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Sample records for ad frontotemporal dementia

  1. Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Roger E; El-Khoury, Ramy

    2016-02-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a not-uncommon explanation for progressive cognitive deficit in patients who often have a genetic susceptibility for such a neurodegenerative process. However, FTD does not seem to identify one particular pathogenetic mechanism but rather a spectrum of pathologies with particular predilection for the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. There have been various subcategorizations of this form of dementia that have a tendency to be of earlier onset than typical Alzheimer disease and heralded by behavioral or communication manifestations. There is a behavioral variant and a language variant, referred to as primary progressive aphasia. PMID:26613998

  2. Frontotemporal Dementias: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Weder, Natalie D; Aziz, Rehan; Wilkins, Kirsten; Tampi, Rajesh R

    2007-01-01

    Dementia is a clinical state characterized by loss of function in multiple cognitive domains. It is a costly disease in terms of both personal suffering and economic loss. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the term now preferred over Picks disease to describe the spectrum of non-Alzheimers dementias characterized by focal atrophy of the frontal and anterior temporal regions of the brain. The prevalence of FTD is considerable, though specific figures vary among different studies. It occurs usually in an age range of 35–75 and it is more common in individuals with a positive family history of dementia. The risk factors associated with this disorder include head injury and family history of FTD. Although there is some controversy regarding the further syndromatic subdivision of the different types of FTD, the three major clinical presentations of FTD include: 1) a frontal or behavioral variant (FvFTD), 2) a temporal, aphasic variant, also called Semantic dementia (SD), and 3) a progressive aphasia (PA). These different variants differ in their clinical presentation, cognitive deficits, and affected brain regions. Patients with FTD should have a neuropsychiatric assessment, neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging studies to confirm and clarify the diagnosis. Treatment for this entity consists of behavioral and pharmacological approaches. Medications such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antipsychotics, mood stabilizer and other novel treatments have been used in FTD with different rates of success. Further research should be directed at understanding and developing new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities to improve the patients' prognosis and quality of life. PMID:17565679

  3. Frontotemporal dementia mimicking bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, Andrew H; Schroeder, Ryan W; Baade, Lyle E; Lincoln, Janka; Khan, Ahsan Y

    2013-11-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is a cause of behavioral disturbance that usually appears in individuals between 45 and 65 years of age. The authors present the case of a 65-year-old patient that illustrates how frontotemporal dementia can be misdiagnosed based on a behavioral pattern that suggests the presence of a primary mood disorder. Early accurate diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia and subsequent supportive measures can allow patients and families to make important decisions about business and legal affairs and how to spend remaining leisure time in the most meaningful and enjoyable way possible. PMID:24241504

  4. Treatment of Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Boxer, Adam L.

    2016-01-01

    Opinion statement Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) encompasses a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases with heterogeneous clinical presentations and two predominant types of underlying neuropathology. FTD typically comprises three distinct clinical syndromes: behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), and nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA). FTD also frequently overlaps both clinically and neuropathologically with three other neurodegenerative syndromes: corticobasal syndrome (CBS), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Each syndrome can be associated with one or more underlying neuropathological diagnoses and are referred to as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Although the various FTD syndromes can substantially differ in terms of clinical symptoms and underlying pathology, the symptoms can be broadly categorized into behavioral, cognitive and motor domains. Currently there are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved therapies for the above syndromes except riluzole for ALS. FTD treatment strategies generally rely on off-label use of medications for symptomatic management, and most therapies lack quality evidence from randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials. For behavioral symptoms, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be effective, while case reports hint at possible efficacy with antipsychotics or antiepileptics, but use of these latter agents is limited due to concerns regarding side effects. There are no effective therapies for cognitive complaints in FTD, which frequently involve executive function, memory, and language. Motor difficulties associated with FTD may present with parkinsonian symptoms or motor neuron disease, for which riluzole is indicated as therapy. Compared to idiopathic Parkinson’s disease, FTD-related atypical parkinsonism is generally not responsive to dopamine replacement therapies, but a

  5. Oxytocin for frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    MacKinley, Julia; Blair, Mervin; Oliver, Lindsay D.; Jesso, Sarah; Tartaglia, Maria C.; Borrie, Michael; Wells, Jennie; Dziobek, Isabel; Pasternak, Stephen; Mitchell, Derek G.V.; Rankin, Katherine; Kertesz, Andrew; Boxer, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the safety and tolerability of 3 doses of intranasal oxytocin (Syntocinon; Novartis, Bern, Switzerland) administered to patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Methods: We conducted a randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using a dose-escalation design to test 3 clinically feasible doses of intranasal oxytocin (24, 48, or 72 IU) administered twice daily for 1 week to 23 patients with behavioral variant FTD or semantic dementia (clinicaltrials.gov registration number NCT01386333). Primary outcome measures were safety and tolerability at each dose. Secondary measures explored efficacy across the combined oxytocin vs placebo groups and examined potential dose-related effects. Results: All 3 doses of intranasal oxytocin were safe and well tolerated. Conclusions: A multicenter trial is warranted to determine the therapeutic efficacy of long-term intranasal oxytocin for behavioral symptoms in FTD. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that for patients with FTD, intranasal oxytocin is not significantly associated with adverse events or significant changes in the overall neuropsychiatric inventory. PMID:25503617

  6. What is frontotemporal dementia?

    PubMed

    Kurz, Alexander; Kurz, Carolin; Ellis, Kathryn; Lautenschlager, Nicola T

    2014-10-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the clinical manifestation of progressive nerve cell loss in the frontal and anterior temporal lobes. It represents the second most frequent form of early-onset dementia. The two major types of FTD are determined by the localisation of the underlying pathology. The behaviour variant is characterised by disinhibition, socially inappropriate manners, loss of empathy, blunting of affect and hyperorality. Key features of the language variant are either non-fluent effortful speech and grammatical errors or impaired word finding and loss of meaning of words and objects. Histopathological changes are characterised by the abnormal processing of proteins including microtubule associated protein Tau, transactive response DNA-binding protein, and tumour-associated protein fused in sarcoma. The familial forms of FTD are caused by mutations in 5 genes. The diagnosis of FTD rests on careful history and psychiatric, neuropsychological and neurological examination supported by laboratory assessments and brain imaging. The management requires an interdisciplinary approach involving the carer and using non-pharmacological approaches in the first line. Current antidementia drugs, including cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, have no consistent positive effects in FTD. Behavioural symptoms may respond favourably to selective serotonergic antidepressants. Antipsychotic agents should be used with caution regarding motor, cardiovascular and mortality risks. PMID:25059437

  7. Frontotemporal dementia: An updated overview

    PubMed Central

    Mohandas, E.; Rajmohan, V.

    2009-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome occurring between 45 and 65 years. The syndrome is also called frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). However, FTLD refers to a larger group of disorders FTD being one of its subgroups. The other subgroups of FTLD are progressive nonfluent aphasia (PFNA), and semantic dementia (SD). FTLD is characterized by atrophy of prefrontal and anterior temporal cortices. FTD occurs in 5-15% of patients with dementia and it is the third most common degenerative dementia. FTD occurs with equal frequency in both sexes. The age of onset is usually between 45 and 65 years though it may range anywhere from 21 to 81 years. The usual course is one of progressive clinicopathological deterioration with mortality within 6-8 years. Unlike Alzheimer’s disease (AD), this condition has a strong genetic basis and family history of FTD is seen in 40-50% of cases. FTD is a genetically complex disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance in majority of cases. Genetic linkage studies have revealed FTLD loci on chromosome 3p, 9, 9p, and 17q. The most prevalent genes are PGRN (progranulin) and MAPT (microtubule-associated protein tau), both located on chromosome 17q21. More than 15 different pathologies can underlie FTD and related disorders and it has four major types of pathological features: (1) microvacuolation without neuronal inclusions, (2) microvacuolation with ubiquitinated rounded intraneuronal inclusions and dystrophic neurites FTLD-ubiquitinated (FTLD-U), (3) transcortical gliosis with tau-reactive rounded intraneuronal inclusions, (4) microvacuolation and taupositive neurofibrillary tangles. Behavior changes are the most common initial symptom of FTD (62%), whereas speech and language problems are most common in NFPA (100%) and SD (58%). There are no approved drugs for the management of FTD and trials are needed to find effective agents. Non-pharmacological treatment and caregiver

  8. Frontotemporal dementia: An updated overview.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, E; Rajmohan, V

    2009-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome occurring between 45 and 65 years. The syndrome is also called frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). However, FTLD refers to a larger group of disorders FTD being one of its subgroups. The other subgroups of FTLD are progressive nonfluent aphasia (PFNA), and semantic dementia (SD). FTLD is characterized by atrophy of prefrontal and anterior temporal cortices. FTD occurs in 5-15% of patients with dementia and it is the third most common degenerative dementia. FTD occurs with equal frequency in both sexes. The age of onset is usually between 45 and 65 years though it may range anywhere from 21 to 81 years. The usual course is one of progressive clinicopathological deterioration with mortality within 6-8 years. Unlike Alzheimer's disease (AD), this condition has a strong genetic basis and family history of FTD is seen in 40-50% of cases. FTD is a genetically complex disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance in majority of cases. Genetic linkage studies have revealed FTLD loci on chromosome 3p, 9, 9p, and 17q. The most prevalent genes are PGRN (progranulin) and MAPT (microtubule-associated protein tau), both located on chromosome 17q21. More than 15 different pathologies can underlie FTD and related disorders and it has four major types of pathological features: (1) microvacuolation without neuronal inclusions, (2) microvacuolation with ubiquitinated rounded intraneuronal inclusions and dystrophic neurites FTLD-ubiquitinated (FTLD-U), (3) transcortical gliosis with tau-reactive rounded intraneuronal inclusions, (4) microvacuolation and taupositive neurofibrillary tangles. Behavior changes are the most common initial symptom of FTD (62%), whereas speech and language problems are most common in NFPA (100%) and SD (58%). There are no approved drugs for the management of FTD and trials are needed to find effective agents. Non-pharmacological treatment and caregiver

  9. TDP-43 and frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Hu, William T; Grossman, Murray

    2009-09-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein of about 43 kDa (TDP-43) is the main ubiquitinated peptide in tau-negative frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). TDP-43 is typically a nuclear protein, and its aggregation and cytoplasmic translocation are thought to represent major steps in the pathogenesis of FTLD due to TDP-43 proteinopathy (FTLD-TDP). Certain clinical syndromes of frontotemporal dementia are preferentially associated with pathologic findings of FTLD-TDP, and TDP-43 pathology represents the connection between FTLD-TDP and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Recent advances in clinical, genetic, and pathologic studies of FTLD-TDP and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shed light on the potentially pathogenic role of TDP-43 and identified TDP-43 itself as a candidate biomarker for antemortem diagnosis of FTLD-TDP. PMID:19664364

  10. Frontotemporal dementia or frontotemporal lobar degeneration--overview of a group of proteinopathies.

    PubMed

    Haberland, Catherine

    2010-03-30

    Frontotemporal dementia is the second most common early onset dementia after Alzheimer disease. Frontotemporal dementias are a complex group of dementias. The clinical diagnosis can be perplexing because of concurring psychiatric and neurologic syndromes. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration, the underlying pathology, represents an emerging group of proteinopathies. Genetic factors play an important part in the etiologies of dementias. This article overviews current defining characteristics of frontotemporal dementias known also as frontotemporal lobar degenerations. PMID:20405665

  11. Somatic complaints in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Landqvist Waldö, Maria; Santillo, Alexander Frizell; Gustafson, Lars; Englund, Elisabet; Passant, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is associated with a broad spectrum of clinical characteristics. The objective of this study was to analyze the prevalence of unexplained somatic complaints in neuropathologically verified FTD. We also examined whether the somatic presentations correlated with protein pathology or regional brain pathology and if the patients with these somatic features showed more depressive traits. Ninety-seven consecutively neuropathologically verified FTLD patients were selected. All 97 patients were part of a longitudinal study of FTD and all medical records were systematically reviewed. The somatic complaints focused on were headache, musculoskeletal, gastro/urogenital and abnormal pain response. Symptoms of somatic character (either somatic complaints and/or abnormal pain response) were found in 40.2%. These patients did not differ from the total group with regard to gender, age at onset or duration. Six patients showed exaggerated reactions to sensory stimuli, whereas three patients showed reduced response to pain. Depressive traits were present in 38% and did not correlate with somatic complaints. Suicidal behavior was present in 17 patients, in 10 of these suicidal behavior was concurrent with somatic complaints. No clear correlation between somatic complaints and brain protein pathology, regional pathology or asymmetric hemispherical atrophy was found. Our results show that many FTD patients suffer from unexplained somatic complaints before and/or during dementia where no clear correlation can be found with protein pathology or regional degeneration. Somatic complaints are not covered by current diagnostic criteria for FTD, but need to be considered in diagnostics and care. The need for prospective studies with neuropathological follow up must be stressed as these phenomena remain unexplained, misinterpreted, bizarre and, in many cases, excruciating. PMID:25232513

  12. Sleep Disturbances in Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    McCarter, Stuart J; St Louis, Erik K; Boeve, Bradley F

    2016-09-01

    Sleep disorders appear to be frequent comorbidities in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness commonly occur in patients with FTD and significantly contribute to caregiver burden and burnout. Sleep is severely fragmented in FTD patients, likely secondary to behavioral disturbances, other primary sleep disorders such as sleep disordered breathing and restless leg syndrome, and neurodegeneration of nuclei involved in sleep and wakefulness. Treatment of primary sleep disorders may improve excessive daytime sleepiness and sleep quality and may improve daytime cognitive functioning. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder is rare in FTD and may be confused with excessive nocturnal activity due to disturbed circadian rhythm. The relationship between FTD, sleep quality, and sleep disorders requires further study to better understand the contribution of disturbed sleep to daytime neurocognitive functioning and quality of life in FTD. Further, future studies should focus on comparing sleep disturbances between different FTD syndromes, especially behavioral variant FTD and primary progressive aphasia. Comorbid sleep disorders should be promptly sought and treated in patients with FTD to improve patient and caregiver quality of life. PMID:27485946

  13. Mentalising music in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Laura E.; Blezat, Alice; Nicholas, Jennifer; Omar, Rohani; Golden, Hannah L.; Mahoney, Colin J.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable recent interest, the biological basis and clinical diagnosis of behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) pose unresolved problems. Mentalising (the cognitive capacity to interpret the behaviour of oneself and others in terms of mental states) is impaired as a prominent feature of bvFTD, consistent with involvement of brain regions including ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), orbitofrontal cortex and anterior temporal lobes. Here, we investigated mentalising ability in a cohort of patients with bvFTD using a novel modality: music. We constructed a novel neuropsychological battery requiring attribution of affective mental or non-mental associations to musical stimuli. Mentalising performance of patients with bvFTD (n = 20) was assessed in relation to matched healthy control subjects (n = 20); patients also had a comprehensive assessment of behaviour and general neuropsychological functions. Neuroanatomical correlates of performance on the experimental tasks were investigated using voxel-based morphometry of patients' brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Compared to healthy control subjects, patients showed impaired ability to attribute mental states but not non-mental characteristics to music, and this deficit correlated with performance on a standard test of social inference and with carer ratings of patients' empathic capacity, but not with other potentially relevant measures of general neuropsychological function. Mentalising performance in the bvFTD group was associated with grey matter changes in anterior temporal lobe and ventro-medial PFC. These findings suggest that music can represent surrogate mental states and the ability to construct such mental representations is impaired in bvFTD, with potential implications for our understanding of the biology of bvFTD and human social cognition more broadly. PMID:23107380

  14. Mentalising music in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Downey, Laura E; Blezat, Alice; Nicholas, Jennifer; Omar, Rohani; Golden, Hannah L; Mahoney, Colin J; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable recent interest, the biological basis and clinical diagnosis of behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) pose unresolved problems. Mentalising (the cognitive capacity to interpret the behaviour of oneself and others in terms of mental states) is impaired as a prominent feature of bvFTD, consistent with involvement of brain regions including ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), orbitofrontal cortex and anterior temporal lobes. Here, we investigated mentalising ability in a cohort of patients with bvFTD using a novel modality: music. We constructed a novel neuropsychological battery requiring attribution of affective mental or non-mental associations to musical stimuli. Mentalising performance of patients with bvFTD (n = 20) was assessed in relation to matched healthy control subjects (n = 20); patients also had a comprehensive assessment of behaviour and general neuropsychological functions. Neuroanatomical correlates of performance on the experimental tasks were investigated using voxel-based morphometry of patients' brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Compared to healthy control subjects, patients showed impaired ability to attribute mental states but not non-mental characteristics to music, and this deficit correlated with performance on a standard test of social inference and with carer ratings of patients' empathic capacity, but not with other potentially relevant measures of general neuropsychological function. Mentalising performance in the bvFTD group was associated with grey matter changes in anterior temporal lobe and ventro-medial PFC. These findings suggest that music can represent surrogate mental states and the ability to construct such mental representations is impaired in bvFTD, with potential implications for our understanding of the biology of bvFTD and human social cognition more broadly. PMID:23107380

  15. Parkinsonism and frontotemporal dementia: the clinical overlap.

    PubMed

    Espay, Alberto J; Litvan, Irene

    2011-11-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is commonly associated with parkinsonism in several sporadic (i.e., progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration) and familial neurodegenerative disorders (i.e., frontotemporal dementia associated with parkinsonism and MAPT or progranulin mutations in chromosome 17). The clinical diagnosis of these disorders may be challenging in view of overlapping clinical features, particularly in speech, language, and behavior. The motor and cognitive phenotypes can be viewed within a spectrum of clinical, pathologic, and genetic disorders with no discrete clinicopathologic correlations but rather lying within a dementia-parkinsonism continuum. Neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis can be helpful, but the poor specificity of clinical and imaging features has enormously challenged the development of biological markers that could differentiate these disorders premortem. This gap is critical to bridge in order to allow testing of novel biological therapies that may slow the progression of these proteinopathies. PMID:21892619

  16. Therapeutic and diagnostic challenges for frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    D’Alton, Simon; Lewis, Jada

    2014-01-01

    In the search for therapeutic modifiers, frontotemporal dementia (FTD) has traditionally been overshadowed by other conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A clinically and pathologically diverse condition, FTD has been galvanized by a number of recent discoveries such as novel genetic variants in familial and sporadic forms of disease and the identification of TAR DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) as the defining constituent of inclusions in more than half of cases. In combination with an ever-expanding knowledge of the function and dysfunction of tau—a protein which is pathologically aggregated in the majority of the remaining cases—there exists a greater understanding of FTD than ever before. These advances may indicate potential approaches for the development of hypothetical therapeutics, but FTD remains highly complex and the roles of tau and TDP-43 in neurodegeneration are still wholly unclear. Here the challenges facing potential therapeutic strategies are discussed, which include sufficiently accurate disease diagnosis and sophisticated technology to deliver effective therapies. PMID:25191265

  17. The frontotemporal dementia-motor neuron disease continuum.

    PubMed

    Burrell, James R; Halliday, Glenda M; Kril, Jillian J; Ittner, Lars M; Götz, Jürgen; Kiernan, Matthew C; Hodges, John R

    2016-08-27

    Early reports of cognitive and behavioural deficits in motor neuron disease might have been overlooked initially, but the concept of a frontotemporal dementia-motor neuron disease continuum has emerged during the past decade. Frontotemporal dementia-motor neuron disease is now recognised as an important dementia syndrome, which presents substantial challenges for diagnosis and management. Frontotemporal dementia, motor neuron disease, and frontotemporal dementia-motor neuron disease are characterised by overlapping patterns of TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43) pathology, while the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) repeat expansion is common across the disease spectrum. Indeed, the C9orf72 repeat expansion provides important clues to disease pathogenesis and suggests potential therapeutic targets. Variable diagnostic criteria identify motor, cognitive, and behavioural deficits, but further refinement is needed to define the clinical syndromes encountered in frontotemporal dementia-motor neuron disease. PMID:26987909

  18. Neuroeconomic dissociation of semantic dementia and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Chiong, Winston; Wood, Kristie A; Beagle, Alexander J; Hsu, Ming; Kayser, Andrew S; Miller, Bruce L; Kramer, Joel H

    2016-02-01

    Many neuropsychiatric disorders are marked by abnormal behaviour and decision-making, but prevailing diagnostic criteria for such behaviours are typically qualitative and often ambiguous. Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (also called semantic dementia) are two clinical variants of frontotemporal dementia with overlapping but distinct anatomical substrates known to cause profound changes in decision-making. We investigated whether abnormal decision-making in these syndromes could be more precisely characterized in terms of dissociable abnormalities in patients' subjective evaluations of valence (positive versus negative outcome) and of time (present versus future outcome). We presented 28 patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, 14 patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia, 25 patients with Alzheimer's disease (as disease controls), and 61 healthy older control subjects with experimental tasks assaying loss aversion and delay discounting. In general linear models controlling for age, gender, education and Mini-Mental State Examination score, patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia were less averse to losses than control subjects (P < 0.001), while patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia discounted delayed rewards more steeply than controls (P = 0.019). There was no relationship between loss aversion and delay discounting across the sample, nor in any of the subgroups. These findings suggest that abnormal behaviours in neurodegenerative disease may result from the disruption of either of two dissociable neural processes for evaluating the outcomes of action. More broadly, these findings suggest a role for computational methods to supplement traditional qualitative characterizations in the differential diagnosis of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26667277

  19. Frontotemporal dementia: a bridge between dementia and neuromuscular disease

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Adeline SL; Rademakers, Rosa; Miller, BL

    2015-01-01

    The concept that frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a purely “cortical” dementia has largely been refuted by the recognition of its close association with motor neuron disease, and the identification of transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) as a major pathological substrate underlying both diseases. Genetic findings have transformed this field and revealed connections between disorders that were previous thought clinically unrelated. The discovery of the C9ORF72 locus as responsible for majority of hereditary FTD, ALS and FTD-ALS cases and the understanding that repeat-containing RNA plays a crucial role in pathogenesis of both disorders has paved the way for development of potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for these devastating diseases. In this review, we summarize the historical aspects leading up to our current understanding of the genetic, clinical and neuropathological overlap between FTD and ALS, and include brief discussions on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) given its association with TDP-43 pathology, increased dementia risk and reports of ALS in CTE patients. Additionally we describe other genetic associations between dementia and neuromuscular disease, such as inclusion body myositis with Paget’s disease and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). PMID:25557955

  20. Vestibular Impairment in Frontotemporal Dementia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Kadono, Kotarou; Koganezawa, Tadachika; Takiguchi, Mao; Terada, Makoto; Yamamoto, Fumiko; Moriyama, Tetsuya; Yanagiha, Kumi; Nohara, Seitaro; Tozaka, Naoki; Miyake, Zenshi; Aizawa, Satoshi; Furusho, Kentaro; Tamaoka, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Background No studies to date have attempted to evaluate frontotemporal lobar degeneration from the perspective of the vestibular system. Objective The present study examined vestibular function in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) clinical syndrome and evaluated whether vestibular disorders are involved in the clinical symptoms due to FTD. Methods Fourteen patients with FTD syndrome, as well as healthy elderly controls without dementia, were included in the present study. All subjects underwent vestibular function tests using electronystagmography, such as caloric tests and visual suppression (VS) tests, in which the induced caloric nystagmus was suppressed by visual stimuli. The association between clinical symptoms and vestibular function in the FTD syndrome group was further examined. Results In the FTD syndrome group, caloric nystagmus was not necessarily suppressed during VS tests. Furthermore, VS was observed to be significantly impaired in FTD syndrome patients with gait disturbance as compared to those without such disturbance. Conclusion The present study revealed that impairment of VS in patients with FTD results in an inability to regulate vestibular function by means of visual perception, regardless of multiple presumed neuropathological backgrounds. This could also be associated with gait disturbance in patients with FTD syndrome. PMID:27350780

  1. Presymptomatic studies in genetic frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Rohrer, J D; Warren, J D; Fox, N C; Rossor, M N

    2013-10-01

    Approximately 20% of patients with the neurodegenerative disorder frontotemporal dementia (FTD) have an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Genetic FTD is caused by mutations in three genes in most cases (progranulin, microtubule-associated protein tau and chromosome 9 open reading frame 72) although a number of other genes are rare causes. Studies of other neurodegenerative diseases have shown imaging and biomarker evidence of disease onset many years prior to the development of symptoms. Similar studies in genetic FTD are now revealing evidence of a series of presymptomatic changes, initially in plasma biomarkers followed by MR imaging abnormalities of functional and structural connectivity and then grey matter atrophy. Lastly, neuropsychometric tests become abnormal in proximity to the onset of symptoms. Such studies have been relatively small until now but research centres with an expertise in genetic FTD are now forming consortia such as the Genetic Frontotemporal Dementia Initiative (GenFI) to create larger cohorts that can form the basis of future clinical trials. PMID:24012408

  2. Phenotypic Heterogeneity of Monogenic Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Benussi, Alberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a genetically and pathologically heterogeneous disorder characterized by personality changes, language impairment, and deficits of executive functions associated with frontal and temporal lobe degeneration. Different phenotypes have been defined on the basis of presenting clinical symptoms, i.e., the behavioral variant of FTD, the agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia, and the semantic variant of PPA. Some patients have an associated movement disorder, either parkinsonism, as in progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal syndrome, or motor neuron disease (FTD–MND). A family history of dementia is found in 40% of cases of FTD and about 10% have a clear autosomal-dominant inheritance. Genetic studies have identified several genes associated with monogenic FTD: microtubule-associated protein tau, progranulin, TAR DNA-binding protein 43, valosin-containing protein, charged multivesicular body protein 2B, fused in sarcoma, and the hexanucleotide repeat expansion in intron 1 of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72. Patients often present with an extensive phenotypic variability, even among different members of the same kindred carrying an identical disease mutation. The objective of the present work is to review and evaluate available literature data in order to highlight recent advances in clinical, biological, and neuroimaging features of monogenic frontotemporal lobar degeneration and try to identify different mechanisms underlying the extreme phenotypic heterogeneity that characterizes this disease. PMID:26388768

  3. Frontotemporal Dementia: Implications for Understanding Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, Michel; Ghetti, Bernardino; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) comprises a group of behavioral, language, and movement disorders. On the basis of the nature of the characteristic protein inclusions, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) can be subdivided into the common FTLD-tau and FTLD-TDP as well as the less common FTLD-FUS and FTLD-UPS. Approximately 10% of cases of FTD are inherited in an autosomal-dominant manner. Mutations in seven genes cause FTD, with those in tau (MAPT), chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72), and progranulin (GRN) being the most common. Mutations in MAPT give rise to FTLD-tau and mutations in C9ORF72 and GRN to FTLD-TDP. The other four genes are transactive response–DNA binding protein-43 (TARDBP), fused in sarcoma (FUS), valosin-containing protein (VCP), and charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B). Mutations in TARDBP and VCP give rise to FTLD-TDP, mutations in FUS to FTLD-FUS, and mutations in CHMP2B to FTLD-UPS. The discovery that mutations in MAPT cause neurodegeneration and dementia has important implications for understanding Alzheimer disease. PMID:22355793

  4. [Is frontotemporal dementia a disease of identity?].

    PubMed

    Lebert, Florence

    2009-06-01

    Patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) have major behavioral troubles and a loss of insight. These factors contribute to reduce self-awareness and recognition of identify of others and by others. Autobiographical amnesia, loss of insight and executive dysfunctions are the major reasons of vulnerable "self" in FTD. Mind representation deficits, decrease of perception of emotions and semantic amnesia contribute to reduced recognition of the relative's identity. Alterations of body expressions, social disinhibition, changes in social and religious values decrease the recognition of patient's identity by the relatives. Different psychological components of identity are modified by the FTD such as feeling of unity, of consistency, of temporality and of affiliation. The fact that brain lesions of FTD are focalized can contribute to understand the biological knowledge of "identity". To know the neurological substrate of alterations of identity, this can help to improve the empathy of the suffering caregivers for the patient. PMID:19473950

  5. Advances in neuroimaging in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Elizabeth; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Fox, Nick C

    2016-08-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinically and neuroanatomically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder with multiple underlying genetic and pathological causes. Whilst initial neuroimaging studies highlighted the presence of frontal and temporal lobe atrophy or hypometabolism as the unifying feature in patients with FTD, more detailed studies have revealed diverse patterns across individuals, with variable frontal or temporal predominance, differing degrees of asymmetry, and the involvement of other cortical areas including the insula and cingulate, as well as subcortical structures such as the basal ganglia and thalamus. Recent advances in novel imaging modalities including diffusion tensor imaging, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and molecular positron emission tomography imaging allow the possibility of investigating alterations in structural and functional connectivity and the visualisation of pathological protein deposition. This review will cover the major imaging modalities currently used in research and clinical practice, focusing on the key insights they have provided into FTD, including the onset and evolution of pathological changes and also importantly their utility as biomarkers for disease detection and staging, differential diagnosis and measurement of disease progression. Validating neuroimaging biomarkers that are able to accomplish these tasks will be crucial for the ultimate goal of powering upcoming clinical trials by correctly stratifying patient enrolment and providing sensitive markers for evaluating the effects and efficacy of disease-modifying therapies. This review describes the key insights provided by research into the major neuroimaging modalities currently used in research and clinical practice, including what they tell us about the onset and evolution of FTD and how they may be used as biomarkers for disease detection and staging, differential diagnosis and measurement of disease progression. This article is

  6. Verb Agreements during On-Line Sentence Processing in Alzheimer's Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, C.C.; Grossman, M.

    2005-01-01

    An on-line ''word detection'' paradigm was used to assess the comprehension of thematic and transitive verb agreements during sentence processing in individuals diagnosed with probable Alzheimer's Disease (AD, n=15) and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD, n=14). AD, FTD, and control participants (n=17) were asked to listen for a word in a sentence.…

  7. Frontotemporal Dysfunction and Dementia in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Susan C; Strong, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Although amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is classically considered a disorder exclusively affecting motor neurons, there is substantial clinical, neuroimaging, and neuropathologic evidence that more than half of patients have an associated syndrome of frontotemporal dysfunction. These syndromes range from frontotemporal dementia to behavioral or cognitive syndromes. Neuroimaging and neuropathologic findings are consistent with frontotemporal lobar degeneration that underpins alterations in network connectivity. Future clinical trials need to be stratified based on the presence or absence of frontotemporal dysfunction on the disease course of ALS. PMID:26515622

  8. Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Colin J; Simpson, Ivor J A; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Fletcher, Phillip D; Downey, Laura E; Golden, Hannah L; Clark, Camilla N; Schmitz, Nicole; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Schott, Jonathan M; Zhang, Hui; Ourselin, Sebastian; Warren, Jason D; Fox, Nick C

    2015-01-01

    Objective Novel biomarkers for monitoring progression in neurodegenerative conditions are needed. Measurement of microstructural changes in white matter (WM) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may be a useful outcome measure. Here we report trajectories of WM change using serial DTI in a cohort with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Methods Twenty-three patients with bvFTD (12 having genetic mutations), and 18 age-matched control participants were assessed using DTI and neuropsychological batteries at baseline and ∼1.3 years later. Baseline and follow-up DTI scans were registered using a groupwise approach. Annualized rates of change for DTI metrics, neuropsychological measures, and whole brain volume were calculated. DTI metric performances were compared, and sample sizes for potential clinical trials were calculated. Results In the bvFTD group as a whole, rates of change in fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) within the right paracallosal cingulum were greatest (FA: −6.8%/yr, p < 0.001; MD: 2.9%/yr, p = 0.01). MAPT carriers had the greatest change within left uncinate fasciculus (FA: −7.9%/yr, p < 0.001; MD: 10.9%/yr, p < 0.001); sporadic bvFTD and C9ORF72 carriers had the greatest change within right paracallosal cingulum (sporadic bvFTD, FA: −6.7%/yr, p < 0.001; MD: 3.8%/yr, p = 0.001; C9ORF72, FA: −6.8%/yr, p = 0.004). Sample size estimates using FA change were substantially lower than neuropsychological or whole brain measures of change. Interpretation Serial DTI scans may be useful for measuring disease progression in bvFTD, with particular trajectories of WM damage emerging. Sample size calculations suggest that longitudinal DTI may be a useful biomarker in future clinical trials. PMID:25363208

  9. Primary empathy deficits in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Baez, Sandra; Manes, Facundo; Huepe, David; Torralva, Teresa; Fiorentino, Natalia; Richter, Fabian; Huepe-Artigas, Daniela; Ferrari, Jesica; Montañes, Patricia; Reyes, Pablo; Matallana, Diana; Vigliecca, Nora S.; Decety, Jean; Ibanez, Agustin

    2014-01-01

    Loss of empathy is an early central symptom and diagnostic criterion of the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Although changes in empathy are evident and strongly affect the social functioning of bvFTD patients, few studies have directly investigated this issue by means of experimental paradigms. The current study assessed multiple components of empathy (affective, cognitive and moral) in bvFTD patients. We also explored whether the loss of empathy constitutes a primary deficit of bvFTD or whether it is explained by impairments in executive functions (EF) or other social cognition domains. Thirty-seven bvFTD patients with early/mild stages of the disease and 30 healthy control participants were assessed with a task that involves the perception of intentional and accidental harm. Participants were also evaluated on emotion recognition, theory of mind (ToM), social norms knowledge and several EF domains. BvFTD patients presented deficits in affective, cognitive and moral aspects of empathy. However, empathic concern was the only aspect primarily affected in bvFTD that was neither related nor explained by deficits in EF or other social cognition domains. Deficits in the cognitive and moral aspects of empathy seem to depend on EF, emotion recognition and ToM. Our findings highlight the importance of using tasks depicting real-life social scenarios because of their greater sensitivity in the assessment of bvFTD. Moreover, our results contribute to the understanding of primary and intrinsic empathy deficits of bvFTD and have important theoretical and clinical implications. PMID:25346685

  10. Primary empathy deficits in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Baez, Sandra; Manes, Facundo; Huepe, David; Torralva, Teresa; Fiorentino, Natalia; Richter, Fabian; Huepe-Artigas, Daniela; Ferrari, Jesica; Montañes, Patricia; Reyes, Pablo; Matallana, Diana; Vigliecca, Nora S; Decety, Jean; Ibanez, Agustin

    2014-01-01

    Loss of empathy is an early central symptom and diagnostic criterion of the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Although changes in empathy are evident and strongly affect the social functioning of bvFTD patients, few studies have directly investigated this issue by means of experimental paradigms. The current study assessed multiple components of empathy (affective, cognitive and moral) in bvFTD patients. We also explored whether the loss of empathy constitutes a primary deficit of bvFTD or whether it is explained by impairments in executive functions (EF) or other social cognition domains. Thirty-seven bvFTD patients with early/mild stages of the disease and 30 healthy control participants were assessed with a task that involves the perception of intentional and accidental harm. Participants were also evaluated on emotion recognition, theory of mind (ToM), social norms knowledge and several EF domains. BvFTD patients presented deficits in affective, cognitive and moral aspects of empathy. However, empathic concern was the only aspect primarily affected in bvFTD that was neither related nor explained by deficits in EF or other social cognition domains. Deficits in the cognitive and moral aspects of empathy seem to depend on EF, emotion recognition and ToM. Our findings highlight the importance of using tasks depicting real-life social scenarios because of their greater sensitivity in the assessment of bvFTD. Moreover, our results contribute to the understanding of primary and intrinsic empathy deficits of bvFTD and have important theoretical and clinical implications. PMID:25346685

  11. Distinct Neuroanatomical Substrates and Cognitive Mechanisms of Figure Copy Performance in Alzheimer's Disease and Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Possin, Katherine L.; Laluz, Victor R.; Alcantar, Oscar Z.; Miller, Bruce L.; Kramer, Joel H.

    2011-01-01

    Figure copy is the most common method of visual spatial assessment in dementia evaluations, but performance on this test may be multifactorial. We examined the neuroanatomical substrates of figure copy performance in 46 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 48 patients with the behavioral variant of Frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). A group of…

  12. Systemic Sarcoidosis Mimicking a Behavioural Variant of Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    De Maindreville, Anne; Bedos, Line; Bakchine, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Among rare neurological manifestations, a progressive dementia may exceptionally be the revealing clinical feature of a sarcoidosis. Diagnosis may then be difficult, especially when systemic signs are missing or latent, with a risk of therapeutic delay. We report the first case of sarcoidosis mimicking a frontotemporal dementia. A 53-year-old man presented with a dementia clinically suggestive of frontotemporal dementia, progressing slowly for about 2 years. However, MRI revealed unusual aspects, mainly large areas of T2/FLAIR hypersignal within temporal regions and cerebellum, with nodular leptomeningeal and juxtacortical Gadolinium enhancement. The patient was finally diagnosed with a systemic sarcoidosis. We discuss the differential diagnosis based on MRI aspects and review the literature on the clinical, biological, and imaging features of sarcoidosis presenting with dementia. This case demonstrates that brain imaging remains mandatory in the exploration process of a patient with dementia. Although the patient presented with rather typical features of a behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia, the MRI aspect was the key exploration that leaded to the diagnosis. PMID:26442161

  13. False Recognition in Lewy-Body Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Boysson, C.; Belleville, S.; Phillips, N. A.; Johns, E. K.; Goupil, D.; Souchay, C.; Bouchard, R.; Chertkow, H.

    2011-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to evaluate the false recognition phenomenon in persons with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and those with Lewy-body disease (LBD). Patients with LBD (n=10) or FTD (n=15) and their corresponding controls (n=30) were subjected to the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm to induce false recognition. Patients were…

  14. Insight in Frontotemporal Dementia: Conceptual Analysis and Empirical Evaluation of the Consensus Criterion ''Loss of Insight'' in Frontotemporal Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Kathinka; Kilander, Lena; Lindau, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to suggest a new formulation of the core research diagnostic consensus criterion ''loss of insight'' in frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Eight patients with FTD (diagnoses made by interviews, medical and neuropsychological examination, CT scan, and regional cerebral glucose metabolism measured by positron emission…

  15. Temporal Variant Frontotemporal Dementia Is Associated with Globular Glial Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Camilla N.; Lashley, Tammaryn; Mahoney, Colin J.; Warren, Jason D.; Revesz, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder associated with atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes. Most patients with focal temporal lobe atrophy present with either the semantic dementia subtype of FTD or the behavioral variant subtype. For patients with temporal variant FTD, the most common cause found on post-mortem examination has been a TDP-43 (transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 kDa) proteinopathy, but tauopathies have also been described, including Pick’s disease and mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. We report the clinical and imaging features of 2 patients with temporal variant FTD associated with a rare frontotemporal lobar degeneration pathology known as globular glial tauopathy. The pathologic diagnosis of globular glial tauopathy should be considered in patients with temporal variant FTD, particularly those who have atypical semantic dementia or an atypical parkinsonian syndrome in association with the right temporal variant. PMID:26102999

  16. Functional MRI of music emotion processing in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Agustus, Jennifer L; Mahoney, Colin J; Downey, Laura E; Omar, Rohani; Cohen, Miriam; White, Mark J; Scott, Sophie K; Mancini, Laura; Warren, Jason D

    2015-03-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is an important neurodegenerative disorder of younger life led by profound emotional and social dysfunction. Here we used fMRI to assess brain mechanisms of music emotion processing in a cohort of patients with frontotemporal dementia (n = 15) in relation to healthy age-matched individuals (n = 11). In a passive-listening paradigm, we manipulated levels of emotion processing in simple arpeggio chords (mode versus dissonance) and emotion modality (music versus human emotional vocalizations). A complex profile of disease-associated functional alterations was identified with separable signatures of musical mode, emotion level, and emotion modality within a common, distributed brain network, including posterior and anterior superior temporal and inferior frontal cortices and dorsal brainstem effector nuclei. Separable functional signatures were identified post-hoc in patients with and without abnormal craving for music (musicophilia): a model for specific abnormal emotional behaviors in frontotemporal dementia. Our findings indicate the potential of music to delineate neural mechanisms of altered emotion processing in dementias, with implications for future disease tracking and therapeutic strategies. PMID:25773639

  17. Functional MRI of music emotion processing in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Agustus, Jennifer L; Mahoney, Colin J; Downey, Laura E; Omar, Rohani; Cohen, Miriam; White, Mark J; Scott, Sophie K; Mancini, Laura; Warren, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is an important neurodegenerative disorder of younger life led by profound emotional and social dysfunction. Here we used fMRI to assess brain mechanisms of music emotion processing in a cohort of patients with frontotemporal dementia (n = 15) in relation to healthy age-matched individuals (n = 11). In a passive-listening paradigm, we manipulated levels of emotion processing in simple arpeggio chords (mode versus dissonance) and emotion modality (music versus human emotional vocalizations). A complex profile of disease-associated functional alterations was identified with separable signatures of musical mode, emotion level, and emotion modality within a common, distributed brain network, including posterior and anterior superior temporal and inferior frontal cortices and dorsal brainstem effector nuclei. Separable functional signatures were identified post-hoc in patients with and without abnormal craving for music (musicophilia): a model for specific abnormal emotional behaviors in frontotemporal dementia. Our findings indicate the potential of music to delineate neural mechanisms of altered emotion processing in dementias, with implications for future disease tracking and therapeutic strategies. PMID:25773639

  18. Degradation of cognitive timing mechanisms in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Henley, Susie M.D.; Downey, Laura E.; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Kinnunen, Kirsi M.; Golden, Hannah L.; Buckley, Aisling; Mahoney, Colin J.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined motor timing in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), which manifests as progressive deterioration in social, behavioural and cognitive functions. Twenty-patients fulfilling consensus clinical criteria for behavioural variant FTD (bvFTD), 11 patients fulfilling consensus clinical criteria for semantic-variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), four patients fulfilling criteria for nonfluent/agrammatic primary progressive aphasia (naPPA), eight patients fulfilling criteria for Alzheimer׳s disease (AD), and 31 controls were assessed on both an externally- and self-paced finger-tapping task requiring maintenance of a regular, 1500 ms beat over 50 taps. Grey and white matter correlates of deficits in motor timing were examined using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). bvFTD patients exhibited significant deficits in aspects of both externally- and self-paced tapping. Increased mean inter-response interval (faster than target tap time) in the self-paced task was associated with reduced grey matter volume in the cerebellum bilaterally, right middle temporal gyrus, and with increased axial diffusivity in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus, regions and tracts which have been suggested to be involved in a subcortical–cortical network of structures underlying timing abilities. This suggests that such structures can be affected in bvFTD, and that impaired motor timing may underlie some characteristics of the bvFTD phenotype. PMID:25447066

  19. You stole my food! Eating alterations in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Marilena; Silani, Vincenzo; Rumiati, Raffaella I

    2016-08-01

    Patients with different types of dementia may exhibit pathological eating habits, including food fads, hyperphagia, or even ingestion of inanimate objects. Several findings reveal that such eating alterations are more common in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) than other types of dementia. Moreover, eating alterations may differ between the two variants of the disease, namely the behavioral variant and semantic dementia (SD). In this review, we summarized evidences regarding four areas: eating and body weight alterations in FTD, the most common assessment methods, anatomical correlates of eating disorders, and finally, proposed underlying mechanisms. An increasing understanding of the factors that contribute to eating abnormalities may allow first, a better comprehension of the clinical features of the disease and second, shed light on the mechanism underlying eating behaviors in the normal population. PMID:27327171

  20. SQSTM1 Mutations in French Patients With Frontotemporal Dementia or Frontotemporal Dementia With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Le Ber, Isabelle; Camuzat, Agnès; Guerreiro, Rita; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Bras, Jose; Nicolas, Gael; Gabelle, Audrey; Didic, Mira; De Septenville, Anne; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Lenglet, Timothée; Latouche, Morwena; Kabashi, Edor; Campion, Dominique; Hannequin, Didier; Hardy, John; Brice, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Mutations in the SQSTM1 gene, coding for p62, are a cause of Paget disease of bone and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Recently, SQSTM1 mutations were confirmed in ALS, and mutations were also identified in 3 patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), suggesting a role for SQSTM1 in FTD. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the exact contribution of SQSTM1 to FTD and FTD with ALS (FTD-ALS) in an independent cohort of patients. DESIGN A SQSTM1 mutation was first identified in a multiplex family with FTD by use of whole-exome sequencing. To evaluate the frequency of SQSTM1 mutations, we sequenced this gene in a cohort of patients with FTD or FTD-ALS, with no mutations in known FTD and ALS genes. SETTING Primary care or referral center. PARTICIPANTS An overall cohort of 188 French patients, including 132 probands with FTD and 56 probands with FTD-ALS. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Frequency of SQSTM1 mutations in patients with FTD or FTD-ALS; description of associated phenotypes. RESULTS We identified 4 heterozygous missense mutations in 4 unrelated families with FTD; only 1 family had clinical symptoms of Paget disease of bone, and only 1 family had clinical symptoms of FTD-ALS, possibly owing to the low penetrance of some of the clinical manifestations. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Although the frequency of the mutations is low in our series (4 of 188 patients [2%]), our results, similar to those already reported, support a direct pathogenic role of p62 in different types of FTD. PMID:24042580

  1. A Systematic Review of Metacognitive Differences Between Alzheimer's Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    DeLozier, Sarah J; Davalos, Deana

    2016-08-01

    Clinicians often have difficulty distinguishing between various forms of dementia to achieve a correct diagnosis. Little research has been done to examine whether awareness of one's cognitive deficits, or metacognitive monitoring, might differ between dementia diagnoses, thereby providing an additional means of differentiating between dementia subtypes. We review articles examining metacognitive comparisons between two of the most common dementia subtypes: Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia. Greater monitoring deficits were apparent in frontotemporal dementia than in Alzheimer's disease, and participants with frontotemporal dementia were less likely to utilize task experience to update and improve the accuracy of subsequent monitoring judgments. Results provide evidence for the utility of metacognitive measures as a means of distinguishing between Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia. PMID:26705377

  2. Sleep in Persons with Frontotemporal Dementia and Their Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Merrilees, Jennifer; Hubbard, Erin; Mastick, Judy; Miller, Bruce L.; Dowling, Glenna A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dementia is associated with disruptions in sleep and sleep quality for patients and their family caregivers. Little is known about the impact of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) on sleep. Objective The purpose of this study was to characterize sleep in patients with frontotemporal dementia and their family caregivers. Methods Twenty-two patient-caregiver dyads were enrolled: Thirteen behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD) and nine semantic dementia (SD). Sleep and sleep quality data were collected for two weeks using diaries and Actiwatches. Results Patients with bvFTD and SD spent more time in bed at night compared to their caregivers. Nighttime behaviors were reported more frequently by caregivers for the bvFTD patients and strongly correlated with caregiver distress. Actigraphy data demonstrated normal sleep efficiency and timing of the nighttime sleep period for both patients and their caregivers. Caregivers of patients with bvFTD reported poorer sleep quality compared to the SD caregivers. A greater number of bvFTD caregivers compared to SD reported negative aspects of sleep quality for themselves and used sleep medications more frequently. Conclusion The clinical manifestations of bvFTD appear to be associated with different and more distressing impacts on the caregiver sleep quality than SD. PMID:24589648

  3. Wandering behavior of a severely demented patient with frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Akira; Suzuki, Hisashi; Hiromitsu, Kentaro; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2016-04-01

    Although wandering is a common behavioral problem in patients with dementia, information about wandering in patients with severe dementia is scarce. This study analyzed data about the wandering behavior of a 77-year-old woman with severe frontotemporal dementia. Due to severe atrophy of the anterior cortex, she was totally unable to act spontaneously. Nevertheless, she walked with her husband every day. Her walking pattern varied on a daily basis but it appeared to be random. However, a mathematical analysis showed that her walking pattern was not random. Our case suggests that even patients with severe atrophy in the anterior cortex may be able to orient themselves within their neighborhood if their posterior cortex is preserved. PMID:26645189

  4. Frontotemporal dementia and primary progressive aphasia, a review

    PubMed Central

    Kirshner, Howard S

    2014-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementias are neurodegenerative diseases in which symptoms of frontal and/or temporal lobe disease are the first signs of the illness, and as the diseases progress, they resemble a focal left hemisphere process such as stroke or traumatic brain injury, even more than a neurodegenerative disease. Over time, some patients develop a more generalized dementia. Four clinical subtypes characterize the predominant presentations of this illness: behavioral or frontal variant FTD, progressive nonfluent aphasia, semantic dementia, and logopenic primary progressive aphasia. These clinical variants correlate with regional patterns of atrophy on brain imaging studies such as MRI and PET scanning, as well as with biochemical and molecular genetic variants of the disorder. The treatment is as yet only symptomatic, but advances in molecular genetics promise new therapies. PMID:24966676

  5. Criminal Behavior in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liljegren, Madeleine; Naasan, Georges; Temlett, Julia; Perry, David C.; Rankin, Katherine P.; Merrilees, Jennifer; Grinberg, Lea T.; Seeley, William W.; Englund, Elisabet; Miller, Bruce L

    2015-01-01

    Importance Neurodegenerative diseases can cause dysfunction of neural structures involved in judgment, executive function, emotional processing, sexual behavior, violence, and self-awareness. Such dysfunctions can lead to antisocial and criminal behavior that appears for the first time in the adult or middle-aged individual or even later in life. Objective To investigate the frequency and type of criminal behavior among patients with a diagnosed dementing disorder. Design, Setting, and Participants We conducted a retrospective medical record review of 2397 patients who were seen at the University of California, San Francisco, Memory and Aging Center between 1999 and 2012, including 545 patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), 171 patients with behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 89 patients with semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia, and 30 patients with Huntington disease. Patient notes containing specific keywords denoting criminal behavior were reviewed. Data were stratified by criminal behavior type and diagnostic groups. Main Outcomes and Measures Frequencies of criminal behavior and χ2 statistics were calculated. Results Of the 2397 patients studied, 204 (8.5%) had a history of criminal behavior that emerged during their illness. Of the major diagnostic groups, 42 of 545 patients (7.7%) with AD, 64 of 171 patients (37.4%) with bvFTD, 24 of 89 patients (27.0%) with semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia, and 6 of 30 patients (20%) with Huntington disease exhibited criminal behavior. A total of 14% of patients with bvFTD were statistically significantly more likely to present with criminal behavior compared with 2% of patients with AD (P < .001) and 6.4% were statistically significantly more likely to exhibit violence compared with 2% of patients with AD (P = .003). Common manifestations of criminal behavior in the bvFTD group included theft, traffic violations, sexual advances, trespassing, and public urination in contrast

  6. Italian Frontotemporal Dementia Network (FTD Group-SINDEM): sharing clinical and diagnostic procedures in Frontotemporal Dementia in Italy.

    PubMed

    Borroni, B; Turrone, R; Galimberti, D; Nacmias, B; Alberici, A; Benussi, A; Caffarra, P; Caltagirone, C; Cappa, S F; Frisoni, G B; Ghidoni, R; Marra, C; Padovani, A; Rainero, I; Scarpini, E; Silani, V; Sorbi, S; Tagliavini, F; Tremolizzo, L; Bruni, A C

    2015-05-01

    In the prospect of improved disease management and future clinical trials in Frontotemporal Dementia, it is desirable to share common diagnostic procedures. To this aim, the Italian FTD Network, under the aegis of the Italian Neurological Society for Dementia, has been established. Currently, 85 Italian Centers involved in dementia care are part of the network. Each Center completed a questionnaire on the local clinical procedures, focused on (1) clinical assessment, (2) use of neuroimaging and genetics; (3) support for patients and caregivers; (4) an opinion about the prevalence of FTD. The analyses of the results documented a comprehensive clinical and instrumental approach to FTD patients and their caregivers in Italy, with about 1,000 newly diagnosed cases per year and 2,500 patients currently followed by the participating Centers. In analogy to other European FTD consortia, future aims will be devoted to collect data on epidemiology of FTD and its subtypes and to provide harmonization of procedures among Centers. PMID:25528460

  7. Overlap in frontotemporal atrophy between normal aging and patients with frontotemporal dementias.

    PubMed

    Chow, Tiffany W; Binns, Malcolm A; Freedman, Morris; Stuss, Donald T; Ramirez, Joel; Scott, Chris J M; Black, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Normal aging leads to frontocortical atrophy. The degree to which this complicates the use of frontotemporal atrophy as a diagnostic criterion for the frontotemporal dementias (FTDs) has not been reported. The present case-control study compared frontotemporal volumes delineated with semi-automatic brain region extraction [n=30 controls vs. 16 behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD) vs. 14 primary progressive aphasia]. Logistic regression identified those regions least helpful for distinguishing bvFTD and primary progressive aphasia from controls. Linear regression tested the correlation of duration of illness to atrophy severity. The control group showed high variance in volumes. Controls had right frontal lobe volumes that overlapped considerably with bvFTD volumes, but, as anticipated, the left anterior temporal volumes of interest showed 91% accuracy in distinguishing the aphasic subgroup from controls. Left-sided and not right-sided atrophy in the medial middle frontal region distinguished the bvFTD group from controls. The relegation of structural imaging to a supportive criterion for diagnosis is reasonable in the context of the range of atrophy due to normal aging. While volumetry identified left-sided atrophy as useful for identifying FTD cases, future studies should determine whether clinicians could make these distinctions on viewing routine diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging scans. PMID:18695590

  8. Frontotemporal dementia: neuroanatomical correlates of an atypical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Felix-Morais, Ricardo; Letra, Liliana; Duro, Diana; Santana, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by frontal and temporal lobes atrophy. Three different clinical subtypes are recognised: behavioural variant, progressive non-fluent aphasia and semantic dementia. Neuroanatomical associations in a diffuse neurodegenerative disease such as FTD should be interpreted carefully; however, each FTD subtype has provided a clinical model that has contributed immensely to our understanding of clinical/neuroanatomical relationships. This case report and recent studies suggest that neuroanatomical findings concerning face-processing mechanisms in FTD can identify the brain regions that are critical for face processing. As seen in this case, right fusiform gyrus atrophy seems to be implied in the aetiology of prosopagnosia. PMID:25063318

  9. The Use of Profanity During Letter Fluency Tasks in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ringman, John M.; Kwon, Eunice; Flores, Deborah L.; Rotko, Carol; Mendez, Mario F.; Lu, Po

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the production of profanity during letter fluency testing distinguishes frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Background Alterations in language and social behavior typify FTD spectrum disorders. Nonetheless, in can be difficult to distinguish pathologically-defined frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) from AD clinically. Assessing verbal fluency by having patients generate as many words as they can beginning with specific letters in a given period of time can yield diverse information of diagnostic utility. Method Words produced during FAS letter fluency testing were reviewed and instances of the use of "f*ck", "*ss", and "sh*t" and other words felt to be inappropriate were sought. The frequency of these words was compared between clinically diagnosed FTD and AD patients using chi-square tests. Results We found that 6/32 (18.8%) patients with FTD generated the word "f*ck" during the "F" trial as opposed to none of 38 patients with AD (p = 0.007). Patients who said "f*ck" had diagnoses of either behavioral variant FTD (3/15), progressive non-fluent aphasia (2/8), or semantic dementia (1/3). Conclusions Though the specific neuropathology in these cases is uncertain, generation of "f*ck" during letter fluency testing appears to have utility in differentiating FTD from AD. PMID:20829665

  10. Paranoid Personality Masking an Atypical Case of Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Iroka, Nneka; Jehangir, Waqas; II, Jay Littlefield; Pattan, Vishwanath; Yousif, Abdalla; Mishra, Arunesh K

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a debilitating disease that is well described in the “Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5)”, and typically presents with memory impairment, progressive decline in cortical functioning, and behavioral changes. Age of onset is generally in the late fifties, and usually the first presentation involves a change in behavior and emotional blunting. Treatment of FTD involves management of any neurobehavioral symptoms while trials of atypical antipsychotics are ongoing but suggest some efficacy. We present a case of a patient who first presented with severe paranoid personality traits and frank persecutory delusions. This atypical presentation of our patient first led to her incorrect diagnosis of a psychotic disorder and paranoid personality disorder. As a result of this diagnosis, she was treated unsuccessfully. A subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) then showed atrophy of frontal and temporal lobes bilaterally (left more prominent than right) which confirmed the diagnosis of FTD. The importance of this case involves the atypical presentation of paranoia and delusions, and our patient’s incorrect diagnosis based on her clinical presentation led to a trial of unsuccessful treatment. Only after performing an MRI, which showed atrophy, was the patient appropriately treated and deemed medically stable. This case report illustrates the importance of considering a rare presentation of frontotemporal lobe dementia with patients who are in the typical age range and present with paranoia and delusions. PMID:25780487

  11. Paranoid personality masking an atypical case of frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Iroka, Nneka; Jehangir, Waqas; Ii, Jay Littlefield; Pattan, Vishwanath; Yousif, Abdalla; Mishra, Arunesh K

    2015-05-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a debilitating disease that is well described in the "Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5)", and typically presents with memory impairment, progressive decline in cortical functioning, and behavioral changes. Age of onset is generally in the late fifties, and usually the first presentation involves a change in behavior and emotional blunting. Treatment of FTD involves management of any neurobehavioral symptoms while trials of atypical antipsychotics are ongoing but suggest some efficacy. We present a case of a patient who first presented with severe paranoid personality traits and frank persecutory delusions. This atypical presentation of our patient first led to her incorrect diagnosis of a psychotic disorder and paranoid personality disorder. As a result of this diagnosis, she was treated unsuccessfully. A subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) then showed atrophy of frontal and temporal lobes bilaterally (left more prominent than right) which confirmed the diagnosis of FTD. The importance of this case involves the atypical presentation of paranoia and delusions, and our patient's incorrect diagnosis based on her clinical presentation led to a trial of unsuccessful treatment. Only after performing an MRI, which showed atrophy, was the patient appropriately treated and deemed medically stable. This case report illustrates the importance of considering a rare presentation of frontotemporal lobe dementia with patients who are in the typical age range and present with paranoia and delusions. PMID:25780487

  12. Neuropsychiatric symptom profile differs based on pathology in patients with clinically diagnosed behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Léger, Gabriel C; Banks, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is pathologically heterogeneous. With emerging therapeutics, determining underlying pathology during life is increasingly important. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are prevalent and diagnostic in bvFTD. Methods We assessed the neuropsychiatric profile in patients with clinically diagnosed bvFTD as a function of pathology at autopsy. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of bvFTD at initial visit were selected from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database. Neuropsychiatric symptoms endorsed on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire were analyzed. Results Of 149 patients with clinically diagnosed bvFTD, pathology was primarily Alzheimer's disease in 20.5%. These patients differed from those with underlying frontotemporal lobar degeneration: patients with AD pathology (plaques and tangles) were more likely to have hallucinations, delusions, or agitation. Patients were further differentiated into tau positive (30 % of cases, including Pick's disease, frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism with tau-positive, and other tauopathies) or tau-negative (70% of cases including bvFTD tau-negative ubiquitin-positive inclusions). These patients also differed in some of the neuropsychiatric symptoms seen. Tau-negative cases were more likely to demonstrate depression, delusions, and changes in appetite and eating. Conclusions These preliminary findings contribute to our increasing ability to predict, using simple clinical tools the neuropathological underpinnings of bvFTD during life. PMID:24135712

  13. Differences in structural covariance brain networks between behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hafkemeijer, Anne; Möller, Christiane; Dopper, Elise G P; Jiskoot, Lize C; van den Berg-Huysmans, Annette A; van Swieten, John C; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Vrenken, Hugo; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Barkhof, Frederik; Scheltens, Philip; van der Grond, Jeroen; Rombouts, Serge A R B

    2016-03-01

    Disease-specific patterns of gray matter atrophy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) overlap with distinct structural covariance networks (SCNs) in cognitively healthy controls. This suggests that both types of dementia target specific structural networks. Here, we study SCNs in AD and bvFTD. We used structural magnetic resonance imaging data of 31 AD patients, 24 bvFTD patients, and 30 controls from two centers specialized in dementia. Ten SCNs were defined based on structural covariance of gray matter density using independent component analysis. We studied group differences in SCNs using F-tests, with Bonferroni corrected t-tests, adjusted for age, gender, and study center. Associations with cognitive performance were studied using linear regression analyses. Cross-sectional group differences were found in three SCNs (all P < 0.0025). In bvFTD, we observed decreased anterior cingulate network integrity compared with AD and controls. Patients with AD showed decreased precuneal network integrity compared with bvFTD and controls, and decreased hippocampal network and anterior cingulate network integrity compared with controls. In AD, we found an association between precuneal network integrity and global cognitive performance (P = 0.0043). Our findings show that AD and bvFTD target different SCNs. The comparison of both types of dementia showed decreased precuneal (i.e., default mode) network integrity in AD and decreased anterior cingulate (i.e., salience) network integrity in bvFTD. This confirms the hypothesis that AD and bvFTD have distinct anatomical networks of degeneration and shows that structural covariance gives valuable insights in the understanding of network pathology in dementia. PMID:26660857

  14. Clinical, genetic and pathological heterogeneity of frontotemporal dementia: a review.

    PubMed

    Seelaar, Harro; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Fox, Nick C; van Swieten, John C

    2011-05-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most common young-onset dementia and is clinically characterised by progressive behavioural change, executive dysfunction and language difficulties. Three clinical syndromes, behavioural variant FTD, semantic dementia and progressive non-fluent aphasia, form part of a clinicopathological spectrum named frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). The classical neuropsychological phenotype of FTD has been enriched by tests exploring Theory of Mind, social cognition and emotional processing. Imaging studies have detailed the patterns of atrophy associated with different clinical and pathological subtypes. These patterns offer some diagnostic utility, while measures of progression of atrophy may be of use in future trials. 30-50% of FTD is familial, and mutations in two genes, microtubule associated protein tau and Progranulin (GRN), account for about half of these cases. Rare defects in VCP, CHMP2B, TARDP and FUS genes have been found in a small number of families. Linkage to chromosome 9p13.2-21.3 has been established in familial FTD with motor neuron disease, although the causative gene is yet to be identified. Recent developments in the immunohistochemistry of FTLD, and also in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), have led to a new pathological nomenclature. The two major groups are those with tau-positive inclusions (FTLD-tau) and those with ubiquitin-positive and TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) positive inclusions (FTLD-TDP). Recently, a new protein involved in familial ALS, fused in sarcoma (FUS), has been found in FTLD patients with ubiquitin-positive and TDP-43-negative inclusions. In this review, the authors discuss recent clinical, neuropsychological, imaging, genetic and pathological developments that have changed our understanding of FTD, its classification and criteria. The potential to establish an early diagnosis, predict underlying pathology during life and quantify disease progression will

  15. Comparative Study of Subcortical Atrophy in Patients with Frontotemporal Dementia and Dementia with Extrapyramidal Signs

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Leonardo; Vieira, Renata Teles; Paes, Flávia; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Rocha, Nuno B. F; Budde, Henning; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives : To investigate the severity of subcortical atrophy in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) without extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) and dementia with EPS. In addition, we aim to verify if there is correlation between demographic and clinical characteristics and subcortical atrophy in the groups. Methodology : The sample was composed of 21 patients with dementia and EPS as well as 19 patients with FTD without EPS. A linear assessment was conducted in order to identify the degree of subcortical atrophy (i.e., bifrontal index - BFI) using MRI. Moreover, the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Pfeffer Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ) and the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) were used to investigate clinical aspects. Results : It was verified that patients with dementia and EPS was older than the patients with FTD (p=0.01). The severity of cognitive deficits was associated with BFI, as well as the dementia severity in the EPS group. Conclusion : FTD group presented mean BFI scores above the cutoff for normal elderly population, indicating the presence of subcortical atrophy in this group. Mean BFI was higher (although not statistically significant) in FTD group than in dementia with EPS, which can suggest at least that subcortical pathology in FTD may be as important as in the dementia with EPS group. Subcortical atrophy is a good biological marker for cognitive deterioration in FTD and in dementia with EPS. PMID:25870648

  16. Mapping neuroinflammation in frontotemporal dementia with molecular PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings have led to a renewed interest and support for an active role of inflammation in neurodegenerative dementias and related neurologic disorders. Detection of neuroinflammation in vivo throughout the course of neurodegenerative diseases is of great clinical interest. Studies have shown that microglia activation (an indicator of neuroinflammation) may present at early stages of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but the role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of FTD is largely unknown. The first-generation translocator protein (TSPO) ligand ([(11)C]-PK11195) has been used to detect microglia activation in FTD, and the second-generation TSPO ligands have imaged neuroinflammation in vivo with improved pharmacokinetic properties. This paper reviews related literature and technical issues on mapping neuroinflammation in FTD with positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging. Early detection of neuroinflammation in FTD may identify new tools for diagnosis, novel treatment targets, and means to monitor therapeutic efficacy. More studies are needed to image and track neuroinflammation in FTD. It is anticipated that the advances of TSPO PET imaging will overcome technical difficulties, and molecular imaging of neuroinflammation will aid in the characterization of neuroinflammation in FTD. Such knowledge has the potential to shed light on the poorly understood pathogenesis of FTD and related dementias, and provide imaging markers to guide the development and assessment of new therapies. PMID:26022249

  17. A Scale of Socioemotional Dysfunction in Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Barsuglia, Joseph P.; Kaiser, Natalie C.; Wilkins, Stacy Schantz; Joshi, Aditi; Barrows, Robin J.; Paholpak, Pongsatorn; Panchal, Hemali Vijay; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Mather, Michelle J.; Mendez, Mario F.

    2014-01-01

    Early social dysfunction is a hallmark symptom of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD); however, validated measures for assessing social deficits in dementia are needed. The purpose of the current study was to examine the utility of a novel informant-based measure of social impairment, the Socioemotional Dysfunction Scale (SDS) in early-onset dementia. Sixteen bvFTD and 18 early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (EOAD) participants received standard clinical neuropsychological measures and neuroimaging. Caregiver informants were administered the SDS. Individuals with bvFTD exhibited greater social dysfunction on the SDS compared with the EOAD group; t(32) = 6.32, p < .001. The scale demonstrated preliminary evidence for discriminating these frequently misdiagnosed groups (area under the curve = 0.920, p = <.001) and internal consistency α = 0.977. The SDS demonstrated initial evidence as an effective measure for detecting abnormal social behavior and discriminating bvFTD from EOAD. Future validation is recommended in larger and more diverse patient groups. PMID:25331776

  18. Substance use history in behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia versus primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Kalapatapu, Raj K; Delucchi, Kevin L; Wang, Sophia; Harbison, John D; Nelson, Emily E; Kramer, Joel H

    2016-01-01

    As older adults are prone to cognitive disorders, the interaction of the fields of substance use and misuse and cognitive neuroscience is an emerging area of research. Substance use has been reported in some subtypes of frontotemporal dementia, such as behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. However, characterization of substance use in other subtypes of frontotemporal dementia, such as primary progressive aphasia, is unknown. The objective of this baseline analysis was to explore whether any measures of substance use history differed significantly among behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 842) and primary progressive aphasia (n = 526) in a large national dataset. The National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center's Uniform Data Set study is a national dataset that collects data on patients with various cognitive disorders and includes some questions on substance use. Each substance use variable was used as the outcome and the frontotemporal dementia subtype as the predictor. Total years smoked cigarettes, age when last smoked cigarettes, average number of packs/day smoked when participants smoked, and any recent, remote, or combined recent/remote history of alcohol abuse or drug abuse did not significantly differ between the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and primary progressive aphasia subtypes (all p-values > .001). A significantly greater percentage of participants smoked in the last 30 days in the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia subtype (10.4%, n = 834) compared to the primary progressive aphasia subtype (3.3%, n = 517; p < .001). Clinical providers in both the dementia and substance use fields are encouraged to screen for and monitor substance use in all frontotemporal dementia subtypes. PMID:26485480

  19. Clinical aspects of familial forms of frontotemporal dementia associated with parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2011-11-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is the second most common dementia among people under the age of 65. Fifty percent of affected patients have an associated family history. Several pathogenic genes have been identified for frontotemporal dementia associated with parkinsonism, including microtubule-associated protein tau, progranulin, and chromatin modifying protein 2B, and fused in sarcoma. It has also been reported that frontotemporal dementia associated with parkinsonism can be linked to chromosome 9p. In addition, there are families with frontotemporal dementia associated with a parkinsonian phenotype but unknown genetic status. Some of these kindreds have been diagnosed clinically as familial progressive supranuclear palsy, hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids, "overlap" syndrome, and others. Clinical presentation of frontotemporal dementia associated with parkinsonism is variable at age of symptomatic disease onset, disease duration, symptoms, and their occurrence during the disease course. Clinically, it is often difficult to sort out the different genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia associated with parkinsonism. However, with available clinical genetic testing for known genes, the precise diagnosis can be accomplished in some cases. PMID:21656039

  20. Discrete Neural Correlates for the Recognition of Negative Emotions: Insights from Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Kumfor, Fiona; Irish, Muireann; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Patients with frontotemporal dementia have pervasive changes in emotion recognition and social cognition, yet the neural changes underlying these emotion processing deficits remain unclear. The multimodal system model of emotion proposes that basic emotions are dependent on distinct brain regions, which undergo significant pathological changes in frontotemporal dementia. As such, this syndrome may provide important insight into the impact of neural network degeneration upon the innate ability to recognise emotions. This study used voxel-based morphometry to identify discrete neural correlates involved in the recognition of basic emotions (anger, disgust, fear, sadness, surprise and happiness) in frontotemporal dementia. Forty frontotemporal dementia patients (18 behavioural-variant, 11 semantic dementia, 11 progressive nonfluent aphasia) and 27 healthy controls were tested on two facial emotion recognition tasks: The Ekman 60 and Ekman Caricatures. Although each frontotemporal dementia group showed impaired recognition of negative emotions, distinct associations between emotion-specific task performance and changes in grey matter intensity emerged. Fear recognition was associated with the right amygdala; disgust recognition with the left insula; anger recognition with the left middle and superior temporal gyrus; and sadness recognition with the left subcallosal cingulate, indicating that discrete neural substrates are necessary for emotion recognition in frontotemporal dementia. The erosion of emotion-specific neural networks in neurodegenerative disorders may produce distinct profiles of performance that are relevant to understanding the neurobiological basis of emotion processing. PMID:23805313

  1. Common and unique gray matter correlates of episodic memory dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Irish, Muireann; Piguet, Olivier; Hodges, John R; Hornberger, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Conflicting evidence exists regarding the integrity of episodic memory in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Recent converging evidence suggests that episodic memory in progressive cases of bvFTD is compromised to the same extent as in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The underlying neural substrates of these episodic memory deficits, however, likely differ contingent on dementia type. In this study we sought to elucidate the neural substrates of episodic memory performance, across recall and recognition tasks, in both patient groups using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses. We predicted that episodic memory dysfunction would be apparent in both patient groups but would relate to divergent patterns of neural atrophy specific to each dementia type. We assessed episodic memory, across verbal and visual domains, in 19 bvFTD, 18 AD patients, and 19 age- and education-matched controls. Behaviorally, patient groups were indistinguishable for immediate and delayed recall, across verbal and visual domains. Whole-brain VBM analyses revealed regions commonly implicated in episodic retrieval across groups, namely the right temporal pole, right frontal lobe, left paracingulate gyrus, and right anterior hippocampus. Divergent neural networks specific to each group were also identified. Whereas a widespread network including posterior regions such as the posterior cingulate cortex, parietal and occipital cortices was exclusively implicated in AD, the frontal and anterior temporal lobes underpinned the episodic memory deficits in bvFTD. Our results point to distinct neural changes underlying episodic memory decline specific to each dementia syndrome. PMID:23670951

  2. The Unique Predisposition to Criminal Violations in Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Mario F.

    2011-01-01

    Brain disorders can lead to criminal violations. Patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are particularly prone to sociopathic behavior while retaining knowledge of their acts and of moral and conventional rules. This report describes four FTD patients who committed criminal violations in the presence of clear consciousness and sufficiently intact cognition. They understood the nature of their acts and the potential consequences, but did not feel sufficiently concerned to be deterred. FTD involves a unique pathologic combination affecting the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, with altered moral feelings, right anterior temporal loss of emotional empathy, and orbitofrontal changes with disinhibited, compulsive behavior. These case histories and the literature indicate that those with right temporal FTD retain the capacity to tell right from wrong but have the slow and insidious loss of the capacity for moral rationality. Patients with early FTD present a challenge to the criminal justice system to consider alterations in moral cognition before ascribing criminal responsibility. PMID:20852216

  3. Diagnosis and Management of Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Pressman, Peter; Miller, Bruce L

    2014-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) was documented over a century ago. The last decade, however, has seen substantial changes in our conceptions of this increasingly recognized disorder. Different clinical variants have been delineated, the most common of which is the behavioral variant (bvFTD). Updated diagnostic criteria have been established. New histopathological findings and genetic etiologies have been discovered. Research continues to uncover molecular mechanisms by which abnormal proteins accumulate in degenerating brain tissue. Novel neuroimaging techniques suggest that functional networks are diminished in bvFTD that may be relevant to empathy and social behavior. Despite rapid advances in our understanding of bvFTD, the disease is still under-recognized and commonly misdiagnosed. The result is inappropriate patient care. Recognizing the various presentations of bvFTD and its histological and genetic subtypes may further diagnosis, treatment and research. PMID:24315411

  4. Recent Advances in the Imaging of Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging has played an important role in the characterization of the frontotemporal dementia (FTD) syndromes, demonstrating neurodegenerative signatures that can aid in the differentiation of FTD from other neurodegenerative disorders. Recent advances have been driven largely by the refinement of the clinical syndromes that underlie FTD, and by the discovery of new genetic and pathological features associated with FTD. Many new imaging techniques and modalities are also now available that allow the assessment of other aspects of brain structure and function, such as diffusion tensor imaging and resting state functional MRI. Studies have utilized these recent techniques, as well as traditional volumetric MRI, to provide further insight into disease progression across the many clinical, genetic and pathological variants of FTD. Importantly, neuroimaging signatures have been identified that will improve the clinician’s ability to predict underlying genetic and pathological features, and hence ultimately improve patient diagnosis. PMID:23015371

  5. Management of Frontotemporal Dementia in Mental Health and Multidisciplinary Settings

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Mary Anne; Shnall, Adriana; Onyike, Chiadi U.; Huey, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in the mental health setting and issues pertaining to longitudinal care of this population in a specialty clinic are reviewed. FTD is often misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder, most commonly as a mood disorder. FTD has features that overlap with those of major depression, mania, obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia. We describe these features and how to differentiate FTD from these psychiatric disorders. This paper also describes practical issues in the management of FTD, specifically the issues that clinicians, patients and their families face in managing this disease. Areas of clinical care along the continuum are explored; FTD care involves collaborative management of symptoms and disability, and assisting patients and families in adapting to the disease. PMID:23611352

  6. Defining the spectrum of frontotemporal dementias associated with TARDBP mutations

    PubMed Central

    Caroppo, Paola; Camuzat, Agnès; Guillot-Noel, Léna; Thomas-Antérion, Catherine; Couratier, Philippe; Wong, Tsz Hang; Teichmann, Marc; Golfier, Véronique; Auriacombe, Sophie; Belliard, Serge; Laurent, Bernard; Lattante, Serena; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Clot, Fabienne; Dubois, Bruno; van Swieten, John C.; Brice, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We describe the largest series of patients with TARDBP mutations presenting with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and review the cases in the literature to precisely characterize FTD diseases associated with this genotype. Methods: The phenotypic characteristics of 29 TARDBP patients, including 10 new French and Dutch cases and 19 reviewed from the literature, were evaluated. Results: The most frequent phenotype was a behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), but a significant proportion (40%) of our patients had semantic (svFTD) or nonfluent variants (nfvFTD) at onset; and svFTD was significantly more frequent in TARDBP carriers than in other FTD genotypes (p < 0.001). Remarkably, only a minority (40%) of our patients secondarily developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Two patients carried a homozygous mutation but strikingly different phenotypes (bvFTD and ALS) indicating that homozygosity does not result in a specific phenotype. Earlier age at onset in children than parent's generations, mimicking an apparent “anticipation” (21.8 ± 9.3 years, p = 0.001), and possible reduced penetrance were present in most families. Conclusions: This study enlarges the phenotypic spectrum of TARDBP and will have important clinical implications: (1) FTD can be the only clinical manifestation of TARDBP mutations; (2) Initial language or semantic disorders might be indicative of a specific genotype; (3) Mutations should be searched in all FTD phenotypes after exclusion of major genes, even in the absence of ALS in the proband or in family history; (4) reduced penetrance and clinical variability should be considered to deliver appropriate genetic counseling. PMID:27280171

  7. Non-pharmacological Management of Behavioral Symptoms in Frontotemporal and Other Dementias.

    PubMed

    Barton, Cynthia; Ketelle, Robin; Merrilees, Jennifer; Miller, Bruce

    2016-02-01

    Worldwide prevalence of dementia is predicted to double every 20 years. The most common cause in individuals over 65 is Alzheimer's disease (AD), but in those under 65, frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is as frequent. The physical and cognitive decline that characterizes these diseases is commonly accompanied by troublesome behavioral symptoms. These behavioral symptoms contribute to significant morbidity and mortality among both patients and caregivers. Medications have been largely ineffective in managing these symptoms and carry significant adverse effects. Non-pharmacological interventions have been recommended to precede the utilization of pharmacological treatments. This article reviews the research about these interventions with special attention to the variations by etiology, especially FTD. The authors offer recommendations for improving utilization of these strategies and future research recommendations. PMID:26750129

  8. White Matter Disease Contributes to Apathy and Disinhibition in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Powers, John P.; Massimo, Lauren; McMillan, Corey T.; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Zhang, Hui; Gee, James C.; Grossman, Murray

    2015-01-01

    Objective To relate changes in fractional anisotropy associated with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia to measures of apathy and disinhibition. Background Apathy and disinhibition are the 2 most common behavioral features of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia, and these symptoms are associated with accelerated patient decline and caregiver stress. However, little is known about how white matter disease contributes to these symptoms. Methods We collected neuropsychiatric data, volumetric magnetic resonance imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging in 11 patients who met published criteria for behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and had an autopsy-validated cerebrospinal fluid profile consistent with frontotemporal lobar degeneration. We also collected imaging data on 34 healthy seniors for analyses defining regions of disease in the patients. We calculated and analyzed fractional anisotropy with a white matter tract-specific method. This approach uses anatomically guided data reduction to increase sensitivity, and localizes results within canonically defined tracts. We used nonparametric, cluster-based statistical analysis to relate fractional anisotropy to neuropsychiatric measures of apathy and disinhibition. Results The patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia had widespread reductions in fractional anisotropy in anterior portions of frontal and temporal white matter, compared to the controls. Fractional anisotropy correlated with apathy in the left uncinate fasciculus and with disinhibition in the right corona radiata. Conclusions In patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia, apathy and disinhibition are associated with distinct regions of white matter disease. The implicated fiber tracts likely support frontotemporal networks that are involved in goal-directed behavior. PMID:25539040

  9. A case report of anxiety disorder preceding frontotemporal dementia with asymmetric right temporal lobe atrophy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia presents with progressive loss of social skills and cognition and is usually associated with asymmetric frontal or temporal lobe involvement. This article reports about a patient with a long history of anxiety disorder who later proceeded to develop behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. Further discussion about selective specific network vulnerability and a possible link between these two conditions is provided. PMID:27489637

  10. FDG-PET improves accuracy in distinguishing frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Foster, Norman L; Heidebrink, Judith L; Clark, Christopher M; Jagust, William J; Arnold, Steven E; Barbas, Nancy R; DeCarli, Charles S; Turner, R Scott; Koeppe, Robert A; Higdon, Roger; Minoshima, Satoshi

    2007-10-01

    Distinguishing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) currently relies on a clinical history and examination, but positron emission tomography with [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) shows different patterns of hypometabolism in these disorders that might aid differential diagnosis. Six dementia experts with variable FDG-PET experience made independent, forced choice, diagnostic decisions in 45 patients with pathologically confirmed AD (n = 31) or FTD (n = 14) using five separate methods: (1) review of clinical summaries, (2) a diagnostic checklist alone, (3) summary and checklist, (4) transaxial FDG-PET scans and (5) FDG-PET stereotactic surface projection (SSP) metabolic and statistical maps. In addition, we evaluated the effect of the sequential review of a clinical summary followed by SSP. Visual interpretation of SSP images was superior to clinical assessment and had the best inter-rater reliability (mean kappa = 0.78) and diagnostic accuracy (89.6%). It also had the highest specificity (97.6%) and sensitivity (86%), and positive likelihood ratio for FTD (36.5). The addition of FDG-PET to clinical summaries increased diagnostic accuracy and confidence for both AD and FTD. It was particularly helpful when raters were uncertain in their clinical diagnosis. Visual interpretation of FDG-PET after brief training is more reliable and accurate in distinguishing FTD from AD than clinical methods alone. FDG-PET adds important information that appropriately increases diagnostic confidence, even among experienced dementia specialists. PMID:17704526

  11. Frontotemporal Dementia in Southeast Asia: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yee-Leng; Ng, Amanda; Kandiah, Nagaendran

    2013-01-01

    Background The clinical profile of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in Southeast Asia is not known. We characterized and compared the demographic and clinical characteristics of FTD patients in Southeast Asia with North Asian and Western patients. Methods The study included Southeast Asian FTD patients presenting to a tertiary neurology institute. Behavioral variant (bv-FTD) and language variant (lv-FTD) subtypes of FTD were diagnosed based on the Lund-Manchester criteria. The patients were characterized according to demographics, clinical, neuroimaging and longitudinal profiles. Results Twenty-five bv-FTD and 19 lv-FTD patients were identified, with a female predominance ratio of 2:1 and a mean age of 56 years. The mean MMSE score was 16.2, and 88.4% of patients had memory symptoms. Over 5.1 ± 2.4 years of follow-up, 60% of bv-FTD and 36.8% of lv-FTD patients developed a second FTD syndrome. bv-FTD was the predominant type of FTD among Southeast Asians. Conclusion FTD represents an important cause of young-onset dementia in Southeast Asia. Greater awareness of FTD is required to ensure early diagnosis and management. PMID:23569453

  12. Divergent network connectivity changes in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Juan; Greicius, Michael D.; Gennatas, Efstathios D.; Growdon, Matthew E.; Jang, Jung Y.; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Kramer, Joel H.; Weiner, Michael; Miller, Bruce L.

    2010-01-01

    Resting-state or intrinsic connectivity network functional magnetic resonance imaging provides a new tool for mapping large-scale neural network function and dysfunction. Recently, we showed that behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer’s disease cause atrophy within two major networks, an anterior ‘Salience Network’ (atrophied in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia) and a posterior ‘Default Mode Network’ (atrophied in Alzheimer’s disease). These networks exhibit an anti-correlated relationship with each other in the healthy brain. The two diseases also feature divergent symptom-deficit profiles, with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia undermining social-emotional function and preserving or enhancing visuospatial skills, and Alzheimer’s disease showing the inverse pattern. We hypothesized that these disorders would exert opposing connectivity effects within the Salience Network (disrupted in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia but enhanced in Alzheimer’s disease) and the Default Mode Network (disrupted in Alzheimer’s disease but enhanced in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia). With task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging, we tested these ideas in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, Alzheimer’s disease and healthy age-matched controls (n = 12 per group), using independent component analyses to generate group-level network contrasts. As predicted, behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia attenuated Salience Network connectivity, most notably in frontoinsular, cingulate, striatal, thalamic and brainstem nodes, but enhanced connectivity within the Default Mode Network. Alzheimer’s disease, in contrast, reduced Default Mode Network connectivity to posterior hippocampus, medial cingulo-parieto-occipital regions and the dorsal raphe nucleus, but intensified Salience Network connectivity. Specific regions of connectivity disruption within each targeted network predicted intrinsic

  13. Progranulin null mutations in both sporadic and familial frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Le Ber, Isabelle; van der Zee, Julie; Hannequin, Didier; Gijselinck, Ilse; Campion, Dominique; Puel, Michèle; Laquerrière, Annie; De Pooter, Tim; Camuzat, Agnès; Van den Broeck, Marleen; Dubois, Bruno; Sellal, François; Lacomblez, Lucette; Vercelletto, Martine; Thomas-Antérion, Catherine; Michel, Bernard-François; Golfier, Véronique; Didic, Mira; Salachas, François; Duyckaerts, Charles; Cruts, Marc; Verpillat, Patrice; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Brice, Alexis

    2007-09-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most frequent type of neurodegenerative dementias. Mutations in the progranulin gene (GRN, PGRN) were recently identified in FTDU-17, an FTD subtype characterized by ubiquitin-immunoreactive inclusions and linkage to chromosome 17q21. We looked for PGRN mutations in a large series of 210 FTD patients (52 familial, 158 sporadic) to accurately evaluate the frequency of PGRN mutations in both sporadic and familial FTD, and FTD with associated motoneuron disease (FTD-MND), as well as to study the clinical phenotype of patients with a PGRN mutation. We identified nine novel PGRN null mutations in 10 index patients. The relative frequency of PGRN null mutations in FTD was 4.8% (10/210) and 12.8% (5/39) in pure familial forms. Interestingly, 5/158 (3.2%) apparently sporadic FTD patients carried a PGRN mutation, suggesting the possibility of de novo mutations or incomplete penetrance. In contrast, none of the 43 patients with FTD-MND had PGRN mutations, supporting that FTDU-17 and FTD-MND are genetically distinct. The clinical phenotype of PGRN mutation carriers was particular because of the wide range in onset age and the frequent occurrence of early apraxia (50%), visual hallucinations (30%), and parkinsonism (30%) during the course of the disease. This study supports that PGRN null mutations represent a more frequent cause of FTD than MAPT mutations (4.8% vs. 2.9%) but are not responsible for FTD-MND. It also demonstrates that half of the patients with a PGRN mutation in our series had no apparent family history of dementia. Taking this into account, genetic testing should be now considered more systematically, even in patients without obvious familial history of FTD. PMID:17436289

  14. Resting state functional connectivity differences between behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hafkemeijer, Anne; Möller, Christiane; Dopper, Elise G. P.; Jiskoot, Lize C.; Schouten, Tijn M.; van Swieten, John C.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Vrenken, Hugo; Pijnenburg, Yolande A. L.; Barkhof, Frederik; Scheltens, Philip; van der Grond, Jeroen; Rombouts, Serge A. R. B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are the most common types of early-onset dementia. Early differentiation between both types of dementia may be challenging due to heterogeneity and overlap of symptoms. Here, we apply resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study functional brain connectivity differences between AD and bvFTD. Methods: We used resting state fMRI data of 31 AD patients, 25 bvFTD patients, and 29 controls from two centers specialized in dementia. We studied functional connectivity throughout the entire brain, applying two different analysis techniques, studying network-to-region and region-to-region connectivity. A general linear model approach was used to study group differences, while controlling for physiological noise, age, gender, study center, and regional gray matter volume. Results: Given gray matter differences, we observed decreased network-to-region connectivity in bvFTD between (a) lateral visual cortical network and lateral occipital and cuneal cortex, and (b) auditory system network and angular gyrus. In AD, we found decreased network-to-region connectivity between the dorsal visual stream network and lateral occipital and parietal opercular cortex. Region-to-region connectivity was decreased in bvFTD between superior temporal gyrus and cuneal, supracalcarine, intracalcarine cortex, and lingual gyrus. Conclusion: We showed that the pathophysiology of functional brain connectivity is different between AD and bvFTD. Our findings support the hypothesis that resting state fMRI shows disease-specific functional connectivity differences and is useful to elucidate the pathophysiology of AD and bvFTD. However, the group differences in functional connectivity are less abundant than has been shown in previous studies. PMID:26441584

  15. Randomized controlled trials in frontotemporal dementia: cognitive and behavioral outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Progress has been made in understanding the genetics and molecular biology of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Targets for intervention have been identified, therapies are being developed, and clinical trials are advancing. A major challenge for FTD research is that multiple underlying pathologies can be associated with heterogeneous phenotypes. The neuropsychological profiles associated with FTD spectrum disorders often include executive dysfunction, language impairments and behavioral disturbance. Behavioral variant FTD is characterized by an initial presentation of changes in personality, behavior and/or emotion, which are often difficult to objectively capture using traditional neuropsychological measures. The two principal language variants of FTD are Progressive Nonfluent Aphasia (PNFA) with predominant agrammatic/non-fluent impairments and Semantic Dementia (SD) with semantic impairments and visual agnosia. Selection of appropriate endpoints for clinical trials is critical to ensure that the measures are adequately sensitive to detect change, yet specific enough to isolate signal from noise, and acceptable to regulatory agencies. Given the anticipated potential for small effect sizes, measures must be able to identify small incremental changes over time. It is also imperative that the measures provide adequate coverage of the constructs or behaviors of interest. Selected outcome measures should be suitable for repeat administration, yet relatively robust to practice effects to ensure that observed changes reflect true signal variance and not residual effects due to repeated measurement or poor reliability. To facilitate widespread adoption as an endpoint, measures should be readily accessible. We provide several examples of potential global, composite, and individual cognitive measures, as well as behavioral measures promising for FTD trials. Development and application of appropriate trial outcomes is critically important to success in advancing new

  16. Randomized controlled trials in frontotemporal dementia: cognitive and behavioral outcomes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Justin B; Banks, Sarah J; Léger, Gabriel C; Cummings, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    Progress has been made in understanding the genetics and molecular biology of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Targets for intervention have been identified, therapies are being developed, and clinical trials are advancing. A major challenge for FTD research is that multiple underlying pathologies can be associated with heterogeneous phenotypes. The neuropsychological profiles associated with FTD spectrum disorders often include executive dysfunction, language impairments and behavioral disturbance. Behavioral variant FTD is characterized by an initial presentation of changes in personality, behavior and/or emotion, which are often difficult to objectively capture using traditional neuropsychological measures. The two principal language variants of FTD are Progressive Nonfluent Aphasia (PNFA) with predominant agrammatic/non-fluent impairments and Semantic Dementia (SD) with semantic impairments and visual agnosia. Selection of appropriate endpoints for clinical trials is critical to ensure that the measures are adequately sensitive to detect change, yet specific enough to isolate signal from noise, and acceptable to regulatory agencies. Given the anticipated potential for small effect sizes, measures must be able to identify small incremental changes over time. It is also imperative that the measures provide adequate coverage of the constructs or behaviors of interest. Selected outcome measures should be suitable for repeat administration, yet relatively robust to practice effects to ensure that observed changes reflect true signal variance and not residual effects due to repeated measurement or poor reliability. To facilitate widespread adoption as an endpoint, measures should be readily accessible. We provide several examples of potential global, composite, and individual cognitive measures, as well as behavioral measures promising for FTD trials. Development and application of appropriate trial outcomes is critically important to success in advancing new

  17. Recent advances in the molecular basis of frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rademakers, Rosa; Neumann, Manuela; Mackenzie, Ian R. A.

    2013-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical syndrome with heterogeneous molecular basis. Until recently, our knowledge was limited to a minority of cases associated with abnormalities of the tau protein or gene (MAPT). However, in 2006, mutations in progranulin (GRN) were discovered as another important cause of familial FTD. That same year, TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) was identified as the pathological protein in the most common subtypes of FTD and ALS. Since then, significant efforts have been made to understand the normal functions and regulation of GRN and TDP-43 and their roles in neurodegeneration. More recently, other DNA/RNA binding proteins (FUS, EWS and TAF15) were identified as pathological proteins in most of the remaining cases of FTD. And just six months ago, abnormal expansion of a hexanucleotide repeat in C9ORF72 was found to be the most common genetic cause of both FTD and ALS. With this remarkable progress, it appears that all the common FTD-causing genes have now been discovered and the major pathological proteins identified. This review highlights recent advances in the molecular aspects of FTD, which will provide the basis for improved patient care through the future development of more targeted diagnostic tests and therapies. PMID:22732773

  18. Dyslexia susceptibility genes influence brain atrophy in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Paternicó, Donata; Premi, Enrico; Alberici, Antonella; Archetti, Silvana; Bonomi, Elisa; Gualeni, Vera; Gasparotti, Roberto; Padovani, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we evaluated whether variations within genes specifically associated with dyslexia, namely KIAA0319, DCDC2, and CNTNAP2, were associated with greater damage of language-related regions in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and primary progressive aphasia (PPA) in particular. Methods: A total of 118 patients with FTD, 84 with the behavioral variant of FTD (bvFTD) and 34 with PPA, underwent neuropsychological examination, genetic analyses, and brain MRI. KIAA0319 rs17243157 G/A, DCDC2 rs793842 A/G, and CNTNAP2 rs17236239 A/G genetic variations were assessed. Patients were grouped according to clinical phenotype and genotype status (GA/AA or GG). Gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) differences were assessed by voxel-based morphometry and structural intercorrelation pattern analyses. Results: Patients carrying KIAA0319 A* (GA or AA) showed greater GM and WM atrophy in the left middle and inferior temporal gyri, as compared with KIAA0319 GG (p < 0.001). The effect of KIAA0319 polymorphism was mainly reported in patients with PPA. In patients with PPA carrying at-risk polymorphism, temporal damage led to loss of interhemispheric and intrahemispheric GM and WM structural association. No effect of DCDC2 and CNTNAP2 was found. Conclusions: Genes involved in dyslexia susceptibility, such as KIAA0319, result in language network vulnerability in FTD, and in PPA in particular. PMID:27066561

  19. CCNF mutations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kelly L; Topp, Simon; Yang, Shu; Smith, Bradley; Fifita, Jennifer A; Warraich, Sadaf T; Zhang, Katharine Y; Farrawell, Natalie; Vance, Caroline; Hu, Xun; Chesi, Alessandra; Leblond, Claire S; Lee, Albert; Rayner, Stephanie L; Sundaramoorthy, Vinod; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Molloy, Mark P; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Dickson, Dennis W; Petersen, Ronald C; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Boeve, Bradley F; Murray, Melissa E; Pottier, Cyril; Don, Emily; Winnick, Claire; McCann, Emily P; Hogan, Alison; Daoud, Hussein; Levert, Annie; Dion, Patrick A; Mitsui, Jun; Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yuji; Goto, Jun; Kost, Jason; Gellera, Cinzia; Gkazi, Athina Soragia; Miller, Jack; Stockton, Joanne; Brooks, William S; Boundy, Karyn; Polak, Meraida; Muñoz-Blanco, José Luis; Esteban-Pérez, Jesús; Rábano, Alberto; Hardiman, Orla; Morrison, Karen E; Ticozzi, Nicola; Silani, Vincenzo; de Belleroche, Jacqueline; Glass, Jonathan D; Kwok, John B J; Guillemin, Gilles J; Chung, Roger S; Tsuji, Shoji; Brown, Robert H; García-Redondo, Alberto; Rademakers, Rosa; Landers, John E; Gitler, Aaron D; Rouleau, Guy A; Cole, Nicholas J; Yerbury, Justin J; Atkin, Julie D; Shaw, Christopher E; Nicholson, Garth A; Blair, Ian P

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are overlapping, fatal neurodegenerative disorders in which the molecular and pathogenic basis remains poorly understood. Ubiquitinated protein aggregates, of which TDP-43 is a major component, are a characteristic pathological feature of most ALS and FTD patients. Here we use genome-wide linkage analysis in a large ALS/FTD kindred to identify a novel disease locus on chromosome 16p13.3. Whole-exome sequencing identified a CCNF missense mutation at this locus. Interrogation of international cohorts identified additional novel CCNF variants in familial and sporadic ALS and FTD. Enrichment of rare protein-altering CCNF variants was evident in a large sporadic ALS replication cohort. CCNF encodes cyclin F, a component of an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complex (SCF(Cyclin F)). Expression of mutant CCNF in neuronal cells caused abnormal ubiquitination and accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, including TDP-43 and a SCF(Cyclin F) substrate. This implicates common mechanisms, linked to protein homeostasis, underlying neuronal degeneration. PMID:27080313

  20. White matter hyperintensities characterize monogenic frontotemporal dementia with granulin mutations.

    PubMed

    Paternicò, Donata; Premi, Enrico; Gazzina, Stefano; Cosseddu, Maura; Alberici, Antonella; Archetti, Silvana; Cotelli, Maria S; Micheli, Anna; Turla, Marinella; Gasparotti, Roberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    No study but one has suggested the presence of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), limited to 4 cases carrying pathogenic Granulin (GRN) gene mutations. We investigated the presence of WMHs in a cohort of 14 FTD patients with pathogenic GRN mutations (GRN+), 28 patients without GRN mutations (GRN-) and 18 healthy controls (HC). We further considered 11 asymptomatic GRN+ subjects and 11 young age-matched healthy controls (yHC). The WMH burden was automatically computed and a voxelwise-based analysis was carried out to explore the differences in WMH brain spatial distribution. FTD-GRN+ patients had increased total WMH burden than both HC (p < 0.001) and FTD-GRN-(p = 0.01) groups. WMHs were mainly localized in the right middle frontal and superior temporal gyri, in the left superior frontal in the left parietal gyri. No significant differences of WMH burden between asymptomatic GRN+ and yHC were observed. The presence of WMHs in cases of FTD may suggest a novel mechanism of GRN disease-related neurodegeneration, may be of help in the differential diagnosis, and in guiding genetic screening. PMID:26827655

  1. CCNF mutations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kelly L.; Topp, Simon; Yang, Shu; Smith, Bradley; Fifita, Jennifer A.; Warraich, Sadaf T.; Zhang, Katharine Y.; Farrawell, Natalie; Vance, Caroline; Hu, Xun; Chesi, Alessandra; Leblond, Claire S.; Lee, Albert; Rayner, Stephanie L.; Sundaramoorthy, Vinod; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Molloy, Mark P.; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Dickson, Dennis W.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Murray, Melissa E.; Pottier, Cyril; Don, Emily; Winnick, Claire; McCann, Emily P.; Hogan, Alison; Daoud, Hussein; Levert, Annie; Dion, Patrick A.; Mitsui, Jun; Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yuji; Goto, Jun; Kost, Jason; Gellera, Cinzia; Gkazi, Athina Soragia; Miller, Jack; Stockton, Joanne; Brooks, William S.; Boundy, Karyn; Polak, Meraida; Muñoz-Blanco, José Luis; Esteban-Pérez, Jesús; Rábano, Alberto; Hardiman, Orla; Morrison, Karen E.; Ticozzi, Nicola; Silani, Vincenzo; de Belleroche, Jacqueline; Glass, Jonathan D.; Kwok, John B. J.; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Chung, Roger S.; Tsuji, Shoji; Brown, Robert H.; García-Redondo, Alberto; Rademakers, Rosa; Landers, John E.; Gitler, Aaron D.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Cole, Nicholas J.; Yerbury, Justin J.; Atkin, Julie D.; Shaw, Christopher E.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Blair, Ian P.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are overlapping, fatal neurodegenerative disorders in which the molecular and pathogenic basis remains poorly understood. Ubiquitinated protein aggregates, of which TDP-43 is a major component, are a characteristic pathological feature of most ALS and FTD patients. Here we use genome-wide linkage analysis in a large ALS/FTD kindred to identify a novel disease locus on chromosome 16p13.3. Whole-exome sequencing identified a CCNF missense mutation at this locus. Interrogation of international cohorts identified additional novel CCNF variants in familial and sporadic ALS and FTD. Enrichment of rare protein-altering CCNF variants was evident in a large sporadic ALS replication cohort. CCNF encodes cyclin F, a component of an E3 ubiquitin–protein ligase complex (SCFCyclin F). Expression of mutant CCNF in neuronal cells caused abnormal ubiquitination and accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, including TDP-43 and a SCFCyclin F substrate. This implicates common mechanisms, linked to protein homeostasis, underlying neuronal degeneration. PMID:27080313

  2. Functional neuroimaging and presenting psychiatric features in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, M F; McMurtray, A; Chen, A K; Shapira, J S; Mishkin, F; Miller, B L

    2006-01-01

    Background Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a behavioural syndrome caused by degeneration of the frontal and anterior temporal lobes. Behavioural disturbances include psychiatric features. Whether patients with FTD present with psychiatric features varies with the initial neuroanatomical variability of FTD. Objective To identify presenting psychiatric changes not part of diagnostic criteria of FTD and contrast them with the degree of hemispheric asymmetry and frontal and temporal hypoperfusion on single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Methods 74 patients who met consensus criteria for FTD were evaluated at a two year follow up. All had brain SPECT on initial presentation. Results of an FTD psychiatric checklist were contrasted with ratings of regional hypoperfusion. Results The regions of predominant hypoperfusion did not correlate with differences on FTD demographic variables but were associated with presenting psychiatric features. Dysthymia and anxiety were associated with right temporal hypoperfusion. “Moria” or frivolous behaviour also occurred with temporal lobe changes, especially on the right. The only significant frontal lobe feature was the presence of a peculiar physical bearing in association with right frontal hypoperfusion. Conclusions Patients with FTD may present with psychiatric changes distinct from the behavioural diagnostic criteria for this disorder. Early temporal involvement is associated with frivolous behaviour and right temporal involvement is associated with emotional disturbances. In contrast, those with right frontal disease may present with alterations in non‐verbal behaviour. PMID:16043457

  3. Self-Consciousness in Patients with Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Anlló, Eva M; Bouston, Adèle Turpin; Fargeau, Marie-Noëlle; Orgaz Baz, Begõna; Gil, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Self-consciousness (SC) is multifaceted and considered to be the consciousness of one's own mental states. The medial prefrontal cortex may play a critical role in SC. The main aim of this paper was to examine SC in patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia, who are characterized more by changes in personal, social, and emotional conduct and loss of insight than by cognitive disturbances. Control and patient groups of 21 subjects each, matched by age, educational level, gender, and nationality were assessed using a SC questionnaire. It measures several aspects: Personal identity, Anosognosia, Affective state, Body representation, Prospective memory, Introspection, and Moral judgments. The most disturbed ones in patients were Anosognosia, Affective state, and Moral judgments, and the least disturbed aspects were awareness of identity and of body representation. No significant correlations were found between the SC score and any clinical or demographical characteristics. The core deficiency of SC in patients was related to behavioral SC aspects, which are more dependent on orbito-frontal functioning. PMID:26599058

  4. Motor neuron disease and frontotemporal dementia: sometimes related, sometimes not.

    PubMed

    Hardy, John; Rogaeva, Ekaterina

    2014-12-01

    Over the last 5 years, several new genes have been described for both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). While it has long been clear that there are many kindreds in which the two diseases co-occur, there are also many in which the diseases segregate alone. In this brief review, we suggest that keeping the loci which lead to both diseases separate from those which lead to just one gives a clearer conclusion about disease mechanisms than lumping them together. The hypothesis that this separation leads to is that loci which cause both ALS and FTD affect the autophagic machinery leading to damaged protein aggregation and those which lead to just ALS are mainly involved in RNA/DNA metabolism. Two of the genes causing FTD alone (CHMP2B and GRN) are associated with damaged autophagy/lysosomal pathway. However, the third FTD gene (MAPT) maps to a different pathway, which perhaps is not surprising, since it is associated with a different (not p62-related) brain pathology characterized by abnormal tau filaments. We conclude that the current state of knowledge points to common mechanisms responsible for susceptibilities specific to neuronal classes. This includes the disruption of RNA metabolism in motor neurons and protein clearance, which is common between cortical and motor neurons. PMID:24246281

  5. What's in a Name: Voxel-Based Morphometric Analyses of MRI and Naming Difficulty in Alzheimer's Disease, Frontotemporal Dementia and Corticobasal Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Murray; McMillan, Corey; Moore, Peachie; Ding, Lijun; Glosser, Guila; Work, Melissa; Gee, James

    2004-01-01

    Confrontation naming is impaired in neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Some behavioural observations suggest a common source of impaired naming across these patient groups, while others find partially unique patterns of naming difficulty. We hypothesized…

  6. Short-term memory binding is impaired in AD but not in non-AD dementias.

    PubMed

    Della Sala, Sergio; Parra, Mario A; Fabi, Katia; Luzzi, Simona; Abrahams, Sharon

    2012-04-01

    Binding is a cognitive function responsible for integrating features within complex stimuli (e.g., shape-colour conjunctions) or events within complex memories (e.g., face-name associations). This function operates both in short-term memory (STM) and in long-term memory (LTM) and is severely affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, forming conjunctions in STM is the only binding function which is not affected by healthy ageing or chronic depression. Whether this specificity holds true across other non-AD dementias is as yet unknown. The present study investigated STM conjunctive binding in a sample of AD patients and patients with other non-AD dementias using a task which has proved sensitive to the effects of AD. The STM task assesses the free recall of objects, colours, and the bindings of objects and colours. Patients with AD, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, lewy body dementia and dementia associated with Parkinson's disease showed memory, visuo-spatial, executive and attentional deficits on standard neuropsychological assessment. However, only AD patients showed STM binding deficits. This deficit was observed even when memory for single features was at a similar level across patient groups. Regression and discriminant analyses confirmed that the STM binding task accounted for the largest proportion of variance between AD and non-AD groups and held the greatest classification power to identify patients with AD. STM conjunctive binding places little demands on executive functions and appears to be subserved by components of the memory network which are targeted by AD, but not by non-AD dementias. PMID:22289292

  7. Reduced frequency of T lymphocytes expressing CTLA-4 in frontotemporal dementia compared to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Torres, Karen C; Lima, Giselle S; Fiamoncini, Carolina M; Mapa, Filipe C; Pereira, Patricia A; Rezende, Vitor B; Martins, Luiza C; Bicalho, Maria A; Moraes, Edgar N; Reis, Helton J; Teixeira, Antonio L; Romano-Silva, Marco A

    2014-01-01

    Studies suggest that inflammation is involved in the neurodegenerative cascade of dementias. Immunological mechanisms may be part of the pathophysiological process in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but up till now only vague evidence of such mechanisms has been presented. The B7- CD28/CTLA-4 pathway is an important immunological signaling pathway involved in modulation of T cell activation. The aim of this study was to compare the expression of molecules associated with co-stimulatory signaling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of FTD to Alzheimer disease (AD) and control groups. Our results confirm the previous demonstrated increased expression of CD80 in CD14+ Alzheimer patients T cells but show, for the first time, a reduction in the expression of CTLA-4 in CD4+ FTD cells. As CTLA-4 is the most potent negative regulators of T-cell activation we speculated that peripheral T lymphocytes in FTD are more activated and this could be involved in the neurodegeneration observed in this dementia. PMID:23891730

  8. Patterns of regional cerebellar atrophy in genetic frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bocchetta, Martina; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Cash, David M.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Warren, Jason D.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder with a strong genetic component. The cerebellum has not traditionally been felt to be involved in FTD but recent research has suggested a potential role. Methods We investigated the volumetry of the cerebellum and its subregions in a cohort of 44 patients with genetic FTD (20 MAPT, 7 GRN, and 17 C9orf72 mutation carriers) compared with 18 cognitively normal controls. All groups were matched for age and gender. On volumetric T1-weighted magnetic resonance brain images we used an atlas propagation and label fusion strategy of the Diedrichsen cerebellar atlas to automatically extract subregions including the cerebellar lobules, the vermis and the deep nuclei. Results The global cerebellar volume was significantly smaller in C9orf72 carriers (mean (SD): 99989 (8939) mm3) compared with controls (108136 (7407) mm3). However, no significant differences were seen in the MAPT and GRN carriers compared with controls (104191 (6491) mm3 and 107883 (6205) mm3 respectively). Investigating the individual subregions, C9orf72 carriers had a significantly lower volume than controls in lobule VIIa-Crus I (15% smaller, p < 0.0005), whilst MAPT mutation carriers had a significantly lower vermal volume (10% smaller, p = 0.001) than controls. All cerebellar subregion volumes were preserved in GRN carriers compared with controls. Conclusion There appears to be a differential pattern of cerebellar atrophy in the major genetic forms of FTD, being relatively spared in GRN, localized to the lobule VIIa-Crus I in the superior-posterior region of the cerebellum in C9orf72, the area connected via the thalamus to the prefrontal cortex and involved in cognitive function, and localized to the vermis in MAPT, the ‘limbic cerebellum’ involved in emotional processing. PMID:26977398

  9. The language profile of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Chris J. D.; Buckley, Aisling H.; Downey, Laura E.; Lehmann, Manja; Zimmerer, Vitor C.; Varley, Rosemary A.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Warrington, Elizabeth K; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The language profile of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) remains to be fully defined. Objective We aimed to quantify the extent of language deficits in this patient group. Methods We assessed a cohort of patients with bvFTD (n=24) in relation to patents with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA; n=14), nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA; n=18) and healthy age-matched individuals (n=24) cross-sectionally and longitudinally using a comprehensive battery of language and general neuropsychological tests. Neuroanatomical associations of language performance were assessed using voxel-based morphometry of patients’ brain magnetic resonance images. Results Relative to healthy controls, and after accounting for nonverbal executive performance, patients with bvFTD showed deficits of noun and verb naming and single word comprehension, diminished spontaneous propositional speech and deterioration in naming performance over time. Within the bvFTD group, patients with MAPT mutations had more severe impairments of noun naming and single word comprehension than patients with C9orf72 mutations. Overall the bvFTD group had less severe language deficits than patients with PPA, but showed a language profile that was qualitatively similar to svPPA. Neuroanatomical correlates of naming and word comprehension performance in bvFTD were identified predominantly in inferior frontal and antero-inferior temporal cortices within the dominant hemispheric language network. Conclusions bvFTD is associated with a language profile including verbal semantic impairment that warrants further evaluation as a novel biomarker. PMID:26682693

  10. A MAPT mutation in a regulatory element upstream of exon 10 causes frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Malkani, Roneil; D'Souza, Ian; Gwinn-Hardy, Katrina; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Hardy, John; Momeni, Parastoo

    2006-05-01

    We report here the genetic analysis of a newly ascertained kindred in which frontotemporal dementia occurs in an apparent autosomal dominant fashion, and in which a novel MAPT gene mutation co-segregates with disease. Sequencing the MAPT gene in affected individuals revealed a change in intron 9. This finding supports earlier studies on the effect of a splice-accepting element in inclusion of exon 10 in the MAPT transcript. This mutation sheds light on a novel mechanism by which over-expression of 4-repeat tau leads to disease. Based on our current findings, we propose a novel mechanism by which intronic mutations can lead to frontotemporal dementia. PMID:16503405

  11. Metacognition in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Howard J.; Alcantar, Oscar; Zakrzewski, Jessica; Shimamura, Arthur P.; Neuhaus, John; Miller, Bruce L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Impaired self-awareness is characteristic of nearly all dementias, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but the deficit is most severe in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). The prominence of frontal pathology in bvFTD suggests that failure of online monitoring, the process by which individuals monitor their own cognitive processing in real time, is an important contributor. Metacognitive research offers several approaches to measure self-assessment, some more and others less sensitive to online monitoring. The goal of this study was to assess metacognition in bvFTD using several approaches, and compare the results with those in AD. Methods We examined metacognition in 12 patients with bvFTD, 14 with AD and 35 healthy controls using Feeling of Knowing (FOK), Ease of Learning (EOL), Judgment of Learning (JOL), and Retrospective Confidence Rating (CR) tasks, as well as response to feedback about performance. Results BvFTD and AD were both impaired at FOK compared with controls, although AD showed some sparing. Both groups were similarly impaired at CR and neither group was impaired at JOL after accounting for memory performance. Most strikingly, bvFTD patients failed to appropriately adjust their predictions about future memory performance even after receiving explicit feedback that they had performed worse than they expected. Conclusions Both bvFTD and AD show deficits in online monitoring, although the deficit appears more severe in bvFTD. The insensitivity of bvFTD patients to overt feedback may point to unique mechanisms, possibly frontally mediated, that add to their severe lack of self-awareness. PMID:24548124

  12. Distinct clinical and pathological characteristics of frontotemporal dementia associated with C9ORF72 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rollinson, Sara; Thompson, Jennifer C.; Harris, Jennifer M.; Stopford, Cheryl L.; Richardson, Anna M. T.; Jones, Matthew; Gerhard, Alex; Davidson, Yvonne S.; Robinson, Andrew; Gibbons, Linda; Hu, Quan; DuPlessis, Daniel; Neary, David; Pickering-Brown, Stuart M.

    2012-01-01

    The identification of a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene as the cause of chromosome 9-linked frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease offers the opportunity for greater understanding of the relationship between these disorders and other clinical forms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. In this study, we screened a cohort of 398 patients with frontotemporal dementia, progressive non-fluent aphasia, semantic dementia or mixture of these syndromes for mutations in the C9ORF72 gene. Motor neuron disease was present in 55 patients (14%). We identified 32 patients with C9ORF72 mutations, representing 8% of the cohort. The patients’ clinical phenotype at presentation varied: nine patients had frontotemporal dementia with motor neuron disease, 19 had frontotemporal dementia alone, one had mixed semantic dementia with frontal features and three had progressive non-fluent aphasia. There was, as expected, a significant association between C9ORF72 mutations and presence of motor neuron disease. Nevertheless, 46 patients, including 22 familial, had motor neuron disease but no mutation in C9ORF72. Thirty-eight per cent of the patients with C9ORF72 mutations presented with psychosis, with a further 28% exhibiting paranoid, deluded or irrational thinking, whereas <4% of non-mutation bearers presented similarly. The presence of psychosis dramatically increased the odds that patients carried the mutation. Mutation bearers showed a low incidence of motor stereotypies, and relatively high incidence of complex repetitive behaviours, largely linked to patients’ delusions. They also showed a lower incidence of acquired sweet food preference than patients without C9ORF72 mutations. Post-mortem pathology in five patients revealed transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 pathology, type A in one patient and type B in three. However, one patient had corticobasal degeneration pathology. The findings indicate that C9ORF72 mutations cause some but not all

  13. Neuropsychological and Neuroanatomical Correlates of the Social Norms Questionnaire in Frontotemporal Dementia Versus Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Hemali; Paholpak, Pongsatorn; Lee, Grace; Carr, Andrew; Barsuglia, Joseph P; Mather, Michelle; Jimenez, Elvira; Mendez, Mario F

    2016-06-01

    Traditional neuropsychological batteries may not distinguish early behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) from Alzheimer's disease (AD) without the inclusion of a social behavioral measure. We compared 33 participants, 15 bvFTD, and 18 matched patients with early-onset AD (eAD), on the Social Norms Questionnaire (SNQ), neuropsychological tests and 3-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The analyses included correlations of SNQ results (total score, overendorsement or "overadhere" errors, and violations or "break" errors) with neuropsychological results and tensor-based morphometry regions of interest. Patients with BvFTD had significantly lower SNQ total scores and higher overadhere errors than patients with eAD. On neuropsychological measures, the SNQ total scores correlated significantly with semantic knowledge and the overadhere subscores with executive dysfunction. On MRI analysis, the break subscores significantly correlated with lower volume of lateral anterior temporal lobes (aTL). The results also suggest that endorsement of social norm violations corresponds to the role of the right aTL in social semantic knowledge. PMID:26646114

  14. Prion-like propagation as a pathogenic principle in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Hock, Eva-Maria; Polymenidou, Magdalini

    2016-08-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is a devastating neurodegenerative disease causing stark alterations in personality and language. Characterized by severe atrophy of the frontal and temporal brain lobes, frontotemporal dementia (FTD) shows extreme heterogeneity in clinical presentation, genetic causes, and pathological findings. Like most neurodegenerative diseases, the initial symptoms of FTD are subtle, but increase in severity over time, as the disease progresses. Clinical progression is paralleled by exacerbation of pathological findings and the involvement of broader brain regions, which currently lack mechanistic explanation. Yet, a flurry of studies indicate that protein aggregates accumulating in neurodegenerative diseases can act as propagating entities, amplifying their pathogenic conformation, in a way similar to infectious prions. In this prion-centric view, FTD can be divided into three subtypes, TDP-43 or FUS proteinopathy and tauopathy. Here, we review the current evidence that FTD-linked pathology propagates in a prion-like manner and discuss the implications of these findings for disease progression and heterogeneity. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease causing severe personality dysfunctions, characterized by profound heterogeneity. Accumulation of tau, TDP-43 or FUS cytoplasmic aggregates characterize molecularly distinct and non-overlapping FTD subtypes. Here, we discuss the current evidence suggesting that prion-like propagation and cell-to-cell spread of each of these cytoplasmic aggregates may underlie disease progression and heterogeneity. This article is part of the Frontotemporal Dementia special issue. PMID:27502124

  15. Problems Inhibiting Attentional Capture by Irrelevant Stimuli in Patients with Frontotemporal Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquard, Ambre; Lacomblez, Lucette; Derouesne, Christian; Sieroff, Eric

    2009-01-01

    We studied the role of the frontal lobes in orienting spatial attention and inhibiting attentional capture by goal-irrelevant stimuli, using a spatial cueing method in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Two blocks of trials were presented, one with non-predictive cues and the other with counter-predictive cues. FTD patients showed a…

  16. Anatomical correlates of reward-seeking behaviours in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Virginia E.; Seeley, William W.; Miller, Bruce L.; Kramer, Joel H.; Rosen, Howard J.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia is characterized by abnormal responses to primary reward stimuli such as food, sex and intoxicants, suggesting abnormal functioning of brain circuitry mediating reward processing. The goal of this analysis was to determine whether abnormalities in reward-seeking behaviour in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia are correlated with atrophy in regions known to mediate reward processing. Review of case histories in 103 patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia identified overeating or increased sweet food preference in 80 (78%), new or increased alcohol or drug use in 27 (26%), and hypersexuality in 17 (17%). For each patient, a primary reward-seeking score of 0–3 was created with 1 point given for each target behaviour (increased seeking of food, drugs, or sex). Voxel-based morphometry performed in 91 patients with available imaging revealed that right ventral putamen and pallidum atrophy correlated with higher reward-seeking scores. Each of the reward-related behaviours involved partially overlapping right hemisphere reward circuit regions including putamen, globus pallidus, insula and thalamus. These findings indicate that in some patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, low volume of subcortical reward-related structures is associated with increased pursuit of primary rewards, which may be a product of increased thalamocortical feedback. PMID:24740987

  17. Hypersexual Behavior in Frontotemporal Dementia: A Comparison with Early-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Mario F.; Shapira, Jill S.

    2013-01-01

    The basis of hypersexual behavior among patients with dementia is not entirely clear. Hypersexual behavior may be a particular feature of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), which affects ventromedial frontal and adjacent anterior temporal regions specialized in interpersonal behavior. Recent efforts to define Hypersexual Disorder indicate an increasing awareness of heightened sexual activity as a source of personal distress and functional impairment, and clarification of hypersexuality in bvFTD could contribute to understanding the neurobiology of this behavior. This study reviewed 47 patients with bvFTD compared to 58 patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) for the presence of heightened sexual activity to the point of distress to caregivers and others. Hypersexual behavior occurred in 6 (13%) bvFTD patients compared to none of the AD patients. Caregivers judged all six bvFTD patients with hypersexual behavior as having a dramatic increase in sexual frequency from premorbid levels. All had general disinhibition, poor impulse control, and actively sought sexual stimulation. They had widened sexual interests and experienced sexual arousal from previously unexciting stimuli. One patient, with early and predominant right anterior temporal involvement, was easily aroused by slight stimuli, such as touching her palms. Although previously considered to be predominantly disinhibited sexual behavior as part of generalized disinhibition, these patients with dementia illustrate varying degrees of increased sexual desire. We conclude that bvFTD is uniquely associated with hypersexuality; it is more than just cognitive impairment with frontal disinhibition but also involves alterations in sexual drive, possibly from right anterior temporal-limbic involvement in this disease. PMID:23297146

  18. Frontotemporal dementia: evidence for impairment of ascending serotoninergic but not noradrenergic innervation. Immunocytochemical and quantitative study using a graph method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Schmitt, H P

    2001-03-01

    A graph method was employed to analyze the spatial neuronal patterns of nuclear grays of the pontine tegmentum with ascending aminergic projections to the forebrain in 12 cases of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The nuclear grays examined were the nucleus centralis superior (NCS), a part of the nucleus raphae dorsalis (NRD), and the locus coeruleus (LC). The results were compared with 30 cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 35 non-demented controls. In addition to the graph evaluations, neuronal cytoplasmic inclusion bodies were stained by silver impregnation and ubiquitin (Ub) and tau immunohistochemistry. The FTD cases showed a significant, 40%, decline in number of neurons in the NCS and NRD, while the LC was spared. The magnitude of neuronal loss matched that of AD where, by contrast, the LC was also severely changed. Amyloid deposition and Alzheimer neurofibrillary tangles occurred in the aminergic nuclei almost exclusively in AD and, to a minor extent, in some aged controls. No cytoplasmic inclusion bodies were found in the aminergic nuclei of the FTD cases. However, 6 cases had Ub-positive but tau-negative neuronal inclusions in the hippocampal dentate fascia and in layer 2 of the prefrontal isocortex, and 3 showed clinical and histological signs of motor neuron disease. Our results suggest that the serotoninergic raphe nuclei with ascending projections to the forebrain, but not the LC, become directly or indirectly involved in frontotemporal dementia both with and without motor neuron disease. PMID:11307626

  19. Clinical and pathological features of familial frontotemporal dementia caused by C9ORF72 mutation on chromosome 9p

    PubMed Central

    Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Feldman, Howard H.; Sengdy, Pheth; Bouchard-Kerr, Phoenix; Dwosh, Emily; Butler, Rachel; Leung, Bonnie; Fok, Alice; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Baker, Matt; Rademakers, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are closely related clinical syndromes with overlapping molecular pathogenesis. Several families have been reported with members affected by frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or both, which show genetic linkage to a region on chromosome 9p21. Recently, two studies identified the FTD/ALS gene defect on chromosome 9p as an expanded GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in a non-coding region of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 gene (C9ORF72). In the present study, we provide detailed analysis of the clinical features and neuropathology for 16 unrelated families with frontotemporal dementia caused by the C9ORF72 mutation. All had an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Eight families had a combination of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis while the other eight had a pure frontotemporal dementia phenotype. Clinical information was available for 30 affected members of the 16 families. There was wide variation in age of onset (mean = 54.3, range = 34–74 years) and disease duration (mean = 5.3, range = 1–16 years). Early diagnoses included behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 15), progressive non-fluent aphasia (n = 5), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 9) and progressive non-fluent aphasia–amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 1). Heterogeneity in clinical presentation was also common within families. However, there was a tendency for the phenotypes to converge with disease progression; seven subjects had final clinical diagnoses of both frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and all of those with an initial progressive non-fluent aphasia diagnosis subsequently developed significant behavioural abnormalities. Twenty-one affected family members came to autopsy and all were found to have transactive response DNA binding protein with Mr 43 kD (TDP-43) pathology in a wide neuroanatomical distribution. All

  20. Clinical and pathological features of familial frontotemporal dementia caused by C9ORF72 mutation on chromosome 9p.

    PubMed

    Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Feldman, Howard H; Sengdy, Pheth; Bouchard-Kerr, Phoenix; Dwosh, Emily; Butler, Rachel; Leung, Bonnie; Fok, Alice; Rutherford, Nicola J; Baker, Matt; Rademakers, Rosa; Mackenzie, Ian R A

    2012-03-01

    Frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are closely related clinical syndromes with overlapping molecular pathogenesis. Several families have been reported with members affected by frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or both, which show genetic linkage to a region on chromosome 9p21. Recently, two studies identified the FTD/ALS gene defect on chromosome 9p as an expanded GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in a non-coding region of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 gene (C9ORF72). In the present study, we provide detailed analysis of the clinical features and neuropathology for 16 unrelated families with frontotemporal dementia caused by the C9ORF72 mutation. All had an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Eight families had a combination of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis while the other eight had a pure frontotemporal dementia phenotype. Clinical information was available for 30 affected members of the 16 families. There was wide variation in age of onset (mean = 54.3, range = 34-74 years) and disease duration (mean = 5.3, range = 1-16 years). Early diagnoses included behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 15), progressive non-fluent aphasia (n = 5), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 9) and progressive non-fluent aphasia-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 1). Heterogeneity in clinical presentation was also common within families. However, there was a tendency for the phenotypes to converge with disease progression; seven subjects had final clinical diagnoses of both frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and all of those with an initial progressive non-fluent aphasia diagnosis subsequently developed significant behavioural abnormalities. Twenty-one affected family members came to autopsy and all were found to have transactive response DNA binding protein with M(r) 43 kD (TDP-43) pathology in a wide neuroanatomical distribution. All had involvement of the extramotor

  1. Behavioural Variant Frontotemporal Dementia with Bilateral Insular Hypometabolism: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Mamta; Bhad, Roshan; Tripathi, Manjari

    2016-01-01

    Fronto-Temporal Dementia (FTD) is a cluster of syndromes, characterized by progressive deterioration of cognition, language and/or behavioural changes associated with degeneration of the frontal and temporal lobes. A 53-year-old man was admitted with a history of gradually progressive behavioural disturbances, disinhibition, unprovoked anger outbursts, apathy, disorganised behaviour and impaired self-care. A clinical diagnosis of Fronto temporal Dementia (behavioural variant) was made. Extensive investigations found no abnormality except in FDG-PET scan of the brain which revealed hypo metabolism in bilateral anterior insular region. Insula is an important brain area implicated in emotional awareness and behaviour control. Hypo metabolism in insular region in the absence of any structural neuroimaging findings, in a case of behavioural variant of Fronto-temporal dementia suggest that, it might be one of the earliest neurobiological changes occurring in this disorder. PMID:27190928

  2. Emotion recognition in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease: A new film-based assessment.

    PubMed

    Goodkind, Madeleine S; Sturm, Virginia E; Ascher, Elizabeth A; Shdo, Suzanne M; Miller, Bruce L; Rankin, Katherine P; Levenson, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    Deficits in recognizing others' emotions are reported in many psychiatric and neurological disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Most previous emotion recognition studies have required participants to identify emotional expressions in photographs. This type of assessment differs from real-world emotion recognition in important ways: Images are static rather than dynamic, include only 1 modality of emotional information (i.e., visual information), and are presented absent a social context. Additionally, existing emotion recognition batteries typically include multiple negative emotions, but only 1 positive emotion (i.e., happiness) and no self-conscious emotions (e.g., embarrassment). We present initial results using a new task for assessing emotion recognition that was developed to address these limitations. In this task, respondents view a series of short film clips and are asked to identify the main characters' emotions. The task assesses multiple negative, positive, and self-conscious emotions based on information that is multimodal, dynamic, and socially embedded. We evaluate this approach in a sample of patients with bvFTD, AD, and normal controls. Results indicate that patients with bvFTD have emotion recognition deficits in all 3 categories of emotion compared to the other groups. These deficits were especially pronounced for negative and self-conscious emotions. Emotion recognition in this sample of patients with AD was indistinguishable from controls. These findings underscore the utility of this approach to assessing emotion recognition and suggest that previous findings that recognition of positive emotion was preserved in dementia patients may have resulted from the limited sampling of positive emotion in traditional tests. PMID:26010574

  3. Emotion Recognition in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease: A New Film-Based Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Goodkind, Madeleine S.; Sturm, Virginia E.; Ascher, Elizabeth A.; Shdo, Suzanne M.; Miller, Bruce L.; Rankin, Katherine P.; Levenson, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Deficits in recognizing others' emotions are reported in many psychiatric and neurological disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Most previous emotion recognition studies have required participants to identify emotional expressions in photographs. This type of assessment differs from real-world emotion recognition in important ways: Images are static rather than dynamic, include only 1 modality of emotional information (i.e., visual information), and are presented absent a social context. Additionally, existing emotion recognition batteries typically include multiple negative emotions, but only 1 positive emotion (i.e., happiness) and no self-conscious emotions (e.g., embarrassment). We present initial results using a new task for assessing emotion recognition that was developed to address these limitations. In this task, respondents view a series of short film clips and are asked to identify the main characters' emotions. The task assesses multiple negative, positive, and self-conscious emotions based on information that is multimodal, dynamic, and socially embedded. We evaluate this approach in a sample of patients with bvFTD, AD, and normal controls. Results indicate that patients with bvFTD have emotion recognition deficits in all 3 categories of emotion compared to the other groups. These deficits were especially pronounced for negative and self-conscious emotions. Emotion recognition in this sample of patients with AD was indistinguishable from controls. These findings underscore the utility of this approach to assessing emotion recognition and suggest that previous findings that recognition of positive emotion was preserved in dementia patients may have resulted from the limited sampling of positive emotion in traditional tests. PMID:26010574

  4. A Multiancestral Genome-Wide Exome Array Study of Alzheimer Disease, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jason A.; Wang, Qing; Davis-Turak, Jeremy; Li, Yun; Karydas, Anna M.; Hsu, Sandy C.; Sears, Renee L.; Chatzopoulou, Doxa; Huang, Alden Y.; Wojta, Kevin J.; Klein, Eric; Lee, Jason; Beekly, Duane L.; Boxer, Adam; Faber, Kelley M.; Haase, Claudia M.; Miller, Josh; Poon, Wayne W.; Rosen, Ami; Rosen, Howard; Sapozhnikova, Anna; Shapira, Jill; Varpetian, Arousiak; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Levenson, Robert W.; Levey, Allan I.; Kukull, Walter A.; Mendez, Mario F.; Ringman, John; Chui, Helena; Cotman, Carl; DeCarli, Charles; Miller, Bruce L.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Coppola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Previous studies have indicated a heritable component of the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). However, few have examined the contribution of low-frequency coding variants on a genome-wide level. OBJECTIVE To identify low-frequency coding variants that affect susceptibility to AD, FTD, and PSP. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We used the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip array to genotype a large number of variants (most of which are low-frequency coding variants) in a cohort of patients with neurodegenerative disease (224 with AD, 168 with FTD, and 48 with PSP) and in 224 control individuals without dementia enrolled between 2005–2012 from multiple centers participating in the Genetic Investigation in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease (GIFT) Study. An additional multiancestral replication cohort of 240 patients with AD and 240 controls without dementia was used to validate suggestive findings. Variant-level association testing and gene-based testing were performed. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Statistical association of genetic variants with clinical diagnosis of AD, FTD, and PSP. RESULTS Genetic variants typed by the exome array explained 44%, 53%, and 57% of the total phenotypic variance of AD, FTD, and PSP, respectively. An association with the known AD gene ABCA7 was replicated in several ancestries (discovery P = .0049, European P = .041, African American P = .043, and Asian P = .027), suggesting that exonic variants within this gene modify AD susceptibility. In addition, 2 suggestive candidate genes, DYSF (P = 5.53 × 10−5) and PAXIP1 (P = 2.26 × 10−4), were highlighted in patients with AD and differentially expressed in AD brain. Corroborating evidence from other exome array studies and gene expression data points toward potential involvement of these genes in the pathogenesis of AD. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Low

  5. Juvenile frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism associated with tau mutation G389R.

    PubMed

    Chaunu, Marie-Pierre; Deramecourt, Vincent; Buée-Scherrer, Valérie; Le Ber, Isabelle; Brice, Alexis; Ehrle, Nathalie; El Hachimi, Khalid; Pluot, Michel; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Bakchine, Serge; Buée, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobe degeneration includes a large spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders. Patients with frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 exhibit heterogeneity in both clinical and neuropathological features. Here, we report the case of a young patient with a G389R mutation. This teenager girl was 17 years old when she progressively developed severe behavioral disturbances. First, she was considered to be suffering from atypical depression. After 2 years, she was referred to the department of neurology. By this time, the patient exhibited typical frontotemporal dementia with mild extrapyramidal disorders. The main behavioral features included apathy and reduced speech output. MRI and SPECT showed a frontotemporal atrophy and hypofixation, respectively. She died 7 years after onset. Three relatives on her father side had also died after early onset dementia. Genetic testing revealed a heterozygous guanine to cytosine mutation at the first base of codon 389 (Exon 13) of MAPT, the tau gene, resulting in a glycine to arginine substitution, in the patient and her non-affected father. Postmortem neuropathological and biochemical data indicate a Pick-like tau pathology but with phosphoserine 262-positive immunoreactivity. This case is remarkable because of the extremely early onset of the disease. PMID:23948919

  6. False Recognition in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease-Disinhibition or Amnesia?

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Emma C; Wong, Stephanie; Dutt, Aparna; Tu, Sicong; Bertoux, Maxime; Irish, Muireann; Piguet, Olivier; Rao, Sulakshana; Hodges, John R; Ghosh, Amitabha; Hornberger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Episodic memory recall processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) can be similarly impaired, whereas recognition performance is more variable. A potential reason for this variability could be false-positive errors made on recognition trials and whether these errors are due to amnesia per se or a general over-endorsement of recognition items regardless of memory. The current study addressed this issue by analysing recognition performance on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) in 39 bvFTD, 77 AD and 61 control participants from two centers (India, Australia), as well as disinhibition assessed using the Hayling test. Whereas both AD and bvFTD patients were comparably impaired on delayed recall, bvFTD patients showed intact recognition performance in terms of the number of correct hits. However, both patient groups endorsed significantly more false-positives than controls, and bvFTD and AD patients scored equally poorly on a sensitivity index (correct hits-false-positives). Furthermore, measures of disinhibition were significantly associated with false positives in both groups, with a stronger relationship with false-positives in bvFTD. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed similar neural correlates of false positive endorsement across bvFTD and AD, with both patient groups showing involvement of prefrontal and Papez circuitry regions, such as medial temporal and thalamic regions, and a DTI analysis detected an emerging but non-significant trend between false positives and decreased fornix integrity in bvFTD only. These findings suggest that false-positive errors on recognition tests relate to similar mechanisms in bvFTD and AD, reflecting deficits in episodic memory processes and disinhibition. These findings highlight that current memory tests are not sufficient to accurately distinguish between bvFTD and AD patients. PMID:27489543

  7. False Recognition in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease—Disinhibition or Amnesia?

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Emma C.; Wong, Stephanie; Dutt, Aparna; Tu, Sicong; Bertoux, Maxime; Irish, Muireann; Piguet, Olivier; Rao, Sulakshana; Hodges, John R.; Ghosh, Amitabha; Hornberger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Episodic memory recall processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) can be similarly impaired, whereas recognition performance is more variable. A potential reason for this variability could be false-positive errors made on recognition trials and whether these errors are due to amnesia per se or a general over-endorsement of recognition items regardless of memory. The current study addressed this issue by analysing recognition performance on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) in 39 bvFTD, 77 AD and 61 control participants from two centers (India, Australia), as well as disinhibition assessed using the Hayling test. Whereas both AD and bvFTD patients were comparably impaired on delayed recall, bvFTD patients showed intact recognition performance in terms of the number of correct hits. However, both patient groups endorsed significantly more false-positives than controls, and bvFTD and AD patients scored equally poorly on a sensitivity index (correct hits—false-positives). Furthermore, measures of disinhibition were significantly associated with false positives in both groups, with a stronger relationship with false-positives in bvFTD. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed similar neural correlates of false positive endorsement across bvFTD and AD, with both patient groups showing involvement of prefrontal and Papez circuitry regions, such as medial temporal and thalamic regions, and a DTI analysis detected an emerging but non-significant trend between false positives and decreased fornix integrity in bvFTD only. These findings suggest that false-positive errors on recognition tests relate to similar mechanisms in bvFTD and AD, reflecting deficits in episodic memory processes and disinhibition. These findings highlight that current memory tests are not sufficient to accurately distinguish between bvFTD and AD patients. PMID:27489543

  8. Memory Test Performance on Analogous Verbal and Nonverbal Memory Tests in Patients with Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, Deanna; Miller, Justin B.; Leger, Gabriel C.; Banks, Sarah Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) typically have initial deficits in language or changes in personality, while the defining characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is memory impairment. Neuropsychological findings in the two diseases tend to differ, but can be confounded by verbal impairment in FTD impacting performance on memory tests in these patients. Methods Twenty-seven patients with FTD and 102 patients with AD underwent a neuropsychological assessment before diagnosis. By utilizing analogous versions of a verbal and nonverbal memory test, we demonstrated differences in these two modalities between AD and FTD. Discussion Better differentiation between AD and FTD is found in a nonverbal memory test, possibly because it eliminates the confounding variable of language deficits found in patients with FTD. These results highlight the importance of nonverbal learning tests with multiple learning trials in diagnostic testing. PMID:26933437

  9. An evidence-based review of the psychopathology of frontotemporal dementia: a report of the ANPA Committee on Research.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Mario F; Lauterbach, Edward C; Sampson, Shirlene M

    2008-01-01

    The Committee on Research of the American Neuropsychiatric Association conducted a review of the noncognitive neuropsychiatric manifestations of frontotemporal dementia. The Committee on Research searched reviews and several online databases for all pertinent publications. Single case reports without pathology were excluded, except for psychosis, where single cases made up much of the literature. The strongest evidence supports an association of frontotemporal dementia with the following behaviors: apathy-abulia; disinhibition-impulsivity; loss of insight and self-referential behavior; decreased emotion and empathy; violation of social and moral norms; changes in dietary or eating behavior; and repetitive behaviors. Frontotemporal dementia is less frequently associated with anxiety and mood disorders, which may be a prodrome or risk factor, and rarely presents with delusions or hallucinations. The results of this review highlight the distinct neuropsychiatric manifestations of frontotemporal dementia and the need to reconsider the current diagnostic criteria for this disorder. PMID:18451185

  10. GroupICA dual regression analysis of resting state networks in a behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rytty, Riikka; Nikkinen, Juha; Paavola, Liisa; Abou Elseoud, Ahmed; Moilanen, Virpi; Visuri, Annina; Tervonen, Osmo; Renton, Alan E.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Remes, Anne M.

    2013-01-01

    Functional MRI studies have revealed changes in default-mode and salience networks in neurodegenerative dementias, especially in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of this study was to analyze the whole brain cortex resting state networks (RSNs) in patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) by using resting state functional MRI (rfMRI). The group specific RSNs were identified by high model order independent component analysis (ICA) and a dual regression technique was used to detect between-group differences in the RSNs with p < 0.05 threshold corrected for multiple comparisons. A y-concatenation method was used to correct for multiple comparisons for multiple independent components, gray matter differences as well as the voxel level. We found increased connectivity in several networks within patients with bvFTD compared to the control group. The most prominent enhancement was seen in the right frontotemporal area and insula. A significant increase in functional connectivity was also detected in the left dorsal attention network (DAN), in anterior paracingulate—a default mode sub-network as well as in the anterior parts of the frontal pole. Notably the increased patterns of connectivity were seen in areas around atrophic regions. The present results demonstrate abnormal increased connectivity in several important brain networks including the DAN and default-mode network (DMN) in patients with bvFTD. These changes may be associated with decline in executive functions and attention as well as apathy, which are the major cognitive and neuropsychiatric defects in patients with frontotemporal dementia. PMID:23986673

  11. Ventromedial-frontopolar prefrontal cortex atrophy correlates with insight loss in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hornberger, Michael; Yew, Belinda; Gilardoni, Silvia; Mioshi, Eneida; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Manes, Facundo; Hodges, John R

    2014-02-01

    Loss in insight is a major feature of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) but has been investigated relatively little. More importantly, the neural basis of insight loss is still poorly understood. The current study investigated insight deficit profiles across a large cohort of neurodegenerative patients (n = 81), including FTD and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We employed a novel insight questionnaire, which tapped into changes across different domains: social interaction, emotion, diagnosis/treatment, language, and motivation. FTD subtypes varied considerably for insight loss, with the behavioral variant worst and the progressive non-fluent variant least affected. All other subtypes and AD showed milder but consistent insight loss. Voxel-based morphometry analysis revealed that overall insight loss correlated with ventromedial and frontopolar prefrontal atrophy, with exception of social interaction and emotion insight loss, which additionally correlated with lateral temporal and amygdala atrophy, respectively. Our results show that patients with neurodegenerative conditions show variable loss of insight, with ventromedial and frontopolar cortex regions appearing to be particularly important for insight. PMID:23125121

  12. Associations between APOE polymorphisms and seven diseases with cognitive impairment including Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies in southeast China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke-Liang; Sun, Yi-Min; Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Qian-Hua; Ding, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of APOE polymorphisms on patients with cognitive impairments in The Chinese Han population. Materials and methods A total of 1027 cases with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), 40 cases with vascular dementia (VaD), 28 cases with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 54 cases with semantic dementia (SD), 44 cases with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), 583 cases with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 32 cases with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (VCIND) were recruited consecutively from memory disorders clinics in Huashan Hospital between January 2010 and December 2014. The 1149 cognitively normal controls were recruited from the community epidemiologic investigations. The APOE genotypes were determined using the TaqMan assay. Results The distribution of genotype and allele frequencies of APOE differed significantly between control and AD or MCI, with ε4 increasing the risk of AD and MCI in a dose-dependent pattern and ε2 decreasing the risk of AD, but not the risk of MCI. As for VaD, significant differences in the APOE genotype distribution were found compared with the controls. E4/4 increased the risk of VaD and ε4 increased the risk of VCIND in women. The allele distribution differed between bvFTD and controls, but genotype and allele frequencies of APOE did not affect the risk of bvFTD, SD, and DLB. Conclusion In The Chinese Han population, APOE ε4 increased the risk of AD and MCI in a dose-dependent manner and ε2 decreased the risk of AD as reported previously. APOE ε4 might increase risk in VaD and female patients with VCIND, but no effects of APOE on bvFTD, DLB, and SD were found. PMID:26981880

  13. Preservation of reasoning in primary progressive aphasia: further differentiation from Alzheimer's disease and the behavioral presentation of frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Wicklund, Alissa H; Johnson, Nancy; Weintraub, Sandra

    2004-05-01

    Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) is a clinical dementia syndrome characterized by the gradual dissolution of language without impairment of other cognitive domains for at least the first 2 years of illness (M.-M. Mesulam, 1982, 2001). It is difficult to demonstrate the integrity of nonlanguage domains in PPA because most neuropsychological tests of memory, reasoning, and attention require language competence for their performance. In the present study, reasoning and cognitive flexibility were tested nonverbally in patients with PPA using a modified ten-item version of the Visual Verbal Test (Feldman & Drasgow, 1959). This test measures the ability to detect similarities among objects and to sort a single set of objects according to two different principles. The performance of PPA patients (n = 20) was compared with that of patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type (AD) (n = 20), patients with the comportmental/executive dysfunction variant of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) (n = 16), and cognitively intact controls (n = 20). Patients with PPA and controls performed similarly, detecting commonalities among objects and shifting from one sorting principle to another. In contrast, both AD and FTD subjects were significantly impaired on both measures. These results provide evidence of preserved reasoning in PPA, further differentiating this syndrome from other behaviorally focal dementia syndromes. PMID:15512925

  14. Concurrent white and gray matter degeneration of disease-specific networks in early-stage Alzheimer's disease and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Steketee, Rebecca M E; Meijboom, Rozanna; de Groot, Marius; Bron, Esther E; Niessen, Wiro J; van der Lugt, Aad; van Swieten, John C; Smits, Marion

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates regional coherence between white matter (WM) microstructure and gray matter (GM) volume and perfusion measures in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) using a correlational approach. WM-GM coherence, compared with controls, was stronger between cingulum WM and frontotemporal GM in AD, and temporoparietal GM in bvFTD. In addition, in AD compared with controls, coherence was stronger between inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus WM microstructure and occipital GM perfusion. In this first study assessing regional WM-GM coherence in AD and bvFTD, we show that WM microstructure and GM volume and perfusion measures are coherent, particularly in regions implicated in AD and bvFTD pathology. This indicates concurrent degeneration in disease-specific networks. Our methodology allows for the detection of incipient abnormalities that go undetected in conventional between-group analyses. PMID:27255821

  15. Comparison of Prefrontal Atrophy and Episodic Memory Performance in Dysexecutive Alzheimer's Disease and Behavioral-Variant Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Stephanie; Bertoux, Maxime; Savage, Greg; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier; Hornberger, Michael

    2016-02-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) sometimes presents with prominent executive dysfunction and associated prefrontal cortex atrophy. The impact of such executive deficits on episodic memory performance as well as their neural correlates in AD, however, remains unclear. The aim of the current study was to investigate episodic memory and brain atrophy in AD patients with relatively spared executive functioning (SEF-AD; n = 12) and AD patients with relatively impaired executive functioning (IEF-AD; n = 23). We also compared the AD subgroups with a group of behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia patients (bvFTD; n = 22), who typically exhibit significant executive deficits, and age-matched healthy controls (n = 38). On cognitive testing, the three patient groups showed comparable memory profiles on standard episodic memory tests, with significant impairment relative to controls. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed extensive prefrontal and medial temporal lobe atrophy in IEF-AD and bvFTD, whereas this was limited to the middle frontal gyrus and hippocampus in SEF-AD. Moreover, the additional prefrontal atrophy in IEF-AD and bvFTD correlated with memory performance, whereas this was not the case for SEF-AD. These findings indicate that IEF-AD patients show prefrontal atrophy in regions similar to bvFTD, and suggest that this contributes to episodic memory performance. This has implications for the differential diagnosis of bvFTD and subtypes of AD. PMID:26923025

  16. Language, Executive Function and Social Cognition in the Diagnosis of Frontotemporal Dementia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Harciarek, Michał; Cosentino, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) represents a spectrum of non-Alzheimer’s degenerative conditions associated with focal atrophy of the frontal and/or temporal lobes. Frontal and temporal regions of the brain have been shown to be strongly involved in executive function, social cognition and language processing and, thus, deficits in these domains are frequently seen in patients with FTD or may even be hallmarks of a specific FTD subtype ( i.e., relatively selective and progressive language impairment in primary progressive aphasia). In this review, we have attempted to delineate how language, executive function, and social cognition may contribute to the diagnosis of FTD syndromes, namely the behavioral variant FTD as well as the language variants of FTD including the three subtypes of primary progressive aphasia (PPA): non-fluent/agrammatic, semantic, and logopenic. This review also addresses the extent to which deficits in these cognitive areas contribute to the differential diagnosis of FTD versus AD. Finally, early clinical determinants of pathology are briefly discussed and contemporary challenges to the diagnosis of FTD are presented. PMID:23611348

  17. Early-onset Alzheimer's disease versus frontotemporal dementia: resolution with genetic diagnoses?

    PubMed

    Sha, Sharon J; Khazenzon, Anna M; Ghosh, Pia M; Rankin, Katherine P; Pribadi, Mochtar; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H; Rabinovici, Gil D; Miller, Bruce L; Lee, Suzee E

    2016-01-01

    We report a diagnostically challenging case of a 64-year-old man with a history of remote head trauma who developed mild behavioral changes and dyscalculia. He was diagnosed with clinical Alzheimer's disease (AD), with additional features consistent with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. Structural magnetic resonance imaging revealed atrophy in bilateral frontal and parietal cortices and hippocampi on visual inspection and left frontal pole and bilateral anterior temporal encephalomalacia, suspected to be due to head trauma. Consistent with the diagnosis of Alzheimer's pathology, positron emission tomography (PET) with Pittsburgh compound B suggested the presence of beta-amyloid. Fluorodeoxyglucose PET demonstrated hypometabolism in bilateral frontal and temporoparietal cortices. Voxel-based morphometry showed atrophy predominant in ventral frontal regions (bilateral orbitofrontal cortex, pregenual anterior cingulate/medial superior frontal gyrus), bilateral mid cingulate, bilateral lateral temporal cortex, and posterior insula. Bilateral caudate, thalamus, hippocampi, and cerebellum were prominently atrophied. Unexpectedly, a pathologic hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 was identified in this patient. This report underscores the clinical variability in C9ORF72 expansion carriers and the need to consider mixed pathologies, particularly when imaging studies are inconsistent with a single syndrome or pathology. PMID:26304661

  18. Genetics Home Reference: CHMP2B-related frontotemporal dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... dementia is a progressive brain disorder that affects personality, behavior, and language. The symptoms of this disorder ... years after the appearance of symptoms. Changes in personality and behavior are the most common early signs ...

  19. Neurodegenerative and psychiatric overlap in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a case of familial frontotemporal dementia presenting with catatonia.

    PubMed

    Holm, Alvin C

    2014-02-01

    The behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) begins with psychiatric symptoms, including changes in personal conduct and/or interpersonal behavior. Prior to developing cognitive impairment, differentiating FTD from primary psychiatric disorders, like schizophrenia, can be challenging. This paper presents a case of traumatic brain injury with subsequent depression and catatonia. Initial response to electroconvulsive therapy and lorazepam suggested primarily psychiatric pathology. Subsequent symptom progression, reduced treatment response, and detailed family history evaluation led to the diagnosis of familial FTD with C9ORF72 mutation. This case highlights that familial FTD can present with depression with suicidal tendencies and catatonia, and that the responsiveness of these behavioral manifestations to standard therapies can change over time. PMID:23962693

  20. Meta-Analysis of Facial Emotion Recognition in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia: Comparison With Alzheimer Disease and Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Bora, Emre; Velakoulis, Dennis; Walterfang, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Behavioral disturbances and lack of empathy are distinctive clinical features of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) in comparison to Alzheimer disease (AD). The aim of this meta-analytic review was to compare facial emotion recognition performances of bvFTD with healthy controls and AD. The current meta-analysis included a total of 19 studies and involved comparisons of 288 individuals with bvFTD and 329 healthy controls and 162 bvFTD and 147 patients with AD. Facial emotion recognition was significantly impaired in bvFTD in comparison to the healthy controls (d = 1.81) and AD (d = 1.23). In bvFTD, recognition of negative emotions, especially anger (d = 1.48) and disgust (d = 1.41), were severely impaired. Emotion recognition was significantly impaired in bvFTD in comparison to AD in all emotions other than happiness. Impairment of emotion recognition is a relatively specific feature of bvFTD. Routine assessment of social-cognitive abilities including emotion recognition can be helpful in better differentiating between cortical dementias such as bvFTD and AD. PMID:27056068

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament light chain protein levels in subtypes of frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is recognised as a clinically and morphologically heterogeneous group of interrelated neurodegenerative conditions. One of the subtypes within this disease spectrum is the behavioural variant FTD (bvFTD). This is known to be a varied disorder with a mixture of tau-positive and tau-negative underlying pathologies. The other subtypes include semantic dementia (SD), which generally exhibits tau-negative pathology, and progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA), which is usually tau-positive. As the clinical presentation of these subtypes may overlap, a specific diagnosis can be difficult to attain and today no specific biomarker can predict the underlying pathology. Neurofilament light chain protein (NFL), a cytoskeletal constituent of intermediate filaments, is thought to reflect neuronal and axonal death when appearing in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). NFL has been shown to be elevated in CSF in patients with FTD compared with AD and controls. Our hypothesis was that the levels of NFL also differ between the subtypes of FTD and may indicate the underlying pathological subtype. Methods We retrospectively analysed data from previous CSF analyses in 34 FTD cases (23 bvFTD, seven SD, four PNFA), 20 AD cases, and 26 healthy controls. A separate group of 10 neuropathologically verified and subtyped FTD cases (seven tau-negative, three tau-positive) were also analysed. Result NFL levels were significantly higher in FTD compared with both AD (p<0.001) and controls (p<0.001). The NFL levels of SD and bvFTD were significantly higher (p<0.001) compared with AD. The biomarker profiles of PNFA and AD were similar. In the neuropathologically verified FTD cases, NFL was higher in the tau-negative than in the tau-positive cases (exact p=0.017). Conclusions The marked NFL elevation in some but not all FTD cases is likely to reflect the different underlying pathologies. The highest NFL values found in the SD group as well as in the

  2. Altered network connectivity in frontotemporal dementia with C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suzee E; Khazenzon, Anna M; Trujillo, Andrew J; Guo, Christine C; Yokoyama, Jennifer S; Sha, Sharon J; Takada, Leonel T; Karydas, Anna M; Block, Nikolas R; Coppola, Giovanni; Pribadi, Mochtar; Geschwind, Daniel H; Rademakers, Rosa; Fong, Jamie C; Weiner, Michael W; Boxer, Adam L; Kramer, Joel H; Rosen, Howard J; Miller, Bruce L; Seeley, William W

    2014-11-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72 represents the most common genetic cause of familial and sporadic behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. Previous studies show that some C9orf72 carriers with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia exhibit distinctive atrophy patterns whereas others show mild or undetectable atrophy despite severe behavioural impairment. To explore this observation, we examined intrinsic connectivity network integrity in patients with or without the C9orf72 expansion. We studied 28 patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, including 14 C9orf72 mutation carriers (age 58.3 ± 7.7 years, four females) and 14 non-carriers (age 60.8 ± 6.9 years, four females), and 14 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Both patient groups included five patients with comorbid motor neuron disease. Neuropsychological data, structural brain magnetic resonance imaging, and task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging were obtained. Voxel-based morphometry delineated atrophy patterns, and seed-based intrinsic connectivity analyses enabled group comparisons of the salience, sensorimotor, and default mode networks. Single-patient analyses were used to explore network imaging as a potential biomarker. Despite contrasting atrophy patterns in C9orf72 carriers versus non-carriers, patient groups showed topographically similar connectivity reductions in the salience and sensorimotor networks. Patients without C9orf72 expansions exhibited increases in default mode network connectivity compared to controls and mutation carriers. Across all patients, behavioural symptom severity correlated with diminished salience network connectivity and heightened default mode network connectivity. In C9orf72 carriers, salience network connectivity reduction correlated with atrophy in the left medial pulvinar thalamic nucleus, and this region further showed diminished connectivity with key salience network hubs. Single-patient analyses revealed salience

  3. Advanced Practice Nursing: Meeting the Caregiving Challenges for Families of Persons with Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Merrilees, Jennifer; Ketelle, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD), once thought to be a rare cause for dementia, is now acknowledged to be the most common presenile (before age 65) cause of dementia (1). FTD is associated with profound changes in behavior, personality, emotions, and cognition. The purpose of this paper is to describe two cases of patients with FTD in order to illustrate salient aspects of the caregiving experience. Issues faced by caregivers are organized into 6 categories: diagnosis, behavioral symptoms, function, communication, long term management and care, and maintenance of the caregiver’s emotional and physical health. Examples of interventions directed by advanced practice nurses are described. We suggest that management of FTD requires expertise as scientific advances and discoveries about FTD continually change the landscape of care. PMID:20716977

  4. Looking for Measures of Disease Severity in the Frontotemporal Dementia Continuum.

    PubMed

    Premi, Enrico; Gualeni, Vera; Costa, Paolo; Cosseddu, Maura; Gasparotti, Roberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara

    2016-04-16

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is characterized by executive dysfunctions, behavioral disturbances, language deficits and extrapyramidal symptoms. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration-modified Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (FTLD modified-CDR) has been proposed to measure disease severity in behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD). No tools of global disease severity are available in the other FTLD phenotypes [primary progressive aphasias (PPAs), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal syndrome (CBS)]. This would be strategic as outcome measures in clinical trials. To this aim, we evaluated the association between brain volume (voxel based morphometry) and available clinical scales in FTD. In 176 FTD patients (64 bvFTD, 40 PPAs, 32 PSP, 40 CBS), instrumental activities of daily living (ADLs), FTLD-modified CDR, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Frontal Behavioral Inventory (FBI), and Neuropsychiatry Inventory (NPI) were administered and MRI performed. Whole-brain linear correlation between each clinical rating scale and brain volume was performed. In bvFTD and PPAs, FTLD-modified CDR was associated with regional brain volume, thereby providing evidence for validity of the FTLD-modified CDR. In PSP, none of the clinical indicators were associated with regional brain volume. In CBS, ADLs and MMSE correlated with frontotemporal lower volume. Considering monogenic disease, FTLD-modified CDR was the best measure. In FTD continuum, different measures able to correlate with brain damage should be considered for the different clinical phenotypes or genetic traits. PMID:27104906

  5. [Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and genetic mutations including progranulin gene].

    PubMed

    Arai, Tetsuaki; Hasegawa, Masato; Nishihara, Masugi; Nonaka, Takashi; Kametani, Fuyuki; Yoshida, Mari; Hashizume, Yoshio; Beach, Thomas G; Morita, Mitsuya; Nakano, Imaharu; Oda, Tatsuro; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2008-11-01

    Research on familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) has led to the discovery of disease-causing genes: microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT), progranulin (PGRN) and valosin-containing protein (VCP). TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been identified as a major component of tau-negative ubiquitin-positive inclusions in familial and sporadic FTLD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which are now referred to as TDP-43 proteinopathy. Recent findings of mutations in TDP-43 gene in familial and sporadic ALS cases confirm the pathogenetic role for TDP-43 in neurodegeneration. TDP-43 proteinopathies have been classified into 4 pathological subtypes. Type 1 is characterized by numerous dystrophic neurites (DNs), Type 2 has numerous neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs), Type 3 has NCIs and DNs and Type 4 has neuronal intranuclear inclusions (NIIs) and DNs. There is a close relationship between such pathological subtypes of TDP-43 proteinopathy and the immunoblot pattern of C-terminal fragments of accumulated TDP-43. These results parallel our earlier findings of differing C-terminal tau fragments in progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration, despite identical composition of tau isoforms. Taken together, these results suggest that elucidating the mechanism of C-terminal fragment origination may shed light on the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders involving TDP-43 proteinopathy and tauopathy. PMID:19198141

  6. Neuropsychological correlates of behavioral symptoms in Alzheimer's disease, frontal variant of frontotemporal, subcortical vascular, and lewy body dementias: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Perri, Roberta; Monaco, Marco; Fadda, Lucia; Caltagirone, Carlo; Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neuropsychological correlates of behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD) in patients affected by various forms of dementia, namely Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontal-variant frontotemporal dementia (fvFTD), Lewy body dementia (LBD), and subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD). 21 fvFTD, 21 LBD, 22 AD, and 22 SIVD patients matched for dementia severity received a battery of neuropsychological tests and the Neuropsychiatry Inventory (NPI). The possible association between performance on neuropsychological tests and severity of BPSD was assessed by correlational analysis and multivariate regression. BPSD were present in 99% of patients. Most behavioral symptoms were not related to a particular dementia group or to a specific cognitive deficit. Euphoria and disinhibition were predicted by fvFTD diagnosis. Hallucinations correlated with the severity of visuospatial deficits in the whole sample of patients and were predicted by LBD diagnosis. Apathy, which was found in all dementia groups, correlated with executive functions and was predicted by both reduced set-shifting aptitude and fvFTD diagnosis. The results confirm the high prevalence of BPSD in the mild to moderate stages of dementia and show that most BPSD are equally distributed across dementia groups. Most of the cognitive and behavioral symptoms are independent dimensions of the dementia syndromes. Nevertheless, hallucinations in LBD and euphoria and disinhibition in fvFTD are related to the structural brain alterations that are responsible for cognitive decline in these dementia groups. Finally, apathy arises from damage in the frontal cortical areas that are also involved in executive functions. PMID:24254701

  7. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with Frontotemporal Dementia in the Presence of C9orf72 Repeat Expansion—A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bonda, Chaitanya; Kolikonda, Murali K.; Brown, Martin E.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia are significant neurodegenerative illnesses with possible genetic predispositions. The C9orf72 gene and the GGGGCC repeat expansions of it are reported to have a causative role in the expression of these conditions. We report a case of a patient with autosomal dominant amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD) in the presence of C9orf72 repeat expansion. We believe our case further supports the theory that the presence of C9orf72 repeat expansion in patients with a family history of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and/or frontotemporal dementia significantly increases their risk of developing either or both diseases. The development of antisense oligonucleotides that might target GGGGCC RNA sequences theoretically may have a therapeutic role in mitigating the clinical expression of these illnesses.

  8. Fair play: social norm compliance failures in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Claire; Bertoux, Maxime; Irish, Muireann; Shine, James M; Wong, Stephanie; Spiliopoulos, Leonidas; Hodges, John R; Hornberger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to social norms is compromised in a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions. Functional neuroimaging studies have investigated social norm compliance in healthy individuals, leading to the identification of a network of fronto-subcortical regions that underpins this ability. However, there is a lack of corroborative evidence from human lesion models investigating the structural anatomy of norm compliance across this fronto-subcortical network. To address this, we developed a neuroeconomic task to investigate social norm compliance in a neurodegenerative lesion model: behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, a condition characterized by gross social dysfunction. The task assessed norm compliance across three behaviours that are well-studied in the neuroeconomics literature: fairness, prosocial and punishing behaviours. We administered our novel version of the Ultimatum Game in 22 patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and 22 age-matched controls, to assess how decision-making behaviour was modulated in response to (i) fairness of monetary offers; and (ii) social context of monetary offers designed to produce either prosocial or punishing behaviours. Voxel-based morphometry was used to characterize patterns of grey matter atrophy associated with task performance. Acceptance rates between patients and controls were equivalent when only fairness was manipulated. However, patients were impaired in modulating their decisions in response to social contextual information. Patients' performance in the punishment condition was consistent with a reduced tendency to engage in punishment; this was associated with decreased grey matter volume in the anterior cingulate, orbitofrontal cortex, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right inferior frontal gyrus. In the prosocial condition, patients' performance suggested a reduced expression of prosocial behaviour, associated with decreased grey matter in the anterior insula, lateral orbitofrontal

  9. Postmorbid learning of saxophone playing in a patient with frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hanna; Chin, Juhee; Suh, Mee Kyung; Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Yeo Jin; Ye, Byoung Seok; Lee, Na Kyung; Kim, Eun Joo; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L

    2015-01-01

    Some patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) show an artistic enhancement of musical abilities. However, no patients with FTD, to date, have been reported to be able to learn how to play a musical instrument after disease onset. Herein we describe a patient (J. K.) who had never played any musical instruments premorbidly, but who learned to play the saxophone after being diagnosed with a behavioral variant of FTD. He mastered a repertoire that consisted of 10 pieces of Korean folk songs over a period of three years. Furthermore, his saxophone skills were high enough to outperform other students in his class. PMID:25587661

  10. Relapsing-remitting behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia in a bipolar patient

    PubMed Central

    Vorspan, Florence; Bertoux, Maxime; Brichant-Petitjean, Clara; Dubois, Bruno; Lépine, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Summary We report the case of a bipolar I patient who was diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia at the age of 54 during a manic episode. Her neurological state improved when this episode ended. Each subsequent thymic relapse was associated with cognitive deficits which subsided when the patient became euthymic, even though SPECT continued to show the same frontal hypoperfusion. We here discuss the hypothesis that the cognitive reserve of this patient, a former journalist, may, except during her mood episodes, have provided her with sufficient resources to meet her life demands despite her underlying neurological disorder. PMID:23402681

  11. Frontal and temporal lobe contributions to emotional enhancement of memory in behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kumfor, Fiona; Irish, Muireann; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Emotional events gain special priority in how they are remembered, with emotionally arousing events typically recalled more vividly and with greater confidence than non-emotional events. In dementia, memory and emotion processing are affected to varying degrees, however, whether emotional enhancement of memory for complex ecologically-valid events is differentially affected across dementia syndromes remains unclear, with previous studies examining effects of emotion on simple visual recognition only. Here, we examined memory for an emotionally arousing short story and a closely matched, emotionally neutral story in behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) (n = 13) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n = 14), and contrasted their performance with healthy controls (n = 12). Multiple-choice recognition memory for specific details of the story was assessed after a 1-h delay. While AD and control groups showed enhanced memory for the emotional story, the bvFTD group recalled a similar number of details from the emotional and neutral stories. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed emotional enhancement of memory correlated with distinct brain regions in each patient group. In AD, emotional enhancement was associated with integrity of the bilateral hippocampus, parahippocampal gyri, temporal fusiform gyrus and frontal pole, regions typically implicated in memory processes. In contrast in bvFTD, integrity of emotion processing regions, including the orbitofrontal cortex, right amygdala and right insula, correlated with the extent emotion enhanced memory. Our results reveal that integrity of frontal and temporal regions determine the quality and nature of emotional memories. While emotional enhancement of memory is present in mild AD, in bvFTD emotion does not facilitate memory retrieval for complex realistic events. This attenuation of emotional enhancement is due to degradation of emotion processing regions, which may be important for modulating levels of arousal

  12. A pathogenic progranulin mutation and C9orf72 repeat expansion in a family with frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lashley, Tammaryn; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Mahoney, Colin; Gordon, Elizabeth; Beck, Jon; Mead, Simon; Warren, Jason; Rossor, Martin; Revesz, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Aims Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease and is the second most common form of young onset dementia after Alzheimer's disease (AD). An autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance is present in around 25–50% of FTLD cases indicating a strong genetic component. Major pathogenic mutations of FTLD have been demonstrated independently in the progranulin (GRN) gene and the C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansion repeat. In this study we present a family that have been identified as carrying both a GRN Cys31fs mutation and the C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansion repeat. Methods In the present study we describe the clinical and genetic details of family members and pathological features of two family members that have come to post-mortem. Results The mean age at disease onset was 57 years (48–61 years) and mean duration 4 years (2–7 years). The most common presenting syndrome was behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. Brain imaging from available cases showed a symmetrical pattern of atrophy particularly affecting the frontal and temporal lobes. Pathologically two cases were classified as FTLD-TDP type A with TDP-43 positive inclusions, with additional p62-positive ‘star-like’ inclusions found in the hippocampal formation and cerebellum. Conclusions The type and distribution of the pathological lesions in these two cases were in keeping with FTLD cases carrying only the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat. However the driving force of the pathological process may be either pathogenic mutation or a combination of both converging on a singular mechanism. PMID:24286341

  13. Early stage of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia: clinical and neuroimaging correlates.

    PubMed

    Borroni, Barbara; Cosseddu, Maura; Pilotto, Andrea; Premi, Enrico; Archetti, Silvana; Gasparotti, Roberto; Cappa, Stefano; Padovani, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The early stages of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are still not completely characterized. In a consecutive series of patients with probable bvFTD diagnosis confirmed by follow-up, we retrospectively evaluated the features at onset. Patients were reclassified according to presenting features and current diagnostic criteria into probable and possible bvFTD. The term "pre-bvFTD" was adopted for patients with cognitive and/or behavioral impairment not fulfilling bvFTD criteria and no deficits in activities of daily living. One hundred ninety-four subjects were included; at first visit, 70% (n = 136) patients were already classified as probable bvFTD. Of the remaining 30% (n = 58), 60% fulfilled criteria for possible bvFTD, while 40% did not, and were classified as pre-FTD. The neuropsychological pattern in possible bvFTD and pre-bvFTD was similar, although possible bvFTD showed more behavioral abnormalities. Pre-bvFTD subjects had frontotemporal gray matter atrophy, although less extensive than possible bvFTD. Conclusively, most bvFTD patients fulfill current diagnostic criteria at first admission, whereas a relatively small group is characterized by mild behavioral and/or cognitive abnormalities in spite of frontotemporal gray matter atrophy. Our preliminary findings will require a validation in prospective studies involving larger samples of patients. PMID:26329689

  14. [Advances in biological psychiatry research on dementia: AD-FTLD spectrum].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Masatoshi

    2012-02-01

    Neurodegenerative dementia, including Alzheimer disease (AD) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), is one of the main target areas for research in biological psychiatry. In this review, the historical view, present situation, and further development in dementia research have been discussed from the viewpoint of biological psychiatry. Considering the rapidly increasing number of dementia patients in Japan, the importance of dementia in clinical psychiatry service will keep increasing in the near future. Biological as well as psychosocial knowledge is required to elucidate the mechanism underlying dementia. Although the molecular mechanism underlying the pathological features of AD has not yet been fully elucidated, it can be placed under the concept of the AD-FTLD spectrum, in which loss of function of an important gene may result in accumulation of insoluble proteins inside and outside neurons. To develop disease-modifying drugs for AD and FTLD, elucidation of pathological events that occur earlier than abnormal protein deposition is essential. Early diagnosis and early intervention are important for overcoming these neurodegenerative dementia. PMID:22308260

  15. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in a Cohort of Patients with Frontotemporal Dementia: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Korada, Suresh Kumar; Teja, Karru Venkata Ravi; Philip, Mariamma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: About 20–50% of relatively young onset dementia belongs to frontotemporal type. Most of these patients are diagnosed as psychiatric illness as their memory and instrumental activities of daily living remain unaltered till late and most of these patients do not qualify for dementia by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV criteria. In this study, we analyzed the behavioral symptoms in our patients with radiologically and neuropsychologically proven as probable behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Patients and Methods: Twenty patients qualifying the International Consensus Criteria were included and evaluated using National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences neuropsychological battery in addition to all mandatory dementia workup. Results: The mean age was 53.9 ± 9.9 years and the mean duration of illness was 2 ± 1.3 years. Sixty percent of them were <60 years. There were 9 males and 11 females. Most common heralding symptom noticed in 85% of the patients was irritability and aggression as against apathy in 100% in western studies. Memory impairment was found in only 11.1% as against 25% in western studies. Disinhibition, eating problems, stereotyped behavior, delusions, and paranoia were comparable between the study population and literature. Discussion and Conclusion: There are minor variations in the neuropsychological manifestations in our patients compared to western population. Agitation and aggression are more and memory impairment is very less making the diagnosis of FTD possible only if there is a high degree of suspicion. These symptoms are less amenable for pharmacotherapy and therefore, there is a need to explore the benefits of nonpharmacological treatment options such as yoga and meditation. PMID:27570344

  16. A comparison of memory and executive functions in Alzheimer disease and the frontal variant of frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Sebastián Gascón, María Victoria; Hernández-Gil, Laura

    2010-08-01

    This study examined memory and executive functions of switching and distributing attention in 25 Alzheimer patients (AD), 9 patients with frontal variant of frontotemporal dementia (fvFTD), and 25 healthy older people, as a control group, in three tasks: verbal digit span, Brown-Peterson (B-P) task, and dual-task. No differences were found in digit span. Qualitative analysis of errors in the B-P task indicated that both ADs and fvFTDs presented a higher number of omissions and perseverations, interpreted in this study as an index of executive dysfunction, compared to the control group. In fact, the ADs persevered more or the same as the fvFTDs, and no differences were found between the two groups of patients in omissions. The dual-task results showed that both AD and fvFTD had difficulties coordinating the two tasks simultaneously compared to the control group, but no differences were found between the patient groups. Although the presence of alterations in the executive functions of AD patients may suggest that these functions would depend on the correct functional integration of various cerebral areas, it would be of great interest to include neurological evidence in order to contrast these results in future research. PMID:20667270

  17. Different patterns of cortical gray matter loss over time in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Möller, Christiane; Hafkemeijer, Anne; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Rombouts, Serge A R B; van der Grond, Jeroen; Dopper, Elise; van Swieten, John; Versteeg, Adriaan; Steenwijk, Martijn D; Barkhof, Frederik; Scheltens, Philip; Vrenken, Hugo; van der Flier, Wiesje M

    2016-02-01

    We examined patterns of cortical thickness loss and cognitive decline over time in 19 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 10 with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), and 34 controls with a mean interval of 2.1 ± 0.4 years. We measured vertexwise and regional cortical thickness changes of 6 lobar regions of interest between groups with the longitudinal FreeSurfer pipeline. Compared with controls, AD and bvFTD had a steeper rate of cognitive decline and showed faster cortical thinning per year. Decrease of thickness over time was highest in AD and generalized throughout the whole brain, most pronounced posteriorly, whereas bvFTD patients had a more selective loss in frontal cortex and in anterior parts of the temporal lobes. In a direct comparison, AD patients showed faster cortical thinning in the insula, temporal, and parietal regions, whereas bvFTD patients only showed faster cortical thinning in the orbitofrontal gyrus. Decline of cognitive performances was in line with cortical thinning and deteriorated the most in AD patients. PMID:26827640

  18. Explicit memory in frontotemporal dementia: the role of medial temporal atrophy.

    PubMed

    Lavenu, I; Pasquier, F; Lebert, F; Pruvo, J P; Petit, H

    1998-01-01

    In our memory clinic experience, memory impairment differs widely in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We searched for a correlation between explicit memory disturbance assessed with the Grober and Buschke test and medial temporal atrophy on CT scan in 22 consecutive patients with FTD. Five of the 22 patients had a medial temporal lobe (MTL) atrophy. There was no significant difference between the two groups for the demographic characteristics. Free recall, cued recall and the learning curve were significantly better in patients without MTL atrophy. The patients with MTL atrophy made more intrusions. We found a positive correlation between total recall and cued recall and the mean of medial temporal lobe measurement. These results are in agreement with the role of the hippocampal formation in the memory process. In our group, the ratio of patients with MTL atrophy is similar to the ratio of Pick's disease in frontotemporal dementia. In histological series more severe hippocampal atrophy are reported in Pick's disease. Therefore MTL atrophy on CT scan could be a marker of Pick's disease in FTD. PMID:9524801

  19. Behavioral Interventions for Enhancing Life Participation in behavioral variant Frontotemporal Dementia and Primary Progressive Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Kortte, Kathleen B.; Rogalski, Emily J.

    2013-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are clinical syndromes under the umbrella term “frontotemporal dementia (FTD)” and are caused by a neurodegenerative disease with an onset most typically in the productive years of adulthood. The cognitive and behavioral impairments associated with FTD interfere with the successful engagement in typical life roles, such as parenting, working, and maintenance of interpersonal relationships. There are currently no treatments to stop or slow the degenerative process and there are only very limited medication options for the management of the cognitive-behavioral symptoms. However, alternative, non-pharmacological interventions may offer significant benefit to the quality of life of the diagnosed individual. The goal of this paper is to provide an overview of the approaches available through neurorehabilitation and community-based services that facilitate successful engagement in life activities and promote optimal quality of life for the individuals and families living with FTD. It is hoped that as medical providers become more familiar with behavioral interventions, referrals for services will increase thereby allowing individuals with FTD and their caregivers to learn ways to adapt, adjust, and participate in life to the fullest despite the impairments from this progressive disease. PMID:23611353

  20. Progranulin Mutations Affects Brain Oscillatory Activity in Fronto-Temporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Davide V.; Benussi, Luisa; Fostinelli, Silvia; Ciani, Miriam; Binetti, Giuliano; Ghidoni, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a clinical stage indicating a prodromal phase of dementia. This practical concept could be used also for fronto-temporal dementia (FTD). Progranulin (PGRN) has been recently recognized as a useful diagnostic biomarker for fronto-temporal lobe degeneration (FTLD) due to GRN null mutations. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a reliable tool in detecting brain networks changes. The working hypothesis of the present study is that EEG oscillations could detect different modifications among FTLD stages (FTD-MCI versus overt FTD) as well as differences between GRN mutation carriers versus non-carriers in patients with overt FTD. Materials and Methods: EEG in all patients and PGRN dosage in patients with a clear FTD were detected. The cognitive state has been investigated through mini mental state examination (MMSE). Results: MCI-FTD showed a significant lower spectral power in both alpha and theta oscillations as compared to overt FTD. GRN mutations carriers affected by FTLD show an increase in high alpha and decrease in theta oscillations as compared to non-carriers. Conclusion: EEG frequency rhythms are sensible to different stage of FTD and could detect changes in brain oscillatory activity affected by GRN mutations. PMID:26973510

  1. Non-pharmacological management for patients with frontotemporal dementia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Plitman, Eric; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel; Mimura, Masaru; Nakayama, Kazuhiko; Miller, Bruce L

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by changes in behavior and language caused by focal degeneration of the frontal and anterior temporal lobes. The behavioral symptoms are distressing to patients and their caregivers. Non-pharmacological management is important as no disease-specific pharmacological treatment for FTD is currently available. The primary objective is to review the literature on non-pharmacological management for FTD and to propose directions for future research, with reference to findings. A search was performed using PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE. Search terms included "frontotemporal dementia", and words related to non-pharmacological management, and it identified a total of 858 articles. Results revealed that very few randomized controlled trials exist on non-pharmacological management interventions for FTD. These interventions have been proposed by literature based on clinical experience. A small number of studies have supported behavioral management techniques that exploit disease-specific behaviors and preserved functions in patients with FTD, along with the management of caregivers' distress. These limitations warrant well-designed large-scale research to examine effects of non-pharmacological interventions on behavioral symptoms of FTD. PMID:25737152

  2. Neural correlates of reduced awareness in instrumental activities of daily living in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Amanzio, Martina; D'Agata, Federico; Palermo, Sara; Rubino, Elisa; Zucca, Milena; Galati, Antonello; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Castellano, Giancarlo; Rainero, Innocenzo

    2016-10-01

    A decline in instrumental activities of daily living has been described as the earliest functional deficit in patients with neurodegenerative disease. It embraces specific competencies such as: "recalling the date and telephone calls, orienting to new places, remembering the location of objects at home, understanding conversation and the plot of a movie, keeping belongings in order, doing mental calculations and handling money, remembering appointments and shopping lists and performing clerical work". Since changes in instrumental daily living activities are one of the descriptors of behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia, we decided to investigate the neural correlates of a reduced awareness in this specific domain in twenty-three consecutive behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia patients. Gray matter volume changes associated with a reduced awareness for the instrumental domain, assessed using a validated caregiver-patient discrepancy questionnaire, were examined. Interestingly, we found disabilities in instrumental daily living activities and a reduced awareness of these to be related to medial prefrontal cortex atrophy, where the mid-cingulate cortices, dorsal anterior insula and cuneous play an important role. Importantly, if the executive system does not function correctly, the comparator mechanism of action self-monitoring does not detect mismatches between the current and previous performance states stored in the personal database, and produces a reduced awareness for the instrumental domain. PMID:27534380

  3. Investigation of the role of rare TREM2 variants in frontotemporal dementia subtypes.

    PubMed

    Thelen, Mathias; Razquin, Cristina; Hernández, Isabel; Gorostidi, Ana; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Wolfsgruber, Steffen; Drichel, Dmitriy; Fliessbach, Klaus; Duenkel, Tanja; Damian, Marinella; Heilmann, Stefanie; Slotosch, Anja; Lennarz, Martina; Seijo-Martínez, Manuel; Rene, Ramón; Kornhuber, Johannes; Peters, Oliver; Luckhaus, Christian; Jahn, Holger; Hüll, Michael; Rüther, Eckart; Wiltfang, Jens; Lorenzo, Elena; Gascon, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Lladó, Albert; Campdelacreu, Jaume; Moreno, Fermin; Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Fortea, Juan; Indakoetxea, Begoña; Heneka, Michael T; Wetter, Axel; Pastor, Maria A; Riverol, Mario; Becker, Tim; Frölich, Lutz; Tárraga, Lluís; Boada, Mercè; Wagner, Michael; Jessen, Frank; Maier, Wolfgang; Clarimón, Jordi; López de Munain, Adolfo; Ruiz, Agustín; Pastor, Pau; Ramirez, Alfredo

    2014-11-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Rare TREM2 variants have been recently identified in families affected by FTD-like phenotype. However, genetic studies of the role of rare TREM2 variants in FTD have generated conflicting results possibly because of difficulties on diagnostic accuracy. The aim of the present study was to investigate associations between rare TREM2 variants and specific FTD subtypes (FTD-S). The entire coding sequence of TREM2 was sequenced in FTD-S patients of Spanish (n = 539) and German (n = 63) origin. Genetic association was calculated using Fisher exact test. The minor allele frequency for controls was derived from in-house genotyping data and publicly available databases. Seven previously reported rare coding variants (p.A28V, p.W44X, p.R47H, p.R62H, p.T66M, p.T96K, and p.L211P) and 1 novel missense variant (p.A105T) were identified. The p.R47H variant was found in 4 patients with FTD-S. Two of these patients showed cerebrospinal fluid pattern of amyloid beta, tau, and phosphorylated-tau suggesting underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. No association was found between p.R47H and FTD-S. A genetic association was found between p.T96K and FTD-S (p = 0.013, odds ratio = 4.23, 95% Confidence Interval [1.17-14.77]). All 6 p.T96K patients also carried the TREM2 variant p.L211P, suggesting linkage disequilibrium. The remaining TREM2 variants were found in 1 patient, respectively, and were absent in controls. The present findings provide evidence that p.T96K is associated with FTD-S and that p.L211P may contribute to its pathogenic effect. The data also suggest that p.R47H is associated with an FTD phenotype that is characterized by the presence of underlying AD pathology. PMID:25042114

  4. Different functional connectivity and network topology in behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Meichen; Gouw, Alida A; Hillebrand, Arjan; Tijms, Betty M; Stam, Cornelis Jan; van Straaten, Elisabeth C W; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L

    2016-06-01

    We investigated whether the functional connectivity and network topology in 69 Alzheimer's disease (AD), 48 behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) patients, and 64 individuals with subjective cognitive decline are different using resting-state electroencephalography recordings. Functional connectivity between all pairs of electroencephalography channels was assessed using the phase lag index (PLI). We subsequently calculated PLI-weighted networks, from which minimum spanning trees (MSTs) were constructed. Finally, we investigated the hierarchical clustering organization of the MSTs. Functional connectivity analysis showed frequency-dependent results: in the delta band, bvFTD showed highest whole-brain PLI; in the theta band, the whole-brain PLI in AD was higher than that in bvFTD; in the alpha band, AD showed lower whole-brain PLI compared with bvFTD and subjective cognitive decline. The MST results indicate that frontal networks appear to be selectively involved in bvFTD against the background of preserved global efficiency, whereas parietal and occipital loss of network organization in AD is accompanied by global efficiency loss. Our findings suggest different pathophysiological mechanisms in these 2 separate neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27143432

  5. Malnutrition in Alzheimer’s Disease, Dementia with Lewy Bodies, and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration: Comparison Using Serum Albumin, Total Protein, and Hemoglobin Level

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Mamoru; Tanaka, Hibiki; Fujise, Noboru; Matsushita, Masateru; Miyagawa, Yusuke; Hatada, Yutaka; Fukuhara, Ryuji; Hasegawa, Noriko; Todani, Shuji; Matsukuma, Kengo; Kawano, Michiyo; Ikeda, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition among dementia patients is an important issue. However, the biochemical markers of malnutrition have not been well studied in this population. The purpose of this study was to compare biochemical blood markers among patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). A total of 339 dementia outpatients and their family caregivers participated in this study. Low serum albumin was 7.2 times more prevalent among patients with DLB and 10.1 times more prevalent among those with FTLD than among those with AD, with adjustment for age. Low hemoglobin was 9.1 times more common in female DLB patients than in female AD patients, with adjustment for age. The levels of biochemical markers were not significantly correlated with cognitive function. Family caregivers of patients with low total protein, low albumin, or low hemoglobin were asked if the patients had loss of weight or appetite; 96.4% reported no loss of weight or appetite. In conclusion, nutritional status was worse in patients with DLB and FTLD than in those with AD. A multidimensional approach, including blood testing, is needed to assess malnutrition in patients with dementia. PMID:27336725

  6. Demographic and neuropsychiatric factors associated with off-label medication use in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, MC; Hu, B; Mehta, K; Neuhaus, J; Yaffe, K; Miller, BL; Boxer, A

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Off-label medication use for treating cognitive impairments and neuropsychiatric symptoms occurs in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We compared use of cognitive and psychiatric medications in FTD and AD and evaluated the relationship between neuropsychiatric symptoms and medication use. Methods Cognitive and psychiatric medication use, demographic variables and Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) subscale symptoms were obtained from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center Uniform Data Set (n=3958, 8.1% FTD). Bivariate statistics and logistic regressions were calculated to evaluate which demographic or NPI subscale symptoms predicted medication use. Results Although cognitive medication was used more commonly in AD (78%) it was also commonly used off-label in FTD (56%). Psychiatric medications were in greater use in FTD than AD (68 vs. 45%, respectively, p<0.001). In FTD, cognitive medication use was associated with elevated NPI elation scores and psychiatric medication use was associated with history of prior psychiatric disease. In AD, demographic variables (white, longer disease duration, higher education, more severe disease or being male) were most predictive of cognitive medication use while having psychiatric disease, being white, having longer disease duration, being younger, greater disease severity, being disinhibited or anxious were associated with psychiatric medication use. Off-label antipsychotics were used in 4.7% of patients with AD and 10% of patients with FTD. Conclusions Our results revealed significant off-label medication use in both FTD and AD. A notable finding from this study was the lack of consistent relationships between medication use and neuropsychiatric symptoms across the two illnesses. PMID:23995817

  7. Structural and functional brain abnormalities place phenocopy frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in the FTD spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Steketee, Rebecca M.E.; Meijboom, Rozanna; Bron, Esther E.; Osse, Robert Jan; de Koning, Inge; Jiskoot, Lize C.; Klein, Stefan; de Jong, Frank Jan; van der Lugt, Aad; van Swieten, John C.; Smits, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Purpose ‘Phenocopy’ frontotemporal dementia (phFTD) patients may clinically mimic the behavioral variant of FTD (bvFTD), but do not show functional decline or abnormalities upon visual inspection of routine neuroimaging. We aimed to identify abnormalities in gray matter (GM) volume and perfusion in phFTD and to assess whether phFTD belongs to the FTD spectrum. We compared phFTD patients with both healthy controls and bvFTD patients. Materials & methods Seven phFTD and 11 bvFTD patients, and 20 age-matched controls underwent structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3D pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) at 3T. Normalized GM (nGM) volumes and perfusion, corrected for partial volume effects, were quantified regionally as well as in the entire supratentorial cortex, and compared between groups taking into account potential confounding effects of gender and scanner. Results PhFTD patients showed cortical atrophy, most prominently in the right temporal lobe. Apart from this regional atrophy, GM volume was generally not different from either controls or from bvFTD. BvFTD however showed extensive frontotemporal atrophy. Perfusion was increased in the left prefrontal cortex compared to bvFTD and to a lesser extent to controls. Conclusion PhFTD and bvFTD show overlapping cortical structural abnormalities indicating a continuum of changes especially in the frontotemporal regions. Together with functional changes suggestive of a compensatory response to incipient pathology in the left prefrontal regions, these findings are the first to support a possible neuropathological etiology of phFTD and suggest that phFTD may be a neurodegenerative disease on the FTD spectrum. PMID:27222795

  8. Clinicopathological Study of Patients With C9ORF72-Associated Frontotemporal Dementia Presenting With Delusions

    PubMed Central

    Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Naasan, Georges; Karydas, Anna M.; Coppola, Giovanni; Pribadi, Mochtar; Seeley, William W.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Miller, Bruce L.; Grinberg, Lea T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Several clinical studies point to a high prevalence of psychotic symptoms in frontotemporal dementia associated with C9ORF72 mutations, but clinicopathological studies addressing the association between C9ORF72 mutations and delusions are lacking. Method Seventeen patients with pathologically proven frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) associated with C9ORF72 mutations were identified from Neurodegenerative Disease Brain Bank. Of the 17 cases with C9ORF72 mutation, 4 exhibited well-defined delusions. The clinical history, neurological examination, neuropsychological testing, neuroimaging analysis, and postmortem assessment of the patients with delusions were evaluated and compared with the other cases. Result The content of the delusions was mixed including persecution, infidelity, and grandiosity. All cases showed parkinsonism; voxel-based morphometry analysis showed greater precuneus atrophy in patients with delusions than those without delusions. All 4 had unclassifiable FTLD with TAR DNA-binding protein inclusions, with characteristics of both type A and type B. Three cases had additional τ pathology and another had α-synuclein pathology. Conclusion C9ORF72 carriers with well-defined delusions likely associated with additional pathologies and parietal atrophy in neuroimaging. Patients presenting with middle-aged onset of delusions should be screened for C9ORF72 mutations, especially if family history and parkinsonism are present. PMID:25342578

  9. Behavioral and neural impairments of frontotemporal dementia: Potential implications for criminal responsibility and sentencing.

    PubMed

    Berryessa, Colleen M

    2016-01-01

    Individuals in the early stages of the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder marked by atrophy to the brain's frontal regions, exhibit severe disturbances to social and moral processing and decision-making after the onset of the disorder. These behavioral impairments, underlain by the neural deficits associated with the disorder, can often lead individuals with bvFTD to criminally offend. As such, behavioral and frontotemporal lobe abnormalities exhibited by offenders with bvFTD potentially represent several complex challenges for the legal system. This paper examines some of the ways in which the behavioral and neural impairments associated with bvFTD may influence issues surrounding the criminal responsibility, specifically legal insanity, and sentencing of offenders with bvFTD in the U.S. legal system. As there is very little literature in these areas concerning bvFTD, the existing academic dialogue on psychopathy, a disorder with similar behavioral symptoms and neural deficits, is used to frame the discussion on these issues. PMID:27039661

  10. DAPHNE: A New Tool for the Assessment of the Behavioral Variant of Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Boutoleau-Bretonnière, Claire; Evrard, Christelle; Hardouin, Jean Benoît; Rocher, Laëtitia; Charriau, Tiphaine; Etcharry-Bouyx, Frédérique; Auriacombe, Sophie; Richard-Mornas, Aurélie; Lebert, Florence; Pasquier, Florence; Sauvaget, Anne; Bulteau, Samuel; Vercelletto, Martine; Derkinderen, Pascal; Bretonnière, Cédric; Thomas-Antérion, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) relies primarily on clinical features and remains challenging. The specificity of the recently revised criteria can be disappointing, justifying development of new clinical tools. Objective We produced a behavioral inventory named DAPHNE. This scale (adapted from Rascovsky's criteria) explores six domains: disinhibition, apathy, perseverations, hyperorality, personal neglect and loss of empathy. It is composed of ten items (five answer categories). The aim was (1) to assess the validity and reliability of DAPHNE and (2) to evaluate its contribution in differentiating patients. Methods Two scores were computed: DAPHNE-6 (screening) from the six domains and DAPHNE-40 (diagnosis) from the ten items. Reliability and reproducibility were assessed. External validity was studied with the Frontal Behavioral Inventory (FBI) and the Frontotemporal Behavioral Scale (FBS). Finally, the diagnostic performance of DAPHNE was compared to revised criteria, FBI and FBS. Results DAPHNE was administered to the caregivers of 89 patients, 36 with bvFTD, 22 with Alzheimer's disease, 15 with progressive supranuclear palsy and 16 with bipolar disorder. Reliability and reproducibility were excellent, as was external validity. DAPHNE-6 allowed bvFTD diagnosis (score ≥4) with a sensitivity of 92%, while DAPHNE-40 (score ≥15) had a specificity of 92%. Conclusion We demonstrate excellent psychometric features for DAPHNE. This quick tool could help for both diagnosing and screening bvFTD. PMID:26955383

  11. Impulsivity, decreased social exploration, and executive dysfunction in a mouse model of frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Van der Jeugd, Ann; Vermaercke, Ben; Halliday, Glenda M; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, a major subset of which is characterized by the accumulation of abnormal forms of the protein tau, leading to impairments in motor functions as well as language and behavioral alterations. Tau58-2/B mice express human tau with the P301S mutation found in familial forms of FTLD in neurons. By assessing three age cohorts of Tau58-2/B mice in a comprehensive behavioral test battery, we found that the tauopathy animals showed age-dependent signs of impulsivity, decreased social exploration and executive dysfunction. The deficit in executive function was first limited to decreased spatial working memory, but with aging this was extended to impaired instrumental short-term memory. Tau pathology was prominent in brain regions underlying these behaviors. Thus, Tau-58-2/B mice recapitulate neurological deficits of the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), presenting them as a suitable model to test therapeutic interventions for the amelioration of this variant. PMID:26827932

  12. Phenocopy or variant: a longitudinal study of very slowly progressive frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Brodtmann, Amy; Cowie, Tiffany; McLean, Catriona; Darby, David

    2013-01-01

    Frontal variant frontotemporal dementia (fvFTD) can present with a range of social and cognitive impairments. Complicating this clinical picture is a group of non-progressive or ‘phenocopy’ patients. We present a patient and his father with very slowly progressive fvFTD over decades. Stable MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging abnormalities were present in the presenting patient, with serial neuropsychological assessments that showed no significant change over 15 years. His father also had a 20-year history of functional decline, associated with neuropsychological evidence of change. Neuropathological confirmation of the condition of his father became available. This revealed gross bilateral frontal atrophy and spongiosis in the frontal cortical regions with mild neuronal loss and rounded ubiquitinated perinuclear inclusions, consistent with early stage frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin by current neuropathological criteria. The phenotype of frontal variant FTD is broad. Many patients present with frontal networks dysfunction. We present evidence that some patients with a very slow clinical progression do have FTD. PMID:23391955

  13. TREM2 mutations are rare in a French cohort of patients with frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Lattante, Serena; Le Ber, Isabelle; Camuzat, Agnès; Dayan, Sarah; Godard, Chloé; Van Bortel, Inge; De Septenville, Anne; Ciura, Sorana; Brice, Alexis; Kabashi, Edor

    2013-10-01

    Homozygous mutations in TREM2 have been recently identified by exome sequencing in families presenting with frontotemporal dementia (FTD)-like phenotype. No study has evaluated the exact frequency of TREM2 mutations in cohorts of FTD patients so far. We sequenced TREM2 in 175 patients with pure FTD, mostly French, to test whether mutations could be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. No disease-causing mutation was identified in 175 individuals from the French cohort of FTD patients. We did not identify the polymorphism p.R47H (rs75932628), strongly associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. We conclude that TREM2 mutations are extremely rare in patients with pure FTD, although further investigation in larger populations is needed. PMID:23759145

  14. Dominant hemisphere lateralization of cortical parasympathetic control as revealed by frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Guo, Christine C; Sturm, Virginia E; Zhou, Juan; Gennatas, Efstathios D; Trujillo, Andrew J; Hua, Alice Y; Crawford, Richard; Stables, Lara; Kramer, Joel H; Rankin, Katherine; Levenson, Robert W; Rosen, Howard J; Miller, Bruce L; Seeley, William W

    2016-04-26

    The brain continuously influences and perceives the physiological condition of the body. Related cortical representations have been proposed to shape emotional experience and guide behavior. Although previous studies have identified brain regions recruited during autonomic processing, neurological lesion studies have yet to delineate the regions critical for maintaining autonomic outflow. Even greater controversy surrounds hemispheric lateralization along the parasympathetic-sympathetic axis. The behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), featuring progressive and often asymmetric degeneration that includes the frontoinsular and cingulate cortices, provides a unique lesion model for elucidating brain structures that control autonomic tone. Here, we show that bvFTD is associated with reduced baseline cardiac vagal tone and that this reduction correlates with left-lateralized functional and structural frontoinsular and cingulate cortex deficits and with reduced agreeableness. Our results suggest that networked brain regions in the dominant hemisphere are critical for maintaining an adaptive level of baseline parasympathetic outflow. PMID:27071080

  15. Recognition of emotion in the frontal and temporal variants of frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Howard J; Pace-Savitsky, Katherine; Perry, Richard J; Kramer, Joel H; Miller, Bruce L; Levenson, Robert W

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the frontal and temporal variants of frontotemporal dementia (fvFTD and tvFTD) are both associated with impairments in emotional processing. However, the degree and type of emotional processing deficits in the two syndromes have not been previously compared. We used the Florida Affect Battery to examine recognition of facial expressions of emotion in fvFTD and tvFTD patients who have no evidence of visual perceptual difficulties for faces. In general, both groups were impaired at recognizing emotions compared with age-matched controls. In tvFTD, this deficit was limited to emotions with a negative valence (sadness, anger, fear), while fvFTD patients showed impairment for positive valence (happiness) as well. These results suggest that damage to frontal lobe regions in FTD may lead to more profound impairment in recognition of emotion than when damage is more limited to the temporal lobe. PMID:15178936

  16. Progranulin mutation analysis: Identification of one novel mutation in exon 12 associated with frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Aswathy, Peethambaran Mallika; Jairani, Pushparajan Sulajamani; Raghavan, Sheela Kumari; Verghese, Joe; Gopala, Srinivas; Srinivas, Priya; Mathuranath, Pavagada Sivasankara

    2016-03-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) mutations account for an average of 15% of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD) cases and 20% of total FTD cases worldwide. Here, we investigated the frequency of PGRN mutations in FTD patients (n = 116) from a clinical cohort of south India and detected one novel mutation located on exon 12 in a familial behavioral variant FTD patient (accounting for ∼1% of total FTD cases and 6% of familial FTD cases). This mutation was found to introduce a premature termination codon and the prematurely terminated messenger RNA may probably undergo nonsense-mediated decay. In enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the proband showed significantly reduced level of plasma PGRN (28 ng/mL) compared with controls (150 ± 38 ng/mL), which implicates haploinsufficiency as the pathogenic mechanism. PMID:26724960

  17. Frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 - the first Polish family

    PubMed Central

    Narożańska, Ewa; Jasińska-Myga, Barbara; Sitek, Emilia J.; Robowski, Piotr; Brockhuis, Bogna; Lass, Piotr; Dubaniewicz, Mirosława; Wieczorek, Dariusz; Baker, Matt; Rademakers, Rosa; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Sławek, Jarosław

    2010-01-01

    Background Frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) is a neurodegenerative disorder with various clinical phenotypes. We present the first Central-Eastern European family (Gdansk Family) with FTDP-17 due to a P301L mutation in MAPT. Methods We have studied a family consisting of 82 family members, 39 of whom were genetically evaluated. The proband and her affected brother underwent detailed clinical and neuropsychological examinations. Results P301L mutation in MAPT was identified in two affected and five asymptomatic family members. New features included hemispatial neglect and unilateral resting tremor not previously reported for P301L MAPT mutation. Low blood folic acid levels were also detected. Conclusions Our report suggests that FTDP-17 affects patients worldwide, but due to its heterogenous clinical presentation remains underrecognized. PMID:20561037

  18. Differential neuropsychological patterns of frontal variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease in a study of diagnostic concordance.

    PubMed

    Giovagnoli, Anna R; Erbetta, Alessandra; Reati, Fabiola; Bugiani, Orso

    2008-04-01

    Although the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontal variant frontotemporal dementia (fvFTD) predict different cognitive patterns, many comparative neuropsychological studies showed no difference in the expected cognitive domains. Inconsistencies in diagnostic criteria, small cohorts of patients, and neuropsychological assessment may account for such findings. Moreover, discrepancies in memory and executive dysfunctions that are expected to distinguish AD and fvFTD may reflect the basic brain organization. Adhering to a strict concordance of clinical and neuroradiological criteria, we compared many patients with AD and fvFTD using a large neuropsychological battery. One hundred and thirty-nine patients with AD (n=89) or fvFTD (n=50) were retrospectively considered in order to verify the diagnostic congruence of clinical and neuroradiological aspects. On this basis, 117 patients with AD (n=77) or fvFTD (n=40) with similar duration and severity of dementia were selected. Ninety-one healthy subjects were also controlled. Mean scores in tests for abstract reasoning, planning, set shifting, initiative, verbal fluency, immediate and episodic memory, constructive, ideomotor and orofacial praxis, selective and divided attention, visuomotor coordination, and visual perception were evaluated. Separate analyses of variance and post hoc Bonferroni tests showed that, with respect to controls, both patient groups were significantly impaired in all neuropsychological tests. Compared to fvFTD patients, AD patients were significantly impaired in episodic memory, selective attention, visual perception, visuomotor coordination, and constructive praxis, whereas no differences were found in executive, intellective, and linguistic abilities between the two patient groups. Logistic regression analyses revealed that episodic memory significantly predicted the diagnosis of AD while no executive deficit was able to predict the diagnosis of fvFTD. To conclude, memory

  19. Characterization of Apathy in Persons with Frontotemporal Dementia and The Impact on Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Merrilees, Jennifer; Dowling, Glenna A.; Hubbard, Erin; Mastick, Judy; Ketelle, Robin; Miller, Bruce L

    2012-01-01

    This study characterized daytime activity and apathy in patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and semantic dementia (SD) and their family caregivers. Twenty-two patient-caregiver dyads were enrolled,13 bvFTD and 9 SD.Data were collected on behaviors and movement. Patients and caregivers wore Actiwatches for 2 weeks to record activity. We predicted that bvFTD patients would show greater caregiver report of apathy and less daytime activity than patients diagnosed with SD. Findings: Patients with bvFTD spent 25% of their day immobile while patients with SD spent 16% of their day inactive. BvFTD caregivers spent 11% of their day immobile and SD caregivers 9%. Apathy was described as present in 100% of the patients with bvFTD and in all but one patient with SD, the severity of apathy was greater in bvFTD compared to SD. Apathy correlated with caregiver emotional distress in both groups. In conclusion, apathy has been defined as a condition of diminished motivation that is difficult to operationalize. Among patients with FTD, apathy was associated with lower levels of activity, greater number bouts of immobility and longer immobility bout duration. Apathy and diminished daytime activity appeared to have an impact on the caregiver. Objective measures of behavioral output may help in formulation of a more precise definition of apathy. PMID:22261729

  20. Disturbance of emotion processing in frontotemporal dementia: a synthesis of cognitive and neuroimaging findings.

    PubMed

    Kumfor, Fiona; Piguet, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    Accurate processing of emotional information is a critical component of appropriate social interactions and interpersonal relationships. Disturbance of emotion processing is present in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and is a clinical feature in two of the three subtypes: behavioural-variant FTD and semantic dementia. Emotion processing in progressive nonfluent aphasia, the third FTD subtype, is thought to be mostly preserved, although current evidence is scant. This paper reviews the literature on emotion recognition, reactivity and expression in FTD subtypes, although most studies focus on emotion recognition. The relationship between patterns of emotion processing deficits and patterns of neural atrophy are considered, by integrating evidence from recent neuroimaging studies. The review findings are discussed in the context of three contemporary theories of emotion processing: the limbic system model, the right hemisphere model and a multimodal system of emotion. Results across subtypes of FTD are most consistent with the multimodal system model, and support the presence of somewhat dissociable neural correlates for basic emotions, with strongest evidence for the emotions anger and sadness. Poor emotion processing is evident in all three subtypes, although deficits are more widespread than what would be predicted based on studies in healthy cohorts. Studies that include behavioural and imaging data are limited. Future investigations combining these approaches will help improve the understanding of the neural network underlying emotion processing. Presently, longitudinal investigations of emotion processing in FTD are lacking, and studies investigating emotion processing over time are critical to understand the clinical manifestations of disease progression in FTD. PMID:22577002

  1. Neurodegenerative disease phenotypes in carriers of MAPT p.A152T, a risk factor for frontotemporal dementia spectrum disorders and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suzee E; Tartaglia, Maria C; Yener, Görsev; Genç, Sermin; Seeley, William W; Sanchez-Juan, Pascual; Moreno, Fermin; Mendez, Mario F; Klein, Eric; Rademakers, Rosa; López de Munain, Adolfo; Combarros, Onofre; Kramer, Joel H; Kenet, Robert O; Boxer, Adam L; Geschwind, Michael D; Gorno-Tempini, Maria-Luisa; Karydas, Anna M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H; Miller, Bruce L

    2013-01-01

    Recently, Coppola and colleagues demonstrated that a rare microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) sequence variant, c.454G>A (p.A152T) significantly increases the risk of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) spectrum disorders and Alzheimer disease (AD) in a screen of 15,369 subjects. We describe clinical features of 9 patients with neurodegenerative disease (4 women) harboring p.A152T, aged 51 to 79 years at symptom onset. Seven developed FTD spectrum clinical syndromes, including progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome (n=2), behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD, n=1), nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA, n=2), and corticobasal syndrome (n=2); 2 patients were diagnosed with clinical AD. Thus, MAPT p.A152T is associated with a variety of FTD spectrum clinical presentations, although patients with clinical AD are also identified. These data warrant larger studies with clinicopathologic correlation to elucidate the influence of this genetic variant on neurodegenerative disease. PMID:23518664

  2. Distinct subtypes of behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia based on patterns of network degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ranasinghe, Kamalini G; Rankin, Katherine P; Pressman, Peter S; Perry, David C; Lobach, Iryna V; Seeley, William W; Coppola, Giovanni; Karydas, Anna M; Grinberg, Lea T; Shany-Ur, Tal; Lee, Suzee E; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rosen, Howard J; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Boxer, Adam L; Miller, Zachary A; Chiong, Winston; DeMay, Mary; Kramer, Joel H; Possin, Katherine L; Sturm, Virginia E; Bettcher, Brianne M; Neylan, Michael; Zackey, Diana D; Nguyen, Lauren A; Ketelle, Robin; Block, Nikolas; Wu, Teresa Q; Dallich, Alison; Russek, Natanya; Caplan, Alyssa; Geschwind, Daniel H; Vossel, Keith A; Miller, Bruce L

    2016-01-01

    Importance Clearer delineation of the phenotypic heterogeneity within behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) will help uncover underlying biological mechanisms, and will improve clinicians’ ability to predict disease course and design targeted management strategies. Objective To identify subtypes of bvFTD syndrome based on distinctive patterns of atrophy defined by selective vulnerability of specific functional networks targeted in bvFTD, using statistical classification approaches. Design, Setting and Participants In this retrospective observational study, 104 patients meeting the Frontotemporal Dementia Consortium consensus criteria for bvFTD were evaluated at the Memory and Aging Center of Department of Neurology at University of California, San Francisco. Patients underwent a multidisciplinary clinical evaluation, including clinical demographics, genetic testing, symptom evaluation, neurological exam, neuropsychological bedside testing, and socioemotional assessments. Ninety patients underwent structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging at their earliest evaluation at the memory clinic. From each patients’ structural imaging, the mean volumes of 18 regions of interest (ROI) comprising the functional networks specifically vulnerable in bvFTD, including the ‘salience network’ (SN), with key nodes in the frontoinsula and pregenual anterior cingulate, and the ‘semantic appraisal network’ (SAN) anchored in the anterior temporal lobe and subgenual cingulate, were estimated. Principal component and cluster analyses of ROI volumes were used to identify patient clusters with anatomically distinct atrophy patterns. Main Outcome Measures We evaluated brain morphology and other clinical features including presenting symptoms, neurologic exam signs, neuropsychological performance, rate of dementia progression, and socioemotional function in each patient cluster. Results We identified four subgroups of bvFTD patients with distinct anatomic patterns of

  3. Do I know you? Examining face and object memory in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Kumfor, Fiona; Hutchings, Rosalind; Irish, Muireann; Hodges, John R; Rhodes, Gillian; Palermo, Romina; Piguet, Olivier

    2015-05-01

    The ability to perceive, learn and recognise faces is a complex ability, which is key to successful social interactions. This ability is proposed to be coordinated by neural regions in the occipital and temporal lobes, specialised for face perception and memory. While previous studies have suggested that memory for faces is compromised in some dementia syndromes, it remains unclear whether this simply reflects more generalised memory deficits. Here, we examined basic face perception (Identity-Matching), face recognition (Cambridge Face Memory Task) and object recognition (Cambridge Car Memory Task) in 11 semantic dementia (SD) patients (8 left-lateralised, 3 right-lateralised) and 13 behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) patients, compared with 11 controls. On the Identity-Matching task, bvFTD were impaired compared to controls, with a similar trend observed in the SD group. Importantly, both bvFTD and SD also demonstrated impaired face recognition. In contrast, only bvFTD showed impaired object recognition, with SD performing within normal limits on this task. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed that Identity-Matching and face recognition were associated with partly dissociable regions including the fusiform cortex and anterior temporal lobe. Object-memory was associated with thalamic integrity in the bvFTD group only. These results reveal that face perception and face memory deficits are common in bvFTD and SD, and have been previously underestimated. These deficits are due to neurodegeneration of key regions within the 'core' and 'extended' face processing system, providing convergent evidence of the neural regions supporting face perception. From a clinical perspective, impaired ability to recognise faces is common in bvFTD and SD and therefore strategies to improve face perception and memory may be beneficial for these patients. PMID:25797589

  4. Differential diagnosis of behavioral variant of fronto-temporal dementia (bvFTD)

    PubMed Central

    Pąchalska, Maria; Bidzan, Leszek; Łukowicz, Małgorzata; Bidzan, Mariola; Markiewicz, Katarzyna; Jastrzębowska, Grażyna; Talar, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The aim of the paper is the differential diagnosis of various types of Fronto-Temporal Dementia (FTD), with the focus on its behavioural variant (bvFTD). Material/Method Material and Method. Screening was done in order to assess the depth of dementia with the short version of MMSE, while evaluation of various variants of FTD was performed with the use of such neuropsychological tests as Newcomb and Chicago Fluency Tests, Wechsler Memory Scale - III (WMS-III), Western Aphasia Battery (WAB-R), and the Boston Naming Test (BNT). Behaviour was evaluated with a Polish version of the Frontal Behavioral Inventory (FBInv). The inventory consists of 24 questions which enable an evaluation of social behaviour disorders. The study included 112 patients - 68 men and 46 women treated in the Reintegrative -Training Centre of the Foundation for Persons with Brain Dysfunctions in Kraków and in the Clinic for Developmental Psychiatry, Psychotic Disorders and Old Age Psychiatry, of the Medical University at Gdańsk, who were suffering from various types of dementia. Results It was found that FTD patients scored the highest, while the VAD patients scored somewhat lower in the FBInv. At the same time the scores obtained by PPA patients were higher in comparison to the control groups, but not as high as in the case of patients with FTD. In the process of the neurotherapy of FTD patients we found a reduction of the behavioral disturbances, despite the progression of the illness. Conclusions The results obtained in the present study confirmed the diagnostic value of FBInv in the differential diagnosis of various types of FTD and in the evaluation of neurotherapy efficacy. PMID:21629185

  5. Sequential distribution of pTDP-43 pathology in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD).

    PubMed

    Brettschneider, Johannes; Del Tredici, Kelly; Irwin, David J; Grossman, Murray; Robinson, John L; Toledo, Jon B; Lee, Edward B; Fang, Lubin; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Ludolph, Albert C; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Braak, Heiko; Trojanowski, John Q

    2014-03-01

    We examined regional distribution patterns of phosphorylated 43-kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (pTDP-43) intraneuronal inclusions in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Immunohistochemistry was performed on 70 μm sections from FTLD-TDP autopsy cases (n = 39) presenting with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. Two main types of cortical pTDP-43 pathology emerged, characterized by either predominantly perikaryal pTDP-43 inclusions (cytoplasmic type, cFTLD) or long aggregates in dendrites (neuritic type, nFTLD). Cortical involvement in nFTLD was extensive and frequently reached occipital areas, whereas cases with cFTLD often involved bulbar somatomotor neurons and the spinal cord. We observed four patterns indicative of potentially sequential dissemination of pTDP-43: cases with the lowest burden of pathology (pattern I) were characterized by widespread pTDP-43 lesions in the orbital gyri, gyrus rectus, and amygdala. With increasing burden of pathology (pattern II) pTDP-43 lesions emerged in the middle frontal and anterior cingulate gyrus as well as in anteromedial temporal lobe areas, the superior and medial temporal gyri, striatum, red nucleus, thalamus, and precerebellar nuclei. More advanced cases showed a third pattern (III) with involvement of the motor cortex, bulbar somatomotor neurons, and the spinal cord anterior horn, whereas cases with the highest burden of pathology (pattern IV) were characterized by pTDP-43 lesions in the visual cortex. We interpret the four neuropathological patterns in bvFTD to be consistent with the hypothesis that pTDP-43 pathology can spread sequentially and may propagate along axonal pathways. PMID:24407427

  6. Clinicopathological description of two cases with SQSTM1 gene mutation associated with frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gabor G; van der Zee, Julie; Hort, Jakub; Kristoferitsch, Wolfgang; Leitha, Thomas; Höftberger, Romana; Ströbel, Thomas; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Matej, Radoslav

    2016-02-01

    There is a strong genetic influence on the clinicopathological phenotypes associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Intracellular deposition of TDP-43 is the phenotypical hallmark of a frequent subgroup of cases. Mutations in the sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1) gene have rarely been found in individuals with FTD. Here we provide a comprehensive clinicopathological description of two cases with a SQSTM1 mutation. The clinical phenotype of patient 1 (mutation p.Glu396*) was compatible with the behavioural variant (bv) of FTD. TDP-43 pathology was consistent with the features of type B of FTLD-TDP pathology. However, prominent neuronal granular cytoplasmic TDP-43 immunoreactivity and abundant oligodendroglial inclusions, proven by colocalization with the oligodendroglial-marker TPPP/p25, were also seen. The clinical phenotype of patient 2 was compatible with bvFTD associated with parkinsonism and bulbar symptoms in the later stage. Genetic testing of patient 2 identified a C9orf72 repeat expansion mutation together with a missense mutation (p.Arg212Cys) in SQSTM1. TDP-43 pathology was characterized by neuritic profiles compatible mostly with type A. In contrast to patient 1, p62 pathology was seen to a greater extent as TDP-43 immunoreactivity in neurons. Using an antibody that detects poly(GP) peptides produced via repeat associated non-ATG translation associated with expanded hexanucleotide repeat in the C9orf72 gene, we confirmed the presence of pathognomonic inclusions. The present study supports previous observations on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) that SQSTM1 mutations consistently associate with TDP-43 pathology. The co-presence of C9orf72 mutation may influence the phenotype, thus finding one FTLD (or ALS) related mutation does not exclude the presence of further influential genetic alterations. Oligodendroglial TDP-43 pathology is considerable in some forms of FTLD-TDP, thus their evaluation might be considered

  7. The behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) syndrome in psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Lanata, Serggio C; Miller, Bruce L

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of this article is to critically discuss the syndromic overlap that exists between early behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD)—the most common clinical syndrome associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD)—and several primary psychiatric disorders. We begin by summarising the current state of knowledge regarding FTLD, including the recent discovery of FTLD-causative genetic mutations. Clinicopathological correlations in FTLD are subsequently discussed, while emphasising that clinical syndromes of FTD are dictated by the distribution of FTLD pathology in the brain. We then review a large number of cases with suspected and confirmed bvFTD that had previously been diagnosed with a primary psychiatric disorder. The clinical and neuroscientific implications of this overlap are discussed, focusing on the importance of early diagnosis for clinical and therapeutic reasons. We propose that largely due to the paucity of biomarkers for primary psychiatric disorders, and the limited use of FTLD-related biomarkers by psychiatrists at present, it is very difficult to separate patients with early bvFTD from those with primary psychiatric disorders based on clinical grounds. Furthermore, specific limitations of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) 5 criteria for bvFTD may inadvertently discourage recognition of bvFTD in mental health settings. Clinically, more research is needed to develop tools that allow early differentiation of bvFTD from primary psychiatric disease, as bvFTD therapies will likely be most effective in the earliest stages of disease. From a neuroscience perspective, we argue that bvFTD provides an excellent paradigm for investigating the neural basis of psychiatric disorders. PMID:26216940

  8. The behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) syndrome in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Lanata, Serggio C; Miller, Bruce L

    2016-05-01

    The primary goal of this article is to critically discuss the syndromic overlap that exists between early behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD)-the most common clinical syndrome associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD)-and several primary psychiatric disorders. We begin by summarising the current state of knowledge regarding FTLD, including the recent discovery of FTLD-causative genetic mutations. Clinicopathological correlations in FTLD are subsequently discussed, while emphasising that clinical syndromes of FTD are dictated by the distribution of FTLD pathology in the brain. We then review a large number of cases with suspected and confirmed bvFTD that had previously been diagnosed with a primary psychiatric disorder. The clinical and neuroscientific implications of this overlap are discussed, focusing on the importance of early diagnosis for clinical and therapeutic reasons. We propose that largely due to the paucity of biomarkers for primary psychiatric disorders, and the limited use of FTLD-related biomarkers by psychiatrists at present, it is very difficult to separate patients with early bvFTD from those with primary psychiatric disorders based on clinical grounds. Furthermore, specific limitations of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) 5 criteria for bvFTD may inadvertently discourage recognition of bvFTD in mental health settings. Clinically, more research is needed to develop tools that allow early differentiation of bvFTD from primary psychiatric disease, as bvFTD therapies will likely be most effective in the earliest stages of disease. From a neuroscience perspective, we argue that bvFTD provides an excellent paradigm for investigating the neural basis of psychiatric disorders. PMID:26216940

  9. Sequential distribution of pTDP-43 pathology in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD)

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Murray; Robinson, John L.; Toledo, Jon B.; Fang, Lubin; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Ludolph, Albert C.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Braak, Heiko; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2014-01-01

    We examined regional distribution patterns of phosphorylated 43-kDa TAr DNA-binding protein (pTDP-43) intraneuronal inclusions in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Immunohistochemistry was performed on 70 μm sections from FTLD-TDP autopsy cases (n = 39) presenting with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. Two main types of cortical pTDP-43 pathology emerged, characterized by either predominantly perikaryal pTDP-43 inclusions (cytoplasmic type, cFTLD) or long aggregates in dendrites (neuritic type, nFTLD). Cortical involvement in nFTLD was extensive and frequently reached occipital areas, whereas cases with cFTLD often involved bulbar somatomotor neurons and the spinal cord. We observed four patterns indicative of potentially sequential dissemination of pTDP-43: cases with the lowest burden of pathology (pattern I) were characterized by widespread pTDP-43 lesions in the orbital gyri, gyrus rectus, and amygdala. With increasing burden of pathology (pattern II) pTDP-43 lesions emerged in the middle frontal and anterior cingulate gyrus as well as in anteromedial temporal lobe areas, the superior and medial temporal gyri, striatum, red nucleus, thalamus, and precerebellar nuclei. More advanced cases showed a third pattern (III) with involvement of the motor cortex, bulbar somatomotor neurons, and the spinal cord anterior horn, whereas cases with the highest burden of pathology (pattern IV) were characterized by pTDP-43 lesions in the visual cortex. We interpret the four neuropathological patterns in bvFTD to be consistent with the hypothesis that pTDP-43 pathology can spread sequentially and may propagate along axonal pathways. PMID:24407427

  10. Behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia: Fundamental clinical issues associated with prediction of pathological bases.

    PubMed

    Miki, Tomoko; Yokota, Osamu; Ishizu, Hideki; Kuroda, Shigetoshi; Oshima, Etsuko; Terada, Seishi; Yamada, Norihito

    2016-08-01

    Behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is a clinical syndrome characterized mainly by behavioral symptoms due to frontal dysfunction. Major neurodegenerative bases of bvFTD include Pick's disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration with trans-activation response DNA protein 43-positive inclusions, corticobasal degeneration, and progressive supranuclear palsy. Early disinhibition characterized by socially inappropriate behaviors, loss of manners, and impulsive, rash and careless actions is the most important clinical feature of bvFTD. On the other hand, it was reported that clinical presentations of some Alzheimer's disease cases and patients with psychiatric disorders (e.g., addictive disorders, gambling disorder and kleptomania) often resemble that of bvFTD. Although clinical differentiation of 'true' bvFTD cases with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) pathology from mimicking cases without it is not always easy, evaluation of the following features, which were noted in autopsy-confirmed FTLD cases and/or clinical bvFTD cases with circumscribed lobar atrophy, may often provide clues for the diagnosis. (i) The initial symptoms frequently develop at 65 years or younger, and (ii) 'socially inappropriate behaviors' can be frequently interpreted as contextually inappropriate behaviors prompted by environmental visual and auditory stimuli. Taking a detailed history usually reveals various kinds of such behaviors in various situations in everyday life rather than the repetition of a single kind of behavior (e.g., repeated shoplifting). (iii) A correlation between the distribution of cerebral atrophy and neurological and behavioral symptoms is usually observed, and the proportion of FTLD cases with right side-predominant cerebral atrophy may be higher in a psychiatric setting than a neurological setting. Finally, (iv) whether the previous course and the combination of symptoms observed at the first medical visit can be explained by major evolution

  11. The behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia: An analysis of the literature and a case report.

    PubMed

    Birkhoff, Jutta Maria; Garberi, Cesare; Re, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to underline the importance of possible legal consequences of the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). This disease is associated with antisocial behavior, impulse control disorder and cognitive and personality impairment, which are often the earliest manifestations of the bvFTD. One of the antisocial behaviors possibly associated with this neurodegenerative disease is pathological stealing. This case report is about a 50-year-old Italian man who had a regular life until 2010. In 2010 and 2011, some critical events occurred: he lost his job, his father-in-law, to whom he was particularly close, died, and his wife had a serious illness. He began to show symptoms of depression, a significant weight loss, apathy, poor self-care, and lack of interest in the activities of his family. He became disengaged from his prior activities, emotionally detached from his family and developed compulsive hoarding. Moreover, he had uninhibited behaviors, a memory retrieval deficit, executive dysfunctions and impulsive behaviors. In January 2012, the subject began stealing objects, particularly components of computer, without premeditation or concern for resulting legal actions. He was then diagnosed affected by bvFTD. He was charged with theft and attempted theft and the Court asked for a psychiatric evaluation, in order to analyze the effect of the neurodegenerative disease on his behavior. To answer to the Court, the Authors analyzed his history of life and made a mental examination. The subject was considered mentally insane at the time of his crimes. This is an example of the practical application in judicial cases of the latest knowledge and evidence in the literature about the frontotemporal dementia, a disease associated with antisocial behaviors that could create tensions with the criminal law. The focus of the paper is to explain how the behavioral symptoms of bvFTD can have legal implications and how to deal with legal

  12. Alzheimer Disease and Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia: Automatic Classification Based on Cortical Atrophy for Single-Subject Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Möller, Christiane; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Versteeg, Adriaan; Tijms, Betty; de Munck, Jan C; Hafkemeijer, Anne; Rombouts, Serge A R B; van der Grond, Jeroen; van Swieten, John; Dopper, Elise; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Vrenken, Hugo; Wink, Alle Meije

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of an image-based classifier to distinguish between Alzheimer disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) in individual patients by using gray matter (GM) density maps computed from standard T1-weighted structural images obtained with multiple imagers and with independent training and prediction data. Materials and Methods The local institutional review board approved the study. Eighty-four patients with AD, 51 patients with bvFTD, and 94 control subjects were divided into independent training (n = 115) and prediction (n = 114) sets with identical diagnosis and imager type distributions. Training of a support vector machine (SVM) classifier used diagnostic status and GM density maps and produced voxelwise discrimination maps. Discriminant function analysis was used to estimate suitability of the extracted weights for single-subject classification in the prediction set. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and area under the ROC curve (AUC) were calculated for image-based classifiers and neuropsychological z scores. Results Training accuracy of the SVM was 85% for patients with AD versus control subjects, 72% for patients with bvFTD versus control subjects, and 79% for patients with AD versus patients with bvFTD (P ≤ .029). Single-subject diagnosis in the prediction set when using the discrimination maps yielded accuracies of 88% for patients with AD versus control subjects, 85% for patients with bvFTD versus control subjects, and 82% for patients with AD versus patients with bvFTD, with a good to excellent AUC (range, 0.81-0.95; P ≤ .001). Machine learning-based categorization of AD versus bvFTD based on GM density maps outperforms classification based on neuropsychological test results. Conclusion The SVM can be used in single-subject discrimination and can help the clinician arrive at a diagnosis. The SVM can be used to distinguish disease-specific GM patterns in patients with AD

  13. Frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 with the MAPT R406W mutation presenting with a broad distribution of abundant senile plaques.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Chiho; Kobayashi, Katsuji; Kitamura, Tatsuru; Ujike, Hiroshi; Iwasa, Kazuo; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-02-01

    We report the autopsy results of a patient with familial dementia who was diagnosed as having frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) with an R406W mutation in the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. This patient showed Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like clinical manifestations from the age of 59, with reduced β-amyloid1-42 (Aβ42 ) and elevated total and phosphorylated tau levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. He did not present with any apparent parkinsonism throughout the disease course. His autopsy at age 73 showed atrophy and neurodegeneration in many brain regions, particularly in the antero-medial temporal cortex and hippocampus, followed by the frontal lobes, with abundant neurofibrillary tangles. In addition, a diffuse distribution of Aβ-positive senile plaques, including many neuritic plaques, was observed and classified as stage C according to the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) criteria. These results suggest that analyzing of the MAPT gene is essential for diagnosing familial dementia, even if amyloid markers such as Aβ42 in the cerebrospinal fluid and amyloid imaging are positive, or if neuropathological findings indicate a diagnosis of AD. PMID:25377499

  14. NREM sleep transient events in fronto-temporal dementia: beyond sleep stage architecture.

    PubMed

    Maestri, Michelangelo; Carnicelli, Luca; Economou, Nicholas-Tiberio; Bonakis, Anastasios; Paparrigopoulos, Thomas; Papageorgiou, Sokratis T; Giorgi, Filippo Sean; Di Coscio, Elisa; Tognoni, Gloria; Ferri, Raffaele; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Bonanni, Enrica

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is increasingly becoming recognized as a major cause of early onset (<65 years) neurodegenerative dementia. Although sleep disorders significantly impair patients' and caregivers' quality of life in neurodegenerative diseases, polysomnographic data in FTD patients are scarce in literature. Aim of our study was to investigate sleep microstructure in FTD, by means of Cyclic Alternating Pattern (CAP), in a group of ten behavioral variant FTD patients (6 M, 4 F; mean age 61.2±7.3 years; disease duration: 1.4±0.7 years) and to compare them with cognitively intact healthy elderly. Sleep in FTD patients was altered at different levels, involving not only the conventional sleep stage architecture parameters (total sleep time, single stage percentage, NREM/REM cycle organization), but also microstructure. FTD subjects showed CAP disruption with decreased slow wave activity related phases (A1 index, n/h:14.5±6.8 vs 38.8±6.6; p<.001) and increased arousal-related fast CAP components (A2 index 22.9±8.2 vs 11.6±3.7; p=.006; A3 index 41.9±20.7 vs 13.0±6.5; p=.002). Several correlations between sleep variables and neuropsychological tests were found. Sleep impairment in FTD may be specifically related to the specific frontal lobe involvement in the neurodegenerative process. The pattern of alterations seems somewhat peculiar, probably due to the anatomical distribution of the neurodegenerative process with a major impact on frontal lobe generated sleep transients, and a substantial sparing of phenomena related to the posterior cortex. PMID:26742675

  15. Atypical, slowly progressive behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia associated with C9ORF72 hexanucleotide expansion

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Baber K.; Yokoyama, Jennifer S.; Takada, Leonel T.; Sha, Sharon J.; Rutherford, Nicola. J.; Fong, Jamie C.; Karydas, Anna; Wu, Teresa; Ketelle, Robin; Baker, Matt C.; Hernandez, Mariely-Dejesus; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Rademakers, Rosa; Lee, Suzee E.; Rosen, Howard J.; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Seeley, William; Rankin, Katherine P.; Boxer, Adam L.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Some patients meeting behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) diagnostic criteria progress slowly and plateau at mild symptom severity. Such patients have mild neuropsychological and functional impairments, lack characteristic bvFTD brain atrophy, and have thus been referred to as bvFTD “phenocopies” or slowly progressive (bvFTD-SP). The few patients with bvFTD-SP that have been studied at autopsy have found no evidence of FTD pathology, suggesting that bvFTD-SP is neuropathologically distinct from other forms of FTD. Here, we describe two patients with bvFTD-SP with chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) hexanucleotide expansions. Methods Three hundred and eighty-four patients with FTD clinical spectrum and Alzheimer’s disease diagnoses were screened for C9ORF72 expansion. Two bvFTD-SP mutation carriers were identified. Neuropsychological and functional data, as well as brain atrophy patterns assessed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), were compared with 44 patients with sporadic bvFTD and 85 healthy controls. Results Both patients were age 48 at baseline and met possible bvFTD criteria. In the first patient, VBM revealed thalamic and posterior insula atrophy. Over seven years, his neuropsychological performance and brain atrophy remained stable. In the second patient, VBM revealed cortical atrophy with subtle frontal and insular volume loss. Over two years, her neuropsychological and functional scores as well as brain atrophy remained stable. Conclusions C9ORF72 mutations can present with a bvFTD-SP phenotype. Some bvFTD-SP patients may have neurodegenerative pathology, and C9ORF72 mutations should be considered in patients with bvFTD-SP and a family history of dementia or motor neuron disease. PMID:22399793

  16. Brain perfusion SPECT with Brodmann areas analysis in differentiating frontotemporal dementia subtypes.

    PubMed

    Valotassiou, Varvara; Papatriantafyllou, John; Sifakis, Nikolaos; Tzavara, Chara; Tsougos, Ioannis; Psimadas, Dimitrios; Kapsalaki, Eftychia; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Hadjigeorgiou, George; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    Despite the known validity of clinical diagnostic criteria, significant overlap of clinical symptoms between Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) subtypes exists in several cases, resulting in great uncertainty of the diagnostic boundaries. We evaluated the perfusion between FTD subtypes using brain perfusion (99m)Tc-HMPAO SPECT with Brodmann areas (BA) mapping. NeuroGam software was applied on single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) studies for the semi-quantitative evaluation of perfusion in BA and the comparison with the software's normal database. We studied 91 consecutive FTD patients: 21 with behavioural variants (bvFTD), 39 with language variants (lvFTD) [12 with progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA), 27 with semantic dementia (SD)], and 31 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP)/corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Stepwise logistic regression analyses showed that the BA 28L and 32R could independently differentiate bvFTD from lvFTD, while the BA 8R and 25R could discriminate bvFTD from SD and PNFA, respectively. Additionally, BA 7R and 32R were found to discriminate bvFTD from CBD/PSP. The only BA that could differentiate SD from PNFA was 6L. BA 6R and 20L were found to independently differentiate CBD/PSP from lvFTD. Moreover, BA 20L and 22R could discriminate CBD/PSP from PNFA, while BA 6R, 20L and 45R were found to independently discriminate CBD/PSP from SD. Brain perfusion SPECT with BA mapping can be a useful additional tool in differentiating FTD variants by improving the definition of brain areas that are specifically implicated, resulting in a more accurate differential diagnosis in atypical or uncertain forms of FTD. PMID:25387340

  17. Rab8, POSH, and TAK1 regulate synaptic growth in a Drosophila model of frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    West, Ryan J.H.; Lu, Yubing; Marie, Bruno; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in genes essential for protein homeostasis have been identified in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. Why mature neurons should be particularly sensitive to such perturbations is unclear. We identified mutations in Rab8 in a genetic screen for enhancement of an FTD phenotype associated with ESCRT-III dysfunction. Examination of Rab8 mutants or motor neurons expressing a mutant ESCRT-III subunit, CHMP2BIntron5, at the Drosophila melanogaster neuromuscular junction synapse revealed synaptic overgrowth and endosomal dysfunction. Expression of Rab8 rescued overgrowth phenotypes generated by CHMP2BIntron5. In Rab8 mutant synapses, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/activator protein-1 and TGF-β signaling were overactivated and acted synergistically to potentiate synaptic growth. We identify novel roles for endosomal JNK-scaffold POSH (Plenty-of-SH3s) and a JNK kinase kinase, TAK1, in regulating growth activation in Rab8 mutants. Our data uncover Rab8, POSH, and TAK1 as regulators of synaptic growth responses and point to recycling endosome as a key compartment for synaptic growth regulation during neurodegenerative processes. PMID:25800055

  18. Impaired recognition of body expressions in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Van den Stock, Jan; De Winter, François-Laurent; de Gelder, Beatrice; Rangarajan, Janaki Raman; Cypers, Gert; Maes, Frederik; Sunaert, Stefan; Goffin, Karolien; Vandenberghe, Rik; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Progressive deterioration of social cognition and emotion processing are core symptoms of the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Here we investigate whether bvFTD is also associated with impaired recognition of static (Experiment 1) and dynamic (Experiment 2) bodily expressions. In addition, we compared body expression processing with processing of static (Experiment 3) and dynamic (Experiment 4) facial expressions, as well as with face identity processing (Experiment 5). The results reveal that bvFTD is associated with impaired recognition of static and dynamic bodily and facial expressions, while identity processing was intact. No differential impairments were observed regarding motion (static vs. dynamic) or category (body vs. face). Within the bvFTD group, we observed a significant partial correlation between body and face expression recognition, when controlling for performance on the identity task. Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) analysis revealed that body emotion recognition was positively associated with gray matter volume in a region of the inferior frontal gyrus (pars orbitalis/triangularis). The results are in line with a supramodal emotion recognition deficit in bvFTD. PMID:26162615

  19. Homozygous TREM2 mutation in a family with atypical frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bras, José; Camuzat, Agnès; Caroppo, Paola; Lattante, Serena; Couarch, Philippe; Kabashi, Edor; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Dubois, Bruno; Brice, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    TREM2 mutations were first identified in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent fractures because of bone cysts and presenile dementia. Recently, homozygous and compound heterozygous TREM2 mutations were identified in rare families with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) but without bone involvement. We identified a p.Thr66Met heterozygous mutation in a new consanguineous Italian family. Two sibs had early onset autosomal recessive FTLD without severe bone disorders. Atypical signs were present in this family: early parietal and hippocampus involvement, parkinsonism, epilepsy, and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. This study further demonstrates the implication of TREM2 mutations in FTLD phenotypes. It illustrates the variability of bone phenotype and underlines the frequency of atypical signs in TREM2 carriers. This and previous studies evidence that TREM2 mutation screening should be limited to autosomal recessive FTLD with atypical phenotypes characterized by: (1) a very young age at onset (20–50 years); (2) early parietal and hippocampal deficits; (3) the presence of seizures and parkinsonism; (4) suggestive extensive white matter lesions and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:24910390

  20. Frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-associated disease protein TDP-43 promotes dendritic branching

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yubing; Ferris, Jacob; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2009-01-01

    Background TDP-43 is an evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding protein implicated in the pathogenesis of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), sporadic and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and possibly other neurodegenerative diseases. In diseased neurons, TDP-43 is depleted in the nucleus, suggesting a loss-of-function pathogenic mechanism. However, the normal function of TDP-43 in postmitotic neurons is largely unknown. Results Here we demonstrate that overexpression of Drosophila TDP-43 (dTDP-43) in vivo significantly increases dendritic branching of sensory neurons in Drosophila larvae. Loss of dTDP-43 function, either in a genetic null mutant or through RNAi knockdown, decreased dendritic branching. Further genetic analysis demonstrated a cell-autonomous role for dTDP-43 in dendrite formation. Moreover, human TDP-43 (hTDP-43) promoted dendritic branching in Drosophila neurons, and this function was attenuated by mutations associated with ALS. Conclusion These findings reveal an essential role for TDP-43 in dendritic structural integrity, supporting the notion that loss of normal TDP-43 function in diseased neurons may compromise neuronal connectivity before neuronal cell loss in FTD and ALS. PMID:19781077

  1. Homozygous TREM2 mutation in a family with atypical frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Le Ber, Isabelle; De Septenville, Anne; Guerreiro, Rita; Bras, José; Camuzat, Agnès; Caroppo, Paola; Lattante, Serena; Couarch, Philippe; Kabashi, Edor; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Dubois, Bruno; Brice, Alexis

    2014-10-01

    TREM2 mutations were first identified in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent fractures because of bone cysts and presenile dementia. Recently, homozygous and compound heterozygous TREM2 mutations were identified in rare families with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) but without bone involvement. We identified a p.Thr66Met heterozygous mutation in a new consanguineous Italian family. Two sibs had early onset autosomal recessive FTLD without severe bone disorders. Atypical signs were present in this family: early parietal and hippocampus involvement, parkinsonism, epilepsy, and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. This study further demonstrates the implication of TREM2 mutations in FTLD phenotypes. It illustrates the variability of bone phenotype and underlines the frequency of atypical signs in TREM2 carriers. This and previous studies evidence that TREM2 mutation screening should be limited to autosomal recessive FTLD with atypical phenotypes characterized by: (1) a very young age at onset (20-50 years); (2) early parietal and hippocampal deficits; (3) the presence of seizures and parkinsonism; (4) suggestive extensive white matter lesions and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:24910390

  2. Terra incognita—cerebellar contributions to neuropsychiatric and cognitive dysfunction in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Rachel H.; Devenney, Emma; Kiernan, Matthew C.; Halliday, Glenda M.; Hodges, John R.; Hornberger, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Although converging evidence has positioned the human cerebellum as an important relay for intact cognitive and neuropsychiatric processing, changes in this large structure remain mostly overlooked in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), a disease which is characterized by cognitive and neuropsychiatric deficits. The present study assessed whether degeneration in specific cerebellar subregions associate with indices of cognition and neuropsychiatric performance in bvFTD. Our results demonstrate a relationship between cognitive and neuropsychiatric decline across various domains of memory, language, emotion, executive, visuospatial function, and motivation and the degree of gray matter degeneration in cerebellar lobules V–VII. Most notably, bilateral cerebellar lobule VII and the posterior vermis emerged as distinct for memory processes, the right cerebellar hemisphere underpinned emotion, and the posterior vermis was highlighted in language dysfunction in bvFTD. Based on cortico-cerebellar connectivity maps, these findings in the cerebellum are consistent with the neural connections with the cortices involved in these domains in patients with bvFTD. Overall, the present study underscores the significance of cortical-cerebellar networks associated with cognition and neuropsychiatric dysfunction in bvFTD. PMID:26191000

  3. Frontotemporal dementia and language networks: cortical thickness reduction is driven by dyslexia susceptibility genes

    PubMed Central

    Paternicó, Donata; Manes, Marta; Premi, Enrico; Cosseddu, Maura; Gazzina, Stefano; Alberici, Antonella; Archetti, Silvana; Bonomi, Elisa; Cotelli, Maria Sofia; Cotelli, Maria; Turla, Marinella; Micheli, Anna; Gasparotti, Roberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Variations within genes associated with dyslexia result in a language network vulnerability, and in patients with Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD), language disturbances represent a disease core feature. Here we explored whether variations within three related-dyslexia genes, namely KIAA0319, DCDC2, and CNTNAP, might affect cortical thickness measures in FTD patients. 112 FTD patients underwent clinical and neuropsychological examination, genetic analyses and brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). KIAA0319 rs17243157 G/A, DCDC2 rs793842 A/G and CNTNAP2 rs17236239 A/G genetic variations were assessed. Cortical thickness was analysed by Freesurfer. Patients carrying KIAA0319 A*(AG or AA) carriers showed greater cortical thickness atrophy in the left fusiform and inferior temporal gyri, compared to KIAA0319 GG (p ≤ 0.001). Patients carrying CNTNAP2 G*(GA or GG) showed reduced cortical thickness in the left insula thenCNTNAP2 AA carriers (p≤0.001). When patients with both at-risk polymorphisms were considered (KIAA0319 A* and CNTNAP2 G*), greater and addictive cortical thickness atrophy of the left insula and the inferior temporal gyrus was demonstrated (p ≤ 0.001). No significant effect of DCDC2 was found. In FTD, variations of KIAA0319 and CNTNAP2 genes were related to cortical thickness abnormalities in those brain areas involved in language abilities. These findings shed light on genetic predisposition in defining phenotypic variability in FTD. PMID:27484312

  4. Frontotemporal Dementia-Like Syndrome Following Recall of Childhood Sexual Abuse.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lisa J; Brody, David

    2015-06-01

    Numerous psychopathological syndromes have been attributed to posttraumatic stress, both at the time of the trauma and many years later. To date, however, there is little literature on pseudodementia as a delayed traumatic stress response. The authors present a case history of a 50-year-old woman who developed severe cognitive impairment following retrieval of previously forgotten memories of childhood sexual abuse. Her cognitive condition deteriorated rapidly and dramatically. Neuropsychological assessment and clinical presentation led to a diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia (vs. corticobasal degeneration). Detailed neurologic and medical evaluations could not identify any underlying physical cause. Her condition progressively worsened over 9 months, at which point memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, was begun. The patient regained full functioning over the next year. Although an organic cause could not be ruled out, it was likely that recovery of traumatic memories was contributory to the patient's condition, as ongoing psychotherapy had begun 1 year into the course. If additional cases with similar presentations are reported, such cases would corroborate the notion that persistent, severe, and reversible cognitive impairment constitutes a previously unrecognized and atypical posttraumatic response. PMID:25991053

  5. TDP-43 in the hypoglossal nucleus identifies amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Glenda M; Kiernan, Matthew C; Kril, Jillian J; Mito, Remika; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami; Hasegawa, Masato; McCann, Heather; Bartley, Lauren; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Kwok, John B J; Hornberger, Michael; Hodges, John R; Tan, Rachel H

    2016-07-15

    The hypoglossal nucleus was recently identified as a key brain region in which the presence of TDP-43 pathology could accurately discriminate TDP-43 proteinopathy cases with clinical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The objective of the present study was to assess the hypoglossal nucleus in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), and determine whether TDP-43 in this region is associated with clinical ALS. Twenty-nine cases with neuropathological FTLD-TDP and clinical bvFTD that had not been previously assessed for hypoglossal TDP-43 pathology were included in this study. Of these 29 cases, 41% (n=12) had a dual diagnosis of bvFTD-ALS at presentation, all 100% (n=12) of which demonstrated hypoglossal TDP-43 pathology. Of the 59% (n=17) cohort that presented with pure bvFTD, 35% (n=6) were identified with hypoglossal TDP-43 pathology. Review of the case files of all pure bvFTD cases revealed evidence of possible or probable ALS in 5 of the 6 hypoglossal-positive cases (83%) towards the end of disease, and this was absent from all cases without such pathology. In conclusion, the present study validates grading the presence of TDP-43 in the hypoglossal nucleus for the pathological identification of bvFTD cases with clinical ALS, and extends this to include the identification of cases with possible ALS at end-stage. PMID:27288806

  6. Parkinsonism and impaired axonal transport in a mouse model of frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ittner, Lars M.; Fath, Thomas; Ke, Yazi D.; Bi, Mian; van Eersel, Janet; Li, Kong M.; Gunning, Peter; Götz, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is characterized by cognitive and behavioral changes and, in a significant subset of patients, Parkinsonism. Histopathologically, FTD frequently presents with tau-containing lesions, which in familial cases result from mutations in the MAPT gene encoding tau. Here we present a novel transgenic mouse strain (K3) that expresses human tau carrying the FTD mutation K369I. K3 mice develop a progressive histopathology that is reminiscent of that in human FTD with the K369I mutation. In addition, K3 mice show early-onset memory impairment and amyotrophy in the absence of overt neurodegeneration. Different from our previously generated tau transgenic strains, the K3 mice express the transgene in the substantia nigra (SN) and show an early-onset motor phenotype that reproduces Parkinsonism with tremor, bradykinesia, abnormal gait, and postural instability. Interestingly, motor performance of young, but not old, K3 mice improves upon L-dopa treatment, which bears similarities to Parkinsonism in FTD. The early-onset symptoms in the K3 mice are mechanistically related to selectively impaired anterograde axonal transport of distinct cargos, which precedes the loss of dopaminergic SN neurons that occurs in aged mice. The impaired axonal transport in SN neurons affects, among others, vesicles containing the dopamine-synthesizing enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase. Distinct modes of transport are also impaired in sciatic nerves, which may explain amyotrophy. Together, the K3 mice are a unique model of FTD-associated Parkinsonism, with pathomechanistic implications for the human pathologic process. PMID:18832465

  7. Haploinsufficiency of TBK1 causes familial ALS and fronto-temporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Freischmidt, Axel; Wieland, Thomas; Richter, Benjamin; Ruf, Wolfgang; Schaeffer, Veronique; Müller, Kathrin; Marroquin, Nicolai; Nordin, Frida; Hübers, Annemarie; Weydt, Patrick; Pinto, Susana; Press, Rayomond; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Molko, Nicolas; Bernard, Emilien; Desnuelle, Claude; Soriani, Marie-Hélène; Dorst, Johannes; Graf, Elisabeth; Nordström, Ulrika; Feiler, Marisa S; Putz, Stefan; Boeckers, Tobias M; Meyer, Thomas; Winkler, Andrea S; Winkelman, Juliane; de Carvalho, Mamede; Thal, Dietmar R; Otto, Markus; Brännström, Thomas; Volk, Alexander E; Kursula, Petri; Danzer, Karin M; Lichtner, Peter; Dikic, Ivan; Meitinger, Thomas; Ludolph, Albert C; Strom, Tim M; Andersen, Peter M; Weishaupt, Jochen H

    2015-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative syndrome hallmarked by adult-onset loss of motor neurons. We performed exome sequencing of 252 familial ALS (fALS) and 827 control individuals. Gene-based rare variant analysis identified an exome-wide significant enrichment of eight loss-of-function (LoF) mutations in TBK1 (encoding TANK-binding kinase 1) in 13 fALS pedigrees. No enrichment of LoF mutations was observed in a targeted mutation screen of 1,010 sporadic ALS and 650 additional control individuals. Linkage analysis in four families gave an aggregate LOD score of 4.6. In vitro experiments confirmed the loss of expression of TBK1 LoF mutant alleles, or loss of interaction of the C-terminal TBK1 coiled-coil domain (CCD2) mutants with the TBK1 adaptor protein optineurin, which has been shown to be involved in ALS pathogenesis. We conclude that haploinsufficiency of TBK1 causes ALS and fronto-temporal dementia. PMID:25803835

  8. Frontotemporal dementia and language networks: cortical thickness reduction is driven by dyslexia susceptibility genes.

    PubMed

    Paternicó, Donata; Manes, Marta; Premi, Enrico; Cosseddu, Maura; Gazzina, Stefano; Alberici, Antonella; Archetti, Silvana; Bonomi, Elisa; Cotelli, Maria Sofia; Cotelli, Maria; Turla, Marinella; Micheli, Anna; Gasparotti, Roberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Variations within genes associated with dyslexia result in a language network vulnerability, and in patients with Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD), language disturbances represent a disease core feature. Here we explored whether variations within three related-dyslexia genes, namely KIAA0319, DCDC2, and CNTNAP, might affect cortical thickness measures in FTD patients. 112 FTD patients underwent clinical and neuropsychological examination, genetic analyses and brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). KIAA0319 rs17243157 G/A, DCDC2 rs793842 A/G and CNTNAP2 rs17236239 A/G genetic variations were assessed. Cortical thickness was analysed by Freesurfer. Patients carrying KIAA0319 A*(AG or AA) carriers showed greater cortical thickness atrophy in the left fusiform and inferior temporal gyri, compared to KIAA0319 GG (p ≤ 0.001). Patients carrying CNTNAP2 G*(GA or GG) showed reduced cortical thickness in the left insula thenCNTNAP2 AA carriers (p≤0.001). When patients with both at-risk polymorphisms were considered (KIAA0319 A* and CNTNAP2 G*), greater and addictive cortical thickness atrophy of the left insula and the inferior temporal gyrus was demonstrated (p ≤ 0.001). No significant effect of DCDC2 was found. In FTD, variations of KIAA0319 and CNTNAP2 genes were related to cortical thickness abnormalities in those brain areas involved in language abilities. These findings shed light on genetic predisposition in defining phenotypic variability in FTD. PMID:27484312

  9. Familial Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia Associated With Astrocyte-Predominant Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Isidre; Legati, Andrea; García-Monco, J. Carlos; Gomez-Beldarrain, Marian; Carmona, Margarita; Blanco, Rosa; Seeley, William W.; Coppola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    A familial behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia associated with astrocyte-predominant tauopathy is described in 2 sisters born from consanguineous parents. The neuropathological examination revealed massive accumulation of abnormally hyper-phosphorylated, conformational, truncated at aspartic acid 421, ubiquitinated, and nitrated tau at Tyr29 in cortical astrocyte (including their perivascular foot processes) and Bergmann glia. Smaller amounts of abnormal tau were observed in neurons and rarely in oligodendrocytes. There was decreased expression of glial glutamate transporter in the majority of tau-positive astrocytes. Gel electrophoresis of sarkosyl-insoluble fractions showed 2 bands of 64 and 60 kDa and a doublet of 67–70 kDa (which are different from those seen in Alzheimer disease and in typical 4R and 3R tauopathies) together with several bands of lower molecular weight indicative of truncated tau. Analysis of expression of MAPT isoforms further revealed altered splicing and representation of tau isoforms involving exons 2, 3 and 10. Genetic testing revealed no known mutations in PSEN1, PSEN2, APP, MAPT, GRN, FUS, and TARDBP, and no pathological expansion in C9ORF72. However, a novel rare heterozygous sequence variant (p.Q140H) of uncertain significance was identified in FUS in both siblings. PMID:25756587

  10. The established and emerging roles of astrocytes and microglia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Rowan A.; Morsch, Marco; Rayner, Stephanie L.; Cole, Nicholas J.; Pountney, Dean L.; Chung, Roger S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are two progressive, fatal neurodegenerative syndromes with considerable clinical, genetic and pathological overlap. Clinical symptoms of FTD can be seen in ALS patients and vice versa. Recent genetic discoveries conclusively link the two diseases, and several common molecular players have been identified (TDP-43, FUS, C9ORF72). The definitive etiologies of ALS and FTD are currently unknown and both disorders lack a cure. Glia, specifically astrocytes and microglia are heavily implicated in the onset and progression of neurodegeneration witnessed in ALS and FTD. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of microglia and astrocytes involved in ALS and FTD, highlighting their recent implications in neuroinflammation, alterations in waste clearance involving phagocytosis and the newly described glymphatic system, and vascular abnormalities. Elucidating the precise mechanisms of how astrocytes and microglia are involved in ALS and FTD will be crucial in characterizing these two disorders and may represent more effective interventions for disease progression and treatment options in the future. PMID:26578880

  11. Abhorring the vacuum: use of Alzheimer’s disease medications in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kerchner, Geoffrey A; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Boxer, Adam L

    2011-01-01

    There is no dedicated therapy for frontotemporal dementia (FTD). In order to treat the often devastating behavioral disturbances that interfere with both normal social functioning and the ability of caregivers to provide needed support, off-label medication usage is frequent. In addition to antidepressant and antipsychotic medications, which afford some benefits, US FDA-approved treatments for Alzheimer’s disease are often used, including both cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine. Here, we review the various clinical manifestations of FTD, a general approach to treatment and the goals of any potential therapies. We review all of the existing literature on the use of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine in FTD. While cholinesterase inhibitors do not currently have a place in FTD treatment, memantine may be helpful, although the results of two placebo-controlled trials with this agent are not yet available. Finally, we discuss our view that such approaches will probably become supplanted by rational, molecularly-based therapies currently in development. PMID:21728274

  12. Altered body schema processing in frontotemporal dementia with C9ORF72 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Laura E; Fletcher, Phillip D; Golden, Hannah L; Mahoney, Colin J; Agustus, Jennifer L; Schott, Jonathan M; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Beck, Jonathan; Mead, Simon; Rossor, Martin N; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations in C9ORF72 are an important cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and motor neuron disease. Accumulating evidence suggests that FTD associated with C9ORF72 mutations (C9ORF72-FTD) is distinguished clinically by early prominent neuropsychiatric features that might collectively reflect deranged body schema processing. However, the pathophysiology of C9ORF72-FTD has not been elucidated. Methods We undertook a detailed neurophysiological investigation of five patients with C9ORF72-FTD, in relation to patients with FTD occurring sporadically and on the basis of mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau gene and healthy older individuals. We designed or adapted behavioural tasks systematically to assess aspects of somatosensory body schema processing (tactile discrimination, proprioceptive and body part illusions and self/non-self differentiation). Results Patients with C9ORF72-FTD selectively exhibited deficits at these levels of body schema processing in relation to healthy individuals and other patients with FTD. Conclusions Altered body schema processing is a novel, generic pathophysiological mechanism that may link the distributed cortico-subcortical network previously implicated in C9ORF72-FTD with a wide range of neuropsychiatric and behavioural symptoms, and constitute a physiological marker of this neurodegenerative proteinopathy. PMID:24521566

  13. Judgments about moral responsibility and determinism in patients with behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia: still compatibilists.

    PubMed

    Cova, Florian; Bertoux, Maxime; Bourgeois-Gironde, Sacha; Dubois, Bruno

    2012-06-01

    Do laypeople think that moral responsibility is compatible with determinism? Recently, philosophers and psychologists trying to answer this question have found contradictory results: while some experiments reveal people to have compatibilist intuitions, others suggest that people could in fact be incompatibilist. To account for this contradictory answers, Nichols and Knobe (2007) have advanced a 'performance error model' according to which people are genuine incompatibilist that are sometimes biased to give compatibilist answers by emotional reactions. To test for this hypothesis, we investigated intuitions about determinism and moral responsibility in patients suffering from behavioural frontotemporal dementia. Patients suffering from bvFTD have impoverished emotional reaction. Thus, the 'performance error model' should predict that bvFTD patients will give less compatibilist answers. However, we found that bvFTD patients give answers quite similar to subjects in control group and were mostly compatibilist. Thus, we conclude that the 'performance error model' should be abandoned in favour of other available model that best fit our data. PMID:22409859

  14. Dominant Frontotemporal Dementia Mutations in 140 Cases of Primary Progressive Aphasia and Speech Apraxia

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Eoin P.; Baker, Matthew C.; Perkerson, Ralph B.; Duffy, Joseph R.; Strand, Edythe A.; Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Machulda, Mary M.; Rademakers, Rosa; Josephs, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations in three genes [chromosome 9 open-reading-frame 72 (C9ORF72); microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and progranulin (GRN)] account for the vast majority of familial, and a proportion of sporadic, frontotemporal dementia (FTD) cases. Progressive apraxia of speech (PAOS) is a type of FTD characterized by speech production deficits without a known cause. Methods We therefore assessed for genetic mutations in C9ORF72, MAPT and GRN in 40 prospectively recruited PAOS patients. For comparison, we also assessed these mutations in 100 patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA), including logopenic PPA (n = 54), nonfluent/agrammatic PPA (n = 17), semantic PPA (n = 16), and unclassifiable PPA (n = 13). Results The mean age at onset of PAOS patients was 66.7 years (± 9.3); 50% were women. Ten patients (25%) had ≥1 first-degree relative with a neurodegenerative disease. No mutations were found in any PAOS patient. In comparison, 36% of the PPA patients had a family history and 5 (5%) had a genetic mutation detected: MAPT (n = 0), GRN (n = 3) and C9ORF72 (n = 2). Conclusions Although limited by an overrepresentation of logopenic PPA, which frequently predicts Alzheimer’s disease pathology, this study suggests that mutations in the three genes most commonly associated with FTD are not associated with PAOS and are rarely associated with PPA. PMID:25765123

  15. TBK1 mutation frequencies in French frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cohorts.

    PubMed

    Le Ber, Isabelle; De Septenville, Anne; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Camuzat, Agnès; Caroppo, Paola; Couratier, Philippe; Blanc, Frédéric; Lacomblez, Lucette; Sellal, François; Fleury, Marie-Céline; Meininger, Vincent; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Clot, Fabienne; Flabeau, Olivier; LeGuern, Eric; Brice, Alexis

    2015-11-01

    TANK1-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) has been recently identified as a new amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) gene. Loss-of-function (LoF) mutations in TBK1 could be responsible for 0.4%-4% of ALS. Considering the strong genetic overlap existing between frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and ALS, we have evaluated the frequencies of TBK1 mutations in a cohort of French FTD and of ALS patients. We identified 5 LoF mutations, in 4 FTD-ALS and 1 ALS patients. We also identified 5 heterozygous missense variants, predicted to be deleterious, in 1 isolated FTD, 1 FTD-ALS, and 3 ALS cases. Our results demonstrate that TBK1 loss-of-function mutations are more frequent in patients with FTD-ALS (10.8%) than in isolated ALS. TBK1 should thus also be sequenced, after exclusion of C9orf72 mutation, in patients presenting FTD, particularly in cases secondarily associated with ALS. PMID:26476236

  16. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia: distinct and overlapping changes in eating behaviour and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rebekah M; Irish, Muireann; Piguet, Olivier; Halliday, Glenda M; Ittner, Lars M; Farooqi, Sadaf; Hodges, John R; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2016-03-01

    Metabolic changes incorporating fluctuations in weight, insulin resistance, and cholesterol concentrations have been identified in several neurodegenerative disorders. Whether these changes result from the neurodegenerative process affecting brain regions necessary for metabolic regulation or whether they drive the degenerative process is unknown. Emerging evidence from epidemiological, clinical, pathological, and experimental studies emphasises a range of changes in eating behaviours and metabolism in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). In ALS, metabolic changes have been linked to disease progression and prognosis. Furthermore, changes in eating behaviour that affect metabolism have been incorporated into the diagnostic criteria for FTD, which has some clinical and pathological overlap with ALS. Whether the distinct and shared metabolic and eating changes represent a component of the proposed spectrum of the two diseases is an intriguing possibility. Moreover, future research should aim to unravel the complex connections between eating, metabolism, and neurodegeneration in ALS and FTD, and aim to understand the potential for targeting modifiable risk factors in disease development and progression. PMID:26822748

  17. A Study of Cortical Excitability, Central Motor Conduction, and Cortical Inhibition Using Single Pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Patients with Early Frontotemporal and Alzheimer's Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Nagaraju, B. C.; Philip, Mariamma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Degenerative cortical dementias affect several million people worldwide. Early diagnosis and categorization are essential for initiating appropriate pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment so that deterioration can be postponed, and disability adjusted life years can be saved both for the patient and for the caregiver. Therefore, an early, simple, noninvasive biomarker will serve as a boon. Patients and Methods: Patients who satisfied probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) or frontotemporal dementia (FTD) using international consensus criteria for FTD and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke-AD and Related Disorders Association criteria for AD were evaluated using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation with figure of eight coil and motor evoked potential from right first dorsal interossei. Resting threshold (MT), central motor conduction time (CMCT), and silent period (SP) were evaluated. Results: Resting MT and SP are reduced in patients with Alzheimer's disease whereas CMCT is prolonged in patients with FTD and SP is in the lower limit of normal in both conditions. Conclusion: The patterns of central motor conduction and MT are distinctly different in patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and FTD. PMID:27011398

  18. Survival in the pre-senile dementia frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 proteinopathy: effects of genetic, demographic and neuropathological variables.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, R A

    2016-01-01

    Factors associated with survival were studied in 84 neuropathologically documented cases of the pre-senile dementia frontotemporal dementia lobar degeneration (FTLD) with transactive response (TAR) DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) proteinopathy (FTLD-TDP). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis estimated mean survival as 7.9 years (range: 1-19 years, SD = 4.64). Familial and sporadic cases exhibited similar survival, including progranulin (GRN) gene mutation cases. No significant differences in survival were associated with sex, disease onset, Braak disease stage, or disease subtype, but higher survival was associated with lower post-mortem brain weight. Survival was significantly reduced in cases with associated motor neuron disease (FTLD-MND) but increased with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or hippocampal sclerosis (HS) co-morbidity. Cox regression analysis suggested that reduced survival was associated with increased densities of neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCI) while increased survival was associated with greater densities of enlarged neurons (EN) in the frontal and temporal lobes. The data suggest that: (1) survival in FTLD-TDP is more prolonged than typical in pre-senile dementia but shorter than some clinical subtypes such as the semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), (2) MND co-morbidity predicts poor survival, and (3) NCI may develop early and EN later in the disease. The data have implications for both neuropathological characterization and subtyping of FTLD-TDP. PMID:27543771

  19. A Brazilian family with hereditary inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Fanganiello, R D; Kimonis, V E; Côrte, C C; Nitrini, R; Passos-Bueno, M R

    2011-04-01

    Inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) is a progressive and usually misdiagnosed autosomal dominant disorder. It is clinically characterized by a triad of features: proximal and distal myopathy, early onset Paget disease of bone (PDB), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). It is caused by missense mutations in the valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene. We describe here the clinical and molecular findings of the first Brazilian family identified with IBMPFD. Progressive myopathy affecting the limb girdles was detected by clinical examination followed by muscle biopsy and creatine kinase measurement. PDB was suggested after anatomopathological bone examination and FTD was diagnosed by clinical, neuropsychological and language evaluations. Brain magnetic resonance revealed severe atrophy of the anterior temporal lobes, including the hippocampi. A R93C mutation in VCP was detected by direct sequencing screening in subject W (age 62) and in his mother. Four more individuals diagnosed with "dementia" were reported in this family. We also present a comprehensive genotype-phenotype correlation analysis of mutations in VCP in 182 patients from 29 families described in the literature and show that while IBM is a conspicuously penetrant symptom, PDB has a lower penetrance when associated with mutations in the AAAD1 domain and FTD has a lower penetrance when associated with mutations in the Junction (L1-D1) domain. Furthermore, the R93C mutation is likely to be associated with the penetrance of all the clinical symptoms of the triad. PMID:21412659

  20. Loss of TBK1 is a frequent cause of frontotemporal dementia in a Belgian cohort

    PubMed Central

    Gijselinck, Ilse; Van Mossevelde, Sara; van der Zee, Julie; Sieben, Anne; Philtjens, Stéphanie; Heeman, Bavo; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; De Baets, Greet; Bäumer, Veerle; Cuijt, Ivy; Van den Broeck, Marleen; Peeters, Karin; Mattheijssens, Maria; Rousseau, Frederic; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Jonghe, Peter; Cras, Patrick; De Deyn, Peter P.; Martin, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the genetic contribution of TBK1, a gene implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and FTD-ALS, in Belgian FTD and ALS patient cohorts containing a significant part of genetically unresolved patients. Methods: We sequenced TBK1 in a hospital-based cohort of 482 unrelated patients with FTD and FTD-ALS and 147 patients with ALS and an extended Belgian FTD-ALS family DR158. We followed up mutation carriers by segregation studies, transcript and protein expression analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Results: We identified 11 patients carrying a loss-of-function (LOF) mutation resulting in an overall mutation frequency of 1.7% (11/629), 1.1% in patients with FTD (5/460), 3.4% in patients with ALS (5/147), and 4.5% in patients with FTD-ALS (1/22). We found 1 LOF mutation, p.Glu643del, in 6 unrelated patients segregating with disease in family DR158. Of 2 mutation carriers, brain and spinal cord was characterized by TDP-43-positive pathology. The LOF mutations including the p.Glu643del mutation led to loss of transcript or protein in blood and brain. Conclusions: TBK1 LOF mutations are the third most frequent cause of clinical FTD in the Belgian clinically based patient cohort, after C9orf72 and GRN, and the second most common cause of clinical ALS after C9orf72. These findings reinforce that FTD and ALS belong to the same disease continuum. PMID:26581300

  1. Damage to Left Frontal Regulatory Circuits Produces Greater Positive Emotional Reactivity in Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Virginia E.; Yokoyama, Jennifer S.; Eckart, Janet A.; Zakrzewski, Jessica; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Seeley, William W.; Levenson, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Positive emotions foster social relationships and motivate thought and action. Dysregulation of positive emotion may give rise to debilitating clinical symptomatology such as mania, risk-taking, and disinhibition. Neuroanatomically, there is extensive evidence that the left hemisphere of the brain, and the left frontal lobe in particular, plays an important role in positive emotion generation. Although prior studies have found that left frontal injury decreases positive emotion, it is not clear whether selective damage to left frontal emotion regulatory systems can actually increase positive emotion. We measured happiness reactivity in 96 patients with frontotemporal dementia, a neurodegenerative disease that targets emotion-relevant neural systems and causes alterations in positive emotion (i.e., euphoria and jocularity), and in 34 healthy controls. Participants watched a film clip designed to elicit happiness and a comparison film clip designed to elicit sadness while their facial behavior, physiological reactivity, and self-reported emotional experience were monitored. Whole-brain voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed that atrophy in predominantly left hemisphere fronto-striatal emotion regulation systems including left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior insula, and striatum (pFWE < .05) was associated with greater happiness facial behavior during the film. Atrophy in left anterior insula and bilateral frontopolar cortex was also associated with higher cardiovascular reactivity (i.e., heart rate and blood pressure) but not self-reported positive emotional experience during the happy film (p< .005, uncorrected). No regions emerged as being associated with greater sadness reactivity, which suggests that left-lateralized fronto-striatal atrophy is selectively associated with happiness dysregulation. Whereas previous models have proposed that left frontal injury decreases positive emotional responding, we argue that selective

  2. Some is not enough: quantifier comprehension in corticobasal syndrome and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Brianna; Gross, Rachel G; Clark, Robin; Dreyfuss, Michael; Boller, Ashley; Camp, Emily; Liang, Tsao-Wei; Avants, Brian; McMillan, Corey T; Grossman, Murray

    2011-11-01

    Quantifiers are very common in everyday speech, but we know little about their cognitive basis or neural representation. The present study examined comprehension of three classes of quantifiers that depend on different cognitive components in patients with focal neurodegenerative diseases. Patients evaluated the truth-value of a sentence containing a quantifier relative to a picture illustrating a small number of familiar objects, and performance was related to MRI grey matter atrophy using voxel-based morphometry. We found that patients with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) and posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) are significantly impaired in their comprehension of cardinal quantifiers (e.g. "At least three birds are on the branch"), due in part to their deficit in quantity knowledge. MRI analyses related this deficit to temporal-parietal atrophy found in CBS/PCA. We also found that patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are significantly impaired in their comprehension of logical quantifiers (e.g. "Some of the birds are on the branch"), associated with a simple form of perceptual logic, and this correlated with their deficit on executive measures. This deficit was related to disease in rostral prefrontal cortex in bvFTD. These patients were also impaired in their comprehension of majority quantifiers (e.g. "At least half of the birds are on the branch"), and this too was correlated with their deficit on executive measures. This was related to disease in the basal ganglia interrupting a frontal-striatal loop critical for executive functioning. These findings suggest that a large-scale frontal-parietal neural network plays a crucial role in quantifier comprehension, and that comprehension of specific classes of quantifiers may be selectively impaired in patients with focal neurodegenerative conditions in these areas. PMID:21930136

  3. Profiling Speech and Pausing in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD)

    PubMed Central

    Yunusova, Yana; Graham, Naida L.; Shellikeri, Sanjana; Phuong, Kent; Kulkarni, Madhura; Rochon, Elizabeth; Tang-Wai, David F.; Chow, Tiffany W.; Black, Sandra E.; Zinman, Lorne H.; Green, Jordan R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examines reading aloud in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and those with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in order to determine whether differences in patterns of speaking and pausing exist between patients with primary motor vs. primary cognitive-linguistic deficits, and in contrast to healthy controls. Design 136 participants were included in the study: 33 controls, 85 patients with ALS, and 18 patients with either the behavioural variant of FTD (FTD-BV) or progressive nonfluent aphasia (FTD-PNFA). Participants with ALS were further divided into 4 non-overlapping subgroups—mild, respiratory, bulbar (with oral-motor deficit) and bulbar-respiratory—based on the presence and severity of motor bulbar or respiratory signs. All participants read a passage aloud. Custom-made software was used to perform speech and pause analyses, and this provided measures of speaking and articulatory rates, duration of speech, and number and duration of pauses. These measures were statistically compared in different subgroups of patients. Results The results revealed clear differences between patient groups and healthy controls on the passage reading task. A speech-based motor function measure (i.e., articulatory rate) was able to distinguish patients with bulbar ALS or FTD-PNFA from those with respiratory ALS or FTD-BV. Distinguishing the disordered groups proved challenging based on the pausing measures. Conclusions and Relevance This study demonstrated the use of speech measures in the identification of those with an oral-motor deficit, and showed the usefulness of performing a relatively simple reading test to assess speech versus pause behaviors across the ALS—FTD disease continuum. The findings also suggest that motor speech assessment should be performed as part of the diagnostic workup for patients with FTD. PMID:26789001

  4. Damage to left frontal regulatory circuits produces greater positive emotional reactivity in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Virginia E; Yokoyama, Jennifer S; Eckart, Janet A; Zakrzewski, Jessica; Rosen, Howard J; Miller, Bruce L; Seeley, William W; Levenson, Robert W

    2015-03-01

    Positive emotions foster social relationships and motivate thought and action. Dysregulation of positive emotion may give rise to debilitating clinical symptomatology such as mania, risk-taking, and disinhibition. Neuroanatomically, there is extensive evidence that the left hemisphere of the brain, and the left frontal lobe in particular, plays an important role in positive emotion generation. Although prior studies have found that left frontal injury decreases positive emotion, it is not clear whether selective damage to left frontal emotion regulatory systems can actually increase positive emotion. We measured happiness reactivity in 96 patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), a neurodegenerative disease that targets emotion-relevant neural systems and causes alterations in positive emotion (i.e., euphoria and jocularity), and in 34 healthy controls. Participants watched a film clip designed to elicit happiness and a comparison film clip designed to elicit sadness while their facial behavior, physiological reactivity, and self-reported emotional experience were monitored. Whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses revealed that atrophy in predominantly left hemisphere fronto-striatal emotion regulation systems including left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior insula, and striatum was associated with greater happiness facial behavior during the film (pFWE < .05). Atrophy in left anterior insula and bilateral frontopolar cortex was also associated with higher cardiovascular reactivity (i.e., heart rate and blood pressure) but not self-reported positive emotional experience during the happy film (p < .005, uncorrected). No regions emerged as being associated with greater sadness reactivity, which suggests that left-lateralized fronto-striatal atrophy is selectively associated with happiness dysregulation. Whereas previous models have proposed that left frontal injury decreases positive emotional responding, we argue that

  5. Orbitofrontal and limbic signatures of empathic concern and intentional harm in the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Baez, Sandra; Morales, Juan P; Slachevsky, Andrea; Torralva, Teresa; Matus, Cristian; Manes, Facundo; Ibanez, Agustin

    2016-02-01

    Perceiving and evaluating intentional harms in an interpersonal context engages both cognitive and emotional domains. This process involves inference of intentions, moral judgment, and, crucially, empathy towards others' suffering. This latter skill is notably impaired in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). However, the relationship between regional brain atrophy in bvFTD and deficits in the above-mentioned abilities is not well understood. The present study investigated how gray matter (GM) atrophy in bvFTD patients correlates with the perception and evaluation of harmful actions (attribution of intentionality, evaluation of harmful behavior, empathic concern, and moral judgment). First, we compared the behavioral performance of 26 bvFTD patients and 23 healthy controls on an experimental task (ET) indexing intentionality, empathy, and moral cognition during evaluation of harmful actions. Second, we compared GM volume in patients and controls using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Third, we examined brain regions where atrophy might be associated with specific impairments in the patient group. Finally, we explored whether the patients' deficits in intentionality comprehension and empathic concern could be partially explained by regional GM atrophy or impairments in other relevant factors, such as executive functions (EFs). In bvFTD patients, atrophy of limbic structures (amygdala and anterior paracingulate cortex--APC) was related to impairments in intentionality comprehension, while atrophy of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) was associated with empathic concern deficits. Intentionality comprehension impairments were predicted by EFs and orbitofrontal atrophy predicted deficits in empathic concern. Thus, although the perception and evaluation of harmful actions are variously compromised in bvFTD, deficits in empathic concern may be central to this syndrome as they are associated with one of the earliest atrophied region. More generally, our results

  6. Delineating the relationship between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia: Sequence and structure-based predictions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Islam, Asimul; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2016-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are related neurodegenerative disorders which are characterized by a rapid decline in cognitive and motor functions, and short survival. Both syndromes may be present within the same family or even in the same person. The genetic findings for both diseases also support the existence of a continuum, with mutations in the same genes being found in patients with ALS, FTD or FTD/ALS. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the differences in mutations of the same protein causing either ALS or FTD. Here, we shed light on 348 ALS and FTD missense mutations in 14 genes focusing on genic intolerance and protein stability based on available 3D structures. Using EvoTol, we prioritized the disease-causing genes and their domain. The most intolerant genes predicted by EvoTol are SQSTM1 and OPTN which are involved in protein homeostasis. Further, using ENCoM (Elastic Network Contact Model) that predicts stability based on vibrational entropy, we predicted that most of the missense mutations with destabilizing energies are in the structural regions that control the protein-protein interaction, and only a few mutations affect protein folding. We found a trend that energy changes are higher for ALS compared to FTD mutations. The stability of the ALS mutants correlated well with the duration of disease progression as compared to FTD-ALS mutants. This study provides a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of ALS and illustrates the significance of structure-energy based studies in differentiating ALS and FTD mutations. PMID:27318084

  7. SOME IS NOT ENOUGH: QUANTIFIER COMPREHENSION IN CORTICOBASAL SYNDROME AND BEHAVIORAL VARIANT FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Brianna; Gross, Rachel; Clark, Robin; Dreyfuss, Michael; Boller, Ashley; Camp, Emily; Liang, Tsao-Wei; Avants, Brian; McMillan, Corey; Grossman, Murray

    2011-01-01

    Quantifiers are very common in everyday speech, but we know little about their cognitive basis or neural representation. The present study examined comprehension of three classes of quantifiers that depend on different cognitive components in patients with focal neurodegenerative diseases. Patients evaluated the truth-value of a sentence containing a quantifier relative to a picture illustrating a small number of familiar objects, and performance was related to MRI grey matter atrophy using voxel-based morphometry. We found that patients with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) and posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) are significantly impaired in their comprehension of Cardinal Quantifiers (e.g. “At least three birds are on the branch”), due in part to their deficit in quantity knowledge. MRI analyses related this deficit to temporal-parietal atrophy found in CBS/PCA. We also found that patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are significantly impaired in their comprehension of Logical Quantifiers (e.g. “Some the birds are on the branch”), associated with a simple form of perceptual logic, and this correlated with their deficit on executive measures. This deficit was related to disease in rostral prefrontal cortex in bvFTD. These patients were also impaired in their comprehension of Majority Quantifiers (e.g. “At least half of the birds are on the branch”), and this too was correlated with their deficit on executive measures. This was related to disease in the basal ganglia interrupting a frontal-striatal loop critical for executive functioning. These findings suggest that a large-scale frontal-parietal neural network plays a crucial role in quantifier comprehension, and that comprehension of specific classes of quantifiers may be selectively impaired in patients with focal neurodegenerative conditions in these areas. PMID:21930136

  8. Formal Psychiatric Disorders are not Overrepresented in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Gossink, Flora T; Dols, Annemieke; Krudop, Welmoed A; Sikkes, Sietske A; Kerssens, Cora J; Prins, Niels D; Scheltens, Philip; Stek, Max L; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L

    2016-02-25

    While psychiatric misdiagnosis is well-known in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), a systematic evaluation of standardized criteria for psychiatric disorders in bvFTD is still missing. Our aim was to define frequency and character of DSM-IV psychiatric disorders among patients with probable and definite bvFTD compared to possible bvFTD, other neurodegenerative diseases, and psychiatric diagnoses, using MINI-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. We additionally compared psychiatric prodromes between these groups. Subjects were participants of the late-onset frontal lobe (LOF) study, a longitudinal multicenter study. In each patient, after baseline diagnostic procedure, a neurologist and geriatric psychiatrist made a joint clinical diagnosis. Independently, a structured diagnostic interview according to DSM-IV and ICD-10 criteria (MINI-Plus) was performed by a trained professional blinded to clinical diagnosis. Out of 91 patients, 23 with probable and definite bvFTD, 3 with possible bvFTD, 25 with a non bvFTD neurodegenerative disease, and 40 with a clinical psychiatric diagnosis were included. Overall frequency of formal current and past psychiatric disorders in probable and definite bvFTD (21.7% current, 8.7% past) did not differ from other neurodegenerative diseases (12.0% current, 16.0% past) or possible bvFTD (66.7% current, 66.7% past), but was less than in patients with a clinical psychiatric diagnosis (57.5% current, 62.5% past; p <  0.01). In probable and definite bvFTD unipolar mood disorders were most common. Formally diagnosed psychiatric disorders are not overrepresented in probable bvFTD, suggesting that psychiatric misdiagnosis in bvFTD can be reduced by strictly applying diagnostic criteria. In suspected bvFTD close collaboration between neurologists and psychiatrists will advance diagnostics and subsequent treatment. PMID:26967225

  9. Frontotemporal dementia and its subtypes: a genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Hernandez, Dena G; Nalls, Michael A; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Kwok, John B J; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Brooks, William S; Schofield, Peter R; Halliday, Glenda M; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier; Bartley, Lauren; Thompson, Elizabeth; Haan, Eric; Hernández, Isabel; Ruiz, Agustín; Boada, Mercè; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Cruchaga, Carlos; Cairns, Nigel J; Benussi, Luisa; Binetti, Giuliano; Ghidoni, Roberta; Forloni, Gianluigi; Galimberti, Daniela; Fenoglio, Chiara; Serpente, Maria; Scarpini, Elio; Clarimón, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Blesa, Rafael; Waldö, Maria Landqvist; Nilsson, Karin; Nilsson, Christer; Mackenzie, Ian R A; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; Mann, David M A; Grafman, Jordan; Morris, Christopher M; Attems, Johannes; Griffiths, Timothy D; McKeith, Ian G; Thomas, Alan J; Pietrini, P; Huey, Edward D; Wassermann, Eric M; Baborie, Atik; Jaros, Evelyn; Tierney, Michael C; Pastor, Pau; Razquin, Cristina; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Alonso, Elena; Perneczky, Robert; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Kurz, Alexander; Rainero, Innocenzo; Rubino, Elisa; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; George-Hyslop, Peter St; Rossi, Giacomina; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Giaccone, Giorgio; Rowe, James B; Schlachetzki, J C M; Uphill, James; Collinge, John; Mead, S; Danek, Adrian; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Grossman, Murray; Trojanowsk, John Q; van der Zee, Julie; Deschamps, William; Van Langenhove, Tim; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Cappa, Stefano F; Le Ber, Isabelle; Hannequin, Didier; Golfier, Véronique; Vercelletto, Martine; Brice, Alexis; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Bagnoli, Silvia; Piaceri, Irene; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Hjermind, Lena E; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Mayhaus, Manuel; Ibach, Bernd; Gasparoni, Gilles; Pichler, Sabrina; Gu, Wei; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C; Warren, Jason D; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Morris, Huw R; Rizzu, Patrizia; Heutink, Peter; Snowden, Julie S; Rollinson, Sara; Richardson, Anna; Gerhard, Alexander; Bruni, Amalia C; Maletta, Raffaele; Frangipane, Francesca; Cupidi, Chiara; Bernardi, Livia; Anfossi, Maria; Gallo, Maura; Conidi, Maria Elena; Smirne, Nicoletta; Rademakers, Rosa; Baker, Matt; Dickson, Dennis W; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Petersen, Ronald C; Knopman, David; Josephs, Keith A; Boeve, Bradley F; Parisi, Joseph E; Seeley, William W; Miller, Bruce L; Karydas, Anna M; Rosen, Howard; van Swieten, John C; Dopper, Elise G P; Seelaar, Harro; Pijnenburg, Yolande AL; Scheltens, Philip; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Capozzo, Rosa; Novelli, Valeria; Puca, Annibale A; Franceschi, M; Postiglione, Alfredo; Milan, Graziella; Sorrentino, Paolo; Kristiansen, Mark; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Graff, Caroline; Pasquier, Florence; Rollin, Adeline; Deramecourt, Vincent; Lebert, Florence; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Ferrucci, Luigi; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Momeni, Parastoo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a complex disorder characterised by a broad range of clinical manifestations, differential pathological signatures, and genetic variability. Mutations in three genes—MAPT, GRN, and C9orf72—have been associated with FTD. We sought to identify novel genetic risk loci associated with the disorder. Methods We did a two-stage genome-wide association study on clinical FTD, analysing samples from 3526 patients with FTD and 9402 healthy controls. All participants had European ancestry. In the discovery phase (samples from 2154 patients with FTD and 4308 controls), we did separate association analyses for each FTD subtype (behavioural variant FTD, semantic dementia, progressive non-fluent aphasia, and FTD overlapping with motor neuron disease [FTD-MND]), followed by a meta-analysis of the entire dataset. We carried forward replication of the novel suggestive loci in an independent sample series (samples from 1372 patients and 5094 controls) and then did joint phase and brain expression and methylation quantitative trait loci analyses for the associated (p<5 × 10−8) and suggestive single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Findings We identified novel associations exceeding the genome-wide significance threshold (p<5 × 10−8) that encompassed the HLA locus at 6p21.3 in the entire cohort. We also identified a potential novel locus at 11q14, encompassing RAB38/CTSC, for the behavioural FTD subtype. Analysis of expression and methylation quantitative trait loci data suggested that these loci might affect expression and methylation incis. Interpretation Our findings suggest that immune system processes (link to 6p21.3) and possibly lysosomal and autophagy pathways (link to 11q14) are potentially involved in FTD. Our findings need to be replicated to better define the association of the newly identified loci with disease and possibly to shed light on the pathomechanisms contributing to FTD. Funding The National Institute of

  10. Fusion FDG-PET/MRI Evidence to Support Diagnosis of Frontotemporal Dementia-Related Primary Progressive Aphasia.

    PubMed

    VanDreel, Aaron; Aftab, Syed A; Sanan, Prateek; Grant, Christopher; Lu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    A 61-year-old right-handed man presented for cognitive neurological evaluation with word-finding difficulty, impaired word retrieval, impaired repetition of phrases, and stammering. Brain MRI and FDG-PET/CT were performed as initial imaging workup. Further FDG PET/MRI brain images were obtained through software fusion and revealed regional cortical atrophy with corresponding hypometabolic activity involving the posterior aspects of the left middle and inferior temporal gyri. These characteristic imaging findings are supportive of patient's diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia-related primary progressive aphasia. PMID:26859219

  11. Invited review: Frontotemporal dementia caused by microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) mutations: a chameleon for neuropathology and neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Ghetti, B; Oblak, A L; Boeve, B F; Johnson, K A; Dickerson, B C; Goedert, M

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary frontotemporal dementia associated with mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) is a protean disorder. Three neuropathologic subtypes can be recognized, based on the presence of inclusions made of tau isoforms with three and four repeats, predominantly three repeats and mostly four repeats. This is relevant for establishing a correlation between structural magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography using tracers specific for aggregated tau. Longitudinal studies will be essential to determine the evolution of anatomical alterations from the asymptomatic stage to the various phases of disease following the onset of symptoms. PMID:25556536

  12. C9ORF72, implicated in amytrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, regulates endosomal trafficking.

    PubMed

    Farg, Manal A; Sundaramoorthy, Vinod; Sultana, Jessica M; Yang, Shu; Atkinson, Rachel A K; Levina, Vita; Halloran, Mark A; Gleeson, Paul A; Blair, Ian P; Soo, Kai Y; King, Anna E; Atkin, Julie D

    2014-07-01

    Intronic expansion of a hexanucleotide GGGGCC repeat in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) gene is the major cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia. However, the cellular function of the C9ORF72 protein remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that C9ORF72 regulates endosomal trafficking. C9ORF72 colocalized with Rab proteins implicated in autophagy and endocytic transport: Rab1, Rab5, Rab7 and Rab11 in neuronal cell lines, primary cortical neurons and human spinal cord motor neurons, consistent with previous predictions that C9ORF72 bears Rab guanine exchange factor activity. Consistent with this notion, C9ORF72 was present in the extracellular space and as cytoplasmic vesicles. Depletion of C9ORF72 using siRNA inhibited transport of Shiga toxin from the plasma membrane to Golgi apparatus, internalization of TrkB receptor and altered the ratio of autophagosome marker light chain 3 (LC3) II:LC3I, indicating that C9ORF72 regulates endocytosis and autophagy. C9ORF72 also colocalized with ubiquilin-2 and LC3-positive vesicles, and co-migrated with lysosome-stained vesicles in neuronal cell lines, providing further evidence that C9ORF72 regulates autophagy. Investigation of proteins interacting with C9ORF72 using mass spectrometry identified other proteins implicated in ALS; ubiquilin-2 and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins, hnRNPA2/B1 and hnRNPA1, and actin. Treatment of cells overexpressing C9ORF72 with proteasome inhibitors induced the formation of stress granules positive for hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA2/B1. Immunohistochemistry of C9ORF72 ALS patient motor neurons revealed increased colocalization between C9ORF72 and Rab7 and Rab11 compared with controls, suggesting possible dysregulation of trafficking in patients bearing the C9ORF72 repeat expansion. Hence, this study identifies a role for C9ORF72 in Rab-mediated cellular trafficking. PMID:24549040

  13. Mutant Tau knock-in mice display frontotemporal dementia relevant behaviour and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Koss, David J; Robinson, Lianne; Drever, Benjamin D; Plucińska, Kaja; Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Veselcic, Peter; Riedel, Gernot; Platt, Bettina

    2016-07-01

    Models of Tau pathology related to frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are essential to determine underlying neurodegenerative pathologies and resulting tauopathy relevant behavioural changes. However, existing models are often limited in their translational value due to Tau overexpression, and the frequent occurrence of motor deficits which prevent comprehensive behavioural assessments. In order to address these limitations, a forebrain-specific (CaMKIIα promoter), human mutated Tau (hTauP301L+R406W) knock-in mouse was generated out of the previously characterised PLB1Triple mouse, and named PLB2Tau. After confirmation of an additional hTau species (~60kDa) in forebrain samples, we identified age-dependent progressive Tau phosphorylation which coincided with the emergence of FTD relevant behavioural traits. In line with the non-cognitive symptomatology of FTD, PLB2Tau mice demonstrated early emerging (~6months) phenotypes of heightened anxiety in the elevated plus maze, depressive/apathetic behaviour in a sucrose preference test and generally reduced exploratory activity in the absence of motor impairments. Investigations of cognitive performance indicated prominent dysfunctions in semantic memory, as assessed by social transmission of food preference, and in behavioural flexibility during spatial reversal learning in a home cage corner-learning task. Spatial learning was only mildly affected and task-specific, with impairments at 12months of age in the corner learning but not in the water maze task. Electroencephalographic (EEG) investigations indicated a vigilance-stage specific loss of alpha power during wakefulness at both parietal and prefrontal recording sites, and site-specific EEG changes during non-rapid eye movement sleep (prefrontal) and rapid eye movement sleep (parietal). Further investigation of hippocampal electrophysiology conducted in slice preparations indicated a modest reduction in efficacy of synaptic transmission in the absence of altered synaptic

  14. Self-Awareness and Self-Monitoring of Cognitive and Behavioral Deficits in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia, Primary Progressive Aphasia and Probable Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Sarah; Weintraub, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Lack of insight is a core diagnostic criterion for behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), and is believed to be intact in the early stages of primary progressive aphasia (PPA). In other neurological conditions, symptom-specific insight has been noted, with behavioral symptoms appearing especially vulnerable to reduced insight.…

  15. A genome-wide screening and SNPs-to-genes approach to identify novel genetic risk factors associated with frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Grassi, Mario; Salvi, Erika; Borroni, Barbara; Palluzzi, Fernando; Pepe, Daniele; D'Avila, Francesca; Padovani, Alessandro; Archetti, Silvana; Rainero, Innocenzo; Rubino, Elisa; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luisa; Binetti, Giuliano; Ghidoni, Roberta; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Serpente, Maria; Rossi, Giacomina; Giaccone, Giorgio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Nacmias, Benedetta; Piaceri, Irene; Bagnoli, Silvia; Bruni, Amalia C; Maletta, Raffaele G; Bernardi, Livia; Postiglione, Alfredo; Milan, Graziella; Franceschi, Massimo; Puca, Annibale A; Novelli, Valeria; Barlassina, Cristina; Glorioso, Nicola; Manunta, Paolo; Singleton, Andrew; Cusi, Daniele; Hardy, John; Momeni, Parastoo

    2015-10-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most prevalent form of early onset dementia after Alzheimer's disease (AD). We performed a case-control association study in an Italian FTD cohort (n = 530) followed by the novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)-to-genes approach and functional annotation analysis. We identified 2 novel potential loci for FTD. Suggestive SNPs reached p-values ∼10(-7) and odds ratio > 2.5 (2p16.3) and 1.5 (17q25.3). Suggestive alleles at 17q25.3 identified a disease-associated haplotype causing decreased expression of -cis genes such as RFNG and AATK involved in neuronal genesis and differentiation and axon outgrowth, respectively. We replicated this locus through the SNPs-to-genes approach. Our functional annotation analysis indicated significant enrichment for functions of the brain (neuronal genesis, differentiation, and maturation), the synapse (neurotransmission and synapse plasticity), and elements of the immune system, the latter supporting our recent international FTD-genome-wide association study. This is the largest genome-wide study in Italian FTD to date. Although our results are not conclusive, we set the basis for future replication studies and identification of susceptible molecular mechanisms involved in FTD pathogenesis. PMID:26154020

  16. A genome-wide screening and SNPs-to-genes approach to identify novel genetic risk factors associated with frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Grassi, Mario; Salvi, Erika; Borroni, Barbara; Palluzzi, Fernando; Pepe, Daniele; D'Avila, Francesca; Padovani, Alessandro; Archetti, Silvana; Rainero, Innocenzo; Rubino, Elisa; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luisa; Binetti, Giuliano; Ghidoni, Roberta; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Serpente, Maria; Rossi, Giacomina; Giaccone, Giorgio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Nacmias, Benedetta; Piaceri, Irene; Bagnoli, Silvia; Bruni, Amalia C.; Maletta, Raffaele G.; Bernardi, Livia; Postiglione, Alfredo; Milan, Graziella; Franceschi, Massimo; Puca, Annibale A.; Novelli, Valeria; Barlassina, Cristina; Glorioso, Nicola; Manunta, Paolo; Singleton, Andrew; Cusi, Daniele; Hardy, John; Momeni, Parastoo

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most prevalent form of early onset dementia after Alzheimer's disease (AD). We performed a case-control association study in an Italian FTD cohort (n = 530) followed by the novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)-to-genes approach and functional annotation analysis. We identified 2 novel potential loci for FTD. Suggestive SNPs reached p-values ∼10−7 and odds ratio > 2.5 (2p16.3) and 1.5 (17q25.3). Suggestive alleles at 17q25.3 identified a disease-associated haplotype causing decreased expression of –cis genes such as RFNG and AATK involved in neuronal genesis and differentiation and axon outgrowth, respectively. We replicated this locus through the SNPs-to-genes approach. Our functional annotation analysis indicated significant enrichment for functions of the brain (neuronal genesis, differentiation, and maturation), the synapse (neurotransmission and synapse plasticity), and elements of the immune system, the latter supporting our recent international FTD–genome-wide association study. This is the largest genome-wide study in Italian FTD to date. Although our results are not conclusive, we set the basis for future replication studies and identification of susceptible molecular mechanisms involved in FTD pathogenesis. PMID:26154020

  17. A Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Neuropsychological Examination in the Diagnostic Distinction of Alzheimer's Disease and Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Redmond, Stephen J; Bertoux, Maxime; Hodges, John R; Hornberger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The clinical distinction between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) remains challenging and largely dependent on the experience of the clinician. This study investigates whether objective machine learning algorithms using supportive neuroimaging and neuropsychological clinical features can aid the distinction between both diseases. Retrospective neuroimaging and neuropsychological data of 166 participants (54 AD; 55 bvFTD; 57 healthy controls) was analyzed via a Naïve Bayes classification model. A subgroup of patients (n = 22) had pathologically-confirmed diagnoses. Results show that a combination of gray matter atrophy and neuropsychological features allowed a correct classification of 61.47% of cases at clinical presentation. More importantly, there was a clear dissociation between imaging and neuropsychological features, with the latter having the greater diagnostic accuracy (respectively 51.38 vs. 62.39%). These findings indicate that, at presentation, machine learning classification of bvFTD and AD is mostly based on cognitive and not imaging features. This clearly highlights the urgent need to develop better biomarkers for both diseases, but also emphasizes the value of machine learning in determining the predictive diagnostic features in neurodegeneration. PMID:27378905

  18. A Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Neuropsychological Examination in the Diagnostic Distinction of Alzheimer's Disease and Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingjing; Redmond, Stephen J.; Bertoux, Maxime; Hodges, John R.; Hornberger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The clinical distinction between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) remains challenging and largely dependent on the experience of the clinician. This study investigates whether objective machine learning algorithms using supportive neuroimaging and neuropsychological clinical features can aid the distinction between both diseases. Retrospective neuroimaging and neuropsychological data of 166 participants (54 AD; 55 bvFTD; 57 healthy controls) was analyzed via a Naïve Bayes classification model. A subgroup of patients (n = 22) had pathologically-confirmed diagnoses. Results show that a combination of gray matter atrophy and neuropsychological features allowed a correct classification of 61.47% of cases at clinical presentation. More importantly, there was a clear dissociation between imaging and neuropsychological features, with the latter having the greater diagnostic accuracy (respectively 51.38 vs. 62.39%). These findings indicate that, at presentation, machine learning classification of bvFTD and AD is mostly based on cognitive and not imaging features. This clearly highlights the urgent need to develop better biomarkers for both diseases, but also emphasizes the value of machine learning in determining the predictive diagnostic features in neurodegeneration. PMID:27378905

  19. Globular Glial Mixed Four Repeat Tau and TDP-43 Proteinopathy with Motor Neuron Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Ryoko; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Tada, Mari; Tanaka, Hidetomo; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Shiga, Atsushi; Miura, Takeshi; Aoki, Kenju; Aikawa, Akane; Ishizawa, Shin; Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may be accompanied by frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We report a case of glial mixed tau and TDP-43 proteinopathies in a Japanese patient diagnosed clinically as having ALS-D. Autopsy revealed loss of lower motor neurons and degeneration of the pyramidal tracts in the spinal cord and brain stem. The brain showed frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), the most severe neuronal loss and gliosis being evident in the precentral gyrus. Although less severe, such changes were also observed in other brain regions, including the basal ganglia and substantia nigra. AT8 immunostaining revealed that predominant occurrence of astrocytic tau lesions termed globular astrocytic inclusions (GAIs) was a feature of the affected regions. These GAIs were Gallyas-Braak negative. Neuronal and oligodendrocytic tau lesions were comparatively scarce. pS409/410 immunostaining also revealed similar neuronal and glial TDP-43 lesions. Interestingly, occasional co-localization of tau and TDP-43 was evident in the GAIs. Immunoblot analyses revealed band patterns characteristic of a 4-repeat (4R) tauopathy, corticobasal degeneration and a TDP-43 proteinopathy, ALS/FTLD-TDP Type B. No mutations were found in the MAPT or TDP-43 genes. We consider that this patient harbored a distinct, sporadic globular glial mixed 4R tau and TDP-43 proteinopathy associated with motor neuron disease and FTD. PMID:25787090

  20. The Use of Stem Cells to Model Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Dementia: From Basic Research to Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hedges, Erin C.; Mehler, Vera J.; Nishimura, Agnes L.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years several genes have linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) as a spectrum disease; however little is known about what triggers their onset. With the ability to generate patient specific stem cell lines from somatic cells, it is possible to model disease without the need to transfect cells with exogenous DNA. These pluripotent stem cells have opened new avenues for identification of disease phenotypes and their relation to specific molecular pathways. Thus, as never before, compounds with potential applications for regenerative medicine can be specifically tailored in patient derived cultures. In this review, we discuss how patient specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been used to model ALS and FTD and the most recent drug screening targets for these diseases. We also discuss how an iPSC bank would improve the quality of the available cell lines and how it would increase knowledge about the ALS/FTD disease spectrum. PMID:26966440

  1. C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia forms RNA G-quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Fratta, Pietro; Mizielinska, Sarah; Nicoll, Andrew J.; Zloh, Mire; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.; Parkinson, Gary; Isaacs, Adrian M.

    2012-01-01

    Large expansions of a non-coding GGGGCC-repeat in the first intron of the C9orf72 gene are a common cause of both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). G-rich sequences have a propensity for forming highly stable quadruplex structures in both RNA and DNA termed G-quadruplexes. G-quadruplexes have been shown to be involved in a range of processes including telomere stability and RNA transcription, splicing, translation and transport. Here we show using NMR and CD spectroscopy that the C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansion can form a stable G-quadruplex, which has profound implications for disease mechanism in ALS and FTD. PMID:23264878

  2. What is known about the subjective needs of people with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia? A scoping review.

    PubMed

    Dinand, Claudia; Nover, Sabine Ursula; Holle, Daniela; Zischka, Matthias; Halek, Margareta

    2016-07-01

    Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is an early-onset and progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with strong changes in judgement, behaviour, personality and emotions. These changes can cause significant problems in everyday life for people with bvFTD and their families, and have implications for health and society. Currently, there are no suitable evidence-based specific interventions for people with bvFTD. This scoping review aims to identify the self-expressed needs, demands and coping strategies of people with bvFTD. Identifying these issues is the first step towards the development of need-based psycho-social interventions for people with bvFTD. A comprehensive literature research was conducted of German and English scientific articles published between January 2000 and October 2014 using the databases MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PSYNDEX, SocINDEX, GeroLit, the Cochrane Library, ProQuest, the German National Library and additional search strategies in terms of a scoping review. Articles were identified by combining search terms related to 'frontotemporal dementia' with terms related to 'self-expressions', 'needs/demands' and 'coping'. After excluding duplicates, two independent reviewers screened the titles and abstracts of 2317 records for eligibility. Because eligibility could not be assessed from the titles or abstracts of 28 articles, those articles were assessed using the full text. One poster abstract met our research question and a few articles were related, but no article met all of the inclusion criteria. This lack of scientifically based knowledge concerning the perspective of people with bvFTD is discussed with reference to the search strategy and the research questions, disease-related aspects such as changes in behaviour or language and emotions and the difficulties in researching this topic. Recommendations are formulated for future research considering the perspective of people with bvFTD and that will involve the

  3. Uncovering the Neural Bases of Cognitive and Affective Empathy Deficits in Alzheimer's Disease and the Behavioral-Variant of Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Dermody, Nadene; Wong, Stephanie; Ahmed, Rebekah; Piguet, Olivier; Hodges, John R; Irish, Muireann

    2016-05-30

    Loss of empathy is a core presenting feature of the behavioral-variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), resulting in socioemotional difficulties and behavioral transgressions. In contrast, interpersonal functioning remains relatively intact in Alzheimer's disease (AD), despite marked cognitive decline. The neural substrates mediating these patterns of loss and sparing in social functioning remain unclear, yet are relevant for our understanding of the social brain. We investigated cognitive versus affective aspects of empathy using the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) in 25 AD and 24 bvFTD patients and contrasted their performance with 22 age- and education-matched controls. Cognitive empathy was comparably compromised in AD and bvFTD, whereas affective empathy was impaired exclusively in bvFTD. While controlling for overall cognitive dysfunction ameliorated perspective-taking deficits in AD, empathy loss persisted across cognitive and affective domains in bvFTD. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed divergent neural substrates of empathy loss in each patient group. Perspective-taking deficits correlated with predominantly left-sided temporoparietal atrophy in AD, whereas widespread bilateral frontoinsular, temporal, parietal, and occipital atrophy was implicated in bvFTD. Reduced empathic concern in bvFTD was associated with atrophy in the left orbitofrontal, inferior frontal, and insular cortices, and the bilateral mid-cingulate gyrus. Our findings suggest that social cognitive deficits in AD arise largely as a consequence of global cognitive dysfunction, rather than a loss of empathy per se. In contrast, loss of empathy in bvFTD reflects the deterioration of a distributed network of frontoinsular and temporal structures that appear crucial for monitoring and processing social information. PMID:27258418

  4. Evaluation of brain perfusion in specific Brodmann areas in Frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer disease using automated 3-D voxel based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valotassiou, V.; Papatriantafyllou, J.; Sifakis, N.; Karageorgiou, C.; Tsougos, I.; Tzavara, C.; Zerva, C.; Georgoulias, P.

    2009-05-01

    Introduction. Brain perfusion studies with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have been applied in demented patients to provide better discrimination between frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aim. To assess the perfusion of specific Brodmann (Br) areas of the brain cortex in FTD and AD patients, using NeuroGam processing program to provide 3D voxel-by-voxel cerebral SPECT analysis. Material and methods. We studied 34 consecutive patients. We used the established criteria for the diagnosis of dementia and the specific established criteria for the diagnosis of FTD and AD. All the patients had a neuropsychological evaluation with a battery of tests including the mini-mental state examination (MMSE).Twenty-six patients (16 males, 10 females, mean age 68.76±6.51 years, education 11.81±4.25 years, MMSE 16.69±9.89) received the diagnosis of FTD and 8 patients (all females, mean age 71.25±10.48 years, education 10±4.6 years, MMSE 12.5±3.89) the diagnosis of AD. All the patients underwent a brain SPECT. We applied the NeuroGam Software for the evaluation of brain perfusion in specific Br areas in the left (L) and right (R) hemispheres. Results. Statistically significant hypoperfusion in FTD compared to AD patients, was found in the following Br areas: 11L (p<0.0001), 11R, 20L, 20R, 32L, 38L, 38R, 44L (p<0.001), 32R, 36L, 36R, 45L, 45R, 47R (p<0.01), 9L, 21L, 39R, 44R, 46R, 47L (p<0.05). On the contrary, AD patients presented significant (p<0.05) hypoperfusion in 7R and 39R Br areas. Conclusion. NeuroGam processing program of brain perfusion SPECT could result in enhanced accuracy for the differential diagnosis between AD and FTD patients.

  5. Selective reduction of soluble tau proteins in sporadic and familial frontotemporal dementias: an international follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Zhukareva, Victoria; Sundarraj, Sonali; Mann, David; Sjogren, Magnus; Blenow, Kaj; Clark, Christopher M; McKeel, Daniel W; Goate, Alison; Lippa, Carol F; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Growdon, John H; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2003-05-01

    Recently, biochemical criteria were proposed to complement histological criteria for the diagnosis of dementia lacking distinctive histopathology (DLDH), the most common pathological variant of frontotemporal dementias (FTDs), based on evidence of a selective reduction of soluble tau proteins in brains from a large cohort of sporadic DLDH and hereditary FTD (HDDD2 family) patients. To ensure that these findings are not unique to the populations included in the initial report, we extended the previous work by analyzing 22 additional DLDH brains from the United States and international centers. Our biochemical analyses here confirmed the previous findings by demonstrating substantial reductions in soluble brain tau in gray and white matter of 14 cases and moderate reductions in 6 cases of DLDH. We also analyzed brain samples from an additional affected HDDD2 family member, and remarkably, unlike other previously studied members of this kindred, this patient's brain contained substantial amounts of pathological or insoluble tau. These findings confirm and extend the definition of DLDH as a sporadic or familial "tau-less" tauopathy with reduced levels of soluble brain tau and no insoluble tau or fibrillary tau inclusions, and the data also underline the phenotypic heterogeneity of HDDD2, which parallels the phenotypic heterogeneity of other hereditary neurodegenerative FTD tauopathies caused by tau gene mutations. PMID:12677447

  6. Early dipeptide repeat pathology in a frontotemporal dementia kindred with C9ORF72 mutation and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Malcolm; Gutowski, Nick J; Edbauer, Dieter; Hilton, David A; Stephens, Mark; Rankin, Julia; Mackenzie, Ian R A

    2014-03-01

    Familial cases of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) provide an opportunity to study the pathophysiology of this clinically diverse condition. The C9ORF72 mutation is the most common cause of familial FTD, recent pathological descriptions challenge existing TDP-43 based hypotheses of sporadic FTD pathogenesis. Non-ATG dependent translation of the hexanucleotide expansion into aggregating dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins may represent a novel pathomechanism. We report detection of the DPR aggregates very early in C9ORF72 FTD development and also describe childhood intellectual disability as a clinical feature preceding dementia. The index case presented with psychiatric symptoms, progressing into typical FTD. Autopsy revealed extensive neuronal DPR aggregates but only minimal TDP-43 pathology. Her intellectually disabled elder son, also carrying the C9ORF72 mutation, died aged 26 years and at autopsy only DPR aggregates without TDP-43 were found. A second son also has intellectual disability, his C9ORF72 status is unknown, but chromosomal microarray revealed no other cause of disability. These cases both extend the existing phenotype of C9ORF72 mutation and highlight the potential significance of DPR translation early in disease development. PMID:24445903

  7. Early onset behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia due to the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion: psychiatric clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Arighi, Andrea; Fumagalli, Giorgio G; Jacini, Francesca; Fenoglio, Chiara; Ghezzi, Laura; Pietroboni, Anna M; De Riz, Milena; Serpente, Maria; Ridolfi, Elisa; Bonsi, Rossana; Bresolin, Nereo; Scarpini, Elio; Galimberti, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the first intron of C9ORF72 has been shown to be responsible for a high number of familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or frontotemporal lobar degeneration with or without concomitant motor neuron disease phenotype and TDP-43 based pathology. Here, we report on three cases carrying the hexanucleotide repeat expansion with an atypical presentation consisting in the development of psychiatric symptoms. Patient #1, a 53 year old man with positive family history for dementia, presented with mood deflection, characterized by apathy, social withdraw, and irritability in the last two years. He was diagnosed with "mild cognitive impairment due to depressive syndrome" six months later and subsequently with Alzheimer's disease. Patient #2, a woman with positive family history for dementia, developed behavioral disturbances, aggressiveness, and swearing at 57 years of age. Patient #3 presented, in the absence of brain atrophy, with mystical delirium with auditory hallucinations at 44 years of age, and did not present neurological symptoms over a 7-year follow up. The description of these cases underlines that the hexanucleotide repeat expansion in chromosome 9 could be associated with early onset psychiatric presentations. PMID:22571983

  8. Using the Revised Diagnostic Criteria for Frontotemporal Dementia in India: Evidence of an Advanced and Florid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Amitabha; Dutt, Aparna; Ghosh, Madhura; Bhargava, Pallavi; Rao, Sulakshana

    2013-01-01

    Background The International Consortium (FTDC) that revised the diagnostic criteria for behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) did not have an Asian representation. Whether the revised criteria are equally useful in the early detection of Asian bvFTD patients therefore remains largely unexplored. Earlier studies have indicated differences in clinical manifestations in Indian and other Asian bvFTD patients when compared to western groups. There is an urgent need for clarification, given the projected exponential rise in dementia in these countries and the imminent clinical trials on bvFTD. Objective To assess how Indian bvFTD patients fulfil the FTDC criteria, hypothesizing that our patients might present differently early in the illness. Method In a hospital-based retrospective observational study, we assessed 48 probable bvFTD patients, diagnosed according to the FTDC criteria, for the speed with which these criteria were fulfilled, the frequency of individual symptoms and their order of appearance during the illness. Results Most of our patients presented with moderate to severe dementia, in spite of having relatively short onset to diagnosis times. Patients on average took 1.4 years from onset to meet the FTDC criteria, with 90% of them presenting with four or more symptoms at diagnosis. Disinhibition was the commonest symptom and the first symptom in most patients. Conclusion With most patients presenting with advanced and florid disease, the FTDC criteria have little additional impact in early identification of bvFTD in India. Modifying the criteria further could allow detection of Indian patients early enough for their inclusion in future clinical trials. PMID:23596513

  9. Right Limbic FDG-PET Hypometabolism Correlates with Emotion Recognition and Attribution in Probable Behavioral Variant of Frontotemporal Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cerami, Chiara; Dodich, Alessandra; Iannaccone, Sandro; Marcone, Alessandra; Lettieri, Giada; Crespi, Chiara; Gianolli, Luigi; Cappa, Stefano F.; Perani, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is a rare disease mainly affecting the social brain. FDG-PET fronto-temporal hypometabolism is a supportive feature for the diagnosis. It may also provide specific functional metabolic signatures for altered socio-emotional processing. In this study, we evaluated the emotion recognition and attribution deficits and FDG-PET cerebral metabolic patterns at the group and individual levels in a sample of sporadic bvFTD patients, exploring the cognitive-functional correlations. Seventeen probable mild bvFTD patients (10 male and 7 female; age 67.8±9.9) were administered standardized and validated version of social cognition tasks assessing the recognition of basic emotions and the attribution of emotions and intentions (i.e., Ekman 60-Faces test-Ek60F and Story-based Empathy task-SET). FDG-PET was analysed using an optimized voxel-based SPM method at the single-subject and group levels. Severe deficits of emotion recognition and processing characterized the bvFTD condition. At the group level, metabolic dysfunction in the right amygdala, temporal pole, and middle cingulate cortex was highly correlated to the emotional recognition and attribution performances. At the single-subject level, however, heterogeneous impairments of social cognition tasks emerged, and different metabolic patterns, involving limbic structures and prefrontal cortices, were also observed. The derangement of a right limbic network is associated with altered socio-emotional processing in bvFTD patients, but different hypometabolic FDG-PET patterns and heterogeneous performances on social tasks at an individual level exist. PMID:26513651

  10. The burden of dementia.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Valerie T

    2007-12-01

    Dementia care is a significant and growing healthcare need that will have major economic and medical impact as the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementias continues to increase in the United States during the next 50 years. The ability to differentiate the signs and symptoms of the most common dementing illnesses - AD, vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies - is essential to dementia care and management. Additionally, dementia patients in longterm care (LTC) facilities are prone to significantly greater risk of negative outcomes compared with nondemented residents as a result of a decline in activities of daily living, physical capacities, and behavioral manifestations. Careful and active assessment of risk factors and their management provides opportunities for improving outcomes. These include behavioral manifestations of pain, wandering, and risks of malnutrition, falls and injuries, and restraint use. Specific nonpharmacologic interventions to promote restraint- and pain-free care in LTC are highlighted. PMID:18095782

  11. TMEM106B p.T185S regulates TMEM106B protein levels: implications for frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Alexandra M; Finch, Nicole A; Wojtas, Aleksandra; Baker, Matt C; Perkerson, Ralph B; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Rousseau, Linda; Benussi, Luisa; Binetti, Giuliano; Ghidoni, Roberta; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; Mackenzie, Ian R; Finger, Elizabeth; Boeve, Bradley F; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Dickson, Dennis W; Rademakers, Rosa

    2013-09-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is the second leading cause of dementia in individuals under age 65. In many patients, the predominant pathology includes neuronal cytoplasmic or intranuclear inclusions of ubiquitinated TAR DNA binding protein 43 (FTLD-TDP). Recently, a genome-wide association study identified the first FTLD-TDP genetic risk factor, in which variants in and around the TMEM106B gene (top SNP rs1990622) were significantly associated with FTLD-TDP risk. Intriguingly, the most significant association was in FTLD-TDP patients carrying progranulin (GRN) mutations. Here, we investigated to what extent the coding variant, rs3173615 (p.T185S) in linkage disequilibrium with rs1990622, affects progranulin protein (PGRN) biology and transmembrane protein 106 B (TMEM106B) regulation. First, we confirmed the association of TMEM106B variants with FTLD-TDP in a new cohort of GRN mutation carriers. We next generated and characterized a TMEM106B-specific antibody for investigation of this protein. Enzyme-linked immunoassay analysis of progranulin protein levels showed similar effects upon T185 and S185 TMEM106B over-expression. However, over-expression of T185 consistently led to higher TMEM106B protein levels than S185. Cycloheximide treatment experiments revealed that S185 degrades faster than T185 TMEM106B, potentially due to differences in N-glycosylation at residue N183. Together, our results provide a potential mechanism by which TMEM106B variants lead to differences in FTLD-TDP risk. We studied the p.T185S TMEM106B genetic variant previously implicated in frontotemporal dementia with TAR DNA binding protein 43 pathology caused by progranulin mutations. Our cell culture studies provide evidence that the protective S185 isoform is degraded more rapidly than T185 TMEM106B, potentially due to differences in glycosylation. These findings suggest that low TMEM106B levels might protect against FTLD-TDP in these patients. PMID:23742080

  12. Characterization of frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with the GGGGCC repeat expansion in C9ORF72.

    PubMed

    Boeve, Bradley F; Boylan, Kevin B; Graff-Radford, Neill R; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Knopman, David S; Pedraza, Otto; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Lowe, Val; Murray, Melissa E; Dickson, Dennis W; Josephs, Keith A; Rush, Beth K; Machulda, Mary M; Fields, Julie A; Ferman, Tanis J; Baker, Matthew; Rutherford, Nicola J; Adamson, Jennifer; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Adeli, Anahita; Savica, Rodolfo; Boot, Brendon; Kuntz, Karen M; Gavrilova, Ralitza; Reeves, Andrew; Whitwell, Jennifer; Kantarci, Kejal; Jack, Clifford R; Parisi, Joseph E; Lucas, John A; Petersen, Ronald C; Rademakers, Rosa

    2012-03-01

    Numerous kindreds with familial frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have been linked to chromosome 9, and an expansion of the GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the non-coding region of chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 has recently been identified as the pathogenic mechanism. We describe the key characteristics in the probands and their affected relatives who have been evaluated at Mayo Clinic Rochester or Mayo Clinic Florida in whom the hexanucleotide repeat expansion were found. Forty-three probands and 10 of their affected relatives with DNA available (total 53 subjects) were shown to carry the hexanucleotide repeat expansion. Thirty-six (84%) of the 43 probands had a familial disorder, whereas seven (16%) appeared to be sporadic. Among examined subjects from the 43 families (n = 63), the age of onset ranged from 33 to 72 years (median 52 years) and survival ranged from 1 to 17 years, with the age of onset <40 years in six (10%) and >60 in 19 (30%). Clinical diagnoses among examined subjects included behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia with or without parkinsonism (n = 30), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 18), frontotemporal dementia/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with or without parkinsonism (n = 12), and other various syndromes (n = 3). Parkinsonism was present in 35% of examined subjects, all of whom had behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia or frontotemporal dementia/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as the dominant clinical phenotype. No subject with a diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia was identified with this mutation. Incomplete penetrance was suggested in two kindreds, and the youngest generation had significantly earlier age of onset (>10 years) compared with the next oldest generation in 11 kindreds. Neuropsychological testing showed a profile of slowed processing speed, complex attention/executive dysfunction, and impairment in rapid word retrieval. Neuroimaging studies showed bilateral frontal abnormalities

  13. Characterization of frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with the GGGGCC repeat expansion in C9ORF72

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Kevin B.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Knopman, David S.; Pedraza, Otto; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Lowe, Val; Murray, Melissa E.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Josephs, Keith A.; Rush, Beth K.; Machulda, Mary M.; Fields, Julie A.; Ferman, Tanis J.; Baker, Matthew; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Adamson, Jennifer; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Adeli, Anahita; Savica, Rodolfo; Boot, Brendon; Kuntz, Karen M.; Gavrilova, Ralitza; Reeves, Andrew; Whitwell, Jennifer; Kantarci, Kejal; Jack, Clifford R.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Lucas, John A.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Numerous kindreds with familial frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have been linked to chromosome 9, and an expansion of the GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the non-coding region of chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 has recently been identified as the pathogenic mechanism. We describe the key characteristics in the probands and their affected relatives who have been evaluated at Mayo Clinic Rochester or Mayo Clinic Florida in whom the hexanucleotide repeat expansion were found. Forty-three probands and 10 of their affected relatives with DNA available (total 53 subjects) were shown to carry the hexanucleotide repeat expansion. Thirty-six (84%) of the 43 probands had a familial disorder, whereas seven (16%) appeared to be sporadic. Among examined subjects from the 43 families (n = 63), the age of onset ranged from 33 to 72 years (median 52 years) and survival ranged from 1 to 17 years, with the age of onset <40 years in six (10%) and >60 in 19 (30%). Clinical diagnoses among examined subjects included behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia with or without parkinsonism (n = 30), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 18), frontotemporal dementia/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with or without parkinsonism (n = 12), and other various syndromes (n = 3). Parkinsonism was present in 35% of examined subjects, all of whom had behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia or frontotemporal dementia/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as the dominant clinical phenotype. No subject with a diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia was identified with this mutation. Incomplete penetrance was suggested in two kindreds, and the youngest generation had significantly earlier age of onset (>10 years) compared with the next oldest generation in 11 kindreds. Neuropsychological testing showed a profile of slowed processing speed, complex attention/executive dysfunction, and impairment in rapid word retrieval. Neuroimaging studies showed bilateral

  14. When a Little Knowledge Can Be Dangerous: False-Positive Diagnosis of Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia among Community Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Catindig, Joseree Ann; Block, Nikolas R.; Miller, Bruce L.; Rankin, Katherine P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate diagnosis of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is important as patients’ behavioral symptoms have profound implications for their families and communities. Since the diagnosis of bvFTD derives from behavioral features, accurate identification of patients can be difficult for non-specialists. Concrete rates of diagnostic accuracy among non-specialists are unavailable. Methods To examine the accuracy of community clinicians’ diagnoses of bvFTD and to identify patient characteristics leading to misdiagnosis, we reviewed the charts and referral letters of 3,578 patients who were seen at our specialized center. Referral diagnosis and reasons, manifesting symptoms, demographic data, Mini-Mental State Examination score, Clinical Dementia Rating score and Neuropsychiatric Inventory score were extracted. Results 60% of patients assigned a single diagnosis of bvFTD by community clinicians did not have bvFTD according to specialists. Compared to specialist-confirmed bvFTD patients, false bvFTD patients were more likely to be depressed and to be non-Caucasian, showed less euphoria, apathy, disinhibition and abnormal eating behaviors, had milder disease severity and better overall cognition. bvFTD was mentioned by referring clinicians in 86% of specialist-confirmed bvFTD cases, but missed cases were called Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s or Huntington’s disease, or progressive aphasia. Conclusion These results revealed a widespread lack of familiarity with core diagnostic symptoms among non-specialists and suggest that community clinicians require specialized diagnostic support before providing a definitive diagnosis of bvFTD. PMID:26741499

  15. [A Pair of Siblings with Frontotemporal Dementia and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and a Novel Thr462Lysfs Mutation in the TBK1 Gene].

    PubMed

    Schönecker, S; Brendel, M; van der Zee, J; van Broeckhoven, C; Rominger, A; Danek, A; Levin, J

    2016-08-01

    We report on a pair of siblings with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and a novel Thr462Lysfs mutation in the TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) gene identified through the European Early-Onset Dementia Consortium. The patients presented at the age of 77 and 75 years and displayed dementia and bulbar symptoms as well as progressive paresis. After a progressive course, both of them died only a few months after diagnosis. Most recently, TBK1 mutations were identified in patients with FTD and ALS. A loss of expression of the mutant allele, leading to 50 % reduced TBK1 protein levels, seems to be causative. The occurrence of TBK1 mutations in FTD and ALS underlines the fact that FTD and ALS are part of the same disease spectrum. For future therapeutic trials, characterization of TBK1 mutation carriers in presymptomatic cohorts, such as the genetic frontotemporal dementia initiative (GENFI), is of great importance. PMID:27570907

  16. Pathogenesis/genetics of frontotemporal dementia and how it relates to ALS

    PubMed Central

    Bennion Callister, Janis; Pickering-Brown, Stuart M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most interesting findings in the field of neurodegeneration in recent years is tfche discovery of a genetic mutation in the C9orf72 gene, the most common mutation found to be causative of sporadic and familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and concomitant FTD-ALS (DeJesus-Hernandez et al., 2011b; Renton et al., 2011). While clinical and molecular data, such as the identification of TDP-43 being a common pathological protein (Neumann et al., 2006) have hinted at such a link for years, the identification of what was formally known as “the chromosome 9 FTLD-ALS gene” has provided a foundation for better understanding of the relationship between the two. Indeed, it is now recognized that ALS and FTLD-TDP represent a disease spectrum. In this review, we will discuss the current genetic and pathological features of the FTLD-ALS spectrum. PMID:24915640

  17. [A nursing experience using the props-integrated communicative approach to ameliorate aggression in a frontotemporal dementia patient].

    PubMed

    Shih, Ying-Jyun; Wang, Ya-Hui; Yang, Yung-Jen

    2014-12-01

    This report introduces the nursing caring experience with a male patient with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) who was hospitalized in an acute psychiatric ward from March 5th to April 30th, 2012 due to the clinical manifestations of verbally expressive impairment, aggression, and subsequent caregiver burden. The patient was assessed according to the guidelines of clinical competencies for mental health nursing assessments developed by the Psychiatric Mental Health Nurses Association. Three clinical diagnoses were identified after this assessment, including (1) impaired verbal communication, (2) chronic confusion, and (3) caregiver role strain. The current report focuses only on the clinical issue of impaired verbal communication. We adopted a props-integrated communicative approach by integrating props and physical motions with communicative strategies. This approach enabled us to formulate a patient-centered communicating model and prompt for active expression and adequate communication, which ultimately resolved the patient's aggression problem. In addition, we provided psychoeducation to the family members in order to teach them the relevant knowledge, skills, and approaches that caregivers may use to enhance their caring capabilities and reduce the burden of caregiving. This successful experience may be used as a reference in caring for FTD patients with communicative impairments. Our proposed approach integrates props with simple language and develops an appropriate communicating model to provide high quality care for patients. PMID:25464962

  18. Constructional apraxia in frontotemporal dementia associated with the C9orf72 mutation: broadening the clinical and neuropsychological phenotype.

    PubMed

    Floris, Gianluca; Borghero, Giuseppe; Cannas, Antonino; Di Stefano, Francesca; Ruiu, Elisa; Murru, Maria R; Corongiu, Daniela; Cuccu, Stefania; Tranquilli, Stefania; Sardu, Claudia; Marrosu, Maria G; Chiò, Adriano; Marrosu, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    In our study we analysed clinical and neuropsychological data in a cohort of 57 Sardinian patients with FTD (55 apparently unrelated and two belonging to the same family), who underwent genetic screening for the C9orf72 mutation. Eight out of 56 patients were found positive for the C9orf72 mutation representing 14% of the entire cohort and 31.6% of the familial cases (6/19). C9orf72 mutated patients differed from the other FTD cases of the cohort for a younger age of onset, higher frequency of familial history for FTD and higher prevalence of delusional psychotic symptoms and hallucinations. In the neuropsychological assessment, C9orf72 mutated patients differed from non-mutated for the high frequency of visuospatial dysfunction regarding constructional apraxia (p = 0.02). In conclusion, our study confirms that Sardinian FTD patients have peculiar genetic characteristics and that C9orf72 mutated patients have a distinctive clinical and neuropsychological profile that could help differentiate them from other FTD patients. In our cohort we found that constructional apraxia, rarely reported in FTD, can properly discriminate between C9orf72 mutated and non-mutated patients and contribute to broaden the neuropsychological profile in frontotemporal dementia associated with this mutation. PMID:25285776

  19. Is the emotion recognition deficit associated with frontotemporal dementia caused by selective inattention to diagnostic facial features?

    PubMed

    Oliver, Lindsay D; Virani, Karim; Finger, Elizabeth C; Mitchell, Derek G V

    2014-07-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by severely impaired social and emotional behaviour, including emotion recognition deficits. Though fear recognition impairments seen in particular neurological and developmental disorders can be ameliorated by reallocating attention to critical facial features, the possibility that similar benefits can be conferred to patients with FTD has yet to be explored. In the current study, we examined the impact of presenting distinct regions of the face (whole face, eyes-only, and eyes-removed) on the ability to recognize expressions of anger, fear, disgust, and happiness in 24 patients with FTD and 24 healthy controls. A recognition deficit was demonstrated across emotions by patients with FTD relative to controls. Crucially, removal of diagnostic facial features resulted in an appropriate decline in performance for both groups; furthermore, patients with FTD demonstrated a lack of disproportionate improvement in emotion recognition accuracy as a result of isolating critical facial features relative to controls. Thus, unlike some neurological and developmental disorders featuring amygdala dysfunction, the emotion recognition deficit observed in FTD is not likely driven by selective inattention to critical facial features. Patients with FTD also mislabelled negative facial expressions as happy more often than controls, providing further evidence for abnormalities in the representation of positive affect in FTD. This work suggests that the emotional expression recognition deficit associated with FTD is unlikely to be rectified by adjusting selective attention to diagnostic features, as has proven useful in other select disorders. PMID:24905284

  20. FUS-regulated RNA metabolism and DNA damage repair: Implications for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yueqin; Liu, Songyan; Oztürk, Arzu; Hicks, Geoffrey G

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic inclusion of RNA binding protein FUS/TLS in neurons and glial cells is a characteristic pathology of a subgroup of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Dysregulation of RNA metabolism caused by FUS cytoplasmic inclusion emerges to be a key event in FUS-associated ALS/FTD pathogenesis. Our recent discovery of a FUS autoregulatory mechanism and its dysregulation in ALS-FUS mutants demonstrated that dysregulated alternative splicing can directly exacerbate the pathological FUS accumulation. We show here that FUS targets RNA for pre-mRNA alternative splicing and for the processing of long intron-containing transcripts, and that these targets are enriched for genes in neurogenesis and gene expression regulation. We also identify that FUS RNA targets are enriched for genes in the DNA damage response pathway. Together, the data support a model in which dysregulated RNA metabolism and DNA damage repair together may render neurons more vulnerable and accelerate neurodegeneration in ALS and FTD. PMID:25083344

  1. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid increases progranulin production in iPSC-derived cortical neurons of frontotemporal dementia patients.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Sandra; Gao, Fuying; Coppola, Giovanni; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in the granulin (GRN) gene cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD) due to progranulin haploinsufficiency. Compounds that can increase progranulin production and secretion may be considered as potential therapeutic drugs; however, very few of them have been directly tested on human cortical neurons. To this end, we differentiated 9 induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from a control subject, a sporadic FTD case and an FTD patient with progranulin S116X mutation. Treatment with 1 μM suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, increased the production of progranulin in cortical neurons of all subjects at both the mRNA and protein levels without affecting their viability. Microarray analysis revealed that SAHA treatment not only reversed some gene expression changes caused by progranulin haploinsufficiency but also caused massive alterations in the overall transcriptome. Thus, histone deacetylase inhibitors may be considered as therapeutic drugs for GRN mutation carriers. However, this class of drugs also causes drastic changes in overall gene expression in human cortical neurons and their side effects and potential impacts on other pathways should be carefully evaluated. PMID:27143419

  2. Management of frontotemporal dementia: targeting symptom management in such a heterogeneous disease requires a wide range of therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Jicha, Gregory A; Nelson, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY There are no US FDA-approved therapies for the management of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Evidence-based medicine that would support a FDA indication for the treatment of FTD requires large-scale, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials that do not currently exist. Progress in obtaining approval and therapeutic indications for FTD has been severely hampered by the heterogeneity of clinical and pathological phenotypes seen in various FTD disease states. These issues are often misinterpreted by clinicians, caregivers and patients suggesting that potential treatment options are nonexistent for this devastating disease. This article discusses these issues in the context of recent studies and publications investigating therapeutic options in FTD, and further suggests a rationale for individualized therapy in FTD. Targeting the myriad of symptoms seen in FTD requires recognition of such symptoms that may play primary or secondary roles in the spectrum of deficits that lead to functional disability in FTD, and the availability of a wide range of therapeutic options that may be helpful in alleviating such symptomatology. Fortunately, agents targeting the many cognitive, behavioral, psychiatric and motor symptoms that can be seen in FTD are readily available, having been previously developed and approved for symptomatic benefit in other disease states. In contrast to the widespread belief that beneficial treatments are not available for FTD today, our therapeutic armament is stocked with pharmacological tools that may improve quality of life for those suffering from this devastating and incurable class of degenerative diseases. PMID:21927623

  3. Medical Management of Frontotemporal Dementias: The Importance of the Caregiver in Symptom Assessment and Guidance of Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There are no currently Food and Drug Administration-approved or proven off-label treatments for the frontotemporal dementias (FTD). Clinicians, care-givers, and patients struggle regularly to find therapeutic regimens that can alleviate the problematic behavioral and cognitive symptoms associated with these devastating conditions. Success is “hit or miss” and the lessons learned are largely anecdotal to date. Drug discovery in this area has been largely hampered by the heterogeneous clinical presentations and pathological phenotypes of disease that represent significant obstacles to progress in this area. Biologically, plausible treatment strategies include the use of antidepressants (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor and monoamine oxidase inhibitors), acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid antagonists, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, stimulants, antihypertensives, and agents that may ameliorate the symptoms of parkinsonism, pseudobulbar affect, and motor neuron disease that can often coexist with FTD. These medications all carry potential risks as well as possible benefits for the person suffering from FTD, and a clear understanding of these factors is critical in selecting an appropriate therapeutic regimen to maximize cognition and daily functions, reduce behavioral symptoms, and alleviate caregiver burden in an individual patient. The role of the caregiver in tracking and reporting of symptoms and the effects of individual therapeutic interventions is pivotal in this process. This manuscript highlights the importance of establishing an effective therapeutic partnership between the physician and caregiver in the medical management of the person suffering from FTD. PMID:21647712

  4. Evaluating Behavior in Mouse Models of the Behavioral Variant of Frontotemporal Dementia: Which Test for Which Symptom?

    PubMed

    Vernay, Aurélia; Sellal, François; René, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    The behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is a neurodegenerative disease affecting people in their early sixties, characterized by dramatic changes in individual and social behavior. Despite the heterogeneity in the presentation of the clinical symptoms of bvFTD, some characteristic changes can be highlighted. Social disinhibition, changes in food preferences as well as loss of empathy and apathy are commonly described. This is accompanied by a characteristic and dramatic atrophy of the prefrontal cortex with the accumulation of protein aggregates in the neurons in this area. Several causative mutations in different genes have been discovered, allowing the development of transgenic animal models, especially mouse models. In mice, attention has been focused on the histopathological aspects of the pathology, but now studies are taking interest in assessing the behavioral phenotype of FTD models. Finding the right test corresponding to human symptoms is quite challenging, especially since the frontal cortex is much less developed in mice than in humans. Although challenging, the ability to detect relevant prefrontal cortex impairments in mice is crucial for therapeutic approaches. In this review, we aim to present the approaches that have been used to model the behavioral symptoms of FTD and to explore other relevant approaches to assess behavior involving the prefrontal cortex, as well as the deficits associated with FTD. PMID:26517704

  5. Analysis of C9orf72 in patients with frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Itzcovich, Tatiana; Xi, Zhengrui; Martinetto, Horacio; Chrem-Méndez, Patricio; Russo, María Julieta; de Ambrosi, Bruno; Uchitel, Osvaldo D; Nogués, Martín; Silva, Emanuel; Rojas, Galeno; Bagnatti, Pablo; Amengual, Alejandra; Campos, Jorge; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Allegri, Ricardo; Sevlever, Gustavo; Surace, Ezequiel I

    2016-04-01

    Pathologic expansion of the G4C2 repeat in C9orf72 is the main genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To evaluate the frequency of the G4C2 expansion in a Latin American cohort of FTD and ALS patients, we used a 2-step genotyping strategy. For FTD, we observed an overall expansion frequency of 18.2% (6 of 33 unrelated cases). Moreover, the C9orf72 expansion accounted for 37.5% of all familial FTD cases (6 of 16 families). The expansion frequency in sporadic ALS cases was 2% (1 of 47 unrelated patients), whereas we observed the expansion in 1 of 3 families with a positive history for ALS. Overall, the expansion frequency in our FTD group was similar to that reported for patients in Europe and North America, whereas the frequency in our sporadic ALS group was significantly lower. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the frequency of the C9orf72 expansion in a Latin American population. PMID:26925510

  6. Tau-mediated NMDA receptor impairment underlies dysfunction of a selectively vulnerable network in a mouse model of frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Warmus, Brian A; Sekar, Dheepa R; McCutchen, Eve; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Roberts, Rosalinda C; McMahon, Lori L; Roberson, Erik D

    2014-12-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a neurodegenerative behavioral disorder that selectively affects the salience network, including the ventral striatum and insula. Tau mutations cause FTD, but how mutant tau impairs the salience network is unknown. Here, we address this question using a mouse model expressing the entire human tau gene with an FTD-associated mutation (V337M). Mutant, but not wild-type, human tau transgenic mice had aging-dependent repetitive and disinhibited behaviors, with synaptic deficits selectively in the ventral striatum and insula. There, mutant tau depleted PSD-95, resulting in smaller postsynaptic densities and impaired synaptic localization of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). In the ventral striatum, decreased NMDAR-mediated transmission reduced striatal neuron firing. Pharmacologically enhancing NMDAR function with the NMDAR co-agonist cycloserine reversed electrophysiological and behavioral deficits. These results indicate that NMDAR hypofunction critically contributes to FTD-associated behavioral and electrophysiological alterations and that this process can be therapeutically targeted by a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug. PMID:25471585

  7. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal dementia and beyond: the TDP-43 diseases

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lage, Maria; Kwong, Linda K.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2009-01-01

    Ever since the significance of pathological 43-kDa transactivating responsive sequence DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) for human disease has been recognized in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin positive inclusions (FTLD-U), a number of publications have emerged reporting on this pathology in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Given the heterogeneous and, in part, conflicting nature of the recent findings, we here review pathological TDP-43 and its relationship to human disease with a special focus on ALS and FTLD-U. To this end, we propose a classification scheme in which pathological TDP-43 is the major disease defining pathology in one group, or is present in addition to other neurodegenerative hallmark pathologies in a second category. We conclude that the TDP-43 proteinopathies represent a novel class of neurodegenerative disorders akin to α-synucleinopathies and tauopathies, with the concept of ALS and FTLD-U to be widened to a broad clinico-pathological multisystem disease, i.e., TDP-43 proteinopathy. PMID:19271105

  8. Sortilin-Mediated Endocytosis Determines Levels of the Fronto-Temporal Dementia Protein, Progranulin

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fenghua; Padukkavidana, Thihan; Vægter, Christian B.; Brady, Owen A.; Zheng, Yanqiu; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Feldman, Howard H.; Nykjaer, Anders; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The most common inherited form of Fronto-Temporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD) known stems from Progranulin (GRN) mutation, and exhibits TDP-43 plus ubiquitin aggregates. Despite the causative role of GRN haploinsufficiency in FTLD-TDP, the neurobiology of this secreted glycoprotein is unclear. Here, we examined PGRN binding to the cell surface. PGRN binds to cortical neurons via its C-terminus, and unbiased expression cloning identifies Sortilin (Sort1) as a binding site. Sort1−/− neurons exhibit reduced PGRN binding. In the CNS, Sortilin is expressed by neurons and PGRN is most strongly expressed by activated microglial cells after injury. Sortilin rapidly endocytoses and delivers PGRN to lysosomes. Mice lacking Sortilin have elevations in brain and serum PGRN levels of 2.5- to 5-fold. The 50% PGRN decrease causative in FTLD-TDP cases is mimicked in GRN+/− mice, and is fully normalized by Sort1 ablation. Sortilin-mediated PGRN endocytosis is likely to play a central role in FTLD-TDP pathophysiology. PMID:21092856

  9. Differential Impairment of Cognitive and Affective Mentalizing Abilities in Neurodegenerative Dementias: Evidence from Behavioral Variant of Frontotemporal Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, and Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Dodich, Alessandra; Cerami, Chiara; Crespi, Chiara; Canessa, Nicola; Lettieri, Giada; Iannaccone, Sandro; Marcone, Alessandra; Cappa, Stefano F; Cacioppo, John T

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive and affective theory of mind (ToM) can be impaired in the course of neurodegenerative dementias. Experimental tests based on different task conditions and/or complexity may fail to capture disease-specific patterns of impairments. In this study, we assessed with a single task both the affective and the cognitive facets of ToM ability in a sample of 47 patients (i.e., 12 AD, 20 bvFTD, and 15 aMCI fulfilling IWG criteria for AD in predementia phase) and 65 healthy controls. Subjects were administered the Story-based Empathy task (SET), a non-verbal task measuring the ability to infer others' intentions (IA) and emotions (EA) compared to a control condition (causal inferences, CI). Global and single sub-condition scores were evaluated with a vectorial method, analyzing the relationship between social abilities and basic cognitive functioning by means of two indices representing the basic ability to perform the task and the balance between basic functions and ToM skills.Dementia (AD and bvFTD) patients showed impaired performances on all SET sub-conditions, whereas aMCI subjects' performance was not different from healthy controls. Vectorial analysis revealed a specific change in the balance between EA and CI conditions only in the bvFTD group, supporting a disproportionate deficit in mental states attribution based on affective cues. The overall deficit in the task in AD appears to be more general and related to the severity of dementia. This latter finding is further supported by the normal performance of the prodromal AD group. PMID:26836153

  10. Affective mentalizing and brain activity at rest in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Caminiti, Silvia P.; Canessa, Nicola; Cerami, Chiara; Dodich, Alessandra; Crespi, Chiara; Iannaccone, Sandro; Marcone, Alessandra; Falini, Andrea; Cappa, Stefano F.

    2015-01-01

    Background bvFTD patients display an impairment in the attribution of cognitive and affective states to others, reflecting GM atrophy in brain regions associated with social cognition, such as amygdala, superior temporal cortex and posterior insula. Distinctive patterns of abnormal brain functioning at rest have been reported in bvFTD, but their relationship with defective attribution of affective states has not been investigated. Objective To investigate the relationship among resting-state brain activity, gray matter (GM) atrophy and the attribution of mental states in the behavioral variant of fronto-temporal degeneration (bvFTD). Methods We compared 12 bvFTD patients with 30 age- and education-matched healthy controls on a) performance in a task requiring the attribution of affective vs. cognitive mental states; b) metrics of resting-state activity in known functional networks; and c) the relationship between task-performances and resting-state metrics. In addition, we assessed a connection between abnormal resting-state metrics and GM atrophy. Results Compared with controls, bvFTD patients showed a reduction of intra-network coherent activity in several components, as well as decreased strength of activation in networks related to attentional processing. Anomalous resting-state activity involved networks which also displayed a significant reduction of GM density. In patients, compared with controls, higher affective mentalizing performance correlated with stronger functional connectivity between medial prefrontal sectors of the default-mode and attentional/performance monitoring networks, as well as with increased coherent activity in components of the executive, sensorimotor and fronto-limbic networks. Conclusions Some of the observed effects may reflect specific compensatory mechanisms for the atrophic changes involving regions in charge of affective mentalizing. The analysis of specific resting-state networks thus highlights an intermediate level of

  11. Dissociation of Structural and Functional Integrities of the Motor System in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Behavioral-Variant Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jong Seok; Ferguson, Michele; Tan, Rachel; Mioshi, Eneida; Simon, Neil; Burrell, James; Vucic, Steve; Hodges, John R.; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study investigated the structural and functional changes in the motor system in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; n=25) and behavioral-variant fronto-temporal dementia (bvFTD; n=17) relative to healthy controls (n=37). Methods Structural changes were examined using a region-of-interest approach, applying voxel-based morphometry for gray-matter changes and diffusion tensor imaging for white-matter changes. Functional changes in the motor system were elucidated using threshold-tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) measurements of upper motor-neuron excitability. Results The structural analyses showed that in ALS there were more white-matter changes in the corticospinal and motor-cortex regions and more gray-matter changes in the cerebellum in comparison to controls. bvFTD showed substantial gray- and white-matter changes across virtually all motor-system regions compared to controls, although the brainstem was affected less than the other regions. Direct comparisons across patient groups showed that the gray- and white-matter motor-system changes inclusive of the motor cortex were greater in bvFTD than in ALS. By contrast, the functional integrity of the motor system was more adversely affected in ALS than in bvFTD, with both patient groups showing increased excitability of upper motor neurons compared to controls. Conclusions Cross-correlation of structural and functional data further revealed a neural dissociation of different motor-system regions and tracts covarying with the TMS excitability across both patient groups. The structural and functional motor-system integrities appear to be dissociated between ALS and bvFTD, which represents useful information for the diagnosis of motor-system changes in these two disorders. PMID:26932257

  12. Ugly aesthetic perception associated with emotional changes in experience of art by behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia patients.

    PubMed

    Boutoleau-Bretonnière, Claire; Bretonnière, Cédric; Evrard, Christelle; Rocher, Laetitia; Mazzietti, Audric; Koenig, Olivier; Vercelletto, Martine; Derkinderen, Pascal; Thomas-Antérion, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    The aesthetic experience through art is a window into the study of emotions. Patients with behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) have early alteration of emotional processing. A new appreciation of art has been reported in some of these patients. We designed a computerized task using 32 abstract paintings that allowed us to investigate the integrity of patients' emotions when viewing the artwork. We evaluated both conscious and explicit appraisal of emotions [aesthetic judgment (beautiful/ugly), emotional relevance (affected or not by the painting), emotional valence (pleasant/unpleasant), emotional reaction (adjective choice) and arousal] and unconscious processing. Fifteen bvFTD patients and 15 healthy controls were included. BvFTD patients reported that they were "little touched" by the paintings. Aesthetic judgment was very different between the two groups: the paintings were considered ugly (negative aesthetic bias) and unpleasant (negative emotional bias) more often by the patients than by controls. Valence and aesthetic judgments correlated in both groups. In addition, there was a positive bias in the implicit task and for explicit emotional responses. Patients frequently chose the word "sad" and rarely expressed themselves with such adjectives as "happy". Our results suggest that bvFTD patients can give an aesthetic judgment, but present abstraction difficulties, as spectators, resulting from impairments in the cognitive processes involved. They also have difficulties in terms of emotional processes with the loss of the ability to feel the emotion per se (i.e., to feel an emotion faced with art) linked to behaviour assessment. This cognitive approach allows us to better understand which spectators are bvFTD patients and to show interactions between emotions and behavioural disorders. PMID:27265766

  13. Striatal Atrophy in the Behavioural Variant of Frontotemporal Dementia: Correlation with Diagnosis, Negative Symptoms and Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Walterfang, Mark; Vestberg, Susanna; Velakoulis, Dennis; Wilkes, Fiona A.; Nilsson, Christer; van Westen, Danielle; Looi, Jeffrey C. L.; Santillo, Alexander Frizell

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is associated with changes in dorsal striatal parts of the basal ganglia (caudate nucleus and putamen), related to dysfunction in the cortico-striato-thalamic circuits which help mediate executive and motor functions. We aimed to determine whether the size and shape of striatal structures correlated with diagnosis of bvFTD, and measures of clinical severity, behaviour and cognition. Materials and Methods Magnetic resonance imaging scans from 28 patients with bvFTD and 26 healthy controls were manually traced using image analysis software (ITK-SNAP). The resulting 3-D objects underwent volumetric analysis and shape analysis, through spherical harmonic description with point distribution models (SPHARM-PDM). Correlations with size and shape were sought with clinical measures in the bvTFD group, including Frontal Behavioural Inventory, Clinical Dementia Rating for bvFTD, Color Word Interference, Hayling part B and Brixton tests, and Trail-Making Test. Results Caudate nuclei and putamina were significantly smaller in the bvFTD group compared to controls (left caudate 16% smaller, partial eta squared 0.173, p=0.003; right caudate 11% smaller, partial eta squared 0.103, p=0.023; left putamen 18% smaller, partial eta squared 0.179, p=0.002; right putamen 12% smaller, partial eta squared 0.081, p=0.045), with global shape deflation in the caudate bilaterally but no localised shape change in putamen. In the bvFTD group, shape deflations on the left, corresponding to afferent connections from dorsolateral prefrontal mediofrontal/anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortex, correlated with worsening disease severity. Global shape deflation in the putamen correlated with Frontal Behavioural Inventory scores—higher scoring on negative symptoms was associated with the left putamen, while positive symptoms were associated with the right. Other cognitive tests had poor completion rates. Conclusion Behavioural

  14. Agraphia in patients with frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 with P301L MAPT mutation: dysexecutive, aphasic, apraxic or spatial phenomenon?

    PubMed Central

    Sitek, Emilia J.; Narożańska, Ewa; Barczak, Anna; Jasińska-Myga, Barbara; Harciarek, Michał; Chodakowska-Żebrowska, Małgorzata; Kubiak, Małgorzata; Wieczorek, Dariusz; Konieczna, Seweryna; Rademakers, Rosa; Baker, Matt; Berdyński, Mariusz; Brockhuis, Bogna; Barcikowska, Maria; Żekanowski, Cezary; Heilman, Kenneth M.; Wszołek, Zbigniew K.; Sławek, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Patients with frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) may be agraphic. The study aimed at characterizing agraphia in individuals with a P301L MAPT mutation. Methods Two pairs of siblings with FTDP-17 were longitudinally examined for agraphia in relation to language and cognitive deficits. Results All patients presented with dysexecutive agraphia. In addition, in the first pair of siblings one sibling demonstrated spatial agraphia with less pronounced allographic agraphia and the other sibling had aphasic agraphia. Aphasic agraphia was also present in one sibling from the second pair. Conclusion Agraphia associated with FTDP-17 is very heterogeneous. PMID:23121543

  15. Cardiovascular risk factors and frontotemporal dementia: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors (CRF) were widely described as related to dementia. There are very few studies regarding this association in FTD. The objective of the study was to compare the frequency of CRF in our population with FTD and controls. 100 consecutive subjects with FTD diagnosis according to Lund-Manchester clinical criteria and 200 controls matched by age and sex were included between January 2003 to February 2007 at the Cognitive and Behavior Unit of Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires. Clinical evaluation, laboratory tests, brain images (CT/MRI), neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric assessment were performed. Multiple regression analysis was performed to analyze the association in CRF between FTD patients vs. controls. The mean age in FTD was 69.7 ± 0.9 vs. 70.1 ± 0.8 in controls (p 0.12). No difference in gender was observed between cases and controls. No differences were identified between patients and controls regarding hypertension (HTA) (65% vs. 67,3% p 0.44); dyslipidemia (57% vs. 54.7% p 0.74); obesity (39% vs. 27.6% p 0.14) and hypothyroidism (26% vs. 17.1% p 0.1). A significant difference was observed for Diabetes Mellitus (39% vs. 22.6% p 0.001). In our population, Diabetes Mellitus was associated as an independent risk factor for FTD. To our knowledge this is the first report in which CRF were evaluated prospectively in FTD patients. More studies are needed to confirm this finding in larger populations. PMID:24995127

  16. The initial recognition and diagnosis of dementia.

    PubMed

    Knopman, D S

    1998-04-27

    Dementia is characterized by a decline in cognition, behavioral disturbances, and interference with daily functioning and independence. Diagnosis is sometimes delayed as patients or family members often misattribute obvious manifestations of cognitive decline to normal aging rather than to the onset of a degenerative disease. Many physicians do not perform mental status examinations or do not use them effectively to detect early symptoms. Clinical markers are available to decrease the difficulty in distinguishing dementia from depression and confusional states such as delirium. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia; others include rapidly progressive dementias, dementias associated with strokes and Parkinson's disease, and frontotemporal dementias. Often, AD coexists with other forms of dementia. Sensitivity to early warning signs, interviews with family members, and mental status examinations are essential to early detection of AD, and will prove useful to primary-care physicians who care for older patients. PMID:9617846

  17. Basics of Frontotemporal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with FTLD are 45 to 64 years old. People can live with frontotemporal disorders for up to ... an inability to recognize potentially dangerous objects—a person might reach for a snake or plunge a hand into boiling water, for ... Lewy Body Dementia: Information for Patients, Families, and ...

  18. Frontotemporal Dementia (Pick's Disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and memory remain intact. There is a strong genetic component to the disease; FTD often runs in families. Is there any treatment? No treatment has been shown to slow the progression of FTD. Behavior modification may help control unacceptable or dangerous behaviors. Aggressive, ...

  19. Frontotemporal Dementia: Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calendar of Events Fundraising Events Conferences Press Releases Genetics of FTD After receiving a diagnosis of FTD ... that recent advances in science have brought the genetics of FTD into much better focus. In 2012, ...

  20. Frontotemporal Dementias: Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging), PET (positron emission tomography), and SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography). Clinical Diagnosis vs. Pathology It ... or if pre-approval is needed. SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) : A type of nuclear medicine ...

  1. Face shape and face identity processing in behavioral variant fronto-temporal dementia: A specific deficit for familiarity and name recognition of famous faces.

    PubMed

    De Winter, François-Laurent; Timmers, Dorien; de Gelder, Beatrice; Van Orshoven, Marc; Vieren, Marleen; Bouckaert, Miriam; Cypers, Gert; Caekebeke, Jo; Van de Vliet, Laura; Goffin, Karolien; Van Laere, Koen; Sunaert, Stefan; Vandenberghe, Rik; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Van den Stock, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in face processing have been described in the behavioral variant of fronto-temporal dementia (bvFTD), primarily regarding the recognition of facial expressions. Less is known about face shape and face identity processing. Here we used a hierarchical strategy targeting face shape and face identity recognition in bvFTD and matched healthy controls. Participants performed 3 psychophysical experiments targeting face shape detection (Experiment 1), unfamiliar face identity matching (Experiment 2), familiarity categorization and famous face-name matching (Experiment 3). The results revealed group differences only in Experiment 3, with a deficit in the bvFTD group for both familiarity categorization and famous face-name matching. Voxel-based morphometry regression analyses in the bvFTD group revealed an association between grey matter volume of the left ventral anterior temporal lobe and familiarity recognition, while face-name matching correlated with grey matter volume of the bilateral ventral anterior temporal lobes. Subsequently, we quantified familiarity-specific and name-specific recognition deficits as the sum of the celebrities of which respectively only the name or only the familiarity was accurately recognized. Both indices were associated with grey matter volume of the bilateral anterior temporal cortices. These findings extent previous results by documenting the involvement of the left anterior temporal lobe (ATL) in familiarity detection and the right ATL in name recognition deficits in fronto-temporal lobar degeneration. PMID:27298765

  2. Communication of brain network core connections altered in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia but possibly preserved in early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Mendez, Mario F.; Bartzokis, George; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusion imaging and brain connectivity analyses can assess white matter deterioration in the brain, revealing the underlying patterns of how brain structure declines. Fiber tractography methods can infer neural pathways and connectivity patterns, yielding sensitive mathematical metrics of network integrity. Here, we analyzed 1.5-Tesla wholebrain diffusion-weighted images from 64 participants - 15 patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 19 with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD), and 30 healthy elderly controls. Using whole-brain tractography, we reconstructed structural brain connectivity networks to map connections between cortical regions. We evaluated the brain's networks focusing on the most highly central and connected regions, also known as hubs, in each diagnostic group - specifically the "high-cost" structural backbone used in global and regional communication. The high-cost backbone of the brain, predicted by fiber density and minimally short pathways between brain regions, accounted for 81-92% of the overall brain communication metric in all diagnostic groups. Furthermore, we found that the set of pathways interconnecting high-cost and high-capacity regions of the brain's communication network are globally and regionally altered in bvFTD, compared to healthy participants; however, the overall organization of the high-cost and high-capacity networks were relatively preserved in EOAD participants, relative to controls. Disruption of the major central hubs that transfer information between brain regions may impair neural communication and functional integrity in characteristic ways typical of each subtype of dementia.

  3. Genotype-Phenotype studies of VCP-associated Inclusion Body Myopathy with Paget Disease of Bone and/or Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Sarju G.; Khare, Manaswitha; Ramani, Rupal; Watts, Giles D. J.; Simon, Mariella; Osann, Kathryn E.; Donkervoort, Sandra; Dec, Eric; Nalbandian, Angele; Platt, Julia; Pasquali, Marzia; Wang, Annabel; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Smith, Charles D.; Kimonis, Virginia E.

    2012-01-01

    VCP disease associated with Inclusion body myopathy, Paget disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia is a progressive autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in Valosin containing protein gene. To establish genotype-phenotype correlations we analyzed clinical and biochemical markers from a database of 190 members in 27 families harboring ten missense mutations. Individuals were grouped into three categories: symptomatic, presymptomatic carriers and non-carriers. The symptomatic families were further divided into ten groups based on their VCP mutations. There was marked intra and inter-familial variation; and significant genotype-phenotype correlations were difficult because of small numbers. Nevertheless when comparing the two most common mutations, R155C mutation was found to be more severe, with earlier onset of myopathy and Paget (p=0.03). Survival analysis of all subjects revealed an average life span after diagnosis of myopathy and Paget of 18 and 19 years respectively, and after dementia only 6 years. R155C had a reduced survival compared to the R155H mutation (p=0.03). We identified amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in thirteen individuals (8.9%) and Parkinson’s disease in five individuals (3%); however there was no genotypic correlation. This study represents the largest dataset of patients with VCP disease and expands our understanding of natural history and provides genotype-phenotype correlations in this unique disease. PMID:22909335

  4. Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    PATIENT / FAMILY TEACHING SHEET Dementia What is dementia? Dementia is a result of diseases that affect how the brain works. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia. Symptoms occur ...

  5. Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Dementia Information Page Condensed from Dementia: Hope Through Research ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Dementia? Dementia is not a specific disease. It is ...

  6. [Neuropsychological exploration in frontotemporal degeneration].

    PubMed

    Peña-Casanova, J; Böhm, P

    2000-01-01

    The present paper discusses the neuropsychological assessment in fronto-temporal lobe degeneration. Having established the neuroanatomical and functional basis for the discussion the major syndromes included in the concept of frontotemporal degeneration are reviewed from a neuropsychological standpoint. With reference to fronto-temporal dementia the different frontal or executive function tests and their limitations are discussed. With reference to progressive aphasia and semantic dementia we differentiate the distinct language profiles as observed in aphasia batteries and general neuropsychological tests. Reference is made to especially useful tests for the differentiation of the two syndromes from each other, as well as from other primary progressive disorders. Concluding remarks postulate a series of axis of cognitive function in fronto-temporal lobe degenerations, which exist at the functional as well as the anatomical level and along which the different syndromes evolve. PMID:10723171

  7. COMPARATIVE EFFECTIVENESS OF MCI and DEMENTIA TREATMENTS IN A COMMUNITY-BASED DEMENTIA PRACTICE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-04

    Mild Cognitive Impairment; Dementia; Hypoxia; Hyperhomocysteinemia; Vitamin B 12 Deficiency; Iron Deficiency; Anemia; TBI; Neurodegenerative Disorders; Alzheimer's Disease; Vascular Dementia; Brain Injuries; Tauopathies; Parkinson's Disease; Lewy Body Dementia; Frontotemporal Dementia; TDP-43 Proteinopathies

  8. Efficacy of memantine on neuropsychiatric symptoms associated with the severity of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia: A six-month, open-label, self-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    LI, PAN; QUAN, WEI; ZHOU, YU-YING; WANG, YAN; ZHANG, HUI-HONG; LIU, SHUAI

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have focused on the curative effects of memantine in patients with mild-to-moderate frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD); however, its benefits in patients with moderate-to-severe FTLD have not been investigated. The present study explores the behavioral, cognitive and functional effects of memantine on behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) in patients with mild and moderate-to-severe stage bvFTD. A total of 42 patients with bvFTD completed a 6-month treatment plan of 20 mg memantine daily in an open-label, self-controlled clinical trial. Patients were divided into two groups according to their Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score: Mild (score, 21–26); and moderate-to-severe (score, 4–20). Primary endpoints included Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire (NPI-Q) and Clinic Dementia Rating (CDR) scores, and secondary endpoints comprised Neuropsychiatric Inventory Caregiver Distress Scale (NPI-D), MMSE, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), Activity of Daily Life (ADL) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) scores. Memantine treatment had no effect on overall NPI-Q scores, with the exception of the agitation subdomain in all patients with bvFTD. However, patients with moderate-to-severe bvFTD exhibited a better performance than patients with mild bvFTD, demonstrated by improved NPI-Q total scores and subscales of agitation, depression, apathy and disinhibition. In the moderate-to-severe group, CDR and HAMD scores remained stable, but MMSE, MoCA and ADL scores were reduced after 6 months of treatment. Memantine was well-tolerated in patients. In conclusion, patients with moderate-to-severe bvFTD responded significantly better to memantine in comparison to patients with mild bvFTD with regard to their neuropsychiatric scores, while memantine did not present any cognitive or functional benefits in patients with mild bvFTD. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial with a larger number of patients is

  9. Human iPSC-Derived Neuronal Model of Tau-A152T Frontotemporal Dementia Reveals Tau-Mediated Mechanisms of Neuronal Vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Silva, M Catarina; Cheng, Chialin; Mair, Waltraud; Almeida, Sandra; Fong, Helen; Biswas, M Helal U; Zhang, Zhijun; Huang, Yadong; Temple, Sally; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H; Karydas, Anna; Miller, Bruce L; Kosik, Kenneth S; Gao, Fen-Biao; Steen, Judith A; Haggarty, Stephen J

    2016-09-13

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and other tauopathies characterized by focal brain neurodegeneration and pathological accumulation of proteins are commonly associated with tau mutations. However, the mechanism of neuronal loss is not fully understood. To identify molecular events associated with tauopathy, we studied induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons from individuals carrying the tau-A152T variant. We highlight the potential of in-depth phenotyping of human neuronal cell models for pre-clinical studies and identification of modulators of endogenous tau toxicity. Through a panel of biochemical and cellular assays, A152T neurons showed accumulation, redistribution, and decreased solubility of tau. Upregulation of tau was coupled to enhanced stress-inducible markers and cell vulnerability to proteotoxic, excitotoxic, and mitochondrial stressors, which was rescued upon CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeting of tau or by pharmacological activation of autophagy. Our findings unmask tau-mediated perturbations of specific pathways associated with neuronal vulnerability, revealing potential early disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets for FTD and other tauopathies. PMID:27594585

  10. Advancing Research and Treatment for Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (ARTFL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-29

    FTLD; Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP); Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD); Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD); PPA Syndrome; Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia (bvFTD); Semantic Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia (svPPA); Nonfluent Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia (nfvPPA); FTD With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (FTD/ALS); Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS); Oligosymptomatic PSP (oPSP); Corticobasal Syndrome (CBS)

  11. Investigating the role of filamin C in Belgian patients with frontotemporal dementia linked to GRN deficiency in FTLD-TDP brains.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Jonathan; Philtjens, Stéphanie; Kleinberger, Gernot; Van Mossevelde, Sara; van der Zee, Julie; Cacace, Rita; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Sieben, Anne; Banzhaf-Strathmann, Julia; Dillen, Lubina; Merlin, Céline; Cuijt, Ivy; Robberecht, Caroline; Schmid, Bettina; Santens, Patrick; Ivanoiu, Adrian; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Vandenberghe, Rik; Cras, Patrick; De Deyn, Peter P; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Maudsley, Stuart; Haass, Christian; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2015-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) inclusions are pathological hallmarks of patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Loss of TDP-43 in zebrafish engenders a severe muscle and vascular phenotype with a concomitant elevation of filamin C (FLNC) levels, an observation confirmed in the frontal cortex of FTLD-TDP patients. Here, we aimed to further assess the contribution of FLNC to frontotemporal dementia (FTD) etiology. We conducted a mutational screening of FLNC in a cohort of 529 unrelated Belgian FTD and FTD-ALS patients, and a control cohort of 920 unrelated and age-matched individuals. Additionally we performed an in-depth characterization of FLNC expression levels in FTD patients and a murine FTD model.In total 68 missense variants were identified of which 19 (MAF < 1%) were patient-only. Gene burden analysis demonstrated a significant association between the presence of rare variants in FLNC and disease (P = 0.0349, RR = 1.46 [95% CI 1.03-2.07]). Furthermore, elevated FLNC expression levels, observed previously in FTLD-TDP patients, were mainly attributable to FTD patients with the progranulin (GRN) p.0(IVS1 + 5G > C) loss-of-function mutation. Increased FLNC levels were, to a lesser extent, also identified in a FLNC p.V831I variant carrier and in FTD patients with the p.R159H mutation in valosin-containing protein (VCP). The GRN-associated increase of FLNC was confirmed in the frontal cortex of aged Grn knockout mice starting at 16-18 months of age. Combined quantitative proteomic and bioinformatic analyses of the frontal cortex of FTD patients possessing elevated FLNC levels, identified multiple altered protein factors involved in accelerated aging, neurodegeneration and synaptogenesis.Our findings further support the involvement of aberrant FLNC expression levels in FTD pathogenesis. Identification of increased FLNC levels in aged Grn mice and impaired pathways related to aging and

  12. Neuroimaging Biomarkers of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders leading to dementia are common diseases that affect many older and some young adults. Neuroimaging methods are important tools for assessing and monitoring pathological brain changes associated with progressive neurodegenerative conditions. In this review, the authors describe key findings from neuroimaging studies (magnetic resonance imaging and radionucleotide imaging) in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and prodromal stages, familial and atypical AD syndromes, frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with and without dementia, Parkinson’s disease with and without dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, and prion protein associated diseases (i.e., Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease). The authors focus on neuroimaging findings of in vivo pathology in these disorders, as well as the potential for neuroimaging to provide useful information for differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24234359

  13. [The other dementias: the neuropathology of the non-Alzheimer's disease dementias].

    PubMed

    Hamilton, R L

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common causes of dementia, but requires neuropathological verification for a definitive diagnosis because there are a number of other neurodegenerative diseases that may present with dementia. Some of these disorders have considerable overlap both clinically and pathologically with AD, while others have distinct clinical and pathological profiles. Vascular dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) have the greatest overlap with AD and considerable controversy still surrounds the exact contribution of the non AD pathology to the dementia syndrome. The frontotemporal dementias are loosely united by clinical presentation, but are pathologically heterogeneous and include Pick's disease, dementia lacking distinctive histopathology, motor neuron disease inclusion dementia and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). CBD can be difficult to distinguish from progressive supranuclear palsy, especially when the latter lacks the distinctive gaze palsy. Finally, Creutzfeldt Jakob disease (CJD) may be difficult to distinguish from AD when the symptoms progress at an atypically slow pace. Recently, a new variant of CJD (vCJD) that has been linked to bovine spongiform encephalopathy ('mad cow' disease) has heightened awareness of these prion protein disorders. The neuropathological criteria for the diagnosis of these non AD dementia disorders will be reviewed. PMID:12938072

  14. Novel marker for the onset of frontotemporal dementia: early increase in activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) in the face of Tau mutation.

    PubMed

    Schirer, Yulie; Malishkevich, Anna; Ophir, Yotam; Lewis, Jada; Giladi, Eliezer; Gozes, Illana

    2014-01-01

    Tauopathy, a major pathology in Alzheimer's disease, is also found in ~50% of frontotemporal dementias (FTDs). Tau transcript, a product of a single gene, undergoes alternative splicing to yield 6 protein species, each with either 3 or 4 microtubule binding repeat domains (tau 3R or 4R, associated with dynamic and stable microtubules, respectively). While the healthy human brain shows a 1/1 ratio of tau 3R/4R, this ratio may be dramatically changed in the FTD brain. We have previously discovered that activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) is essential for brain formation in the mouse, with ADNP+/- mice exhibiting tauopathy, age-driven neurodegeneration and behavioral deficits. Here, in transgenic mice overexpressing a mutated tau 4R species, in the cerebral cortex but not in the cerebellum, we showed significantly increased ADNP expression (~3-fold transcripts) in the cerebral cortex of young transgenic mice (~disease onset), but not in the cerebellum, as compared to control littermates. The transgene-age-related increased ADNP expression paralleled augmented dynamic tau 3R transcript level compared to control littermates. Blocking mutated tau 4R transgene expression resulted in normalization of ADNP and tau 3R expression. ADNP was previously shown to be a member of the SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complex. Here, Brahma (Brm), a component of the SWI/SNF complex regulating alternative splicing, showed a similar developmental expression pattern to ADNP. Immunoprecipitations further suggested Brm-ADNP interaction coupled to ADNP - polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB)-associated splicing factor (PSF)-binding, with PSF being a direct regulator of tau transcript splicing. It should be noted that although we have shown a correlation between levels of ADNP and tau isoform expression three months of age, we are not presenting evidence of a direct link between the two. Future research into ADNP/tau relations is warranted. PMID

  15. Developmental regulation of tau splicing is disrupted in stem cell-derived neurons from frontotemporal dementia patients with the 10 + 16 splice-site mutation in MAPT.

    PubMed

    Sposito, Teresa; Preza, Elisavet; Mahoney, Colin J; Setó-Salvia, Núria; Ryan, Natalie S; Morris, Huw R; Arber, Charles; Devine, Michael J; Houlden, Henry; Warner, Thomas T; Bushell, Trevor J; Zagnoni, Michele; Kunath, Tilo; Livesey, Frederick J; Fox, Nick C; Rossor, Martin N; Hardy, John; Wray, Selina

    2015-09-15

    The alternative splicing of the tau gene, MAPT, generates six protein isoforms in the adult human central nervous system (CNS). Tau splicing is developmentally regulated and dysregulated in disease. Mutations in MAPT that alter tau splicing cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD) with tau pathology, providing evidence for a causal link between altered tau splicing and disease. The use of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons has revolutionized the way we model neurological disease in vitro. However, as most tau mutations are located within or around the alternatively spliced exon 10, it is important that iPSC-neurons splice tau appropriately in order to be used as disease models. To address this issue, we analyzed the expression and splicing of tau in iPSC-derived cortical neurons from control patients and FTD patients with the 10 + 16 intronic mutation in MAPT. We show that control neurons only express the fetal tau isoform (0N3R), even at extended time points of 100 days in vitro. Neurons from FTD patients with the 10 + 16 mutation in MAPT express both 0N3R and 0N4R tau isoforms, demonstrating that this mutation overrides the developmental regulation of exon 10 inclusion in our in vitro model. Further, at extended time points of 365 days in vitro, we observe a switch in tau splicing to include six tau isoforms as seen in the adult human CNS. Our results demonstrate the importance of neuronal maturity for use in in vitro modeling and provide a system that will be important for understanding the functional consequences of altered tau splicing. PMID:26136155

  16. Developmental regulation of tau splicing is disrupted in stem cell-derived neurons from frontotemporal dementia patients with the 10 + 16 splice-site mutation in MAPT

    PubMed Central

    Sposito, Teresa; Preza, Elisavet; Mahoney, Colin J.; Setó-Salvia, Núria; Ryan, Natalie S.; Morris, Huw R.; Arber, Charles; Devine, Michael J.; Houlden, Henry; Warner, Thomas T.; Bushell, Trevor J.; Zagnoni, Michele; Kunath, Tilo; Livesey, Frederick J.; Fox, Nick C.; Rossor, Martin N.; Hardy, John; Wray, Selina

    2015-01-01

    The alternative splicing of the tau gene, MAPT, generates six protein isoforms in the adult human central nervous system (CNS). Tau splicing is developmentally regulated and dysregulated in disease. Mutations in MAPT that alter tau splicing cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD) with tau pathology, providing evidence for a causal link between altered tau splicing and disease. The use of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons has revolutionized the way we model neurological disease in vitro. However, as most tau mutations are located within or around the alternatively spliced exon 10, it is important that iPSC–neurons splice tau appropriately in order to be used as disease models. To address this issue, we analyzed the expression and splicing of tau in iPSC-derived cortical neurons from control patients and FTD patients with the 10 + 16 intronic mutation in MAPT. We show that control neurons only express the fetal tau isoform (0N3R), even at extended time points of 100 days in vitro. Neurons from FTD patients with the 10 + 16 mutation in MAPT express both 0N3R and 0N4R tau isoforms, demonstrating that this mutation overrides the developmental regulation of exon 10 inclusion in our in vitro model. Further, at extended time points of 365 days in vitro, we observe a switch in tau splicing to include six tau isoforms as seen in the adult human CNS. Our results demonstrate the importance of neuronal maturity for use in in vitro modeling and provide a system that will be important for understanding the functional consequences of altered tau splicing. PMID:26136155

  17. The 5-HTTLPR variant in the serotonin transporter gene modifies degeneration of brain regions important for emotion in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Jennifer S.; Bonham, Luke W.; Sturm, Virginia E.; Adhimoolam, Babu; Karydas, Anna; Coppola, Giovanni; Miller, Bruce L.; Rankin, Katherine P.

    2015-01-01

    The serotonin transporter length polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) short allele (5-HTTLPR-s) has been associated with differential susceptibility for anxiety and depression in multiple psychiatric disorders. 5-HTTLPR-s modifies the serotonergic systems that support emotion and behavioral regulation by reducing gene expression, which slows the reuptake of serotonin, and is associated with distinct morphological and functional effects. Serotonergic systems are also shown to be dysfunctional in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), a disease characterized by marked socioemotional dysfunction. However, studies of 5-HTTLPR-s effects in bvFTD have been inconsistent. Our objective was to investigate the patterns of gray matter volume by 5-HTTLPR-s genotype in both healthy older controls and bvFTD patients. We performed voxel-based morphometry of 179 cognitively normal older adults and 24 bvFTD cases to determine brain changes associated with dose (0/1/2) of 5-HTTLPR-s allele. 5-HTTLPR-s frequency did not differ between controls and bvFTD. We found a significant interaction effect whereby carrying more 5-HTTLPR-s alleles in bvFTD was associated with smaller volume in left inferior frontal gyrus (T = 4.86, PFWE = 0.03) and larger volume in right temporal lobe (T = 5.01, PFWE = 0.01). These results suggest that the 5-HTTLPR-s allele differentially influences brain morphology in bvFTD. We propose that patients with bvFTD and 5-HTTLPR-s have altered volumes in regions that support socioemotional behavior, which may be a developmental or disease-related compensation for altered serotonergic activity. PMID:26509115

  18. Novel Marker for the Onset of Frontotemporal Dementia: Early Increase in Activity-Dependent Neuroprotective Protein (ADNP) in the Face of Tau Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Ophir, Yotam; Lewis, Jada; Giladi, Eliezer; Gozes, Illana

    2014-01-01

    Tauopathy, a major pathology in Alzheimer's disease, is also found in ∼50% of frontotemporal dementias (FTDs). Tau transcript, a product of a single gene, undergoes alternative splicing to yield 6 protein species, each with either 3 or 4 microtubule binding repeat domains (tau 3R or 4R, associated with dynamic and stable microtubules, respectively). While the healthy human brain shows a 1/1 ratio of tau 3R/4R, this ratio may be dramatically changed in the FTD brain. We have previously discovered that activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) is essential for brain formation in the mouse, with ADNP+/− mice exhibiting tauopathy, age-driven neurodegeneration and behavioral deficits. Here, in transgenic mice overexpressing a mutated tau 4R species, in the cerebral cortex but not in the cerebellum, we showed significantly increased ADNP expression (∼3-fold transcripts) in the cerebral cortex of young transgenic mice (∼disease onset), but not in the cerebellum, as compared to control littermates. The transgene-age-related increased ADNP expression paralleled augmented dynamic tau 3R transcript level compared to control littermates. Blocking mutated tau 4R transgene expression resulted in normalization of ADNP and tau 3R expression. ADNP was previously shown to be a member of the SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complex. Here, Brahma (Brm), a component of the SWI/SNF complex regulating alternative splicing, showed a similar developmental expression pattern to ADNP. Immunoprecipitations further suggested Brm-ADNP interaction coupled to ADNP - polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB)-associated splicing factor (PSF)-binding, with PSF being a direct regulator of tau transcript splicing. It should be noted that although we have shown a correlation between levels of ADNP and tau isoform expression three months of age, we are not presenting evidence of a direct link between the two. Future research into ADNP/tau relations is

  19. Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dementia may also cause changes in mood and personality. Early on, lapses in memory and clear thinking ... to tears to anger in a few minutes. Personality changes. People who have dementia may have drastic ...

  20. Reduced miR-659-3p Levels Correlate with Progranulin Increase in Hypoxic Conditions: Implications for Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Piscopo, Paola; Grasso, Margherita; Fontana, Francesca; Crestini, Alessio; Puopolo, Maria; Del Vescovo, Valerio; Venerosi, Aldina; Calamandrei, Gemma; Vencken, Sebastian F; Greene, Catherine M; Confaloni, Annamaria; Denti, Michela A

    2016-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a secreted protein expressed ubiquitously throughout the body, including the brain, where it localizes in neurons and is activated microglia. Loss-of-function mutations in the GRN gene are an important cause of familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). PGRN has a neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory activity, and it is neuroprotective in several injury conditions, such as oxygen or glucose deprivation, oxidative injury, and hypoxic stress. Indeed, we have previously demonstrated that hypoxia induces the up-regulation of GRN transcripts. Several studies have shown microRNAs (miRNAs) involvement in hypoxia. Moreover, in FTLD patients with a genetic variant of GRN (rs5848), the reinforcement of miR-659-3p binding site has been suggested to be a risk factor. Here, we report that miR-659-3p interacts directly with GRN 3'UTR as shown by luciferase assay in HeLa cells and ELISA and Western Blot analysis in HeLa and Kelly cells. Moreover, we demonstrate the physical binding between GRN mRNA and miR-659-3p employing a miRNA capture-affinity technology in SK-N-BE and Kelly cells. In order to study miRNAs involvement in hypoxia-mediated up-regulation of GRN, we evaluated miR-659-3p levels in SK-N-BE cells after 24 h of hypoxic treatment, finding them inversely correlated to GRN transcripts. Furthermore, we analyzed an animal model of asphyxia, finding that GRN mRNA levels increased at post-natal day (pnd) 1 and pnd 4 in rat cortices subjected to asphyxia in comparison to control rats and miR-659-3p decreased at pnd 4 just when GRN reached the highest levels. Our results demonstrate the interaction between miR-659-3p and GRN transcript and the involvement of miR-659-3p in GRN up-regulation mediated by hypoxic/ischemic insults. PMID:27199656

  1. Reduced miR-659-3p Levels Correlate with Progranulin Increase in Hypoxic Conditions: Implications for Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Piscopo, Paola; Grasso, Margherita; Fontana, Francesca; Crestini, Alessio; Puopolo, Maria; Del Vescovo, Valerio; Venerosi, Aldina; Calamandrei, Gemma; Vencken, Sebastian F.; Greene, Catherine M.; Confaloni, Annamaria; Denti, Michela A.

    2016-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a secreted protein expressed ubiquitously throughout the body, including the brain, where it localizes in neurons and is activated microglia. Loss-of-function mutations in the GRN gene are an important cause of familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). PGRN has a neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory activity, and it is neuroprotective in several injury conditions, such as oxygen or glucose deprivation, oxidative injury, and hypoxic stress. Indeed, we have previously demonstrated that hypoxia induces the up-regulation of GRN transcripts. Several studies have shown microRNAs (miRNAs) involvement in hypoxia. Moreover, in FTLD patients with a genetic variant of GRN (rs5848), the reinforcement of miR-659-3p binding site has been suggested to be a risk factor. Here, we report that miR-659-3p interacts directly with GRN 3′UTR as shown by luciferase assay in HeLa cells and ELISA and Western Blot analysis in HeLa and Kelly cells. Moreover, we demonstrate the physical binding between GRN mRNA and miR-659-3p employing a miRNA capture-affinity technology in SK-N-BE and Kelly cells. In order to study miRNAs involvement in hypoxia-mediated up-regulation of GRN, we evaluated miR-659-3p levels in SK-N-BE cells after 24 h of hypoxic treatment, finding them inversely correlated to GRN transcripts. Furthermore, we analyzed an animal model of asphyxia, finding that GRN mRNA levels increased at post-natal day (pnd) 1 and pnd 4 in rat cortices subjected to asphyxia in comparison to control rats and miR-659-3p decreased at pnd 4 just when GRN reached the highest levels. Our results demonstrate the interaction between miR-659-3p and GRN transcript and the involvement of miR-659-3p in GRN up-regulation mediated by hypoxic/ischemic insults. PMID:27199656

  2. Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... dementia have serious problems with two or more brain functions, such as memory and language. Although dementia is common in very elderly people, it is not part of normal aging. Many ... dementia or repair brain damage, they may improve symptoms or slow down ...

  3. Study of visuospatial skill in patients with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Asutosh; Biswas, Atanu; Pandit, Alak; Roy, Arijit; Guin, Debsankar; Gangopadhyay, Goutam; Senapati, Asit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the visuospatial function in different types of dementia with the visual object and space perception (VOSP) battery and to relate the degree of visuospatial dysfunction with different types and stages of dementia. Materials and Methods: A sample of 53 participants with dementia and equal number of age-, sex-, and education-matched controls were recruited for the study. Participants were evaluated for visuospatial skill using VOSP test battery. The scores of dementia patients were compared with controls and within dementia cohort scores were compared based on stage of dementia. Results: The dementia group scored low in all of the subtests of the VOSP battery in comparison to controls. Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia of Lewy bodies (DLB), and vascular dementia (VaD) patients performed more poorly than controls in all subtests examining object perception and space perception. The three semantic variants of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) patients scored low in all four subtests of object perception, whereas behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD) patients performed normally. The scores deteriorated with the advancement of dementia in all patients from the dementia groups. Conclusions: Visuospatial function is significantly impaired in dementia patients particularly in AD, DLB, and VaD patients from the beginning, and the impairment is severe in advanced disease stages. PMID:27011635

  4. Autophagy in dementias.

    PubMed

    Kragh, Christine Lund; Ubhi, Kiren; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Wyss-Corey, Tony; Masliah, Eliezer

    2012-01-01

    Dementias are a varied group of disorders typically associated with memory loss, impaired judgment and/or language and by symptoms affecting other cognitive and social abilities to a degree that interferes with daily functioning. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of a progressive dementia, followed by dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), (VaD) and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The pathogenesis of this group of disorders has been linked to the abnormal accumulation of proteins in the brains of affected individuals, which in turn has been related to deficits in protein clearance. Autophagy is a key cellular protein clearance pathway with proteolytic cleavage and degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway representing another important clearance mechanism. Alterations in the levels of autophagy and the proteins associated with the autophagocytic pathway have been reported in various types of dementias. This review will examine recent literature across these disorders and highlight a common theme of altered autophagy across the spectrum of the dementias. PMID:22150925

  5. Recent insights into the molecular genetics of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rademakers, Rosa; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular genetic basis of two common neurodegenerative dementias, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) has greatly advanced in recent years. Progranulin mutations were identified as a major cause of FTLD and a potential susceptibility factor for other forms of dementia. In addition, through copy-number analyses of previously identified disease genes and the study of microRNA regulation in dementia, new evidence emerged to support the view that subtle variability in the expression of known disease proteins may increase the risk for sporadic forms of dementia. Finally, in late-onset AD populations, the first genome-wide association studies were performed and novel potential AD susceptibility genes reported. These exciting findings provide novel insights into the disease mechanisms underlying dementia and hold promise for the development of potential treatments. PMID:19640594

  6. A 6.4MB duplication of the alpha-synuclein locus causing fronto-temporal dementia and parkinsonism - phenotype-genotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Eleanna; Kiely, Aoife P; Proukakis, Christos; Giffin, Nicola; Love, Seth; Hehir, Jason; Rantell, Khadija; Pandraud, Amelie; Hernandez, Dena G; Nacheva, Elizabeth; Pittman, Alan M; Nalls, Mike A; Singleton, Andrew B; Revesz, Tamas; Bhatia, Kailash P; Quinn, Niall; Hardy, John; Holton, Janice L; Houlden, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Importance SNCA locus duplications are associated with variable clinical features and reduced penetrance but the reasons underlying this variability are unknown. Objective 1) To report a novel family carrying a heterozygous 6.4Mb duplication of the SNCA locus with an atypical clinical presentation strongly reminiscent of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and late-onset pallidopyramidal syndromes. 2) To study phenotype-genotype correlations in SNCA locus duplications. Design, Setting, Participants and Data sources We report the clinical and neuropathologic features of a family carrying a 6.4Mb duplication of the SNCA locus. To identify candidate disease modifiers, we undertake a genetic analysis in the family and conduct statistical analysis on previously published cases carrying SNCA locus duplication using regression modelling with robust standard errors to account for clustering at the family level. Main outcome measures To assess whether length of the SNCA locus duplication influences disease penetrance and severity, and whether extra-duplication factors have a disease-modifying role. Results We identified a large 6.4Mb duplication of the SNCA locus in this family. Neuropathological analysis showed extensive α-synuclein pathology with minimal phospho-tau pathology. Genetic analysis showed an increased burden of PD-related risk factors and the disease-predisposing H1/H1 MAPT haplotype. Statistical analysis of previously published cases suggested that there is a trend towards increasing disease severity and disease penetrance with increasing duplication size. The corresponding odds ratios (95% CI) from the univariate analyses were 1.17 (0.81 to 1.68) and 1.34 (0.78 to 2.31) respectively. Gender was significantly associated with both disease risk and severity; males compared to females had increased disease risk and severity and the corresponding odds ratios (95% CI) from the univariate analyses were 8.36 (1.97 to 35.42) and 5.55 (1.39 to 22.22) respectively

  7. Frequency of the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Majounie, Elisa; Renton, Alan E; Mok, Kin; Dopper, Elise GP; Waite, Adrian; Rollinson, Sara; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Nicolaou, Nayia; Simon-Sanchez, Javier; van Swieten, John C; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Johnson, Janel O; Sendtner, Michael; Pamphlett, Roger; Orrell, Richard W; Mead, Simon; Sidle, Katie C; Houlden, Henry; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Morrison, Karen E; Pall, Hardev; Talbot, Kevin; Ansorge, Olaf; Hernandez, Dena G; Arepalli, Sampath; Sabatelli, Mario; Mora, Gabriele; Corbo, Massimo; Giannini, Fabio; Calvo, Andrea; Englund, Elisabet; Borghero, Giuseppe; Floris, Gian Luca; Remes, Anne M; Laaksovirta, Hannu; McCluskey, Leo; Trojanowski, John Q; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Nalls, Michael A; Drory, Vivian E; Lu, Chin-Song; Yeh, Tu-Hsueh; Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yuji; Tsuji, Shoji; Le Ber, Isabelle; Brice, Alexis; Drepper, Carsten; Williams, Nigel; Kirby, Janine; Shaw, Pamela; Hardy, John; Tienari, Pentti J; Heutink, Peter; Morris, Huw R; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Traynor, Bryan J

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background We aimed to accurately estimate the frequency of a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72 that has been associated with a large proportion of cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Methods We screened 4448 patients diagnosed with ALS (El Escorial criteria) and 1425 patients with FTD (Lund-Manchester criteria) from 17 regions worldwide for the GGGGCC hexanucleotide expansion using a repeat-primed PCR assay. We assessed familial disease status on the basis of self-reported family history of similar neurodegenerative diseases at the time of sample collection. We compared haplotype data for 262 patients carrying the expansion with the known Finnish founder risk haplotype across the chromosomal locus. We calculated age-related penetrance using the Kaplan-Meier method with data for 603 individuals with the expansion. Findings In patients with sporadic ALS, we identified the repeat expansion in 236 (7·0%) of 3377 white individuals from the USA, Europe, and Australia, two (4·1%) of 49 black individuals from the USA, and six (8·3%) of 72 Hispanic individuals from the USA. The mutation was present in 217 (39·3%) of 552 white individuals with familial ALS from Europe and the USA. 59 (6·0%) of 981 white Europeans with sporadic FTD had the mutation, as did 99 (24·8%) of 400 white Europeans with familial FTD. Data for other ethnic groups were sparse, but we identified one Asian patient with familial ALS (from 20 assessed) and two with familial FTD (from three assessed) who carried the mutation. The mutation was not carried by the three Native Americans or 360 patients from Asia or the Pacific Islands with sporadic ALS who were tested, or by 41 Asian patients with sporadic FTD. All patients with the repeat expansion had (partly or fully) the founder haplotype, suggesting a one-off expansion occurring about 1500 years ago. The pathogenic expansion was non-penetrant in individuals younger than 35 years, 50

  8. Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... agitated or see things that are not there. Memory loss is a common symptom of dementia. However, memory loss by itself does not mean you have ... with two or more brain functions, such as memory and language. Although dementia is common in very ...

  9. How many biomarkers to discriminate neurodegenerative dementia?

    PubMed

    Sancesario, Giulia M; Bernardini, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    A number of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers are currently used for the diagnosis of dementia. Opposite changes in the level of amyloid-β(1-42) versus total tau and phosphorylated-tau181 in the CSF reflect the specific pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the brain. This panel of biomarkers has proven to be effective to differentiate AD from controls and from the major types of neurodegenerative dementia, and to evaluate the progression from mild cognitive impairment to AD. In the absence of specific biomarkers reflecting the pathologies of the other most common forms of dementia, such as Lewy Body disease, Frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, etc., the evaluation of biomarkers of AD pathology is used, attempting to exclude rather than to confirm AD. Other biomarkers included in the common clinical practice do not clearly relate to the underlying pathology: progranulin (PGRN) is a selective marker of frontotemporal dementia with mutations in the PGRN gene; the 14-3-3 protein is a highly sensitive and specific marker for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, but has to be used carefully in differentiating rapid progressive dementia; and α-synuclein is an emerging candidate biomarker of the different forms of synucleinopathy. This review summarizes several biomarkers of neurodegenerative dementia validated based on the neuropathological processes occurring in brain tissue. Notwithstanding the paucity of pathologically validated biomarkers and their high analytical variability, the combinations of these biomarkers may well represent a key and more precise analytical and diagnostic tool in the complex plethora of degenerative dementia. PMID:26292074

  10. Familial Dementia With Lewy Bodies With an Atypical Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Lauren T.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Cherrier, Monique M.; Eugenio, Charisma J.; Du, Jennifer Q.; Steinbart, Ellen J.; Limprasert, Pornprot; La Spada, Albert R.; Seltzer, Benjamin; Bird, Thomas D.; Leverenz, James B.

    2006-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 64-year-old male with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) pathology at autopsy who did not manifest the core symptoms of DLB until very late in his clinical course. His initial presentation of early executive and language dysfunction suggested a cortical dementia similar to frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Core symptoms of DLB including dementia, hallucination, and parkinsonian symptoms were not apparent until late in the course of his illness. Autopsy revealed both brainstem and cortical Lewy bodies and AD pathology. Family history revealed 7 relatives with a history of dementia including 4 with possible or probable DLB. This case is unique because of the FTLD-like presentation, positive family history of dementia, and autopsy confirmation of DLB. PMID:12641375

  11. Biomarkers of aggression in dementia.

    PubMed

    Gotovac, Kristina; Nikolac Perković, Matea; Pivac, Nela; Borovečki, Fran

    2016-08-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome defined by progressive global impairment of acquired cognitive abilities. It can be caused by a number of underlying conditions. The most common types of dementia are Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Despite the fact that cognitive impairment is central to the dementia, noncognitive symptoms, most commonly described nowadays as neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) exist almost always at certain point of the illness. Aggression as one of the NPS represents danger both for patients and caregivers and the rate of aggression correlates with the loss of independence, cognitive decline and poor outcome. Therefore, biomarkers of aggression in dementia patients would be of a great importance. Studies have shown that different genetic factors, including monoamine signaling and processing, can be associated with various NPS including aggression. There have been significant and multiple neurotransmitter changes identified in the brains of patients with dementia and some of these changes have been involved in the etiology of NPS. Aggression specific changes have also been observed in neuropathological studies. The current consensus is that the best approach for development of such biomarkers may be incorporation of genetics (polymorphisms), neurobiology (neurotransmitters and neuropathology) and neuroimaging techniques. PMID:26952705

  12. Key Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Common Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Sadak, Tatiana I.; Katon, Jodie; Beck, Cornelia; Cochrane, Barbara B.; Borson, Soo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) among people with common dementias and equip interdisciplinary clinicians and health services planners with large-sample data necessary to plan care for patients and families. We analyzed selected variables from baseline assessments of older adults with dementia of one or more etiologies (N = 3,768) from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center data repository. Dementias included Alzheimer's disease (AD), Lewy body dementia (DLB), behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), and vascular dementia (VaD). We compared the prevalence of four NPS clusters (agitation/aggression, depression/dysphoria, anxiety, irritability/lability) across dementia etiologies and stages using logistic regression and AD as the reference group. NPS profiles differed significantly across dementia types and stages. Compared with primary AD, DLB was associated with greater odds of depression/dysphoria (OR = 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28, 2.20) and anxiety (OR = 1.80, 95% CI 1.37, 2.36), with similar findings when DLB was diagnosed in combination with AD (depression/dysphoria: OR = 1.79, 95% CI 1.11, 2.89; anxiety: OR = 1.88, 95% CI 1.17, 3.02). Primary bvFTD was associated with greater odds of agitation/aggression (OR = 1.59, 95% CI 1.17, 2.18). The prevalence of anxiety and irritability/lability was highest in moderate stages of dementia, and agitation/aggression was most prevalent in severe dementia. Differential diagnosis and staging of dementias and inclusion of single and overlapping etiologies is important for planning and implementing appropriate strategies to anticipate, report, and intervene with key NPS that complicate home and health care. PMID:24079749

  13. Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovici, Gil D.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2010-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous syndrome, characterized by progressive decline in behaviour or language associated with degeneration of the frontal and anterior temporal lobes. While the seminal cases were described at the turn of the 20th century, FTLD has only recently been appreciated as a leading cause of dementia, particularly in patients presenting before the age of 65 years. Three distinct clinical variants of FTLD have been described: (i) behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia, characterized by changes in behaviour and personality in association with frontal-predominant cortical degeneration; (ii) semantic dementia, a syndrome of progressive loss of knowledge about words and objects associated with anterior temporal neuronal loss; and (iii) progressive nonfluent aphasia, characterized by effortful language output, loss of grammar and motor speech deficits in the setting of left perisylvian cortical atrophy. The majority of pathologies associated with FTLD clinical syndromes include either tau-positive (FTLD-TAU) or TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43)-positive (FTLD-TDP) inclusion bodies. FTLD overlaps clinically and pathologically with the atypical parkinsonian disorders corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, and with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The majority of familial FTLD cases are caused by mutations in the genes encoding microtubule-associated protein tau (leading to FTLD-TAU) or progranulin (leading to FTLD-TDP). The clinical and pathologic heterogeneity of FTLD poses a significant diagnostic challenge, and in vivo prediction of underlying histopathology can be significantly improved by supplementing the clinical evaluation with genetic tests and emerging biological markers. Current pharmacotherapy for FTLD focuses on manipulating serotonergic or dopaminergic neurotransmitter systems to ameliorate behavioural or motor symptoms. However, recent advances in FTLD

  14. Living With Semantic Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Karen; Wilkinson, Ray; Keady, John

    2014-01-01

    Semantic dementia is a variant of frontotemporal dementia and is a recently recognized diagnostic condition. There has been some research quantitatively examining care partner stress and burden in frontotemporal dementia. There are, however, few studies exploring the subjective experiences of family members caring for those with frontotemporal dementia. Increased knowledge of such experiences would allow service providers to tailor intervention, support, and information better. We used a case study design, with thematic narrative analysis applied to interview data, to describe the experiences of a wife and son caring for a husband/father with semantic dementia. Using this approach, we identified four themes: (a) living with routines, (b) policing and protecting, (c) making connections, and (d) being adaptive and flexible. Each of these themes were shared and extended, with the importance of routines in everyday life highlighted. The implications for policy, practice, and research are discussed. PMID:24532121

  15. Frontotemporal brain sagging syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wicklund, M.R.; Mokri, B.; Drubach, D.A.; Boeve, B.F.; Parisi, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is a relatively well-defined clinical syndrome. It is associated with frontal and temporal lobe structural/metabolic changes and pathologic findings of a neurodegenerative disease. We have been evaluating patients with clinical and imaging features partially consistent with bvFTD but with evidence also suggestive of brain sagging, which we refer to as frontotemporal brain sagging syndrome (FBSS). Methods: Retrospective medical chart review to identify all patients seen at our institution between 1996 and 2010, who had a clinical diagnosis of FTD and imaging evidence of brain sag. Results: Eight patients, 7 male and 1 female, were diagnosed with FBSS. The median age at symptom onset was 53 years. All patients had insidious onset and slow progression of behavioral and cognitive dysfunction accompanied by daytime somnolence and headache. Of the 5 patients with functional imaging, all showed evidence of hypometabolism of the frontotemporal regions. On brain MRI, all patients had evidence of brain sagging with distortion of the brainstem; 3 patients had diffuse pachymeningeal enhancement. CSF opening pressure was varied and CSF protein was mildly elevated. A definite site of CSF leak was not identified by myelogram or cisternography, except in one patient with a site highly suggestive of leak who subsequently underwent surgery confirming a CSF leak. In 2 patients with a neuropathologic examination, there was no evidence of a neurodegenerative disease. Conclusions: This case series demonstrates that FBSS may mimic typical bvFTD but should be recognized as an unusual presentation that is potentially treatable. PMID:21502595

  16. Mutations in presenilin 2 and its implications in Alzheimer's disease and other dementia-associated disorders.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yan; An, Seong Soo A; Kim, SangYun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Mutations in the genes encoding presenilin 1 (PSEN1), presenilin 2 (PSEN2), and amyloid precursor protein have been identified as the main genetic causes of familial AD. To date, more than 200 mutations have been described worldwide in PSEN1, which is highly homologous with PSEN2, while mutations in PSEN2 have been rarely reported. We performed a systematic review of studies describing the mutations identified in PSEN2. Most PSEN2 mutations were detected in European and in African populations. Only two were found in Korean populations. Interestingly, PSEN2 mutations appeared not only in AD patients but also in patients with other disorders, including frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, breast cancer, dilated cardiomyopathy, and Parkinson's disease with dementia. Here, we have summarized the PSEN2 mutations and the potential implications of these mutations in dementia-associated disorders. PMID:26203236

  17. Dementia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Dementia is characterised by chronic, global, non-reversible deterioration in memory, executive function, and personality. Speech and motor function may also be impaired. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments on cognitive symptoms of dementia (Alzheimer's, Lewy body, or vascular)? What are the effects of treatments on behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (Alzheimer's, Lewy body, or vascular)? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 49 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine), antidepressants (clomipramine, fluoxetine, imipramine, sertraline), antipsychotics (haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone), aromatherapy, benzodiazepines (diazepam, lorazepam), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), cognitive stimulation, exercise, ginkgo biloba, memantine, mood stabilisers (carbamazepine, sodium valproate/valproic acid), music therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), omega 3 (fish oil), reminiscence therapy, and statins. PMID:23870856

  18. Dementia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Dementia is characterised by chronic, global, non-reversible deterioration in memory, executive function, and personality. Speech and motor function may also be impaired. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments on cognitive symptoms of dementia (Alzheimer's, Lewy body, or vascular)? What are the effects of treatments on behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (Alzheimer's, Lewy body, or vascular)? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 33 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine), antidepressants (clomipramine, fluoxetine, imipramine, sertraline), antipsychotics (haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone), aromatherapy, benzodiazepines (diazepam, lorazepam), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), cognitive stimulation, exercise, ginkgo biloba, memantine, mood stabilisers (carbamazepine, sodium valproate/valproic acid), music therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), omega 3 (fish oil), reminiscence therapy, and statins. PMID:21726471

  19. Epidemiology of early-onset dementia: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Renata Teles; Caixeta, Leonardo; Machado, Sergio; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Carta, Mauro Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Presenile Dementia or Early Onset Dementia (EOD) is a public health problem, it differs from Senile Dementia, and encloses a significant number of cases; nevertheless, it is still poorly understood and underdiagnosed. This study aims to review the prevalence and etiology of EOD, comparing EOD with Senile Dementia, as well as to show the main causes of EOD and their prevalence in population and non-population based studies. The computer-supported search used the following databases: Pubmed/Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge and Scielo. The search terms were alcohol-associated dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, Creutzfeldt-jakob disease, dementia with lewy bodies, early onset dementia, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Huntington’s disease, mixed dementia, neurodegenerative disorders, Parkinson’s disease dementia, presenile dementia, traumatic brain injury, vascular dementia. Only papers published in English and conducted from 1985 up to 2012 were preferentially reviewed. Neurodegenerative diseases are the most common etiologies seen in EOD. Among the general population, the prevalence of EOD was found to range between 0 to 700 per 100.000 habitants in groups of 25-64 years old, with an increasing incidence with age. The progression of EOD was found to range between 8.3 to 22.8 new cases per 100.000 in those aged under 65 years. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major etiology, followed by Vascular Dementia (VaD) and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD). A larger number of epidemiological studies to elucidate how environmental issues contribute to EOD are necessary, thus, we can collaborate in the planning and prevention of services toward dementia patients. PMID:23878613

  20. Differences of Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia in Disease Severity in Four Major Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Kazui, Hiroaki; Yoshiyama, Kenji; Kanemoto, Hideki; Suzuki, Yukiko; Sato, Shunsuke; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Ikeda, Manabu; Tanaka, Hibiki; Hatada, Yutaka; Matsushita, Masateru; Nishio, Yoshiyuki; Mori, Etsuro; Tanimukai, Satoshi; Komori, Kenjiro; Yoshida, Taku; Shimizu, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Teruhisa; Mori, Takaaki; Kashibayashi, Tetsuo; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Shimomura, Tatsuo; Kabeshita, Yasunobu; Adachi, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSDs) negatively impact the prognosis of dementia patients and increase caregiver distress. The aims of this study were to clarify the differences of trajectories of 12 kinds of BPSDs by disease severity in four major dementias and to develop charts showing the frequency, severity, and associated caregiver distress (ACD) of BPSDs using the data of a Japan multicenter study (J-BIRD). Methods We gathered Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) data of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD; n = 1091), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB; n = 249), vascular dementia (VaD; n = 156), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD; n = 102) collected during a 5-year period up to July 31, 2013 in seven centers for dementia in Japan. The NPI composite scores (frequency × severity) of 12 kinds of items were analyzed using a principal component analysis (PCA) in each dementia. The factor scores of the PCA were compared in each dementia by disease severity, which was determined with Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR). Results Significant increases with higher CDR scores were observed in 1) two of the three factor scores which were loaded for all items except euphoria in AD, 2) two of the four factor scores for apathy, aberrant motor behavior (AMB), sleep disturbances, agitation, irritability, disinhibition, and euphoria in DLB, and 3) one of the four factor scores for apathy, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances in VaD. However, no increases were observed in any of the five factor scores in FTLD. Conclusions As dementia progresses, several BPSDs become more severe, including 1) apathy and sleep disturbances in AD, DLB, and VaD, 2) all of the BPSDs except euphoria in AD, 3) AMB, agitation, irritability, disinhibition, and euphoria in DLB, and 4) depression and anxiety in VaD. Trajectories of BPSDs in FTLD were unclear. PMID:27536962

  1. Genetics of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio

    2012-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), the most frequent neurodegenerative disorder with a presenile onset, presents with a spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from behavioral and executive impairment to language disorders and motor dysfunction. Familial aggregation is frequently reported, and about 10% of cases have an autosomal dominant transmission. Microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) gene mutations have been the first ones identified and are associated with early onset behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia phenotype. More recently, progranulin gene (GRN) mutations were recognized in association with familial form of FTLD. In addition, other genes are linked to rare cases of familial FTLD. Lastly, a number of genetic risk factors for sporadic forms have also been identified. In this review, current knowledge about mutations at the basis of familial FTLD will be described, together with genetic risk factors influencing the susceptibility to FTLD. PMID:22536193

  2. Imaging neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias: Recent advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Varley, James; Brooks, David J; Edison, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and Huntington's disease (HD) are the main neurodegenerative causes of dementia. Causes and mechanisms of these diseases remain elusive. Neuroinflammation is increasingly emerging as an important pathological factor in their development. Positron emission tomography (PET) using [11C]PK11195 represents a method of visualizing the microglial component of neuroinflammation via the translocator protein (TSPO) and we discuss the valuable insights this has yielded in neurodegenerative diseases. We discuss the limitations of this method and the development of second generation TSPO PET ligands which hope to overcome these limitations. We also discuss other methods of visualizing neuroinflammation and review the state of current dementia treatments targeted at neuroinflammation. It is our view that a multimodal investigation into neuroinflammation in AD, Parkinson's disease dementia, FTD and HD will yield valuable pathological insights which will usefully inform development of therapeutic targets and biomarkers. PMID:25449529

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid Aβ40 is similarly reduced in patients with Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Baldeiras, Inês; Santana, Isabel; Leitão, Maria João; Ribeiro, Maria Helena; Pascoal, Rui; Duro, Diana; Lemos, Raquel; Santiago, Beatriz; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Oliveira, Catarina Resende

    2015-11-15

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers have been increasingly studied for dementia diagnosis, however the accuracy to distinguish between different forms of dementia is still unsatisfactory. In this study, the added value of another CSF Aβ-peptide (Aβ40), along with the core CSF markers t-Tau, p-Tau, and Aβ42, in the discrimination between two large dementia groups of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD; n=107), Alzheimer's Disease (AD; n=107) and non-demented subjects (n=33) was evaluated. In FTLD, t-Tau and p-Tau were significantly increased in relation to controls, but lower than in AD, while Aβ42 was similar in FTLD and controls, but higher than in AD. Equally reduced Aβ40 levels were seen in both dementia groups, and therefore the combination of Aβ40 with core CSF biomarkers optimally discriminated FTLD and AD patients from controls. Aβ42 and t-Tau were selected as the best biomarker subset to differentiate FTLD from AD, with no added value of Aβ40 to the model. Diagnostic accuracy between FTLD and AD was still sub-optimal, with a significant percentage (23%) of FTLD patients, in particularly women, carrying an ApoE-ε4 allele, showing a CSF-AD biomarkers profile. Although CSF Aβ40 does not appear to have an additional value in the distinction between FTLD and AD, it increases the discrimination between subjects with dementia from controls. A CSF-AD biomarker profile can be seen in patients with a clinical phenotype of FTLD, reinforcing the need for autopsy confirmation. PMID:26388316

  4. CSF d-serine concentrations are similar in Alzheimer's disease, other dementias, and elderly controls.

    PubMed

    Biemans, Elisanne A L M; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M; Gerrits, Johan; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Kuiperij, H Bea; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2016-06-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of d-serine were recently reported as a potential new biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD), showing a perfect distinction between AD patients and healthy controls. In this study, we aimed to confirm these results and extend these previous findings to dementia with Lewy bodies and frontotemporal dementia. d-Serine levels in CSF of 29 AD patients, 8 dementia with Lewy bodies patients, 14 frontotemporal dementia patients, and 28 nondemented controls were measured using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In contrast to previous findings, in our study CSF d-serine levels were only slightly increased in AD patients compared with controls. CSF d-serine in AD did not differ from other dementias and was also not correlated to mini-mental state examination-scores. Owing to the large overlap of d-serine levels, we conclude that CSF d-serine is neither a suitable biomarker for AD nor for cognitive decline. PMID:27143438

  5. Personality and dementia.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Borin, Gemma; Del Debbio, Alessandro; Di Fiorino, Mario

    2015-03-01

    Personality describes persistent human behavioral responses to broad classes of environmental stimuli. Change in personality may be an early sign of dementia. Our goal was to review scientific literature on the association between personality and dementia. Medline and Google Scholar searches were conducted for relevant articles, chapters, and books published since 1980. Search terms used included personality, dementia, Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies. People with dementia commonly exhibit changes in personality that sometimes precede the other early clinical manifestations of the condition, such as cognitive impairment. Premorbid personality might be a determining factor so that caricature or exaggeration of original personality emerges as dementia progresses. Although it is generally accepted that these personality changes reflect the impact of progressive brain damage, there are several possible patterns of personality alterations with dementia. Early identification of personality modifications might assist with the timely diagnosis of dementia. PMID:25714255

  6. [Neuroepigenetics: Desoxyribonucleic acid methylation in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias].

    PubMed

    Mendioroz Iriarte, Maite; Pulido Fontes, Laura; Méndez-López, Iván

    2015-05-21

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that controls gene expression. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), global DNA hypomethylation of neurons has been described in the human cerebral cortex. Moreover, several variants in the methylation pattern of candidate genes have been identified in brain tissue when comparing AD patients and controls. Specifically, DNA methylation changes have been observed in PSEN1 and APOE, both genes previously being involved in the pathophysiology of AD. In other degenerative dementias, methylation variants have also been described in key genes, such as hypomethylation of the SNCA gene in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies or hypermethylation of the GRN gene promoter in frontotemporal dementia. The finding of aberrant DNA methylation patterns shared by brain tissue and peripheral blood opens the door to use those variants as epigenetic biomarkers in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24907105

  7. Mutations in presenilin 2 and its implications in Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia-associated disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yan; An, Seong Soo A; Kim, SangYun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Mutations in the genes encoding presenilin 1 (PSEN1), presenilin 2 (PSEN2), and amyloid precursor protein have been identified as the main genetic causes of familial AD. To date, more than 200 mutations have been described worldwide in PSEN1, which is highly homologous with PSEN2, while mutations in PSEN2 have been rarely reported. We performed a systematic review of studies describing the mutations identified in PSEN2. Most PSEN2 mutations were detected in European and in African populations. Only two were found in Korean populations. Interestingly, PSEN2 mutations appeared not only in AD patients but also in patients with other disorders, including frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, breast cancer, dilated cardiomyopathy, and Parkinson’s disease with dementia. Here, we have summarized the PSEN2 mutations and the potential implications of these mutations in dementia-associated disorders. PMID:26203236

  8. Nuclear inclusions mimicking poly(A)-binding protein nuclear 1 inclusions in a case of inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia with a novel mutation in the valosin-containing protein gene.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Shiro; Shimizu, Toshio; Komori, Takashi; Mori-Yoshimura, Madoka; Minami, Narihiro; Hayashi, Yukiko K

    2016-07-01

    A middle-aged Japanese man presented with slowly progressive asymmetric weakness of legs and arm but had neither ptosis nor dysphagia. He had a family history of similar condition suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. A muscle biopsy showed mixture of neurogenic atrophy and myopathy with rimmed vacuoles. Furthermore we found intranuclear inclusions that had a fine structure mimicking that of inclusions reported in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Immunohistochemical staining for polyadenylate-binding nuclear protein 1, which is identified within the nuclear inclusions of OPMD, demonstrated nuclear positivity in this case. However, OPMD was thought unlikely based on the clinical features and results of genetic analyses. Instead, a novel mutation in valosin-containing protein, c.376A>T (p.Ile126Phe), was revealed. A diagnosis of inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia was made. This is the first report of polyadenylate-binding nuclear protein 1-positive nuclear inclusions in the muscle of this condition. PMID:27209344

  9. C9orf72 Hexanucleotide Expansions Are Associated with Altered Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Homeostasis and Stress Granule Formation in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons from Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Dafinca, Ruxandra; Scaber, Jakub; Ababneh, Nida'a; Lalic, Tatjana; Weir, Gregory; Christian, Helen; Vowles, Jane; Douglas, Andrew G L; Fletcher-Jones, Alexandra; Browne, Cathy; Nakanishi, Mahito; Turner, Martin R; Wade-Martins, Richard; Cowley, Sally A; Talbot, Kevin

    2016-08-01

    An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in a noncoding region of the C9orf72 gene is a major cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), accounting for up to 40% of familial cases and 7% of sporadic ALS in European populations. We have generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of patients carrying C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansions, differentiated these to functional motor and cortical neurons, and performed an extensive phenotypic characterization. In C9orf72 iPSC-derived motor neurons, decreased cell survival is correlated with dysfunction in Ca(2+) homeostasis, reduced levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, C9orf72 motor neurons, and also cortical neurons, show evidence of abnormal protein aggregation and stress granule formation. This study is an extensive characterization of iPSC-derived motor neurons as cellular models of ALS carrying C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeats, which describes a novel pathogenic link between C9orf72 mutations, dysregulation of calcium signaling, and altered proteostasis and provides a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of ALS and the related neurodegenerative disease frontotemporal dementia. Stem Cells 2016;34:2063-2078. PMID:27097283

  10. C9orf72 Hexanucleotide Expansions Are Associated with Altered Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Homeostasis and Stress Granule Formation in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell‐Derived Neurons from Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Dafinca, Ruxandra; Scaber, Jakub; Ababneh, Nida'a; Lalic, Tatjana; Weir, Gregory; Christian, Helen; Vowles, Jane; Douglas, Andrew G.L.; Fletcher‐Jones, Alexandra; Browne, Cathy; Nakanishi, Mahito; Turner, Martin R.; Wade‐Martins, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in a noncoding region of the C9orf72 gene is a major cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), accounting for up to 40% of familial cases and 7% of sporadic ALS in European populations. We have generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of patients carrying C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansions, differentiated these to functional motor and cortical neurons, and performed an extensive phenotypic characterization. In C9orf72 iPSC‐derived motor neurons, decreased cell survival is correlated with dysfunction in Ca2+ homeostasis, reduced levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl‐2, increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, C9orf72 motor neurons, and also cortical neurons, show evidence of abnormal protein aggregation and stress granule formation. This study is an extensive characterization of iPSC‐derived motor neurons as cellular models of ALS carrying C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeats, which describes a novel pathogenic link between C9orf72 mutations, dysregulation of calcium signaling, and altered proteostasis and provides a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of ALS and the related neurodegenerative disease frontotemporal dementia. Stem Cells 2016;34:2063–2078 PMID:27097283

  11. Progranulin deficiency induces overactivation of WNT5A expression via TNF-α/NF-κB pathway in peripheral cells from frontotemporal dementia-linked granulin mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Alquézar, Carolina; de la Encarnación, Ana; Moreno, Fermín; de Munain, Adolfo López; Martín-Requero, Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Background Loss-of-function progranulin gene (GRN) mutations have been identified as the major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with transactive response (TAR) DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) pathology (frontotemporal lobar degeneration [FTLD]-TDP); however, little is known about the association between progranulin (PGRN) deficiency and neuronal loss in individuals with FTLD-TDP. Previously we reported enhanced proliferative activity associated with the activation of WNT5A/CDK6/pRb signalling in PGRN-deficient cells. The objective of this work was to elucidate the association between PGRN deficiency, WNT5A signalling and cell proliferation in immortalized lymphoblasts from carriers of the c.709–1G > A GRN mutation (asymptomatic and FTLD-TDP). Methods We assessed cell proliferation in carriers of the c.709–1G > A GRN gene mutation and controls without GRN mutation and without sign of neurologic degeneration by cell counting or using an MTT assay. We used a luciferase assay to measure the nuclear factor-κ (NF-κ) activity. We evaluated messenger RNA levels using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and protein levels by immunoblotting. Co-immunoprecipitation was used to analyze the interaction between PGRN and its receptors. Results We enrolled 19 carriers of the GRN gene mutation and 10 controls in this study. The PGRN-deficient cells showed increased expression of WNT5A due to NF-κB signalling overactivation. We observed a competition between PGRN and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) for binding both TNF receptors (TNFR) I and II. Blocking NF-κB signalling using wedelolactone or specific antibodies against TNFRs inhibited WNT5A overexpression and proliferation of PGRN-deficient cells. Conversely, the activation of NF-κB signalling by TNF-α increased WNT5A-dependent proliferation of control cells. Limitations All cell lines were derived from individuals harboring the same splicing GRN mutation. Nevertheless, most of the known GRN

  12. Neuronal ubiquitinated intranuclear inclusions in familial and non-familial frontotemporal dementia of the motor neuron disease type associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bigio, Eileen H; Johnson, Nancy A; Rademaker, Alfred W; Fung, Bing B; Mesulam, M-Marsel; Siddique, Nailah; Dellefave, Lisa; Caliendo, Janice; Freeman, Stefanie; Siddique, Teepu

    2004-08-01

    Ubiquitinated cytoplasmic inclusions (Ub-CIs) in superficial frontal cortex and dentate gyrus neurons are the hallmark of frontotemporal degeneration of the motor neuron disease-type (FTD-MND-type). To date, 2 reports have described intranuclear ubiquitinated inclusions (Ub-INIs) in 9 cases of familial FTD-MND-type (without clinical or pathologic motor neuron disease, MND). In the current study we found an additional 11 cases with Ub-INIs. We have identified for the first time among these cases 2 with a negative family history and 3 that have concomitant amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The results of the present study i) confirm a previous report of significantly lower average brain weight and longer duration in cases with Ub-INIs, ii) reveal significantly greater striatal neuronal loss and gliosis in cases with intranuclear inclusions, and iii) demonstrate that intranuclear inclusions correlate with cytoplasmic inclusions and dystrophic neurites in frontal cortex and striatum but not in dentate gyrus. In addition, the current study confirms that Ub-INIs are found in familial FTD-MND-type, but also extends the presence of Ub-INIs to familial FTD-MND (with concomitant ALS), and probably also to non-familial FTD-MND-type. PMID:15330335

  13. Altered Sense of Humor in Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Camilla N.; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Gordon, Elizabeth; Golden, Hannah L.; Cohen, Miriam H.; Woodward, Felix J.; Macpherson, Kirsty; Slattery, Catherine F.; Mummery, Catherine J.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Sense of humor is potentially relevant to social functioning in dementias, but has been little studied in these diseases. We designed a semi-structured informant questionnaire to assess humor behavior and preferences in patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD; n = 15), semantic dementia (SD; n = 7), progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA; n = 10), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD; n = 16) versus healthy age-matched individuals (n = 21). Altered (including frankly inappropriate) humor responses were significantly more frequent in bvFTD and SD (all patients) than PNFA or AD (around 40% of patients). All patient groups liked satirical and absurdist comedy significantly less than did healthy controls. This pattern was reported premorbidly for satirical comedy in bvFTD, PNFA, and AD. Liking for slapstick comedy did not differ between groups. Altered sense of humor is particularly salient in bvFTD and SD, but also frequent in AD and PNFA. Humor may be a sensitive probe of social cognitive impairment in dementia, with diagnostic, biomarker and social implications. PMID:26444779

  14. In silico analysis of SIGMAR1 variant (rs4879809) segregating in a consanguineous Pakistani family showing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis without frontotemporal lobar dementia.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Muhammad Ikram; Ahmad, Arsalan; Raza, Syed Irfan; Amar, Ali; Ali, Amjad; Bhatti, Attya; John, Peter; Mohyuddin, Aisha; Ahmad, Wasim; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad

    2015-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting upper motor neurons in the brain and lower motor neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord, resulting in fatal paralysis. It has been found to be associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). In the present study, we have described homozygosity mapping and gene sequencing in a consanguineous autosomal recessive Pakistani family showing non-juvenile ALS without signs of FTLD. Gene mapping was carried out in all recruited family members using microsatellite markers, and linkage was established with sigma non-opioid intracellular receptor 1 (SIGMAR1) gene at chromosome 9p13.2. Gene sequencing of SIGMAR1 revealed a novel 3'-UTR nucleotide variation c.672*31A>G (rs4879809) segregating with disease in this family. The C9ORF72 repeat region in intron 1, previously implicated in a related phenotype, was excluded through linkage, and further confirmation of exclusion was obtained by amplifying intron 1 of C9ORF72 with multiple primers in affected individuals and controls. In silico analysis was carried out to explore the possible role of 3'-UTR variant of SIGMAR1 in ALS. The Regulatory RNA motif and Element Finder program revealed disturbance in miRNA (hsa-miR-1205) binding site due to this variation. ESEFinder analysis showed new SRSF1 and SRSF1-IgM-BRCA1 binding sites with significant scores due to this variation. Our results indicate that the 3'-UTR SIGMAR1 variant c.672*31A>G may have a role in the pathogenesis of ALS in this family. PMID:26205306

  15. Towards a nosology for frontotemporal lobar degenerations-a meta-analysis involving 267 subjects.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Matthias L; Raczka, Karolina; Neumann, Jane; Yves von Cramon, D

    2007-07-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration is the second most common diagnosis of dementia in individuals younger than 65 years. We conducted a systematic and quantitative meta-analysis to examine neural correlates of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and its subtypes and to place the disease in a framework of cognitive neuropsychiatry. MedLine and Current Contents search engines were used to identify functional and anatomical imaging studies investigating frontotemporal lobar degeneration between 1980 and 2005. Studies were included, if they were peer-reviewed, applied internationally recognized diagnostic criteria, were original studies, and had results normalized to a stereotactic space. 19 studies were identified reporting either atrophy or decreases in glucose utilization. Finally, the analysis involved 267 subjects suffering from frontotemporal lobar degeneration and 351 control subjects. A quantitative meta-analysis was performed. Maxima of the studies resulted in activation likelihood estimates. The meta-analysis revealed specific neural networks for each of the three clinically defined subtypes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration, namely frontotemporal dementia, semantic dementia, and progressive non-fluent aphasia. Networks did not overlap as shown by a conjunction analysis, and they corresponded to clinical characteristics. The study relates the clinical features of each subtype of frontotemporal lobar degeneration specifically to its neural substrate. By 'triple dissociating' frontotemporal lobar degenerations into three clinicoanatomical prototypes, the study contributes to placing these disorders in cognitive neuropsychiatry and suggests a respective nosology. PMID:17478101

  16. Natural Phytochemicals in the Treatment and Prevention of Dementia: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Libro, Rosaliana; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Soundara Rajan, Thangavelu; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    The word dementia describes a class of heterogeneous diseases which etiopathogenetic mechanisms are not well understood. There are different types of dementia, among which, Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are the more common. Currently approved pharmacological treatments for most forms of dementia seem to act only on symptoms without having profound disease-modifying effects. Thus, alternative strategies capable of preventing the progressive loss of specific neuronal populations are urgently required. In particular, the attention of researchers has been focused on phytochemical compounds that have shown antioxidative, anti-amyloidogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties and that could represent important resources in the discovery of drug candidates against dementia. In this review, we summarize the neuroprotective effects of the main phytochemicals belonging to the polyphenol, isothiocyanate, alkaloid and cannabinoid families in the prevention and treatment of the most common kinds of dementia. We believe that natural phytochemicals may represent a promising sources of alternative medicine, at least in association with therapies approved to date for dementia. PMID:27110749

  17. Defensive Effect of Lansoprazole in Dementia of AD Type in Mice Exposed to Streptozotocin and Cholesterol Enriched Diet

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Rupinder K.; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the potential of lansoprazole (a proton pump inhibitor and agonist of liver x receptors) in experimental dementia of AD type. Streptozotocin [STZ, 3 mg/kg, injected intracerebroventricular (i.c.v), and high fat diet (HFD, administered for 90 days)] were used to induce dementia in separate groups of Swiss mice. Morris water maze (MWM) test was performed to assess learning and memory of the animals. A battery of biochemical and histopathological studies were also performed. Extent of oxidative stress was measured by estimating the levels of brain reduced glutathione (GSH) and thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS). Brain acetylcholinestrase (AChE) activity and serum cholesterol levels were also estimated. The brain level of myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured as a marker of inflammation. STZ and HFD produced a marked decline in MWM performance of the animals, reflecting impairment of learning and memory. STZ/HFD treated mice exhibited a marked accentuation of AChE activity, TBARS and MPO levels along with a fall in GSH levels. Further, the stained micrographs of STZ/HFD treated mice indicated pathological changes, severe neutrophilic infiltration and amyloid deposition. Lansoprazole treatment significantly attenuated STZ and HFD -induced memory deficits, biochemical and histopathological alterations. It also prevented HFD-induced rise in the cholesterol level. Therefore, the findings demonstrate potential of lansoprazole in memory dysfunctions which may probably be attributed to its anti-cholinesterase, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover, both cholesterol-dependent as well as cholesterol-independent effects of lansoprazole appear to play a role. In addition study indicates the role of liver x receptors in dementia. PMID:23936214

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid proteomics and protein biomarkers in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Oeckl, Patrick; Steinacker, Petra; Feneberg, Emily; Otto, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) comprises a spectrum of rare neurodegenerative diseases with an estimated prevalence of 15-22 cases per 100,000 persons including the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA), semantic dementia (SD), FTD with motor neuron disease (FTD-MND), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS). The pathogenesis of the diseases is still unclear and clinical diagnosis of FTLD is hampered by overlapping symptoms within the FTLD subtypes and with other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Intracellular protein aggregates in the brain are a major hallmark of FTLD and implicate alterations in protein metabolism or function in the disease's pathogenesis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) which surrounds the brain can be used to study changes in neurodegenerative diseases and to identify disease-related mechanisms or neurochemical biomarkers for diagnosis. In the present review, we will give an overview of the current literature on proteomic studies in CSF of FTLD patients. Reports of targeted and unbiased proteomic approaches are included and the results are discussed in regard of their informative value about disease pathology and the suitability to be used as diagnostic biomarkers. Finally, we will give some future perspectives on CSF proteomics and a list of candidate biomarkers which might be interesting for validation in further studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in neuroscience and neurology. PMID:25526887

  19. Financial errors in dementia: Testing a neuroeconomic conceptual framework

    PubMed Central

    Chiong, Winston; Hsu, Ming; Wudka, Danny; Miller, Bruce L.; Rosen, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    Financial errors by patients with dementia can have devastating personal and family consequences. We developed and evaluated a neuroeconomic conceptual framework for understanding financial errors across different dementia syndromes, using a systematic, retrospective, blinded chart review of demographically-balanced cohorts of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD, n=100) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, n=50). Reviewers recorded specific reports of financial errors according to a conceptual framework identifying patient cognitive and affective characteristics, and contextual influences, conferring susceptibility to each error. Specific financial errors were reported for 49% of AD and 70% of bvFTD patients (p = 0.012). AD patients were more likely than bvFTD patients to make amnestic errors (p< 0.001), while bvFTD patients were more likely to spend excessively (p = 0.004) and to exhibit other behaviors consistent with diminished sensitivity to losses and other negative outcomes (p< 0.001). Exploratory factor analysis identified a social/affective vulnerability factor associated with errors in bvFTD, and a cognitive vulnerability factor associated with errors in AD. Our findings highlight the frequency and functional importance of financial errors as symptoms of AD and bvFTD. A conceptual model derived from neuroeconomic literature identifies factors that influence vulnerability to different types of financial error in different dementia syndromes, with implications for early diagnosis and subsequent risk prevention. PMID:23550884

  20. Spontaneous Social Behaviors Discriminate “Behavioral Dementias” from Psychiatric Disorders and Other Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Katherine P.; Santos-Modesitt, Wendy; Kramer, Joel H.; Pavlic, Danijela; Beckman, Victoria; Miller, Bruce L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Changes in social behavior are often the first symptoms of neurodegenerative disease. Patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) often go undiagnosed, or are misclassified as psychiatric patients, because in the absence of cognitive deficits, non-experts fail to recognize these social changes as dementia symptoms. The object of this study was to improve screening for behavioral dementia in primary care and mental health settings by quantifying spontaneous social behaviors specific to FTLD. Method In a university hospital dementia clinic, examiners blind to subject diagnosis performed one hour of cognitive testing, then completed the Interpersonal Measure of Psychopathy (IMP), an 18-item checklist of observed inappropriate behaviors. Patients then underwent a multidisciplinary evaluation to derive a neurodegenerative or psychiatric diagnosis. Data were collected from 288 subjects: 45 Alzheimer's disease (AD), 40 frontotemporal dementia (FTD), 21 semantic dementia (SD), 13 progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA), 14 corticobasal degeneration (CBD), 21 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), 37 dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), 16 vascular dementia, 29 mixed vascular and AD, 35 primary psychiatric disorders, and 17 normal older controls. Results Statistical item analyses demonstrated specific patterns of social behavior that differentiated both FTD and SD patients from 1) non-dementing older adults, 2) non-dementing individuals with psychiatric conditions, 3) individuals with cerebrovascular disease, and 4) individuals with other neurodegenerative disorders. SDs verbally and physically interrupted evaluations, spoke perseveratively and tangentially and resisted clinician redirection. FTDs were apathetic or disinhibited and were unconcerned about meeting clinician expectations. Conclusions Specific, abnormal interpersonal behaviors can alert non-experts to the need for specialized dementia referral. PMID:18312039

  1. Gene Therapy Models of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Benjamin; Kneynsberg, Andrew; Kanaan, Nicholas M.

    2016-01-01

    Dementias are among the most common neurological disorders, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. AD remains a looming health crisis despite great efforts to learn the mechanisms surrounding the neuron dysfunction and neurodegeneration that accompanies AD primarily in the medial temporal lobe. In addition to AD, a group of diseases known as frontotemporal dementias (FTDs) are degenerative diseases involving atrophy and degeneration in the frontal and temporal lobe regions. Importantly, AD and a number of FTDs are collectively known as tauopathies due to the abundant accumulation of pathological tau inclusions in the brain. The precise role tau plays in disease pathogenesis remains an area of strong research focus. A critical component to effectively study any human disease is the availability of models that recapitulate key features of the disease. Accordingly, a number of animal models are currently being pursued to fill the current gaps in our knowledge of the causes of dementias and to develop effective therapeutics. Recent developments in gene therapy-based approaches, particularly in recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs), have provided new tools to study AD and other related neurodegenerative disorders. Additionally, gene therapy approaches have emerged as an intriguing possibility for treating these diseases in humans. This chapter explores the current state of rAAV models of AD and other dementias, discuss recent efforts to improve these models, and describe current and future possibilities in the use of rAAVs and other viruses in treatments of disease. PMID:26611599

  2. Auditory hedonic phenotypes in dementia: A behavioural and neuroanatomical analysis.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Phillip D; Downey, Laura E; Golden, Hannah L; Clark, Camilla N; Slattery, Catherine F; Paterson, Ross W; Schott, Jonathan M; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Rossor, Martin N; Warren, Jason D

    2015-06-01

    Patients with dementia may exhibit abnormally altered liking for environmental sounds and music but such altered auditory hedonic responses have not been studied systematically. Here we addressed this issue in a cohort of 73 patients representing major canonical dementia syndromes (behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), semantic dementia (SD), progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) amnestic Alzheimer's disease (AD)) using a semi-structured caregiver behavioural questionnaire and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of patients' brain MR images. Behavioural responses signalling abnormal aversion to environmental sounds, aversion to music or heightened pleasure in music ('musicophilia') occurred in around half of the cohort but showed clear syndromic and genetic segregation, occurring in most patients with bvFTD but infrequently in PNFA and more commonly in association with MAPT than C9orf72 mutations. Aversion to sounds was the exclusive auditory phenotype in AD whereas more complex phenotypes including musicophilia were common in bvFTD and SD. Auditory hedonic alterations correlated with grey matter loss in a common, distributed, right-lateralised network including antero-mesial temporal lobe, insula, anterior cingulate and nucleus accumbens. Our findings suggest that abnormalities of auditory hedonic processing are a significant issue in common dementias. Sounds may constitute a novel probe of brain mechanisms for emotional salience coding that are targeted by neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25929717

  3. What contributes to a good quality of life in early dementia? awareness and the QoL-AD: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Self-report quality of life (QoL) measures for people with dementia are widely used as outcome measures in trials of dementia care interventions. Depressed mood, relationship quality and neuropsychiatric symptoms predict scores on these measures, whereas cognitive impairment and functional abilities typically do not. This study examines whether these self-reports are influenced by personality and by the person’s awareness of his/her impairments. A strong negative association between QoL and awareness of deficits would have implications for the validity of self-report in this context and for therapeutic interventions aiming to increase adjustment and coping. Methods Participants were 101 individuals with early‒stage dementia and their family carers participating in the Memory Impairment and Dementia Awareness (MIDAS) Study. QoL was assessed using the QoL-AD scale, and awareness was assessed in relation to memory, activities of daily living and social functioning. Self-concept, conscientiousness, quality of relationship and mood were assessed and a brief neuropsychological battery administered. Carers rated their own stress and well-being and reported on neuropsychiatric symptoms. A series of regression analyses predicting QoL-AD were carried out, identifying key variables in each domain of assessment to take forward to an overall model. Results Cognitive impairment was not related to QoL. The final model accounted for 57% of the variance in QoL-AD scores, with significant contributions from depressed mood, severity of irritability shown by the person with dementia, self-concept, quality of relationship (rated by the person with dementia) and male gender. The bivariate relationships of QoL-AD with awareness of memory function, awareness of functional abilities and conscientiousness were mediated by both depressed mood and self-concept. Conclusions This study reports the most comprehensive approach to evaluation of awareness to date. Most of the indices

  4. Creativity and dementia: a review.

    PubMed

    Palmiero, Massimiliano; Di Giacomo, Dina; Passafiume, Domenico

    2012-08-01

    In these last years, creativity was found to play an important role for dementia patients in terms of diagnosis and rehabilitation strategies. This led us to explore the relationships between dementia and creativity. At the aim, artistic creativity and divergent thinking are considered both in non-artists and artists affected by different types of dementia. In general, artistic creativity can be expressed in exceptional cases both in Alzheimer's disease and Frontotemporal dementia, whereas divergent thinking decreases in dementia. The creation of paintings or music is anyway important for expressing emotions and well-being. Yet, creativity seems to emerge when the right prefrontal cortex, posterior temporal, and parietal areas are relatively intact, whereas it declines when these areas are damaged. However, enhanced creativity in dementia is not confirmed by controlled studies conducted in non-artists, and whether artists with dementia can show creativity has to be fully addressed. Future research directions are suggested. PMID:22438178

  5. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Lina; Mackenzie, Ian R; Förstl, Hans; Kurz, Alexander; Diehl-Schmid, Janine

    2014-01-01

    The term frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) refers to a group of progressive brain diseases, which preferentially involve the frontal and temporal lobes. Depending on the primary site of atrophy, the clinical manifestation is dominated by behavior alterations or impairment of language. The onset of symptoms usually occurs before the age of 60 years, and the mean survival from diagnosis varies between 3 and 10 years. The prevalence is estimated at 15 per 100,000 in the population aged between 45 and 65 years, which is similar to the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease in this age group. There are two major clinical subtypes, behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia and primary progressive aphasia. The neuropathology underlying the clinical syndromes is also heterogeneous. A common feature is the accumulation of certain neuronal proteins. Of these, the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT), the transactive response DNA-binding protein, and the fused in sarcoma protein are most important. Approximately 10% to 30% of FTLD shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, with mutations in the genes for MAPT, progranulin (GRN), and in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) accounting for more than 80% of familial cases. Although significant advances have been made in recent years regarding diagnostic criteria, clinical assessment instruments, neuropsychological tests, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, and brain imaging techniques, the clinical diagnosis remains a challenge. To date, there is no specific pharmacological treatment for FTLD. Some evidence has been provided for serotonin reuptake inhibitors to reduce behavioral disturbances. No large-scale or high-quality studies have been conducted to determine the efficacy of non-pharmacological treatment approaches in FTLD. In view of the limited treatment options, caregiver education and support is currently the most important component of the clinical management. PMID:24600223

  6. Frontotemporal Disorders: Treatment and Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... Initiatives alzheimers.gov National Alzheimer’s Plan National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Frontotemporal Disorders: Information for Patients, Families, and Caregivers Treatment and Management Managing the symptoms of frontotemporal disorders may involve ...

  7. Sexual disinhibition and dementia.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Ulivi, Martina; Danti, Sabrina; Lucetti, Claudio; Nuti, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    To describe inappropriate sexual behaviour (ISB) observed in patients with dementia, we conducted searches using the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and Web of Science to find relevant articles, chapters, and books published from 1950 to 2014. Search terms used included 'hypersexuality', 'inappropriate sexual behaviors', and 'dementia'. Publications found through this indexed search were reviewed for further relevant references. Sexuality is a human's need to express intimacy, but persons with dementia may not know how to appropriately meet their needs for closeness and intimacy due to their decline in cognition. Generally, the interaction among brain, physical, psychological, and environmental factors can create what we call ISB. The most likely change in the sexual behaviour of a person with dementia is indifference. However, ISB in dementia appear to be of two types--intimacy-seeking and disinhibited--that differ in their association with dementia type, dementia severity and, possibly, other concurrent behavioural disorder. Tensions develop from uncertainties regarding which, or when, behaviours are to be considered 'inappropriate' (i.e. improper) or abnormal. While most ISB occur in the moderate to severe stages of Alzheimer's dementia, they may also be seen in early stages of frontotemporal dementia because of the lack of insight and disinhibition. ISB are often better managed by non-pharmacological means, as patients may be less responsive to psychoactive therapies, but non-pharmacological interventions do not always stop the behaviour. PMID:26215977

  8. A comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of the AD8 and BCAT-SF in identifying dementia and mild cognitive impairment in long-term care residents.

    PubMed

    Mansbach, William E; Mace, Ryan A

    2016-09-01

    We compared the accuracy of the Brief Cognitive Assessment Tool-Short Form (BCAT-SF) and AD8 in identifying mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia among long-term care residents. Psychometric analyses of 357 long-term care residents (n = 228, nursing home; n = 129, assisted living) in Maryland referred for neuropsychological evaluation evidenced robust internal consistency reliability and construct validity for the BCAT-SF. Furthermore, hierarchical logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses demonstrated superior predictive validity for the BCAT-SF in identifying MCI and dementia relative to the AD8. In contrast, previously reported psychometric properties or cut scores for the AD8 could not be cross-validated in this long-term care sample. Based on these findings, the BCAT-SF appears to be a more reliable and valid screening instrument than the AD8 for rapidly identifying MCI and dementia in long-term care residents. PMID:26873431

  9. Young-Onset Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kuruppu, Dulanji K; Matthews, Brandy R

    2014-01-01

    Young-onset dementia (YOD) is an neurological syndrome that affects behavior and cognition of patients younger than 65 years of age. Although frequently misdiagnosed, a systematic approach, reliant upon attainment of detailed medical history, collateral history from an informant, neuropsychological testing, laboratory studies, and neuroimaging, may facilitate earlier and more accurate diagnosis with subsequent intervention. The differential diagnosis of YOD is extensive and includes early-onset forms of adult neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, Lewy body dementias, Huntington's disease, and prion disease. Late-onset forms of childhood neurodegenerative conditions may also present as YOD and include mitochondrial disorders, lysosomal storage disorders, and leukodystrophies. Potentially reversible etiologies including inflammatory disorders, infectious diseases, toxic/metabolic abnormalities, transient epileptic amnesia, obstructive sleep apnea, and normal pressure hydrocephalus also represent important differential diagnostic considerations in YOD. This review will present etiologies, diagnostic strategies, and options for management of YOD with comprehensive summary tables for clinical reference. PMID:24234358

  10. Early onset degenerative dementias: demographic characteristics and etiologic classification in a tertiary referral center.

    PubMed

    Maiovis, Pantelis; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Konstantinopoulou, Elina; Karacostas, Dimitris

    2015-03-01

    Early onset dementia (EOD) is a major diagnostic challenge as it often presents with atypical features and may be attributed to treatable diseases. Primary degenerative dementias (Alzheimer's disease-AD, frontotemporal lobar degeneration-FTLD, Lewy body dementia-LBD), although traditionally considered to affect older people, are still a main cause of EOD. 491 demented patients were assessed from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2010 in the Neurology Department of a tertiary referral center. Patients were classified as AD, behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), non-fluent agrammatic variant primary progressive aphasia (naPPA), semantic variant PPA (svPPA), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), or progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) who also met criteria for naPPA and LBD. Finally, their demographic characteristics were analysed, according to age at onset (EOD <65 years, late onset dementia-LOD ≥65 years). From the 491 patients, 137 (27.9 %) were EOD. In the EOD group, 52 (38 %) were diagnosed with bvFTD, 34 (24.8 %) with AD, 27 (19.7 %) with naPPA, 10 (7.2 %) with svPPA, 12 (8.8 %) with CBD or PSP, and 2 (1.5 %) with LBD. Demographic characteristics did not differ significantly among diagnostic categories in the EOD group, while in the LOD group FTLD patients were younger and more frequently men compared to both AD and LBD patients. EOD patients had more years of education than LOD patients. Degenerative disorders as causes of EOD are not rare. High clinical alertness is warranted to achieve correct and timely diagnosis. PMID:24878660

  11. Optimal feature selection for automated classification of FDG-PET in patients with suspected dementia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serag, Ahmed; Wenzel, Fabian; Thiele, Frank; Buchert, Ralph; Young, Stewart

    2009-02-01

    FDG-PET is increasingly used for the evaluation of dementia patients, as major neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Lewy body dementia (LBD), and Frontotemporal dementia (FTD), have been shown to induce specific patterns of regional hypo-metabolism. However, the interpretation of FDG-PET images of patients with suspected dementia is not straightforward, since patients are imaged at different stages of progression of neurodegenerative disease, and the indications of reduced metabolism due to neurodegenerative disease appear slowly over time. Furthermore, different diseases can cause rather similar patterns of hypo-metabolism. Therefore, classification of FDG-PET images of patients with suspected dementia may lead to misdiagnosis. This work aims to find an optimal subset of features for automated classification, in order to improve classification accuracy of FDG-PET images in patients with suspected dementia. A novel feature selection method is proposed, and performance is compared to existing methods. The proposed approach adopts a combination of balanced class distributions and feature selection methods. This is demonstrated to provide high classification accuracy for classification of FDG-PET brain images of normal controls and dementia patients, comparable with alternative approaches, and provides a compact set of features selected.

  12. Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Josephs, Keith A.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a syndromic diagnosis that encompasses at least three different variants. Imaging modalities are clinically useful in FTLD while pathology remains the gold standard for definitive diagnosis. To date three different genes have been identified that account for FTLD. PMID:17659185

  13. Vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Korczyn, Amos D; Vakhapova, Veronika; Grinberg, Lea T

    2012-01-01

    The epidemic grow of dementia causes great concern for the society. It is customary to consider Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia (VaD). This dichotomous view of a neurodegenerative disease as opposed to brain damage caused by extrinsic factors led to separate lines of research in these two entities. Indeed, accumulated data suggest that the two disorders have additive effects and probably interact; however it is still unknown to what degree. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have shown “vascular” risk factors to be associated with AD. Therefore, a clear distinction between AD and VaD cannot be made in most cases, and is furthermore unhelpful. In the absence of efficacious treatment for the neurodegenerative process, special attention must be given to vascular component, even in patients with presumed mixed pathology. Symptomatic treatment of VaD and AD are similar, although the former is less effective. For prevention of dementia it is important to treat aggressively all factors, even in stroke survivors who do not show evidence of cognitive decline,. In this review, we will give a clinical and pathological picture of the processes leading to VaD and discuss it interaction with AD. PMID:22575403

  14. Prevalence of Amyloid PET Positivity in Dementia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Jansen, Willemijn J.; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Knol, Dirk L.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; van Berckel, Bart N. M.; Scheltens, Philip; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2015-01-01

    y Dementia with Lewy bodies  emsp;APOE ε4 carrier  1663 (48–80)83 (67–92)  emsp;APOE ε4 noncarrier  1829 (15–50)54 (30–77) Frontotemporal dementia  emsp;APOE ε4 carrier  4819 (12–28)43 (35–50)  emsp;APOE ε4 noncarrier160  5 (3–8)14 (11–18) Vascular dementia  emsp;APOE ε4 carrier  3025 (9–52)64 (49–77)  emsp;APOE ε4 noncarrier  77  7 (3–18)29 (17–43) CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Among participants with dementia, the prevalence of amyloid positivity was associated with clinical diagnosis, age, and APOE genotype. These findings indicate the potential clinical utility of amyloid imaging for differential diagnosis in early-onset dementia and to support the clinical diagnosis of participants with AD dementia and noncarrier APOE ε4 status who are older than 70 years. PMID:25988463

  15. Primary ectopic frontotemporal craniopharyngioma

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Porcayo, Luis Alberto; Ponce-Gómez, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Moreno, Mauricio; Portocarrero-Ortíz, Lesly; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; Gómez-Amador, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary ectopic craniopharyngiomas have only rarely been reported. Craniopharyngiomas involve usually the sellar and suprasellar region, but can be originated from cell remnants of the obliterated craniopharyngeal duct or metaplastic change of andenohypophyseal cells. We present the first case of a primary ectopic frontotemporal craniopharyngioma. Presentation of case A 35-year old woman presented with a one-year history of headache and diplopia. MRI showed a large frontotemporal cystic lesion. Tumor resection was performed with a keyhole endoscopic frontal lateral approach. The pathological features showed an adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma with a cholesterol granuloma reaction. Discussion There have been reported different localizations for primary ectopic craniopharyngioma. Our case presented a lobulated frontotemporal cystic mass formed by a dense eosinophilic proteinaceous material dystrophic calcifications and cholesterol crystals, with epithelial remnants. No tumor regrowth was observed in the magnetic resonance image 27 months postoperatively. Conclusion Primary ectopic craniopharyngioma is a rare entity with a pathogenesis that remains uncertain. This is an unusual anatomic location associated with unique clinical findings. PMID:25725331

  16. [Artistic creativity and dementia].

    PubMed

    Sellal, François; Musacchio, Mariano

    2008-03-01

    Artistic creativity can be defined as the ability to produce both innovative and esthetic works. Though most dementias result in a loss of instrumental functions and a deterioration in artistic production, for some established artists, dementia, most often Alzheimer's disease, changed their style and technique but preserved their creativity and prolific artistic drive. Moreover, in some cases, mainly frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson's disease, and very occasionally strokes, the disease may favour the emergence of de novo artistic talent. This phenomenon has been conceptualized as a paradoxical facilitation, a disinhibition of brain areas devoted to visuospatial processing, greater freedom in a patient who becomes less bound by social conventions, enhancement of motivation and pleasure, etc. These neurological cases provide an opportunity to shed some light on the roots of artistic creation. PMID:18364297

  17. Auditory hedonic phenotypes in dementia: A behavioural and neuroanatomical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Phillip D.; Downey, Laura E.; Golden, Hannah L.; Clark, Camilla N.; Slattery, Catherine F.; Paterson, Ross W.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Rossor, Martin N.; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with dementia may exhibit abnormally altered liking for environmental sounds and music but such altered auditory hedonic responses have not been studied systematically. Here we addressed this issue in a cohort of 73 patients representing major canonical dementia syndromes (behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), semantic dementia (SD), progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) amnestic Alzheimer's disease (AD)) using a semi-structured caregiver behavioural questionnaire and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of patients' brain MR images. Behavioural responses signalling abnormal aversion to environmental sounds, aversion to music or heightened pleasure in music (‘musicophilia’) occurred in around half of the cohort but showed clear syndromic and genetic segregation, occurring in most patients with bvFTD but infrequently in PNFA and more commonly in association with MAPT than C9orf72 mutations. Aversion to sounds was the exclusive auditory phenotype in AD whereas more complex phenotypes including musicophilia were common in bvFTD and SD. Auditory hedonic alterations correlated with grey matter loss in a common, distributed, right-lateralised network including antero-mesial temporal lobe, insula, anterior cingulate and nucleus accumbens. Our findings suggest that abnormalities of auditory hedonic processing are a significant issue in common dementias. Sounds may constitute a novel probe of brain mechanisms for emotional salience coding that are targeted by neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25929717

  18. An analysis of communication in conversation in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, Marc; Sève, Amandine; Vallet, Marion; Pasquier, Florence; Mackowiak-Cordoliani, Marie Anne

    2010-11-01

    Patients with degenerative dementia often show language disorders, but little is known about their verbal (VC) and non-verbal communication (NVC). Our aim was to analyse VC and NVC in patients with standard criteria of mild-moderately severe dementia (MMSE ≥14/30) resulting from Alzheimer's disease (AD; 29 cases), behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia (FTD; 16), or dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB; 13). We used the Lille Communication Test, which addresses three domains: participation in communication (PC: greeting, attention, participation), VC (verbal comprehension, speech outflow, intelligibility, word production, syntax, verbal pragmatics and verbal feedback), and NVC (understanding gestures, affective expressivity, producing gestures, pragmatics and feedback). Patients were compared with 47 matching control subjects. AD patients were partially impaired (p≤0.01) in PC (greeting), and more definitely in VC, especially by verbal comprehension and word finding difficulties and to a much lesser degree in verbal pragmatics (responding to open questions, presenting new information), while NVC was mostly preserved. FTD patients were severely impaired in PC. VC difficulties were related to lexical-semantic, syntactic and more specifically pragmatic problems. NVC was impaired by difficulties in affective expressivity, pragmatics and feedback management. DLB patients showed modest difficulties with VC. PC, VC and NVC strongly correlated with performance in the dementia rating scale. In conclusion, the profile of communication difficulties was quite different between groups. FTD patients showed most severe difficulties in PC and verbal and non-verbal pragmatics, in relation to their frontal lesions. AD patients had prominent impairment of lexical-semantic operations. PMID:20888846

  19. Endpoints for Pre-Dementia AD Trials: A Report from the EU/US/CTAD Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Vellas, B.; Bateman, R.; Blennow, K.; Frisoni, G.; Johnson, K.; Katz, R.; Langbaum, J.; Marson, D.; Sperling, R.; Wessels, A.; Salloway, S.; Doody, R.; Aisen, P.

    2015-01-01

    For Alzheimer’s disease treatment trials that focus on the pre-dementia stage of disease, outcome measures are needed that will enable assessment of disease progression in patients who are clinically normal. The EU/US CTAD Task Force, an international collaboration of investigators from industry, academia, non-profit foundations, and regulatory agencies, met in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, on November 19, 2014 to discuss existing and novel outcome assessments that may be useful in pre-dementia trials. Composite measures that assess changes in episodic memory, executive function, global cognition, and global function have recently been developed by a number of groups and appear to be sensitive at this stage. Functional measures that involve real-life complex tasks also appear to capture early subtle changes in pre-dementia subjects and have the advantage of representing clinically meaningful change. Patient reported outcomes and novel CSF and imaging biomarkers have also shown promise. More studies are needed to validate all of these tests in the pre-dementia population. Many of them have been incorporated as exploratory measures in ongoing or planned trials. PMID:26247004

  20. Catecholamine-Based Treatment in AD Patients: Expectations and Delusions

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Alessandro; Olivola, Enrica; Liguori, Claudio; Hainsworth, Atticus H.; Saviozzi, Valentina; Angileri, Giacoma; D’Angelo, Vincenza; Galati, Salvatore; Pierantozzi, Mariangela

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the gap between excellence of diagnostics and efficacy of therapy is wide. Despite sophisticated imaging and biochemical markers, the efficacy of available therapeutic options is limited. Here we examine the possibility that assessment of endogenous catecholamine levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may fuel new therapeutic strategies. In reviewing the available literature, we consider the effects of levodopa, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and noradrenaline (NE) modulators, showing disparate results. We present a preliminary assessment of CSF concentrations of dopamine (DA) and NE, determined by HPLC, in a small dementia cohort of either Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or frontotemporal dementia patients, compared to control subjects. Our data reveal detectable levels of DA, NE in CSF, though we found no significant alterations in the dementia population as a whole. AD patients exhibit a small impairment of the DA axis and a larger increase of NE concentration, likely to represent a compensatory mechanism. While waiting for preventive strategies, a pragmatic approach to AD may re-evaluate catecholamine modulation, possibly stratified to dementia subtypes, as part of the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:25999852

  1. Frontotemporal Disorders: Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s Alzheimer's Basics Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Caregiving Other Dementias Publications FAQs Images and Video ...

  2. Differential clinicopathologic and Genetic features of late-onset amnestic dementias

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Melissa E.; Cannon, Ashley; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Liesinger, Amanda M.; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Ross, Owen A.; Duara, Ranjan; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis of the elderly (HpScl) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), especially the limbic-predominant subtype (LP-AD), are amnestic syndromes that can be difficult to distinguish. To complicate matters, a subset has concomitant HpScl and AD (HpScl-AD). We examined a large cohort of autopsy-confirmed cases of HpScl, HpScl-AD, LP-AD, and typical AD to identify distinct clinical, Genetic, and pathologic characteristics. HpScl cases were significantly older at death and had a substantially slower rate of cognitive decline than the AD subtypes. Genetic analysis revealed that the AD groups (AD, LP-AD, and HpScl–AD) were more likely to be APOE ε4 carriers. In contrast, the HpScl groups (HpScl and HpScl-AD) were more likely to exhibit Genetic variants in GRN and TMEM106B that are associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The HpScl groups had a high frequency of TDP-43 pathology that was most often Type A morphology and distribution, while typical AD and LP-AD had a significantly lower frequency of TDP-43 pathology that was most often Type B. These results suggest that HpScl and AD are pathologically and Genetically distinct and non-synergistic neurodegenerative processes that present with amnestic dementia. Pure HpScl and HpScl with concomitant AD occur most often in elderly individuals. PMID:24899141

  3. Molecular Pathways Bridging Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zanardini, Roberta; Ciani, Miriam; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The overlap of symptoms between neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases has been reported. Neuropsychiatric alterations are commonly observed in dementia, especially in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), which is the most common clinical FTD subtype. At the same time, psychiatric disorders, like schizophrenia (SCZ), can display symptoms of dementia, including features of frontal dysfunction with relative sparing of memory. In the present review, we discuss common molecular features in these pathologies with a special focus on FTD. Molecules like Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and progranulin are linked to the pathophysiology of both neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. In these brain-associated illnesses, the presence of disease-associated variants in BDNF and progranulin (GRN) genes cause a reduction of circulating proteins levels, through alterations in proteins expression or secretion. For these reasons, we believe that prevention and therapy of psychiatric and neurological disorders could be achieved enhancing both BDNF and progranulin levels thanks to drug discovery efforts. PMID:26869919

  4. When one loses empathy: its effect on carers of patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Sharpley; Irish, Muireann; Daveson, Naomi; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    The effects of empathy loss in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer disease (AD) on carer symptomatology were investigated. Carers of patients with 2 clinical subtypes of FTD (behavioral-variant FTD [bvFTD] = 18; semantic dementia [SD] = 14) and AD (n = 18) completed the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI), a standardized questionnaire of empathy as well as a measure of perceived burden (Zarit Burden Interview) and the quality of the marital relationship (Intimate Bond Measure). Patient ratings were also obtained on the IRI. Loss of empathy was most striking in the bvFTD group with a marked discrepancy observed between carer and patient ratings for change in emotional warmth and the ability to take the perspective of others. Empathy loss in bvFTD was associated with a loss of a caring marital relationship. Empathic deficits in SD were milder by comparison to bvFTD and correlated with disease severity and increased perceived carer burden. The behavioral pattern observed in AD differed from the FTD syndromes; deficits were observed only for measures of personal distress with carers reporting that patients were less able to handle emotionally evocative situations. Results highlight that changes in aspects of empathy differ across dementia syndromes and are associated with differing carer and clinical variables. These findings might be explained by the progression of atrophy in regions that are known to be critical for empathy and social behavior and has implications for the delivery and planning of services in dementia. PMID:23857888

  5. Anatomical Correlates of Non-Verbal Perception in Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pin-Hsuan; Chen, Hsiu-Hui; Chen, Nai-Ching; Chang, Wen-Neng; Huang, Chi-Wei; Chang, Ya-Ting; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Hsu, Che-Wei; Chang, Chiung-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with dementia who have dissociations in verbal and non-verbal sound processing may offer insights into the anatomic basis for highly related auditory modes. Methods: To determine the neuronal networks on non-verbal perception, 16 patients with Alzheimer’s dementia (AD), 15 with behavior variant fronto-temporal dementia (bv-FTD), 14 with semantic dementia (SD) were evaluated and compared with 15 age-matched controls. Neuropsychological and auditory perceptive tasks were included to test the ability to compare pitch changes, scale-violated melody and for naming and associating with environmental sound. The brain 3D T1 images were acquired and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to compare and correlated the volumetric measures with task scores. Results: The SD group scored the lowest among 3 groups in pitch or scale-violated melody tasks. In the environmental sound test, the SD group also showed impairment in naming and also in associating sound with pictures. The AD and bv-FTD groups, compared with the controls, showed no differences in all tests. VBM with task score correlation showed that atrophy in the right supra-marginal and superior temporal gyri was strongly related to deficits in detecting violated scales, while atrophy in the bilateral anterior temporal poles and left medial temporal structures was related to deficits in environmental sound recognition. Conclusions: Auditory perception of pitch, scale-violated melody or environmental sound reflects anatomical degeneration in dementia patients and the processing of non-verbal sounds are mediated by distinct neural circuits.

  6. Brain metabolic maps in Mild Cognitive Impairment predict heterogeneity of progression to dementia

    PubMed Central

    Cerami, Chiara; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Magnani, Giuseppe; Santangelo, Roberto; Marcone, Alessandra; Cappa, Stefano F.; Perani, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    [18F]FDG-PET imaging has been recognized as a crucial diagnostic marker in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), supporting the presence or the exclusion of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) pathology. A clinical heterogeneity, however, underlies MCI definition. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the predictive role of single-subject voxel-based maps of [18F]FDG distribution generated through statistical parametric mapping (SPM) in the progression to different dementia subtypes in a sample of 45 MCI. Their scans were compared to a large normal reference dataset developed and validated for comparison at single-subject level. Additionally, Aβ42 and Tau CSF values were available in 34 MCI subjects. Clinical follow-up (mean 28.5 ± 7.8 months) assessed subsequent progression to AD or non-AD dementias. The SPM analysis showed: 1) normal brain metabolism in 14 MCI cases, none of them progressing to dementia; 2) the typical temporo-parietal pattern suggestive for prodromal AD in 15 cases, 11 of them progressing to AD; 3) brain hypometabolism suggestive of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) subtypes in 7 and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) in 2 subjects (all fulfilled FTLD or DLB clinical criteria at follow-up); and 4) 7 MCI cases showed a selective unilateral or bilateral temporo-medial hypometabolism without the typical AD pattern, and they all remained stable. In our sample, objective voxel-based analysis of [18F]FDG-PET scans showed high predictive prognostic value, by identifying either normal brain metabolism or hypometabolic patterns suggestive of different underlying pathologies, as confirmed by progression at follow-up. These data support the potential usefulness of this SPM [18F]FDG PET analysis in the early dementia diagnosis and for improving subject selection in clinical trials based on MCI definition. PMID:25610780

  7. A physiological signature of sound meaning in dementia

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Phillip D.; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Downey, Laura E.; Golden, Hannah L.; Clark, Camilla N.; Pires, Carolina; Agustus, Jennifer L.; Mummery, Catherine J.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    The meaning of sensory objects is often behaviourally and biologically salient and decoding of semantic salience is potentially vulnerable in dementia. However, it remains unclear how sensory semantic processing is linked to physiological mechanisms for coding object salience and how that linkage is affected by neurodegenerative diseases. Here we addressed this issue using the paradigm of complex sounds. We used pupillometry to compare physiological responses to real versus synthetic nonverbal sounds in patients with canonical dementia syndromes (behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia – bvFTD, semantic dementia – SD; progressive nonfluent aphasia – PNFA; typical Alzheimer's disease – AD) relative to healthy older individuals. Nonverbal auditory semantic competence was assessed using a novel within-modality sound classification task and neuroanatomical associations of pupillary responses were assessed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of patients' brain MR images. After taking affective stimulus factors into account, patients with SD and AD showed significantly increased pupil responses to real versus synthetic sounds relative to healthy controls. The bvFTD, SD and AD groups had a nonverbal auditory semantic deficit relative to healthy controls and nonverbal auditory semantic performance was inversely correlated with the magnitude of the enhanced pupil response to real versus synthetic sounds across the patient cohort. A region of interest analysis demonstrated neuroanatomical associations of overall pupil reactivity and differential pupil reactivity to sound semantic content in superior colliculus and left anterior temporal cortex respectively. Our findings suggest that autonomic coding of auditory semantic ambiguity in the setting of a damaged semantic system may constitute a novel physiological signature of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26889604

  8. Positive Florbetapir PET Amyloid Imaging in a Subject with Frequent Cortical Neuritic Plaques and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration with TDP43-Positive Inclusions

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Geidy E.; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Sue, Lucia I.; Hidalgo, Jose A.; Schneider, Julie A.; Bedell, Barry J.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Suh, Eunran; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Joshi, Abhinay D.; Pontecorvo, Michael J.; Mintun, Mark A.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal neuronal accumulation and modification of TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) have recently been discovered to be defining histopathological features of particular subtypes of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and are also common in aging, particularly coexisting with hippocampal sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. This case report describes a 72 year old Hispanic male with no family history of neurological disease, who presented at age 59 with obsessive behavior, anxiety, agitation and dysphasia. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using the amyloid ligand 18F florbetapir (Amyvid) was positive. Postmortem examination revealed frequent diffuse and neuritic amyloid plaques throughout the cerebral cortex, thalamus and striatum, Braak stage II neurofibrillary degeneration and frequent frontal and temporal cortex TDP-43-positive neurites with rare nuclear inclusions. The case is unusual and instructive because of the co-existence of frequent cortical and diencephalic amyloid plaques with extensive TDP-43-positive histopathology in the setting of early-onset dementia and because it demonstrates that a positive cortical amyloid imaging signal in a subject with dementia does not necessarily establish that AD is the sole cause. PMID:24927705

  9. Living with semantic dementia: a case study of one family's experience.

    PubMed

    Kindell, Jacqueline; Sage, Karen; Wilkinson, Ray; Keady, John

    2014-03-01

    Semantic dementia is a variant of frontotemporal dementia and is a recently recognized diagnostic condition. There has been some research quantitatively examining care partner stress and burden in frontotemporal dementia. There are, however, few studies exploring the subjective experiences of family members caring for those with frontotemporal dementia. Increased knowledge of such experiences would allow service providers to tailor intervention, support, and information better. We used a case study design, with thematic narrative analysis applied to interview data, to describe the experiences of a wife and son caring for a husband/father with semantic dementia. Using this approach, we identified four themes: (a) living with routines, (b) policing and protecting, (c) making connections, and (d) being adaptive and flexible. Each of these themes were shared and extended, with the importance of routines in everyday life highlighted. The implications for policy, practice, and research are discussed. PMID:24532121

  10. Music Recognition in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Julene K; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Brambati, Simona M; Migliaccio, Raffaella; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Miller, Bruce L; Janata, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare music recognition in patients with frontotemporal dementia, semantic dementia, Alzheimer disease, and controls and to evaluate the relationship between music recognition and brain volume. Background Recognition of familiar music depends on several levels of processing. There are few studies about how patients with dementia recognize familiar music. Methods Subjects were administered tasks that assess pitch and melody discrimination, detection of pitch errors in familiar melodies, and naming of familiar melodies. Results There were no group differences on pitch and melody discrimination tasks. However, patients with semantic dementia had considerable difficulty naming familiar melodies and also scored the lowest when asked to identify pitch errors in the same melodies. Naming familiar melodies, but not other music tasks, was strongly related to measures of semantic memory. Voxel-based morphometry analysis of brain MRI showed that difficulty in naming songs was associated with the bilateral temporal lobes and inferior frontal gyrus, whereas difficulty in identifying pitch errors in familiar melodies correlated with primarily the right temporal lobe. Conclusions The results support a view that the anterior temporal lobes play a role in familiar melody recognition, and that musical functions are affected differentially across forms of dementia. PMID:21617528

  11. ADNP: in search for molecular mechanisms and innovative therapeutic strategies for frontotemporal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gozes, Illana; Ivashko-Pachima, Yanina

    2015-01-01

    Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) is deregulated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in schizophrenia and mutated in autism. In mice, ADNP is essential for brain formation and ADNP haploinsufficiency is associated with cognitive and social deficits and tauopathy. Tauopathy, a major pathology in AD, is also found in ~45% of frontotemporal dementias (FTDs). Tau transcript, a product of a single gene, undergoes alternative splicing. Tau splicing seems to be altered in FTD brain. In transgenic mice overexpressing a mutated tau in the cerebral cortex, significant increases in ADNP transcript expression were observed in the cerebral cortex of young transgenic mice (~disease onset) and a marked decrease with aging as compared to control littermates. ADNP is a member of the SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complex also associated with alternative splicing, including tau transcript splicing. Further cellular interactions of ADNP include association with microtubules, with tau being a microtubule—associated protein. NAP (davundetide), a novel drug candidate derived from ADNP, increases ADNP-microtubule association and protects against tauopathy and cognitive deficiencies in mice. Although, NAP did not provide protection in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a pure tauopathy, it increased cognitive scores in amnestic mild cognitively impaired patients and protected functional activity in schizophrenia patients. This mini-review focuses on ADNP in the context of FTD and tau/microtubules and proposes NAP as a novel drug target for future clinical evaluations. PMID:26578950

  12. Imaging of neurodegenerative cognitive and behavioral disorders: practical considerations for dementia clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Atri, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    This chapter reviews clinical applications and imaging findings useful in medical practice relating to neurodegenerative cognitive/dementing disorders. The preponderance of evidence and consensus guidelines support an essential role of multitiered neuroimaging in the evaluation and management of neurodegenerative cognitive/dementia syndrome that range in severity from mild impairments to frank dementia. Additionally, imaging features are incorporated in updated clinical and research diagnostic criteria for most dementias, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), Frontotemporal Lobar Degenerations/Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD), and Vascular Cognitive Impairment (VCI). Best clinical practices dictate that structural imaging, preferably with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) when possible and computed tomography when not, be obtained as a first-tier approach during the course of a thorough clinical evaluation to improve diagnostic confidence and assess for nonneurodegenerative treatable conditions that may cause or substantially contribute to cognitive/behavioral symptoms or which may dictate a substantial change in management. These conditions include less common structural (e.g., mass lesions such as tumors and hematomas; normal-pressure hydrocephalus), inflammatory, autoimmune and infectious conditions, and more common comorbid contributing conditions (e.g., vascular cerebral injury causing leukoaraiosis, infarcts, or microhemorrhages) that can produce a mixed dementia syndrome. When, after appropriate clinical, cognitive/neuropsychologic, and structural neuroimaging assessment, a dementia specialist remains in doubt regarding etiology and appropriate management, second-tier imaging with molecular methods, preferably with fluorodexoyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) (or single-photon emission computed tomography if PET is unavailable) can provide more diagnostic specificity (e.g., help differentiate between atypical AD and FTD as

  13. Saccade abnormalities in autopsy-confirmed frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Boxer, Adam L.; Garbutt, Siobhan; Seeley, William W.; Jafari, Aria; Heuer, Hilary W.; Mirsky, Jacob; Hellmuth, Joanna; Trojanowski, John Q.; Huang, Erik; DeArmond, Steven; Neuhaus, John; Miller, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Deficits in the generation and control of saccades have been described in clinically-defined frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Because clinical FTD syndromes can correspond to a number of different underlying neuropathologic FTD and non-FTD diagnoses, we sought to determine the saccade abnormalities associated with autopsy-defined cases of FTLD and AD. Participants and design An infrared eye tracker was used to record visually guided saccades to ten degree targets and antisaccades in 28 autopsy-confirmed FTD and 10 AD subjects, an average of 35.6 ± 10 months prior to death and 27 age-matched normal controls (NC). 12 FTD subjects had FTLD-TDP pathology, 15 had FTLD-tau pathology and one showed FTLD-FUS pathology. Receiver operating curve (ROC) statistics were used to determine diagnostic value of oculomotor variables. Neuroanatomical correlates of oculomotor abnormalities were investigated using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Results All FTD and AD subjects were impaired relative to NC on the antisaccade task. However, only FTLD-tau and AD cases displayed reflexive visually-guided saccade abnormalities. AD cases displayed prominent increases in horizontal saccade latency that differentiated them from FTD cases. Impairments in velocity and gain were most severe in individuals with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) but were also present in other tauopathies. Vertical and horizontal saccade velocity and gain were able to differentiate PSP cases from other patients. Vertical saccade velocity was strongly correlated with dorsal midbrain volume. Conclusion Decreased visually-guided saccade velocity and gain are suggestive of underlying tau pathology in FTD, with vertical saccade abnormalities most diagnostic of PSP. PMID:22491196

  14. Atypical multiple system atrophy is a new subtype of frontotemporal lobar degeneration: frontotemporal lobar degeneration associated with α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Naoya; Boyer, Philip J; Lund, Cheryl; Lin, Wen-Lang; Koga, Shunsuke; Ross, Owen A; Weiner, Myron; Lipton, Anne; Powers, James M; White, Charles L; Dickson, Dennis W

    2015-07-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a sporadic neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized by cerebellar signs, parkinsonism, and autonomic dysfunction. Pathologically, MSA is an α-synucleinopathy affecting striatonigral and olivopontocerebellar systems, while neocortical and limbic involvement is usually minimal. In this study, we describe four patients with atypical MSA with clinical features consistent with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), including two with corticobasal syndrome, one with progressive non-fluent aphasia, and one with behavioral variant FTD. None had autonomic dysfunction. All had frontotemporal atrophy and severe limbic α-synuclein neuronal pathology. The neuronal inclusions were heterogeneous, but included Pick body-like inclusions. The latter were strongly associated with neuronal loss in the hippocampus and amygdala. Unlike typical Pick bodies, the neuronal inclusions were positive on Gallyas silver stain and negative on tau immunohistochemistry. In comparison to 34 typical MSA cases, atypical MSA had significantly more neuronal inclusions in anteromedial temporal lobe and limbic structures. While uncommon, our findings suggest that MSA may present clinically and pathologically as a frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). We suggest that this may represent a novel subtype of FTLD associated with α-synuclein (FTLD-synuclein). PMID:25962793

  15. CSF biomarkers in neurodegenerative and vascular dementias.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Franc; Schmitz, Matthias; Ferrer, Isidro; Zerr, Inga

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases with abnormal protein aggregates such as Alzheimer's disease, tauopathies, synucleinopathies, and prionopathies, together with vascular encephalopathies, are cause of cognitive impairment and dementia. Identification of reliable biomarkers in biological fluids, particularly in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), is of extreme importance in optimizing the precise early clinical diagnosis of distinct entities and predicting the outcome in particular settings. In addition, the study of CSF biomarkers is useful to identify and monitor the underlying pathological processes developing in the central nervous system of affected individuals. Evidence suggests that levels of key CSF molecules correlate, in some circumstances, with prediction, disease progression, and severity of cognitive decline. Correlation of CSF markers and underlying pathological molecular substrates in brain is an exciting field for further study. However, while some dementias such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease have accurate CSF biomarkers, other disease types such as dementia with Lewy bodies, vascular dementia, and frontotemporal dementia lack reliable biomarkers for their specific clinical diagnosis. PMID:27016008

  16. Diogenes syndrome in patients suffering from dementia

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Lucetti, Claudio; Vedovello, Marcella; Nuti, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Diogenes syndrome (DS) is a behavioral disorder of the elderly. Symptoms include living in extreme squalor, a neglected physical state, and unhygienic conditions. This is accompanied by a self-imposed isolation, the refusal of external help, and a tendency to accumulate unusual objects. To explore the phenomenon of DS in dementia we searched for the terms: “Diogenes syndrome, self-neglect, dementia. ” It has long been understood that individuals with dementia often become shut-ins, living in squalor, in the Eastern Baltimore study, dementia was present in 15% of the elderly cases with moderate and severe social breakdown syndrome; twice as many as in the general population of the same age group. Researchers have underlined the frequent presence of DS (36%) in frontotemporal dementia (FTD): different neuropsychological modifications in FTD may contribute to symptoms of DS. The initial treatment should be a behavioral program, but there is not sufficient information regarding pharmacological treatment of the syndrome. PMID:23393422

  17. Proteomics as an innovative tool to investigate frontotemporal disorders.

    PubMed

    Agresta, Anna Maria; De Palma, Antonella; Bardoni, Anna; Salvini, Roberta; Iadarola, Paolo; Mauri, Pier Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by slow progressive loss of one or more functions of the CNS. Worldwide, the number of people affected by neurodegeneration is dramatically high and the social impact is upsetting. While being a heterogeneous group of diseases, most of these pathologies manifest similar clinical features and illness progression, thus making their diagnosis elusive. With its ability to meet the needs of neurodegenerative research, proteomics could help facilitate the diagnosis of these disorders. This strategy, recently emerged as complementary to genomics, has led in the last years to substantial achievements in deciphering molecular mechanisms and the follow-up of neurodegenerative diseases. Specifically, aim of this review is to cover the main proteomic investigations realized in the field of familial frontotemporal dementias. This disorder is less common than Alzheimer's disease and disproportionately affects younger individuals, thus representing a major psychological and economic burden for both patients and families. Although early and accurate differential diagnosis of frontotemporal dementias is crucial because of its implications for heritability, prognosis, therapeutics, and environmental management of patients, the investigative methods currently available to clinicians are incomplete. Certainly, the development of a focused therapy cannot be separated from the investigation of biochemical pathways involved in the pathogenesis. PMID:27061321

  18. Clinical and neuroanatomical signatures of tissue pathology in frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Lashley, Tammaryn; Schott, Jonathan M.; Warren, Jane E.; Mead, Simon; Isaacs, Adrian M.; Beck, Jonathan; Hardy, John; de Silva, Rohan; Warrington, Elizabeth; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; King, Andrew; Borroni, Barbara; Clarkson, Matthew J.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Holton, Janice L.; Fox, Nick C.; Revesz, Tamas; Rossor, Martin N.

    2011-01-01

    Relating clinical symptoms to neuroanatomical profiles of brain damage and ultimately to tissue pathology is a key challenge in the field of neurodegenerative disease and particularly relevant to the heterogeneous disorders that comprise the frontotemporal lobar degeneration spectrum. Here we present a retrospective analysis of clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging (volumetric and voxel-based morphometric) features in a pathologically ascertained cohort of 95 cases of frontotemporal lobar degeneration classified according to contemporary neuropathological criteria. Forty-eight cases (51%) had TDP-43 pathology, 42 (44%) had tau pathology and five (5%) had fused-in-sarcoma pathology. Certain relatively specific clinicopathological associations were identified. Semantic dementia was predominantly associated with TDP-43 type C pathology; frontotemporal dementia and motoneuron disease with TDP-43 type B pathology; young-onset behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia with FUS pathology; and the progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome with progressive supranuclear palsy pathology. Progressive non-fluent aphasia was most commonly associated with tau pathology. However, the most common clinical syndrome (behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia) was pathologically heterogeneous; while pathologically proven Pick's disease and corticobasal degeneration were clinically heterogeneous, and TDP-43 type A pathology was associated with similar clinical features in cases with and without progranulin mutations. Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging, voxel-based morphometry and cluster analyses of the pathological groups here suggested a neuroanatomical framework underpinning this clinical and pathological diversity. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration-associated pathologies segregated based on their cerebral atrophy profiles, according to the following scheme: asymmetric, relatively localized (predominantly temporal lobe) atrophy (TDP-43 type C); relatively symmetric

  19. The neuropathology and cerebrovascular mechanisms of dementia.

    PubMed

    Raz, Limor; Knoefel, Janice; Bhaskar, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of dementia is increasing in our aging population at an alarming rate. Because of the heterogeneity of clinical presentation and complexity of disease neuropathology, dementia classifications remain controversial. Recently, the National Plan to address Alzheimer’s Disease prioritized Alzheimer’s disease-related dementias to include: Alzheimer’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, and mixed dementias. While each of these dementing conditions has their unique pathologic signature, one common etiology shared among all these conditions is cerebrovascular dysfunction at some point during the disease process. The goal of this comprehensive review is to summarize the current findings in the field and address the important contributions of cerebrovascular, physiologic, and cellular alterations to cognitive impairment in these human dementias. Specifically, evidence will be presented in support of small-vessel disease as an underlying neuropathologic hallmark of various dementias, while controversial findings will also be highlighted. Finally, the molecular mechanisms shared among all dementia types including hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial bioenergetics, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and blood–brain barrier permeability responsible for disease etiology and progression will be discussed. PMID:26174330

  20. Neuropsychological assessment and differential diagnosis in young-onset dementias.

    PubMed

    Sitek, Emilia J; Barczak, Anna; Harciarek, Michał

    2015-06-01

    Although Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, there are several conditions (ie, frontotemporal dementia or Huntington's disease) associated with a relatively earlier onset. This article provides arguments in favor of a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment in the differential diagnosis of young-onset dementia, as episodic memory impairment is not observed early in the course of most types of young-onset dementia that predominantly affect the domains of behavior, executive, language, and/or motor function. PMID:25998115

  1. Relationship between Dementia Severity and Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia in Dementia with Lewy Bodies and Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Mamoru; Yatabe, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Tomohisa; Fukuhara, Ryuji; Kaneda, Keiichiro; Honda, Kazuki; Yuki, Seiji; Ogawa, Yusuke; Imamura, Toru; Kazui, Hiroaki; Kamimura, Naoto; Shinagawa, Syunichiro; Mizukami, Katsuyoshi; Mori, Etsuro; Ikeda, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are common in the clinical manifestation of dementia. Although most patients with dementia exhibit some BPSD during the course of the illness, the association of BPSD with the stage of dementia remains unclear. It was the aim of this study to evaluate the impact of severity of dementia on the expression of BPSD in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods Ninety-seven patients with DLB and 393 patients with AD were recruited from 8 dementia clinics across Japan. BPSD were assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). A relationship between BPSD and dementia stage classified by the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) in each type of dementia was assessed. Results No significant difference was seen in NPI total score across CDR staging in the DLB group. On the other hand, the NPI total score significantly increased with dementia stage in the AD group. Conclusion The relationship of dementia stage with the expression of BPSD was different according to the type of dementia. BPSD and dementia stage were correlated in AD subjects, in whom psychiatric symptoms increase as the disease progresses, but not in DLB subjects. PMID:26195980

  2. Primary ectopic frontotemporal extradural craniopharyngioma

    PubMed Central

    Pourkhalili, Reza; Shekarchizadeh, Ahmad; Seif, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of primary ectopic frontotemporal extradural craniopharyngioma. Primary ectopic craniopharyngiomas are very rare and have been reported involving the fourth ventricle, infrasellar region, lateral ventricle, temporal area, cerebellopontine angle, clivus, corpus callosum, and prepontine cistern. There was just 1 case of craniopharyngioma previously presented in the literature, with nearly same location as the presenting case. PMID:27195250

  3. Humour processing in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: A behavioural and neuroanatomical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Camilla N.; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Henley, Susie M.D.; Downey, Laura E.; Woollacott, Ione O.; Golden, Hannah L.; Fletcher, Phillip D.; Mummery, Catherine J.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Humour is a complex cognitive and emotional construct that is vulnerable in neurodegenerative diseases, notably the frontotemporal lobar degenerations. However, humour processing in these diseases has been little studied. Here we assessed humour processing in patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 22, mean age 67 years, four female) and semantic dementia (n = 11, mean age 67 years, five female) relative to healthy individuals (n = 21, mean age 66 years, 11 female), using a joint cognitive and neuroanatomical approach. We created a novel neuropsychological test requiring a decision about the humorous intent of nonverbal cartoons, in which we manipulated orthogonally humour content and familiarity of depicted scenarios. Structural neuroanatomical correlates of humour detection were assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Assessing performance in a signal detection framework and after adjusting for standard measures of cognitive function, both patient groups showed impaired accuracy of humour detection in familiar and novel scenarios relative to healthy older controls (p < .001). Patient groups showed similar overall performance profiles; however the behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia group alone showed a significant advantage for detection of humour in familiar relative to novel scenarios (p = .045), suggesting that the behavioural variant syndrome may lead to particular difficulty decoding novel situations for humour, while semantic dementia produces a more general deficit of humour detection that extends to stock comedic situations. Humour detection accuracy was associated with grey matter volume in a distributed network including temporo-parietal junctional and anterior superior temporal cortices, with predominantly left-sided correlates of processing humour in familiar scenarios and right-sided correlates of processing novel humour. The findings quantify deficits of core cognitive operations underpinning humour

  4. The Philadelphia Brief Assessment of Cognition (PBAC): A Validated Screening Measure for Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Libon, David J.; Rascovsky, Katya; Gross, Rachel G.; White, Matthew T.; Xie, Sharon X.; Dreyfuss, Michael; Boller, Ashley; Massimo, Lauren; Moore, Peachie; Kitain, Jessica; Coslett, H. Branch; Chatterjee, Anjan; Grossman, Murray

    2012-01-01

    The Philadelphia Brief Assessment of the Cognition (PBAC) is a brief dementia-screening instrument. The PBAC assesses five cognitive domains: working memory/executive control; lexical retrieval/language; visuospatial/visuoconstructional operations; verbal/visual episodic memory; and behavior/social comportment. A revised version of the PBAC was administered to 198 participants including patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (n=46) and four groups of patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) syndromes: behavioral-variant FTD (bvFTD; n=65), semantic-variant primary progressive aphasia (PPA) (svPPA; n=22), non-fluent/agrammatic-variant PPA (nfaPPA; n=23), and corticobasal syndrome (CBS; n=42), and a group of normal controls (n=15). The total PBAC score was highly correlated with the MMSE. The criterion validity of the PBAC was assessed relative to standard neuropsychological test performance. Using standard neuropsychological test performance as a criterion, the total PBAC score accurately identified the presence and severity of dementia. Intra-class correlations between PBAC subscales and standard neuropsychological tests were highly significant. PBAC subscales demonstrated good clinical utility in distinguishing AD and FTD subtypes using receiver operating characteristic analysis and standard diagnostic performance statistics to determine optimal subscale cut scores. The PBAC is a valid tool and able to assesses differential patterns neuropsychological/behavioral impairment in a broad range of neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:22084867

  5. Apraxias in Neurodegenerative Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Abbas, Mirza Masoom

    2015-01-01

    Background: Apraxia is a state of inability to carry out a learned motor act in the absence of motor, sensory or cerebellar defect on command processed through the Praxis circuit. Breakdown in default networking is one of the early dysfunction in cortical dementias and result in perplexity, awkwardness, omission, substitution errors, toying behavior and unrecognizable gestures in response to command with voluntary reflex dissociation where, when unobserved patient will carry out reflex movements normally. Awareness into the organicity of these phenomenas will help in early diagnosis, which will help in initiating appropriate treatment and slowing down the progression of the disease. Aims and Objectives: The aim was to look for the various kinds of apraxias in patients with dementia using appropriate simple tests. Patients and Methods: Three hundred patients satisfying Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for dementia were evaluated in detail with mandatory investigations for dementia followed by testing for ideational, ideomotor, limb-kinetic, buccopharyngeal, dressing apraxia, constructional apraxia and gait apraxias in addition to recording of rare apraxias when present. Results: Alzheimer's disease showed maximum association with apraxias in all the phases of the disease ideational, ideomotor, dressing and constructional apraxias early and buccopharyngeal and gait apraxia late. Frontotemporal lobe dementia showed buccopharyngeal and gait apraxias late into the disease. Cortical basal ganglionic degeneration showed limb apraxias and diffuse Lewy body disease showed more agnosias and less apraxias common apraxias seen was Ideational and Ideomotor. Conclusion: Recognition of the apraxias help in establishing organicity, categorization, caregiver education, early strategies for treatment, avoiding anti-psychotics and introducing disease modifying pharmacotherapeutic agents and also prognosticating. PMID:25722511

  6. Frontotemporal Disorders: Common Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Resources Research Portfolio (IADRP) AMP-AD Detecting Cognitive Impairment Database Federal Initiatives alzheimers.gov National Alzheimer’s ... For example, a person might hum at a business meeting or laugh at a funeral. Compulsive eating — ...

  7. New perspective on parkinsonism in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Kyung; Chung, Sun J

    2013-05-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most common type of presenile dementia. Three clinical prototypes have been defined; behavioral variant FTD, semantic dementia, and progressive nonfluent aphasia. Progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and motor neuron disease may possess clinical and pathological characteristics that overlap with FTD, and it is possible that they may all belong to the same clinicopathological spectrum. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a clinicopathological syndrome that encompasses a heterogenous group of neurodegenerative disorders. Owing to the advancement in the field of molecular genetics, diagnostic imaging, and pathology, FTLD has been the focus of great interest. Nevertheless, parkinsonism in FTLD has received relatively less attention. Parkinsonism is found in approximately 20-30% of patients in FTLD. Furthermore, parkinsonism can be seen in all FTLD subtypes, and some patients with familial and sporadic FTLD can present with prominent parkinsonism. Therefore, there is a need to understand parkinsonism in FTLD in order to obtain a better understanding of the disease. With regard to the clinical characteristics, the akinetic rigid type of parkinsonism has predominantly been described. Parkinsonism is frequently observed in familial FTD, more specifically, in FTD with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17q (FTDP-17). The genes associated with parkinsonism are microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT), progranulin (GRN or PGRN), and chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) repeat expansion. The neural substrate of parkinsonism remains to be unveiled. Dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging revealed decreased uptake of DAT, and imaging findings indicated atrophic changes of the basal ganglia. Parkinsonism can be an important feature in FTLD and, therefore, increased attention is needed on the subject. PMID:24868417

  8. New Perspective on Parkinsonism in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Kyung; Chung, Sun J.

    2013-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most common type of presenile dementia. Three clinical prototypes have been defined; behavioral variant FTD, semantic dementia, and progressive nonfluent aphasia. Progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and motor neuron disease may possess clinical and pathological characteristics that overlap with FTD, and it is possible that they may all belong to the same clinicopathological spectrum. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a clinicopathological syndrome that encompasses a heterogenous group of neurodegenerative disorders. Owing to the advancement in the field of molecular genetics, diagnostic imaging, and pathology, FTLD has been the focus of great interest. Nevertheless, parkinsonism in FTLD has received relatively less attention. Parkinsonism is found in approximately 20–30% of patients in FTLD. Furthermore, parkinsonism can be seen in all FTLD subtypes, and some patients with familial and sporadic FTLD can present with prominent parkinsonism. Therefore, there is a need to understand parkinsonism in FTLD in order to obtain a better understanding of the disease. With regard to the clinical characteristics, the akinetic rigid type of parkinsonism has predominantly been described. Parkinsonism is frequently observed in familial FTD, more specifically, in FTD with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17q (FTDP-17). The genes associated with parkinsonism are microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT), progranulin (GRN or PGRN), and chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) repeat expansion. The neural substrate of parkinsonism remains to be unveiled. Dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging revealed decreased uptake of DAT, and imaging findings indicated atrophic changes of the basal ganglia. Parkinsonism can be an important feature in FTLD and, therefore, increased attention is needed on the subject. PMID:24868417

  9. CSF neurofilament concentration reflects disease severity in frontotemporal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Scherling, Carole S.; Hall, Tracey; Berisha, Flora; Klepac, Kristen; Karydas, Anna; Coppola, Giovanni; Kramer, Joel H.; Rabinovici, Gil; Ahlijanian, Michael; Miller, Bruce L.; Seeley, William; Grinberg, Lea T.; Rosen, Howard; Meredith, Jere; Boxer, Adam L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurofilament light chain (NfL) concentration is elevated in neurological disorders including frontotemporal degeneration (FTD). We investigated the clinical correlates of elevated CSF NfL levels in FTD. Methods CSF NfL, amyloid-β42 (Aβ42), tau and phosphorylated tau (ptau) concentrations were compared in 47 normal controls (NC), 8 asymptomatic gene carriers (NC2) of FTD-causing mutations, 79 FTD (45 behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia [bvFTD], 18 progressive nonfluent aphasia [PNFA], 16 semantic dementia [SD]), 22 progressive supranuclear palsy, 50 Alzheimer’s disease, 6 Parkinson’s disease and 17 corticobasal syndrome patients. Correlations between CSF analyte levels were performed with neuropsychological measures and the Clinical Dementia Rating scale sum of boxes (CDRsb). Voxel-based morphometry of structural MR images determined the relationship between brain volume and CSF NfL. Results Mean CSF NfL concentrations were higher in bvFTD, SD and PNFA than other groups. NfL in NC2 was similar to NC. CSF NfL, but not other CSF measures, correlated with CDRsb and neuropsychological measures in FTD, and not in other diagnostic groups. Analyses in two independent FTD cohorts and a group of autopsy verified or biomarker enriched cases confirmed the larger group analysis. In FTD, gray and white matter volume negatively correlated with CSF NfL concentration, such that individuals with highest NfL levels exhibited the most atrophy. Interpretation CSF NfL is elevated in symptomatic FTD and correlates with disease severity. This measurement may be a useful surrogate endpoint of disease severity in FTD clinical trials. Longitudinal studies of CSF NfL in FTD are warranted. PMID:24242746

  10. Treatable Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Michael E.; Cummings, Jeffrey L.; Benson, D. Frank

    1987-01-01

    Dementia is an acquired impairment of intellect produced by brain dysfunction. In the past, dementia was regarded as inevitably chronic, progressive and irreversible. More recently dementia has been viewed as a clinical syndrome that may be produced by both irreversible and reversible conditions. Recognition of the presence of a dementia syndrome should be followed by an evaluation for potentially treatable causes of the intellectual deterioration. Dementia treatment includes therapy for reversible or curable dementias and nonspecific interventions that may improve the condition of patients with progressive dementia syndromes. PMID:3617715

  11. Amyloid precursor protein expression is enhanced in human platelets from subjects with Alzheimer's disease and Frontotemporal lobar degeneration: A Real-time PCR study.

    PubMed

    Vignini, Arianna; Morganti, Stefano; Salvolini, Eleonora; Sartini, Davide; Luzzi, Simona; Fiorini, Rosamaria; Provinciali, Leandro; Di Primio, Roberto; Mazzanti, Laura; Emanuelli, Monica

    2013-10-26

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) represent the most frequent causes of early-onset and late-onset degenerative dementia, respectively. A correct diagnosis entails the choice of appropriate therapies. In this view the present study aimed to identify biomarkers that could improve the differential diagnosis. We recently found an overexpression of platelet amyloid precursor protein (APP) in AD; furthermore, recent studies have suggested the presence of changes in APP processing in FTLD. In this context, we analyzed the mRNA expression level of Total APP (TOT) and APP containing a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor domain (KPI) in platelets obtained from AD patients, subjects with FTLD, and healthy subjects. In addition, we evaluated the correlation between platelet APP mRNA expression levels and cognitive impairment. Differential gene expression measurements revealed a significant up-regulation of APP TOT and APP KPI in both AD and FTLD patients compared to the controls (being AD/Controls: 1.67 for APP TOT and 1.47 for APP KPI; FTLD/Controls: 1.62 for APP TOT and 1.51 for APP KPI; p<0.05) , although it is interesting to note that in FTLD patients this expression did not correlate with the severity of cognitive impairment. This could be related to a reduced beta-amyloid (Aβ) formation, caused by an alteration of secretase enzymatic activity, even though a post-transcriptional regulation of APP mRNAs in FTLD cannot be excluded. PMID:24513653

  12. Dementia friendly, dementia capable, and dementia positive: concepts to prepare for the future.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Lewis, Frances Marcus

    2015-04-01

    With an aging global population, the number of dementia cases is growing exponentially. To address the upcoming dementia crisis, the World Health Organization and Alzheimer's Disease International (2012) collaborated on an extensive report, Dementia: A Public Health Priority. In the United Kingdom, Prime Minster David Cameron initiated a national challenge on dementia, forming 3 dementia challenge champion groups aimed at improving health and care, creating dementia-friendly communities, and promoting dementia research. In the U.S., President Obama signed the National Alzheimer's Project Act, which led to the formation of the Advisory Council on Alzheimer's Research, Care, and Services and the launch of the first National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease. The term "dementia capable" was introduced in the 2012 Recommendations of the Public Members of the Advisory Council and has since been adopted in both the recommendations and annual updates of the national plan. This paper will first compare and contrast government usage of the concepts dementia friendly and dementia capable, along with another valuable concept, dementia positive, that was added after reviewing the literature. Finally, a new vision statement for the U.S.' national plan will be proposed and recommendations incorporating these 3 concepts in policy, research, and practice will be made. PMID:26035599

  13. Dementia Friendly, Dementia Capable, and Dementia Positive: Concepts to Prepare for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Lewis, Frances Marcus

    2015-01-01

    With an aging global population, the number of dementia cases is growing exponentially. To address the upcoming dementia crisis, the World Health Organization and Alzheimer’s Disease International (2012) collaborated on an extensive report, Dementia: A Public Health Priority. In the United Kingdom, Prime Minster David Cameron initiated a national challenge on dementia, forming 3 dementia challenge champion groups aimed at improving health and care, creating dementia-friendly communities, and promoting dementia research. In the U.S., President Obama signed the National Alzheimer’s Project Act, which led to the formation of the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care, and Services and the launch of the first National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease. The term “dementia capable” was introduced in the 2012 Recommendations of the Public Members of the Advisory Council and has since been adopted in both the recommendations and annual updates of the national plan. This paper will first compare and contrast government usage of the concepts dementia friendly and dementia capable, along with another valuable concept, dementia positive, that was added after reviewing the literature. Finally, a new vision statement for the U.S.’ national plan will be proposed and recommendations incorporating these 3 concepts in policy, research, and practice will be made. PMID:26035599

  14. Portraits of artists: emergence of visual creativity in dementia.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bruce L; Hou, Craig E

    2004-06-01

    As a uniquely human talent that has evolved from prehistoric cave paintings, art draws on many brain areas responsible for various cognitive processes. The pattern of degeneration in dementia leads to predictable changes in art. The visuospatial deficits in Alzheimer disease lead to less precision and attention to spatial relationships. In some cases of frontotemporal dementia, artistic creativity appears anew as the disease develops. The artwork is approached in a compulsive manner and is often realistic or surrealistic in style. Art in the context of dementia provides a unique window into the cognitive processes of various brain regions and an opportunity for rehabilitation. PMID:15210520

  15. Two cases of food aversion with semantic dementia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Alexandra E; Clark, Camilla N; Hardy, Christopher J; Fletcher, Phillip D; Greene, John; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Warren, Jason D

    2016-06-01

    Accounts of altered eating behavior in semantic dementia generally emphasize gluttony and abnormal food preferences. Here we describe two female patients with no past history of eating disorders who developed early prominent aversion to food in the context of an otherwise typical semantic dementia syndrome. One patient (aged 57) presented features in line with anorexia nervosa while the second patient (aged 58) presented with a syndrome more suggestive of bulimia nervosa. These cases add to the growing spectrum of apparently dichotomous behavior patterns in the frontotemporal dementias and illustrate a potentially under-recognized cause of eating disorders presenting in later life. PMID:26963051

  16. Two cases of food aversion with semantic dementia

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alexandra E.; Clark, Camilla N.; Hardy, Christopher J.; Fletcher, Phillip D.; Greene, John; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Warren, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accounts of altered eating behavior in semantic dementia generally emphasize gluttony and abnormal food preferences. Here we describe two female patients with no past history of eating disorders who developed early prominent aversion to food in the context of an otherwise typical semantic dementia syndrome. One patient (aged 57) presented features in line with anorexia nervosa while the second patient (aged 58) presented with a syndrome more suggestive of bulimia nervosa. These cases add to the growing spectrum of apparently dichotomous behavior patterns in the frontotemporal dementias and illustrate a potentially under-recognized cause of eating disorders presenting in later life. PMID:26963051

  17. Other Dementias

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Institute on Aging) Vascular Dementia fact sheet (University of California, San Francisco, Memory and Aging Center) ... Library of Medicine) Lewy Body Dementias fact sheet (University of California, San Francisco, Memory and Aging Center) ...

  18. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration FTLD-tau: preclinical lesions, vascular, and Alzheimer-related co-pathologies.

    PubMed

    Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; von Arnim, Christine A F; Griffin, W Sue T; Mrak, Robert E; Walker, Lauren; Attems, Johannes; Arzberger, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with τ pathology (FTLD-tau) is one of a group of neurodegenerative diseases that manifests with cognitive decline. Alzheimer (AD) and cerebrovascular lesions are commonly noted in the brains of most elderly individuals, begging the question as to whether (a) coexisting AD and vascular pathology or age contribute to the development of FTLD-tau disorders and vice versa and (b) FTLD-tau-like pathology can be found in non-diseased individuals. We studied brains of FTLD-tau cases exhibiting (a) argyrophilc grain disease (AGD), (b) progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), (c) corticobasal degeneration (CBD), or (d) Pick's disease (PiD) for coexisting AD and vascular pathology for comparison with that of non-diseased individuals and AD patients. We confirmed that AGD lowered the threshold for AD pathology to cause dementia. Such an effect was not seen in PSP, CBD, or PiD. In PiD, white matter degeneration and demyelination was observed in the frontal and temporal lobes in association with small vessel disease (SVD)-related changes in white matter arteries. Age at death varied among the four types of FTLD-tau. PiD cases were youngest at death followed by CBD, PSP, and finally AGD. In 9.8% of non-diseased controls, we found grains, coiled bodies, and/or τ-positive astrocytes mimicking an AGD-like pattern. Moreover, the prevalence of FTLD-tau pathology in non-diseased individuals increased with age. In summary, this study demonstrates that age impacts of the diversity of neuropathological changes in FTLD-tau. The age-related coexistence of AD-related pathology is, thereby, associated with AGD but not with PSP, CBD, and PiD. Moreover, severe SVD and white matter demyelination is associated with PiD indicating a role of vascular copathology in this type of FTLD-tau. Finally, our finding that FTLD-tau-related pathological lesions occur in non-diseased individuals suggests that preclinical stages of FTLD-tau exist. As such, our results indicate

  19. [Dyslipidemia and Dementia].

    PubMed

    Tamaoka, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Several lines of evidences support a possible involvement of serum cholesterol in the development of dementia/Alzheimer's disease (AD), with hypercholesterolemia as one of the risk factors that can be targeted by therapeutic interventions. It has also been suggested that statins, prescribed as lipid-lowering drugs to patients at risk for cardiovascular conditions, may be useful in both the prevention and treatment of AD. Currently, conflicting evidences from epidemiological studies indicate a controversial association between dyslipidemia and dementia/AD risk. In randomized clinical trials, virtually no beneficial effect of statin therapy has been observed. On the other hand, in vitro and in vivo animal experiments have revealed that statins suppress amyloid β protein (Aβ) generation. All these findings suggest that statins can be potentially used as preventive or therapeutic agents for AD. In addition, currently the pathophysiological process of AD is thought to begin many years before the diagnosis of AD dementia. Then, statin treatment as well as some disease-modifying therapies may be more efficacious at an early stage of AD including preclinical AD or mild cognitive impairment due to AD. PMID:27395458

  20. Genetics Home Reference: GRN-related frontotemporal dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... temporal lobes . The frontal lobes are involved in reasoning, planning, judgment, and problem-solving, while the temporal ... MND. Phenotype variability in progranulin mutation carriers: a clinical, neuropsychological, imaging and genetic study. Brain. 2008 Mar; ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-17

    MedlinePlus

    ... FTDP-17 also have restricted up-and-down eye movement (vertical gaze palsy) and rapid abnormal movements of ... characterized by the gradual death of cells in areas of the brain called the frontal and temporal ...

  2. Facilitating the Validation of Novel Protein Biomarkers for Dementia: An Optimal Workflow for the Development of Sandwich Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Marta; Jongbloed, Wesley; Twaalfhoven, Harry A. M.; Veerhuis, Robert; Blankenstein, Marinus A.; Teunissen, Charlotte E.

    2015-01-01

    Different neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), lead to dementia syndromes. Dementia will pose a huge impact on society and thus it is essential to develop novel tools that are able to detect the earliest, most sensitive, discriminative, and dynamic biomarkers for each of the disorders. To date, the most common assays used in large-scale protein biomarker analysis are enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), such as the sandwich immunoassays, which are sensitive, practical, and easily implemented. However, due to the novelty of many candidate biomarkers identified during proteomics screening, such assays or the antibodies that specifically recognize the desired marker are often not available. The development and optimization of a new ELISA should be carried out with considerable caution since a poor planning can be costly, ineffective, time consuming, and it may lead to a misinterpretation of the findings. Previous guidelines described either the overall biomarker development in more general terms (i.e., the process from biomarker discovery to validation) or the specific steps of performing an ELISA procedure. However, a workflow describing and guiding the main issues in the development of a novel ELISA is missing. Here, we describe a specific and detailed workflow to develop and validate new ELISA for a successful and reliable validation of novel dementia biomarkers. The proposed workflow highlights the main issues in the development of an ELISA and covers several critical aspects, including production, screening, and selection of specific antibodies until optimal fine-tuning of the assay. Although these recommendations are designed to analyze novel biomarkers for dementia in cerebrospinal fluid, they are generally applicable for the development of immunoassays for biomarkers in other human body fluids or tissues. This workflow is designed to maximize the quality of the developed ELISA using a time

  3. Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care

    PubMed Central

    Grand, Jacob HG; Caspar, Sienna; MacDonald, Stuart WS

    2011-01-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1) Alzheimer’s disease; 2) vascular dementias; 3) frontotemporal dementias; and 4) dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of pathological burden. Future research goals are outlined, with a call to action for social policy initiatives that promote preventive lifestyle behaviors, and healthcare programs that will support the growing number of individuals affected by

  4. [Dementia due to Endocrine Diseases].

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Akiko; Yoneda, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Endocrine diseases affecting various organs, such as the pituitary gland, the thyroid, the parathyroid, the adrenal glands and the pancreas, occasionally cause dementia. While Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the main cause of dementia in the elderly and is untreatable, dementia caused by endocrine diseases is treatable in most cases. However, patients with dementia associated with endocrine diseases show memory impairments similar to those found in AD, often leading to misdiagnoses. Patients with endocrine diseases often present with other characteristic systemic and neuropsychiatric symptoms caused by altered hormone levels. Such neuropsychiatric symptoms include involuntary movements, depression, seizures, and muscle weakness. In these cases, abnormalities in imaging and blood or urine tests are helpful in making a differential diagnosis. As delays in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients may cause irreversible brain damage, it is imperative for clinicians to carefully exclude the possibility of latent endocrine diseases when treating patients with dementia. PMID:27056858

  5. [Epidemiology of Diabetes and Risk of Dementia].

    PubMed

    Ohara, Tomoyuki

    2016-07-01

    The association between diabetes and the risk of developing dementia has received much attention in epidemiological studies. An accurate population-based prospective cohort study has been conducted in the elderly population of the town of Hisayama in Japan since 1985 aiming to elucidate the secular trends in the prevalence of dementia and examine risk and protective factors for dementia in the Japanese population. The prevalence of all-cause dementia significantly increased from 1985 to 2012. In regard to subtypes of dementia, a similar trend was observed for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In a prospective study of risk factors for dementia in Hisayama elder residents without dementia, diabetes was identified as a significant risk factor for developing all-cause dementia, especially AD. Moreover, 2-hour post-load glucose levels were closely associated with increased risk of all-cause dementia, AD, and vascular dementia. In a pathological study of Hisayama residents, higher levels of 2-hour post-load glucose, fasting insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were significantly associated with increased risk of neuritic plaques. The steep increase in the frequency of diabetes could lead to the increasing trend in the prevalence of dementia, especially AD, in the Japanese elderly. PMID:27395456

  6. [Semantic dementia: clinical profile and cognitive-neuropsychological relevance].

    PubMed

    Eisfeld, I S

    2004-07-01

    Semantic Dementia (SD) represents a rare variant of presenile primary degenerative diseases of "frontotemporal lobar degenerations" (FTLD). SD is characterized by anterior-temporal atrophy and a selective semantic deficit. Neuropsychological impairment either bears on fluent aphasia with marked naming and comprehension difficulties or on a disorder of object recognition or on both. Behavioural alterations such as stereotyped behaviour and change in food preference become prominent as the disease progresses and are interpreted as a correlative for the pathological spreading to frontal structures. Since SD is often misclassified as Alzheimer's disease (AD), but calls for a different management, diagnostic consensus criteria by Neary and colleagues are depicted. The neuropsychological profile is described in detail and complemented by a case report. Implications from the dissociation of disturbed memory systems of SD (semantic) and AD (episodic) for models of long-term memory are discussed in terms of connectivity in the medial temporal lobe. SD can contribute to a better understanding of the structure and organisation of the semantic system. PMID:15252752

  7. [Dementia with motor and language disorders].

    PubMed

    Frédéric, Assal; Ghika, Joseph

    2016-04-20

    Memory is not the only core diagnostic criteria in Alzheimer's disease and many dementias are characterized by other cognitive deficits. Moreover dementias are often associated with multiple and complex motor signs. The first part of this reviewcovers parkinsonism in diffuse Lewy Body Disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, corticobasal syndrome, or motor deficit in the motoneurone disease-frontotemporal dementia spectrum. In the second part, primary progressive aphasia and its three variants including basic clinical evaluation are described. These complex clinical syndromes involving motor and language systems are important for the clinical practice since they are part of diagnostic criteria of several neurodegenerative diseases and can be considered as phenotypical markers of neurodegeneration. PMID:27276720

  8. Clinico-Pathological Correlations of the Most Common Neurodegenerative Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Taipa, Ricardo; Pinho, João; Melo-Pires, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegenerative dementias are a group of neurological disorders characterized by deterioration in several cognitive domains in which there is selective and progressive loss of specific populations of neurons. The precise neurobiological basis for the different neurodegenerative dementias remains unknown. It is expected that different pathologies reflect different mechanisms, at least early in the neurodegeneration process. The next decades promise treatments directed to causes and mechanisms, bringing an outstanding challenge to clinicians due to heterogeneous clinical presentations with the same molecular pathology. The purpose of this brief review is to describe the key neuropathological features of the most common neurodegenerative dementias (Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson’s disease dementia, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration) and the relationship with the clinical syndromes described in clinico-pathological studies. We expect this overview contributes for the understanding of this broad topic integrating the two ends of the spectrum: clinical and pathological. PMID:22557993

  9. Hippocampal sclerosis of aging is a key Alzheimer's disease mimic: clinical-pathologic correlations and comparisons with both alzheimer's disease and non-tauopathic frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Brenowitz, Willa D; Monsell, Sarah E; Schmitt, Frederick A; Kukull, Walter A; Nelson, Peter T

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging) neuropathology was observed in more than 15% of aged individuals in prior studies. However, much remains unknown about the clinical correlates of HS-Aging pathology or the association(s) between HS-Aging, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) pathology. Clinical and comorbid pathological features linked to HS-Aging pathology were analyzed using National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) data. From autopsy data extending back to 1990 (n = 9,817 participants), the neuropathological diagnoses were evaluated from American AD Centers (ADCs). Among participants who died between 2005-2012 (n = 1,422), additional analyses identified clinical and pathological features associated with HS-Aging pathology. We also compared cognitive testing and longevity outcomes between HS-Aging cases and a subsample with non-tauopathy FTLD (n = 210). Reporting of HS-Aging pathology increased dramatically among ADCs in recent years, to nearly 20% of autopsies in 2012. Participants with relatively "pure" HS-Aging pathology were often diagnosed clinically as having probable (68%) or possible (15%) AD. However, the co-occurrence of HS-Aging pathology and AD neuropathology (AD-NP) did not indicate any pattern of correlation between the two pathologies. Compared with other pathologies, participants with HS-Aging pathology had higher overall cognitive/functional ability (versus AD-NP) and verbal fluency (versus both AD-NP and FTLD) but similar episodic memory impairment at one clinic visit 2-5 years prior to death. Patients with HS-Aging live considerably longer than patients with non-tauopathy FTLD. We conclude that the manifestations of HS-Aging, increasingly recognized in recent years, probably indicate a separate disease process of direct relevance to patient care, dementia research, and clinical trials. PMID:24270205

  10. Vascular lesions in mixed dementia, vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease with cerebrovascular disease: the Kurihara Project.

    PubMed

    Meguro, Kenichi; Tanaka, Naofumi; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Nakamura, Kei; Satoh, Masayuki

    2012-11-15

    The concept and diagnosis for mixed dementia is not simple, since it is difficult to identify the type and regions of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) responsible for causing dementia. An investigation is needed to confirm the presence of mixed dementia, those who met the criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and those for vascular dementia (VaD). According to the community-based stroke, dementia, and bed-confinement prevention in Kurihara, northern Japan (Kurihara Project), the prevalence of dementia and dementing diseases was surveyed in 2008-2010. Five hundred and ninety people finally agreed to participate (47.0%), and 73 (12.4%) people were diagnosed with dementia according to the DSM-IV. Using MRI, intensive evaluations on CVDs were performed for the 49 dementia patients associated with CVDs (mixed dementia, VaD, and AD with CVD). For the mixed dementia group, all had left subcortical strategic CVDs. These included the caudate head and thalamus. For the VaD group, all patients had at least cortical CVDs or subcortical strategic CVDs. The AD with CVD group had non-strategic CVDs in cortical, subcortical, or other areas in 5 or 6 patients each. Two extreme concepts regarding CVD and dementia are possible. One is that there is no concept for mixed dementia or VaD. An alternative is that the vascular factor should be considered as primary. Our data showed an importance of cortical and subcortical "strategic" areas, the latter included thalamus and caudate head. PMID:22871542

  11. Dural Reduction Surgery: A Treatment Option for Frontotemporal Brain Sagging Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mostofi, Emily; Schievink, Wouter I; Sim, Valerie L

    2016-07-01

    Frontotemporal brain sagging syndrome is a dementia associated with hypersomnolence, personality changes, and features of intracranial hypotension on magnetic resonance imaging. The literature is sparse with respect to treatment options; many patients simply worsen. We present a case in which this syndrome responded to lumbar dural reduction surgery. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging indicated normalization of brain sagging and lumbar intrathecal pressure. Although no evidence of cerebrospinal leak was found, extremely thin dura was noted intraoperatively, suggesting that a thin and incompetent dura could result in this low-pressure syndrome. Clinicians who encounter this syndrome should consider dural reduction surgery as a treatment strategy. PMID:26972054

  12. Drawing Disorders in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Forms of Dementia.

    PubMed

    Trojano, Luigi; Gainotti, Guido

    2016-04-21

    Drawing is a multicomponential process that can be impaired by many kinds of brain lesions. Drawing disorders are very common in Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, and can provide clinical information for the distinction of the different dementing diseases. In our review we started from an overview of the neural and cognitive bases of drawing, and from a recollection of the drawing tasks more frequently used for assessing individuals with dementia. Then, we analyzed drawing disorders in dementia, paying special attention to those observed in Alzheimer's disease, from the prodromal stages of the amnesic mild cognitive impairment to the stages of full-blown dementia, both in the sporadic forms with late onset in the entorhino-hippocampal structures and in those with early onset in the posterior neocortical structures. We reviewed the drawing features that could differentiate Alzheimer's disease from vascular dementia and from the most frequent forms of degenerative dementia, namely frontotemporal dementia and Lewy body disease. Finally, we examined some peculiar aspects of drawing disorders in dementia, such as perseverations, rotations, and closing-in. We argue that a careful analysis of drawing errors helps to differentiate the different forms of dementia more than overall accuracy in drawing. PMID:27104898

  13. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration: defining phenotypic diversity through personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David J; Cairns, Nigel J; Grossman, Murray; McMillan, Corey T; Lee, Edward B; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2015-04-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) comprises two main classes of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by neuronal/glial proteinaceous inclusions (i.e., proteinopathies) including tauopathies (i.e., FTLD-Tau) and TDP-43 proteinopathies (i.e., FTLD-TDP) while other very rare forms of FTLD are known such as FTLD with FUS pathology (FTLD-FUS). This review focuses mainly on FTLD-Tau and FLTD-TDP, which may present as several clinical syndromes: a behavioral/dysexecutive syndrome (behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia); language disorders (primary progressive aphasia variants); and motor disorders (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, corticobasal syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome). There is considerable heterogeneity in clinical presentations of underlying neuropathology and current clinical criteria do not reliably predict underlying proteinopathies ante-mortem. In contrast, molecular etiologies of hereditary FTLD are consistently associated with specific proteinopathies. These include MAPT mutations with FTLD-Tau and GRN, C9orf72, VCP and TARDBP with FTLD-TDP. The last decade has seen a rapid expansion in our knowledge of the molecular pathologies associated with this clinically and neuropathologically heterogeneous group of FTLD diseases. Moreover, in view of current limitations to reliably diagnose specific FTLD neuropathologies prior to autopsy, we summarize the current state of the science in FTLD biomarker research including neuroimaging, biofluid and genetic analyses. We propose that combining several of these biomarker modalities will improve diagnostic specificity in FTLD through a personalized medicine approach. The goals of these efforts are to enhance power for clinical trials focused on slowing or preventing progression of spread of tau, TDP-43 and other FTLD-associated pathologies and work toward the goal of defining clinical endophenotypes of FTD. PMID:25549971

  14. Processing emotion from abstract art in frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Miriam H.; Carton, Amelia M.; Hardy, Christopher J.; Golden, Hannah L.; Clark, Camilla N.; Fletcher, Phillip D.; Jaisin, Kankamol; Marshall, Charles R.; Henley, Susie M.D.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract art may signal emotions independently of a biological or social carrier: it might therefore constitute a test case for defining brain mechanisms of generic emotion decoding and the impact of disease states on those mechanisms. This is potentially of particular relevance to diseases in the frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) spectrum. These diseases are often led by emotional impairment despite retained or enhanced artistic interest in at least some patients. However, the processing of emotion from art has not been studied systematically in FTLD. Here we addressed this issue using a novel emotional valence matching task on abstract paintings in patients representing major syndromes of FTLD (behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, n=11; sematic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), n=7; nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA), n=6) relative to healthy older individuals (n=39). Performance on art emotion valence matching was compared between groups taking account of perceptual matching performance and assessed in relation to facial emotion matching using customised control tasks. Neuroanatomical correlates of art emotion processing were assessed using voxel-based morphometry of patients' brain MR images. All patient groups had a deficit of art emotion processing relative to healthy controls; there were no significant interactions between syndromic group and emotion modality. Poorer art emotion valence matching performance was associated with reduced grey matter volume in right lateral occopitotemporal cortex in proximity to regions previously implicated in the processing of dynamic visual signals. Our findings suggest that abstract art may be a useful model system for investigating mechanisms of generic emotion decoding and aesthetic processing in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26748236

  15. Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration: Defining Phenotypic Diversity Through Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David J; Cairns, Nigel J.; Grossman, Murray; McMillan, Corey T.; Lee, Edward B.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) comprises two main classes of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by neuronal/glial proteinaceous inclusions (ie. proteinopathies) including tauopathies (i.e. FTLD-Tau) and TDP-43 proteinopathies (i.e. FTLD-TDP) while other very rare forms of FTLD are known such as FTLD with FUS pathology (FTLD-FUS). This review focuses mainly on FTLD-Tau and FLTD-TDP, which may present as several clinical syndromes: a behavioral/dysexecutive syndrome (behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia); language disorders (primary progressive aphasia variants); and motor disorders (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, corticobasal syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome). There is considerable heterogeneity in clinical presentations of underlying neuropathology and current clinical criteria do not reliably predict underlying proteinopathies ante-mortem. In contrast, molecular etiologies of hereditary FTLD are consistently associated with specific proteinopathies. These include MAPT mutations with FTLD-Tau and GRN, C9orf72, VCP and TARDBP with FTLD-TDP. The last decade has seen a rapid expansion in our knowledge of the molecular pathologies associated with this clinically and neuropathologically heterogeneous group of FTLD diseases. Moreover, in view of current limitations to reliably diagnose specific FTLD neuropathologies prior to autopsy, we summarize the current state of the science in FTLD biomarker research including neuroimaging, biofluid and genetic analyses. We propose that combining several of these biomarker modalities will improve diagnostic specificity in FTLD through a personalized medicine approach. The goals of these efforts are to enhance power for clinical trials focused on slowing or preventing progression of spread of tau, TDP-43 and other FTLD-associated pathologies and work towards the goal of defining clinical endophenotypes of FTD. PMID:25549971

  16. Prevalence, characteristics, and survival of frontotemporal lobar degeneration syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Katrina M.; Patterson, Karalyn; Vázquez Rodríquez, Patricia; Wehmann, Eileen; Wilcox, Alicia; Lansdall, Claire J.; Dawson, Kate E.; Wiggins, Julie; Mead, Simon; Brayne, Carol; Rowe, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the lifetime risk, prevalence, incidence, and mortality of the principal clinical syndromes associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) using revised diagnostic criteria and including intermediate clinical phenotypes. Methods: Multisource referral over 2 years to identify all diagnosed or suspected cases of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), or corticobasal syndrome (CBS) in 2 UK counties (population 1.69 million). Diagnostic confirmation used current consensus diagnostic criteria after interview and reexamination. Results were adjusted to the 2013 European standard population. Results: The prevalence of FTD, PSP, and CBS was 10.8/100,000. The incidence and mortality were very similar, at 1.61/100,000 and 1.56/100,000 person-years, respectively. The estimated lifetime risk is 1 in 742. Survival following diagnosis varied widely: from PSP 2.9 years to semantic variant FTD 9.1 years. Age-adjusted prevalence peaked between 65 and 69 years at 42.6/100,000: the age-adjusted prevalence for persons older than 65 years is double the prevalence for those between 40 and 64 years. Fifteen percent of those screened had a relevant genetic mutation. Conclusions: Key features of this study include the revised diagnostic criteria with improved specificity and sensitivity, an unrestricted age range, and simultaneous assessment of multiple FTLD syndromes. The prevalence of FTD, PSP, and CBS increases beyond 65 years, with frequent genetic causes. The time from onset to diagnosis and from diagnosis to death varies widely among syndromes, emphasizing the challenge and importance of accurate and timely diagnosis. A high index of suspicion for FTLD syndromes is required by clinicians, even for older patients. PMID:27037234

  17. Tau physiology and pathomechanisms in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Bodea, Liviu-Gabriel; Eckert, Anne; Ittner, Lars Matthias; Piguet, Olivier; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    with subsequent degeneration of synapses and synaptic loss. Thus, by providing a mechanistic explanation for the observations made in FTLD-tau cases, arises a possibility for therapeutic interventions. This article is part of the Frontotemporal Dementia special issue. PMID:27306859

  18. [What is dementia? 2. A fuzzy construct].

    PubMed

    Derouesné, Christian

    2003-03-01

    frontotemporal dementia or dementia with Lewy bodies in which memory deficits are minor or late. Presently, diagnostic strategy should be directed towards specific entities such as Alzheimer's disease which can be diagnosed accurately in mildly impaired individuals. It is proposed that the term dementia should only be used to specify a degree of severity of the disease, corresponding to the restriction of the patient's autonomy. PMID:15683939

  19. [Falls in patients with dementia].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi

    2008-11-01

    People with cognitive impairment are at about 2 to 3 times higher risk of falling compared with cognitively intact elderly. Incidence of falls among patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is high, nevertheless the clinical feature common in patients with mild to moderate AD is the absence of motor impairment. Recent studies suggest that the divided attention markedly impairs the ability of patients with AD to regulate the gait. Falls are particularly common in Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) patients and may aid diagnosis, and the falls are associated with parkinsonism and other unclear factors. Treatment studies evaluating fall reduction strategies in dementia patients are a priority. PMID:18974447

  20. Face-Name Repetition Priming in Semantic Dementia: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabria, Marco; Miniussi, Carlo; Bisiacchi, Patricia S.; Zanetti, Orazio; Cotelli, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Repetition priming (RP) has been employed as a measure of implicit processing in patients suffering from a breakdown of semantic memory, as in the case of semantic dementia (SD), a subtype of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Here, we investigated face-name representation in a case of SD using a paradigm of within- and cross-domain…

  1. Pharmacological management of behavioral symptoms associated with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Madhusoodanan, Subramoniam; Ting, Mark Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome with features of neurocognitive decline. Subtypes of dementia include Alzheimer’s, frontotemporal, Parkinson’s, Lewy body disease, and vascular type. Dementia is associated with a variety of neuropsychiatric symptoms that may include agitation, psychosis, depression, and apathy. These symptoms can lead to dangerousness to self or others and are the main source for caregiver burnout. Treatment of these symptoms consists of nonpharmacological and pharmacological interventions. However, there are no Food and Drug Administration-approved medications for the treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. Pharmacological interventions are used off-label. This article reviews the current evidence supporting or negating the use of psychotropic medications along with safety concerns, monitoring, regulations, and recommendations. PMID:25540722

  2. Drug development in dementia.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Emma L; Passmore, Anthony P

    2013-11-01

    Dementia is a progressive, irreversible decline in cognition that, by definition, impacts on a patient's pre-existing level of functioning. The clinical syndrome of dementia has several aetiologies of which Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common. Drug development in AD is based on evolving pathophysiological theory. Disease modifying approaches include the targeting of amyloid processing, aggregation of tau, insulin signalling, neuroinflammation and neurotransmitter dysfunction, with efforts thus far yielding abandoned hopes and ongoing promise. Reflecting its dominance on the pathophysiological stage the amyloid cascade is central to many of the emerging drug therapies. The long preclinical phase of the disease requires robust biomarker means of identifying those at risk if timely intervention is to be possible. PMID:23707728

  3. [Dementia with Lewy bodies].

    PubMed

    Orimo, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    It is important to differentiate dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and other dementia, especially Alzheimer disease (AD), because the medical treatment, management, and the prognosis of these diseases are different. In regard to clinical features, DLB patients have relatively mild memory disturbance, fluctuating cognition, more severe disturbances of attention, executive function, visuospacial function, visual hallucination, depression, autonomic symptoms, REM sleep behavior disorder, and idiopathic parkinsonism compared to AD patients. In regard to imaging tools, DLB patients have milder atrophy of medial temporal lobe by brain MRI, reduced occipital activity by SPECT or PET, reduced MIBG uptake by MIBG cardiac scintigraphy, and low dopamine transporter activity in the basal ganglia by SPECT or PET. PMID:27025091

  4. Comparing the Psychometric Properties of the Checklist of Nonverbal Pain Behaviors (CNPI) and the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia (PAIN-AD) Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Ersek, Mary; Herr, Keela; Neradilek, Moni Blazej; Buck, Harleah G.; Black, Brianne

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine and compare the psychometric properties of two common observational pain assessment tools used in persons with dementia. Design In a cross-sectional descriptive study nursing home (NH) residents were videotaped at rest and during a structured movement procedure. Following one training session and one practice session, two trained graduate nursing research assistants independently scored the tapes using the two pain observation tools. Setting Fourteen nursing homes in Western Washington State participating in a randomized controlled trial of an intervention to enhance pain assessment and management. Participants Sixty participants with moderate to severe pain were identified by nursing staff or chosen based on the pain items from the most recent Minimum Data Set assessment. Measures Checklist of Nonverbal Pain Indicators (CNPI) and the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia (PAINAD), demographic and pain-related data (Minimum Data Set), nursing assistant reports of participants’ usual pain intensity, Pittsburgh Agitation Scale (PAS). Results Internal consistency for both tools was good except for the CNPI at rest for one rater. Inter-rater reliability for pain presence was fair (K = 0.25 for CNPI with movement; K = 0.31 for PAINAD at rest) to moderate (K = 0.43 for CNPI at rest; K = 0.54 for PAINAD with movement). There were significant differences in mean CNPI and PAINAD scores at rest and during movement, providing support for construct validity. However, both tools demonstrated marked floor effects, particularly when participants were at rest, Conclusions Despite earlier studies supporting the reliability and validity of the CNPI and the PAINAD, findings from the current study indicate that these measures warrant further study with clinical users, should be used cautiously both in research and clinical settings and only as part of a comprehensive approach to pain assessment. PMID:20088854

  5. Mixed Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bodies , What Is Alzheimer's? NIA-Funded Memory & Aging Project Reveals Mixed Dementia Common Data from the first ... disease. For example, in the Memory and Aging Project study involving long-term cognitive assessments followed by ...

  6. Vascular dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alzheimer's Disease, and Dementia . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 6. Gorelick PB, Scuteri A, Black ... eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 402. Peterson R, Graff-Radford ...

  7. Amyloid precursor protein expression is enhanced in human platelets from subjects with Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a real-time PCR study.

    PubMed

    Vignini, Arianna; Morganti, Stefano; Salvolini, Eleonora; Sartini, Davide; Luzzi, Simona; Fiorini, Rosamaria; Provinciali, Leandro; Di Primio, Roberto; Mazzanti, Laura; Emanuelli, Monica

    2013-12-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) represent the most frequent causes of early-onset and late-onset degenerative dementia, respectively. A correct diagnosis entails the choice of appropriate therapies. In this view the present study aimed to identify biomarkers that could improve the differential diagnosis. We recently found an overexpression of platelet amyloid precursor protein (APP) in AD; furthermore, recent studies have suggested the presence of changes in APP processing in FTLD. In this context, we analyzed the mRNA expression level of Total APP (TOT) and APP containing a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor domain (KPI) in platelets obtained from AD patients, subjects with FTLD, and healthy subjects. In addition, we evaluated the correlation between platelet APP mRNA expression levels and cognitive impairment.Differential gene expression measurements revealed a significant up-regulation of APP TOT and APP KPI in both AD and FTLD patients compared to the controls (being AD/Controls: 1.67 for APP TOT and 1.47 for APP KPI; FTLD/Controls: 1.62 for APP TOT and 1.51 for APP KPI; p < 0.05), although it is interesting to note that in FTLD patients this expression did not correlate with the severity of cognitive impairment.This could be related to a reduced beta-amyloid (Aβ) formation, caused by an alteration of secretase enzymatic activity, even though a post-transcriptional regulation of APP mRNAs in FTLD cannot be excluded. PMID:24400342

  8. Nuclear medicine imaging in dementia: a practical overview for hospitalists.

    PubMed

    Toney, Lauren Kay; McCue, Tim J; Minoshima, Satoshi; Lewis, David H

    2011-08-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome with diverse presentation, a challenging differential diagnosis, and time-sensitive therapy. The most common cause of dementia in patients aged > 65 years is Alzheimer's disease, which now affects 4 million people in the United States, but is often underrecognized, especially in the inpatient population. The hospitalist may have the opportunity to evaluate a patient's initial presentation of dementia. Addressing the inpatient's dementia symptoms can improve overall care and outcomes, so it is imperative that the hospitalist is abreast of recent developments in the dementia workup. The focus of this article is to overview how nuclear medicine imaging of the brain can aid in this process, with perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and fludeoxyglucose F 18 ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) as the 2 most common modalities. Our discussion focuses on Alzheimer's disease, as this the most common etiology of dementia in patients aged > 65 years; however, we also touch on the other common neurodegenerative dementias (eg, dementia with Lewy bodies, vascular dementia, and frontotemporal dementia) for completeness. We begin with a summary of the most recent published guidelines for each of these neurodegenerative diseases, and then expand on the role that nuclear imaging plays in each. We provide a basic overview of the principles of these nuclear medicine techniques, and then illustrate findings in perfusion SPECT and (18)F-FDG PET for typical patterns of dementia, with emphasis on evidence regarding diagnostic accuracy of each modality, in comparison with accepted gold standards. Finally, we outline some future research topics within the field of nuclear medicine in dementia, including amyloid plaque imaging and dopamine transporter imaging. PMID:21881402

  9. The structural neuroanatomy of music emotion recognition: evidence from frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Omar, Rohani; Henley, Susie M D; Bartlett, Jonathan W; Hailstone, Julia C; Gordon, Elizabeth; Sauter, Disa A; Frost, Chris; Scott, Sophie K; Warren, Jason D

    2011-06-01

    Despite growing clinical and neurobiological interest in the brain mechanisms that process emotion in music, these mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) frequently exhibit clinical syndromes that illustrate the effects of breakdown in emotional and social functioning. Here we investigated the neuroanatomical substrate for recognition of musical emotion in a cohort of 26 patients with FTLD (16 with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, bvFTD, 10 with semantic dementia, SemD) using voxel-based morphometry. On neuropsychological evaluation, patients with FTLD showed deficient recognition of canonical emotions (happiness, sadness, anger and fear) from music as well as faces and voices compared with healthy control subjects. Impaired recognition of emotions from music was specifically associated with grey matter loss in a distributed cerebral network including insula, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex, anterior temporal and more posterior temporal and parietal cortices, amygdala and the subcortical mesolimbic system. This network constitutes an essential brain substrate for recognition of musical emotion that overlaps with brain regions previously implicated in coding emotional value, behavioural context, conceptual knowledge and theory of mind. Musical emotion recognition may probe the interface of these processes, delineating a profile of brain damage that is essential for the abstraction of complex social emotions. PMID:21385617

  10. Co-Occurrence of Language and Behavioural Change in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Jennifer M.; Jones, Matthew; Gall, Claire; Richardson, Anna M.T.; Neary, David; du Plessis, Daniel; Pal, Piyali; Mann, David M.A.; Snowden, Julie S.; Thompson, Jennifer C.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives We aimed to evaluate the co-occurrence of language and behavioural impairment in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) spectrum pathology. Methods Eighty-one dementia patients with pathological confirmation of FTLD were identified. Anonymized clinical records from patients' first assessment were rated for language and behavioural features from frontotemporal dementia consensus criteria, primary progressive aphasia (PPA) criteria and 1998 FTLD criteria. Results Over 90% of patients with FTLD pathology exhibited a combination of at least one behavioural and one language feature. Changes in language, in particular, were commonly accompanied by behavioural change. Notably, the majority of patients who displayed language features characteristic of semantic variant PPA exhibited ‘early perseverative, stereotyped or compulsive/ritualistic behaviour’. Moreover, ‘executive/generation deficits with relative sparing of memory and visuospatial functions’ occurred in most patients with core features of non-fluent variant PPA. Conclusion Behavioural and language symptoms frequently co-occur in patients with FTLD pathology. Current classifications, which separate behavioural and language syndromes, do not reflect this co-occurrence. PMID:27350781

  11. The CERAD Neuropsychological Battery in Patients with Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Haanpää, Ramona M.; Suhonen, Noora-Maria; Hartikainen, Päivi; Koivisto, Anne M.; Moilanen, Virpi; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Hänninen, Tuomo; Remes, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The diagnosis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is based on neuropsychological examination in addition to clinical symptoms and brain imaging. There is no simple, validated, cognitive tool available in screening for FTLD. The Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease neuropsychological battery (CERAD-NB) was originally devised to identify the early cognitive changes related to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our aim was to investigate the utility of the CERAD-NB in FTLD. Methods Patients with FTLD (n = 95) and AD (n = 90) were assessed with the CERAD-NB, Trail Making Test parts A and B and single-letter Phonemic Fluency. Results FTLD patients were more severely impaired in the Verbal Fluency subtest in the CERAD-NB and Trail Making Test part A compared to AD patients. In addition, AD patients were more impaired in memory subtests compared to FTLD patients. Conclusion The CERAD-NB may be a useful tool in screening for FTLD. Impaired performance in Verbal Fluency with moderately well-preserved Delayed Recall and Memory Tests may help in identifying patients with probable FTLD and discriminating FTLD from AD. Adding the Trail Making Test to the battery might enhance its value as a screening instrument for FTLD. PMID:25999981

  12. Dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Ferman, Tanis J.; Boeve, Bradley F.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis The advent of new immunostains have improved our ability to detect limbic and cortical Lewy bodies, and it is now evident that Dementa with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common neurodegenerative dementia, after Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Distinguishing DLB from AD has important implications for treatment, in terms of substances that may worsen symptoms (i.e., anticholinergic and certain neuroleptic medications) and those that may improve them (i.e., cholinesterase inhibitors, carbidopa-levodopa). Neurocognitive patterns, psychiatric features, extrapyramidal signs and sleep disturbance are helpful in differentiating DLB from AD early in the disease course. Differences in the severity of cholinergic depletion as well as type and distribution of neuropathology contribute to these clinical differences, though DLB patients with a high density of co-occuring AD pathology are less clinical distinguishable from AD. PMID:17659188

  13. Voxel-based classification of FDG PET in dementia using inter-scanner normalization.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Frank; Young, Stewart; Buchert, Ralph; Wenzel, Fabian

    2013-08-15

    Statistical mapping of FDG PET brain images has become a common tool in differential diagnosis of patients with dementia. We present a voxel-based classification system of neurodegenerative dementias based on partial least squares (PLS). Such a classifier relies on image databases of normal controls and dementia cases as training data. Variations in PET image characteristics can be expected between databases, for example due to differences in instrumentation, patient preparation, and image reconstruction. This study evaluates (i) the impact of databases from different scanners on classification accuracy and (ii) a method to improve inter-scanner classification. Brain FDG PET databases from three scanners (A, B, C) at two clinical sites were evaluated. Diagnostic categories included normal controls (NC, nA=26, nB=20, nC=24 for each scanner respectively), Alzheimer's disease (AD, nA=44, nB=11, nC=16), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD, nA=13, nB=13, nC=5). Spatially normalized images were classified as NC, AD, or FTD using partial least squares. Supervised learning was employed to determine classifier parameters, whereby available data is sub-divided into training and test sets. Four different database setups were evaluated: (i) "in-scanner": training and test data from the same scanner, (ii) "x-scanner": training and test data from different scanners, (iii) "train other": train on both x-scanners, and (iv) "train all": train on all scanners. In order to moderate the impact of inter-scanner variations on image evaluation, voxel-by-voxel scaling was applied based on "ratio images". Good classification accuracy of on average 94% was achieved for the in-scanner setups. Accuracy deteriorated for setups with mismatched scanners (79-91%). Ratio-image normalization improved all results with mismatched scanners (85-92%). In conclusion, automatic classification of individual FDG PET in differential diagnosis of dementia is feasible. Accuracy can vary with respect to scanner or

  14. Visual search patterns in semantic dementia show paradoxical facilitation of binding processes

    PubMed Central

    Viskontas, Indre V.; Boxer, Adam L.; Fesenko, John; Matlin, Alisa; Heuer, Hilary W.; Mirsky, Jacob; Miller, Bruce L.

    2011-01-01

    While patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) show deficits in attention, manifested by inefficient performance on visual search, new visual talents can emerge in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), suggesting that, at least in some of the patients, visual attention is spared, if not enhanced. To investigate the underlying mechanisms for visual talent in FTLD (behavioral variant FTD [bvFTD] and semantic dementia [SD]) patients, we measured performance on a visual search paradigm that includes both feature and conjunction search, while simultaneously monitoring saccadic eye movements. AD patients were impaired relative to healthy controls (NC) and FTLD patients on both feature and conjunction search. BvFTD patients showed less accurate performance only on the conjunction search task, but slower response times than NC on all three tasks. In contrast, SD patients were as accurate as controls and had faster response times when faced with the largest number of distracters in the conjunction search task. Measurement of saccades during visual search showed that AD patients explored more of the image, whereas SD patients explored less of the image before making a decision as to whether the target was present. Performance on the conjunction search task positively correlated with gray matter volume in the superior parietal lobe, precuneus, middle frontal gyrus and superior temporal gyrus. These data suggest that despite the presence of extensive temporal lobe degeneration, visual talent in SD may be facilitated by more efficient visual search under distracting conditions due to enhanced function in the dorsal frontoparietal attention network. PMID:21215762

  15. Epidemiology of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration in Northern Finland

    PubMed Central

    Luukkainen, Laura; Bloigu, Risto; Moilanen, Virpi; Remes, Anne Marja

    2015-01-01

    Background Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is responsible for as many as every fifth case of early-onset dementia. Very few epidemiological studies of FTLD have been conducted; there are no published epidemiological data of FTLD from Finland or the other Nordic countries. The C9ORF72 expansion-associated FTLD is common in Finland; thus, the prevalence of FTLD is expected to be high in this population. Methods We retrospectively evaluated the incidence and prevalence of FTLD in university hospital settings in Northern Finland. Results The mean 1-year incidence of FTLD was 5.54/100,000 (range 1.9-11.3/100,000) in the population aged 45-65 years. The prevalence of FTLD in the same age group was 20.5/100,000. Conclusion The incidence and prevalence of FTLD in Finland seem to be the highest in Europe. However, studies from different countries may not be directly mutually comparable due to methodological issues. PMID:26675285

  16. Frontotemporal and dopaminergic control of idea generation and creative drive.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Alice W

    2005-12-01

    This article presents a three-factor anatomical model of human idea generation and creative drive, focusing on interactions between the temporal lobes, frontal lobes, and limbic system. Evidence is drawn from functional imaging, drug studies, and lesion analysis. Temporal lobe changes, as in hypergraphia, often increase idea generation, sometimes at the expense of quality. Frontal lobe deficits may decrease idea generation, in part because of rigid judgments about an idea's worth. These phenomena are clearest in verbal creativity, and roughly parallel the pressured communication of temporal lobe epilepsy, mania, and Wernicke's aphasia-compared to the sparse speech and cognitive inflexibility of depression, Broca's aphasia, and other frontal lobe lesions. The phenomena also shape non-linguistic creativity, as in that of frontotemporal dementia. The appropriate balance between frontal and temporal activity is mediated by mutually inhibitory corticocortical interactions. Mesolimbic dopamine influences novelty seeking and creative drive. Dopamine agonists and antagonists have opposite effects on goal-directed behavior and hallucinations. Creative drive is not identical to skill-the latter depends more on neocortical association areas. However, drive correlates better with successful creative output than skill does. Traditional neuroscientific models of creativity, such as the left brain - right brain hemispheric model, emphasize skills primarily, and stress art and musical skill at the expense of language and mathematics. The three-factor model proposed here predicts findings in a broad range of normal and pathological states and can be tested in many experimental paradigms. PMID:16254989

  17. The brain basis of musicophilia: evidence from frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Phillip D.; Downey, Laura E.; Witoonpanich, Pirada; Warren, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Musicophilia, or abnormal craving for music, is a poorly understood phenomenon that has been associated in particular with focal degeneration of the temporal lobes. Here we addressed the brain basis of musicophilia using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) on MR volumetric brain images in a retrospectively ascertained cohort of patients meeting clinical consensus criteria for frontotemporal lobar degeneration: of 37 cases ascertained, 12 had musicophilia, and 25 did not exhibit the phenomenon. The syndrome of semantic dementia was relatively over-represented among the musicophilic subgroup. A VBM analysis revealed significantly increased regional gray matter volume in left posterior hippocampus in the musicophilic subgroup relative to the non-musicophilic group (p < 0.05 corrected for regional comparisons); at a relaxed significance threshold (p < 0.001 uncorrected across the brain volume) musicophilia was associated with additional relative sparing of regional gray matter in other temporal lobe and prefrontal areas and atrophy of gray matter in posterior parietal and orbitofrontal areas. The present findings suggest a candidate brain substrate for musicophilia as a signature of distributed network damage that may reflect a shift of hedonic processing toward more abstract (non-social) stimuli, with some specificity for particular neurodegenerative pathologies. PMID:23801975

  18. FRONTOTEMPORAL AND DOPAMINERGIC CONTROL OF IDEA GENERATION AND CREATIVE DRIVE

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Alice W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a three-factor anatomical model of human idea generation and creative drive, focusing on interactions between the temporal lobes, frontal lobes, and limbic system. Evidence is drawn from functional imaging, drug studies, and lesion analysis. Temporal lobe changes, as in hypergraphia, often increase idea generation, sometimes at the expense of quality. Frontal lobe deficits may decrease idea generation, in part because of rigid judgments about an idea's worth. These phenomena are clearest in verbal creativity, and roughly parallel the pressured communication of temporal lobe epilepsy, mania, and Wernicke's aphasia--compared to the sparse speech and cognitive inflexibility of depression, Broca's aphasia, and other frontal lobe lesions. The phenomena also shape non-linguistic creativity, as in that of frontotemporal dementia. The appropriate balance between frontal and temporal activity is mediated by mutually inhibitory corticocortical interactions. Mesolimbic dopamine influences novelty seeking and creative drive. Dopamine agonists and antagonists have opposite effects on goal-directed behavior and hallucinations. Creative drive is not identical to skill—the latter depends more on neocortical association areas. However, drive correlates better with successful creative output than skill does. Traditional neuroscientific models of creativity, such as the left brain – right brain hemispheric model, emphasize skills primarily, and stress art and musical skill at the expense of language and mathematics. The three-factor model proposed here predicts findings in a broad range of normal and pathological states, and can be tested in many experimental paradigms. PMID:16254989

  19. Free and cued selective reminding identifies very mild dementia in primary care.

    PubMed

    Grober, Ellen; Sanders, Amy E; Hall, Charles; Lipton, Richard B

    2010-01-01

    The Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (FCSRT) is used widely to identify very mild dementia; 3 alternative scoring procedures have been proposed based on free recall, total recall, and cue efficiency. We compared the predictive validity of these scoring procedures for the identification of very mild prevalent dementia (CDR=0.5), of incident dementia, and for distinguishing Alzheimer Disease (AD) and nonAD dementias. We tested 244 elderly African American and White primary care patients at 18 month intervals using a screening neuropsychologic battery that included the FCSRT and a comprehensive diagnostic neuropsychologic battery. Median follow-up was 2.6 years. Dementia diagnoses were assigned using standard criteria without access to the results of the screening battery. There were 50 prevalent and 28 incident dementia cases. At scores selected to provide specificities of 90%, free recall was more sensitive to incident and prevalent dementia than the other 2 measures. Patients with impaired free recall were 15 times more likely to have a prevalent dementia and their risk of future dementia was 4 times higher than patients with intact free recall. Neither race nor education affected prediction although older patients were at increased risk of future dementia. Total recall was more impaired in AD dementia than in nonAD dementias. The results indicate that using the FCSRT, free recall is the best measure for detecting prevalent dementia and predicting future dementia. Total recall impairment supports the diagnosis of AD rather than nonAD dementia. PMID:20683186

  20. Cognition, Language, and Clinical Pathological Features of Non-Alzheimer’s Dementias: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Jamie; Rodriguez, Amy; Lamy, Martine; Neils-Strunjas, Jean

    2010-01-01

    There are many distinct forms of dementia whose pharmacological and behavioral management differ. Differential diagnosis among the dementia variants currently relies upon a weighted combination of genetic and protein biomarkers, neuroanatomical integrity, and behavior. Diagnostic specificity is complicated by a high degree of overlap in the initial presenting symptoms across dementia subtypes. For this reason, reliable markers are of considerable diagnostic value. Communication disorders have proven to be among the strongest predictors for discriminating among dementia subtypes. As such, Speech-Language Pathologists may be poised to make an increasingly visible contribution to dementia diagnosis and its ongoing management. The value and durability of this potential contribution, however, demands an improved discipline-wide knowledge base about the unique features associated with different dementia variants. To this end we provide an overview of cognition, language, and clinical pathological features of four of the most common non-Alzheimer’s dementias: Frontotemporal Dementia, Vascular Dementia, Lewy Body Disease Dementia, and Parkinson’s Disease Dementia. PMID:20493496

  1. Personality changes in dementia: are they disease specific and universal?

    PubMed

    Torrente, Fernando; Pose, Mariángeles; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Torralva, Teresa; López, Pablo; Cetkovich-Bakmas, Marcelo; Manes, Facundo

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies about personality changes in dementia suggest that they may be due to the disruption of the biological basis of personality traits, and hence, that they are disease specific and universal. However, evidence about its specificity is still limited and scarce regarding culturally diverse populations. Accordingly, our aim was to compare personality changes in Argentinean patients with Alzheimer disease, behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia, and primary progressive aphasia. The closest living relatives of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer disease (n=19), behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (n=16), and primary progressive aphasia (n=15) were asked to complete 2 versions of the personality inventory NEO Personality Inventory-Revised, one for assessing patients' premorbid personality traits, and the other for assessing current traits. All groups showed changes in several domains and facets of the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised. Globally, the observed pattern of changes was fairly consistent with previous studies based on the same model of personality. Nevertheless, our results regarding disease-specificity were less conclusive. Even if there were some indicators of specific differences between groups, most traits varied similarly across the 3 groups, revealing a pattern of generalized changes in personality expression after illness onset. More studies are needed that help to distinguish real personality changes from other affective or cognitive symptoms that accompany dementia, as well as further data from culturally diverse populations. PMID:24614269

  2. The Spectrum of Sociopathy in Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Mario F.; Shapira, Jill S.; Saul, Ronald E.

    2012-01-01

    Although well-known from head trauma and acute strokes, sociopathic behavior from dementia is less known and understood. This study reviewed 33 dementia patients who had been in trouble with the law. They were divided into two groups: 22 who committed impulsive sociopathic acts and 11 who committed non-impulsive acts. The impulsive patients demonstrated nonviolent acts, such as dis-inhibited sexual behavior or pathological stealing, and had disproportionate frontal-caudate atrophy on neuroimaging. The majority of non-impulsive patients demonstrated agitation-paranoia, sometimes with reactive aggression, delusional beliefs, or aphasic paranoia, and had advanced memory and other cognitive impairment. The impulsive patients tended to have frontally predominant illnesses such as frontotemporal dementia or Huntington’s disease, whereas the non-impulsive group tended to have Alzheimer’s disease or prominent aphasia. Sociopathy has different causes in dementia. Two common mechanisms are disinhibition, with frontally predominant disease, and agitation-paranoia, with greater cognitive impairment. These forms of sociopathy differ significantly from the antisocial/ psychopathic personality. PMID:21677240

  3. Adipokines: a link between obesity and dementia?

    PubMed Central

    Kiliaan, Amanda J; Arnoldussen, Ilse AC; Gustafson, Deborah R

    2014-01-01

    Being overweight or obese, as measured with body mass index (BMI) or central adiposity (waist circumference), and evolving trajectory of BMI over the life course, have been associated with brain atrophy, white matter changes, blood brain barrier integrity and risk of all-cause late-onset dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). This observation leads us to question what it is about BMI that is associated with health of the brain and dementia risk. If high BMI and central adiposity represent an increase in adipose tissue, then the endocrine aspect of adipose tissue, mediated by adipose tissue hormones and adipokines, may be a clue to understanding the association with dementia and AD. Hundreds of adipokines have been identified, creating a complexity that is challenging to simplify. Nonetheless, adipokines are being investigated in association with clinical dementia outcomes, as well as imaging-based measures of brain volume, structure and function in preclinical and human models of clinical dementia. PMID:25142458

  4. MAPT H1 Haplotype is Associated with Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Risk in APOEɛ4 Noncarriers: Results from the Dementia Genetics Spanish Consortium.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Pau; Moreno, Fermín; Clarimón, Jordi; Ruiz, Agustín; Combarros, Onofre; Calero, Miguel; López de Munain, Adolfo; Bullido, Maria J; de Pancorbo, Marian M; Carro, Eva; Antonell, Anna; Coto, Eliecer; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Hernandez, Isabel; Tárraga, Lluís; Boada, Mercè; Lleó, Alberto; Dols-Icardo, Oriol; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Vázquez-Higuera, José Luis; Infante, Jon; Rábano, Alberto; Fernández-Blázquez, Miguel Ángel; Valentí, Meritxell; Indakoetxea, Begoña; Barandiarán, Myriam; Gorostidi, Ana; Frank-García, Ana; Sastre, Isabel; Lorenzo, Elena; Pastor, María A; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; Lennarz, Martina; Maier, Wolfang; Rámirez, Alfredo; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Lee, Suzee E; Sánchez-Juan, Pascual

    2015-01-01

    The MAPT H1 haplotype has been linked to several disorders, but its relationship with Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains controversial. A rare variant in MAPT (p.A152T) has been linked with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and AD. We genotyped H1/H2 and p.A152T MAPT in 11,572 subjects from Spain (4,327 AD, 563 FTD, 648 Parkinson's disease (PD), 84 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and 5,950 healthy controls). Additionally, we included 101 individuals from 21 families with genetic FTD. MAPT p.A152T was borderline significantly associated with FTD [odds ratio (OR) = 2.03; p = 0.063], but not with AD. MAPT H1 haplotype was associated with AD risk (OR = 1.12; p = 0.0005). Stratification analysis showed that this association was mainly driven by APOE ɛ4 noncarriers (OR = 1.14; p = 0.0025). MAPT H1 was also associated with risk for PD (OR = 1.30; p = 0.0003) and PSP (OR = 3.18; p = 8.59 × 10-8) but not FTD. Our results suggest that the MAPT H1 haplotype increases the risk of PD, PSP, and non-APOE ɛ4 AD. PMID:26444794

  5. Progressive amnestic dementia, hippocampal sclerosis, and mutation in C9ORF72.

    PubMed

    Murray, Melissa E; Bieniek, Kevin F; Banks Greenberg, M; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Rutherford, Nicola J; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Niemantsverdriet, Ellis; Ash, Peter E; Gendron, Tania F; Kouri, Naomi; Baker, Matt; Goodman, Ira J; Petrucelli, Leonard; Rademakers, Rosa; Dickson, Dennis W

    2013-10-01

    The most common cause of familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TAR DNA-binding protein-43 pathology (FTLD-TDP) has been found to be an expansion of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in a noncoding region of the gene C9ORF72. Hippocampal sclerosis (HpScl) is a common finding in FTLD-TDP. Our objective was to screen for the presence of C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions in a pathologically confirmed cohort of "pure" hippocampal sclerosis cases (n = 33), outside the setting of FTLD-TDP and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using a recently described repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation (C9RANT) antibody that was found to be highly specific for c9FTD/ALS, we identified a single "pure" HpScl autopsy case with a repeat expansion in C9ORF72 (c9HpScl). Mutation screening was also performed with repeat-primed polymerase chain reaction and further confirmed with Southern blotting. The c9HpScl patient had a 14-year history of a slowly progressive amnestic syndrome and a clinical diagnosis of probable AD. Neuropsychological testing revealed memory impairment, but no deficits in other cognitive domains. Autopsy showed hippocampal sclerosis with TDP-43 immunoreactive neuronal inclusions relatively limited to limbic lobe structures. Neuritic pathology immunoreactive for p62 was more frequent than TDP-43 in amygdala and hippocampus. Frequent p62-positive neuronal inclusions were present in cerebellar granule neurons as is typical of C9ORF72 mutation carriers. There was no significant FTLD or motor neuron disease. C9RANT was found to be sensitive and specific in this autopsy-confirmed series of HpScl cases. The findings in this patient suggest that the clinical and pathologic spectrum of C9ORF72 repeat expansion is wider than frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease, including cases of progressive amnestic dementia with restricted TDP-43 pathology associated with HpScl. PMID:23922030

  6. Guidance for reading FDG PET scans in dementia patients.

    PubMed

    Herholz, K

    2014-12-01

    18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful method for detection of disease-related impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism in neurodegenerative diseases. It is of particular interest for early and differential diagnosis of dementia. Reading FDG PET scans requires training to recognise deviations from normal functional brain anatomy and its variations. This paper provides guidance for displaying FDG PET brain scans in a reproducible manner that allows reliable recognition of characteristic disease-related metabolic changes. It also describes typical findings in Alzheimer's disease, Frontotemporal Dementia and Dementia with Lewy Bodies and possible confounding factors, such as vascular changes and brain atrophy. It provides a brief overview on findings in other neurodegenerative diseases and addresses the potential and limitations of software packages for comparison of individual scans with reference data. PMID:25391316

  7. [Dementia tends to become an impediment to continued homecare - "staying home until death" even with dementia].

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Hideo

    2014-12-01

    With the rate of aging rising each year, the number of patients with dementia increases. The latest study released by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare estimated that, as of 2012, there were a total of 3.05 million people with dementia in Japan, with 10% of aged 65 and over, 15% of aged 70 and over, 20% of aged 75 and over, and 40% of aged 85 and over. Dementia includes Alzheimer's disease, which makes up the most cases, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia, and cerebrovascular dementia which is caused by a cerebral infarction or cerebral hemorrhage. Hypothyroidism, normal pressure hydrocephalus, and depression also impair cognitive functions, and therefore these pathological conditions are easily mistaken for dementia. Methods that can easily distinguish between these diseases have been devised. Early and accurate diagnoses are very important for patients and their families as there are a number of diseases that can be treated. In addition, although Japan only has medicines that delay the advance of Alzheimer's disease, in recent years, efforts have been made to prevent the onset of Alzheimer's disease through reducing the potential for diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, and depression, quitting smoking, and improving physical and intellectual activities. At the annual meeting last year, we reported the results of a survey at our health counseling center on the quality of life a person wants as dementia progresses. The survey had some surprising results: two-thirds of the people surveyed preferred to be in a group home or an advanced medical center, rather than in their own homes. One-third of the respondents expressed a desire to be at home. The survey showed that if possible, a person diagnosed with dementia will stay at home, however, where this is not possible, they have no choice other than to resign themselves to leaving home. Furthermore, patients with dementia feel that the medication that will allow them to continue their

  8. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Dementia Types of Dementia Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Dementia with Lewy Bodies Down ... Research Traumatic Brain Injury and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Awardees Year Researcher Study Name 2015 Jesse Mez ...

  9. Types of Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Dementia Types of Dementia Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Dementia with Lewy Bodies Down ... Research Traumatic Brain Injury and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Awardees Year Researcher Study Name 2015 Jesse Mez ...

  10. What to Ask: Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... What to Ask: Dementia Tools and Tips The memory loss and other changes seen in dementia can ... can ask your healthcare proffesional about dementia. Is memory loss a normal part of aging? If so, ...

  11. Dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Murray, Melissa E.; Lowe, Val J.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Ferman, Tanis J.; Przybelski, Scott A.; Lesnick, Timothy G.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Smith, Glenn E.; Knopman, David S.; Jack, Clifford R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate clinical, imaging, and pathologic associations of the cingulate island sign (CIS) in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Methods: We retrospectively identified and compared patients with a clinical diagnosis of DLB (n = 39); patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) matched by age, sex, and education (n = 39); and cognitively normal controls (n = 78) who underwent 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and C11 Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET scans. Among these patients, we studied those who came to autopsy and underwent Braak neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) staging (n = 10). Results: Patients with a clinical diagnosis of DLB had a higher ratio of posterior cingulate to precuneus plus cuneus metabolism, cingulate island sign (CIS), on FDG-PET than patients with AD (p < 0.001), a finding independent of β-amyloid load on PiB-PET (p = 0.56). Patients with CIS positivity on visual assessment of FDG-PET fit into the group of high- or intermediate-probability DLB pathology and received clinical diagnosis of DLB, not AD. Higher CIS ratio correlated with lower Braak NFT stage (r = −0.96; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Our study found that CIS on FDG-PET is not associated with fibrillar β-amyloid deposition but indicates lower Braak NFT stage in patients with DLB. Identifying biomarkers that measure relative contributions of underlying pathologies to dementia is critical as neurotherapeutics move toward targeted treatments. PMID:25056580

  12. Impact of Adult Day Services on Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Femia, Elia E.; Zarit, Steven H.; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Greene, Rick

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored whether adult day service (ADS) use was associated with reductions in behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in individuals with dementia. Design and Methods: We used a quasi-experimental design to compare a group of 133 persons with dementia (PWDs) who initially enrolled in an ADS program to a…

  13. White matter tract signatures of impaired social cognition in frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Laura E.; Mahoney, Colin J.; Buckley, Aisling H.; Golden, Hannah L.; Henley, Susie M.; Schmitz, Nicole; Schott, Jonathan M.; Simpson, Ivor J.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Fox, Nick C.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Impairments of social cognition are often leading features in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and likely to reflect large-scale brain network disintegration. However, the neuroanatomical basis of impaired social cognition in FTLD and the role of white matter connections have not been defined. Here we assessed social cognition in a cohort of patients representing two core syndromes of FTLD, behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD; n = 29) and semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA; n = 15), relative to healthy older individuals (n = 37) using two components of the Awareness of Social Inference Test, canonical emotion identification and sarcasm identification. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to derive white matter tract correlates of social cognition performance and compared with the distribution of grey matter atrophy on voxel-based morphometry. The bvFTD and svPPA groups showed comparably severe deficits for identification of canonical emotions and sarcasm, and these deficits were correlated with distributed and overlapping white matter tract alterations particularly affecting frontotemporal connections in the right cerebral hemisphere. The most robust DTI associations were identified in white matter tracts linking cognitive and evaluative processing with emotional responses: anterior thalamic radiation, fornix (emotion identification) and uncinate fasciculus (sarcasm identification). DTI associations of impaired social cognition were more consistent than corresponding grey matter associations. These findings delineate a brain network substrate for the social impairment that characterises FTLD syndromes. The findings further suggest that DTI can generate sensitive and functionally relevant indexes of white matter damage in FTLD, with potential to transcend conventional syndrome boundaries. PMID:26236629

  14. White Matter Tauopathy with Globular Glial Inclusions: A Distinct Sporadic Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Gabor G.; Majtenyi, Katalin; Spina, Salvatore; Murrell, Jill R.; Gelpi, Ellen; Hoftberger, Romana; Fraser, Graham; Crowther, R. Anthony; Goedert, Michel; Budka, Herbert; Ghetti, Bernardino

    2009-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degenerations are a group of disorders characterized by circumscribed degeneration of the frontal and temporal lobes and diverse histopathological features. We report clinical, neuropathological, ultrastructural, biochemical and genetic data on seven individuals with a four-repeat (4R) tauopathy characterized by the presence of globular glial inclusions (GGIs) in brain white matter. Clinical manifestations were compatible with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and included motor neuron symptoms; there was prominent neuronal loss in the frontal and temporal cortex, subiculum and amygdala. The surrounding white matter showed abundant GGIs composed of abnormal filaments present mostly in oligodendrocytes. The severity of white matter tau abnormalities correlated with a reduction in myelin and axons and with microglial activation. Western blotting of sarkosyl-insoluble tau demonstrated the presence of two major tau bands of 64 and 68 kDa. No mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) gene were detected in two affected individuals. We propose that 4R tau-immunoreactive GGIs are the neuropathologic hallmark of a distinct sporadic tauopathy with variable clinical presentations that include FTD and occasionally upper motor neuron disease. This type of tauopathy with GGIs expands the group of neurodegenerative disorders in which oligodendroglial pathology predominates, beyond the synucleinopathy multiple system atrophy disorders. PMID:18800011

  15. Voice processing in dementia: a neuropsychological and neuroanatomical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hailstone, Julia C.; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Bartlett, Jonathan W.; Goll, Johanna C.; Buckley, Aisling H.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2011-01-01

    Voice processing in neurodegenerative disease is poorly understood. Here we undertook a systematic investigation of voice processing in a cohort of patients with clinical diagnoses representing two canonical dementia syndromes: temporal variant frontotemporal lobar degeneration (n = 14) and Alzheimer’s disease (n = 22). Patient performance was compared with a healthy matched control group (n = 35). All subjects had a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment including measures of voice perception (vocal size, gender, speaker discrimination) and voice recognition (familiarity, identification, naming and cross-modal matching) and equivalent measures of face and name processing. Neuroanatomical associations of voice processing performance were assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Both disease groups showed deficits on all aspects of voice recognition and impairment was more severe in the temporal variant frontotemporal lobar degeneration group than the Alzheimer’s disease group. Face and name recognition were also impaired in both disease groups and name recognition was significantly more impaired than other modalities in the temporal variant frontotemporal lobar degeneration group. The Alzheimer’s disease group showed additional deficits of vocal gender perception and voice discrimination. The neuroanatomical analysis across both disease groups revealed common grey matter associations of familiarity, identification and cross-modal recognition in all modalities in the right temporal pole and anterior fusiform gyrus; while in the Alzheimer’s disease group, voice discrimination was associated with grey matter in the right inferior parietal lobe. The findings suggest that impairments of voice recognition are significant in both these canonical dementia syndromes but particularly severe in temporal variant frontotemporal lobar degeneration, whereas impairments of voice perception may show relative specificity for Alzheimer’s disease. The right anterior

  16. Recognition of dementia in ancient China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Lu-Ning; Tian, Jin-Zhou

    2012-12-01

    A search of previous records in the literatures was done to summarize the opinions for dementia in ancient China. The earliest description of dementia was traced in the Yellow emperor's internal classic, a book written 2000 years ago. Hua Tuo (AD 140-208) in Han Dynasty first denominated "dementia" in the book, Hua Tuo Shen Yi Mi Zhuan. The pathogenesis of dementia could be generalized as the insufficiency of Qi, a flowing energy; the stagnation of phlegm, a harmful liquid substance in the body; and the blood stasis, which were also regarded as therapeutic targets. Therefore, we can conclude that dementia has been recognized and investigated in traditional Chinese medicine, which is definitely before the industrial civilization era. PMID:22835605

  17. Novel progranulin mutations with reduced serum-progranulin levels in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Forsell, Charlotte; Lilius, Lena; Öijerstedt, Linn; Thordardottir, Steinunn; Shanmugarajan, Krishnan; Westerlund, Marie; Nennesmo, Inger; Thonberg, Håkan; Graff, Caroline

    2013-11-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with an age at onset generally below 65 years. Mutations in progranulin (GRN) have been reported to be able to cause FTLD through haploinsufficiency. We have sequenced GRN in 121 patients with FTLD and detected six different mutations in eight patients: p.Gly35Glufs*19, p.Asn118Phefs*4, p.Val200Glyfs*18, p.Tyr294*, p.Cys404* and p.Cys416Leufs*30. Serum was available for five of the mutations, where the serum-GRN levels were found to be >50% reduced compared with FTLD patients without GRN mutations. Moreover, the p.Cys416Leufs*30 mutation segregated in an affected family with different dementia diagnoses. The mutation frequency of GRN mutation was 6.6% in our FTLD cohort. PMID:23463024

  18. Vascular aspects of cognitive impairment and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Wiesmann, Maximilian; Kiliaan, Amanda J; Claassen, Jurgen AHR

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension and stroke are highly prevalent risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia. Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the most common forms of dementia, and both conditions are preceded by a stage of cognitive impairment. Stroke is a major risk factor for the development of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and VaD; however, stroke may also predispose to AD. Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, thus linking hypertension to VCI and VaD, but hypertension is also an important risk factor for AD. Reducing these two major, but modifiable, risk factors—hypertension and stroke—could be a successful strategy for reducing the public health burden of cognitive impairment and dementia. Intake of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-n3-FA) and the manipulation of factors involved in the renin–angiotensin system (e.g. angiotensin II or angiotensin-converting enzyme) have been shown to reduce the risk of developing hypertension and stroke, thereby reducing dementia risk. This paper will review the research conducted on the relationship between hypertension, stroke, and dementia and also on the impact of LC-n3-FA or antihypertensive treatments on risk factors for VCI, VaD, and AD. PMID:24022624

  19. Validation of an optimized SPM procedure for FDG-PET in dementia diagnosis in a clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Perani, Daniela; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Cerami, Chiara; Gallivanone, Francesca; Fallanca, Federico; Vanoli, Emilia Giovanna; Panzacchi, Andrea; Nobili, Flavio; Pappatà, Sabina; Marcone, Alessandra; Garibotto, Valentina; Castiglioni, Isabella; Magnani, Giuseppe; Cappa, Stefano F.; Gianolli, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic accuracy in FDG-PET imaging highly depends on the operating procedures. In this clinical study on dementia, we compared the diagnostic accuracy at a single-subject level of a) Clinical Scenarios, b) Standard FDG Images and c) Statistical Parametrical (SPM) Maps generated via a new optimized SPM procedure. We evaluated the added value of FDG-PET, either Standard FDG Images or SPM Maps, to Clinical Scenarios. In 88 patients with neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's Disease—AD, Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration—FTLD, Dementia with Lewy bodies—DLB and Mild Cognitive Impairment—MCI), 9 neuroimaging experts made a forced diagnostic decision on the basis of the evaluation of the three types of information. There was also the possibility of a decision of normality on the FDG-PET images. The clinical diagnosis confirmed at a long-term follow-up was used as the gold standard. SPM Maps showed higher sensitivity and specificity (96% and 84%), and better diagnostic positive (6.8) and negative (0.05) likelihood ratios compared to Clinical Scenarios and Standard FDG Images. SPM Maps increased diagnostic accuracy for differential diagnosis (AD vs. FTD; beta 1.414, p = 0.019). The AUC of the ROC curve was 0.67 for SPM Maps, 0.57 for Clinical Scenarios and 0.50 for Standard FDG Images. In the MCI group, SPM Maps showed the highest predictive prognostic value (mean LOC = 2.46), by identifying either normal brain metabolism (exclusionary role) or hypometabolic patterns typical of different neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:25389519

  20. Exome sequencing in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Keogh, M J; Kurzawa-Akanbi, M; Griffin, H; Douroudis, K; Ayers, K L; Hussein, R I; Hudson, G; Pyle, A; Cordell, H J; Attems, J; McKeith, I G; O'Brien, J T; Burn, D J; Morris, C M; Thomas, A J; Chinnery, P F

    2016-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common form of degenerative dementia. Siblings of affected individuals are at greater risk of developing DLB, but little is known about the underlying genetic basis of the disease. We set out to determine whether mutations in known highly penetrant neurodegenerative disease genes are found in patients with DLB. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on 91 neuropathologically confirmed cases of DLB, supplemented by independent APOE genotyping. Genetic variants were classified using established criteria, and additional neuropathological examination was performed for putative mutation carriers. Likely pathogenic variants previously described as causing monogenic forms of neurodegenerative disease were found in 4.4% of patients with DLB. The APOE ɛ4 allele increased the risk of disease (P=0.0001), conferred a shorter disease duration (P=0.043) and earlier age of death (P=0.0015). In conclusion, although known pathogenic mutations in neurodegenerative disease genes are uncommon in DLB, known genetic risk factors are present in >60% of cases. APOE ɛ4 not only modifies disease risk, but also modulates the rate of disease progression. The reduced penetrance of reported pathogenic alleles explains the lack of a family history in most patients, and the presence of variants previously described as causing frontotemporal dementia suggests a mechanistic overlap between DLB and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26836416

  1. Exome sequencing in dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Keogh, M J; Kurzawa-Akanbi, M; Griffin, H; Douroudis, K; Ayers, K L; Hussein, R I; Hudson, G; Pyle, A; Cordell, H J; Attems, J; McKeith, I G; O'Brien, J T; Burn, D J; Morris, C M; Thomas, A J; Chinnery, P F

    2016-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common form of degenerative dementia. Siblings of affected individuals are at greater risk of developing DLB, but little is known about the underlying genetic basis of the disease. We set out to determine whether mutations in known highly penetrant neurodegenerative disease genes are found in patients with DLB. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on 91 neuropathologically confirmed cases of DLB, supplemented by independent APOE genotyping. Genetic variants were classified using established criteria, and additional neuropathological examination was performed for putative mutation carriers. Likely pathogenic variants previously described as causing monogenic forms of neurodegenerative disease were found in 4.4% of patients with DLB. The APOE ɛ4 allele increased the risk of disease (P=0.0001), conferred a shorter disease duration (P=0.043) and earlier age of death (P=0.0015). In conclusion, although known pathogenic mutations in neurodegenerative disease genes are uncommon in DLB, known genetic risk factors are present in >60% of cases. APOE ɛ4 not only modifies disease risk, but also modulates the rate of disease progression. The reduced penetrance of reported pathogenic alleles explains the lack of a family history in most patients, and the presence of variants previously described as causing frontotemporal dementia suggests a mechanistic overlap between DLB and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26836416

  2. Assessment and Reporting of Driving Fitness in Patients with Dementia in Clinical Practice: Data from SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry

    PubMed Central

    Lovas, Joel; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Cermakova, Pavla; Lundberg, Catarina; Johansson, Björn; Johansson, Kurt; Winblad, Bengt; Eriksdotter, Maria; Religa, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Background: Driving constitutes a very important aspect of daily life and is dependent on cognitive functions such as attention, visuo-spatial skills and memory, which are often compromised in dementia. Therefore, the driving fitness of patients with dementia needs to be addressed by physicians and those that are deemed unfit should not be allowed to continue driving. Objective: We aimed at investigating to what extent physicians assess driving fitness in dementia patients and determinant factors for revoking of their licenses. Methods: This study includes 15113 patients with newly diagnosed dementia and driver’s license registered in the Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem). The main outcomes were reporting to the licensing authority and making an agreement about driving eligibility with the patients. Results: Physicians had not taken any action in 16% of dementia patients, whereas 9% were reported to the authority to have their licenses revoked. Males (OR = 3.04), those with an MMSE score between 20–24 (OR = 1.35) and 10–19 (OR = 1.50), patients with frontotemporal (OR = 3.09) and vascular dementia (OR = 1.26) were more likely to be reported to the authority. Conclusion: For the majority of patients with dementia, driving fitness was assessed. Nevertheless, physicians did not address the issue in a sizeable proportion of dementia patients. Type of dementia, cognitive status, age, sex and burden of comorbidities are independent factors associated with the assessment of driving fitness in patients with dementia. Increased knowledge on how these factors relate to road safety may pave the way for more specific guidelines addressing the issue of driving in patients with dementia. PMID:27163829

  3. Whole-brain patterns of (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging in Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Su, L; Blamire, A M; Watson, R; He, J; Hayes, L; O'Brien, J T

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy has demonstrated metabolite changes in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB); however, their pattern and relationship to clinical symptoms is unclear. To determine whether the spatial patterns of brain-metabolite changes in AD and DLB are regional or diffused, and to examine whether the key metabolite levels are associated with cognitive and non-cognitive symptoms, we acquired whole-brain spatially resolved 3T magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data from subjects with AD (N=36), DLB (N=35) and similarly aged controls (N=35). Voxel-wise measurement of N-acetylaspartate to creatine (NAA/Cr), choline to Cr (Cho/Cr), myo-inositol to Cr (mI/Cr) as well as glutamate and glutamine to Cr (Glx/Cr) ratios were determined using MRSI. Compared with controls, AD and DLB groups showed a significant decrease in most brain metabolites, with NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and mI/Cr levels being reduced in posterior cingulate, thalamus, frontotemporal areas and basal ganglia. The Glx/Cr level was more widely decreased in DLB (posterior cingulate, hippocampus, temporal regions and caudate) than in AD (only in posterior cingulate). DLB was also associated with increased levels of Cho/Cr, NAA/Cr and mI/Cr in occipital regions. Changes in metabolism in the brain were correlated with cognitive and non-cognitive symptoms in the DLB but not in the AD group. The different patterns between AD and DLB may have implications for improving diagnosis, better understanding disease-specific neurobiology and targeting therapeutics. In addition, the study raised important questions about the role of occipital neuroinflammation and glial activation as well as the glutamatergic treatment in DLB. PMID:27576166

  4. Senile dementia.

    PubMed

    Terry, R D

    1978-12-01

    The Alzheimer type of senile dementia (SDAT) accounts for more than 50% of such cases, and is a very common disorder as well as being very costly in emotional, economic, and medical terms. It carries a markedly shortened life expectancy. Gray-to-white-matter ratios change and the brain shrinks slightly in the course of normal aging, but SDAT brains may not be significantly more atrophic than are normal controls. Cortical neurons are diminished in number in normal aging, but counts from frontal and midtemporal regions of SDAT specimens are not different from age-matched controls. There is loss of dendrites and of dendritic spines in both normal and abnormal aged specimens. Neurofibrillary tangles are made up of paired helical filaments that appear to be chemically and immunologically related to normal neurofibers. Neuritic plaques are made up of an amyloid core surrounded by abnormal axonal endings. Both plaques and tangles are to be correlated with the presence of senile dementia. There is some evidence for an infectious etiology of SDAT. Choline acetyltransferase is markedly reduced in cortical tissue of these patients, but the muscarinic receptors of acetylcholine are normal. PMID:720637

  5. Pain and temperature processing in dementia: a clinical and neuroanatomical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Phillip D.; Downey, Laura E.; Golden, Hannah L.; Clark, Camilla N.; Slattery, Catherine F.; Paterson, Ross W.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Rossor, Martin N.

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms suggesting altered processing of pain and temperature have been described in dementia diseases and may contribute importantly to clinical phenotypes, particularly in the frontotemporal lobar degeneration spectrum, but the basis for these symptoms has not been characterized in detail. Here we analysed pain and temperature symptoms using a semi-structured caregiver questionnaire recording altered behavioural responsiveness to pain or temperature for a cohort of patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (n = 58, 25 female, aged 52–84 years, representing the major clinical syndromes and representative pathogenic mutations in the C9orf72 and MAPT genes) and a comparison cohort of patients with amnestic Alzheimer’s disease (n = 20, eight female, aged 53–74 years). Neuroanatomical associations were assessed using blinded visual rating and voxel-based morphometry of patients’ brain magnetic resonance images. Certain syndromic signatures were identified: pain and temperature symptoms were particularly prevalent in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (71% of cases) and semantic dementia (65% of cases) and in association with C9orf72 mutations (6/6 cases), but also developed in Alzheimer’s disease (45% of cases) and progressive non-fluent aphasia (25% of cases). While altered temperature responsiveness was more common than altered pain responsiveness across syndromes, blunted responsiveness to pain and temperature was particularly associated with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (40% of symptomatic cases) and heightened responsiveness with semantic dementia (73% of symptomatic cases) and Alzheimer’s disease (78% of symptomatic cases). In the voxel-based morphometry analysis of the frontotemporal lobar degeneration cohort, pain and temperature symptoms were associated with grey matter loss in a right-lateralized network including insula (P < 0.05 corrected for multiple voxel-wise comparisons within the prespecified anatomical

  6. The undiscovered syndrome: Macdonald Critchley’s case of semantic dementia

    PubMed Central

    Witoonpanich, Pirada; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.; Rossor, Martin N.

    2015-01-01

    Semantic dementia is a unique clinicopathological syndrome in the frontotemporal lobar degeneration spectrum. It is characterized by progressive and relatively selective impairment of semantic memory, associated with asymmetric antero-inferior temporal lobe atrophy. Although the syndrome became widely recognized only in the 1980s, descriptions of cases with typical features of semantic dementia have been on record for over a century. Here, we draw attention to a well documented historical case of a patient with features that would have fulfilled current consensus criteria for semantic dementia, as reconstructed from the notes made by her neurologist, Macdonald Critchley, in 1938. This case raises a number of issues concerning the nosology of the semantic dementia syndrome and the potential value of archived case material. PMID:24818802

  7. [Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia and their management].

    PubMed

    Lykouras, L; Gournellis, R

    2011-01-01

    The decline in cognitive function is a core feature of dementias. However, other symptoms of the disease are also crucial. These symptoms are the behavioral and psychological manifestations of dementia and include symptoms such as delusions, hallucinations, delusional misindentification syndromes (DMS), illusions, anxiety, aggression, depression, personality changes, disinhibition-impulsivity, violation of social and moral norms, changes in dietary or eating behavior and repetitive behaviors. Delusions, hallucinations, anxiety, depression and aggression are highly prevalent in Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, whereas symptoms that include severe disturbance of behavior are highly prevalent in frontotemporal dementias. Psychotic symptoms are associated with subcortical disturbances mainly of the limbic system. Patients with depression present greater loss of noradrenergic cells in the locus coeruleus and loss of serotonergic nuclei of dorsal raphe. Furthermore, disturbances of behavior are associated with frontal lobe dysfunction. Atypical antipsychotics is the first treatment option for delusions, hallucinations, misidentifications, anxiety and aggression. Furthermore, antidepressants may be useful for moderate or severe depression as well as for disinhibition-impulsivity, aggression, changes in dietary or eating behavior and repetitive behaviors. Cholinesterase inhibitors may also improve apathy, anxiety, disinhibition, aberrant behavior, mood disorders and hallucinations. Moreover, non-pharmacological methods alone or in combination with psychotropic drugs may also improve patient's symptomatology. PMID:21688522

  8. Hearing and music in dementia

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Julene K; Chow, Maggie L

    2016-01-01

    Music is a complex acoustic signal that relies on a number of different brain and cognitive processes to create the sensation of hearing. Changes in hearing function are generally not a major focus of concern for persons with a majority of neurodegenerative diseases associated with dementia, such as Alzheimer disease (AD). However, changes in the processing of sounds may be an early, and possibly preclinical, feature of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this chapter is to review the current state of knowledge concerning hearing and music perception in persons who have a dementia as a result of a neurodegenerative disease. The review focuses on both peripheral and central auditory processing in common neurodegenerative diseases, with a particular focus on the processing of music and other non-verbal sounds. The chapter also reviews music interventions used for persons with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25726296

  9. Hearing and music in dementia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Julene K; Chow, Maggie L

    2015-01-01

    Music is a complex acoustic signal that relies on a number of different brain and cognitive processes to create the sensation of hearing. Changes in hearing function are generally not a major focus of concern for persons with a majority of neurodegenerative diseases associated with dementia, such as Alzheimer disease (AD). However, changes in the processing of sounds may be an early, and possibly preclinical, feature of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this chapter is to review the current state of knowledge concerning hearing and music perception in persons who have a dementia as a result of a neurodegenerative disease. The review focuses on both peripheral and central auditory processing in common neurodegenerative diseases, with a particular focus on the processing of music and other non-verbal sounds. The chapter also reviews music interventions used for persons with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25726296

  10. A Novel GRN Mutation (GRN c.708+6_+9delTGAG) in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration with TDP-43-positive Inclusions: Clinicopathologic Report of 6 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bit-Ivan, Esther N.; Suh, Eunran; Shim, H-S; Weintraub, Sandra; Hyman, Bradley T.; Arnold, Steven E.; McCarty-Wood, Elisabeth; Van Deerlin, Viviana M.; Schneider, Julie A.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Baker, Matt C.; Rademakers, Rosa; Mesulam, Marsel; Bigio, Eileen H.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), the underlying pathology that is most often linked to the clinical diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), is rapidly increasing. Mutations in 7 known genes (MAPT, GRN, C9orf72, VCP, CHMP2B, and rarely TARDBP and FUS) are associated with FTD and the pathologic classification of FTLD has recently been modified to reflect these discoveries. Mutations in one of these genes (GRN), which encodes progranulin, have been implicated in up to one quarter of FTLD cases with TAR DNA-binding protein 43-positive inclusions (FTLD-TDP); there currently are more than 60 known pathogenic mutations of the gene. We present the clinical, pathologic, and genetic findings of 6 cases from 4 families, 5 of which were shown to have a novel GRN c.708+6_+9delTGAG mutation. PMID:24709683

  11. Diabetes, Dementia and Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Meneilly, Graydon S; Tessier, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    We are experiencing an epidemic of both diabetes and dementia among older adults in this country. The risk for dementia appears to be increased in patients with diabetes, and patients with dementia and diabetes appear to be at greater risk for severe hypoglycemia. In addition, there may be an increased risk for developing dementia by older patients with diabetes who have had episodes of severe hypoglycemia, although this issue is controversial. In this article, we review the factors that contribute to the increased risk for dementia in older adults with diabetes and outline the complex relationships between hypoglycemia and dementia. PMID:26778684

  12. Anosognosia in Dementia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert S; Sytsma, Joel; Barnes, Lisa L; Boyle, Patricia A

    2016-09-01

    Progressive decline in memory (and other functions) is the defining feature of late-life dementia but affected individuals are often unaware of this impairment. This article reviews recent research on anosognosia in dementia, including methods of assessing anosognosia, its prevalence and developmental course in dementia, its occurrence in different forms of dementia, neuroimaging findings, and hypothesized component mechanisms. The results suggest that anosognosia is eventually exhibited by nearly all persons with dementia. Its occurrence is robustly associated with common dementia-related pathologies and damage to memory and self-referential brain networks and their interconnections. PMID:27438597

  13. Caring for a Person with a Frontotemporal Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information for Patients, Families, and Caregivers Caring for a Person with a Frontotemporal Disorder In addition to managing the medical ... help with information about caregiver services and support. A stressful disorder Robert, 60, started humming and whistling ...

  14. Dementia: Diagnosis and Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Dementia Diagnosis & Tests If you or someone you care ... To determine whether an older adult might have dementia, a healthcare professional will: Ask about the person’s ...

  15. Lewy Body Dementia Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... individuals, it may also be due to the natural course of the disease. All Rights Reserved Lewy Body Dementia Association, Inc. 912 Killian Hill Road S.W., Lilburn, GA 30047 © 2016 Lewy Body Dementia Association, Inc. Connect ...

  16. [Personality and Dementia].

    PubMed

    Masui, Yukie

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have looked into the relationships between personality and dementia from three hypothetical points of views: 1) that personality type is a risk factor for dementia, 2) that personality changes occur before receiving a diagnosis of dementia, and 3) that premorbid personality traits define behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) after receiving a diagnosis. This article overviews all three perspectives of the studies, after explaining the character and characteristic attributes of each perspective. PMID:27395463

  17. On the right side? A longitudinal study of left- versus right-lateralized semantic dementia.

    PubMed

    Kumfor, Fiona; Landin-Romero, Ramon; Devenney, Emma; Hutchings, Rosalind; Grasso, Roberto; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    with right temporal pole cortical thinning. While left and right semantic dementia show distinct profiles at presentation, both phenotypes develop deficits in emotion recognition and behaviour. These findings highlight the pervasive socio-emotional deficits in frontotemporal dementia, even in patients with an initial language presentation. These changes reflect right anterior temporal and orbitofrontal cortex degeneration, underscoring the role of these regions in social cognition and behaviour. PMID:26811253

  18. Role of neuroimaging in multidisciplinary approach towards Non-Alzheimer's dementia.

    PubMed

    Patro, Satya Narayana; Glikstein, Rafael; Hanagandi, Prasad; Chakraborty, Santanu

    2015-10-01

    Dementia is defined as chronic deterioration of intellectual function and cognitive skills significant enough to interfere with the ability to perform daily activities. Recent advances in the treatment of dementia have renewed interest in the use of various neuroimaging techniques that can assist in the diagnosis and differentiation of various subtypes. Neuroimaging and computational techniques have helped the radiological community to monitor disease progression of various neurodegenerative conditions presenting with dementia, such as Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal lobe dementia (FTLD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multisystem atrophy-cerebellar variant (MSA-C), and their response to newer therapies. Prompt identification of treatable or reversible forms of dementia, such as tumours, subdural haemorrhage and intracranial dAVF, is crucial for the effective management of these conditions. It is also prudent to recognize the imaging spectrum of metabolic, infective and autoimmune diseases with rapidly progressing dementia, such as methanol toxicity, central pontine myelinolysis (CPM), delayed post hypoxic leukoencephalopathy (DPHL), HIV, Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), Sjogren's syndrome, multiple sclerosis (MS), radiation necrosis and Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS), which are difficult to treat and often require palliative care. This pictorial review emphasizes various non-Alzheimer's dementia entities and discusses their imaging highlights. Teaching Points • Non Alzheimer's dementia constitutes a broad spectrum of conditions. • Neuroimaging plays an important role in differentiating treatable from irreversible dementia. • Neuroimaging is often non-specific in early stages of neurodegenerative conditions with dementia. • Neuroimaging plays an important role in the multimodal approach towards management of dementia. PMID:26206249

  19. Childhood Learning Disabilities and Atypical Dementia: A Retrospective Chart Review

    PubMed Central

    Seifan, Alon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To further our understanding of the association between self-reported childhood learning disabilities (LDs) and atypical dementia phenotypes (Atypical Dementia), including logopenic primary progressive aphasia (L-PPA), Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA), and Dysexecutive-type Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Methods This retrospective case series analysis of 678 comprehensive neuropsychological assessments compared rates of self-reported LD between dementia patients diagnosed with Typical AD and those diagnosed with Atypical Dementia. 105 cases with neuroimaging or CSF data available and at least one neurology follow-up were identified as having been diagnosed by the neuropsychologist with any form of neurodegenerative dementia. These cases were subject to a consensus diagnostic process among three dementia experts using validated clinical criteria for AD and PPA. LD was considered Probable if two or more statements consistent with prior LD were documented within the Social & Developmental History of the initial neuropsychological evaluation. Results 85 subjects (Typical AD n=68, Atypical AD n=17) were included in the final analysis. In logistic regression models adjusted for age, gender, handedness, education and symptom duration, patients with Probable LD, compared to patients without Probable LD, were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with Atypical Dementia vs. Typical AD (OR 13.1, 95% CI 1.3-128.4). All three of the L-PPA cases reporting a childhood LD endorsed childhood difficulty with language. By contrast, both PCA cases reporting Probable childhood LD endorsed difficulty with attention and/or math. Conclusions In people who develop dementia, childhood LD may predispose to atypical phenotypes. Future studies are required to confirm whether atypical neurodevelopment predisposes to regional-specific neuropathology in AD and other dementias. PMID:26106899

  20. Where we stand with treating dementia.

    PubMed

    Amador, L; Jayaraj, K

    2000-01-01

    Our aging population is growing. As a result, dementia is becoming an ever more prevalent problem--with devastating consequences to the affected persons and their families. In the evaluation of the demented patient, it is crucial to look for and exclude conditions such as depression and other reversible causes of cognitive impairment before branding the patient with a diagnosis of dementia. Drug treatment of AD is not highly successful, although the Food and Drug Administration has approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for the treatment of mild to moderate AD. Present-day treatment for dementia focuses mainly on improving or preserving the quality of life of patients and their families, and on treating concomitant psychosocial, behavioral, and medical issues. We are optimistic that new, innovative medications may in the future allow us to treat or even cure Alzheimer's disease and other progressive dementing disorders. PMID:10917038

  1. Cobalamin, folate, methylmalonic acid, homocysteine, and gastritis markers in dementia.

    PubMed

    Nägga, K; Rajani, R; Mårdh, E; Borch, K; Mårdh, S; Marcusson, J

    2003-01-01

    The prevalence of dementia disorders, cobalamin and/or folate deficiency as well as gastritis increases with age. To investigate whether there is an association between these conditions, plasma homocysteine (Hcy), serum methylmalonic acid, serum cobalamin and blood folate concentrations were measured. Gastritis was indirectly diagnosed by measuring serum antibodies against H,K-ATPase, HELICOBACTER PYLORI and intrinsic factor, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The studied groups consisted of 47 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 9 with AD pathology in combination with additive vascular lesions, 59 with vascular dementia, 8 who were cogn