, as well as relative and joint value of indices obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns of brain atrophy (quantified by the SPARE-AD index), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, APOE genotype, and cognitive performance (ADAS-Cog) in progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD) within a variable follow-up period up to 6 years, using data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1). SPARE-AD was first established as a highly sensitive and specific MRI-marker of AD vs. cognitively normal (CN) subjects (AUC = 0.98). Baseline predictive values of all aforementioned indices were then compared using survival analysis on 381 MCI subjects. SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog were found to have similar predictive value, and their combination was significantly better than their individual performance. APOE genotype did not significantly improve prediction, although the combination of SPARE-AD, ADAS-Cog and APOE ε4 provided the highest hazard ratio estimates of 17.8 (last vs. first quartile). In a subset of 192 MCI patients who also had CSF biomarkers, the addition of Aβ1-42, t-tau, and p-tau181p to the previous model did not improve predictive value significantly over SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog combined. Importantly, in amyloid-negative patients with MCI, SPARE-AD had high predictive power of clinical progression. Our findings suggest that SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog in combination offer the highest predictive power of conversion from MCI to AD, which is improved, albeit not significantly, by APOE genotype. The finding that SPARE-AD in amyloid-negative MCI patients was predictive of clinical progression is not expected under the amyloid hypothesis and merits further investigation.

  8. Experimental assessment of the safety and potential efficacy of high irradiance photostimulation of brain tissues

    PubMed Central

    Suhan, Senova; Ilona, Scisniak; Chih-Chieh, Chiang; Isabelle, Doignon; Stéphane, Palfi; Antoine, Chaillet; Claire, Martin; Frédéric, Pain

    2017-01-01

    Optogenetics is widely used in fundamental neuroscience. Its potential clinical translation for brain neuromodulation requires a careful assessment of the safety and efficacy of repeated, sustained optical stimulation of large volumes of brain tissues. This study was performed in rats and not in non-human primates for ethical reasons. We studied the spatial distribution of light, potential damage, and non-physiological effects in vivo, in anesthetized rat brains, on large brain volumes, following repeated high irradiance photo-stimulation. We generated 2D irradiance and temperature increase surface maps based on recordings taken during optical stimulation using irradiance and temporal parameters representative of common optogenetics experiments. Irradiances of 100 to 600 mW/mm2 with 5 ms pulses at 20, 40, and 60 Hz were applied during 90 s. In vivo electrophysiological recordings and post-mortem histological analyses showed that high power light stimulation had no obvious phototoxic effects and did not trigger non-physiological functional activation. This study demonstrates the ability to illuminate cortical layers to a depth of several millimeters using pulsed red light without detrimental thermal damages. PMID:28276522

  9. Prion Protein Deficiency Causes Diverse Proteome Shifts in Cell Models That Escape Detection in Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Williams, Declan; Wang, Hansen; Arnould, Hélène; Schneider, Benoit; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    A popular method for studying the function of a given protein is to generate and characterize a suitable model deficient for its expression. For the prion protein (PrP), best known for its role in several invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases, a natural choice, therefore, would be to undertake such studies with brain samples. We recently documented the surprising observation that PrP deficiency caused a loss or enhancement of NCAM1 polysialylation, dependent on the cell model used. To identify possible causes for this disparity, we set out to systematically investigate the consequence of PrP deficiency on the global proteome in brain tissue and in four distinct cell models. Here we report that PrP deficiency causes robust but surprisingly divergent changes to the global proteomes of cell models but has no discernible impact on the global brain proteome. Amongst >1,500 proteins whose levels were compared in wild-type and PrP-deficient models, members of the MARCKS protein family exhibited pronounced, yet cell model-dependent changes to their steady-state levels. Follow-up experiments revealed that PrP collaborates with members of the MARCKS protein family in its control of NCAM1 polysialylation. We conclude that the physiological function of PrP may be masked in analyses of complex brain samples but its cell-type specific influence on a lipid raft-based NCAM1-related cell biology comes to the fore in investigations of specific cell types. PMID:27327609

  10. Fiber-based tissue identification for electrode placement in deep brain stimulation neurosurgery (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePaoli, Damon T.; Lapointe, Nicolas; Goetz, Laurent; Parent, Martin; Prudhomme, Michel; Cantin, Léo.; Galstian, Tigran; Messaddeq, Younès.; Côté, Daniel C.

    2016-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation's effectiveness relies on the ability of the stimulating electrode to be properly placed within a specific target area of the brain. Optical guidance techniques that can increase the accuracy of the procedure, without causing any additional harm, are therefore of great interest. We have designed a cheap optical fiber-based device that is small enough to be placed within commercially available DBS stimulating electrodes' hollow cores and that is capable of sensing biological information from the surrounding tissue, using low power white light. With this probe we have shown the ability to distinguish white and grey matter as well as blood vessels, in vitro, in human brain samples and in vivo, in rats. We have also repeated the in vitro procedure with the probe inserted in a DBS stimulating electrode and found the results were in good agreement. We are currently validating a second fiber optic device, with micro-optical components, that will result in label free, molecular level sensing capabilities, using CARS spectroscopy. The final objective will be to use this data in real time, during deep brain stimulation neurosurgery, to increase the safety and accuracy of the procedure.

  11. Methods to optimize the generation of cDNA from postmortem human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christine L; Yolken, Robert H

    2003-02-01

    The analysis of gene transcript levels in postmortem human brain is a valuable tool for the study of neurological and psychiatric diseases. Optimization of the methods of RNA extraction and cDNA generation is particularly important in this application because postmortem human brain tissue is in limited supply and generally yields less RNA than many other human tissues. We compared column extraction and solvent extraction for total RNA, reverse transcription (RT) with random hexamers versus oligo-dT priming, and incubation of the RNA with or without DNase for effect on the cDNA product derived from the same homogenized pool of postmortem human frontal cortex. The total RNA obtained from the solvent method was found to be less stable at room temperature and to contain a higher proportion of non-messenger RNA than that obtained from the column method. Evaluating the RT-PCR results per wet weight of tissue extracted, we found that the signal strength was increased >20-fold by a protocol of Qiagen RNeasy column extraction, random hexamer RT priming and omitting DNase treatment of the RNA.

  12. Optimization of multiplexed bead-based cytokine immunoassays for rat serum and brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Hulse, R E; Kunkler, P E; Fedynyshyn, J P; Kraig, R P

    2004-06-15

    The ability to simultaneously quantify multiple signaling molecule protein levels from microscopic neural tissue samples would be of great benefit to deciphering how they affect brain function. This follows from evidence that indicates signaling molecules can be pleiotropic and can have complex interactive behavior that is regionally and cellularly heterogeneous. Multiplexed examination of tissue proteins has been exceedingly difficult because of the absence of available techniques. This void now has been removed by the commercial availability of bead-based immunoassays for targeted proteins that allow analyses of up to 100 (6-150 kDa) proteins from as little as 12 microl. Thus far used only for sera (human and mouse) and culture media, we demonstrate here that sensitive (as low as 2 pg/ml), wide-ranging (up to 2-32 000 pg/ml), accurate (8% intra-assay covariance) and reliable (4-7% inter-assay covariance) measurements can be made of nine exemplary cytokines (e.g., IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, GM-CSF, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha) simultaneously not only from rat serum but, for the first time, also brain tissue. Furthermore, we describe animal handling procedures that minimize stress as determined by serum glucocorticoid levels since they can influence cytokine expression.

  13. Effects of isomers of apomorphines on dopamine receptors in striatal and limbic tissue of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kula, N.S.; Baldessarini, R.J.; Bromley, S.; Neumeyer, J.L.

    1985-09-16

    The optical isomers of apomorphine (APO) and N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) were interacted with three biochemical indices of dopamine (Da) receptors in extrapyramidal and limbic preparations of rat brain tissues. There were consistent isomeric preferences for the R(-) configuration of both DA analogs in stimulation adenylate cyclase (D-1 sites) and in competing for high affinity binding of /sup 3/H-spiroperidol (D-2 sites) and of /sup 3/H-ADTN (DA agonist binding sites) in striatal tissue, with lesser isomeric differences in the limbic tissue. The S(+) apomorphines did not inhibit stimulation of adenylate cyclase by DA. The tendency for greater activity of higher apparent affinity of R(-) apomorphines in striatum may reflect the evidently greater abundance of receptor sites in that region. There were only small regional differences in interactions of the apomorphine isomers with all three receptor sites, except for a strong preference of (-)NPA for striatal D-2 sites. These results do not parallel our recent observations indicating potent and selective antidopaminergic actions of S(+) apomorphines in the rat limbic system. They suggest caution in assuming close parallels between current biochemical functional, especially behavioral, methods of evaluating dopamine receptors of mammalian brain.

  14. Brain tissue characterisation by infrared imaging in a rat glioma model.

    PubMed

    Amharref, Nadia; Beljebbar, Abdelilah; Dukic, Sylvain; Venteo, Lydie; Schneider, Laurence; Pluot, Michel; Vistelle, Richard; Manfait, Michel

    2006-07-01

    Pathological changes associated with the development of brain tumor were investigated by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FT-IRM) with high spatial resolution. Using multivariate statistical analysis and imaging, all normal brain structures were discriminated from tumor and surrounding tumor tissues. These structural changes were mainly related to qualitative and quantitative changes in lipids (tumors contain little fat) and were correlated to the degree of myelination, an important factor in several neurodegenerative disorders. Lipid concentration and composition may thus be used as spectroscopic markers to discriminate between healthy and tumor tissues. Additionally, we have identified one peculiar structure all around the tumor. This structure could be attributed to infiltrative events, such as peritumoral oedema observed during tumor development. Our results highlight the ability of FT-IRM to identify the molecular origin that gave rise to the specific changes between healthy and diseased states. Comparison between pseudo-FT-IRM maps and histological examinations (Luxol fast blue, Luxol fast blue-cresyl violet staining) showed the complementarities of both techniques for early detection of tissue abnormalities.

  15. Computational Simulation of the Mechanical Response of Brain Tissue under Blast Loading

    PubMed Central

    Laksari, Kaveh; Assari, Soroush; Seibold, Benjamin; Sadeghipour, Keya; Darvish, Kurosh

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, numerical simulations of nonlinear wave propagation and shock formation in brain tissue have been presented and a new mechanism of injury for Blast-Induced Neurotrauma (BINT) is proposed. A quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) constitutive material model was used that encompasses the nonlinearity as well as the rate dependence of the tissue relevant to BINT modeling. A one-dimensional model was implemented using the discontinuous Galerkin -finite element method and studied with displacement-input and pressure-input boundary conditions. The model was validated against LS-DYNA finite element code and theoretical results for speci c conditions that resulted in shock wave formation. It was shown that a continuous wave can become a shock wave as it propagates in the QLV brain tissue when the initial changes in acceleration are beyond a certain limit. The high spatial gradient of stress and strain at the shock front cause large relative motions at the cellular scale at high temporal rates even when the maximum stresses and strains are relatively low. This gradient-induced local deformation may occur away from the boundary and is proposed as a contributing factor to the diffuse nature of BINT. PMID:25205088

  16. Computational simulation of the mechanical response of brain tissue under blast loading.

    PubMed

    Laksari, Kaveh; Assari, Soroush; Seibold, Benjamin; Sadeghipour, Keya; Darvish, Kurosh

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, numerical simulations of nonlinear wave propagation and shock formation in brain tissue have been presented and a new mechanism of injury for blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) is proposed. A quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) constitutive material model was used that encompasses the nonlinearity as well as the rate dependence of the tissue relevant to BINT modeling. A one-dimensional model was implemented using the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method and studied with displacement- and pressure-input boundary conditions. The model was validated against LS-DYNA finite element code and theoretical results for specific conditions that resulted in shock wave formation. It was shown that a continuous wave can become a shock wave as it propagates in the QLV brain tissue when the initial changes in acceleration are beyond a certain limit. The high spatial gradient of stress and strain at the shock front cause large relative motions at the cellular scale at high temporal rates even when the maximum stresses and strains are relatively low. This gradient-induced local deformation may occur away from the boundary and is proposed as a contributing factor to the diffuse nature of BINT.

  17. Label-free monitoring of tissue biochemistry following traumatic brain injury using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Surmacki, Jakub Maciej; Ansel-Bollepalli, Laura; Pischiutta, Francesca; Zanier, Elisa R; Ercole, Ari; Bohndiek, Sarah Elizabeth

    2016-12-19

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) constitutes a major cause of death and long-term disability. At present, we lack methods to non-invasively track tissue biochemistry and hence select appropriate interventions for patients. We hypothesized that detailed label-free vibrational chemical analysis of focal TBI could provide such information. We assessed the early spatial and temporal changes in tissue biochemistry that are associated with brain injury in mice. Numerous differences were observed in the spectra of the contusion core and pericontusional tissue between 2 and 7 days. For example, a strong signal from haem was seen in the contusion core at 2 days due to haemorrhage, which subsequently resolved. More importantly, elevated cholesterol levels were demonstrated by 7 days, which may be a marker of important cell repair processes. Principal component analysis revealed an early 'acute' component dominated by haemorrhage and a delayed component reflecting changes in protein and lipid composition. Notably we demonstrated changes in Raman signature with time even in the contralateral hemisphere when compared to sham control mice. Raman spectroscopy therefore shows promise as a probe that is sensitive to important pathobiological processes in TBI and could be applied in future both in the experimental setting, as well as in the clinic.

  18. Fiber-optic probe design and optical property recovery algorithm for optical biopsy of brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Cappon, Derek J; Farrell, Thomas J; Fang, Qiyin; Hayward, Joseph E

    2013-10-01

    Optical biopsy techniques offer a minimally invasive, real-time alternative to traditional biopsy and pathology during tumor resection surgery. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is a commonly used technique in optical biopsy. Optical property recovery from spatially resolved DRS data allows quantification of the scattering and absorption properties of tissue. Monte Carlo simulation methods were used to evaluate a unique fiber-optic probe design for a DRS instrument to be used specifically for optical biopsy of the brain. The probe diameter was kept to a minimum to allow usage in small surgical cavities at least 1 cm in diameter. Simulations showed that the close proximity of fibers to the edge of the probe resulted in boundary effects due to reflection of photons from the surrounding air-tissue interface. A new algorithm for rapid optical property recovery was developed that accounts for this reflection and therefore overcomes these effects. The parameters of the algorithm were adjusted for use over the wide range of optical properties encountered in brain tissue, and its precision was evaluated by subjecting it to random noise. This algorithm can be adapted to work with any probe geometry to allow optical property recovery in small surgical cavities.

  19. Behcet brain tissue identified with increased levels of Si and Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranyosiova, Monika; Kopani, Martin; Rychly, Boris; Jakubovsky, Jan; Velic, Dusan

    2008-12-01

    Behcet disease is a multi-system disorder with still uncertain chemical causality. Chemical composition of molecules and elements in a human brain tissue of Behcet diseased patient is of interest. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry is used to provide complex composition in Behcet disease and control tissues. Determined organic compounds are represented by fragments of carbohydrates, phospholipids, amino acids, and peptides in both samples without any qualitative differences. Trace heavy elements as Fe, Zn, and Cu are identified in Behcet disease tissue with increased intensities by only an averaged factor of 2.2 in comparison to the control. The significant differences between the control and Behcet disease tissues are in the presence of Si and Al. These two elements have significantly higher intensities by an averaged factor of 10.0 in Behcet disease tissue. The origin of Al and Si occurrence and the chronology of their accumulation are not clear, moreover this observation supports a significance of chemical characterization in an early stage of disease.

  20. Clustering-initiated factor analysis application for tissue classification in dynamic brain positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Mitra, Debasis; Baker, Suzanne L; Jagust, William J; Gullberg, Grant T

    2015-07-01

    The goal is to quantify the fraction of tissues that exhibit specific tracer binding in dynamic brain positron emission tomography (PET). It is achieved using a new method of dynamic image processing: clustering-initiated factor analysis (CIFA). Standard processing of such data relies on region of interest analysis and approximate models of the tracer kinetics and of tissue properties, which can degrade accuracy and reproducibility of the analysis. Clustering-initiated factor analysis allows accurate determination of the time-activity curves and spatial distributions for tissues that exhibit significant radiotracer concentration at any stage of the emission scan, including the arterial input function. We used this approach in the analysis of PET images obtained using (11)C-Pittsburgh Compound B in which specific binding reflects the presence of β-amyloid. The fraction of the specific binding tissues determined using our approach correlated with that computed using the Logan graphical analysis. We believe that CIFA can be an accurate and convenient tool for measuring specific binding tissue concentration and for analyzing tracer kinetics from dynamic images for a variety of PET tracers. As an illustration, we show that four-factor CIFA allows extraction of two blood curves and the corresponding distributions of arterial and venous blood from PET images even with a coarse temporal resolution.

  1. A biphasic hyperelastic model for the analysis of fluid and mass transport in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    García, José Jaime; Smith, Joshua H

    2009-02-01

    A biphasic hyperelastic finite element model is proposed for the description of the mechanical behavior of brain tissue. The model takes into account finite deformations through an Ogden-type hyperelastic compressible function and a hydraulic conductivity dependent on deformation. The biphasic equations, implemented here for spherical symmetry using an updated Lagrangian algorithm, yielded radial coordinates and fluid velocities that were used with the convective-diffusive equation in order to predict mass transport in the brain. Results of the model were equal to those of a closed-form solution under infinitesimal deformations, however, for a wide range of material parameters, the model predicted important increments in the infusion sphere, reductions of the fluid velocities, and changes in the species content distribution. In addition, high localized deformation and stresses were obtained at the infusion sphere. Differences with the infinitesimal solution may be mainly attributed to geometrical nonlinearities related to the increment of the infusion sphere and not to material nonlinearities.

  2. Astrocyte cultures derived from human brain tissue express angiotensinogen mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Milsted, A.; Barna, B.P.; Ransohoff, R.M.; Brosnihan, K.B.; Ferrario, C.M. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors have identified human cultured cell lines that are useful for studying angiotensinogen gene expression and its regulation in the central nervous system. A model cell system of human central nervous system origin expressing angiotensinogen has not previously been available. Expression of angiotensinogen mRNA appears to be a basal property of noninduced human astrocytes, since astrocytic cell lines derived from human glioblastomas or nonneoplastic human brain tissue invariably produced angiotensinogen mRNA. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that angiotensinogen mRNA production was not limited to a subpopulation of astrocytes because >99% of cells in these cultures contained angiotensinogen mRNA. These cell lines will be useful in studies of the molecular mechanisms controlling angiotensin synthesis and the role of biologically active angiotensin in the human brain by allowing the authors to examine regulation of expression of the renin-angiotensin system in human astrocyte cultures.

  3. Puerarin protects brain tissue against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by inhibiting the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Wang, Liang; Liu, Panpan; Hu, Weiwei; Zhu, Xiangdong; Shen, Hong; Yao, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Puerarin, a traditional Chinese medicine, exerts a powerful neuroprotective effect in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, but its mechanism is unknown. Here, we established rat models of middle cerebral artery ischemia/reperfusion injury using the suture method. Puerarin (100 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 30 minutes before middle cerebral artery occlusion and 8 hours after reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, we found that puerarin significantly improved neurological deficit, reduced infarct size and brain water content, and notably diminished the expression of Toll-like receptor-4, myeloid differentiation factor 88, nuclear factor kappa B and tumor necrosis factor-α in the ischemic region. These data indicate that puerarin exerts an anti-inflammatory protective effect on brain tissue with ischemia/reperfusion damage by downregulating the expression of multiple inflammatory factors. PMID:25657724

  4. Growth trajectories of the human fetal brain tissues estimated from 3D reconstructed in utero MRI

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Julia A.; Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Hamzelou, Kia S.; Corbett-Detig, James M.; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    In the latter half of gestation (20 to 40 gestational weeks), human brain growth accelerates in conjunction with cortical folding and the deceleration of ventricular zone progenitor cell proliferation. These processes are reflected in changes in the volume of respective fetal tissue zones. Thus far, growth trajectories of the fetal tissue zones have been extracted primarily from 2D measurements on histological sections and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, the volumes of major fetal zones—cortical plate (CP), subplate and intermediate zone (SP+IZ), germinal matrix (GMAT), deep gray nuclei (DG), and ventricles (VENT)—are calculated from automatic segmentation of motion-corrected, 3D reconstructed MRI. We analyzed 48 T2-weighted MRI scans from 39 normally developing fetuses in utero between 20.57 and 31.14 gestational weeks (GW). The supratentorial volume (STV) increased linearly at a rate of 15.22% per week. The SP+IZ (14.75% per week) and DG (15.56% per week) volumes increased at similar rates. The CP increased at a greater relative rate (18.00% per week), while the VENT (9.18% per week) changed more slowly. Therefore, CP increased as a fraction of STV and the VENT fraction declined. The total GMAT volume slightly increased then decreased after 25 GW. We did not detect volumetric sexual dimorphisms or total hemispheric volume asymmetries, which may emerge later in gestation. Further application of the automated fetal brain segmentation to later gestational ages will bridge the gap between volumetric studies of premature brain development and normal brain development in utero. PMID:21530634

  5. Growth trajectories of the human fetal brain tissues estimated from 3D reconstructed in utero MRI.

    PubMed

    Scott, Julia A; Habas, Piotr A; Kim, Kio; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Hamzelou, Kia S; Corbett-Detig, James M; Barkovich, A James; Glenn, Orit A; Studholme, Colin

    2011-08-01

    In the latter half of gestation (20-40 gestational weeks), human brain growth accelerates in conjunction with cortical folding and the deceleration of ventricular zone progenitor cell proliferation. These processes are reflected in changes in the volume of respective fetal tissue zones. Thus far, growth trajectories of the fetal tissue zones have been extracted primarily from 2D measurements on histological sections and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, the volumes of major fetal zones-cortical plate (CP), subplate and intermediate zone (SP+IZ), germinal matrix (GMAT), deep gray nuclei (DG), and ventricles (VENT)--are calculated from automatic segmentation of motion-corrected, 3D reconstructed MRI. We analyzed 48 T2-weighted MRI scans from 39 normally developing fetuses in utero between 20.57 and 31.14 gestational weeks (GW). The supratentorial volume (STV) increased linearly at a rate of 15.22% per week. The SP+IZ (14.75% per week) and DG (15.56% per week) volumes increased at similar rates. The CP increased at a greater relative rate (18.00% per week), while the VENT (9.18% per week) changed more slowly. Therefore, CP increased as a fraction of STV and the VENT fraction declined. The total GMAT volume slightly increased then decreased after 25 GW. We did not detect volumetric sexual dimorphisms or total hemispheric volume asymmetries, which may emerge later in gestation. Further application of the automated fetal brain segmentation to later gestational ages will bridge the gap between volumetric studies of premature brain development and normal brain development in utero.

  6. [Influence of n-hexane on vascular endothelial active substances in brain tissue in mice].

    PubMed

    Lin, L; Zhang, Z Q; Zhang, C Z

    2017-01-20

    Objective: To investigate the influence of n-hexane on vascular endothelial active substances in brain tissue in mice and its significance. Methods: A total of 48 healthy Kunming mice were randomly divided into high-dose exposure group, middle-dose exposure group, low-dose exposure group, and control group, with 12 mice in each group. All groups except the control group were exposed to n-hexane via static inhalation (0.035 g/L, 0.018 g/L, and 0.009 g/L for the high-, middle-, and low-dose exposure groups, respectively) 4 hours a day for 21 days. the mice in the control groups were not exposed to n-hexane. After the exposure, the lev-els of endothelin-1 (ET-1) , nitric oxide (NO) , and angiotensin II (Ang II) in brain tissue were measured in all groups. Results: There were significant differences in the levels of ET-1, NO, and Ang II between the three ex-posure groups and the control group (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, the high-and middle-dose expo-sure group had significant increases in the levels of ET-1 and Ang II and the high-dose exposure group had a sig-nificant reduction in the level of NO (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Conclusion: n-Hexane can affect the vascular endothe-lial active substances in brain tissue in mice, and the changes and imbalance in vascular endothelial active sub-stances may be one of the reasons for central nervous system impairment caused by n-hexane.

  7. Automated tissue segmentation of MR brain images in the presence of white matter lesions.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Sergi; Oliver, Arnau; Roura, Eloy; González-Villà, Sandra; Pareto, Deborah; Vilanova, Joan C; Ramió-Torrentà, Lluís; Rovira, Àlex; Lladó, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Over the last few years, the increasing interest in brain tissue volume measurements on clinical settings has led to the development of a wide number of automated tissue segmentation methods. However, white matter lesions are known to reduce the performance of automated tissue segmentation methods, which requires manual annotation of the lesions and refilling them before segmentation, which is tedious and time-consuming. Here, we propose a new, fully automated T1-w/FLAIR tissue segmentation approach designed to deal with images in the presence of WM lesions. This approach integrates a robust partial volume tissue segmentation with WM outlier rejection and filling, combining intensity and probabilistic and morphological prior maps. We evaluate the performance of this method on the MRBrainS13 tissue segmentation challenge database, which contains images with vascular WM lesions, and also on a set of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patient images. On both databases, we validate the performance of our method with other state-of-the-art techniques. On the MRBrainS13 data, the presented approach was at the time of submission the best ranked unsupervised intensity model method of the challenge (7th position) and clearly outperformed the other unsupervised pipelines such as FAST and SPM12. On MS data, the differences in tissue segmentation between the images segmented with our method and the same images where manual expert annotations were used to refill lesions on T1-w images before segmentation were lower or similar to the best state-of-the-art pipeline incorporating automated lesion segmentation and filling. Our results show that the proposed pipeline achieved very competitive results on both vascular and MS lesions. A public version of this approach is available to download for the neuro-imaging community.

  8. Assessment of Breast, Brain and Skin Pathological Tissue Using Full Field OCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalimier, Eugénie; Assayag, Osnath; Harms, Fabrice; Boccara, A. Claude

    The aim of this chapter is to assess whether the images of the breast, brain, and skin tissue obtained by FFOCM contain sufficient detail to allow pathologists to make a diagnosis of cancer and other pathologies comparable to what was obtained by conventional histological techniques. More precisely, it is necessary to verify on FFOCM images if it is possible to differentiate a healthy area from a pathological area. The reader interested in other organs or in animal studies may find a large number of 2D or 3D images in the atlas [2].

  9. MALDI imaging and in situ identification of integral membrane proteins from rat brain tissue sections

    PubMed Central

    Nicklay, Joshua J.; Harris, Glenn A.; Schey, Kevin L.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins are greatly underrepresented in data generated by imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) because of analytical challenges related to their size and solubility. Here we present the first example of MALDI IMS of two highly modified multi-transmembrane domain proteins, myelin proteolipid protein (PLP, 30 kDa) and DM-20 (26 kDa), from various regions of rat brain, namely the cerebrum, cerebellum, and medulla. We utilize a novel tissue pre-treatment aimed at transmembrane protein enrichment to show the in situ distribution of fatty acylation of these proteins, particularly of post-translational palmitoylation. Additionally, we demonstrate the utility of protease-encapsulated hydrogels for spatially localized on-tissue protein digestion and peptide extraction for subsequent direct coupling to LC-MS/MS for protein identification. PMID:23829295

  10. Intravital fluorescence imaging of mouse brain using implantable semiconductor devices and epi-illumination of biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Haruta, Makito; Nagasaki, Mizuki; Takehara, Hironari; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2015-05-01

    The application of the fluorescence imaging method to living animals, together with the use of genetically engineered animals and synthesized photo-responsive compounds, is a powerful method for investigating brain functions. Here, we report a fluorescence imaging method for the brain surface and deep brain tissue that uses compact and mass-producible semiconductor imaging devices based on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. An image sensor chip was designed to be inserted into brain tissue, and its size was 1500 × 450 μm. Sample illumination is also a key issue for intravital fluorescence imaging. Hence, for the uniform illumination of the imaging area, we propose a new method involving the epi-illumination of living biological tissues, and we performed investigations using optical simulations and experimental evaluation.

  11. Intravital fluorescence imaging of mouse brain using implantable semiconductor devices and epi-illumination of biological tissue

    PubMed Central

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Haruta, Makito; Nagasaki, Mizuki; Takehara, Hironari; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The application of the fluorescence imaging method to living animals, together with the use of genetically engineered animals and synthesized photo-responsive compounds, is a powerful method for investigating brain functions. Here, we report a fluorescence imaging method for the brain surface and deep brain tissue that uses compact and mass-producible semiconductor imaging devices based on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. An image sensor chip was designed to be inserted into brain tissue, and its size was 1500 × 450 μm. Sample illumination is also a key issue for intravital fluorescence imaging. Hence, for the uniform illumination of the imaging area, we propose a new method involving the epi-illumination of living biological tissues, and we performed investigations using optical simulations and experimental evaluation. PMID:26137364

  12. Quantifying brain tissue volume in multiple sclerosis with automated lesion segmentation and filling

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, Sergi; Oliver, Arnau; Roura, Eloy; Pareto, Deborah; Vilanova, Joan C.; Ramió-Torrentà, Lluís; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Montalban, Xavier; Rovira, Àlex; Lladó, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Lesion filling has been successfully applied to reduce the effect of hypo-intense T1-w Multiple Sclerosis (MS) lesions on automatic brain tissue segmentation. However, a study of fully automated pipelines incorporating lesion segmentation and lesion filling on tissue volume analysis has not yet been performed. Here, we analyzed the % of error introduced by automating the lesion segmentation and filling processes in the tissue segmentation of 70 clinically isolated syndrome patient images. First of all, images were processed using the LST and SLS toolkits with different pipeline combinations that differed in either automated or manual lesion segmentation, and lesion filling or masking out lesions. Then, images processed following each of the pipelines were segmented into gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) using SPM8, and compared with the same images where expert lesion annotations were filled before segmentation. Our results showed that fully automated lesion segmentation and filling pipelines reduced significantly the % of error in GM and WM volume on images of MS patients, and performed similarly to the images where expert lesion annotations were masked before segmentation. In all the pipelines, the amount of misclassified lesion voxels was the main cause in the observed error in GM and WM volume. However, the % of error was significantly lower when automatically estimated lesions were filled and not masked before segmentation. These results are relevant and suggest that LST and SLS toolboxes allow the performance of accurate brain tissue volume measurements without any kind of manual intervention, which can be convenient not only in terms of time and economic costs, but also to avoid the inherent intra/inter variability between manual annotations. PMID:26740917

  13. Brain herniation

    MedlinePlus

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  14. Radiological and histopathological examination of early tissue reactions to absorbable hemostatic agents in the rabbit brain.

    PubMed

    Kaymaz, Memduh; Tokgoz, Nil; Kardes, Ozgür; Ozköse, Zerrin; Ozogul, Candan; Orbay, Toygun

    2005-05-01

    Topical hemostatic agents are widely and safely used in neurosurgery. The purpose of this study was to compare and analyse the early tissue reactions to two hemostatic agents, oxidized regenerated cellulose and gelatin sponge, in rabbit brain by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathologic sections. Bilateral identical parenchymal lesions were made in the frontal regions of each hemisphere in 13 rabbits. Hemostasis was achieved using oxidized regenerated cellulose or gelatin sponge, one agent being used on each side. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging was performed 24 h postoperatively and there was no statistical difference in edema formation at the site of the lesions. Histopathologic examinations indicated that pericapillary edema and endothelial distortion were common in both groups but that there was additional tissue degeneration evident in the regions where gelatin sponge had been used. Oxidized regenerated cellulose seemed to cause greater tissue distortion in magnetic resonance images than gelatin sponge but in contrast, histological examination of lesions in which oxidized regenerated cellulose had been used revealed less tissue degeneration than histopathologic examinations of lesions in which gelatin sponge had been used.

  15. Dynamic, mating-induced gene expression changes in female head and brain tissues of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Drosophila melanogaster females show changes in behavior and physiology after mating that are thought to maximize the number of progeny resulting from the most recent copulation. Sperm and seminal fluid proteins induce post-mating changes in females, however, very little is known about the resulting gene expression changes in female head and central nervous system tissues that contribute to the post-mating response. Results We determined the temporal gene expression changes in female head tissues 0-2, 24, 48 and 72 hours after mating. Females from each time point had a unique post-mating gene expression response, with 72 hours post-mating having the largest number of genes with significant changes in expression. At most time points, genes expressed in the head fat body that encode products involved in metabolism showed a marked change in expression. Additional analysis of gene expression changes in dissected brain tissues 24 hours post-mating revealed changes in transcript abundance of many genes, notably, the reduced transcript abundance of genes that encode ion channels. Conclusions Substantial changes occur in the regulation of many genes in female head tissues after mating, which might underlie aspects of the female post-mating response. These results provide new insights into the physiological and metabolic changes that accompany changes in female behaviors. PMID:20925960

  16. Sodium tungstate attenuate oxidative stress in brain tissue of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nakhaee, Alireza; Bokaeian, Mohammad; Akbarzadeh, Azim; Hashemi, Mohammad

    2010-08-01

    High blood glucose concentration in diabetes induces free radical production and, thus, causes oxidative stress. Damage of cellular structures by free radicals play an important role in development of diabetic complications. In this study, we evaluated effects of sodium tungstate on enzymatic and nonenzymatic markers of oxidative stress in brain of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Rats were divided into four groups (ten rats in each group): untreated control, sodium tungstate-treated control, untreated diabetic, and sodium tungstate-treated diabetic. Diabetes was induced with an intraperitoneal STZ injection (65 mg/kg body weight), and sodium tungstate with concentration of 2 g/L was added to drinking water of treated animals for 4 weeks. Diabetes caused a significant increase in the brain thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (P < 0.01) and protein carbonyl levels (P < 0.01) and a decrease in ferric reducing antioxidant power (P < 0.01). Moreover, diabetic rats presented a reduction in brain glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (21%), superoxide dismutase (41%), glutathione peroxidase (19%), and glutathione reductase (36%) activities. Sodium tungstate reduced the hyperglycemia and restored the diabetes-induced changes in all mentioned markers of oxidative stress. However, catalase activity was not significantly affected by diabetes (P = 0.4), while sodium tungstate caused a significant increase in enzyme activity of treated animals (P < 0.05). Data of present study indicated that sodium tungstate can ameliorate brain oxidative stress in STZ-induced diabetic rats, probably by reducing of the high glucose-induced oxidative stress and/or increasing of the antioxidant defense mechanisms.

  17. Terahertz spectroscopy and detection of brain tumor in rat fresh-tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Fukushi, Y.; Kubota, O.; Itsuji, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Ouchi, T.

    2015-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and imaging of biomedical samples is expected to be an important application of THz analysis techniques. Identification and localization of tumor tissue, imaging of biological samples, and analysis of DNA by THz spectroscopy have been reported. THz time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) is useful for obtaining the refractive index over a broad frequency range. However, THz-TDS spectra of fresh tissue samples are sensitive to procedures such as sample preparation, and a standardized measurement protocol is required. Therefore, in this work, we establish a protocol for measurements of THz spectra of fresh tissue and demonstrate reliable detection of rat brain tumor tissue. We use a reflection THz-TDS system to measure the refractive index spectra of the samples mounted on a quartz plate. The tissue samples were measured immediately after sectioning to avoid sample denaturalization during storage. Special care was taken in THz data processing to eliminate parasitic reflections and reduce noise. The error level in our refractive index measurements was as low as 0.02 in the frequency range 0.8-1.5 THz. With increasing frequency, the refractive index in the tumor and normal regions monotonically decreased, similarly to water, and it was 0.02 higher in the tumor regions. The spectral data suggest that the tumor regions have higher water content. Hematoxylin-eosin stained images showed that increased cell density was also responsible for the observed spectral features. A set of samples from 10 rats showed consistent results. Our results suggest that reliable tumor detection in fresh tissue without pretreatment is possible with THz spectroscopy measurements. THz spectroscopy has the potential to become a real-time in vivo diagnostic method.

  18. Monoamines tissue content analysis reveals restricted and site-specific correlations in brain regions involved in cognition.

    PubMed

    Fitoussi, A; Dellu-Hagedorn, F; De Deurwaerdère, P

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine (DA), noradrenalin (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) monoaminergic systems are deeply involved in cognitive processes via their influence on cortical and subcortical regions. The widespread distribution of these monoaminergic networks is one of the main difficulties in analyzing their functions and interactions. To address this complexity, we assessed whether inter-individual differences in monoamine tissue contents of various brain areas could provide information about their functional relationships. We used a sensitive biochemical approach to map endogenous monoamine tissue content in 20 rat brain areas involved in cognition, including 10 cortical areas and examined correlations within and between the monoaminergic systems. Whereas DA content and its respective metabolite largely varied across brain regions, the NA and 5-HT contents were relatively homogenous. As expected, the tissue content varied among individuals. Our analyses revealed a few specific relationships (10%) between the tissue content of each monoamine in paired brain regions and even between monoamines in paired brain regions. The tissue contents of NA, 5-HT and DA were inter-correlated with a high incidence when looking at a specific brain region. Most correlations found between cortical areas were positive while some cortico-subcortical relationships regarding the DA, NA and 5-HT tissue contents were negative, in particular for DA content. In conclusion, this work provides a useful database of the monoamine tissue content in numerous brain regions. It suggests that the regulation of these neuromodulatory systems is achieved mainly at the terminals, and that each of these systems contributes to the regulation of the other two.

  19. COB231 targets amyloid plaques in post-mortem human brain tissue and in an Alzheimer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Garin, Dominique; Virgone-Carlotta, Angélique; Gözel, Bülent; Oukhatar, Fatima; Perret, Pascale; Marti-Battle, Danièle; Touret, Monique; Millet, Philippe; Dubois-Dauphin, Michel; Meyronet, David; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Laferla, Frank M; Demeunynck, Martine; Chierici, Sabine; Sallanon Moulin, Marcelle; Ghezzi, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Previous works have shown the interest of naturally fluorescent proflavine derivatives to label Abeta deposits in vitro. This study aimed to further characterize the properties of the proflavine 3-acetylamino-6-[3-(propargylamino)propanoyl]aminoacridine (COB231) derivative as a probe. This compound was therefore evaluated on human post-mortem and mice brain slices and in vivo in 18-month-old triple transgenic mice APPswe, PS1M146V and tauP301L (3xTgAD) mice presenting the main characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD). COB231 labelled amyloid plaques on brain slices of AD patients, and 3xTgAD mice at 10 and 0.1 μM respectively. However, no labelling of the neurofibrillary tangle-rich areas was observed either at high concentration or in the brain of fronto-temporal dementia patients. The specificity of this mapping was attested in mice using Thioflavin S and IMPY as positive controls of amyloid deposits. After intravenous injection of COB231 in old 3xTgAD mice, fluorescent amyloid plaques were detected in the cortex and hippocampus, demonstrating COB231 blood–brain barrier permeability. We also controlled the cellular localization of COB231 on primary neuronal cultures and showed that COB231 accumulates into the cytoplasm and not into the nucleus. Finally, using a viability assay, we only detected a slight cytotoxic effect of COB231 (< 10%) for the highest concentration (100 μM).

  20. Rosuvastatin reduces microglia in the brain of wild type and ApoE knockout mice on a high cholesterol diet; implications for prevention of stroke and AD.

    PubMed

    Famer, D; Wahlund, L-O; Crisby, M

    2010-11-12

    We have previously shown that a high cholesterol (HC) diet results in increases in microglia load and levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the brains of wild type (WT) and apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. In the present investigation, we analyzed whether treatment with rosuvastatin, an inhibitor of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, would prevent the increases in inflammatory microglia and IL-6 levels in the brain and plasma of WT and ApoE-/- mice. We report that a HC diet resulted in an increased microglia load in the brains of WT and ApoE-/- mice, in support of our previous study. Treatment with rosuvastatin significantly decreased the microglia load in the brains of WT and ApoE-/- mice on a HC diet. Rosuvastatin treatment resulted in lowered plasma IL-6 levels in WT mice on a HC diet. However, in the present study the number of IL-6 positive cells in the brain was not significantly affected by a HC diet. A recent clinical study has shown that rosuvastatin reduces risk of ischemic stroke in patients with high plasma levels of the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein by 50%. The results from our study show that rosuvastatin reduces inflammatory cells in the brain. This finding is essential for furthering the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and stroke.

  1. Reflection imaging of China ink-perfused brain vasculature using confocal laser-scanning microscopy after clarification of brain tissue by the Spalteholz method.

    PubMed

    Gutierre, R C; Vannucci Campos, D; Mortara, R A; Coppi, A A; Arida, R M

    2017-01-05

    Confocal laser-scanning microscopy is a useful tool for visualizing neurons and glia in transparent preparations of brain tissue from laboratory animals. Currently, imaging capillaries and venules in transparent brain tissues requires the use of fluorescent proteins. Here, we show that vessels can be imaged by confocal laser-scanning microscopy in transparent cortical, hippocampal and cerebellar preparations after clarification of China ink-injected specimens by the Spalteholz method. This method may be suitable for global, three-dimensional, quantitative analyses of vessels, including stereological estimations of total volume and length and of surface area of vessels, which constitute indirect approaches to investigate angiogenesis.

  2. Exenatide promotes cognitive enhancement and positive brain metabolic changes in PS1-KI mice but has no effects in 3xTg-AD animals

    PubMed Central

    Bomba, M; Ciavardelli, D; Silvestri, E; Canzoniero, L MT; Lattanzio, R; Chiappini, P; Piantelli, M; Di Ilio, C; Consoli, A; Sensi, S L

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor for cognitive dysfunction or dementia. Insulin resistance is often associated with T2DM and can induce defective insulin signaling in the central nervous system as well as increase the risk of cognitive impairment in the elderly. Glucagone like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone and, like GLP-1 analogs, stimulates insulin secretion and has been employed in the treatment of T2DM. GLP-1 and GLP-1 analogs also enhance synaptic plasticity and counteract cognitive deficits in mouse models of neuronal dysfunction and/or degeneration. In this study, we investigated the potential neuroprotective effects of long-term treatment with exenatide, a GLP-1 analog, in two animal models of neuronal dysfunction: the PS1-KI and 3xTg-AD mice. We found that exenatide promoted beneficial effects on short- and long-term memory performances in PS1-KI but not in 3xTg-AD animals. In PS1-KI mice, the drug increased brain lactate dehydrogenase activity leading to a net increase in lactate levels, while no effects were observed on mitochondrial respiration. On the contrary, exenatide had no effects on brain metabolism of 3xTg-AD mice. In summary, our data indicate that exenatide improves cognition in PS1-KI mice, an effect likely driven by increasing the brain anaerobic glycolysis rate. PMID:23640454

  3. Current Steering to Control the Volume of Tissue Activated During Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Butson, Christopher R.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Over the last two decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a recognized and effective clinical therapy for numerous neurological conditions. Since its inception, clinical DBS technology has progressed at a relatively slow rate; however, advances in neural engineering research have the potential to improve DBS systems. One such advance is the concept of current steering, or the use of multiple stimulation sources to direct current flow through targeted regions of brain tissue. Objective The goals of this study were to develop a theoretical understanding of the effects of current steering in the context of DBS, and use that information to evaluate the potential utility of current steering during stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. Methods We used finite element electric field models, coupled to multi-compartment cable axon models, to predict the volume of tissue activated (VTA) by DBS as a function of the stimulation parameter settings. Results Balancing current flow through adjacent cathodes increased the VTA magnitude, relative to monopolar stimulation, and current steering enabled us to sculpt the shape of the VTA to fit a given anatomical target. Conclusions These results provide motivation for the integration of current steering technology into clinical DBS systems, thereby expanding opportunities to customize DBS to individual patients, and potentially enhancing therapeutic efficacy. PMID:19142235

  4. Hydrogel-delivered brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes tissue repair and recovery after stroke.

    PubMed

    Cook, Douglas J; Nguyen, Cynthia; Chun, Hyun N; L Llorente, Irene; Chiu, Abraham S; Machnicki, Michal; Zarembinski, Thomas I; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability. Systemic delivery of candidate neural repair therapies is limited by the blood-brain barrier and off-target effects. We tested a bioengineering approach for local depot release of BDNF from the infarct cavity for neural repair in chronic periods after stroke. The brain release levels of a hyaluronic acid hydrogel + BDNF were tested in several stroke models in mouse (strains C57Bl/6, DBA) and non-human primate ( Macaca fascicularis) and tracked with MRI. The behavioral recovery effects of hydrogel + BDNF and the effects on tissue repair outcomes were determined. Hydrogel-delivered BDNF diffuses from the stroke cavity into peri-infarct tissue over 3 weeks in two mouse stroke models, compared with 1 week for direct BDNF injection. Hydrogel delivery of BDNF promotes recovery of motor function. Mapping of motor system connections indicates that hydrogel-BDNF induces axonal sprouting within existing cortical and cortico-striatal systems. Pharmacogenetic studies show that hydrogel-BDNF induces the initial migration of immature neurons into the peri-infarct cortex and their long-term survival. In chronic stroke in the non-human primate, hydrogel-released BDNF can be detected up to 2 cm from the infarct, a distance relevant to human functional recovery in stroke. The hydrogel can be tracked by MRI in mouse and primate.

  5. A novel approach to quantify different iron forms in ex-vivo human brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pravin; Bulk, Marjolein; Webb, Andrew; van der Weerd, Louise; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H.; Huber, Martina; Bossoni, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel combination of methods to study the physical properties of ferric ions and iron-oxide nanoparticles in post-mortem human brain, based on the combination of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and SQUID magnetometry. By means of EPR, we derive the concentration of the low molecular weight iron pool, as well as the product of its electron spin relaxation times. Additionally, by SQUID magnetometry we identify iron mineralization products ascribable to a magnetite/maghemite phase and a ferrihydrite (ferritin) phase. We further derive the concentration of magnetite/maghemite and of ferritin nanoparticles. To test out the new combined methodology, we studied brain tissue of an Alzheimer’s patient and a healthy control. Finally, we estimate that the size of the magnetite/maghemite nanoparticles, whose magnetic moments are blocked at room temperature, exceeds 40–50 nm, which is not compatible with the ferritin protein, the core of which is typically 6–8 nm. We believe that this methodology could be beneficial in the study of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s Disease which are characterized by abnormal iron accumulation in the brain. PMID:27941952

  6. Connecting brains to robots: an artificial body for studying the computational properties of neural tissues.

    PubMed

    Reger, B D; Fleming, K M; Sanguineti, V; Alford, S; Mussa-Ivaldi, F A

    2000-01-01

    We have created a hybrid neuro-robotic system that establishes two-way communication between the brain of a lamprey and a small mobile robot. The purpose of this system is to offer a new paradigm for investigating the behavioral, computational, and neurobiological mechanisms of sensory-motor learning in a unified context. The mobile robot acts as an artificial body that delivers sensory information to the neural tissue and receives command signals from it. The sensory information encodes the intensity of light generated by a fixed source. The closed-loop interaction between brain and robot generates autonomous behaviors whose features are strictly related to the structure and operation of the neural preparation. We provide a detailed description of the hybrid system, and we present experimental findings on its performance. In particular, we found (a) that the hybrid system generates stable behaviors, (b) that different preparations display different but systematic responses to the presentation of an optical stimulus, and (c) that alteration of the sensory input leads to short- and long-term adaptive changes in the robot responses. The comparison of the behaviors generated by the lamprey's brain stem with the behaviors generated by network models of the same neural system provides us with a new tool for investigating the computational properties of synaptic plasticity.

  7. A novel approach to quantify different iron forms in ex-vivo human brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pravin; Bulk, Marjolein; Webb, Andrew; van der Weerd, Louise; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H.; Huber, Martina; Bossoni, Lucia

    2016-12-01

    We propose a novel combination of methods to study the physical properties of ferric ions and iron-oxide nanoparticles in post-mortem human brain, based on the combination of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and SQUID magnetometry. By means of EPR, we derive the concentration of the low molecular weight iron pool, as well as the product of its electron spin relaxation times. Additionally, by SQUID magnetometry we identify iron mineralization products ascribable to a magnetite/maghemite phase and a ferrihydrite (ferritin) phase. We further derive the concentration of magnetite/maghemite and of ferritin nanoparticles. To test out the new combined methodology, we studied brain tissue of an Alzheimer’s patient and a healthy control. Finally, we estimate that the size of the magnetite/maghemite nanoparticles, whose magnetic moments are blocked at room temperature, exceeds 40–50 nm, which is not compatible with the ferritin protein, the core of which is typically 6–8 nm. We believe that this methodology could be beneficial in the study of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s Disease which are characterized by abnormal iron accumulation in the brain.

  8. Spectroscopic magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: voxel localisation and tissue segmentation in the follow up of brain tumour.

    PubMed

    Poloni, Guy; Bastianello, S; Vultaggio, Angela; Pozzi, S; Maccabelli, Gloria; Germani, Giancarlo; Chiarati, Patrizia; Pichiecchio, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The field of application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in biomedical research is expanding all the time and providing opportunities to investigate tissue metabolism and function. The data derived can be integrated with the information on tissue structure gained from conventional and non-conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Clinical MRS is also strongly expected to play an important role as a diagnostic tool. Essential for the future success of MRS as a clinical and research tool in biomedical sciences, both in vivo and in vitro, is the development of an accurate, biochemically relevant and physically consistent and reliable data analysis standard. Stable and well established analysis algorithms, in both the time and the frequency domain, are already available, as is free commercial software for implementing them. In this study, we propose an automatic algorithm that takes into account anatomical localisation, relative concentrations of white matter, grey matter, cerebrospinal fluid and signal abnormalities and inter-scan patient movement. The endpoint is the collection of a series of covariates that could be implemented in a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) of the MRS data, as a tool for dealing with differences that may be ascribed to the anatomical variability of the subjects, to inaccuracies in the localisation of the voxel or slab, or to movement, rather than to the pathology under investigation. The aim was to develop an analysis procedure that can be consistently and reliably applied in the follow up of brain tumour. In this study, we demonstrate that the inclusion of such variables in the data analysis of quantitative MRS is fundamentally important (especially in view of the reduced accuracy typical of MRS measures compared to other MRI techniques), reducing the occurrence of false positives.

  9. Transcription levels of sirtuin family in neural stem cells and brain tissues of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, H F; Li, Q; Feng, R L; Wen, T Q

    2012-09-10

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) has been used as a well-known model to investigate apoptosis, differentiation, maintenance of stem cells status, and therapy of neurological disease. The C17.2 NSCs line was produced after v-myc transformation of neural progenitor from mouse cerebellar cortex. Sirtuin family plays important roles involved in neuronal differentiation, genomic stability, lifespan, cell survival. However, little is known about gene expression variation of sirtuin family in C17.2 NSCs, primary NSCs, and different brain tissues in adult mice. Here, we confirmed that the mRNA expression levels of sirt2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 in E14.5 NSCs were significantly higher than in C17.2 NSCs, whereas that sirt 6 displayed an opposing mode. Moreover, a higher mRNA level of sirtuin family was observed in the adult mouse brain compared to C17.2 NSCs. In addition, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors nicotinamide and Trichostatin A (TSA) were used to explore differential changes at the transcriptional level of sirtuins. Results indicated that the expression of sirt1, sirt5 and sirt6 was significant downregulated by nicotinamide treatment. Whereas, a significant downregulation in sirt1 and sirt3 and a significant upregulation in sirt2, sirt4, sirt6, and sirt7 were observed in the treatment of TSA. Thus our studies indicate different sirtuin mRNA expression profiles between C17.2 NSCs, E14.5 NSCs and brain tissues, suggesting the transcriptional regulation of sirtuin family could be mediated by different histone acetylation.

  10. Variation of macrophage tropism among HIV-1 R5 envelopes in brain and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Peters, Paul J; Dueñas-Decamp, Maria J; Sullivan, W Matthew; Clapham, Paul R

    2007-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals frequently suffer from progressive encephelopathy, which is characterized by sensory neuropathy, sensory myelopathy, and dementia. Our group and others have reported the presence of highly macrophage-tropic R5 variants of HIV-1 in brain tissue of patients with neurological complications. These variants are able to exploit low amounts of CD4 and/or CCR5 for infection and potentially confer an expanded tropism for any cell types that express low CD4 and/or CCR5. In contrast to the brain-derived envelopes, we found that envelopes from lymph node tissue, blood, or semen were predominantly non-macrophage-tropic and required high amounts of CD4 for infection. Nevertheless, where tested, the non-macrophage-tropic envelopes conferred efficient replication in primary CD4(+) T-cell cultures. Determinants of R5 macrophage tropism appear to involve changes in the CD4 binding site, although further unknown determinants are also involved. The variation of R5 envelopes also affects their sensitivity to inhibition by ligands and entry inhibitors that target CD4 and CCR5. In summary, HIV-1 R5 viruses vary extensively in macrophage tropism. In the brain, highly macrophage-tropic variants may represent neurotropic or neurovirulent viruses. In addition, variation in R5 macrophage tropism may also have implications (1) for transmission, depending on what role macrophages or cells that express low CD4 and/or CCR5 play in the establishment of infection in a new host, and (2) for pathogenesis and depletion of CD4(+) T cells (i.e., do highly macrophage-tropic variants confer a broader tropism among CD4(+) T-cell populations late in disease and contribute to their depletion?).

  11. A Whole Methylome CpG-SNP Association Study of Psychosis in Blood and Brain Tissue.

    PubMed

    van den Oord, Edwin J C G; Clark, Shaunna L; Xie, Lin Ying; Shabalin, Andrey A; Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Kumar, Gaurav; Vladimirov, Vladimir I; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Aberg, Karolina A

    2016-07-01

    Mutated CpG sites (CpG-SNPs) are potential hotspots for human diseases because in addition to the sequence variation they may show individual differences in DNA methylation. We performed methylome-wide association studies (MWAS) to test whether methylation differences at those sites were associated with schizophrenia. We assayed all common CpG-SNPs with methyl-CpG binding domain protein-enriched genome sequencing (MBD-seq) using DNA extracted from 1408 blood samples and 66 postmortem brain samples (BA10) of schizophrenia cases and controls. Seven CpG-SNPs passed our FDR threshold of 0.1 in the blood MWAS. Of the CpG-SNPs methylated in brain, 94% were also methylated in blood. This significantly exceeded the 46.2% overlap expected by chance (P-value < 1.0×10(-8)) and justified replicating findings from blood in brain tissue. CpG-SNP rs3796293 in IL1RAP replicated (P-value = .003) with the same direction of effects. This site was further validated through targeted bisulfite pyrosequencing in 736 independent case-control blood samples (P-value < 9.5×10(-4)). Our top result in the brain MWAS (P-value = 8.8×10(-7)) was CpG-SNP rs16872141 located in the potential promoter of ENC1. Overall, our results suggested that CpG-SNP methylation may reflect effects of environmental insults and can provide biomarkers in blood that could potentially improve disease management.

  12. Antioxidant Effect of Sericin in Brain and Peripheral Tissues of Oxidative Stress Induced Hypercholesterolemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Deori, Meetali; Devi, Dipali; Kumari, Sima; Hazarika, Ankita; Kalita, Himadri; Sarma, Rahul; Devi, Rajlakshmi

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the antioxidant effect of crude sericin extract (CSE) from Antheraea assamensis in high cholesterol fed rats. Investigation was conducted by administering graded oral dose of 0.25 and 0.5 gm/kg body weight (b.w.)/day of CSE for a period of 28 days. Experiments were conducted in 30 rats and were divided into five groups: normal control, high cholesterol fed (HCF), HCF + 0.065 gm/kg b.w./day fenofibrate (FF), HCF + sericin 0.25 gm/kg b.w./day (LSD), and HCF + sericin 0.5 gm/kg b.w./day (HSD). In brain, heart, liver, serum, and kidney homogenates nitric oxide (NO), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyl content (PCC), superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione (GSH) was measured. LSD treatment prevented the alterations in GSH and PCC levels in hypercholesterolemic (HyC) brain tissue homogenates of rats. CSE lowers the serum total cholesterol level in HyC rats by promoting fecal cholesterol (FC) excretion. CSE increases FC level by promoting inhibition of cholesterol absorption in intestine. The endogenous antioxidant reduced significantly and the oxidative stress marker TBARS level increases significantly in the peripheral tissue of HCF rats. However, the administration of LSD and HSD exhibited a good antioxidant activity by reducing the TBARS level and increasing the endogenous antioxidant in peripheral tissue. In addition, a histological examination revealed loss of normal liver and kidney architecture in cholesterol fed rats which were retained in sericin treated groups. The findings of this study suggested that CSE improves hypercholesterolemia in rats fed a HyC diet. Clinical relevance of this effect of CSE seems worthy of further studies. PMID:27695419

  13. Brain Tissue Responses to Neural Implants Impact Signal Sensitivity and Intervention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Implantable biosensors are valuable scientific tools for basic neuroscience research and clinical applications. Neurotechnologies provide direct readouts of neurological signal and neurochemical processes. These tools are generally most valuable when performance capacities extend over months and years to facilitate the study of memory, plasticity, and behavior or to monitor patients’ conditions. These needs have generated a variety of device designs from microelectrodes for fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) and electrophysiology to microdialysis probes for sampling and detecting various neurochemicals. Regardless of the technology used, the breaching of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) to insert devices triggers a cascade of biochemical pathways resulting in complex molecular and cellular responses to implanted devices. Molecular and cellular changes in the microenvironment surrounding an implant include the introduction of mechanical strain, activation of glial cells, loss of perfusion, secondary metabolic injury, and neuronal degeneration. Changes to the tissue microenvironment surrounding the device can dramatically impact electrochemical and electrophysiological signal sensitivity and stability over time. This review summarizes the magnitude, variability, and time course of the dynamic molecular and cellular level neural tissue responses induced by state-of-the-art implantable devices. Studies show that insertion injuries and foreign body response can impact signal quality across all implanted central nervous system (CNS) sensors to varying degrees over both acute (seconds to minutes) and chronic periods (weeks to months). Understanding the underlying biological processes behind the brain tissue response to the devices at the cellular and molecular level leads to a variety of intervention strategies for improving signal sensitivity and longevity. PMID:25546652

  14. Identification of the boundary between normal brain tissue and ischemia region using two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Huiping; Wang, Shu; Wang, Xingfu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the common neurological diseases, and it is becoming the leading causes of death and permanent disability around the world. Early and accurate identification of the potentially salvageable boundary region of ischemia brain tissues may enable selection of the most appropriate candidates for early stroke therapies. In this work, TPEF microscopy was used to image the microstructures of normal brain tissues, ischemia regions and the boundary region between normal and ischemia brain tissues. The ischemia brain tissues from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were subjected to 6 hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Our study demonstrates that TPEF microscopy has the ability to not only reveal the morphological changes of the neurons but also identify the boundary between normal brain tissue and ischemia region, which correspond well to the hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained images. With the development of miniaturized TPEF microscope imaging devices, TPEF microscopy can be developed into an effectively diagnostic and monitoring tool for cerebral ischemia.

  15. Conjugated linoleic acid-enriched butter improved memory and up-regulated phospholipase A2 encoding-genes in rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Gama, Marco A S; Raposo, Nádia R B; Mury, Fábio B; Lopes, Fernando C F; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Talib, Leda L; Gattaz, Wagner F

    2015-10-01

    Reduced phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity has been reported in blood cells and in postmortem brains of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), and there is evidence that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) modulates the activity of PLA2 groups in non-brain tissues. As CLA isomers were shown to be actively incorporated and metabolized in the brains of rats, we hypothesized that feeding a diet naturally enriched in CLA would affect the activity and expression of Pla 2 -encoding genes in rat brain tissue, with possible implications for memory. To test this hypothesis, Wistar rats were trained for the inhibitory avoidance task and fed a commercial diet (control) or experimental diets containing either low CLA- or CLA-enriched butter for 4 weeks. After this period, the rats were tested for memory retrieval and killed for tissue collection. Hippocampal expression of 19 Pla 2 genes was evaluated by qPCR, and activities of PLA2 groups (cPLA2, iPLA2, and sPLA2) were determined by radioenzymatic assay. Rats fed the high CLA diet had increased hippocampal mRNA levels for specific PLA2 isoforms (iPla 2 g6γ; cPla 2 g4a, sPla 2 g3, sPla 2 g1b, and sPla 2 g12a) and higher enzymatic activity of all PLA2 groups as compared to those fed the control and the low CLA diet. The increment in PLA2 activities correlated significantly with memory enhancement, as assessed by increased latency in the step-down inhibitory avoidance task after 4 weeks of treatment (rs = 0.69 for iPLA2, P < 0.001; rs = 0.81 for cPLA2, P < 0.001; and rs = 0.69 for sPLA2, P < 0.001). In face of the previous reports showing reduced PLA2 activity in AD brains, the present findings suggest that dairy products enriched in cis-9, trans-11 CLA may be useful in the treatment of this disease.

  16. Changes of extracellular potassium activity induced by electric current through brain tissue in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner-Medwin, A R; Nicholson, C

    1983-01-01

    Ion-selective micro-electrodes have been used to measure K+ and Ca2+ activity changes in extracellular space beneath the surface of the neocortex and cerebellar cortex during current flow across the tissue surface in anaesthetized rats. Inward currents produced decreases of [K+]o and outward currents produced increases, with insignificant changes in [Ca2+]o. Changes of [K+]o were largest just under the surface of the tissue, but were detectable down to depths of ca. 1 mm. With appropriate sitting of electrodes in the cerebellar cortex, currents of 22 microA mm-2 for 400 sec produced changes averaging -42% for inward current and +66% for outward current. The [K+]o changes near the surface were most rapid immediately after the onset of current and more gradual after some tens of seconds. Deeper within the tissue the rate of change was more uniform and after the end of stimulation the return to base line was slower. The amplitude, depth dependence and time course of the [K+]o changes were in reasonable agreement with the results calculated for a model in which K+ moves partly through extracellular space but primarily through membranes and cytoplasm within the tissue. The [K+]o changes were not attributable to variations in neuronal activity, although unit activity could be modified by current, since alternating currents failed to produce [K+]o changes and neither 0.1 mM-tetrodotoxin nor 5 mM-Mn2+ abolished the changes. The [K+]o changes were not abolished by topically applied ouabain (4 X 10(-4) M), 2,4-dinitrophenol (20 mM) or iodoacetate (10 mM), or by asphyxiation. Consequently the [K+]o changes are not dependent on metabolism. The data suggest that there is a selective mechanism for passive K+ transport in an electrochemical gradient within brain tissue that results in higher K+ fluxes than could be supported by ionic mobility in the extracellular fluid. This mechanism exists not only at the surface but within the brain parenchyma and may involve current flow

  17. Computational deconvolution of genome wide expression data from Parkinson's and Huntington's disease brain tissues using population-specific expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Capurro, Alberto; Bodea, Liviu-Gabriel; Schaefer, Patrick; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Perreau, Victoria M.

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of molecular changes in diseased tissues gives insight into pathophysiological mechanisms and is important for therapeutic development. Genome-wide gene expression analysis has proven valuable for identifying biological processes in neurodegenerative diseases using post mortem human brain tissue and numerous datasets are publically available. However, many studies utilize heterogeneous tissue samples consisting of multiple cell types, all of which contribute to global gene expression values, confounding biological interpretation of the data. In particular, changes in numbers of neuronal and glial cells occurring in neurodegeneration confound transcriptomic analyses, particularly in human brain tissues where sample availability and controls are limited. To identify cell specific gene expression changes in neurodegenerative disease, we have applied our recently published computational deconvolution method, population specific expression analysis (PSEA). PSEA estimates cell-type-specific expression values using reference expression measures, which in the case of brain tissue comprises mRNAs with cell-type-specific expression in neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia. As an exercise in PSEA implementation and hypothesis development regarding neurodegenerative diseases, we applied PSEA to Parkinson's and Huntington's disease (PD, HD) datasets. Genes identified as differentially expressed in substantia nigra pars compacta neurons by PSEA were validated using external laser capture microdissection data. Network analysis and Annotation Clustering (DAVID) identified molecular processes implicated by differential gene expression in specific cell types. The results of these analyses provided new insights into the implementation of PSEA in brain tissues and additional refinement of molecular signatures in human HD and PD. PMID:25620908

  18. Brain tissue fragments in jugular vein blood of cattle stunned by use of penetrating or nonpenetrating captive bolt guns.

    PubMed

    Coore, R R; Love, S; McKinstry, J L; Weaver, H R; Philips, A; Hillman, T; Hiles, M; Helps, C R; Anil, M H

    2005-04-01

    Although the incidence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle continues to decline in the United Kingdom, it remains important to maintain vigilance of all potential routes of transmission of infection to humans. Initial studies have demonstrated a potential risk of carcass contamination with brain tissue following the use of captive bolt gun stunning in cattle. The objective of this study was to further explore these initial findings particularly in regard to captive bolt guns currently in use in the United Kingdom. Brain tissue fragments or elevated levels of a marker protein for brain tissue were detected in venous blood samples from 4% (95% confidence interval, 1.6 to 9.8%) of cattle stunned by penetrating captive bolt gun and from 2% (95% confidence interval, 0.6 to 7%) of those stunned by nonpenetrating captive bolt gun.

  19. Optical scatter imaging of cellular and mitochondrial swelling in brain tissue models of stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lee James

    2001-08-01

    The severity of brain edema resulting from a stroke can determine a patient's survival and the extent of their recovery. Cellular swelling is the microscopic source of a significant part of brain edema. Mitochondrial swelling also appears to be a determining event in the death or survival of the cells that are injured during a stroke. Therapies for reducing brain edema are not effective in many cases and current treatments of stroke do not address mitochondrial swelling at all. This dissertation is motivated by the lack of a complete understanding of cellular swelling resulting from stroke and the lack of a good method to begin to study mitochondrial swelling resulting from stroke in living brain tissue. In this dissertation, a novel method of detecting mitochondrial and cellular swelling in living hippocampal slices is developed and validated. The system is used to obtain spatial and temporal information about cellular and mitochondrial swelling resulting from various models of stroke. The effect of changes in water content on light scatter and absorption are examined in two models of brain edema. The results of this study demonstrate that optical techniques can be used to detect changes in water content. Mie scatter theory, the theoretical basis of the dual- angle scatter ratio imaging system, is presented. Computer simulations based on Mie scatter theory are used to determine the optimal angles for imaging. A detailed account of the early systems is presented to explain the motivations for the system design, especially polarization, wavelength and light path. Mitochondrial sized latex particles are used to determine the system response to changes in scattering particle size and concentration. The dual-angle scatter ratio imaging system is used to distinguish between osmotic and excitotoxic models of stroke injury. Such distinction cannot be achieved using the current techniques to study cellular swelling in hippocampal slices. The change in the scatter ratio is

  20. X-ray micro-tomography for investigations of brain tissues on cellular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khimchenko, Anna; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Thalmann, Peter; Zanette, Irene; Zdora, Marie-Christine; Bikis, Christos; Hipp, Alexander; Hieber, Simone E.; Schweighauser, Gabriel; Hench, Jürgen; Müller, Bert

    2016-10-01

    X-ray imaging in absorption contrast mode is well established for hard tissue visualization. However, performance for lower density materials is limited due to a reduced contrast. Our aim is three-dimensional (3D) characterization of micro-morphology of human brain tissues down to (sub-)cellular resolution within a laboratory environment. Using the laboratory-based microtomography (μCT) system nanotom m (GE Sensing and Inspection Technologies GmbH, Wunstorf, Germany) and synchrotron radiation at the Diamond-Manchester Imaging Branchline I13-2 (Diamond Light Source, Didcot, UK), we have acquired 3D data with a resolution down to 0.45 μm for visualization of a human cerebellum specimen down to cellular level. We have shown that all selected modalities, namely laboratory-based absorption contrast micro-tomography (LBμCT), synchrotron radiation based in-line single distance phase contrast tomography (SDPR) and synchrotron radiation based single-grating interferometry (GI), can reach cellular resolution for tissue samples with a size in the mm-range. The results are discussed qualitatively in comparison to optical microscopy of haematoxylin and eosin (HE) stained sections. As phase contrast yields to a better data quality for soft tissues and in order to overcome restrictions of limited beamline access for phase contrast measurements, we have equipped the μCT system nanotom m with a double-grating phase contrast set-up. Preliminary experimental results of a knee sample consisting of a bony part and a cartilage demonstrate that phase contrast data exhibits better quality compared to absorption contrast. Currently, the set-up is under adjustment. It is expected that cellular resolution would also be achieved. The questions arise (1) what would be the quality gain of laboratory-based phase contrast in comparison to laboratory-based absorption contrast tomography and (2) could laboratory-based phase contrast data provide comparable results to synchrotron radiation based

  1. Development and Validation of a Method for Alcohol Analysis in Brain Tissue by Headspace Gas Chromatography with Flame Ionization Detector.

    PubMed

    Chun, Hao-Jung; Poklis, Justin L; Poklis, Alphonse; Wolf, Carl E

    2016-10-01

    Ethanol is the most widely used and abused drug. While blood is the preferred specimen for analysis, tissue specimens such as brain serve as alternative specimens for alcohol analysis in post-mortem cases where blood is unavailable or contaminated. A method was developed using headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (HS-GC-FID) for the detection and quantification of ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, methanol and n-propanol in brain tissue specimens. Unfixed volatile-free brain tissue specimens were obtained from the Department of Pathology at Virginia Commonwealth University. Calibrators and controls were prepared from 4-fold diluted homogenates of these brain tissue specimens, and were analyzed using t-butanol as the internal standard. The chromatographic separation was performed with a Restek BAC2 column. A linear calibration was generated for all analytes (mean r(2) > 0.9992) with the limits of detection and quantification of 100-110 mg/kg. Matrix effect from the brain tissue was determined by comparing the slopes of matrix prepared calibration curves with those of aqueous calibration curves; no significant differences were observed for ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, methanol and n-propanol. The bias and the CVs for all volatile controls were ≤10%. The method was also evaluated for carryover, selectivity, interferences, bench-top stability and freeze-thaw stability. The HS-GC-FID method was determined to be reliable and robust for the analysis of ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, methanol and n-propanol concentrations in brain tissue, effectively expanding the specimen options for post-mortem alcohol analysis.

  2. An experimental study on the mechanical properties of rat brain tissue using different stress-strain definitions.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2014-07-01

    There are different stress-strain definitions to measure the mechanical properties of the brain tissue. However, there is no agreement as to which stress-strain definition should be employed to measure the mechanical properties of the brain tissue at both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. It is worth knowing that an optimize stress-strain definition of the brain tissue at different loading directions may have implications for neuronavigation and surgery simulation through haptic devices. This study is aimed to conduct a comparative study on different results are given by the various definitions of stress-strain and to recommend a specific definition when testing brain tissues. Prepared cylindrical samples are excised from the parietal lobes of rats' brains and experimentally tested by applying load on both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. Three stress definitions (second Piola-Kichhoff stress, engineering stress, and true stress) and four strain definitions (Almansi-Hamel strain, Green-St. Venant strain, engineering strain, and true strain) are used to determine the elastic modulus, maximum stress and strain. The highest non-linear stress-strain relation is observed for the Almansi-Hamel strain definition and it may overestimate the elastic modulus at different stress definitions at both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. The Green-St. Venant strain definition fails to address the non-linear stress-strain relation using different definitions of stress and triggers an underestimation of the elastic modulus. The results suggest the application of the true stress-true strain definition for characterization of the brain tissues mechanics since it gives more accurate measurements of the tissue's response using the instantaneous values.

  3. A spatiotemporal atlas of MR intensity, tissue probability and shape of the fetal brain with application to segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Corbett-Detig, James M.; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A.; Barkovich, A. James; Studholme, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Modeling and analysis of MR images of the developing human brain is a challenge due to rapid changes in brain morphology and morphometry. We present an approach to the construction of a spatiotemporal atlas of the fetal brain with temporal models of MR intensity, tissue probability and shape changes. This spatiotemporal model is created from a set of reconstructed MR images of fetal subjects with different gestational ages. Groupwise registration of manual segmentations and voxelwise nonlinear modeling allow us to capture the appearance, disappearance and spatial variation of brain structures over time. Applying this model to atlas-based segmentation, we generate age-specific MR templates and tissue probability maps and use them to initialize automatic tissue delineation in new MR images. The choice of model parameters and the final performance are evaluated using clinical MR scans of young fetuses with gestational ages ranging from 20.57 to 24.71 weeks. Experimental results indicate that quadratic temporal models can correctly capture growth-related changes in the fetal brain anatomy and provide improvement in accuracy of atlas-based tissue segmentation. PMID:20600970

  4. Connecting fractional anisotropy from medical images with mechanical anisotropy of a hyperviscoelastic fibre-reinforced constitutive model for brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Chiara; Kleiven, Svein

    2014-02-06

    Brain tissue modelling has been an active area of research for years. Brain matter does not follow the constitutive relations for common materials and loads applied to the brain turn into stresses and strains depending on tissue local morphology. In this work, a hyperviscoelastic fibre-reinforced anisotropic law is used for computational brain injury prediction. Thanks to a fibre-reinforcement dispersion parameter, this formulation accounts for anisotropic features and heterogeneities of the tissue owing to different axon alignment. The novelty of the work is the correlation of the material mechanical anisotropy with fractional anisotropy (FA) from diffusion tensor images. Finite-element (FE) models are used to investigate the influence of the fibre distribution for different loading conditions. In the case of tensile-compressive loads, the comparison between experiments and simulations highlights the validity of the proposed FA-k correlation. Axon alignment affects the deformation predicted by FE models and, when the strain in the axonal direction is large with respect to the maximum principal strain, decreased maximum deformations are detected. It is concluded that the introduction of fibre dispersion information into the constitutive law of brain tissue affects the biofidelity of the simulations.

  5. Non-pathogenic tissue-resident CD8+ T cells uniquely accumulate in the brains of lupus-prone mice

    PubMed Central

    Morawski, Peter A.; Qi, Chen-Feng; Bolland, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Severe lupus often includes psychiatric and neurological sequelae, although the cellular contributors to CNS disease remain poorly defined. Using intravascular staining to discriminate tissue-localized from blood-borne cells, we find substantial accumulation of CD8+ T cells relative to other lymphocytes in brain tissue, which correlates with lupus disease and limited neuropathology. This is in contrast to all other affected organs, where infiltrating CD4+ cells are predominant. Brain-infiltrating CD8+ T cells represent an activated subset of those found in the periphery, having a resident-memory phenotype (CD69+CD122−PD1+CD44+CD62L−) and expressing adhesion molecules (VLA-4+LFA-1+) complementary to activated brain endothelium. Remarkably, infiltrating CD8+ T cells do not cause tissue damage in lupus-prone mice, as genetic ablation of these cells via β2 m deficiency does not reverse neuropathology, but exacerbates disease both in the brain and globally despite decreased serum IgG levels. Thus, lupus-associated inflammation disrupts the blood-brain barrier in a discriminating way biased in favor of non-pathogenic CD8+ T cells relative to other infiltrating leukocytes, perhaps preventing further tissue damage in such a sensitive organ. PMID:28098193

  6. Expression profile of the aromatase enzyme in the Xenopus brain and localization of estradiol and estrogen receptors in each tissue.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Junshin; Koshimizu, Kouta; Nakagawa, Tadahiko

    2013-12-01

    Estradiol (E2) with the strongest bioactivity of the estrogens, is synthesized by the cytochrome p450 aromatase enzyme and plays a key role in sex differentiation of the vertebrate's gonads. In Xenopus, aromatase mRNA is highly expressed in the brain rather than in the gonad during sex differentiation. In this study, we analyzed the stage change, tissue specificity, and localization of the aromatase expression in the Xenopus brain. Regardless of the sex difference, expression level of aromatase was remarkably higher in the brain than in other tissues during the early stages of brain morphogenesis and was observed in the formation regions of the choroid plexus of cerebral ventricle and the paleocortex and olfactory bulb of the prosencephalon. However, E2 concentrations in each tissue indicated a different localization of aromatase and were seen in the heart at almost double the level as seen in the brain. In addition, while aromatase expression level in the brain was increasing, E2 in the whole body began to increase at the same stage. Since the expression level of estrogen receptor α also corresponded to localization of E2, these results may imply that the E2 synthesized by the high aromatase expression in the choroid plexus, which generates cerebrospinal fluid, circulates to the heart and acts through ERα.

  7. Intracellular distribution of the vitamin D receptor in the brain: comparison with classic target tissues and redistribution with development.

    PubMed

    Eyles, D W; Liu, P Y; Josh, P; Cui, X

    2014-05-30

    Apart from its role in regulating calcium there is growing evidence that vitamin D is a neuroactive steroid capable of regulating multiple pathways important for both brain development and mature brain function. Vitamin D induces its genomic effects through its nuclear receptor the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Although there is abundant evidence for this receptor's presence in the mammalian brain from studies employing immunohistochemistry, Western blot or quantitative RNA studies there remains some dispute regarding the validity of these studies. In this study we provide unambiguous confirmation for the VDR in adult rodent brain using proteomic techniques. However Western blot experiments show that compared to more classic target organs such as the gut and kidney, VDR expression is quantitatively lower in the brain. In addition we have examined VDR subcellular distribution in the gut, kidney and brain from both embryonic and adult tissues. We show that in all embryonic tissues VDR distribution is mostly nuclear, however by adulthood it appears that at least in the gut and kidney, VDR presence in the plasma membrane is more prominent perhaps reflecting some change in VDR function with the maturation of these tissues. Finally the subcellular distribution of VDR in the embryo did not appear to be altered by vitamin D deficiency indicating that perhaps there are other mechanisms at play in vivo to stabilize this receptor in the absence of its ligand.

  8. Fast Three-Dimensional Single-Particle Tracking in Natural Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sokoll, Stefan; Prokazov, Yury; Hanses, Magnus; Biermann, Barbara; Tönnies, Klaus; Heine, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Observation of molecular dynamics is often biased by the optical very heterogeneous environment of cells and complex tissue. Here, we have designed an algorithm that facilitates molecular dynamic analyses within brain slices. We adjust fast astigmatism-based three-dimensional single-particle tracking techniques to depth-dependent optical aberrations induced by the refractive index mismatch so that they are applicable to complex samples. In contrast to existing techniques, our online calibration method determines the aberration directly from the acquired two-dimensional image stream by exploiting the inherent particle movement and the redundancy introduced by the astigmatism. The method improves the positioning by reducing the systematic errors introduced by the aberrations, and allows correct derivation of the cellular morphology and molecular diffusion parameters in three dimensions independently of the imaging depth. No additional experimental effort for the user is required. Our method will be useful for many imaging configurations, which allow imaging in deep cellular structures. PMID:26445447

  9. Imaging MALDI MS of Dosed Brain Tissues Utilizing an Alternative Analyte Pre-extraction Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiason, Cristine M.; Shahidi-Latham, Sheerin K.

    2015-06-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry has been adopted in the pharmaceutical industry as a useful tool to detect xenobiotic distribution within tissues. A unique sample preparation approach for MALDI imaging has been described here for the extraction and detection of cobimetinib and clozapine, which were previously undetectable in mouse and rat brain using a single matrix application step. Employing a combination of a buffer wash and a cyclohexane pre-extraction step prior to standard matrix application, the xenobiotics were successfully extracted and detected with an 8 to 20-fold gain in sensitivity. This alternative approach for sample preparation could serve as an advantageous option when encountering difficult to detect analytes.

  10. Potential effects of fat on magnetic resonance signal intensity and derived brain tissue volumes

    PubMed Central

    Mon, Anderson; Abé, Christoph; Durazzo, Timothy C.; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity/overweight is reported to affect MR-measured brain tissue volume and white matter (WM) signal intensity. This study investigated possible effects of fat on these measures, using pig fat on three participants at a 4 Tesla magnet. Gray matter volumes in the presence of fat were lower than baseline measures. Total WM volumes in the presence of fat were higher than baseline measures. WM hypo-intensities on T1-weighted images were higher in the presence of fat than baseline measures. Therefore physical effects of head fat of obese/overweight individual may at least, partly contribute to the association of obesity/overweight with MR structural measures. PMID:26259685

  11. Proteolytic activity is altered in brain tissue of rats upon chronic exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Benuck, M.; Banay-Schwartz, M.; Lajtha, A. )

    1993-01-01

    Tissue from pons medulla of rats exposed in vivo to various levels of ozone was assayed for calpain and cathepsin D activity. Chronic exposure to ozone increased calpain activity, which was 35% to 46% higher in the homogenates of animals exposed to 1.0 ppm ozone than in those of animals exposed to 0.5 ppm ozone or of controls. An increase in activity of 26% was also observed in the soluble supernatant. The increase in activity did not seem to be caused by ozone effects on calpastatin. Addition of 32 mM carnitine to the incubation mixture increased total activity 3-4 fold, making the differences in activity proportionately smaller. Cathepsin D activity was little altered. Changes in calpain activity and in the generation of free oxygen radicals have been implicated in the aging process, long-term exposure to ozone may magnify changes. Ozone exposure may cause changes in brain protein metabolism. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Consent for Brain Tissue Donation after Intracerebral Haemorrhage: A Community-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Samarasekera, Neshika; Lerpiniere, Christine; Farrall, Andrew J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; White, Philip M.; Torgersen, Antonia; Ironside, James W.; Smith, Colin; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage is a devastating form of stroke and its incidence increases with age. Obtaining brain tissue following intracerebral haemorrhage helps to understand its cause. Given declining autopsy rates worldwide, the feasibility of establishing an autopsy-based collection and its generalisability are uncertain. Methods We used multiple overlapping sources of case ascertainment to identify every adult diagnosed with intracerebral haemorrhage between 1st June 2010-31st May 2012, whilst resident in the Lothian region of Scotland. We sought consent from patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (or their nearest relative if the patient lacked mental capacity) to conduct a research autopsy. Results Of 295 adults with acute intracerebral haemorrhage, 110 (37%) could not be approached to consider donation. Of 185 adults/relatives approached, 91 (49%) consented to research autopsy. There were no differences in baseline demographic variables or markers of intracerebral haemorrhage severity between consenters and non-consenters. Adults who died and became donors (n = 46) differed from the rest of the cohort (n = 249) by being older (median age 80, IQR 76–86 vs. 75, IQR 65–83, p = 0.002) and having larger haemorrhages (median volume 23ml, IQR 13–50 vs. 13ml, IQR 4–40; p = 0.002). Conclusions Nearly half of those approached consent to brain tissue donation after acute intracerebral haemorrhage. The characteristics of adults who gave consent were comparable to those in an entire community, although those who donate early are older and have larger haemorrhage volumes. PMID:26302447

  13. Encapsulation of mesenchymal stem cells by bioscaffolds protects cell survival and attenuates neuroinflammatory reaction in injured brain tissue after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sarnowska, Anna; Jablonska, Anna; Jurga, Marcin; Dainiak, Maria; Strojek, Lukasz; Drela, Katarzyna; Wright, Kathleen; Tripathi, Anuj; Kumar, Ashok; Jungvid, Hans; Lukomska, Barbara; Forraz, Nico; McGuckin, Colin; Domanska-Janik, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    Since the brain is naturally inefficient in regenerating functional tissue after injury or disease, novel restorative strategies including stem cell transplantation and tissue engineering have to be considered. We have investigated the use of such strategies in order to achieve better functional repair outcomes. One of the fundamental challenges of successful transplantation is the delivery of cells to the injured site while maintaining cell viability. Classical cell delivery methods of intravenous or intraparenchymal injections are plagued by low engraftment and poor survival of transplanted stem cells. Novel implantable devices such as 3D bioactive scaffolds can provide the physical and metabolic support required for successful progenitor cell engraftment, proliferation, and maturation. In this study, we performed in situ analysis of laminin-linked dextran and gelatin macroporous scaffolds. We revealed the protective action of gelatin-laminin (GL) scaffolds seeded with mesenchymal stem cells derived from donated human Wharton's jelly (hUCMSCs) against neuroinflammatory reactions of injured mammalian brain tissue. These bioscaffolds have been implanted into (i) intact and (ii) ischemic rat hippocampal organotypic slices and into the striatum of (iii) normal and (iv) focally injured brains of adult Wistar rats. We found that transplantation of hUCMSCs encapsulated in GL scaffolds had a significant impact on the prevention of glial scar formation (low glial acidic fibrillary protein) and in the reduction of neuroinflammation (low interleukin-6 and the microglial markers ED1 and Iba1) in the recipient tissue. Moreover, implantation of hUCMSCs encapsulated within GL scaffolds induced matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 proteolytic activities in the surrounding brain tissue. This facilitated scaffold biodegradation while leaving the remaining grafted hUCMSCs untouched. In conclusion, transplanting GL scaffolds preseeded with hUCMSCs into mammalian brain tissue escaped

  14. Rebuilding Brain Circuitry with Living Micro-Tissue Engineered Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Struzyna, Laura A.; Wolf, John A.; Mietus, Constance J.; Adewole, Dayo O.; Chen, H. Isaac; Smith, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    Prominent neuropathology following trauma, stroke, and various neurodegenerative diseases includes neuronal degeneration as well as loss of long-distance axonal connections. While cell replacement and axonal pathfinding strategies are often explored independently, there is no strategy capable of simultaneously replacing lost neurons and re-establishing long-distance axonal connections in the central nervous system. Accordingly, we have created micro-tissue engineered neural networks (micro-TENNs), which are preformed constructs consisting of long integrated axonal tracts spanning discrete neuronal populations. These living micro-TENNs reconstitute the architecture of long-distance axonal tracts, and thus may serve as an effective substrate for targeted neurosurgical reconstruction of damaged pathways in the brain. Cerebral cortical neurons or dorsal root ganglia neurons were precisely delivered into the tubular constructs, and properties of the hydrogel exterior and extracellular matrix internal column (180–500 μm diameter) were optimized for robust neuronal survival and to promote axonal extensions across the 2.0 cm tube length. The very small diameter permits minimally invasive delivery into the brain. In this study, preformed micro-TENNs were stereotaxically injected into naive rats to bridge deep thalamic structures with the cerebral cortex to assess construct survival and integration. We found that micro-TENN neurons survived at least 1 month and maintained their long axonal architecture along the cortical–thalamic axis. Notably, we also found neurite penetration from micro-TENN neurons into the host cortex, with evidence of synapse formation. These micro-TENNs represent a new strategy to facilitate nervous system repair by recapitulating features of neural pathways to restore or modulate damaged brain circuitry. PMID:26414439

  15. Mechanical properties of gray and white matter brain tissue by indentation.

    PubMed

    Budday, Silvia; Nay, Richard; de Rooij, Rijk; Steinmann, Paul; Wyrobek, Thomas; Ovaert, Timothy C; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-06-01

    The mammalian brain is composed of an outer layer of gray matter, consisting of cell bodies, dendrites, and unmyelinated axons, and an inner core of white matter, consisting primarily of myelinated axons. Recent evidence suggests that microstructural differences between gray and white matter play an important role during neurodevelopment. While brain tissue as a whole is rheologically well characterized, the individual features of gray and white matter remain poorly understood. Here we quantify the mechanical properties of gray and white matter using a robust, reliable, and repeatable method, flat-punch indentation. To systematically characterize gray and white matter moduli for varying indenter diameters, loading rates, holding times, post-mortem times, and locations we performed a series of n=192 indentation tests. We found that indenting thick, intact coronal slices eliminates the common challenges associated with small specimens: it naturally minimizes boundary effects, dehydration, swelling, and structural degradation. When kept intact and hydrated, brain slices maintained their mechanical characteristics with standard deviations as low as 5% throughout the entire testing period of five days post mortem. White matter, with an average modulus of 1.89 5kPa ± 0.592 kPa, was on average 39% stiffer than gray matter, p<0.01, with an average modulus of 1.389 kPa ± 0.289 kPa, and displayed larger regional variations. It was also more viscous than gray matter and responded less rapidly to mechanical loading. Understanding the rheological differences between gray and white matter may have direct implications on diagnosing and understanding the mechanical environment in neurodevelopment and neurological disorders.

  16. Alterations of p11 in brain tissue and peripheral blood leukocytes in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Green, Holly; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Tiklova, Katarina; Volakakis, Nikolaos; Brodin, Lovisa; Berg, Louise; Perlmann, Thomas; Svenningsson, Per

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) often suffer from comorbid depression. P11 (S100A10), a member of the S100 family of proteins, is expressed widely throughout the body and is involved in major depressive disorder and antidepressant response. Central p11 levels are reduced in postmortem tissue from depressed individuals; however, p11 has not yet been investigated in PD patients with depression or those without depression. We investigated p11 levels in postmortem PD brains and assessed whether peripheral p11 levels correlate with disease severity. Substantia nigra, putamen, and cortical p11 protein levels were assessed in postmortem brain samples from PD patients and matched controls. In a different set of postmortem brains, p11 mRNA expression was measured in dopaminergic cells from the substantia nigra. Both p11 protein and mRNA levels were decreased in PD patients. Peripheral p11 protein levels were investigated in distinct leukocyte populations from PD patients with depression and those without depression. Monocyte, natural killer (NK) cell, and cytotoxic T-cell p11 levels were positively associated with the severity of PD, and NK cell p11 levels were positively associated with depression scores. Given that inflammation plays a role in both PD and depression, it is intriguing that peripheral p11 levels are altered in immune cells in both conditions. Our data provide insight into the pathological alterations occurring centrally and peripherally in PD. Moreover, if replicated in other cohorts, p11 could be an easily accessible biomarker for monitoring the severity of PD, especially in the context of comorbid depression. PMID:28137881

  17. Quantitative analysis of phenibut in rat brain tissue extracts by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Grinberga, Solveiga; Zvejniece, Liga; Liepinsh, Edgars; Dambrova, Maija; Pugovics, Osvalds

    2008-12-01

    Phenibut (3-phenyl-4-aminobutyric acid) is a gamma-aminobutyric acid mimetic drug, which is used clinically as a mood elevator and tranquilizer. In the present work, a rapid, selective and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for quantification of phenibut in biological matrices has been developed. The method is based on protein precipitation with acidic acetonitrile followed by isocratic chromatographic separation using acetonitrile-formic acid (0.1% in water; 8:92, v/v) mobile phase on a reversed-phase column. Detection of the analyte was performed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring mode with the precursor-to-product ion transition m/z 180.3 --> m/z 117.2. The calibration curve was linear over the concentration range 50-2000 ng/mL. The lower limit of quantification for phenibut in rat brain extracts was 50 ng/mL. Acceptable precision and accuracy were obtained over the whole concentration range. The validated method was successfully applied in a pharmacological study to analyze phenibut concentration in rat brain tissue extract samples.

  18. Imaging extracellular potassium dynamics in brain tissue using a potassium-sensitive nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Wellbourne-Wood, Joel; Rimmele, Theresa S; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal activity results in the release of [Formula: see text] into the extracellular space (ECS). Classically, measurements of extracellular [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]) are carried out using [Formula: see text]-sensitive microelectrodes, which provide a single point measurement with undefined spatial resolution. An imaging approach would enable the spatiotemporal mapping of [Formula: see text]. Here, we report on the design and characterization of a fluorescence imaging-based [Formula: see text]-sensitive nanosensor for the ECS based on dendrimer nanotechnology. Spectral characterization, sensitivity, and selectivity of the nanosensor were assessed by spectrofluorimetry, as well as in both wide-field and two-photon microscopy settings, demonstrating the nanosensor efficacy over the physiologically relevant ion concentration range. Spatial and temporal kinetics of the nanosensor responses were assessed using a localized iontophoretic [Formula: see text] application on a two-photon imaging setup. Using acute mouse brain slices, we demonstrate that the nanosensor is retained in the ECS for extended periods of time. In addition, we present a ratiometric version of the nanosensor, validate its sensitivity in brain tissue in response to elicited neuronal activity and correlate the responses to the extracellular field potential. Together, this study demonstrates the efficacy of the [Formula: see text]-sensitive nanosensor approach and validates the possibility of creating multimodal nanosensors.

  19. Organization and evolution of brain lipidome revealed by large-scale analysis of human, chimpanzee, macaque, and mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Bozek, Katarzyna; Wei, Yuning; Yan, Zheng; Liu, Xiling; Xiong, Jieyi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Tomita, Masaru; Pääbo, Svante; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R; Ely, John J; Li, Yan; Steinhauser, Dirk; Willmitzer, Lothar; Giavalisco, Patrick; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2015-02-18

    Lipids are prominent components of the nervous system. Here we performed a large-scale mass spectrometry-based analysis of the lipid composition of three brain regions as well as kidney and skeletal muscle of humans, chimpanzees, rhesus macaques, and mice. The human brain shows the most distinct lipid composition: 76% of 5,713 lipid compounds examined in our study are either enriched or depleted in the human brain. Concentration levels of lipids enriched in the brain evolve approximately four times faster among primates compared with lipids characteristic of non-neural tissues and show further acceleration of change in human neocortical regions but not in the cerebellum. Human-specific concentration changes are supported by human-specific expression changes for corresponding enzymes. These results provide the first insights into the role of lipids in human brain evolution.

  20. RNA Sequencing Analysis Reveals Interactions between Breast Cancer or Melanoma Cells and the Tissue Microenvironment during Brain Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Ryo; Nakano, Teppei; Hosonaga, Mari; Sampetrean, Oltea; Harigai, Ritsuko; Sasaki, Takashi; Koya, Ikuko; Okano, Hideyuki; Kudoh, Jun; Saya, Hideyuki; Arima, Yoshimi

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of treatment failure and death in cancer patients. Metastasis of tumor cells to the brain occurs frequently in individuals with breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, or melanoma. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the causes and in the treatment of primary tumors, the biological and molecular mechanisms underlying the metastasis of cancer cells to the brain have remained unclear. Metastasizing cancer cells interact with their microenvironment in the brain to establish metastases. We have now developed mouse models of brain metastasis based on intracardiac injection of human breast cancer or melanoma cell lines, and we have performed RNA sequencing analysis to identify genes in mouse brain tissue and the human cancer cells whose expression is associated specifically with metastasis. We found that the expressions of the mouse genes Tph2, Sspo, Ptprq, and Pole as well as those of the human genes CXCR4, PLLP, TNFSF4, VCAM1, SLC8A2, and SLC7A11 were upregulated in brain tissue harboring metastases. Further characterization of such genes that contribute to the establishment of brain metastases may provide a basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies and consequent improvement in the prognosis of cancer patients.

  1. RNA Sequencing Analysis Reveals Interactions between Breast Cancer or Melanoma Cells and the Tissue Microenvironment during Brain Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Hosonaga, Mari; Koya, Ikuko

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of treatment failure and death in cancer patients. Metastasis of tumor cells to the brain occurs frequently in individuals with breast cancer, non–small cell lung cancer, or melanoma. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the causes and in the treatment of primary tumors, the biological and molecular mechanisms underlying the metastasis of cancer cells to the brain have remained unclear. Metastasizing cancer cells interact with their microenvironment in the brain to establish metastases. We have now developed mouse models of brain metastasis based on intracardiac injection of human breast cancer or melanoma cell lines, and we have performed RNA sequencing analysis to identify genes in mouse brain tissue and the human cancer cells whose expression is associated specifically with metastasis. We found that the expressions of the mouse genes Tph2, Sspo, Ptprq, and Pole as well as those of the human genes CXCR4, PLLP, TNFSF4, VCAM1, SLC8A2, and SLC7A11 were upregulated in brain tissue harboring metastases. Further characterization of such genes that contribute to the establishment of brain metastases may provide a basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies and consequent improvement in the prognosis of cancer patients. PMID:28210624

  2. The effects of dietary carbohydrates on the retention of added lead and uptake of Pb/sup 210/ in tissues of weanling rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nzelibe, C.G.

    1981-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted in this study. Fifty weanling rats of Holtzman strain were assigned to five treatment groups and fed corn starch (control) diet and/or lactose or sucrose with basal ingredients in various proportions. All the diets had 2000ppm Pb (as lead nitrate) and low - Ca (as calcium carbonate). At the end of eight weeks feeding period, the rats (2 per group) were killed sequentially at intervals of 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours following intramuscular injection of Pb/sup 210/ at 20 ..mu..Ci/100 g body weight. Activity of Pb/sup 210/ in liver of rats fed 30% sucrose and lactose diets was statistically significant P < 0.05 at both 4 and 8 hours. Both diet and time of injection had statistically significant (P < 0.001) effect on Pb/sup 210/ uptake by the serum. There were positive correlations between different variables at different intervals of time. The second part of this study involved atomic absorption spectrophometric analysis of lead content of blood serum, liver, kidneys, brain, heart, urine, and feces. The results showed that lactose in the diet caused increased retention in the tissues except in the brain and kidneys, while sucrose diet lowered the lead content of these tissues. Rats fed 30% sucrose diet showed the highest weight gain and those on 50% lactose diet showed lowest weight gain. The results of this study show that dietary carbohydrate treatment is the main effect on the activity of Pb/sup 210/ in blood serum, liver, kidneys, brain, heart, urine and feces; and a 50% sucrose diet inhibits lead content in these tissues. It also induces removal of lead by the urine, thus reducing the lead burden in the body.

  3. The adult brain tissue response to hollow fiber membranes of varying surface architecture with or without cotransplanted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning

    A variety of biomaterials have been chronically implanted into the central nervous system (CNS) for repair or therapeutic purposes. Regardless of the application, chronic implantation of materials into the CNS induces injury and elicits a wound healing response, eventually leading to the formation of a dense extracellular matrix (ECM)-rich scar tissue that is associated with the segregation of implanted materials from the surrounding normal tissue. Often this reaction results in impaired performance of indwelling CNS devices. In order to enhance the performance of biomaterial-based implantable devices in the CNS, this thesis investigated whether adult brain tissue response to implanted biomaterials could be manipulated by changing biomaterial surface properties or further by utilizing the biology of co-transplanted cells. Specifically, the adult rat brain tissue response to chronically implanted poly(acrylonitrile-vinylchloride) (PAN-PVC) hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) of varying surface architecture were examined temporally at 2, 4, and 12 weeks postimplantation. Significant differences were discovered in the brain tissue response to the PAN-PVC HFMs of varying surface architecture at 4 and 12 weeks. To extend this work, whether the soluble factors derived from a co-transplanted cellular component further affect the brain tissue response to an implanted HFM in a significant way was critically exploited. The cells used were astrocytes, whose ability to influence scar formation process following CNS injury by physical contact with the host tissue had been documented in the literature. Data indicated for the first time that astrocyte-derived soluble factors ameliorate the adult brain tissue reactivity toward HFM implants in an age-dependent manner. While immature astrocytes secreted soluble factors that suppressed the brain tissue reactivity around the implants, mature astrocytes secreted factors that enhanced the gliotic response. These findings prove the feasibility

  4. Tissue specific resonance frequencies of water and metabolites within the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadzynski, Grzegorz L.; Bender, Benjamin; Groeger, Adriane; Erb, Michael; Klose, Uwe

    2011-09-01

    Chemical shift imaging (CSI) without water suppression was used to examine tissue-specific resonance frequencies of water and metabolites within the human brain. The aim was to verify if there are any regional differences in those frequencies and to determine the influence of chemical shift displacement in slice-selection direction. Unsuppressed spectra were acquired at 3 T from nine subjects. Resonance frequencies of water and after water signal removal of total choline, total creatine and NAA were estimated. Furthermore, frequency distances between the water and those resonances were calculated. Results were corrected for chemical shift displacement. Frequency distances between water and metabolites were consistent and greater for GM than for WM. The highest value of WM to GM difference (14 ppb) was observed for water to NAA frequency distance. This study demonstrates that there are tissue-specific differences between frequency distances of water and metabolites. Moreover, the influence of chemical shift displacement in slice-selection direction is showed to be negligible.

  5. Quantitative analysis of group-specific brain tissue probability map for schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Uicheul; Lee, Jong-Min; Koo, B B; Shin, Yong-Wook; Lee, Kyung Jin; Kim, In Young; Kwon, Jun Soo; Kim, Sun I

    2005-06-01

    We developed group-specific tissue probability map (TPM) for gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on the common spatial coordinates of an averaged brain atlas derived from normal controls (NC) and from schizophrenic patients (SZ). To identify differences in group-specific TPMs, we used quantitative evaluation methods based on differences in probabilistic distribution as a global criterion, and the mean probability and the similarity index (SI) by lobe as regional criteria. The SZ group showed more spatial variation with a lower mean probability than NC subjects. And, for the right temporal and left parietal lobes, the SI between each group was lower than the other lobes. It can be said that there were significant differences in spatial distribution between controls and schizophrenic patients at those areas. In case of female group, although group differences in the volumes of GM and WM were not significant, global difference in the probabilistic distribution of GM was more prominent and the SI was lower and its descent rate was greater in all lobes, compared with the male group. If these morphological differences caused by disease or group-specific features were not considered in TPM, the accuracy and certainty of specific group studies would be greatly reduced. Therefore, suitable TPM is required as a common framework for functional neuroimaging studies and an a priori knowledge of tissue classification.

  6. Low-frequency conductivity tensor of rat brain tissues inferred from diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Sekino, Masaki; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Iriguchi, Norio; Ueno, Shoogo

    2009-09-01

    Conductivity tensor maps of the rat brain were obtained using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Signal attenuations in the cortex and the corpus callosum were measured using the stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) sequence with b factors up to 6000 s/mm(2). Our previously published method was improved to infer 3 x 3 conductivity tensor at the low-frequency limit. The conductivity tensor of the tissue was inferred from the fast component of the diffusion tensor and a fraction of the fast component. The mean conductivity (MC) of the cortex and the corpus callosum was 0.52 and 0.62 S/m, respectively. Diffusion-weighted images were obtained with b factors up to 4500 s/mm(2). Conductivity tensor images were calculated from the fast diffusion tensor images. Tissues with highly anisotropic cellular structures, such as the corpus callosum, the internal capsule, and the trigeminal nerve, exhibited high anisotropy in conductivity. The resulting values corresponded to conductivities at the low-frequency limit because our method assumed electric currents flowing only through extracellular fluid.

  7. What lies beneath? Diffusion EAP-based study of brain tissue microstructure.

    PubMed

    Zucchelli, Mauro; Brusini, Lorenza; Andrés Méndez, C; Daducci, Alessandro; Granziera, Cristina; Menegaz, Gloria

    2016-08-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance signals convey information about tissue microstructure and cytoarchitecture. In the last years, many models have been proposed for recovering the diffusion signal and extracting information to constitute new families of numerical indices. Two main categories of reconstruction models can be identified in diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (DMRI): ensemble average propagator (EAP) models and compartmental models. From both, descriptors can be derived for elucidating the underlying microstructural architecture. While compartmental models indices directly quantify the fraction of different cell compartments in each voxel, EAP-derived indices are only a derivative measure and the effect of the different microstructural configurations on the indices is still unclear. In this paper, we analyze three EAP indices calculated using the 3D Simple Harmonic Oscillator based Reconstruction and Estimation (3D-SHORE) model and estimate their changes with respect to the principal microstructural configurations. We take advantage of the state of the art simulations to quantify the variations of the indices with the simulation parameters. Analysis of in-vivo data correlates the EAP indices with the microstructural parameters obtained from the Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density Imaging (NODDI) model as a pseudo ground truth for brain data. Results show that the EAP derived indices convey information on the tissue microstructure and that their combined values directly reflect the configuration of the different compartments in each voxel.

  8. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Xie, Fang; Moore, Ronald J.; Ramirez Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Myers, Amanda J.

    2013-05-03

    To design a robust quantitative proteomics study, an understanding of both the inherent heterogeneity of the biological samples being studied as well as the technical variability of the proteomics methods and platform is needed. Additionally, accurately identifying the technical steps associated with the largest variability would provide valuable information for the improvement and design of future processing pipelines. We present an experimental strategy that allows for a detailed examination of the variability of the quantitative LC-MS proteomics measurements. By replicating analyses at different stages of processing, various technical components can be estimated and their individual contribution to technical variability can be dissected. This design can be easily adapted to other quantitative proteomics pipelines. Herein, we applied this methodology to our label-free workflow for the processing of human brain tissue. For this application, the pipeline was divided into four critical components: Tissue dissection and homogenization (extraction), protein denaturation followed by trypsin digestion and SPE clean-up (digestion), short-term run-to-run instrumental response fluctuation (instrumental variance), and long-term drift of the quantitative response of the LC-MS/MS platform over the 2 week period of continuous analysis (instrumental stability). From this analysis, we found the following contributions to variability: extraction (72%) >> instrumental variance (16%) > instrumental stability (8.4%) > digestion (3.1%). Furthermore, the stability of the platform and its’ suitability for discovery proteomics studies is demonstrated.

  9. The relationship between decorrelation time and sample thickness in acute rat brain tissue slices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brake, Joshua; Jang, Mooseok; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-03-01

    The optical opacity of biological tissue has long been a challenge in biomedical optics due to the strong scattering nature of tissue in the optical regime. While most conventional optical techniques attempt to gate out multiply scattered light and use only unscattered light, new approaches in the field of wavefront shaping exploit the time reversible symmetry of optical scattering in order to focus light inside or through scattering media. While these approaches have been demonstrated effectively on static samples, it has proven difficult to apply them to dynamic biological samples since even small changes in the relative positions of the scatterers within will cause the time symmetry that wavefront shaping relies upon to decorrelate. In this paper we investigate the decorrelation curves of acute rat brain slices for thicknesses in the range 1-3 mm (1/e decorrelation time on the order of seconds) using multi-speckle diffusing wave spectroscopy (MSDWS) and compare the results with theoretical predictions. The results of this study demonstrate that the 1/L^2 relationship between decorrelation time and thickness predicted by diffusing wave spectroscopy provides a good rule of thumb for estimating how the decorrelation of a sample will change with increasing thickness. Understanding this relationship will provide insight to guide the future development of biophotonic wavefront shaping tools by giving an estimate of how fast wavefront shaping systems need to operate to overcome the dynamic nature of biological samples.

  10. Accuracy of a Wearable Sensor for Measures of Head Kinematics and Calculation of Brain Tissue Strain.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Brooklynn M; Yu, Henry; Dennison, Christopher R

    2017-02-01

    Wearable kinematic sensors can be used to study head injury biomechanics based on kinematics and, more recently, based on tissue strain metrics using kinematics-driven brain models. These sensors require in-situ calibration and there is currently no data conveying wearable ability to estimate tissue strain. We simulated head impact (n = 871) to a 50th percentile Hybrid III (H-III) head wearing a hockey helmet instrumented with wearable GForceTracker (GFT) sensors measuring linear acceleration and angular velocity. A GFT was also fixed within the H-III head to establish a lower boundary on systematic errors. We quantified GFT errors relative to H-III measures based on peak kinematics and cumulative strain damage measure (CSDM). The smallest mean errors were 12% (peak resultant linear acceleration) and 15% (peak resultant angular velocity) for the GFT within the H-III. Errors for GFTs on the helmet were on average 54% (peak resultant linear acceleration) and 21% (peak resultant angular velocity). On average, the GFT inside the helmet overestimated CSDM by 0.15.

  11. Whole genome association study of brain-wide imaging phenotypes for identifying quantitative trait loci in MCI and AD: A study of the ADNI cohort.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Kim, Sungeun; Risacher, Shannon L; Nho, Kwangsik; Swaminathan, Shanker; West, John D; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Moore, Jason H; Sloan, Chantel D; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Dechairo, Bryan M; Potkin, Steven G; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Saykin, Andrew J

    2010-11-15

    A genome-wide, whole brain approach to investigate genetic effects on neuroimaging phenotypes for identifying quantitative trait loci is described. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 1.5 T MRI and genetic dataset was investigated using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and FreeSurfer parcellation followed by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). One hundred forty-two measures of grey matter (GM) density, volume, and cortical thickness were extracted from baseline scans. GWAS, using PLINK, were performed on each phenotype using quality-controlled genotype and scan data including 530,992 of 620,903 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 733 of 818 participants (175 AD, 354 amnestic mild cognitive impairment, MCI, and 204 healthy controls, HC). Hierarchical clustering and heat maps were used to analyze the GWAS results and associations are reported at two significance thresholds (p<10(-7) and p<10(-6)). As expected, SNPs in the APOE and TOMM40 genes were confirmed as markers strongly associated with multiple brain regions. Other top SNPs were proximal to the EPHA4, TP63 and NXPH1 genes. Detailed image analyses of rs6463843 (flanking NXPH1) revealed reduced global and regional GM density across diagnostic groups in TT relative to GG homozygotes. Interaction analysis indicated that AD patients homozygous for the T allele showed differential vulnerability to right hippocampal GM density loss. NXPH1 codes for a protein implicated in promotion of adhesion between dendrites and axons, a key factor in synaptic integrity, the loss of which is a hallmark of AD. A genome-wide, whole brain search strategy has the potential to reveal novel candidate genes and loci warranting further investigation and replication.

  12. In situ monitoring of brain tissue reaction of chronically implanted electrodes with an optical coherence tomography fiber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yijing; Hassler, Christina; Stieglitz, Thomas; Seifert, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2014-03-01

    Neural microelectrodes are well established tools for delivering therapeutic electrical pulses, and recording neural electrophysiological signals. However, long term implanted neural probes often become functionally impaired by tissue encapsulation. At present, analyzing this immune reaction is only feasible with post-mortem histology; currently no means for specific in vivo monitoring exist and most applicable imaging modalities provide no sufficient resolution for a cellular measurement in deep brain regions. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a well developed imaging modality, providing cellular resolution and up to 1.2 mm imaging depth in brain tissue. Further more, a fiber based spectral domain OCT was shown to be capable of minimally invasive brain intervention. In the present study, we propose to use a fiber based spectral domain OCT to monitor the the progression of the tissue's immune response and scar encapsulation of microprobes in a rat animal model. We developed an integrated OCT fiber catheter consisting of an implantable ferrule based fiber cannula and a fiber patch cable. The fiber cannula was 18.5 mm long, including a 10.5 mm ceramic ferrule and a 8.0 mm long, 125 μm single mode fiber. A mating sleeve was used to fix and connect the fiber cannula to the OCT fiber cable. Light attenuation between the OCT fiber cable and the fiber cannula through the mating sleeve was measured and minimized. The fiber cannula was implanted in rat brain together with a microelectrode in sight used as a foreign body to induce the brain tissue immune reaction. Preliminary data showed a significant enhancement of the OCT backscattering signal during the brain tissue scarring process, while the OCT signal of the flexible microelectrode was getting weaker consequentially.

  13. Increased brain uptake of targeted nanoparticles by adding an acid-cleavable linkage between transferrin and the nanoparticle core.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew J; Davis, Mark E

    2015-10-06

    Most therapeutic agents are excluded from entering the central nervous system by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Receptor mediated transcytosis (RMT) is a common mechanism used by proteins, including transferrin (Tf), to traverse the BBB. Here, we prepared Tf-containing, 80-nm gold nanoparticles with an acid-cleavable linkage between the Tf and the nanoparticle core to facilitate nanoparticle RMT across the BBB. These nanoparticles are designed to bind to Tf receptors (TfRs) with high avidity on the blood side of the BBB, but separate from their multidentate Tf-TfR interactions upon acidification during the transcytosis process to allow release of the nanoparticle into the brain. These targeted nanoparticles show increased ability to cross an in vitro model of the BBB and, most important, enter the brain parenchyma of mice in greater amounts in vivo after systemic administration compared with similar high-avidity nanoparticles containing noncleavable Tf. In addition, we investigated this design with nanoparticles containing high-affinity antibodies (Abs) to TfR. With the Abs, the addition of the acid-cleavable linkage provided no improvement to in vivo brain uptake for Ab-containing nanoparticles, and overall brain uptake was decreased for all Ab-containing nanoparticles compared with Tf-containing ones. These results are consistent with recent reports of high-affinity anti-TfR Abs trafficking to the lysosome within BBB endothelium. In contrast, high-avidity, Tf-containing nanoparticles with the acid-cleavable linkage avoid major endothelium retention by shedding surface Tf during their transcytosis.

  14. Amplification of Herpes simplex type 1 and Human Herpes type 5 viral DNA from formalin-fixed Alzheimer brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, John D; Royall, Donald; Daum, Luke T; Kagan-Hallet, Kathleen; Chambers, James P

    2005-12-16

    It is known that nucleic acids from formalin-fixed tissues are not nearly as good templates for DNA amplification as those extracted from fresh tissues. However, specimens stored in most pathologic archives are initially fixed in formalin. The possibility of an infectious etiology of several diseases including Alzheimer's underscores the usefulness of archived tissue in assessing the association of infectious agents with specific pathology. In this report, we describe in detail a method resulting in robust amplification of HSV1 and Human Herpes type (HHV) 5 viral DNA targets using formalin-fixed Alzheimer brain frontal and temporal tissue as source of amplification template. Herpes simplex type 2 viral DNA was not detected in the limited samples examined in this study. Amplicons were verified by sequence analysis. Brain tissue stored in formalin longer than 1 year prior to post-formalin-fixation analysis gave rise to significantly shorter amplicons consistent with the observation that template DNA integrity decreases significantly with increasing time of storage in formalin. Thus, this report should be useful in PCR-based investigations assessing the regional presence of viral DNAs in formalin-fixed brain tissue.

  15. Sex- and Tissue-Specific Methylome Changes in Brains of Mice Perinatally Exposed to Lead

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Martín, Francisco Javier; Lindquist, Diana M.; Landero-Figueroa, Julio; Zhang, Xiang; Chen, Jing; Cecil, Kim M.; Medvedovic, Mario; Puga, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Changes in DNA methylation and subsequent changes in gene expression regulation are the hallmarks of age- and tissue-dependent epigenetic drift and plasticity resulting from the combinatorial integration of genetic determinants and environmental cues. To determine whether perinatal lead exposure caused persistent DNA methylation changes in target tissues, we exposed mouse dams to 0, 3 or 30 ppm of lead acetate in drinking water for a period extending from 2 months prior to mating, through gestation, until weaning of pups at postnatal day-21, and analyzed whole-genome DNA methylation in brain cortex and hippocampus of 2-month old exposed and unexposed progeny. Lead exposure resulted in hypermethylation of three differentially methylated regions in the hippocampus of females, but not males. These regions mapped to Rn4.5s, Sfi1, and Rn45s loci in mouse chromosomes 2, 11 and 17, respectively. At a conservative fdr<0.001, 1,623 additional CpG sites were differentially methylated in female hippocampus, corresponding to 117 unique genes. Sixty of these genes were tested for mRNA expression and showed a trend towards negative correlation between mRNA expression and methylation in exposed females but not males. No statistically significant methylome changes were detected in male hippocampus or in cortex of either sex. We conclude that exposure to lead during embryonic life, a time when the organism is most sensitive to environmental cues, appears to have a sex- and tissue-specific effect on DNA methylation that may produce pathological or physiological deviations from the epigenetic plasticity operative in unexposed mice. PMID:25530354

  16. Tetracyclic Truncated Analogue of the Marine Toxin Gambierol Modifies NMDA, Tau, and Amyloid β Expression in Mice Brains: Implications in AD Pathology.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Eva; Vieira, Andrés C; Rodriguez, Inés; Alvariño, Rebeca; Gegunde, Sandra; Fuwa, Haruhiko; Suga, Yuto; Sasaki, Makoto; Alfonso, Amparo; Cifuentes, José Manuel; Botana, Luis M

    2017-02-13

    Gambierol and its two, tetra- and heptacyclic, analogues have been previously proved as promising molecules for the modulation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmarks in primary cortical neurons of 3xTg-AD fetuses. In this work, the effect of the tetracyclic analogue of gambierol was tested in vivo in 3xTg-AD mice (10 months old) after 1 month of weekly treatment with 50 μg/kg. Adverse effects were not reported throughout the whole treatment period and no pathological signs were observed for the analyzed organs. The compound was found in brain samples after intraperitoneal injection. The tetracyclic analogue of gambierol elicited a decrease of amyloid β1-42 levels and a dose-dependent inhibition of β-secretase enzyme-1 activity. Moreover, this compound also reduced the phosphorylation of tau at the 181 and 159/163 residues with an increase of the inactive isoform of the glycogen synthase kinase-3β. In accordance with our in vitro neuronal model, this compound produced a reduction in the N2A subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. The combined effect of this compound on amyloid β1-42 and tau phosphorylation represents a multitarget therapeutic approach for AD which might be more effective for this multifactorial and complex neurodegenerative disease than the current treatments.

  17. Stereotactic radiosurgery as therapy for melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma brain metastases: Impact of added surgical resection and whole-brain radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ganesh; Klimo, Paul; Thompson, Clinton J.; Samlowski, Wolfram; Wang, Michael; Watson, Gordon; Shrieve, Dennis; Jensen, Randy L. . E-mail: randy.jensen@hsc.utah.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Brain metastases of melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma have traditionally responded poorly to conventional treatments, including surgery and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Several studies have suggested a beneficial effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). We evaluated our institutional experience with systematic SRS in patients harboring these 'radioresistant' metastases. Methods and Materials: A total of 68 patients with brain metastases from melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma underwent SRS with or without WBRT or surgical resection. All patients had Karnofsky performance scores >70, and SRS was performed before the initiation of systemic therapy. The survival time was calculated from the diagnosis of brain metastases using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Statistical significance was calculated using the log-rank test. Factors influencing survival, including surgical resection, WBRT, gender, number of SRS sessions, and histologic type, were evaluated retrospectively using Cox univariate models. Results: The overall median survival was 427 days (14.2 months), which appears superior to the results obtained with conventional WBRT. The addition of neither surgery nor WBRT to SRS provided a statistically significant increase in survival. Conclusion: Our results suggest that patients undergoing SRS for up to five cerebral metastases from 'radioresistant' tumors (melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma) have survival rates comparable to those in other series of more selected patients. The addition of surgical resection or WBRT did not result in improved survival in our series.

  18. Olfactory cells via nasal biopsy reflect the developing brain in gene expression profiles: utility and limitation of the surrogate tissues in research for brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Yasue; Kano, Shin-Ichi; Ishizuka, Koko; Cascella, Nicola G; Ishii, Seiji; Talbot, C Conover; Jaffe, Andrew E; Okano, Hideyuki; Pevsner, Jonathan; Colantuoni, Carlo; Sawa, Akira

    2013-12-01

    Human olfactory cells obtained by rapid nasal biopsy have been suggested to be a good surrogate system to address brain disease-associated molecular changes. Nonetheless, whether use of this experimental strategy is justified remains unclear. Here we compared expression profiles of olfactory cells systematically with those from the brain tissues and other cells. Principal component analysis indicated that the expression profiles of olfactory cells are very different from those of blood cells, but are closer to those of stem cells, in particular mesenchymal stem cells, that can be differentiated into the cells of the central nervous system.

  19. Olfactory cells via nasal biopsy reflect the developing brain in gene expression profiles: utility and limitation of the surrogate tissues in research for brain disorders

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Yasue; Kano, Shin-ichi; Ishizuka, Koko; Cascella, Nicola G.; Ishii, Seiji; Talbot, C. Conover; Jaffe, Andrew E.; Okano, Hideyuki; Pevsner, Jonathan; Colantuoni, Carlo; Sawa, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Human olfactory cells obtained by rapid nasal biopsy have been suggested to be a good surrogate system to address brain disease-associated molecular changes. Nonetheless, whether use of this experimental strategy is justified remains unclear. Here we compared expression profiles of olfactory cells systematically with those from the brain tissues and other cells. Principal component analysis indicated that the expression profiles of olfactory cells are very different from those of blood cells, but are closer to those of stem cells, in particular mesenchymal stem cells, that can be differentiated into the cells of the central nervous system. PMID:24120685

  20. Generation of Bioactive Oxylipins from Exogenously Added Arachidonic, Eicosapentaenoic and Docosahexaenoic Acid in Primary Human Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Aukema, Harold M; Winter, Tanja; Ravandi, Amir; Dalvi, Siddhartha; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-05-01

    The human blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood and is formed in part by microvessel endothelial cells. The brain contains significant amounts of arachidonic acid (ARA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which potentially give rise to the generation of bioactive oxylipins. Oxylipins are oxygenated fatty acid metabolites that are involved in an assortment of biological functions regulating neurological health and disease. Since it is not known which oxylipins are generated by human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMECs), they were incubated for up to 30 min in the absence or presence of 0.1-mM ARA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or DHA bound to albumin (1:1 molar ratio), and the oxylipins generated were examined using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS). Of 135 oxylipins screened in the media, 63 were present at >0.1 ng/mL at baseline, and 95 were present after incubation with fatty acid. Oxylipins were rapidly generated and reached maximum levels by 2-5 min. While ARA, EPA and DHA each stimulated the production of oxylipins derived from these fatty acids themselves, ARA also stimulated the production of oxylipins from endogenous 18- and 20-carbon fatty acids, including α-linolenic acid. Oxylipins generated by the lipoxygenase pathway predominated both in resting and stimulated states. Oxylipins formed via the cytochrome P450 pathway were formed primarily from DHA and EPA, but not ARA. These data indicate that HBMECs are capable of generating a plethora of bioactive lipids that have the potential to modulate BBB endothelial cell function.

  1. Determination of the lipophilic antipsychotic drug ziprasidone in rat plasma and brain tissue using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guodong; Terry, Alvin V; Bartlett, Michael G

    2008-07-01

    A simple, sensitive and robust liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LCESI-MS/MS) method with low matrix effects was developed and validated for the quantification of the lipophilic antipsychotic ziprasidone from rat plasma and brain tissue. Ziprasidone was extracted from rat plasma and brain homogenate using a single-step liquid-liquid extraction. Ziprasidone was separated on an Agilent Eclipse XDB C8 column (150 x 2.1 mm i.d., 5 microm) column using a mobile phase of acetonitrile-0.02% ammonia in water (pH 7.20 adjusted with formic acid) using gradient elution. Ziprasidone was detected in the positive ion mode using multiple reaction monitoring. The method was validated and the specificity, linearity, lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ), precision, accuracy, recovery, matrix effects and stability were determined. The LLOQ was 0.2 ng/mL for plasma and 0.833 ng/g for brain tissue. The method was linear over the concentration range from 0.2 to 200.0 ng/mL for plasma and 0.833-833.3 ng/g for brain tissue. The correlation coefficient (R2) values were more than 0.996 for both plasma and brain homogenate. The precision and accuracy intra-day and inter-day were better than 8.13%. The relative and absolute recovery was above 81.0% and matrix effects were lower than 5.2%. This validated method has been successfully used to quantify the rat plasma and brain tissue concentration of ziprasidone after chronic treatment.

  2. A stereotaxic, population-averaged T1w ovine brain atlas including cerebral morphology and tissue volumes

    PubMed Central

    Nitzsche, Björn; Frey, Stephen; Collins, Louis D.; Seeger, Johannes; Lobsien, Donald; Dreyer, Antje; Kirsten, Holger; Stoffel, Michael H.; Fonov, Vladimir S.; Boltze, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Standard stereotaxic reference systems play a key role in human brain studies. Stereotaxic coordinate systems have also been developed for experimental animals including non-human primates, dogs, and rodents. However, they are lacking for other species being relevant in experimental neuroscience including sheep. Here, we present a spatial, unbiased ovine brain template with tissue probability maps (TPM) that offer a detailed stereotaxic reference frame for anatomical features and localization of brain areas, thereby enabling inter-individual and cross-study comparability. Three-dimensional data sets from healthy adult Merino sheep (Ovis orientalis aries, 12 ewes and 26 neutered rams) were acquired on a 1.5 T Philips MRI using a T1w sequence. Data were averaged by linear and non-linear registration algorithms. Moreover, animals were subjected to detailed brain volume analysis including examinations with respect to body weight (BW), age, and sex. The created T1w brain template provides an appropriate population-averaged ovine brain anatomy in a spatial standard coordinate system. Additionally, TPM for gray (GM) and white (WM) matter as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) classification enabled automatic prior-based tissue segmentation using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Overall, a positive correlation of GM volume and BW explained about 15% of the variance of GM while a positive correlation between WM and age was found. Absolute tissue volume differences were not detected, indeed ewes showed significantly more GM per bodyweight as compared to neutered rams. The created framework including spatial brain template and TPM represent a useful tool for unbiased automatic image preprocessing and morphological characterization in sheep. Therefore, the reported results may serve as a starting point for further experimental and/or translational research aiming at in vivo analysis in this species. PMID:26089780

  3. A stereotaxic, population-averaged T1w ovine brain atlas including cerebral morphology and tissue volumes.

    PubMed

    Nitzsche, Björn; Frey, Stephen; Collins, Louis D; Seeger, Johannes; Lobsien, Donald; Dreyer, Antje; Kirsten, Holger; Stoffel, Michael H; Fonov, Vladimir S; Boltze, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Standard stereotaxic reference systems play a key role in human brain studies. Stereotaxic coordinate systems have also been developed for experimental animals including non-human primates, dogs, and rodents. However, they are lacking for other species being relevant in experimental neuroscience including sheep. Here, we present a spatial, unbiased ovine brain template with tissue probability maps (TPM) that offer a detailed stereotaxic reference frame for anatomical features and localization of brain areas, thereby enabling inter-individual and cross-study comparability. Three-dimensional data sets from healthy adult Merino sheep (Ovis orientalis aries, 12 ewes and 26 neutered rams) were acquired on a 1.5 T Philips MRI using a T1w sequence. Data were averaged by linear and non-linear registration algorithms. Moreover, animals were subjected to detailed brain volume analysis including examinations with respect to body weight (BW), age, and sex. The created T1w brain template provides an appropriate population-averaged ovine brain anatomy in a spatial standard coordinate system. Additionally, TPM for gray (GM) and white (WM) matter as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) classification enabled automatic prior-based tissue segmentation using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Overall, a positive correlation of GM volume and BW explained about 15% of the variance of GM while a positive correlation between WM and age was found. Absolute tissue volume differences were not detected, indeed ewes showed significantly more GM per bodyweight as compared to neutered rams. The created framework including spatial brain template and TPM represent a useful tool for unbiased automatic image preprocessing and morphological characterization in sheep. Therefore, the reported results may serve as a starting point for further experimental and/or translational research aiming at in vivo analysis in this species.

  4. Experimental in-vivo study of laser-tissue interaction on the brain: influence of gaseous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavantes, Maria C.; Zamorano, Lucia J.; Vinas, Federico; Dujovny, Manuel; Dragovic, Ljubisa

    1990-06-01

    The present study attempted to assess the in vivo effects of Nd-YAG laser irradiation in different gaseous environments on liver and brain. Such an investigation is critical for determining the extent of injury under such conditions for improving further clinical applications. We intended to define the influence on laser-tissue interaction of Room Air, 30% Oxygen, Helium, and Nitrogen. The anesthetized rats were placed in a special chamber and kept breathtng via a tracheostomy tube to the outside, and craniotomy or laparotomy was performed. Nd-YAG laser fiber was directed with a fixed distance at the exposed brain/liver. The staining drug for brain study was 2,3,5 triphenyltetrazolium chloride, which was injected into the aorta before sacrificing the animals. The 44 rats studied were divided into: liver and brain groups. The resulting lesions were photographed macroscopically. In the liver group, statistical analysis showed that laser-liver tissue interaction in helium and nitrogen created a well defined and less hemorrhagic lesions. Macroscopically, in the brain group, we found that the target zones were well delineated with Nitrogen concentration. Moreover, we observed smaller lesions and more sharply defined areas with Helium concentration. In Room Air and Oxygen concentrations, more carbonized and bloodish lesions were found. Laser-tissue interaction in Helium and Nitrogen environments produces more sharply defined lesions with less involvement of the sorrounding tissue, less hemorrhagic lesions to the target, and reduce smoke production. This effect may be of benefit in clinical application of Nd YAG laser, where a more specific target-laser interaction could be achieved avoiding undesired complications due to penetration on the surrounding healthy tissue.

  5. Research of electrosurgical ablation with antiadhesive functionalization on thermal and histopathological effects of brain tissues in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Wen-Tien; Kung, Chun-Ming; Chu, Jan-Show; Ou, Keng-Liang; Peng, Pei-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Thermal injury and tissue sticking are two major concerns in the electrosurgery. In the present study, the effect of lateral thermal injury caused by different electrosurgical electrodes on wound healing was investigated. An electrosurgical unit equipped with untreated (SS) and titanium oxide layer-coated (TiO2-coated) stainless steel needle-type electrodes was used to create lesions on the rat brain tissue. TiO2 layers were produced by radiofrequency plasma and magnetron sputtering in the form of amorphous (TO-SS-1), anatase (TO-SS-2), and rutile (TO-SS-3) phase. Animals were sacrificed for evaluations at 0, 2, 7, and 28 days postoperatively. TO-SS-3 electrodes generated lower levels of sticking tissue, and the thermographs showed that the recorded highest temperature in brain tissue from the TO-SS-3 electrode was significantly lower than in the SS electrode. The total injury area of brain tissue caused by TO-SS-1 and TO-SS-3 electrodes was significantly lower than that caused by SS electrodes at each time point. The results of the present study reveal that the plating of electrodes with a TiO2 film with rutile phases is an efficient method for improving the performance of electrosurgical units and should benefit wound healing.

  6. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry for direct measurement of clozapine in rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yunsheng; Casale, Roger; Fukuda, Elaine; Chen, Jiwen; Knemeyer, Ian; Wingate, Julia; Morrison, Richard; Korfmacher, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization hyphenated with quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to directly determine the distribution of pharmaceuticals in rat brain tissue slices which might unravel their disposition for new drug development. Clozapine, an antipsychotic drug, and norclozapine were used as model compounds to investigate fundamental parameters such as matrix and solvent effects and irradiance dependence on MALDI intensity but also to address the issues with direct tissue imaging MS technique such as (1) uniform coating by the matrix, (2) linearity of MALDI signals, and (3) redistribution of surface analytes. The tissue sections were coated with various matrices on MALDI plates by airspray deposition prior to MS detection. MALDI signals of analytes were detected by monitoring the dissociation of the individual protonated molecules to their predominant MS/MS product ions. The matrices were chosen for tissue applications based on their ability to form a homogeneous coating of dense crystals and to yield greater sensitivity. Images revealing the spatial localization in tissue sections using MALDI-QTOF following a direct infusion of (3)H-clozapine into rat brain were found to be in good correlation with those using a radioautographic approach. The density of clozapine and its major metabolites from whole brain homogenates was further confirmed using fast high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) procedures.

  7. A derivative of the brain metabolite lanthionine ketimine improves cognition and diminishes pathology in the 3 × Tg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Kenneth; Gabbita, S Prasad; Venkova, Kalina; Hristov, Alexandar; Johnson, Ming F; Eslami, Pirooz; Harris-White, Marni E

    2013-10-01

    Lanthionine ketimine ([LK] 3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-thiazine-3,5-dicarboxylic acid) is the archetype for a family of naturally occurring brain sulfur amino acid metabolites, the physiologic function of which is unknown. Lanthionine ketimine and its synthetic derivatives have recently demonstrated neurotrophic, neuroprotective, and antineuroinflammatory properties in vitro through a proposed mechanism involving the microtubule-associated protein collapsin response mediator protein 2. Therefore, studies were undertaken to test the effects of a bioavailable LK ester in the 3 × Tg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer disease. Lanthionine ketimine ester treatment substantially diminished cognitive decline and brain amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide deposition and phospho-Tau accumulation in 3 × Tg-AD mice and also reduced the density of Iba1-positive microglia. Furthermore, LK ester treatment altered collapsin response mediator protein 2 phosphorylation. These findings suggest that LK may not be a metabolic waste but rather a purposeful neurochemical, the synthetic derivatives of which constitute a new class of experimental therapeutics for Alzheimer disease and related entities.

  8. Influence of time to achieve substrate distribution equilibrium between brain tissue and blood on quantitation of the blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein effect.

    PubMed

    Padowski, Jeannie M; Pollack, Gary M

    2011-12-02

    Active efflux transport processes at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated efflux, can limit brain uptake of therapeutics. Accurate determination of the consequent impact on brain uptake is assumed to require sampling post-attainment of brain-to-blood distribution equilibrium. Because this approach is not always feasible, understanding the relationship between apparent degree of efflux (e.g., calculated BBB P-gp effect) and the fraction of time remaining until distribution equilibrium is achieved (FTDE) would be advantageous. This study employed simulation strategies to explore this relationship in the simplest relevant system (absence of protein binding, saturable uptake, or metabolism at the BBB). Concentration-time profiles were simulated with a 4-compartment system (blood, peripheral tissues, BBB endothelium and brain parenchyma). A unidirectional endothelium-to-blood rate constant, PS(e), represented P-gp-mediated efflux. A parameter space was selected to simulate an 18-fold P-gp effect, (K(p,brain) at distribution equilibrium in the absence [K(p,brain)=82] vs. presence [K(p,brain)=4.5] of P-gp-mediated flux), as observed for paclitaxel in P-gp-deficient vs. P-gp-competent mice. Hypothetical compounds with different P-gp effects, peripheral compartment distribution kinetics, or times to achieve distribution equilibrium were simulated by perturbing the values of relevant model parameters. P-gp effects calculated prior to attainment of distribution equilibrium may be substantially erroneous. However, reasonably accurate estimates can be obtained relatively early in the net distributional phase (under 20% error at FTDE>0.36 or 0.11 for bolus or infusion administration, respectively). Potential errors associated with non-equilibrium calculations are dependent on both P-gp-mediated and P-gp-independent components of flux across the BBB.

  9. Characterization of the Distance Relationship Between Localized Serotonin Receptors and Glia Cells on Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Brain Tissue.

    PubMed

    Jacak, Jaroslaw; Schaller, Susanne; Borgmann, Daniela; Winkler, Stephan M

    2015-08-01

    We here present two new methods for the characterization of fluorescent localization microscopy images obtained from immunostained brain tissue sections. Direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy images of 5-HT1A serotonin receptors and glial fibrillary acidic proteins in healthy cryopreserved brain tissues are analyzed. In detail, we here present two image processing methods for characterizing differences in receptor distribution on glial cells and their distribution on neural cells: One variant relies on skeleton extraction and adaptive thresholding, the other on k-means based discrete layer segmentation. Experimental results show that both methods can be applied for distinguishing classes of images with respect to serotonin receptor distribution. Quantification of nanoscopic changes in relative protein expression on particular cell types can be used to analyze degeneration in tissues caused by diseases or medical treatment.

  10. Neural network-based brain tissue segmentation in MR images using extracted features from intraframe coding in H.264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Mehdi; Kasaei, Shohreh

    2011-12-01

    Automatic brain tissue segmentation is a crucial task in diagnosis and treatment of medical images. This paper presents a new algorithm to segment different brain tissues, such as white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), background (BKG), and tumor tissues. The proposed technique uses the modified intraframe coding yielded from H.264/(AVC), for feature extraction. Extracted features are then imposed to an artificial back propagation neural network (BPN) classifier to assign each block to its appropriate class. Since the newest coding standard, H.264/AVC, has the highest compression ratio, it decreases the dimension of extracted features and thus yields to a more accurate classifier with low computational complexity. The performance of the BPN classifier is evaluated using the classification accuracy and computational complexity terms. The results show that the proposed technique is more robust and effective with low computational complexity compared to other recent works.

  11. Neural network-based brain tissue segmentation in MR images using extracted features from intraframe coding in H.264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Mehdi; Kasaei, Shohreh

    2012-01-01

    Automatic brain tissue segmentation is a crucial task in diagnosis and treatment of medical images. This paper presents a new algorithm to segment different brain tissues, such as white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), background (BKG), and tumor tissues. The proposed technique uses the modified intraframe coding yielded from H.264/(AVC), for feature extraction. Extracted features are then imposed to an artificial back propagation neural network (BPN) classifier to assign each block to its appropriate class. Since the newest coding standard, H.264/AVC, has the highest compression ratio, it decreases the dimension of extracted features and thus yields to a more accurate classifier with low computational complexity. The performance of the BPN classifier is evaluated using the classification accuracy and computational complexity terms. The results show that the proposed technique is more robust and effective with low computational complexity compared to other recent works.

  12. Increased brain tissue sodium concentration in Huntington's Disease - a sodium imaging study at 4 T.

    PubMed

    Reetz, Kathrin; Romanzetti, Sandro; Dogan, Imis; Saß, Christian; Werner, Cornelius J; Schiefer, Johannes; Schulz, Jörg B; Shah, N Jon

    2012-10-15

    The neuropathological hallmark of the autosomal dominantly inherited, neurodegenerative disorder Huntington's disease is progressive striatal loss starting several years prior to symptom manifestation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been widely used to detect altered structure in premanifest and early Huntington's disease. Given that neurodegeneration is likely preceded by substantial neuronal dysfunction, we used in vivo sodium MR imaging, which has been shown to be sensitive to cell death and viability, to investigate cellular and metabolic integrity of Huntington's disease brain tissue. We studied a total of thirteen healthy controls and thirteen Huntington's disease gene carriers (11 manifest and 2 premanifest). The manifest Huntington's disease group was subdivided into stages 1 and 2 according to their Total Functional Capacity scores. Clinical total motor and cognitive scores, as well as calibrated sodium and T1-weighted MR images were obtained with a 4 T Siemens MR scanner. Sodium images were acquired by means of a constant time imaging technique with an ultra-short "echo time". T1-weighted MR images were further analysed with voxel-based morphometry. The absolute total sodium concentration and grey matter values were measured in several Huntington's disease-specific and also non-specific areas. Statistical analysis of variance and Pearson correlation were applied. In Huntington's disease subjects, we found an increase of total sodium concentration of the entire brain compared to controls. Increased total sodium concentration values were found in structurally affected, but also in some non-affected, regions. The highest total sodium concentration values were found in the bilateral caudate, which was associated with caudate grey matter atrophy and CAG repeat length. In all Huntington's disease subjects we further found a profound increase of total sodium concentration in the putamen, pallidum, thalamus, hippocampus, insula, precuneus and occipital

  13. In-vivo monitoring of tissue oxygen saturation in deep brain structures using a single fiber optical system

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Linhui; Wu, Ying; Dunn, Jeff F.; Murari, Kartikeya

    2016-01-01

    We propose a single fiber optical system for monitoring tissue oxygen saturation (sO2) based on continuous-wave reflectance spectroscopy in the visible wavelengths. The system is designed for measurements in deep brain structures by stereotaxically implanting the 200 μm-core fiber probe into the tissue of interest. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to estimate the measurement tissue volume between 0.02–0.03 mm3. Experiments in an optical phantom indicated the system had a root mean squared error (RMSE) of 4.21% compared with a commercial fluorescence-based tissue oxygen partial pressure measuring system. Finally, we used the system for continuously monitoring tissue sO2 from a highly-localized volume in anesthetized mice. PMID:27896007

  14. Brain tissue oxygen tension and its response to physiological manipulations: influence of distance from injury site in a swine model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hawryluk, Gregory W J; Phan, Nicolas; Ferguson, Adam R; Morabito, Diane; Derugin, Nikita; Stewart, Campbell L; Knudson, M Margaret; Manley, Geoffrey; Rosenthal, Guy

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE The optimal site for placement of tissue oxygen probes following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains unresolved. The authors used a previously described swine model of focal TBI and studied brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) at the sites of contusion, proximal and distal to contusion, and in the contralateral hemisphere to determine the effect of probe location on PbtO2 and to assess the effects of physiological interventions on PbtO2 at these different sites. METHODS A controlled cortical impact device was used to generate a focal lesion in the right frontal lobe in 12 anesthetized swine. PbtO2 was measured using Licox brain tissue oxygen probes placed at the site of contusion, in pericontusional tissue (proximal probe), in the right parietal region (distal probe), and in the contralateral hemisphere. PbtO2 was measured during normoxia, hyperoxia, hypoventilation, and hyperventilation. RESULTS Physiological interventions led to expected changes, including a large increase in partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood with hyperoxia, increased intracranial pressure (ICP) with hypoventilation, and decreased ICP with hyperventilation. Importantly, PbtO2 decreased substantially with proximity to the focal injury (contusion and proximal probes), and this difference was maintained at different levels of fraction of inspired oxygen and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood. In the distal and contralateral probes, hypoventilation and hyperventilation were associated with expected increased and decreased PbtO2 values, respectively. However, in the contusion and proximal probes, these effects were diminished, consistent with loss of cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity at and near the injury site. Similarly, hyperoxia led to the expected rise in PbtO2 only in the distal and contralateral probes, with little or no effect in the proximal and contusion probes, respectively. CONCLUSIONS PbtO2 measurements are strongly influenced by the distance from the

  15. Application of Quantitative MRI for Brain Tissue Segmentation at 1.5 T and 3.0 T Field Strengths

    PubMed Central

    West, Janne; Blystad, Ida; Engström, Maria; Warntjes, Jan B. M.; Lundberg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Brain tissue segmentation of white matter (WM), grey matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are important in neuroradiological applications. Quantitative Mri (qMRI) allows segmentation based on physical tissue properties, and the dependencies on MR scanner settings are removed. Brain tissue groups into clusters in the three dimensional space formed by the qMRI parameters R1, R2 and PD, and partial volume voxels are intermediate in this space. The qMRI parameters, however, depend on the main magnetic field strength. Therefore, longitudinal studies can be seriously limited by system upgrades. The aim of this work was to apply one recently described brain tissue segmentation method, based on qMRI, at both 1.5 T and 3.0 T field strengths, and to investigate similarities and differences. Methods In vivo qMRI measurements were performed on 10 healthy subjects using both 1.5 T and 3.0 T MR scanners. The brain tissue segmentation method was applied for both 1.5 T and 3.0 T and volumes of WM, GM, CSF and brain parenchymal fraction (BPF) were calculated on both field strengths. Repeatability was calculated for each scanner and a General Linear Model was used to examine the effect of field strength. Voxel-wise t-tests were also performed to evaluate regional differences. Results Statistically significant differences were found between 1.5 T and 3.0 T for WM, GM, CSF and BPF (p<0.001). Analyses of main effects showed that WM was underestimated, while GM and CSF were overestimated on 1.5 T compared to 3.0 T. The mean differences between 1.5 T and 3.0 T were -66 mL WM, 40 mL GM, 29 mL CSF and -1.99% BPF. Voxel-wise t-tests revealed regional differences of WM and GM in deep brain structures, cerebellum and brain stem. Conclusions Most of the brain was identically classified at the two field strengths, although some regional differences were observed. PMID:24066153

  16. MALDI mass spectrometry based molecular phenotyping of CNS glial cells for prediction in mammalian brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Hanrieder, Jörg; Wicher, Grzegorz; Bergquist, Jonas; Andersson, Malin; Fex-Svenningsen, Asa

    2011-07-01

    The development of powerful analytical techniques for specific molecular characterization of neural cell types is of central relevance in neuroscience research for elucidating cellular functions in the central nervous system (CNS). This study examines the use of differential protein expression profiling of mammalian neural cells using direct analysis by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). MALDI-MS analysis is rapid, sensitive, robust, and specific for large biomolecules in complex matrices. Here, we describe a newly developed and straightforward methodology for direct characterization of rodent CNS glial cells using MALDI-MS-based intact cell mass spectrometry (ICMS). This molecular phenotyping approach enables monitoring of cell growth stages, (stem) cell differentiation, as well as probing cellular responses towards different stimulations. Glial cells were separated into pure astroglial, microglial, and oligodendroglial cell cultures. The intact cell suspensions were then analyzed directly by MALDI-TOF-MS, resulting in characteristic mass spectra profiles that discriminated glial cell types using principal component analysis. Complementary proteomic experiments revealed the identity of these signature proteins that were predominantly expressed in the different glial cell types, including histone H4 for oligodendrocytes and S100-A10 for astrocytes. MALDI imaging MS was performed, and signature masses were employed as molecular tracers for prediction of oligodendroglial and astroglial localization in brain tissue. The different cell type specific protein distributions in tissue were validated using immunohistochemistry. ICMS of intact neuroglia is a simple and straightforward approach for characterization and discrimination of different cell types with molecular specificity.

  17. Metabolomic Analysis of Rat Brain by High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Tissue Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Norbert W.; Béraud, Evelyne; Cozzone, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of gene expression on the RNA and protein levels have long been used to explore biological processes underlying disease. More recently, genomics and proteomics have been complemented by comprehensive quantitative analysis of the metabolite pool present in biological systems. This strategy, termed metabolomics, strives to provide a global characterization of the small-molecule complement involved in metabolism. While the genome and the proteome define the tasks cells can perform, the metabolome is part of the actual phenotype. Among the methods currently used in metabolomics, spectroscopic techniques are of special interest because they allow one to simultaneously analyze a large number of metabolites without prior selection for specific biochemical pathways, thus enabling a broad unbiased approach. Here, an optimized experimental protocol for metabolomic analysis by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy is presented, which is the method of choice for efficient quantification of tissue metabolites. Important strengths of this method are (i) the use of crude extracts, without the need to purify the sample and/or separate metabolites; (ii) the intrinsically quantitative nature of NMR, permitting quantitation of all metabolites represented by an NMR spectrum with one reference compound only; and (iii) the nondestructive nature of NMR enabling repeated use of the same sample for multiple measurements. The dynamic range of metabolite concentrations that can be covered is considerable due to the linear response of NMR signals, although metabolites occurring at extremely low concentrations may be difficult to detect. For the least abundant compounds, the highly sensitive mass spectrometry method may be advantageous although this technique requires more intricate sample preparation and quantification procedures than NMR spectroscopy. We present here an NMR protocol adjusted to rat brain analysis; however, the same protocol can be applied to other tissues with minor

  18. Tissomics: two- and three-dimensional distribution of nuclei in brain tissue using laser scanning cytometry (LSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Domnik; Mittag, Anja; Mosch, Birgit; Bocsi, Jozsef; Arendt, Thomas; Tarnok, Attila

    2005-03-01

    Automated quantitative (i.e. stochiometric) analysis of tissues is of eminent importance in the understanding of all interactions between cells in their natural environment. In tissue cytometry a solid trigger is necessary in order to unequivocally differentiate between cellular and non-cellular events. This can be best performed by nuclear staining. Aim of this study was to analyze a brain tissue section by laser scanning cytometry (LSC) in order to depict the threedimensional distribution of nuclei in the tissue. To this end the section was measured in several foci and different nuclei detected in several depths of the tissue were assigned to the respective layer. Frozen sections of formalin-fixed rat or human brain tissue (120μm thickness) were incubated with propidiumiodide (PI) (50μg/ml) and covered on slides. For analysis by the LSC propidiumiodide was used as trigger. After a first analysis focussed on the top of the tissue, the focus was adjusted in 30μm steps deeper into the tissue. Per analysis data of at least 50,000 cells were acquired. After finishing measurements from all depths of the field were merged, i.e. data were combined into a composite data file. With the special features of the LSC it was possible to develop a method depicting the threedimensional distribution of the nuclei in solid tissue sections. LSC can be useful tool for this relatively new field of solid tissue cytometry termed tissomics. After evaluation of methods like this, so far not available data can be analysed for diagnostic purposes. By these studies we intend to demonstrate the power of the LSC for the routine pathological use. This should add up to the bright versatility of applications for the LSC as a cytometric instrument suitable for high throughput and high content analysis.

  19. [Late-onset Neurodegenerative Diseases Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) and Alzheimer's Disease Secondary to TBI (AD-TBI)].

    PubMed

    Takahata, Keisuke; Tabuchi, Hajime; Mimura, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is associated with mild repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). This long-term and progressive symptom due to TBI was initially called punch-drunk syndrome or dementia pugilistica, since it was believed to be associated with boxing. However, serial neuropathological studies of mild repetitive TBI in the last decade have revealed that CTE occurs not only in boxers but also in a wider population including American football players, wrestlers, and military personnel. CTE has gained large public interest owing to dramatic cases involving retired professional athletes wherein serious behavioral problems and tragic incidents were reported. Unlike mild repetitive TBI, a single episode of severe TBI can cause another type of late-onset neuropsychiatric disease including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several epidemiological studies have shown that a single episode of severe TBI is one of the major risk factors of AD. Pathologically, both AD and CTE are characterized by abnormal accumulations of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. However, recent neuropathological studies revealed that CTE demonstrates a unique pattern of tau pathology in neurons and astrocytes, and accumulation of other misfolded proteins such as TDP-43. Currently, no reliable biomarkers of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI are available, and a definitive diagnosis can be made only via postmortem neuropathological examination. Development in neuroimaging techniques such as tau and amyloid positron emission tomography imaging might not only enable early diagnosis of CTE, but also contribute to the interventions for prevention of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in the living brain of patients with TBI.

  20. Postmortem concentrations of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in peripheral blood and brain tissue - Differentiating between postmortem formation and antemortem intake.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Ragnar; Rasmussen, Brian Schou; Johansen, Sys Stybe; Linnet, Kristian

    2017-03-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a recreational drug, a drug of abuse, as well as an endogenous molecule in mammals. The drug has become infamous as a tool for drug-facilitated sexual assault. GHB is found in low concentrations in living humans, while at postmortem the concentration of GHB rises due to fermentation processes. The endogenous nature of GHB leads to difficulty in interpretation of concentrations, as the source of GHB is not obvious. Postmortem brain and blood samples were collected from 221 individuals at autopsy. Of these, 218 were not suspected of having ingested GHB, while GHB intake was reported for the last three (cases A-C). Decomposition level was estimated and cases classified into no/minor and advanced decomposition. Brain samples were extracted from the frontal lobe; only gray matter from the cerebral cortex was used. Blood was drawn from the femoral vein. Brain samples were homogenized and diluted with water. Brain homogenates or femoral blood were then prepared using protein precipitation and GHB was quantified with UHPLC-MS/MS. For 189 cases where ingestion of GHB was not suspected and where no/minor decomposition had occurred the concentrations were in the range 4.8-45.4mg/kg (median 15.3mg/kg) in blood and not-detected to 9.8mg/kg (median 4.8mg/kg) in brain tissue. For case A, where intoxication with GHB was deemed to be the sole cause of death, the concentrations were 199 and 166mg/kg in blood and brain, respectively. For case B, where intoxication with G