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Sample records for ad csf biomarkers

  1. Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease: A Unique Resource to Study CSF Biomarker Changes in Preclinical AD

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Suzanne Elizabeth; Fagan, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) has been greatly influenced by investigation of rare families with autosomal dominant mutations that cause early onset AD. Mutations in the genes coding for amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PSEN-1), and presenilin 2 (PSEN-2) cause over-production of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) leading to early deposition of Aβ in the brain, which in turn is hypothesized to initiate a cascade of processes, resulting in neuronal death, cognitive decline, and eventual dementia. Studies of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from individuals with the common form of AD, late-onset AD (LOAD), have revealed that low CSF Aβ42 and high CSF tau are associated with AD brain pathology. Herein, we review the literature on CSF biomarkers in autosomal dominant AD (ADAD), which has contributed to a detailed road map of AD pathogenesis, especially during the preclinical period, prior to the appearance of any cognitive symptoms. Current drug trials are also taking advantage of the unique characteristics of ADAD and utilizing CSF biomarkers to accelerate development of effective therapies for AD. PMID:26175713

  2. Integration and relative value of biomarkers for prediction of MCI to AD progression: spatial patterns of brain atrophy, cognitive scores, APOE genotype and CSF biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Da, Xiao; Toledo, Jon B; Zee, Jarcy; Wolk, David A; Xie, Sharon X; Ou, Yangming; Shacklett, Amanda; Parmpi, Paraskevi; Shaw, Leslie; Trojanowski, John Q; Davatzikos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the individual, as well as relative and joint value of indices obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns of brain atrophy (quantified by the SPARE-AD index), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, APOE genotype, and cognitive performance (ADAS-Cog) in progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD) within a variable follow-up period up to 6 years, using data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1). SPARE-AD was first established as a highly sensitive and specific MRI-marker of AD vs. cognitively normal (CN) subjects (AUC = 0.98). Baseline predictive values of all aforementioned indices were then compared using survival analysis on 381 MCI subjects. SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog were found to have similar predictive value, and their combination was significantly better than their individual performance. APOE genotype did not significantly improve prediction, although the combination of SPARE-AD, ADAS-Cog and APOE ε4 provided the highest hazard ratio estimates of 17.8 (last vs. first quartile). In a subset of 192 MCI patients who also had CSF biomarkers, the addition of Aβ1-42, t-tau, and p-tau181p to the previous model did not improve predictive value significantly over SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog combined. Importantly, in amyloid-negative patients with MCI, SPARE-AD had high predictive power of clinical progression. Our findings suggest that SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog in combination offer the highest predictive power of conversion from MCI to AD, which is improved, albeit not significantly, by APOE genotype. The finding that SPARE-AD in amyloid-negative MCI patients was predictive of clinical progression is not expected under the amyloid hypothesis and merits further investigation.

  3. CSF biomarkers in neurodegenerative and vascular dementias.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Franc; Schmitz, Matthias; Ferrer, Isidro; Zerr, Inga

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases with abnormal protein aggregates such as Alzheimer's disease, tauopathies, synucleinopathies, and prionopathies, together with vascular encephalopathies, are cause of cognitive impairment and dementia. Identification of reliable biomarkers in biological fluids, particularly in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), is of extreme importance in optimizing the precise early clinical diagnosis of distinct entities and predicting the outcome in particular settings. In addition, the study of CSF biomarkers is useful to identify and monitor the underlying pathological processes developing in the central nervous system of affected individuals. Evidence suggests that levels of key CSF molecules correlate, in some circumstances, with prediction, disease progression, and severity of cognitive decline. Correlation of CSF markers and underlying pathological molecular substrates in brain is an exciting field for further study. However, while some dementias such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease have accurate CSF biomarkers, other disease types such as dementia with Lewy bodies, vascular dementia, and frontotemporal dementia lack reliable biomarkers for their specific clinical diagnosis. PMID:27016008

  4. Neuropsychological and behavioural correlates of CSF biomarkers in dementia.

    PubMed

    Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Maertens, Karen; Vloeberghs, Ellen; Aerts, Tony; Somers, Nore; Mariën, Peter; De Deyn, Peter P

    2006-03-01

    To improve clinical, neuropsychological and behavioural characterisation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers beta-amyloid((1-42)) protein (Abeta42), protein tau (tau) and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-tau181) across diagnostic dementia categories, a prospective study was set up. Patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n=201), AD with cerebrovascular disease (CVD) (AD+CVD) (n=33), frontotemporal dementia (FTD) (n=27), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) (n=22) and healthy controls (n=148) were included. All patients underwent neuropsychological examination and behavioural assessment by means of a battery of behavioural assessment scales. CSF was obtained by lumbar puncture and levels of Abeta42, tau and P-tau181 were determined with commercially available ELISA kits. Negative correlations between CSF Abeta42 levels and aggressiveness (Spearman: r=-0.223; p=0.002) and positive correlations with age at inclusion (r=0.195; p=0.006), age at onset (r=0.205; p=0.003) and MMSE scores (r=0.198; p=0.005) were found in AD. In AD+CVD, CSF Abeta42 levels were correlated with MMSE (r=0.482; p=0.006), Hierarchic Dementia Scale (r=0.503; p=0.017) and Boston Naming Test (r=0.516; p=0.012) scores. In controls, age was positively correlated with CSF tau (r=0.465; p<0.001) and P-tau181 levels (r=0.312; p<0.001). CSF tau and P-tau181 levels correlated significantly in all groups, whereas CSF Abeta42 correlated with tau and P-tau181 levels in healthy controls only. Negative correlations between CSF Abeta42 levels and aggressiveness were found in AD patients. CSF Abeta42 seems to be a stage marker for AD (+/-CVD) given the positive correlations with neuropsychological test results suggesting that CSF Abeta42 might be of help for monitoring disease progression. Different correlations between age and CSF biomarker levels were obtained in healthy controls compared to AD patients, indicating that AD-induced pathophysiological processes change age-dependent regulation of

  5. Using CSF biomarkers to replicate genetic associations in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Schott, Jonathan M

    2012-07-01

    Defining cases and controls on the basis of biomarkers rather than clinical diagnosis may reduce sample sizes required for genetic studies. The aim of this study was to assess whether characterizing case/control status on the basis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile would increase power to replicate known genetic associations for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Independent of clinical diagnosis, Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) subjects with 2 CSF biomarkers for AD (Aβ1-42 < 192 pg/mL and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (p-tau) > 23 pg/mL, "CSF-positive") were compared with those without CSF evidence for AD (Aβ1-42 > 192 pg/mL and 181-phosphorylated tau < 23 pg/mL, "CSF-negative"). Minor allele frequency (MAF) and odds ratios (ORs) between these 2 groups were calculated for 7 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of interest. Two hundred thirty-two individuals were CSF-positive and 94 CSF-negative. There were no differences in age (74.7 ± 7.2 vs. 75.0 ± 6.5 years, p = 0.7), but significant differences in Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) (25.9 ± 2.6 vs. 28.2 ± 1.7, p < 0.001) between the CSF-positive and CSF-negative groups. Significant differences in MAF (p < 0.05, uncorrected) were seen for CR1 (rs1408077; OR, 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-2.49), PICALM (rs541458; OR, 0.68, 95% CI, 0.47-0.98), TOMM40 (rs2075650; OR, 4.30; 95% CI, 2.61-7.06); and possession of 1 or more APOE ε4 alleles (OR, 9.84; 95% CI, 5.48-17.67). These results suggest that using biomarkers of AD pathology to define case and control status may increase power in genetic association studies.

  6. Clinical indications for analysis of Alzheimer's disease CSF biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Engelborghs, S

    2013-10-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers β-amyloid1-42 (Aβ1-42), total tau protein (T-tau) and hyperphosphorylated tau (P-tau181P) are well-validated and are increasingly used in clinical practice as an affirmative diagnostic tool for Alzheimer's disease (AD). These biomarkers have also been implemented in the revised diagnostic criteria of AD. The combination of the CSF biomarkers Aβ1-42, T-tau and P-tau181P results in high levels of sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy for discriminating AD from controls (including psychiatric disorders like depression). These biomarkers can be applied for diagnosing AD in the prodromal phase of the disease (mild cognitive impairment). In case of doubt between vascular dementia (VaD) or mixed AD-VaD pathology in dementia patients, the determination of CSF Aβ1-42, T-tau and P-tau181P levels is of help to confirm or exclude the AD component in the pathophysiology of the dementia syndrome. However, their discriminatory power for the differential diagnosis of dementia is suboptimal. Other CSF biomarkers like Aβ1-40, and those that are reflective of the pathology of non-AD dementias, could improve the accuracy of differential dementia diagnosis. The added differential diagnostic value of the CSF biomarkers Aβ1-42, T-tau and P-tau181P could lie within those cases in which the routine clinical diagnostic work-up is not able to discriminate between AD or non-AD dementias. In summary, the CSF biomarkers Aβ1-42, T-tau and P-tau181P can be used in clinical practice to discriminate AD from healthy aging (including psychiatric disorders like depression), to diagnose AD in its prodromal phase or in atypical forms with prominent non-memory impairment, to identify AD in patients with mixed pathologies and in case of an ambiguous (AD versus non-AD) dementia diagnosis.

  7. CSF biomarkers cutoffs: the importance of coincident neuropathological diseases.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Jon B; Brettschneider, Johannes; Grossman, Murray; Arnold, Steven E; Hu, William T; Xie, Sharon X; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q

    2012-07-01

    The effects of applying clinical versus neuropathological diagnosis and the inclusion of cases with coincident neuropathological diagnoses have not been assessed specifically when studying cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker classification cutoffs for patients with neurodegenerative diseases that cause dementia. Thus, 142 neuropathologically diagnosed neurodegenerative dementia patients [71 Alzheimer's disease (AD), 29 frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), 3 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 7 dementia with Lewy bodies, 32 of which cases also had coincident diagnoses] were studied. 96 % had enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) CSF data and 77 % had Luminex CSF data, with 43 and 46 controls for comparison, respectively. Aβ(42), total, and phosphorylated tau(181) were measured. Clinical and neuropathological diagnoses showed an 81.4 % overall agreement. Both assays showed high sensitivity and specificity to classify AD subjects against FTLD subjects and controls, and moderate sensitivity and specificity for classifying FTLD subjects against controls. However, among the cases with neuropathological diagnoses of AD plus another pathology (26.8 % of the sample), 69.4 % (ELISA) and 96.4 % (Luminex) were classified as AD according to their biomarker profiles. Use of clinical diagnosis instead of neuropathological diagnosis led to a 14-17 % underestimation of the biomarker accuracy. These results show that while CSF Aβ and tau assays are useful for diagnosis of AD and neurodegenerative diseases even at MCI stages, CSF diagnostic analyte panels that establish a positive diagnosis of Lewy body disease and FTLD are also needed, and must be established based on neuropathological rather than clinical diagnoses.

  8. Mapping CSF biomarker profiles onto NIA-AA guidelines for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Roesler, Jennifer; Thierjung, Nathalie; Werle, Lukas; Buck, Dorothea; Yakushev, Igor; Gleixner, Lena; Kagerbauer, Simone; Ortner, Marion; Grimmer, Timo; Kübler, Hubert; Martin, Jan; Laskaris, Nikolaos; Kurz, Alexander; Perneczky, Robert

    2016-10-01

    The National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA) guidelines for Alzheimer's disease (AD) propose the categorization of individuals according to their biomarker constellation. Though the NIA-AA criteria for preclinical AD and AD dementia have already been applied in conjunction with imaging AD biomarkers, the application of the criteria using comprehensive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker information has not been thoroughly studied yet. The study included a monocentric cohort with healthy (N = 41) and disease (N = 22) controls and patients with AD dementia (N = 119), and a multicentric sample with healthy controls (N = 116) and patients with AD dementia (N = 102). The CSF biomarkers β-amyloid 1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau at threonine 181 were measured with commercially available assays. Biomarker values were trichotomized into positive for AD, negative, or borderline. In controls the presence of normal CSF profiles varied between 13.6 and 25.4 % across the studied groups, while up to 8.6 % of them had abnormal CSF biomarkers. In 40.3-52.9 % of patients with AD dementia, a typical CSF profile for AD was detected. Approximately 40 % of the potential biomarker constellations are not considered in the NIA-AA guidelines, and more than 40 % of participants could not be classified into the NIA-AA categories with distinct biomarker constellations. Here, a refined scheme covering all potential biomarker constellations is proposed. These results enrich the discussion on the NIA-AA guidelines and point to a discordance between clinical symptomatology and CSF biomarkers even in patients with full-blown AD dementia, who are supposed to have a clearly positive for AD neurochemical profile.

  9. Predicting MCI outcome with clinically available MRI and CSF biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Heister, D.; Brewer, J.B.; Magda, S.; Blennow, K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the ability of clinically available volumetric MRI (vMRI) and CSF biomarkers, alone or in combination with a quantitative learning measure, to predict conversion to Alzheimer disease (AD) in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: We stratified 192 MCI participants into positive and negative risk groups on the basis of 1) degree of learning impairment on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test; 2) medial temporal atrophy, quantified from Food and Drug Administration–approved software for automated vMRI analysis; and 3) CSF biomarker levels. We also stratified participants based on combinations of risk factors. We computed Cox proportional hazards models, controlling for age, to assess 3-year risk of converting to AD as a function of risk group and used Kaplan-Meier analyses to determine median survival times. Results: When risk factors were examined separately, individuals testing positive showed significantly higher risk of converting to AD than individuals testing negative (hazard ratios [HR] 1.8–4.1). The joint presence of any 2 risk factors substantially increased risk, with the combination of greater learning impairment and increased atrophy associated with highest risk (HR 29.0): 85% of patients with both risk factors converted to AD within 3 years, vs 5% of those with neither. The presence of medial temporal atrophy was associated with shortest median dementia-free survival (15 months). Conclusions: Incorporating quantitative assessment of learning ability along with vMRI or CSF biomarkers in the clinical workup of MCI can provide critical information on risk of imminent conversion to AD. PMID:21998317

  10. Detailed comparison of amyloid PET and CSF biomarkers for identifying early Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Zetterberg, Henrik; Mattsson, Niklas; Johansson, Per; Minthon, Lennart; Blennow, Kaj; Olsson, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of CSF biomarkers and amyloid PET for diagnosing early-stage Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: From the prospective, longitudinal BioFINDER study, we included 122 healthy elderly and 34 patients with mild cognitive impairment who developed AD dementia within 3 years (MCI-AD). β-Amyloid (Aβ) deposition in 9 brain regions was examined with [18F]-flutemetamol PET. CSF was analyzed with INNOTEST and EUROIMMUN ELISAs. The results were replicated in 146 controls and 64 patients with MCI-AD from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study. Results: The best CSF measures for identifying MCI-AD were Aβ42/total tau (t-tau) and Aβ42/hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) (area under the curve [AUC] 0.93–0.94). The best PET measures performed similarly (AUC 0.92–0.93; anterior cingulate, posterior cingulate/precuneus, and global neocortical uptake). CSF Aβ42/t-tau and Aβ42/p-tau performed better than CSF Aβ42 and Aβ42/40 (AUC difference 0.03–0.12, p < 0.05). Using nonoptimized cutoffs, CSF Aβ42/t-tau had the highest accuracy of all CSF/PET biomarkers (sensitivity 97%, specificity 83%). The combination of CSF and PET was not better than using either biomarker separately. Conclusions: Amyloid PET and CSF biomarkers can identify early AD with high accuracy. There were no differences between the best CSF and PET measures and no improvement when combining them. Regional PET measures were not better than assessing the global Aβ deposition. The results were replicated in an independent cohort using another CSF assay and PET tracer. The choice between CSF and amyloid PET biomarkers for identifying early AD can be based on availability, costs, and doctor/patient preferences since both have equally high diagnostic accuracy. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that amyloid PET and CSF biomarkers identify early-stage AD equally accurately. PMID:26354982

  11. Reduced CSF p-Tau181 to Tau ratio is a biomarker for FTLD-TDP

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Kelly; Grossman, Murray; Glass, Jonathan; Lah, James J.; Hales, Chadwick; Shelnutt, Matthew; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Trojanowski, John Q.; Levey, Allan I.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To validate the ability of candidate CSF biomarkers to distinguish between the 2 main forms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), FTLD with TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) inclusions (FTLD-TDP) and FTLD with Tau inclusions (FTLD-Tau). Methods: Antemortem CSF samples were collected from 30 patients with FTLD in a single-center validation cohort, and CSF levels of 5 putative FTLD-TDP biomarkers as well as levels of total Tau (t-Tau) and Tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (p-Tau181) were measured using independent assays. Biomarkers most associated with FTLD-TDP were then tested in a separate 2-center validation cohort composed of subjects with FTLD-TDP, FTLD-Tau, Alzheimer disease (AD), and cognitively normal subjects. The sensitivity and specificity of FTLD-TDP biomarkers were determined. Results: In the first validation cohort, FTLD-TDP cases had decreased levels of p-Tau181 and interleukin-23, and increased Fas. Reduced ratio of p-Tau181 to t-Tau (p/t-Tau) was the strongest predictor of FTLD-TDP pathology. Analysis in the second validation cohort showed CSF p/t-Tau ratio <0.37 to distinguish FTLD-TDP from FTLD-Tau, AD, and healthy seniors with 82% sensitivity and 82% specificity. Conclusion: A reduced CSF p/t-Tau ratio represents a reproducible, validated biomarker for FTLD-TDP with performance approaching well-established CSF AD biomarkers. Introducing this biomarker into research and the clinical arena can significantly increase the power of clinical trials targeting abnormal accumulations of TDP-43 or Tau, and select the appropriate patients for target-specific therapies. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that the CSF p/t-Tau ratio distinguishes FTLD-TDP from FTLD-Tau. PMID:24174584

  12. Longitudinal change in CSF biomarkers in autosomal-dominant Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Anne M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Bateman, Randall J.; Goate, Alison M.; Benzinger, Tammie L.S.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Martins, Ralph N.; Masters, Colin L.; Mayeux, Richard; Ringman, John M.; Rossor, Martin N.; Salloway, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Marcus, Daniel; Cairns, Nigel J.; Buckles, Virginia D.; Ladenson, Jack H.; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Clinicopathologic evidence suggests the pathology of Alzheimer disease (AD) begins many years prior to cognitive symptoms. Biomarkers are required to identify affected individuals during this asymptomatic (“pre-clinical”) stage to permit intervention with potential disease-modifying therapies designed to preserve normal brain function. Studies of families with autosomal-dominant AD (ADAD) mutations provide a unique and powerful means to investigate AD biomarker changes during the asymptomatic period. In this biomarker study comparing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), plasma and in vivo amyloid imaging, cross-sectional data obtained at baseline in individuals from ADAD families enrolled in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) demonstrate reduced concentrations of CSF amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ1–42) associated with the presence of β-amyloid plaques, and elevated concentrations of CSF tau, ptau181 and VILIP-1, markers of neurofibrillary tangles and/or neuronal injury/death, in asymptomatic mutation carriers 10-20 years prior to their estimated age at symptom onset (EAO), and prior to detection of cognitive deficits. When compared longitudinally, however, the concentrations of CSF biomarkers of neuronal injury/death within-individuals decrease after their EAO, suggesting a slowing of acute neurodegenerative processes with symptomatic disease progression. These results emphasize the importance of longitudinal, within-person assessment when modeling biomarker trajectories across the course of the disease. If corroborated, this pattern may influence the definition of a positive neurodegenerative biomarker outcome in clinical trials. PMID:24598588

  13. Biobanking of CSF: international standardization to optimize biomarker development.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Charlotte E; Tumani, Hayrettin; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Mollenhauer, Brit

    2014-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reflects pathophysiological aspects of neurological diseases, where neuroprotective strategies and biomarkers are urgently needed. Therefore, biobanking is very relevant for biomarker discovery and evaluation of neurological diseases. Important and unique features of CSF biobanking are intensive collaboration in international networks and the tight application of standardized protocols. The current adoption of standardized protocols for CSF and blood collection as presented in this review enables biomarker studies in large cohorts of patients and controls. Another topic of this review is the selection of control groups, which influences the outcome of biomarker investigations. Control groups in CSF biobanks mainly consist of different disease controls. This is in part due to the fact that lumbar punctures are mostly performed for clinical indications and rarely for research purposes only, as it is a relatively invasive procedure. Moreover, there is a lack of homogenous criteria and definition of control groups. We therefore propose uniform consensus definitions for such control groups in biomarker research, i.e. Healthy controls (HC), Spinal anesthesia subjects (SAS), Symptomatic controls (SC), Inflammatory Neurological Disease Controls (CINDC), Peripheral Inflammatory Neurological Disease Controls (PINDC) and Non-inflammatory Neurological Disease Controls (NINDC). Another important aspect of CSF biobanking is quality control. Systematic studies to address effects of pre-analytical and storage variation on a broad range of CSF proteins are needed. In conclusion, biomarker research in neurodegenerative diseases has entered a new era due to the collaborative and multicenter efforts of many groups. The streamlining of biobanking procedures, including quality control, and the selection of optimal control groups for investigating biomarkers are important improvements to perform high quality biomarker studies.

  14. NIA-AA staging of preclinical Alzheimer disease: discordance and concordance of CSF and imaging biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Vos, Stephanie J B; Gordon, Brian A; Su, Yi; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Holtzman, David M; Morris, John C; Fagan, Anne M; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2016-08-01

    The National Institute of Aging and Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA) criteria for Alzheimer disease (AD) treat neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of AD pathology as if they would be interchangeable. We tested this assumption in 212 cognitively normal participants who have both neuroimaging and CSF measures of β-amyloid (CSF Aβ1-42 and positron emission tomography imaging with Pittsburgh Compound B) and neuronal injury (CSF t-tau and p-tau and structural magnetic resonance imaging) with longitudinal clinical follow-up. Participants were classified in preclinical AD stage 1 (β-amyloidosis) or preclinical AD stage 2+ (β-amyloidosis and neuronal injury) using the NIA-AA criteria, or in the normal or suspected non-Alzheimer disease pathophysiology group (neuronal injury without β-amyloidosis). At baseline, 21% of participants had preclinical AD based on CSF and 28% based on neuroimaging. Between modalities, staging was concordant in only 47% of participants. Disagreement resulted from low concordance between biomarkers of neuronal injury. Still, individuals in stage 2+ using either criterion had an increased risk for clinical decline. This highlights the heterogeneity of the definition of neuronal injury and has important implications for clinical trials using biomarkers for enrollment or as surrogate end point measures. PMID:27318129

  15. Cognitive Reserve Modifies Age-Related Alterations in CSF Biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rodrigo P.; Schultz, Stephanie A.; Austin, Benjamin P.; Boots, Elizabeth A.; Dowling, N. Maritza; Gleason, Carey E.; Bendlin, Barbara B.; Sager, Mark; Hermann, Bruce P.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Carlsson, Cindy; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Although advancing age is the strongest risk factor for the development of symptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD), recent studies have shown that there are individual differences in susceptibility to age-related alterations in the biomarkers of AD pathophysiology. Objective In this study, we investigated whether cognitive reserve modifies the adverse influence of age on key cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD. Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional cohort of 268 individuals (211 cognitively normal and 57 cognitively impaired) from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention and the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Disease Research Center participated in this study. They underwent lumbar puncture for collection of CSF samples, from which amyloid-β 42 (Aβ42), total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) were immunoassayed. Additionally, we computed t-tau/Aβ42 and p-tau/Aβ42 ratios. Cognitive reserve was indexed by years of education, with ≥16 years taken to confer high reserve. Covariate-adjusted regression analyses were used to test whether the effect of age on CSF biomarkers was modified by cognitive reserve. Main outcome measures CSF levels of Aβ42, t-tau, p-tau, t-tau/Aβ42, and p-tau/Aβ42. Results There were significant age*cognitive reserve interactions for CSF t-tau (p=.019), p-tau (p=.009), t-tau/Aβ42 (p=.021), and p-tau/Aβ42 (p=.004). Specifically, with advancing age, individuals with high cognitive reserve exhibited attenuated adverse alterations in these CSF biomarkers compared with individuals with low cognitive reserve. This attenuation of age effects by cognitive reserve tended to be more pronounced in the cognitively-impaired group compared with the cognitively-normal group. Lastly, there was modest evidence of a dose response relationship such that the effect of age on the biomarkers was progressively attenuated given additional years of schooling. Conclusions and Relevance In a sample comprised of both cognitively

  16. Characterization of Novel CSF Tau and ptau Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guss, Valerie; Lanzetti, Anthony J.; Berisha, Flora; Neely, Robert J.; Slemmon, J. Randall; Portelius, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Soares, Holly; Ahlijanian, Michael; Albright, Charles F.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) Aβ42, tau and p181tau are widely accepted biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Numerous studies show that CSF tau and p181tau levels are elevated in mild-to-moderate AD compared to age-matched controls. In addition, these increases might predict preclinical AD in cognitively normal elderly. Despite their importance as biomarkers, the molecular nature of CSF tau and ptau is not known. In the current study, reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography was used to enrich and concentrate tau prior to western-blot analysis. Multiple N-terminal and mid-domain fragments of tau were detected in pooled CSF with apparent sizes ranging from <20 kDa to ~40 kDa. The pattern of tau fragments in AD and control samples were similar. In contrast, full-length tau and C-terminal-containing fragments were not detected. To quantify levels, five tau ELISAs and three ptau ELISAs were developed to detect different overlapping regions of the protein. The discriminatory potential of each assay was determined using 20 AD and 20 age-matched control CSF samples. Of the tau ELISAs, the two assays specific for tau containing N-terminal sequences, amino acids 9-198 (numbering based on tau 441) and 9-163, exhibited the most significant differences between AD and control samples. In contrast, CSF tau was not detected with an ELISA specific for a more C-terminal region (amino acids 159-335). Significant discrimination was also observed with ptau assays measuring amino acids 159-p181 and 159-p231. Interestingly, the discriminatory potential of p181 was reduced when measured in the context of tau species containing amino acids 9-p181. Taken together, these results demonstrate that tau in CSF occurs as a series of fragments and that discrimination of AD from control is dependent on the subset of tau species measured. These assays provide novel tools to investigate CSF tau and ptau as biomarkers for other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24116116

  17. CSF protein biomarkers predicting longitudinal reduction of CSF β-amyloid42 in cognitively healthy elders

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, N; Insel, P; Nosheny, R; Zetterberg, H; Trojanowski, J Q; Shaw, L M; Tosun, D; Weiner, M

    2013-01-01

    β-amyloid (Aβ) plaque accumulation is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is believed to start many years prior to symptoms and is reflected by reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the peptide Aβ1–42 (Aβ42). Here we tested the hypothesis that baseline levels of CSF proteins involved in microglia activity, synaptic function and Aβ metabolism predict the development of Aβ plaques, assessed by longitudinal CSF Aβ42 decrease in cognitively healthy people. Forty-six healthy people with three to four serial CSF samples were included (mean follow-up 3 years, range 2–4 years). There was an overall reduction in Aβ42 from a mean concentration of 211–195 pg ml−1 after 4 years. Linear mixed-effects models using longitudinal Aβ42 as the response variable, and baseline proteins as explanatory variables (n=69 proteins potentially relevant for Aβ metabolism, microglia or synaptic/neuronal function), identified 10 proteins with significant effects on longitudinal Aβ42. The most significant proteins were angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE, P=0.009), Chromogranin A (CgA, P=0.009) and Axl receptor tyrosine kinase (AXL, P=0.009). Receiver-operating characteristic analysis identified 11 proteins with significant effects on longitudinal Aβ42 (largely overlapping with the proteins identified by linear mixed-effects models). Several proteins (including ACE, CgA and AXL) were associated with Aβ42 reduction only in subjects with normal baseline Aβ42, and not in subjects with reduced baseline Aβ42. We conclude that baseline CSF proteins related to Aβ metabolism, microglia activity or synapses predict longitudinal Aβ42 reduction in cognitively healthy elders. The finding that some proteins only predict Aβ42 reduction in subjects with normal baseline Aβ42 suggest that they predict future development of the brain Aβ pathology at the earliest stages of AD, prior to widespread development of Aβ plaques. PMID:23962923

  18. CSF YKL-40 and pTau181 are related to different cerebral morphometric patterns in early AD.

    PubMed

    Gispert, Juan Domingo; Monté, Gemma C; Falcon, Carles; Tucholka, Alan; Rojas, Santiago; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Antonell, Anna; Lladó, Albert; Rami, Lorena; Molinuevo, José Luis

    2016-02-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of YKL-40 that serve as biomarker of neuroinflammation are known to be altered along the clinico-biological continuum of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The specific structural cerebral correlates of CSF YKL-40 were evaluated across the early stages of AD from normal to preclinical to mild dementia. Nonlinear gray matter (GM) volume associations with CSF YKL-40 levels were assessed in a total of 116 subjects, including normal controls and those with preclinical AD as defined by CSF Aβ < 500 pg/mL, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to AD, or mild AD dementia. Age-corrected YKL-40 levels were increased in MCIs versus the rest of groups and showed an inverse u-shaped association with p-tau values. A similar nonlinear relationship was found between GM volume and YKL-40 in inferior and lateral temporal regions spreading to the supramarginal gyrus, insula, inferior frontal cortex, and cerebellum in MCI and AD. These findings for YKL-40 remained unchanged after adjusting for p-tau, which was found to be associated with GM volumes in distinct anatomic areas. CSF YKL-40, a biomarker of glial inflammation, is associated with a cerebral structural signature distinct from that related to p-tau neurodegeneration at the earliest stages of cognitive decline due to AD. PMID:26827642

  19. Meta-Review of CSF Core Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease: The State-of-the-Art after the New Revised Diagnostic Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Daniel; Perestelo-Pérez, Lilisbeth; Westman, Eric; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Sarría, Antonio; Serrano-Aguilar, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current research criteria for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) include cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers into the diagnostic algorithm. However, spreading their use to the clinical routine is still questionable. Objective: To provide an updated, systematic and critical review on the diagnostic utility of the CSF core biomarkers for AD. Data sources: MEDLINE, PreMedline, EMBASE, PsycInfo, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and CRD. Eligibility criteria: (1a) Systematic reviews with meta-analysis; (1b) Primary studies published after the new revised diagnostic criteria; (2) Evaluation of the diagnostic performance of at least one CSF core biomarker. Results: The diagnostic performance of CSF biomarkers is generally satisfactory. They are optimal for discriminating AD patients from healthy controls. Their combination may also be suitable for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) prognosis. However, CSF biomarkers fail to distinguish AD from other forms of dementia. Limitations: (1) Use of clinical diagnosis as standard instead of pathological postmortem confirmation; (2) variability of methodological aspects; (3) insufficiently long follow-up periods in MCI studies; and (4) lower diagnostic accuracy in primary care compared with memory clinics. Conclusion: Additional work needs to be done to validate the application of CSF core biomarkers as they are proposed in the new revised diagnostic criteria. The use of CSF core biomarkers in clinical routine is more likely if these limitations are overcome. Early diagnosis is going to be of utmost importance when effective pharmacological treatment will be available and the CSF core biomarkers can also be implemented in clinical trials for drug development. PMID:24715863

  20. Approach to Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Biomarker Discovery and Evaluation in HIV Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Richard W.; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Angel, Thomas E.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars; Spudich, Serena S.; Smith, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Gisslen, Magnus

    2013-12-13

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a nearly universal facet of systemic HIV infection that varies in character and neurological consequences. While clinical staging and neuropsychological test performance have been helpful in evaluating patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers present a valuable and objective approach to more accurate diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects and understanding of evolving pathobiology. We review some lessons from our recent experience with CSF biomarker studies. We have used two approaches to biomarker analysis: targeted, hypothesis-driven and non-targeted exploratory discovery methods. We illustrate the first with data from a cross-sectional study of defined subject groups across the spectrum of systemic and CNS disease progression and the second with a longitudinal study of the CSF proteome in subjects initiating antiretroviral treatment. Both approaches can be useful and, indeed, complementary. The first is helpful in assessing known or hypothesized biomarkers while the second can identify novel biomarkers and point to broad interactions in pathogenesis. Common to both is the need for well-defined samples and subjects that span a spectrum of biological activity and biomarker concentrations. Previouslydefined guide biomarkers of CNS infection, inflammation and neural injury are useful in categorizing samples for analysis and providing critical biological context for biomarker discovery studies. CSF biomarkers represent an underutilized but valuable approach to understanding the interactions of HIV and the CNS and to more objective diagnosis and assessment of disease activity. Both hypothesis-based and discovery methods can be useful in advancing the definition and use of these biomarkers.

  1. CSF neuroinflammatory biomarkers in bipolar disorder are associated with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Rolstad, Sindre; Jakobsson, Joel; Sellgren, Carl; Isgren, Anniella; Ekman, Carl Johan; Bjerke, Maria; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Pålsson, Erik; Landén, Mikael

    2015-08-01

    Persistent cognitive impairment in the euthymic state of bipolar disorder is increasingly recognized. Mounting evidence also suggests an association between neuroinflammation and cognitive dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to test if cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of neuroinflammation could account for cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder. Hierarchical linear regression models were applied to account for performance in five cognitive domains using CSF neuroinflammatory biomarkers as predictors in patients with bipolar disorder type I and II (N=78). The associations between these biomarkers and cognition were further tested in healthy age- and sex-matched controls (N=86). In patients with bipolar disorder, the CSF biomarkers accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in executive functions (42.8%, p=<.0005) independently of age, medication, disease status, and bipolar subtype. The microglial marker YKL-40 had a high impact (beta=-.99), and was the only biomarker that contributed individually. CSF biomarkers were not associated with cognitive performance in healthy controls. The CSF neuroinflammation biomarker YKL-40 is associated with executive performance in euthymic bipolar disorder, but not in healthy controls.

  2. Genome-wide association study of CSF biomarkers Aβ1-42, t-tau, and p-tau181p in the ADNI cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Shen, L.; Risacher, S.L.; Nho, K.; Foroud, T.; Shaw, L.M.; Trojanowski, J.Q.; Potkin, S.G.; Huentelman, M.J.; Craig, D.W.; DeChairo, B.M.; Aisen, P.S.; Petersen, R.C.; Weiner, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: CSF levels of Aβ1-42, t-tau, and p-tau181p are potential early diagnostic markers for probable Alzheimer disease (AD). The influence of genetic variation on these markers has been investigated for candidate genes but not on a genome-wide basis. We report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of CSF biomarkers (Aβ1-42, t-tau, p-tau181p, p-tau181p/Aβ1-42, and t-tau/Aβ1-42). Methods: A total of 374 non-Hispanic Caucasian participants in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative cohort with quality-controlled CSF and genotype data were included in this analysis. The main effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) under an additive genetic model was assessed on each of 5 CSF biomarkers. The p values of all SNPs for each CSF biomarker were adjusted for multiple comparisons by the Bonferroni method. We focused on SNPs with corrected p < 0.01 (uncorrected p < 3.10 × 10−8) and secondarily examined SNPs with uncorrected p values less than 10−5 to identify potential candidates. Results: Four SNPs in the regions of the APOE, LOC100129500, TOMM40, and EPC2 genes reached genome-wide significance for associations with one or more CSF biomarkers. SNPs in CCDC134, ABCG2, SREBF2, and NFATC4, although not reaching genome-wide significance, were identified as potential candidates. Conclusions: In addition to known candidate genes, APOE, TOMM40, and one hypothetical gene LOC100129500 partially overlapping APOE; one novel gene, EPC2, and several other interesting genes were associated with CSF biomarkers that are related to AD. These findings, especially the new EPC2 results, require replication in independent cohorts. PMID:21123754

  3. Approach to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker discovery and evaluation in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Price, Richard W; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Angel, Thomas E; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars; Spudich, Serena; Smith, Richard D; Jacobs, Jon M; Brown, Joseph N; Gisslen, Magnus

    2013-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a nearly universal facet of systemic HIV infection that varies in character and neurological consequences. While clinical staging and neuropsychological test performance have been helpful in evaluating patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers present a valuable and objective approach to more accurate diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects and understanding of evolving pathobiology. We review some lessons from our recent experience with CSF biomarker studies. We have used two approaches to biomarker analysis: targeted, hypothesis-driven and non-targeted exploratory discovery methods. We illustrate the first with data from a cross-sectional study of defined subject groups across the spectrum of systemic and CNS disease progression and the second with a longitudinal study of the CSF proteome in subjects initiating antiretroviral treatment. Both approaches can be useful and, indeed, complementary. The first is helpful in assessing known or hypothesized biomarkers while the second can identify novel biomarkers and point to broad interactions in pathogenesis. Common to both is the need for well-defined samples and subjects that span a spectrum of biological activity and biomarker concentrations. Previously-defined guide biomarkers of CNS infection, inflammation and neural injury are useful in categorizing samples for analysis and providing critical biological context for biomarker discovery studies. CSF biomarkers represent an underutilized but valuable approach to understanding the interactions of HIV and the CNS and to more objective diagnosis and assessment of disease activity. Both hypothesis-based and discovery methods can be useful in advancing the definition and use of these biomarkers.

  4. Development and Evaluation of a Multiplexed Mass Spectrometry-Based Assay for Measuring Candidate Peptide Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) CSF

    PubMed Central

    Spellman, Daniel S.; Wildsmith, Kristin R.; Honigberg, Lee A.; Tuefferd, Marianne; Baker, David; Raghavan, Nandini; Nairn, Angus C.; Croteau, Pascal; Schirm, Michael; Allard, Rene; Lamontagne, Julie; Chelsky, Daniel; Hoffmann, Steven; Potter, William Z.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We describe the outcome of the Biomarkers Consortium CSF Proteomics Project, a public-private partnership of government, academia, non-profit, and industry. The goal of this study was to evaluate a multiplexed mass spectrometry-based approach for the qualification of candidate Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) biomarkers using CSF samples from the AD Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Experimental Design Reproducibility of sample processing, analytic variability, and ability to detect a variety of analytes of interest were thoroughly investigated. Multiple approaches to statistical analyses assessed whether panel analytes were associated with baseline pathology (MCI, AD) vs. Healthy Controls (CN) or associated with progression for MCI patients, and included: (i) univariate association analyses, (ii) univariate prediction models, (iii) exploratory multivariate analyses, and (iv) supervised multivariate analysis. Results A robust targeted mass spectrometry-based approach for the qualification of candidate AD biomarkers was developed. The results identified several peptides with potential diagnostic or predictive utility, with the most significant differences observed for the following peptides for differentiating (including peptides from Hemoglobin A (HBA), Hemoglobin B (HBB), and Superoxide dismutase (SODE)) or predicting (including peptides from Neuronal pentraxin-2 (NPTX2), Neurosecretory protein VGF (VGF), and Secretogranin-2 (SCG2)) progression vs. non-progression from mild cognitive impairment to AD. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance These data provide potential insights into the biology of CSF in AD and MCI progression and provide a novel tool for AD researchers and clinicians working to improve diagnostic accuracy, evaluation of treatment efficacy, and early diagnosis. PMID:25676562

  5. IL-17 production by CSF lymphocytes as a biomarker for cerebral vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Vivien; Schmid, Sabrina; Gelderblom, Mathias; Hackbusch, Romy; Kolster, Manuela; Schuster, Simon; Thomalla, Götz; Keminer, Oliver; Pleß, Ole; Bernreuther, Christian; Glatzel, Markus; Wegscheider, Karl; Gerloff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the possibility of using interleukin-17 (IL-17) production by CD4+ T cells in the CSF as a potential biomarker for cerebral vasculitis in stroke patients. Methods: In this consecutive case study, we performed prospective analysis of CSF and blood in patients admitted to a university medical center with symptoms of stroke and suspected cerebral vasculitis. Flow cytometry was performed for intracellular detection of inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood lymphocytes and expanded T cells from CSF. Results: CSF CD4+ lymphocytes from patients with cerebral vasculitis showed significantly higher levels of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 compared to patients with stroke not due to vasculitis or with other, noninflammatory neurologic diseases. There was no difference in the production of interferon-γ in the CSF and no overall differences in the relative frequencies of peripheral immune cells. Conclusions: Intracellular IL-17 in CSF cells is potentially useful in discriminating cerebral vasculitis as a rare cause in patients presenting with ischemic stroke. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that an increased proportion of IL-17-producing CD4+ cells in CSF of patients presenting with stroke symptoms is indicative of cerebral vasculitis (sensitivity 73%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 39–94%; specificity 100%, 95% CI 74%–100%). PMID:27144213

  6. Circulating miR-150 in CSF is a novel candidate biomarker for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Petra; Piket, Eliane; Khademi, Mohsen; James, Tojo; Brundin, Lou; Olsson, Tomas; Piehl, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) in cell-free CSF as novel biomarkers for multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Profiling of miRNAs in CSF of pooled patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), patients with relapsing-remitting MS, and inflammatory and noninflammatory neurologic disease controls was performed using TaqMan miRNA arrays. Two independent patient cohorts (n = 142 and n = 430) were used for validation with real-time PCR. Results: We reliably detected 88 CSF miRNAs in the exploratory cohort. Subsequent validation in 2 cohorts demonstrated significantly higher levels of miR-150 in patients with MS. Higher miR-150 levels were also observed in patients with CIS who converted to MS compared to nonconverters, and in patients initiating natalizumab treatment. Levels of miR-150 correlated with immunologic parameters including CSF cell count, immunoglobulin G index, and presence of oligoclonal bands, and with candidate protein biomarkers C-X-C motif chemokine 13, matrix metallopeptidase 9, and osteopontin. Correlation with neurofilament light chain (NFL) was observed only when NFL was adjusted for age using a method that requires further validation. Additionally, miR-150 discriminated MS from controls and CIS converters from nonconverters equally well as the most informative protein biomarkers. Following treatment with natalizumab, but not fingolimod, CSF levels of miR-150 decreased, while plasma levels increased with natalizumab and decreased with fingolimod, suggesting immune cells as a source of miR-150. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate miR-150 as a putative novel biomarker of inflammatory active disease with the potential to be used for early diagnosis of MS. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that CSF miR-150 distinguishes patients with MS from patients with other neurologic conditions. PMID:27144214

  7. Monitoring concussion in a knocked-out boxer by CSF biomarker analysis.

    PubMed

    Neselius, Sanna; Brisby, Helena; Granholm, Fredrik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj

    2015-09-01

    Concussion is common in many sports, and the incidence is increasing. The medical consequences after a sport-related concussion have received increased attention in recent years since it is known that concussions cause axonal and glial damage, which disturbs the cerebral physiology and makes the brain more vulnerable for additional concussions. This study reports on a knocked-out amateur boxer in whom cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurofilament light (NFL) protein, reflecting axonal damage, was used to identify and monitor brain damage. CSF NFL was markedly increased during 36 weeks, suggesting that neuronal injury persists longer than expected after a concussion. CSF biomarker analysis may be valuable in the medical counselling of concussed athletes and in return-to-play considerations.

  8. Neurological Assessment and Its Relationship to CSF Biomarkers in Amateur Boxers

    PubMed Central

    Neselius, Sanna; Brisby, Helena; Marcusson, Jan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Karlsson, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) or concussion is common in many sports. Today, neuropsychological evaluation is recommended in the monitoring of a concussion and in return-to-play considerations. To investigate the sensitivity of neuropsychological assessment, we tested amateur boxers post bout and compared with controls. Further the relationship between neuropsychological test results and brain injury biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated. Method Thirty amateur boxers on high elite level with a minimum of 45 bouts and 25 non-boxing matched controls were included. Memory tests (Rey Osterrieth Complex Figure, Listening Span, Digit Span, Controlled Word Association Test, and computerized testing of episodic memory), tests of processing speed and executive functions (Trail Making, Reaction Time, and Finger Tapping) were performed and related to previously published CSF biomarker results for the axonal injury marker neurofilament light (NFL). Results The neurological assessment showed no significant differences between boxers and controls, although elevated CSF NFL, as a sign of axonal injury, was detected in about 80% of the boxers 1–6 days post bout. The investigation of the relationship between neuropsychological evaluation and CSF NFL concentrations revealed that boxers with persisting NFL concentration elevation after at least 14 days resting time post bout, had a significantly poorer performance on Trail Making A (p = 0.041) and Simple Reaction Time (p = 0.042) compared to other boxers. Conclusion This is the first study showing traumatic axonal brain injury can be present without measureable cognitive impairment. The repetitive, subconcussive head trauma in amateur boxing causes axonal injury that can be detected with analysis of CSF NFL, but is not sufficient to produce impairment in memory tests, tests of processing speed, or executive functions. The association of prolonged CSF NFL increase in boxers with

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neuronal biomarkers across the spectrum of HIV infection: hierarchy of injury and detection.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Julia; Gisslen, Magnus; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fuchs, Dietmar; Shacklett, Barbara L; Hagberg, Lars; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T; Spudich, Serena S; Price, Richard W

    2014-01-01

    The character of central nervous system (CNS) HIV infection and its effects on neuronal integrity vary with evolving systemic infection. Using a cross-sectional design and archived samples, we compared concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neuronal biomarkers in 143 samples from 8 HIV-infected subject groups representing a spectrum of untreated systemic HIV progression and viral suppression: primary infection; four groups of chronic HIV infection neuroasymptomatic (NA) subjects defined by blood CD4+ T cells of >350, 200-349, 50-199, and <50 cells/µL; HAD; treatment-induced viral suppression; and 'elite' controllers. Samples from 20 HIV-uninfected controls were also examined. The neuronal biomarkers included neurofilament light chain protein (NFL), total and phosphorylated tau (t-tau, p-tau), soluble amyloid precursor proteins alpha and beta (sAPPα, sAPPβ) and amyloid beta (Aβ) fragments 1-42, 1-40 and 1-38. Comparison of the biomarker changes showed a hierarchy of sensitivity in detection and suggested evolving mechanisms with progressive injury. NFL was the most sensitive neuronal biomarker. Its CSF concentration exceeded age-adjusted norms in all HAD patients, 75% of NA CD4<50, 40% of NA CD4 50-199, and 42% of primary infection, indicating common neuronal injury with untreated systemic HIV disease progression as well as transiently during early infection. By contrast, only 75% of HAD subjects had abnormal CSF t-tau levels, and there were no significant differences in t-tau levels among the remaining groups. sAPPα and β were also abnormal (decreased) in HAD, showed less marked change than NFL with CD4 decline in the absence of HAD, and were not decreased in PHI. The CSF Aβ peptides and p-tau concentrations did not differ among the groups, distinguishing the HIV CNS injury profile from Alzheimer's disease. These CSF biomarkers can serve as useful tools in selected research and clinical settings for patient classification, pathogenetic analysis

  10. Selected CSF biomarkers indicate no evidence of early neuroinflammation in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Börnsen, Lars; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Ammitzbøll, Cecilie; Larsen, Ida U.; Hjermind, Lena E.; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate CSF biomarkers of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD) gene-expansion carriers compared to controls and to investigate these biomarkers in association with clinical HD rating scales and disease burden score. Methods: We collected CSF from 32 premanifest and 48 manifest HD gene-expansion carriers and 24 gene-expansion negative at-risk controls. We examined biomarkers of neuroinflammation (matrix metalloproteinase 9, C-X-C motif chemokine 13, terminal complement complex, chitinase-3-like-protein 1 [CHI3L1], and osteopontin [OPN]) and neurodegeneration (microtubule-associated protein tau, neurofilament light polypeptide [NFL], and myelin basic protein [MBP]). The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Capital Region of Denmark (H2-2011-085) and written informed consent was obtained from each participant before enrollment. Results: NFL was the only biomarker that increased in premanifest stages and no evidence of early involvement of neuroinflammation in HD was found. However, we found that the biomarkers for neurodegeneration, MBP and tau, increased during the disease course in manifest HD gene-expansion carriers and were associated with an increase of the neuroinflammation biomarkers CHI3L1 and OPN. Tau was also increased in all gene-expansion carriers with psychiatric symptoms compared to gene-expansion carriers without psychiatric symptoms. Conclusions: Neuroinflammation, which seems not to be an early event in our cohort, may be secondary to neurodegeneration in late HD. NFL is a possible disease burden correlate in HD, reflecting neuronal loss even before motor symptom onset, and may be useful as a dynamic biomarker in intervention studies. PMID:27734023

  11. Csf p-tau181/tau ratio as biomarker for TDP pathology in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Borroni, Barbara; Benussi, Alberto; Archetti, Silvana; Galimberti, Daniela; Parnetti, Lucilla; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Scarpini, Elio; Padovani, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the CSF phospho-Tau181/total-Tau (p/t-Tau) ratio to distinguish between the two main forms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD): FTLD with TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP) and FTLD with Tau inclusions (FTLD-Tau). CSF p/t-Tau ratio was examined in 79 FTLD patients with predictable neuropathology, i.e. Tau (affected by progressive supranuclear palsy or carriers of mutations within the MAPT gene) or TDP-43 (carriers of mutations within granulin, C9orf72, TARDBP genes or affected by FTD with motor neuron disease). FTLD patients were randomly grouped in a training cohort (n = 39) to assess the best CSF p/t-Tau cut-off score according to ROC analysis, and a validation cohort (n = 40) to evaluate accuracy values of the identified marker. Results showed that, in the training cohort, we found a significantly reduced CSF p/t-Tau ratio in FTLD-TDP relative to FTLD-Tau. ROC analysis for p/t-Tau ratio was 0.873 and cut-off score of 0.136 allowed to differentiate FTLD-TDP and FTLD-Tau with 81.8% sensitivity and 88.2% specificity, respectively. Analysis in the validation cohort showed CSF p/t-Tau ratio < 0.136 to distinguish FTLD-TDP from FTLD-Tau with 83.3% specificity and 63.6% sensitivity, respectively. The positive predictive value of detecting TDP neuropathology was 82.4%. In conclusion, a reduced CSF p/t-Tau ratio represents a viable biomarker to correctly identify TDP pathology in FTLD.

  12. Validating predicted biological effects of Alzheimer’s disease associated SNPs using CSF biomarker levels

    PubMed Central

    Kauwe, John SK; Cruchaga, Carlos; Bertelsen, Sarah; Mayo, Kevin; Latu, Wayne; Nowotny, Petra; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Fagan, Anne M; Holtzman, David M; Goate, Alison M

    2011-01-01

    Recent large-scale genetic studies of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) have identified risk variants in CALHM1, GAB2 and SORL1. The mechanisms by which these genes might modulate risk are not definitively known. CALHM1 and SORL1 may alter amyloid-beta (Aβ) levels and GAB2 may influence phosphorylation of the tau protein. In this study we have analyzed disease associated genetic variants in each of these genes for association with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ or tau levels in 602 samples from two independent CSF series. We failed to detect association between CSF Aβ42 levels and SNPs in SORL1 despite substantial statistical power to detect association. While we also failed to detect association between variants in GAB2 and CSF tau levels, power to detect this association was limited. Finally, our data suggest that the minor allele of rs2986017, in CALHM1, is marginally associated with CSF Aβ42 levels. This association is consistent with previous reports that this non-synonymous coding substitution results in increased Aβ levels in vitro and provides support for an Aβ-related mechanism for modulating risk for AD. PMID:20634593

  13. Metallomics study in CSF for putative biomarkers to predict cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaofang; Clark, Joseph F; Pyne-Geithman, Gail; Caruso, Joseph

    2010-09-01

    suggested protein similarities or differences across the three CSF sample types. Six protein families with possible protein markers were further identified, and may be considered as possible focus areas for discovering valuable biomarkers to preclude the debilitating or deadly vasospasm.

  14. Age-dependent inverse correlations in CSF and plasma amyloid-β(1–42) concentrations prior to amyloid plaque deposition in the brain of 3xTg-AD mice

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soo Min; Lee, Sejin; Yang, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Hye Yun; Lee, Michael Jisoo; Kim, Hyunjin Vincent; Kim, Jiyoon; Baek, Seungyeop; Yun, Jin; Kim, Dohee; Kim, Yun Kyung; Cho, Yakdol; Woo, Jiwan; Kim, Tae Song; Kim, YoungSoo

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) plays a critical role as a biomarker in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) diagnosis. In addition to its diagnostic potential in the brain, recent studies have suggested that changes of Aβ level in the plasma can possibly indicate AD onset. In this study, we found that plasma Aβ(1–42) concentration increases with age, while the concentration of Aβ(1–42) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) decreases in APPswe, PS1M146V and TauP301L transgenic (3xTg-AD) mice, if measurements were made before formation of ThS-positive plaques in the brain. Our data suggests that there is an inverse correlations between the plasma and CSF Aβ(1–42) levels until plaques form in transgenic mice’s brains and that the plasma Aβ concentration possesses the diagnostic potential as a biomarker for diagnosis of early AD stages. PMID:26830653

  15. CSF Biomarkers of Monocyte Activation and Chemotaxis correlate with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Metabolites during Chronic HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Albert M.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Umlauf, Anya; Taylor, Michael J.; Clifford, David B.; Marra, Christina M.; Collier, Ann C.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; McArthur, Justin C.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Simpson, David M.; Morgello, Susan; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), supporting the need to better understand HIV neuropathogenesis. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain has demonstrated abnormalities in HIV-infected individuals despite cART. We examined the associations between MRS metabolites and selected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers reflecting monocyte/macrophage activation and chemotaxis. Methods A multicenter cross-sectional study involving five sites in the United States was conducted. The following CSF biomarkers were measured: soluble CD14 (sCD14), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), interferon inducible protein 10 (IP-10), and stromal cell derived growth factor 1 alpha (SDF-1α). The following MRS metabolites were measured from basal ganglia (BG), frontal white matter (FWM) and frontal gray matter (FGM): N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), Myo-inositol (MI), Choline (Cho), and Creatine (Cr). CSF biomarkers were compared to absolute MRS metabolites as well as metabolite/Cr ratios using linear regression. Results 83 HIV-infected individuals were included, 78% on cART and 37% with HAND. The most robust positive correlations were between MCP-1 and Cho in BG (R2 0.179, p<0.001) as well as MCP-1 and MI in FWM (R2 0.137, p=0.002). Higher Cr levels in FWM were associated with MCP-1 (R2 0. 075, p=0.01) and IP-10 (R2 0.106, p=0.003). Comparing biomarkers to MRS metabolite/Cr ratios impacted some relationships, e.g., higher sCD14 levels were associated with lower Cho/Cr ratios in FGM (R2 0.224, p<0.001), although higher MCP-1 levels remained associated with Cho/Cr in BG. Conclusion These findings provide evidence that monocyte activation and chemotaxis continue to contribute to HIV-associated brain abnormalities in cART-treated individuals. PMID:26069183

  16. CSF Biomarkers and Its Associations with 18F-AV133 Cerebral VMAT2 Binding in Parkinson’s Disease—A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rui; Zhang, Guangjian; Chen, Xueqi; Yang, Aimin; Smith, Gwenn; Wong, Dean F.; Zhou, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, such as α-synuclein (α-syn), amyloid beta peptide 1–42 (Aβ1–42), phosphorylated tau (181P) (p-tau), and total tau (t-tau), have long been associated with the development of Parkinson disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. In this investigation, we reported the assessment of CSF biomarkers and their correlations with vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) bindings measured with 18F-9-fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine (18F-AV133) that is being developed as a biomarker for PD. We test the hypothesis that monoaminergic degeneration was correlated with CSF biomarker levels in untreated PD patients. Methods The available online data from the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative study (PPMI) project were collected and analyzed, which include demographic information, clinical evaluations, CSF biomarkers (α-syn, Aβ1–42, p-tau, and t-tau), 18F-AV133 brain PET, and T1 weighted MRIs. Region of interest (ROI) and voxel-wise Pearson correlation between standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) and CSF biomarkers were calculated. Results Our major findings are: 1) Compared with controls, CSF α-syn and tau levels decreased significantly in PD; 2) α-syn was closely correlated with Aβ1–42 and tau in PD, especially in early-onset patients; and 3) hypothesis-driven ROI analysis found a significant negative correlation between CSF Aβ1–42 levels and VMAT2 densities in post cingulate, left caudate, left anterior putamen, and left ventral striatum in PDs. CSF t-tau and p-tau levels were significantly negatively related to VMAT2 SUVRs in substantia nigra and left ventral striatum, respectively. Voxel-wise analysis showed that left caudate, parahippocampal gyrus, insula and temporal lobe were negatively correlated with Aβ1–42. In addition, superior frontal gyrus and transverse temporal gyrus were negatively correlated with CSF p-tau levels. Conclusion These results suggest that monoaminergic

  17. Mean diffusivity: A biomarker for CSF-related disease and genetic liability effects in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Narr, Katherine L.; Hageman, Nathan; Woods, Roger P.; Hamilton, Liberty S.; Clark, Kristi; Phillips, Owen; Shattuck, David W.; Asarnow, Robert F.; Toga, Arthur W.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.

    2009-01-01

    Mean diffusivity (MD), the rotationally invariant magnitude of water diffusion that is greater in CSF and smaller in organized brain tissue, has been suggested to reflect schizophrenia-associated cortical atrophy. Regional changes, associations with CSF, and the effects of genetic predisposition towards schizophrenia, however, remain uncertain. Six-direction DTI and high-resolution structural images were obtained from 26 schizophrenia patients, 36 unaffected first-degree patient relatives, 20 control subjects and 32 control relatives (N = 114). Registration procedures aligned DTI data across imaging modalities. MD was averaged within lobar regions and the cingulate and superior temporal gyri. CSF volume and MD were highly correlated. Significant bilateral temporal, and superior temporal MD increases were observed in schizophrenia compared to unrelated control probands. First-degree relatives of schizophrenia probands showed larger MD measures compared to controls within bilateral superior temporal regions with CSF volume correction. Superior temporal lobe brain tissue deficits and proximal CSF enlargements are widely documented in schizophrenia. Larger MD indices in patients and their relatives may thus reflect similar pathophysiological mechanisms. However, persistence of regional MD effects after controlling for CSF volume, suggests that MD is a sensitive biological marker of disease and genetic liability, characterizing at least partially distinct aspects of brain structural integrity. PMID:19081707

  18. [Biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    García-Ribas, G; López-Sendón Moreno, J L; García-Caldentey, J

    2014-04-01

    The new diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) include brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, with the aim of increasing the certainty of whether a patient has an ongoing AD neuropathologic process or not. Three CSF biomarkers, Aß42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau, reflect the core pathological features of AD. It is already known that these pathological processes of AD starts decades before the first symptoms, so these biomarkers may provide means of early disease detection. At least three stages of AD could be identified: preclinical AD, mild cognitive impairment due to AD, and dementia due to AD. In this review, we aim to summarize the CSF biomarker data available for each of these stages. We also review the actual research on blood-based biomarkers. Recent studies on healthy elderly subjects and on carriers of dominantly inherited AD mutations have also found biomarker changes that allow separate groups in these preclinical stages. These studies may aid for segregate populations in clinical trials and objectively evaluate if there are changes over the pathological processes of AD. Limits to widespread use of CSF biomarkers, apart from the invasive nature of the process itself, is the higher coefficient of variation for the analyses between centres. It requires strict pre-analytical and analytical procedures that may make feasible multi-centre studies and global cut-off points for the different stages of AD.

  19. Effect of intellectual enrichment on AD biomarker trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Lesnick, Timothy G.; Przybelski, Scott A.; Knopman, David S.; Machulda, Mary; Lowe, Val J.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Roberts, Rosebud O.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Geda, Yonas E.; Rocca, Walter A.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of age, sex, APOE4 genotype, and lifestyle enrichment (education/occupation, midlife cognitive activity, and midlife physical activity) on Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarker trajectories using longitudinal imaging data (brain β-amyloid load via Pittsburgh compound B PET and neurodegeneration via 18fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET and structural MRI) in an elderly population without dementia. Methods: In the population-based longitudinal Mayo Clinic Study of Aging, we studied 393 participants without dementia (340 clinically normal, 53 mild cognitive impairment; 70 years and older) who had cognitive and physical activity measures and at least 2 visits with imaging biomarkers. We dichotomized participants into high (≥14 years) and low (<14 years) education levels using the median. For the entire cohort and the 2 education strata, we built linear mixed models to investigate the effect of the predictors on each of the biomarker outcomes. Results: Age was associated with amyloid and neurodegeneration trajectories; APOE4 status appears to influence only the amyloid and FDG trajectories but not hippocampal volume trajectory. In the high-education stratum, high midlife cognitive activity was associated with lower amyloid deposition in APOE4 carriers. APOE4 status was associated with lower FDG uptake in the entire cohort and in participants with lower education but not the high-education cohort. Conclusions: There were minimal effects of lifestyle enrichment on AD biomarker trajectories (specifically rates). Lifetime intellectual enrichment (high education, high midlife cognitive activity) is associated with lower amyloid in APOE4 carriers. High education is protective from the APOE4 effect on FDG metabolism. Differing education levels may explain the conflicting results seen in the literature. PMID:26911640

  20. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in CSF versus brain assessed by 11C-PMP PET in AD patients treated with galantamine.

    PubMed

    Darreh-Shori, T; Kadir, A; Almkvist, O; Grut, M; Wall, A; Blomquist, G; Eriksson, B; Långström, B; Nordberg, A

    2008-02-01

    The relationship between acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the CSF and brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) was investigated in 18 mild AD patients following galantamine treatment. The first 3 months of the study had a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled design, during which 12 patients received galantamine (16-24 mg/day) and six patients placebo. This was followed by 9 months galantamine treatment in all patients. Activities and protein levels of both the "read-through" AChE (AChE-R) and the synaptic (AChE-S) variants in CSF were assessed in parallel together with the regional brain AChE activity by (11)C-PMP and PET. The AChE-S inhibition was 30-36% in CSF, which correlated well with the in vivo AChE inhibition in the brain. No significant AChE inhibition was observed in the placebo group. The increased level of the AChE-R protein was 16% higher than that of AChE-S. Both the AChE inhibition and the increased level of AChE-R protein positively correlated with the patient's performance in cognitive tests associated with visuospatial ability and attention. In conclusion, AChE levels in CSF closely mirror in vivo brain AChE levels prior to and after treatment with the cholinesterase inhibitors. A positive cognitive response seems to dependent on the AChE inhibition level, which is balanced by an increased protein level of the AChE-R variant in the patients.

  1. Autoantibodies Profile in Matching CSF and Serum from AD and aMCI patients: Potential Pathogenic Role and Link to Oxidative Damage.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Fabio; Pupo, Gilda; Giraldo, Esther; Lloret, Ana; Badia, Mari-Carmen; Schinina, Maria Eugenia; Giorgi, Alessandra; Butterfield, D Allan; Vina, Jose; Perluigi, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the elderly and is characterized by progressive loss of memory and cognition. Amyloid-ß-peptide (Aß) forms senile plaques, which, together with hyperphosphorylated tau-based neurofibrillary tangles, are the hallmarks of AD neuropathology. Evidence support the involvement of immune system in AD progression and current concepts regarding its pathogenesis include the participation of inflammatory and autoimmune components in the neurodegenerative process. Pathologically, immune system components have been detected in the brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in serum of AD subjects and their trend of variation correlates with disease progression. However, patients with AD present significantly lower levels of antibody immunoreactivity against Aß in serum and CSF than healthy controls suggesting that a depletion of such patrolling system is involved in the deposition of toxic aggregates in AD. Within this frame, incomplete and often controversial results are reported about CNS immune/ autoimmune responses during AD, and a better comprehension of such processes is needed. Our research will aim to shed light on the nature and potential role of autoantibodies in CSF and serum from AD and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) patients compared to healthy subjects by using an immunoproteomics approach. Our method allows recognition of natural occurring antibodies by the identification of brain antigen targeted by human IgGs. Overall our data reveal that the alterations of autoantibodies profile both in CSF and serum follow disease staging and progression. However, we demonstrate a fair overlap between CSF and serum suggesting the existence of different immunogenic events. Interestingly, CSF autoantibodies recognized, among others, key players of energy metabolic pathway, including glycolysis and TCA cycle, found oxidatively modified in AD brain studies. These data suggest a potential casual sequence

  2. Altered protein phosphorylation as a resource for potential AD biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana Gabriela; Müller, Thorsten; Oliveira, Joana Machado; Cova, Marta; da Cruz e Silva, Cristóvão B.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.

    2016-01-01

    The amyloidogenic peptide, Aβ, provokes a series of events affecting distinct cellular pathways regulated by protein phosphorylation. Aβ inhibits protein phosphatases in a dose-dependent manner, thus it is expected that the phosphorylation state of specific proteins would be altered in response to Aβ. In fact several Alzheimer’s disease related proteins, such as APP and TAU, exhibit pathology associated hyperphosphorylated states. A systems biology approach was adopted and the phosphoproteome, of primary cortical neuronal cells exposed to Aβ, was evaluated. Phosphorylated proteins were recovered and those whose recovery increased or decreased, upon Aβ exposure across experimental sets, were identified. Significant differences were evident for 141 proteins and investigation of their interactors revealed key protein clusters responsive to Aβ treatment. Of these, 73 phosphorylated proteins increased and 68 decreased upon Aβ addition. These phosphorylated proteins represent an important resource of potential AD phospho biomarkers that should be further pursued. PMID:27466139

  3. Abnormalities of CSF flow patterns in the cerebral aqueduct in treatment-resistant late-life depression: a potential biomarker of microvascular angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Naish, Josephine H; Baldwin, Robert C; Patankar, Tufail; Jeffries, Suzanne; Burns, Alistair S; Taylor, Christopher J; Waterton, John C; Jackson, Alan

    2006-09-01

    There is growing evidence that microvascular angiopathy (MVA) plays an important role in the development of dementia and affective disorders in older people. At currently available image resolutions it is not possible to image directly the vascular changes associated with MVA, but the effects on blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow may be detectable. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential biomarker for MVA based on MRI of abnormalities in CSF flow. Since there is considerable indirect evidence that treatment resistance in late-onset depressive disorder is related to MVA, we assessed the method in a group of 22 normal volunteers and 29 patients with responsive (N=21) or treatment-resistant (N=8) late-onset depressive disorder. Single-slice quantified phase-contrast (PC) images of cerebral blood and CSF flow were collected at 15 points over a cardiac cycle, and the resulting flow curves were parameterized. Significant differences in the CSF flow (width of systolic flow peak and diastolic flow volume, both P<0.01) through the cerebral aqueduct were observed for the group of treatment-resistant patients when compared to age matched controls. No significant difference was observed for a group of 21 patients with treatment-responsive depression. The findings support the hypothesis that MR measurement of CSF flow abnormalities provides a biomarker of MVA, and thus could have application in a wide range of age-related diseases.

  4. The Glycan Role in the Glycopeptide Immunogenicity Revealed by Atomistic Simulations and Spectroscopic Experiments on the Multiple Sclerosis Biomarker CSF114(Glc)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Agostino; Scrima, Mario; Novellino, Ettore; D'Errico, Gerardino; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Limongelli, Vittorio

    2015-03-01

    Glycoproteins are often recognized as not-self molecules by antibodies triggering the onset of severe autoimmune diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Thus, the development of antigen-mimicking biomarkers represents an attractive strategy for an early diagnosis of the disease. An example is the synthetic glycopeptide CSF114(Glc), which was designed and tested as MS biomarker and whose clinical application was limited by its reduced ability to detect autoantibodies in MS patients. In the attempt to improve the efficacy of CSF114(Glc), we have characterized all the events leading to the final binding of the biomarker to the autoantibody using atomistic simulations, ESR and NMR experiments. The glycosydic moiety plays a primary role in the whole process. In particular, in an environment mimicking that used in the clinical tests the glycopeptide assumes a α-helix structure that is functional for the interaction with the antibody. In this conformation CSF114(Glc) binds the monoclonal antibody mAb8-18C5 similarly to the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein MOG, which is a known MS auto-antigen, thus explaining its diagnostic activity. Our study offers new molecular bases to design more effective biomarkers and provides a most valid protocol to investigate other systems where the environment effect is determinant for the biological activity.

  5. Alzheimer disease: from inherited to sporadic AD-crossing the biomarker bridge.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Harald; Lista, Simone

    2012-11-01

    Whether dominantly inherited variants of Alzheimer disease (AD) and 'sporadic' forms exhibit similar pathophysiological and biomarker signatures remains unresolved. A landmark study has proposed a biomarker progression model of dominantly inherited AD, but a complex systems biology and physiology approach is required to translate these findings to sporadic disease.

  6. Body mass index is associated with biological CSF markers of core brain pathology of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ewers, Michael; Schmitz, Susanne; Hansson, Oskar; Walsh, Cathal; Fitzpatrick, Annette; Bennett, David; Minthon, Lennart; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M; Faluyi, Yetunde O; Vellas, Bruno; Dubois, Bruno; Blennow, Kaj; Buerger, Katharina; Teipel, Stefan J; Weiner, Michael; Hampel, Harald

    2012-08-01

    Weight changes are common in aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and postmortem findings suggest a relation between lower body mass index (BMI) and increased AD brain pathology. In the current multicenter study, we tested whether lower BMI is associated with higher core AD brain pathology as assessed by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-based biological markers of AD in 751 living subjects: 308 patients with AD, 296 subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 147 elderly healthy controls (HC). Based upon a priori cutoff values on CSF concentration of total tau and beta-amyloid (Aβ(1-42)), subjects were binarized into a group with abnormal CSF biomarker signature (CSF+) and those without (CSF-). Results showed that BMI was significantly lower in the CSF+ when compared with the CSF- group (F = 27.7, df = 746, p < 0.001). There was no interaction between CSF signature and diagnosis or apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype. In conclusion, lower BMI is indicative of AD pathology as assessed with CSF-based biomarkers in demented and nondemented elderly subjects.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and memory present distinct associations along the continuum from healthy subjects to AD patients.

    PubMed

    Rami, Lorena; Fortea, Juan; Bosch, Beatriz; Solé-Padullés, Cristina; Lladó, Albert; Iranzo, Alex; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Molinuevo, Jose Luis

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to study the association between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of amyloid-β (Aβ)(1-42), t-tau, and p-tau and cognitive performance along the Alzheimer's disease (AD) continuum from healthy subjects to AD patients and, specifically, among patients in the pre-dementia stage of the disease. A total of 101 subjects were studied: 19 healthy controls (CTR), 17 subjects with subjective memory complaints (SMC), 47 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 18 AD patients. Only memory performance significantly correlated with CSF levels of Aβ(1-42), t-tau, and p-tau along the AD continuum. Subgroup analyses revealed that in SMC patients Aβ(1-42) levels positively correlated with the total recall score of the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (FCRST) (r = 0.666; p < 0.005), Digit Span (r = 0.752; p < 0.005), and CERAD world list learning (r = 0.697; p < 0.005). In MCI patients, a significant inverse correlation was found between the word list recall score from the CERAD and t-tau (r = -0.483; p < 0.005) and p-tau levels (r = -0.495; p < 0.005), as well as between the total recall subtest score from the FCRST and both t-tau (r = -0.420; p < 0.005) and p-tau levels (r = -0.422; p < 0.005). No significant correlations were found between other aspects of cognition and CSF levels in CTR or AD patients. These results indicate that memory performance is related to Aβ(1-42) levels in SMC, while it is associated with tau in the prodromal stage of the disease. This suggests that in the continuum from healthy aging to AD, memory performance is first related with Aβ(1-42) levels and then with t-tau or p-tau, before becoming independent of biomarker levels in the dementia stage. PMID:21098971

  8. Harnessing Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Potential and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dana; Kim, Young-Sam; Shin, Dong Wun; Park, Chang-Shin

    2016-01-01

    No disease-modifying therapies (DMT) for neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) have been established, particularly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). It is unclear why candidate drugs that successfully demonstrate therapeutic effects in animal models fail to show disease-modifying effects in clinical trials. To overcome this hurdle, patients with homogeneous pathologies should be detected as early as possible. The early detection of AD patients using sufficiently tested biomarkers could demonstrate the potential usefulness of combining biomarkers with clinical measures as a diagnostic tool. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for NDs are being incorporated in clinical trials designed with the aim of detecting patients earlier, evaluating target engagement, collecting homogeneous patients, facilitating prevention trials, and testing the potential of surrogate markers relative to clinical measures. In this review we summarize the latest information on CSF biomarkers in NDs, particularly AD and PD, and their use in clinical trials. The large number of issues related to CSF biomarker measurements and applications has resulted in relatively few clinical trials on CSF biomarkers being conducted. However, the available CSF biomarker data obtained in clinical trials support the advantages of incorporating CSF biomarkers in clinical trials, even though the data have mostly been obtained in AD trials. We describe the current issues with and ongoing efforts for the use of CSF biomarkers in clinical trials and the plans to harness CSF biomarkers for the development of DMT and clinical routines. This effort requires nationwide, global, and multidisciplinary efforts in academia, industry, and regulatory agencies to facilitate a new era.

  9. Increased CSF neurogranin concentration is specific to Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Ross W.; Portelius, Erik; Törnqvist, Ulrika; Magdalinou, Nadia; Fox, Nick C.; Blennow, Kaj; Schott, Jonathan M.; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the specificity of the dendritic protein neurogranin (Ng) in CSF from patients with a broad range of neurodegenerative diseases including a variety of dementias, tauopathies, and synucleinopathies. Method: An optimized immunoassay was used to analyze CSF Ng in a retrospective cohort of 331 participants with different neurodegenerative diseases, including healthy controls (n = 19), biomarker-proven Alzheimer disease (AD) (n = 100), genetic AD (n = 2), behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 20), speech variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 21), Lewy body dementia (n = 13), Parkinson disease (n = 31), progressive supranuclear palsy (n = 46), multiple system atrophy (n = 29), as well as a heterogeneous group with non-neurodegenerative cognitive impairment (n = 50). CSF Ng concentrations and correlations of CSF Ng with total tau, phosphorylated tau, and β-amyloid 42 concentrations, Mini-Mental State Examination score, and disease duration in the different groups were investigated. Results: Median CSF Ng concentration was higher in patients with AD compared to both controls (p < 0.001) and all other disease groups (all p < 0.001) except speech variant frontotemporal dementia. There were no significant differences in CSF Ng concentrations between any other neurodegenerative groups and controls. In addition, we found strong correlations between Ng and total tau (p < 0.001) and phosphorylated tau (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These results confirm an increase in CSF Ng concentration in patients with AD as previously reported and show that this is specific to AD and not seen in a range of other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26826204

  10. Impact of cerebro-spinal fluid biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease in clinical practice: a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Mouton-Liger, François; Wallon, David; Troussière, Anne-Cécile; Yatimi, Rachida; Dumurgier, Julien; Magnin, Eloi; de la Sayette, Vincent; Duron, Emannuelle; Philippi, Nathalie; Beaufils, Emilie; Gabelle, Audrey; Croisile, Bernard; Robert, Philippe; Pasquier, Florence; Hannequin, Didier; Hugon, Jacques; Paquet, Claire

    2014-01-01

    CSF biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease are well validated in clinical research; however, their pragmatic utility in daily practice is still unappreciated. These biomarkers are used in routine practice according to Health Authority Recommendations. In 604 consecutive patients explored for cognitive disorders, questionnaires were prospectively proposed and filled. Before and after CSF biomarker results, clinicians provided a diagnosis and an estimate of their diagnostic confidence. Analysis has compared the frequency of diagnosis before and after CSF biomarker results using the net reclassification improvement (NRI) method. We have evaluated external validity comparing with data of French Bank National of AD (BNA). A total of 561 patients [Alzheimer's disease (AD), n = 253; non-AD, n = 308] were included (mean age, 68.6 years; women, 52 %). Clinically suspected diagnosis and CSF results were concordant in 65.2 % of cases. When clinical hypothesis and biological results were discordant, a reclassification occurred in favour of CSF biomarkers results in 76.9 %. The NRI was 39.5 %. In addition, the results show a statistically significant improvement in clinician confidence for their diagnosis. In comparison with BNA data, patients were younger and more frequently diagnosed with AD. Clinicians tend to heavily rely on the CSF AD biomarkers results and are more confident in their diagnoses using CSF AD biomarkers. Thus, these biomarkers appear as a key tool in clinical practice.

  11. A low molecular-weight ferroxidase is increased in the CSF of sCJD cases: CSF ferroxidase and transferrin as diagnostic biomarkers for sCJD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imbalance of brain iron homeostasis is a common feature of neurodegenerative conditions that include sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease, among others. However, the mechanisms underlying this change are unclear. In s...

  12. CSF markers related to pathogenetic mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mulder, C; Schoonenboom, S N M; Wahlund, L-O; Scheltens, Ph; van Kamp, G J; Veerhuis, R; Hack, C E; Blomberg, M; Schutgens, R B H; Eikelenboom, P

    2002-12-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) and complement C1q are found highly co-localized with extracellular fibrillar amyloidbeta (Abeta) deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Conflicting data were reported earlier about the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of SAP and C1q in AD compared to controls. The objective of the present study was to compare the levels of Abeta(1-42), tau, C1q and SAP in CSF of a well characterized group of AD patients and controls, and to assess the association with dementia severity. Significantly decreased CSF levels of Abeta(1-42) were observed in the AD group (480 +/- 104 ng/L) as compared to controls (1,040 +/- 213 ng/L), whereas tau levels were significantly higher in patients with AD (618 +/- 292 ng/L) than in controls (277 +/- 136 ng/L). Combining the results of Abeta(1-42) and tau measurements resulted in a clear separation between the AD group and the controls. No significant differences in CSF levels of SAP and C1q were observed between the well characterized AD patients and non demented control group. Furthermore, we could not demonstrate a correlation between SAP and C1q CSF levels and the severity of the disease, expressed in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores. Therefore, in our opinion these factors can be excluded from the list of potentially interesting biomarkers for AD diagnosis and progression.

  13. Plasmin system of Alzheimer's disease patients: CSF analysis.

    PubMed

    Martorana, Alessandro; Sancesario, Giulia M; Esposito, Zaira; Nuccetelli, Marzia; Sorge, Roberto; Formosa, Amanda; Dinallo, Vincenzo; Bernardi, Giorgio; Bernardini, Sergio; Sancesario, Giuseppe

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the extracellular deposit of Amyloid beta (Aβ), mainly of the Amyloid beta(1-42) (Aβ(1-42)) peptide in the hippocampus and neocortex leading to progressive cognitive decline and dementia. The possible imbalance between the Aβ production/degradation process was suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. Among others, the serine protease plasmin has shown to be involved in Aβ(1-42) clearance, a hypothesis strengthened by neuropathological studies on AD brains. To explore whether there is a change in plasmin system in CSF of AD patients, we analyzed CSF samples from AD and age-matched controls, looking at plasminogen, tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) protein levels and t-PA and urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA) enzymatic activities. We also measured Aβ(1-42), total-tau and phospho-tau (181) CSF levels and sought for a possible relationship between them and plasmin system values. Our findings showed that t-PA, plasminogen and PAI-1 levels, as t-PA enzymatic activity, remained unchanged in AD with respect to controls; u-PA activity was not detected. We conclude that CSF analysis of plasminogen system does not reflect changes observed post-mortem. Unfortunately, the CSF detection of plasmin system could not be a useful biomarker for either AD diagnosis or disease progression. However, these findings do not exclude the possible involvement of the plasmin system in AD.

  14. Using AD biomarker research results for clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Melanie B.; Harkins, Kristin; Green, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To inform whether the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) should change its policy of not returning research results to ADNI participants, we surveyed investigators and research staff about disclosing ADNI biomarker information to research participants, with particular emphasis on amyloid imaging results. Methods: In April 2012, just before Food and Drug Administration approval of the amyloid-binding radiotracer, florbetapir, all ADNI investigators and personnel were recruited to complete an anonymous online survey that contained fixed choice and free-text questions. Results: Although ADNI participants often requested amyloid imaging results (the proportions of investigators who reported requests from more than half of their participants with normal cognition or mild cognitive impairment were 20% and 22%, respectively), across all diagnostic groups, the majority of ADNI investigators (approximately 90%) did not return amyloid imaging results to ADNI participants. However, the majority of investigators reported that, if the Food and Drug Administration approved florbetapir, they would support the return of amyloid imaging results to participants with mild cognitive impairment and normal cognition, but they emphasized the need for guidance on how to provide these results to participants and for research to assess the value of returning results as well as how returning results will affect study validity and participant well-being. Conclusions: A majority of ADNI investigators support returning amyloid imaging results to ADNI participants. The findings that they want guidance on how to do this and research on the impact of disclosure suggest how to develop and monitor a disclosure process. PMID:23966249

  15. Evaluation of CART peptide level in rat plasma and CSF: Possible role as a biomarker in opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Bakhtazad, Atefeh; Vousooghi, Nasim; Garmabi, Behzad; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2016-10-01

    It has been shown previously that cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide has a modulatory role and homeostatic regulatory effect in motivation to and reward of the drugs of abuse specially psychostimulants. Recent data also showed that in addition to psychostimulants, CART is critically involved in the different stages of opioid addiction. Here we have evaluated the fluctuations in the level of CART peptide in plasma and CSF in different phases of opioid addiction to find out whether CART can serve as a suitable marker in opioid addiction studies. Male rats were randomly distributed in groups of control, acute low-dose (10mg/kg) morphine, acute high-dose morphine (80mg/kg), chronic escalating doses of morphine, withdrawal syndrome precipitated by administration of naloxone (1mg/kg), and abstinent after long-term drug-free maintenance of addicted animals. The level of CART peptide in CSF and plasma samples was measured by enzyme immunoassay. CART peptide concentration in the CSF and plasma was significantly elevated in acute high-dose morphine and withdrawal state animals and down-regulated in addicted rats. In abstinent group, CART peptide level was up-regulated in plasma but not in CSF samples. As the observed results are in agreement with data regarding the CART mRNA and protein expression in the brain reward pathway in opioid addiction phases, it may be suggested that evaluation of CART peptide level in CSF or plasma could be a suitable marker which reflects the rises and falls of the peptide concentration in brain in the development of opioid addiction. PMID:27349817

  16. Evaluation of CART peptide level in rat plasma and CSF: Possible role as a biomarker in opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Bakhtazad, Atefeh; Vousooghi, Nasim; Garmabi, Behzad; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2016-10-01

    It has been shown previously that cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide has a modulatory role and homeostatic regulatory effect in motivation to and reward of the drugs of abuse specially psychostimulants. Recent data also showed that in addition to psychostimulants, CART is critically involved in the different stages of opioid addiction. Here we have evaluated the fluctuations in the level of CART peptide in plasma and CSF in different phases of opioid addiction to find out whether CART can serve as a suitable marker in opioid addiction studies. Male rats were randomly distributed in groups of control, acute low-dose (10mg/kg) morphine, acute high-dose morphine (80mg/kg), chronic escalating doses of morphine, withdrawal syndrome precipitated by administration of naloxone (1mg/kg), and abstinent after long-term drug-free maintenance of addicted animals. The level of CART peptide in CSF and plasma samples was measured by enzyme immunoassay. CART peptide concentration in the CSF and plasma was significantly elevated in acute high-dose morphine and withdrawal state animals and down-regulated in addicted rats. In abstinent group, CART peptide level was up-regulated in plasma but not in CSF samples. As the observed results are in agreement with data regarding the CART mRNA and protein expression in the brain reward pathway in opioid addiction phases, it may be suggested that evaluation of CART peptide level in CSF or plasma could be a suitable marker which reflects the rises and falls of the peptide concentration in brain in the development of opioid addiction.

  17. The added value of biomarker analysis to the genesis of Plaggic Anthrosols.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mourik, Jan; Jansen, Boris

    2015-04-01

    degradation, resulting in the second extension of sand drifting. To improve our knowledge about the evolution of plaggen soils we can combine data of pollen and biomarker spectra of samples of plaggic deposits. Species, present in pollen spectra of plaggic deposits, can have three sources: 1. Pollen, already present in sods, used in the stable to produce manure. 2. Pollen, originating from flowering crop species. 3. Pollen, originating from flowering species in the surroundings. Species, present in biomarker spectra, can have three sources: 1. Biomarkers from tissues, present in sods, used for manure production. 2. Biomarkers from decomposed roots of crop species. 3. Biomarkers from straw of crop species, used in the stable for manure production. Comparison pollen and biomarker spectra of samples of a regular Anthrosol (Posteles, NE-Netherlands) and a Buried (Nabbegat, SE-Netherlands, buried around 1800 AD) Plaggic Anthrosol yielded some interesting features: a. The biomarker spectra of the 2Ap horizons (agricultural layer below the plaggic deposits) are dominated by biomarkers of deciduous trees (dominated by Quercus), indicating the use of organic litter from the forests. These trees are also present in the pollen spectra. b. The biomarker spectra of the plaggic deposits are dominated by crop species (Avena, Secale, Fagpyrum), Calluna is absent in most of the spectra. This is different from pollen spectra where Calluna is present, together with crop species and transported pollen of other species. Only the biomarker spectra of the upper 10 cm of the plaggic horizons are dominated by Calluna. c. Comparison of the spectra of the buried and regular Plaggic Anthrosols show the contribution of biomarkers of roots of Zea mais (introduced around 1950 AD), suppressing the other species. The negligible percentages of Calluna in biomarker spectra of plaggic deposits suggest an overestimating of the use of heath sods in the traditional interpretation of the genesis of plaggic horizons

  18. Reference measurement procedures for Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers: definitions and approaches with focus on amyloid β42.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Zegers, Ingrid; Andreasson, Ulf; Bjerke, Maria; Blankenstein, Marinus A; Bowser, Robert; Carrillo, Maria C; Gobom, Johan; Heath, Theresa; Jenkins, Rand; Jeromin, Andreas; Kaplow, June; Kidd, Daniel; Laterza, Omar F; Lockhart, Andrew; Lunn, Michael P; Martone, Robert L; Mills, Kevin; Pannee, Josef; Ratcliffe, Marianne; Shaw, Leslie M; Simon, Adam J; Soares, Holly; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Verbeek, Marcel M; Umek, Robert M; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Portelius, Erik

    2012-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) are increasingly used in clinical settings, research and drug trials. However, their broad-scale use on different technology platforms is hampered by the lack of standardization at the level of sample handling, determination of concentrations of analytes and the absence of well-defined performance criteria for in vitro diagnostic or companion diagnostic assays, which influences the apparent concentration of the analytes measured and the subsequent interpretation of the data. There is a need for harmonization of CSF AD biomarker assays that can reliably, across centers, quantitate CSF biomarkers with high analytical precision, selectivity and stability over long time periods. In this position paper, we discuss reference procedures for the measurement of CSF AD biomarkers, especially amyloid β42 and tau. We describe possible technical approaches, focusing on a selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry assay as a candidate reference method for quantification of CSF amyloid β42. PMID:22917143

  19. CSF α-synuclein improves diagnostic and prognostic performance of CSF tau and Aβ in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Jon B; Korff, Ane; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Zhang, Jing

    2013-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Lewy body diseases (LBD), e.g., Parkinson's disease (PD) dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), are common causes of geriatric cognitive impairments. In addition, AD and LBD are often found in the same patients at autopsy; therefore, biomarkers that can detect the presence of both pathologies in living subjects are needed. In this investigation, we report the assessment of α-synuclein (α-syn) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and its association with CSF total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181 (p-tau181), and amyloid beta1-42 (Aβ1-42) in subjects of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI; n = 389), with longitudinal clinical assessments. A strong correlation was noted between α-syn and t-tau in controls, as well as in patients with AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the correlation is not specific to subjects in the ADNI cohort, as it was also seen in PD patients and controls enrolled in the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI; n = 102). A bimodal distribution of CSF α-syn levels was observed in the ADNI cohort, with high levels of α-syn in the subjects with abnormally increased t-tau values. Although a correlation was also noted between α-syn and p-tau181, there was a mismatch (α-syn-p-tau181-Mis), i.e., higher p-tau181 levels accompanied by lower α-syn levels in a subset of ADNI patients. We hypothesize that this α-syn-p-tau181-Mis is a CSF signature of concomitant LBD pathology in AD patients. Hence, we suggest that inclusion of measures of CSF α-syn and calculation of α-syn-p-tau181-Mis improves the diagnostic sensitivity/specificity of classic CSF AD biomarkers and better predicts longitudinal cognitive changes.

  20. CSF Apo-E levels associate with cognitive decline and MRI changes

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Jon B.; Da, Xiao; Weiner, Michael W.; Wolk, David A.; Xie, Sharon X.; Arnold, Steven E.; Davatzikos, Christos; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele is the most important genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and it is thought to do so by modulating levels of the its product, apolipoprotein E (Apo-E), and regulating amyloid-β (Aβ) clearance. However, information on clinical and biomarker correlates of Apo-E proteins is scarce. We examined the relationship of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma Apo-E protein levels, and APOE genotype to cognition and AD biomarker changes in 311 AD Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) subjects with CSF Apo-E measurements and 565 subjects with plasma Apo-E measurements. At baseline, higher CSF Apo-E levels were associated with higher total and phosphorylated CSF tau levels. CSF Apo-E levels were associated with longitudinal cognitive decline, MCI conversion to dementia, and grey matter atrophy rate in total tau/Aβ1–42 ratio and APOE genotype adjusted analyses. In analyses stratified by APOE genotype, our results were only significant in the group without the ε4 allele. Baseline CSF Apo-E levels did not predict longitudinal CSF Aβ or tau changes. Plasma Apo-E levels show a mild correlation with CSF Apo-E levels, but were not associated with longitudinal cognitive and MRI changes. Based on our analyses, we speculate that increased CSF Apo-E2 or -E3 levels might represent a protective response to injury in AD and may have neuroprotective effects by decreasing neuronal damage independent of tau and amyloid deposition in addition to its effects on amyloid clearance. PMID:24385135

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of CSF Ab42 and florbetapir PET for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip S; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William; Donohue, Michael; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) β-amyloid42 (Aβ42) and increased florbetapir positron emission tomography (PET) uptake reflects brain Aβ accumulation. These biomarkers are correlated with each other and altered in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but no study has directly compared their diagnostic performance. Methods We examined healthy controls (CN, N = 169) versus AD dementia patients (N = 118), and stable (sMCI; no dementia, followed up for at least 2 years, N = 165) versus progressive MCI (pMCI; conversion to AD dementia, N = 59). All subjects had florbetapir PET (global and regional; temporal, frontal, parietal, and cingulate) and CSF Aβ42 measurements at baseline. We compared area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, and specificity (testing a priori and optimized cutoffs). Clinical diagnosis was the reference standard. Results CSF Aβ42 and (global or regional) PET florbetapir did not differ in AUC (CN vs. AD, CSF 84.4%; global PET 86.9%; difference [95% confidence interval] −6.7 to 1.5). CSF Aβ42 and global PET florbetapir did not differ in sensitivity, but PET had greater specificity than CSF in most comparisons. Sixteen CN progressed to MCI and AD (six Aβ negative, seven Aβ positive, and three PET positive but CSF negative). Interpretation The overall diagnostic accuracies of CSF Aβ42 and PET florbetapir were similar, but PET had greater specificity. This was because some CN and sMCI subjects appear pathological using CSF but not using PET, suggesting that low CSF Aβ42 not always translates to cognitive decline or brain Aβ accumulation. Other factors, including costs and side effects, may also be considered when determining the optimal modality for different applications. PMID:25356425

  2. The added value of biomarker analysis to the genesis of Plaggic Anthrosols.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mourik, Jan; Jansen, Boris

    2015-04-01

    degradation, resulting in the second extension of sand drifting. To improve our knowledge about the evolution of plaggen soils we can combine data of pollen and biomarker spectra of samples of plaggic deposits. Species, present in pollen spectra of plaggic deposits, can have three sources: 1. Pollen, already present in sods, used in the stable to produce manure. 2. Pollen, originating from flowering crop species. 3. Pollen, originating from flowering species in the surroundings. Species, present in biomarker spectra, can have three sources: 1. Biomarkers from tissues, present in sods, used for manure production. 2. Biomarkers from decomposed roots of crop species. 3. Biomarkers from straw of crop species, used in the stable for manure production. Comparison pollen and biomarker spectra of samples of a regular Anthrosol (Posteles, NE-Netherlands) and a Buried (Nabbegat, SE-Netherlands, buried around 1800 AD) Plaggic Anthrosol yielded some interesting features: a. The biomarker spectra of the 2Ap horizons (agricultural layer below the plaggic deposits) are dominated by biomarkers of deciduous trees (dominated by Quercus), indicating the use of organic litter from the forests. These trees are also present in the pollen spectra. b. The biomarker spectra of the plaggic deposits are dominated by crop species (Avena, Secale, Fagpyrum), Calluna is absent in most of the spectra. This is different from pollen spectra where Calluna is present, together with crop species and transported pollen of other species. Only the biomarker spectra of the upper 10 cm of the plaggic horizons are dominated by Calluna. c. Comparison of the spectra of the buried and regular Plaggic Anthrosols show the contribution of biomarkers of roots of Zea mais (introduced around 1950 AD), suppressing the other species. The negligible percentages of Calluna in biomarker spectra of plaggic deposits suggest an overestimating of the use of heath sods in the traditional interpretation of the genesis of plaggic horizons

  3. Physical activity attenuates age-related biomarker alterations in preclinical AD

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Stephanie A.; Oh, Jennifer M.; Larson, Jordan; Edwards, Dorothy; Cook, Dane; Koscik, Rebecca; Gallagher, Catherine L.; Dowling, N.M.; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Bendlin, Barbara B.; LaRue, Asenath; Rowley, Howard A.; Christian, Brad T.; Asthana, Sanjay; Hermann, Bruce P.; Johnson, Sterling C.; Sager, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether engagement in physical activity might favorably alter the age-dependent evolution of Alzheimer disease (AD)-related brain and cognitive changes in a cohort of at-risk, late-middle-aged adults. Methods: Three hundred seventeen enrollees in the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention underwent T1 MRI; a subset also underwent 11C-Pittsburgh compound B–PET (n = 186) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose–PET (n = 152) imaging. Participants' responses on a self-report measure of current physical activity were used to classify them as either physically active or physically inactive based on American Heart Association guidelines. They also completed a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Covariate-adjusted regression analyses were used to test whether the adverse effect of age on imaging and cognitive biomarkers was modified by physical activity. Results: There were significant age × physical activity interactions for β-amyloid burden (p = 0.014), glucose metabolism (p = 0.015), and hippocampal volume (p = 0.025) such that, with advancing age, physically active individuals exhibited a lesser degree of biomarker alterations compared with the physically inactive. Similar age × physical activity interactions were also observed on cognitive domains of Immediate Memory (p = 0.042) and Visuospatial Ability (p = 0.016). In addition, the physically active group had higher scores on Speed and Flexibility (p = 0.002) compared with the inactive group. Conclusions: In a middle-aged, at-risk cohort, a physically active lifestyle is associated with an attenuation of the deleterious influence of age on key biomarkers of AD pathophysiology. However, because our observational, cross-sectional design cannot establish causality, randomized controlled trials/longitudinal studies will be necessary for determining whether midlife participation in structured physical exercise forestalls the development of AD and related disorders in later life. PMID:25298312

  4. BACE1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid and its relation to markers of AD pathology.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Sandra D; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Verheijen, Jan H; Mulder, Cees; Scheltens, Philip; Blankenstein, Marinus A; Hack, C Erik; Veerhuis, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that reduced amyloid-beta 1-42 (Abeta(42)) and increased tau levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reflect increased Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in the brain. beta-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is thought to be the major beta-secretase involved in Abeta production in the brain, and therefore we investigated the relation between BACE1 activity and CSF markers Abeta(40), Abeta(42), total tau (t-tau), and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (p-tau) in CSF of control (n=12), mild cognitive impairment (n=18), and AD (n=17) subjects. Patients were classified according to their Abeta(42), t-tau, and p-tau CSF biomarker levels, with either an AD-like biomarker profile (two or three biomarkers abnormal: Abeta(42) < 495 pg/ml in combination with t-tau > 356 pg/ml, and/or p-tau > 54 pg/ml) or a normal biomarker profile (biomarker abnormal). This resulted in 19 subjects with an AD-like biomarker profile (66 +/- 6 years, 53% female, and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) score: 23 +/- 5) and 28 subjects with a normal biomarker profile (62 +/- 11 years, 43% female, and MMSE score: 27 +/- 4). Subjects with an AD-like biomarker profile had higher CSF BACE1 activity levels, compared to patients with a normal biomarker profile (20 pg/ml and 16 pg/ml respectively; p=0.01), when controlled for age and gender. In the whole sample, BACE1 activity correlated with CSF levels of Abeta(40), t-tau, and p-tau (r=0.38, r=0.63, and r=0.65; all p< 0.05), but not with Abeta(42). These data suggest that increased BACE1 activity in CSF relates to AD pathology in the brain.

  5. BACE1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid and its relation to markers of AD pathology.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Sandra D; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Verheijen, Jan H; Mulder, Cees; Scheltens, Philip; Blankenstein, Marinus A; Hack, C Erik; Veerhuis, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that reduced amyloid-beta 1-42 (Abeta(42)) and increased tau levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reflect increased Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in the brain. beta-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is thought to be the major beta-secretase involved in Abeta production in the brain, and therefore we investigated the relation between BACE1 activity and CSF markers Abeta(40), Abeta(42), total tau (t-tau), and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (p-tau) in CSF of control (n=12), mild cognitive impairment (n=18), and AD (n=17) subjects. Patients were classified according to their Abeta(42), t-tau, and p-tau CSF biomarker levels, with either an AD-like biomarker profile (two or three biomarkers abnormal: Abeta(42) < 495 pg/ml in combination with t-tau > 356 pg/ml, and/or p-tau > 54 pg/ml) or a normal biomarker profile (biomarker abnormal). This resulted in 19 subjects with an AD-like biomarker profile (66 +/- 6 years, 53% female, and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) score: 23 +/- 5) and 28 subjects with a normal biomarker profile (62 +/- 11 years, 43% female, and MMSE score: 27 +/- 4). Subjects with an AD-like biomarker profile had higher CSF BACE1 activity levels, compared to patients with a normal biomarker profile (20 pg/ml and 16 pg/ml respectively; p=0.01), when controlled for age and gender. In the whole sample, BACE1 activity correlated with CSF levels of Abeta(40), t-tau, and p-tau (r=0.38, r=0.63, and r=0.65; all p< 0.05), but not with Abeta(42). These data suggest that increased BACE1 activity in CSF relates to AD pathology in the brain. PMID:20164582

  6. Fluid biomarkers in Alzheimer’s disease – current concepts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The diagnostic guidelines of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have recently been updated to include brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, with the aim of increasing the certainty of whether a patient has an ongoing AD neuropathologic process or not. The CSF biomarkers total tau (T-tau), hyperphosphorylated tau (P-tau) and the 42 amino acid isoform of amyloid β (Aβ42) reflect the core pathologic features of AD, which are neuronal loss, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular senile plaques. Since the pathologic processes of AD start decades before the first symptoms, these biomarkers may provide means of early disease detection. The updated guidelines identify three different stages of AD: preclinical AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to AD and AD with dementia. In this review, we aim to summarize the CSF biomarker data available for each of these stages. We also review results from blood biomarker studies. In summary, the core AD CSF biomarkers have high diagnostic accuracy both for AD with dementia and to predict incipient AD (MCI due to AD). Longitudinal studies on healthy elderly and recent cross-sectional studies on patients with dominantly inherited AD mutations have also found biomarker changes in cognitively normal at-risk individuals. This will be important if disease-modifying treatment becomes available, given that treatment will probably be most effective early in the disease. An important prerequisite for this is trustworthy analyses. Since measurements vary between studies and laboratories, standardization of analytical as well as pre-analytical procedures will be essential. This process is already initiated. Apart from filling diagnostic roles, biomarkers may also be utilized for prognosis, disease progression, development of new treatments, monitoring treatment effects and for increasing the knowledge about pathologic processes coupled to the disease. Hence, the search for new biomarkers continues. Several

  7. Alzheimer's Disease Cerebrospinal Fluid and Neuroimaging Biomarkers: Diagnostic Accuracy and Relationship to Drug Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tapan K; Alkon, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Widely researched Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers include in vivo brain imaging with PET and MRI, imaging of amyloid plaques, and biochemical assays of Aβ 1 - 42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau (p-tau-181) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In this review, we critically evaluate these biomarkers and discuss their clinical utility for the differential diagnosis of AD. Current AD biomarker tests are either highly invasive (requiring CSF collection) or expensive and labor-intensive (neuroimaging), making them unsuitable for use in the primary care, clinical office-based setting, or to assess drug efficacy in clinical trials. In addition, CSF and neuroimaging biomarkers continue to face challenges in achieving required sensitivity and specificity and minimizing center-to-center variability (for CSF-Aβ 1 - 42 biomarkers CV = 26.5% ; http://www.alzforum.org/news/conference-coverage/paris-standardization-hurdle-spinal-fluid-imaging-markers). Although potentially useful for selecting patient populations for inclusion in AD clinical trials, the utility of CSF biomarkers and neuroimaging techniques as surrogate endpoints of drug efficacy needs to be validated. Recent trials of β- and γ-secretase inhibitors and Aβ immunization-based therapies in AD showed no significant cognitive improvements, despite changes in CSF and neuroimaging biomarkers. As we learn more about the dysfunctional cellular and molecular signaling processes that occur in AD, and how these processes are manifested in tissues outside of the brain, new peripheral biomarkers may also be validated as non-invasive tests to diagnose preclinical and clinical AD. PMID:26402622

  8. A Decade of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Somers, Charisse; Struyfs, Hanne; Goossens, Joery; Niemantsverdriet, Ellis; Luyckx, Jill; De Roeck, Naomi; De Roeck, Ellen; De Vil, Bart; Cras, Patrick; Martin, Jean-Jacques; De Deyn, Peter-Paul; Bjerke, Maria; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2016-08-10

    During the past ten years, over 5,000 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were analyzed at the Reference Center for Biological Markers of Dementia (BIODEM), UAntwerp, for core Alzheimer's disease (AD) CSF biomarkers: amyloid-β peptide of 42 amino acids (Aβ1-42), total tau protein (T-tau), and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-tau181P). CSF biomarker analyses were performed using single-analyte ELISA kits. In-house validated cutoff values were applied: Aβ1-42 <638.5 pg/mL, T-tau >296.5 pg/mL, P-tau181P >56.5 pg/mL. A CSF biomarker profile was considered to be suggestive for AD if the CSF Aβ1-42 concentration was below the cutoff, in combination with T-tau and/or P-tau181P values above the cutoff (IWG2 criteria for AD). Biomarker analyses were requested for following clinical indications: 1) neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of clinical AD, 2) neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of doubt between AD and a non-AD dementia, 3) neurochemical diagnosis of prodromal AD in case of mild cognitive impairment, 4) neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of psychiatric symptoms (like depression, psychosis), or 5) other clinical indications. During these ten years, the number of yearly referred samples increased by 238% and clinical indications for referral showed a shift from neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of clinical AD to differential dementia diagnosis in case of doubt between AD and a non-AD dementia. Four percent of the patients also had a postmortem neuropathological examination. Together, these biomarker data were the basis for several research papers, and significantly contributed to the validation of these biomarkers in autopsy-confirmed subjects. PMID:27567807

  9. A Decade of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Somers, Charisse; Struyfs, Hanne; Goossens, Joery; Niemantsverdriet, Ellis; Luyckx, Jill; De Roeck, Naomi; De Roeck, Ellen; De Vil, Bart; Cras, Patrick; Martin, Jean-Jacques; De Deyn, Peter-Paul; Bjerke, Maria; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2016-08-10

    During the past ten years, over 5,000 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were analyzed at the Reference Center for Biological Markers of Dementia (BIODEM), UAntwerp, for core Alzheimer's disease (AD) CSF biomarkers: amyloid-β peptide of 42 amino acids (Aβ1-42), total tau protein (T-tau), and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-tau181P). CSF biomarker analyses were performed using single-analyte ELISA kits. In-house validated cutoff values were applied: Aβ1-42 <638.5 pg/mL, T-tau >296.5 pg/mL, P-tau181P >56.5 pg/mL. A CSF biomarker profile was considered to be suggestive for AD if the CSF Aβ1-42 concentration was below the cutoff, in combination with T-tau and/or P-tau181P values above the cutoff (IWG2 criteria for AD). Biomarker analyses were requested for following clinical indications: 1) neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of clinical AD, 2) neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of doubt between AD and a non-AD dementia, 3) neurochemical diagnosis of prodromal AD in case of mild cognitive impairment, 4) neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of psychiatric symptoms (like depression, psychosis), or 5) other clinical indications. During these ten years, the number of yearly referred samples increased by 238% and clinical indications for referral showed a shift from neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of clinical AD to differential dementia diagnosis in case of doubt between AD and a non-AD dementia. Four percent of the patients also had a postmortem neuropathological examination. Together, these biomarker data were the basis for several research papers, and significantly contributed to the validation of these biomarkers in autopsy-confirmed subjects.

  10. The PredictAD project: development of novel biomarkers and analysis software for early diagnosis of the Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Antila, Kari; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Thurfjell, Lennart; Laine, Jarmo; Massimini, Marcello; Rueckert, Daniel; Zubarev, Roman A; Orešič, Matej; van Gils, Mark; Mattila, Jussi; Hviid Simonsen, Anja; Waldemar, Gunhild; Soininen, Hilkka

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia affecting 36 million people worldwide. As the demographic transition in the developed countries progresses towards older population, the worsening ratio of workers per retirees and the growing number of patients with age-related illnesses such as AD will challenge the current healthcare systems and national economies. For these reasons AD has been identified as a health priority, and various methods for diagnosis and many candidates for therapies are under intense research. Even though there is currently no cure for AD, its effects can be managed. Today the significance of early and precise diagnosis of AD is emphasized in order to minimize its irreversible effects on the nervous system. When new drugs and therapies enter the market it is also vital to effectively identify the right candidates to benefit from these. The main objective of the PredictAD project was to find and integrate efficient biomarkers from heterogeneous patient data to make early diagnosis and to monitor the progress of AD in a more efficient, reliable and objective manner. The project focused on discovering biomarkers from biomolecular data, electrophysiological measurements of the brain and structural, functional and molecular brain images. We also designed and built a statistical model and a framework for exploiting these biomarkers with other available patient history and background data. We were able to discover several potential novel biomarker candidates and implement the framework in software. The results are currently used in several research projects, licensed to commercial use and being tested for clinical use in several trials.

  11. The PredictAD project: development of novel biomarkers and analysis software for early diagnosis of the Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Antila, Kari; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Thurfjell, Lennart; Laine, Jarmo; Massimini, Marcello; Rueckert, Daniel; Zubarev, Roman A.; Orešič, Matej; van Gils, Mark; Mattila, Jussi; Hviid Simonsen, Anja; Waldemar, Gunhild; Soininen, Hilkka

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia affecting 36 million people worldwide. As the demographic transition in the developed countries progresses towards older population, the worsening ratio of workers per retirees and the growing number of patients with age-related illnesses such as AD will challenge the current healthcare systems and national economies. For these reasons AD has been identified as a health priority, and various methods for diagnosis and many candidates for therapies are under intense research. Even though there is currently no cure for AD, its effects can be managed. Today the significance of early and precise diagnosis of AD is emphasized in order to minimize its irreversible effects on the nervous system. When new drugs and therapies enter the market it is also vital to effectively identify the right candidates to benefit from these. The main objective of the PredictAD project was to find and integrate efficient biomarkers from heterogeneous patient data to make early diagnosis and to monitor the progress of AD in a more efficient, reliable and objective manner. The project focused on discovering biomarkers from biomolecular data, electrophysiological measurements of the brain and structural, functional and molecular brain images. We also designed and built a statistical model and a framework for exploiting these biomarkers with other available patient history and background data. We were able to discover several potential novel biomarker candidates and implement the framework in software. The results are currently used in several research projects, licensed to commercial use and being tested for clinical use in several trials. PMID:24427524

  12. How many biomarkers to discriminate neurodegenerative dementia?

    PubMed

    Sancesario, Giulia M; Bernardini, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    A number of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers are currently used for the diagnosis of dementia. Opposite changes in the level of amyloid-β(1-42) versus total tau and phosphorylated-tau181 in the CSF reflect the specific pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the brain. This panel of biomarkers has proven to be effective to differentiate AD from controls and from the major types of neurodegenerative dementia, and to evaluate the progression from mild cognitive impairment to AD. In the absence of specific biomarkers reflecting the pathologies of the other most common forms of dementia, such as Lewy Body disease, Frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, etc., the evaluation of biomarkers of AD pathology is used, attempting to exclude rather than to confirm AD. Other biomarkers included in the common clinical practice do not clearly relate to the underlying pathology: progranulin (PGRN) is a selective marker of frontotemporal dementia with mutations in the PGRN gene; the 14-3-3 protein is a highly sensitive and specific marker for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, but has to be used carefully in differentiating rapid progressive dementia; and α-synuclein is an emerging candidate biomarker of the different forms of synucleinopathy. This review summarizes several biomarkers of neurodegenerative dementia validated based on the neuropathological processes occurring in brain tissue. Notwithstanding the paucity of pathologically validated biomarkers and their high analytical variability, the combinations of these biomarkers may well represent a key and more precise analytical and diagnostic tool in the complex plethora of degenerative dementia. PMID:26292074

  13. No Added Value of Novel Biomarkers in the Diagnostic Assessment of Patients Suspected of Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Poldervaart, Judith M.; Röttger, Emma; Dekker, Marieke S.; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P. A.; Verheggen, Peter W. H. M.; de Vrey, Evelyn A.; Wildbergh, Thierry X.; van ‘t Hof, Arnoud W. J.; Mosterd, Arend; Hoes, Arno W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of high-sensitive troponin (hs-cTnT), there is still room for improvement in the diagnostic assessment of patients suspected of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Apart from serial biomarker testing, which is time-consuming, novel biomarkers like copeptin have been proposed to expedite the early diagnosis of suspected ACS in addition to hs-cTnT. We determined whether placenta derived growth factor (PlGF), soluble Fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1), myoglobin, N-terminal prohormone B-type Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP), growth-differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) and copeptin improved early assessment of chest pain patients. Methods This prospective, single centre diagnostic FAME-ER study included patients presenting to the ED with symptoms suggestive of ACS. Blood was collected to measure biomarkers, notably, hs-cTnT was retrospectively assessed. Added value of markers was judged by increase in AUC using multivariable logistic regression. Results Of 453 patients enrolled, 149 (33%) received a final diagnosis of ACS. Hs-cTnT had the highest diagnostic value in both univariable and multivariable analysis. PPVs of the biomarkers ranged from 23.5% (PlGF) to 77.9% (hs-cTnT), NPVs from 67.0% (PlGF) to 86.4% (hs-cTnT). Only myoglobin yielded diagnostic value in addition to clinical symptoms and electrocardiography (ECG) (AUC of clinical model 0.80) with AUC of 0.84 (p<0.001). However, addition of hs-cTnT was superior (AUC 0.89, p<0.001). Addition of the biomarkers to our clinical model and hs-cTnT did not or only marginally (GDF-15) improved diagnostic performance. Conclusion When assessing patients suspected of ACS, only myoglobin had added diagnostic value beyond clinical symptoms and ECG. However, when combined with hs-cTnT, it yields no additional diagnostic value. PlGF, sFlt-1, NT-proBNP, GDF-15 and copeptin had no added value to the clinical model or hs-cTnT. PMID:26177390

  14. Role of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Alzheimer's Disease Modifying Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Na-Young; Shin, Dong Wun; Trojanowski, John Q

    2014-01-01

    Until now, a disease-modifying therapy (DMT) that has an ability to slow or arrest Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression has not been developed, and all clinical trials involving AD patients enrolled by clinical assessment alone also have not been successful. Given the growing consensus that the DMT is likely to require treatment initiation well before full-blown dementia emerges, the early detection of AD will provide opportunities to successfully identify new drugs that slow the course of AD pathology. Recent advances in early detection of AD and prediction of progression of the disease using various biomarkers, including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ1-42, total tau and p-tau181 levels, and imagining biomarkers, are now being actively integrated into the designs of AD clinical trials. In terms of therapeutic mechanisms, monitoring these markers may be helpful for go/no-go decision making as well as surrogate markers for disease severity or progression. Furthermore, CSF biomarkers can be used as a tool to enrich patients for clinical trials with prospect of increasing statistical power and reducing costs in drug development. However, the standardization of technical aspects of analysis of these biomarkers is an essential prerequisite to the clinical uses. To accomplish this, global efforts are underway to standardize CSF biomarker measurements and a quality control program supported by the Alzheimer's Association. The current review summarizes therapeutic targets of developing drugs in AD pathophysiology, and provides the most recent advances in the PMID:25598657

  15. CSF monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactate in the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (normal pressure hydrocephalus) related to CSF hydrodynamic parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Malm, J; Kristensen, B; Ekstedt, J; Adolfsson, R; Wester, P

    1991-01-01

    Monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactic acid in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated on patients with the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (idiopathic normal pressure syndrome; AHS, n = 15), Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 14), multi-infarct dementia (MID, n = 13) and controls (n = 21). Patients had clinical and CSF hydrodynamic investigations. Monoamine concentrations were determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, cholinesterases and lactate were determined photometrically. In the AHS patients, CSF monoamine concentrations were not significantly different compared with controls, AD or MID patients. AHS and AD patients showed a similar reduction of CSF acetylcholinesterase activity compared with controls. Positive correlations were found in concentrations of CSF homovanillic acid, CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and CSF lactic acid versus CSF outflow conductance (that is, resistance against CSF outflow) in the AHS patients. A similar pattern was observed in a subgroup of MID patients characterised by dilated ventricles and disturbed CSF hydrodynamics. These data suggest that a low CSF outflow conductance may facilitate the clearance of acidic substances from the arachnoid space at the probenecid sensitive active transport site. Alternative explanations would be that a pathologically low CSF outflow conductance is accompanied by an inverse caudorostral flow of CSF or a compromised trans-ependymal diffusion. PMID:1709421

  16. Exploring Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeti; Singh, Anshika Nikita

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is one of the most common form of dementia occurring in elderly population worldwide. Currently Aβ42, tau and p-tau in the cerebrospinal fluid is estimated for confirmation of AD. CSF which is being used as the potent source for biomarker screening is obtained by invasive lumbar punctures. Thus, there is an urgent need of minimal invasive methods for identification of diagnostic markers for early detection of AD. Blood serum and plasma serves as an appropriate source, due to minimal discomfort to the patients, promoting frequent testing, better follow-up and better consent to clinical trials. Hence, the need of the hour demands discovery of diagnostic and prognostic patient specific signature biomarkers by using emerging technologies of mass spectrometry, microarrays and peptidomics. In this review we summarize the present scenario of AD biomarkers such as circulatory biomarkers, blood based amyloid markers, inflammatory markers and oxidative stress markers being investigated and also some of the potent biomarkers which might be able to predict early onset of Alzheimer's and delay cognitive impairment. PMID:27630867

  17. A/T/N: An unbiased descriptive classification scheme for Alzheimer disease biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, David A.; Blennow, Kaj; Carrillo, Maria C.; Feldman, Howard H.; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Hampel, Harald; Jagust, William J.; Johnson, Keith A.; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Scheltens, Philip; Sperling, Reisa A.; Dubois, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers have become an essential component of Alzheimer disease (AD) research and because of the pervasiveness of AD pathology in the elderly, the same biomarkers are used in cognitive aging research. A number of current issues suggest that an unbiased descriptive classification scheme for these biomarkers would be useful. We propose the “A/T/N” system in which 7 major AD biomarkers are divided into 3 binary categories based on the nature of the pathophysiology that each measures. “A” refers to the value of a β-amyloid biomarker (amyloid PET or CSF Aβ42); “T,” the value of a tau biomarker (CSF phospho tau, or tau PET); and “N,” biomarkers of neurodegeneration or neuronal injury ([18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose–PET, structural MRI, or CSF total tau). Each biomarker category is rated as positive or negative. An individual score might appear as A+/T+/N−, or A+/T−/N−, etc. The A/T/N system includes the new modality tau PET. It is agnostic to the temporal ordering of mechanisms underlying AD pathogenesis. It includes all individuals in any population regardless of the mix of biomarker findings and therefore is suited to population studies of cognitive aging. It does not specify disease labels and thus is not a diagnostic classification system. It is a descriptive system for categorizing multidomain biomarker findings at the individual person level in a format that is easy to understand and use. Given the present lack of consensus among AD specialists on terminology across the clinically normal to dementia spectrum, a biomarker classification scheme will have broadest acceptance if it is independent from any one clinically defined diagnostic scheme. PMID:27371494

  18. A/T/N: An unbiased descriptive classification scheme for Alzheimer disease biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Jack, Clifford R; Bennett, David A; Blennow, Kaj; Carrillo, Maria C; Feldman, Howard H; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Hampel, Harald; Jagust, William J; Johnson, Keith A; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Scheltens, Philip; Sperling, Reisa A; Dubois, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    Biomarkers have become an essential component of Alzheimer disease (AD) research and because of the pervasiveness of AD pathology in the elderly, the same biomarkers are used in cognitive aging research. A number of current issues suggest that an unbiased descriptive classification scheme for these biomarkers would be useful. We propose the "A/T/N" system in which 7 major AD biomarkers are divided into 3 binary categories based on the nature of the pathophysiology that each measures. "A" refers to the value of a β-amyloid biomarker (amyloid PET or CSF Aβ42); "T," the value of a tau biomarker (CSF phospho tau, or tau PET); and "N," biomarkers of neurodegeneration or neuronal injury ([(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, structural MRI, or CSF total tau). Each biomarker category is rated as positive or negative. An individual score might appear as A+/T+/N-, or A+/T-/N-, etc. The A/T/N system includes the new modality tau PET. It is agnostic to the temporal ordering of mechanisms underlying AD pathogenesis. It includes all individuals in any population regardless of the mix of biomarker findings and therefore is suited to population studies of cognitive aging. It does not specify disease labels and thus is not a diagnostic classification system. It is a descriptive system for categorizing multidomain biomarker findings at the individual person level in a format that is easy to understand and use. Given the present lack of consensus among AD specialists on terminology across the clinically normal to dementia spectrum, a biomarker classification scheme will have broadest acceptance if it is independent from any one clinically defined diagnostic scheme.

  19. CSF-VDRL test

    MedlinePlus

    Venereal disease research laboratory slide test - CSF ... provider's instructions on how to prepare for this test. ... The CSF-VDRL test is done to diagnose syphilis in the brain or spinal cord. Brain and spinal cord involvement is often a ...

  20. Synergistic anti-tumor efficacy of immunogenic adenovirus ONCOS-102 (Ad5/3-D24-GM-CSF) and standard of care chemotherapy in preclinical mesothelioma model.

    PubMed

    Kuryk, Lukasz; Haavisto, Elina; Garofalo, Mariangela; Capasso, Cristian; Hirvinen, Mari; Pesonen, Sari; Ranki, Tuuli; Vassilev, Lotta; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2016-10-15

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a rare cancer type caused mainly by asbestos exposure. The median overall survival time of a mesothelioma cancer patient is less than 1-year from diagnosis. Currently there are no curative treatment modalities for malignant mesothelioma, however treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy can help to improve patient prognosis and increase life expectancy. Pemetrexed-Cisplatin is the only standard of care (SoC) chemotherapy for malignant mesothelioma, but the median PFS/OS (progression-free survival/overall survival) from the initiation of treatment is only up to 12 months. Therefore, new treatment strategies against malignant mesothelioma are in high demand. ONCOS-102 is a dual targeting, chimeric oncolytic adenovirus, coding for human GM-CSF. The safety and immune activating properties of ONCOS-102 have already been assessed in phase 1 study (NCT01598129). In this preclinical study, we evaluated the antineoplastic activity of combination treatment with SoC chemotherapy (Pemetrexed, Cisplatin, Carboplatin) and ONCOS-102 in xenograft BALB/c model of human malignant mesothelioma. We demonstrated that ONCOS-102 is able to induce immunogenic cell death of human mesothelioma cell lines in vitro and showed anti-tumor activity in the treatment of refractory H226 malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) xenograft model. While chemotherapy alone showed no anti-tumor activity in the mesothelioma mouse model, ONCOS-102 was able to slow down tumor growth. Interestingly, a synergistic anti-tumor effect was seen when ONCOS-102 was combined with chemotherapy regimens. These findings give a rationale for the clinical testing of ONCOS-102 in combination with first-line chemotherapy in patients suffering from malignant mesothelioma. PMID:27287512

  1. Pre-analytical and analytical factors influencing Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarker variability.

    PubMed

    Fourier, Anthony; Portelius, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Quadrio, Isabelle; Perret-Liaudet, Armand

    2015-09-20

    A panel of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers including total Tau (t-Tau), phosphorylated Tau protein at residue 181 (p-Tau) and β-amyloid peptides (Aβ42 and Aβ40), is frequently used as an aid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnosis for young patients with cognitive impairment, for predicting prodromal AD in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects, for AD discrimination in atypical clinical phenotypes and for inclusion/exclusion and stratification of patients in clinical trials. Due to variability in absolute levels between laboratories, there is no consensus on medical cut-off value for the CSF AD signature. Thus, for full implementation of this core AD biomarker panel in clinical routine, this issue has to be solved. Variability can be explained both by pre-analytical and analytical factors. For example, the plastic tubes used for CSF collection and storage, the lack of reference material and the variability of the analytical protocols were identified as important sources of variability. The aim of this review is to highlight these pre-analytical and analytical factors and describe efforts done to counteract them in order to establish cut-off values for core CSF AD biomarkers. This review will give the current state of recommendations. PMID:26141614

  2. Pre-analytical and analytical factors influencing Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarker variability.

    PubMed

    Fourier, Anthony; Portelius, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Quadrio, Isabelle; Perret-Liaudet, Armand

    2015-09-20

    A panel of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers including total Tau (t-Tau), phosphorylated Tau protein at residue 181 (p-Tau) and β-amyloid peptides (Aβ42 and Aβ40), is frequently used as an aid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnosis for young patients with cognitive impairment, for predicting prodromal AD in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects, for AD discrimination in atypical clinical phenotypes and for inclusion/exclusion and stratification of patients in clinical trials. Due to variability in absolute levels between laboratories, there is no consensus on medical cut-off value for the CSF AD signature. Thus, for full implementation of this core AD biomarker panel in clinical routine, this issue has to be solved. Variability can be explained both by pre-analytical and analytical factors. For example, the plastic tubes used for CSF collection and storage, the lack of reference material and the variability of the analytical protocols were identified as important sources of variability. The aim of this review is to highlight these pre-analytical and analytical factors and describe efforts done to counteract them in order to establish cut-off values for core CSF AD biomarkers. This review will give the current state of recommendations.

  3. Impact of the 2008-2012 French Alzheimer Plan on the use of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in research memory center: the PLM Study.

    PubMed

    Gabelle, Audrey; Dumurgier, Julien; Vercruysse, Olivier; Paquet, Claire; Bombois, Stéphanie; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Peoc'h, Katell; Schraen, Susanna; Buée, Luc; Pasquier, Florence; Hugon, Jacques; Touchon, Jacques; Lehmann, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    The French Alzheimer's Disease Plan aims, in an unprecedented national effort, to develop research, promote optimal diagnosis, and take better care of patients. In order to evaluate the clinical interest and use of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, a data-sharing project, the PLM (Paris-North, Lille and Montpellier) study has emerged through collaboration between these memory centers, already involved in this field. The revised Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnosis criteria include CSF biomarkers, but little is known about their use in routine clinical practice. To evaluate their interest and diagnostic accuracy in routine AD diagnosis, a cohort of 677 patients from Montpellier was first analyzed. The results were then validated through the analysis of a second cohort of 638 patients from Lille and Paris-Nord. Diagnoses of AD and other dementias were established by multidisciplinary expert teams, based on neuropsychological exams and structural brain imaging, blinded from CSF results. CSF amyloid-β, tau, and p-tau concentrations were measured for all patients. Receiver-operating characteristic curves were used to define cut-offs and evaluate the ability of each biomarker to discriminate AD from other diagnoses. We showed that p-tau outperformed other biomarkers for discriminating AD from non-AD patients and presents a clear clinical interest. The other biomarkers also showed relevant variations especially when the differential AD diagnoses were taken into account. Altogether we could demonstrate in both mono-centric and multi-centric cohorts from memory clinics the capacity of CSF biomarkers to discriminate AD from non-AD patients in clinical routine with a high sensitivity and specificity.

  4. Alzheimer’s Biomarkers are Correlated with Brain Connectivity in Older Adults Differentially during Resting and Task States

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yang; Huang, Haiqing; Abner, Erin; Broster, Lucas S.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Kryscio, Richard; Andersen, Anders; Powell, David; Van Eldik, Linda; Gold, Brian T.; Nelson, Peter T.; Smith, Charles; Ding, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and tau-related neurodegeneration are pathologic hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The utility of AD biomarkers, including those measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), in predicting future AD risk and cognitive decline is still being refined. Here, we explored potential relationships between functional connectivity (FC) patterns within the default-mode network (DMN), age, CSF biomarkers (Aβ42 and pTau181), and cognitive status in older adults. Multiple measures of FC were explored, including a novel time series-based measure [total interdependence (TI)]. In our sample of 27 cognitively normal older adults, no significant associations were found between levels of Aβ42 or pTau181 and cognitive scores or regional brain volumes. However, we observed several novel relationships between these biomarkers and measures of FC in DMN during both resting-state and a short-term memory task. First, increased connectivity between bilateral anterior middle temporal gyri was associated with higher levels of CSF Aβ42 and Aβ42/pTau181 ratio (reflecting lower AD risk) during both rest and task. Second, increased bilateral parietal connectivity during the short-term memory task, but not during rest, was associated with higher levels of CSF pTau181 (reflecting higher AD risk). Third, increased connectivity between left middle temporal and left parietal cortices during the active task was associated with decreased global cognitive status but not CSF biomarkers. Lastly, we found that our new TI method was more sensitive to the CSF Aβ42-connectivity relationship whereas the traditional cross-correlation method was more sensitive to levels of CSF pTau181 and cognitive status. With further refinement, resting-state connectivity and task-driven connectivity measures hold promise as non-invasive neuroimaging markers of Aβ and pTau burden in cognitively normal older adults. PMID:26903858

  5. Circulating Biomarker Panels in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zafari, Sachli; Backes, Christina; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The early diagnosis of diseases frequently represents an important unmet clinical need supporting in-time treatment of pathologies. This also applies to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, estimated to affect millions of individuals worldwide. The respective diagnostic and prognostic markers, especially for the preclinical stages of AD, are expected to improve patients' outcome significantly. In the last decades, many approaches to detecting AD have been developed, including markers to discover changes in amyloid-β levels [from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or using positron emission tomography] or other brain imaging technologies such as structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional-connectivity MRI or task-related functional MRI. A major challenge is the detection of AD using minimally or even noninvasive biomarkers from body fluids such as plasma or serum. Circulating biomarker candidates based on mRNAs or proteins measured from blood cells, plasma or serum have been proposed for various pathologies including AD. As for other diseases, there is a tendency to use marker signatures obtained by high-throughput approaches, which allow the generation of profiles of hundreds to thousands of biomarkers simultaneously [microarrays, mass spectrometry or next-generation sequencing (NGS)]. Beyond mRNAs and proteins, recent approaches have measured small noncoding RNA (so-called microRNA) profiles in AD patients' blood samples using NGS or array-based technologies. Generally, the development of marker panels is in its early stages and requires further, substantial clinical validation. In this review, we provide an overview of different circulating AD biomarkers, starting with a brief summary of CSF markers and focusing on novel biomarker signatures such as small noncoding RNA profiles.

  6. Limited agreement between biomarkers of neuronal injury at different stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Kriett, Laura; Haller, Bernhard; Klupp, Elisabeth; Gray, Katherine; Grimmer, Timo; Laskaris, Nikolaos; Förster, Stefan; Perneczky, Robert; Kurz, Alexander; Drzezga, Alexander; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Yakushev, Igor

    2014-11-01

    New diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treat different biomarkers of neuronal injury as equivalent. Here, we quantified the degree of agreement between hippocampal volume on structural magnetic resonance imaging, regional glucose metabolism on positron emission tomography, and levels of phosphorylated tau in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in 585 subjects from all phases of the AD Neuroimaging Initiative. The overall chance-corrected agreement was poor (Cohen κ, 0.24-0.34), in accord with a high rate of conflicting findings (26%-41%). Neither diagnosis nor APOE ε4 status significantly influenced the distribution of agreement between the biomarkers. The degree of agreement tended to be higher in individuals with abnormal versus normal CSF β-amyloid (Aβ1-42) levels. Prospective diagnostic criteria for AD should address the relative importance of markers of neuronal injury and elaborate a way of dealing with conflicting biomarker findings.

  7. Limited agreement between biomarkers of neuronal injury at different stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Kriett, Laura; Haller, Bernhard; Klupp, Elisabeth; Gray, Katherine; Grimmer, Timo; Laskaris, Nikolaos; Förster, Stefan; Perneczky, Robert; Kurz, Alexander; Drzezga, Alexander; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Yakushev, Igor

    2014-11-01

    New diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treat different biomarkers of neuronal injury as equivalent. Here, we quantified the degree of agreement between hippocampal volume on structural magnetic resonance imaging, regional glucose metabolism on positron emission tomography, and levels of phosphorylated tau in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in 585 subjects from all phases of the AD Neuroimaging Initiative. The overall chance-corrected agreement was poor (Cohen κ, 0.24-0.34), in accord with a high rate of conflicting findings (26%-41%). Neither diagnosis nor APOE ε4 status significantly influenced the distribution of agreement between the biomarkers. The degree of agreement tended to be higher in individuals with abnormal versus normal CSF β-amyloid (Aβ1-42) levels. Prospective diagnostic criteria for AD should address the relative importance of markers of neuronal injury and elaborate a way of dealing with conflicting biomarker findings. PMID:24857233

  8. The cathepsin D rs17571 polymorphism: effects on CSF tau concentrations in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Matthias; Blennow, Kaj; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Andreasen, Niels; Prince, Jonathan A; Laws, Simon M; Förstl, Hans; Kurz, Alexander

    2006-06-01

    The lysosomal protease cathepsin D (CtsD, EC 3.4.23.5; gene, CTSD) has been associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) due to its cerebral expression being increased early in the course of AD; additionally, a CTSD exon 2 polymorphism (rs17571; NT_009237.17:g.569834T>C) may confer risk to AD. Functionally, it may be implicated in amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and tau protein degradation. The objective of this study was to determine whether the CTSD exon 2 polymorphism affects cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), concentrations of beta-amyloid (Abeta42) and tau in two independent samples from Germany (n=73) and Sweden (n=66). Patients carrying the CTSD rs17571-T allele had significantly decreased CSF levels of tau (Munich, p=0.003; Swedish, p=0.029; combined sample, p<0.001), whereas no significant effect was observed on Abeta42 concentrations. Likewise, no significant impact was observed on Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores. The data of both independent samples suggest that the CTSD rs17571 polymorphism does not affect APP processing but shows significant effects on tau processing. The result may corroborate the implication of the lysosomal system in the pathogenesis of AD and is of particular importance if CSF tau is used as a diagnostic biomarker. PMID:16652347

  9. d-serine levels in Alzheimer's disease: implications for novel biomarker development

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, C; Lourenco, M V; Vargas-Lopes, C; Suemoto, C K; Brandão, C O; Reis, T; Leite, R E P; Laks, J; Jacob-Filho, W; Pasqualucci, C A; Grinberg, L T; Ferreira, S T; Panizzutti, R

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder still in search of effective methods of diagnosis. Altered levels of the NMDA receptor co-agonist, d-serine, have been associated with neurological disorders, including schizophrenia and epilepsy. However, whether d-serine levels are deregulated in AD remains elusive. Here, we first measured D-serine levels in post-mortem hippocampal and cortical samples from nondemented subjects (n=8) and AD patients (n=14). We next determined d-serine levels in experimental models of AD, including wild-type rats and mice that received intracerebroventricular injections of amyloid-β oligomers, and APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Finally, we assessed d-serine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 21 patients with a diagnosis of probable AD, as compared with patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (n=9), major depression (n=9) and healthy controls (n=10), and results were contrasted with CSF amyloid-β/tau AD biomarkers. d-serine levels were higher in the hippocampus and parietal cortex of AD patients than in control subjects. Levels of both d-serine and serine racemase, the enzyme responsible for d-serine production, were elevated in experimental models of AD. Significantly, d-serine levels were higher in the CSF of probable AD patients than in non-cognitively impaired subject groups. Combining d-serine levels to the amyloid/tau index remarkably increased the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis of probable AD in our cohort. Our results show that increased brain and CSF d-serine levels are associated with AD. CSF d-serine levels discriminated between nondemented and AD patients in our cohort and might constitute a novel candidate biomarker for early AD diagnosis. PMID:25942042

  10. Preanalytical Confounding Factors in the Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease: The Issue of Diurnal Variation

    PubMed Central

    Cicognola, Claudia; Chiasserini, Davide; Parnetti, Lucilla

    2015-01-01

    Given the growing use of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau as biomarkers for early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), it is essential that the diagnostic procedures are standardized and the results comparable across different laboratories. Preanalytical factors are reported to be the cause of at least 50% of the total variability. Among them, diurnal variability is a key issue and may have an impact on the comparability of the values obtained. The available studies on this issue are not conclusive so far. Fluctuations of CSF biomarkers in young healthy volunteers have been previously reported, while subsequent studies have not confirmed those observations in older subjects, the ones most likely to receive this test. The observed differences in circadian rhythms need to be further assessed not only in classical CSF biomarkers but also in novel forthcoming biomarkers. In this review, the existing data on the issue of diurnal variations of CSF classical biomarkers for AD will be analyzed, also evaluating the available data on new possible biomarkers. PMID:26175714

  11. Predicting missing biomarker data in a longitudinal study of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Jagust, William J.; Aisen, Paul; Jack, Clifford R.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Gamst, Anthony; Soares, Holly; C. Green, Robert; Montine, Tom; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Bandy, Dan; Chen, Kewei; Morris, John; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Harvey, Danielle; Kornak, John; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Buckholtz, Neil; Kaye, Jeffrey; Dolen, Sara; Quinn, Joseph; Schneider, Lon; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Tang, Cheuk; Marzloff, George; Toledo-Morrell, Leylade; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn S.; Pedroso, Julia; Toroney, Jaimie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; De Santi, Susan M; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Aiello, Marilyn; Clark, Christopher M.; Pham, Cassie; Nunez, Jessica; Smith, Charles D.; Given, Curtis A.; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Richard, Jennifer; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Laubinger, Mary M.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Lu, Po H.; Graff-Radford MBBCH, Neill R; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin; Herring, Scott; Hake, Ann M.; van Dyck, Christopher H.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Benincasa, Amanda L.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Graham, Simon; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Mesulam, Marsel; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Scott; Johnson, Kathleen B.; Behan, Kelly E.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Ashford, Wes; Sabbagh, Marwan; Connor, Donald; Jacobson, Sandra; Killiany, Ronald; Norbash, Alexander; Nair, Anil; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni; Wang, Paul; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; DeCarli, Charles; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Kittur, Smita; Mirje, Seema; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Dr Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Hendin, Barry A.; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Gandy, Sam; Marenberg, Marjorie E.; Rovner, Barry W.; Pearlson, Godfrey; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Englert, Jessica; Williamson, Jeff D.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Cohen, Ronald; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate predictors of missing data in a longitudinal study of Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is a clinic-based, multicenter, longitudinal study with blood, CSF, PET, and MRI scans repeatedly measured in 229 participants with normal cognition (NC), 397 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 193 with mild AD during 2005–2007. We used univariate and multivariable logistic regression models to examine the associations between baseline demographic/clinical features and loss of biomarker follow-ups in ADNI. Results: CSF studies tended to recruit and retain patients with MCI with more AD-like features, including lower levels of baseline CSF Aβ42. Depression was the major predictor for MCI dropouts, while family history of AD kept more patients with AD enrolled in PET and MRI studies. Poor cognitive performance was associated with loss of follow-up in most biomarker studies, even among NC participants. The presence of vascular risk factors seemed more critical than cognitive function for predicting dropouts in AD. Conclusion: The missing data are not missing completely at random in ADNI and likely conditional on certain features in addition to cognitive function. Missing data predictors vary across biomarkers and even MCI and AD groups do not share the same missing data pattern. Understanding the missing data structure may help in the design of future longitudinal studies and clinical trials in AD. PMID:22491869

  12. CSF glucose test

    MedlinePlus

    Glucose test - CSF; Cerebrospinal fluid glucose test ... The glucose level in the CSF should be 50 to 80 mg/100 mL (or greater than 2/3 ... Abnormal results include higher and lower glucose levels. Abnormal ... or fungus) Inflammation of the central nervous system Tumor

  13. CSF total protein

    MedlinePlus

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 mg/dL. Note: mg/dL = ...

  14. Salivary tau species are potential biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Sui, Yu-Ting; Peskind, Elaine R; Li, Ge; Hwang, HyeJin; Devic, Ivana; Ginghina, Carmen; Edgar, John Scott; Pan, Catherine; Goodlett, David R; Furay, Amy R; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F; Zhang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorylation of tau protein is a critical event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased phosphorylated tau and total tau levels, combined with reduced concentrations of amyloid-β 1-42 (Aβ42) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), but not in plasma or serum, have been generally accepted as sensitive AD diagnostic markers. However, obtaining CSF is a relatively invasive procedure that requires participation of specially trained medical professionals, i.e., CSF is not an ideal sample source for screening or early diagnosis of AD, which is essential to current and future neuroprotective treatments for the disease. Here, we identified tau, but not Aβ species, with mass spectrometry in human saliva, a body fluid that is much more accessible compared to CSF or even blood. Quantitative assessment of salivary levels of total tau, phosphorylated tau, and Aβ42 using highly sensitive Luminex assays revealed that, while Aβ42 was not detectable, the phosphorylated tau/tau ratio significantly increased in patients with AD compared to healthy controls. These results suggest that salivary tau species could be ideal biomarkers for AD diagnosis, especially at early stages of the disease or even screening asymptomatic subjects, allowing for a much larger therapeutic window for AD patients. PMID:21841250

  15. Exploring Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anshika Nikita

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is one of the most common form of dementia occurring in elderly population worldwide. Currently Aβ42, tau and p-tau in the cerebrospinal fluid is estimated for confirmation of AD. CSF which is being used as the potent source for biomarker screening is obtained by invasive lumbar punctures. Thus, there is an urgent need of minimal invasive methods for identification of diagnostic markers for early detection of AD. Blood serum and plasma serves as an appropriate source, due to minimal discomfort to the patients, promoting frequent testing, better follow-up and better consent to clinical trials. Hence, the need of the hour demands discovery of diagnostic and prognostic patient specific signature biomarkers by using emerging technologies of mass spectrometry, microarrays and peptidomics. In this review we summarize the present scenario of AD biomarkers such as circulatory biomarkers, blood based amyloid markers, inflammatory markers and oxidative stress markers being investigated and also some of the potent biomarkers which might be able to predict early onset of Alzheimer’s and delay cognitive impairment. PMID:27630867

  16. Exploring Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anshika Nikita

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is one of the most common form of dementia occurring in elderly population worldwide. Currently Aβ42, tau and p-tau in the cerebrospinal fluid is estimated for confirmation of AD. CSF which is being used as the potent source for biomarker screening is obtained by invasive lumbar punctures. Thus, there is an urgent need of minimal invasive methods for identification of diagnostic markers for early detection of AD. Blood serum and plasma serves as an appropriate source, due to minimal discomfort to the patients, promoting frequent testing, better follow-up and better consent to clinical trials. Hence, the need of the hour demands discovery of diagnostic and prognostic patient specific signature biomarkers by using emerging technologies of mass spectrometry, microarrays and peptidomics. In this review we summarize the present scenario of AD biomarkers such as circulatory biomarkers, blood based amyloid markers, inflammatory markers and oxidative stress markers being investigated and also some of the potent biomarkers which might be able to predict early onset of Alzheimer’s and delay cognitive impairment.

  17. CSF-1 signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, J A

    1997-08-01

    Colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) or macrophage-CSF (M-CSF) is a growth factor involved in the proliferation, differentiation, and activation of cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Its receptor is the homodimeric, tyrosine kinase product of the c-fms proto-oncogene, which contains a so-called kinase insert domain. This review focuses mainly on recent studies of signal transduction events that are initiated on interaction of CSF-1 and its receptor. A summary is given of the tyrosine autophosphorylation sites on c-Fms identified to date, including their interaction with various substrates and their possible significance for signal transduction and cellular function. In addition, the signal transduction pathways that have been identified to lie downstream of activated c-Fms are reviewed. Although it is apparent that there have been many recent significant developments in our understanding of CSF-1 signaling, a number of examples are mentioned of significant discrepancies in the literature, some possible reasons for which can sometimes be offered. It is also apparent that any particular biochemical response or signal transduction pathway, even though widespread in other ligand receptor/cellular systems, including those with similar receptor structures to c-Fms, may not be relevant to CSF-1 signaling. The relevance of any potentially important molecular signaling pathway activated by CSF-1 in cells in vitro will ultimately have to be related to the functions of monocytes/macrophages in vivo.

  18. Temporal evolution of biomarkers and cognitive markers in the asymptomatic, MCI and dementia stage of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bertens, Daniela; Knol, Dirk L.; Scheltens, Philip; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated the pattern of disease progression in the asymptomatic, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia stage of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Methods We selected 284 subjects with AD pathology, defined as abnormal levels of amyloid beta 1-42 (Aß1-42) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Disease outcome measures included six biomarkers and five cognitive markers. We compared differences in baseline measures and decline over 4 years between the AD stages and tested whether these changes differed from subjects, without AD pathology (N=132). Results CSF Aß1-42 reached the maximum abnormality level in the asymptomatic stage and tau in the MCI stage. The imaging and cognitive markers started to decline in the asymptomatic stage, and decline accelerated with advancing clinical stage. Conclusion This study provides further evidence for a temporal evolution of AD biomarkers. Our findings may be helpful to determine stage specific outcome measures for clinical trials. PMID:25150730

  19. [G-CSF treatment].

    PubMed

    Mizuma, Atsushi; Takizawa, Shunya

    2016-04-01

    In acute phase of ischemic stroke, as neuroprotective and neurogenerative role of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor(G-CSF), anti-apoptotic action, anti-inflammatory and anti-immune effect, and brain protective action against excitatory neurotoxicity have been reported. Several clinical trials in ischemic stroke patients using G-CSF have been carried out and reported the safety, improvement of clinical symptom, and reduction of infarct volume. But the efficacy of G-CSF administration in acute ischemic stroke has not been well proved. Further clinical studies with more patients, more uniform infarct size, and similar distributions of stroke subtype, are needed to clarify its effectiveness. Combined therapy with G-CSF and thrombolysis will be also expected as the next step of clinical trials. PMID:27333753

  20. Potential fluid biomarkers for pathological brain changes in Alzheimer's disease: Implication for the screening of cognitive frailty

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Qingwei; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Sancarlo, Daniele; Greco, Antonio; Yu, Zhuowei

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive frailty (CF) overlaps with early neuropathological alterations associated with aging-related major neurocognitive disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Fluid biomarkers for these pathological brain alterations allow for early diagnosis in the preclinical stages of AD, and for objective prognostic assessments in clinical intervention trials. These biomarkers may also be helpful in the screening of CF. The present study reviewed the literature and identified systematic reviews of cohort studies and other authoritative reports. The selection criteria for potentially suitable fluid biomarkers included: i) Frequent use in studies of fluid-derived markers and ii) evidence of novel measurement techniques for fluid-derived markers. The present study focused on studies that assessed these biomarkers in AD, mild cognitive impairment and non-AD demented subjects. At present, widely used fluid biomarkers include cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β levels. With the development of novel measurement techniques and improvements in understanding regarding the mechanisms underlying aging-related major neurocognitive disorders, numerous novel biomarkers associated with various aspects of AD neuropathology are being explored. These include specific measurements of Aβ oligomer or monomer forms, tau proteins in the peripheral plasma and CSF, and novel markers of synaptic dysfunction, neuronal damage and apoptosis, neuronal activity alteration, neuroinflammation, blood brain barrier dysfunction, oxidative stress, metabolites, mitochondrial function and aberrant lipid metabolism. The proposed panels of fluid biomarkers may be useful in the early diagnosis of AD, prediction of the progression of AD from preclinical stages to the dementia stage, and the differentiation of AD from non-AD dementia. In combination with physical frailty, the present study surmised that these biomarkers may also be used as biomarkers for CF, thus contribute

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for differentiation of frontotemporal lobar degeneration from Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David J; Trojanowski, John Q; Grossman, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Accurate ante mortem diagnosis in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is crucial to the development and implementation of etiology-based therapies. Several neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins, including the major protein constituents of inclusions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) associated with amyloid-beta (Aβ(1-42)) plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle pathology, can be measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for diagnostic applications. Comparative studies using autopsy-confirmed samples suggest that CSF total-tau (t-tau) and Aβ(1-42) levels can accurately distinguish FTLD from AD, with a high t-tau to Aβ(1-42) ratio diagnostic of AD; however, there is also an urgent need for FTLD-specific biomarkers. These analytes will require validation in large autopsy-confirmed cohorts and face challenges of standardization of within- and between-laboratory sources of error. In addition, CSF biomarkers with prognostic utility and longitudinal study of CSF biomarker levels over the course of disease are also needed. Current goals in the field include identification of analytes that are easily and reliably measured and can be used alone or in a multi-modal approach to provide an accurate prediction of underlying neuropathology for use in clinical trials of disease modifying treatments in FTLD. To achieve these goals it will be of the utmost importance to view neurodegenerative disease, including FTLD, as a clinicopathological entity, rather than exclusively a clinical syndrome.

  2. Brain ventricular volume and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Brian R.; Cohen, Ronald A.; Gongvatana, Assawin; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.; Johanson, Conrad E.; Stopa, Edward G.; Donahue, John E.; Silverberg, Gerald D.

    2010-01-01

    The frequent co-occurrence of Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus suggests a possible link between ventricular dilation and AD. If enlarging ventricles serve as a marker of faulty cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clearance mechanisms, then a relationship may be demonstrable between increasing ventricular volume and decreasing levels of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) in CSF in preclinical and early AD. CSF biomarker data (Aβ, tau, and phosphorylated tau) as well as direct measurements of whole brain and ventricular volumes were obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative dataset. The ratio of ventricular volume to whole brain volume was derived as a secondary independent measure. Baseline data were used for the group analyses of 288 subjects classified as being either normal (n=87), having the syndrome of mild cognitive impairment (n=136), or mild AD (n=65). Linear regression models were derived for each biomarker as the dependent variable, using the MRI volume measures and age as independent variables. For controls, ventricular volume was negatively associated with CSF Aβ in APOE ε4 positive subjects. A different pattern was seen in AD subjects, in whom ventricular volume was negatively associated with tau, but not Aβ in ε4 positive subjects. Increased ventricular volume may be associated with decreased levels of CSF Aβ in preclinical AD. The basis for the apparent effect of APOE ε4 genotype on the relationship of ventricular volume to Aβ and tau levels is unknown, but could involve altered CSF-blood-brain barrier function during the course of disease. PMID:20182051

  3. Insulin Resistance is Associated with Increased Levels of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease and Reduced Memory Function in At-Risk Healthy Middle-Aged Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hoscheidt, Siobhan M.; Starks, Erika J.; Oh, Jennifer M.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Krause, Rachel A.; Gleason, Carey E.; Puglielli, Luigi; Atwood, Craig S.; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Asthana, Sanjay; Johnson, Sterling C.; Bendlin, Barbara B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased risk for Alzheimer disease (AD). Regulation of normal insulin function may be important in reducing the prevalence of dementia due to AD, particularly in individuals who harbor genetic risk for or have a parental family history of AD. The relationship between insulin resistance (IR) and AD pathology remains poorly understood, particularly in midlife prior to the onset of clinical metabolic disease or cognitive decline. Objective We examined associations between IR as indexed by HOMA-IR, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD pathology and memory in middle-aged adults enriched for AD. We postulated that higher HOMA-IR and APOE ε4 carriage would be associated with greater CSF AD pathology and poor memory performance. Methods Cognitively asymptomatic middle-aged adults (N=70, mean age=57.7 years) from the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center with a parental family history of dementia due to AD underwent lumbar puncture, blood draw and neuropsychological testing. CSF AD biomarkers including soluble amyloid precursor protein β (sAPP-β), β–amyloid42 (Aβ42) and phosphorylated tau (P-tau181) were examined with respect to HOMA-IR and APOE ε4 status. Delayed memory performance was examined with respect to HOMA-IR, CSF AD biomarkers and APOE ε4 status. Results Higher HOMA-IR was associated with higher sAPP-β and Aβ42. APOE ε4 carriers had significantly higher levels of sAPP-α, sAPP-β and P-tau181/Aβ42 compared to noncarriers. The concurrent presence of higher HOMA-IR and CSF AD pathology predicted worse delayed memory performance. Conclusion Overall, the findings suggest that IR and APOE ε4 are contributing factors to the development of AD pathology in midlife, and provide support for targeting insulin function as a potentially modifiable risk factor for AD. PMID:27079723

  4. Practical detection of a definitive biomarker panel for Alzheimer’s disease; comparisons between matched plasma and cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Richens, Joanna L; Vere, Kelly-Ann; Light, Roger A; Soria, Daniele; Garibaldi, Jonathan; Smith, A David; Warden, Donald; Wilcock, Gordon; Bajaj, Nin; Morgan, Kevin; O’Shea, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Previous mass spectrometry analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has allowed the identification of a panel of molecular markers that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The panel comprises Amyloid beta, Apolipoprotein E, Fibrinogen alpha chain precursor, Keratin type I cytoskeletal 9, Serum albumin precursor, SPARC-like 1 protein and Tetranectin. Here we report the development and implementation of immunoassays to measure the abundance and diagnostic capacity of these putative biomarkers in matched lumbar CSF and blood plasma samples taken in life from individuals confirmed at post-mortem as suffering from AD (n = 10) and from screened ‘cognitively healthy’ subjects (n = 18). The inflammatory components of Alzheimer’s disease were also investigated. Employment of supervised learning techniques permitted examination of the interrelated expression patterns of the putative biomarkers and identified inflammatory components, resulting in biomarker panels with a diagnostic accuracy of 87.5% and 86.7% for the plasma and CSF datasets respectively. This is extremely important as it offers an ideal high-throughput and relatively inexpensive population screening approach. It appears possible to determine the presence or absence of AD based on our biomarker panel and it seems likely that a cheap and rapid blood test for AD is feasible. PMID:24959311

  5. CSF oligoclonal banding - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... performed: This test helps confirm the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). The laboratory procedure is called CSF electrophoresis, which is a method used to study the levels of protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In electrophoresis, a ...

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in neurological diseases in children.

    PubMed

    Shahim, Pashtun; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Darin, Niklas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mattsson, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers is an integral part of neurology. Basic CSF biomarkers, such as CSF/serum albumin ratio and CSF cell counts, have been used to diagnose inflammatory and infectious CNS disorders in adults and children for decades. During recent years, however, numerous biomarkers for neuronal and astroglial injury, as well as disease-specific protein inclusions, have been developed for neurodegenerative disorders in adults. The overall aim of this paper is to give an updated overview of some of these biomarkers with special focus on their possible relevance to neurological disorders in children and adolescents.

  7. Florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Hake, Ann; Trzepacz, Paula T.; Wang, Shufang; Yu, Peng; Case, Michael; Hochstetler, Helen; Witte, Michael M.; Degenhardt, Elisabeth K.; Dean, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the relationship between florbetapir-F18 positron emission tomography (FBP PET) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers. Methods Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI)-GO/2 healthy control (HC), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia subjects with clinical measures and CSF collected ±90 days of FBP PET data were analyzed using correlation and logistic regression. Results In HC and MCI subjects, FBP PET anterior and posterior cingulate and composite standard uptake value ratios correlated with CSF amyloid beta (Aβ1-42) and tau/Aβ1-42 ratios. Using logistic regression, Aβ1-42, total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181P (p-tau), and FBP PET composite each differentiated HC versus AD. Aβ1-42 and t-tau distinguished MCI versus AD, without additional contribution by FBP PET. Total tau and p-tau added discriminative power to FBP PET when classifying HC versus AD. Conclusion Based on cross-sectional diagnostic groups, both amyloid and tau measures distinguish healthy from demented subjects. Longitudinal analyses are needed. PMID:25916563

  8. Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers in animal models: closing the translational gap

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Kinney, Jefferson W; Cummings, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    The rising prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is rapidly becoming one of the largest health and economic challenges in the world. There is a growing need for the development and implementation of reliable biomarkers for AD that can be used to assist in diagnosis, inform disease progression, and monitor therapeutic efficacy. Preclinical models permit the evaluation of candidate biomarkers and assessment of pipeline agents before clinical trials are initiated and provide a translational opportunity to advance biomarker discovery. Fast and inexpensive data can be obtained from examination of peripheral markers, though they currently lack the sensitivity and consistency of imaging techniques such as MRI or PET. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in animal models can assist in development and implementation of similar approaches in clinical populations. These biomarkers may also be invaluable in decisions to advance a treatment to human testing. Longitudinal studies in AD models can determine initial presentation and progression of biomarkers that may also be used to evaluate disease-modifying efficacy of drugs. The refinement of biomarker approaches in preclinical systems will not only aid in drug development, but may facilitate diagnosis and disease monitoring in AD patients. PMID:23844335

  9. The Role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Decline: Exploring Interactions with Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hohman, Timothy J.; Bell, Susan P.; Jefferson, Angela L.

    2015-01-01

    Importance A subset of older adults present post-mortem with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathologic features but without any significant clinical manifestation of dementia. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in staving off AD-related neurodegeneration. Objective Evaluate whether VEGF levels are associated with brain aging outcomes (hippocampal volume, cognition). Further evaluate whether VEGF modifies relations between AD biomarkers and brain aging outcomes. Design Biomarker analysis using neuroimaging and neuropsychological outcomes from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Setting Prospective longitudinal study across North America. Participants Participants were drawn from the ADNI and included individuals with normal cognition (n=90), mild cognitive impairment (n=130), and AD (n=59). Main Outcome Measures Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) VEGF was cross-sectionally related to brain aging outcomes (hippocampal volume, episodic memory, executive function) using a general linear model and longitudinally using mixed-effects regression. AD biomarker (CSF amyloid-β42 and total tau) x VEGF interactions evaluated the effect of VEGF on brain aging outcomes in the presence of enhanced AD biomarkers. Results VEGF was associated with baseline hippocampal volume (p=0.009), longitudinal hippocampal atrophy (p=0.01), and longitudinal decline in memory (p<0.0001) and executive function (p=0.003). VEGF interacted with tau in predicting longitudinal hippocampal atrophy (p<0.0001), memory decline (p=0.01), and executive function decline (p=0.0002). VEGF interacted with amyloid-β42 in predicting longitudinal memory decline (p=0.01). Conclusions Elevated CSF VEGF was associated with more optimal brain aging in vivo. The neuroprotective effect appeared strongest in the presence of enhanced AD biomarkers, suggesting that VEGF may be particularly beneficial in individuals showing early hallmarks of the AD cascade. Future work should evaluate

  10. The mediational effects of FDG hypometabolism on the association between cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and neurocognitive function.

    PubMed

    Dowling, N Maritza; Johnson, Sterling C; Gleason, Carey E; Jagust, William J

    2015-01-15

    Positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of tau and amyloid beta42 suggest possible active underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD) including neurometabolic dysfunction and neurodegeneration leading to eventual cognitive decline. But the temporal relationship between CSF, imaging markers of neural function, and cognition has not been described. Using a statistical mediation model, we examined relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analytes (hyperphosphorylated tau (p-Tau(181p)), β-amyloid peptides 1-42 (Aβ(1-42)), total tau (t-Tau), and their ratios); change in cognitive function; and change in [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake using positron emission tomography (PET). We hypothesized that a) abnormal CSF protein values at baseline, result in cognitive declines by decreasing neuronal glucose metabolism across time, and b) the role of altered glucose metabolism in the assumed causal chain varies by brain region and the nature of CSF protein alteration. Data from 412 individuals participating in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging (ADNI) cohort studies were included in analyses. At baseline, individuals were cognitively normal (N = 82), or impaired: 241 with mild cognitive impairment, and 89 with Alzheimer's disease. A parallel-process latent growth curve model was used to test mediational effects of changes in regional FDG-PET uptake over time in relation to baseline CSF biomarkers and changes in cognition, measured with the 13-item Alzheimer Disease's Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog). Findings suggested a causal sequence of events; specifically, FDG hypometabolism acted as a mediator between antecedent CSF biomarker alterations and subsequent cognitive impairment. Higher baseline concentrations of t-Tau, and p-Tau(181p) were more predictive of decline in cerebral glucose metabolism than lower baseline concentrations of Aβ(1-42). FDG-PET changes appeared to mediate t-Tau or t-Tau/Aβ(1-42)-associated cognitive change across all brain

  11. The Mediational Effects of FDG Hypometabolism on the Association between Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers and Neurocognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, N. Maritza; Johnson, Sterling C.; Gleason, Carey E.; Jagust, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of tau and amyloid beta42 suggest possible active underlying Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) including neurometabolic dysfunction and neurodegeneration leading to eventual cognitive decline. But the temporal relationship between CSF, imaging markers of neural function, and cognition has not been described. Using a statistical mediation model, we examined relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analytes (hyperphosphorylated tau (p-Tau181p), β-amyloid 1–42 (Aβ1–42), total tau (t-Tau), and their ratios); change in cognitive function; and change in [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake using positron emission tomography (PET). We hypothesized that a) abnormal CSF protein values at baseline, result in cognitive declines by decreasing neuronal glucose metabolism across time, and b) the role of altered glucose metabolism in the assumed causal chain varies by brain region and the nature of CSF protein alteration. Data from 412 individuals participating in Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging (ADNI) cohort studies were included in analyses. At baseline, individuals were cognitively normal (N = 82), or impaired: 241 with mild cognitive impairment, and 89 with Alzheimer’s disease. A parallel-process latent growth curve model was used to test mediational effects of changes in regional FDG-PET uptake over time in relation to baseline CSF biomarkers and changes in cognition, measured with the 13-item Alzheimer Disease’s Assessment Scale–cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog). Findings suggested a causal sequence of events; specifically, FDG hypometabolism acted as a mediator between antecedent CSF biomarker alterations and subsequent cognitive impairment. Higher baseline concentrations of t-Tau, and p-Tau181p were more predictive of decline in cerebral glucose metabolism than lower baseline concentrations of Aβ1–42. FDG-PET changes appeared to mediate t-Tau or t-Tau/Aβ1–42 -associated cognitive change across all brain

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers and Reserve Variables as Predictors of Future “Non-Cognitive” Outcomes of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ingber, Adam P.; Hassenstab, Jason; Fagan, Anne M.; Benzinger, Tammie L.S.; Grant, Elizabeth A.; Holtzman, David M.; Morris, John C.; Roe, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The influence of reserve variables and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) biomarkers on cognitive test performance has been fairly well-characterized. However, less is known about the influence of these factors on “non-cognitive” outcomes, including functional abilities and mood. Objective We examined whether cognitive and brain reserve variables mediate how AD biomarker levels in cognitively normal persons predict future changes in function, mood, and neuropsychiatric behavior. Methods Non-cognitive outcomes were examined in 328 individuals 50 years and older enrolled in ongoing studies of aging and dementia at the Knight Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC). All participants were cognitively normal at baseline (Clinical Dementia Rating [CDR] 0), completed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and structural neuroimaging studies within one year of baseline, and were followed for an average of 4.6 annual visits. Linear mixed effects models explored how cognitive reserve and brain reserve variables mediate the relationships between AD biomarker levels and changes in function, mood, and neuropsychiatric behavior in cognitively normal participants. Results Education levels did not have a significant effect on predicting non-cognitive decline. However, participants with smaller brain volumes exhibited the worst outcomes on measures of mood, functional abilities, and behavioral disturbance. This effect was most pronounced in individuals who also had abnormal CSF biomarkers. Conclusions The findings suggest that brain reserve plays a stronger, or earlier, role than cognitive reserve in protecting against non-cognitive impairment in AD. PMID:27104893

  13. Genetic variation modifies risk for neurodegeneration based on biomarker status

    PubMed Central

    Hohman, Timothy J.; Koran, Mary Ellen I.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: While a great deal of work has gone into understanding the relationship between Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, brain atrophy, and disease progression, less work has attempted to investigate how genetic variation modifies these relationships. The goal of this study was two-fold. First, we sought to identify high-risk vs. low-risk individuals based on their CSF tau and Aβ load and characterize these individuals with regard to brain atrophy in an AD-relevant region of interest. Next, we sought to identify genetic variants that modified the relationship between biomarker classification and neurodegeneration. Methods: Participants were categorized based on established cut-points for biomarker positivity. Mixed model regression was used to quantify longitudinal change in the left inferior lateral ventricle. Interaction analyses between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and biomarker group status were performed using a genome wide association study (GWAS) approach. Correction for multiple comparisons was performed using the Bonferroni procedure. Results: One intergenic SNP (rs4866650) and one SNP within the SPTLC1 gene (rs7849530) modified the association between amyloid positivity and neurodegeneration. A transcript variant of WDR11-AS1 gene (rs12261764) modified the association between tau positivity and neurodegeneration. These effects were consistent across the two sub-datasets and explained approximately 3% of variance in ventricular dilation. One additional SNP (rs6887649) modified the association between amyloid positivity and baseline ventricular volume, but was not observed consistently across the sub-datasets. Conclusions: Genetic variation modifies the association between AD biomarkers and neurodegeneration. Genes that regulate the molecular response in the brain to oxidative stress may be particularly relevant to neural vulnerability to the damaging effects of amyloid-β. PMID:25140149

  14. Associations Between Biomarkers and Age in the Presenilin 1 E280A Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease Kindred A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, Adam S.; Chen, Kewei; Quiroz, Yakeel T.; Jakimovich, Laura J.; Gomez, Madelyn Gutierrez; Langois, Carolyn M.; Langbaum, Jessica B. S.; Roontiva, Auttawut; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Lee, Wendy; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Lopez, Liliana; Moreno, Sonia; Muñoz, Claudia; Tirado, Victoria; Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Fagan, Anne M.; Giraldo, Margarita; Garcia, Gloria; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Tariot, Pierre N.; Lopera, Francisco; Reiman, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Age-associated changes in brain imaging and fluid biomarkers are characterized and compared in presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers and noncarriers from the world’s largest known autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (AD) kindred. OBJECTIVE To characterize and compare age-associated changes in brain imaging and fluid biomarkers in PSEN1 E280A mutation carriers and noncarriers. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional measures of 18F-florbetapir positron emission tomography, 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, structural magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and plasma biomarkers of AD were assessed from 54 PSEN1 E280A kindred members (age range, 20-59 years). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We used brain mapping algorithms to compare regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose and gray matter volumes in cognitively unimpaired mutation carriers and noncarriers. We used regression analyses to characterize associations between age and the mean cortical to pontine 18F-florbetapir standard uptake value ratios, precuneus cerebral metabolic rates for glucose, hippocampal gray matter volume, CSF Aβ1-42, total tau and phosphorylated tau181, and plasma Aβ measurements. Age at onset of progressive biomarker changes that distinguish carriers from noncarriers was estimated using best-fitting regression models. RESULTS Compared with noncarriers, cognitively unimpaired mutation carriers had significantly lower precuneus cerebral metabolic rates for glucose, smaller hippocampal volume, lower CSF Aβ1-42, higher CSF total tau and phosphorylated tau181, and higher plasma Aβ1-42 measurements. Sequential changes in biomarkers were seen at age 20 years (95% CI, 14-24 years) for CSF Aβ1-42, age 16 years (95% CI, 11-24 years) for the mean cortical 18F-florbetapir standard uptake value ratio, age 15 years (95% CI, 10-24 years) for precuneus cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, age 15 years (95% CI, 7-20 years) for CSF total tau

  15. Super-Resolution Microscopy of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers as a Tool for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, William I; Antonios, Gregory; Rabano, Alberto; Bayer, Thomas A; Schneider, Anja; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is neuropathologically characterized by aggregates of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) and tau proteins. The consensus in the AD field is that Aβ and tau should serve as diagnostic biomarkers for AD. However, their aggregates have been difficult to investigate by conventional fluorescence microscopy, since their size is below the diffraction limit (∼200 nm). To solve this, we turned to a super-resolution imaging technique, stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, which has a high enough precision to allow the discrimination of low- and high-molecular weight aggregates prepared in vitro. We used STED to analyze the structural organization of Aβ and tau in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 36 AD patients, 11 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 21 controls. We measured the numbers of aggregates in the CSF samples, and the aggregate sizes and intensities. These parameters enabled us to distinguish AD patients from controls with a specificity of ∼87% and a sensitivity of ∼79% . In addition, the aggregate parameters determined with STED microscopy correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment in AD patients. Finally, these parameters may be useful as predictive tools for MCI cases. The STED parameters of two MCI patients who developed AD during the course of the study, as well as of MCI patients whose Aβ ELISA values fall within the accepted range for AD, placed them close to the AD averages. We suggest that super-resolution imaging is a promising tool for AD diagnostics.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid proteomics and protein biomarkers in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Oeckl, Patrick; Steinacker, Petra; Feneberg, Emily; Otto, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) comprises a spectrum of rare neurodegenerative diseases with an estimated prevalence of 15-22 cases per 100,000 persons including the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA), semantic dementia (SD), FTD with motor neuron disease (FTD-MND), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS). The pathogenesis of the diseases is still unclear and clinical diagnosis of FTLD is hampered by overlapping symptoms within the FTLD subtypes and with other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Intracellular protein aggregates in the brain are a major hallmark of FTLD and implicate alterations in protein metabolism or function in the disease's pathogenesis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) which surrounds the brain can be used to study changes in neurodegenerative diseases and to identify disease-related mechanisms or neurochemical biomarkers for diagnosis. In the present review, we will give an overview of the current literature on proteomic studies in CSF of FTLD patients. Reports of targeted and unbiased proteomic approaches are included and the results are discussed in regard of their informative value about disease pathology and the suitability to be used as diagnostic biomarkers. Finally, we will give some future perspectives on CSF proteomics and a list of candidate biomarkers which might be interesting for validation in further studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in neuroscience and neurology.

  17. CSF neurofilament light chain is elevated in OMS (decreasing with immunotherapy) and other pediatric neuroinflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Pranzatelli, Michael R; Tate, Elizabeth D; McGee, Nathan R; Verhulst, Steven J

    2014-01-15

    Using a panel of seven brain cell-specific biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), pediatric opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) (n=234) was compared to pediatric non-inflammatory neurological controls (n=84) and other inflammatory neurological disorders (OIND) (n=44). Only CSF NFL was elevated in untreated OMS versus controls (+83%). It was 87% higher in OIND than in OMS. On combination treatment with front-loaded ACTH, IVIg, rituximab, median CSF NFL decreased by 60% to control levels. These biochemical data suggest neuronal/axonal injury in some children with OMS without indicators of astrogliosis, and reduction on sufficient immunotherapy.

  18. A diagnostic scale for Alzheimer’s disease based on cerebrospinal fluid biomarker profiles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The relevance of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related disorders is clearly established. However, the question remains on how to use these data, which are often heterogeneous (not all biomarkers being pathologic). The objective of this study is to propose to physicians in memory clinics a biologic scale of probabilities that the patient with cognitive impairments has an Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathologic process. Methods For that purpose, we took advantage of the multicenter data of our Paris-North, Lille, and Montpellier (PLM) study, which has emerged through the initial sharing of information from these memory centers. Different models combining the CSF levels of amyloid-β 42, tau, and p-tau(181) were tested to generate categories of patients with very low (<10%), low (<25%), high (>75%), and very high predictive values (>90%) for positive AD. In total, 1,273 patients (646 AD and 627 non-AD) from six independent memory-clinic cohorts were included. Results A prediction model based on logistic regressions achieved a very good stratification of the population but had the disadvantages of needing mathematical optimization and being difficult to use in daily clinical practice. Remarkably, a simple and intuitive model based on the number (from zero to three) of three pathologic CSF biomarkers resulted in a very efficient predictive scale for AD in patients seen in memory clinics. The scale’s overall predictive value for AD for the different categories were as follows: class 0, 9.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), 6.0% to 13.2%); class 1, 24.7% (95% CI, 18.0% to 31.3%); class 2, 77.2% (95% CI, 67.8% to 86.5%); and class 3, 94.2% (95% CI, 90.7% to 97.7%). In addition, with this scale, significantly more patients were correctly classified than with the logistic regression. Its superiority in model performance was validated by the computation of the net reclassification index (NRI). The

  19. Biomarker Modeling of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Clifford R; Holtzman, David M

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a slowly progressing disorder in which pathophysiological abnormalities, detectable in vivo by biomarkers, precede overt clinical symptoms by many years to decades. Five AD biomarkers are sufficiently validated to have been incorporated into clinical diagnostic criteria and commonly used in therapeutic trials. Current AD biomarkers fall into 2 categories: biomarkers of amyloid-β plaques and of tau-related neurodegeneration. Three of the 5 are imaging measures and two are cerebrospinal fluid analytes. AD biomarkers do not evolve in an identical manner but rather in a sequential but temporally overlapping manner. Models of the temporal evolution of AD biomarkers can take the form of plots of biomarker severity (degree of abnormality) vs. time. In this review we discuss several time-dependent models of AD which take into consideration varying age of onset (early vs. late) and the influence of aging and co-occurring brain pathologies that commonly arise in the elderly. PMID:24360540

  20. Evaluation of HS-SPME and ultrasonic solvent extraction for monitoring of plant flavours added by the bees to herbhoneys: traceability biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kuś, Piotr Marek; Marijanović, Zvonimir; Jerković, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The volatile composition of 21 herbhoneys (HHs) of 7 different botanical origins was characterised for the first time. Ultrasound solvent extraction (USE) and headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by GC-FID/MS were successfully applied as complementary methods for monitoring the volatile plant flavours added by the bees. HHs showed significant compositional variability related to the botanical origin and compounds that could serve as traceability biomarkers were identified. The most important compounds with high abundance were (E,extract; H, headspace): caffeine (up to 68.7%, E) and trans-linalool oxide (up to 26.0%, H) in coffee HH, α-terpineol (up to 8.2%, E; 27.1%, H) and bornyl acetate (up to 3.1, E; 11.9%, H) in pine HH, thymol (up to 3.1%, E; 55.4%, H) in thyme HH. Hawthorn HH was characterised by the presence of herniarin (up to 13.4%, E) and lemon HH contained limonene (up to 1.6%, E; 33.2%, H). Other HHs (nettle and aloe) contained lower amounts of volatiles and their profiles were not specific. In all the HHs, methyl syringate was found and it was most abundant in thyme HH (up to 17.4%, E). The volatile fraction of HHs showed some substantial similarities and differences with the composition of herbs from which they derive. It confirms the selective bee-mediated transfer of phytochemicals, including known flavour-active volatiles into the final product, but also biotransformation of several compounds. Additionally, several similarities to the corresponding natural honeys were observed, but in general HHs exhibited less rich volatile profiles. PMID:26365314

  1. Evaluation of HS-SPME and ultrasonic solvent extraction for monitoring of plant flavours added by the bees to herbhoneys: traceability biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kuś, Piotr Marek; Marijanović, Zvonimir; Jerković, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The volatile composition of 21 herbhoneys (HHs) of 7 different botanical origins was characterised for the first time. Ultrasound solvent extraction (USE) and headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by GC-FID/MS were successfully applied as complementary methods for monitoring the volatile plant flavours added by the bees. HHs showed significant compositional variability related to the botanical origin and compounds that could serve as traceability biomarkers were identified. The most important compounds with high abundance were (E,extract; H, headspace): caffeine (up to 68.7%, E) and trans-linalool oxide (up to 26.0%, H) in coffee HH, α-terpineol (up to 8.2%, E; 27.1%, H) and bornyl acetate (up to 3.1, E; 11.9%, H) in pine HH, thymol (up to 3.1%, E; 55.4%, H) in thyme HH. Hawthorn HH was characterised by the presence of herniarin (up to 13.4%, E) and lemon HH contained limonene (up to 1.6%, E; 33.2%, H). Other HHs (nettle and aloe) contained lower amounts of volatiles and their profiles were not specific. In all the HHs, methyl syringate was found and it was most abundant in thyme HH (up to 17.4%, E). The volatile fraction of HHs showed some substantial similarities and differences with the composition of herbs from which they derive. It confirms the selective bee-mediated transfer of phytochemicals, including known flavour-active volatiles into the final product, but also biotransformation of several compounds. Additionally, several similarities to the corresponding natural honeys were observed, but in general HHs exhibited less rich volatile profiles.

  2. Fine mapping of genetic variants in BIN1, CLU, CR1 and PICALM for association with cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kauwe, John S K; Cruchaga, Carlos; Karch, Celeste M; Sadler, Brooke; Lee, Mo; Mayo, Kevin; Latu, Wayne; Su'a, Manti; Fagan, Anne M; Holtzman, David M; Morris, John C; Goate, Alison M

    2011-02-09

    Recent genome-wide association studies of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have identified variants in BIN1, CLU, CR1 and PICALM that show replicable association with risk for disease. We have thoroughly sampled common variation in these genes, genotyping 355 variants in over 600 individuals for whom measurements of two AD biomarkers, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 42 amino acid amyloid beta fragments (Aβ(42)) and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (ptau(181)), have been obtained. Association analyses were performed to determine whether variants in BIN1, CLU, CR1 or PICALM are associated with changes in the CSF levels of these biomarkers. Despite adequate power to detect effects as small as a 1.05 fold difference, we have failed to detect evidence for association between SNPs in these genes and CSF Aβ(42) or ptau(181) levels in our sample. Our results suggest that these variants do not affect risk via a mechanism that results in a strong additive effect on CSF levels of Aβ(42) or ptau(181).

  3. Crystallization of M-CSF.alpha.

    DOEpatents

    Pandit, Jayvardhan; Jancarik, Jarmila; Kim, Sung-Hou; Koths, Kirston; Halenbeck, Robert; Fear, Anna Lisa; Taylor, Eric; Yamamoto, Ralph; Bohm, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and to a crystalline M-CSF produced thereby. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  4. Tumor-Associated CSF MicroRNAs for the Prediction and Evaluation of CNS Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a readily reachable body fluid that is reflective of the underlying pathological state of the central nervous system (CNS). Hence it has been targeted for biomarker discovery for a variety of neurological disorders. CSF is also the major route for seeding metastases of CNS malignancies and its analysis could be informative for diagnosis and risk stratification of brain cancers. Recently, modern high-throughput, microRNAs (miRNAs) measuring technology has enabled sensitive detection of distinct miRNAs that are bio-chemicallystable in the CSF and can distinguish between different types of CNS cancers. Owing to the fact that a CSF specimen can be obtained with relative ease, analysis of CSF miRNAs could be a promising contribution to clinical practice. In this review, we examine the current scientific knowledge on tumor associated CSF miRNAs that could guide diagnosis of different brain cancer types, or could be helpful in predicting disease progression and therapy response. Finally, we highlight their potential applications clinically as biomarkers and discuss limitations. PMID:26690130

  5. Oligomeric α-synuclein and β-amyloid variants as potential biomarkers for Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stephanie M; Schulz, Philip; Sierks, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Oligomeric forms of α-synuclein and β-amyloid are toxic protein variants that are thought to contribute to the onset and progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), respectively. The detection of toxic variants in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood has great promise for facilitating early and accurate diagnoses of these devastating diseases. Two hurdles that have impeded the use of these protein variants as biomarkers are the availability of reagents that can bind the different variants and a sensitive assay to detect their very low concentrations. We previously isolated antibody-based reagents that selectively bind two different oligomeric variants of α-synuclein and two of β-amyloid, and developed a phage-based capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with subfemtomolar sensitivity to quantify their presence. Here, we used these reagents to show that these oligomeric α-synuclein variants are preferentially present in PD brain tissue, CSF and serum, and that the oligomeric β-amyloid variants are preferentially present in AD brain tissue, CSF, and serum. Some AD samples also had α-synuclein pathology and some PD samples also had β-amyloid pathology, and, very intriguingly, these PD cases also had a history of dementia. Detection of different oligomeric α-synuclein and β-amyloid species is an effective method for identifying tissue, CSF and sera from PD and AD samples, respectively, and samples that also contained early stages of other protein pathologies, indicating their potential value as blood-based biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26332448

  6. Oligomeric α-synuclein and β-amyloid variants as potential biomarkers for Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stephanie M; Schulz, Philip; Sierks, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Oligomeric forms of α-synuclein and β-amyloid are toxic protein variants that are thought to contribute to the onset and progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), respectively. The detection of toxic variants in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood has great promise for facilitating early and accurate diagnoses of these devastating diseases. Two hurdles that have impeded the use of these protein variants as biomarkers are the availability of reagents that can bind the different variants and a sensitive assay to detect their very low concentrations. We previously isolated antibody-based reagents that selectively bind two different oligomeric variants of α-synuclein and two of β-amyloid, and developed a phage-based capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with subfemtomolar sensitivity to quantify their presence. Here, we used these reagents to show that these oligomeric α-synuclein variants are preferentially present in PD brain tissue, CSF and serum, and that the oligomeric β-amyloid variants are preferentially present in AD brain tissue, CSF, and serum. Some AD samples also had α-synuclein pathology and some PD samples also had β-amyloid pathology, and, very intriguingly, these PD cases also had a history of dementia. Detection of different oligomeric α-synuclein and β-amyloid species is an effective method for identifying tissue, CSF and sera from PD and AD samples, respectively, and samples that also contained early stages of other protein pathologies, indicating their potential value as blood-based biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Quantitative Appraisal of Ventricular Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Neuropathologically Diagnosed Parkinson’s Disease Cases Lacking Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Maarouf, Chera L.; Beach, Thomas G.; Adler, Charles H.; Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Kokjohn, Tyler A.; Dugger, Brittany N.; Walker, Douglas G.; Shill, Holly A.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Roher, Alex E.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying biomarkers that distinguish Parkinson’s disease (PD) from normal control (NC) individuals has the potential to increase diagnostic sensitivity for the detection of early-stage PD. A previous proteomic study identified potential biomarkers in postmortem ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (V-CSF) from neuropathologically diagnosed PD subjects lacking Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology. In the present study, we assessed these biomarkers as well as p-tau181, Aβ42, and S100B by ELISA in PD (n = 43) and NC (n = 49) cases. The p-tau181/Aβ42 ratio and ApoA-1 showed statistically significant differences between groups. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that p-tau181/Aβ42 had a significant odds ratio: OR = 1.42 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12–1.84), P = 0.006. Among the molecules investigated, intriguing correlations were observed that require further investigation. Our results suggest coexistent AD CSF biomarkers within the PD group notwithstanding that it was selected to minimize AD neuropathological lesions. PMID:23533154

  8. Pro-inflammatory S100A9 Protein as a Robust Biomarker Differentiating Early Stages of Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Istvan; Jia, Xueen; Johansson, Per; Wang, Chao; Moskalenko, Roman; Steinau, Andreas; Forsgren, Lars; Wågberg, Thomas; Svensson, Johan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A

    2016-01-20

    Pro-inflammatory protein S100A9 was established as a biomarker of dementia progression and compared with others such as Aβ(1-42) and tau-proteins. CSF samples from 104 stringently diagnosed individuals divided into five subgroups were analyzed, including nondemented controls, stable mild cognitive impairment (SMCI), mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease (MCI-AD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD) patients. ELISA, dot-blotting, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used as research methods. The S100A9 and Aβ(1-42) levels correlated with each other: their CSF content decreased already at the SMCI stage and declined further under MCI-AD, AD, and VaD conditions. Immunohistochemical analysis also revealed involvement of both Aβ(1-42) and S100A9 in the amyloid-neuroinflammatory cascade already during SMCI. Tau proteins were not yet altered in SMCI; however their contents increased during MCI-AD and AD, diagnosing later dementia stages. Thus, four biomarkers together, reflecting different underlying pathological causes, can accurately differentiate dementia progression and also distinguish AD from VaD.

  9. γ-secretase binding sites in aged and Alzheimer's disease human cerebrum: the choroid plexus as a putative origin of CSF Aβ.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Xue, Zhi-Qin; Deng, Si-Hao; Kun, Xiong; Luo, Xue-Gang; Patrylo, Peter R; Rose, Gregory M; Cai, Huaibin; Struble, Robert G; Cai, Yan; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2013-05-01

    Deposition of β -amyloid (Aβ) peptides, cleavage products of β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase-1 (BACE1) and γ-secretase, is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). γ-Secretase inhibition is a therapeutical anti-Aβ approach, although changes in the enzyme's activity in AD brain are unclear. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ peptides are thought to derive from brain parenchyma and thus may serve as biomarkers for assessing cerebral amyloidosis and anti-Aβ efficacy. The present study compared active γ-secretase binding sites with Aβ deposition in aged and AD human cerebrum, and explored the possibility of Aβ production and secretion by the choroid plexus (CP). The specific binding density of [(3) H]-L-685,458, a radiolabeled high-affinity γ-secretase inhibitor, in the temporal neocortex and hippocampal formation was similar for AD and control cases with similar ages and post-mortem delays. The CP in post-mortem samples exhibited exceptionally high [(3) H]-L-685,458 binding density, with the estimated maximal binding sites (Bmax) reduced in the AD relative to control groups. Surgically resected human CP exhibited APP, BACE1 and presenilin-1 immunoreactivity, and β-site APP cleavage enzymatic activity. In primary culture, human CP cells also expressed these amyloidogenic proteins and released Aβ40 and Aβ42 into the medium. Overall, our results suggest that γ-secretase activity appears unaltered in the cerebrum in AD and is not correlated with regional amyloid plaque pathology. The CP appears to be a previously unrecognised non-neuronal contributor to CSF Aβ, probably at reduced levels in AD.

  10. Amyloid-β Peptides and Tau Protein as Biomarkers in Cerebrospinal and Interstitial Fluid Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review of Experimental and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Tsitsopoulos, Parmenion P.; Marklund, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors frequently suffer from life-long deficits in cognitive functions and a reduced quality of life. Axonal injury, observed in many severe TBI patients, results in accumulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Post-injury enzymatic cleavage of APP can generate amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, a hallmark finding in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). At autopsy, brains of AD and a subset of TBI victims display some similarities including accumulation of Aβ peptides and neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Most epidemiological evidence suggests a link between TBI and AD, implying that TBI has neurodegenerative sequelae. Aβ peptides and tau may be used as biomarkers in interstitial fluid (ISF) using cerebral microdialysis and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following clinical TBI. In the present review, the available clinical and experimental literature on Aβ peptides and tau as potential biomarkers following TBI is comprehensively analyzed. Elevated CSF and ISF tau protein levels have been observed following severe TBI and suggested to correlate with clinical outcome. Although Aβ peptides are produced by normal neuronal metabolism, high levels of long and/or fibrillary Aβ peptides may be neurotoxic. Increased CSF and/or ISF Aβ levels post-injury may be related to neuronal activity and/or the presence of axonal injury. The heterogeneity of animal models, clinical cohorts, analytical techniques, and the complexity of TBI in the available studies make the clinical value of tau and Aβ as biomarkers uncertain at present. Additionally, the link between early post-injury changes in tau and Aβ peptides and the future risk of developing AD remains unclear. Future studies using methods such as rapid biomarker sampling combined with enhanced analytical techniques and/or novel pharmacological tools could provide additional information on the importance of Aβ peptides and tau protein in both the acute pathophysiology and long

  11. The added value of biomarker analysis to the genesis of plaggic Anthrosols; the identification of stable fillings used for the production of plaggic manure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mourik, Jan M.; Wagner, Thomas V.; Geert de Boer, J.; Jansen, Boris

    2016-07-01

    Plaggic Anthrosols are the result of historical forms of land management in cultural landscapes on chemically poor sandy substrates. Application of plaggic manure was responsible for the development of the plaggic horizons of these agricultural soils. Pollen diagrams reflect aspects of the environmental development but the interpretation of the pollen spectra is complicated due to the mix of the aeolian pollen influx of crop species and species in the surroundings, and of pollen occurring in the used stable fillings. Pollen diagrams and radiocarbon dates of plaggic Anthrosols suggested a development period of more than a millennium. Calluna is present in almost all the pollen spectra, indicating the presence of heath in the landscape during the whole period of soil development. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of the plaggic horizon made clear that the deposition of plaggic covers started in the 16th century and accelerated in the 18th century. The stable fillings, used for the production of plaggic manure and responsible for the rise of the soil surface, cannot be identified with pollen diagrams alone. Biomarker analyses provide more evidence about the sources of stable fillings. The oldest biomarker spectra of the plaggic horizons of three typical plaggic Anthrosols examined in this study were dominated by biomarkers of forest species such as Quercus and Betula while the spectra of middle part of the plaggic horizons were dominated by biomarkers of stem tissue of crop species such as Secale and Avena. Only the youngest spectra of the plaggic horizons were dominated by biomarkers of Calluna. This indicates that the use of heath sods as stable filling was most likely introduced very late in the development of the Anthrosols. Before the 19th century the mineral component in plaggic manure cannot be explained by the use of heath sods. We conclude that other sources of materials, containing mineral grains must have been responsible for the raise of the plaggic

  12. The added value of biomarker analysis to the genesis of Plaggic Anthrosols; the identification of stable fillings used for the production of plaggic manure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mourik, Jan; Wagner, Thomas; de Boer, Geert; Jansen, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Plaggic Anthrosols are the result of historical forms of land management in cultural landscapes on chemically poor sandy substrates. Application of plaggic manure was responsible for the development of the plaggic horizons of these agricultural soils. Pollen diagrams reflect aspects of the environmental development but the interpretation of the pollen spectra is complicated due to the mix of the aeolian pollen influx of crop species and species in the surroundings, and of pollen occurring in the used stable fillings. Pollen diagrams and radiocarbon dates of plaggic Anthrosols suggested a development period of more than a millennium. Calluna is present in almost all the pollen spectra, indicating the presence of heath in the landscape during the whole period of soil development. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of the plaggic horizon made clear that the deposition of plaggic covers started in the 16th century and accelerated in the 18th century. The stable fillings, used for the production of plaggic manure and responsible for the rise of the soil surface, cannot be identified with pollen diagrams alone. Biomarker analyses provide more evidence about the sources of stable fillings. The oldest biomarker spectra of the plaggic horizons of three typical plaggic Anthrosols examined in this study, were dominated by biomarkers of forests species as Quercus and Betula while the spectra of middle part of the plaggic horizons were dominated by biomarkers of stem tissue of crop species as Secale and Avena. Only the youngest spectra of the plaggic horizons were dominated by biomarkers of Calluna. This indicates that the use of heath sods as stable filling was most likely introduced late in the development of the Anthrosols. Before the 18th century the mineral component in plaggic manure cannot be explained by the use of (dry) heath sods. We conclude that other sources of materials, containing mineral grains must have been responsible for the raise of the plaggic

  13. Biomarkers for neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Ro, Long-Sun; Lyu, Rong-Kuo; Chen, Chiung-Mei

    2015-02-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an acquired, heterogeneous inflammatory disorder, which is characterized by recurrent optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. The discovery of the serum autoantibody marker, anti-aquaporin 4 (anti-AQP4) antibody, revolutionizes our understanding of pathogenesis of NMO. In addition to anti-AQP4 antibody, other biomarkers for NMO are also reported. These candidate biomarkers are particularly involved in T helper (Th)17 and astrocytic damages, which play a critical role in the development of NMO lesions. Among them, IL-6 in the peripheral blood is associated with anti-AQP4 antibody production. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in CSF demonstrates good correlations with clinical severity of NMO relapses. Detecting these useful biomarkers may be useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of disease activity of NMO. Development of compounds targeting these biomarkers may provide novel therapeutic strategies for NMO. This article will review the related biomarker studies in NMO and discuss the potential therapeutics targeting these biomarkers.

  14. Identification and Validation of Novel Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Staging Early Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Malone, James P.; Shah, Aarti R.; Gilmore, Petra; Davis, Alan E.; Roe, Catherine M.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Li, Ge; Galasko, Douglas R.; Clark, Christopher M.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David M.; Townsend, R. Reid; Fagan, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ideally, disease modifying therapies for Alzheimer disease (AD) will be applied during the ‘preclinical’ stage (pathology present with cognition intact) before severe neuronal damage occurs, or upon recognizing very mild cognitive impairment. Developing and judiciously administering such therapies will require biomarker panels to identify early AD pathology, classify disease stage, monitor pathological progression, and predict cognitive decline. To discover such biomarkers, we measured AD-associated changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome. Methods and Findings CSF samples from individuals with mild AD (Clinical Dementia Rating [CDR] 1) (n = 24) and cognitively normal controls (CDR 0) (n = 24) were subjected to two-dimensional difference-in-gel electrophoresis. Within 119 differentially-abundant gel features, mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identified 47 proteins. For validation, eleven proteins were re-evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Six of these assays (NrCAM, YKL-40, chromogranin A, carnosinase I, transthyretin, cystatin C) distinguished CDR 1 and CDR 0 groups and were subsequently applied (with tau, p-tau181 and Aβ42 ELISAs) to a larger independent cohort (n = 292) that included individuals with very mild dementia (CDR 0.5). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses using stepwise logistic regression yielded optimal biomarker combinations to distinguish CDR 0 from CDR>0 (tau, YKL-40, NrCAM) and CDR 1 from CDR<1 (tau, chromogranin A, carnosinase I) with areas under the curve of 0.90 (0.85–0.94 95% confidence interval [CI]) and 0.88 (0.81–0.94 CI), respectively. Conclusions Four novel CSF biomarkers for AD (NrCAM, YKL-40, chromogranin A, carnosinase I) can improve the diagnostic accuracy of Aβ42 and tau. Together, these six markers describe six clinicopathological stages from cognitive normalcy to mild dementia, including stages defined by increased risk of cognitive decline. Such a panel

  15. [Clinically validated molecular biomarkers of neurodegenerative dementia].

    PubMed

    Wiltfang, J

    2014-11-01

    As cerebrospinal fluid-based neurochemical dementia diagnostics (CSF-NDD) has now been validated at the S3 evidence level, the German Association for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics (DGPPN) and the German Society for Neurology (DGN) recommend CSF-NDD in the recent joint dementia guidelines for improved early and differential diagnostics of multigenic (sporadic) Alzheimer's dementia (AD). The CSF-NDD also provides a predictive diagnosis of incipient AD for high-risk patients when they are still in the prodromal stage of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) but as no (secondary) preventive therapy of AD is currently available, the use of CSF-NDD for the predictive molecular diagnosis of AD is not recommended in the neuropsychiatry guidelines (http://www.DGPPN.de). However, molecular diagnostics of preclinical AD by CSF-NDD and/or [18F]-amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) has meanwhile gained high clinical relevance for therapeutic clinical research, as this novel clinical model allows systematic screening for promising (secondary) preventive therapy options. Moreover, it has now become apparent that blood-based neurochemical diagnostics of preclinical and early AD will be possible by means of various formats of multiplex assays. However, so far promising blood assays have not been consistently validated by independent research groups and in contrast to CSF-NDD a blood-based diagnosis of AD is not yet available.

  16. Perspectives in molecular imaging using staging biomarkers and immunotherapies in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Benoît; Abulrob, Abedelnasser

    2013-01-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an emerging chronic illness characterized by a progressive pleiotropic pathophysiological mode of actions triggered during the senescence process and affecting the elderly worldwide. The complex molecular mechanisms of AD not only are supported by cholinergic, beta-amyloid, and tau theories but also have a genetic basis that accounts for the difference in symptomatology processes activation among human population which will evolve into divergent neuropathological features underlying cognitive and behaviour alterations. Distinct immune system tolerance could also influence divergent responses among AD patients treated by immunotherapy. The complexity in nature increases when taken together the genetic/immune tolerance with the patient's brain reserve and with neuropathological evolution from early till advance AD clinical stages. The most promising diagnostic strategies in today's world would consist in performing high diagnostic accuracy of combined modality imaging technologies using beta-amyloid 42 peptide-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) positron emission tomography (PET), Pittsburgh compound B-PET, fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, total and phosphorylated tau-CSF, and volumetric magnetic resonance imaging hippocampus biomarkers for criteria evaluation and validation. Early diagnosis is the challenge task that needs to look first at plausible mechanisms of actions behind therapies, and combining them would allow for the development of efficient AD treatment in a near future.

  17. Perspectives in Molecular Imaging Using Staging Biomarkers and Immunotherapies in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, Benoît; Abulrob, Abedelnasser

    2013-01-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an emerging chronic illness characterized by a progressive pleiotropic pathophysiological mode of actions triggered during the senescence process and affecting the elderly worldwide. The complex molecular mechanisms of AD not only are supported by cholinergic, beta-amyloid, and tau theories but also have a genetic basis that accounts for the difference in symptomatology processes activation among human population which will evolve into divergent neuropathological features underlying cognitive and behaviour alterations. Distinct immune system tolerance could also influence divergent responses among AD patients treated by immunotherapy. The complexity in nature increases when taken together the genetic/immune tolerance with the patient's brain reserve and with neuropathological evolution from early till advance AD clinical stages. The most promising diagnostic strategies in today's world would consist in performing high diagnostic accuracy of combined modality imaging technologies using beta-amyloid 42 peptide-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) positron emission tomography (PET), Pittsburgh compound B-PET, fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, total and phosphorylated tau-CSF, and volumetric magnetic resonance imaging hippocampus biomarkers for criteria evaluation and validation. Early diagnosis is the challenge task that needs to look first at plausible mechanisms of actions behind therapies, and combining them would allow for the development of efficient AD treatment in a near future. PMID:23476143

  18. Tau and Amyloid-β Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers have Differential Relationships with Cognition in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Malpas, Charles B; Saling, Michael M; Velakoulis, Dennis; Desmond, Patricia; O'Brien, Terence J

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by two primary pathologies: tau-related neurofibrillary tangles and the extracellular accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ). The development of these pathologies is topologically distinct early in the disease, with Aβ beginning to accumulate as a diffuse, neocortical pathology, while tau-related pathology begins to form in mesial temporal regions. This study investigated the hypothesis that, by virtue of this distinction, there exist preferential associations between the primary pathologies and aspects of the cognitive phenotype. We investigated the relationship between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for tau and Aβ pathologies with neurocognitive measures in 191 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Participants completed cognitive tests of new learning, information processing speed, and working memory. Separate regression models were computed and then followed up with mediation analyses to examine the predictive status of CSF biomarkers. The effect of Aβ on learning was mediated by phospho-tau (p = 0.008). In contrast, Aβ had a direct effect on information processing speed that was not mediated by phospho-tau (p = 0.59). No predictors were significant for working memory. This study provided evidence for a differential relationship of Aβ and phospho-tau pathologies on the neurocognitive phenotype of MCI. This supports the proposition that these primary AD pathologies maximally affect different aspects of cognition, and has potential implications for cognitive assessments and the use of biomarkers in disease-modifyingtherapeutic trials.

  19. Tau and Amyloid-β Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers have Differential Relationships with Cognition in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Malpas, Charles B; Saling, Michael M; Velakoulis, Dennis; Desmond, Patricia; O'Brien, Terence J

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by two primary pathologies: tau-related neurofibrillary tangles and the extracellular accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ). The development of these pathologies is topologically distinct early in the disease, with Aβ beginning to accumulate as a diffuse, neocortical pathology, while tau-related pathology begins to form in mesial temporal regions. This study investigated the hypothesis that, by virtue of this distinction, there exist preferential associations between the primary pathologies and aspects of the cognitive phenotype. We investigated the relationship between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for tau and Aβ pathologies with neurocognitive measures in 191 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Participants completed cognitive tests of new learning, information processing speed, and working memory. Separate regression models were computed and then followed up with mediation analyses to examine the predictive status of CSF biomarkers. The effect of Aβ on learning was mediated by phospho-tau (p = 0.008). In contrast, Aβ had a direct effect on information processing speed that was not mediated by phospho-tau (p = 0.59). No predictors were significant for working memory. This study provided evidence for a differential relationship of Aβ and phospho-tau pathologies on the neurocognitive phenotype of MCI. This supports the proposition that these primary AD pathologies maximally affect different aspects of cognition, and has potential implications for cognitive assessments and the use of biomarkers in disease-modifyingtherapeutic trials. PMID:26401775

  20. GM-CSF augments the immunosuppressive capacity of neonatal spleen cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, P.J.; Ireland, R. )

    1991-09-01

    Addition of exogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to cultures of adult murine spleen cells with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) results in an augmented plaque forming cell (PFC) response. The influence of GM-CSF on the ability of neonatal spleen cells to suppress the anti-SRBC plaque forming response of adult spleen cells was tested by adding GM-CSF to cultures of neonatal and adult spleen cells. The suppressive capacity of the neonatal spleen cells was augmented by exogenous GM-CSF. The augmented suppression of the neonatal spleen cells was dependent on a G-10 adherent population since the addition of GM-CSF to cultures containing G-10 passed neonatal spleen cells resulted in an augmented PFC response and not suppression. Neonatal splenic glass adherent cells were also capable of suppressing the response. Neonatal spleen cells or purified neonatal glass adherent spleen cells cultured in the presence of GM-CSF had markedly increased levels of PGE2 in the culture supernatant. Neonatal spleen cells cultured with GM-CSF had increased numbers of morphologically identifiable macrophages after 48 hr of culture. Both irradiation and G-10 passage of the neonatal spleen diminished the numbers of macrophages formed in response to GM-CSF, and both of these manipulations resulted in reversal of suppression in response to GM-CSF. Thus, the augmented suppressive capacity of neonatal spleen cells in response to GM-CSF is probably mediated by its ability to drive monocyte to macrophage differentiation as well as increase the suppressive capacity of the existing neonatal splenic macrophages by increasing their production of PGE2.

  1. The interaction between sleep-disordered breathing and ApoE genotype on cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease in cognitively normal elderly

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Ricardo S.; Ayappa, Indu; Mantua, Janna; Gumb, Tyler; Varga, Andrew; Mooney, Anne M.; Burschtin, Omar E.; Taxin, Zachary; During, Emmanuel; Spector, Nicole; Biagioni, Milton; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Lau, Hiuyan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Lu, Shou-En; Mosconi, Lisa; Glodzik, Lidia; Rapoport, David M.; de Leon, Mony J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested a link between Sleep Disordered Breathing (SDB) and dementia risk. In the present study, we analyzed the relationship between SDB severity, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers, and the ApoE alleles. Methods 95 cognitively normal elderly participants were analyzed for SDB severity, CSF measures of phosphorylated-tau (P-Tau), total-tau (T-Tau), and amyloid beta 42 (Aβ42), as well as ApoE allele status. Findings In ApoE3+ subjects, significant differences were found between sleep groups for P-Tau (F[df2]=4.3, p=0.017), and T-Tau (F[df2]=3.3, p=0.043). Additionally, among ApoE3+ subjects, the apnea/hypopnea with 4% O2-desaturation index (AHI4%) was positively correlated with P-Tau (r=0.30, p=0.023), T-Tau (r=0.31, p=0.021), and Aβ42 (r=0.31, p=0.021). In ApoE2+ subjects, AHI4% was correlated with lower levels of CSF Aβ42 (r=−0.71, p=0.004), similarly to ApoE4+ subjects where there was also a trend towards lower CSF Aβ42 levels Interpretation Our observations suggest that there is an association between SDB and CSF AD- biomarkers in cognitively normal elderly. Existing therapies for SDB such as CPAP could delay the onset to mild cognitive impairment or dementia in normal elderly. PMID:24439479

  2. CSF copper concentrations in chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Shore, D; Potkin, S G; Weinberger, D R; Torrey, E F; Henkin, R I; Agarwal, R P; Gillin, J C; Wyatt, R J

    1983-06-01

    The authors used a sensitive flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometric procedure to measure CSF copper concentrations in normal controls, former heroin addicts, and unmedicated and medicated chronic schizophrenic patients and found no significant differences in CSF copper levels between these groups. Schizophrenic women had significantly lower CSF copper levels than schizophrenic men, but no significant differences were found between control men and control women. There were no differences in CSF copper levels between patient subgroups with respect to diagnostic subtype (acute versus chronic, paranoid versus chronic undifferentiated), length of hospitalization, race, medication status, platelet monoamine oxidase values, or CAT scan abnormalities.

  3. Are circulating microRNAs peripheral biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Subodh; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by memory loss, multiple cognitive abnormalities and intellectual impairments. Currently, there are no drugs or agents that can delay and/or prevent the progression of disease in elderly individuals, and there are no peripheral biomarkers that can detect AD early in its pathogenesis. Research has focused on identifying biomarkers for AD so that treatment can be begun as soon as possible in order to restrict or prevent intellectual impairments, memory loss, and other cognitive abnormalities that are associated with the disease. One such potential biomarker is microRNAs that are found in circulatory biofluids, such as blood and blood components, serum and plasma. Blood and blood components are primary sources where miRNAs are released in either cell-free form and then bind to protein components, or are in an encapsulated form with microvesicle particles. Exosomal miRNAs are known to be stable in biofluids and can be detected by high throughput techniques, like microarray and RNA sequencing. In AD brain, enriched miRNAs encapsulated with exosomes crosses the blood brain barrier and secreted in the CSF and blood circulations. This review summarizes recent studies that have identified miRNAs in the blood, serum, plasma, exosomes, cerebral spinal fluids, and extracellular fluids as potential biomarkers of AD. Recent research has revealed only six miRNAs - miR-9, miR-125b, miR-146a, miR-181c, let-7g-5p, and miR-191-5p - that were reported by multiple investigators. Some studies analyzed the diagnostic potential of these six miRNAs through receiver operating curve analysis which indicates the significant area-under-curve values in different biofluid samples. miR-191-5p was found to have the maximum area-under-curve value (0.95) only in plasma and serum samples while smaller area-under-curve values were found for miR-125, miR-181c, miR-191-5p, miR-146a, and miR-9. This article shortlisted the

  4. Neurogranin as a Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker for Synaptic Loss in Symptomatic Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kester, Maartje I.; Teunissen, Charlotte E.; Crimmins, Daniel L.; Herries, Elizabeth M.; Ladenson, Jack. H.; Scheltens, Philip; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David M.; Fagan, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Neurogranin (NGRN) seems to be a promising novel cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker for synaptic loss; however, clinical, and especially longitudinal, data are sparse. OBJECTIVE To examine the utility of NGRN, with repeated CSF sampling, for diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of Alzheimer disease (AD). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Longitudinal study of consecutive patients who underwent 2 lumbar punctures between the beginning of 1995 and the end of 2010 within the memory clinic–based Amsterdam Dementia Cohort. The study included 163 patients: 37 cognitively normal participants (mean [SE] age, 64 [2] years; 38% female; and mean [SE] Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] score, 28 [0.3]), 61 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (mean [SE] age, 68 [1] years; 38% female; and mean [SE] MMSE score, 27 [0.3]), and 65 patients with AD (mean [SE] age, 65 [1] years; 45% female; and mean [SE] MMSE score, 22 [0.7]). The mean (SE) interval between lumbar punctures was 2.0 (0.1) years, and the mean (SE) duration of cognitive follow-up was 3.8 (0.2) years. Measurements of CSF NGRN levels were obtained in January and February 2014. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE Levels of NGRN in CSF samples. RESULTS Baseline CSF levels of NGRN in patients with AD (median level, 2381 pg/mL [interquartile range, 1651-3416 pg/mL]) were higher than in cognitively normal participants (median level, 1712 pg/mL [interquartile range, 1206-2724 pg/mL]) (P = .04). Baseline NGRN levels were highly correlated with total tau and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 in all patient groups (all P < .001), but not with Aβ42. Baseline CSF levels of NGRN were also higher in patients with MCI who progressed to AD (median level, 2842 pg/mL [interquartile range, 1882-3950 pg/mL]) compared with those with stable MCI (median level, 1752 pg/mL [interquartile range, 1024-2438 pg/mL]) (P = .004), and they were predictive of progression from MCI to AD (hazard ratio, 1.8 [95% CI, 1.1-2.9]; stratified

  5. Neurochemical biomarkers in the diagnosis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration: an update.

    PubMed

    Oeckl, Patrick; Steinacker, Petra; Feneberg, Emily; Otto, Markus

    2016-08-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a spectrum of rare neurodegenerative diseases with overlapping symptoms and neuropathology. It includes the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), the semantic and non-fluent variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA and nfvPPA), FTD with motor neuron disease (FTD-MND), progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal syndrome. The diagnosis of the FTLD spectrum of diseases is based on clinical symptoms which hampers the differentiation of the diseases among each other and with other disorders that show a similar clinical appearance resulting in a high rate of misdiagnoses. This highlights the need for objective and selective measures in the diagnostic criteria and there is extensive research on neurochemical biomarkers in FTLD as one option to address this unmet clinical need. Here, we review the advances in CSF biomarker research in FTLD in the last 2 years with regard to the validation of previously suggested and identification of new biomarker candidates for the differential diagnosis of FTLD. New biomarkers for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) are urgently needed to support differential diagnosis within the disease spectrum and with related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD). Here, we review the advances in cerebrospinal fluid biomarker research in FTLD and provide a list of promising candidate markers.

  6. In-depth Characterization of the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Proteome Displayed Through the CSF Proteome Resource (CSF-PR)*

    PubMed Central

    Guldbrandsen, Astrid; Vethe, Heidrun; Farag, Yehia; Oveland, Eystein; Garberg, Hilde; Berle, Magnus; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Opsahl, Jill A.; Barsnes, Harald; Berven, Frode S.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome was mapped using three different strategies prior to Orbitrap LC-MS/MS analysis: SDS-PAGE and mixed mode reversed phase-anion exchange for mapping the global CSF proteome, and hydrazide-based glycopeptide capture for mapping glycopeptides. A maximal protein set of 3081 proteins (28,811 peptide sequences) was identified, of which 520 were identified as glycoproteins from the glycopeptide enrichment strategy, including 1121 glycopeptides and their glycosylation sites. To our knowledge, this is the largest number of identified proteins and glycopeptides reported for CSF, including 417 glycosylation sites not previously reported. From parallel plasma samples, we identified 1050 proteins (9739 peptide sequences). An overlap of 877 proteins was found between the two body fluids, whereas 2204 proteins were identified only in CSF and 173 only in plasma. All mapping results are freely available via the new CSF Proteome Resource (http://probe.uib.no/csf-pr), which can be used to navigate the CSF proteome and help guide the selection of signature peptides in targeted quantitative proteomics. PMID:25038066

  7. Effects of CX3CR1 and Fractalkine Chemokines in Amyloid Beta Clearance and p-Tau Accumulation in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) Rodent Models: Is Fractalkine a Systemic Biomarker for AD?

    PubMed

    Merino, José Joaquín; Muñetón-Gómez, Vilma; Alvárez, María-Isabel; Toledano-Díaz, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Microglia and astrocytes are the major source of cytokines in Alzheimer,s disease (AD). CX3CR1 is a delta chemokine receptor found in microglia and its neuronal ligand, Fractalkine, has two isoforms: an anchored-membrane isoform, and a soluble isoform. The reduced soluble fractalkine levels found in the brain (cortex/hippocampus) of aged rats, may be a consequence of neuronal loss. This soluble fractalkine maintains microglia in an appropiate state by interacting with CX3CR1. The ablation of the CX3CR1 gene in mice overexpressing human amyloid precursor protein (APP/PS-1) increased cytokine levels, enhanced Tau pathology and worsened behavioural performance in these mice. However, CX3CR1 deficiency resulted in a gene dose-dependent Aβ clearance in the brain, and induced microglial activation. In addition, CX3CR1 deficiency can have benefical effects by preventing neuronal loss in the 3xTg model. In fact, CX3CR1 deficiency increases microglial phagocytosome activity by inducing selective protofibrillar amyloid-beta phagocytosis in microglial cells in transgenic AD models. On the other hand, the fractalkine membrane isoform plays a differential role in amyloid beta clearance and Tau deposition. This anchored membrane FKN signalling might increase amyloid pathology while soluble fractalkine levels could prevent taupathies. However, in human AD, the only published study has reported higher systemic fractalkine levels in AD patients with cognitive impairment. In mouse models, inflammatory activation of microglia accelerates Tau pathology. Studies in transgenic mice with fractalkine null mice suggest that APP/PS-1 mice deficient for the anchored membrane-fractalkine isoform exhibited enhanced neuronal MAPT phosphorylation despite their reduced amyloid burden. The soluble fractalkine overexpression with adenoviral vectors reduced tau pathology and prevented neurodegeneration in a Tg4510 model of taupathy Finally, animals with Aβ (1-42) infused by lentivirus (cortex) or

  8. The relative balance of GM-CSF and TGF-β1 regulates lung epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Christian E; Schlingmann, Barbara; Dorsainvil White, StevenClaude; Ward, Christina; Fan, Xian; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Brown, Lou Ann S; Guidot, David M; Koval, Michael

    2015-06-15

    Lung barrier dysfunction is a cardinal feature of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Alcohol abuse, which increases the risk of ARDS two- to fourfold, induces transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, which increases epithelial permeability and impairs granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent barrier integrity in experimental models. We hypothesized that the relative balance of GM-CSF and TGF-β1 signaling regulates lung epithelial barrier function. GM-CSF and TGF-β1 were tested separately and simultaneously for their effects on lung epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. TGF-β1 alone caused an ∼ 25% decrease in transepithelial resistance (TER), increased paracellular flux, and was associated with projections perpendicular to tight junctions ("spikes") containing claudin-18 that colocalized with F-actin. In contrast, GM-CSF treatment induced an ∼ 20% increase in TER, decreased paracellular flux, and showed decreased colocalization of spike-associated claudin-18 with F-actin. When simultaneously administered to lung epithelial cells, GM-CSF antagonized the effects of TGF-β1 on epithelial barrier function in cultured cells. Given this, GM-CSF and TGF-β1 levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia and correlated with markers for pulmonary edema and patient outcome. In patient BAL fluid, protein markers of lung barrier dysfunction, serum α2-macroglobulin, and IgM levels were increased at lower ratios of GM-CSF/TGF-β1. Critically, patients who survived had significantly higher GM-CSF/TGF-β1 ratios than nonsurviving patients. This study provides experimental and clinical evidence that the relative balance between GM-CSF and TGF-β1 signaling is a key regulator of lung epithelial barrier function. The GM-CSF/TGF-β1 ratio in BAL fluid may provide a concentration-independent biomarker that can predict patient outcomes in ARDS.

  9. Longitudinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker Changes in Preclinical Alzheimer Disease During Middle Age

    PubMed Central

    Sutphen, Courtney L.; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Shah, Aarti R.; Macy, Elizabeth M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Vlassenko, Andrei G.; Benzinger, Tammie L. S.; Stoops, Erik E. J.; Vanderstichele, Hugo M. J.; Brix, Britta; Darby, Heather D.; Vandijck, Manu L. J.; Ladenson, Jack H.; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David M.; Fagan, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Individuals in the presymptomatic stage of Alzheimer disease (AD) are increasingly being targeted for AD secondary prevention trials. How early during the normal life span underlying AD pathologies begin to develop, their patterns of change over time, and their relationship with future cognitive decline remain to be determined. OBJECTIVE To characterize the within-person trajectories of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD over time and their association with changes in brain amyloid deposition and cognitive decline in cognitively normal middle-aged individuals. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS As part of a cohort study, cognitively normal (Clinical Dementia Rating [CDR] of 0) middle-aged research volunteers (n = 169) enrolled in the Adult Children Study at Washington University, St Louis, Missouri, had undergone serial CSF collection and longitudinal clinical assessment (mean, 6 years; range, 0.91–11.3 years) at 3-year intervals at the time of analysis, between January 2003 and November 2013. A subset (n = 74) had also undergone longitudinal amyloid positron emission tomographic imaging with Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) in the same period. Serial CSF samples were analyzed for β-amyloid 40 (Aβ40), Aβ42, total tau, tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-tau181), visinin-like protein 1 (VILIP-1), and chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40). Within-person measures were plotted according to age and AD risk defined by APOE genotype (ε4 carriers vs noncarriers). Linear mixed models were used to compare estimated biomarker slopes among middle-age bins at baseline (early, 45–54 years; mid, 55–64 years; late, 65–74 years) and between risk groups. Within-person changes in CSF biomarkers were also compared with changes in cortical PiB binding and progression to a CDR higher than 0 at follow-up. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Changes in Aβ40, Aβ42, total tau, P-tau181, VILIP-1, and YKL-40 and, in a subset of participants, changes in cortical PiB binding

  10. Interleukin-33 stimulates GM-CSF and M-CSF production by human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Eliana; Stojkovic, Stefan; Kaun, Christoph; Lemberger, Christof E; de Martin, Rainer; Rauscher, Sabine; Gröger, Marion; Maurer, Gerald; Neumayer, Christoph; Huk, Ihor; Huber, Kurt; Demyanets, Svitlana; Wojta, Johann

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33, a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines, is involved in various inflammatory conditions targeting amongst other cells the endothelium. Besides regulating the maturation and functions of myeloid cells, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage-CSF (M-CSF) have been shown to play a role in such pathologies too. It was the aim of our study to investigate a possible influence of IL-33 on GM-CSF and M-CSF production by human endothelial cells. IL-33, but not IL-18 or IL-37, stimulated GM-CSF and M-CSF mRNA expression and protein production by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human coronary artery ECs (HCAECs) through the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathway in an IL-1-independent way. This effect was inhibited by the soluble form of ST2 (sST2), which is known to act as a decoy receptor for IL-33. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor fluvastatin could also be shown to moderately reduce the IL-33-mediated effect on M-CSF, but not on GM-CSF expression. In addition, IL-33, IL-1β, GM-CSF and M-CSF were detected in endothelial cells of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques using immunofluorescence. Upregulation of GM-CSF and M-CSF production by human endothelial cells, an effect that appears to be mediated by NF-κB and to be independent of IL-1, may be an additional mechanism through which IL-33 contributes to inflammatory activation of the vessel wall. PMID:27173404

  11. Identification of CSF fistulas by radionuclide counting

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Y.; Kunishio, K.; Sunami, N.; Yamamoto, Y.; Satoh, T.; Suga, M.; Asari, S. )

    1990-07-01

    A radionuclide counting method, performed with the patient prone and the neck flexed, was used successfully to diagnose CSF rhinorrhea in two patients. A normal radionuclide ratio (radionuclide counts in pledget/radionuclide counts in 1-ml blood sample) was obtained in 11 normal control subjects. Significance was determined to be a ratio greater than 0.37. Use of radionuclide counting method of determining CSF rhinorrhea is recommended when other methods have failed to locate a site of leakage or when posttraumatic meningitis suggests subclinical CSF rhinorrhea.

  12. CSF Levels of Angiopoietin-2 Do Not Differ between Patients with CSF Fluid Leakage Syndrome and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Pul, Refik; Yildiz, Özlem; Morbiducci, Franco; Skripuletz, Thomas; Schwenkenbecher, Philipp; Stangel, Martin; Götz, Friedrich; Berding, Georg; Trebst, Corinna; Donnerstag, Frank

    2015-01-01

    CSF abnormalities have been reported in CSF leakage syndrome. However, the mechanism for these CSF changes is actually unknown and they may indicate impaired CSF flow or blood-CSF barrier. Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), a protein which is expressed and released by endothelial cells, has been associated with increased vascular permeability. In the assumption that CSF changes are due to an impaired blood-CSF barrier, we hypothesized that subjects with persistent CSF leakage may have increased CSF Ang-2 levels. We enrolled 10 subjects with a clinically definite diagnosis of persisting CSF leakage syndrome and 10 control subjects. In CSF analyses, CSF to serum albumin ratio (Qalb) was the most frequently increased parameter indicating a disturbed blood-CSF barrier function. Comparison of the mean CSF Ang-2 levels, CSF to serum Ang-2 ratio (QAng-2), and QAng-2/Qalb between the control and CSF leakage patients did not show any significant difference. We suggest that the increase of Qalb results from a low CSF flow. Future studies with phase contrast-MRI in conjunction with CSF analyses before and after epidural blood patch treatment are required to address this question. It would be of particular interest whether Qalb can be used as a marker for successful nontargeted epidural blood patch treatment. PMID:26448679

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid P-Tau181P: Biomarker for Improved Differential Dementia Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Struyfs, Hanne; Niemantsverdriet, Ellis; Goossens, Joery; Fransen, Erik; Martin, Jean-Jacques; De Deyn, Peter P; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the value of tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-tau181P) in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker panel for differential dementia diagnosis in autopsy confirmed AD and non-AD patients. The study population consisted of 140 autopsy confirmed AD and 77 autopsy confirmed non-AD dementia patients. CSF concentrations of amyloid-β peptide of 42 amino acids (Aβ1-42), total tau protein (T-tau), and P-tau181P were determined with single analyte ELISA-kits (INNOTEST(®), Fujirebio, Ghent, Belgium). Diagnostic accuracy was assessed through receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses to obtain area under the curve (AUC) values and to define optimal cutoff values to discriminate AD from pooled and individual non-AD groups. ROC curve analyses were only performed on biomarkers and ratios that differed significantly between the groups. Pairwise comparison of AUC values was performed by means of DeLong tests. The Aβ1-42/P-tau181P ratio (AUC = 0.770) performed significantly better than Aβ1-42 (AUC = 0.677, P = 0.004), T-tau (AUC = 0.592, P < 0.001), and Aβ1-42/T-tau (AUC = 0.678, P = 0.001), while P-tau181P (AUC = 0.720) performed significantly better than T-tau (AUC = 0.592, P < 0.001) to discriminate between AD and the pooled non-AD group. When comparing AD and the individual non-AD diagnoses, Aβ1-42/P-tau181P (AUC = 0.894) discriminated AD from frontotemporal dementia significantly better than Aβ1-42 (AUC = 0.776, P = 0.020) and T-tau (AUC = 0.746, P = 0.004), while P-tau181P/T-tau (AUC = 0.958) significantly improved the differentiation between AD and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease as compared to Aβ1-42 (AUC = 0.688, P = 0.004), T-tau (AUC = 0.874, P = 0.040), and Aβ1-42/P-tau181P (AUC = 0.760, P = 0.003). In conclusion, this study demonstrates P-tau181P is an essential component of the AD CSF biomarker

  14. Confirmed viral meningitis with normal CSF findings.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Naghum; Desjobert, Edouard; Lumley, Janine; Webster, Daniel; Jacobs, Michael

    2014-07-17

    An 18-year-old woman presented with a progressively worsening headache, photophobia feverishness and vomiting. Three weeks previously she had returned to the UK from a trip to Peru. At presentation, she had clinical signs of meningism. On admission, blood tests showed a mild lymphopenia, with a normal C reactive protein and white cell count. Chest X-ray and CT of the head were normal. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) microscopy was normal. CSF protein and glucose were in the normal range. MRI of the head and cerebral angiography were also normal. Subsequent molecular testing of CSF detected enterovirus RNA by reverse transcriptase PCR. The patient's clinical syndrome correlated with her virological diagnosis and no other cause of her symptoms was found. Her symptoms were self-limiting and improved with supportive management. This case illustrates an important example of viral central nervous system infection presenting clinically as meningitis but with normal CSF microscopy.

  15. Biomarkers for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Soomro, Sanam; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-06-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is a rare but fatal type of spongiform encephalopathy with unknown cause. Unfortunately, definitive diagnosis of this disease can only be done by examination of postmortem brain tissue. Presumptive diagnosis is done through a combination of clinical manifestations, radiology results, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) testing for CSF 14-3-3. Even with these guidelines, premortem diagnosis of sCJD can be unreliable with high rates of misdiagnosis. This calls for more reliable biomarkers of the disease, allowing for better diagnosis as well as understanding the pathogenesis of sCJD. This review compiles potential genetic, protein, biomolecular, and imaging biomarker studies for sCJD since 2010, highlighting the promise of proteins, cytokines, and composite biomarkers for improving the diagnosis as well as understanding the pathogenesis of this mysterious ailment. PMID:27547775

  16. Immunohistochemistry in the Diagnosis of Mucinous Neoplasms Involving the Ovary: The Added Value of SATB2 and Biomarker Discovery Through Protein Expression Database Mining.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Sarah; Wasserman, Jason K; Giassi, Ana; Djordjevic, Bojana; Parra-Herran, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    77.1% sensitivity and 99% specificity, outperforming tumor laterality and size. Second-line markers such as CDX2, MUC2, estrogen receptor, MUC1, and β-catenin increased the sensitivity of immunohistochemistry in excluding lower GI origin. Biomarker search using proteomic databases has a value in diagnostic pathology, as shown with SATB2; however, as seen with POF1B, expression profiles in these databases are not always reproduced in larger cohorts.

  17. Targeting GM-CSF in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Avci, Ali Berkant; Feist, Eugen; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is well-known as a haemopoietic growth factor. However, it is also essential in regulating functions of mature myeloid cells such as macrophages. Preclinical studies and observations of flares of arthritis in patients following GM-CSF treatment supported its important contribution to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As the most advanced compound, mavrilimumab, a monoclonal antibody against GM-CSF receptor, has already completed phase II trials with a long term of follow-up period of 74 weeks. During this exposure period, an acceptable sustained safety and tolerability profile has been observed addressing the concerns of development of cytopenias or pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Of note, a rapid and sustained efficacy and normalisation of acute phase reactants were consistently shown in studies both targeting GM-CSF and its receptor. Its tumour necrosis factor (TNF) independent mode of action with concurrent blockade of GM-CSF as well as IL-17 signalling reported from preclinical studies supports the assumption that it can be a useful biologic and an alternative agent in TNF inhibitor resistant patients with RA. Therefore, subsequent studies are warranted to investigate the safety and efficacy of GM-CSF blocking agents in different subgroups of RA. PMID:27586802

  18. Semi-Supervised Multimodal Relevance Vector Regression Improves Cognitive Performance Estimation from Imaging and Biological Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bo; Chen, Songcan; Kaufer, Daniel I.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate estimation of cognitive scores for patients can help track the progress of neurological diseases. In this paper, we present a novel semi-supervised multimodal relevance vector regression (SM-RVR) method for predicting clinical scores of neurological diseases from multimodal imaging and biological biomarker, to help evaluate pathological stage and predict progression of diseases, e.g., Alzheimer’s diseases (AD). Unlike most existing methods, we predict clinical scores from multimodal (imaging and biological) biomarkers, including MRI, FDG-PET, and CSF. Considering that the clinical scores of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects are often less stable compared to those of AD and normal control (NC) subjects due to the heterogeneity of MCI, we use only the multimodal data of MCI subjects, but no corresponding clinical scores, to train a semi-supervised model for enhancing the estimation of clinical scores for AD and NC subjects. We also develop a new strategy for selecting the most informative MCI subjects. We evaluate the performance of our approach on 202 subjects with all three modalities of data (MRI, FDG-PET and CSF) from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. The experimental results show that our SM-RVR method achieves a root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 1.91 and a correlation coefficient (CORR) of 0.80 for estimating the MMSE scores, and also a RMSE of 4.45 and a CORR of 0.78 for estimating the ADAS-Cog scores, demonstrating very promising performances in AD studies. PMID:23504659

  19. CSF concentration gradients of monoamine metabolites in patients with hydrocephalus.

    PubMed Central

    Malm, J; Kristensen, B; Ekstedt, J; Wester, P

    1994-01-01

    Concentration gradients of homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), were assessed in 762 successive CSF fractions (2 ml lumbar CSF) from 15 patients with the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (AHS) and 11 patients with hydrocephalus of other causes (mixed group). A mean volume of 49.6 (SD 11.8) ml CSF was removed in the AHS group and 56.4 (10.2) ml in the mixed group. The CSF was collected with a specially designed carousel fraction collector and the corresponding CSF dynamics were continuously registered by a constant pressure CSF infusion method. Pronounced gradients in CSF HVA and CSF 5-HIAA were seen in both patient groups in the first 25 ml of CSF removed. The concentration curves levelled off, despite the removal of larger amounts of CSF and stabilised at about twice the initial concentrations. This phenomenon has not been described before. Concentrations of HVA and 5-HIAA in the first CSF fraction correlated strongly with concentrations in fractions up to about 40 ml. A positive correlation between the first fraction of CSF HVA and CSF 5-HIAA concentrations and CSF outflow conductance was found in the AHS group. There was no gradient in MHPG. It is suggested that the rostrocaudal gradients in CSF HVA and 5-HIAA may be explained by a downward flow of CSF along the spinal cord with absorption of metabolites occurring during passage. Mixing of CSF from different CSF compartments, extraventricular production sites of CSF, clearance of metabolites to venous blood or extracellular fluid, and CSF outflow conductance are probably important determinants of the plateau phase in patients with hydrocephalus. It is concluded that lumbar CSF does not exclusively reflect the concentrations of HVA, 5-HIAA, or MHPG in the ventricles. It should be noted that these results obtained in patients with hydrocephalus may not be applicable to other groups of patients or normal subjects. PMID:7522267

  20. The effect of live, attenuated measles vaccine and measles infection on measles antibody levels in serum and CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis or clinically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, Cecilia; Odén, Anders; Haghighi, Sara; Andersen, Oluf; Bergström, Tomas; Lycke, Jan

    2011-06-01

    High occurrence of measles, rubella and varicella zoster antibodies has been used as a biomarker for MS (the MRZ test). We analyzed measles antibody titres with respect to measles infection/measles vaccination status in 166 patients with MS or clinically isolated syndrome. Fifty blood donors served as controls. Measles vaccination yielded CSF measles antibodies in fewer patients (62%) than measles infection did (87%, p=0.001) and yielded lower measles titres in both serum and CSF (p<0.001). Controls had lower CSF measles titres than patients with measles vaccination alone (p<0.001). Childhood vaccinations probably reduce the sensitivity of the MRZ diagnostic test for MS.

  1. Neurofilament Light Chain in Blood and CSF as Marker of Disease Progression in Mouse Models and in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bacioglu, Mehtap; Maia, Luis F; Preische, Oliver; Schelle, Juliane; Apel, Anja; Kaeser, Stephan A; Schweighauser, Manuel; Eninger, Timo; Lambert, Marius; Pilotto, Andrea; Shimshek, Derya R; Neumann, Ulf; Kahle, Philipp J; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Neumann, Manuela; Maetzler, Walter; Kuhle, Jens; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    A majority of current disease-modifying therapeutic approaches for age-related neurodegenerative diseases target their characteristic proteopathic lesions (α-synuclein, Tau, Aβ). To monitor such treatments, fluid biomarkers reflecting the underlying disease process are crucial. We found robust increases of neurofilament light chain (NfL) in CSF and blood in murine models of α-synucleinopathies, tauopathy, and β-amyloidosis. Blood and CSF NfL levels were strongly correlated, and NfL increases coincided with the onset and progression of the corresponding proteopathic lesions in brain. Experimental induction of α-synuclein lesions increased CSF and blood NfL levels, while blocking Aβ lesions attenuated the NfL increase. Consistently, we also found NfL increases in CSF and blood of human α-synucleinopathies, tauopathies, and Alzheimer's disease. Our results suggest that CSF and particularly blood NfL can serve as a reliable and easily accessible biomarker to monitor disease progression and treatment response in mouse models and potentially in human proteopathic neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27292537

  2. Neurofilament Light Chain in Blood and CSF as Marker of Disease Progression in Mouse Models and in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bacioglu, Mehtap; Maia, Luis F; Preische, Oliver; Schelle, Juliane; Apel, Anja; Kaeser, Stephan A; Schweighauser, Manuel; Eninger, Timo; Lambert, Marius; Pilotto, Andrea; Shimshek, Derya R; Neumann, Ulf; Kahle, Philipp J; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Neumann, Manuela; Maetzler, Walter; Kuhle, Jens; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    A majority of current disease-modifying therapeutic approaches for age-related neurodegenerative diseases target their characteristic proteopathic lesions (α-synuclein, Tau, Aβ). To monitor such treatments, fluid biomarkers reflecting the underlying disease process are crucial. We found robust increases of neurofilament light chain (NfL) in CSF and blood in murine models of α-synucleinopathies, tauopathy, and β-amyloidosis. Blood and CSF NfL levels were strongly correlated, and NfL increases coincided with the onset and progression of the corresponding proteopathic lesions in brain. Experimental induction of α-synuclein lesions increased CSF and blood NfL levels, while blocking Aβ lesions attenuated the NfL increase. Consistently, we also found NfL increases in CSF and blood of human α-synucleinopathies, tauopathies, and Alzheimer's disease. Our results suggest that CSF and particularly blood NfL can serve as a reliable and easily accessible biomarker to monitor disease progression and treatment response in mouse models and potentially in human proteopathic neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. European multicentre double-blind placebo-controlled trial of Nilvadipine in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease—the substudy protocols: NILVAD frailty; NILVAD blood and genetic biomarkers; NILVAD cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers; NILVAD cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbroek, Olga; O'Dwyer, Sarah; de Jong, Daan; van Spijker, Gerrita; Kennelly, Sean; Cregg, Fiona; Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Abdullah, Laila; Wallin, Anders; Walsh, Cathal; Coen, Robert; Kenny, Rose Anne; Daly, Leslie; Segurado, Ricardo; Borjesson-Hanson, Anne; Crawford, Fiona; Mullan, Michael; Lucca, Ugo; Banzi, Rita; Pasquier, Florence; Breuilh, Laetitia; Riepe, Matthias; Kalman, Janos; Tsolaki, Magda; Howard, Robert; Adams, Jessica; Gaynor, Siobhan; Lawlor, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In conjunction with the NILVAD trial, a European Multicentre Double-Blind Placebo Controlled trial of Nilvadipine in Mild-to-Moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD), there are four NILVAD substudies in which eligible NILVAD patients are also invited to participate. The main NILVAD protocol was previously published in BMJ Open (2014). The objectives of the NILVAD substudies are to determine whether frailty, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), blood biomarker profile and Apolipoprotein E (APOE) status predict response to Nilvadipine, and to investigate the effect of Nilvadipine on cerebral blood flow and blood biomarkers. Methods and analysis All participants who fulfil criteria for the main NILVAD study are eligible for participation in the NILVAD substudies. Participation is subject to informed consent and whether the substudy is available at a particular NILVAD study site. Each substudy entails extra measurements during the course of the main NILVAD study. For example, in the blood and genetic biomarkers substudy, extra blood (30 mL) will be collected at week 0, week 13, week 52 and week 78, while in the cerebral blood flow substudy, participants will receive an MRI and transcranial Doppler measurements at week 0, week 26 and week 78. In the CSF substudy, 10 mL CSF is collected at week 0 and week 78. Ethics and dissemination All NILVAD substudies and all subsequent amendments have received ethical approval within each participating country, according to national regulations. Each participant provides written consent to participate. All participants remain anonymised throughout and the results of each substudy will be published in an international peer reviewed journal. Trial registration number EUDRACT 2012-002764-27; Pre-results. PMID:27436668

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Peptides as Potential Parkinson Disease Biomarkers: A Staged Pipeline for Discovery and Validation*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Movius, James; Dator, Romel; Aro, Patrick; Zhao, Yanchun; Pan, Catherine; Lin, Xiangmin; Bammler, Theo K.; Stewart, Tessandra; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Hu, Shu-Ching; Quinn, Joseph F.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Finding robust biomarkers for Parkinson disease (PD) is currently hampered by inherent technical limitations associated with imaging or antibody-based protein assays. To circumvent the challenges, we adapted a staged pipeline, starting from our previous proteomic profiling followed by high-throughput targeted mass spectrometry (MS), to identify peptides in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for PD diagnosis and disease severity correlation. In this multicenter study consisting of training and validation sets, a total of 178 subjects were randomly selected from a retrospective cohort, matching age and sex between PD patients, healthy controls, and neurological controls with Alzheimer disease (AD). From ∼14,000 unique peptides displaying differences between PD and healthy control in proteomic investigations, 126 peptides were selected based on relevance and observability in CSF using bioinformatic analysis and MS screening, and then quantified by highly accurate and sensitive selected reaction monitoring (SRM) in the CSF of 30 PD patients versus 30 healthy controls (training set), followed by diagnostic (receiver operating characteristics) and disease severity correlation analyses. The most promising candidates were further tested in an independent cohort of 40 PD patients, 38 AD patients, and 40 healthy controls (validation set). A panel of five peptides (derived from SPP1, LRP1, CSF1R, EPHA4, and TIMP1) was identified to provide an area under curve (AUC) of 0.873 (sensitivity = 76.7%, specificity = 80.0%) for PD versus healthy controls in the training set. The performance was essentially confirmed in the validation set (AUC = 0.853, sensitivity = 82.5%, specificity = 82.5%). Additionally, this panel could also differentiate the PD and AD groups (AUC = 0.990, sensitivity = 95.0%, specificity = 97.4%). Furthermore, a combination of two peptides belonging to proteins TIMP1 and APLP1 significantly correlated with disease severity as determined by the Unified Parkinson

  5. Absence of systemic oxidative stress and increased CSF prostaglandin F2α in progressive MS

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Magda A.; Maghzal, Ghassan J.; Khademi, Mohsen; Piehl, Fredik; Ratzer, Rikke; Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Sellebjerg, Finn Thorup; Olsson, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the role of oxidative stress in the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: We determined by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry nonenzymatic (F2-isoprostanes) and enzymatic oxidation products of arachidonic acid (prostaglandin F2α [PGF2α]) in plasma and CSF of 45 controls (other neurologic disease [OND] with no signs of inflammation) and 62 patients with MS. Oxidation products were correlated with disease severity and validated biomarkers of inflammation (chemokine ligand 13; matrix metalloproteinase-9; osteopontin) and axonal damage (neurofilament light protein). Results: Compared with OND controls, plasma concentrations of F2-isoprostanes and PGF2α were significantly lower in patients with progressive disease, and decreased with increasing disability score (Expanded Disability Status Scale). In contrast, CSF concentrations of PGF2α, but not F2-isoprostanes, were significantly higher in patients with progressive disease than OND controls (p < 0.01). The content of PGF2α in CSF increased with disease severity (p = 0.044) and patient age (p = 0.022), although this increase could not be explained by age. CSF PGF2α decreased with natalizumab and methylprednisolone treatment and was unaffected by the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in secondary progressive MS. CSF PGF2α did not associate with validated CSF markers of inflammation and axonal damage that themselves did not associate with the Expanded Disability Status Scale. Conclusions: Our data suggest that MS progression is associated with low systemic oxidative activity. This may contribute to immune dysregulation with CNS inflammation accompanied by increased local cyclooxygenase-dependent lipid oxidation. PMID:27386506

  6. rhCSF3 accelerates the proliferation of human melanocytes in culture through binding CSF3R and the expression of CSF3R transcripts.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Guo, Ze; Zhou, Mei-Hua; Li, Xue; Sun, Jie; Gong, Qing-Li; Zhu, Wen-Yuan

    2015-05-01

    Melanogenic paracrine and autocrine cytokine networks have recently been discovered in vitro between melanocytes and other types of skin cells. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF3R) controls the survival, proliferation and differentiation of many kinds of cells, including neutrophils. To understand the function of CSF3R and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhCSF3) on melanocyte proliferation, this study compared the expression of CSF3R and the effects of rhCSF3 in primary human melanocytes, neutrophils and HEL 92.1.7 cells. The results show that CSF3R is localized in the cytoplasm and on cell membranes of melanocytes and neutrophils. The percentage of CSF3R(+) melanocytes was higher than CSF3R(+) HEL 92.1.7 cells, but was lower than CSF3R(+) neutrophils. Both CSF3R mRNA and CSF3R protein levels in melanocytes were higher than in HEL 92.1.7 cells, but were lower than in neutrophils. Treatment with rhCSF3 increased the proliferation of human melanocytes, but not their tyrosinase activity. Transcripts of CSF3R in human melanocytes, M14, A375 melanoma and A431 squamous cell carcinoma cells were also detected. Expression of the CSF3R V3 transcript was lower in melanocytes than in M14, A375 melanoma and A431 squamous cell carcinoma cells. In conclusion, rhCSF3 can promote melanocyte proliferation through CSF3R without affecting tyrosinase activity.

  7. CSF markers in Alzheimer disease patients are not related to the different degree of cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Alessandro; Martorana, Alessandro; Bernardini, Sergio; Panella, Marta; Mercati, Flavio; Orlacchio, Antonio; Pierantozzi, Mariangela

    2006-12-21

    Standard markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as soluble amyloid beta 1-42 (Abeta1-42) and total tau protein (t-tau), may contribute to dementia subtypes diagnostic accuracy. Yet, their sensitivity to assess the different degree of cognitive deficit is not fully clarified. Our study analyses Abeta1-42 and t-tau CSF levels in different cohorts of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, distinguished as early AD (mild cognitively impaired subjects recently converted to AD), mild AD (MMSE<23; > or =18), and moderately advanced AD (MMSE<18). The control group was represented by age-matched patients affected by depressive pseudo-dementia. Reduced Abeta1-42 and increased t-tau CSF levels were confirmed as hallmarks of AD at any disease stage. In early AD patients, Abeta1-42 levels were already significantly low, if compared to the control group (336 vs 867 ng/L; p<0.0001). On the contrary, Abeta1-42 levels did not differ between AD subgroups, and in particular between mild to moderate AD. A significant progressive increase of t-tau concentration was found when comparing early AD (269 ng/L) to more advanced AD stages (468 ng/L and 495 ng/L for mild and moderate AD, respectively). Our findings confirm that the impairment of amyloidogenic cascade is an early, even pre-clinical process, but suggest that soluble Abeta1-42 concentration has a negligible correlation with the clinical progression. Conversely, t-tau concentration correlates with the transition towards marked cognitive impairment.

  8. GM-CSF and phorbol esters modulate GM-CSF receptor expression by independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Brizzi, M F; Arduino, C; Avanzi, G C; Bussolino, F; Pegoraro, L

    1991-07-01

    Human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (0.1 nM) down-modulates its receptor in IL-3/GM-CSF dependent M-07e cells, in KG-1 cells and normal granulocytes, whereas phorbol esters 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (2 nM) down-modulates the GM-CSF receptor in M-07e cells and granulocytes but not in KG-1 cells. As data analysis shows by nonlinear regression, the decreased binding ability depends on a reduction of the binding sites with no significant change of their dissociation constant. To gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the GM-CSF receptor regulation, we investigated the role of protein kinase C (PKC). GM-CSF, unlike TPA, was unable to activate PKC in all the cells studied. Moreover, unlike TPA, GM-CSF was still able to down-modulate its receptor in cells where PKC was inhibited by 1-(5-isoquinolonesulphonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7) and staurosporine or in cells where PKC was exhausted by prolonged incubation with 1 microM TPA. Finally, the receptor re-expression rate was accelerated by protein kinases inhibitors. These results, taken together, indicate the presence of a PKC-dependent and -independent down-modulation mechanism and a negative role of the endogeneous protein kinases in GM-CSF receptor re-expression.

  9. Fluid biomarkers in multiple system atrophy: A review of the MSA Biomarker Initiative.

    PubMed

    Laurens, Brice; Constantinescu, Radu; Freeman, Roy; Gerhard, Alexander; Jellinger, Kurt; Jeromin, Andreas; Krismer, Florian; Mollenhauer, Brit; Schlossmacher, Michael G; Shaw, Leslie M; Verbeek, Marcel M; Wenning, Gregor K; Winge, Kristian; Zhang, Jing; Meissner, Wassilios G

    2015-08-01

    Despite growing research efforts, no reliable biomarker currently exists for the diagnosis and prognosis of multiple system atrophy (MSA). Such biomarkers are urgently needed to improve diagnostic accuracy, prognostic guidance and also to serve as efficacy measures or surrogates of target engagement for future clinical trials. We here review candidate fluid biomarkers for MSA and provide considerations for further developments and harmonization of standard operating procedures. A PubMed search was performed until April 24, 2015 to review the literature with regard to candidate blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for MSA. Abstracts of 1760 studies were retrieved and screened for eligibility. The final list included 60 studies assessing fluid biomarkers in patients with MSA. Most studies have focused on alpha-synuclein, markers of axonal degeneration or catecholamines. Their results suggest that combining several CSF fluid biomarkers may be more successful than using single markers, at least for the diagnosis. Currently, the clinically most useful markers may comprise a combination of the light chain of neurofilament (which is consistently elevated in MSA compared to controls and Parkinson's disease), metabolites of the catecholamine pathway and proteins such as α-synuclein, DJ-1 and total-tau. Beyond future efforts in biomarker discovery, the harmonization of standard operating procedures will be crucial for future success.

  10. CXCL13, CXCL10 and CXCL8 as Potential Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Neurosyphilis Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuini; Wu, Kaiqi; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Sufang; Gao, Zixiao; Liu, Yudan; Ni, Liyan; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Guan, Zhifang; Shi, Mei; Lu, Haikong; Lou, Yongliang; Zhou, Pingyu

    2016-01-01

    At present, diagnosis for neurosyphilis remains a major clinical challenge. Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) titer of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is suboptimally sensitive to diagnose neurosyphilis, which can be negative in neurosyphilis patients, especially in asymptomatic neurosyphilis patients. In the search for biomarkers of neurosyphilis, we investigated the chemokine profile in CSF of neurosyphilis patients and found that the concentrations of CXCL13, CXCL10 and CXCL8 were selectively elevated in neurosyphilis patients and correlated with CSF protein concentration and CSF-VDRL titer. After antibiotic treatment, the concentration of these chemokines was dramatically reduced. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) of CSF CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 and the CSF/serum ratio of CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 in the diagnosis of neurosyphilis were 0.940, 0.899, 0.915, 0.963, 0.846 and 0.926, respectively. The corresponding sensitivities/specificities of CSF CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 and the CSF/serum ratio of CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 in diagnosis of neurosyphilis were 85.4%/89.1%, 79%/90.1% and 79.6%/91.1%, 86.6%/99%, 79%/73.3% and 86%/92.1%, respectively. Our results suggest that the elevated concentrations of CXCL13, CXCL8, and CXCL10 or their increasing CSF/serum ratios may be potential biomarkers of neurosyphilis, particularly for asymptomatic neurosyphilis. Reduced concentration of these chemokines may indicate the prognosis of antibiotic therapy.

  11. Therapeutic applications of macrophage colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and antagonists of CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) signaling.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2012-02-23

    Macrophage-colony stimulating factor (CSF-1) signaling through its receptor (CSF-1R) promotes the differentiation of myeloid progenitors into heterogeneous populations of monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and bone-resorbing osteoclasts. In the periphery, CSF-1 regulates the migration, proliferation, function, and survival of macrophages, which function at multiple levels within the innate and adaptive immune systems. Macrophage populations elicited by CSF-1 are associated with, and exacerbate, a broad spectrum of pathologies, including cancer, inflammation, and bone disease. Conversely, macrophages can also contribute to immunosuppression, disease resolution, and tissue repair. Recombinant CSF-1, antibodies against the ligand and the receptor, and specific inhibitors of CSF-1R kinase activity have been each been tested in a range of animal models and in some cases, in patients. This review examines the potential clinical uses of modulators of the CSF-1/CSF-1R system. We conclude that CSF-1 promotes a resident-type macrophage phenotype. As a treatment, CSF-1 has therapeutic potential in tissue repair. Conversely, inhibition of CSF-1R is unlikely to be effective in inflammatory disease but may have utility in cancer.

  12. Identification of Altered Metabolic Pathways in Plasma and CSF in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease Using Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Trushina, Eugenia; Dutta, Tumpa; Persson, Xuan-Mai T.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) currently affects more than 5 million Americans, with numbers expected to grow dramatically as the population ages. The pathophysiological changes in AD patients begin decades before the onset of dementia, highlighting the urgent need for the development of early diagnostic methods. Compelling data demonstrate that increased levels of amyloid-beta compromise multiple cellular pathways; thus, the investigation of changes in various cellular networks is essential to advance our understanding of early disease mechanisms and to identify novel therapeutic targets. We applied a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based non-targeted metabolomics approach to determine global metabolic changes in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the same individuals with different AD severity. Metabolic profiling detected a total of significantly altered 342 plasma and 351 CSF metabolites, of which 22% were identified. Based on the changes of >150 metabolites, we found 23 altered canonical pathways in plasma and 20 in CSF in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) vs. cognitively normal (CN) individuals with a false discovery rate <0.05. The number of affected pathways increased with disease severity in both fluids. Lysine metabolism in plasma and the Krebs cycle in CSF were significantly affected in MCI vs. CN. Cholesterol and sphingolipids transport was altered in both CSF and plasma of AD vs. CN. Other 30 canonical pathways significantly disturbed in MCI and AD patients included energy metabolism, Krebs cycle, mitochondrial function, neurotransmitter and amino acid metabolism, and lipid biosynthesis. Pathways in plasma that discriminated between all groups included polyamine, lysine, tryptophan metabolism, and aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis; and in CSF involved cortisone and prostaglandin 2 biosynthesis and metabolism. Our data suggest metabolomics could advance our understanding of the early disease mechanisms shared in progression from CN to MCI and to AD

  13. Multi-platform mass spectrometry analysis of the CSF and plasma metabolomes of rigorously matched amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and control subjects.

    PubMed

    Wuolikainen, Anna; Jonsson, Pär; Ahnlund, Maria; Antti, Henrik; Marklund, Stefan L; Moritz, Thomas; Forsgren, Lars; Andersen, Peter M; Trupp, Miles

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are protein-aggregation diseases that lack clear molecular etiologies. Biomarkers could aid in diagnosis, prognosis, planning of care, drug target identification and stratification of patients into clinical trials. We sought to characterize shared and unique metabolite perturbations between ALS and PD and matched controls selected from patients with other diagnoses, including differential diagnoses to ALS or PD that visited our clinic for a lumbar puncture. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from rigorously age-, sex- and sampling-date matched patients were analyzed on multiple platforms using gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS). We applied constrained randomization of run orders and orthogonal partial least squares projection to latent structure-effect projections (OPLS-EP) to capitalize upon the study design. The combined platforms identified 144 CSF and 196 plasma metabolites with diverse molecular properties. Creatine was found to be increased and creatinine decreased in CSF of ALS patients compared to matched controls. Glucose was increased in CSF of ALS patients and α-hydroxybutyrate was increased in CSF and plasma of ALS patients compared to matched controls. Leucine, isoleucine and ketoleucine were increased in CSF of both ALS and PD. Together, these studies, in conjunction with earlier studies, suggest alterations in energy utilization pathways and have identified and further validated perturbed metabolites to be used in panels of biomarkers for the diagnosis of ALS and PD. PMID:26883206

  14. CSF1R signaling blockade stanches tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and improves the efficacy of radiotherapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingying; Escamilla, Jemima; Mok, Stephen; David, John; Priceman, Saul; West, Brian; Bollag, Gideon; McBride, William; Wu, Lily

    2013-05-01

    Radiotherapy is used to treat many types of cancer, but many treated patients relapse with local tumor recurrence. Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells (TIM), including CD11b (ITGAM)(+)F4/80 (EMR1)+ tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), and CD11b(+)Gr-1 (LY6G)+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), respond to cancer-related stresses and play critical roles in promoting tumor angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and immunosuppression. In this report, we used a prostate cancer model to investigate the effects of irradiation on TAMs and MDSCs in tumor-bearing animals. Unexpectedly, when primary tumor sites were irradiated, we observed a systemic increase of MDSCs in spleen, lung, lymph nodes, and peripheral blood. Cytokine analysis showed that the macrophage colony-stimulating factor CSF1 increased by two-fold in irradiated tumors. Enhanced macrophage migration induced by conditioned media from irradiated tumor cells was completely blocked by a selective inhibitor of CSF1R. These findings were confirmed in patients with prostate cancer, where serum levels of CSF1 increased after radiotherapy. Mechanistic investigations revealed the recruitment of the DNA damage-induced kinase ABL1 into cell nuclei where it bound the CSF1 gene promoter and enhanced CSF1 gene transcription. When added to radiotherapy, a selective inhibitor of CSF1R suppressed tumor growth more effectively than irradiation alone. Our results highlight the importance of CSF1/CSF1R signaling in the recruitment of TIMs that can limit the efficacy of radiotherapy. Furthermore, they suggest that CSF1 inhibitors should be evaluated in clinical trials in combination with radiotherapy as a strategy to improve outcomes.

  15. Identification of M-CSF agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, Jayvardhan; Jancarik, Jarmila; Kim, Sung-Hou; Koths, Kirston; Halenbeck, Robert; Fear, Anna Lisa; Taylor, Eric; Yamamoto, Ralph; Bohm, Andrew

    2000-02-15

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  16. CSF levels of the histamine metabolite tele-methylhistamine are only slightly decreased in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Motawaj, Mouhammad; Peoc'h, Katell; Callebert, Jacques; Arrang, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    Neuropathological studies have reported a strong neurofibrillary degeneration of the tuberomamillary nucleus, the region of origin of histamine neurons, in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Histaminergic neurons enhance cognition and memory, suggesting that their degeneration may contribute to the cognitive decline of AD. Besides neurons, the brain histaminergic system comprises mast cells and microglia that can also produce histamine. The level of activity of this histaminergic system in AD remained unknown. In the present study, we have measured the levels of the main histamine metabolite in brain, tele-methylhistamine (t-MeHA), an index of histaminergic system activity, in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 97 non-AD (controls) and 91 AD patients, males or females. t-MeHA levels in CSF of controls tended to be higher, although non-significantly, in females than in males. t-MeHA levels of controls and AD significantly increased with age (1.66 ± 0.13, 2.04 ± 0.12, and 2.76 ± 0.12 pmol/ml at 40, 60 and 80 years, respectively). In spite of the strong degeneration of histamine neurons in the disease, t-MeHA levels in CSF were only slightly decreased in AD compared to controls (2.14 ± 0.10 vs 2.76 ± 0.13 pmol/ml, -22%, p < 0.01). This decrease was similar whatever the age, and was slightly higher in females than in males. The increase observed with age, and the limited magnitude of the decrease in AD even at late stages may result from the compensatory activation of spared neurons, as well as the neuroinflammation-induced activation of microglia occurring in senescence and AD.

  17. Phosphatidylcholine signaling in response to CSF-1.

    PubMed

    Jackowski, S; Xu, X X; Rock, C O

    1997-01-01

    The formation of cell membrane following CSF-1 stimulation of a macrophage cell line is coordinated with cell cycle progression. The majority of membrane phospholipid accumulates during the S phase and results from cell-cycle dependent oscillations in the rates of phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis and degradation. Both synthesis and degradation are enhanced during the G1 phase, resulting in a high rate of phosphatidylcholine turnover. Degradation of phosphatidylcholine after CSF-1 stimulation is mediated by a phospholipase C, and the release of diacylglycerol during G1 phase is biphasic. The degradation essentially stops during the S phase, thus allowing biosynthesis to supply the necessary membrane for cell division and doubling. The degradation of phosphatidylcholine during G1 signals the downstream activation of c-fos and junB transcription and can be mimicked by incubation of the macrophage cells with exogenous bacterial phospholipase C. In contrast, the expression of c-myc transcripts normally associated with CSF-1 stimulation is severely compromised in phospholipase C-treated cells, indicating that the diacylglycerol signals a pathway distinct from the pathway that governs c-myc activation. Constitutive expression of c-myc complements phospholipase C activity and permits the growth of cells in the presence of exogenous bacterial enzyme and the absence of CSF-1. Protein kinase C is not required to mediate the diacylglycerol signal that supports cell growth. GTP exchange on Ras is not enhanced, and MAP kinase activity is not stimulated in response to phosphatidylcholine degradation by exogenous phospholipase C. The 85 kDa cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 is activated, however, as well as a novel protein we have called p96. Rapid serine phosphorylation of p96 follows stimulation of cells with either CSF-1 or exogenous phospholipase C. Analysis of the murine cDNA encoding p96 reveals an amino-terminal domain with significant similarity to the amino-terminal domain of

  18. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease (recent update).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sushil; Moon, Carolyn Seungyoun; Khogali, Azza; Haidous, Ali; Chabenne, Anthony; Ojo, Comfort; Jelebinkov, Miriana; Kurdi, Yousef; Ebadi, Manuchair

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder mostly affecting the aging population over sixty. Cardinal symptoms including, tremors, muscle rigidity, drooping posture, drooling, walking difficulty, and autonomic symptoms appear when a significant number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons are already destroyed. Hence we need early, sensitive, specific, and economical peripheral and/or central biomarker(s) for the differential diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of PD. These can be classified as clinical, biochemical, genetic, proteomic, and neuroimaging biomarkers. Novel discoveries of genetic as well as nongenetic biomarkers may be utilized for the personalized treatment of PD during preclinical (premotor) and clinical (motor) stages. Premotor biomarkers including hyper-echogenicity of substantia nigra, olfactory and autonomic dysfunction, depression, hyposmia, deafness, REM sleep disorder, and impulsive behavior may be noticed during preclinical stage. Neuroimaging biomarkers (PET, SPECT, MRI), and neuropsychological deficits can facilitate differential diagnosis. Single-cell profiling of dopaminergic neurons has identified pyridoxal kinase and lysosomal ATPase as biomarker genes for PD prognosis. Promising biomarkers include: fluid biomarkers, neuromelanin antibodies, pathological forms of α-Syn, DJ-1, amyloid β and tau in the CSF, patterns of gene expression, metabolomics, urate, as well as protein profiling in the blood and CSF samples. Reduced brain regional N-acetyl-aspartate is a biomarker for the in vivo assessment of neuronal loss using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and T2 relaxation time with MRI. To confirm PD diagnosis, the PET biomarkers include [(18)F]-DOPA for estimating dopaminergic neurotransmission, [(18)F]dG for mitochondrial bioenergetics, [(18)F]BMS for mitochondrial complex-1, [(11)C](R)-PK11195 for microglial activation, SPECT imaging with (123)Iflupane and βCIT for dopamine transporter, and urinary

  19. Neurofilament light in CSF and serum is a sensitive marker for axonal white matter injury in MS

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Joakim; Dring, Ann; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Norgren, Niklas; Gilthorpe, Jonathan; Bergenheim, Tommy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In an ongoing, open-label, phase 1b study on the intrathecal administration of rituximab for progressive multiple sclerosis, an intraventricular catheter was inserted for drug delivery. The objective of this study was to characterize the limited white matter axonal injury evoked by catheter insertion by analyzing a panel of markers for tissue damage in CSF and serum. Methods: Lumbar CSF and serum were collected before catheter insertion and at regular intervals during the follow-up period of 1 year. Levels of neurofilament light polypeptide (NF-L), glial fibrillary acidic protein, microtubule-associated protein tau, and S100 calcium binding protein B were measured in the CSF, and NF-L was also quantified in serum at each time point. Results: One month after neurosurgical trauma, there was a distinct peak in NF-L concentration in both CSF and serum. In contrast, the biomarkers S100 calcium binding protein B, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and microtubule-associated protein tau did not show any significant changes. NF-L levels in both CSF and serum peaked at 1 month post surgery, returning to baseline after 6 to 9 months. A strong correlation was observed between the concentrations of NF-L in CSF and serum. Conclusions: The NF-L level, in CSF and serum, appears to be both a sensitive and specific marker for white matter axonal injury. This makes NF-L a valuable tool with which to evaluate acute white matter axonal damage in a clinical setting. Serum analysis of NF-L may become a convenient way to follow white matter axonal damage longitudinally. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01719159. PMID:27536708

  20. Receptor occupancy in lumbar CSF as a measure of the antagonist activity of atenolol, metoprolol and propranolol in the CNS.

    PubMed Central

    Kaila, T; Marttila, R

    1993-01-01

    1. The antagonist activity of atenolol, metoprolol and propranolol in the CNS was estimated by determining the extent to which the drugs occupy animal beta 1- and beta 2-receptors in CSF ex vivo at the time of lumbar puncture. 2. Five CSF and plasma samples were obtained 4 h after drug intake from subjects treated for hypertension with atenolol, 100 mg once daily and five from subjects treated with metoprolol, 50 mg three times daily. Twenty-four samples were obtained 1, 2, 4 or 12 h after drug intake from subjects receiving a single 40 mg dose of propranolol. 3. The receptor occupancy in the samples was determined by adding beta 1-receptors of rabbit lung and beta 2-receptors of rat reticulocytes into the samples and labeling the receptors with a nonselective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, (-)-[3H]-CGP-12177. 4. Atenolol and metoprolol occupied, as expected, larger fractions of beta 1- than beta 2-receptors in CSF and plasma samples. The receptor fraction occupied by atenolol in CSF was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that occupied by metoprolol. The differences in occupancy between the drugs in plasma, however, were not statistically significant. 5. Propranolol occupied larger fractions of beta 2- than beta 1-receptors in the samples. Although propranolol concentrations in CSF were only 1/20-1/40 of those in plasma, the receptor occupancy of propranolol in CSF was similar to that in plasma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8099803

  1. Associations between performance on an abbreviated CogState battery, other measures of cognitive function, and biomarkers in people at risk for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Annie M.; Clark, Lindsay R.; Berman, Sara E.; Koscik, Rebecca L.; Mueller, Kimberly D.; Norton, Derek; Nicholas, Christopher R.; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Jedynak, Bruno; Bilgel, Murat; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Christian, Bradley T.; Asthana, Sanjay; Johnson, Sterling C.

    2016-01-01

    It is not known whether computerized cognitive assessments, like the CogState battery, are sensitive to preclinical cognitive changes or pathology in people at risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In 469 late middle-aged participants from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer’s Prevention (mean age 63.8±7 years at testing; 67% female; 39% APOE4+), we examined relationships between a CogState abbreviated battery (CAB) of seven tests and demographic characteristics, traditional paper-based neuropsychological tests as well as a composite cognitive impairment index, cognitive impairment status (determined by consensus review); and biomarkers for amyloid and tau (CSF phosphorylated-tau/Aβ42 and global PET-PiB burden) and neural injury (CSF neurofilament light protein). CSF and PET-PiB were collected in n=71 and n=91 participants, respectively, approximately four years prior to CAB testing. For comparison, we examined three traditional tests of delayed memory in parallel. Similar to studies in older samples, the CAB was less influenced by demographic factors than traditional tests. CAB tests were generally correlated with most paper-based cognitive tests examined and mapped onto the same cognitive domains. Greater composite cognitive impairment index was associated with worse performance on all CAB tests. Cognitively impaired participants performed significantly worse compared to normal controls on all but one CAB test. Poorer One Card Learning test performance was associated with higher levels of CSF phosphorylated-tau/Aβ42. These results support the use of the CogState battery as measures of early cognitive impairment in studies of people at risk for AD. PMID:27589532

  2. CSF markers of Alzheimer’s pathology and microglial activation are associated with altered white matter microstructure in asymptomatic adults at risk for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Melah, Kelsey E; Lu, Sharon Yuan-Fu; Hoscheidt, Siobhan M; Alexander, Andrew L; Adluru, Nagesh; Destiche, Daniel J; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Gleason, Carey E; Dowling, N Maritza; Bratzke, Lisa C; Rowley, Howard A; Sager, Mark A; Asthana, Sanjay; Johnson, Sterling C; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2015-01-01

    Background The immune response in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) involves activation of microglia which may remove β-amyloid. However, overproduction of inflammatory compounds may exacerbate neural damage in Alzheimer’s disease. AD pathology accumulates years before diagnosis, yet the extent to which neuroinflammation is involved in the earliest disease stages is unknown. Objective To determine whether neuroinflammation exacerbates neural damage in preclinical AD. Methods We utilized cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and magnetic resonance imaging collected in 192 asymptomatic late-middle-aged adults (mean age=60.98 years). Neuroinflammatory markers chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in CSF were utilized as markers of neuroinflammation. Neural cell damage was assessed using CSF neurofilament light chain protein (NFL), CSF total tau (T-Tau), and neural microstructure assessed with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). With regard to AD pathology, CSF Aβ42 and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-Tau181) were used as markers of amyloid and tau pathology, respectively. We hypothesized that higher YKL-40 and MCP-1 in the presence of AD pathology would be associated with higher NFL, T-Tau, and altered microstructure on DTI. Results Neuroinflammation was associated with markers of neural damage. Higher CSF YKL-40 was associated with both higher CSF NFL and T-Tau. Inflammation interacted with AD pathology, such that greater MCP-1 and lower Aβ42 was associated with altered microstructure in bilateral frontal and right temporal lobe and that greater MCP-1 and greater P-Tau181 was associated with altered microstructure in precuneus. Conclusion Inflammation may play a role in neural damage in preclinical AD. PMID:26836182

  3. Specific Contributions of CSF-1 and GM-CSF to the Dynamics of the Mononuclear Phagocyte System.

    PubMed

    Louis, Cynthia; Cook, Andrew D; Lacey, Derek; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Vlahos, Ross; Anderson, Gary P; Hamilton, John A

    2015-07-01

    M-CSF (or CSF-1) and GM-CSF can regulate the development and function of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS). To address some of the outstanding and sometimes conflicting issues surrounding this biology, we undertook a comparative analysis of the effects of neutralizing mAbs to these CSFs on murine MPS populations in the steady-state and during acute inflammatory reactions. CSF-1 neutralization, but not of GM-CSF, in normal mice rapidly reduced the numbers of more mature Ly6C(-) monocytes in blood and bone marrow, without any effect on proliferating precursors, and also the numbers of the resident peritoneal macrophages, observations consistent with CSF-1 signaling being essential only at a relatively late state in steady-state MPS development; in contrast, GM-CSF neutralization had no effect on the numbers of these particular populations. In Ag-induced peritonitis (AIP), thioglycolate-induced peritonitis, and LPS-induced lung inflammation, CSF-1 neutralization lowered inflammatory macrophage number; in the AIP model, this reduced number was not due to suppressed proliferation. More detailed studies with the convenient AIP model indicated that CSF-1 neutralization led to a relatively uniform reduction in all inflammatory cell populations; GM-CSF neutralization, in contrast, was more selective, resulting in the preferential loss among the MPS populations of a cycling, monocyte-derived inflammatory dendritic cell population. Some mechanistic options for the specific CSF-dependent biologies enumerated are discussed.

  4. Utility of CSF Cytokine/Chemokines as Markers of Active Intrathecal Inflammation: Comparison of Demyelinating, Anti-NMDAR and Enteroviral Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Kothur, Kavitha; Wienholt, Louise; Mohammad, Shekeeb S.; Tantsis, Esther M.; Pillai, Sekhar; Britton, Philip N.; Jones, Cheryl A.; Angiti, Rajeshwar R.; Barnes, Elizabeth H.; Schlub, Timothy; Bandodkar, Sushil; Brilot, Fabienne; Dale, Russell C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the discovery of CSF and serum diagnostic autoantibodies in autoimmune encephalitis, there are still very limited CSF biomarkers for diagnostic and monitoring purposes in children with inflammatory or autoimmune brain disease. The cause of encephalitis is unknown in up to a third of encephalitis cohorts, and it is important to differentiate infective from autoimmune encephalitis given the therapeutic implications. Aim To study CSF cytokines and chemokines as diagnostic biomarkers of active neuroinflammation, and assess their role in differentiating demyelinating, autoimmune, and viral encephalitis. Methods We measured and compared 32 cytokine/chemokines using multiplex immunoassay and APRIL and BAFF using ELISA in CSF collected prior to commencing treatment from paediatric patients with confirmed acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM, n = 16), anti-NMDAR encephalitis (anti-NMDAR E, n = 11), and enteroviral encephalitis (EVE, n = 16). We generated normative data using CSF from 20 non-inflammatory neurological controls. The sensitivity of CSF cytokine/chemokines to diagnose encephalitis cases was calculated using 95th centile of control values as cut off. We correlated CSF cytokine/chemokines with disease severity and follow up outcome based on modified Rankin scale. One-way hierarchical correlational cluster analysis of molecules was performed in different encephalitis and outcome groups. Results In descending order, CSF TNF-α, IL-10, IFN-α, IL-6, CXCL13 and CXCL10 had the best sensitivity (>79.1%) when all encephalitis patients were included. The combination of IL-6 and IFN-α was most predictive of inflammation on multiple logistic regression with area under the ROC curve 0.99 (CI 0.97–1.00). There were no differences in CSF cytokine concentrations between EVE and anti-NMDAR E, whereas ADEM showed more pronounced elevation of Th17 related (IL-17, IL-21) and Th2 (IL-4, CCL17) related cytokine/chemokines. Unlike EVE, heat map analysis

  5. Pivotal Roles of GM-CSF in Autoimmunity and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Shiomi, Aoi; Usui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor, which stimulates the proliferation of granulocytes and macrophages from bone marrow precursor cells. In autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, Th17 cells have been considered as strong inducers of tissue inflammation. However, recent evidence indicates that GM-CSF has prominent proinflammatory functions and that this growth factor (not IL-17) is critical for the pathogenicity of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the mechanism of GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cell differentiation and the role of GM-CSF in the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases are gaining increasing attention. This review summarizes the latest knowledge of GM-CSF and its relationship with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The potential therapies targeting GM-CSF as well as their possible side effects have also been addressed in this review. PMID:25838639

  6. Characterization of lipoproteins in human and canine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)

    SciTech Connect

    Pitas, R.E.; Weisgraber, K.H.; Boyles, J.K.; Lee, S.; Mahley, R.W.

    1986-03-01

    Previously the authors demonstrated that rat brain astrocytes in vitro synthesize and secrete apo-E and possess apo-B,E(LDL) receptors. The apo-E secreted by astrocytes and apo-E in rat brain extracts differed from serum apo-E in two respects. Brain apo-E had a higher apparent molecular weight and a higher percentage of more acidic isoforms. To characterize further the apo-E within the central nervous system, apo-E in human and canine CSF was investigated. Compared to plasma apo-E, CSF apo-E had a higher apparent M/sub r/ and a higher percentage of acidic isoforms which were sialylated, as shown by neuraminidase digestion. The apo-E in human CSF was approx.5-10% of the plasma level. In CSF 60-80% of the apo-E was in lipoproteins with d = 1.09-1.15. The remainder of the apo-E was in the d > 1.21 fraction. Human CSF lipoproteins were primarily spherical (110-190 A) while canine CSF lipoproteins were a mixture of discs (205 x 65 A) while canine CSF lipoproteins were a mixture of discs (205 x 65 A) and spheres (100-150 A). The CSF also contained apo-AI in the d = 1.09-1.15 g/ml fraction. Human CSF lipoproteins containing both apo-E and apo-AI were isolated on an anti-apo-E affinity column, suggesting that apo-E and AI occurred in the same particles. The CSF apo-E-containing lipoproteins competed for binding of /sup 125/I-LDL to the apo-B,E(LDL) receptor. There was no detectable apo-B in CSF. These data suggest that CSF lipoproteins might transport lipid and regulate lipid homeostasis within the brain.

  7. Characterization of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma NPY levels in normal volunteers over a 24-h timeframe.

    PubMed

    Baker, Dewleen G; Bertram, Tobias Moeller; Patel, Piyush M; Barkauskas, Donald A; Clopton, Paul; Patel, Sejal; Geracioti, Thomas D; Haji, Uzair; O'Connor, Daniel T; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Hauger, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is abundant in mammals, where it contributes to diverse behavioral and physiological functions, centrally and peripherally, but little information is available in regard to NPY cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/plasma concentration relationships and dynamics. Since plasma NPY levels are commonly used as proxy "biomarkers" for central NPY activity in stress and mental health research in humans this study aims to better characterize the CSF/plasma NPY relationships. Subjects were eleven healthy male volunteers, admitted to the clinical research center for placement of an indwelling CSF catheter, as well as venous catheter, for 24-h collection of CSF NPY (cNPY) and plasma NPY (pNPY) samples. As observed in prior studies, group mean (SE) cNPY concentrations [792.1 (7.80) pg/mL] were higher than pNPY concentrations [220.0 (3.63) pg/mL]. For the eleven normal volunteers who had sufficient common (hourly) pNPY and cNPY data points, analysis of pNPY/cNPY concentration ratios and lagged cross-correlation analysis was completed. Average pNPY/cNPY concentration ratios ranged from .20 to .40 across study subjects, with a mean of .29. pNPY/cNPY cross correlation analyses, computed at varying time lags, were non-significant. An attempt was made to analyze the circadian rhythmicity of NPY secretion, but circadian components were not detectable. Using 24-h data collection, we characterized CSF/plasma NPY relationships, including presentation of evidence of weak CSF and plasma correlations, an important consideration for study design of NPY in stress or mental health.

  8. Biomarkers of Guillain-Barré Syndrome: Some Recent Progress, More Still to Be Explored.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Sun, Shuang; Zhu, Jie; Cui, Li; Zhang, Hong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), the axonal subtype of which is mainly triggered by C. jejuni with ganglioside-mimicking lipooligosaccharides (LOS), is an immune-mediated disorder in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) accompanied by the disruption of the blood-nerve barrier (BNB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (B-CSF-B). Biomarkers of GBS have been extensively explored and some of them are proved to assist in the clinical diagnosis and in monitoring disease progression as well as in assessing the efficacy of immunotherapy. Herein, we systemically review the literature on biomarkers of GBS, including infection-/immune-/BNB, B-CSF-B, and PNS damage-associated biomarkers, aiming at providing an overview of GBS biomarkers and guiding further investigations. Furthermore, we point out further directions for studies on GBS biomarkers. PMID:26451079

  9. Consensus definitions and application guidelines for control groups in cerebrospinal fluid biomarker studies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Charlotte; Menge, Til; Altintas, Ayse; Álvarez-Cermeño, José C; Bertolotto, Antonio; Berven, Frode S; Brundin, Lou; Comabella, Manuel; Degn, Matilde; Deisenhammer, Florian; Fazekas, Franz; Franciotta, Diego; Frederiksen, Jette L; Galimberti, Daniela; Gnanapavan, Sharmilee; Hegen, Harald; Hemmer, Bernhard; Hintzen, Rogier; Hughes, Steve; Iacobaeus, Ellen; Kroksveen, Ann C; Kuhle, Jens; Richert, John; Tumani, Hayrettin; Villar, Luisa M; Drulovic, Jelena; Dujmovic, Irena; Khalil, Michael; Bartos, Ales

    2013-11-01

    The choice of appropriate control group(s) is critical in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker research in multiple sclerosis (MS). There is a lack of definitions and nomenclature of different control groups and a rationalized application of different control groups. We here propose consensus definitions and nomenclature for the following groups: healthy controls (HCs), spinal anesthesia subjects (SASs), inflammatory neurological disease controls (INDCs), peripheral inflammatory neurological disease controls (PINDCs), non-inflammatory neurological controls (NINDCs), symptomatic controls (SCs). Furthermore, we discuss the application of these control groups in specific study designs, such as for diagnostic biomarker studies, prognostic biomarker studies and therapeutic response studies. Application of these uniform definitions will lead to better comparability of biomarker studies and optimal use of available resources. This will lead to improved quality of CSF biomarker research in MS and related disorders.

  10. Hairy AdS solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru; Choque, David

    2016-11-01

    We construct exact hairy AdS soliton solutions in Einstein-dilaton gravity theory. We examine their thermodynamic properties and discuss the role of these solutions for the existence of first order phase transitions for hairy black holes. The negative energy density associated to hairy AdS solitons can be interpreted as the Casimir energy that is generated in the dual filed theory when the fermions are antiperiodic on the compact coordinate.

  11. Characterization of pathogenic human monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanni; Thomson, Christy A.; Allan, Lenka L.; Jackson, Linda M.; Olson, Melanie; Hercus, Timothy R.; Nero, Tracy L.; Turner, Amanda; Parker, Michael W.; Lopez, Angel L.; Waddell, Thomas K.; Anderson, Gary P.; Hamilton, John A.; Schrader, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of pathogenic autoantibodies remains unknown. Idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is caused by autoantibodies against granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We generated 19 monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF from six patients with idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The autoantibodies used multiple V genes, excluding preferred V-gene use as an etiology, and targeted at least four nonoverlapping epitopes on GM-CSF, suggesting that GM-CSF is driving the autoantibodies and not a B-cell epitope on a pathogen cross-reacting with GM-CSF. The number of somatic mutations in the autoantibodies suggests that the memory B cells have been helped by T cells and re-entered germinal centers. All autoantibodies neutralized GM-CSF bioactivity, with general correlations to affinity and off-rate. The binding of certain autoantibodies was changed by point mutations in GM-CSF that reduced binding to the GM-CSF receptor. Those monoclonal autoantibodies that potently neutralize GM-CSF may be useful in treating inflammatory disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, cancer, and pain. PMID:23620516

  12. Biomarker-based dissection of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Bob; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hampel, Harald; Blennow, Kaj

    2011-12-01

    The diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases within neurology and psychiatry are hampered by the difficulty in getting biopsies and thereby validating the diagnosis by pathological findings. Biomarkers for other types of disease have been readily adopted into the clinical practice where for instance troponins are standard tests when myocardial infarction is suspected. However, the use of biomarkers for neurodegeneration has not been fully incorporated into the clinical routine. With the development of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers that reflect pathological events within the central nervous system (CNS), important clinical diagnostic tools are becoming available. This review summarizes the most promising biomarker candidates that may be used to monitor different types of neurodegeneration and protein inclusions, as well as different types of metabolic changes, in living patients in relation to the clinical phenotype and disease progression over time. Our aim is to provide the reader with an updated lexicon on currently available biomarker candidates, how far they have come in development and how well they reflect pathogenic processes in different neurodegenerative diseases. Biomarkers for specific pathogenetic processes would also be valuable tools both to study disease pathogenesis directly in patients and to identify and monitor the effect of novel treatment strategies.

  13. Unruptured translabyrinthine meningocele without CSF otorrhea.

    PubMed

    Kong, Won Kyoung; Lee, Chang Ho; Eunhye, Yoo; Shin, Seung-Ho

    2014-03-01

    Labyrinthine meningocele can be classified into translabyrinthine and perilabyrinthine type. We describe a case of rare unruptured translabyrinthine meningocele (TLM). It is rare to encounter an unruptured TLM because it is usually diagnosed after rupture as a labyrinthine fistula, cerebral spinal fluid otorrhea, and subsequent meningitis. We provide for the first time an intraoperative photo and video of a case of an unruptured TLM that developed through an inner ear malformation in a single-side deaf child, which was preoperatively misdiagnosed as congenital cholesteatoma in preoperative temporal bone computed tomography. TLM without CSF otorrhea in an unruptured state merit attention because of its importance during the workup of congenital cholesteatoma or cochlear implantation in spite of its rarity of reports. PMID:24480122

  14. Value Added?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UCLA IDEA, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Value added measures (VAM) uses changes in student test scores to determine how much "value" an individual teacher has "added" to student growth during the school year. Some policymakers, school districts, and educational advocates have applauded VAM as a straightforward measure of teacher effectiveness: the better a teacher, the better students…

  15. CSF hydrothorax: An unusual cause of pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Cato-Addison, William Bentil; Strachan, Roger

    2015-01-01

    A 20-year-old male with hydrocephalus managed with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VP) was diagnosed with a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleural effusion. Imaging studies revealed an intrathoracic course of a disconnected VP shunt. Physicians should consider CSF effusion in their differential diagnosis in patients with a VP shunt and an unexplained pleural effusion.

  16. CSF 5-HIAA Predicts Suicide Risk after Attempted Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordstrom, Peter; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Studied suicide risk after attempted suicide, as predicted by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolite concentrations, in 92 psychiatric mood disorder inpatients admitted shortly after attempting suicide. Results revealed that low CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) predicted short-range suicide risk after attempted suicide in mood…

  17. Stem Cell Mobilization with G-CSF versus Cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF in Mexican Children

    PubMed Central

    Meraz, José Eugenio Vázquez; Arellano-Galindo, José; Avalos, Armando Martínez; Mendoza-García, Emma; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva

    2016-01-01

    Fifty-six aphaereses were performed in 23 pediatric patients with malignant hematological and solid tumors, following three different protocols for PBPC mobilization and distributed as follows: A: seventeen mobilized with 4 g/m2 of cyclophosphamide (CFA) and 10 μg/kg/day of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), B: nineteen with CFA + G-CSF, and C: twenty only with G-CSF when the WBC count exceeded 10 × 109/L. The average number of MNC/kg body weight (BW)/aphaeresis was 0.4 × 108 (0.1–1.4), 2.25 × 108 (0.56–6.28), and 1.02 × 108 (0.34–2.5) whereas the average number of CD34+ cells/kg BW/aphaeresis was 0.18 × 106/kg (0.09–0.34), 1.04 × 106 (0.19–9.3), and 0.59 × 106 (0.17–0.87) and the count of CFU/kg BW/aphaeresis was 1.11 × 105 (0.31–2.12), 1.16 × 105 (0.64–2.97), and 1.12 × 105 (0.3–6.63) in groups A, B, and C, respectively. The collection was better in group B versus group A (p = 0.007 and p = 0.05, resp.) and in group C versus group A (p = 0.08 and p = 0.05, resp.). The collection of PBPCs was more effective in the group mobilized with CFM + G-CSF when the WBC exceeded 10 × 103/μL in terms of MNC and CD34+ cells and there was no toxicity of the chemotherapy. PMID:26880960

  18. Stem Cell Mobilization with G-CSF versus Cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF in Mexican Children.

    PubMed

    Meraz, José Eugenio Vázquez; Arellano-Galindo, José; Avalos, Armando Martínez; Mendoza-García, Emma; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva

    2016-01-01

    Fifty-six aphaereses were performed in 23 pediatric patients with malignant hematological and solid tumors, following three different protocols for PBPC mobilization and distributed as follows: A: seventeen mobilized with 4 g/m(2) of cyclophosphamide (CFA) and 10 μg/kg/day of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), B: nineteen with CFA + G-CSF, and C: twenty only with G-CSF when the WBC count exceeded 10 × 10(9)/L. The average number of MNC/kg body weight (BW)/aphaeresis was 0.4 × 10(8) (0.1-1.4), 2.25 × 10(8) (0.56-6.28), and 1.02 × 10(8) (0.34-2.5) whereas the average number of CD34+ cells/kg BW/aphaeresis was 0.18 × 10(6)/kg (0.09-0.34), 1.04 × 10(6) (0.19-9.3), and 0.59 × 10(6) (0.17-0.87) and the count of CFU/kg BW/aphaeresis was 1.11 × 10(5) (0.31-2.12), 1.16 × 10(5) (0.64-2.97), and 1.12 × 10(5) (0.3-6.63) in groups A, B, and C, respectively. The collection was better in group B versus group A (p = 0.007 and p = 0.05, resp.) and in group C versus group A (p = 0.08 and p = 0.05, resp.). The collection of PBPCs was more effective in the group mobilized with CFM + G-CSF when the WBC exceeded 10 × 10(3)/μL in terms of MNC and CD34+ cells and there was no toxicity of the chemotherapy.

  19. Levels of HVA, 5-HIAA, and MHPG in the CSF of vascular parkinsonism compared to Parkinson's disease and controls.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Megan K; Kuiperij, H Bea; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2013-12-01

    The neurochemical abnormalities underlying vascular parkinsonism (VP) have not been well characterised. A better understanding may help to optimize pharmacological interventions. Since VP patients generally have a poorer response to l-Dopa than Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, we investigated whether levels of relevant CSF neurotransmitter metabolites may be differentially altered in VP and PD and assessed the potential of neurotransmitter metabolites as biomarkers. We compared CSF levels of homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid, and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol, in 16 VP patients, 57 PD patients and 60 non-neurological controls. We found that levels of HVA were reduced in PD compared with both VP and controls but did not differ significantly between VP and controls indicating that dopamine deficiency was less pronounced in VP. PMID:24122060

  20. Administration of G-CSF from day +6 post-allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children and adolescents accelerates neutrophil engraftment but does not appear to have an impact on cost savings.

    PubMed

    O'Rafferty, Ciara; O'Brien, Mairead; Smyth, Elaine; Keane, Sinead; Robinson, Hillary; Lynam, Paul; O'Marcaigh, Aengus; Smith, Owen P

    2016-05-01

    G-CSF post-allogeneic HSCT accelerates neutrophil engraftment, but evidence that it impacts on cost-related outcomes is lacking. We performed a retrospective child and adolescent single-center cohort study examining G-CSF administration from Day +6 of allogeneic HSCT vs. ad hoc G-CSF use where clinically indicated. Forty consecutive children and adolescents undergoing allogeneic HSCT were included. End-points were as follows: time to engraftment; incidence of acute and chronic GvHD; number of patients alive at Day +100; 180-day TRM; post-transplant days in hospital; and cost of antimicrobials, TPN, and G-CSF usage. Neutrophil engraftment occurred earlier in the group that received G-CSF from Day +6. There was no difference between groups in any of the other end-points with the following exception: the cost of GCSF was significantly higher in the D + 6 G-CSF group. However, median G-CSF cost in this group amounted to only €280. There was a trend towards reduced cost of antimicrobials in the D + 6 G-CSF group, although this did not reach significance (p = 0.13). The median cost per patient of antimicrobial agents between groups differed by €1116. This study demonstrated the administration of G-CSF on Day +6 in pediatric HSCT to be safe. A further study using a larger cohort of patients is warranted to ascertain its true clinico-economic value.

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Pneumococcal Meningitis Reveals Potential Biomarkers Associated with Survival

    PubMed Central

    Goonetilleke, Upali R.; Scarborough, Matthew; Ward, Stephen A.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with pneumococcal meningitis often die or have severe neurological damage despite optimal antibiotic therapy. New or improved therapy is required. The delivery of new interventions will require an improved understanding of the disease pathogenesis. Our objective was to learn more about the pathophysiology of severe meningitis through the interpretation of differences in the proteomic profile of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with meningitis. Methods Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of CSF from normal subjects (controls, n = 10) and patients with pneumococcal meningitis (n = 20) was analyzed. Spot differences were compared and identified between controls, nonsurvivors (n = 9), and survivors (n = 11). Results Protein concentration in CSF of patients with meningitis was 4-fold higher than in CSF of control subjects (7.0 mg/mL vs 0.23 mg/mL; P < .01). A mean of 2466 discrete protein spots was present in CSF of patients with meningitis. Thirty-four protein spots were differentially expressed in CSF of nonsurvivors, compared with survivors. None of these protein spots were observed in CSF of control subjects. Conclusions Proteomic screening of CSF yields potential biomarkers capable of differentiating control subjects from nonsurvivors and survivors of meningitis. Proteins involved in the inflammatory process and central metabolism were represented in the differentially expressed protein repertoire. PMID:20608875

  2. Postmortem quantitative 1.5-T MRI for the differentiation and characterization of serous fluids, blood, CSF, and putrefied CSF.

    PubMed

    Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Schwendener, Nicole; Persson, Anders; Warntjes, Marcel J; Riva, Fabiano; Schuster, Frederick; Jackowski, Christian

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether serous fluids, blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and putrefied CSF can be characterized and differentiated in synthetically calculated magnetic resonance (MR) images based on their quantitative T1, T2, and proton density (PD) values. Images from 55 postmortem short axis cardiac and 31 axial brain 1.5-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Serous fluids, fluid blood, sedimented blood, blood clots, CSF, and putrefied CSF were analyzed for their mean T1, T2, and PD values. Body core temperature was measured during the MRI scans. The fluid-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. In a 3D plot as well as in statistical analysis, the quantitative T1, T2 and PD values of serous fluids, fluid blood, sedimented blood, blood clots, CSF, and putrefied CSF could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative T1 and T2 values were temperature-dependent. Correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 °C resulted in significantly better discrimination between all investigated fluid mediums. We conclude that postmortem 1.5-T MR quantification is feasible to discriminate between blood, serous fluids, CSF, and putrefied CSF. This finding provides a basis for the computer-aided diagnosis and detection of fluids and hemorrhages.

  3. Rabbit M1 and M2 macrophages can be induced by human recombinant GM-CSF and M-CSF.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Kazuyoshi; Leung, Kai-Poon

    2016-09-01

    Macrophages can change their phenotype in response to environmental cues. Polarized macrophages are broadly classified into two groups: classical activated M1 and alternative activated M2. Characterization of human macrophages has been widely studied, but polarized macrophages in rabbits have not been characterized. We characterized rabbit macrophages that were polarized using human recombinant GM-CSF and M-CSF. GM-CSF-treated macrophages had higher mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines (M1 phenotype) than did the M-CSF-treated counterpart. By contrast, high levels of TGF-β and IL-10 expression (M2 phenotype) were found in M-CSF-treated macrophages. The present study may be useful to understand roles of polarized macrophages in rabbit disease models. PMID:27642558

  4. CXCL13, CXCL10 and CXCL8 as Potential Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Neurosyphilis Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuini; Wu, Kaiqi; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Sufang; Gao, Zixiao; Liu, Yudan; Ni, Liyan; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Guan, Zhifang; Shi, Mei; Lu, Haikong; Lou, Yongliang; Zhou, Pingyu

    2016-01-01

    At present, diagnosis for neurosyphilis remains a major clinical challenge. Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) titer of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is suboptimally sensitive to diagnose neurosyphilis, which can be negative in neurosyphilis patients, especially in asymptomatic neurosyphilis patients. In the search for biomarkers of neurosyphilis, we investigated the chemokine profile in CSF of neurosyphilis patients and found that the concentrations of CXCL13, CXCL10 and CXCL8 were selectively elevated in neurosyphilis patients and correlated with CSF protein concentration and CSF-VDRL titer. After antibiotic treatment, the concentration of these chemokines was dramatically reduced. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) of CSF CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 and the CSF/serum ratio of CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 in the diagnosis of neurosyphilis were 0.940, 0.899, 0.915, 0.963, 0.846 and 0.926, respectively. The corresponding sensitivities/specificities of CSF CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 and the CSF/serum ratio of CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 in diagnosis of neurosyphilis were 85.4%/89.1%, 79%/90.1% and 79.6%/91.1%, 86.6%/99%, 79%/73.3% and 86%/92.1%, respectively. Our results suggest that the elevated concentrations of CXCL13, CXCL8, and CXCL10 or their increasing CSF/serum ratios may be potential biomarkers of neurosyphilis, particularly for asymptomatic neurosyphilis. Reduced concentration of these chemokines may indicate the prognosis of antibiotic therapy. PMID:27650493

  5. CXCL13, CXCL10 and CXCL8 as Potential Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Neurosyphilis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cuini; Wu, Kaiqi; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Sufang; Gao, Zixiao; Liu, Yudan; Ni, Liyan; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Guan, Zhifang; Shi, Mei; Lu, Haikong; Lou, Yongliang; Zhou, Pingyu

    2016-01-01

    At present, diagnosis for neurosyphilis remains a major clinical challenge. Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) titer of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is suboptimally sensitive to diagnose neurosyphilis, which can be negative in neurosyphilis patients, especially in asymptomatic neurosyphilis patients. In the search for biomarkers of neurosyphilis, we investigated the chemokine profile in CSF of neurosyphilis patients and found that the concentrations of CXCL13, CXCL10 and CXCL8 were selectively elevated in neurosyphilis patients and correlated with CSF protein concentration and CSF-VDRL titer. After antibiotic treatment, the concentration of these chemokines was dramatically reduced. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) of CSF CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 and the CSF/serum ratio of CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 in the diagnosis of neurosyphilis were 0.940, 0.899, 0.915, 0.963, 0.846 and 0.926, respectively. The corresponding sensitivities/specificities of CSF CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 and the CSF/serum ratio of CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 in diagnosis of neurosyphilis were 85.4%/89.1%, 79%/90.1% and 79.6%/91.1%, 86.6%/99%, 79%/73.3% and 86%/92.1%, respectively. Our results suggest that the elevated concentrations of CXCL13, CXCL8, and CXCL10 or their increasing CSF/serum ratios may be potential biomarkers of neurosyphilis, particularly for asymptomatic neurosyphilis. Reduced concentration of these chemokines may indicate the prognosis of antibiotic therapy. PMID:27650493

  6. Cloning and expression of porcine Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) and Colony Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor (CSF-1R) and analysis of the species specificity of stimulation by CSF-1 and Interleukin 34.

    PubMed

    Gow, Deborah J; Garceau, Valerie; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Sester, David P; Fici, Greg J; Shelly, John A; Wilson, Thomas L; Hume, David A

    2012-12-01

    Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (CSF-1) controls the survival, differentiation and proliferation of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. A second ligand for the CSF-1R, Interleukin 34 (IL-34), has been described, but its physiological role is not yet known. The domestic pig provides an alternative to traditional rodent models for evaluating potential therapeutic applications of CSF-1R agonists and antagonists. To enable such studies, we cloned and expressed active pig CSF-1. To provide a bioassay, pig CSF-1R was expressed in the factor-dependent Ba/F3 cell line. On this transfected cell line, recombinant porcine CSF-1 and human CSF-1 had identical activity. Mouse CSF-1 does not interact with the human CSF-1 receptor but was active on pig. By contrast, porcine CSF-1 was active on mouse, human, cat and dog cells. IL-34 was previously shown to be species-specific, with mouse and human proteins demonstrating limited cross-species activity. The pig CSF-1R was equally responsive to both mouse and human IL-34. Based upon the published crystal structures of CSF-1/CSF-1R and IL34/CSF-1R complexes, we discuss the molecular basis for the species specificity.

  7. CSF diazepam binding inhibitor and schizophrenia: clinical and biochemical relationships.

    PubMed

    van Kammen, D P; Guidotti, A; Kelley, M E; Gurklis, J; Guarneri, P; Gilbertson, M W; Yao, J K; Peters, J; Costa, E

    1993-10-15

    Diazepam-binding inhibitor (DBI) is a 9-kD neuropeptide that interacts with the benzodiazepine (BZD) binding sites of the neuronal gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor and with the glial mitochondrial BZD receptor (MBR). We explored the involvement of CSF DBI-LI in schizophrenia, based on the potential role of GABA in the negative symptoms associated with schizophrenia, the relationship of its receptors with dopamine and norepinephrine release, and the proposed therapeutic efficacy of BZDs in schizophrenia. Clinical data, CSF DBI-LI and CSF monoamine measures were obtained in 65 drug-free male chronic (DSM-IIIR) schizophrenic patients, 53 of whom were also tested prior to haloperidol withdrawal. Following haloperidol withdrawal, CSF DBI-LI increased significantly. Drug-free CSF DBI-LI did not correlate with CSF monoamines. CSF DBI-LI was significantly higher in paranoid compared to chronic undifferentiated schizophrenic patients. The data suggest that DBI may have a symptom modulatory rather than an etiological role in schizophrenia.

  8. TNF polymorphisms in Alzheimer disease and functional implications on CSF beta-amyloid levels.

    PubMed

    Laws, Simon M; Perneczky, Robert; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Müller, Ulrich; Förstl, Hans; Martins, Ralph N; Kurz, Alexander; Riemenschneider, Matthias

    2005-07-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD), vascular dementia, and stroke are all associated with inflammation though their respective initiating factors differ. Recently a polymorphism in the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF), in association with apolipoprotein E (APOE), was reported to increase AD risk. Two SNPs, rs1799724 (-850C>T; NT_007592.14:g.22400733C>T) and rs1800629 (-308G>A; [NT_007592.14:g.22401282G>A]), and the APOE polymorphism were genotyped in 506 patients with sporadic AD and in 277 cognitively healthy controls. In a subset of 90 individuals we also investigated whether these SNPs exerted any functional effects on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) beta-amyloid (Abeta) levels. The frequency of the rs1799724 genotypes and the rs1799724-T allele were significantly different in AD individuals (P=0.009; odds ratio [OR], 1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-2.34), while the rs1800629 SNP was not associated with AD. Significant interaction was observed between the rs1799724-T and APOE epsilon4 alleles in that the rs1799724-T allele significantly modified risk associated with possession of the epsilon4 allele only (epsilon4 in absence of rs1799724-T: OR, 2.92; 95% CI, 2.00-4.27; epsilon4 in presence of rs1799724-T: OR, 6.65; 95% CI, 3.26-13.55; P=0.03). Haplotyping analysis revealed a significant overrepresentation of an rs1799724-T/rs1800629-G haplotype in AD (P=0.012; OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.11-2.29), although to a lesser degree than rs1799724-T alone. Further, the rs1799724-T allele was found to be associated with lower levels of CSF Abeta42 (P=0.023), thus corroborating the genetic findings. Inheritance of the rs1799724-T allele appears to synergistically increase the risk of AD in APOEepsilon4 carriers and is associated with altered CSF Abeta42 levels. Further investigations are warranted to assess the significance of these novel findings.

  9. Longitudinal Measurements of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Surova, Yulia; Öhrfelt, Annika; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of tau, phosphorylated tau, β‐amyloid42, α‐synuclein, neurofilament light, and YKL‐40 change over time and if changes correlate with motor progression and/or cognitive decline in patients with PD and controls. Methods We included 63 patients with PD (nondemented) and 21 neurologically healthy controls from the prospective and longitudinal Swedish BioFINDER study, all of whom had clinical assessments and lumbar punctures at baseline and after 2 years. Results CSF tau levels correlated strongly with α‐synuclein. The levels of CSF α‐synuclein, tau, phosphorylated tau, neurofilament light, and YKL‐40, but not β‐amyloid42, increased in CSF over 2 years in PD. No changes were seen in the control group. Studying patients with a short disease duration ( ≤ 5 years) and patients with a long disease duration ( > 5 years) separately, α‐synuclein and tau only increased in the PD group with long disease duration. In the PD group, an increase in phosphorylated tau over 2 years correlated with faster motor progression and faster cognitive decline. An increase in YKL‐40 over 2 years correlated with faster cognitive decline. Conclusion CSF biomarkers reflecting Lewy body pathology and neurodegeneration (α‐synuclein), neuronal degeneration (tau, phosphorylated tau, and neurofilament light), and inflammation (YKL‐40) increase significantly over 2 years in PD. CSF levels of α‐synuclein and tau correlate and remain stable in the early symptomatic phase of PD but increase in the later phase. We hypothesize that CSF α‐synuclein levels might increase as a result of more intense neurodegeneration in PD with long disease duration. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:26878815

  10. Few Patient, Treatment, and Diagnostic or Microbiological Factors, Except Complications and Intermittent Negative Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Cultures During First CSF Shunt Infection, Are Associated With Reinfection

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Tamara D.; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Whitlock, Kathryn B.; Langley, Marcie; Kestle, John R. W.; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Thorell, Emily A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship between first and subsequent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt infections is poorly understood. By understanding the factors associated with increased risk of reinfection, researchers may provide optimal treatment strategies at the time of first infection. The objective of this study was to describe and compare children with and without CSF shunt reinfection. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed among 118 children who underwent initial CSF shunt placement and developed first CSF shunt infection. The primary outcome variable was CSF shunt reinfection. Patient risk factors and medical and surgical management of initial CSF shunt placement and first CSF shunt infection were compared between children with and without reinfection. Results Of 118 children with first infection, 31 (26%) developed a reinfection during the study period (overall median follow-up, 2096 days). Factors associated with reinfection in this cohort included ventriculoatrial or complex shunt at initial CSF shunt placement, complications after first CSF shunt infection, and intermittent negative CSF cultures. Conclusions Few patient or treatment factors were associated with reinfection. Factors associated with difficult-to-treat first CSF shunt infection, including complications after first CSF shunt infection and intermittent negative CSF cultures, were associated with reinfection. Clinicians who treat patients with unusual CSF shunts or more difficult first infections should have a high index of suspicion for reinfection after treatment is completed. PMID:24567841

  11. Improved multimodal biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment diagnosis: data from ADNI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Torteya, Antonio; Treviño-Alvarado, Víctor; Tamez-Peña, José

    2013-02-01

    The accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) confers many clinical research and patient care benefits. Studies have shown that multimodal biomarkers provide better diagnosis accuracy of AD and MCI than unimodal biomarkers, but their construction has been based on traditional statistical approaches. The objective of this work was the creation of accurate AD and MCI diagnostic multimodal biomarkers using advanced bioinformatics tools. The biomarkers were created by exploring multimodal combinations of features using machine learning techniques. Data was obtained from the ADNI database. The baseline information (e.g. MRI analyses, PET analyses and laboratory essays) from AD, MCI and healthy control (HC) subjects with available diagnosis up to June 2012 was mined for case/controls candidates. The data mining yielded 47 HC, 83 MCI and 43 AD subjects for biomarker creation. Each subject was characterized by at least 980 ADNI features. A genetic algorithm feature selection strategy was used to obtain compact and accurate cross-validated nearest centroid biomarkers. The biomarkers achieved training classification accuracies of 0.983, 0.871 and 0.917 for HC vs. AD, HC vs. MCI and MCI vs. AD respectively. The constructed biomarkers were relatively compact: from 5 to 11 features. Those multimodal biomarkers included several widely accepted univariate biomarkers and novel image and biochemical features. Multimodal biomarkers constructed from previously and non-previously AD associated features showed improved diagnostic performance when compared to those based solely on previously AD associated features.

  12. Viral antibodies in the CSF after acute CNS infections.

    PubMed

    Cappel, R; Thiry, L; Clinet, G

    1975-09-01

    Viral antibodies were measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum from 25 patients having acute viral central nervous system (CNS) infections, and from 39 control patients. The results, collected two weeks after the clinical onset, revealed the presence of antibodies in nine of 13 (69%) CSF specimens from patients suffering from encephalitis of myelitis, and in only one of nine (11%) of the CSF samples of those presenting a viral meningitis infection. This difference was statistically significant and suggests that the titration of viral antibodies in the CSF can be helpful in establishing the diagnosis of viral CNS infection. Our data also suggest that localized production of antibodies occurs during the course of acute CNS infections, and that the respiratory syncytial virus can be associated with CNS infections in man.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid biochemical studies in patients with Parkinson's disease: toward a potential search for biomarkers for this disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix J.; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A. G.

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier supplies brain tissues with nutrients and filters certain compounds from the brain back to the bloodstream. In several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD), there are disruptions of the blood-brain barrier. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been widely investigated in PD and in other parkinsonian syndromes with the aim of establishing useful biomarkers for an accurate differential diagnosis among these syndromes. This review article summarizes the studies reported on CSF levels of many potential biomarkers of PD. The most consistent findings are: (a) the possible role of CSF urate on the progression of the disease; (b) the possible relations of CSF total tau and phosphotau protein with the progression of PD and with the preservation of cognitive function in PD patients; (c) the possible value of CSF beta-amyloid 1-42 as a useful marker of further cognitive decline in PD patients, and (d) the potential usefulness of CSF neurofilament (NFL) protein levels in the differential diagnosis between PD and other parkinsonian syndromes. Future multicentric, longitudinal, prospective studies with long-term follow-up and neuropathological confirmation would be useful in establishing appropriate biomarkers for PD. PMID:25426023

  14. Plasma Exosomal miRNAs in Persons with and without Alzheimer Disease: Altered Expression and Prospects for Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, David A.; Shah, Raj C.; Fields, Christopher J.; Hernandez, Alvaro G.; Smalheiser, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the value of exosomal miRNAs as biomarkers for Alzheimer disease (AD), the expression of microRNAs was measured in a plasma fraction enriched in exosomes by differential centrifugation, using Illumina deep sequencing. Samples from 35 persons with a clinical diagnosis of AD dementia were compared to 35 age and sex matched controls. Although these samples contained less than 0.1 microgram of total RNA, deep sequencing gave reliable and informative results. Twenty miRNAs showed significant differences in the AD group in initial screening (miR-23b-3p, miR-24-3p, miR-29b-3p, miR-125b-5p, miR-138-5p, miR-139-5p, miR-141-3p, miR-150-5p, miR-152-3p, miR-185-5p, miR-338-3p, miR-342-3p, miR-342-5p, miR-548at-5p, miR-659-5p, miR-3065-5p, miR-3613-3p, miR-3916, miR-4772-3p, miR-5001-3p), many of which satisfied additional biological and statistical criteria, and among which a panel of seven miRNAs were highly informative in a machine learning model for predicting AD status of individual samples with 83–89% accuracy. This performance is not due to over-fitting, because a) we used separate samples for training and testing, and b) similar performance was achieved when tested on technical replicate data. Perhaps the most interesting single miRNA was miR-342-3p, which was a) expressed in the AD group at about 60% of control levels, b) highly correlated with several of the other miRNAs that were significantly down-regulated in AD, and c) was also reported to be down-regulated in AD in two previous studies. The findings warrant replication and follow-up with a larger cohort of patients and controls who have been carefully characterized in terms of cognitive and imaging data, other biomarkers (e.g., CSF amyloid and tau levels) and risk factors (e.g., apoE4 status), and who are sampled repeatedly over time. Integrating miRNA expression data with other data is likely to provide informative and robust biomarkers in Alzheimer disease. PMID:26426747

  15. Sepsis biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Prucha, Miroslav; Bellingan, Geoff; Zazula, Roman

    2015-02-01

    Sepsis is the most frequent cause of death in non-coronary intensive care units (ICUs). In the past 10 years, progress has been made in the early identification of septic patients and in their treatment and these improvements in support and therapy mean that the mortality is gradually decreasing but it still remains unacceptably high. Leaving clinical diagnosis aside, the laboratory diagnostics represent a complex range of investigations that can place significant demands on the system given the speed of response required. There are hundreds of biomarkers which could be potentially used for diagnosis and prognosis in septic patients. The main attributes of successful markers would be high sensitivity, specificity, possibility of bed-side monitoring, and financial accessibility. Only a fraction is used in routine clinical practice because many lack sufficient sensitivity or specificity. The following review gives a short overview of the current epidemiology of sepsis, its pathogenesis and state-of-the-art knowledge on the use of specific biochemical, hematological and immunological parameters in its diagnostics. Prospective approaches towards discovery of new diagnostic biomarkers have been shortly mentioned.

  16. Post craniotomy extra-ventricular drain (EVD) associated nosocomial meningitis: CSF diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Gómez, Sigridh; Wirkowski, Elizabeth; Cunha, Burke A

    2015-01-01

    Because external ventricular drains (EVDs) provide access to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), there is potential for EVD associated acute bacterial meningitis (EVD-AM). Post-craniotomy, in patients with EVDs, one or more CSF abnormalities are commonly present making the diagnosis of EVD-AM problematic. EVD-AM was defined as elevated CSF lactic acid (>6 nmol/L), plus CSF marked pleocytosis (>50 WBCs/mm(3)), plus a positive Gram stain (same morphology as CSF isolate), plus a positive CSF culture of neuropathogen (same morphology as Gram stained organism). We reviewed 22 adults with EVDs to determine if our four CSF parameters combined accurately identified EVD-AM. No single or combination of <4 CSF parameters correctly diagnosed or ruled out EVD-AM. Combined our four CSF parameters clearly differentiated EVD-AM from one case of pseudomeningitis due to E. cloacae. We conclude that our four CSF criteria combined are useful in diagnosing EVD-AM in adults.

  17. Biomarkers in Japanese Encephalitis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kant Upadhyay, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    JE is a flavivirus generated dreadful CNS disease which causes high mortality in various pediatric groups. JE disease is currently diagnosed by measuring the level of viral antigens and virus neutralization IgM antibodies in blood serum and CSF by ELISA. However, it is not possible to measure various disease-identifying molecules, structural and molecular changes occurred in tissues, and cells by using such routine methods. However, few important biomarkers such as cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, neuro-imaging, brain mapping, immunotyping, expression of nonstructural viral proteins, systematic mRNA profiling, DNA and protein microarrays, active caspase-3 activity, reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, levels of stress-associated signaling molecules, and proinflammatory cytokines could be used to confirm the disease at an earlier stage. These biomarkers may also help to diagnose mutant based environment specific alterations in JEV genotypes causing high pathogenesis and have immense future applications in diagnostics. There is an utmost need for the development of new more authentic, appropriate, and reliable physiological, immunological, biochemical, biophysical, molecular, and therapeutic biomarkers to confirm the disease well in time to start the clinical aid to the patients. Hence, the present review aims to discuss new emerging biomarkers that could facilitate more authentic and fast diagnosis of JE disease and its related disorders in the future. PMID:24455705

  18. Cerebrospinal Fluid Calbindin D Concentration as a Biomarker of Cerebellar Disease Progression in Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Allison; Bagel, Jessica; Sampson, Maureen; Farhat, Nicole; Ding, Wenge; Swain, Gary; Prociuk, Maria; O'Donnell, Patricia; Drobatz, Kenneth; Gurda, Brittney; Wassif, Christopher; Remaley, Alan; Porter, Forbes; Vite, Charles

    2016-08-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) 1 disease is a rare, inherited, neurodegenerative disease. Clear evidence of the therapeutic efficacy of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) in animal models resulted in the initiation of a phase I/IIa clinical trial in 2013 and a phase IIb/III trial in 2015. With clinical trials ongoing, validation of a biomarker to track disease progression and serve as a supporting outcome measure of therapeutic efficacy has become compulsory. In this study, we evaluated calcium-binding protein calbindin D-28K (calbindin) concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a biomarker of NPC1 disease. In the naturally occurring feline model, CSF calbindin was significantly elevated at 3 weeks of age, prior to the onset of cerebellar dysfunction, and steadily increased to >10-fold over normal at end-stage disease. Biweekly intrathecal administration of HPβCD initiated prior to the onset of neurologic dysfunction completely normalized CSF calbindin in NPC1 cats at all time points analyzed when followed up to 78 weeks of age. Initiation of HPβCD after the onset of clinical signs (16 weeks of age) resulted in a delayed reduction of calbindin levels in the CSF. Evaluation of CSF from patients with NPC1 revealed that calbindin concentrations were significantly elevated compared with CSF samples collected from unaffected patients. Off-label treatment of patients with NPC1 with miglustat, an inhibitor of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, significantly decreased CSF calbindin compared with pretreatment concentrations. These data suggest that the CSF calbindin concentration is a sensitive biomarker of NPC1 disease that could be instrumental as an outcome measure of therapeutic efficacy in ongoing clinical trials. PMID:27307499

  19. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers predict cerebral injury in HIV-infected individuals on stable combination antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Albert M.; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Bharti, Ajay; Mi, Deming; Taylor, Michael J.; Daar, Eric S.; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhong, Jianhui; Alger, Jeffry R.; Brown, Mark S.; Singer, Elyse J.; Campbell, Thomas B.; McMahon, Deborah D.; Buchthal, Steven; Cohen, Ronald; Yiannoutsos, Constantin; Letendre, Scott L.; Navia, Bradford A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives HIV-associated brain injury persists despite antiretroviral therapy (cART), but contributing factors remain poorly understood. We postulated that inflammation-associated biomarkers will be associated with cerebral injury on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in chronically HIV-infected subjects. Methods Five biomarkers were measured in 197 HIV-infected subjects: soluble CD14, MCP-1, IP-10, MIP-1β, and fractalkine. Levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), Choline (Cho), Myoinositol (MI), Glutamate+Glutamine (Glx), and Creatine (Cr) were acquired in the midfrontal cortex (MFC), frontal white matter (FWM), and basal ganglia (BG). Predictive models were built via linear regression and the best models were chosen using the Akaike Information Criterion. Results Increases in plasma or CSF MCP-1 were associated with lower NAA/Cr in the MFC and BG while metabolite changes in the FWM for NAA/Cr, GlxCr and Cho/Cr were explained almost exclusively by a single factor, sCD14. Plasma and CSF levels of this factor were also significantly associated with Glx/Cr in MFC and BG. Higher CSF FKN was associated with higher NAA/Cr in BG. Best predictors for higher Cho/Cr in BG and MFC were CSF sCD14 and CSF MIP-1β. Plasma and CSF IP-10 were only associated with Cho/Cr in MFC. Of the three models that simultaneously accounted for both plasma and CSF, there were more associations between CSF biomarkers and MRS metabolites. Conclusions Markers of inflammation and immune activation, in particular MCP-1 and sCD14, predominantly reflecting CNS sources, contribute to the persistence of brain injury in a metabolite and region dependent manner in chronically HIV-infected patients on stable cART. PMID:25622053

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Calbindin D Concentration as a Biomarker of Cerebellar Disease Progression in Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bagel, Jessica; Sampson, Maureen; Farhat, Nicole; Ding, Wenge; Swain, Gary; Prociuk, Maria; O’Donnell, Patricia; Drobatz, Kenneth; Gurda, Brittney; Wassif, Christopher; Remaley, Alan; Porter, Forbes; Vite, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) 1 disease is a rare, inherited, neurodegenerative disease. Clear evidence of the therapeutic efficacy of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) in animal models resulted in the initiation of a phase I/IIa clinical trial in 2013 and a phase IIb/III trial in 2015. With clinical trials ongoing, validation of a biomarker to track disease progression and serve as a supporting outcome measure of therapeutic efficacy has become compulsory. In this study, we evaluated calcium-binding protein calbindin D-28K (calbindin) concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a biomarker of NPC1 disease. In the naturally occurring feline model, CSF calbindin was significantly elevated at 3 weeks of age, prior to the onset of cerebellar dysfunction, and steadily increased to >10-fold over normal at end-stage disease. Biweekly intrathecal administration of HPβCD initiated prior to the onset of neurologic dysfunction completely normalized CSF calbindin in NPC1 cats at all time points analyzed when followed up to 78 weeks of age. Initiation of HPβCD after the onset of clinical signs (16 weeks of age) resulted in a delayed reduction of calbindin levels in the CSF. Evaluation of CSF from patients with NPC1 revealed that calbindin concentrations were significantly elevated compared with CSF samples collected from unaffected patients. Off-label treatment of patients with NPC1 with miglustat, an inhibitor of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, significantly decreased CSF calbindin compared with pretreatment concentrations. These data suggest that the CSF calbindin concentration is a sensitive biomarker of NPC1 disease that could be instrumental as an outcome measure of therapeutic efficacy in ongoing clinical trials. PMID:27307499

  1. Stat3 and G-CSF-induced myeloid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, A; Tweardy, D J

    1998-08-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is the cytokine critical for directing neutrophilic granulocyte differentiation. Early G-CSF signaling events in myeloid cells involves activation of STATs, proteins that serve the dual function of signal transduction and activation of transcription, especially the activation of Stat3. A dominant-negative mutant construct of Stat3 inhibited G-CSF-mediated neutrophilic differentiation indicating that Stat3 is a essential component for driving the G-CSF-mediated differentiation program in myeloid cells. Three isoforms of Stat3 have been identified, alpha(p92), beta(p83) and gamma(p72) each derived from a single gene. Stat3alpha is the predominant isoform expressed in most cells. Stat3beta is derived from Stat3alpha by alternative RNA splicing. Stat3gamma is derived from Stat3alpha by limited proteolysis. Mapping of Stat3alpha and Stat3beta activation in M1 murine myeloid leukemia cells revealed that their optimal activation required G-CSFR constructs containing both Y704 and Y744. These amino acid residues has previously been demonstrated to be essential for G-CSF-induced differentiation in this cells. Phosphopeptide affinity and phosphopeptide inhibition studies indicate that Stat3alpha and Stat3beta are recruited to the G-CSF receptor complex through their interaction with the receptor at phosphotyrosines Y704 and Y744. Y744 is followed at the +3 position by Cys (C). This sequence YXXC, represents a novel motif implicated in the recruitment and activation of Stat3alpha, Stat3beta and Stat3gamma by the hG-CSFR. Structurally, Stat3alpha, Stat3beta and Stat3gamma differ from each other in their C-terminal transactivation domain. In the beta isoform, the Stat3alpha transactivation domain is replaced by 7 amino acid residues which enable Stat3beta to interact with c-Jun. In the gamma isoform, the Stat3alpha transactivation domain is removed by limited proteolysis creating a dominant negative isoform. In immature human

  2. Using biomarkers to improve detection of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Biagioni, Milton C; Galvin, James E

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Disease-modifying approaches for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) might be most effective when initiated very early in the course, before the pathologic burden and neuronal and synaptic degeneration make it unlikely that halting disease progression would have a significant impact on patient outcomes. Biomarkers of disease may provide important avenues of research to enhance the diagnosis of individuals with early AD and could assist in the identification of those individuals at risk for developing AD. However, for such biomarkers to become clinically useful, long-term follow-up studies are necessary to evaluate the relevance of cross-sectional biomarker changes to the longitudinal course of the disease. The objective of this article is to review recent progress in AD biomarkers for the early diagnosis, classification, progression and prediction of AD and their usefulness in new treatment trials. PMID:22076127

  3. G-CSF attenuates noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ze-tao; Lin, Ying; Wang, Jie; Wu, Jin; Wang, Ren-feng; Chen, Fu-quan; Mi, Wen-juan; Qiu, Jian-hua

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for the treatment of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in a guinea pig model. Forty guinea pigs were randomly divided into four groups: control, noise (white noise, 3 h/d for 2 days at 115 dB), noise+G-CSF (350 μg/kg/d for 5 days), and noise+saline. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) were used to determine the hearing threshold and outer hair cell function, respectively, in each group. Cochlear morphology was examined to evaluate hair cell injury induced by intense noise exposure. Fourteen days after noise exposure, the noise+G-CSF group had a lower ABR value than the noise group (P<0.05) or the noise+saline group (P<0.01). At most frequencies, the DPOAE value of the noise+G-CSF group showed a significant rise (P<0.05) compared to the noise group or the noise+saline group. Neither the ABR value nor the DPOAE value differed between the noise group and the noise+saline group. The morphology of the phalloidin-stained organ of Corti was consistent with the functional measurements. In conclusion, G-CSF can preserve hearing in an experimental model of NIHL in guinea pigs, by preserving hair cells after intense noise exposure. PMID:23916659

  4. G-CSF attenuates noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ze-tao; Lin, Ying; Wang, Jie; Wu, Jin; Wang, Ren-feng; Chen, Fu-quan; Mi, Wen-juan; Qiu, Jian-hua

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for the treatment of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in a guinea pig model. Forty guinea pigs were randomly divided into four groups: control, noise (white noise, 3 h/d for 2 days at 115 dB), noise+G-CSF (350 μg/kg/d for 5 days), and noise+saline. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) were used to determine the hearing threshold and outer hair cell function, respectively, in each group. Cochlear morphology was examined to evaluate hair cell injury induced by intense noise exposure. Fourteen days after noise exposure, the noise+G-CSF group had a lower ABR value than the noise group (P<0.05) or the noise+saline group (P<0.01). At most frequencies, the DPOAE value of the noise+G-CSF group showed a significant rise (P<0.05) compared to the noise group or the noise+saline group. Neither the ABR value nor the DPOAE value differed between the noise group and the noise+saline group. The morphology of the phalloidin-stained organ of Corti was consistent with the functional measurements. In conclusion, G-CSF can preserve hearing in an experimental model of NIHL in guinea pigs, by preserving hair cells after intense noise exposure.

  5. DIS in AdS

    SciTech Connect

    Albacete, Javier L.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Taliotis, Anastasios

    2009-03-23

    We calculate the total cross section for the scattering of a quark-anti-quark dipole on a large nucleus at high energy for a strongly coupled N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory using AdS/CFT correspondence. We model the nucleus by a metric of a shock wave in AdS{sub 5}. We then calculate the expectation value of the Wilson loop (the dipole) by finding the extrema of the Nambu-Goto action for an open string attached to the quark and antiquark lines of the loop in the background of an AdS{sub 5} shock wave. We find two physically meaningful extremal string configurations. For both solutions we obtain the forward scattering amplitude N for the quark dipole-nucleus scattering. We study the onset of unitarity with increasing center-of-mass energy and transverse size of the dipole: we observe that for both solutions the saturation scale Q{sub s} is independent of energy/Bjorken-x and depends on the atomic number of the nucleus as Q{sub s}{approx}A{sup 1/3}. Finally we observe that while one of the solutions we found corresponds to the pomeron intercept of {alpha}{sub P} = 2 found earlier in the literature, when extended to higher energy or larger dipole sizes it violates the black disk limit. The other solution we found respects the black disk limit and yields the pomeron intercept of {alpha}{sub P} = 1.5. We thus conjecture that the right pomeron intercept in gauge theories at strong coupling may be {alpha}{sub P} = 1.5.

  6. CSF shunt complications: what the abdominal imager needs to know.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Eric K; Williams, Todd R; Myers, Daniel T

    2015-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting has been a mainstay in the treatment of hydrocephalus for many decades. With a reported 33,000 shunt placement procedures performed in the US annually, and a lifetime revision rate approaching 50%, abdominal radiologists must be familiar with the typical imaging appearance of an array of shunt complications. Complications related to the peritoneal portion of the shunt have been reported in up to 25% of patients. We present a comprehensive pictorial essay including computed tomography, conventional radiography, ultrasound, and nuclear medicine examples illustrating abdominal complications related to CSF shunting and a review of the current literature. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to provide multimodality imaging examples of CSF shunt complications and familiarize the abdominal imager with the spectrum of findings.

  7. Echocardiographic findings in patients with spontaneous CSF leak.

    PubMed

    Pimienta, Allen L; Rimoin, David L; Pariani, Mitchel; Schievink, Wouter I; Reinstein, Eyal

    2014-10-01

    The presence of cardiovascular abnormalities in patients with spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are not well-documented in the literature, as cardiovascular evaluation is not generally pursued if a patient does not exhibit additional clinical features suggesting an inherited connective tissue disorder. We aimed to assess this association, enrolling a consecutive group of 50 patients referred for spinal CSF leak consultation. Through echocardiographic evaluation and detailed medical history, we estimate that up to 20% of patients presenting with a spontaneous CSF leak may have some type of cardiovascular abnormality. Further, the increase in prevalence of aortic dilatation in our cohort was statistically significant in comparison to the estimated population prevalence. This supports a clinical basis for echocardiographic screening of these individuals for cardiovascular manifestations that may have otherwise gone unnoticed or evolved into a more severe manifestation.

  8. Delivery of CSF-1R to the lumen of macropinosomes promotes its destruction in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jieqiong; Low-Nam, Shalini T.; Kerkvliet, Jason G.; Hoppe, Adam D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Activation of the macrophage colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) by CSF-1 stimulates pronounced macropinocytosis and drives proliferation of macrophages. Although the role of macropinocytosis in CSF-1R signaling remains unknown, we show here that, despite internalizing large quantities of plasma membrane, macropinosomes contribute little to the internalization of the CSF-1–CSF-1R complex. Rather, internalization of the CSF-1R in small endocytic vesicles that are sensitive to clathrin disruption, outcompetes macropinosomes for CSF-1R endocytosis. Following internalization, small vesicles carrying the CSF-1R underwent homotypic fusion and then trafficked to newly formed macropinosomes bearing Rab5. As these macropinosomes matured, acquiring Rab7, the CSF-1R was transported into their lumen and degraded. Inhibition of macropinocytosis delayed receptor degradation despite no disruption to CSF-1R endocytosis. These data indicate that CSF-1-stimulated macropinosomes are sites of multivesicular body formation and accelerate CSF-1R degradation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that macropinocytosis and cell growth have a matching dose dependence on CSF-1, suggesting that macropinosomes might be a central mechanism coupling CSF-1R signaling and macrophage growth. PMID:25335894

  9. Evaluation of new primers for CSF1PO.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Sekiguchi, K; Kasai, K; Sato, H; Seta, S; Sensabaugh, G F

    1997-01-01

    We describe new primers for the detection of the STR polymorphism at the CSF1PO locus. These primers have been designed to produce shorter amplicons (150-182 bp) than the primers in standard use (295-327 bp). The reliability of the new primers for CSF1PO typing has been demonstrated by testing on known samples and by sequence analysis. These primers are superior to the original primers with regard to electrophoretic resolution and utility for typing of severely degraded DNA.

  10. The role of G-CSF and IL-6 in the granulopoiesis-stimulating activity of murine blood serum induced by perorally administered ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, IMUNOR.

    PubMed

    Vacek, Antonín; Hofer, Michal; Holá, Jirina; Weiterová, Lenka; Streitová, Denisa; Svoboda, Jaroslav

    2007-05-01

    IMUNOR, a low-molecular weight (< 12 kD) ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, has been previously found to have significant stimulatory effects on murine hematopoiesis supressed by ionizing radiation or cytotoxic drugs. This communication shows data on the mechanisms of these effects. Using ELISA assay, significantly increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were observed. On the contrary, no detectable levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CFC) and interleukin-3 (IL-3) have been found in blood serum of IMUNOR-treated mice. Incubation of the serum from IMUNOR-treated mice with antibodies against G-CSF caused abrogation of the ability of the sera to stimulate in vitro growth of colonies originating from granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC). In contrast, incubation of the serum with antibodies against IL-6 did not change its colony-stimulating activity. It may be inferred from these findings that G-CSF is probably the main cytokine responsible for the granulopoiesis-stimulating effects of IMUNOR. When the serum from IMUNOR-treated mice with G-CSF inactivated by anti-G-CSF antibodies (but with elevated IL-6) was added to cultures of bone marrow cells together with a suboptimum concentration of IL-3, a significant increase in the numbers of GM-CFC colonies was found. Moreover, conjoint inactivation of G-CSF and IL-6 significantly decreased the numbers of GM-CFC colonies in comparison with those observed when only G-CSF was inactivated. This observation strongly suggests that though IMUNOR-induced IL-6 is not able to induce the growth of GM-CFC colonies alone, it is able to potentiate the hematopoiesis-stimulating effect of IL-3. These findings represent a new knowledge concerning the hematopoiesis-stimulating action of IMUNOR, a promising immunomodulatory agent.

  11. Segmentation and quantification for Alzheimer's disease (AD): a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Tianhu; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Zhuge, Ying; Moonis, Gul; Clark, Christopher

    2003-05-01

    Alzheimer's is a progressive brain disease and is clinically characterized by cognitive symptoms that, in combination with behavioral disturbances, significantly interfere with activities of daily living. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility of developing volumetric measures of the structural damage and atrophy of brain derived from multiprotocol MR imaging. Our approach first applies intensity inhomogeneity correction and intensity standardization to PD and T2 weighted MR images to create base images for quantitative image analysis. Then, vectorial scale-based fuzzy connectedness segmentation (VSFCS) and morphological operations are applied to the base images to extract masks of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), grey matter (GM), and white matter (WM), and further to create a clean and accurate intracranial (IC) mask. After separating CSF from brain parenchyma (BP), VSFCS is applied to BP (PD and T2) images to generate pure GM and WM masks, and then subtracting these pure from the BP mask to detect AD lesions. This method was applied to a set of conventional PD and T2 weighted MR images that were obtained from 5 patients with probable AD and 5 healthy normal control subjects. The segmented images of individual brain tissue regions (CSF, GM, WM, and AD lesion) are consistent with a Neuroradiologist's examination. The quantitative analysis shows that patients with AD have more atrophy. The mean value of the volume of brain parenchyma of patients with AD is about 10% less than that of healthy controls.

  12. An N-glucosylated peptide detecting disease-specific autoantibodies, biomarkers of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lolli, Francesco; Mulinacci, Barbara; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Bonetti, Bruno; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Mazzanti, Benedetta; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Novellino, Ettore; Pazzagli, Marta; Lovato, Laura; Alcaro, Maria C.; Peroni, Elisa; Pozo-Carrero, Maria C.; Nuti, Francesca; Battistini, Luca; Borsellino, Giovanna; Chelli, Mario; Rovero, Paolo; Papini, Anna Maria

    2005-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disease that seems to depend on several pathophysiological processes. Because of its varied clinical presentation, natural history, and response to therapeutic interventions, MS can be considered to be a group of diseases that have not been yet characterized, thus resulting in difficult evaluation of prognosis. In the last few years, the role of autoAbs in MS has been reevaluated, and, therefore, their identification as specific biomarkers became a relevant target. In this paper, we demonstrate that an aberrant N-glucosylation is a fundamental determinant of autoAb recognition in MS. Thus, we developed CSF114(Glc), an antigenic probe accurately measuring IgM autoAbs in the sera of a patient population, as disease biomarker. The relevance of CSF114(Glc) is demonstrated by its clinical application and correlation with disease activity and prognosis. In fact, CSF114(Glc), a structure-based designed glycopeptide, is able to recognize, by ELISA, the presence of specific IgM autoAbs in the sera of a MS patient population but not in blood donors and other autoimmune conditions. AutoAbs specific for CSF114(Glc) isolated from MS patients recognized myelin and oligodendrocyte antigens by immunohistochemistry but not other nonrelevant tissues. We demonstrate that CSF114(Glc) is a reliable, specific probe in a longitudinal study of untreated MS patients. Development of IgG/IgM anti-CSF114(Glc) Abs paralleled clinical activity and brain lesions positive to MRI. Therefore, a CSF114(Glc)-based immunoassay on sera may have important prognostic value in monitoring MS disease progression guiding optimal therapeutic treatment. PMID:16014416

  13. sTREM2 cerebrospinal fluid levels are a potential biomarker for microglia activity in early-stage Alzheimer's disease and associate with neuronal injury markers.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Calvet, Marc; Kleinberger, Gernot; Araque Caballero, Miguel Ángel; Brendel, Matthias; Rominger, Axel; Alcolea, Daniel; Fortea, Juan; Lleó, Alberto; Blesa, Rafael; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Antonell, Anna; Rami, Lorena; Molinuevo, José L; Brosseron, Frederic; Traschütz, Andreas; Heneka, Michael T; Struyfs, Hanne; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Zetterberg, Henrik; Nellgård, Bengt; Blennow, Kaj; Crispin, Alexander; Ewers, Michael; Haass, Christian

    2016-01-01

    TREM2 is an innate immune receptor expressed on the surface of microglia. Loss-of-function mutations of TREM2 are associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). TREM2 is a type-1 protein with an ectodomain that is proteolytically cleaved and released into the extracellular space as a soluble variant (sTREM2), which can be measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In this cross-sectional multicenter study, we investigated whether CSF levels of sTREM2 are changed during the clinical course of AD, and in cognitively normal individuals with suspected non-AD pathology (SNAP). CSF sTREM2 levels were higher in mild cognitive impairment due to AD than in all other AD groups and controls. SNAP individuals also had significantly increased CSF sTREM2 compared to controls. Moreover, increased CSF sTREM2 levels were associated with higher CSF total tau and phospho-tau181P, which are markers of neuronal degeneration and tau pathology. Our data demonstrate that CSF sTREM2 levels are increased in the early symptomatic phase of AD, probably reflecting a corresponding change of the microglia activation status in response to neuronal degeneration. PMID:26941262

  14. Cyclic AMP-elevating agents down-regulate the oxidative burst induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in adherent neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Ottonello, L; Morone, M P; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    1995-01-01

    Human neutrophils, plated on fibronectin-precoated wells, were found to release large quantities of superoxide anion (O2-) in response to GM-CSF. O2- production was reduced by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the phosphodiesterase type IV (PDE IV) inhibitor RO 20-1724. Both agents are known to increase intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels by inducing its production (PGE2) or blocking its catabolism (RO 20-1724). When added in combination, PGE2 and RO 20-1724 had a marked synergistic inhibitory effect, which was reproduced by replacing PGE2 with a direct activator of adenylate cyclase, i.e. forskolin (FK). Moreover, the neutrophil response to GM-CSF was inhibited by a membrane-permeable analogue of cAMP in a dose-dependent manner. As GM-CSF and PGE2 are known to be generated at tissue sites of inflammation, the results suggest the existence of a PGE2-dependent regulatory pathway potentially capable of controlling the neutrophil response to GM-CSF, in turn limiting the risk of local oxidative tissue injury. Moreover, owing to its susceptibility to amplification by RO 20-1724, the PGE2-dependent pathway and in particular PDE-IV may represent a pharmacological target to reduce the generation of histotoxic oxidants by GM-CSF-responding neutrophils. PMID:7664497

  15. Tau/Amyloid Beta 42 Peptide Test (Alzheimer Biomarkers)

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alzheimer Biomarkers Formal name: Tau Protein and Amyloid Beta ... supplemental tests to help establish a diagnosis of Alzheimer disease and to distinguish between AD and other ...

  16. Disseminated protothecosis diagnosed by evaluation of CSF in a dog.

    PubMed

    Lane, Laura V; Meinkoth, James H; Brunker, Jill; Smith, Stephen K; Snider, Timothy A; Thomas, John; Bradway, Dan; Love, Brenda C

    2012-03-01

    A 5-year-old female spayed Shetland Sheepdog Mix dog was evaluated for a history of recent seizure activity, progressive hind limb ataxia, polyuria, and polydipsia and no history of gastrointestinal signs. Physical examination findings included conscious proprioceptive deficits, ataxia, and anterior uveitis along with a hypermature cataract in the right eye. Results of a CBC, serum biochemical profile, urinalysis, and computed tomography scan of the brain were unremarkable. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed marked eosinophilic pleocytosis and rare organisms consistent with Prototheca spp within neutrophils and macrophages. On postmortem histologic examination, mononuclear inflammation and numerous intralesional algal organisms, similar to those seen on the cytologic preparation of CSF, were found in the brain, eyes, kidneys, and heart. Abnormalities were not detected on gross and histologic examination of the gastrointestinal tract. Cultures of CSF and subdural/olfactory bulb, but not intestinal tract, yielded growth of Prototheca spp, and PCR analysis and DNA sequencing confirmed the organism as Prototheca zopfii genotype 2. We have reported a rare case of disseminated protothecosis that was diagnosed by evaluation of CSF in a dog presented with neurologic signs and no overt enteric disease. Protothecosis should be considered as a rare cause of seizures, even in the absence of obvious enteric signs, and should be included in the differential diagnosis of eosinophilic pleocytosis. PMID:22251039

  17. Inherited biallelic CSF3R mutations in severe congenital neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Triot, Alexa; Järvinen, Päivi M.; Arostegui, Juan I.; Murugan, Dhaarini; Kohistani, Naschla; Dapena Díaz, José Luis; Racek, Tomas; Puchałka, Jacek; Gertz, E. Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Kotlarz, Daniel; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Díaz de Heredia Rubio, Cristina; Ozdemir, Mehmet Akif; Patiroglu, Turkan; Karakukcu, Musa; Sánchez de Toledo Codina, José; Yagüe, Jordi; Touw, Ivo P.; Unal, Ekrem

    2014-01-01

    Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) is characterized by low numbers of peripheral neutrophil granulocytes and a predisposition to life-threatening bacterial infections. We describe a novel genetic SCN type in 2 unrelated families associated with recessively inherited loss-of-function mutations in CSF3R, encoding the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor. Family A, with 3 affected children, carried a homozygous missense mutation (NM_000760.3:c.922C>T, NP_000751.1:p.Arg308Cys), which resulted in perturbed N-glycosylation and aberrant localization to the cell surface. Family B, with 1 affected infant, carried compound heterozygous deletions provoking frameshifts and premature stop codons (NM_000760.3:c.948_963del, NP_000751.1:p.Gly316fsTer322 and NM_000760.3:c.1245del, NP_000751.1:p.Gly415fsTer432). Despite peripheral SCN, all patients had morphologic evidence of full myeloid cell maturation in bone marrow. None of the patients responded to treatment with recombinant human G-CSF. Our study highlights the genetic and morphologic SCN variability and provides evidence both for functional importance and redundancy of G-CSF receptor-mediated signaling in human granulopoiesis. PMID:24753537

  18. Increased CSF Homocysteine in Pathological Gamblers Compared with Healthy Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordin, Conny; Sjodin, Ingemar

    2009-01-01

    Neurocognitive disturbances suggesting a frontal lobe dysfunction have been observed in pathological gamblers and alcohol dependents. Given that a high homocysteine level has been suggested to be a mediating factor in alcohol-related cognitive decline, we have determined homocysteine and cobalamine in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from 11…

  19. CSF Amino Acids, Pterins and Mechanism of the Ketogenic Diet.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2015-10-01

    Investigators from Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona, Spain, studied the relationship between the etiology of refractory childhood epilepsy, CSF neurotransmitters, pterins, and amino acids, and response to a ketogenic diet in 60 patients with refractory epilepsy, 83% focal and 52% idiopathic. PMID:26933537

  20. Endoscopic Repair of CSF Fistulae: A Ten Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Arun; Mathew, John; Varghese, Ajoy Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cerebrospinal Fluid (CFF) fistulae are repaired endoscopically with varying degrees of success around the world. Large series are still uncommon, and the results varied primarily because of the different techniques by different surgeons and also because of a variation in the patient profile in each series, for example, many series deal primarily with traumatic CSF leaks where the defects are larger and outcomes poorer. Aim To analyse the surgical outcomes of Endoscopic CSF rhinorrhea closure. Materials and Methods This is a series of 34 cases operated upon primarily by one surgeon in two different centres over a period of 10 years. Results Of the 34 cases, 76% of the patients were women. Among the patients only 20.6% patients had a history of trauma preceding the CSF leak. The most common site of leak was in the fovea ethmoidalis in 19 (55.8%) followed by 10 (29.4%) in the cribriform plate. An overlay technique of placing the multiple layers of fascia and mucosa was used in 26 (76.5%) patients and underlay technique in the remaining. Postoperative lumbar drain was used in all patients. Conclusion Based on the treatment outcome of the 34 patients, it can be concluded that the success rate of a single endoscopic procedure in our experience is 97% and 100% following the second. Endoscopic approach for closure of CSF leak is safe with minimal complications and little morbidity. PMID:27656471

  1. CSF B-Endorphin Levels in Patients with Infantile Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A Japanese study measured CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) levels of beta-endorphin in 19 children (ages 4-6) with infantile autism and in 3 children (ages 10-14) with Rett syndrome. In infantile autism, levels did not differ significantly from control participants (n=23). However, levels were significantly higher in those with Rett syndrome. (Author/CR)

  2. G-CSF Intrauterine for Thin Endometrium, and Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Tehraninejad, Ensieh; Davari Tanha, Fateme; Asadi, Ebrahim; Kamali, Koorosh; Aziminikoo, Elham; Rezayof, Elahe

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate effects of G-CSF on a cancelled ART cycle due to thin endometrium. Materials and methods: In a nonrandomized clinical trial from January 2011 to January 2013 in two tertiary university based hospitals fifteen patients undergoing embryo transfer and with the history of cycle cancellation due to thin endometrium were studied. Intrauterine infusion of G-CSF was done on the day of oocyte pick-up or 5 days before embryo transfer. The primary outcome to be measured was an endometrium thickened to at least 6 mm and the secondary outcome was clinical pregnancy rate and consequently take-home baby. All previous cycles were considered as control for each patient. Results: The G-CSF was infused at the day of oocyte retrieval or 5 days before embryo transfer. The endometrial thickness reached from 3.593±0.251 mm to 7.120 ± 0.84 mm. The mean age, gravidity, parity, and FSH were 35.13± 9.531 years, 3, 1 and 32.78 ± 31.10 mIU/ml, respectively. The clinical pregnancy rate was 20%, and there was one missed abortion, a mother death at 34 weeks, and a preterm labor at 30 weeks due to PROM. Conclusion: G-CSF may increase endometrial thickness in the small group of patients who had no choice except cycle cancellation or surrogacy. PMID:26622308

  3. Biomarkers of Brain Damage: S100B and NSE Concentrations in Cerebrospinal Fluid—A Normative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hajduková, Lenka; Sobek, Ondřej; Prchalová, Darina; Bílková, Zuzana; Koudelková, Martina; Lukášková, Jiřina; Matuchová, Inka

    2015-01-01

    NSE and S100B belong among the so-called structural proteins of the central nervous system (CNS). Lately, this group of structural proteins has been profusely used as specific biomarkers of CNS tissue damage. So far, the majority of the research papers have focused predominantly on the concentrations of these proteins in blood in relation to CNS damage of various origins. Considering the close anatomic and functional relationship between the brain or spinal cord and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), in case of a CNS injury, a rapid and pronounced increase of the concentrations of structural proteins specifically in CSF takes place. This study inquires into the physiological concentrations of NSE and S100B proteins in CSF, carried out on a sufficiently large group of 601 patients. The detected values can be used for determination of a normal reference range in CSF in a clinical laboratory diagnostics. PMID:26421286

  4. Biomarkers of Brain Damage: S100B and NSE Concentrations in Cerebrospinal Fluid--A Normative Study.

    PubMed

    Hajduková, Lenka; Sobek, Ondřej; Prchalová, Darina; Bílková, Zuzana; Koudelková, Martina; Lukášková, Jiřina; Matuchová, Inka

    2015-01-01

    NSE and S100B belong among the so-called structural proteins of the central nervous system (CNS). Lately, this group of structural proteins has been profusely used as specific biomarkers of CNS tissue damage. So far, the majority of the research papers have focused predominantly on the concentrations of these proteins in blood in relation to CNS damage of various origins. Considering the close anatomic and functional relationship between the brain or spinal cord and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), in case of a CNS injury, a rapid and pronounced increase of the concentrations of structural proteins specifically in CSF takes place. This study inquires into the physiological concentrations of NSE and S100B proteins in CSF, carried out on a sufficiently large group of 601 patients. The detected values can be used for determination of a normal reference range in CSF in a clinical laboratory diagnostics. PMID:26421286

  5. BIOMARKERS OF REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification and verification of anatomical, endocrine, cellular and molecular biomarkers is crucial for successful clinical diagnosis and treatment of toxicity and disease, as well as basic toxicological, epidemiological and other research. Various in situ biomarkers of repro...

  6. Biomarkers in Computational Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biomarkers are a means to evaluate chemical exposure and/or the subsequent impacts on toxicity pathways that lead to adverse health outcomes. Computational toxicology can integrate biomarker data with knowledge of exposure, chemistry, biology, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, and e...

  7. Biological role of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on cells of the myeloid lineage.

    PubMed

    Ushach, Irina; Zlotnik, Albert

    2016-09-01

    M-CSF and GM-CSF are 2 important cytokines that regulate macrophage numbers and function. Here, we review their known effects on cells of the macrophage-monocyte lineage. Important clues to their function come from their expression patterns. M-CSF exhibits a mostly homeostatic expression pattern, whereas GM-CSF is a product of cells activated during inflammatory or pathologic conditions. Accordingly, M-CSF regulates the numbers of various tissue macrophage and monocyte populations without altering their "activation" status. Conversely, GM-CSF induces activation of monocytes/macrophages and also mediates differentiation to other states that participate in immune responses [i.e., dendritic cells (DCs)]. Further insights into their function have come from analyses of mice deficient in either cytokine. M-CSF signals through its receptor (CSF-1R). Interestingly, mice deficient in CSF-1R expression exhibit a more significant phenotype than mice deficient in M-CSF. This observation was explained by the discovery of a novel cytokine (IL-34) that represents a second ligand of CSF-1R. Information about the function of these ligands/receptor system is still developing, but its complexity is intriguing and strongly suggests that more interesting biology remains to be elucidated. Based on our current knowledge, several therapeutic molecules targeting either the M-CSF or the GM-CSF pathways have been developed and are currently being tested in clinical trials targeting either autoimmune diseases or cancer. It is intriguing to consider how evolution has directed these pathways to develop; their complexity likely mirrors the multiple functions in which cells of the monocyte/macrophage system are involved. PMID:27354413

  8. Bacterially expressed murine CSF-1 possesses agonistic activity in its monomeric form.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, S; Baccarini, M

    1993-04-30

    CSF-1 is a dimeric peptide growth factor, stabilized by disulfide bonds. We expressed mouse CSF-1 in bacteria as a fusion protein either with glutathione S-transferase (GST) or with a six histidine tag (His-tag). Large amounts of recombinant material were obtained and purified by a single affinity chromatography step. Purified CSF-1-His-tag monomers efficiently dimerized in vitro, but the presence of variable amounts of GST-moiety in CSF-1 preparations obtained by thrombin cleavage of GST-fusion proteins (thrombin-released CSF-1) interfered with dimerization. However, the thrombin-released CSF-1 monomers possessed agonistic activity, being capable of stimulating tyrosine phosphorylation of the CSF-1 receptor and of an array of cellular proteins in living macrophages and of supporting their growth. These results show that CSF-1 dimerization is not essential for receptor activation in vivo. PMID:8484779

  9. Proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases in CSF of patients with VZV vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dallas; Alvarez, Enrique; Selva, Sean; Gilden, Don

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the CSF of patients with virologically verified varicella zoster virus (VZV) vasculopathy. Methods: CSF from 30 patients with virologically verified VZV vasculopathy was analyzed for levels of proinflammatory cytokines and MMPs using the Meso Scale Discovery multiplex ELISA platform. Positive CNS inflammatory disease controls were provided by CSF from 30 patients with multiple sclerosis. Negative controls were provided by CSF from 20 healthy controls. Results: Compared to multiple sclerosis CSF and CSF from healthy controls, levels of interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6, and MMP-2 were significantly elevated in VZV vasculopathy CSF. Conclusions: CSF of patients with VZV vasculopathy revealed a unique profile of elevated proinflammatory cytokines, IL-8 and IL-6, along with elevated MMP-2. The relevance of these cytokines to the pathogenesis of VZV vasculopathy requires further study. PMID:27340684

  10. Emerging Roles for CSF-1 Receptor and its Ligands in the Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Chitu, Violeta; Gokhan, Şölen; Nandi, Sayan; Mehler, Mark F; Stanley, E Richard

    2016-06-01

    The colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) kinase regulates tissue macrophage homeostasis, osteoclastogenesis, and Paneth cell development. However, recent studies in mice have revealed that CSF-1R signaling directly controls the development and maintenance of microglia, and cell autonomously regulates neuronal differentiation and survival. While the CSF-1R-cognate ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34 (IL-34) compete for binding to the CSF-1R, they are expressed in a largely non-overlapping manner by mature neurons. The recent identification of a dominantly inherited, adult-onset, progressive dementia associated with inactivating mutations in the CSF-1R highlights the importance of CSF-1R signaling in the brain. We review the roles of the CSF-1R and its ligands in microglial and neural development and function, and their relevance to our understanding of neurodegenerative disease.

  11. Systematic review: new serological markers (anti-glycan, anti-GP2, anti-GM-CSF Ab) in the prediction of IBD patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, J; Dumestre-Perard, C; Rinaudo-Gaujous, M; Genin, C; Sparrow, M; Roblin, X; Paul, S

    2015-03-01

    Traditionally, IBD diagnosis is based on clinical, radiological, endoscopic, and histological criteria. Biomarkers are needed in cases of uncertain diagnosis, or to predict disease course and therapeutic response. No guideline recommends the detection of antibodies (including ASCA and ANCA) for diagnosis or prognosis of IBD to date. However, many recent data suggest the potential role of new serological markers (anti-glycan (ACCA, ALCA, AMCA, anti-L and anti-C), anti-GP2 and anti-GM-CSF Ab). This review focuses on clinical utility of these new serological markers in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic monitoring of IBD. Literature review of anti-glycan, anti-GP2 and anti-GM-CSF Ab and their impact on diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of therapeutic response was performed in PubMed/MEDLINE up to June 2014. Anti-glycan, anti-GP2 and anti-GM-CSF Ab are especially associated with CD and seem to be correlated with complicated disease phenotypes even if results differ between studies. Although anti-glycan Ab and anti-GP2 Ab have low sensitivity in diagnosis of IBD, they could identify a small number of CD patients not detected by other tests such as ASCA. Anti-glycan Abs are associated with a progression to a more severe disease course and a higher risk for IBD-related surgery. Anti-GP2 Ab could particularly contribute to better stratify cases of pouchitis. Anti-GM-CSF Ab seems to be correlated with disease activity and could help predict relapses. These new promising biomarkers could particularly be useful in stratification of patients according to disease phenotype and risk of complications. They could be a valuable aid in prediction of disease course and therapeutic response but more prospective studies are needed.

  12. Comparative antitumor effect among GM-CSF, IL-12 and GM-CSF+IL-12 genetically modified tumor cell vaccines.

    PubMed

    Miguel, A; Herrero, M J; Sendra, L; Botella, R; Algás, R; Sánchez, M; Aliño, S F

    2013-10-01

    Genetically modified cells have been shown to be one of the most effective cancer vaccine strategies. An evaluation is made of the efficacy of both preventive and therapeutic antitumor vaccines against murine melanoma, using C57BL/6 mice and irradiated B16 tumor cells expressing granulocyte and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-12 (IL-12) or both. Tumor was transplanted by the injection of wild-type B16 cells. Tumor growth and survival were measured to evaluate the efficacy of vaccination. Specific humoral response and immunoglobulin G (IgG) switch were evaluated measuring total IgG and IgG1 and IgG2a subtypes against tumor membrane proteins of B16 cells. In preventive vaccination, all treated groups showed delayed tumor growth. In addition, the group vaccinated to express only GM-CSF achieved 100% animal survival (P<0.005). Vaccination with GM-CSF+IL-12-producing B16 cells yielded lesser results (60% survival, P<0.005). Furthermore, all surviving animals remained disease-free after second tumor implantation 1 year later. The therapeutic vaccination strategies resulted in significantly delayed tumor growth, mainly using B16 cells producing GM-CSF+IL-12 cytokines, with 70% tumor growth inhibition (P<0.001)-although none of the animals reached overall survival. The results obtained suggest that the GM-CSF+IL-12 combination only increases the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines. No differences in classical regulatory T cells were found among the different groups.

  13. [Potential for the cytochemical study of CSF smears in the determination of neuroleukemia variants].

    PubMed

    Berliner, G B; Mendeleev, I M; Kheĭfets, L M; Polezhaev, Iu N; Gavrilova, S A

    1986-01-01

    The cytochemical test for PAS-positive material in CSF smears can be used for identification of leukemic cells of the lymphoid line. Qualitative smears were obtained from the CSF by the sedimentation method. Five patients were examined. A very suggestive case is described. The cytochemical studies of CSF smears help diagnose neuroleukemia and evaluate the treatment efficacy.

  14. Pivotal Advance: Avian colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1), interleukin-34 (IL-34), and CSF-1 receptor genes and gene products.

    PubMed

    Garceau, Valerie; Smith, Jacqueline; Paton, Ian R; Davey, Megan; Fares, Mario A; Sester, David P; Burt, David W; Hume, David A

    2010-05-01

    Macrophages are involved in many aspects of development, host defense, pathology, and homeostasis. Their normal differentiation, proliferation, and survival are controlled by CSF-1 via the activation of the CSF1R. A recently discovered cytokine, IL-34, was shown to bind the same receptor in humans. Chicken is a widely used model organism in developmental biology, but the factors that control avian myelopoiesis have not been identified previously. The CSF-1, IL-34, and CSF1R genes in chicken and zebra finch were identified from respective genomic/cDNA sequence resources. Comparative analysis of the avian CSF1R loci revealed likely orthologs of mammalian macrophage-specific promoters and enhancers, and the CSF1R gene is expressed in the developing chick embryo in a pattern consistent with macrophage-specific expression. Chicken CSF-1 and IL-34 were expressed in HEK293 cells and shown to elicit macrophage growth from chicken BM cells in culture. Comparative sequence and co-evolution analysis across all vertebrates suggests that the two ligands interact with distinct regions of the CSF1R. These studies demonstrate that there are two separate ligands for a functional CSF1R across all vertebrates.

  15. Fatal cerebral edema associated with serine deficiency in CSF.

    PubMed

    Keularts, Irene M L W; Leroy, Piet L J M; Rubio-Gozalbo, Estela M; Spaapen, Leo J M; Weber, Biene; Dorland, Bert; de Koning, Tom J; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M

    2010-12-01

    Two young girls without a notable medical history except for asthma presented with an acute toxic encephalopathy with very low serine concentrations both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) comparable to patients with 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency. Clinical symptoms and enzyme measurement (in one patient) excluded 3-PGDH deficiency. Deficiencies in other serine biosynthesis enzymes were highly unlikely on clinical grounds. On basis of the fasting state, ketone bodies and lactate in plasma, urine and CSF, we speculate that reduced serine levels were due to its use as gluconeogenic substrate, conversion to pyruvate by brain serine racemase or decreased L-serine production because of a lack of glucose. These are the first strikingly similar cases of patients with a clear secondary serine deficiency associated with a toxic encephalopathy.

  16. Fatal cerebral edema associated with serine deficiency in CSF.

    PubMed

    Keularts, Irene M L W; Leroy, Piet L J M; Rubio-Gozalbo, Estela M; Spaapen, Leo J M; Weber, Biene; Dorland, Bert; de Koning, Tom J; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M

    2010-12-01

    Two young girls without a notable medical history except for asthma presented with an acute toxic encephalopathy with very low serine concentrations both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) comparable to patients with 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency. Clinical symptoms and enzyme measurement (in one patient) excluded 3-PGDH deficiency. Deficiencies in other serine biosynthesis enzymes were highly unlikely on clinical grounds. On basis of the fasting state, ketone bodies and lactate in plasma, urine and CSF, we speculate that reduced serine levels were due to its use as gluconeogenic substrate, conversion to pyruvate by brain serine racemase or decreased L-serine production because of a lack of glucose. These are the first strikingly similar cases of patients with a clear secondary serine deficiency associated with a toxic encephalopathy. PMID:20300853

  17. Imatinib sensitivity as a consequence of a CSF1R-Y571D mutation and CSF1/CSF1R signaling abnormalities in the cell line GDM1.

    PubMed

    Chase, A; Schultheis, B; Kreil, S; Baxter, J; Hidalgo-Curtis, C; Jones, A; Zhang, L; Grand, F H; Melo, J V; Cross, N C P

    2009-02-01

    Imatinib is usually a highly effective treatment for myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) associated with ABL, PDGFRA or PDGFRB gene fusions; however, occasional imatinib-responsive patients have been reported without abnormalities of these genes. To identify novel imatinib-sensitive lesions, we screened 11 BCR-ABL-negative cell lines and identified GDM1, derived from a patient with an atypical MPN (aMPN), as being responsive to imatinib. Screening of genes encoding known imatinib targets revealed an exon 12 mutation in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R; c-FMS) with a predicted Y571D amino-acid substitution. CSF1R in GDM1 was constitutively phosphorylated, but rapidly dephosphorylated on exposure to imatinib. Y571D did not transform FDCP1 cells to growth factor independence, but resulted in a significantly increased colony growth compared with controls, constitutive CSF1R phosphorylation and elevated CSF1R signaling. We found that GDM1 expresses CSF1, and CSF1 neutralization partially inhibited proliferation, suggesting the importance of both autocrine and intrinsic mechanisms of CSF1R activation. An extensive screen of CSF1R in aMPNs and acute myeloid leukemia identified three additional novel missense variants. None of these variants were active in transformation assays and are therefore likely to be previously unreported rare polymorphisms or non-pathogenic passenger mutations.

  18. Photocopy of photograph (from NBPPNSY, CSF 4036766) Joseph P. Garfinkel, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (from NBP-PNSY, CSF 4036-7-66) Joseph P. Garfinkel, photographer, July 20, 1966 oblique aerial photo taken from an altitude of approximately 6,000 feet; view north of Philadelphia Naval Base and Shipyard. Reserve basin (Haer no. Pa-387-W) is at left center of photograph. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  19. PET measurements of cerebral metabolism corrected for CSF contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Chawluk, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.J.; Hurtig, H.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Reivich, M.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-three subjects have been studied with PET and anatomic imaging (proton-NMR and/or CT) in order to determine the effect of cerebral atrophy on calculations of metabolic rates. Subgroups of neurologic disease investigated include stroke, brain tumor, epilepsy, psychosis, and dementia. Anatomic images were digitized through a Vidicon camera and analyzed volumetrically. Relative areas for ventricles, sulci, and brain tissue were calculated. Preliminary analysis suggests that ventricular volumes as determined by NMR and CT are similar, while sulcal volumes are larger on NMR scans. Metabolic rates (18F-FDG) were calculated before and after correction for CSF spaces, with initial focus upon dementia and normal aging. Correction for atrophy led to a greater increase (%) in global metabolic rates in demented individuals (18.2 +- 5.3) compared to elderly controls (8.3 +- 3.0,p < .05). A trend towards significantly lower glucose metabolism in demented subjects before CSF correction was not seen following correction for atrophy. These data suggest that volumetric analysis of NMR images may more accurately reflect the degree of cerebral atrophy, since NMR does not suffer from beam hardening artifact due to bone-parenchyma juxtapositions. Furthermore, appropriate correction for CSF spaces should be employed if current resolution PET scanners are to accurately measure residual brain tissue metabolism in various pathological states.

  20. Atherosclerosis, biomarkers of atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fiolaki, Aidonio; Tsamis, Konstantinos I; Milionis, Haralampos J; Kyritsis, Athanassios P; Kosmidou, Maria; Giannopoulos, Sotirios

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent type of dementia, involving progressive deterioration of neuronal networks. Although the pathophysiological mechanism of AD is not fully elucidated, apart from β-amyloid and tau protein, a diverse number of factors such as cardiovascular risk factors, inflammation, and lipids metabolism may play a significant role. Numerous epidemiological and laboratory studies support vascular injury and inflammation, as key pathological processes. The present review is focused on cardiovascular risk factors, lipids, and circulating biomarkers of inflammation, discussing them as independent mechanisms converging to the same final pathogenetic cascade of AD.

  1. Neurofilaments as Biomarkers for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Robert David; David, Michael; McCombe, Pamela Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background To allow early diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression, there is a need for biomarkers in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Neurofilaments (NF) are emerging protein biomarkers in other neurological diseases, and are of possible use in ALS. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the utility of NF levels as blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker in patients with ALS. Methods A systematic search of Pubmed, Embase and Scopus was performed. Methodological quality assessment was applied to refine the final search results. Meta-analysis of the data was performed. Results Level of NF heavy chain and light chains were significantly elevated in the CSF of ALS patients compared to healthy controls/controls without parenchymal central nervous system (CNS) involvement and ALS mimic disease patients. NF light chain level in CSF was higher in ALS patients than in neurological patients with CNS involvement (SMD = 1.352, P = 0.01). NF light chain concentration in blood was higher in ALS patients than healthy controls/controls without CNS involvement (SMD = 1.448, P<0.0001). NF heavy chain levels in CSF were negatively correlated disease duration and ALSFRS-R ((r = -0.447, P<0.0001; r = -0.486, P<0.0001). NF light chain levels in CSF were negatively correlated with disease duration (r = -0.273, P = 0.011). Conclusion NF heavy and light chain levels have potential use as a marker of neural degeneration in ALS, but are not specific for the disease, and are more likely to be used as measures of disease progression. PMID:27732645

  2. Diagnostic utility of CSF α-synuclein species in Parkinson's disease: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Eusebi, Paolo; Giannandrea, David; Biscetti, Leonardo; Abraha, Iosief; Chiasserini, Davide; Orso, Massimiliano; Calabresi, Paolo; Parnetti, Lucilla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The diagnostic criteria currently used for Parkinson's disease (PD) are mainly based on clinical motor symptoms. For these reasons many biomarkers are under investigation to support the diagnosis at the early stage. The neuropathological hallmark of PD is represented by Lewy bodies (LBs), which are intracytoplasmic inclusions in substantia nigra neurons. The major component of LBs, α-synuclein (α-syn), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and in other ‘synucleinopathies’ such as multisystem atrophy (MSA) and dementia with LBs (DLBs). Several studies have investigated this presynaptic protein as a potential biomarker of PD. The aim of our meta-analysis is to determine the ability of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of total α-syn, oligomeric α-syn and phosphorylated α-syn to discriminate patients with PD from healthy participants, non-degenerative neurological controls and patients suffering from parkinsonism and or synucleinopathies. Methods and analysis This systematic review protocol has been developed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocol (PRISMA-P) 2015 statement and was registered on PROSPERO (CRD42016013217). We will search Cochrane Library, Web of Science, MEDLINE (via PubMed) and EMBASE from inception, using appropriate search strategies. Two independent reviewers will screen titles, abstracts and full-text articles, and will complete data abstraction. We will include studies that involved patients with PD, DLB, MSA, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal disease and vascular PD, and in which at least one between total α-syn, oligomeric α-syn and phosphorylated α-syn was measured in CSF. To evaluate the risk of bias and applicability of primary diagnostic accuracy studies, we will use QUADAS-2. Ethics and dissemination Our study will not include confidential data, and no intervention will be involved, so ethical approval is not required. The results of the

  3. Integrative EEG biomarkers predict progression to Alzheimer's disease at the MCI stage

    PubMed Central

    Poil, Simon-Shlomo; de Haan, Willem; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; Scheltens, Philip; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating disorder of increasing prevalence in modern society. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is considered a transitional stage between normal aging and AD; however, not all subjects with MCI progress to AD. Prediction of conversion to AD at an early stage would enable an earlier, and potentially more effective, treatment of AD. Electroencephalography (EEG) biomarkers would provide a non-invasive and relatively cheap screening tool to predict conversion to AD; however, traditional EEG biomarkers have not been considered accurate enough to be useful in clinical practice. Here, we aim to combine the information from multiple EEG biomarkers into a diagnostic classification index in order to improve the accuracy of predicting conversion from MCI to AD within a 2-year period. We followed 86 patients initially diagnosed with MCI for 2 years during which 25 patients converted to AD. We show that multiple EEG biomarkers mainly related to activity in the beta-frequency range (13–30 Hz) can predict conversion from MCI to AD. Importantly, by integrating six EEG biomarkers into a diagnostic index using logistic regression the prediction improved compared with the classification using the individual biomarkers, with a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 82%, compared with a sensitivity of 64% and specificity of 62% of the best individual biomarker in this index. In order to identify this diagnostic index we developed a data mining approach implemented in the Neurophysiological Biomarker Toolbox (http://www.nbtwiki.net/). We suggest that this approach can be used to identify optimal combinations of biomarkers (integrative biomarkers) also in other modalities. Potentially, these integrative biomarkers could be more sensitive to disease progression and response to therapeutic intervention. PMID:24106478

  4. Catecholamine-Based Treatment in AD Patients: Expectations and Delusions

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Alessandro; Olivola, Enrica; Liguori, Claudio; Hainsworth, Atticus H.; Saviozzi, Valentina; Angileri, Giacoma; D’Angelo, Vincenza; Galati, Salvatore; Pierantozzi, Mariangela

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the gap between excellence of diagnostics and efficacy of therapy is wide. Despite sophisticated imaging and biochemical markers, the efficacy of available therapeutic options is limited. Here we examine the possibility that assessment of endogenous catecholamine levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may fuel new therapeutic strategies. In reviewing the available literature, we consider the effects of levodopa, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and noradrenaline (NE) modulators, showing disparate results. We present a preliminary assessment of CSF concentrations of dopamine (DA) and NE, determined by HPLC, in a small dementia cohort of either Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or frontotemporal dementia patients, compared to control subjects. Our data reveal detectable levels of DA, NE in CSF, though we found no significant alterations in the dementia population as a whole. AD patients exhibit a small impairment of the DA axis and a larger increase of NE concentration, likely to represent a compensatory mechanism. While waiting for preventive strategies, a pragmatic approach to AD may re-evaluate catecholamine modulation, possibly stratified to dementia subtypes, as part of the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:25999852

  5. Outcomes and costs of autologous stem cell mobilization with chemotherapy plus G-CSF versus G-CSF alone

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Anthony D.; Grima, Daniel T.; Bernard, Lisa M.; Brown, Stephen; Carrum, George; Holmberg, Leona; Horwitz, Mitchell E.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Kanda, Junya; McClune, Brian; Shaughnessy, Paul; Tricot, Guido J.; Chao, Nelson J.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy plus granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (C+G) and G-CSF alone are two of the most common methods of mobilizing CD34+ cells for autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). In order to compare and determine real-world outcomes and costs of these strategies, we performed a retrospective study of 226 consecutive patients at 11 medical centers (64 lymphoma, 162 multiple myeloma), of whom 55% and 66% received C+G. Patients with C+G collected more CD34+ cells/day than G-CSF alone (lymphoma: average 5.51x106 cells/kg on day 1 vs. 2.92x106 cells/kg, p=0.0231; myeloma: 4.16x106 cells/kg vs. 3.69x106 cells/kg, p<0.00001) and required fewer days of apheresis (lymphoma: average 2.11 days vs. 2.96, p=0.012; myeloma: 2.02 vs. 2.83 days, p=0.0015), though nearly all patients ultimately reached the goal of 2x106 cells/kg. With the exception of higher rates of febrile neutropenia in myeloma patients with C+G (17% vs. 2%, p<0.05), toxicities and other outcomes were similar. Mobilization with C+G cost significantly more (lymphoma: median $10,300 vs. $7,300, p<0.0001; myeloma: $8,800 vs. $5,600, p<0.0001), though re-mobilization adds $6,700 for drugs alone. Our results suggest that while both C+G and G-CSF alone are effective mobilization strategies, C+G may be more cost-effective for patients at high risk of insufficient mobilization. PMID:23749109

  6. Loss of GM-CSF signalling in non-haematopoietic cells increases NSAID ileal injury

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaonan; Gilbert, Shila; Groschwitz, Katherine; Hogan, Simon; Jurickova, Ingrid; Trapnell, Bruce; Samson, Charles; Gully, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Background Administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) relieves symptoms in Crohn's disease (CD). It has been reported that reduced GM-CSF bioactivity is associated with more aggressive ileal behaviour and that GM-CSF-null mice exhibit ileal barrier dysfunction and develop a transmural ileitis following exposure to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). STAT5 signalling is central to GM-CSF action. It was therefore hypothesised that GM-CSF signalling in non-haematopoietic cells is required for ileal homeostasis. Methods Bone marrow (BM) chimeras were generated by reconstituting irradiated GM-CSF receptor (gm-csfr) β chain or GM-CSF (gm-csf) deficient mice with wild type BM (WTBM→GMRKO and WTBM→GMKO). Intestinal barrier function and the response to NSAID-induced ileal injury were examined. Expression of gm-csf, gm-csfr or stat5 in Caco-2 and HT-29 intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) lines was knocked down and the effect of GM-CSF signalling on IEC survival and proliferation was determined. Results Elevated levels of GM-CSF autoantibodies in ileal CD were found to be associated with dysregulation of IEC survival and proliferation. GM-CSF receptor-deficient mice and WTBM→GMRKO chimeras exhibited ileal hyperpermeability. NSAID exposure induced a transmural ileitis in GM-CSF receptor-deficient mice and WTBM→GMRKO chimeras. Transplantation of wild type BM into GM-CSF-deficient mice prevented NSAID ileal injury and restored ileal barrier function. Ileal crypt IEC proliferation was reduced in WTBM→GMRKO chimeras, while STAT5 activation in ileal IEC following NSAID exposure was abrogated in WTBM→GMRKO chimeras. Following knock down of gm-csf, gm-csfr α or β chain or stat5a/b expression in Caco-2 cells, basal proliferation was suppressed. GM-CSF normalised proliferation of Caco-2 cells exposed to NSAID, which was blocked by stat5a/b RNA interference. Conclusions Loss of GM-CSF signalling in non-haematopoietic cells

  7. Cerebrospinal Fluid Inflammatory Biomarkers Reflect Clinical Severity in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Lauren M.; McColgan, Peter; Robertson, Nicola; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wild, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Immune system activation is involved in Huntington’s disease (HD) pathogenesis and biomarkers for this process could be relevant to study the disease and characterise the therapeutic response to specific interventions. We aimed to study inflammatory cytokines and microglial markers in the CSF of HD patients. Methods CSF TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, YKL-40, chitotriosidase, total tau and neurofilament light chain (NFL) from 23 mutation carriers and 14 healthy controls were assayed. Results CSF TNF-α and IL-1β were below the limit of detection. Mutation carriers had higher YKL-40 (p = 0.003), chitotriosidase (p = 0.015) and IL-6 (p = 0.041) than controls. YKL-40 significantly correlated with disease stage (p = 0.007), UHDRS total functional capacity score (r = -0.46, p = 0.016), and UHDRS total motor score (r = 0.59, p = 4.5*10−4) after adjustment for age. Conclusion YKL-40 levels in CSF may, after further study, come to have a role as biomarkers for some aspects of HD. Further investigation is needed to support our exploratory findings. PMID:27657730

  8. Circulating glioma biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Kros, Johan M.; Mustafa, Dana M.; Dekker, Lennard J.M.; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A.E.; Luider, Theo M.; Zheng, Ping-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Validated biomarkers for patients suffering from gliomas are urgently needed for standardizing measurements of the effects of treatment in daily clinical practice and trials. Circulating body fluids offer easily accessible sources for such markers. This review highlights various categories of tumor-associated circulating biomarkers identified in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioma patients, including circulating tumor cells, exosomes, nucleic acids, proteins, and oncometabolites. The validation and potential clinical utility of these biomarkers is briefly discussed. Although many candidate circulating protein biomarkers were reported, none of these have reached the required validation to be introduced for clinical practice. Recent developments in tracing circulating tumor cells and their derivatives as exosomes and circulating nuclear acids may become more successful in providing useful biomarkers. It is to be expected that current technical developments will contribute to the finding and validation of circulating biomarkers. PMID:25253418

  9. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral particles as a non-transmissible bivalent marker vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A trans-complemented CSF- JE chimeric viral replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The E2 gene of CSFV Alfort/187 strain was deleted and the resultant plasmid pA187delE2 was inserted by a fragment containing the region coding for a truncate...

  10. Segmented strings in AdS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callebaut, Nele; Gubser, Steven S.; Samberg, Andreas; Toldo, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    We study segmented strings in flat space and in AdS 3. In flat space, these well known classical motions describe strings which at any instant of time are piecewise linear. In AdS 3, the worldsheet is composed of faces each of which is a region bounded by null geodesics in an AdS 2 subspace of AdS 3. The time evolution can be described by specifying the null geodesic motion of kinks in the string at which two segments are joined. The outcome of collisions of kinks on the worldsheet can be worked out essentially using considerations of causality. We study several examples of closed segmented strings in AdS 3 and find an unexpected quasi-periodic behavior. We also work out a WKB analysis of quantum states of yo-yo strings in AdS 5 and find a logarithmic term reminiscent of the logarithmic twist of string states on the leading Regge trajectory.

  11. Polarised black holes in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Miguel S.; Greenspan, Lauren; Oliveira, Miguel; Penedones, João; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-06-01

    We consider solutions in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a negative cosmological constant that asymptote to global AdS 4 with conformal boundary {S}2× {{{R}}}t. At the sphere at infinity we turn on a space-dependent electrostatic potential, which does not destroy the asymptotic AdS behaviour. For simplicity we focus on the case of a dipolar electrostatic potential. We find two new geometries: (i) an AdS soliton that includes the full backreaction of the electric field on the AdS geometry; (ii) a polarised neutral black hole that is deformed by the electric field, accumulating opposite charges in each hemisphere. For both geometries we study boundary data such as the charge density and the stress tensor. For the black hole we also study the horizon charge density and area, and further verify a Smarr formula. Then we consider this system at finite temperature and compute the Gibbs free energy for both AdS soliton and black hole phases. The corresponding phase diagram generalizes the Hawking-Page phase transition. The AdS soliton dominates the low temperature phase and the black hole the high temperature phase, with a critical temperature that decreases as the external electric field increases. Finally, we consider the simple case of a free charged scalar field on {S}2× {{{R}}}t with conformal coupling. For a field in the SU(N ) adjoint representation we compare the phase diagram with the above gravitational system.

  12. Biomarker in archaeological soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedner, Katja; Glaser, Bruno; Schneeweiß, Jens

    2015-04-01

    The use of biomarkers in an archaeological context allow deeper insights into the understanding of anthropogenic (dark) earth formation and from an archaeological point of view, a completely new perspective on cultivation practices in the historic past. During an archaeological excavation of a Slavic settlement (10th/11th C. A.D.) in Brünkendorf (Wendland region in Northern Germany), a thick black soil (Nordic Dark Earth) was discovered that resembled the famous terra preta phenomenon. For the humid tropics, terra preta could act as model for sustainable agricultural practices and as example for long-term CO2-sequestration into terrestrial ecosystems. The question was whether this Nordic Dark Earth had similar properties and genesis as the famous Amazonian Dark Earth in order to find a model for sustainable agricultural practices and long term CO2-sequestration in temperate zones. For this purpose, a multi-analytical approach was used to characterize the sandy-textured Nordic Dark Earth in comparison to less anthropogenically influenced soils in the adjacent area in respect of ecological conditions (e.g. amino sugar), input materials (faeces) and the presence of stable soil organic matter (black carbon). Amino sugar analyses showed that Nordic Dark Earth contained higher amounts of microbial residues being dominated by soil fungi. Faecal biomarkers such as stanols and bile acids indicated animal manure from omnivores and herbivores but also human excrements. Black carbon content of about 30 Mg ha-1 in the Nordic Dark Earth was about four times higher compared to the adjacent soil and in the same order of magnitude compared to terra preta. Our data strongly suggest parallels to anthropogenic soil formation in Amazonia and in Europe by input of organic wastes, faecal material and charred organic matter. An obvious difference was that in terra preta input of human-derived faecal material dominated while in NDE human-derived faecal material played only a minor role

  13. Biomarkers for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Danil V; Loeb, Stacy; Getzenberg, Robert H; Partin, Alan W

    2009-01-01

    The development of biomarkers for prostate cancer screening, detection, and prognostication has revolutionized the management of this disease. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a useful, though not specific, biomarker for detecting prostate cancer. We review the literature on prostate cancer biomarkers, including serum markers (PAP, tPSA, fPSA, proPSA, PSAD, PSAV, PSADT, EPCA, and EPCA-2), tissue markers (AMACR, methylated GSTP1, and the TMPRSS2-ETS gene rearrangement), and a urine marker (DD3PCA3/UPM-3). Future research should focus on validation of already existing biomarkers and the discovery of new markers to identify men with aggressive prostate cancer.

  14. In Vivo Imaging Biomarkers in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease: Are We Lost in Translation or Breaking Through?

    PubMed Central

    Delatour, Benoît; Epelbaum, Stéphane; Petiet, Alexandra; Dhenain, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Identification of biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a critical priority to efficiently diagnose the patients, to stage the progression of neurodegeneration in living subjects, and to assess the effects of disease-modifier treatments. This paper addresses the development and usefulness of preclinical neuroimaging biomarkers of AD. It is today possible to image in vivo the brain of small rodents at high resolution and to detect the occurrence of macroscopic/microscopic lesions in these species, as well as of functional alterations reminiscent of AD pathology. We will outline three different types of imaging biomarkers that can be used in AD mouse models: biomarkers with clear translational potential, biomarkers that can serve as in vivo readouts (in particular in the context of drug discovery) exclusively for preclinical research, and finally biomarkers that constitute new tools for fundamental research on AD physiopathogeny. PMID:20953404

  15. Translational Biomarkers of Neurotoxicity: A Health and Environmental Sciences Institute Perspective on the Way Forward

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Ruth A.; Aschner, Michael; Calligaro, David; Guilarte, Tomas R.; Hanig, Joseph P.; Herr, David W.; Hudzik, Thomas J.; Jeromin, Andreas; Kallman, Mary J.; Liachenko, Serguei; Lynch, James J.; Miller, Diane B.; Moser, Virginia C.; O’Callaghan, James P.; Slikker, William; Paule, Merle G.

    2015-01-01

    Neurotoxicity has been linked to a number of common drugs and chemicals, yet efficient and accurate methods to detect it are lacking. There is a need for more sensitive and specific biomarkers of neurotoxicity that can help diagnose and predict neurotoxicity that are relevant across animal models and translational from nonclinical to clinical data. Fluid-based biomarkers such as those found in serum, plasma, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have great potential due to the relative ease of sampling compared with tissues. Increasing evidence supports the potential utility of fluid-based biomarkers of neurotoxicity such as microRNAs, F2-isoprostanes, translocator protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1, myelin basic protein, microtubule-associated protein-2, and total tau. However, some of these biomarkers such as those in CSF require invasive sampling or are specific to one disease such as Alzheimer’s, while others require further validation. Additionally, neuroimaging methodologies, including magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and positron emission tomography, may also serve as potential biomarkers and have several advantages including being minimally invasive. The development of biomarkers of neurotoxicity is a goal shared by scientists across academia, government, and industry and is an ideal topic to be addressed via the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) framework which provides a forum to collaborate on key challenging scientific topics. Here we utilize the HESI framework to propose a consensus on the relative potential of currently described biomarkers of neurotoxicity to assess utility of the selected biomarkers using a nonclinical model. PMID:26609132

  16. Translational Biomarkers of Neurotoxicity: A Health and Environmental Sciences Institute Perspective on the Way Forward.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ruth A; Aschner, Michael; Calligaro, David; Guilarte, Tomas R; Hanig, Joseph P; Herr, David W; Hudzik, Thomas J; Jeromin, Andreas; Kallman, Mary J; Liachenko, Serguei; Lynch, James J; Miller, Diane B; Moser, Virginia C; O'Callaghan, James P; Slikker, William; Paule, Merle G

    2015-12-01

    Neurotoxicity has been linked to a number of common drugs and chemicals, yet efficient and accurate methods to detect it are lacking. There is a need for more sensitive and specific biomarkers of neurotoxicity that can help diagnose and predict neurotoxicity that are relevant across animal models and translational from nonclinical to clinical data. Fluid-based biomarkers such as those found in serum, plasma, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have great potential due to the relative ease of sampling compared with tissues. Increasing evidence supports the potential utility of fluid-based biomarkers of neurotoxicity such as microRNAs, F2-isoprostanes, translocator protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1, myelin basic protein, microtubule-associated protein-2, and total tau. However, some of these biomarkers such as those in CSF require invasive sampling or are specific to one disease such as Alzheimer's, while others require further validation. Additionally, neuroimaging methodologies, including magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and positron emission tomography, may also serve as potential biomarkers and have several advantages including being minimally invasive. The development of biomarkers of neurotoxicity is a goal shared by scientists across academia, government, and industry and is an ideal topic to be addressed via the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) framework which provides a forum to collaborate on key challenging scientific topics. Here we utilize the HESI framework to propose a consensus on the relative potential of currently described biomarkers of neurotoxicity to assess utility of the selected biomarkers using a nonclinical model. PMID:26609132

  17. A Review of GM-CSF Therapy in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Brittany; Szpila, Benjamin E; Moore, Frederick A; Efron, Philip A; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2015-12-01

    Determine what clinical role, if any, GM-CSF may have in the clinical treatment of sepsis in the adult patient. Advancements in the management of sepsis have led to significant decreases in early mortality; however, sepsis remains a significant source of long-term mortality and disability which places strain on healthcare resources with a substantial growing economic impact. Historically, early multiple organ failure (MOF) and death in patients with severe sepsis was thought to result from an exaggerated proinflammatory response called the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Numerous prospective randomized controlled trials (PRCTs) tested therapies aimed at decreasing the organ injury associated with an exaggerated inflammatory response. With few exceptions, the results from these PRCTs have been disappointing, and currently no specific therapeutic agent is approved to counteract the early SIRS response in patients with severe sepsis. It has long been recognized that there is a delayed immunosuppressive state that contributes to long-term morbidity. However, recent findings now support a concurrent proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory response present throughout sepsis. Multiple immunomodulating agents have been studied to combat the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis with the goal of decreasing secondary infection, reducing organ dysfunction, decreasing ICU stays, and improving survival. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a myelopoietic growth factor currently used in patients with neutropenia secondary to chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, has been studied as a potential immune-activating agent. The applicability of GM-CSF as a standard therapy for generalized sepsis is still largely understudied; however, small-scale studies available have demonstrated some improved recovery from infection, decreased hospital length of stay, decreased days requiring mechanical ventilation, and decreased medical costs. PMID:26683913

  18. A Review of GM-CSF Therapy in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Brittany; Szpila, Benjamin E.; Moore, Frederick A.; Efron, Philip A.; Moldawer, Lyle L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Determine what clinical role, if any, GM-CSF may have in the clinical treatment of sepsis in the adult patient. Advancements in the management of sepsis have led to significant decreases in early mortality; however, sepsis remains a significant source of long-term mortality and disability which places strain on healthcare resources with a substantial growing economic impact. Historically, early multiple organ failure (MOF) and death in patients with severe sepsis was thought to result from an exaggerated proinflammatory response called the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Numerous prospective randomized controlled trials (PRCTs) tested therapies aimed at decreasing the organ injury associated with an exaggerated inflammatory response. With few exceptions, the results from these PRCTs have been disappointing, and currently no specific therapeutic agent is approved to counteract the early SIRS response in patients with severe sepsis. It has long been recognized that there is a delayed immunosuppressive state that contributes to long-term morbidity. However, recent findings now support a concurrent proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory response present throughout sepsis. Multiple immunomodulating agents have been studied to combat the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis with the goal of decreasing secondary infection, reducing organ dysfunction, decreasing ICU stays, and improving survival. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a myelopoietic growth factor currently used in patients with neutropenia secondary to chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, has been studied as a potential immune-activating agent. The applicability of GM-CSF as a standard therapy for generalized sepsis is still largely understudied; however, small-scale studies available have demonstrated some improved recovery from infection, decreased hospital length of stay, decreased days requiring mechanical ventilation, and decreased medical costs. PMID

  19. Wastewater renovation using constructed soil filter (CSF): a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Nemade, P D; Kadam, A M; Shankar, H S

    2009-10-30

    Constructed soil filter (CSF) also known as Soil Biotechnology (SBT) is a process for water renovation which makes use of formulated media with culture of soil macro- and microorganisms. CSF combines sedimentation, infiltration and biodegradation processes to remove oxidizable organics and inorganics of wastewater in a single facility. Operating experience shows hydraulic loading in the range of 0.05-0.25 m(3)/m(2) h and organic loading up to 200-680 g/m(2) d. The results show increase in dissolved oxygen levels, COD removal (from 352 mg/l to 20 mg/l); BOD removal (from 211 mg/l to 7.0 mg/l); suspended solids removal (from 293 mg/l to 16 mg/l); turbidity reduction (from 145 NTU to 5.3 NTU); iron (from 5 mg/l to 0.3 mg/l); arsenic (from 500 microg/l to 10 microg/l); total coliform and fecal coliform removal (from 145 x 10(5) to 55 CFU/100 mL and 150 x 10(8) to 110 CFU/100 mL respectively), with desired pathogen levels as per WHO standards, i.e. < or =10(3) CFU/100 mL. CSF reveals advantages such as low HRT (0.5-2.0 h), low energy requirement (0.04 kWh/m(3)), no pre-treatment, high dissolved oxygen levels in the effluent, no biosludge production, no mechanical aeration and no odor, fish compatible water quality and evergreen ambience. PMID:19501460

  20. Clinical, CSF, and MRI findings in Devic's neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed Central

    O'Riordan, J I; Gallagher, H L; Thompson, A J; Howard, R S; Kingsley, D P; Thompson, E J; McDonald, W I; Miller, D H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Since Devic's original description of neuromyelitis optica in 1894 there has been much debate regarding its aetiology. A specific cause has been identified in a minority of cases but in most the question has arisen whether or not Devic's neuromyelitis optica is a variant of multiple sclerosis. This study was undertaken to help clarify this issue. METHODS: Neuromyelitis optica was defined as (1) a severe transverse myelitis; (2) an acute unilateral or bilateral optic neuropathy; (3) no clinical involvement beyond the spinal cord or optic nerves, and (4) a monophasic or multiphasic illness. The clinical and autoantibody status was documented. Patients underwent CSF examination and MRI of brain and spinal cord. RESULTS: Twelve patients, with a mean age of presentation of 35.1 years, were seen. Eleven were women; vision was reduced to counting fingers or worse in 10 patients and seven became confined to a wheelchair. Examination of CSF showed local synthesis of oligoclonal bands in only two patients and a neutrophil pleocytosis in two. A possible aetiology was identified in five: a specific connective tissue disorder (two), pulmonary tuberculosis (one), and possible acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (two). Six had non-specific increases in various autoantibodies. Eleven patients underwent MRI of the brain and spinal cord. In 10 there were diffuse abnormalities involving cervical and thoracic cords with extensive swelling in the acute phase. Brain MRI was normal in five; in five there were multiple deep white matter lesions, and one patient had minor age related changes. CONCLUSION: It is proposed that Devic's neuromyelitis optica is a distinctive disorder with some clinical, CSF, and MRI features different from those found in classic multiple sclerosis. In most cases a specific aetiology is not identified, but an immunological mechanism of tissue damage seems likely. Images PMID:8774400

  1. Perspectives for multimodal neurochemical and imaging biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Teipel, Stefan J; Sabri, Osama; Grothe, Michel; Barthel, Henryk; Prvulovic, David; Buerger, Katharina; Bokde, Arun L W; Ewers, Michael; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is presently going through a paradigm shift from disease categories to dimensions and toward the implementation of biomarkers to support identification of predementia and even preclinical asymptomatic stages of the disease. We outline the methodological basis of presently available biomarkers and technological methodologies in AD, including exploratory and hypothesis-based plasma and blood candidates, cerebrospinal fluid markers of amyloid load and axonal destruction, and imaging markers of amyloid deposition, synaptic dysfunction, cortical functional and structural disconnection, and regional atrophy. We integrate biomarker findings into a comprehensive model of AD pathogenesis from healthy aging to cognitive decline, the resilience to cerebral amyloid load (RECAL) matrix. The RECAL framework integrates factors of risk and resilience to cerebral amyloid load for individual risk prediction. We show the clinical consequences when the RECAL matrix is operationalized into a diagnostic algorithm both for individual counseling of subjects and for the identification of at risk samples for primary and secondary preventive trials. We discuss the implication of biomarkers for the identification of prodromal AD for the primary care system that seems presently not even prepared to cope with the increasing number of subjects afflicted with late stage AD dementia, let alone future cohorts of subjects searching counseling or treatment of predementia and asymptomatic stages of AD. The paradigm shift in AD diagnosis and its operationalization into a diagnostic framework will have major implications for our understanding of disease pathogenesis. Now, for the first time, we have access to in vivo markers of key events in AD pathogenesis integrated into a heuristic framework that makes strong predictions on pattern of multimodal biomarkers in different stages of AD. Critical testing of these predictions will help us to modify or even falsify

  2. Respiratory Toxicity Biomarkers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The advancement in high throughput genomic, proteomic and metabolomic techniques have accelerated pace of lung biomarker discovery. A recent growth in the discovery of new lung toxicity/disease biomarkers have led to significant advances in our understanding of pathological proce...

  3. Biomarkers in overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Bhide, Alka A; Cartwright, Rufus; Khullar, Vik; Digesu, G Alessandro

    2013-07-01

    A biomarker is an indicator of a particular disease. It is generally used to define the presence (diagnostic biomarker), severity, progression (prognostic biomarker) of a condition and/or its response to a specific treatment (predictive biomarker). Biomarkers can be specific cells, enzymes, hormones, genes or gene products, which can be detected and measured in parts of the body such as blood, urine or tissue. Therefore, biomarkers have been suggested to play an important role in both the clinical assessment and the management of patients, as well as in the research setting. Recently, interest has gathered in urinary biomarkers as a tool to assess overactive bladder (OAB), potentially playing a role in the diagnosis, disease progression and monitoring response to treatment. Urinary biomarkers identified so far include nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), prostaglandins, cytokines and C-reactive protein. The aim of this review was to review the published literature on biomarkers in OAB. A literature review using Pub Med, clinicaltrials.gov and the controlled trials online registries was performed from 1970 up to June 2012. The search keywords were: the International Continence Society (ICS) definition of "OAB", "nerve growth fac- tor" (NGF), "brain derived growth factor" (BDNF), "prostaglandins," "cytokines," "genetic biomarkers" and "C reactive protein".The results were limited for fully published English-language articles. The search was then subsequently expanded to include urinary biomarkers in interstitial cystitis and bladder pain where relevant. Each of the studies/articles was reviewed, interpreted and discussed to consider the role of urinary biomarkers in OAB. Using the search criteria, a total of 20 studies (animal and human) that investigated the role of urinary biomarkers in OAB were identified. Full text versions of these articles were obtained and reviewed. Studies on NGF suggested that urinary levels were higher in OAB

  4. Post-Traumatic Hypoxia Is Associated with Prolonged Cerebral Cytokine Production, Higher Serum Biomarker Levels, and Poor Outcome in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Edwin B.; Satgunaseelan, Laveniya; Paul, Eldho; Bye, Nicole; Nguyen, Phuong; Agyapomaa, Doreen; Kossmann, Thomas; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Secondary hypoxia is a known contributor to adverse outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Based on the evidence that hypoxia and TBI in isolation induce neuroinflammation, we investigated whether TBI combined with hypoxia enhances cerebral cytokine production. We also explored whether increased concentrations of injury biomarkers discriminate between hypoxic (Hx) and normoxic (Nx) patients, correlate to worse outcome, and depend on blood–brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. Forty-two TBI patients with Glasgow Coma Scale ≤8 were recruited. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum were collected over 6 days. Patients were divided into Hx (n=22) and Nx (n=20) groups. Eight cytokines were measured in the CSF; albumin, S100, myelin basic protein (MBP) and neuronal specific enolase (NSE) were quantified in serum. CSF/serum albumin quotient was calculated for BBB function. Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE) was assessed at 6 months post-TBI. Production of granulocye macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was higher, and profiles of GM-CSF, interferon (IFN)-γ and, to a lesser extent, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), were prolonged in the CSF of Hx but not Nx patients at 4–5 days post-TBI. Interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10 increased similarly in both Hx and Nx groups. S100, MBP, and NSE were significantly higher in Hx patients with unfavorable outcome. Among these three biomarkers, S100 showed the strongest correlations to GOSE after TBI-Hx. Elevated CSF/serum albumin quotients lasted for 5 days post-TBI and displayed similar profiles in Hx and Nx patients. We demonstrate for the first time that post-TBI hypoxia is associated with prolonged neuroinflammation, amplified extravasation of biomarkers, and poor outcome. S100 and MBP could be implemented to track the occurrence of post-TBI hypoxia, and prompt adequate treatment. PMID:24279428

  5. Biomarkers in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Goldani, Andre A. S.; Downs, Susan R.; Widjaja, Felicia; Lawton, Brittany; Hendren, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are complex, heterogeneous disorders caused by an interaction between genetic vulnerability and environmental factors. In an effort to better target the underlying roots of ASD for diagnosis and treatment, efforts to identify reliable biomarkers in genetics, neuroimaging, gene expression, and measures of the body’s metabolism are growing. For this article, we review the published studies of potential biomarkers in autism and conclude that while there is increasing promise of finding biomarkers that can help us target treatment, there are none with enough evidence to support routine clinical use unless medical illness is suspected. Promising biomarkers include those for mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, and immune function. Genetic clusters are also suggesting the potential for useful biomarkers. PMID:25161627

  6. CSF1R mutations in hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids are loss of function.

    PubMed

    Pridans, Clare; Sauter, Kristin A; Baer, Kristin; Kissel, Holger; Hume, David A

    2013-10-22

    Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) in humans is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by giant neuroaxonal swellings (spheroids) within the CNS white matter. Symptoms are variable and can include personality and behavioural changes. Patients with this disease have mutations in the protein kinase domain of the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) which is a tyrosine kinase receptor essential for microglia development. We investigated the effects of these mutations on Csf1r signalling using a factor dependent cell line. Corresponding mutant forms of murine Csf1r were expressed on the cell surface at normal levels, and bound CSF1, but were not able to sustain cell proliferation. Since Csf1r signaling requires receptor dimerization initiated by CSF1 binding, the data suggest a mechanism for phenotypic dominance of the mutant allele in HDLS.

  7. The Effects of Rm-CSF and Ril-6 Therapy on Immunosuppressed Antiorthostatically Suspended Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstong, Jason W.; Kirby-Dobbels, Kathy; Chapes, Steven K.

    1995-01-01

    Antiorthostatically suspended mice had suppressed macrophage development in both unloaded and loaded bones, indicating a systemic effect. Bone marrow cells from those mice secreted less macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) than did control mice. Because M-CSF and IL-6 are important to bone marrow macrophage maturation, we formulated the hypothesis that suppressed macrophage development occurred as a result of the depressed levels of either M-CSF or IL-6. To test the hypothesis, mice were administered recombinant M-CSF or IL-6 intraperitoneally. We showed that recombinant M-CSF therapy, but not recombinant IL-6 therapy, reversed the suppressive effects of orthostatic suspension on macrophage development. These data suggest that bone marrow cells that produce M-CSF are affected by antiorthostatic suspension and may contribute to the inhibited maturation of bone marrow macrophage progenitors.

  8. A Csf1r-EGFP Transgene Provides a Novel Marker for Monocyte Subsets in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Pridans, Clare; Davis, Gemma M.; Sauter, Kristin A.; Lisowski, Zofia M.; Corripio-Miyar, Yolanda; Raper, Anna; Lefevre, Lucas; Young, Rachel; McCulloch, Mary E.; Lillico, Simon; Milne, Elspeth; Whitelaw, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Expression of Csf1r in adults is restricted to cells of the macrophage lineage. Transgenic reporters based upon the Csf1r locus require inclusion of the highly conserved Fms-intronic regulatory element for expression. We have created Csf1r-EGFP transgenic sheep via lentiviral transgenesis of a construct containing elements of the mouse Fms-intronic regulatory element and Csf1r promoter. Committed bone marrow macrophage precursors and blood monocytes express EGFP in these animals. Sheep monocytes were divided into three populations, similar to classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes in humans, based upon CD14 and CD16 expression. All expressed EGFP, with increased levels in the nonclassical subset. Because Csf1r expression coincides with the earliest commitment to the macrophage lineage, Csf1r-EGFP bone marrow provides a tool for studying the earliest events in myelopoiesis using the sheep as a model. PMID:27521343

  9. A Csf1r-EGFP Transgene Provides a Novel Marker for Monocyte Subsets in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Pridans, Clare; Davis, Gemma M; Sauter, Kristin A; Lisowski, Zofia M; Corripio-Miyar, Yolanda; Raper, Anna; Lefevre, Lucas; Young, Rachel; McCulloch, Mary E; Lillico, Simon; Milne, Elspeth; Whitelaw, Bruce; Hume, David A

    2016-09-15

    Expression of Csf1r in adults is restricted to cells of the macrophage lineage. Transgenic reporters based upon the Csf1r locus require inclusion of the highly conserved Fms-intronic regulatory element for expression. We have created Csf1r-EGFP transgenic sheep via lentiviral transgenesis of a construct containing elements of the mouse Fms-intronic regulatory element and Csf1r promoter. Committed bone marrow macrophage precursors and blood monocytes express EGFP in these animals. Sheep monocytes were divided into three populations, similar to classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes in humans, based upon CD14 and CD16 expression. All expressed EGFP, with increased levels in the nonclassical subset. Because Csf1r expression coincides with the earliest commitment to the macrophage lineage, Csf1r-EGFP bone marrow provides a tool for studying the earliest events in myelopoiesis using the sheep as a model.

  10. CSF1R mutations in hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids are loss of function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pridans, Clare; Sauter, Kristin A.; Baer, Kristin; Kissel, Holger; Hume, David A.

    2013-10-01

    Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) in humans is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by giant neuroaxonal swellings (spheroids) within the CNS white matter. Symptoms are variable and can include personality and behavioural changes. Patients with this disease have mutations in the protein kinase domain of the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) which is a tyrosine kinase receptor essential for microglia development. We investigated the effects of these mutations on Csf1r signalling using a factor dependent cell line. Corresponding mutant forms of murine Csf1r were expressed on the cell surface at normal levels, and bound CSF1, but were not able to sustain cell proliferation. Since Csf1r signaling requires receptor dimerization initiated by CSF1 binding, the data suggest a mechanism for phenotypic dominance of the mutant allele in HDLS.

  11. A Csf1r-EGFP Transgene Provides a Novel Marker for Monocyte Subsets in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Pridans, Clare; Davis, Gemma M; Sauter, Kristin A; Lisowski, Zofia M; Corripio-Miyar, Yolanda; Raper, Anna; Lefevre, Lucas; Young, Rachel; McCulloch, Mary E; Lillico, Simon; Milne, Elspeth; Whitelaw, Bruce; Hume, David A

    2016-09-15

    Expression of Csf1r in adults is restricted to cells of the macrophage lineage. Transgenic reporters based upon the Csf1r locus require inclusion of the highly conserved Fms-intronic regulatory element for expression. We have created Csf1r-EGFP transgenic sheep via lentiviral transgenesis of a construct containing elements of the mouse Fms-intronic regulatory element and Csf1r promoter. Committed bone marrow macrophage precursors and blood monocytes express EGFP in these animals. Sheep monocytes were divided into three populations, similar to classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes in humans, based upon CD14 and CD16 expression. All expressed EGFP, with increased levels in the nonclassical subset. Because Csf1r expression coincides with the earliest commitment to the macrophage lineage, Csf1r-EGFP bone marrow provides a tool for studying the earliest events in myelopoiesis using the sheep as a model. PMID:27521343

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum biomarkers of cerebral malaria mortality in Ghanaian children

    PubMed Central

    Armah, Henry B; Wilson, Nana O; Sarfo, Bismark Y; Powell, Michael D; Bond, Vincent C; Anderson, Winston; Adjei, Andrew A; Gyasi, Richard K; Tettey, Yao; Wiredu, Edwin K; Tongren, Jon Eric; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Stiles, Jonathan K

    2007-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum can cause a diffuse encephalopathy known as cerebral malaria (CM), a major contributor to malaria associated mortality. Despite treatment, mortality due to CM can be as high as 30% while 10% of survivors of the disease may experience short- and long-term neurological complications. The pathogenesis of CM and other forms of severe malaria is multi-factorial and appear to involve cytokine and chemokine homeostasis, inflammation and vascular injury/repair. Identification of prognostic markers that can predict CM severity will enable development of better intervention. Methods Postmortem serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained within 2–4 hours of death in Ghanaian children dying of CM, severe malarial anemia (SMA), and non-malarial (NM) causes. Serum and CSF levels of 36 different biomarkers (IL-1β, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IL-12 (p70), IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, Eotaxin, FGF basic protein, CRP, G-CSF, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IP-10, MCP-1 (MCAF), MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, SDF-1α, CXCL11 (I-TAC), Fas-ligand [Fas-L], soluble Fas [sFas], sTNF-R1 (p55), sTNF-R2 (p75), MMP-9, TGF-β1, PDGF bb and VEGF) were measured and the results compared between the 3 groups. Results After Bonferroni adjustment for other biomarkers, IP-10 was the only serum biomarker independently associated with CM mortality when compared to SMA and NM deaths. Eight CSF biomarkers (IL-1ra, IL-8, IP-10, PDGFbb, MIP-1β, Fas-L, sTNF-R1, and sTNF-R2) were significantly elevated in CM mortality group when compared to SMA and NM deaths. Additionally, CSF IP-10/PDGFbb median ratio was statistically significantly higher in the CM group compared to SMA and NM groups. Conclusion The parasite-induced local cerebral dysregulation in the production of IP-10, 1L-8, MIP-1β, PDGFbb, IL-1ra, Fas-L, sTNF-R1, and sTNF-R2 may be involved in CM neuropathology, and their immunoassay may have potential utility in predicting mortality in CM

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Spinocerebellar Ataxia: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Brouillette, Ashley M; Öz, Gülin; Gomez, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), would benefit from the identification of reliable biomarkers that could serve as disease subtype-specific and stage-specific indicators for the development and monitoring of treatments. We analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of tau, α-synuclein, DJ-1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), proteins previously associated with neurodegenerative processes, in patients with the autosomal dominant SCA1, SCA2, and SCA6, and the sporadic disease multiple system atrophy, cerebellar type (MSA-C), compared with age-matched controls. We estimated disease severity using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Most proteins measured trended higher in disease versus control group yet did not reach statistical significance. We found the levels of tau in both SCA2 and MSA-C patients were significantly higher than control. We found that α-synuclein levels were lower with higher SARA scores in SCA1 and tau levels were higher with greater SARA in MSA-C, although this final correlation did not reach statistical significance after post hoc correction. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are needed to improve the power of these studies and validate the use of CSF biomarkers in SCA and MSA-C.

  14. Biomarkers and infection in the emergency unit.

    PubMed

    Hausfater, P

    2014-04-01

    The emergency unit is one of the main places for acute medical care and therefore, has a pivotal role in determining a diagnosis of bacterial infection and initiating antibiotic therapy. There is an unquestionable and growing interest for infection biomarkers because of the polymorphism of septic state presentations in the emergency unit and the lack of accuracy of available biological tools. The C Reactive protein (CRP) is a biomarker of inflammation, not of infection. CRP is highly sensitive but lacks specificity. Moreover, there are few interventional studies evaluating its true added diagnostic value in the emergency unit, therefore preventing using CRP as a biomarker of infection. Serum procalcitonin (PCT) dosage is more specific for the diagnosis of bacterial infection. PCT levels do not increase or only slightly in non-bacterial inflammatory syndromes. PCT also provides prognostic information and risk stratification assessment in the emergency unit. Moreover, many authors of interventional studies have validated the contribution of PCT in decision taking for antibiotic therapy when suspecting low respiratory tract infection. It is currently the first-line biomarker of infection in the emergency unit. Other biomarkers such as presepsin (sCD14) may be contributive for the diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:24556451

  15. The subcommissural organ of the rat secretes Reissner's fiber glycoproteins and CSF-soluble proteins reaching the internal and external CSF compartments

    PubMed Central

    Vio, Karin; Rodríguez, Sara; Yulis, Carlos R; Oliver, Cristian; Rodríguez, Esteban M

    2008-01-01

    Background The subcommissural organ (SCO) is a highly conserved brain gland present throughout the vertebrate phylum; it secretes glycoproteins into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), where they aggregate to form Reissner's fiber (RF). SCO-spondin is the major constituent protein of RF. Evidence exists that the SCO also secretes proteins that remain soluble in the CSF. The aims of the present investigation were: (i) to identify and partially characterize the SCO-secretory compounds present in the SCO gland itself and in the RF of the Sprague-Dawley rat and non-hydrocephalic hyh mouse, and in the CSF of rat; (ii) to make a comparative analysis of the proteins present in these three compartments; (iii) to identify the proteins secreted by the SCO into the CSF at different developmental periods. Methods The proteins of the SCO secreted into the CSF were studied (i) by injecting specific antibodies into ventricular CSF in vivo; (ii) by immunoblots of SCO, RF and CSF samples, using specific antibodies against the SCO secretory proteins (AFRU and anti-P15). In addition, the glycosylated nature of SCO-compounds was analysed by concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin binding. To analyse RF-glycoproteins, RF was extracted from the central canal of juvenile rats and mice; to investigate the CSF-soluble proteins secreted by the SCO, CSF samples were collected from the cisterna magna of rats at different stages of development (from E18 to PN30). Results Five glycoproteins were identified in the rat SCO with apparent molecular weights of 630, 450, 390, 320 and 200 kDa. With the exception of the 200-kDa compound, all other compounds present in the rat SCO were also present in the mouse SCO. The 630 and 390 kDa compounds of the rat SCO have affinity for concanavalin A but not for wheat germ agglutinin, suggesting that they correspond to precursor forms. Four of the AFRU-immunoreactive compounds present in the SCO (630, 450, 390, 320 kDa) were absent from the RF and CSF. These may be

  16. An accessible pharmacodynamic transcriptional biomarker for notch target engagement.

    PubMed

    Tanis, K Q; Podtelezhnikov, A A; Blackman, S C; Hing, J; Railkar, R A; Lunceford, J; Klappenbach, J A; Wei, B; Harman, A; Camargo, L M; Shah, S; Finney, E M; Hardwick, J S; Loboda, A; Watters, J; Bergstrom, D A; Demuth, T; Herman, G A; Strack, P R; Iannone, R

    2016-04-01

    γ-Secretase mediates amyloid production in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and oncogenic activity of Notch. γ-Secretase inhibitors (GSIs) are thus of interest for AD and oncology. A peripheral biomarker of Notch activity would aid determination of the therapeutic window and dosing regimen for GSIs, given toxicities associated with chronic Notch inhibition. This study examined the effects of GSI MK-0752 on blood and hair follicle transcriptomes in healthy volunteers. The effects of a structurally diverse GSI on rhesus blood and hair follicles were also compared. Significant dose-related effects of MK-0752 on transcription were observed in hair follicles, but not blood. The GSI biomarker identified in follicles exhibited 100% accuracy in a clinical test cohort, and was regulated in rhesus by a structurally diverse GSI. This study identified a translatable, accessible pharmacodynamic biomarker of GSI target engagement and provides proof of concept of hair follicle RNA as a translatable biomarker source.

  17. rhGM-CSF vs placebo following rhGM-CSF-mobilized PBPC transplantation: a phase III double-blind randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Legros, M; Fleury, J; Bay, J O; Choufi, B; Basile, M; Condat, P; Glenat, C; Communal, Y; Tavernier, F; Bons, J M; Chollet, P; Plagne, R; Chassagne, J

    1997-02-01

    In this placebo-controlled randomized trial we evaluated the hematological and clinical effects of r-Hu GM-CSF after high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) followed by GM-CSF-mobilized PBPC transplantation. Fifty patients with poor prognosis malignancies were randomized in a double-blind study to receive either GM-CSF or placebo after HDC followed by PBPC rescue. For all patients, PBPCs were recruited using a combination of VP-16 (300 mg/m2 on days 1 and 2), cytoxan (3 g/m2 on days 3 and 4) and GM-CSF (5 micrograms/kg from day 5). No differences were demonstrated between the two groups in median time to neutrophil or platelet recoveries. There was no significant difference between the GM-CSF group and the placebo group in the median duration of post-transplant hospitalization, in the number of days of antibiotic treatment, in the number of infections and in red blood cell or platelet transfusion requirements. There was a significant difference with an advantage for the placebo group in the mean duration of febrile days (P = 0.01). We conclude that the administration of GM-CSF in patients transplanted with GM-CSF-mobilized PBPC is not associated with a clinical benefit in term of tempo of engraftment, numbers of documented infections, transfusion requirements and mucositis grading.

  18. Evaluating the performance of the quick CSF method in detecting contrast sensitivity function changes

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Fang; Lesmes, Luis Andres; Kim, Woojae; Gu, Hairong; Pitt, Mark A.; Myung, Jay I.; Lu, Zhong-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The contrast sensitivity function (CSF) has shown promise as a functional vision endpoint for monitoring the changes in functional vision that accompany eye disease or its treatment. However, detecting CSF changes with precision and efficiency at both the individual and group levels is very challenging. By exploiting the Bayesian foundation of the quick CSF method (Lesmes, Lu, Baek, & Albright, 2010), we developed and evaluated metrics for detecting CSF changes at both the individual and group levels. A 10-letter identification task was used to assess the systematic changes in the CSF measured in three luminance conditions in 112 naïve normal observers. The data from the large sample allowed us to estimate the test–retest reliability of the quick CSF procedure and evaluate its performance in detecting CSF changes at both the individual and group levels. The test–retest reliability reached 0.974 with 50 trials. In 50 trials, the quick CSF method can detect a medium 0.30 log unit area under log CSF change with 94.0% accuracy at the individual observer level. At the group level, a power analysis based on the empirical distribution of CSF changes from the large sample showed that a very small area under log CSF change (0.025 log unit) could be detected by the quick CSF method with 112 observers and 50 trials. These results make it plausible to apply the method to monitor the progression of visual diseases or treatment effects on individual patients and greatly reduce the time, sample size, and costs in clinical trials at the group level. PMID:27120074

  19. Chimaeric Lym-1 monoclonal antibody-mediated cytolysis by neutrophils from G-CSF-treated patients: stimulation by GM-CSF and role of Fcγ-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ottonello, L; Epstein, A L; Mancini, M; Tortolina, G; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    2001-01-01

    Chimaeric Lym-1 (chLym-1) is a monoclonal antibody generated by fusing the variable region genes of murine Lym-1 to human γ1 and κ constant regions. Owing to its selectivity and avidity for human malignant B cells, it is an attractive candidate for developing immune-interventions in B-lymphomas. In the attempt to identify rational bases for optimizing potential chLym-1 related therapeutic approaches, we studied the ability of this ch-mAb to trigger neutrophil-mediated Raji cell cytolysis in cooperation with two neutrophil-related cytokines, G-CSF and GM-CSF. ChLym-1 triggered low levels of cytolysis by normal neutrophils but induced consistent cytolysis in neutrophils from individuals treated with G-CSF. When exposed to GM-CSF, neutrophils from subjects treated with G-CSF became potent effectors, also leading to 75% lysis. By using mAbs specific for distinct FcγRs, normal neutrophils were inhibited by mAb IV.3, suggesting the intervention of FcγRII, constitutively expressed on the cells. On the other hand, neutrophils from patients treated with G-CSF were inhibited by mAb IV.3 plus mAb 197, a finding consistent with a cooperative intervention of FCγRII and G-CSF-induced FcγRI. The anti-FcγRIII mAb 3G8 promoted significant enhancement of the neutrophil cytolytic efficiency. Therefore, neutrophil FcγRIII behaves as a down-regulator of the cytolytic potential. The present findings suggest new attempts to develop mAb-based and G-CSF/GM-CSF combined immune-interventions in B lymphomas. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11487281

  20. Prediagnostic serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers are correlated with future development of lung and esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Keeley, Brieze R; Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Poustchi, Hossein; Pak, Jamie S; Brennan, Paul; Khademi, Hooman; Genden, Eric M; Abnet, Christian C; Dawsey, Sanford M; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza; Sikora, Andrew G

    2014-09-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that prediagnostic serum levels of 20 cancer-associated inflammatory biomarkers correlate directly with future development of head and neck, esophageal, and lung cancers in a high-risk prospective cohort. This is a nested case-control pilot study of subjects enrolled in the Golestan Cohort Study, an ongoing epidemiologic project assessing cancer trends in Golestan, Iran. We measured a panel of 20 21 cytokines, chemokines, and inflammatory molecules using Luminex technology in serum samples collected 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis in 78 aerodigestive cancer cases and 81 controls. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon rank sum test, odds ratios, receiver operating characteristic areas of discrimination, and multivariate analysis. Biomarkers were profoundly and globally elevated in future esophageal and lung cancer patients compared to controls. Odds ratios were significant for association between several biomarkers and future development of esophageal cancer, including interleukin-1Rα (IL-1Ra; 35.9), interferon α2 (IFN-a2; 34.0), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2; 17.4), and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; 17.4). The same pattern was observed among future lung cancer cases for G-CSF (27.7), GM-CSF (13.3), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-a; 8.6). By contrast, the majority of biomarkers studied showed no significant correlation with future head and neck cancer development. This study provides the first direct evidence that multiple inflammatory biomarkers are coordinately elevated in future lung and esophageal cancer patients 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis. PMID:25040886

  1. Prediagnostic serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers are correlated with future development of lung and esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Keeley, Brieze R; Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Poustchi, Hossein; Pak, Jamie S; Brennan, Paul; Khademi, Hooman; Genden, Eric M; Abnet, Christian C; Dawsey, Sanford M; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza; Sikora, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that prediagnostic serum levels of 20 cancer-associated inflammatory biomarkers correlate directly with future development of head and neck, esophageal, and lung cancers in a high-risk prospective cohort. This is a nested case–control pilot study of subjects enrolled in the Golestan Cohort Study, an ongoing epidemiologic project assessing cancer trends in Golestan, Iran. We measured a panel of 20 21cytokines, chemokines, and inflammatory molecules using Luminex technology in serum samples collected 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis in 78 aerodigestive cancer cases and 81 controls. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon rank sum test, odds ratios, receiver operating characteristic areas of discrimination, and multivariate analysis. Biomarkers were profoundly and globally elevated in future esophageal and lung cancer patients compared to controls. Odds ratios were significant for association between several biomarkers and future development of esophageal cancer, including interleukin-1Rα (IL-1Ra; 35.9), interferon α2 (IFN-a2; 34.0), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2; 17.4), and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; 17.4). The same pattern was observed among future lung cancer cases for G-CSF (27.7), GM-CSF (13.3), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-a; 8.6). By contrast, the majority of biomarkers studied showed no significant correlation with future head and neck cancer development. This study provides the first direct evidence that multiple inflammatory biomarkers are coordinately elevated in future lung and esophageal cancer patients 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis. PMID:25040886

  2. CSF Flow in the Brain in the Context of Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Bradley, W G

    2015-05-01

    CSF normally flows back and forth through the aqueduct during the cardiac cycle. During systole, the brain and intracranial vasculature expand and compress the lateral and third ventricles, forcing CSF craniocaudad. During diastole, they contract and flow through the aqueduct reverses. Hyperdynamic CSF flow through the aqueduct is seen when there is ventricular enlargement without cerebral atrophy. Therefore, patients presenting with clinical normal pressure hydrocephalus who have hyperdynamic CSF flow have been found to respond better to ventriculoperitoneal shunting than those with normal or decreased CSF flow. Patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus have also been found to have larger intracranial volumes than sex-matched controls, suggesting that they may have had benign external hydrocephalus as infants. While their arachnoidal granulations clearly have decreased CSF resorptive capacity, it now appears that this is fixed and that the arachnoidal granulations are not merely immature. Such patients appear to develop a parallel pathway for CSF to exit the ventricles through the extracellular space of the brain and the venous side of the glymphatic system. This pathway remains functional until late adulthood when the patient develops deep white matter ischemia, which is characterized histologically by myelin pallor (ie, loss of lipid). The attraction between the bare myelin protein and the CSF increases resistance to the extracellular outflow of CSF, causing it to back up, resulting in hydrocephalus. Thus idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus appears to be a "2 hit" disease: benign external hydrocephalus in infancy followed by deep white matter ischemia in late adulthood.

  3. Diabetes Limits Stem Cell Mobilization Following G-CSF but Not Plerixafor.

    PubMed

    Fadini, Gian Paolo; Fiala, Mark; Cappellari, Roberta; Danna, Marianna; Park, Soo; Poncina, Nicol; Menegazzo, Lisa; Albiero, Mattia; DiPersio, John; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith; Avogaro, Angelo

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies suggest that diabetes impairs hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization in response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). In this study, we tested whether the CXCR4 antagonist plerixafor, differently from G-CSF, is effective in mobilizing HSCs in patients with diabetes. In a prospective study, individuals with and without diabetes (n = 10/group) were administered plerixafor to compare CD34(+) HSC mobilization; plerixafor was equally able to mobilize CD34(+) HSCs in the two groups, whereas in historical data, G-CSF was less effective in patients with diabetes. In a retrospective autologous transplantation study conducted on 706 patients, diabetes was associated with poorer mobilization in patients who received G-CSF with/without chemotherapy, whereas it was not in patients who received G-CSF plus plerixafor. Similarly in an allogeneic transplantation study (n = 335), diabetes was associated with poorer mobilization in patients who received G-CSF. Patients with diabetes who received G-CSF without plerixafor had a lower probability of reaching >50/μL CD34(+) HSCs, independent from confounding variables. In conclusion, diabetes negatively impacted HSC mobilization after G-CSF with or without chemotherapy but had no effect on mobilization induced by G-CSF with plerixafor. This finding has major implications for the care of patients with diabetes undergoing stem cell mobilization and transplantation and for the vascular regenerative potential of bone marrow stem cells.

  4. Pleiotropic effects of extended blockade of CSF1R signaling in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Kristin A; Pridans, Clare; Sehgal, Anuj; Tsai, Yi Ting; Bradford, Barry M; Raza, Sobia; Moffat, Lindsey; Gow, Deborah J; Beard, Philippa M; Mabbott, Neil A; Smith, Lee B; Hume, David A

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the role of CSF1R signaling in adult mice using prolonged treatment with anti-CSF1R antibody. Mutation of the CSF1 gene in the op/op mouse produces numerous developmental abnormalities. Mutation of the CSF1R has an even more penetrant phenotype, including perinatal lethality, because of the existence of a second ligand, IL-34. These effects on development provide limited insight into functions of CSF1R signaling in adult homeostasis. The carcass weight and weight of several organs (spleen, kidney, and liver) were reduced in the treated mice, but overall body weight gain was increased. Despite the complete loss of Kupffer cells, there was no effect on liver gene expression. The treatment ablated OCL, increased bone density and trabecular volume, and prevented the decline in bone mass seen in female mice with age. The op/op mouse has a deficiency in pancreatic β cells and in Paneth cells in the gut wall. Only the latter was reproduced by the antibody treatment and was associated with increased goblet cell number but no change in villus architecture. Male op/op mice are infertile as a result of testosterone insufficiency. Anti-CSF1R treatment ablated interstitial macrophages in the testis, but there was no sustained effect on testosterone or LH. The results indicate an ongoing requirement for CSF1R signaling in macrophage and OCL homeostasis but indicate that most effects of CSF1 and CSF1R mutations are due to effects on development.

  5. Development and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies reactive with porcine CSF1R (CD115).

    PubMed

    Moffat, L; Rothwell, L; Garcia-Morales, C; Sauter, K A; Kapetanovic, R; Gow, D J; Hume, D A

    2014-11-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF1) controls the proliferation and differentiation of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. CSF1, alongside a second ligand, interleukin-34 (IL-34), acts by binding to a cell surface receptor (CSF1R). We previously cloned and expressed pig CSF1 and IL-34. Here we produced a pig CSF1R-Ig+pFUSE Fc fusion protein and used it as an immunogen to produce three monoclonal antibodies (ROS8G11, ROS3A5 and ROS3B10) targeted against porcine CSF1R. Specific binding of each monoclonal antibody was confirmed by ELISA, Western blot, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. The antibodies did not block CSF1 signalling. The surface expression of CSF1R in pig peripheral blood was restricted to CD14-positive monocytes and was also detected on lung macrophages. These antibodies provided an opportunity to investigate the increase of available CSF1R during pig BMDM differentiation. The new monoclonal antibodies provide useful reagents to support the study of monocyte and macrophage biology in the pig.

  6. Biomarkers for dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Alvarado, Manuel; Gago, Belén; Navalpotro-Gomez, Irene; Jiménez-Urbieta, Haritz; Rodriguez-Oroz, María C

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive decline is one of the most frequent and disabling nonmotor features of Parkinson's disease. Around 30% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience mild cognitive impairment, a well-established risk factor for the development of dementia. However, mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous entity that involves different types and extents of cognitive deficits. Because it is not currently known which type of mild cognitive impairment confers a higher risk of progression to dementia, it would be useful to define biomarkers that could identify these patients to better study disease progression and possible interventions. In this sense, the identification among patients with Parkinson's disease and mild cognitive impairment of biomarkers associated with dementia would allow the early detection of this process. This review summarizes studies from the past 25 years that have assessed the potential biomarkers of dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease patients. Despite the potential importance, no biomarker has as yet been validated. However, features such as low levels of epidermal and insulin-like growth factors or uric acid in plasma/serum and of Aß in CSF, reduction of cerebral cholinergic innervation and metabolism measured by PET mainly in posterior areas, and hippocampal atrophy in MRI might be indicative of distinct deficits with a distinct risk of dementia in subgroups of patients. Longitudinal studies combining the existing techniques and new approaches are needed to identify patients at higher risk of dementia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27193487

  7. Biomarkers for dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Alvarado, Manuel; Gago, Belén; Navalpotro-Gomez, Irene; Jiménez-Urbieta, Haritz; Rodriguez-Oroz, María C

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive decline is one of the most frequent and disabling nonmotor features of Parkinson's disease. Around 30% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience mild cognitive impairment, a well-established risk factor for the development of dementia. However, mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous entity that involves different types and extents of cognitive deficits. Because it is not currently known which type of mild cognitive impairment confers a higher risk of progression to dementia, it would be useful to define biomarkers that could identify these patients to better study disease progression and possible interventions. In this sense, the identification among patients with Parkinson's disease and mild cognitive impairment of biomarkers associated with dementia would allow the early detection of this process. This review summarizes studies from the past 25 years that have assessed the potential biomarkers of dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease patients. Despite the potential importance, no biomarker has as yet been validated. However, features such as low levels of epidermal and insulin-like growth factors or uric acid in plasma/serum and of Aß in CSF, reduction of cerebral cholinergic innervation and metabolism measured by PET mainly in posterior areas, and hippocampal atrophy in MRI might be indicative of distinct deficits with a distinct risk of dementia in subgroups of patients. Longitudinal studies combining the existing techniques and new approaches are needed to identify patients at higher risk of dementia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  8. AdS duals of matrix strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Jose F.; Samtleben, Henning

    2003-06-01

    We review recent work on the holographic duals of type II and heterotic matrix string theories described by warped AdS3 supergravities. In particular, we compute the spectra of Kaluza-Klein primaries for type I, II supergravities on warped AdS3 × S7 and match them with the primary operators in the dual two-dimensional gauge theories. The presence of non-trivial warp factors and dilaton profiles requires a modification of the familiar dictionary between masses and 'scaling' dimensions of fields and operators. We present these modifications for the general case of domain wall/QFT correspondences between supergravities on warped AdSd+1 × Sq geometries and super Yang-Mills theories with 16 supercharges.

  9. Rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells generated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or FLT3L exhibit distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics.

    PubMed

    N'diaye, Marie; Warnecke, Andreas; Flytzani, Sevasti; Abdelmagid, Nada; Ruhrmann, Sabrina; Olsson, Tomas; Jagodic, Maja; Harris, Robert A; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells are professional APCs that play a central role in the initiation of immune responses. The limited ex vivo availability of dendritic cells inspires the widespread use of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells as an alternative in research. However, the functional characteristics of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells are incompletely understood. Therefore, we compared functional and phenotypic characteristics of rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells generated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or FLT3 ligand bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. A comparison of surface markers revealed that FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells expressed signal regulatory protein α, CD103, and CD4 and baseline levels of MHC class II, CD40, and CD86, which were highly up-regulated upon stimulation. Conversely, GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells constitutively expressed signal regulatory protein α, CD11c, and CD11b but only mildly up-regulated MHC class II, CD40, or CD86 following stimulation. Expression of dendritic cell-associated core transcripts was restricted to FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells . GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells were superior at phagocytosis but were outperformed by FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells at antigen presentation and T cell stimulation in vitro. Stimulated GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells secreted more TNF, CCL5, CCL20, and NO, whereas FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells secreted more IL-6 and IL-12. Finally, whereas GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture supernatants added to resting T cell cultures promoted forkhead box p3(+) regulatory T cell populations, FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture supernatants drove Th17 differentiation. We conclude that rat GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells are functionally distinct. Our data support the current rationale that FLT3

  10. Associations between Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers and Cognition in Early Untreated Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Skogseth, Ragnhild E.; Bronnick, Kolbjorn; Pereira, Joana B.; Mollenhauer, Brit; Weintraub, Daniel; Fladby, Tormod; Aarsland, Dag

    2016-01-01

    Background Mild cognitive impairment and dementia are common, clinically important features of Parkinson's disease (PD). The underlying disease pathology is heterogeneous and not yet well characterized. Biomarkers for cognitive impairment in PD could aid in diagnostic and prognostic evaluation and in the development of new cognitive enhancing treatments. Objective To examine the relationship between CSF markers and cognition in a large, multicentre, cohort study of early, untreated PD, and compare marker concentrations between PD patients with and without MCI and healthy, age-matched controls. Methods 414 early, untreated PD (34% with mild cognitive impairment) and 189 healthy, cognitively intact controls with baseline neuropsychological testing and CSF abeta42, t-tau, p-tau181 and α-synuclein results were included. Multiple linear regression models were constructed with a composite cognition factor, or memory-, or visuospatial- or executive-attention domains as dependent variables, and CSF markers, demographic characteristics and MDS-UPDRS III score as predictors. Results Lower α-synuclein was associated with reduced performance on the executive-attention domain and the composite cognition factor in the whole PD-group. Abeta42 was significantly decreased in PD with mild cognitive impairment compared with controls after adjusting for covariates, while values in PD without MCI were identical to healthy controls. Conclusions The association between reduced CSF α-synuclein concentrations and cognition suggests that α-synuclein pathology contributes to early cognitive impairment in PD, in particular to executive-attentional dysfunction. Longitudinal analyses are needed to determine if this and other CSF biomarkers in early Parkinson's disease are associated with the risk of future cognitive decline and dementia. PMID:26599300

  11. Biomarkers in Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiao Chloe; Woodruff, Prescott G

    2016-08-01

    Biomarkers have been critical for studies of disease pathogenesis and the development of new therapies in severe asthma. In particular, biomarkers of type 2 inflammation have proven valuable for endotyping and targeting new biological agents. Because of these successes in understanding and marking type 2 inflammation, lack of knowledge regarding non-type 2 inflammatory mechanisms in asthma will soon be the major obstacle to the development of new treatments and management strategies in severe asthma. Biomarkers can play a role in these investigations as well by providing insight into the underlying biology in human studies of patients with severe asthma. PMID:27401625

  12. Metabolic products as biomarkers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melancon, M.J.; Alscher, R.; Benson, W.; Kruzynski, G.; Lee, R.F.; Sikka, H.C.; Spies, R.B.; Huggett, Robert J.; Kimerle, Richard A.; Mehrle, Paul M.=; Bergman, Harold L.

    1992-01-01

    Ideally, endogenous biomarkers would indicate both exposure and environmental effects of toxic chemicals; however, such comprehensive biochemical and physiological indices are currently being developed and, at the present time, are unavailable for use in environmental monitoring programs. Continued work is required to validate the use of biochemical and physiological stress indices as useful components of monitoring programs. Of the compounds discussed only phytochelatins and porphyrins are currently in biomarkers in a useful state; however, glutathione,metallothioneins, stress ethylene, and polyamines are promising as biomarkers in environmental monitoring.

  13. Discovering Alzheimer Genetic Biomarkers Using Bayesian Networks.

    PubMed

    Sherif, Fayroz F; Zayed, Nourhan; Fakhr, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contribute most of the genetic variation to the human genome. SNPs associate with many complex and common diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Discovering SNP biomarkers at different loci can improve early diagnosis and treatment of these diseases. Bayesian network provides a comprehensible and modular framework for representing interactions between genes or single SNPs. Here, different Bayesian network structure learning algorithms have been applied in whole genome sequencing (WGS) data for detecting the causal AD SNPs and gene-SNP interactions. We focused on polymorphisms in the top ten genes associated with AD and identified by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. New SNP biomarkers were observed to be significantly associated with Alzheimer's disease. These SNPs are rs7530069, rs113464261, rs114506298, rs73504429, rs7929589, rs76306710, and rs668134. The obtained results demonstrated the effectiveness of using BN for identifying AD causal SNPs with acceptable accuracy. The results guarantee that the SNP set detected by Markov blanket based methods has a strong association with AD disease and achieves better performance than both naïve Bayes and tree augmented naïve Bayes. Minimal augmented Markov blanket reaches accuracy of 66.13% and sensitivity of 88.87% versus 61.58% and 59.43% in naïve Bayes, respectively. PMID:26366461

  14. Discovering Alzheimer Genetic Biomarkers Using Bayesian Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Fayroz F.; Zayed, Nourhan; Fakhr, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contribute most of the genetic variation to the human genome. SNPs associate with many complex and common diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Discovering SNP biomarkers at different loci can improve early diagnosis and treatment of these diseases. Bayesian network provides a comprehensible and modular framework for representing interactions between genes or single SNPs. Here, different Bayesian network structure learning algorithms have been applied in whole genome sequencing (WGS) data for detecting the causal AD SNPs and gene-SNP interactions. We focused on polymorphisms in the top ten genes associated with AD and identified by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. New SNP biomarkers were observed to be significantly associated with Alzheimer's disease. These SNPs are rs7530069, rs113464261, rs114506298, rs73504429, rs7929589, rs76306710, and rs668134. The obtained results demonstrated the effectiveness of using BN for identifying AD causal SNPs with acceptable accuracy. The results guarantee that the SNP set detected by Markov blanket based methods has a strong association with AD disease and achieves better performance than both naïve Bayes and tree augmented naïve Bayes. Minimal augmented Markov blanket reaches accuracy of 66.13% and sensitivity of 88.87% versus 61.58% and 59.43% in naïve Bayes, respectively. PMID:26366461

  15. CSF shunts 50 years on--past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Drake, J M; Kestle, J R; Tuli, S

    2000-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunts were invented almost 50 years ago. While their introduction revolutionized the treatment of hydrocephalus, their complications have become legendary, and the focus of much investigation and development of new devices. New devices have been based upon improved understanding of the pathophysiology of hydrocephalus or shunt complications. Despite the rational, or frequently "more physiological," functioning of these devices, all too often unexpected complications have ensued, and the initial enthusiasm for the devices has waned. Assessing the efficacy of the devices has been difficult, owing to the lack of properly conducted studies. Nevertheless, the overall impact of shunt design improvements has seemed very limited. A recent randomized trial of CSF shunt design, examining the failure rates of two new and widely used valves (the Cordis Orbis Sigma and the Medtronic PS Medical Delta valves) failed to find any advantage of these over standard valve designs, many of which have been used almost since the inception of CSF shunts. A search for risk factors for failure, in a post hoc analysis of the data, indicated only that the etiology of the hydrocephalus and the position and local environment of the ventricular catheter tip were probably important. Remarkably, the rate of change in the size of the ventricles and the final ventricular size were not different despite the substantial differences in flow characteristics of the two new valves. Shunt failure rates of less than 5% at 1 year, with infection rates of less than 1%, seem like reasonable goals for the next decade in the new millenium. This can be achieved through basic research into the pathophysiology of shunt failure with improved mathematical models, and perhaps animal models of shunt failure. Efficacy of new devices or treatments must be scrutinized scientifically so as not to waste valuable resources and time on unproven treatments. Uncontrolled series and testimonial

  16. Elevated CSF dynorphin A [1-8] in Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leckman, J F; Riddle, M A; Berrettini, W H; Anderson, G M; Hardin, M; Chappell, P; Bissette, G; Nemeroff, C B; Goodman, W K; Cohen, D J

    1988-01-01

    A recent neuropathological study has reported decreased levels of dynorphin A immunoreactivity in striato-pallidal fibers in the brain of a patient with severe Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (TS). This observation, taken with the neuroanatomic distribution of dynorphin and its broad range of motor and behavioral effects, has led to speculation concerning its role in the pathobiology of TS. We report on the presence of elevated concentrations of dynorphin A [1-8] in the CSF of 7 TS patients, aged 20 to 45 years. The increase in CSF dynorphin was found to be associated with the severity of the obsessive compulsive symptoms but not with tic severity in these patients. Although CSF studies lack the precision necessary to address questions of selective involvement of neuronal system in specific CNS locations, these findings suggest that endogenous opioids are involved in the pathobiology of TS and related disorders. Tourette's syndrome (TS) is a chronic neuropsychiatric disorder of childhood onset that is characterized by multiple motor and phonic tics that wax and wane in severity and an array of behavioral problems including some forms of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) (1). Once thought to be a rare condition, the prevalence of TS is now estimated to be one case per 1,000 boys and one case per 10,000 girls, and milder variants of the syndrome are likely to occur in a sizeable percentage of the population (2). Although the etiology of TS remains unknown, the vertical transmission of TS within families follows a pattern consistent with an autosomal dominant form of inheritance (3,4). Neurobiologic and pharmacological data have implicated central monoaminergic and neuropeptidergic systems in the pathophysiology of TS, and basal ganglia structures remain the prime candidates as the neuroanatomical origin for TS and related conditions (1). Endogenous opioids, including dynorphin and met-enkephalin are concentrated in structures of the basal ganglia (5), are known to

  17. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia

    SciTech Connect

    Koshida, Ryusuke Oishi, Hisashi Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-17

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia. - Highlights: • GM-CSF alters the phenotype of microglia in vitro more potently than M-CSF. • Transcription factor MafB antagonizes the effect of GM-CSF on microglia in vitro. • MafB deficiency leads to RhoA activation in microglia in response to GM-CSF. • We show for the first time the function of MafB in microglia.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in patients with plasma HIV RNA below 20 copies/mL

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Andrea; Atzori, Cristiana; Romito, Alessandra; Ecclesia, Sara; Imperiale, Daniele; Audagnotto, Sabrina; Chiara Alberione, Maria; Trentalange, Alice; Di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low level HIV-1 CSF replication (CsfLLV) is often found even in patients with controlled plasma viraemia. The clinical consequences of such finding are uncertain; however, both symptomatic neurological disturbances and neurocognitive disorders may arise in the context of CSF-escape. Two reports suggested that low level replication in the CSF may be associated with increased CSF neopterine although the impact on other markers of neuroinflammation/damage is currently unknown. Materials and Methods Patients with neurocognitive disorders, new neurological symptoms or followed in longitudinal studies were included provided that they were on HAART, with last available viral load below 20 copies/mL and without central nervous system (CNS)-involving infections/neoplasms. After brain Magnetic Resonance (MR) CSF HIV RNA (CAP/CTM HIV-1 v2.0) and biomarkers [total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau (p-tau), 1–42 Beta amyloid (Beta42), neopterine and S100beta] were measured through validated methods. Data are presented as medians (IQR); non-parametric tests are used for all analysis. Results 70 patients [66.7% male, median age 47.8 years (40–56), median BMI 22.2 kg/m2 (20–24)] were enrolled. Current and nadir CD4+ cell count were 379 (219–656) and 116 cell/mm3 (46–225); HIV RNA was undetectable since 19.7 months (9–53). CSF HIV RNA was undetectable in 24 (34.3%), below 20 copies/mL in 26 (37.1%), above 20 copies/mL in 25 patients [35.7%, median 69 copies/mL (41–134]). Median (IQR) CSF biomarkers values were as follows: t-tau 109 pg/mL (<75–161), p-tau 31.6 pg/mL (23.4–35.4), Beta42 818 pg/mL (623–973), neopterine 0.58 ng/mL (0.45–0.87) and S100beta 149 pg/mL (110–186). Patients with CsfLLV did not show significant differences as for demographic, therapeutic, virological, radiological variables. t-tau (134 vs 92.6, p=0.05) and Beta42 (953 vs 675, p=0.007) were higher in patients with CsfLLV. Neopterine levels were directly associated with p

  19. Meloxicam, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, increases the level of serum G-CSF and might be usable as an auxiliary means in G-CSF therapy.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Pospísil, M; Znojil, V; Holá, J; Vacek, A; Streitová, D

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoiesis-modulating action of meloxicam, a cyclooxyge-nase-2 inhibitor, has been evaluated in mice. Increased serum level of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) after meloxicam administration has been found in sublethally gamma-irradiated animals. In further experiments hematopoiesis-stimulating effects of meloxicam and G-CSF given alone or in combination have been investigated. Granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells counts were used to monitor these effects. Meloxicam and exogenous G-CSF did not act synergistically when given in combination, but could be mutually substituted during their repeated administration. The results suggest a promising possibility of using meloxicam as an auxiliary drug reducing the high costs of G-CSF therapy of myelosuppression.

  20. Biomarker analysis for oncology.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yinfa; Gamagedara, Sanjeewa

    2015-01-01

    Cancer biomarkers are biological, chemical or biophysical entities that are present in tumor tissues or body fluids which give valuable information about current and future behavior of cancer. This review discusses the applicability of biomarkers in different stages of cancer from cancer risk assessment to recurrence. In medical practice, biomarkers can be helpful in finding out one's potential cancer risk, confirming whether or not one is already affected with a particular type of cancer, to which drug will the cancer respond best and in what doses should it be administered, the effectiveness of the treatment and whether the cancer will recur. Although biomarker discovery and validation is a very challenging process, when considering its applications and advantages, it is well worth the effort.

  1. Biomarker time out.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel; Bowser, Robert; Calabresi, Paolo; Zetterberg, Henrik; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J

    2014-10-01

    The advancement of knowledge relies on scientific investigations. The timing between asking a question and data collection defines if a study is prospective or retrospective. Prospective studies look forward from a point in time, are less prone to bias and are considered superior to retrospective studies. This conceptual framework conflicts with the nature of biomarker research. New candidate biomarkers are discovered in a retrospective manner. There are neither resources nor time for prospective testing in all cases. Relevant sources for bias are not covered. Ethical questions arise through the time penalty of an overly dogmatic concept. The timing of sample collection can be separated from testing biomarkers. Therefore the moment of formulating a hypothesis may be after sample collection was completed. A conceptual framework permissive to asking research questions without the obligation to bow to the human concept of calendar time would simplify biomarker research, but will require new safeguards against bias.

  2. A Novel Point-of-Care Biomarker Recognition Method: Validation by Detecting Marker for Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Pentyala, Sahana; Muller, John; Tumillo, Thomas; Roy, Avijit; Mysore, Pooja; Pentyala, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Biological fluid collection to identify and analyze different disease markers is a routine and normal procedure in health care settings. Body fluids are as varied as urine, blood, mucus, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), tears, semen, etc. The volumes of the collected fluids range from micro liters (e.g., tears, CSF) to tens and hundreds of milliliters (blood, urine, etc.). In some manifestations, a disease marker (particularly protein markers) can occur in trace amounts, yet the fluids collected are in large volumes. To identify these trace markers, cumbersome methods, expensive instruments, and trained personnel are required. We developed an easy method to rapidly capture, concentrate, and identify protein markers in large volumes of test fluids. This method involves the utilization of two antibodies recognizing two different epitopes of the protein biomarker. Antibody-1 helps to capture and concentrate the biomarker and Antibody-2 adsorbed or conjugated to nanogold beads will detect the biomarker. This method was validated in capturing and detecting lipocalin type prostaglandin-D2 synthase, a marker in urine that implicates diabetic nephropathy. A one-step collection, concentration, and detection device was designed based on this method. This device can replace many of the normal body fluid collection devices such as tubes and containers. A one-step fluid collection and biomarker capture and concentration device for rapid diagnosis of diseases has tremendous advantage in terms of cost and providing timely results. PMID:26854148

  3. Chronicity following ischaemia-reperfusion injury depends on tubular-macrophage crosstalk involving two tubular cell-derived CSF-1R activators: CSF-1 and IL-34.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Sanz, Ana Belen; Ortiz, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Two structurally unrelated ligands activate the macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R, c-fms, CD115): M-CSF/CSF-1 and interleukin-34 (IL-34). Both ligands promote macrophage proliferation, survival and differentiation. IL-34 also activates the protein-tyrosine phosphatase ζ receptor (PTP-ζ, PTPRZ1). Both receptors and cytokines are increased during acute kidney injury. While tubular cell-derived CSF-1 is required for kidney repair, Baek et al (J Clin Invest 2015; 125: 3198-3214) have now identified tubular epithelial cell-derived IL-34 as a promoter of kidney neutrophil and macrophage infiltration and tubular cell destruction during experimental kidney ischaemia-reperfusion, leading to chronic injury. IL-34 promoted proliferation of both intrarenal macrophages and bone marrow cells, increasing circulating neutrophils and monocytes and their kidney recruitment. Thus, injured tubular cells release two CSF-1R activators, one (CSF-1) that promotes tubular cell survival and kidney repair and another (IL-34) that promotes chronic kidney damage. These results hold promise for the development of IL-34-targeting strategies to prevent ischaemia-reperfusion kidney injury in contexts such as kidney transplantation. However, careful consideration should be given to the recent characterization by Bezie et al. (J Clin Invest 2015; 125: 3952-3964) of IL-34 as a T regulatory cell (Treg) cytokine that modulates macrophage responses so that IL-34-primed macrophages potentiate the immune suppressive capacity of Tregs and promote graft tolerance. PMID:27190368

  4. Mathematical modeling of CSF pulsatile hydrodynamics based on fluid-solid interaction.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Bastani, Dariush; Najarian, Siamak; Ganji, Fariba; Farmanzad, Farhad; Seddighi, Amir Saeed

    2010-06-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is derived from cerebral blood pressure and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulatory dynamics and can be affected in the course of many diseases. Computer analysis of the ICP time pattern plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and treatment of those diseases. This study proposes the application of Linninger et al.'s [IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 557-565, Apr. 2005] fluid-solid interaction model of CSF hydrodynamic in ventricular system based on our clinical data from a group of patients with brain parenchyma tumor. The clinical experiments include the arterial blood pressure (ABP), venous blood pressure, and ICP in the subarachnoid space (SAS). These data were used as inputs to the model that predicts the intracranial dynamic phenomena. In addition, the model has been modified by considering CSF pulsatile production rate as the major factor of CSF motion. The approximations of ventricle enlargement, CSF pressure distribution in the ventricular system and CSF velocity magnitude in the aqueduct and foramina were obtained in this study. The observation of reversal flow in the CSF flow pattern due to brain tissue compression is another finding in our investigation. Based on the experimental results, no existence of large transmural pressure differences were found in the brain system. The measured pressure drop in the ventricular system was less than 5 Pa. Moreover, the CSF flow pattern, ICP distribution, and velocity magnitude were in good agreement with the published models and CINE (phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging) experiments, respectively.

  5. Protein array–based profiling of CSF identifies RBPJ as an autoantigen in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Querol, Luis; Clark, Pamela L.; Bailey, Mary A.; Cotsapas, Chris; Cross, Anne H.; Hafler, David A.; Kleinstein, Steven H.; Lee, Jae-Yun; Yaari, Gur

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To profile the reactivity of CSF-derived immunoglobulin from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) against a large panel of antigens, to identify disease-specific reactivities. Methods: CSF from subjects with MS with elevated immunoglobulin G and CSF from control subjects presenting with other inflammatory neurologic disease were screened against a protein array consisting of 9,393 proteins. Reactivity to a candidate protein identified using these arrays was confirmed with ELISA and immunocytochemistry. Results: Autoantibodies against one protein on the array, recombination signal binding protein for immunoglobulin kappa J region (RBPJ), discriminated between patients with MS and controls (p = 0.0052). Using a large validation cohort, we found a higher prevalence of autoantibodies against RBPJ in the CSF of patients with MS (12.5%) compared with the CSF of patients with other neurologic diseases (1.6%; p = 0.02) by ELISA. This difference in reactivity was restricted to the CSF as serum reactivity against RBPJ did not differ between patients and controls. The presence of CSF autoantibodies against RBPJ was further confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Conclusions: These data indicate that RBPJ, a ubiquitous protein of the Notch signaling pathway that plays an important role in Epstein-Barr virus infection, is a novel MS autoantigen candidate that is recognized by CSF-derived immunoglobulin G in a subset of patients with MS. PMID:23921886

  6. Exploring Erythropoietin and G-CSF Combination Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) are known to have neuroprotective actions. Based on previous reports showing the synergistic effects of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in experimental models, we investigated the safety of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in patients with chronic stroke. In a pilot study, 3 patients were treated with EPO and G-CSF for 5 consecutive days, with follow-up on day 30. In an exploratory double-blind study, 6 patients were allocated to treatment with either EPO+G-CSF or placebo. Treatment was applied once a day for 5 days per month over 3 months. Participants were followed up for 6 months. To substantiate safety, vital signs, adverse events, and hematological values were measured on days 0, 5, and 30 in each cycle and on day 180. Functional outcomes were determined on day 0 and 180. In the laboratory measurements, EPO+G-CSF combination therapy significantly elevated erythropoietin, CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells, white blood cells, and neutrophils on day 5 of each cycle. There were no observations of serious adverse events. In the functional outcomes, the grip power of the dominant hand was increased in the EPO+G-CSF treatment group. In conclusion, this exploratory study suggests a novel strategy of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy for stroke patients. PMID:27043535

  7. Exploring Erythropoietin and G-CSF Combination Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) are known to have neuroprotective actions. Based on previous reports showing the synergistic effects of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in experimental models, we investigated the safety of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in patients with chronic stroke. In a pilot study, 3 patients were treated with EPO and G-CSF for 5 consecutive days, with follow-up on day 30. In an exploratory double-blind study, 6 patients were allocated to treatment with either EPO+G-CSF or placebo. Treatment was applied once a day for 5 days per month over 3 months. Participants were followed up for 6 months. To substantiate safety, vital signs, adverse events, and hematological values were measured on days 0, 5, and 30 in each cycle and on day 180. Functional outcomes were determined on day 0 and 180. In the laboratory measurements, EPO+G-CSF combination therapy significantly elevated erythropoietin, CD34⁺ hematopoietic stem cells, white blood cells, and neutrophils on day 5 of each cycle. There were no observations of serious adverse events. In the functional outcomes, the grip power of the dominant hand was increased in the EPO+G-CSF treatment group. In conclusion, this exploratory study suggests a novel strategy of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy for stroke patients. PMID:27043535

  8. Bayesian adaptive estimation of the contrast sensitivity function: The quick CSF method

    PubMed Central

    Lesmes, Luis Andres; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Baek, Jongsoo; Albright, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    The contrast sensitivity function (CSF) predicts functional vision better than acuity, but long testing times prevent its psychophysical assessment in clinical and practical applications. This study presents the quick CSF (qCSF) method, a Bayesian adaptive procedure that applies a strategy developed to estimate multiple parameters of the psychometric function (A. B. Cobo-Lewis, 1996; L. L. Kontsevich & C. W. Tyler, 1999). Before each trial, a one-step-ahead search finds the grating stimulus (defined by frequency and contrast) that maximizes the expected information gain (J. V. Kujala & T. J. Lukka, 2006; L. A. Lesmes et al., 2006), about four CSF parameters. By directly estimating CSF parameters, data collected at one spatial frequency improves sensitivity estimates across all frequencies. A psychophysical study validated that CSFs obtained with 100 qCSF trials (~10 min) exhibited good precision across spatial frequencies (SD < 2–3 dB) and excellent agreement with CSFs obtained independently (mean RMSE = 0.86 dB). To estimate the broad sensitivity metric provided by the area under the log CSF (AULCSF), only 25 trials were needed to achieve a coefficient of variation of 15–20%. The current study demonstrates the method’s value for basic and clinical investigations. Further studies, applying the qCSF to measure wider ranges of normal and abnormal vision, will determine how its efficiency translates to clinical assessment. PMID:20377294

  9. Neutralization and clearance of GM-CSF by autoantibodies in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Luca; Campo, Ilaria; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Rodriguez, Blanca Maria Fernandez; Minola, Andrea; Sallusto, Federica; Luisetti, Maurizio; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2015-06-16

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a severe autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies that neutralize GM-CSF resulting in impaired function of alveolar macrophages. In this study, we characterize 21 GM-CSF autoantibodies from PAP patients and find that somatic mutations critically determine their specificity for the self-antigen. Individual antibodies only partially neutralize GM-CSF activity using an in vitro bioassay, depending on the experimental conditions, while, when injected in mice together with human GM-CSF, they lead to the accumulation of a large pool of circulating GM-CSF that remains partially bioavailable. In contrast, a combination of three non-cross-competing antibodies completely neutralizes GM-CSF activity in vitro by sequestering the cytokine in high-molecular-weight complexes, and in vivo promotes the rapid degradation of GM-CSF-containing immune complexes in an Fc-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings provide a plausible explanation for the severe phenotype of PAP patients and for the safety of treatments based on single anti-GM-CSF monoclonal antibodies.

  10. Neutralization and clearance of GM-CSF by autoantibodies in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Luca; Campo, Ilaria; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Rodriguez, Blanca Maria Fernandez; Minola, Andrea; Sallusto, Federica; Luisetti, Maurizio; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a severe autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies that neutralize GM-CSF resulting in impaired function of alveolar macrophages. In this study, we characterize 21 GM-CSF autoantibodies from PAP patients and find that somatic mutations critically determine their specificity for the self-antigen. Individual antibodies only partially neutralize GM-CSF activity using an in vitro bioassay, depending on the experimental conditions, while, when injected in mice together with human GM-CSF, they lead to the accumulation of a large pool of circulating GM-CSF that remains partially bioavailable. In contrast, a combination of three non-cross-competing antibodies completely neutralizes GM-CSF activity in vitro by sequestering the cytokine in high-molecular-weight complexes, and in vivo promotes the rapid degradation of GM-CSF-containing immune complexes in an Fc-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings provide a plausible explanation for the severe phenotype of PAP patients and for the safety of treatments based on single anti-GM-CSF monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26077231

  11. Using 10AFC to further improve the efficiency of the quick CSF method

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Fang; Lesmes, Luis; Bex, Peter; Dorr, Michael; Lu, Zhong-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The contrast sensitivity function (CSF) provides a fundamental characterization of spatial vision, important for basic and clinical applications, but its long testing times have prevented easy, widespread assessment. The original quick CSF method was developed using a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) grating orientation identification task (Lesmes, Lu, Baek, & Albright, 2010), and obtained precise CSF assessments while reducing the testing burden to only 50 trials. In this study, we attempt to further improve the efficiency of the quick CSF method by exploiting the properties of psychometric functions in multiple-alternative forced choice (m-AFC) tasks. A simulation study evaluated the effect of the number of alternatives m on the efficiency of the sensitivity measurement by the quick CSF method, and a psychophysical study validated the quick CS method in a 10AFC task. We found that increasing the number of alternatives of the forced-choice task greatly improved the efficiency of CSF assessment in both simulation and psychophysical studies. The quick CSF method based on a 10-letter identification task can assess the CSF with an averaged standard deviation of 0.10 decimal log unit in less than 2 minutes. PMID:26161631

  12. G-CSF promotes autophagy and reduces neural tissue damage after spinal cord injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuji; Liu, Shangming; Zhang, Xianghong; Wang, Liyan; Gao, Jiangang; Han, Aiqing; Hao, Aijun

    2015-12-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was investigated for its capacity to induce autophagy and related neuroprotective mechanisms in an acute spinal cord injury model. To accomplish this goal, we established a mouse spinal cord hemisection model to test the effects of recombinant human G-CSF. The results showed that autophagy was activated after spinal cord injury and G-CSF appears to induce a more rapid activation of autophagy within injured spinal cords as compared with that of non-treated animals. Apoptosis as induced in mechanically injured neurons with G-CSF treatment was enhanced after inhibiting autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), which partially blocked the neuroprotective effect of autophagy as induced by G-CSF. In addition, G-CSF inhibited the activity of the NF-κB signal pathway in neurons after mechanical injury. We conclude that G-CSF promotes autophagy by inhibiting the NF-κB signal pathway and protects neuronal structure after spinal cord injury. We therefore suggest that G-CSF, which rapidly induces autophagy after spinal cord injury to inhibit neuronal apoptosis, may thus provide an effective auxiliary therapeutic intervention for spinal cord injury.

  13. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) produced in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Kraševec, Nada; Milunović, Tatjana; Lasnik, Marija Anžur; Lukančič, Irena; Komel, Radovan; Porekar, Vladka Gaberc

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, a fungal production system is described for expression and secretion of the medically important human protein G-CSF, in Aspergillus niger. A reliable strategy was chosen with in-frame fusion of G-CSF behind a KEX2 cleavage site downstream of the coding region of the highly secreted homologous glucoamylase. This provided secretion levels of 5-10 mg/l culture medium of correctly processed G-CSF, although the majority of the protein (>90%) was biologically inactive. Following denaturation/ concentration and chromatographic separation/ renaturation, the G-CSF proliferation activity increased considerably, and analytical immobilised metal affinity chromatography confirmed the monomeric and correctly folded protein. These data suggest that this human secretory protein secreted into the medium of A. niger was not correctly folded, and that it escaped the endoplasmic reticulum folding control systems. This is compared to the folding of G-CSF produced in bacteria and yeast. PMID:25551710

  14. Development of Membrane-Bound GM-CSF and IL-18 as an Effective Tumor Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ta-Chun; Chuang, Chih-Hung; Kao, Chien-Han; Hsieh, Yuan-Chin; Cheng, Kuang-Hung; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Cheng, Chiu-Min; Chen, Chien-Shu; Cheng, Tian-Lu

    2015-01-01

    The development of effective adjuvant is the key factor to boost the immunogenicity of tumor cells as a tumor vaccine. In this study, we expressed membrane-bound granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) as adjuvants in tumor cells to stimulate immune response. B7 transmembrane domain fused GM-CSF and IL-18 was successfully expressed in the cell membrane and stimulated mouse splenocyte proliferation. Co-expression of GM-CSF and IL-18 reduced tumorigenesis (P<0.05) and enhanced tumor protective efficacy (P<0.05) significantly in comparison with GM-CSF alone. These results indicated that the combination of GM-CSF andIL-18 will enhance the immunogenicity of a cell-based anti-tumor vaccine. This membrane-bound approach can be applied to other cytokines for the development of novel vaccine strategies. PMID:26186692

  15. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in CSF from Three Patients with Meningoencephalitis by Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ming; Zhou, Jiali; Zhu, Yicheng; Zhang, Yinxin; Lv, Xia; Sun, Ruixue; Shen, Ao; Ren, Haitao; Cui, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Encephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) is rare but sometimes fatal. Early diagnosis is difficult using routine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests, while next-generation sequencing (NGS) is increasingly being used for the detection and characterization of pathogens. Methods This study set up and applied unbiased NGS to detect L. monocytogenes in CSF collected from three cases of clinically suspected listeria meningoencephalitis. Results Three cases of patients with acute/subacute meningoencephalitis are reported. Magnetic resonance imaging and blood cultures led to a suspected diagnosis of L. monocytogenes, while the CSF cultures were negative. Unbiased NGS of CSF identified and sequenced reads corresponding to L. monocytogenes in all three cases. Conclusions This is the first report highlighting the feasibility of applying NGS of CSF as a diagnostic method for central nervous system (CNS) L. monocytogenes infection. Routine application of this technology in clinical microbiology will significantly improve diagnostic methods for CNS infectious diseases.

  16. The tumor microenvironment underlies acquired resistance to CSF-1R inhibition in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Quail, Daniela F; Bowman, Robert L; Akkari, Leila; Quick, Marsha L; Schuhmacher, Alberto J; Huse, Jason T; Holland, Eric C; Sutton, James C; Joyce, Johanna A

    2016-05-20

    Macrophages accumulate with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) progression and can be targeted via inhibition of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) to regress high-grade tumors in animal models of this cancer. However, whether and how resistance emerges in response to sustained CSF-1R blockade is unknown. We show that although overall survival is significantly prolonged, tumors recur in >50% of mice. Gliomas reestablish sensitivity to CSF-1R inhibition upon transplantation, indicating that resistance is tumor microenvironment-driven. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway activity was elevated in recurrent GBM, driven by macrophage-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and tumor cell IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R). Combining IGF-1R or PI3K blockade with CSF-1R inhibition in recurrent tumors significantly prolonged overall survival. Our findings thus reveal a potential therapeutic approach for treating resistance to CSF-1R inhibitors. PMID:27199435

  17. Blood-Brain Barrier Function and Biomarkers of Central Nervous System Injury in Rickettsial Versus Other Neurological Infections in Laos.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Sabine; Sunyakumthorn, Piyanate; Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Panyanivong, Phonepasith; Sengduangphachanh, Amphonsavanh; Phouminh, Phonelavanh; Anantatat, Tippawan; Chanthongthip, Anisone; Lee, Sue J; Dubot-Pérès, Audrey; Day, Nicholas P J; Paris, Daniel H; Newton, Paul N; Turner, Gareth D H

    2015-08-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers were measured in patients admitted to hospital with severe neurological infections in the Lao People's Democratic Republic (N = 66), including bacterial meningitis (BM; N = 9) or tuberculosis meningitis (TBM; N = 11), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV; N = 25), and rickettsial infections (N = 21) including murine and scrub typhus patients. The albumin index (AI) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) levels were significantly higher in BM and TBM than other diseases but were also raised in individual rickettsial patients. Total tau protein was significantly raised in the CSF of JEV patients. No differences were found between clinical or neurological symptoms, AI, or biomarker levels that allowed distinction between severe neurological involvement by Orientia tsutsugamushi compared with Rickettsia species.

  18. A Multiplex Protein Panel Applied to Cerebrospinal Fluid Reveals Three New Biomarker Candidates in ALS but None in Neuropathic Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Freyhult, Eva; Bodolea, Constantin; Ekegren, Titti; Larsson, Anders; Gustafsson, Mats G.; Katila, Lenka; Bergquist, Jonas; Gordh, Torsten; Landegren, Ulf; Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and apply a novel multiplex panel of solid-phase proximity ligation assays (SP-PLA) requiring only 20 μL of samples, as a tool for discovering protein biomarkers for neurological disease and treatment thereof in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We applied the SP-PLA to samples from two sets of patients with poorly understood nervous system pathologies amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and neuropathic pain, where patients were treated with spinal cord stimulation (SCS). Forty-seven inflammatory and neurotrophic proteins were measured in samples from 20 ALS patients and 15 neuropathic pain patients, and compared to normal concentrations in CSF from control individuals. Nineteen of the 47 proteins were detectable in more than 95% of the 72 controls. None of the 21 proteins detectable in CSF from neuropathic pain patients were significantly altered by SCS. The levels of the three proteins, follistatin, interleukin-1 alpha, and kallikrein-5 were all significantly reduced in the ALS group compared to age-matched controls. These results demonstrate the utility of purpose designed multiplex SP-PLA panels in CSF biomarker research for understanding neuropathological and neurotherapeutic mechanisms. The protein changes found in the CSF of ALS patients may be of diagnostic interest. PMID:26914813

  19. Label-Free LC-MS/MS Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Identifies Protein/Pathway Alterations and Candidate Biomarkers for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Mahlon A; An, Jiyan; Hood, Brian L; Conrads, Thomas P; Bowser, Robert P

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome has proven valuable to the study of neurodegenerative disorders. To identify new protein/pathway alterations and candidate biomarkers for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we performed comparative proteomic profiling of CSF from sporadic ALS (sALS), healthy control (HC), and other neurological disease (OND) subjects using label-free liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 1712 CSF proteins were detected and relatively quantified by spectral counting. Levels of several proteins with diverse biological functions were significantly altered in sALS samples. Enrichment analysis was used to link these alterations to biological pathways, which were predominantly related to inflammation, neuronal activity, and extracellular matrix regulation. We then used our CSF proteomic profiles to create a support vector machines classifier capable of discriminating training set ALS from non-ALS (HC and OND) samples. Four classifier proteins, WD repeat-containing protein 63, amyloid-like protein 1, SPARC-like protein 1, and cell adhesion molecule 3, were identified by feature selection and externally validated. The resultant classifier distinguished ALS from non-ALS samples with 83% sensitivity and 100% specificity in an independent test set. Collectively, our results illustrate the utility of CSF proteomic profiling for identifying ALS protein/pathway alterations and candidate disease biomarkers.

  20. Digital subtraction myelography for the identification of spontaneous spinal CSF-venous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Moser, Franklin G; Maya, M Marcel; Prasad, Ravi S

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE In most patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension, a spinal CSF leak can be found, but occasionally, no leak can be demonstrated despite extensive spinal imaging. Failure to localize a CSF leak limits treatment options. The authors recently reported the discovery of CSF-venous fistulas in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension and now report on the use of digital subtraction myelography in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension but no CSF leak identifiable on conventional spinal imaging (i.e., non-digital subtraction myelography). METHODS The patient population consisted of 53 consecutive patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension who underwent digital subtraction myelography but in whom no spinal CSF leak (i.e., presence of extradural CSF) was identifiable on conventional spinal imaging. RESULTS The mean age of the 33 women and 20 men was 53.4 years (range 29-71 years). A CSF-venous fistula was demonstrated in 10 (19%) of the 53 patients. A CSF-venous fistula was found in 9 (27%) of the 33 women and in 1 (5%) of the 20 men (p = 0.0697). One patient was treated successfully with percutaneous injection of fibrin sealant. Nine patients underwent surgery for the fistula. Surgery resulted in complete resolution of symptoms in 8 patients (follow-up 7-25 months), and in 1 patient, symptoms recurred after 4 months. CONCLUSIONS In this study, the authors found a CSF-venous fistula in approximately one-fifth of the patients with recalcitrant spontaneous intracranial hypotension but no CSF leak identifiable on conventional spinal imaging. The authors suggest that digital subtraction myelography be considered in this patient population. PMID:26849709

  1. Concordant HER2 status between metastatic breast cancer cells in CSF and primary breast cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Park, In Hae; Kwon, Youngmee; Ro, Jae Y; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil

    2010-08-01

    It is not known whether the HER2 status of malignant CSF cells coincides with that of the original breast carcinoma cells. We investigated whether CSF cytology specimens were suitable to evaluate HER2 status by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in patient with leptomeningeal metastasis (LM). Both formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) breast cancer tissue and liquid based CSF cytology specimens were evaluated for HER2 status in 16 patients with LM. We evaluated HER2 gene amplification using FISH on destained CSF cytology slides containing a minimum of 20 malignant cells per slide, and compared these with the HER2 status by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or FISH in FFPE tissues. HER2 was considered positive when the HER2:CEP17 ratio was >or=2.0 or IHC 3+. Of 16 cases, four were HER2 positive and 12 were HER2 negative by FISH analysis in CSF cytology. All CSF-positive cases were HER2 positive by IHC in FFPE tissue. Of 12 HER2 FISH-negative cases in CSF cytology, 10 were HER2 negative (IHC 0 or 1+) and two were IHC 2+ in FFPE tissue. Two IHC 2+ cases had HER2:CEP17 ratios of 1.27 and 2.1, respectively, by FISH in FFPE tissue. As a result, the HER2 status concordance rate between metastatic breast cancer cells in CSF and FFPE primary tissue by IHC and FISH was very high. When CSF cytology specimens were appropriately prepared and had adequate cellularity without dry artifacts, the CSF cytology was suitable to evaluate HER2 status by FISH analysis in patients with LM.

  2. CSF/serum quotient graphs for the evaluation of intrathecal C4 synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Docal, Barbara; Dorta-Contreras, Alberto J; Bu-Coifiu-Fanego, Raisa; Rey, Alexis Rodriguez

    2009-01-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/serum quotient graphs have been used previously to determine local synthesis in brain of immunoglobulins and C3 complement component. The aim of this study was to use the same technique to construct quotient graphs, or Reibergrams, for the beta globulin C4 and to evaluate the method for assessing intrathecal synthesis in neurological disease. Methods The constants in the previously-defined Reibergram for immunoglobulin IgA were used to calculate the CSF/serum quotient for C4. CSF and serum were analyzed for C4, IgA and albumin from a total of 12 patients with meningoencephalitis caused by encapsulated microorganisms and 10 subjects without infections or inflammatory neurological disease, some of which had dysfunction of the blood-CSF barrier, Results The formula and C4 Reibergram with the constants previously found for IgA, determined the intrathecal C4 synthesis in CSF. The intrathecal C4 fraction in CSF (C4 loc in mg/l) was compared to the C4-Index (fraction of CSF: serum for C 4/fraction of CSF: serum for albumin). There was a significant correlation between the two formulae. The CSF/Serum quotient graph was superior for detecting intrathecal synthesis of C4 under variable conditions of blood-CSF barrier permeability. Conclusion The C4 Reibergram can be used to quantify the intrathecal synthesis of this component of the complement system in different infectious diseases of the central nervous system and is especially useful for patients with blood-brain barrier dysfunction. PMID:19573230

  3. Cost and clinical analysis of autologous hematopoietic stem cell mobilization with G-CSF and plerixafor compared to G-CSF and cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Paul; Islas-Ohlmayer, Miguel; Murphy, Julie; Hougham, Maureen; MacPherson, Jill; Winkler, Kurt; Silva, Matthew; Steinberg, Michael; Matous, Jeffrey; Selvey, Sheryl; Maris, Michael; McSweeney, Peter A

    2011-05-01

    Plerixafor plus granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to mobilize more CD34(+) cells than G-CSF alone for autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, many centers use chemotherapy followed by G-CSF to mobilize CD34(+) cells prior to HSCT. We performed a retrospective study of patients who participated in the expanded access program (EAP) of plerixafor and G-CSF for initial mobilization of CD34(+) cells, and compared outcomes to matched historic controls mobilized with cyclophosphamide 3-5 g/m(2) and G-CSF at 2 centers that participated in the EAP Control patients were matched for age, sex, disease, disease stage, and number of prior therapies. Mobilization costs were defined to be the costs of medical procedures, resource utilization, and medications. Median national CMS reimbursement rates were used to establish the costs of procedures, hospitalization, provider visits, apheresis, CD34(+) cell processing and cryopreservation. Average sale price was used for G-CSF, plerixafor, cyclophosphamide, MESNA, antiemetics, and antimicrobials. A total of 33 patients from the EAP and 33 matched controls were studied. Two patients in the control group were hospitalized for neutropenic fever during the mobilization period. Apheresis started on the scheduled day in 33 (100%) study patients and in 29 (88%) control patients (P = 0.04). Sixteen (48%) control patients required weekend apheresis. There was no difference in number of CD34(+) cells collected between the groups, and all patients proceeded to HSCT with no difference in engraftment outcomes. Median total cost of mobilization was not different between the plerixafor/G-CSF and control groups ($14,224 versus $18,824; P = .45). In conclusion, plerixafor/G-CSF and cyclophosphamide/G-CSF for upfront mobilization of CD34(-) cells resulted in similar numbers of cells collected, costs of mobilization, and clinical outcomes. Additionally, plerixafor/G-CSF mobilization resulted in more

  4. Kidney biomarkers in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Francoz, Claire; Nadim, Mitra K; Durand, François

    2016-10-01

    Impaired renal function due to acute kidney injury (AKI) and/or chronic kidney diseases (CKD) is frequent in cirrhosis. Recurrent episodes of AKI may occur in end-stage cirrhosis. Differential diagnosis between functional (prerenal and hepatorenal syndrome) and acute tubular necrosis (ATN) is crucial. The concept that AKI and CKD represent a continuum rather than distinct entities, is now emerging. Not all patients with AKI have a potential for full recovery. Precise evaluation of kidney function and identification of kidney changes in patients with cirrhosis is central in predicting reversibility. This review examines current biomarkers for assessing renal function and identifying the cause and mechanisms of impaired renal function. When CKD is suspected, clearance of exogenous markers is the reference to assess glomerular filtration rate, as creatinine is inaccurate and cystatin C needs further evaluation. Recent biomarkers may help differentiate ATN from hepatorenal syndrome. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin has been the most extensively studied biomarker yet, however, there are no clear-cut values that differentiate each of these conditions. Studies comparing ATN and hepatorenal syndrome in cirrhosis, do not include a gold standard. Combinations of innovative biomarkers are attractive to identify patients justifying simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation. Accurate biomarkers of underlying CKD are lacking and kidney biopsy is often contraindicated in this population. Urinary microRNAs are attractive although not definitely validated. Efforts should be made to develop biomarkers of kidney fibrosis, a common and irreversible feature of CKD, whatever the cause. Biomarkers of maladaptative repair leading to irreversible changes and CKD after AKI are also promising.

  5. Biomarkers for antipsychotic therapies.

    PubMed

    Pich, Emilio Merlo; Vargas, Gabriel; Domenici, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Molecular biomarkers for antipsychotic treatments have been conceptually linked to the measurements of dopamine functions, mostly D(2) receptor occupancy, either by imaging using selective PET/SPECT radioactive tracers or by assessing plasma prolactin levels. A quest for novel biomarkers was recently proposed by various academic, health service, and industrial institutions driven by the need for better treatments of psychoses. In this review we conceptualize biomarkers within the Translational Medicine paradigm whose goal was to provide support to critical decision-making in drug discovery. At first we focused on biomarkers as outcome measure of clinical studies by searching into the database clinicaltrial.gov. The results were somewhat disappointing, showing that out of 1,659 antipsychotic trials only 18 used a biomarker as an outcome measure. Several of these trials targeted plasma lipids as sentinel marker for metabolic adverse effects associated with the use of atypical antipsychotics, while only few studies were aimed to new disease specific biological markers. As an example of a mechanistic biomarker, we described the work done to progress the novel class of glycine transporter inhibitors as putative treatment for negative symptoms of schizophrenia. We also review how large-scale multiplex biological assays were applied to samples from tissues of psychiatric patients, so to learn from changes of numerous analytes (metabolic products, lipids, proteins, RNA transcripts) about the substrates involved in the disease. We concluded that a stringent implementation of these techniques could contribute to the endophenotypic characterization of patients, helping in the identification of key biomarkers to drive personalized medicine and new treatment development. PMID:23129338

  6. Agricultural Education: Value Adding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riesenberg, Lou E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This issue develops the theme of "Agricultural Education--Value Adding." The concept value adding has been a staple in the world of agricultural business for describing adding value to a commodity that would profit the producer and the local community. Agricultural education should add value to individuals and society to justify agricultural…

  7. Metallomic Biomarkers in Cerebrospinal fluid and Serum in patients with Parkinson’s disease in Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Jaya; Ahmed, Shiek S. S. J.; Ng, Hon Keung Tony; Naiya, Tufan; Ghosh, Epsita; Banerjee, Tapas Kumar; Lakshmi, Jaya; Guha, Gautam; Rao, Vadlamudi Raghavendra

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with the absence of markers for diagnosis. Several studies on PD reported the elements imbalance in biofluids as biomarkers. However, their results remained inconclusive. This study integrates metallomics, multivariate and artificial neural network (ANN) to understand element variations in CSF and serum of PD patients from the largest cohort of Indian population to solve the inconsistent results of previous studies. Also, this study is aimed to (1) ascertain a common element signature between CSF and serum. (2) Assess cross sectional element variation with clinical symptoms. (3) Develop ANN models for rapid diagnosis. A metallomic profile of 110 CSF and 530 serum samples showed significant variations in 10 elements of CSF and six in serum of patients compared to controls. Consistent variations in elements pattern were noticed for Calcium, Magnesium and Iron in both the fluids of PD, which provides feasible diagnosis from serum. Furthermore, implementing multivariate analyses showed clear classification between normal and PD in both the fluids. Also, ANN provides 99% accuracy in detection of disease from CSF and serum. Overall, our analyses demonstrate that elements profile in biofluids of PD will be useful in development of diagnostic markers for PD. PMID:27752066

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurovascular dysfunction in mild dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Melanie D; Sagare, Abhay P; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of age-related dementias. In addition to genetics, environment, and lifestyle, growing evidence supports vascular contributions to dementias including dementia because of AD. Alzheimer's disease affects multiple cell types within the neurovascular unit (NVU), including brain vascular cells (endothelial cells, pericytes, and vascular smooth muscle cells), glial cells (astrocytes and microglia), and neurons. Thus, identifying and integrating biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses and injury with established AD biomarkers, amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau, has a potential to contribute to better understanding of the disease process in dementias including AD. Here, we discuss the existing literature on cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses during early stages of dementia and AD. We suggest that the clinical usefulness of established AD biomarkers, Aβ and tau, could be further improved by developing an algorithm that will incorporate biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses and injury. Such biomarker algorithm could aid in early detection and intervention as well as identify novel treatment targets to delay disease onset, slow progression, and/or prevent AD.

  9. Expanding the Repertoire of Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease: Targeted and Non-targeted Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Galasko, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The first biofluid markers developed for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) used targeted approaches for discovery. These initial biomarkers were directed at key protein constituents of the hallmark brain lesions in AD. Biomarkers for plaques targeted the amyloid beta protein (Aβ) and for tangles, the microtubule-associated protein tau. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of Aβ and tau have excellent diagnostic utility and can be used to monitor aspects of therapeutic development. Recent research has extended our current concepts of AD, which now include a slow buildup of pathology during a long pre-symptomatic period, a complex cascade of pathological pathways in the brain that may accelerate once symptoms develop, the potential of aggregated proteins to spread across brain pathways, and interactions with vascular and other age-associated brain pathologies. There are many potential roles for biomarkers within this landscape. A more diverse set of biomarkers would provide a better picture of the staging and state of pathological events in the brain across the stages of AD. The aim of this review is to focus on methods of biomarker discovery that may help to expand the currently accepted biomarkers. Opportunities and approaches for targeted and non-targeted (or −omic) biomarker discovery are highlighted, with examples from recent studies. How biomarker discoveries can be developed and integrated to become useful tools in diagnostic and therapeutic efforts is discussed. PMID:26733934

  10. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  11. G-CSF loaded biodegradable PLGA nanoparticles prepared by a single oil-in-water emulsion method.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Ho; Park, Tae Gwan

    2006-03-27

    A new formulation method was developed for preparing poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles loaded with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). Lyophilized rhG-CSF powder and PLGA polymer were directly co-dissolved in a single organic phase, and the resulting solution was dispersed into an aqueous solution. PLGA nanoparticles encapsulating rhG-CSF were produced by a spontaneous emulsion/solvent diffusion method. In this manner, rhG-CSF was molecularly dissolved in the polymer phase. Release profile of rhG-CSF from PLGA nanoparticles was compared with those from two kinds of PLGA microparticles which were separately prepared by either single oil-in-water (O/W) or double water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsion technique. The sizes of rhG-CSF loaded nanoparticles, O/W microparticles, and W/O/W microparticles were about 257 nm, 4.7 microm, and 4.3 microm, respectively. For rhG-CSF nanoparticles, about 90% of encapsulated rhG-CSF was released out in a sustained manner from PLGA nanoparticles over a 1 week period, but for rhG-CSF microparticles, only about 20% of rhG-CSF could be released out during the same period. Reversed phase and size exclusion chromatograms revealed that the structural integrity of released rhG-CSF from nanoparticles was nearly intact, compared to that of native rhG-CSF.

  12. Stimulatory versus suppressive effects of GM-CSF on tumor progression in multiple cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Hong, In-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, also called CSF-2) is best known for its critical role in immune modulation and hematopoiesis. A large body of experimental evidence indicates that GM-CSF, which is frequently upregulated in multiple types of human cancers, effectively marks cancer cells with a ‘danger flag' for the immune system. In this context, most studies have focused on its function as an immunomodulator, namely its ability to stimulate dendritic cell (DC) maturation and monocyte/macrophage activity. However, recent studies have suggested that GM-CSF also promotes immune-independent tumor progression by supporting tumor microenvironments and stimulating tumor growth and metastasis. Although some studies have suggested that GM-CSF has inhibitory effects on tumor growth and metastasis, an even greater number of studies show that GM-CSF exerts stimulatory effects on tumor progression. In this review, we summarize a number of findings to provide the currently available information regarding the anticancer immune response of GM-CSG. We then discuss the potential roles of GM-CSF in the progression of multiple types of cancer to provide insights into some of the complexities of its clinical applications. PMID:27364892

  13. Changes in Gene Expression during G-CSF-Induced Emergency Granulopoiesis in Humans.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Corinna C; Borup, Rehannah; Fischer-Nielsen, Anne; Mora-Jensen, Helena; Fossum, Anna; Cowland, Jack B; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Emergency granulopoiesis refers to the increased production of neutrophils in bone marrow and their release into circulation induced by severe infection. Several studies point to a critical role for G-CSF as the main mediator of emergency granulopoiesis. However, the consequences of G-CSF stimulation on the transcriptome of neutrophils and their precursors have not yet been investigated in humans. In this work, we examine the changes in mRNA expression induced by administration of G-CSF in vivo, as a model of emergency granulopoiesis in humans. Blood samples were collected from healthy individuals after 5 d of G-CSF administration. Neutrophil precursors were sorted into discrete stages of maturation by flow cytometry, and RNA was subjected to microarray analysis. mRNA levels were compared with previously published expression levels in corresponding populations of neutrophil precursors isolated from bone marrow of untreated, healthy individuals. One thousand one hundred and ten mRNAs were differentially expressed >2-fold throughout terminal granulopoiesis. Major changes were seen in pathways involved in apoptosis, cytokine signaling, and TLR pathways. In addition, G-CSF treatment reduced the levels of four of five measured granule proteins in mature neutrophils, including the proantibacterial protein hCAP-18, which was completely deficient in neutrophils from G-CSF-treated donors. These results indicate that multiple biological processes are altered to satisfy the increased demand for neutrophils during G-CSF-induced emergency granulopoiesis in humans. PMID:27481851

  14. G-CSF administration after myocardial infarction in mice attenuates late ischemic cardiomyopathy by enhanced arteriogenesis.

    PubMed

    Deindl, Elisabeth; Zaruba, Marc-Michael; Brunner, Stefan; Huber, Bruno; Mehl, Ursula; Assmann, Gerald; Hoefer, Imo E; Mueller-Hoecker, Josef; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael

    2006-05-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI) by bone marrow cell mobilization and by protecting cardiomyocytes from apoptotic cell death. However, its role in collateral artery growth (arteriogenesis) has not been elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of G-CSF on arteriolar growth and cardiac function in a murine MI model. Mice were treated with G-CSF (100 microg/kg/day) directly after MI for 5 consecutive days. G-CSF application resulted in a significant increase of circulating mononuclear cells expressing stem cell markers. Arterioles in the border zone of infarcted myocardium showed an increased expression of ICAM-1 accompanied by an accumulation of bone marrow derived cells and a pronounced proliferation of endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Histology of G-CSF treated mice revealed a lower amount of granulation tissue (67.8 vs. 84.4%) associated with a subsequent reduction in free LV wall thinning and scar extension (23.1 vs. 30.8% of LV). Furthermore, G-CSF treated animals showed a significant improvement of post-MI survival (68.8 vs. 46.2%). Pressure-volume relations revealed a partially restored myocardial function at day 30 (EF: 32.5 vs. 17.2%). Our results demonstrate that G-CSF administration after MI stimulates arteriogenesis and attenuates ischemic cardiomyopathy after MI.

  15. CSF lactate for accurate diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Giulieri, S; Chapuis-Taillard, C; Jaton, K; Cometta, A; Chuard, C; Hugli, O; Du Pasquier, R; Bille, J; Meylan, P; Manuel, O; Marchetti, O

    2015-10-01

    CSF lactate measurement is recommended when nosocomial meningitis is suspected, but its value in community-acquired bacterial meningitis is controversial. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of lactate and other CSF parameters in a prospective cohort of adult patients with acute meningitis. Diagnostic accuracy of lactate and other CSF parameters in patients with microbiologically documented episodes was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The cut-offs with the best diagnostic performance were determined. Forty-five of 61 patients (74%) had a documented bacterial (n = 18; S. pneumoniae, 11; N. meningitidis, 5; other, 2) or viral (n = 27 enterovirus, 21; VZV, 3; other, 3) etiology. CSF parameters were significantly different in bacterial vs. viral meningitis, respectively (p < 0.001 for all comparisons): white cell count (median 1333 vs. 143/mm(3)), proteins (median 4115 vs. 829 mg/l), CSF/blood glucose ratio (median 0.1 vs. 0.52), lactate (median 13 vs. 2.3 mmol/l). ROC curve analysis showed that CSF lactate had the highest accuracy for discriminating bacterial from viral meningitis, with a cutoff set at 3.5 mmol/l providing 100% sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and efficiency. CSF lactate had the best accuracy for discriminating bacterial from viral meningitis and should be included in the initial diagnostic workup of this condition.

  16. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia.

    PubMed

    Koshida, Ryusuke; Oishi, Hisashi; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia.

  17. CSF Tau proteins reduce misdiagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease suspected cases with inconclusive 14-3-3 result.

    PubMed

    Leitão, M J; Baldeiras, I; Almeida, M R; Ribeiro, M H; Santos, A C; Ribeiro, M; Tomás, J; Rocha, S; Santana, I; Oliveira, C R

    2016-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 14-3-3 protein supports sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob (sCJD) diagnosis, but often leads to weak-positive results and lacks standardization. In this study, we explored the added diagnostic value of Total Tau (t-Tau) and phosphorylated Tau (p-Tau) in sCJD diagnosis, particularly in the cases with inconclusive 14-3-3 result. 95 definite sCJD and 287 patients without prion disease (non-CJD) were included in this study. CSF samples were collected in routine clinical diagnosis and analysed for 14-3-3 detection by Western blot (WB). CSF t-Tau and p-Tau were quantified by commercial ELISA kits and PRNP and APOE genotyping assessed by PCR-RFLP. In a regression analysis of the whole cohort, 14-3-3 protein revealed an overall accuracy of 82 % (sensitivity = 96.7 %; specificity = 75.6 %) for sCJD. Regarding 14-3-3 clear positive results, we observed no added value either of t-Tau alone or p-Tau/t-Tau ratio in the model. On the other hand, considering 14-3-3 weak-positive cases, t-Tau protein increased the overall accuracy of 14-3-3 alone from 91 to 94 % and specificity from 74 to 93 % (p < 0.05), with no sensitivity improvement. However, inclusion of p-Tau/t-Tau ratio did not significantly improve the first model (p = 0.0595). Globally, t-Tau protein allowed a further discrimination of 65 % within 14-3-3 inconclusive results. Furthermore, PRNP MV genotype showed a trend to decrease 14-3-3 sensitivity (p = 0.051), but such effect was not seen on t-Tau protein. In light of these results, we suggest that t-Tau protein assay is of significant importance as a second marker in identifying 14-3-3 false-positive results among sCJD probable cases.

  18. CSF Tau proteins reduce misdiagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease suspected cases with inconclusive 14-3-3 result.

    PubMed

    Leitão, M J; Baldeiras, I; Almeida, M R; Ribeiro, M H; Santos, A C; Ribeiro, M; Tomás, J; Rocha, S; Santana, I; Oliveira, C R

    2016-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 14-3-3 protein supports sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob (sCJD) diagnosis, but often leads to weak-positive results and lacks standardization. In this study, we explored the added diagnostic value of Total Tau (t-Tau) and phosphorylated Tau (p-Tau) in sCJD diagnosis, particularly in the cases with inconclusive 14-3-3 result. 95 definite sCJD and 287 patients without prion disease (non-CJD) were included in this study. CSF samples were collected in routine clinical diagnosis and analysed for 14-3-3 detection by Western blot (WB). CSF t-Tau and p-Tau were quantified by commercial ELISA kits and PRNP and APOE genotyping assessed by PCR-RFLP. In a regression analysis of the whole cohort, 14-3-3 protein revealed an overall accuracy of 82 % (sensitivity = 96.7 %; specificity = 75.6 %) for sCJD. Regarding 14-3-3 clear positive results, we observed no added value either of t-Tau alone or p-Tau/t-Tau ratio in the model. On the other hand, considering 14-3-3 weak-positive cases, t-Tau protein increased the overall accuracy of 14-3-3 alone from 91 to 94 % and specificity from 74 to 93 % (p < 0.05), with no sensitivity improvement. However, inclusion of p-Tau/t-Tau ratio did not significantly improve the first model (p = 0.0595). Globally, t-Tau protein allowed a further discrimination of 65 % within 14-3-3 inconclusive results. Furthermore, PRNP MV genotype showed a trend to decrease 14-3-3 sensitivity (p = 0.051), but such effect was not seen on t-Tau protein. In light of these results, we suggest that t-Tau protein assay is of significant importance as a second marker in identifying 14-3-3 false-positive results among sCJD probable cases. PMID:27357003

  19. New and emerging prognostic and predictive genetic biomarkers in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Anthony V

    2016-04-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease at the genetic level. Chromosomal abnormalities are used as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers to provide subtype, outcome and drug response information. t(12;21)/ETV6-RUNX1 and high hyper-diploidy are good-risk prognostic biomarkers whereas KMT2A(MLL) translocations, t(17;19)/TCF3-HLF, haploidy or low hypodiploidy are high-risk biomarkers. t(9;22)/BCR-ABL1 patients require targeted treatment (imatinib/dasatinib), whereas iAMP21 patients achieve better outcomes when treated intensively. High-risk genetic biomarkers are four times more prevalent in adults compared to children. The application of genomic technologies to cases without an established abnormality (B-other) reveals copy number alterations which can be used either individually or in combination as prognostic biomarkers. Transcriptome sequencing studies have identified a network of fusion genes involving kinase genes -ABL1,ABL2,PDGFRB,CSF1R,CRLF2,JAK2 and EPOR in-vitro and in-vivo studies along with emerging clinical observations indicate that patients with a kinase-activating aberration may respond to treatment with small molecular inhibitors like imatinib/dasatinib and ruxolitinib. Further work is required to determine the true frequency of these abnormalities across the age spectrum and the optimal way to incorporate such inhibitors into protocols. In conclusion, genetic biomarkers are playing an increasingly important role in the management of patients with ALL. PMID:27033238

  20. New and emerging prognostic and predictive genetic biomarkers in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Moorman, Anthony V.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease at the genetic level. Chromosomal abnormalities are used as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers to provide subtype, outcome and drug response information. t(12;21)/ETV6-RUNX1 and high hyper-diploidy are good-risk prognostic biomarkers whereas KMT2A (MLL) translocations, t(17;19)/TCF3-HLF, haploidy or low hypodiploidy are high-risk biomarkers. t(9;22)/BCR-ABL1 patients require targeted treatment (imatinib/dasatinib), whereas iAMP21 patients achieve better outcomes when treated intensively. High-risk genetic biomarkers are four times more prevalent in adults compared to children. The application of genomic technologies to cases without an established abnormality (B-other) reveals copy number alterations which can be used either individually or in combination as prognostic biomarkers. Transcriptome sequencing studies have identified a network of fusion genes involving kinase genes - ABL1, ABL2, PDGFRB, CSF1R, CRLF2, JAK2 and EPOR. In vitro and in vivo studies along with emerging clinical observations indicate that patients with a kinase-activating aberration may respond to treatment with small molecular inhibitors like imatinib/dasatinib and ruxolitinib. Further work is required to determine the true frequency of these abnormalities across the age spectrum and the optimal way to incorporate such inhibitors into protocols. In conclusion, genetic biomarkers are playing an increasingly important role in the management of patients with ALL. PMID:27033238

  1. CCL2 shapes macrophage polarization by GM-CSF and M-CSF: identification of CCL2/CCR2-dependent gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Filardi, Elena; Nieto, Concha; Domínguez-Soto, Angeles; Barroso, Rubén; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Puig-Kroger, Amaya; López-Bravo, María; Joven, Jorge; Ardavín, Carlos; Rodríguez-Fernández, José L; Sánchez-Torres, Carmen; Mellado, Mario; Corbí, Angel L

    2014-04-15

    The CCL2 chemokine mediates monocyte egress from bone marrow and recruitment into inflamed tissues through interaction with the CCR2 chemokine receptor, and its expression is upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines. Analysis of the gene expression profile in GM-CSF- and M-CSF-polarized macrophages revealed that a high CCL2 expression characterizes macrophages generated under the influence of M-CSF, whereas CCR2 is expressed only by GM-CSF-polarized macrophages. Analysis of the factors responsible for this differential expression identified activin A as a critical factor controlling the expression of the CCL2/CCR2 pair in macrophages, as activin A increased CCR2 expression but inhibited the acquisition of CCL2 expression by M-CSF-polarized macrophages. CCL2 and CCR2 were found to determine the extent of macrophage polarization because CCL2 enhances the LPS-induced production of IL-10, whereas CCL2 blockade leads to enhanced expression of M1 polarization-associated genes and cytokines, and diminished expression of M2-associated markers in human macrophages. Along the same line, Ccr2-deficient bone marrow-derived murine macrophages displayed an M1-skewed polarization profile at the transcriptomic level and exhibited a significantly higher expression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6) in response to LPS. Therefore, the CCL2-CCR2 axis regulates macrophage polarization by influencing the expression of functionally relevant and polarization-associated genes and downmodulating proinflammatory cytokine production.

  2. Pleiotropic effects of extended blockade of CSF1R signaling in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Kristin A.; Pridans, Clare; Sehgal, Anuj; Tsai, Yi Ting; Bradford, Barry M.; Raza, Sobia; Moffat, Lindsey; Gow, Deborah J.; Beard, Philippa M.; Mabbott, Neil A.; Smith, Lee B.; Hume, David A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the role of CSF1R signaling in adult mice using prolonged treatment with anti-CSF1R antibody. Mutation of the CSF1 gene in the op/op mouse produces numerous developmental abnormalities. Mutation of the CSF1R has an even more penetrant phenotype, including perinatal lethality, because of the existence of a second ligand, IL-34. These effects on development provide limited insight into functions of CSF1R signaling in adult homeostasis. The carcass weight and weight of several organs (spleen, kidney, and liver) were reduced in the treated mice, but overall body weight gain was increased. Despite the complete loss of Kupffer cells, there was no effect on liver gene expression. The treatment ablated OCL, increased bone density and trabecular volume, and prevented the decline in bone mass seen in female mice with age. The op/op mouse has a deficiency in pancreatic β cells and in Paneth cells in the gut wall. Only the latter was reproduced by the antibody treatment and was associated with increased goblet cell number but no change in villus architecture. Male op/op mice are infertile as a result of testosterone insufficiency. Anti-CSF1R treatment ablated interstitial macrophages in the testis, but there was no sustained effect on testosterone or LH. The results indicate an ongoing requirement for CSF1R signaling in macrophage and OCL homeostasis but indicate that most effects of CSF1 and CSF1R mutations are due to effects on development. PMID:24652541

  3. Biomarkers for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ahearn, Joseph M; Liu, Chau-Ching; Kao, Amy H; Manzi, Susan

    2012-04-01

    The urgent need for lupus biomarkers was demonstrated in September 2011 during a Workshop sponsored by the Food and Drug Administration: Potential Biomarkers Predictive of Disease Flare. After 2 days of discussion and more than 2 dozen presentations from thought leaders in both industry and academia, it became apparent that highly sought biomarkers to predict lupus flare have not yet been identified. Even short of the elusive biomarker of flare, few biomarkers for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) diagnosis, monitoring, and stratification have been validated and employed for making clinical decisions. This lack of reliable, specific biomarkers for SLE hampers proper clinical management of patients with SLE and impedes development of new lupus therapeutics. As such, the intensity of investigation to identify lupus biomarkers is climbing a steep trajectory, lending cautious optimism that a validated panel of biomarkers for lupus diagnosis, monitoring, stratification, and prediction of flare may soon be in hand.

  4. Biomarkers in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Reid, Brian J; Blount, Patricia L; Rabinovitch, Peter S

    2003-04-01

    This article provides a framework for clinicians who are attempting the difficult task of interpreting the Barrett's biomarker literature with the goal of improving care for their patients. Although many articles. including more that 60 proposed biomarkers, have been published on this subject, only a few describe phase 3 and 4 studies that are of interest to the clinical gastroenterologist (Table 1). For year, dysplasia grade has been the sole means of risk stratification for patients with BE, and it likely will continue to be used in the foreseeable future. The current authors believe that dysplasia classification can be valuable using the team management approach and quality controls described previously. Significant problems, however, have emerged in phase 2 through 4 studies of dysplasia that make it imperative for the Barrett's field to incorporate additional biomarkers as they are validated. These problems include poor reproducibility of dysplasia interpretations, poor predictive value for negative, indefinite, and low-grade dysplasia, and inconsistent results for HGD in different centers, all of which makes it virtually impossible to develop national guidelines for surveillance. Some studies have even suggested that endoscopic biopsy surveillance using dysplasia may not be worthwhile. Currently, flow cytometric tetraploidy and aneuploidy have progressed furthest in biomarker validation (see Table 1). With proper handling, endoscopic biopsy specimens can be shipped to reference laboratories that have the instruments, computer analytic methods, and expertise to reproducibly detect tetraploidy and aneuploidy. The results of phase 4 studies indicate that flow cytometry appears to be useful in detecting a subset of patients who do not have HGD and yet have an increased risk of progression to cancer that cannot be identified by dysplasia grade. For many reasons, the authors anticipate that the number of validated biomarkers will increase substantially in the

  5. Adding flavor to AdS4/CFT3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammon, Martin; Erdmenger, Johanna; Meyer, René; O'Bannon, Andy; Wrase, Timm

    2009-11-01

    Aharony, Bergman, Jafferis, and Maldacena have proposed that the low-energy description of multiple M2-branes at a Bbb C4/Bbb Zk singularity is a (2+1)-dimensional Script N = 6 supersymmetric U(Nc) × U(Nc) Chern-Simons matter theory, the ABJM theory. In the large-Nc limit, its holographic dual is supergravity in AdS4 × S7/Bbb Zk. We study various ways to add fields that transform in the fundamental representation of the gauge groups, i.e. flavor fields, to the ABJM theory. We work in a probe limit and perform analyses in both the supergravity and field theory descriptions. In the supergravity description we find a large class of supersymmetric embeddings of probe flavor branes. In the field theory description, we present a general method to determine the couplings of the flavor fields to the fields of the ABJM theory. We then study four examples in detail: codimension-zero Script N = 3 supersymmetric flavor, described in supergravity by Kaluza-Klein monopoles or D6-branes; codimension-one Script N = (0,6) supersymmetric chiral flavor, described by D8-branes; codimension-one Script N = (3,3) supersymmetric non-chiral flavor, described by M5/D4-branes; codimension-two Script N = 4 supersymmetric flavor, described by M2/D2-branes. Finally we discuss special physical equivalences between brane embeddings in M-theory, and their interpretation in the field theory description.

  6. MCH levels in the CSF, brain preproMCH and MCHR1 gene expression during paradoxical sleep deprivation, sleep rebound and chronic sleep restriction.

    PubMed

    Dias Abdo Agamme, Ana Luiza; Aguilar Calegare, Bruno Frederico; Fernandes, Leandro; Costa, Alicia; Lagos, Patricia; Torterolo, Pablo; D'Almeida, Vânia

    2015-12-01

    Neurons that utilize melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) as neuromodulator are located in the lateral hypothalamus and incerto-hypothalamic area. These neurons project throughout the central nervous system and play a role in sleep regulation. With the hypothesis that the MCHergic system function would be modified by the time of the day as well as by disruptions of the sleep-wake cycle, we quantified in rats the concentration of MCH in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the expression of the MCH precursor (Pmch) gene in the hypothalamus, and the expression of the MCH receptor 1 (Mchr1) gene in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. These analyses were performed during paradoxical sleep deprivation (by a modified multiple platform technique), paradoxical sleep rebound and chronic sleep restriction, both at the end of the active (dark) phase (lights were turned on at Zeitgeber time zero, ZT0) and during the inactive (light) phase (ZT8). We observed that in control condition (waking and sleep ad libitum), Mchr1 gene expression was larger at ZT8 (when sleep predominates) than at ZT0, both in frontal cortex and hippocampus. In addition, compared to control, disturbances of the sleep-wake cycle produced the following effects: paradoxical sleep deprivation for 96 and 120 h reduced the expression of Mchr1 gene in frontal cortex at ZT0. Sleep rebound that followed 96 h of paradoxical sleep deprivation increased the MCH concentration in the CSF also at ZT0. Twenty-one days of sleep restriction produced a significant increment in MCH CSF levels at ZT8. Finally, sleep disruptions unveiled day/night differences in MCH CSF levels and in Pmch gene expression that were not observed in control (undisturbed) conditions. In conclusion, the time of the day and sleep disruptions produced subtle modifications in the physiology of the MCHergic system.

  7. Industry perspectives on biomarker qualification

    PubMed Central

    Womack, AW

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers have the potential to expedite drug development, increase patient safety, and optimize clinical response. Yet few have achieved regulatory qualification. A survey was conducted to clarify industry's perspective on biomarker qualification and identify the most promising biomarkers for drug development. The results across toxicities/clinical areas highlight challenges in regulatory qualification, although early prioritization and alignment on an evidentiary standard framework are key factors in facilitating biomarker development and qualification. PMID:26378777

  8. Robust changes in expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein across the brain do not translate to detectable changes in BDNF levels in CSF or plasma.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Thomas A; Bove, Susan E; Pilsmaker, Catherine D; Mariga, Abigail; Drummond, Elena M; Cadelina, Gregory W; Adamowicz, Wendy O; Swetter, Brentt J; Carmel, Sharon; Dumin, Jo Ann; Kleiman, Robin J

    2012-09-01

    Adult rats were treated acutely with peripheral kainic acid (KA), and changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein were tracked over time across multiple brain regions. Despite robust elevation in both mRNA and protein in multiple brain regions, plasma BDNF was unchanged and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) BDNF levels remained undetectable. Primary neurons were then treated with KA. BDNF was similarly elevated within neurons, but was undetectable in neuronal media. Thus, while deficits in BDNF signaling have been implicated in a number of diseases, these data suggest that extracellular concentrations of BDNF may not be a facile biomarker for changes in neurons.

  9. Twistor methods for AdS5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, Tim; Skinner, David; Williams, Jack

    2016-08-01

    We consider the application of twistor theory to five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space. The twistor space of AdS5 is the same as the ambitwistor space of the four-dimensional conformal boundary; the geometry of this correspondence is reviewed for both the bulk and boundary. A Penrose transform allows us to describe free bulk fields, with or without mass, in terms of data on twistor space. Explicit representatives for the bulk-to-boundary propagators of scalars and spinors are constructed, along with twistor action functionals for the free theories. Evaluating these twistor actions on bulk-to-boundary propagators is shown to produce the correct two-point functions.

  10. AdS3: the NHEK generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Heurtier, Lucien; Puhm, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    It was argued in [1] that the five-dimensional near-horizon extremal Kerr (NHEK) geometry can be embedded in String Theory as the infrared region of an infinite family of non-supersymmetric geometries that have D1, D5, momentum and KK monopole charges. We show that there exists a method to embed these geometries into asymptotically- {AdS}_3× {S}^3/{{Z}}_N solutions, and hence to obtain infinite families of flows whose infrared is NHEK. This indicates that the CFT dual to the NHEK geometry is the IR fixed point of a Renormalization Group flow from a known local UV CFT and opens the door to its explicit construction.

  11. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    DOEpatents

    Dirmi, G.P.; Campisi, J.; Peacocke, M.

    1996-02-13

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, {beta}-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in in vitro cell cultures or in vivo. 1 fig.

  12. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    DOEpatents

    Dimri, G.P.; Campisi, J.; Peacocke, M.

    1998-08-18

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, {beta}-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in vitro cell cultures or in vivo. 1 fig.

  13. [Biomarkers of tobacco smoke].

    PubMed

    Sobczak, Andrzej; Wardas, Władysław; Zielińska-Danch, Wioleta; Szołtysek-Bołdys, Izabela

    2005-01-01

    In order to estimate the exposure of passive and active smokers to tobacco smoke one can use the questionnaire method or laboratory examination of chemical compounds being widely accepted exposure biomarkers. Substances that make such biomarkers include some of the tobacco smoke components and its metabolites formed in the body. The study discusses two groups of biomarkers. First, includes substances that serve as exposure markers of carcinogenous properties (metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, N-nitrosamines, trans,transmuconic acid, S-phenylmercapturic acid). Second group includes substances which role is limited to the evaluation of exposure to tobacco smoke (nicotine, cotinine, anatabine, anabasine, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, thiocyanate, carboxyhemoglobin, carbon monoxide). Sensitivity and specificity of biomakers used were evaluated, their concentration ranges in physiological fluids in non-smokers, passive-, and active smokers. The simplicity of the examination method was evaluated. Articles published during last two decades indicate that the substance that have all features that make it the most appropriate biomarker is cotinine. It can be assessed in plasma and in urine of smokers and persons exposed to environmental tobacco smoke.

  14. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    DOEpatents

    Dimri, Goberdhan P.; Campisi, Judith; Peacocke, Monica

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, .beta.-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in vitro cell cultures or in vivo.

  15. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    DOEpatents

    Dirmi, Goberdhan P.; Campisi, Judith; Peacocke, Monica

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, .beta.-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in in vitro cell cultures or in vivo.

  16. Establishment of atypical-teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) cell cultures from disseminated CSF cells: a model to elucidate biology and potential targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Narendran, Aru; Coppes, Lucas; Jayanthan, Aarthi; Coppes, Michael; Teja, Bijan; Bernoux, Delphine; George, David; Strother, Douglas

    2008-11-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) is a highly malignant central nervous system neoplasm that usually affects infants and young children. In this report, we describe culture conditions that enabled the sustained growth of tumor cells obtained from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of an infant with AT/RT. These cells retained the morphological and biomarker characteristics of the original tumor. A screening of receptor tyrosine kinases identified the presence of phosphorylated ErbB4, Insulin-R, PDGFR and IGF-IR, which appear to depend on Hsp90 to maintain their active form. IGF-IR activity is consistent with data from other established AT/RT cell lines. Inhibition of IGF-IR by the small molecular weight inhibitor AEW541 led to growth suppression of cultured AT/RT cells. In addition, neutralizing antibodies to IGF-II also inhibited the growth of these cells suggesting a potential autocrine function for this cytokine. We also compared cultured AT/RT cells to established cell lines to identify consistent drug sensitivity patterns among these cells. In addition to previously described cell lines and xenograft models, continuous culture of CSF derived cells may also provide an effective way to study the biology of AT/RT and to identify potential targets for future therapeutics for this tumor.

  17. Shadows, currents, and AdS fields

    SciTech Connect

    Metsaev, R. R.

    2008-11-15

    Conformal totally symmetric arbitrary spin currents and shadow fields in flat space-time of dimension greater than or equal to four are studied. A gauge invariant formulation for such currents and shadow fields is developed. Gauge symmetries are realized by involving the Stueckelberg fields. A realization of global conformal boost symmetries is obtained. Gauge invariant differential constraints for currents and shadow fields are obtained. AdS/CFT correspondence for currents and shadow fields and the respective normalizable and non-normalizable solutions of massless totally symmetric arbitrary spin AdS fields are studied. The bulk fields are considered in a modified de Donder gauge that leads to decoupled equations of motion. We demonstrate that leftover on shell gauge symmetries of bulk fields correspond to gauge symmetries of boundary currents and shadow fields, while the modified de Donder gauge conditions for bulk fields correspond to differential constraints for boundary conformal currents and shadow fields. Breaking conformal symmetries, we find interrelations between the gauge invariant formulation of the currents and shadow fields, and the gauge invariant formulation of massive fields.

  18. A differentially expressed set of microRNAs in cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) can diagnose CNS malignancies.

    PubMed

    Drusco, Alessandra; Bottoni, Arianna; Laganà, Alessandro; Acunzo, Mario; Fassan, Matteo; Cascione, Luciano; Antenucci, Anna; Kumchala, Prasanthi; Vicentini, Caterina; Gardiman, Marina P; Alder, Hansjuerg; Carosi, Mariantonia A; Ammirati, Mario; Gherardi, Stefano; Luscrì, Marilena; Carapella, Carmine; Zanesi, Nicola; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-08-28

    Central Nervous System malignancies often require stereotactic biopsy or biopsy for differential diagnosis, and for tumor staging and grading. Furthermore, stereotactic biopsy can be non-diagnostic or underestimate grading. Hence, there is a compelling need of new diagnostic biomarkers to avoid such invasive procedures. Several biological markers have been proposed, but they can only identify specific prognostic subtype of Central Nervous System tumors, and none of them has found a standardized clinical application.The aim of the study was to identify a Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature that could differentiate among Central Nervous System malignancies.CSF total RNA of 34 neoplastic and of 14 non-diseased patients was processed by NanoString. Comparison among groups (Normal, Benign, Glioblastoma, Medulloblastoma, Metastasis and Lymphoma) lead to the identification of a microRNA profile that was further confirmed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization.Hsa-miR-451, -711, 935, -223 and -125b were significantly differentially expressed among the above mentioned groups, allowing us to draw an hypothetical diagnostic chart for Central Nervous System malignancies.This is the first study to employ the NanoString technique for Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling. In this article, we demonstrated that Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling mirrors Central Nervous System physiologic or pathologic conditions. Although more cases need to be tested, we identified a diagnostic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature with good perspectives for future diagnostic clinical applications.

  19. Neuroimaging Biomarkers for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Hager, Brandon M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biomarkers provide clinicians with a predictable model for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of medical ailments. Psychiatry has lagged behind other areas of medicine in the identification of biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we investigated the current state of neuroimaging as it pertains to biomarkers for psychosis. Methods We reviewed systematic reviews and meta-analyses of the structural (sMRI), functional (fMRI), diffusion-tensor (DTI), Positron emission tomography (PET) and spectroscopy (MRS) studies of subjects at-risk or those with an established schizophrenic illness. Only articles reporting effect-sizes and confidence intervals were included in an assessment of robustness. Results Out of the identified meta-analyses and systematic reviews, 21 studies met the inclusion criteria for assessment. There were 13 sMRI, 4 PET, 3 MRS, and 1 DTI studies. The search terms included in the current review encompassed familial high risk (FHR), clinical high risk (CHR), First episode (FES), Chronic (CSZ), schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD), and healthy controls (HC). Conclusions Currently, few neuroimaging biomarkers can be considered ready for diagnostic use in patients with psychosis. At least in part, this may be related to the challenges inherent in the current symptom-based approach to classifying these disorders. While available studies suggest a possible value of imaging biomarkers for monitoring disease progression, more systematic research is needed. To date, the best value of imaging data in psychoses has been to shed light on questions of disease pathophysiology, especially through the characterization of endophenotypes. PMID:25883891

  20. Biomarkers for disease progression and AAV therapeutic efficacy in feline Sandhoff disease

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Allison M; Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Shirley, Jamie L; McCurdy, Victoria J; Colaco, Alexandria N; Randle, Ashley N; Christopherson, Pete W; Bird, Allison C; Johnson, Aime K; Wilson, Diane U; Hudson, Judith A; De Pompa, Nicholas L; Sorjonen, Donald C; Brunson, Brandon L; Jeyakumar, Mylvaganam; Platt, Frances M; Baker, Henry J; Cox, Nancy R; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R

    2014-01-01

    The GM2 gangliosidoses, Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) and Sandhoff disease (SD), are progressive neurodegenerative disorders that are caused by a mutation in the enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (Hex). Due to the recent emergence of novel experimental treatments, biomarker development has become particularly relevant in GM2 gangliosidosis as an objective means to measure therapeutic efficacy. Here we describe blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and electrodiagnostic methods for evaluating disease progression in the feline SD model and application of these approaches to assess AAV-mediated gene therapy. SD cats were treated by intracranial injections of the thalami combined with either the deep cerebellar nuclei or a single lateral ventricle using AAVrh8 vectors encoding feline Hex. Significantly altered in untreated SD cats, blood and CSF based biomarkers were normalized after AAV gene therapy. Also reduced after treatment were expansion of the lysosomal compartment in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and elevated activity of secondary lysosomal enzymes. MRI changes characteristic of the gangliosidoses were documented in SD cats and normalized after AAV gene therapy. The minimally invasive biomarkers reported herein should be useful to assess disease progression of untreated GM2 patients and those in future clinical trials. PMID:25284324

  1. Biomarkers for disease progression and AAV therapeutic efficacy in feline Sandhoff disease.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Allison M; Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Shirley, Jamie L; McCurdy, Victoria J; Colaco, Alexandria N; Randle, Ashley N; Christopherson, Pete W; Bird, Allison C; Johnson, Aime K; Wilson, Diane U; Hudson, Judith A; De Pompa, Nicholas L; Sorjonen, Donald C; Brunson, Brandon L; Jeyakumar, Mylvaganam; Platt, Frances M; Baker, Henry J; Cox, Nancy R; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    The GM2 gangliosidoses, Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) and Sandhoff disease (SD), are progressive neurodegenerative disorders that are caused by a mutation in the enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (Hex). Due to the recent emergence of novel experimental treatments, biomarker development has become particularly relevant in GM2 gangliosidosis as an objective means to measure therapeutic efficacy. Here we describe blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and electrodiagnostic methods for evaluating disease progression in the feline SD model and application of these approaches to assess AAV-mediated gene therapy. SD cats were treated by intracranial injections of the thalami combined with either the deep cerebellar nuclei or a single lateral ventricle using AAVrh8 vectors encoding feline Hex. Significantly altered in untreated SD cats, blood and CSF based biomarkers were largely normalized after AAV gene therapy. Also reduced after treatment were expansion of the lysosomal compartment in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and elevated activity of secondary lysosomal enzymes. MRI changes characteristic of the gangliosidoses were documented in SD cats and normalized after AAV gene therapy. The minimally invasive biomarkers reported herein should be useful to assess disease progression of untreated SD patients and those in future clinical trials. PMID:25284324

  2. Multicentre quality control evaluation of different biomarker candidates for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Stefan; Costa, Julia; de Carvalho, Mamede; Kirby, Janine; Kuzma-Kozakiewicz, Magdalena; Morelli, Claudia; Robberecht, Wim; Shaw, Pamela; Silani, Vincenzo; Steinacker, Petra; Tumani, Hayrettin; Van Damme, Philip; Ludolph, Albert; Otto, Markus

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron disease that mainly causes degeneration of the upper and lower motor neurons, ultimately leading to paralysis and death within three to five years after first symptoms. The pathological mechanisms leading to ALS are still not completely understood. Several biomarker candidates have been proposed in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). However, none of these has successfully translated into clinical routine. Part of the reason for this failure to translate may relate to differences across laboratories. For this reason, several of the most commonly used ALS biomarker candidates were evaluated on clinically well-defined ALS samples from six European centres in a multicentre sample-collection approach with centralized sample processing. Results showed that phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain differentiated between ALS and control cases in all centres. We therefore propose that measurement of phosphorylated neurofilaments in CSF is the most promising candidate for translation into the clinical setting and might serve as a benchmark for other biomarker candidates.

  3. Potential biomarkers for monitoring therapeutic response in patients with CIDP.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2011-06-01

    Although the majority of patients with CIDP variably respond to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), steroids, or plasmapheresis, 30% of them are unresponsive or insufficiently responsive to these therapies. The heterogeneity in therapeutic responses necessitates the need to search for biomarkers to determine the most suitable therapy from the outset and explore the best means for monitoring disease activity. The ICE study, which led to the first FDA-approved indication for IVIg in CIDP, has shown that maintenance therapy prevents relapses and axonal loss. In this paper, the multiple actions exerted by IVIg on the immunoregulatory network of CIDP are discussed as potential predictors of response to therapies. Emerging molecular markers, promising in identifying responders to IVIg from non-responders, include modulation of FcγRIIB receptors on monocytes and genome-wide transcription studies related to inflammatory mediators, demyelination, or axonal degeneration. Skin biopsies, Peripheral Blood Lymhocytes, CSF, and sera are accessible surrogate tissues for further exploring these molecules during therapies.

  4. Fibronectin changes in eosinophilic meningitis with blood-CSF barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Shyu, Ling-Yuh; Hu, Ming-E; Chou, Chun-Hui; Chen, Ke-Min; Chiu, Ping-Sung; Lai, Shih-Chan

    2015-01-01

    Fibronectin, which is present at relatively low levels in healthy central nervous systems (CNS), shows increased levels in meningitis. In this study, fibronectin processing was correlated with the increased permeability of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier as well as with the formation of eosinophil infiltrates in angiostrongyliasis meningitis. The immunohistochemistry results show matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is localized in the choroid plexus epithelium. Coimmunoprecipitation demonstrated fibronectin strongly binds MMP-9. Furthermore, treatment with the MMP-9 inhibitor GM6001 significantly inhibited fibronectin processing, reduced the blood-CSF barrier permeability, and decreased the eosinophil counts. The decreased fibronectin processing in CSF implies decreased cellular invasion of the subarachnoid space across the blood-CSF barrier. Therefore, increased fibronectin processing may be associated with barrier disruption and participate in the extravasation and migration of eosinophils into the CNS during experimental parasitic infection.

  5. Cataplexy with Normal Sleep Studies and Normal CSF Hypocretin: An Explanation?

    PubMed Central

    Drakatos, Panagis; Leschziner, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Patients with narcolepsy usually develop excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) before or coincide with the occurrence of cataplexy, with the latter most commonly associated with low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin-1 levels. Cataplexy preceding the development of other features of narcolepsy is a rare phenomenon. We describe a case of isolated cataplexy in the context of two non-diagnostic multiple sleep latency tests and normal CSF-hypocretin-1 levels (217 pg/mL) who gradually developed EDS and low CSF-hypocretin-1 (< 110 pg/mL). Citation: Drakatos P, Leschziner G. Cataplexy with normal sleep studies and normal csf hypocretin: an explanation? J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(3):449–450. PMID:26564387

  6. G-CSF Predicts Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Katsaros, Katharina M.; Speidl, Walter S; Demyanets, Svitlana; Kastl, Stefan P.; Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Wonnerth, Anna; Zorn, Gerlinde; Tentzeris, Ioannis; Farhan, Serdar; Maurer, Gerald; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony-stimulating-factor (G-CSF) induces mobilization of progenitor cells but may also exert pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic effects. Treatment with recombinant G-CSF after acute myocardial infarction is currently under examination and has been associated with in-stent restenosis. However, it is not known whether plasma levels of endogenous G-CSF are also associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Therefore we included 280 patients with angiographically proven stable coronary artery disease. G-CSF was measured by specific ELISA and patients were followed for a median of 30 months for the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE: death, myocardial infarction, re-hospitalization). Those with cardiac events during follow-up showed significant higher G-CSF levels (32.3 pg/mL IQR 21.4–40.5 pg/mL vs. 24.6 pg/mL IQR 16.4–34.9 pg/mL; p<0.05) at baseline. Patients with G-CSF plasma levels above the median had a 2-fold increased risk for MACE (p<0.05). This was independent from established cardiovascular risk factors. In addition, G-CSF above the median was a predictor of clinical in-stent restenosis after implantation of bare-metal stents (6.6% vs. 19.4%; p<0.05) but not of drug-eluting stents (7.7% vs. 7.6%; p = 0.98). This data suggests that endogenous plasma levels of G-CSF predict cardiovascular events independently from established cardiac risk factors and are associated with increased in-stent restenosis rates after implantation of bare metal stents. PMID:26555480

  7. Isolated abdominal aortitis following administration of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF).

    PubMed

    Miller, Edward B; Grosu, Roy; Landau, Zvi

    2016-06-01

    G-CSF is a myeloid growth factor produced by monocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Clinical uses of G-CSF includes mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells from healthy donors before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, acceleration of neutrophil recovery following chemotherapy, and in the management of neutropenia due to other causes including AIDS and genetic disorders of granulocyte production. G-CSF is well tolerated and reports to be safe in healthy donors, although follow-up studies are limited in duration (D'Souza et al. in Transfus Med Rev 22(4):280-290, 2008).Isolated abdominal aortitis (IAA) is a rare disorder most commonly caused by the large-vessel vasculitides giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu arteritis, although it may also be associated with several other rheumatologic diseases and infections (Gornik and Creager in Circulation 117:3039-3051, 2008). To our knowledge, there only two cases have been published of IAA occurring in patients who had received G-CSF therapy (Dariea et al. in Rev Med Interne 25(3):225-229, 2004; Adiga et al. in Clin Drug Investig 29:821-825, 2009).We describe a case of a 55-year-old male, with peripheral vascular disease who after receiving Neupogen (G-CSF) developed a latent case of IAA. After further investigation and exclusion of other possible causative factors, we conclude that the most probable etiology is induction by G-CSF.

  8. CSF1R mutations identified in three families with autosomal dominantly inherited leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Jun; Matsukawa, Takashi; Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Higasa, Koichiro; Yoshimura, Jun; Saito, Taro L; Ahsan, Budrul; Takahashi, Yuji; Goto, Jun; Iwata, Atsushi; Niimi, Yuki; Riku, Yuuichi; Goto, Yoji; Mano, Kazuo; Yoshida, Mari; Morishita, Shinichi; Tsuji, Shoji

    2012-12-01

    Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneities are considerably high in adult-onset leukoencephalopathy, in which comprehensive mutational analyses of the candidate genes by conventional methods are too laborious. We applied exome sequencing to conduct a comprehensive mutational analysis of genes for autosomal dominant leukoencephalopathies. Genomic DNA samples from four patients of three families with autosomal dominantly inherited adult-onset leukodystrophy were subjected to exome sequencing. On the basis of the results, 21 patients with adult-onset sporadic leukodystrophy and one patient with pathologically proven HDLS were additionally screened for CSF1R mutations. Exome sequencing identified heterozygous CSF1R mutations (p.I794T and p.R777W) in two families. I794T has recently been reported as a causative mutation for hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS), and R777W is a novel mutation. Although mutational analysis of CSF1R in 21 sporadic cases revealed no mutations, another novel CSF1R mutation, p.C653Y, was identified in one patient with autopsy-proven HDSL. These variants were located in the PTK domain where the causative mutations cluster. Functional prediction of the mutant CSF1R as well as cross-species conservation of the affected amino acids supports the notion that these variants are pathogenic for HDLS. Exome sequencing is useful for a comprehensive mutational analysis of causative genes for hereditary leukoencephalopathies, and CSF1R should be considered a candidate gene for patients with autosomal dominant leukoencephalopathies.

  9. Imaging cadavers: cold FLAIR and noninvasive brain thermometry using CSF diffusion.

    PubMed

    Tofts, Paul S; Jackson, Jonathan S; Tozer, Daniel J; Cercignani, Mara; Keir, Geoffrey; MacManus, David G; Ridgway, Gerard R; Ridha, Basil H; Schmierer, Klaus; Siddique, Durre; Thornton, John S; Wroe, Stephen J; Fox, Nick C

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing interest in imaging cadavers for noninvasive autopsies for research purposes. However, the temperature is well below that of in vivo imaging, and a variety of interesting 'cold brain' effects are observed. At lower temperatures conventional FLAIR sequences no longer produce dark cerebrospinal fluid (CSF); T(1) is reduced from about 4.0 sec in vivo to 1.7 sec at 1 degrees C. The diffusion coefficient (DC) of CSF is much reduced (from 3.1 10(-9) m(2)s(-1) in vivo to 1.1 at 1 degrees C). DC values therefore provide a noninvasive thermometer to measure brain core temperature to within 1.0 degrees C. In three cadavers DC values were 1.1-1.5 10(-9) m(2)s(-1), indicating brain core temperatures of 1-10 degrees C, consistent with external thermocouple measurements. An improved inversion time (TI(0)) can then be found for FLAIR. At 10 degrees C this Cold FLAIR sequence (TI(0) = 1.5 sec) gave black CSF. Expressions for CSF DC and T(1) as a function of temperature were produced. A measurement of CSF DC could be converted directly to temperature and the required TI(0) found. In vitro values of CSF DC were about 1% lower than that of water. Thus, FLAIR imaging can be optimized for cadaveric brains at low and unknown temperatures, thereby improving value for autopsy purposes and facilitating comparisons with in vivo imaging. PMID:18058937

  10. Flow cytometry measurement of GM-CSF receptors in acute leukemic blasts, and normal hemopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Lanza, F; Castagnari, B; Rigolin, G; Moretti, S; Latorraca, A; Ferrari, L; Bardi, A; Castoldi, G

    1997-10-01

    A quantitative analysis of expression levels of GM-CSF receptors was performed by flow cytometry in different disease categories, ie AML (n = 72), ALL (n = 18), and MDS (n = 12), as well as 12 healthy volunteers, using three different unconjugated GM-CSF/R monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) (HGM-CSFR (CD116), M5D12, 4B5F5), and appropriate standards. By using the reference HGM-CSFR McAb, in healthy subjects we found detectable levels of GM-CSF/R on blood monocytes (mean MESF (molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochrome)/cell: 36.1 x 10[3]), neutrophils (mean MESF/cell: 7.4 x 10[3]), bone marrow (BM) myelo-monocytic precursors (MESF range for the myeloid component, ie promyelocytes, myelocytes, metamyelocytes: 11.7-40.5 x 10[3], and for the monocytic lineage: 25.7-69.2 x 10[3]), and in two distinct subsets of BM CD34+ progenitor cells (GM-CSF/R dim: 2.5 x 10[3] MESF/cell, GM-CSF/R bright (10% of the total number of CD34 cells: 22.0 x 10[3] MESF/cell). In these subjects, there was no correlation between the expression levels of GM-CSF/R and CFU (CFU-GM, CFU-GEMM, BFU-E) colony production. Among the AML samples, M5D12 McAb was positive in 33%, 4B5F5 McAb in 90%, and HGM-CSF/R McAb in 78% of the cases examined (range of MESF/cell for the HGM-CSFR McAb: 0.9 x 10[3]-106.7 x 10[3]). The highest MESF values were seen in the M5 FAB subvariety (mean: 39.4 x 10[3]), where all the patients tested (n = 20) showed a strong positivity for the HGM-CSFR McAb. On the contrary, all ALL samples were GM-CSF/R negative except in two patients, who displayed a dim GM-CSF/R positivity (My+ALL: 1.3 x 10[3] MESF/cell; pro-B ALL: 1.0 x 10[3] MESF/cell). In most (>70%) M1 FAB subtypes, GM-CSF/R+ blasts co-expressed CD34low, HLA-DRhigh, CD33, CD38 antigens, and had little or no capacity to form CFU-GM colonies. GM-CSF/R+ blasts from the M5 FAB category were also positive for CD14, CD11c, CD33 and CD87. Furthermore, the number of GM-CSF/R expressed by leukemic cells from five out of 72 (7%) AML

  11. Recombinant rabies virus expressing dog GM-CSF is an efficacious oral rabies vaccine for dogs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Songqin; Wang, Zhao; Ruan, Juncheng; Tang, Lijun; Jia, Ziming; Cui, Min; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F

    2015-11-17

    Developing efficacious oral rabies vaccines is an important step to increase immunization coverage for stray dogs, which are not accessible for parenteral vaccination. Our previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing cytokines/chemokines induces robust protective immune responses after oral immunization in mice by recruiting and activating dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells. To develop an effective oral rabies vaccine for dogs, a recombinant attenuated RABV expressing dog GM-CSF, designated as LBNSE-dGM-CSF was constructed and used for oral vaccination in a dog model. Significantly more DCs or B cells were activated in the peripheral blood of dogs vaccinated orally with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than those vaccinated with the parent virus LBNSE, particularly at 3 days post immunization (dpi). As a result, significantly higher levels of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) were detected in dogs immunized with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than with the parent virus. All the immunized dogs were protected against a lethal challenge with 4500 MICLD50 of wild-type RABV SXTYD01. LBNSE-dGM-CSF was found to replicate mainly in the tonsils after oral vaccination as detected by nested RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Taken together, our results indicate that LBNSE-dGM-CSF could be a promising oral rabies vaccine candidate for dogs.

  12. CSF-contacting neurons regulate locomotion by relaying mechanical stimuli to spinal circuits.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Urs Lucas; Prendergast, Andrew; Djenoune, Lydia; Nunes Figueiredo, Sophie; Gomez, Johanna; Stokes, Caleb; Kaiser, Sonya; Suster, Maximilliano; Kawakami, Koichi; Charpentier, Marine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Rio, Jean-Paul; Del Bene, Filippo; Wyart, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Throughout vertebrates, cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (CSF-cNs) are ciliated cells surrounding the central canal in the ventral spinal cord. Their contribution to modulate locomotion remains undetermined. Recently, we have shown CSF-cNs modulate locomotion by directly projecting onto the locomotor central pattern generators (CPGs), but the sensory modality these cells convey to spinal circuits and their relevance to innate locomotion remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate in vivo that CSF-cNs form an intraspinal mechanosensory organ that detects spinal bending. By performing calcium imaging in moving animals, we show that CSF-cNs respond to both passive and active bending of the spinal cord. In mutants for the channel Pkd2l1, CSF-cNs lose their response to bending and animals show a selective reduction of tail beat frequency, confirming the central role of this feedback loop for optimizing locomotion. Altogether, our study reveals that CSF-cNs constitute a mechanosensory organ operating during locomotion to modulate spinal CPGs. PMID:26946992

  13. Imaging cadavers: cold FLAIR and noninvasive brain thermometry using CSF diffusion.

    PubMed

    Tofts, Paul S; Jackson, Jonathan S; Tozer, Daniel J; Cercignani, Mara; Keir, Geoffrey; MacManus, David G; Ridgway, Gerard R; Ridha, Basil H; Schmierer, Klaus; Siddique, Durre; Thornton, John S; Wroe, Stephen J; Fox, Nick C

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing interest in imaging cadavers for noninvasive autopsies for research purposes. However, the temperature is well below that of in vivo imaging, and a variety of interesting 'cold brain' effects are observed. At lower temperatures conventional FLAIR sequences no longer produce dark cerebrospinal fluid (CSF); T(1) is reduced from about 4.0 sec in vivo to 1.7 sec at 1 degrees C. The diffusion coefficient (DC) of CSF is much reduced (from 3.1 10(-9) m(2)s(-1) in vivo to 1.1 at 1 degrees C). DC values therefore provide a noninvasive thermometer to measure brain core temperature to within 1.0 degrees C. In three cadavers DC values were 1.1-1.5 10(-9) m(2)s(-1), indicating brain core temperatures of 1-10 degrees C, consistent with external thermocouple measurements. An improved inversion time (TI(0)) can then be found for FLAIR. At 10 degrees C this Cold FLAIR sequence (TI(0) = 1.5 sec) gave black CSF. Expressions for CSF DC and T(1) as a function of temperature were produced. A measurement of CSF DC could be converted directly to temperature and the required TI(0) found. In vitro values of CSF DC were about 1% lower than that of water. Thus, FLAIR imaging can be optimized for cadaveric brains at low and unknown temperatures, thereby improving value for autopsy purposes and facilitating comparisons with in vivo imaging.

  14. CSF-contacting neurons regulate locomotion by relaying mechanical stimuli to spinal circuits

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Urs Lucas; Prendergast, Andrew; Djenoune, Lydia; Nunes Figueiredo, Sophie; Gomez, Johanna; Stokes, Caleb; Kaiser, Sonya; Suster, Maximilliano; Kawakami, Koichi; Charpentier, Marine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Rio, Jean-Paul; Del Bene, Filippo; Wyart, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Throughout vertebrates, cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (CSF-cNs) are ciliated cells surrounding the central canal in the ventral spinal cord. Their contribution to modulate locomotion remains undetermined. Recently, we have shown CSF-cNs modulate locomotion by directly projecting onto the locomotor central pattern generators (CPGs), but the sensory modality these cells convey to spinal circuits and their relevance to innate locomotion remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate in vivo that CSF-cNs form an intraspinal mechanosensory organ that detects spinal bending. By performing calcium imaging in moving animals, we show that CSF-cNs respond to both passive and active bending of the spinal cord. In mutants for the channel Pkd2l1, CSF-cNs lose their response to bending and animals show a selective reduction of tail beat frequency, confirming the central role of this feedback loop for optimizing locomotion. Altogether, our study reveals that CSF-cNs constitute a mechanosensory organ operating during locomotion to modulate spinal CPGs. PMID:26946992

  15. GM-CSF primes cardiac inflammation in a mouse model of Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Stock, Angus T; Hansen, Jacinta A; Sleeman, Matthew A; McKenzie, Brent S; Wicks, Ian P

    2016-09-19

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the leading cause of pediatric heart disease in developed countries. KD patients develop cardiac inflammation, characterized by an early infiltrate of neutrophils and monocytes that precipitates coronary arteritis. Although the early inflammatory processes are linked to cardiac pathology, the factors that regulate cardiac inflammation and immune cell recruitment to the heart remain obscure. In this study, using a mouse model of KD (induced by a cell wall Candida albicans water-soluble fraction [CAWS]), we identify an essential role for granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in orchestrating these events. GM-CSF is rapidly produced by cardiac fibroblasts after CAWS challenge, precipitating cardiac inflammation. Mechanistically, GM-CSF acts upon the local macrophage compartment, driving the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, whereas therapeutically, GM-CSF blockade markedly reduces cardiac disease. Our findings describe a novel role for GM-CSF as an essential initiating cytokine in cardiac inflammation and implicate GM-CSF as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in KD.

  16. CSF and blood oxytocin concentration changes following intranasal delivery in macaque.

    PubMed

    Dal Monte, Olga; Noble, Pamela L; Turchi, Janita; Cummins, Alex; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2014-01-01

    Oxytocin (OT) in the central nervous system (CNS) influences social cognition and behavior, making it a candidate for treating clinical disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Intranasal administration has been proposed as a possible route of delivery to the CNS for molecules like OT. While intranasal administration of OT influences social cognition and behavior, it is not well established whether this is an effective means for delivering OT to CNS targets. We administered OT or its vehicle (saline) to 15 primates (Macaca mulatta), using either intranasal spray or a nebulizer, and measured OT concentration changes in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and in blood. All subjects received both delivery methods and both drug conditions. Baseline samples of blood and CSF were taken immediately before drug administration. Blood was collected every 10 minutes after administration for 40 minutes and CSF was collected once post-delivery, at the 40 minutes time point. We found that intranasal administration of exogenous OT increased concentrations in both CSF and plasma compared to saline. Both delivery methods resulted in similar elevations of OT concentration in CSF, while the changes in plasma OT concentration were greater after nasal spray compared to nebulizer. In conclusion our study provides evidence that both nebulizer and nasal spray OT administration can elevate CSF OT levels. PMID:25133536

  17. Prior chemotherapy does not prevent effective mobilisation by G-CSF of peripheral blood progenitor cells.

    PubMed Central

    DeLuca, E.; Sheridan, W. P.; Watson, D.; Szer, J.; Begley, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that the hemopoietic growth factor, G-CSF successfully mobilised progenitor cell populations into the peripheral blood in a population of patients despite intensive pretreatment with chemotherapy. Administration of G-CSF increased the numbers of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) by a median of 76-fold above basal levels. Maximal levels of PBPC were observed on days 5 and 6 after G-CSF treatment. In two patients a second cycle of G-CSF mobilised PBPC to levels comparable with those seen after the first cycle of G-CSF treatment. An earlier hemopoietic cell population (pre-CFC's) was also mobilised with levels increased up to 50-fold above basal levels. Using a standard mononuclear cell leukapheresis technique the PBPC were collected extremely efficiently (essentially 100%) and could be further successfully enriched by separation using a Ficoll gradient. For patients who underwent the optimal collection protocol (i.e. leukapheresis on days 5, 6 and 7) a total of 32 +/- 6 x 10(4) GM-CFC kg-1 were collected. The ability to mobilise PBPC using G-CSF alone and to successfully and efficiently harvest these cells has important implications for the future of transplantation and high dose chemotherapy procedures. PMID:1384644

  18. Hepatocyte growth factor can substitute for M-CSF to support osteoclastogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Adamopoulos, Iannis E. . E-mail: iadamopoulos@path.wustl.edu; Xia Zhidao; Lau, Y.S.; Athanasou, Nicholas A.

    2006-11-17

    Osteopetrotic mice lacking functional macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) recover with ageing, suggesting that alternative osteoclastogenesis pathways exist. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and M-CSF signal through tyrosine kinase receptors and phosphorylate common transducers and effectors such as Src, Grb2, and PI3-Kinase. HGF is known to play a role in osteoclast formation, and in this study we have determined whether HGF could replace M-CSF to support human osteoclastogenesis. We found that the HGF receptor, c-Met, is expressed by the CD14{sup +} monocyte fraction of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). HGF was able to support monocyte-osteoclast differentiation in the presence of receptor activator for nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand as evidenced by the formation of numerous multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and vitronectin receptor positive cells which formed F-actin rings and were capable of lacunar resorption. The addition of a neutralising antibody to M-CSF did not inhibit osteoclast differentiation. HGF is a well-established survival factor and viability assays and live/dead staining showed that it promoted the survival and proliferation of monocytes and osteoclasts in a manner similar to M-CSF. Our findings indicate that HGF can substitute for M-CSF to support human osteoclast formation.

  19. Isolated abdominal aortitis following administration of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF).

    PubMed

    Miller, Edward B; Grosu, Roy; Landau, Zvi

    2016-06-01

    G-CSF is a myeloid growth factor produced by monocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Clinical uses of G-CSF includes mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells from healthy donors before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, acceleration of neutrophil recovery following chemotherapy, and in the management of neutropenia due to other causes including AIDS and genetic disorders of granulocyte production. G-CSF is well tolerated and reports to be safe in healthy donors, although follow-up studies are limited in duration (D'Souza et al. in Transfus Med Rev 22(4):280-290, 2008).Isolated abdominal aortitis (IAA) is a rare disorder most commonly caused by the large-vessel vasculitides giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu arteritis, although it may also be associated with several other rheumatologic diseases and infections (Gornik and Creager in Circulation 117:3039-3051, 2008). To our knowledge, there only two cases have been published of IAA occurring in patients who had received G-CSF therapy (Dariea et al. in Rev Med Interne 25(3):225-229, 2004; Adiga et al. in Clin Drug Investig 29:821-825, 2009).We describe a case of a 55-year-old male, with peripheral vascular disease who after receiving Neupogen (G-CSF) developed a latent case of IAA. After further investigation and exclusion of other possible causative factors, we conclude that the most probable etiology is induction by G-CSF. PMID:27094941

  20. Recombinant rabies virus expressing dog GM-CSF is an efficacious oral rabies vaccine for dogs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Songqin; Wang, Zhao; Ruan, Juncheng; Tang, Lijun; Jia, Ziming; Cui, Min; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F

    2015-11-17

    Developing efficacious oral rabies vaccines is an important step to increase immunization coverage for stray dogs, which are not accessible for parenteral vaccination. Our previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing cytokines/chemokines induces robust protective immune responses after oral immunization in mice by recruiting and activating dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells. To develop an effective oral rabies vaccine for dogs, a recombinant attenuated RABV expressing dog GM-CSF, designated as LBNSE-dGM-CSF was constructed and used for oral vaccination in a dog model. Significantly more DCs or B cells were activated in the peripheral blood of dogs vaccinated orally with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than those vaccinated with the parent virus LBNSE, particularly at 3 days post immunization (dpi). As a result, significantly higher levels of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) were detected in dogs immunized with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than with the parent virus. All the immunized dogs were protected against a lethal challenge with 4500 MICLD50 of wild-type RABV SXTYD01. LBNSE-dGM-CSF was found to replicate mainly in the tonsils after oral vaccination as detected by nested RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Taken together, our results indicate that LBNSE-dGM-CSF could be a promising oral rabies vaccine candidate for dogs. PMID:26436700

  1. VEGF/VEGFR-2 changes in frontal cortex, choroid plexus, and CSF after chronic obstructive hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Dombrowski, Stephen M; Deshpande, Abhishek; Krajcir, Natalie; Luciano, Mark G

    2010-01-01

    Chronic Hydrocephalus (CH) is often associated with decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen levels. While the exact pathophysiology is not clear, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) may be involved. Because the choroid plexus (CP) is involved in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production and secretes numerous growth factors including VEGF, it is important to understand VEGF/VEGFR-2 levels in the CP–CSF circulatory system. Our results showed significant decreases in CBF and VEGFR-2 levels in frontal cortex (FC) in CH compared with SC; there were no significant changes in VEGF levels. CBF change in FC was positively correlated with VEGFR-2 levels (P=0.024). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed robust expression of VEGF/VEGFR-2 in CP. After CH induction, ventricular CSF volume and VEGF levels significantly increased. These results suggest that the decreased VEGFR-2 levels in FC may be contributed to decreased CBF and increased ventricular CSF-VEGF levels possibly reflected a hypoxic response and/or accumulation of VEGF from CP secretion after blockage of CSF outlet. Further investigation into CSF-VEGF levels in different sites may provide a better understanding of VEGF/VEGFR-2 modulation in the normal and hydrocephalic brain, and may represent a feasible approach to potential therapeutic options for hydrocephalus. PMID:20619858

  2. Repairing the Brain by SCF+G-CSF Treatment at 6 Months Postexperimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lili; Wang, Dandan; McGillis, Sandra; Kyle, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Stroke, a leading cause of adult disability in the world, is a severe medical condition with limited treatment. Physical therapy, the only treatment available for stroke rehabilitation, appears to be effective within 6 months post-stroke. Here, we have mechanistically determined the efficacy of combined two hematopoietic growth factors, stem cell factor (SCF) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF; SCF + G-CSF), in brain repair 6 months after cortical infarct induction in the transgenic mice carrying yellow fluorescent protein in Layer V pyramidal neurons (Thy1-YFP-H). Using a combination of live brain imaging, whole brain imaging, molecular manipulation, synaptic and vascular assessments, and motor function examination, we found that SCF + G-CSF promoted mushroom spine formation, enlarged postsynaptic membrane size, and increased postsynaptic density-95 accumulation and blood vessel density in the peri-infarct cavity cortex; and that SCF + G-CSF treatment improved motor functional recovery. The SCF + G-CSF-enhanced motor functional recovery was dependent on the synaptic and vascular regeneration in the peri-infarct cavity cortex. These data suggest that a stroke-damaged brain is repairable by SCF + G-CSF even 6 months after the lesion occurs. This study provides novel insights into the development of new restorative strategies for stroke recovery. PMID:27511907

  3. Diagnosis of acute leukemia in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-acute leukemia).

    PubMed

    Crespo-Solis, Erick; López-Karpovitch, Xavier; Higuera, Jesús; Vega-Ramos, Beatriz

    2012-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid-acute leukemia (CSF-acute leukemia) is a frequent and serious complication in patients with acute leukemia. One of the major problems of this complication is the diagnosis process itself. CSF cytology is currently considered the gold standard for establishing the diagnosis, a technique which presents various processing limitations, seriously impacting the predictive values. In the last 11 years, studies of CSF flow cytometry analysis done in patients with acute leukemia have demonstrated superiority in comparison with CSF cytology. Although comparative studies between these two techniques have been reported since 2001, no new consensus or formal changes to the gold standard have been established for the CSF acute leukemia diagnosis. The evidence suggests that positive flow cytometry cases, considered as indeterminate cases, will behave like disease in the central nervous system (CNS). Nevertheless, we think there are some variables and considerations that must be first evaluated under research protocols before CNS relapse can be established with only one positive flow cytometry analysis in the setting of indeterminate CSF samples. This paper proposes a diagnostic algorithm and complementary strategies. PMID:22639108

  4. Systematic Review of Clinical Studies Examining Biomarkers of Brain Injury in Athletes after Sports-Related Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Ramia, Michelle M.; Edwards, Damyan; Johnson, Brian D.; Slobounov, Semyon M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to systematically review clinical studies examining biofluid biomarkers of brain injury for concussion in athletes. Data sources included PubMed®, MEDLINE®, and the Cochrane Database from 1966 to October 2013. Studies were included if they recruited athletes participating in organized sports who experienced concussion or head injury during a sports-related activity and had brain injury biomarkers measured. Acceptable research designs included experimental, observational, and case-control studies. Review articles, opinion papers, and editorials were excluded. After title and abstract screening of potential articles, full texts were independently reviewed to identify articles that met inclusion criteria. A composite evidentiary table was then constructed and documented the study title, design, population, methods, sample size, outcome measures, and results. The search identified 52 publications, of which 13 were selected and critically reviewed. All of the included studies were prospective and were published either in or after the year 2000. Sports included boxing (six studies), soccer (five studies), running/jogging (two studies), hockey (one study), basketball (one study), cycling (one study), and swimming (one study). The majority of studies (92%) had fewer than 100 patients. Three studies (23%) evaluated biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), one in both serum and CSF, and 10 (77%) in serum exclusively. There were 11 different biomarkers assessed, including S100β, glial fibrillary acidic protein, neuron-specific enolase, tau, neurofilament light protein, amyloid beta, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, creatine kinase and heart-type fatty acid binding protein, prolactin, cortisol, and albumin. A handful of biomarkers showed a correlation with number of hits to the head (soccer), acceleration/deceleration forces (jumps, collisions, and falls), postconcussive symptoms, trauma to the body versus the head, and dynamics of

  5. Systematic review of clinical studies examining biomarkers of brain injury in athletes after sports-related concussion.

    PubMed

    Papa, Linda; Ramia, Michelle M; Edwards, Damyan; Johnson, Brian D; Slobounov, Semyon M

    2015-05-15

    The aim of this study was to systematically review clinical studies examining biofluid biomarkers of brain injury for concussion in athletes. Data sources included PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Database from 1966 to October 2013. Studies were included if they recruited athletes participating in organized sports who experienced concussion or head injury during a sports-related activity and had brain injury biomarkers measured. Acceptable research designs included experimental, observational, and case-control studies. Review articles, opinion papers, and editorials were excluded. After title and abstract screening of potential articles, full texts were independently reviewed to identify articles that met inclusion criteria. A composite evidentiary table was then constructed and documented the study title, design, population, methods, sample size, outcome measures, and results. The search identified 52 publications, of which 13 were selected and critically reviewed. All of the included studies were prospective and were published either in or after the year 2000. Sports included boxing (six studies), soccer (five studies), running/jogging (two studies), hockey (one study), basketball (one study), cycling (one study), and swimming (one study). The majority of studies (92%) had fewer than 100 patients. Three studies (23%) evaluated biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), one in both serum and CSF, and 10 (77%) in serum exclusively. There were 11 different biomarkers assessed, including S100β, glial fibrillary acidic protein, neuron-specific enolase, tau, neurofilament light protein, amyloid beta, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, creatine kinase and heart-type fatty acid binding protein, prolactin, cortisol, and albumin. A handful of biomarkers showed a correlation with number of hits to the head (soccer), acceleration/deceleration forces (jumps, collisions, and falls), postconcussive symptoms, trauma to the body versus the head, and dynamics of different sports

  6. The BioFIND study: Characteristics of a clinically typical Parkinson's disease biomarker cohort

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Jennifer G.; Alcalay, Roy N.; Xie, Tao; Tuite, Paul; Henchcliffe, Claire; Hogarth, Penelope; Amara, Amy W.; Frank, Samuel; Rudolph, Alice; Casaceli, Cynthia; Andrews, Howard; Gwinn, Katrina; Sutherland, Margaret; Kopil, Catherine; Vincent, Lona; Frasier, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Identifying PD‐specific biomarkers in biofluids will greatly aid in diagnosis, monitoring progression, and therapeutic interventions. PD biomarkers have been limited by poor discriminatory power, partly driven by heterogeneity of the disease, variability of collection protocols, and focus on de novo, unmedicated patients. Thus, a platform for biomarker discovery and validation in well‐characterized, clinically typical, moderate to advanced PD cohorts is critically needed. Methods BioFIND (Fox Investigation for New Discovery of Biomarkers in Parkinson's Disease) is a cross‐sectional, multicenter biomarker study that established a repository of clinical data, blood, DNA, RNA, CSF, saliva, and urine samples from 118 moderate to advanced PD and 88 healthy control subjects. Inclusion criteria were designed to maximize diagnostic specificity by selecting participants with clinically typical PD symptoms, and clinical data and biospecimen collection utilized standardized procedures to minimize variability across sites. Results We present the study methodology and data on the cohort's clinical characteristics. Motor scores and biospecimen samples including plasma are available for practically defined off and on states and thus enable testing the effects of PD medications on biomarkers. Other biospecimens are available from off state PD assessments and from controls. Conclusion Our cohort provides a valuable resource for biomarker discovery and validation in PD. Clinical data and biospecimens, available through The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, can serve as a platform for discovering biomarkers in clinically typical PD and comparisons across PD's broad and heterogeneous spectrum. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:27113479

  7. Septoclast Deficiency Accompanies Postnatal Growth Plate Chondrodysplasia in the Toothless (tl) Osteopetrotic, Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1)-Deficient Rat and Is Partially Responsive to CSF-1 Injections

    PubMed Central

    Gartland, Alison; Mason-Savas, April; Yang, Meiheng; MacKay, Carole A.; Birnbaum, Mark J.; Odgren, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    The septoclast is a specialized, cathepsin B-rich, perivascular cell type that accompanies invading capillaries on the metaphyseal side of the growth plate during endochondral bone growth. The putative role of septoclasts is to break down the terminal transverse septum of growth plate cartilage and permit capillaries to bud into the lower hypertrophic zone. This process fails in osteoclast-deficient, osteopetrotic animal models, resulting in a progressive growth plate dysplasia. The toothless rat is severely osteopetrotic because of a frameshift mutation in the colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) gene (Csf1tl). Whereas CSF-1 injections quickly restore endosteal osteoclast populations, they do not improve the chondrodysplasia. We therefore investigated septoclast populations in Csf1tl/Csf1tl rats and wild-type littermates, with and without CSF-1 treatment, at 2 weeks, before the dysplasia is pronounced, and at 4 weeks, by which time it is severe. Tibial sections were immunolabeled for cathepsin B and septoclasts were counted. Csf1tl/Csf1tl mutants had significant reductions in septoclasts at both times, although they were more pronounced at 4 weeks. CSF-1 injections increased counts in wild-type and mutant animals at both times, restoring mutants to normal levels at 2 weeks. In all of the mutants, septoclasts seemed misoriented and had abnormal ultrastructure. We conclude that CSF-1 promotes angiogenesis at the chondroosseous junction, but that, in Csf1tl/Csf1tl rats, septoclasts are unable to direct their degradative activity appropriately, implying a capillary guidance role for locally supplied CSF-1. PMID:19893052

  8. Biologic Effects of Anti-Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Antibody Formation in Patients Treated with GM-CSF (Sargramostim) as Adjuvant Therapy of Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Spitler, Lynn E.; Cao, Huynh; Piironen, Timo; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Weber, Robert W.; Cruickshank, Scott

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We investigated the development of binding and neutralizing antibodies to GM-CSF in patients receiving prolonged therapy with GM-CSF as adjuvant therapy of melanoma and the impact of these antibodies on biologic effects. METHODS Fifty-three patients with high-risk melanoma which had been surgically excised were treated with GM-CSF, 125 µg/m2 daily for 14 days every 28 days for 1 year following surgical resection of disease. Serum samples for antibodies to GM-CSF were measured before treatment and on Study Days 155 and 351. Blood draws for testing biologic effects were keyed to GM-CSF administration: Days 0 (before), 15 (after 14 days on GM-CSF), 29 (after 14 days off GM-CSF), 155, and 351 (after 14 days on GM-CSF in the 6th and 13th cycle of treatment). RESULTS Of 53 patients enrolled, 43 were evaluable for the development of anti-GM-CSF antibodies. Of these, 93% developed binding antibodies and 42% developed both binding and neutralizing antibodies. The increase in the white blood cell (WBC) count, percent eosinophils, or neopterin levels engendered by GM-CSF administration, was abrogated or markedly decreased in patients with neutralizing antibodies but not in patients who developed only binding antibodies. CONCLUSIONS Ninety-three percent of patients with melanoma treated with GM-CSF as adjuvant therapy develop antibodies to GM-CSF. In those with neutralizing antibodies, a diminution of the biologic effects of GM-CSF was observed. The development of neutralizing antibodies might also abrogate the potential clinical benefit of this treatment and should be considered in the design of future clinical trials. PMID:25286079

  9. M-CSF and GM-CSF Receptor Signaling Differentially Regulate Monocyte Maturation and Macrophage Polarization in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Van Overmeire, Eva; Stijlemans, Benoît; Heymann, Felix; Keirsse, Jiri; Morias, Yannick; Elkrim, Yvon; Brys, Lea; Abels, Chloé; Lahmar, Qods; Ergen, Can; Vereecke, Lars; Tacke, Frank; De Baetselier, Patrick; Van Ginderachter, Jo A; Laoui, Damya

    2016-01-01

    Tumors contain a heterogeneous myeloid fraction comprised of discrete MHC-II(hi) and MHC-II(lo) tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) subpopulations that originate from Ly6C(hi) monocytes. However, the mechanisms regulating the abundance and phenotype of distinct TAM subsets remain unknown. Here, we investigated the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in TAM differentiation and polarization in different mouse tumor models. We demonstrate that treatment of tumor-bearing mice with a blocking anti-M-CSFR monoclonal antibody resulted in a reduction of mature TAMs due to impaired recruitment, extravasation, proliferation, and maturation of their Ly6C(hi) monocytic precursors. M-CSFR signaling blockade shifted the MHC-II(lo)/MHC-II(hi) TAM balance in favor of the latter as observed by the preferential differentiation of Ly6C(hi) monocytes into MHC-II(hi) TAMs. In addition, the genetic and functional signatures of MHC-II(lo) TAMs were downregulated upon M-CSFR blockade, indicating that M-CSFR signaling shapes the MHC-II(lo) TAM phenotype. Conversely, granulocyte macrophage (GM)-CSFR had no effect on the mononuclear tumor infiltrate or relative abundance of TAM subsets. However, GM-CSFR signaling played an important role in fine-tuning the MHC-II(hi) phenotype. Overall, our data uncover the multifaceted and opposing roles of M-CSFR and GM-CSFR signaling in governing the phenotype of macrophage subsets in tumors, and provide new insight into the mechanism of action underlying M-CSFR blockade. PMID:26573801

  10. M-CSF and GM-CSF Receptor Signaling Differentially Regulate Monocyte Maturation and Macrophage Polarization in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Van Overmeire, Eva; Stijlemans, Benoît; Heymann, Felix; Keirsse, Jiri; Morias, Yannick; Elkrim, Yvon; Brys, Lea; Abels, Chloé; Lahmar, Qods; Ergen, Can; Vereecke, Lars; Tacke, Frank; De Baetselier, Patrick; Van Ginderachter, Jo A; Laoui, Damya

    2016-01-01

    Tumors contain a heterogeneous myeloid fraction comprised of discrete MHC-II(hi) and MHC-II(lo) tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) subpopulations that originate from Ly6C(hi) monocytes. However, the mechanisms regulating the abundance and phenotype of distinct TAM subsets remain unknown. Here, we investigated the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in TAM differentiation and polarization in different mouse tumor models. We demonstrate that treatment of tumor-bearing mice with a blocking anti-M-CSFR monoclonal antibody resulted in a reduction of mature TAMs due to impaired recruitment, extravasation, proliferation, and maturation of their Ly6C(hi) monocytic precursors. M-CSFR signaling blockade shifted the MHC-II(lo)/MHC-II(hi) TAM balance in favor of the latter as observed by the preferential differentiation of Ly6C(hi) monocytes into MHC-II(hi) TAMs. In addition, the genetic and functional signatures of MHC-II(lo) TAMs were downregulated upon M-CSFR blockade, indicating that M-CSFR signaling shapes the MHC-II(lo) TAM phenotype. Conversely, granulocyte macrophage (GM)-CSFR had no effect on the mononuclear tumor infiltrate or relative abundance of TAM subsets. However, GM-CSFR signaling played an important role in fine-tuning the MHC-II(hi) phenotype. Overall, our data uncover the multifaceted and opposing roles of M-CSFR and GM-CSFR signaling in governing the phenotype of macrophage subsets in tumors, and provide new insight into the mechanism of action underlying M-CSFR blockade.

  11. Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease Risk in Peripheral Tissues; Focus on Buccal Cells

    PubMed Central

    François, Maxime; Leifert, Wayne; Martins, Ralph; Thomas, Philip; Fenech, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive degenerative disorder of the brain and is the most common form of dementia. To-date no simple, inexpensive and minimally invasive procedure is available to confirm with certainty the early diagnosis of AD prior to the manifestations of symptoms characteristic of the disease. Therefore, if population screening of individuals is to be performed, more suitable, easily accessible tissues would need to be used for a diagnostic test that would identify those who exhibit cellular pathology indicative of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD risk so that they can be prioritized for primary prevention. This need for minimally invasive tests could be achieved by targeting surrogate tissues, since it is now well recognized that AD is not only a disorder restricted to pathology and biomarkers within the brain. Human buccal cells for instance are accessible in a minimally invasive manner, and exhibit cytological and nuclear morphologies that may be indicative of accelerated ageing or neurodegenerative disorders such as AD. However, to our knowledge there is no review available in the literature covering the biology of buccal cells and their applications in AD biomarker research. Therefore, the aim of this review is to summarize some of the main findings of biomarkers reported for AD in peripheral tissues, with a further focus on the rationale for the use of the buccal mucosa (BM) for biomarkers of AD and the evidence to date of changes exhibited in buccal cells with AD. PMID:24938500

  12. Improved Diagnostic Multimodal Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Torteya, Antonio; Treviño, Víctor; Tamez-Peña, José G

    2015-01-01

    The early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is very important for treatment research and patient care purposes. Few biomarkers are currently considered in clinical settings, and their use is still optional. The objective of this work was to determine whether multimodal and nonpreviously AD associated features could improve the classification accuracy between AD, MCI, and healthy controls, which may impact future AD biomarkers. For this, Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database was mined for case-control candidates. At least 652 baseline features extracted from MRI and PET analyses, biological samples, and clinical data up to February 2014 were used. A feature selection methodology that includes a genetic algorithm search coupled to a logistic regression classifier and forward and backward selection strategies was used to explore combinations of features. This generated diagnostic models with sizes ranging from 3 to 8, including well documented AD biomarkers, as well as unexplored image, biochemical, and clinical features. Accuracies of 0.85, 0.79, and 0.80 were achieved for HC-AD, HC-MCI, and MCI-AD classifications, respectively, when evaluated using a blind test set. In conclusion, a set of features provided additional and independent information to well-established AD biomarkers, aiding in the classification of MCI and AD.

  13. The Ewing sarcoma protein (EWS) binds directly to the proximal elements of the macrophage-specific promoter of the CSF-1 receptor (csf1r) gene.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A; Sasmono, Tedjo; Himes, S Roy; Sharma, Sudarshana M; Bronisz, Agnieszka; Constantin, Myrna; Ostrowski, Michael C; Ross, Ian L

    2008-05-15

    Many macrophage-specific promoters lack classical transcriptional start site elements such as TATA boxes and Sp1 sites. One example is the CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R, CD115, c-fms), which is used as a model of the transcriptional regulation of macrophage genes. To understand the molecular basis of start site recognition in this gene, we identified cellular proteins binding specifically to the transcriptional start site (TSS) region. The mouse and human csf1r TSS were identified using cap analysis gene expression (CAGE) data. Conserved elements flanking the TSS cluster were analyzed using EMSAs to identify discrete DNA-binding factors in primary bone marrow macrophages as candidate transcriptional regulators. Two complexes were identified that bind in a highly sequence-specific manner to the mouse and human TSS proximal region and also to high-affinity sites recognized by myeloid zinc finger protein 1 (Mzf1). The murine proteins were purified by DNA affinity isolation from the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line and identified by mass spectrometry as EWS and FUS/TLS, closely related DNA and RNA-binding proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in bone marrow macrophages confirmed that EWS, but not FUS/TLS, was present in vivo on the CSF-1R proximal promoter in unstimulated primary macrophages. Transfection assays suggest that EWS does not act as a conventional transcriptional activator or repressor. We hypothesize that EWS contributes to start site recognition in TATA-less mammalian promoters.

  14. Tear biomarkers for keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Nishtala, Krishnatej; Pahuja, Natasha; Shetty, Rohit; Nuijts, Rudy M M A; Ghosh, Arkasubhra

    2016-01-01

    Keratoconus is a progressive corneal thinning, ectatic condition, which affects vision. Recent advances in corneal topography measurements has helped advance proper diagnosis of this condition and increased research and clinical interests in the disease etiopathogenesis. Considerable progress has been achieved in understanding the progression of the disease and tear fluid has played a major role in the progress. This review discusses the importance of tear fluid as a source of biomarker for keratoconus and how advances in technology have helped map the complexity of tears and thereby molecular readouts of the disease. Expanding knowledge of the tear proteome, lipidome and metabolome opened up new avenues to study keratoconus and to identify probable prognostic or diagnostic biomarkers for the disease. A multidimensional approach of analyzing tear fluid of patients layering on proteomics, lipidomics and metabolomics is necessary in effectively decoding keratoconus and thereby identifying targets for its treatment. PMID:27493978

  15. Constraint programming based biomarker optimization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Manli; Luo, Youxi; Sun, Guoquan; Mai, Guoqin; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and intuitive characterization of biological big data is becoming a major challenge for modern bio-OMIC based scientists. Interactive visualization and exploration of big data is proven to be one of the successful solutions. Most of the existing feature selection algorithms do not allow the interactive inputs from users in the optimizing process of feature selection. This study investigates this question as fixing a few user-input features in the finally selected feature subset and formulates these user-input features as constraints for a programming model. The proposed algorithm, fsCoP (feature selection based on constrained programming), performs well similar to or much better than the existing feature selection algorithms, even with the constraints from both literature and the existing algorithms. An fsCoP biomarker may be intriguing for further wet lab validation, since it satisfies both the classification optimization function and the biomedical knowledge. fsCoP may also be used for the interactive exploration of bio-OMIC big data by interactively adding user-defined constraints for modeling.

  16. Biomarkers of environmental contamination

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.; Shugart, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    Biological markers are measurements at the molecular, biochemical, or cellular level in either wild populations from contaminated habitats or in organisms experimentally exposed to pollutants that indicate that the organism has been exposed to toxic chemicals, and the magnitude of the organisms response to the contaminant. Biological markers measured in wild animals can directly contribute to detecting, quantifying, and understanding the significance of exposure to chemicals in the environment. These measurements in environmental species may also help assess the potential for human exposure to environmental pollutants, and for predicting the human health risks. It is the objective of this volume to review the current state of science as it pertains to the scientific basis, current state of development, validation, and use of biological markers in environmental research. The emphasis is on identifying and evaluating exposure of environmental species and effects on the health of environmental species and the integrity of their ecosystem. The various chapters describe different types of biomarkers that offer promise for environmental monitoring. The biomarkers are arranged in categories defined by the nature of the toxic endpoint being probed: anatomical and cytological endpoints; detoxification, adaptive and immunological responses; genotoxic responses; metal metabolism; and application of biomarkers in field evaluation.

  17. S100b as a Prognostic Biomarker in Outcome Prediction for Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Akash; Failla, Michelle D.; Niyonkuru, Christian; Amin, Krutika; Fabio, Anthony; Berger, Rachel P.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract As an astrocytic protein specific to the central nervous system, S100b is a potentially useful marker in outcome prediction after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Some studies have questioned the validity of S100b, citing the extracerebral origins of the protein as reducing the specificity of the marker. This study evaluated S100b as a prognostic biomarker in adult subjects with severe TBI (sTBI) by comparing outcomes with S100b temporal profiles generated from both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (n=138 subjects) and serum (n=80 subjects) samples across a 6-day time course. Long-bone fracture, Injury Severity Score (ISS), and isolated head injury status were variables used to assess extracerebral sources of S100b in serum. After TBI, CSF and serum S100b levels were increased over healthy controls across the first 6 days post-TBI (p≤0.005 and p≤0.031). Though CSF and serum levels were highly correlated during early time points post-TBI, this association diminished over time. Bivariate analysis showed that subjects who had temporal CSF profiles with higher S100b concentrations had higher acute mortality (p<0.001) and worse Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS; p=0.002) and Disability Rating Scale (DRS) scores (p=0.039) 6 months post-injury. Possibly as a result of extracerebral sources of S100b in serum, as represented by high ISS scores (p=0.032), temporal serum profiles were associated with acute mortality (p=0.015). High CSF S100b levels were observed in women (p=0.022) and older subjects (p=0.004). Multivariate logistic regression confirmed CSF S100b profiles in predicting GOS and DRS and showed mean and peak serum S100b as acute mortality predictors after sTBI. PMID:23190274

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis for HIV replication and biomarkers of immune activation and neurodegeneration in long-term atazanavir/ritonavir monotherapy treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, Francesca; Bigoloni, Alba; Passeri, Laura; Galli, Laura; Longo, Valeria; Gerevini, Simonetta; Spagnuolo, Vincenzo; Gisslen, Magnus; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fuchs, Dietmar; Cattaneo, Dario; Caramatti, Giada; Lazzarin, Adriano; Cinque, Paola; Castagna, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) viral escape is a concern in ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors monotherapy. The aim was to assess HIV-RNA, biomarkers of immune activation and neurodegeneration, and atazanavir concentrations in CSF of patients on successful long-term atazanavir/ritonavir (ATV/r) monotherapy. Methods: This is a substudy of the multicentric, randomized, open-label, noninferiority trial monotherapy once a day with atazanavir/ritonavir (NCT01511809), comparing the ongoing ATV/r along with 2 nucleoside retrotranscriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) regimen to a simplified ATV/r monotherapy. Patients with plasma HIV-RNA < 50 copies/mL after at least 96 study weeks were eligible. We assessed HIV-RNA, soluble (s)CD14, sCD163, CCL2, CXCL10, interleukin-6, and YKL40 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; neopterin, tryptophan, kynurenine, and neurofilament by immunoassays; and ATV concentrations by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry in paired plasma and CSF samples. Variables were compared with Wilcoxon rank-sum or Fisher exact test, as appropriate. Results: HIV-RNA was detected in the CSF of 1/11 patients on ATV/r monotherapy (114 copies/mL), without neurological symptoms, who was successfully reintensified with his previous 2NRTIs, and in none of the 12 patients on ATV/r + 2NRTIs. CSF biomarkers and ATV concentrations did not differ between the 2 arms. Conclusions: CSF escape was uncommon in patients on long-term ATV/r monotherapy and was controlled with reintensification. PMID:27428202

  19. ADS pilot program Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauson, J.; Heuser, J.

    1981-01-01

    The Applications Data Service (ADS) is a system based on an electronic data communications network which will permit scientists to share the data stored in data bases at universities and at government and private installations. It is designed to allow users to readily locate and access high quality, timely data from multiple sources. The ADS Pilot program objectives and the current plans for accomplishing those objectives are described.

  20. Serotype chimeric oncolytic adenovirus coding for GM-CSF for treatment of sarcoma in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Bramante, Simona; Koski, Anniina; Kipar, Anja; Diaconu, Iulia; Liikanen, Ilkka; Hemminki, Otto; Vassilev, Lotta; Parviainen, Suvi; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Pesonen, Saila K; Oksanen, Minna; Heiskanen, Raita; Rouvinen-Lagerström, Noora; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Hakonen, Tiina; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-08-01

    Sarcomas are a relatively rare cancer, but often incurable at the late metastatic stage. Oncolytic immunotherapy has gained attention over the past years, and a wide range of oncolytic viruses have been delivered via intratumoral injection with positive safety and promising efficacy data. Here, we report preclinical and clinical results from treatment of sarcoma with oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF (CGTG-102). Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF is a serotype chimeric oncolytic adenovirus coding for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The efficacy of Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF was evaluated on a panel of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) cell lines and in two animal models. Sarcoma specific human data were also collected from the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP), in preparation for further clinical development. Efficacy was seen in both in vitro and in vivo STS models. Fifteen patients with treatment-refractory STS (13/15) or primary bone sarcoma (2/15) were treated in ATAP, and treatments appeared safe and well-tolerated. A total of 12 radiological RECIST response evaluations were performed, and two cases of minor response, six cases of stable disease and four cases of progressive disease were detected in patients progressing prior to virus treatment. Overall, the median survival time post treatment was 170 days. One patient is still alive at 1,459 days post virus treatment. In summary, Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF appears promising for the treatment of advanced STS; a clinical trial for treatment of refractory injectable solid tumors including STS is ongoing.

  1. Imago Mundi, Imago AD, Imago ADNI

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Since the launch in 2003 of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) in the USA, ever growing, similarly oriented consortia have been organized and assembled around the world. The various accomplishments of ADNI have contributed substantially to a better understanding of the underlying physiopathology of aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). These accomplishments are basically predicated in the trinity of multimodality, standardization and sharing. This multimodality approach can now better identify those subjects with AD-specific traits that are more likely to present cognitive decline in the near future and that might represent the best candidates for smaller but more efficient therapeutic trials – trials that, through gained and shared knowledge, can be more focused on a specific target or a specific stage of the disease process. In summary, data generated from ADNI have helped elucidate some of the pathophysiological mechanisms underpinning aging and AD pathology, while contributing to the international effort in setting the groundwork for biomarker discovery and establishing standards for early diagnosis of AD. PMID:25478022

  2. Cellular Specificity of the Blood–CSF Barrier for Albumin Transfer across the Choroid Plexus Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Liddelow, Shane A.; Dzięgielewska, Katarzyna M.; Møllgård, Kjeld; Whish, Sophie C.; Noor, Natassya M.; Wheaton, Benjamin J.; Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Traweger, Andreas; Bauer, Hannelore; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Saunders, Norman R.

    2014-01-01

    To maintain the precise internal milieu of the mammalian central nervous system, well-controlled transfer of molecules from periphery into brain is required. Recently the soluble and cell-surface albumin-binding glycoprotein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) has been implicated in albumin transport into developing brain, however the exact mechanism remains unknown. We postulate that SPARC is a docking site for albumin, mediating its uptake and transfer by choroid plexus epithelial cells from blood into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We used in vivo physiological measurements of transfer of endogenous (mouse) and exogenous (human) albumins, in situ Proximity Ligation Assay (in situ PLA), and qRT-PCR experiments to examine the cellular mechanism mediating protein transfer across the blood–CSF interface. We report that at all developmental stages mouse albumin and SPARC gave positive signals with in situ PLAs in plasma, CSF and within individual plexus cells suggesting a possible molecular interaction. In contrast, in situ PLA experiments in brain sections from mice injected with human albumin showed positive signals for human albumin in the vascular compartment that were only rarely identifiable within choroid plexus cells and only at older ages. Concentrations of both endogenous mouse albumin and exogenous (intraperitoneally injected) human albumin were estimated in plasma and CSF and expressed as CSF/plasma concentration ratios. Human albumin was not transferred through the mouse blood–CSF barrier to the same extent as endogenous mouse albumin, confirming results from in situ PLA. During postnatal development Sparc gene expression was higher in early postnatal ages than in the adult and changed in response to altered levels of albumin in blood plasma in a differential and developmentally regulated manner. Here we propose a possible cellular route and mechanism by which albumin is transferred from blood into CSF across a sub-population of

  3. Cancer biomarker discovery and validation

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Nicolas; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Sun, Xiaochen; Hoshida, Yujin

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of genomic profiling technologies and selective molecular targeted therapies, biomarkers play an increasingly important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Single gene/protein or multi-gene “signature”-based assays have been introduced to measure specific molecular pathway deregulations that guide therapeutic decision-making as predictive biomarkers. Genome-based prognostic biomarkers are also available for several cancer types for potential incorporation into clinical prognostic staging systems or practice guidelines. However, there is still a large gap between initial biomarker discovery studies and their clinical translation due to the challenges in the process of cancer biomarker development. In this review we summarize the steps of biomarker development, highlight key issues in successful validation and implementation, and overview representative examples in the oncology field. We also discuss regulatory issues and future perspectives in the era of big data analysis and precision medicine. PMID:26213686

  4. Early diagnosis of complex diseases by molecular biomarkers, network biomarkers, and dynamical network biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Xiangdong; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Chen, Luonan

    2014-05-01

    Many studies have been carried out for early diagnosis of complex diseases by finding accurate and robust biomarkers specific to respective diseases. In particular, recent rapid advance of high-throughput technologies provides unprecedented rich information to characterize various disease genotypes and phenotypes in a global and also dynamical manner, which significantly accelerates the study of biomarkers from both theoretical and clinical perspectives. Traditionally, molecular biomarkers that distinguish disease samples from normal samples are widely adopted in clinical practices due to their ease of data measurement. However, many of them suffer from low coverage and high false-positive rates or high false-negative rates, which seriously limit their further clinical applications. To overcome those difficulties, network biomarkers (or module biomarkers) attract much attention and also achieve better performance because a network (or subnetwork) is considered to be a more robust form to characterize diseases than individual molecules. But, both molecular biomarkers and network biomarkers mainly distinguish disease samples from normal samples, and they generally cannot ensure to identify predisease samples due to their static nature, thereby lacking ability to early diagnosis. Based on nonlinear dynamical theory and complex network theory, a new concept of dynamical network biomarkers (DNBs, or a dynamical network of biomarkers) has been developed, which is different from traditional static approaches, and the DNB is able to distinguish a predisease state from normal and disease states by even a small number of samples, and therefore has great potential to achieve "real" early diagnosis of complex diseases. In this paper, we comprehensively review the recent advances and developments on molecular biomarkers, network biomarkers, and DNBs in particular, focusing on the biomarkers for early diagnosis of complex diseases considering a small number of samples and high

  5. Stroke risk interacts with Alzheimer's disease biomarkers on brain aging outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hohman, Timothy J; Samuels, Lauren R; Liu, Dandan; Gifford, Katherine A; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Benson, Elleena M; Abel, Ty; Ruberg, Frederick L; Jefferson, Angela L

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers and stroke risk factors independently predict cognitive impairment, likely through independent disease pathways. However, limited work has sought to describe the dynamic interplay between these important risk factors. This article evaluated the interaction between stroke risk and AD biomarkers on hippocampal volume and cognitive performance. We first evaluated the interaction between stroke risk factors and AD biomarkers using data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI, n = 1202). We then extended our findings to an independent autopsy data set from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC, n = 1122) using measures of AD pathology. Stroke risk was quantified using the Framingham Stroke Risk Profile. In ADNI, stroke risk interacted with tau and amyloid levels in relation to baseline and longitudinal cognitive performance. Similarly, in NACC, stroke risk interacted with amyloid and tau positivity on cognitive performance. The effect of stroke risk factors on cognition was strongest in the absence of AD biomarkers or neuropathology, providing additional evidence that AD biomarkers and stroke risk factors relate to cognition through independent pathways.

  6. Targeting tumor-associated macrophages with anti-CSF-1R antibody reveals a strategy for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ries, Carola H; Cannarile, Michael A; Hoves, Sabine; Benz, Jörg; Wartha, Katharina; Runza, Valeria; Rey-Giraud, Flora; Pradel, Leon P; Feuerhake, Friedrich; Klaman, Irina; Jones, Tobin; Jucknischke, Ute; Scheiblich, Stefan; Kaluza, Klaus; Gorr, Ingo H; Walz, Antje; Abiraj, Keelara; Cassier, Philippe A; Sica, Antonio; Gomez-Roca, Carlos; de Visser, Karin E; Italiano, Antoine; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Levitsky, Hyam; Blay, Jean-Yves; Rüttinger, Dominik

    2014-06-16

    Macrophage infiltration has been identified as an independent poor prognostic factor in several cancer types. The major survival factor for these macrophages is macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1). We generated a monoclonal antibody (RG7155) that inhibits CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) activation. In vitro RG7155 treatment results in cell death of CSF-1-differentiated macrophages. In animal models, CSF-1R inhibition strongly reduces F4/80(+) tumor-associated macrophages accompanied by an increase of the CD8(+)/CD4(+) T cell ratio. Administration of RG7155 to patients led to striking reductions of CSF-1R(+)CD163(+) macrophages in tumor tissues, which translated into clinical objective responses in diffuse-type giant cell tumor (Dt-GCT) patients.

  7. Clinical utility of testing AQP4-IgG in CSF

    PubMed Central

    Majed, Masoud; Fryer, James P.; McKeon, Andrew; Lennon, Vanda A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To define, using assays of optimized sensitivity and specificity, the most informative specimen type for aquaporin-4 immunoglobulin G (AQP4-IgG) detection. Methods: Results were reviewed from longitudinal service testing for AQP4-IgG among specimens submitted to the Mayo Clinic Neuroimmunology Laboratory from 101,065 individual patients. Paired samples of serum/CSF were tested from 616 patients, using M1-AQP4-transfected cell-based assays (both fixed AQP4-CBA Euroimmun kit [commercial CBA] and live in-house flow cytometry [FACS]). Sensitivities were compared for 58 time-matched paired specimens (drawn ≤30 days apart) from patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) or high-risk patients. Results: The frequency of CSF submission as sole initial specimen was 1 in 50 in 2007 and 1 in 5 in 2015. In no case among 616 paired specimens was CSF positive and serum negative. In 58 time-matched paired specimens, AQP4-IgG was detected by FACS or by commercial CBA more sensitively in serum than in CSF (respectively, p = 0.06 and p < 0.001). A serum titer >1:100 predicted CSF positivity (p < 0.001). The probability of CSF positivity was greater around attack time (p = 0.03). No control specimen from 128 neurologic patients was positive by either assay. Conclusions: FACS and commercial CBA detection of AQP4-IgG is less sensitive in CSF than in serum. The data suggest that most AQP4-IgG is produced in peripheral lymphoid tissues and that a critical serum/CSF gradient is required for IgG to penetrate the CNS in pathogenic quantity. Serum is the optimal and most cost-effective specimen for AQP4-IgG testing. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with NMO or NMOSD, CSF is less sensitive than serum for detection of AQP4-IgG. PMID:27144221

  8. Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Mukesh; Patel, Payal; Verma, Mudit

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the etiology of a disease such as prostate cancer may help in identifying populations at high risk, timely intervention of the disease, and proper treatment. Biomarkers, along with exposure history and clinical data, are useful tools to achieve these goals. Individual risk and population incidence of prostate cancer result from the intervention of genetic susceptibility and exposure. Biochemical, epigenetic, genetic, and imaging biomarkers are used to identify people at high risk for developing prostate cancer. In cancer epidemiology, epigenetic biomarkers offer advantages over other types of biomarkers because they are expressed against a person's genetic background and environmental exposure, and because abnormal events occur early in cancer development, which includes several epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. This article describes different biomarkers that have potential use in studying the epidemiology of prostate cancer. We also discuss the characteristics of an ideal biomarker for prostate cancer, and technologies utilized for biomarker assays. Among epigenetic biomarkers, most reports indicate GSTP1 hypermethylation as the diagnostic marker for prostate cancer; however, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS, and NSE1 also have been reported to be regulated by methylation mechanisms in prostate cancer. Current challenges in utilization of biomarkers in prostate cancer diagnosis and epidemiologic studies and potential solutions also are discussed. PMID:24213111

  9. Biomarker Identification Using Text Mining

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Liu, Chunmei

    2012-01-01

    Identifying molecular biomarkers has become one of the important tasks for scientists to assess the different phenotypic states of cells or organisms correlated to the genotypes of diseases from large-scale biological data. In this paper, we proposed a text-mining-based method to discover biomarkers from PubMed. First, we construct a database based on a dictionary, and then we used a finite state machine to identify the biomarkers. Our method of text mining provides a highly reliable approach to discover the biomarkers in the PubMed database. PMID:23197989

  10. Peak CSF Velocities in Patients with Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Chiari I Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, K.D.; Haughton, V.M.; Hetzel, S.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE PCMR is used to evaluate the Chiari I malformation. We compared quantitative PCMR in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with Chiari I. MATERIALS AND METHODS PCMR image data in an axial section near the foramen magnum in a consecutive series of patients with Chiari I malformations were evaluated. Patients were classified as symptomatic for a Chiari I if they had apnea spells and/or exertional headaches and as asymptomatic if they had symptoms not considered specific for a Chiari I malformation. The PCMR CSF flow study was obtained with the same protocol for all patients and with the neck in neutral, flexed, and extended positions. Images were inspected for CSF flow jets and synchronous bidirectional flow. Peak CSF flow velocities were calculated with commercial software. Differences between the 2 groups were tested with mixed-effects ANOVA and Wilcoxon rank sum or Fisher exact probability tests with significance set at the .05 level. RESULTS Twenty-six patients with Chiari I were classified as symptomatic, and 24, as asymptomatic. Abnormal flow jets tended to occur more often in the symptomatic than in the asymptomatic patients (P = .054). Peak CSF velocities ranged from 2 to 20 cm/s in the symptomatic and the asymptomatic groups and did not differ significantly between the 2 groups or with neck position. CONCLUSIONS Peak CSF flow velocities near the foramen magnum did not differentiate symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with Chiari I. PMID:20884747

  11. ADAM17 limits the expression of CSF1R on murine hematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Becker, Amy M; Walcheck, Bruce; Bhattacharya, Deepta

    2015-01-01

    All-lymphoid progenitors (ALPs) yield few myeloid cells in vivo, but readily generate such cells in vitro. The basis for this difference remains unknown. We hypothesized that ALPs limit responsiveness to in vivo concentrations of myeloid-promoting cytokines by reducing expression of the corresponding receptors, potentially through posttranscriptional mechanisms. Consistent with such a mechanism, ALPs express higher levels of CSF1R transcripts than their upstream precursors, yet show limited cell-surface protein expression of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R). All-lymphoid progenitors and other hematopoietic progenitors deficient in A disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 17 (ADAM17), display elevated cell surface CSF1R expression. ADAM17(-/-) ALPs, however, fail to yield myeloid cells upon transplantation into irradiated recipients. Moreover, ADAM17(-/-) ALPs yield fewer macrophages in vitro than control ALPs at high concentrations of macrophage colony stimulating factor. Mice with hematopoietic-specific deletion of ADAM17 have normal numbers of myeloid and lymphoid progenitors and mature cells in vivo. These data demonstrate that ADAM17 limits CSF1R protein expression on hematopoietic progenitors, but that compensatory mechanisms prevent elevated CSF1R levels from altering lymphoid progenitor potential.

  12. Intravenous magnesium sulfate does not increase ventricular CSF ionized magnesium concentration of patients with intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Brewer, R P; Parra, A; Borel, C O; Hopkins, M B; Reynolds, J D

    2001-01-01

    Magnesium sulfate has attracted interest as a potential neuroprotectant but passage of magnesium ion into the central nervous system has not been well documented. For this study, we quantified plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ionized magnesium concentration after systemic magnesium sulfate infusion in patients with intracranial hypertension. Patients ( N = 9) received an intravenous infusion of 5 g/20 mmol magnesium sulfate (125 mL of a 4% wt/vol solution) over 30 minutes. Before and after dosing, CSF (from an indwelling ventricular catheter) and blood samples were collected at hourly intervals. Ionized magnesium concentration in all samples was determined using an electrolyte analyzer. Baseline plasma and CSF ionized magnesium concentrations were 0.58 +/- 0.05 and 0.82 +/- 0.06 mmol/L, respectively. Intravenous magnesium sulfate infusion significantly increased plasma ionized magnesium concentration (peak, 0.89 +/- 0.11 mmol/L), but CSF magnesium levels did not change during the 4-hour study. Systemic administration of magnesium sulfate failed to increase CSF ionized magnesium concentration in patients with intracranial hypertension despite increasing plasma magnesium levels by >50%.

  13. Management of CSF leakage after microsurgery for vestibular schwannoma via the middle cranial fossa approach.

    PubMed

    Scheich, Matthias; Ginzkey, Christian; Ehrmann-Müller, Desiree; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa; Hagen, Rudolf

    2016-10-01

    Microsurgery is one of the primary current standard options for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma (VS). Especially the middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach is a safe and efficacious technique for the preservation of hearing and facial nerve function in small VS. Postoperative complications are rare, although a leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is common. The aim of this study was to analyze postoperative CSF leaks and to describe strategies for postoperative treatment. Between October 2005 and May 2012, 148 patients suffering from VS and selected for microsurgery via the MCF approach were treated in our department. Postoperative CSF leakage occurred in 19 patients. We found a leakage via the Eustachian tube into the nasopharynx in 18 patients and one case of incisional leakage. In 13 cases leaking stopped within 5 days by conservative management including bed rest and intravenous (i.v) antibiotics. Five patients needed lumbar drainage (LD) and only two patients had to undergo revision surgery to seal and pack the mastoid. Analyzed risk factors were age, gender, tumor size and pneumatization of the mastoid. Only the latter showed a significant influence on CSF leakage. We could demonstrate that a stepwise strategy is needed for successful treatment of CSF leaks. PMID:26749560

  14. Mitochondrial DNA in CSF distinguishes LRRK2 from idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Podlesniy, Petar; Vilas, Dolores; Taylor, Peggy; Shaw, Leslie M; Tolosa, Eduard; Trullas, Ramon

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA regulates mitochondrial function which is altered in both idiopathic and familial forms of Parkinson's disease. To investigate whether these two disease forms exhibit an altered regulation of mitochondrial DNA we measured cell free mitochondrial DNA content in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from idiopathic and LRRK2-related Parkinson's disease patients. The concentration of mitochondrial DNA was measured using a digital droplet polymerase chain reaction technique in a total of 98 CSF samples from a cohort of subjects including: 20 LRRK2(G2019S) mutation carriers with Parkinson's disease, 26 asymptomatic LRRK2(G2019S) mutation carriers, 31 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 21 first-degree relatives of LRRK2 Parkinson's disease patients without the mutation. Here we report that LRRK2(G2019S) mutation carriers with Parkinson's disease exhibit a high concentration of mitochondrial DNA in CSF compared with asymptomatic LRRK2(G2019S) mutation carriers and with idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients. In addition, idiopathic, but not LRRK2 Parkinson's disease is associated with low CSF concentration of α-synuclein. These results show that high mitochondrial DNA content in CSF distinguishes idiopathic from LRRK2-related Parkinson's disease suggesting that different biochemical pathways underlie neurodegeneration in these two disorders.

  15. rhGM-CSF ameliorates neutropenia in patients with malignant glioma treated with BCNU.

    PubMed Central

    Rampling, R.; Steward, W.; Paul, J.; Macham, M. A.; Harvey, E.; Eckley, D.

    1994-01-01

    Nitrosoureas are the drugs most effective in the treatment of patients with intracerebral malignant glioma. Their limiting toxicity is delayed myelosuppression. A prospective, randomised crossover study of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) was performed in patients receiving BCNU for relapsed glioblastoma, to investigate whether the resulting haematological toxicity profile could be modified by rhGM-CSF. Adequate data for analysis were obtained in 13 patients. Following BCNU, the nadir neutrophil count was higher in 12 out of 13 patients during the rhGM-CSF-protected cycles compared with the unprotected cycles. The median nadir was also significantly higher (1.79, CI 0.76-3.52, P < 0.005). Five episodes of neutropenia (< 2 x 10(9) l-1) occurred during the unprotected cycles compared with none in the rhGM-CSF-protected cycles (P = 0.076). There was no evidence of any effect on platelets. This result shows that the haematological toxicity profile following therapeutic doses of BCNU can be modified. It suggests that rhGM-CSF and other growth factors should be investigated for clinical efficacy in chemotherapy using nitrosoureas. PMID:8123485

  16. Effects of recombinant human GM-CSF on proliferation of clonogenic cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J D; Young, D; Herrmann, F; Wiper, D; Wagner, K; Sabbath, K D

    1986-05-01

    Proliferation of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) cells in vitro is limited in most cases to a small subset of blasts that have several properties of stem cells. These leukemic colony-forming cells (AML-CFU) generally require addition of exogenous growth factors for proliferation in agar or methylcellulose. These factors can be supplied by media conditioned by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated normal leukocytes or by CSF-secreting tumor cell lines. However, the exact factor or factors required for stimulation of AML-CFU growth have not been defined. We compared the AML-CFU stimulatory activity of a human recombinant GM-CSF with that of GCT-CM, Mo-CM, and the PHA-leukocyte feeder system in 15 cases of AML. In each of the 12 cases that required exogenous growth factors for maximum AML-CFU growth, recombinant GM-CSF could replace either GM-CSF or Mo-CM, and could partially replace the PHA-leukocyte feeder system. These results indicate that this GM-CSF is a growth promoter of AML-CFU in these culture systems.

  17. Structural characterization of PEGylated rHuG-CSF and location of PEG attachment sites.

    PubMed

    Cindrić, Mario; Cepo, Tina; Galić, Nives; Bukvić-Krajacić, Mirjana; Tomczyk, Nick; Vissers, Johaness P C; Bindila, Laura; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna

    2007-06-28

    Mass spectrometry structural characterization is an essential tool in validating the quality of PEG-rHu-proteins. However, in either case top-down or bottom-up fashion, the interference of high intensity PEG signals on MS detection or detrimental influence of PEG on protein structure, leads to incomplete structural characterization. We propose here a method that permits complete and reliable structural characterization of PEGylated recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rHuG-CSF). The approach includes on-column 2-methoxy-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazole derivatization of digested PEG rHuG-CSF and subsequent LC/MS investigation. By comparing the LC/MS retention of derivatized and underivatized digested PEG rHuG-CSF, location of the PEG attachment within rHuG-CSF could be deduced. Besides, the protein sequence coverage and position of the disulfide bridges was fully deducible from the MS data interpretation. Additionally, ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-to-the-E (UPLC-MS(E)) was introduced for analysis of label-free digested PEG rHuG-CSF here to enable high resolution and mass accuracy of MS detection and facilitate deep structural insights of peptides.

  18. Phase I dose intensification study of 2-weekly epirubicin with GM-CSF in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Michael, M; Toner, G C; Olver, I N; Fenessy, A; Bishop, J F

    1997-06-01

    This study investigated dose intensification of epirubicin administered as a 2-weekly regimen with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) support. The aim was to define the maximally tolerated dose of epirubicin and to assess the efficacy of GM-CSF to ameliorate its toxicity. Patients with anthracycline-responsive advanced malignancies were eligible. Six dose levels, commencing at 90 mg/m2, of epirubicin administered every 2 weeks for four courses were planned with GM-CSF 10 micrograms/kg/day administered for 10 days from the second day of each course. Six patients were to be entered at each dose level, and escalation to the next level was based upon toxicity criteria. Twelve patients were entered, six at dose level 1 (90 mg/m2) and six at dose level 2 (120 mg/m2). Prospectively defined haematological dose-limiting toxicities were noted in one patient at dose level 1 and in five patients at dose level 2. Further dose escalation was not attempted. Significant nonhaematological toxicities included febrile neutropenia in two and four patients at dose levels 1 and 2, respectively. This study has demonstrated that epirubicin can be safely administered at 2 week intervals with GM-CSF at a dose of 90 mg/m2, equivalent to the previously reported maximum tolerated dose intensity of 45 mg/m2/week. Neutropenia was dose-limiting despite the use of GM-CSF.

  19. CSF as a surrogate for assessing CNS exposure: an industrial perspective.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiunn H

    2008-01-01

    For drugs that directly act on targets in the central nervous system (CNS), sufficient drug delivery into the brain is a prerequisite for drug action. Systemically administered drugs can reach CNS by passage across the endothelium of capillary vasculatures, the so-called blood-brain barrier (BBB). Literature data suggest that most marketed CNS drugs have good membrane permeability and relatively high plasma unbound fraction, but are not good P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates. Therefore, it is important to use the in vitro parameters of P-gp function activity, membrane permeability and plasma unbound fraction as key criteria for lead optimization during the early stage of drug discovery. Evidence from preclinical and clinical studies suggests that drug concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) appears to be reasonably accurate in predicting unbound drug concentration in the brain. Therefore, CSF can be used as a useful surrogate for in vivo assessment of CNS exposure and provides an important basis for the selection of drug candidates for entry into development. However, it is important to point out that CSF drug concentration is not always an accurate surrogate for predicting unbound drug concentration in the brain. Depending on the physicochemical properties of drugs and the site/timing of CSF sampling, the unbound drug concentration at the biophase within the brain could differ significantly from the corresponding CSF drug concentration.

  20. CSF1R mosaicism in a family with hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Florian S; Li, Jiankang; Guo, Yiran; Caruso, Paul A; Bjonnes, Andrew C; Pan, Jessica; Booker, Jessica K; Lane, Jacqueline M; Tare, Archana; Vlasac, Irma; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gusella, James F; Zhang, Jianguo; Keating, Brendan J; Saxena, Richa

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) have recently been discovered as causal for hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids. We identified a novel, heterozygous missense mutation in CSF1R [c.1990G > A p.(E664K)] by exome sequencing in five members of a family with hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids. Three affected siblings had characteristic white matter abnormalities and presented with progressive neurological decline. In the fourth affected sibling, early progression halted after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a related donor. Blood spot DNA from this subject displayed chimerism in CSF1R acquired after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Interestingly, both parents were unaffected but the mother's blood and saliva were mosaic for the CSF1R mutation. Our findings suggest that expression of wild-type CSF1R in some cells, whether achieved by mosaicism or chimerism, may confer benefit in hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and suggest that haematopoietic stem cell transplantation might have a therapeutic role for this disorder. PMID:27190017

  1. Meningiomas and Proteomics: Focus on New Potential Biomarkers and Molecular Pathways.

    PubMed

    Abbritti, Rosaria Viola; Polito, Francesca; Cucinotta, Maria; Lo Giudice, Claudio; Caffo, Maria; Tomasello, Chiara; Germanò, Antonino; Aguennouz, Mohammed

    Meningiomas are one of the most common tumors affecting the central nervous system, exhibiting a great heterogeneity in grading, treatment and molecular background. This article provides an overview of the current literature regarding the molecular aspect of meningiomas. Analysis of potential biomarkers in serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and pathological tissues was reported. Applying bioinformatic methods and matching the common proteic pro