Science.gov

Sample records for ad genome-wide association

  1. Genome Wide Association Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastiani, Paola; Solovieff, Nadia

    The availability of high throughput technology for parallel genotyping has opened the field of genetics to genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These studies generate massive amount of genetic data that challenge investigators with issues related to data management, statistical analysis of large data sets, visualization, and annotation of results. We will review the common approach to analysis of GWAS data and then discuss options to learn more from these data.

  2. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Zsofia K.; Thom, Peter; Robson, Mark E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Kauff, Noah D.; Hurley, Karen E.; Devlin, Vincent; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the inherited risk for cancer is an important component of preventive oncology. In addition to well-established syndromes of cancer predisposition, much remains to be discovered about the genetic variation underlying susceptibility to common malignancies. Increased knowledge about the human genome and advances in genotyping technology have made possible genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of human diseases. These studies have identified many important regions of genetic variation associated with an increased risk for human traits and diseases including cancer. Understanding the principles, major findings, and limitations of GWAS is becoming increasingly important for oncologists as dissemination of genomic risk tests directly to consumers is already occurring through commercial companies. GWAS have contributed to our understanding of the genetic basis of cancer and will shed light on biologic pathways and possible new strategies for targeted prevention. To date, however, the clinical utility of GWAS-derived risk markers remains limited. PMID:20585100

  3. Genome-wide association interaction analysis for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gusareva, Elena S.; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Bellenguez, Céline; Cuyvers, Elise; Colon, Samuel; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mahachie Johna, Jestinah M.; Bessonov, Kyrylo; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Williams, Julie; Amouyel, Philippe; Sleegers, Kristel; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Van Steen, Kristel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a minimal protocol for exhaustive genome-wide association interaction analysis that involves screening for epistasis over large-scale genomic data combining strengths of different methods and statistical tools. The different steps of this protocol are illustrated on a real-life data application for Alzheimer's disease (AD) (2259 patients and 6017 controls from France). Particularly, in the exhaustive genome-wide epistasis screening we identified AD-associated interacting SNPs-pair from chromosome 6q11.1 (rs6455128, the KHDRBS2 gene) and 13q12.11 (rs7989332, the CRYL1 gene) (p = 0.006, corrected for multiple testing). A replication analysis in the independent AD cohort from Germany (555 patients and 824 controls) confirmed the discovered epistasis signal (p = 0.036). This signal was also supported by a meta-analysis approach in 5 independent AD cohorts that was applied in the context of epistasis for the first time. Transcriptome analysis revealed negative correlation between expression levels of KHDRBS2 and CRYL1 in both the temporal cortex (β = −0.19, p = 0.0006) and cerebellum (β = −0.23, p < 0.0001) brain regions. This is the first time a replicable epistasis associated with AD was identified using a hypothesis free screening approach. PMID:24958192

  4. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical) Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma A team of international researchers supported by the ... when they divide and grow uncontrollably, develop into melanoma. Also, MITF activity is known to be amplified ...

  5. Genome-wide association studies in maize: praise and stargaze

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide association study (GWAS) has appeared as a widespread strategy in decoding genotype-phenotype associations in many species thanks to technical advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) applications. Maize is an ideal crop for GWAS and significant progress has been made in the last dec...

  6. A super powerful method for genome wide association study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-Wide Association Studies shed light on the identification of genes underlying human diseases and agriculturally important traits. This potential has been shadowed by false positive findings. The Mixed Linear Model (MLM) method is flexible enough to simultaneously incorporate population struct...

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated (6p21.32-p22.1 and 18q21.2). The strongest new finding (P = 1.6 × 10−11) was with rs1625579 within an intron of a putative primary transcript for MIR137 (microRNA 137), a known regulator of neuronal development. Four other schizophrenia loci achieving genome-wide significance contain predicted targets of MIR137, suggesting MIR137-mediated dysregulation as a previously unknown etiologic mechanism in schizophrenia. In a joint analysis with a bipolar disorder sample (16,374 affected individuals and 14,044 controls), three loci reached genome-wide significance: CACNA1C (rs4765905, P = 7.0 × 10−9), ANK3 (rs10994359, P = 2.5 × 10−8) and the ITIH3-ITIH4 region (rs2239547, P = 7.8 × 10−9). PMID:21926974

  8. Genome-Wide Association Study of Polymorphisms Predisposing to Bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Pasanen, Anu; Karjalainen, Minna K.; Bont, Louis; Piippo-Savolainen, Eija; Ruotsalainen, Marja; Goksör, Emma; Kumawat, Kuldeep; Hodemaekers, Hennie; Nuolivirta, Kirsi; Jartti, Tuomas; Wennergren, Göran; Hallman, Mikko; Rämet, Mika; Korppi, Matti

    2017-01-01

    Bronchiolitis is a major cause of hospitalization among infants. Severe bronchiolitis is associated with later asthma, suggesting a common genetic predisposition. Genetic background of bronchiolitis is not well characterized. To identify polymorphisms associated with bronchiolitis, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in which 5,300,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for association in a Finnish–Swedish population of 217 children hospitalized for bronchiolitis and 778 controls. The most promising SNPs (n = 77) were genotyped in a Dutch replication population of 416 cases and 432 controls. Finally, we used a set of 202 Finnish bronchiolitis cases to further investigate candidate SNPs. We did not detect genome-wide significant associations, but several suggestive association signals (p < 10−5) were observed in the GWAS. In the replication population, three SNPs were nominally associated (p < 0.05). Of them, rs269094 was an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) for KCND3, previously shown to be associated with occupational asthma. In the additional set of Finnish cases, the association for another SNP (rs9591920) within a noncoding RNA locus was further strengthened. Our results provide a first genome-wide examination of the genetics underlying bronchiolitis. These preliminary findings require further validation in a larger sample size. PMID:28139761

  9. Genome-wide association studies of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fall, Tove; Ingelsson, Erik

    2014-01-25

    Until just a few years ago, the genetic determinants of obesity and metabolic syndrome were largely unknown, with the exception of a few forms of monogenic extreme obesity. Since genome-wide association studies (GWAS) became available, large advances have been made. The first single nucleotide polymorphism robustly associated with increased body mass index (BMI) was in 2007 mapped to a gene with for the time unknown function. This gene, now known as fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) has been repeatedly replicated in several ethnicities and is affecting obesity by regulating appetite. Since the first report from a GWAS of obesity, an increasing number of markers have been shown to be associated with BMI, other measures of obesity or fat distribution and metabolic syndrome. This systematic review of obesity GWAS will summarize genome-wide significant findings for obesity and metabolic syndrome and briefly give a few suggestions of what is to be expected in the next few years.

  10. Voxelwise genome-wide association study (vGWAS).

    PubMed

    Stein, Jason L; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Ho, April J; Leow, Alex D; Toga, Arthur W; Saykin, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Gerber, Jill D; Allen, April N; Corneveaux, Jason J; Dechairo, Bryan M; Potkin, Steven G; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul

    2010-11-15

    The structure of the human brain is highly heritable, and is thought to be influenced by many common genetic variants, many of which are currently unknown. Recent advances in neuroimaging and genetics have allowed collection of both highly detailed structural brain scans and genome-wide genotype information. This wealth of information presents a new opportunity to find the genes influencing brain structure. Here we explore the relation between 448,293 single nucleotide polymorphisms in each of 31,622 voxels of the entire brain across 740 elderly subjects (mean age+/-s.d.: 75.52+/-6.82 years; 438 male) including subjects with Alzheimer's disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and healthy elderly controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). We used tensor-based morphometry to measure individual differences in brain structure at the voxel level relative to a study-specific template based on healthy elderly subjects. We then conducted a genome-wide association at each voxel to identify genetic variants of interest. By studying only the most associated variant at each voxel, we developed a novel method to address the multiple comparisons problem and computational burden associated with the unprecedented amount of data. No variant survived the strict significance criterion, but several genes worthy of further exploration were identified, including CSMD2 and CADPS2. These genes have high relevance to brain structure. This is the first voxelwise genome wide association study to our knowledge, and offers a novel method to discover genetic influences on brain structure.

  11. Genome-wide association study of paliperidone efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Wineinger, Nathan E.; Fu, Dong-Jing; Libiger, Ondrej; Alphs, Larry; Savitz, Adam; Gopal, Srihari; Cohen, Nadine; Schork, Nicholas J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Clinical response to the atypical antipsychotic paliperidone is known to vary among schizophrenic patients. We carried out a genome-wide association study to identify common genetic variants predictive of paliperidone efficacy. Methods We leveraged a collection of 1390 samples from individuals of European ancestry enrolled in 12 clinical studies investigating the efficacy of the extended-release tablet paliperidone ER (n1=490) and the once-monthly injection paliperidone palmitate (n2=550 and n3=350). We carried out a genome-wide association study using a general linear model (GLM) analysis on three separate cohorts, followed by meta-analysis and using a mixed linear model analysis on all samples. The variations in response explained by each single nucleotide polymorphism (h2SNP) were estimated. Results No SNP passed genome-wide significance in the GLM-based analyses with suggestive signals from rs56240334 [P=7.97×10−8 for change in the Clinical Global Impression Scale-Severity (CGI-S); P=8.72×10−7 for change in the total Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS)] in the intron of ADCK1. The mixed linear model-based association P-values for rs56240334 were consistent with the results from GLM-based analyses and the association with change in CGI-S (P=4.26×10−8) reached genome-wide significance (i.e. P<5×10−8). We also found suggestive evidence for a polygenic contribution toward paliperidone treatment response with estimates of heritability, h2SNP, ranging from 0.31 to 0.43 for change in the total PANSS score, the PANSS positive Marder factor score, and CGI-S. Conclusion Genetic variations in the ADCK1 gene may differentially predict paliperidone efficacy in schizophrenic patients. However, this finding should be replicated in additional samples. PMID:27846195

  12. Genome-Wide Association Studies and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of the human genome has opened up many opportunities to learn about our own genetic susceptibilities to disease. In this Foreword to this issue of Seminars in Liver Disease, I provide some required background to understanding genome-wide association analyses in general, including a list of terms (Table 1) often used in such studies. Five areas of particular significance are then reviewed in detail in the articles that follow. PMID:26676811

  13. Genome-wide association studies and contribution to cardiovascular physiology

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Patricia B.

    2015-01-01

    The study of family pedigrees with rare monogenic cardiovascular disorders has revealed new molecular players in physiological processes. Genome-wide association studies of complex traits with a heritable component may afford a similar and potentially intellectually richer opportunity. In this review we focus on the interpretation of genetic associations and the issue of causality in relation to known and potentially new physiology. We mainly discuss cardiometabolic traits as it reflects our personal interests, but the issues pertain broadly in many other disciplines. We also describe some of the resources that are now available that may expedite follow up of genetic association signals into observations on causal mechanisms and pathophysiology. PMID:26106147

  14. Genome-Wide Association of Heroin Dependence in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Jonathan R. I.; Ducci, Francesca; Aliev, Fazil; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Liu, Xiehe; Ma, Xiaohong; Wang, Yingcheng; Collier, David A.; Asherson, Philip; Li, Tao; Breen, Gerome

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction is a costly and recurring healthcare problem, necessitating a need to understand risk factors and mechanisms of addiction, and to identify new biomarkers. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for heroin addiction have been limited; moreover they have been restricted to examining samples of European and African-American origin due to difficulty of recruiting samples from other populations. This is the first study to test a Han Chinese population; we performed a GWAS on a homogeneous sample of 370 Han Chinese subjects diagnosed with heroin dependence using the DSM-IV criteria and 134 ethnically matched controls. Analysis using the diagnostic criteria of heroin dependence yielded suggestive evidence for association between variants in the genes CCDC42 (coiled coil domain 42; p = 2.8x10-7) and BRSK2 (BR serine/threonine 2; p = 4.110−6). In addition, we found evidence for risk variants within the ARHGEF10 (Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 10) gene on chromosome 8 and variants in a region on chromosome 20q13, which is gene-poor but has a concentration of mRNAs and predicted miRNAs. Gene-based association analysis identified genome-wide significant association between variants in CCDC42 and heroin addiction. Additionally, when we investigated shared risk variants between heroin addiction and risk of other addiction-related and psychiatric phenotypes using polygenic risk scores, we found a suggestive relationship with variants predicting tobacco addiction, and a significant relationship with variants predicting schizophrenia. Our genome wide association study of heroin dependence provides data in a novel sample, with functionally plausible results and evidence of genetic data of value to the field. PMID:27936112

  15. Genome-wide association study of parity in Bangladeshi women.

    PubMed

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Argos, Maria; Pierce, Brandon L; Tong, Lin; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Ahsan, Habibul

    2015-01-01

    Human fertility is a complex trait determined by gene-environment interactions in which genetic factors represent a significant component. To better understand inter-individual variability in fertility, we performed one of the first genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of common fertility phenotypes, lifetime number of pregnancies and number of children in a developing country population. The fertility phenotype data and DNA samples were obtained at baseline recruitment from individuals participating in a large prospective cohort study in Bangladesh. GWAS analyses of fertility phenotypes were conducted among 1,686 married women. One SNP on chromosome 4 was non-significantly associated with number of children at P <10(-7) and number of pregnancies at P <10(-6). This SNP is located in a region without a gene within 1 Mb. One SNP on chromosome 6 was non-significantly associated with extreme number of children at P <10(-6). The closest gene to this SNP is HDGFL1, a hepatoma-derived growth factor. When we excluded hormonal contraceptive users, a SNP on chromosome 5 was non-significantly associated at P <10(-5) for number of children and number of pregnancies. This SNP is located near C5orf64, an open reading frame, and ZSWIM6, a zinc ion binding gene. We also estimated the heritability of these phenotypes from our genotype data using GCTA (Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis) for number of children (hg2 = 0.149, SE = 0.24, p-value = 0.265) and number of pregnancies (hg2 = 0.007, SE = 0.22, p-value = 0.487). Our genome-wide association study and heritability estimates of number of pregnancies and number of children in Bangladesh did not confer strong evidence of common variants for parity variation. However, our results suggest that future studies may want to consider the role of 3 notable SNPs in their analysis.

  16. Validating, augmenting and refining genome-wide association signals.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, John P A; Thomas, Gilles; Daly, Mark J

    2009-05-01

    Studies using genome-wide platforms have yielded an unprecedented number of promising signals of association between genomic variants and human traits. This Review addresses the steps required to validate, augment and refine such signals to identify underlying causal variants for well-defined phenotypes. These steps include: large-scale exact replication across both similar and diverse populations; fine mapping and resequencing; determination of the most informative markers and multiple independent informative loci; incorporation of functional information; and improved phenotype mapping of the implicated genetic effects. Even in cases for which replication proves that an effect exists, confident localization of the causal variant often remains elusive.

  17. [New insight of genome-wide association study (GWAS)].

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kikuko

    2013-02-01

    The number of obese patients is increasing in Japan, due to the westernization of lifestyle. Obesity, especially visceral fat obesity, is important for the development of metabolic syndrome. Genetic factors are important for the development of obesity as well as environmental factors. Importance of genetic factors of fat distribution is also reported. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed the obesity and fat distribution-related polymorphisms. GWAS will highlight a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms in the regulation of obesity and distribution of body fat.

  18. [Genome-wide association study for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yoji; Kou, Ikuyo; Scoliosis, Japan; Matsumoto, Morio; Watanabe, Kota; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis(AIS)is a polygenic disease. Genome-wide association studies(GWASs)have been performed for a lot of polygenic diseases. For AIS, we conducted GWAS and identified the first AIS locus near LBX1. After the discovery, we have extended our study by increasing the numbers of subjects and SNPs. In total, our Japanese GWAS has identified four susceptibility genes. GWASs for AIS have also been performed in the USA and China, which identified one and three susceptibility genes, respectively. Here we review GWASs in Japan and abroad and functional analysis to clarify the pathomechanism of AIS.

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study of Metabolic Syndrome in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seok Won; Chung, Myungguen; Park, Soo-Jung; Cho, Seong Beom

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (METS) is a disorder of energy utilization and storage and increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. To identify the genetic risk factors of METS, we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for 2,657 cases and 5,917 controls in Korean populations. As a result, we could identify 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with genome-wide significance level p-values (<5 × 10-8), 8 SNPs with genome-wide suggestive p-values (5 × 10-8 ≤ p < 1 × 10-5), and 2 SNPs of more functional variants with borderline p-values (5 × 10-5 ≤ p < 1 × 10-4). On the other hand, the multiple correction criteria of conventional GWASs exclude false-positive loci, but simultaneously, they discard many true-positive loci. To reconsider the discarded true-positive loci, we attempted to include the functional variants (nonsynonymous SNPs [nsSNPs] and expression quantitative trait loci [eQTL]) among the top 5,000 SNPs based on the proportion of phenotypic variance explained by genotypic variance. In total, 159 eQTLs and 18 nsSNPs were presented in the top 5,000 SNPs. Although they should be replicated in other independent populations, 6 eQTLs and 2 nsSNP loci were located in the molecular pathways of LPL, APOA5, and CHRM2, which were the significant or suggestive loci in the METS GWAS. Conclusively, our approach using the conventional GWAS, reconsidering functional variants and pathway-based interpretation, suggests a useful method to understand the GWAS results of complex traits and can be expanded in other genomewide association studies. PMID:25705157

  20. Genome-wide Association Study of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, S Evelyn; Yu, Dongmei; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Neale, Benjamin M; Fagerness, Jesen A; Mathews, Carol A; Arnold, Paul D; Evans, Patrick D; Gamazon, Eric R; Osiecki, Lisa; McGrath, Lauren; Haddad, Stephen; Crane, Jacquelyn; Hezel, Dianne; Illman, Cornelia; Mayerfeld, Catherine; Konkashbaev, Anuar; Liu, Chunyu; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Tikhomirov, Anna; Edlund, Christopher K; Rauch, Scott L; Moessner, Rainald; Falkai, Peter; Maier, Wolfgang; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Lennertz, Leonard; Wagner, Michael; Bellodi, Laura; Cavallini, Maria Cristina; Richter, Margaret A; Cook, Edwin H; Kennedy, James L; Rosenberg, David; Stein, Dan J; Hemmings, Sian MJ; Lochner, Christine; Azzam, Amin; Chavira, Denise A; Fournier, Eduardo; Garrido, Helena; Sheppard, Brooke; Umaña, Paul; Murphy, Dennis L; Wendland, Jens R; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Denys, Damiaan; Blom, Rianne; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Westenberg, Herman GM; Walitza, Susanne; Egberts, Karin; Renner, Tobias; Miguel, Euripedes Constantino; Cappi, Carolina; Hounie, Ana G; Conceição do Rosário, Maria; Sampaio, Aline S; Vallada, Homero; Nicolini, Humberto; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Camarena, Beatriz; Delorme, Richard; Leboyer, Marion; Pato, Carlos N; Pato, Michele T; Voyiaziakis, Emanuel; Heutink, Peter; Cath, Danielle C; Posthuma, Danielle; Smit, Jan H; Samuels, Jack; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Cullen, Bernadette; Fyer, Abby J; Grados, Marco A; Greenberg, Benjamin D; McCracken, James T; Riddle, Mark A; Wang, Ying; Coric, Vladimir; Leckman, James F; Bloch, Michael; Pittenger, Christopher; Eapen, Valsamma; Black, Donald W; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; Cusi, Daniele; Turiel, Maurizio; Frau, Francesca; Macciardi, Fabio; Gibbs, J Raphael; Cookson, Mark R; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Crenshaw, Andrew T; Parkin, Melissa A; Mirel, Daniel B; Conti, David V; Purcell, Shaun; Nestadt, Gerald; Hanna, Gregory L; Jenike, Michael A; Knowles, James A; Cox, Nancy; Pauls, David L

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common, debilitating neuropsychiatric illness with complex genetic etiology. The International OCD Foundation Genetics Collaborative (IOCDF-GC) is a multi-national collaboration established to discover the genetic variation predisposing to OCD. A set of individuals affected with DSM-IV OCD, a subset of their parents, and unselected controls, were genotyped with several different Illumina SNP microarrays. After extensive data cleaning, 1,465 cases, 5,557 ancestry-matched controls and 400 complete trios remained, with a common set of 469,410 autosomal and 9,657 X-chromosome SNPs. Ancestry-stratified case-control association analyses were conducted for three genetically-defined subpopulations and combined in two meta-analyses, with and without the trio-based analysis. In the case-control analysis, the lowest two p-values were located within DLGAP1 (p=2.49×10-6 and p=3.44×10-6), a member of the neuronal postsynaptic density complex. In the trio analysis, rs6131295, near BTBD3, exceeded the genome-wide significance threshold with a p-value=3.84 × 10-8. However, when trios were meta-analyzed with the combined case-control samples, the p-value for this variant was 3.62×10-5, losing genome-wide significance. Although no SNPs were identified to be associated with OCD at a genome-wide significant level in the combined trio-case-control sample, a significant enrichment of methylation-QTLs (p<0.001) and frontal lobe eQTLs (p=0.001) was observed within the top-ranked SNPs (p<0.01) from the trio-case-control analysis, suggesting these top signals may have a broad role in gene expression in the brain, and possibly in the etiology of OCD. PMID:22889921

  1. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Peltonen, Leena; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls) of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448) were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448) lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision.

  2. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E.; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls) of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448) were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448) lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision. PMID:26176695

  3. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Stefan; Atzmon, Gil; Demerath, Ellen W.; Garcia, Melissa E.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kumari, Meena; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tranah, Gregory J.; Völker, Uwe; Yu, Lei; Arnold, Alice; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Biffar, Reiner; Buchman, Aron S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Couper, David; De Jager, Philip L.; Evans, Denis A.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P.; Kocher, Thomas; Kuningas, Maris; Launer, Lenore J.; Lohman, Kurt K.; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Mackenbach, Johan; Marciante, Kristin; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reiman, Eric M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seshadri, Sudha; Shardell, Michelle D.; Smith, Albert V.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Walston, Jeremy; Zillikens, M. Carola; Bandinelli, Stefania; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Bennett, David A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Liu, Yongmei; Murabito, Joanne M.; Newman, Anne B.; Tiemeier, Henning; Franceschini, Nora

    2011-01-01

    Human longevity and healthy aging show moderate heritability (20–50%). We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from nine studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium for two outcomes: a) all-cause mortality and b) survival free of major disease or death. No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was a genome-wide significant predictor of either outcome (p < 5 × 10−8). We found fourteen independent SNPs that predicted risk of death, and eight SNPs that predicted event-free survival (p < 10−5). These SNPs are in or near genes that are highly expressed in the brain (HECW2, HIP1, BIN2, GRIA1), genes involved in neural development and function (KCNQ4, LMO4, GRIA1, NETO1) and autophagy (ATG4C), and genes that are associated with risk of various diseases including cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition to considerable overlap between the traits, pathway and network analysis corroborated these findings. These findings indicate that variation in genes involved in neurological processes may be an important factor in regulating aging free of major disease and achieving longevity. PMID:21782286

  4. A genome-wide association study of aging.

    PubMed

    Walter, Stefan; Atzmon, Gil; Demerath, Ellen W; Garcia, Melissa E; Kaplan, Robert C; Kumari, Meena; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Milaneschi, Yuri; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tranah, Gregory J; Völker, Uwe; Yu, Lei; Arnold, Alice; Benjamin, Emelia J; Biffar, Reiner; Buchman, Aron S; Boerwinkle, Eric; Couper, David; De Jager, Philip L; Evans, Denis A; Harris, Tamara B; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Kocher, Thomas; Kuningas, Maris; Launer, Lenore J; Lohman, Kurt K; Lutsey, Pamela L; Mackenbach, Johan; Marciante, Kristin; Psaty, Bruce M; Reiman, Eric M; Rotter, Jerome I; Seshadri, Sudha; Shardell, Michelle D; Smith, Albert V; van Duijn, Cornelia; Walston, Jeremy; Zillikens, M Carola; Bandinelli, Stefania; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Bennett, David A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Liu, Yongmei; Murabito, Joanne M; Newman, Anne B; Tiemeier, Henning; Franceschini, Nora

    2011-11-01

    Human longevity and healthy aging show moderate heritability (20%-50%). We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from 9 studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium for 2 outcomes: (1) all-cause mortality, and (2) survival free of major disease or death. No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was a genome-wide significant predictor of either outcome (p < 5 × 10(-8)). We found 14 independent SNPs that predicted risk of death, and 8 SNPs that predicted event-free survival (p < 10(-5)). These SNPs are in or near genes that are highly expressed in the brain (HECW2, HIP1, BIN2, GRIA1), genes involved in neural development and function (KCNQ4, LMO4, GRIA1, NETO1) and autophagy (ATG4C), and genes that are associated with risk of various diseases including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. In addition to considerable overlap between the traits, pathway and network analysis corroborated these findings. These findings indicate that variation in genes involved in neurological processes may be an important factor in regulating aging free of major disease and achieving longevity.

  5. Genome-wide association study of Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Yu, Dongmei; Mathews, Carol A.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Fagerness, Jesen A; Evans, Patrick; Gamazon, Eric; Edlund, Christopher K.; Service, Susan; Tikhomirov, Anna; Osiecki, Lisa; Illmann, Cornelia; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Konkashbaev, Anuar; Davis, Lea K; Han, Buhm; Crane, Jacquelyn; Moorjani, Priya; Crenshaw, Andrew T.; Parkin, Melissa A.; Reus, Victor I.; Lowe, Thomas L.; Rangel-Lugo, Martha; Chouinard, Sylvain; Dion, Yves; Girard, Simon; Cath, Danielle C; Smit, Jan H; King, Robert A.; Fernandez, Thomas; Leckman, James F.; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Kidd, Judith R.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; State, Matthew; Herrera, Luis Diego; Romero, Roxana; Fournier, Eduardo; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy L; Phan, Nam; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Benarroch, Fortu; Pollak, Yehuda; Budman, Cathy L.; Bruun, Ruth D.; Erenberg, Gerald; Naarden, Allan L; Lee, Paul C; Weiss, Nicholas; Kremeyer, Barbara; Berrío, Gabriel Bedoya; Campbell, Desmond; Silgado, Julio C. Cardona; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Restrepo, Sandra C. Mesa; Muller, Heike; Duarte, Ana V. Valencia; Lyon, Gholson J; Leppert, Mark; Morgan, Jubel; Weiss, Robert; Grados, Marco A.; Anderson, Kelley; Davarya, Sarah; Singer, Harvey; Walkup, John; Jankovic, Joseph; Tischfield, Jay A.; Heiman, Gary A.; Gilbert, Donald L.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Robertson, Mary M.; Kurlan, Roger; Liu, Chunyu; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Strengman, Eric; Ophoff, Roel; Wagner, Michael; Moessner, Rainald; Mirel, Daniel B.; Posthuma, Danielle; Sabatti, Chiara; Eskin, Eleazar; Conti, David V.; Knowles, James A.; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Rouleau, Guy A.; Purcell, Shaun; Heutink, Peter; Oostra, Ben A.; McMahon, William; Freimer, Nelson; Cox, Nancy J.; Pauls, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder that has one of the highest familial recurrence rates among neuropsychiatric diseases with complex inheritance. However, the identification of definitive TS susceptibility genes remains elusive. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TS in 1285 cases and 4964 ancestry-matched controls of European ancestry, including two European-derived population isolates, Ashkenazi Jews from North America and Israel, and French Canadians from Quebec, Canada. In a primary meta-analysis of GWAS data from these European ancestry samples, no markers achieved a genome-wide threshold of significance (p<5 × 10−8); the top signal was found in rs7868992 on chromosome 9q32 within COL27A1 (p=1.85 × 10−6). A secondary analysis including an additional 211 cases and 285 controls from two closely-related Latin-American population isolates from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and Antioquia, Colombia also identified rs7868992 as the top signal (p=3.6 × 10−7 for the combined sample of 1496 cases and 5249 controls following imputation with 1000 Genomes data). This study lays the groundwork for the eventual identification of common TS susceptibility variants in larger cohorts and helps to provide a more complete understanding of the full genetic architecture of this disorder. PMID:22889924

  6. Genome-wide association study of antisocial personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rautiainen, M-R; Paunio, T; Repo-Tiihonen, E; Virkkunen, M; Ollila, H M; Sulkava, S; Jolanki, O; Palotie, A; Tiihonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) remains unclear. Although the most consistent biological finding is reduced grey matter volume in the frontal cortex, about 50% of the total liability to developing ASPD has been attributed to genetic factors. The contributing genes remain largely unknown. Therefore, we sought to study the genetic background of ASPD. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a replication analysis of Finnish criminal offenders fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for ASPD (N=370, N=5850 for controls, GWAS; N=173, N=3766 for controls and replication sample). The GWAS resulted in suggestive associations of two clusters of single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 6p21.2 and at 6p21.32 at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Imputation of HLA alleles revealed an independent association with DRB1*01:01 (odds ratio (OR)=2.19 (1.53–3.14), P=1.9 × 10-5). Two polymorphisms at 6p21.2 LINC00951–LRFN2 gene region were replicated in a separate data set, and rs4714329 reached genome-wide significance (OR=1.59 (1.37–1.85), P=1.6 × 10−9) in the meta-analysis. The risk allele also associated with antisocial features in the general population conditioned for severe problems in childhood family (β=0.68, P=0.012). Functional analysis in brain tissue in open access GTEx and Braineac databases revealed eQTL associations of rs4714329 with LINC00951 and LRFN2 in cerebellum. In humans, LINC00951 and LRFN2 are both expressed in the brain, especially in the frontal cortex, which is intriguing considering the role of the frontal cortex in behavior and the neuroanatomical findings of reduced gray matter volume in ASPD. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing genome-wide significant and replicable findings on genetic variants associated with any personality disorder. PMID:27598967

  7. Implications of genome-wide association studies in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jai N; McLeod, Howard L; Innocenti, Federico

    2013-09-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) provide an agnostic approach to identifying potential genetic variants associated with disease susceptibility, prognosis of survival and/or predictive of drug response. Although these techniques are costly and interpretation of study results is challenging, they do allow for a more unbiased interrogation of the entire genome, resulting in the discovery of novel genes and understanding of novel biological associations. This review will focus on the implications of GWAS in cancer therapy, in particular germ-line mutations, including findings from major GWAS which have identified predictive genetic loci for clinical outcome and/or toxicity. Lessons and challenges in cancer GWAS are also discussed, including the need for functional analysis and replication, as well as future perspectives for biological and clinical utility. Given the large heterogeneity in response to cancer therapeutics, novel methods of identifying mechanisms and biology of variable drug response and ultimately treatment individualization will be indispensable.

  8. Genome-Wide Association Study of Meiotic Recombination Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Ferdouse; Chowdhury, Reshmi; Cheung, Vivian G.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Feingold, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is an essential step in gametogenesis, and is one that also generates genetic diversity. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and molecular studies have identified genes that influence of human meiotic recombination. RNF212 is associated with total or average number of recombination events, and PRDM9 is associated with the locations of hotspots, or sequences where crossing over appears to cluster. In addition, a common inversion on chromosome 17 is strongly associated with recombination. Other genes have been identified by GWAS, but those results have not been replicated. In this study, using new datasets, we characterized additional recombination phenotypes to uncover novel candidates and further dissect the role of already known loci. We used three datasets totaling 1562 two-generation families, including 3108 parents with 4304 children. We estimated five different recombination phenotypes including two novel phenotypes (average recombination counts within recombination hotspots and outside of hotspots) using dense SNP array genotype data. We then performed gender-specific and combined-sex genome-wide association studies (GWAS) meta-analyses. We replicated associations for several previously reported recombination genes, including RNF212 and PRDM9. By looking specifically at recombination events outside of hotspots, we showed for the first time that PRDM9 has different effects in males and females. We identified several new candidate loci, particularly for recombination events outside of hotspots. These include regions near the genes SPINK6, EVC2, ARHGAP25, and DLGAP2. This study expands our understanding of human meiotic recombination by characterizing additional features that vary across individuals, and identifying regulatory variants influencing the numbers and locations of recombination events. PMID:27733454

  9. Genome-Wide Association Study of Meiotic Recombination Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Begum, Ferdouse; Chowdhury, Reshmi; Cheung, Vivian G; Sherman, Stephanie L; Feingold, Eleanor

    2016-12-07

    Meiotic recombination is an essential step in gametogenesis, and is one that also generates genetic diversity. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and molecular studies have identified genes that influence of human meiotic recombination. RNF212 is associated with total or average number of recombination events, and PRDM9 is associated with the locations of hotspots, or sequences where crossing over appears to cluster. In addition, a common inversion on chromosome 17 is strongly associated with recombination. Other genes have been identified by GWAS, but those results have not been replicated. In this study, using new datasets, we characterized additional recombination phenotypes to uncover novel candidates and further dissect the role of already known loci. We used three datasets totaling 1562 two-generation families, including 3108 parents with 4304 children. We estimated five different recombination phenotypes including two novel phenotypes (average recombination counts within recombination hotspots and outside of hotspots) using dense SNP array genotype data. We then performed gender-specific and combined-sex genome-wide association studies (GWAS) meta-analyses. We replicated associations for several previously reported recombination genes, including RNF212 and PRDM9 By looking specifically at recombination events outside of hotspots, we showed for the first time that PRDM9 has different effects in males and females. We identified several new candidate loci, particularly for recombination events outside of hotspots. These include regions near the genes SPINK6, EVC2, ARHGAP25, and DLGAP2 This study expands our understanding of human meiotic recombination by characterizing additional features that vary across individuals, and identifying regulatory variants influencing the numbers and locations of recombination events.

  10. [Genome-wide associations for cigarette smoking behavior].

    PubMed

    Strauss, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Diseases related to tobacco smoking are the second leading cause of death in the world. Despite increasing evidence of genetic determination, the susceptibility genes and loci underlying various aspects of smoking behavior are largely unknown. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) provided a new conceptual framework in the search for variants underlying common traits/disorders. A massive scan of the genome and a "hypothesis-free" approach enable discovery of new aspects of genetics of complex traits. In this paper the results of GWASs and GWAS meta-analyzes of cigarette smoking behavior and nicotine dependence are reviewed with the particular attention to smoking cessation success and the replacement therapy. The results of these studies are discussed in the context of the results of the candidate gene association studies. Studies on the role of the genomic regions, identified in GWASs, in the development of smoking-related diseases are also discussed.

  11. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Slof-Op t Landt, Margarita CT; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O’Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10−7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10−6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10−6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10−6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P= 4×10−6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:21079607

  12. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Boraska, V; Franklin, C S; Floyd, J A B; Thornton, L M; Huckins, L M; Southam, L; Rayner, N W; Tachmazidou, I; Klump, K L; Treasure, J; Lewis, C M; Schmidt, U; Tozzi, F; Kiezebrink, K; Hebebrand, J; Gorwood, P; Adan, R A H; Kas, M J H; Favaro, A; Santonastaso, P; Fernández-Aranda, F; Gratacos, M; Rybakowski, F; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Kaprio, J; Keski-Rahkonen, A; Raevuori, A; Van Furth, E F; Slof-Op 't Landt, M C T; Hudson, J I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Knudsen, G P S; Monteleone, P; Kaplan, A S; Karwautz, A; Hakonarson, H; Berrettini, W H; Guo, Y; Li, D; Schork, N J; Komaki, G; Ando, T; Inoko, H; Esko, T; Fischer, K; Männik, K; Metspalu, A; Baker, J H; Cone, R D; Dackor, J; DeSocio, J E; Hilliard, C E; O'Toole, J K; Pantel, J; Szatkiewicz, J P; Taico, C; Zerwas, S; Trace, S E; Davis, O S P; Helder, S; Bühren, K; Burghardt, R; de Zwaan, M; Egberts, K; Ehrlich, S; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Herzog, W; Imgart, H; Scherag, A; Scherag, S; Zipfel, S; Boni, C; Ramoz, N; Versini, A; Brandys, M K; Danner, U N; de Kovel, C; Hendriks, J; Koeleman, B P C; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; van Elburg, A A; Bruson, A; Clementi, M; Degortes, D; Forzan, M; Tenconi, E; Docampo, E; Escaramís, G; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Lissowska, J; Rajewski, A; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Slopien, A; Hauser, J; Karhunen, L; Meulenbelt, I; Slagboom, P E; Tortorella, A; Maj, M; Dedoussis, G; Dikeos, D; Gonidakis, F; Tziouvas, K; Tsitsika, A; Papezova, H; Slachtova, L; Martaskova, D; Kennedy, J L; Levitan, R D; Yilmaz, Z; Huemer, J; Koubek, D; Merl, E; Wagner, G; Lichtenstein, P; Breen, G; Cohen-Woods, S; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Cichon, S; Giegling, I; Herms, S; Rujescu, D; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H-E; Dina, C; Sladek, R; Gambaro, G; Soranzo, N; Julia, A; Marsal, S; Rabionet, R; Gaborieau, V; Dick, D M; Palotie, A; Ripatti, S; Widén, E; Andreassen, O A; Espeseth, T; Lundervold, A; Reinvang, I; Steen, V M; Le Hellard, S; Mattingsdal, M; Ntalla, I; Bencko, V; Foretova, L; Janout, V; Navratilova, M; Gallinger, S; Pinto, D; Scherer, S W; Aschauer, H; Carlberg, L; Schosser, A; Alfredsson, L; Ding, B; Klareskog, L; Padyukov, L; Courtet, P; Guillaume, S; Jaussent, I; Finan, C; Kalsi, G; Roberts, M; Logan, D W; Peltonen, L; Ritchie, G R S; Barrett, J C; Estivill, X; Hinney, A; Sullivan, P F; Collier, D A; Zeggini, E; Bulik, C M

    2014-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14 860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery data sets. Seventy-six (72 independent) single nucleotide polymorphisms were taken forward for in silico (two data sets) or de novo (13 data sets) replication genotyping in 2677 independent AN cases and 8629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication data sets comprised 5551 AN cases and 21 080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1606 AN restricting; 1445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01 × 10(-7)) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84 × 10(-6)) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76 × 10(-)(6)) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05 × 10(-)(6)) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery with replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4 × 10(-6)), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field.

  13. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Landt, Margarita CT Slof-Op t; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O'Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10-7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10-6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10-6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10-6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4×10-6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:24514567

  14. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenomics of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Eugene; Lane, Hsien-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders worldwide. Doctors must prescribe antidepressants based on educated guesses due to the fact that it is unmanageable to predict the effectiveness of any particular antidepressant in an individual patient. With the recent advent of scientific research, the genome-wide association study (GWAS) is extensively employed to analyze hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms by high-throughput genotyping technologies. In addition to the candidate-gene approach, the GWAS approach has recently been utilized to investigate the determinants of antidepressant response to therapy. In this study, we reviewed GWAS studies, their limitations and future directions with respect to the pharmacogenomics of antidepressants in MDD.

  15. Genome-wide association study of atypical psychosis.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Tetsufumi; Ikeda, Masashi; Glatt, Stephen J; Tsutsumi, Atsushi; Kikuyama, Hiroki; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Nishida, Nao; Miyagawa, Taku; Hashimoto, Ryota; Takeda, Masatoshi; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Koh, Jun; Iwata, Nakao; Yoneda, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    Atypical psychosis with a periodic course of exacerbation and features of major psychiatric disorders [schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD)] has a long history in clinical psychiatry in Japan. Based upon the new criteria of atypical psychosis, a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) was conducted to identify the risk gene or variants. The relationships between atypical psychosis, SZ and BD were then assessed using independent GWAS data. Forty-seven patients with solid criteria of atypical psychosis and 882 normal controls (NCs) were scanned using an Affymetrics 6.0 chip. GWAS SZ data (560 SZ cases and 548 NCs) and GWAS BD (107 cases with BD type 1 and 107 NCs) were compared using gene-based analysis. The most significant SNPs were detected around the CHN2/CPVL genes (rs245914, P = 1.6 × 10(-7)) , COL21A1 gene (rs12196860, P = 2.45 × 10(-7) ), and PYGL/TRIM9 genes (rs1959536, P = 7.73 × 10(-7) ), although none of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms exhibited genome-wide significance (P = 5 × 10(-8) ). One of the highest peaks was detected on the major histocompatibility complex region, where large SZ GWASs have previously disclosed an association. The gene-based analysis suggested significant enrichment between SZ and atypical psychosis (P = 0.01), but not BD. This study provides clues about the types of patient whose diagnosis lies between SZ and BD. Studies with larger samples are required to determine the causal variant.

  16. Genome-Wide Association Studies for Comb Traits in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Meng; Dou, Taocun; Lu, Jian; Guo, Jun; Hu, Yuping; Yi, Guoqiang; Yuan, Jingwei; Sun, Congjiao; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The comb, as a secondary sexual character, is an important trait in chicken. Indicators of comb length (CL), comb height (CH), and comb weight (CW) are often selected in production. DNA-based marker-assisted selection could help chicken breeders to accelerate genetic improvement for comb or related economic characters by early selection. Although a number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and candidate genes have been identified with advances in molecular genetics, candidate genes underlying comb traits are limited. The aim of the study was to use genome-wide association (GWA) studies by 600 K Affymetrix chicken SNP arrays to detect genes that are related to comb, using an F2 resource population. For all comb characters, comb exhibited high SNP-based heritability estimates (0.61–0.69). Chromosome 1 explained 20.80% genetic variance, while chromosome 4 explained 6.89%. Independent univariate genome-wide screens for each character identified 127, 197, and 268 novel significant SNPs with CL, CH, and CW, respectively. Three candidate genes, VPS36, AR, and WNT11B, were determined to have a plausible function in all comb characters. These genes are important to the initiation of follicle development, gonadal growth, and dermal development, respectively. The current study provides the first GWA analysis for comb traits. Identification of the genetic basis as well as promising candidate genes will help us understand the underlying genetic architecture of comb development and has practical significance in breeding programs for the selection of comb as an index for sexual maturity or reproduction. PMID:27427764

  17. Genome-wide association and genomic selection in animal breeding.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Ben; Goddard, Mike

    2010-11-01

    Results from genome-wide association studies in livestock, and humans, has lead to the conclusion that the effect of individual quantitative trait loci (QTL) on complex traits, such as yield, are likely to be small; therefore, a large number of QTL are necessary to explain genetic variation in these traits. Given this genetic architecture, gains from marker-assisted selection (MAS) programs using only a small number of DNA markers to trace a limited number of QTL is likely to be small. This has lead to the development of alternative technology for using the available dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) information, called genomic selection. Genomic selection uses a genome-wide panel of dense markers so that all QTL are likely to be in linkage disequilibrium with at least one SNP. The genomic breeding values are predicted to be the sum of the effect of these SNPs across the entire genome. In dairy cattle breeding, the accuracy of genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) that can be achieved and the fact that these are available early in life have lead to rapid adoption of the technology. Here, we discuss the design of experiments necessary to achieve accurate prediction of GEBV in future generations in terms of the number of markers necessary and the size of the reference population where marker effects are estimated. We also present a simple method for implementing genomic selection using a genomic relationship matrix. Future challenges discussed include using whole genome sequence data to improve the accuracy of genomic selection and management of inbreeding through genomic relationships.

  18. Genome-wide association study of circulating retinol levels.

    PubMed

    Mondul, Alison M; Yu, Kai; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Hong; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Major, Jacqueline M; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Männistö, Satu; Hazra, Aditi; Hsing, Ann W; Jacobs, Kevin B; Eliassen, Heather; Tanaka, Toshiko; Reding, Douglas J; Hendrickson, Sara; Ferrucci, Luigi; Virtamo, Jarmo; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Kraft, Peter; Albanes, Demetrius

    2011-12-01

    Retinol is one of the most biologically active forms of vitamin A and is hypothesized to influence a wide range of human diseases including asthma, cardiovascular disease, infectious diseases and cancer. We conducted a genome-wide association study of 5006 Caucasian individuals drawn from two cohorts of men: the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. We identified two independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with circulating retinol levels, which are located near the transthyretin (TTR) and retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) genes which encode major carrier proteins of retinol: rs1667255 (P =2.30× 10(-17)) and rs10882272 (P =6.04× 10(-12)). We replicated the association with rs10882272 in RBP4 in independent samples from the Nurses' Health Study and the Invecchiare in Chianti Study (InCHIANTI) that included 3792 women and 504 men (P =9.49× 10(-5)), but found no association for retinol with rs1667255 in TTR among women, thus suggesting evidence for gender dimorphism (P-interaction=1.31× 10(-5)). Discovery of common genetic variants associated with serum retinol levels may provide further insight into the contribution of retinol and other vitamin A compounds to the development of cancer and other complex diseases.

  19. Genome-wide significant risk associations for mucinous ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Linda E.; Lawrenson, Kate; Tyrer, Jonathan; Li, Qiyuan; M. Lee, Janet; Seo, Ji-Heui; Phelan, Catherine M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqin; Spindler, Tassja J.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Baker, Helen; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Y. Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T.; Edwards, Robert P.; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B.; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Grownwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wlodzimierz, Sawicki; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Sellers, Thomas A.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.; Gayther, Simon A.; Berchuck, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas (OC) but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOC). Genotypes from OC cases and controls were imputed into the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel. Analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls identified three novel risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10−8), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10−12) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10−13). Expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL) analysis in ovarian and colorectal tumors (which are histologically similar to MOC) identified significant eQTL associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10−4, FDR = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors, and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease. PMID:26075790

  20. Genome-wide association study of aggressive behaviour in chicken

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhui; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Zhenqiang; Ye, Qiao; Xu, Haiping; Luo, Wei; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    In the poultry industry, aggressive behaviour is a large animal welfare issue all over the world. To date, little is known about the underlying genetics of the aggressive behaviour. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to explore the genetic mechanism associated with aggressive behaviour in chickens. The GWAS results showed that a total of 33 SNPs were associated with aggressive behaviour traits (P < 4.6E-6). rs312463697 on chromosome 4 was significantly associated with aggression (P = 2.10905E-07), and it was in the intron region of the sortilin-related VPS10 domain containing receptor 2 (SORCS2) gene. In addition, biological function analysis of the nearest 26 genes around the significant SNPs was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. An interaction network contained 17 genes was obtained and SORCS2 was involved in this network, interacted with nerve growth factor (NGF), nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), dopa decarboxylase (L-dopa) and dopamine. After knockdown of SORCS2, the mRNA levels of NGF, L-dopa and dopamine receptor genes DRD1, DRD2, DRD3 and DRD4 were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). In summary, our data indicated that SORCS2 might play an important role in chicken aggressive behaviour through the regulation of dopaminergic pathways and NGF. PMID:27485826

  1. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Multiple Keratinocyte Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Verkouteren, Joris A. C.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Kraft, Peter; Turman, Constance; Han, Jiali; Cho, Eunyoung; Murabito, Joanne M.; Levy, Daniel; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Nijsten, Tamar

    2017-01-01

    There is strong evidence for a role of environmental risk factors involved in susceptibility to develop multiple keratinocyte cancers (mKCs), but whether genes are also involved in mKCs susceptibility has not been thoroughly investigated. We investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with susceptibility for mKCs. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 1,666 cases with mKCs and 1,950 cases with single KC (sKCs; controls) from Harvard cohorts (the Nurses' Health Study [NHS], NHS II, and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study) and the Framingham Heart Study was carried-out using over 8 million SNPs (stage-1). We sought to replicate the most significant statistical associations (p-value≤ 5.5x10-6) in an independent cohort of 574 mKCs and 872 sKCs from the Rotterdam Study. In the discovery stage, 40 SNPs with suggestive associations (p-value ≤5.5x10-6) were identified, with eight independent SNPs tagging all 40 SNPs. The most significant SNP was located at chromosome 9 (rs7468390; p-value = 3.92x10-7). In stage-2, none of these SNPs replicated and only two of them were associated with mKCs in the same direction in the combined meta-analysis. We tested the associations for 19 previously reported basal cell carcinoma-related SNPs (candidate gene association analysis), and found that rs1805007 (MC1R locus) was significantly associated with risk of mKCs (p-value = 2.80x10-4). Although the suggestive SNPs with susceptibility for mKCs were not replicated, we found that previously identified BCC variants may also be associated with mKC, which the most significant association (rs1805007) located at the MC1R gene. PMID:28081215

  2. Weighted SNP set analysis in genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hui; Zhao, Yang; Qian, Cheng; Cai, Min; Zhang, Ruyang; Chu, Minjie; Dai, Juncheng; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are popular for identifying genetic variants which are associated with disease risk. Many approaches have been proposed to test multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a region simultaneously which considering disadvantages of methods in single locus association analysis. Kernel machine based SNP set analysis is more powerful than single locus analysis, which borrows information from SNPs correlated with causal or tag SNPs. Four types of kernel machine functions and principal component based approach (PCA) were also compared. However, given the loss of power caused by low minor allele frequencies (MAF), we conducted an extension work on PCA and used a new method called weighted PCA (wPCA). Comparative analysis was performed for weighted principal component analysis (wPCA), logistic kernel machine based test (LKM) and principal component analysis (PCA) based on SNP set in the case of different minor allele frequencies (MAF) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) structures. We also applied the three methods to analyze two SNP sets extracted from a real GWAS dataset of non-small cell lung cancer in Han Chinese population. Simulation results show that when the MAF of the causal SNP is low, weighted principal component and weighted IBS are more powerful than PCA and other kernel machine functions at different LD structures and different numbers of causal SNPs. Application of the three methods to a real GWAS dataset indicates that wPCA and wIBS have better performance than the linear kernel, IBS kernel and PCA.

  3. A genome-wide association study in multiple system atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sailer, Anna; Nalls, Michael A.; Schulte, Claudia; Federoff, Monica; Price, T. Ryan; Lees, Andrew; Ross, Owen A.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mok, Kin; Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Schottlaender, Lucia; Chelban, Viorica; Ling, Helen; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Federoff, Howard J.; Mhyre, Timothy R.; Morris, Huw R.; Deuschl, Günther; Quinn, Niall; Widner, Hakan; Albanese, Alberto; Infante, Jon; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Poewe, Werner; Oertel, Wolfgang; Höglinger, Günter U.; Wüllner, Ullrich; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Ferreira, Joaquim; Tolosa, Eduardo; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Rascol, Olivier; Meissner, Wassilios G.; Hardy, John A.; Revesz, Tamas; Holton, Janice L.; Gasser, Thomas; Wenning, Gregor K.; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify genetic variants that play a role in the pathogenesis of multiple system atrophy (MSA), we undertook a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Methods: We performed a GWAS with >5 million genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 918 patients with MSA of European ancestry and 3,864 controls. MSA cases were collected from North American and European centers, one third of which were neuropathologically confirmed. Results: We found no significant loci after stringent multiple testing correction. A number of regions emerged as potentially interesting for follow-up at p < 1 × 10−6, including SNPs in the genes FBXO47, ELOVL7, EDN1, and MAPT. Contrary to previous reports, we found no association of the genes SNCA and COQ2 with MSA. Conclusions: We present a GWAS in MSA. We have identified several potentially interesting gene loci, including the MAPT locus, whose significance will have to be evaluated in a larger sample set. Common genetic variation in SNCA and COQ2 does not seem to be associated with MSA. In the future, additional samples of well-characterized patients with MSA will need to be collected to perform a larger MSA GWAS, but this initial study forms the basis for these next steps. PMID:27629089

  4. Genome-wide Association Studies for Osteoporosis: A 2013 Update

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Lei; Papasian, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, the bone field has witnessed great advances in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of osteoporosis, with a number of promising genes identified. In particular, meta-analysis of GWASs, aimed at increasing the power of studies by combining the results from different study populations, have led to the identification of novel associations that would not otherwise have been identified in individual GWASs. Recently, the first whole genome sequencing study for osteoporosis and fractures was published, reporting a novel rare nonsense mutation. This review summarizes the important and representative findings published by December 2013. Comments are made on the notable findings and representative studies for their potential influence and implications on our present understanding of the genetics of osteoporosis. Potential limitations of GWASs and their meta-analyses are evaluated, with an emphasis on understanding the reasons for inconsistent results between different studies and clarification of misinterpretation of GWAS meta-analysis results. Implications and challenges of GWAS are also discussed, including the need for multi- and inter-disciplinary studies. PMID:25006567

  5. Genome-Wide Association Mapping for Phenotypic Plasticity in Rice.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Shinji; Bheemanahalli, Raju; Jagadish, Krishna S V; Kumagai, Etsushi; Masuya, Yusuke; Kuroda, Eiki; Raghavan, Chitra; Dingkuhn, Michael; Abe, Akira; Shimono, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-31

    Phenotypic plasticity of plants in response to environmental changes is important for adapting to changing climate. Less attention has been paid to exploring the advantages of phenotypic plasticity in resource-rich environments to enhance the productivity of agricultural crops. Here, we examined genetic variation in phenotypic plasticity in indica rice (Oryza sativa L.) across two diverse panels: (i) a Phenomics of Rice Adaptation and Yield (PRAY) population comprising 301 accessions and (ii) a Multi-parent-Advanced-Generation-Inter-Cross (MAGIC) indica population comprising 151 accessions. Altered planting density was used as a proxy for elevated atmospheric CO2 response. Low planting density significantly increased panicle weight per plant compared with normal density, and the magnitude of the increase ranged from 1.10 to 2.78 times among accessions for the PRAY population and from 1.05 to 2.45 times for the MAGIC population. Genome-wide-association studies revealed three Environmental Responsiveness (ER) candidate alleles (qER1-3) that were associated with relative response of panicle weight to low density. Two of these alleles were tested in 13 genotypes to clarify their biomass responses during vegetative growth under elevated CO2 in Japan. Our study provides evidence for polymorphisms that control rice phenotypic plasticity in environments that are rich in resources such as light and CO2 .

  6. Multicentric Genome-Wide Association Study for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Abrantes, Patrícia; Francisco, Vânia; Teixeira, Gilberto; Monteiro, Marta; Neves, João; Norte, Ana; Robalo Cordeiro, Carlos; Moura e Sá, João; Reis, Ernestina; Santos, Patrícia; Oliveira, Manuela; Sousa, Susana; Fradinho, Marta; Malheiro, Filipa; Negrão, Luís

    2016-01-01

    Despite elevated incidence and recurrence rates for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax (PSP), little is known about its etiology, and the genetics of idiopathic PSP remains unexplored. To identify genetic variants contributing to sporadic PSP risk, we conducted the first PSP genome-wide association study. Two replicate pools of 92 Portuguese PSP cases and of 129 age- and sex-matched controls were allelotyped in triplicate on the Affymetrix Human SNP Array 6.0 arrays. Markers passing quality control were ranked by relative allele score difference between cases and controls (|RASdiff|), by a novel cluster method and by a combined Z-test. 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected using these three approaches for technical validation by individual genotyping in the discovery dataset. 87 out of 94 successfully tested SNPs were nominally associated in the discovery dataset. Replication of the 87 technically validated SNPs was then carried out in an independent replication dataset of 100 Portuguese cases and 425 controls. The intergenic rs4733649 SNP in chromosome 8 (between LINC00824 and LINC00977) was associated with PSP in the discovery (P = 4.07E-03, ORC[95% CI] = 1.88[1.22–2.89]), replication (P = 1.50E-02, ORC[95% CI] = 1.50[1.08–2.09]) and combined datasets (P = 8.61E-05, ORC[95% CI] = 1.65[1.29–2.13]). This study identified for the first time one genetic risk factor for sporadic PSP, but future studies are warranted to further confirm this finding in other populations and uncover its functional role in PSP pathogenesis. PMID:27203581

  7. Genome-wide association study of sleep in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sleep is a highly conserved behavior, yet its duration and pattern vary extensively among species and between individuals within species. The genetic basis of natural variation in sleep remains unknown. Results We used the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) to perform a genome-wide association (GWA) study of sleep in D. melanogaster. We identified candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with differences in the mean as well as the environmental sensitivity of sleep traits; these SNPs typically had sex-specific or sex-biased effects, and were generally located in non-coding regions. The majority of SNPs (80.3%) affecting sleep were at low frequency and had moderately large effects. Additive models incorporating multiple SNPs explained as much as 55% of the genetic variance for sleep in males and females. Many of these loci are known to interact physically and/or genetically, enabling us to place them in candidate genetic networks. We confirmed the role of seven novel loci on sleep using insertional mutagenesis and RNA interference. Conclusions We identified many SNPs in novel loci that are potentially associated with natural variation in sleep, as well as SNPs within genes previously known to affect Drosophila sleep. Several of the candidate genes have human homologues that were identified in studies of human sleep, suggesting that genes affecting variation in sleep are conserved across species. Our discovery of genetic variants that influence environmental sensitivity to sleep may have a wider application to all GWA studies, because individuals with highly plastic genotypes will not have consistent phenotypes. PMID:23617951

  8. Genome-Wide Association Study of Schizophrenia in Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazuo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Hattori, Eiji; Iwamoto, Kazuya; Toyota, Tomoko; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Ohba, Hisako; Maekawa, Motoko; Kato, Tadafumi; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating neuropsychiatric disorder with genetically complex traits. Genetic variants should explain a considerable portion of the risk for schizophrenia, and genome-wide association study (GWAS) is a potentially powerful tool for identifying the risk variants that underlie the disease. Here, we report the results of a three-stage analysis of three independent cohorts consisting of a total of 2,535 samples from Japanese and Chinese populations for searching schizophrenia susceptibility genes using a GWAS approach. Firstly, we examined 115,770 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 120 patient-parents trio samples from Japanese schizophrenia pedigrees. In stage II, we evaluated 1,632 SNPs (1,159 SNPs of p<0.01 and 473 SNPs of p<0.05 that located in previously reported linkage regions). The second sample consisted of 1,012 case-control samples of Japanese origin. The most significant p value was obtained for the SNP in the ELAVL2 [(embryonic lethal, abnormal vision, Drosophila)-like 2] gene located on 9p21.3 (p = 0.00087). In stage III, we scrutinized the ELAVL2 gene by genotyping gene-centric tagSNPs in the third sample set of 293 family samples (1,163 individuals) of Chinese descent and the SNP in the gene showed a nominal association with schizophrenia in Chinese population (p = 0.026). The current data in Asian population would be helpful for deciphering ethnic diversity of schizophrenia etiology. PMID:21674006

  9. Genome-wide association mapping of soybean aphid resistance traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean aphid is the most damaging insect pest of soybean in the Upper Midwest and is primarily controlled by insecticides. Soybean aphid resistance (i.e., Rag genes) has been documented in some soybean lines at chromosomes 6, 7, 13, and 16, but more sources of resistance are needed. Genome-wide ass...

  10. Assessing statistical significance in multivariable genome wide association analysis

    PubMed Central

    Buzdugan, Laura; Kalisch, Markus; Navarro, Arcadi; Schunk, Daniel; Fehr, Ernst; Bühlmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Although Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) genotype a very large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the data are often analyzed one SNP at a time. The low predictive power of single SNPs, coupled with the high significance threshold needed to correct for multiple testing, greatly decreases the power of GWAS. Results: We propose a procedure in which all the SNPs are analyzed in a multiple generalized linear model, and we show its use for extremely high-dimensional datasets. Our method yields P-values for assessing significance of single SNPs or groups of SNPs while controlling for all other SNPs and the family wise error rate (FWER). Thus, our method tests whether or not a SNP carries any additional information about the phenotype beyond that available by all the other SNPs. This rules out spurious correlations between phenotypes and SNPs that can arise from marginal methods because the ‘spuriously correlated’ SNP merely happens to be correlated with the ‘truly causal’ SNP. In addition, the method offers a data driven approach to identifying and refining groups of SNPs that jointly contain informative signals about the phenotype. We demonstrate the value of our method by applying it to the seven diseases analyzed by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). We show, in particular, that our method is also capable of finding significant SNPs that were not identified in the original WTCCC study, but were replicated in other independent studies. Availability and implementation: Reproducibility of our research is supported by the open-source Bioconductor package hierGWAS. Contact: peter.buehlmann@stat.math.ethz.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153677

  11. Genome-wide association study of recalcitrant atopic dermatitis in Korean children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Won; Myers, Rachel A.; Lee, Ji Hyun; Igartua, Catherine; Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Yoon Hee; Kim, Eun-Jin; Yoon, Dankyu; Lee, Joo-Shil; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Tamari, Mayumi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Choi, Je-Min; Kim, Kyu-Earn; Nicolae, Dan L.; Ober, Carole; Sohn, Myung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a heterogeneous chronic inflammatory skin disease. Most AD during infancy resolves during childhood, but moderate to severe AD with allergic sensitization is more likely to persist into adulthood and more often occurs with other allergic diseases. Objective We sought to find susceptibility loci by performing the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of AD in Korean children with recalcitrant AD, defined as moderate to severe AD with allergic sensitization. Methods Our study included 246 children with recalcitrant AD and 551 adult controls with a negative history of both allergic disease and allergic sensitization. DNA from these individuals was genotyped; sets of common SNPs were imputed and used in the GWAS after quality control checks. Results SNPs at a region on 13q21.31 were associated with recalcitrant AD at a genome-wide threshold of significance (P < 2.0×10−8). These associated SNPs are >1Mb from the closest gene, PCDH9. SNPs at four additional loci had P < 1×10−6, including SNPs at or near the NBAS (2p24.3), THEMIS (6q22.33), GATA3 (10p14) and SCAPER (15q24.3) genes. Further analysis of total serum IgE levels suggested 13q21.31 may be primarily an IgE locus, and analyses of published data demonstrated SNPs at the 15q24.3 region are expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) for two nearby genes, ISL2 and PSTPIP1, in immune cells. Conclusion Our GWAS of recalcitrant AD identified new susceptibility regions containing genes involved in epithelial cell function and immune dysregulation, two key features of AD, and potentially extend our understanding of their role in pathogenesis. PMID:25935106

  12. Family-Based Genome-Wide Association Scan of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, Eric; Todorov, Alexandre; Smalley, Susan; Hu, Xiaolan; Loo, Sandra; Todd, Richard D.; Biederman, Joseph; Byrne, Deirdre; Dechairo, Bryan; Guiney, Allan; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Nelson, Stanley F.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Wozniak, Janet; Neale, Benjamin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Genes likely play a substantial role in the etiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic architecture of the disorder is unknown, and prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not identified a genome-wide significant association. We have conducted a third, independent, multisite GWAS of…

  13. More heritability probably captured by psoriasis genome-wide association study in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Long; Liu, Lu; Cheng, Yuyan; Lin, Yan; Shen, Changbing; Zhu, Caihong; Yang, Sen; Yin, Xianyong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-11-15

    Missing heritability is a common problem in genome-wide association studies in complex diseases/traits. To quantify the unbiased heritability estimate, we applied the phenotype correlation-genotype correlation regression in psoriasis genome-wide association data in Han Chinese which comprises 1139 cases and 1132 controls. We estimated that 45.7% heritability of psoriasis in Han Chinese were captured by common variants (s.e.=12.5%), which reinforced that the majority of psoriasis heritability can be covered by common variants in genome-wide association data (68.2%). The results provided evidence that the heritability covered by psoriasis genome-wide genotyping data was probably underestimated in previous restricted maximum likelihood method. Our study highlights the broad role of common variants in the etiology of psoriasis and sheds light on the possibility to identify more common variants of small effect by increasing the sample size in psoriasis genome-wide association studies.

  14. Genome-wide association study of Alzheimer's disease with psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hollingworth, P; Sweet, R; Sims, R; Harold, D; Russo, G; Abraham, R; Stretton, A; Jones, N; Gerrish, A; Chapman, J; Ivanov, D; Moskvina, V; Lovestone, S; Priotsi, P; Lupton, M; Brayne, C; Gill, M; Lawlor, B; Lynch, A; Craig, D; McGuinness, B; Johnston, J; Holmes, C; Livingston, G; Bass, N J; Gurling, H; McQuillin, A; Holmans, P; Jones, L; Devlin, B; Klei, L; Barmada, M M; Demirci, F Y; DeKosky, S T; Lopez, O L; Passmore, P; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C; Mayeux, R; Kamboh, M I; Williams, J

    2012-12-01

    Psychotic symptoms occur in ~40% of subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and are associated with more rapid cognitive decline and increased functional deficits. They show heritability up to 61% and have been proposed as a marker for a disease subtype suitable for gene mapping efforts. We undertook a combined analysis of three genome-wide association studies (GWASs) to identify loci that (1) increase susceptibility to an AD and subsequent psychotic symptoms; or (2) modify risk of psychotic symptoms in the presence of neurodegeneration caused by AD. In all, 1299 AD cases with psychosis (AD+P), 735 AD cases without psychosis (AD-P) and 5659 controls were drawn from Genetic and Environmental Risk in AD Consortium 1 (GERAD1), the National Institute on Aging Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease (NIA-LOAD) family study and the University of Pittsburgh Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC) GWASs. Unobserved genotypes were imputed to provide data on >1.8 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Analyses in each data set were completed comparing (1) AD+P to AD-P cases, and (2) AD+P cases with controls (GERAD1, ADRC only). Aside from the apolipoprotein E (APOE) locus, the strongest evidence for association was observed in an intergenic region on chromosome 4 (rs753129; 'AD+PvAD-P' P=2.85 × 10(-7); 'AD+PvControls' P=1.11 × 10(-4)). SNPs upstream of SLC2A9 (rs6834555, P=3.0 × 10(-7)) and within VSNL1 (rs4038131, P=5.9 × 10(-7)) showed strongest evidence for association with AD+P when compared with controls. These findings warrant further investigation in larger, appropriately powered samples in which the presence of psychotic symptoms in AD has been well characterized.

  15. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J. L.; Langely, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of…

  16. Case-Control Genome-Wide Association Study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah; Ripke, Stephan; Anney, Richard J. L.; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey; Holmans, Peter; Middleton, Frank; Thapar, Anita; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Daly, Mark; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Freitag, Christine; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Rothenberger, Aribert; Hawi, Ziarih; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. Thus additional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are needed. Method: We used case-control analyses of 896 cases…

  17. Genome-wide Association Study of Alzheimer’s disease with Psychotic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hollingworth, Paul; Sweet, Robert A.; Sims, Rebecca; Harold, Denise; Russo, Giancarlo; Abraham, Richard; Stretton, Alexandra; Jones, Nicola; Gerrish, Amy; Chapman, Jade; Ivanov, Dobril; Moskvina, Valentina; Lovestone, Simon; Priotsi, Petroula; Lupton, Michelle; Brayne, Carol; Gill, Michael; Lawlor, Brian; Lynch, Aoibhinn; Craig, David; McGuinness, Bernadette; Johnston, Janet; Holmes, Clive; Livingston, Gill; Bass, Nicholas J.; Gurling, Hugh; McQuillin, Andrew; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Devlin, Bernie; Klei, Lambertus; Barmada, M. Michael; Demirci, F. Yesim; DeKosky, Steven T.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Passmore, Peter; Owen, Michael J; O’Donovan, Michael C; Mayeux, Richard; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Williams, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms occur in approximately 40% of subjects with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and are associated with more rapid cognitive decline and increased functional deficits. They show heritability up to 61% and have been proposed as a marker for a disease subtype suitable for gene mapping efforts. We undertook a combined analysis of three genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify loci that a) increase susceptibility to an AD and subsequent psychotic symptoms; or b) modify risk of psychotic symptoms in the presence of neurodegeneration caused by AD. 1299 AD cases with psychosis (AD+P), 735 AD cases without psychosis (AD−P) and 5659 controls were drawn from GERAD1, the NIA-LOAD family study and the University of Pittsburgh ADRC GWAS. Unobserved genotypes were imputed to provide data on > 1.8 million SNPs. Analyses in each dataset were completed comparing a) AD+P to AD−P cases, and b) AD+P cases with controls (GERAD1, ADRC only). Aside from the APOE locus, the strongest evidence for association was observed in an intergenic region on chromosome 4 (rs753129; ‘AD+PvAD−P’ P=2.85 × 10−7; ‘AD+PvControls’ P=1.11 × 10−4). SNPs upstream of SLC2A9 (rs6834555, P=3.0×10−7) and within VSNL1 (rs4038131, P=5.9×10−7) showed strongest evidence for association with AD+P when compared to controls. These findings warrant further investigation in larger, appropriately powered samples in which the presence of psychotic symptoms in AD has been well characterised. PMID:22005930

  18. Genome-wide association study for feedlot average daily gain in Nellore cattle (Bos indicus).

    PubMed

    Santana, M H A; Utsunomiya, Y T; Neves, H H R; Gomes, R C; Garcia, J F; Fukumasu, H; Silva, S L; Leme, P R; Coutinho, L L; Eler, J P; Ferraz, J B S

    2014-06-01

    The genome-wide association study (GWAS) results are presented for average daily gain (ADG) in Nellore cattle. Phenotype of 720 male Bos indicus animals with information of ADG in feedlots and 354,147 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) obtained from a database added by information from Illumina Bovine HD (777,962 SNPs) and Illumina BovineSNP50 (54,609) by imputation were used. After quality control and imputation, 290,620 SNPs remained in the association analysis, using R package Genome-wide Rapid Association using Mixed Model and Regression method GRAMMAR-Gamma. A genomic region with six significant SNPs, at Bonferroni-corrected significance, was found on chromosome 3. The most significant SNP (rs42518459, BTA3: 85849977, p = 9.49 × 10(-8)) explained 5.62% of the phenotypic variance and had the allele substitution effect of -0.269 kg/day. Important genes such as PDE4B, LEPR, CYP2J2 and FGGY are located near this region, which is overlapped by 12 quantitative trait locus (QTLs) described for several production traits. Other regions with markers with suggestive effects were identified in BTA6 and BTA10. This study showed regions with major effects on ADG in Bos indicus in feedlots. This information may be useful to increase the efficiency of selecting this trait and to understand the physiological processes involved in its regulation.

  19. Efficient multivariate linear mixed model algorithms for genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Stephens, Matthew

    2014-04-01

    Multivariate linear mixed models (mvLMMs) are powerful tools for testing associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms and multiple correlated phenotypes while controlling for population stratification in genome-wide association studies. We present efficient algorithms in the genome-wide efficient mixed model association (GEMMA) software for fitting mvLMMs and computing likelihood ratio tests. These algorithms offer improved computation speed, power and P-value calibration over existing methods, and can deal with more than two phenotypes.

  20. Genome-Wide Association Mapping for Intelligence in Military Working Dogs: Canine Cohort, Canine Intelligence Assessment Regimen, Genome-Wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Typing, and Unsupervised Classification Algorithm for Genome-Wide Association Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    were down-selected and successfully genotyped for whole genome (WG) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers by means of the Affymetrix Canine...SUBJECT TERMS Military working dog genome-wide association study genetic marker intelligence... marker , intelligence, Canine Intelligence Testing Protocol, classification technique, clustering analysis Technical Report: September 2011 2

  1. Genome-wide association mapping in plants exemplified for root growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Slovak, Radka; Göschl, Christian; Seren, Ümit; Busch, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) mapping is a powerful technique to address the molecular basis of genotype to phenotype relationships and to map regulators of biological processes. This chapter presents a protocol for genome-wide association mapping in Arabidopsis thaliana using the user-friendly internet application GWAPP, and provides a specific protocol for acquiring root trait data suitable for GWA studies using the semi-automated, high-throughput phenotyping pipeline BRAT for early root growth.

  2. Genome-wide association analysis for drought tolerance and associated traits in common bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted to explore the genetic basis of variation for drought tolerance and related traits in a Middle American diversity panel comprised of 96 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) genotypes. The panel grown under irrigated and rainfed conditions and single n...

  3. Brain expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) identifies human disease-associated variants.

    PubMed

    Zou, Fanggeng; Chai, High Seng; Younkin, Curtis S; Allen, Mariet; Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Rowley, Christopher N; Nair, Asha A; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Farrer, Lindsay A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Petersen, Ronald C; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Dickson, Dennis W; Younkin, Steven G; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n=197, temporal cortex n=202) and with other brain pathologies (non-AD, cerebellar n=177, temporal cortex n=197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ± 100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non-ADs (q<0.05, p=7.70 × 10(-5)-1.67 × 10(-82)). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p=1.85 × 10(-5)-1.70 × 10(-141)). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10(-6)). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9-3.3 fold enrichment (p<10(-6)) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD-risk association (p<10(-3)) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non-CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with functional implications. Our findings

  4. Brain Expression Genome-Wide Association Study (eGWAS) Identifies Human Disease-Associated Variants

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V. Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Rowley, Christopher N.; Nair, Asha A.; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G.; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P.; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Younkin, Steven G.; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n = 197, temporal cortex n = 202) and with other brain pathologies (non–AD, cerebellar n = 177, temporal cortex n = 197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ±100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non–ADs (q<0.05, p = 7.70×10−5–1.67×10−82). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p = 1.85×10−5–1.70×10−141). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10−6). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9–3.3 fold enrichment (p<10−6) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD–risk association (p<10−3) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non–CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with

  5. Family-based designs for genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Ott, Jurg; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lathrop, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Association mapping has successfully identified common SNPs associated with many diseases. However, the inability of this class of variation to account for most of the supposed heritability has led to a renewed interest in methods - primarily linkage analysis - to detect rare variants. Family designs allow for control of population stratification, investigations of questions such as parent-of-origin effects and other applications that are imperfectly or not readily addressed in case-control association studies. This article guides readers through the interface between linkage and association analysis, reviews the new methodologies and provides useful guidelines for applications. Just as effective SNP-genotyping tools helped to realize the potential of association studies, next-generation sequencing tools will benefit genetic studies by improving the power of family-based approaches.

  6. Novel Loci Associated with Usual Sleep Duration: The CHARGE Consortium Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Hek, Karin; Chen, Ting-hsu; Watson, Nathaniel F.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Byrne, Enda M.; Cornelis, Marilyn; Warby, Simon C.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Cherkas, Lynn; Evans, Daniel S.; Grabe, Hans J.; Lahti, Jari; Li, Man; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lumley, Thomas; Marciante, Kristin D.; Pérusse, Louis; Psaty, Bruce M.; Robbins, John; Tranah, Gregory J.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Bellis, Claire; Biffar, Reiner; Bouchard, Claude; Cade, Brian; Curhan, Gary C.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Ewert, Ralf; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fülöp, Tibor; Gehrman, Philip R.; Goodloe, Robert; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hernandez, Dena; Hofman, Albert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hunter, David J.; Jensen, Majken K.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Kähönen, Mika; Kao, Linda; Kraft, Peter; Larkin, Emma K.; Lauderdale, Diane S.; Luik, Annemarie I.; Medici, Marco; Montgomery, Grant W.; Palotie, Aarno; Patel, Sanjay R.; Pistis, Giorgio; Porcu, Eleonora; Quaye, Lydia; Raitakari, Olli; Redline, Susan; Rimm, Eric B.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Smith, Albert V.; Spector, Tim D.; Teumer, Alexander; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Young, Terry; Zhang, Xiaoling; Liu, Yongmei; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hu, Frank; Mangino, Massimo; Martin, Nicholas G.; O’Connor, George T.; Stone, Katie L.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Viikari, Jorma; Gharib, Sina A.; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Räikkönen, Katri; Völzke, Henry; Mignot, Emmanuel; Tiemeier, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Usual sleep duration is a heritable trait correlated with psychiatric morbidity, cardiometabolic disease and mortality, although little is known about the genetic variants influencing this trait. A genome-wide association study of usual sleep duration was conducted using 18 population-based cohorts totaling 47,180 individuals of European ancestry. Genome-wide significant association was identified at two loci. The strongest is located on chromosome 2, in an intergenic region 35–80 kb upstream from the thyroid-specific transcription factor PAX8 (lowest p=1.1 ×10−9). This finding was replicated in an African-American sample of 4771 individuals (lowest p=9.3 × 10−4). The strongest combined association was at rs1823125 (p=1.5 × 10−10, minor allele frequency 0.26 in the discovery sample, 0.12 in the replication sample), with each copy of the minor allele associated with a sleep duration 3.1 minutes longer per night. The alleles associated with longer sleep duration were associated in previous genome-wide association studies with a more favorable metabolic profile and a lower risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these associations may help elucidate biological mechanisms influencing sleep duration and its association with psychiatric, metabolic and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25469926

  7. The new NHGRI-EBI Catalog of published genome-wide association studies (GWAS Catalog)

    PubMed Central

    MacArthur, Jacqueline; Bowler, Emily; Cerezo, Maria; Gil, Laurent; Hall, Peggy; Hastings, Emma; Junkins, Heather; McMahon, Aoife; Milano, Annalisa; Morales, Joannella; Pendlington, Zoe May; Welter, Danielle; Burdett, Tony; Hindorff, Lucia; Flicek, Paul; Cunningham, Fiona; Parkinson, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The NHGRI-EBI GWAS Catalog has provided data from published genome-wide association studies since 2008. In 2015, the database was redesigned and relocated to EMBL-EBI. The new infrastructure includes a new graphical user interface (www.ebi.ac.uk/gwas/), ontology supported search functionality and an improved curation interface. These developments have improved the data release frequency by increasing automation of curation and providing scaling improvements. The range of available Catalog data has also been extended with structured ancestry and recruitment information added for all studies. The infrastructure improvements also support scaling for larger arrays, exome and sequencing studies, allowing the Catalog to adapt to the needs of evolving study design, genotyping technologies and user needs in the future. PMID:27899670

  8. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity.

    PubMed

    Loth, Daan W; Soler Artigas, María; Gharib, Sina A; Wain, Louise V; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess D; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P; James, Alan L; Huffman, Jennifer E; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kähönen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K; Fall, Tove; Viñuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J; Loehr, Laura R; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wilk, Jemma B; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B; North, Kari E; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F; Hastie, Nicholas D; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Asa; Wild, Sarah H; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Völzke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C; Rotter, Jerome I; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S; White, Wendy B; Rich, Stephen S; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J; Psaty, Bruce M; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G; Uitterlinden, André G; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R; McArdle, Wendy L; Musk, A Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah L; Zhao, Jing Hua; Rantanen, Taina; O'Connor, George T; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C; Starr, John M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L; Lederer, David J; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Morris, Andrew P; Gläser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J; Burkart, Kristin M; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hancock, Dana B; Williams, O Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H; Viljanen, Anne; Heliövaara, Markku; Attia, John R; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J; Boezen, H Marike; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D; Melén, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J; Lange, Leslie A; Barr, R Graham; Bracke, Ken R; Verhamme, Fien M; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Cassano, Patricia A; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josée; Hall, Ian P; Brusselle, Guy G; Tobin, Martin D; London, Stephanie J

    2014-07-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 additional individuals of European ancestry. We found six new regions associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) with FVC in or near EFEMP1, BMP6, MIR129-2-HSD17B12, PRDM11, WWOX and KCNJ2. Two loci previously associated with spirometric measures (GSTCD and PTCH1) were related to FVC. Newly implicated regions were followed up in samples from African-American, Korean, Chinese and Hispanic individuals. We detected transcripts for all six newly implicated genes in human lung tissue. The new loci may inform mechanisms involved in lung development and the pathogenesis of restrictive lung disease.

  9. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    PubMed Central

    Loth, Daan W.; Artigas, María Soler; Gharib, Sina A.; Wain, Louise V.; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P.; James, Alan L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kähönen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M.; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K.; Fall, Tove; Viňuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J.; Loehr, Laura R.; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wilk, Jemma B.; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B.; North, Kari E.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A.; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M.; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Åsa; Wild, Sarah H.; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Völzke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S.; White, Wendy B.; Rich, Stephen S.; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Musk, A. Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R.; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah; Zhao, Jing Hua; Rantanen, Taina; O’Connor, George T.; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J.; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Starr, John M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L.; Lederer, David J.; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Morris, Andrew P.; Gläser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J.; Burkart, Kristin M.; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hancock, Dana B.; Williams, O. Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F.; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J.; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H.; Viljanen, Anne; Heliövaara, Markku; Attia, John R.; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J.; Boezen, H. Marike; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F.; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H.; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D.; Melén, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J.; Lange, Leslie A.; Barr, R. Graham; Bracke, Ken R.; Verhamme, Fien M.; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Cassano, Patricia A.; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josée; Hall, Ian P.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Tobin, Martin D.; London, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 additional individuals of European ancestry. We found six new regions associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) with FVC in or near EFEMP1, BMP6, MIR-129-2/HSD17B12, PRDM11, WWOX, and KCNJ2. Two (GSTCD and PTCH1) loci previously associated with spirometric measures were related to FVC. Newly implicated regions were followed-up in samples of African American, Korean, Chinese, and Hispanic individuals. We detected transcripts for all six newly implicated genes in human lung tissue. The new loci may inform mechanisms involved in lung development and pathogenesis of restrictive lung disease. PMID:24929828

  10. Genome-wide association with delayed puberty in swine.

    PubMed

    Nonneman, D; Lents, C; Rohrer, G; Rempel, L; Vallet, J

    2014-02-01

    An improvement in the proportion of gilts entering the herd that farrow a litter would increase overall herd performance and profitability. A significant proportion (10-30%) of gilts that enter the herd never farrow a litter; reproductive reasons account for approximately a third of gilt removals, with anestrous and failure to conceive the most common reasons for culling. Tools to select gilts for reproductive longevity through genomics or alternative phenotypes would be of great benefit to the producer. Ninety-one gilts that failed to display behavioral estrus by 240 days (cases) and 127 pubertal littermates (controls) were genotyped with the Illumina Porcine SNP60 Beadchip. One hundred and seventy-four SNPs with the most significant associations were genotyped in an additional 86 cases and 103 controls. Twelve of these associations were significant in the final analysis. The most significant (P < 1.5 × 10(-14) ) region associated with failure to attain puberty was on chromosome 4 surrounding the NHLH2 gene. Delayed pubertal development and age at first estrus have been associated with NHLH2 in mice. Because attainment of puberty is a complex trait, identifying genes that affect pubertal age would greatly contribute to our knowledge of reproductive development as well as overall fertility.

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies 14 novel risk alleles associated with basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Harvind S.; Wu, Wenting; Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Yang, Lingyao; Hedlin, Haley; Desai, Manisha; Lin, Yuan; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Hinds, David A.; Tang, Jean Y.; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y.

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of 2.8 million cases in the United States alone. Previous studies have demonstrated an association between 21 distinct genetic loci and BCC risk. Here, we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of BCC, totalling 17,187 cases and 287,054 controls. We confirm 17 previously reported loci and identify 14 new susceptibility loci reaching genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8, logistic regression). These newly associated SNPs lie within predicted keratinocyte regulatory elements and in expression quantitative trait loci; furthermore, we identify candidate genes and non-coding RNAs involved in telomere maintenance, immune regulation and tumour progression, providing deeper insight into the pathogenesis of BCC. PMID:27539887

  12. Epigenetic genome-wide association methylation in aging and longevity.

    PubMed

    Ben-Avraham, Danny; Muzumdar, Radhika H; Atzmon, Gil

    2012-10-01

    The aging phenotype is the result of a complex interaction between genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. Evidence suggests that epigenetic changes (i.e., a set of reversible, heritable changes in gene function or other cell phenotype that occurs without a change in DNA sequence) may affect the aging process and may be one of the central mechanisms by which aging predisposes to many age-related diseases. The total number of altered methylation sites increases with increasing age, such that they could serve as marker for chronological age. This article systematically highlights the advances made in the field of epigenomics and their contribution to the understanding of the complex physiology of aging, lifespan and age-associated diseases.

  13. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Genetic Variants Associated with Mathematics Ability

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan; Gu, Xiao-hong; Zhou, Yuxi; Ge, Zeng; Wang, Bin; Siok, Wai Ting; Wang, Guoqing; Huen, Michael; Jiang, Yuyang; Tan, Li-Hai; Sun, Yimin

    2017-01-01

    Mathematics ability is a complex cognitive trait with polygenic heritability. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been an effective approach to investigate genetic components underlying mathematic ability. Although previous studies reported several candidate genetic variants, none of them exceeded genome-wide significant threshold in general populations. Herein, we performed GWAS in Chinese elementary school students to identify potential genetic variants associated with mathematics ability. The discovery stage included 494 and 504 individuals from two independent cohorts respectively. The replication stage included another cohort of 599 individuals. In total, 28 of 81 candidate SNPs that met validation criteria were further replicated. Combined meta-analysis of three cohorts identified four SNPs (rs1012694, rs11743006, rs17778739 and rs17777541) of SPOCK1 gene showing association with mathematics ability (minimum p value 5.67 × 10−10, maximum β −2.43). The SPOCK1 gene is located on chromosome 5q31.2 and encodes a highly conserved glycoprotein testican-1 which was associated with tumor progression and prognosis as well as neurogenesis. This is the first study to report genome-wide significant association of individual SNPs with mathematics ability in general populations. Our preliminary results further supported the role of SPOCK1 during neurodevelopment. The genetic complexities underlying mathematics ability might contribute to explain the basis of human cognition and intelligence at genetic level. PMID:28155865

  14. Genome-wide efficient mixed-model analysis for association studies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Stephens, Matthew

    2012-06-17

    Linear mixed models have attracted considerable attention recently as a powerful and effective tool for accounting for population stratification and relatedness in genetic association tests. However, existing methods for exact computation of standard test statistics are computationally impractical for even moderate-sized genome-wide association studies. To address this issue, several approximate methods have been proposed. Here, we present an efficient exact method, which we refer to as genome-wide efficient mixed-model association (GEMMA), that makes approximations unnecessary in many contexts. This method is approximately n times faster than the widely used exact method known as efficient mixed-model association (EMMA), where n is the sample size, making exact genome-wide association analysis computationally practical for large numbers of individuals.

  15. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Novel Loci Associated With Diisocyanate-Induced Occupational Asthma.

    PubMed

    Yucesoy, Berran; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Lummus, Zana L; Weirauch, Matthew T; Zhang, Ge; Cartier, André; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Sastre, Joaquin; Quirce, Santiago; Tarlo, Susan M; Cruz, Maria-Jesus; Munoz, Xavier; Harley, John B; Bernstein, David I

    2015-07-01

    Diisocyanates, reactive chemicals used to produce polyurethane products, are the most common causes of occupational asthma. The aim of this study is to identify susceptibility gene variants that could contribute to the pathogenesis of diisocyanate asthma (DA) using a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) approach. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping was performed in 74 diisocyanate-exposed workers with DA and 824 healthy controls using Omni-2.5 and Omni-5 SNP microarrays. We identified 11 SNPs that exceeded genome-wide significance; the strongest association was for the rs12913832 SNP located on chromosome 15, which has been mapped to the HERC2 gene (p = 6.94 × 10(-14)). Strong associations were also found for SNPs near the ODZ3 and CDH17 genes on chromosomes 4 and 8 (rs908084, p = 8.59 × 10(-9) and rs2514805, p = 1.22 × 10(-8), respectively). We also prioritized 38 SNPs with suggestive genome-wide significance (p < 1 × 10(-6)). Among them, 17 SNPs map to the PITPNC1, ACMSD, ZBTB16, ODZ3, and CDH17 gene loci. Functional genomics data indicate that 2 of the suggestive SNPs (rs2446823 and rs2446824) are located within putative binding sites for the CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein (CEBP) and Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4, Alpha transcription factors (TFs), respectively. This study identified SNPs mapping to the HERC2, CDH17, and ODZ3 genes as potential susceptibility loci for DA. Pathway analysis indicated that these genes are associated with antigen processing and presentation, and other immune pathways. Overlap of 2 suggestive SNPs with likely TF binding sites suggests possible roles in disruption of gene regulation. These results provide new insights into the genetic architecture of DA and serve as a basis for future functional and mechanistic studies.

  16. Genome-Wide Association Mapping for Intelligence in Military Working Dogs: Development of Advanced Classification Algorithm for Genome-Wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    distribution unlimited. QC – quality control QTL – quantitative trait loci SNP – single nucleotide polymorphism TE – Tris + EDTA TBE – Tris + Boric Acid + EDTA WGSA – whole genome sampling assay ...canine intelligence testing protocol EDTA – ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid GWAS – genome-wide association study LD – linkage disequilibrium MWD

  17. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with bladder cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Jonine D.; Ye, Yuanqing; Siddiq, Afshan; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Kooperberg, Charles; Cussenot, Olivier; Benhamou, Simone; Prescott, Jennifer; Porru, Stefano; Dinney, Colin P.; Malats, Núria; Baris, Dalsu; Purdue, Mark; Jacobs, Eric J.; Albanes, Demetrius; Wang, Zhaoming; Deng, Xiang; Chung, Charles C.; Tang, Wei; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ljungberg, Börje; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Travis, Ruth; Tjønneland, Anne; Brenan, Paul; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Riboli, Elio; Conti, David; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Stern, Mariana C.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hohensee, Chancellor; Rodabough, Rebecca; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Roupret, Morgan; Comperat, Eva; Chen, Constance; De Vivo, Immaculata; Giovannucci, Edward; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Lindstrom, Sara; Carta, Angela; Pavanello, Sofia; Arici, Cecilia; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Kamat, Ashish M.; Lerner, Seth P.; Barton Grossman, H.; Lin, Jie; Gu, Jian; Pu, Xia; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Wheeler, William; Kogevinas, Manolis; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R.; Johnson, Alison; Schned, Alan; Armenti, Karla R.; Hosain, G.M.; Andriole, Gerald; Grubb, Robert; Black, Amanda; Ryan Diver, W.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Haiman, Chris A.; Landi, Maria T.; Caporaso, Neil; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Vineis, Paolo; Wu, Xifeng; Silverman, Debra T.; Chanock, Stephen; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 11 independent susceptibility loci associated with bladder cancer risk. To discover additional risk variants, we conducted a new GWAS of 2422 bladder cancer cases and 5751 controls, followed by a meta-analysis with two independently published bladder cancer GWAS, resulting in a combined analysis of 6911 cases and 11 814 controls of European descent. TaqMan genotyping of 13 promising single nucleotide polymorphisms with P < 1 × 10−5 was pursued in a follow-up set of 801 cases and 1307 controls. Two new loci achieved genome-wide statistical significance: rs10936599 on 3q26.2 (P = 4.53 × 10−9) and rs907611 on 11p15.5 (P = 4.11 × 10−8). Two notable loci were also identified that approached genome-wide statistical significance: rs6104690 on 20p12.2 (P = 7.13 × 10−7) and rs4510656 on 6p22.3 (P = 6.98 × 10−7); these require further studies for confirmation. In conclusion, our study has identified new susceptibility alleles for bladder cancer risk that require fine-mapping and laboratory investigation, which could further understanding into the biological underpinnings of bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:24163127

  18. Genetics of autoimmune diseases: perspectives from genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Kochi, Yuta

    2016-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) for autoimmune diseases (ADs) have identified many risk loci and have provided insights into the etiology of each disease. Some of these loci, such asPTPN22,IL23RandSTAT4, are shared among different ADs, and the combination of risk loci may determine an individual's susceptibility for a disease. The majority of GWAS loci are expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), where disease-causing variants regulate expression of neighboring (or sometimes distant) genes. Because the eQTL effects are often cell type-specific, the incorporation of epigenetic data from disease-related cell types and tissues is expected to refine the identification of causal variants. The cumulative eQTL effects in multiple genes may influence the activity or fate of immune cells, which in turn may affect the function of the immune system in individuals. In this paper, I review the etiology of ADs by focusing on important immune cells (Th1 cells, Th17 cells and regulatory T cells), important pathways (antigen-receptor signaling and type I interferon signaling) and relevant genes identified in GWASs.

  19. Control selection options for genome-wide association studies in cohorts.

    PubMed

    Wacholder, Sholom; Rotunno, Melissa

    2009-03-01

    Investigators planning studies within cohorts have many options for choosing an efficient sampling design for genome-wide association and other molecular epidemiology studies. Consideration of person-year and proportional hazards analyses of full cohorts may add further insight into ramifications of different designs. Empirical evidence from genome-wide association studies can supplement intuition and simulations in comparing properties of various case-control designs within cohorts. Additional theoretical and empirical work, justification of sampling choice in publications, and consideration of context and scientific aims can improve designs and, thereby, increase the scientific value and cost effectiveness of future studies.

  20. Genome-Wide Association Mapping of Root Traits in the Context of Plant Hormone Research.

    PubMed

    Ristova, Daniela; Busch, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) mapping is a powerful method for the identification of alleles that underlie quantitative traits. It enables one to understand how genetic variation translates into phenotypic variation. In particular, plant hormone signaling pathways play a key role in shaping phenotypes. This chapter presents a protocol for genome-wide association mapping of root traits of Arabidopsis thaliana in the context of hormone research. We describe a specific protocol for acquiring primary and lateral root trait data that is appropriate for GWA studies using FIJI (ImageJ), and subsequent GWA mapping using a user-friendly Internet application.

  1. A genome-wide association study of atopic dermatitis identifies loci with overlapping effects on asthma and psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Weidinger, Stephan; Willis-Owen, Saffron A.G.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Morar, Nilesh; Liang, Liming; Edser, Pauline; Street, Teresa; Rodriguez, Elke; O'Regan, Grainne M.; Beattie, Paula; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Novak, Natalija; Fahy, Caoimhe M.; Winge, Mårten C.G.; Kabesch, Michael; Illig, Thomas; Heath, Simon; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Pershagen, Göran; Kere, Juha; Bradley, Maria; Lieden, Agne; Nordenskjold, Magnus; Harper, John I.; Mclean, W.H. Irwin; Brown, Sara J.; Cookson, William O.C.; Lathrop, G. Mark; Irvine, Alan D.; Moffatt, Miriam F.

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common dermatological disease of childhood. Many children with AD have asthma and AD shares regions of genetic linkage with psoriasis, another chronic inflammatory skin disease. We present here a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of childhood-onset AD in 1563 European cases with known asthma status and 4054 European controls. Using Illumina genotyping followed by imputation, we generated 268 034 consensus genotypes and in excess of 2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for analysis. Association signals were assessed for replication in a second panel of 2286 European cases and 3160 European controls. Four loci achieved genome-wide significance for AD and replicated consistently across all cohorts. These included the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) on chromosome 1, the genomic region proximal to LRRC32 on chromosome 11, the RAD50/IL13 locus on chromosome 5 and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6; reflecting action of classical HLA alleles. We observed variation in the contribution towards co-morbid asthma for these regions of association. We further explored the genetic relationship between AD, asthma and psoriasis by examining previously identified susceptibility SNPs for these diseases. We found considerable overlap between AD and psoriasis together with variable coincidence between allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma. Our results indicate that the pathogenesis of AD incorporates immune and epidermal barrier defects with combinations of specific and overlapping effects at individual loci. PMID:23886662

  2. Genome wide association analysis for seedling response traits to thermal stress in sorghum germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sorghum association panel exhibited extensive variation for seedling traits under cold and heat stress. Genome-wide analyses identified thirty single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were strongly associated with traits measured at seedling stage under cold stress and tagged genes that act a...

  3. A population structure and genome-wide association analysis on the USDA soybean germplasm collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotype-phenotype associations within the soybean (Glycine max) germplasm collection could provide valuable information on the frequency and distribution of alleles affecting economically important traits. Here we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for seed protein and oil content in ...

  4. Software engineering the mixed model for genome-wide association studies on large samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mixed models improve the ability to detect phenotype-genotype associations in the presence of population stratification and multiple levels of relatedness in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), but for large data sets the resource consumption becomes impractical. At the same time, the sample siz...

  5. Genome-wide Association Analysis of Kernel Weight in Hard Winter Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat kernel weight is an important and heritable component of wheat grain yield and a key predictor of flour extraction. Genome-wide association analysis was conducted to identify genomic regions associated with kernel weight and kernel weight environmental response in 8 trials of 299 hard winter ...

  6. Genome-Wide Association Study of Intelligence: Additive Effects of Novel Brain Expressed Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Sandra K.; Shtir, Corina; Doyle, Alysa E.; Mick, Eric; McGough, James J.; McCracken, James; Biederman, Joseph; Smalley, Susan L.; Cantor, Rita M.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nelson, Stanley F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to identify common genetic variants that are associated with human intelligence or general cognitive ability. Method: We performed a genome-wide association analysis with a dense set of 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and quantitative intelligence scores within an ancestrally…

  7. Enhancing genomic prediction with genome-wide association studies in multiparental maize populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide association mapping using dense marker sets has identified some nucleotide variants affecting complex traits which have been validated with fine-mapping and functional analysis. Many sequence variants associated with complex traits in maize have small effects and low repeatability, howev...

  8. Random forests on Hadoop for genome-wide association studies of multivariate neuroimaging phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Motivation Multivariate quantitative traits arise naturally in recent neuroimaging genetics studies, in which both structural and functional variability of the human brain is measured non-invasively through techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There is growing interest in detecting genetic variants associated with such multivariate traits, especially in genome-wide studies. Random forests (RFs) classifiers, which are ensembles of decision trees, are amongst the best performing machine learning algorithms and have been successfully employed for the prioritisation of genetic variants in case-control studies. RFs can also be applied to produce gene rankings in association studies with multivariate quantitative traits, and to estimate genetic similarities measures that are predictive of the trait. However, in studies involving hundreds of thousands of SNPs and high-dimensional traits, a very large ensemble of trees must be inferred from the data in order to obtain reliable rankings, which makes the application of these algorithms computationally prohibitive. Results We have developed a parallel version of the RF algorithm for regression and genetic similarity learning tasks in large-scale population genetic association studies involving multivariate traits, called PaRFR (Parallel Random Forest Regression). Our implementation takes advantage of the MapReduce programming model and is deployed on Hadoop, an open-source software framework that supports data-intensive distributed applications. Notable speed-ups are obtained by introducing a distance-based criterion for node splitting in the tree estimation process. PaRFR has been applied to a genome-wide association study on Alzheimer's disease (AD) in which the quantitative trait consists of a high-dimensional neuroimaging phenotype describing longitudinal changes in the human brain structure. PaRFR provides a ranking of SNPs associated to this trait, and produces pair-wise measures of genetic proximity

  9. Novel loci associated with usual sleep duration: the CHARGE Consortium Genome-Wide Association Study.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, D J; Hek, K; Chen, T-H; Watson, N F; Eiriksdottir, G; Byrne, E M; Cornelis, M; Warby, S C; Bandinelli, S; Cherkas, L; Evans, D S; Grabe, H J; Lahti, J; Li, M; Lehtimäki, T; Lumley, T; Marciante, K D; Pérusse, L; Psaty, B M; Robbins, J; Tranah, G J; Vink, J M; Wilk, J B; Stafford, J M; Bellis, C; Biffar, R; Bouchard, C; Cade, B; Curhan, G C; Eriksson, J G; Ewert, R; Ferrucci, L; Fülöp, T; Gehrman, P R; Goodloe, R; Harris, T B; Heath, A C; Hernandez, D; Hofman, A; Hottenga, J-J; Hunter, D J; Jensen, M K; Johnson, A D; Kähönen, M; Kao, L; Kraft, P; Larkin, E K; Lauderdale, D S; Luik, A I; Medici, M; Montgomery, G W; Palotie, A; Patel, S R; Pistis, G; Porcu, E; Quaye, L; Raitakari, O; Redline, S; Rimm, E B; Rotter, J I; Smith, A V; Spector, T D; Teumer, A; Uitterlinden, A G; Vohl, M-C; Widen, E; Willemsen, G; Young, T; Zhang, X; Liu, Y; Blangero, J; Boomsma, D I; Gudnason, V; Hu, F; Mangino, M; Martin, N G; O'Connor, G T; Stone, K L; Tanaka, T; Viikari, J; Gharib, S A; Punjabi, N M; Räikkönen, K; Völzke, H; Mignot, E; Tiemeier, H

    2015-10-01

    Usual sleep duration is a heritable trait correlated with psychiatric morbidity, cardiometabolic disease and mortality, although little is known about the genetic variants influencing this trait. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of usual sleep duration was conducted using 18 population-based cohorts totaling 47 180 individuals of European ancestry. Genome-wide significant association was identified at two loci. The strongest is located on chromosome 2, in an intergenic region 35- to 80-kb upstream from the thyroid-specific transcription factor PAX8 (lowest P=1.1 × 10(-9)). This finding was replicated in an African-American sample of 4771 individuals (lowest P=9.3 × 10(-4)). The strongest combined association was at rs1823125 (P=1.5 × 10(-10), minor allele frequency 0.26 in the discovery sample, 0.12 in the replication sample), with each copy of the minor allele associated with a sleep duration 3.1 min longer per night. The alleles associated with longer sleep duration were associated in previous GWAS with a more favorable metabolic profile and a lower risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these associations may help elucidate biological mechanisms influencing sleep duration and its association with psychiatric, metabolic and cardiovascular disease.

  10. Power comparison of admixture mapping and direct association analysis in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Qin, Huaizhen; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2012-04-01

    When dense markers are available, one can interrogate almost every common variant across the genome via imputation and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) test, which has become a routine in current genome-wide association studies (GWASs). As a complement, admixture mapping exploits the long-range linkage disequilibrium (LD) generated by admixture between genetically distinct ancestral populations. It is then questionable whether admixture mapping analysis is still necessary in detecting the disease associated variants in admixed populations. We argue that admixture mapping is able to reduce the burden of massive comparisons in GWASs; it therefore can be a powerful tool to locate the disease variants with substantial allele frequency differences between ancestral populations. In this report we studied a two-stage approach, where candidate regions are defined by conducting admixture mapping at stage 1, and single SNP association tests are followed at stage 2 within the candidate regions defined at stage 1. We first established the genome-wide significance levels corresponding to the criteria to define the candidate regions at stage 1 by simulations. We next compared the power of the two-stage approach with direct association analysis. Our simulations suggest that the two-stage approach can be more powerful than the standard genome-wide association analysis when the allele frequency difference of a causal variant in ancestral populations, is larger than 0.4. Our conclusion is consistent with a theoretical prediction by Risch and Tang ([2006] Am J Hum Genet 79:S254). Surprisingly, our study also suggests that power can be improved when we use less strict criteria to define the candidate regions at stage 1.

  11. Genome-Wide Association Study of Receptive Language Ability of 12-Year-Olds

    PubMed Central

    Harlaar, Nicole; Meaburn, Emma L.; Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Docherty, Sophia; Hanscombe, Ken B.; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Price, Thomas S.; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Researchers have previously shown that individual differences in measures of receptive language ability at age 12 are highly heritable. In the current study, the authors attempted to identify some of the genes responsible for the heritability of receptive language ability using a genome-wide association approach. Method The authors administered 4 Internet-based measures of receptive language (vocabulary, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics) to a sample of 2,329 twelve-year-olds for whom DNA and genome-wide genotyping were available. Nearly 700,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1 million imputed SNPs were included in a genome-wide association analysis of receptive language composite scores. Results No SNP associations met the demanding criterion of genome-wide significance that corrects for multiple testing across the genome (p < 5 × 10–8). The strongest SNP association did not replicate in an additional sample of 2,639 twelve-year-olds. Conclusions These results indicate that individual differences in receptive language ability in the general population do not reflect common genetic variants that account for more than 3% of the phenotypic variance. The search for genetic variants associated with language skill will require larger samples and additional methods to identify and functionally characterize the full spectrum of risk variants. PMID:24687471

  12. Genome-Wide Association Study in African-Americans with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Americans with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Harley, M.D., Ph.D...September 2012 – 31 August 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genome-Wide Association Study in African-Americans with Systemic Lupus ...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus ( lupus ) is a potentially deadly systemic autoimmune disease that disproportionately

  13. Genome-wide association study of maize identifies genes affecting leaf architecture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    U.S. maize yield has increased eightfold in the past 80 years with half of the improvement attributed to genetics. Changes in maize leaf angle and size provided a basis for more efficient light capture as plant densities increased. Through a genome wide association study (GWAS) of the maize nested a...

  14. Mixed linear model approach adapted for genome-wide association studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mixed linear model (MLM) methods have proven useful in controlling for population structure and relatedness within genome-wide association studies. However, MLM-based methods can be computationally challenging for large datasets. We report a compression approach, called ‘compressed MLM,’ that decrea...

  15. Genome-wide association study of swine farrowing traits. Part II: Bayesian analysis of marker data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reproductive efficiency has a great impact on the economic success of pork production. Number born alive (NBA) and average piglet birth weight (ABW) contribute greatly to reproductive efficiency. To better understand the underlying genetics of birth traits, a genome wide association study (GWAS) w...

  16. Implementing meta-analysis from genome-wide association studies for pork quality traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pork quality plays an important role in the meat processing industry, thus different methodologies have been implemented to elucidate the genetic architecture of traits affecting meat quality. One of the most common and widely used approaches is to perform genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Howe...

  17. Genome-wide association mapping of partial resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches in pea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide association mapping has recently emerged as a valuable approach to refine genetic basis of polygenic resistance to plant diseases, which are increasingly used in integrated strategies for durable crop protection. Aphanomyces euteiches is a soil borne pathogen of pea and other legumes wor...

  18. Genome-Wide Association Study of Receptive Language Ability of 12-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlaar, Nicole; Meaburn, Emma L.; Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Docherty, Sophia; Hanscombe, Ken B.; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Price, Thomas S.; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Researchers have previously shown that individual differences in measures of receptive language ability at age 12 are highly heritable. In the current study, the authors attempted to identify some of the genes responsible for the heritability of receptive language ability using a "genome-wide association" approach. Method: The…

  19. Genome-wide association of meat quality traits and tenderness in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pork quality has a large impact on consumer preference and perception of eating quality. A genome-wide association was performed for pork quality traits [intramuscular fat (IMF)], slice shear force (SSF), color attributes, purge, cooking loss, and pH] from 531 to 1,237 records on barrows and gilts o...

  20. Implementing Meta-analysis for genome-wide association studies of pork quality traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pork quality is a critical concern in the meat industry. Implementation of genome-wide association studies (GWA) allows identification of genomic regions that explain a substantial portion of the variation of relevant traits. It is also important to determine the consistency of results of GWA across...

  1. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association from genomic prediction models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A limitation of many genome-wide association studies (GWA) in animal breeding is that there are many loci with small effect sizes; thus, larger sample sizes (N) are required to guarantee suitable power of detection. To increase sample size, results from different GWA can be combined in a meta-analys...

  2. Methods for meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A limitation of many genome-wide association studies (GWA) in animal breeding is that there are many loci with small effect sizes; thus, larger sample sizes (N) are required to guarantee suitable power of detection. For increasing N, results from different GWA can be combined in a meta-analysis (MA-...

  3. Meta-analysis of genome wide association studies for pork quality traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Given the importance of pork quality in the meat processing industry, genome-wide association studies were performed for eight meat quality traits and also, a meta-analysis (MA) of GWA was implemented combining independent results from pig populations. Data from three pig datasets (USMARC, Commercia...

  4. Genome-wide association as a means to understanding the mammary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next-generation sequencing and related technologies have facilitated the creation of enormous public databases that catalogue genomic variation. These databases have facilitated a variety of approaches to discover new genes that regulate normal biology as well as disease. Genome wide association (...

  5. A genome-wide association study platform built on iPlant cyber-infrastructure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We demonstrated a flexible Genome-Wide Association (GWA) Study (GWAS) platform built upon the iPlant Collaborative Cyber-infrastructure. The platform supports big data management, sharing, and large scale study of both genotype and phenotype data on clusters. End users can add their own analysis too...

  6. Genome-wide association study of agronomic traits in common bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) using a global Andean diversity panel (ADP) of 237 genotypes of common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris was conducted to gain insight into the genetic architecture of several agronomic traits controlling phenology, biomass, yield components and seed yield. The panel wa...

  7. Genome-wide CNV analysis reveals variants associated with growth traits in Bos indicus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Apart from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), copy number variation (CNV) is another important type of genetic variation, which may affect growth traits and play key roles for the production of beef cattle. To date, no genome-wide association study (GWAS) for CNV and body traits in be...

  8. CNV-based genome wide association study reveals additional variants contributing to meat quality in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pork quality is important both to the meat processing industry and consumers’ purchasing attitudes. Copy number variation (CNV) is a burgeoning kind of variant that may influence meat quality. Herein, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed between CNVs and meat quality traits in swine....

  9. Genome wide search for variation associated with micronutrient density of developing rice grains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    "Omic" tools are rapidly being employed to delineate the biological framework controlling phenotypes of interest in crop species. An advanced understanding of the genetic basis for quantitative trait variation has been made possible through genome wide association studies (GWAS) that make use of gen...

  10. Genome-wide association analysis of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in common bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted to explore the genetic basis of variation for symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) and related traits in the Andean diversity panel (ADP) comprised of 259 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) genotypes. The ADP was evaluated for SNF and related traits in...

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment

    PubMed Central

    Okbay, Aysu; Beauchamp, Jonathan P.; Fontana, Mark A.; Lee, James J.; Pers, Tune H.; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Turley, Patrick; Chen, Guo-Bo; Emilsson, Valur; Meddens, S. Fleur W.; Oskarsson, Sven; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Thom, Kevin; Timshel, Pascal; de Vlaming, Ronald; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Bacelis, Jonas; Baumbach, Clemens; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Brandsma, Johannes H.; Concas, Maria Pina; Derringer, Jaime; Furlotte, Nicholas A.; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Girotto, Giorgia; Gupta, Richa; Hall, Leanne M.; Harris, Sarah E.; Hofer, Edith; Horikoshi, Momoko; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Kaasik, Kadri; Kalafati, Ioanna P.; Karlsson, Robert; Kong, Augustine; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J.; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Lind, Penelope A.; Lindgren, Karl-Oskar; Liu, Tian; Mangino, Massimo; Marten, Jonathan; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Michael B.; van der Most, Peter J.; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Payton, Antony; Pervjakova, Natalia; Peyrot, Wouter J.; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rueedi, Rico; Salvi, Erika; Schmidt, Börge; Schraut, Katharina E.; Shi, Jianxin; Smith, Albert V.; Poot, Raymond A.; Pourcain, Beate; Teumer, Alexander; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Verweij, Niek; Vuckovic, Dragana; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yang, Jingyun; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Zhihong; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Biino, Ginevra; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Boyle, Patricia A.; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Davies, Gail; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Deloukas, Panos; Demuth, Ilja; Ding, Jun; Eibich, Peter; Eisele, Lewin; Eklund, Niina; Evans68, David M.; Faul, Jessica D.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Forstner, Andreas J.; Gandin, Ilaria; Gunnarsson, Bjarni; Halldórsson, Bjarni V.; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Homuth, Georg; Horan, Michael A.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Jager, Philip L.; Joshi, Peter K.; Jugessur, Astanand; Kaakinen, Marika A.; Kähönen, Mika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Keltigangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M.; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kroh, Martin; Kutalik, Zoltan; Latvala, Antti; Launer, Lenore J.; Lebreton, Maël P.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lichtner, Peter; Liewald, David C.M.; Loukola, Anu; Madden, Pamela A.; Mägi, Reedik; Mäki-Opas, Tomi; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meddens, Gerardus A.; McMahon, George; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Milaneschi, Yusplitri; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Myhre, Ronny; Nelson, Christopher P.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Ollier, William E.R.; Palotie, Aarno; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Petrovic, Katja E.; Porteous, David J.; Räikkönen, Katri; Ring, Susan M.; Robino, Antonietta; Rostapshova, Olga; Rudan, Igor; Rustichini, Aldo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Schmidt, Helena; Scott, Rodney J.; Smith, Blair H.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Staessen, Jan A.; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Strauch, Konstantin; Terracciano, Antonio; Tobin, Martin D.; Ulivi, Sheila; Vaccargiu, Simona; Quaye, Lydia; van Rooij, Frank J.A.; Venturini, Cristina; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A.E.; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Vonk, Judith M.; Vozzi, Diego; Waage, Johannes; Ware, Erin B.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Attia, John R.; Bennett, David A.; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Bisgaard, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bultmann, Ute; Chabris, Christopher F.; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George V.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Franke, Barbara; Franke, Lude; Gasparini, Paolo; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gieger, Christian; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Gratten, Jacob; Groenen, Patrick J.F.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Hinds, David A.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hyppönen, Elina; Iacono, William G.; Jacobsson, Bo; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lehrer, Steven F.; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Pendleton, Neil; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H.; Perola, Markus; Pirastu, Nicola; Pirastu, Mario; Polasek, Ozren; Posthuma, Danielle; Power, Christine; Province, Michael A.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A. Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tiemeier, Henning; Tung, Joyce Y.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vitart, Veronique; Vollenweider, Peter; Weir, David R.; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Conley, Dalton C.; Krueger, Robert F.; Smith, George Davey; Hofman, Albert; Laibson, David I.; Medland, Sarah E.; Meyer, Michelle N.; Yang, Jian; Johannesson, Magnus; Visscher, Peter M.; Esko, Tõnu; Koellinger, Philipp D.; Cesarini, David; Benjamin, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Educational attainment (EA) is strongly influenced by social and other environmental factors, but genetic factors are also estimated to account for at least 20% of the variation across individuals1. We report the results of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for EA that extends our earlier discovery sample1,2 of 101,069 individuals to 293,723 individuals, and a replication in an independent sample of 111,349 individuals from the UK Biobank. We now identify 74 genome-wide significant loci associated with number of years of schooling completed. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with educational attainment are disproportionately found in genomic regions regulating gene expression in the fetal brain. Candidate genes are preferentially expressed in neural tissue, especially during the prenatal period, and enriched for biological pathways involved in neural development. Our findings demonstrate that, even for a behavioral phenotype that is mostly environmentally determined, a well-powered GWAS identifies replicable associated genetic variants that suggest biologically relevant pathways. Because EA is measured in large numbers of individuals, it will continue to be useful as a proxy phenotype in efforts to characterize the genetic influences of related phenotypes, including cognition and neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:27225129

  12. Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment.

    PubMed

    Okbay, Aysu; Beauchamp, Jonathan P; Fontana, Mark Alan; Lee, James J; Pers, Tune H; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Turley, Patrick; Chen, Guo-Bo; Emilsson, Valur; Meddens, S Fleur W; Oskarsson, Sven; Pickrell, Joseph K; Thom, Kevin; Timshel, Pascal; de Vlaming, Ronald; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Bacelis, Jonas; Baumbach, Clemens; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Brandsma, Johannes H; Pina Concas, Maria; Derringer, Jaime; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Galesloot, Tessel E; Girotto, Giorgia; Gupta, Richa; Hall, Leanne M; Harris, Sarah E; Hofer, Edith; Horikoshi, Momoko; Huffman, Jennifer E; Kaasik, Kadri; Kalafati, Ioanna P; Karlsson, Robert; Kong, Augustine; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J; deLeeuw, Christiaan; Lind, Penelope A; Lindgren, Karl-Oskar; Liu, Tian; Mangino, Massimo; Marten, Jonathan; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Michael B; van der Most, Peter J; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Payton, Antony; Pervjakova, Natalia; Peyrot, Wouter J; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rueedi, Rico; Salvi, Erika; Schmidt, Börge; Schraut, Katharina E; Shi, Jianxin; Smith, Albert V; Poot, Raymond A; St Pourcain, Beate; Teumer, Alexander; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Verweij, Niek; Vuckovic, Dragana; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yang, Jingyun; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Zhihong; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Biino, Ginevra; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Boyle, Patricia A; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Davies, Gail; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Deloukas, Panos; Demuth, Ilja; Ding, Jun; Eibich, Peter; Eisele, Lewin; Eklund, Niina; Evans, David M; Faul, Jessica D; Feitosa, Mary F; Forstner, Andreas J; Gandin, Ilaria; Gunnarsson, Bjarni; Halldórsson, Bjarni V; Harris, Tamara B; Heath, Andrew C; Hocking, Lynne J; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Homuth, Georg; Horan, Michael A; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Jager, Philip L; Joshi, Peter K; Jugessur, Astanand; Kaakinen, Marika A; Kähönen, Mika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Keltigangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kraja, Aldi T; Kroh, Martin; Kutalik, Zoltan; Latvala, Antti; Launer, Lenore J; Lebreton, Maël P; Levinson, Douglas F; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lichtner, Peter; Liewald, David C M; Loukola, Anu; Madden, Pamela A; Mägi, Reedik; Mäki-Opas, Tomi; Marioni, Riccardo E; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meddens, Gerardus A; McMahon, George; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Milaneschi, Yusplitri; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W; Myhre, Ronny; Nelson, Christopher P; Nyholt, Dale R; Ollier, William E R; Palotie, Aarno; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pedersen, Nancy L; Petrovic, Katja E; Porteous, David J; Räikkönen, Katri; Ring, Susan M; Robino, Antonietta; Rostapshova, Olga; Rudan, Igor; Rustichini, Aldo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Schmidt, Helena; Scott, Rodney J; Smith, Blair H; Smith, Jennifer A; Staessen, Jan A; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Strauch, Konstantin; Terracciano, Antonio; Tobin, Martin D; Ulivi, Sheila; Vaccargiu, Simona; Quaye, Lydia; van Rooij, Frank J A; Venturini, Cristina; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Vonk, Judith M; Vozzi, Diego; Waage, Johannes; Ware, Erin B; Willemsen, Gonneke; Attia, John R; Bennett, David A; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Bisgaard, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bültmann, Ute; Chabris, Christopher F; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Deary, Ian J; Dedoussis, George V; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan G; Franke, Barbara; Franke, Lude; Gasparini, Paolo; Gejman, Pablo V; Gieger, Christian; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Gratten, Jacob; Groenen, Patrick J F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Hinds, David A; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hyppönen, Elina; Iacono, William G; Jacobsson, Bo; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L R; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lehrer, Steven F; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Pendleton, Neil; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Perola, Markus; Pirastu, Nicola; Pirastu, Mario; Polasek, Ozren; Posthuma, Danielle; Power, Christine; Province, Michael A; Samani, Nilesh J; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tiemeier, Henning; Tung, Joyce Y; Uitterlinden, André G; Vitart, Veronique; Vollenweider, Peter; Weir, David R; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Conley, Dalton C; Krueger, Robert F; Davey Smith, George; Hofman, Albert; Laibson, David I; Medland, Sarah E; Meyer, Michelle N; Yang, Jian; Johannesson, Magnus; Visscher, Peter M; Esko, Tõnu; Koellinger, Philipp D; Cesarini, David; Benjamin, Daniel J

    2016-05-26

    Educational attainment is strongly influenced by social and other environmental factors, but genetic factors are estimated to account for at least 20% of the variation across individuals. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for educational attainment that extends our earlier discovery sample of 101,069 individuals to 293,723 individuals, and a replication study in an independent sample of 111,349 individuals from the UK Biobank. We identify 74 genome-wide significant loci associated with the number of years of schooling completed. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with educational attainment are disproportionately found in genomic regions regulating gene expression in the fetal brain. Candidate genes are preferentially expressed in neural tissue, especially during the prenatal period, and enriched for biological pathways involved in neural development. Our findings demonstrate that, even for a behavioural phenotype that is mostly environmentally determined, a well-powered GWAS identifies replicable associated genetic variants that suggest biologically relevant pathways. Because educational attainment is measured in large numbers of individuals, it will continue to be useful as a proxy phenotype in efforts to characterize the genetic influences of related phenotypes, including cognition and neuropsychiatric diseases.

  13. Reproduction and In-Depth Evaluation of Genome-Wide Association Studies and Genome-Wide Meta-analyses Using Summary Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yao-Fang; Ye, Chengyin; He, Ji; Han, Fang; Guo, Long-Biao; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Chen, Guo-Bo

    2017-01-01

    In line with open-source genetics, we report a novel linear regression technique for genome-wide association studies (GWAS), called Open GWAS algoriTHm (OATH). When individual-level data are not available, OATH can not only completely reproduce reported results from an experimental model, but also recover underreported results from other alternative models with a different combination of nuisance parameters using naïve summary statistics (NSS). OATH can also reliably evaluate all reported results in-depth (e.g., p-value variance analysis), as demonstrated for 42 Arabidopsis phenotypes under three magnesium (Mg) conditions. In addition, OATH can be used for consortium-driven genome-wide association meta-analyses (GWAMA), and can greatly improve the flexibility of GWAMA. A prototype of OATH is available in the Genetic Analysis Repository (https://github.com/gc5k/GEAR). PMID:28122950

  14. The mouse QTL map helps interpret human genome-wide association studies for HDL cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Magalie S; Lyons, Malcolm; Darvishi, Katayoon; Walsh, Kenneth; Sheehan, Susan; Amend, Sarah; Cox, Allison; Orho-Melander, Marju; Kathiresan, Sekar; Paigen, Beverly; Korstanje, Ron

    2011-06-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies represent a powerful strategy for identifying susceptibility genes for complex diseases in human populations but results must be confirmed and replicated. Because of the close homology between mouse and human genomes, the mouse can be used to add evidence to genes suggested by human studies. We used the mouse quantitative trait loci (QTL) map to interpret results from a GWA study for genes associated with plasma HDL cholesterol levels. We first positioned single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from a human GWA study on the genomic map for mouse HDL QTL. We then used mouse bioinformatics, sequencing, and expression studies to add evidence for one well-known HDL gene (Abca1) and three newly identified genes (Galnt2, Wwox, and Cdh13), thus supporting the results of the human study. For GWA peaks that occur in human haplotype blocks with multiple genes, we examined the homologous regions in the mouse to prioritize the genes using expression, sequencing, and bioinformatics from the mouse model, showing that some genes were unlikely candidates and adding evidence for candidate genes Mvk and Mmab in one haplotype block and Fads1 and Fads2 in the second haplotype block. Our study highlights the value of mouse genetics for evaluating genes found in human GWA studies.

  15. Genome-Wide Association Study of Down Syndrome-Associated Atrioventricular Septal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Dhanya; Zeng, Zhen; Locke, Adam E.; Mulle, Jennifer G.; Bean, Lora J.H.; Rosser, Tracie C.; Dooley, Kenneth J.; Cua, Clifford L.; Capone, George T.; Reeves, Roger H.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Cutler, David J.; Feingold, Eleanor; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Zwick, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the contribution of common genetic variants to Down syndrome−associated atrioventricular septal defect, a severe heart abnormality. Compared with the euploid population, infants with Down syndrome, or trisomy 21, have a 2000-fold increased risk of presenting with atrioventricular septal defects. The cause of this increased risk remains elusive. Here we present data from the largest heart study conducted to date on a trisomic background by using a carefully characterized collection of individuals from extreme ends of the phenotypic spectrum. We performed a genome-wide association study using logistic regression analysis on 452 individuals with Down syndrome, consisting of 210 cases with complete atrioventricular septal defects and 242 controls with structurally normal hearts. No individual variant achieved genome-wide significance. We identified four disomic regions (1p36.3, 5p15.31, 8q22.3, and 17q22) and two trisomic regions on chromosome 21 (around PDXK and KCNJ6 genes) that merit further investigation in large replication studies. Our data show that a few common genetic variants of large effect size (odds ratio >2.0) do not account for the elevated risk of Down syndrome−associated atrioventricular septal defects. Instead, multiple variants of low-to-moderate effect sizes may contribute to this elevated risk, highlighting the complex genetic architecture of atrioventricular septal defects even in the highly susceptible Down syndrome population. PMID:26194203

  16. Genome-Wide Association Study of Down Syndrome-Associated Atrioventricular Septal Defects.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Dhanya; Zeng, Zhen; Locke, Adam E; Mulle, Jennifer G; Bean, Lora J H; Rosser, Tracie C; Dooley, Kenneth J; Cua, Clifford L; Capone, George T; Reeves, Roger H; Maslen, Cheryl L; Cutler, David J; Feingold, Eleanor; Sherman, Stephanie L; Zwick, Michael E

    2015-07-20

    The goal of this study was to identify the contribution of common genetic variants to Down syndrome-associated atrioventricular septal defect, a severe heart abnormality. Compared with the euploid population, infants with Down syndrome, or trisomy 21, have a 2000-fold increased risk of presenting with atrioventricular septal defects. The cause of this increased risk remains elusive. Here we present data from the largest heart study conducted to date on a trisomic background by using a carefully characterized collection of individuals from extreme ends of the phenotypic spectrum. We performed a genome-wide association study using logistic regression analysis on 452 individuals with Down syndrome, consisting of 210 cases with complete atrioventricular septal defects and 242 controls with structurally normal hearts. No individual variant achieved genome-wide significance. We identified four disomic regions (1p36.3, 5p15.31, 8q22.3, and 17q22) and two trisomic regions on chromosome 21 (around PDXK and KCNJ6 genes) that merit further investigation in large replication studies. Our data show that a few common genetic variants of large effect size (odds ratio >2.0) do not account for the elevated risk of Down syndrome-associated atrioventricular septal defects. Instead, multiple variants of low-to-moderate effect sizes may contribute to this elevated risk, highlighting the complex genetic architecture of atrioventricular septal defects even in the highly susceptible Down syndrome population.

  17. Translating Lung Function Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) Findings: New Insights for Lung Biology.

    PubMed

    Kheirallah, A K; Miller, S; Hall, I P; Sayers, I

    2016-01-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases are a major cause of worldwide mortality and morbidity. Although hereditary severe deficiency of α1 antitrypsin (A1AD) has been established to cause emphysema, A1AD accounts for only ∼ 1% of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) cases. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful at detecting multiple loci harboring variants predicting the variation in lung function measures and risk of COPD. However, GWAS are incapable of distinguishing causal from noncausal variants. Several approaches can be used for functional translation of genetic findings. These approaches have the scope to identify underlying alleles and pathways that are important in lung function and COPD. Computational methods aim at effective functional variant prediction by combining experimentally generated regulatory information with associated region of the human genome. Classically, GWAS association follow-up concentrated on manipulation of a single gene. However association data has identified genetic variants in >50 loci predicting disease risk or lung function. Therefore there is a clear precedent for experiments that interrogate multiple candidate genes in parallel, which is now possible with genome editing technology. Gene expression profiling can be used for effective discovery of biological pathways underpinning gene function. This information may be used for informed decisions about cellular assays post genetic manipulation. Investigating respiratory phenotypes in human lung tissue and specific gene knockout mice is a valuable in vivo approach that can complement in vitro work. Herein, we review state-of-the-art in silico, in vivo, and in vitro approaches that may be used to accelerate functional translation of genetic findings.

  18. Genome-wide association study identifies common variants associated with pharmacokinetics of psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Athanasiu, Lavinia; Smorr, Lisa-Lena H; Tesli, Martin; Røssberg, Jan I; Sønderby, Ida E; Spigset, Olav; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A

    2015-08-01

    Individual variation in pharmacokinetics of psychotropic drugs, particularly metabolism, is an important factor to consider in pharmacological treatment in psychiatry. A large proportion of this variance is still not accounted for, but evidence so far suggests the involvement of genetic factors. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with concentration dose ratio (CDR) as sub-phenotype to assess metabolism rate of psychotropic drugs in a homogenous Norwegian sample of 1334 individuals diagnosed with a severe mental disorder. The GWAS revealed one genome-wide significant marker (rs16935279, p-value=3.95×10(-10), pperm=7.5×10(-4)) located in an intronic region of the lncRNA LOC100505718. Carriers of the minor allele have a lower metabolism rate of antiepileptic drugs compared to major allele carriers. In addition, several nominally significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and CDR for antipsychotic, antidepressant and antiepileptic drugs were disclosed. We consider standardised CDR to be a useful measure of the metabolism rate of a drug. The present findings indicate that common gene variants could affect the metabolism of psychotropic drugs. This warrants further investigations into the functional mechanisms involved as it may lead to identification of predictive markers as well as novel drug targets.

  19. Gene-Environment Interactions in Genome-Wide Association Studies: Current Approaches and New Directions

    PubMed Central

    Winham, Stacey J; Biernacka, Joanna M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Complex psychiatric traits have long been thought to be the result of a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and gene-environment interactions are thought to play a crucial role in behavioral phenotypes and the susceptibility and progression of psychiatric disorders. Candidate gene studies to investigate hypothesized gene-environment interactions are now fairly common in human genetic research, and with the shift towards genome-wide association studies, genome-wide gene-environment interaction studies are beginning to emerge. Methods We summarize the basic ideas behind gene-environment interaction, and provide an overview of possible study designs and traditional analysis methods in the context of genome-wide analysis. We then discuss novel approaches beyond the traditional strategy of analyzing the interaction between the environmental factor and each polymorphism individually. Results Two-step filtering approaches that reduce the number of polymorphisms tested for interactions can substantially increase the power of genome-wide gene-environment studies. New analytical methods including data-mining approaches, and gene-level and pathway-level analyses, also have the capacity to improve our understanding of how complex genetic and environmental factors interact to influence psychological and psychiatric traits. Such methods, however, have not yet been utilized much in behavioral and mental health research. Conclusions Although methods to investigate gene-environment interactions are available, there is a need for further development and extension of these methods to identify gene-environment interactions in the context of genome-wide association studies. These novel approaches need to be applied in studies of psychology and psychiatry. PMID:23808649

  20. Integrating Genome-Wide Association Study and Brain Expression Data Highlights Cell Adhesion Molecules and Purine Metabolism in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zimin; Xu, Meiling; Liao, Mingzhi; Jiang, Yongshuai; Jiang, Qinghua; Feng, Rennan; Zhang, Liangcai; Ma, Guoda; Wang, Guangyu; Chen, Zugen; Zhao, Bin; Sun, Tiansheng; Li, Keshen; Liu, Guiyou

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been used to investigate AD pathogenesis. However, a large proportion of AD heritability has yet to be explained. We previously identified the cell adhesion molecule (CAM) pathway as a consistent signal in two AD GWAS. However, it is unclear whether CAM is present in the Genetic and Environmental Risk for Alzheimer's Disease Consortium (GERAD) GWAS and brain expression GWAS. Meanwhile, we think integrating AD GWAS and AD brain expression datasets may provide complementary information to identify important pathways involved in AD. Here, we conducted a systems analysis using (1) KEGG pathways, (2) large-scale AD GWAS from GERAD (n = 11,789), (3) two brain expression GWAS datasets (n = 399) from the AD cerebellum and temporal cortex, and (4) previous results from pathway analysis of AD GWAS. Our results indicate that (1) CAM is a consistent signal in five AD GWAS; (2) CAM is the most significant signal in AD; (3) we confirmed previous AD risk pathways related to immune system and diseases, and cardiovascular disease, etc.; and (4) we highlighted the purine metabolism pathway in AD for the first time. We believe that our results may advance our understanding of AD mechanisms and will be very informative for future genetic studies in AD.

  1. HIV Genome-Wide Protein Associations: a Review of 30 Years of Research.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangdi; De Clercq, Erik

    2016-09-01

    The HIV genome encodes a small number of viral proteins (i.e., 16), invariably establishing cooperative associations among HIV proteins and between HIV and host proteins, to invade host cells and hijack their internal machineries. As a known example, the HIV envelope glycoprotein GP120 is closely associated with GP41 for viral entry. From a genome-wide perspective, a hypothesis can be worked out to determine whether 16 HIV proteins could develop 120 possible pairwise associations either by physical interactions or by functional associations mediated via HIV or host molecules. Here, we present the first systematic review of experimental evidence on HIV genome-wide protein associations using a large body of publications accumulated over the past 3 decades. Of 120 possible pairwise associations between 16 HIV proteins, at least 34 physical interactions and 17 functional associations have been identified. To achieve efficient viral replication and infection, HIV protein associations play essential roles (e.g., cleavage, inhibition, and activation) during the HIV life cycle. In either a dispensable or an indispensable manner, each HIV protein collaborates with another viral protein to accomplish specific activities that precisely take place at the proper stages of the HIV life cycle. In addition, HIV genome-wide protein associations have an impact on anti-HIV inhibitors due to the extensive cross talk between drug-inhibited proteins and other HIV proteins. Overall, this study presents for the first time a comprehensive overview of HIV genome-wide protein associations, highlighting meticulous collaborations between all viral proteins during the HIV life cycle.

  2. Genome-wide association analyses of quantitative traits: the GAW16 experience.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Saurabh

    2009-01-01

    The group that formed on the theme of genome-wide association analyses of quantitative traits (Group 2) in the Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 comprised eight sets of investigators. Three data sets were available: one on autoantibodies related to rheumatoid arthritis provided by the North American Rheumatoid Arthritis Consortium; the second on anthropometric, lipid, and biochemical measures provided by the Framingham Heart Study (FHS); and the third a simulated data set modeled after FHS. The different investigators in the group addressed a large set of statistical challenges and applied a wide spectrum of association methods in analyzing quantitative traits at the genome-wide level. While some previously reported genes were validated, some novel chromosomal regions provided significant evidence of association in multiple contributions in the group. In this report, we discuss the different strategies explored by the different investigators with the common goal of improving the power to detect association.

  3. Genome-wide association study in essential tremor identifies three new loci

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Stefanie H.; Girard, Simon L.; Hopfner, Franziska; Merner, Nancy D.; Bourassa, Cynthia V.; Lorenz, Delia; Clark, Lorraine N.; Tittmann, Lukas; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Klebe, Stephan; Hallett, Mark; Schneider, Susanne A.; Hodgkinson, Colin A.; Lieb, Wolfgang; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Poewe, Werner; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Seppi, Klaus; Rajput, Alex; Hussl, Anna; Rajput, Ali H.; Berg, Daniela; Dion, Patrick A.; Wurster, Isabel; Shulman, Joshua M.; Srulijes, Karin; Haubenberger, Dietrich; Pastor, Pau; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Postuma, Ronald B.; Bernard, Geneviève; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Dupré, Nicolas; Jankovic, Joseph; Strauch, Konstantin; Panisset, Michel; Winkelmann, Juliane; Testa, Claudia M.; Reischl, Eva; Zeuner, Kirsten E.; Ross, Owen A.; Arzberger, Thomas; Chouinard, Sylvain; Deuschl, Günther; Louis, Elan D.; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study of essential tremor, a common movement disorder characterized mainly by a postural and kinetic tremor of the upper extremities. Twin and family history studies show a high heritability for essential tremor. The molecular genetic determinants of essential tremor are unknown. We included 2807 patients and 6441 controls of European descent in our two-stage genome-wide association study. The 59 most significantly disease-associated markers of the discovery stage were genotyped in the replication stage. After Bonferroni correction two markers, one (rs10937625) located in the serine/threonine kinase STK32B and one (rs17590046) in the transcriptional coactivator PPARGC1A were associated with essential tremor. Three markers (rs12764057, rs10822974, rs7903491) in the cell-adhesion molecule CTNNA3 were significant in the combined analysis of both stages. The expression of STK32B was increased in the cerebellar cortex of patients and expression quantitative trait loci database mining showed association between the protective minor allele of rs10937625 and reduced expression in cerebellar cortex. We found no expression differences related to disease status or marker genotype for the other two genes. Replication of two lead single nucleotide polymorphisms of previous small genome-wide association studies (rs3794087 in SLC1A2, rs9652490 in LINGO1) did not confirm the association with essential tremor. PMID:27797806

  4. Genome-wide association study in essential tremor identifies three new loci.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stefanie H; Girard, Simon L; Hopfner, Franziska; Merner, Nancy D; Bourassa, Cynthia V; Lorenz, Delia; Clark, Lorraine N; Tittmann, Lukas; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I; Klebe, Stephan; Hallett, Mark; Schneider, Susanne A; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Lieb, Wolfgang; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Poewe, Werner; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Seppi, Klaus; Rajput, Alex; Hussl, Anna; Rajput, Ali H; Berg, Daniela; Dion, Patrick A; Wurster, Isabel; Shulman, Joshua M; Srulijes, Karin; Haubenberger, Dietrich; Pastor, Pau; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Postuma, Ronald B; Bernard, Geneviève; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Dupré, Nicolas; Jankovic, Joseph; Strauch, Konstantin; Panisset, Michel; Winkelmann, Juliane; Testa, Claudia M; Reischl, Eva; Zeuner, Kirsten E; Ross, Owen A; Arzberger, Thomas; Chouinard, Sylvain; Deuschl, Günther; Louis, Elan D; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Rouleau, Guy A

    2016-12-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study of essential tremor, a common movement disorder characterized mainly by a postural and kinetic tremor of the upper extremities. Twin and family history studies show a high heritability for essential tremor. The molecular genetic determinants of essential tremor are unknown. We included 2807 patients and 6441 controls of European descent in our two-stage genome-wide association study. The 59 most significantly disease-associated markers of the discovery stage were genotyped in the replication stage. After Bonferroni correction two markers, one (rs10937625) located in the serine/threonine kinase STK32B and one (rs17590046) in the transcriptional coactivator PPARGC1A were associated with essential tremor. Three markers (rs12764057, rs10822974, rs7903491) in the cell-adhesion molecule CTNNA3 were significant in the combined analysis of both stages. The expression of STK32B was increased in the cerebellar cortex of patients and expression quantitative trait loci database mining showed association between the protective minor allele of rs10937625 and reduced expression in cerebellar cortex. We found no expression differences related to disease status or marker genotype for the other two genes. Replication of two lead single nucleotide polymorphisms of previous small genome-wide association studies (rs3794087 in SLC1A2, rs9652490 in LINGO1) did not confirm the association with essential tremor.

  5. Genome-Wide Pathway Association Studies of Multiple Correlated Quantitative Phenotypes Using Principle Component Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Guo, Xiong; Wu, Shixun; Han, Jing; Liu, Yongjun; Shen, Hui; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide pathway association studies provide novel insight into the biological mechanism underlying complex diseases. Current pathway association studies primarily focus on single important disease phenotype, which is sometimes insufficient to characterize the clinical manifestations of complex diseases. We present a multi-phenotypes pathway association study(MPPAS) approach using principle component analysis(PCA). In our approach, PCA is first applied to multiple correlated quantitative phenotypes for extracting a set of orthogonal phenotypic components. The extracted phenotypic components are then used for pathway association analysis instead of original quantitative phenotypes. Four statistics were proposed for PCA-based MPPAS in this study. Simulations using the real data from the HapMap project were conducted to evaluate the power and type I error rates of PCA-based MPPAS under various scenarios considering sample sizes, additive and interactive genetic effects. A real genome-wide association study data set of bone mineral density (BMD) at hip and spine were also analyzed by PCA-based MPPAS. Simulation studies illustrated the performance of PCA-based MPPAS for identifying the causal pathways underlying complex diseases. Genome-wide MPPAS of BMD detected associations between BMD and KENNY_CTNNB1_TARGETS_UP as well as LONGEVITYPATHWAY pathways in this study. We aim to provide a applicable MPPAS approach, which may help to gain deep understanding the potential biological mechanism of association results for complex diseases. PMID:23285279

  6. Genetic risk factors for the development of allergic disease identified by genome-wide association

    PubMed Central

    Portelli, M A; Hodge, E; Sayers, I

    2015-01-01

    An increasing proportion of the worldwide population is affected by allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis (AR), atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic asthma and improved treatment options are needed particularly for severe, refractory disease. Allergic diseases are complex and development involves both environmental and genetic factors. Although the existence of a genetic component for allergy was first described almost 100 years ago, progress in gene identification has been hindered by lack of high throughput technologies to investigate genetic variation in large numbers of subjects. The development of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), a hypothesis-free method of interrogating large numbers of common variants spanning the entire genome in disease and non-disease subjects has revolutionised our understanding of the genetics of allergic disease. Susceptibility genes for asthma, AR and AD have now been identified with confidence, suggesting there are common and distinct genetic loci associated with these diseases, providing novel insights into potential disease pathways and mechanisms. Genes involved in both adaptive and innate immune mechanisms have been identified, notably including multiple genes involved in epithelial function/secretion, suggesting that the airway epithelium may be particularly important in asthma. Interestingly, concordance/discordance between the genetic factors driving allergic traits such as IgE levels and disease states such as asthma have further supported the accumulating evidence for heterogeneity in these diseases. While GWAS have been useful and continue to identify novel genes for allergic diseases through increased sample sizes and phenotype refinement, future approaches will integrate analyses of rare variants, epigenetic mechanisms and eQTL approaches, leading to greater insight into the genetic basis of these diseases. Gene identification will improve our understanding of disease mechanisms and generate potential

  7. Genome-wide Association and Functional Studies Identify a Role for IGFBP3 in Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Daniel S.; Cailotto, Frederic; Parimi, Neeta; Valdes, Ana M.; Castaño-Betancourt, Martha C.; Liu, Youfang; Kaplan, Robert C.; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Teumer, Alexander; Tranah, Gregory J.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Cummings, Steven R.; Orwoll, Eric S.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Renner, Jordan B.; Jordan, Joanne M.; Doherty, Michael; Doherty, Sally A.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Spector, Tim D.; Lories, Rik J.; Lane, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify genetic associations with hip osteoarthritis (HOA), we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of HOA. Methods The GWAS meta-analysis included approximately 2.5 million imputed HapMap single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). HOA cases and controls defined radiographically and by total hip replacement were selected from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study and the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF) (654 cases and 4697 controls, combined). Replication of genome-wide significant SNP associations (P-value ≤ 5x10−8) was examined in five studies (3243 cases and 6891 controls, combined). Functional studies were performed using in vitro models of chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Results The A allele of rs788748, located 65 kb upstream of the IGFBP3 gene, was associated with lower HOA odds at the genome-wide significance level in the discovery stage (OR = 0.71, P-value = 2x10−8). The association replicated in five studies (OR = 0.92, P-value = 0.020), but the joint analysis of discovery and replication results was not genome-wide significant (P-value = 1x10−6). In separate study populations, the rs788748 A allele was also associated with lower circulating IGFBP3 protein levels (P-value = 4x10−13), suggesting that this SNP or a variant in linkage disequilibrium (LD) could be an IGFBP3 regulatory variant. Results from functional studies were consistent with association results. Chondrocyte hypertrophy, a deleterious event in OA pathogenesis, was largely prevented upon IGFBP3 knockdown in chondrocytes. Furthermore, IGFBP3 overexpression induced cartilage catabolism and osteogenic differentiation. Conclusions Results from GWAS and functional studies provided suggestive links between IGFBP3 and HOA. PMID:24928840

  8. A genome-wide association study of sleep habits and insomnia.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Enda M; Gehrman, Philip R; Medland, Sarah E; Nyholt, Dale R; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Hickie, Ian B; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Henders, Anjali K; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Wray, Naomi R

    2013-07-01

    Several aspects of sleep behavior such as timing, duration and quality have been demonstrated to be heritable. To identify common variants that influence sleep traits in the population, we conducted a genome-wide association study of six sleep phenotypes assessed by questionnaire in a sample of 2,323 individuals from the Australian Twin Registry. Genotyping was performed on the Illumina 317, 370, and 610K arrays and the SNPs in common between platforms were used to impute non-genotyped SNPs. We tested for association with more than 2,000,000 common polymorphisms across the genome. While no SNPs reached the genome-wide significance threshold, we identified a number of associations in plausible candidate genes. Most notably, a group of SNPs in the third intron of the CACNA1C gene ranked as most significant in the analysis of sleep latency (P = 1.3 × 10⁻⁶). We attempted to replicate this association in an independent sample from the Chronogen Consortium (n = 2,034), but found no evidence of association (P = 0.73). We have identified several other suggestive associations that await replication in an independent sample. We did not replicate the results from previous genome-wide analyses of self-reported sleep phenotypes after correction for multiple testing.

  9. Replicability and robustness of genome-wide-association studies for behavioral traits.

    PubMed

    Rietveld, Cornelius A; Conley, Dalton; Eriksson, Nicholas; Esko, Tõnu; Medland, Sarah E; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Yang, Jian; Boardman, Jason D; Chabris, Christopher F; Dawes, Christopher T; Domingue, Benjamin W; Hinds, David A; Johannesson, Magnus; Kiefer, Amy K; Laibson, David; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mountain, Joanna L; Oskarsson, Sven; Rostapshova, Olga; Teumer, Alexander; Tung, Joyce Y; Visscher, Peter M; Benjamin, Daniel J; Cesarini, David; Koellinger, Philipp D

    2014-11-01

    A recent genome-wide-association study of educational attainment identified three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whose associations, despite their small effect sizes (each R (2) ≈ 0.02%), reached genome-wide significance (p < 5 × 10(-8)) in a large discovery sample and were replicated in an independent sample (p < .05). The study also reported associations between educational attainment and indices of SNPs called "polygenic scores." In three studies, we evaluated the robustness of these findings. Study 1 showed that the associations with all three SNPs were replicated in another large (N = 34,428) independent sample. We also found that the scores remained predictive (R (2) ≈ 2%) in regressions with stringent controls for stratification (Study 2) and in new within-family analyses (Study 3). Our results show that large and therefore well-powered genome-wide-association studies can identify replicable genetic associations with behavioral traits. The small effect sizes of individual SNPs are likely to be a major contributing factor explaining the striking contrast between our results and the disappointing replication record of most candidate-gene studies.

  10. Genome-wide association analyses identify 13 new susceptibility loci for generalized vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ying; Birlea, Stanca A; Fain, Pamela R; Ferrara, Tracey M; Ben, Songtao; Riccardi, Sheri L; Cole, Joanne B; Gowan, Katherine; Holland, Paulene J; Bennett, Dorothy C; Luiten, Rosalie M; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; van der Veen, JP Wietze; Hartmann, Anke; Eichner, Saskia; Schuler, Gerold; van Geel, Nanja; Lambert, Jo; Kemp, E Helen; Gawkrodger, David J; Weetman, Anthony P; Taïeb, Alain; Jouary, Thomas; Ezzedine, Khaled; Wallace, Margaret R; McCormack, Wayne T; Picardo, Mauro; Leone, Giovanni; Overbeck, Andreas; Silverberg, Nanette B; Spritz, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    In previous linkage and genome-wide association studies we identified 17 susceptibility loci for generalized vitiligo. By a second genome-wide association study, meta-analysis, and independent replication study, we have now identified 13 additional vitiligo-associated loci, including OCA2-HERC2, a region of 16q24.3 containing MC1R, a region of chromosome 11q21 near TYR, several immunoregulatory loci including IFIH1, CD80, CLNK, BACH2, SLA, CASP7, CD44, IKZF4, SH2B3, and a region of 22q13.2 where the causal gene remains uncertain. Functional pathway analysis shows that most vitiligo susceptibility loci encode immunoregulatory proteins or melanocyte components that likely mediate immune targeting and genetic relationships among vitiligo, malignant melanoma, and normal variation of eye, skin, and hair color. PMID:22561518

  11. A GENOME-WIDE LINKAGE AND ASSOCIATION SCAN REVEALS NOVEL LOCI FOR AUTISM

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Lauren A.; Arking, Dan E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Although autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, attempts to identify specific susceptibility genes have thus far met with limited success 1. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using half a million or more markers, particularly those with very large sample sizes achieved through meta-analysis, have shown great success in mapping genes for other complex genetic traits (http://www.genome.gov/26525384). Consequently, we initiated a linkage and association mapping study using half a million genome-wide SNPs in a common set of 1,031 multiplex autism families (1,553 affected offspring). We identified regions of suggestive and significant linkage on chromosomes 6q27 and 20p13, respectively. Initial analysis did not yield genome-wide significant associations; however, genotyping of top hits in additional families revealed a SNP on chromosome 5p15 (between SEMA5A and TAS2R1) that was significantly associated with autism (P = 2 × 10−7). We also demonstrated that expression of SEMA5A is reduced in brains from autistic patients, further implicating SEMA5A as an autism susceptibility gene. The linkage regions reported here provide targets for rare variation screening while the discovery of a single novel association demonstrates the action of common variants. PMID:19812673

  12. Genome-wide association study of toxic metals and trace elements reveals novel associations.

    PubMed

    Ng, Esther; Lind, P Monica; Lindgren, Cecilia; Ingelsson, Erik; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew; Lind, Lars

    2015-08-15

    The accumulation of toxic metals in the human body is influenced by exposure and mechanisms involved in metabolism, some of which may be under genetic control. This is the first genome-wide association study to investigate variants associated with whole blood levels of a range of toxic metals. Eleven toxic metals and trace elements (aluminium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, chromium, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead and zinc) were assayed in a cohort of 949 individuals using mass spectrometry. DNA samples were genotyped on the Infinium Omni Express bead microarray and imputed up to reference panels from the 1000 Genomes Project. Analyses revealed two regions associated with manganese level at genome-wide significance, mapping to 4q24 and 1q41. The lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 4q24 locus was rs13107325 (P-value = 5.1 × 10(-11), β = -0.77), located in an exon of SLC39A8, which encodes a protein involved in manganese and zinc transport. The lead SNP in the 1q41 locus is rs1776029 (P-value = 2.2 × 10(-14), β = -0.46). The SNP lies within the intronic region of SLC30A10, another transporter protein. Among other metals, the loci 6q14.1 and 3q26.32 were associated with cadmium and mercury levels (P = 1.4 × 10(-10), β = -1.2 and P = 1.8 × 10(-9), β = -1.8, respectively). Whole blood measurements of toxic metals are associated with genetic variants in metal transporter genes and others. This is relevant in inferring metabolic pathways of metals and identifying subsets of individuals who may be more susceptible to metal toxicity.

  13. Genome-wide association study of toxic metals and trace elements reveals novel associations

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Esther; Lind, P. Monica; Lindgren, Cecilia; Ingelsson, Erik; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew; Lind, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of toxic metals in the human body is influenced by exposure and mechanisms involved in metabolism, some of which may be under genetic control. This is the first genome-wide association study to investigate variants associated with whole blood levels of a range of toxic metals. Eleven toxic metals and trace elements (aluminium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, chromium, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead and zinc) were assayed in a cohort of 949 individuals using mass spectrometry. DNA samples were genotyped on the Infinium Omni Express bead microarray and imputed up to reference panels from the 1000 Genomes Project. Analyses revealed two regions associated with manganese level at genome-wide significance, mapping to 4q24 and 1q41. The lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 4q24 locus was rs13107325 (P-value = 5.1 × 10−11, β = −0.77), located in an exon of SLC39A8, which encodes a protein involved in manganese and zinc transport. The lead SNP in the 1q41 locus is rs1776029 (P-value = 2.2 × 10−14, β = −0.46). The SNP lies within the intronic region of SLC30A10, another transporter protein. Among other metals, the loci 6q14.1 and 3q26.32 were associated with cadmium and mercury levels (P = 1.4 × 10−10, β = −1.2 and P = 1.8 × 10−9, β = −1.8, respectively). Whole blood measurements of toxic metals are associated with genetic variants in metal transporter genes and others. This is relevant in inferring metabolic pathways of metals and identifying subsets of individuals who may be more susceptible to metal toxicity. PMID:26025379

  14. Sniffing out significant “Pee values”: genome wide association study of asparagus anosmia

    PubMed Central

    Markt, Sarah C; Nuttall, Elizabeth; Turman, Constance; Sinnott, Jennifer; Rimm, Eric B; Ecsedy, Ethan; Unger, Robert H; Fall, Katja; Finn, Stephen; Jensen, Majken K; Rider, Jennifer R; Kraft, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the inherited factors associated with the ability to smell asparagus metabolites in urine. Design Genome wide association study. Setting Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study cohorts. Participants 6909 men and women of European-American descent with available genetic data from genome wide association studies. Main outcome measure Participants were characterized as asparagus smellers if they strongly agreed with the prompt “after eating asparagus, you notice a strong characteristic odor in your urine,” and anosmic if otherwise. We calculated per-allele estimates of asparagus anosmia for about nine million single nucleotide polymorphisms using logistic regression. P values <5×10-8 were considered as genome wide significant. Results 58.0% of men (n=1449/2500) and 61.5% of women (n=2712/4409) had anosmia. 871 single nucleotide polymorphisms reached genome wide significance for asparagus anosmia, all in a region on chromosome 1 (1q44: 248139851-248595299) containing multiple genes in the olfactory receptor 2 (OR2) family. Conditional analyses revealed three independent markers associated with asparagus anosmia: rs13373863, rs71538191, and rs6689553. Conclusion A large proportion of people have asparagus anosmia. Genetic variation near multiple olfactory receptor genes is associated with the ability of an individual to smell the metabolites of asparagus in urine. Future replication studies are necessary before considering targeted therapies to help anosmic people discover what they are missing. PMID:27965198

  15. A guide to genome-wide association analysis and post-analytic interrogation.

    PubMed

    Reed, Eric; Nunez, Sara; Kulp, David; Qian, Jing; Reilly, Muredach P; Foulkes, Andrea S

    2015-12-10

    This tutorial is a learning resource that outlines the basic process and provides specific software tools for implementing a complete genome-wide association analysis. Approaches to post-analytic visualization and interrogation of potentially novel findings are also presented. Applications are illustrated using the free and open-source R statistical computing and graphics software environment, Bioconductor software for bioinformatics and the UCSC Genome Browser. Complete genome-wide association data on 1401 individuals across 861,473 typed single nucleotide polymorphisms from the PennCATH study of coronary artery disease are used for illustration. All data and code, as well as additional instructional resources, are publicly available through the Open Resources in Statistical Genomics project: http://www.stat-gen.org.

  16. Quality control and conduct of genome-wide association meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Thomas W; Day, Felix R; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Wood, Andrew R; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Ferreira, Teresa; Fall, Tove; Graff, Mariaelisa; Justice, Anne E; Luan, Jian'an; Gustafsson, Stefan; Randall, Joshua C; Vedantam, Sailaja; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Scherag, André; Esko, Tonu; Kutalik, Zoltán; Heid, Iris M; Loos, Ruth J F

    2014-05-01

    Rigorous organization and quality control (QC) are necessary to facilitate successful genome-wide association meta-analyses (GWAMAs) of statistics aggregated across multiple genome-wide association studies. This protocol provides guidelines for (i) organizational aspects of GWAMAs, and for (ii) QC at the study file level, the meta-level across studies and the meta-analysis output level. Real-world examples highlight issues experienced and solutions developed by the GIANT Consortium that has conducted meta-analyses including data from 125 studies comprising more than 330,000 individuals. We provide a general protocol for conducting GWAMAs and carrying out QC to minimize errors and to guarantee maximum use of the data. We also include details for the use of a powerful and flexible software package called EasyQC. Precise timings will be greatly influenced by consortium size. For consortia of comparable size to the GIANT Consortium, this protocol takes a minimum of about 10 months to complete.

  17. Quality control and conduct of genome-wide association meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Thomas W; Day, Felix R; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Wood, Andrew R; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Ferreira, Teresa; Fall, Tove; Graff, Mariaelisa; Justice, Anne E; Luan, Jian'an; Gustafsson, Stefan; Randall, Joshua C; Vedantam, Sailaja; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Scherag, André; Esko, Tonu; Kutalik, Zoltán; Heid, Iris M; Loos, Ruth JF

    2014-01-01

    Rigorous organization and quality control (QC) are necessary to facilitate successful genome-wide association meta-analyses (GWAMAs) of statistics aggregated across multiple genome-wide association studies. This protocol provides guidelines for [1] organizational aspects of GWAMAs, and for [2] QC at the study file level, the meta-level across studies, and the meta-analysis output level. Real–world examples highlight issues experienced and solutions developed by the GIANT Consortium that has conducted meta-analyses including data from 125 studies comprising more than 330,000 individuals. We provide a general protocol for conducting GWAMAs and carrying out QC to minimize errors and to guarantee maximum use of the data. We also include details for use of a powerful and flexible software package called EasyQC. For consortia of comparable size to the GIANT consortium, the present protocol takes a minimum of about 10 months to complete. PMID:24762786

  18. Genome-wide association study for semen quality traits in German Warmblood stallions.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Maren; Metzger, Julia; Martinsson, Gunilla; Sieme, Harald; Distl, Ottmar

    2016-08-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study for semen quality traits in 139 German Warmblood stallions. Stallions were genotyped using the Illumina equine SNP50 Beadchip. Traits analysed were de-regressed estimated breeding values (EBVs) for gel-free volume, sperm concentration, total number of sperm, progressive motility and the total number of progressively motile sperm. The GWAS revealed 29 SNPs on 12 different chromosomes as genome-wide significantly associated with semen quality traits. For ten genomic regions we could retrieve candidate genes influencing stallion fertility. Among the candidate genes, we could find the genes encoding cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISP1, CRISP2 and CRISP3). This was the first GWAS in horses performed for semen quality traits.

  19. Genome-wide association study for wool production traits in a Chinese Merino sheep population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhipeng; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Hua; Wang, Shouzhi; Rong, Enguang; Pei, Wenyu; Li, Hui; Wang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide a powerful approach for identifying quantitative trait loci without prior knowledge of location or function. To identify loci associated with wool production traits, we performed a genome-wide association study on a total of 765 Chinese Merino sheep (JunKen type) genotyped with 50 K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In the present study, five wool production traits were examined: fiber diameter, fiber diameter coefficient of variation, fineness dispersion, staple length and crimp. We detected 28 genome-wide significant SNPs for fiber diameter, fiber diameter coefficient of variation, fineness dispersion, and crimp trait in the Chinese Merino sheep. About 43% of the significant SNP markers were located within known or predicted genes, including YWHAZ, KRTCAP3, TSPEAR, PIK3R4, KIF16B, PTPN3, GPRC5A, DDX47, TCF9, TPTE2, EPHA5 and NBEA genes. Our results not only confirm the results of previous reports, but also provide a suite of novel SNP markers and candidate genes associated with wool traits. Our findings will be useful for exploring the genetic control of wool traits in sheep.

  20. Meta-analysis of sex-specific genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Magi, Reedik; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P

    2010-12-01

    Despite the success of genome-wide association studies, much of the genetic contribution to complex human traits is still unexplained. One potential source of genetic variation that may contribute to this "missing heritability" is that which differs in magnitude and/or direction between males and females, which could result from sexual dimorphism in gene expression. Such sex-differentiated effects are common in model organisms, and are becoming increasingly evident in human complex traits through large-scale male- and female-specific meta-analyses. In this article, we review the methodology for meta-analysis of sex-specific genome-wide association studies, and propose a sex-differentiated test of association with quantitative or dichotomous traits, which allows for heterogeneity of allelic effects between males and females. We perform detailed simulations to compare the power of the proposed sex-differentiated meta-analysis with the more traditional "sex-combined" approach, which is ambivalent to gender. The results of this study highlight only a small loss in power for the sex-differentiated meta-analysis when the allelic effects of the causal variant are the same in males and females. However, over a range of models of heterogeneity in allelic effects between genders, our sex-differentiated meta-analysis strategy offers substantial gains in power, and thus has the potential to discover novel loci contributing effects to complex human traits with existing genome-wide association data.

  1. Quality control and quality assurance in genotypic data for genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, Cathy C.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Mirel, Daniel B.; Pugh, Elizabeth W.; Bierut, Laura J.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boehm, Frederick; Caporaso, Neil E.; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Gabriel, Stacy B.; Harris, Emily L.; Hu, Frank B.; Jacobs, Kevin; Kraft, Peter; Landi, Maria Teresa; Lumley, Thomas; Manolio, Teri A.; McHugh, Caitlin; Painter, Ian; Paschall, Justin; Rice, John P.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Zheng, Xiuwen; Weir, Bruce S.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide scans of nucleotide variation in human subjects are providing an increasing number of replicated associations with complex disease traits. Most of the variants detected have small effects and, collectively, they account for a small fraction of the total genetic variance. Very large sample sizes are required to identify and validate findings. In this situation, even small sources of systematic or random error can cause spurious results or obscure real effects. The need for careful attention to data quality has been appreciated for some time in this field, and a number of strategies for quality control and quality assurance (QC/QA) have been developed. Here we extend these methods and describe a system of QC/QA for genotypic data in genome-wide association studies. This system includes some new approaches that (1) combine analysis of allelic probe intensities and called genotypes to distinguish gender misidentification from sex chromosome aberrations, (2) detect autosomal chromosome aberrations that may affect genotype calling accuracy, (3) infer DNA sample quality from relatedness and allelic intensities, (4) use duplicate concordance to infer SNP quality, (5) detect genotyping artifacts from dependence of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) test p-values on allelic frequency, and (6) demonstrate sensitivity of principal components analysis (PCA) to SNP selection. The methods are illustrated with examples from the ‘Gene Environment Association Studies’ (GENEVA) program. The results suggest several recommendations for QC/QA in the design and execution of genome-wide association studies. PMID:20718045

  2. Genome-wide association analysis of age at onset and psychotic symptoms in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Belmonte Mahon, Pamela; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Goes, Fernando S; Seifuddin, Fayaz; Steele, Jo; Lee, Phil Hyoun; Huang, Jie; Hamshere, Marian L; Depaulo, J Raymond; Kelsoe, John R; Rietschel, Marcella; Nöthen, Markus; Cichon, Sven; Gurling, Hugh; Purcell, Shaun; Smoller, Jordan W; Craddock, Nick; Schulze, Thomas G; McMahon, Francis J; Potash, James B; Zandi, Peter P

    2011-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several susceptibility loci for bipolar disorder (BP), most notably ANK3. However, most of the inherited risk for BP remains unexplained. One reason for the limited success may be the genetic heterogeneity of BP. Clinical sub-phenotypes of BP may identify more etiologically homogeneous subsets of patients, which can be studied with increased power to detect genetic variation. Here, we report on a mega-analysis of two widely studied sub-phenotypes of BP, age at onset and psychotic symptoms, which are familial and clinically significant. We combined data from three GWAS: NIMH Bipolar Disorder Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN-BP), NIMH Bipolar Disorder Genome Study (BiGS), and a German sample. The combined sample consisted of 2,836 BP cases with information on sub-phenotypes and 2,744 controls. Imputation was performed, resulting in 2.3 million SNPs available for analysis. No SNP reached genome-wide significance for either sub-phenotype. In addition, no SNP reached genome-wide significance in a meta-analysis with an independent replication sample. We had 80% power to detect associations with a common SNP at an OR of 1.6 for psychotic symptoms and a mean difference of 1.8 years in age at onset. Age at onset and psychotic symptoms in BP may be influenced by many genes of smaller effect sizes or other variants not measured well by SNP arrays, such as rare alleles.

  3. On the analysis of a repeated measure design in genome-wide association analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young; Park, Suyeon; Moon, Sanghoon; Lee, Juyoung; Elston, Robert C; Lee, Woojoo; Won, Sungho

    2014-11-28

    Longitudinal data enables detecting the effect of aging/time, and as a repeated measures design is statistically more efficient compared to cross-sectional data if the correlations between repeated measurements are not large. In particular, when genotyping cost is more expensive than phenotyping cost, the collection of longitudinal data can be an efficient strategy for genetic association analysis. However, in spite of these advantages, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with longitudinal data have rarely been analyzed taking this into account. In this report, we calculate the required sample size to achieve 80% power at the genome-wide significance level for both longitudinal and cross-sectional data, and compare their statistical efficiency. Furthermore, we analyzed the GWAS of eight phenotypes with three observations on each individual in the Korean Association Resource (KARE). A linear mixed model allowing for the correlations between observations for each individual was applied to analyze the longitudinal data, and linear regression was used to analyze the first observation on each individual as cross-sectional data. We found 12 novel genome-wide significant disease susceptibility loci that were then confirmed in the Health Examination cohort, as well as some significant interactions between age/sex and SNPs.

  4. Genome-wide association study in Chinese identifies novel loci for blood pressure and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiangfeng; Wang, Laiyuan; Lin, Xu; Huang, Jianfeng; Charles Gu, C.; He, Meian; Shen, Hongbing; He, Jiang; Zhu, Jingwen; Li, Huaixing; Hixson, James E.; Wu, Tangchun; Dai, Juncheng; Lu, Ling; Shen, Chong; Chen, Shufeng; He, Lin; Mo, Zengnan; Hao, Yongchen; Mo, Xingbo; Yang, Xueli; Li, Jianxin; Cao, Jie; Chen, Jichun; Fan, Zhongjie; Li, Ying; Zhao, Liancheng; Li, Hongfan; Lu, Fanghong; Yao, Cailiang; Yu, Lin; Xu, Lihua; Mu, Jianjun; Wu, Xianping; Deng, Ying; Hu, Dongsheng; Zhang, Weidong; Ji, Xu; Guo, Dongshuang; Guo, Zhirong; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Yang, Zili; Wang, Renping; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Xiaoyang; Yan, Weili; Sun, Ningling; Gao, Pingjin; Gu, Dongfeng

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a common disorder and the leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature deaths worldwide. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in the European population have identified multiple chromosomal regions associated with blood pressure, and the identified loci altogether explain only a small fraction of the variance for blood pressure. The differences in environmental exposures and genetic background between Chinese and European populations might suggest potential different pathways of blood pressure regulation. To identify novel genetic variants affecting blood pressure variation, we conducted a meta-analysis of GWASs of blood pressure and hypertension in 11 816 subjects followed by replication studies including 69 146 additional individuals. We identified genome-wide significant (P < 5.0 × 10−8) associations with blood pressure, which included variants at three new loci (CACNA1D, CYP21A2, and MED13L) and a newly discovered variant near SLC4A7. We also replicated 14 previously reported loci, 8 (CASZ1, MOV10, FGF5, CYP17A1, SOX6, ATP2B1, ALDH2, and JAG1) at genome-wide significance, and 6 (FIGN, ULK4, GUCY1A3, HFE, TBX3-TBX5, and TBX3) at a suggestive level of P = 1.81 × 10−3 to 5.16 × 10−8. These findings provide new mechanistic insights into the regulation of blood pressure and potential targets for treatments. PMID:25249183

  5. A twin study of breastfeeding with a preliminary genome wide association scan

    PubMed Central

    Colodro-Conde, L.; Zhu, G.; Power, R. A.; Henders, A.; Heath, A.C.; Madden, P.A.F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Medland, S. E.; Ordoñana, J.R.; Martin, N.G.

    2015-01-01

    Breastfeeding has been an important survival trait during human history, though it has long been recognised that individuals differ in their exact breastfeeding behaviour. Here our aims were, first, to explore to what extent genetic and environmental influences contributed to the individual differences in breastfeeding behaviour; second, to detect possible genetic variants related to breastfeeding; and lastly, to test if the genetic variants associated with breastfeeding have been previously found to be related with breast size. Data were collected from a large community-based cohort of Australian twins, with 3,364 women for the twin modelling analyses and 1,521 of them included in the genome wide association study. Monozygotic twin correlations (rMZ = .52, 95% CI .46 – .57) were larger than dizygotic twin correlations (rDZ = .35, 95% CI .25 – .43) and the best-fitting model was the one composed by additive genetics and unique environmental factors, explaining 53% and 47% of the variance in breastfeeding behaviour, respectively. No breastfeeding-related genetic variants reached genome-wide significance. The polygenic risk score analyses showed no significant results, suggesting breast size does not influence breastfeeding. This study confers a replication of a previous one exploring the sources of variance of breastfeeding and, to our knowledge, is the first one to conduct a Genome-Wide Association Study on breastfeeding and look at the overlap with variants for breast size. PMID:25475840

  6. Unraveling the Genetic Etiology of Adult Antisocial Behavior: A Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Tielbeek, Jorim J.; Medland, Sarah E.; Benyamin, Beben; Byrne, Enda M.; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wray, Naomi R.; Verweij, Karin J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Crime poses a major burden for society. The heterogeneous nature of criminal behavior makes it difficult to unravel its causes. Relatively little research has been conducted on the genetic influences of criminal behavior. The few twin and adoption studies that have been undertaken suggest that about half of the variance in antisocial behavior can be explained by genetic factors. In order to identify the specific common genetic variants underlying this behavior, we conduct the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) on adult antisocial behavior. Our sample comprised a community sample of 4816 individuals who had completed a self-report questionnaire. No genetic polymorphisms reached genome-wide significance for association with adult antisocial behavior. In addition, none of the traditional candidate genes can be confirmed in our study. While not genome-wide significant, the gene with the strongest association (p-value = 8.7×10−5) was DYRK1A, a gene previously related to abnormal brain development and mental retardation. Future studies should use larger, more homogeneous samples to disentangle the etiology of antisocial behavior. Biosocial criminological research allows a more empirically grounded understanding of criminal behavior, which could ultimately inform and improve current treatment strategies. PMID:23077488

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies novel loci predisposing to cutaneous melanoma†

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Christopher I.; Wang, Li-E; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Chen, Wei V.; Fang, Shenying; Kosoy, Roman; Zhang, Mingfeng; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Vattathil, Selina; Schacherer, Christopher W.; Gardner, Julie M.; Wang, Yuling; Tim Bishop, D.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; MacGregor, Stuart; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Duffy, David L.; Mann, Graham J.; Cust, Anne; Hopper, John; Brown, Kevin M.; Grimm, Elizabeth A.; Xu, Yaji; Han, Younghun; Jing, Kaiyan; McHugh, Caitlin; Laurie, Cathy C.; Doheny, Kim F.; Pugh, Elizabeth W.; Seldin, Michael F.; Han, Jiali; Wei, Qingyi

    2011-01-01

    We performed a multistage genome-wide association study of melanoma. In a discovery cohort of 1804 melanoma cases and 1026 controls, we identified loci at chromosomes 15q13.1 (HERC2/OCA2 region) and 16q24.3 (MC1R) regions that reached genome-wide significance within this study and also found strong evidence for genetic effects on susceptibility to melanoma from markers on chromosome 9p21.3 in the p16/ARF region and on chromosome 1q21.3 (ARNT/LASS2/ANXA9 region). The most significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 15q13.1 locus (rs1129038 and rs12913832) lie within a genomic region that has profound effects on eye and skin color; notably, 50% of variability in eye color is associated with variation in the SNP rs12913832. Because eye and skin colors vary across European populations, we further evaluated the associations of the significant SNPs after carefully adjusting for European substructure. We also evaluated the top 10 most significant SNPs by using data from three other genome-wide scans. Additional in silico data provided replication of the findings from the most significant region on chromosome 1q21.3 rs7412746 (P = 6 × 10−10). Together, these data identified several candidate genes for additional studies to identify causal variants predisposing to increased risk for developing melanoma. PMID:21926416

  8. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Two Susceptibility Loci for Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Sharon A.; Mirabello, Lisa; Wang, Zhaoming; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gorlick, Richard; Khanna, Chand; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Andrulis, Irene L.; Wunder, Jay S.; Gokgoz, Nalan; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Lecanda, Fernando; Kurucu, Nilgün; Ilhan, Inci Ergurhan; Sari, Neriman; Serra, Massimo; Hattinger, Claudia; Picci, Piero; Spector, Logan; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Marina, Neyssa; de Toledo, Silvia Regina Caminada; Petrilli, Antonio S.; Amary, Maria Fernanda; Halai, Dina; Thomas, David M.; Douglass, Chester; Meltzer, Paul S.; Jacobs, Kevin; Chung, Charles C.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Purdue, Mark P.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Tucker, Margaret; Rothman, Nathaniel; Landi, Maria Teresa; Silverman, Debra T.; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J.; Malats, Nuria; Kogevinas, Manolis; Wacholder, Sholom; Troisi, Rebecca; Helman, Lee; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Yeager, Meredith; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone malignancy of adolescents and young adults. In order to better understand the genetic etiology of osteosarcoma, we performed a multi-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) consisting of 941 cases and 3,291 cancer-free adult controls of European ancestry. Two loci achieved genome-wide significance: rs1906953 at 6p21.3, in the glutamate receptor metabotropic 4 [GRM4] gene (P = 8.1 ×10-9), and rs7591996 and rs10208273 in a gene desert on 2p25.2 (P = 1.0 ×10-8 and 2.9 ×10-7). These two susceptibility loci warrant further exploration to uncover the biological mechanisms underlying susceptibility to osteosarcoma. PMID:23727862

  9. Family-based association analyses of imputed genotypes reveal genome-wide significant association of Alzheimer's disease with OSBPL6, PTPRG, and PDCL3.

    PubMed

    Herold, C; Hooli, B V; Mullin, K; Liu, T; Roehr, J T; Mattheisen, M; Parrado, A R; Bertram, L; Lange, C; Tanzi, R E

    2016-11-01

    The genetic basis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is complex and heterogeneous. Over 200 highly penetrant pathogenic variants in the genes APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 cause a subset of early-onset familial AD. On the other hand, susceptibility to late-onset forms of AD (LOAD) is indisputably associated to the ɛ4 allele in the gene APOE, and more recently to variants in more than two-dozen additional genes identified in the large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and meta-analyses reports. Taken together however, although the heritability in AD is estimated to be as high as 80%, a large proportion of the underlying genetic factors still remain to be elucidated. In this study, we performed a systematic family-based genome-wide association and meta-analysis on close to 15 million imputed variants from three large collections of AD families (~3500 subjects from 1070 families). Using a multivariate phenotype combining affection status and onset age, meta-analysis of the association results revealed three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that achieved genome-wide significance for association with AD risk: rs7609954 in the gene PTPRG (P-value=3.98 × 10(-8)), rs1347297 in the gene OSBPL6 (P-value=4.53 × 10(-8)), and rs1513625 near PDCL3 (P-value=4.28 × 10(-8)). In addition, rs72953347 in OSBPL6 (P-value=6.36 × 10(-7)) and two SNPs in the gene CDKAL1 showed marginally significant association with LOAD (rs10456232, P-value=4.76 × 10(-7); rs62400067, P-value=3.54 × 10(-7)). In summary, family-based GWAS meta-analysis of imputed SNPs revealed novel genomic variants in (or near) PTPRG, OSBPL6, and PDCL3 that influence risk for AD with genome-wide significance.

  10. Genetic determinants of common epilepsies: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The epilepsies are a clinically heterogeneous group of neurological disorders. Despite strong evidence for heritability, genome-wide association studies have had little success in identification of risk loci associated with epilepsy, probably because of relatively small sample sizes and insufficient power. We aimed to identify risk loci through meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for all epilepsy and the two largest clinical subtypes (genetic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy). Methods We combined genome-wide association data from 12 cohorts of individuals with epilepsy and controls from population-based datasets. Controls were ethnically matched with cases. We phenotyped individuals with epilepsy into categories of genetic generalised epilepsy, focal epilepsy, or unclassified epilepsy. After standardised filtering for quality control and imputation to account for different genotyping platforms across sites, investigators at each site conducted a linear mixed-model association analysis for each dataset. Combining summary statistics, we conducted fixed-effects meta-analyses of all epilepsy, focal epilepsy, and genetic generalised epilepsy. We set the genome-wide significance threshold at p<1·66 × 10−8. Findings We included 8696 cases and 26 157 controls in our analysis. Meta-analysis of the all-epilepsy cohort identified loci at 2q24.3 (p=8·71 × 10−10), implicating SCN1A, and at 4p15.1 (p=5·44 × 10−9), harbouring PCDH7, which encodes a protocadherin molecule not previously implicated in epilepsy. For the cohort of genetic generalised epilepsy, we noted a single signal at 2p16.1 (p=9·99 × 10−9), implicating VRK2 or FANCL. No single nucleotide polymorphism achieved genome-wide significance for focal epilepsy. Interpretation This meta-analysis describes a new locus not previously implicated in epilepsy and provides further evidence about the genetic architecture of these disorders, with the

  11. A Genome-Wide Association Study of a Biomarker of Nicotine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Loukola, Anu; Buchwald, Jadwiga; Gupta, Richa; Palviainen, Teemu; Hällfors, Jenni; Tikkanen, Emmi; Korhonen, Tellervo; Ollikainen, Miina; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Ripatti, Samuli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli; Salomaa, Veikko; Rose, Richard J.; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with fast nicotine metabolism typically smoke more and thus have a greater risk for smoking-induced diseases. Further, the efficacy of smoking cessation pharmacotherapy is dependent on the rate of nicotine metabolism. Our objective was to use nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR), an established biomarker of nicotine metabolism rate, in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify novel genetic variants influencing nicotine metabolism. A heritability estimate of 0.81 (95% CI 0.70–0.88) was obtained for NMR using monozygotic and dizygotic twins of the FinnTwin cohort. We performed a GWAS in cotinine-verified current smokers of three Finnish cohorts (FinnTwin, Young Finns Study, FINRISK2007), followed by a meta-analysis of 1518 subjects, and annotated the genome-wide significant SNPs with methylation quantitative loci (meQTL) analyses. We detected association on 19q13 with 719 SNPs exceeding genome-wide significance within a 4.2 Mb region. The strongest evidence for association emerged for CYP2A6 (min p = 5.77E-86, in intron 4), the main metabolic enzyme for nicotine. Other interesting genes with genome-wide significant signals included CYP2B6, CYP2A7, EGLN2, and NUMBL. Conditional analyses revealed three independent signals on 19q13, all located within or in the immediate vicinity of CYP2A6. A genetic risk score constructed using the independent signals showed association with smoking quantity (p = 0.0019) in two independent Finnish samples. Our meQTL results showed that methylation values of 16 CpG sites within the region are affected by genotypes of the genome-wide significant SNPs, and according to causal inference test, for some of the SNPs the effect on NMR is mediated through methylation. To our knowledge, this is the first GWAS on NMR. Our results enclose three independent novel signals on 19q13.2. The detected CYP2A6 variants explain a strikingly large fraction of variance (up to 31%) in NMR in these study samples. Further, we provide evidence

  12. A Genome-Wide Association Study of a Biomarker of Nicotine Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Loukola, Anu; Buchwald, Jadwiga; Gupta, Richa; Palviainen, Teemu; Hällfors, Jenni; Tikkanen, Emmi; Korhonen, Tellervo; Ollikainen, Miina; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Ripatti, Samuli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli; Salomaa, Veikko; Rose, Richard J; Tyndale, Rachel F; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with fast nicotine metabolism typically smoke more and thus have a greater risk for smoking-induced diseases. Further, the efficacy of smoking cessation pharmacotherapy is dependent on the rate of nicotine metabolism. Our objective was to use nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR), an established biomarker of nicotine metabolism rate, in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify novel genetic variants influencing nicotine metabolism. A heritability estimate of 0.81 (95% CI 0.70-0.88) was obtained for NMR using monozygotic and dizygotic twins of the FinnTwin cohort. We performed a GWAS in cotinine-verified current smokers of three Finnish cohorts (FinnTwin, Young Finns Study, FINRISK2007), followed by a meta-analysis of 1518 subjects, and annotated the genome-wide significant SNPs with methylation quantitative loci (meQTL) analyses. We detected association on 19q13 with 719 SNPs exceeding genome-wide significance within a 4.2 Mb region. The strongest evidence for association emerged for CYP2A6 (min p = 5.77E-86, in intron 4), the main metabolic enzyme for nicotine. Other interesting genes with genome-wide significant signals included CYP2B6, CYP2A7, EGLN2, and NUMBL. Conditional analyses revealed three independent signals on 19q13, all located within or in the immediate vicinity of CYP2A6. A genetic risk score constructed using the independent signals showed association with smoking quantity (p = 0.0019) in two independent Finnish samples. Our meQTL results showed that methylation values of 16 CpG sites within the region are affected by genotypes of the genome-wide significant SNPs, and according to causal inference test, for some of the SNPs the effect on NMR is mediated through methylation. To our knowledge, this is the first GWAS on NMR. Our results enclose three independent novel signals on 19q13.2. The detected CYP2A6 variants explain a strikingly large fraction of variance (up to 31%) in NMR in these study samples. Further, we provide evidence

  13. Inferring Quantitative Trait Pathways Associated with Bull Fertility from a Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Peñagaricano, Francisco; Weigel, Kent A.; Rosa, Guilherme J. M.; Khatib, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Whole-genome association studies typically focus on genetic markers with the strongest evidence of association. However, single markers often explain only a small component of the genetic variance and hence offer a limited understanding of the trait under study. As such, the objective of this study was to perform a pathway-based association analysis in Holstein dairy cattle in order to identify relevant pathways involved in bull fertility. The results of a single-marker association analysis, using 1,755 bulls with sire conception rate data and genotypes for 38,650 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), were used in this study. A total of 16,819 annotated genes, including 2,767 significantly associated with bull fertility, were used to interrogate a total of 662 Gene Ontology (GO) terms and 248 InterPro (IP) entries using a test of proportions based on the cumulative hypergeometric distribution. After multiple-testing correction, 20 GO categories and one IP entry showed significant overrepresentation of genes statistically associated with bull fertility. Several of these functional categories such as small GTPases mediated signal transduction, neurogenesis, calcium ion binding, and cytoskeleton are known to be involved in biological processes closely related to male fertility. These results could provide insight into the genetic architecture of this complex trait in dairy cattle. In addition, this study shows that quantitative trait pathways inferred from single-marker analyses could enhance our interpretations of the results of genome-wide association studies. PMID:23335935

  14. Five endometrial cancer risk loci identified through genome-wide association analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Timothy H T; Thompson, Deborah J; O'Mara, Tracy A; Painter, Jodie N; Glubb, Dylan M; Flach, Susanne; Lewis, Annabelle; French, Juliet D; Freeman-Mills, Luke; Church, David; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Webb, Penelope M; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Nyholt, Dale R; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Shah, Mitul; Dennis, Joe; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo; Amant, Frederic; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Zhao, Hui; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Dowdy, Sean C; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Njølstad, Tormund S; Salvesen, Helga B; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica M J; Ashton, Katie; Otton, Geoffrey; Proietto, Tony; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Tham, Emma; Li, Mulin Jun; Yip, Shun H; Wang, Junwen; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Palles, Claire; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Cunningham, Julie M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Edwards, Stacey L; Easton, Douglas F; Tomlinson, Ian; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of three endometrial cancer genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and two follow-up phases totaling 7,737 endometrial cancer cases and 37,144 controls of European ancestry. Genome-wide imputation and meta-analysis identified five new risk loci of genome-wide significance at likely regulatory regions on chromosomes 13q22.1 (rs11841589, near KLF5), 6q22.31 (rs13328298, in LOC643623 and near HEY2 and NCOA7), 8q24.21 (rs4733613, telomeric to MYC), 15q15.1 (rs937213, in EIF2AK4, near BMF) and 14q32.33 (rs2498796, in AKT1, near SIVA1). We also found a second independent 8q24.21 signal (rs17232730). Functional studies of the 13q22.1 locus showed that rs9600103 (pairwise r(2) = 0.98 with rs11841589) is located in a region of active chromatin that interacts with the KLF5 promoter region. The rs9600103[T] allele that is protective in endometrial cancer suppressed gene expression in vitro, suggesting that regulation of the expression of KLF5, a gene linked to uterine development, is implicated in tumorigenesis. These findings provide enhanced insight into the genetic and biological basis of endometrial cancer.

  15. Genome-wide Association Analysis Identifies 14 New Risk Loci for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ripke, Stephan; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Chambert, Kimberly; Moran, Jennifer L; Kähler, Anna K; Akterin, Susanne; Bergen, Sarah; Collins, Ann L; Crowley, James J; Fromer, Menachem; Kim, Yunjung; Lee, Sang Hong; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Sanchez, Nick; Stahl, Eli A; Williams, Stephanie; Wray, Naomi R; Xia, Kai; Bettella, Francesco; Børglum, Anders D; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan K; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Durmishi, Naser; Gill, Michael; Golimbet, Vera; Hamshere, Marian L; Holmans, Peter; Hougaard, David M; Kendler, Kenneth S; Lin, Kuang; Morris, Derek W; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B; Neale, Benjamin M; O'Neill, Francis A; Owen, Michael J; Milovancevic, MilicaPejovic; Posthuma, Danielle; Powell, John; Richards, Alexander L; Riley, Brien P; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rujescu, Dan; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Smit, August B; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tosato, Sarah; Verhage, Matthijs; Walters, James T; Bramon, Elvira; Corvin, Aiden P; O'Donovan, Michael C; Stefansson, Kari; Scolnick, Edward; Purcell, Shaun; McCarroll, Steve; Sklar, Pamela; Hultman, Christina M; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a heritable disorder with substantial public health impact. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) for schizophrenia beginning with a Swedish national sample (5,001 cases, 6,243 controls) followed by meta-analysis with prior schizophrenia GWAS (8,832 cases, 12,067 controls) and finally by replication of SNPs in 168 genomic regions in independent samples (7,413 cases, 19,762 controls, and 581 trios). In total, 22 regions met genome-wide significance (14 novel and one previously implicated in bipolar disorder). The results strongly implicate calcium signaling in the etiology of schizophrenia, and include genome-wide significant results for CACNA1C and CACNB2 whose protein products interact. We estimate that ∼8,300 independent and predominantly common SNPs contribute to risk for schizophrenia and that these collectively account for most of its heritability. Common genetic variation plays an important role in the etiology of schizophrenia, and larger studies will allow more detailed understanding of this devastating disorder. PMID:23974872

  16. Genome-wide association studies suggest sex-specific loci associated with abdominal and visceral fat

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Yun Ju; Pérusse, Louis; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Fornage, Myriam; Sidney, Steve; Sternfeld, Barbara; Rice, Treva; Terry, Gregg; Jacobs, David R.; Katzmarzyk, Peter; Curran, Joanne E; Carr, John Jeffrey; Blangero, John; Ghosh, Sujoy; Després, Jean-Pierre; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D.C.; Bouchard, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Background To identify loci associated with abdominal fat and replicate prior findings, we performed genome-wide association (GWA) studies of abdominal fat traits: subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), total adipose tissue (TAT) and visceral to subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio (VSR). Subjects and Methods Sex-combined and sex-stratified analyses were performed on each trait with (TRAIT-BMI) or without (TRAIT) adjustment for BMI, and cohort-specific results were combined via a fixed effects meta-analysis. A total of 2,513 subjects of European descent were available for the discovery phase. For replication, 2,171 European Americans and 772 African Americans were available. Results A total of 52 SNPs encompassing 7 loci showed suggestive evidence of association (p < 1.0 × 10−6) with abdominal fat in the sex-combined analyses. The strongest evidence was found on chromosome 7p14.3 between a SNP near BBS9 gene and VAT (rs12374818; p= 1.10 × 10−7), an association that was replicated (p = 0.02). For the BMI-adjusted trait, the strongest evidence of association was found between a SNP near CYCSP30 and VAT-BMI (rs10506943; p= 2.42 × 10−7). Our sex-specific analyses identified one genome-wide significant (p < 5.0 × 10−8) locus for SAT in women with 11 SNPs encompassing the MLLT10, DNAJC1 and EBLN1 genes on chromosome 10p12.31 (p = 3.97 × 10−8 to 1.13 × 10−8). The THNSL2 gene previously associated with VAT in women was also replicated (p= 0.006). The six gene/loci showing the strongest evidence of association with VAT or VAT-BMI were interrogated for their functional links with obesity and inflammation using the Biograph knowledge-mining software. Genes showing the closest functional links with obesity and inflammation were ADCY8 and KCNK9, respectively. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for new loci influencing abdominal visceral (BBS9, ADCY8, KCNK9) and subcutaneous (MLLT10/DNAJC1/EBLN1) fat, and confirmed a locus (THNSL2

  17. A Genome-wide Association Study Identifies LIPA as a Susceptibility Gene for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Philipp S; Zeller, Tanja; Schillert, Arne; Szymczak, Silke; Sinning, Christoph R; Deiseroth, Arne; Schnabel, Renate B; Lubos, Edith; Keller, Till; Eleftheriadis, Medea S; Bickel, Christoph; Rupprecht, Hans J; Wilde, Sandra; Rossmann, Heidi; Diemert, Patrick; Cupples, L Adrienne; Perret, Claire; Erdmann, Jeanette; Stark, Klaus; Kleber, Marcus E; Epstein, Stephen E; Voight, Benjamin F; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Li, Mingyao; Schäfer, Arne S; Klopp, Norman; Braund, Peter S; Sager, Hendrik B; Demissie, Serkalem; Proust, Carole; König, Inke R; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Reinhard, Wibke; Hoffmann, Michael M; Virtamo, Jarmo; Burnett, Mary Susan; Siscovick, David; Wiklund, Per Gunnar; Qu, Liming; El Mokthari, Nour Eddine; Thompson, John R; Peters, Annette; Smith, Albert V; Yon, Emmanuelle; Baumert, Jens; Hengstenberg, Christian; März, Winfried; Amouyel, Philippe; Devaney, Joseph; Schwartz, Stephen M; Saarela, Olli; Mehta, Nehal N; Rubin, Diana; Silander, Kaisa; Hall, Alistair S; Ferrieres, Jean; Harris, Tamara B; Melander, Olle; Kee, Frank; Hakonarson, Hakon; Schrezenmeir, Juergen; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Elosua, Roberto; Arveiler, Dominique; Evans, Alun; Rader, Daniel J; Illig, Thomas; Schreiber, Stefan; Bis, Joshua C; Altshuler, David; Kavousi, Maryam; Witteman, Jaqueline CM; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Folsom, Aaron R; Barbalic, Maja; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Cambien, Francois; Lackner, Karl J; Tiret, Laurence; Salomaa, Veikko; Munzel, Thomas; Ziegler, Andreas; Blankenberg, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Background eQTL analyses are important to improve the understanding of genetic association results. Here, we performed a genome-wide association and global gene expression study to identify functionally relevant variants affecting the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods and Results In a genome-wide association analysis of 2,078 CAD cases and 2,953 controls, we identified 950 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were associated with CAD at P<10-3. Subsequent in silico and wet-lab replication stages and a final meta-analysis of 21,428 CAD cases and 38,361 controls revealed a novel association signal at chromosome 10q23.31 within the LIPA (Lysosomal Acid Lipase A) gene (P=3.7×10-8; OR 1.1; 95% CI: 1.07-1.14). The association of this locus with global gene expression was assessed by genome-wide expression analyses in the monocyte transcriptome of 1,494 individuals. The results showed a strong association of this locus with expression of the LIPA transcript (P=1.3×10-96). An assessment of LIPA SNPs and transcript with cardiovascular phenotypes revealed an association of LIPA transcript levels with impaired endothelial function (P=4.4×10-3). Conclusions The use of data on genetic variants and the addition of data on global monocytic gene expression led to the identification of the novel functional CAD susceptibility locus LIPA, located on chromosome 10q23.31. The respective eSNPs associated with CAD strongly affect LIPA gene expression level, which itself was related to endothelial dysfunction, a precursor of CAD. PMID:21606135

  18. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Multiple Regions Associated with Head Size in Catfish

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xin; Liu, Shikai; Yao, Jun; Bao, Lisui; Zhang, Jiaren; Li, Chao; Wang, Ruijia; Sha, Jin; Zeng, Peng; Zhi, Degui; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2016-01-01

    Skull morphology is fundamental to evolution and the biological adaptation of species to their environments. With aquaculture fish species, head size is also important for economic reasons because it has a direct impact on fillet yield. However, little is known about the underlying genetic basis of head size. Catfish is the primary aquaculture species in the United States. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study using the catfish 250K SNP array with backcross hybrid catfish to map the QTL for head size (head length, head width, and head depth). One significantly associated region on linkage group (LG) 7 was identified for head length. In addition, LGs 7, 9, and 16 contain suggestively associated regions for head length. For head width, significantly associated regions were found on LG9, and additional suggestively associated regions were identified on LGs 5 and 7. No region was found associated with head depth. Head size genetic loci were mapped in catfish to genomic regions with candidate genes involved in bone development. Comparative analysis indicated that homologs of several candidate genes are also involved in skull morphology in various other species ranging from amphibian to mammalian species, suggesting possible evolutionary conservation of those genes in the control of skull morphologies. PMID:27558670

  19. Principal components analysis corrects for stratification in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Price, Alkes L; Patterson, Nick J; Plenge, Robert M; Weinblatt, Michael E; Shadick, Nancy A; Reich, David

    2006-08-01

    Population stratification--allele frequency differences between cases and controls due to systematic ancestry differences-can cause spurious associations in disease studies. We describe a method that enables explicit detection and correction of population stratification on a genome-wide scale. Our method uses principal components analysis to explicitly model ancestry differences between cases and controls. The resulting correction is specific to a candidate marker's variation in frequency across ancestral populations, minimizing spurious associations while maximizing power to detect true associations. Our simple, efficient approach can easily be applied to disease studies with hundreds of thousands of markers.

  20. Genome-wide meta-analyses identify three loci associated with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangdong; Invernizzi, Pietro; Lu, Yue; Kosoy, Roman; Lu, Yan; Bianchi, Ilaria; Podda, Mauro; Xu, Chun; Xie, Gang; Macciardi, Fabio; Selmi, Carlo; Lupoli, Sara; Shigeta, Russell; Ransom, Michael; Lleo, Ana; Lee, Annette T; Mason, Andrew L; Myers, Robert P; Peltekian, Kevork M; Ghent, Cameron N; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Zuin, Massimo; Rosina, Floriano; Borghesio, Elisabetta; Floreani, Annarosa; Lazzari, Roberta; Niro, Grazia; Andriulli, Angelo; Muratori, Luigi; Muratori, Paolo; Almasio, Piero L; Andreone, Pietro; Margotti, Marzia; Brunetto, Maurizia; Coco, Barbara; Alvaro, Domenico; Bragazzi, Maria C; Marra, Fabio; Pisano, Alessandro; Rigamonti, Cristina; Colombo, Massimo; Marzioni, Marco; Benedetti, Antonio; Fabris, Luca; Strazzabosco, Mario; Portincasa, Piero; Palmieri, Vincenzo O; Tiribelli, Claudio; Croce, Lory; Bruno, Savino; Rossi, Sonia; Vinci, Maria; Prisco, Cleofe; Mattalia, Alberto; Toniutto, Pierluigi; Picciotto, Antonio; Galli, Andrea; Ferrari, Carlo; Colombo, Silvia; Casella, Giovanni; Morini, Lorenzo; Caporaso, Nicola; Colli, Agostino; Spinzi, Giancarlo; Montanari, Renzo; Gregersen, Peter K; Heathcote, E Jenny; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Amos, Christopher I; Gershwin, M Eric; Seldin, Michael F

    2010-08-01

    A genome-wide association screen for primary biliary cirrhosis risk alleles was performed in an Italian cohort. The results from the Italian cohort replicated IL12A and IL12RB associations, and a combined meta-analysis using a Canadian dataset identified newly associated loci at SPIB (P = 7.9 x 10(-11), odds ratio (OR) = 1.46), IRF5-TNPO3 (P = 2.8 x 10(-10), OR = 1.63) and 17q12-21 (P = 1.7 x 10(-10), OR = 1.38).

  1. Genome-wide meta-analyses identify three loci associated with primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiangdong; Invernizzi, Pietro; Lu, Yue; Kosoy, Roman; Lu, Yan; Bianchi, Ilaria; Podda, Mauro; Xu, Chun; Xie, Gang; Macciardi, Fabio; Selmi, Carlo; Lupoli, Sara; Shigeta, Russell; Ransom, Michael; Lleo, Ana; Lee, Annette T; Mason, Andrew L; Myers, Robert P; Peltekian, Kevork M; Ghent, Cameron N; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Zuin, Massimo; Rosina, Floriano; Borghesio, Elisabetta; Floreani, Annarosa; Lazzari, Roberta; Niro, Grazia; Andriulli, Angelo; Muratori, Luigi; Muratori, Paolo; Almasio, Piero L; Andreone, Pietro; Margotti, Marzia; Brunetto, Maurizia; Coco, Barbara; Alvaro, Domenico; Bragazzi, Maria C; Marra, Fabio; Pisano, Alessandro; Rigamonti, Cristina; Colombo, Massimo; Marzioni, Marco; Benedetti, Antonio; Fabris, Luca; Strazzabosco, Mario; Portincasa, Piero; Palmieri, Vincenzo O; Tiribelli, Claudio; Croce, Lory; Bruno, Savino; Rossi, Sonia; Vinci, Maria; Prisco, Cleofe; Mattalia, Alberto; Toniutto, Pierluigi; Picciotto, Antonio; Galli, Andrea; Ferrari, Carlo; Colombo, Silvia; Casella, Giovanni; Morini, Lorenzo; Caporaso, Nicola; Colli, Agostino; Spinzi, Giancarlo; Montanari, Renzo; Gregersen, Peter K; Heathcote, E Jenny; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Amos, Christopher I; Gershwin, M Eric; Seldin, Michael F

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide association screen for primary biliary cirrhosis risk alleles was performed in an Italian cohort. The results from the Italian cohort replicated IL12A and IL12RB associations, and a combined meta-analysis using a Canadian dataset identified newly associated loci at SPIB (P = 7.9 × 10–11, odds ratio (OR) = 1.46), IRF5-TNPO3 (P = 2.8 × 10–10, OR = 1.63) and 17q12-21 (P = 1.7 × 10–10, OR = 1.38). PMID:20639880

  2. Longitudinal Genome-Wide Association of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in the Bogalusa Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Erin N.; Chen, Wei; Kähönen, Mika; Kettunen, Johannes; Lehtimäki, Terho; Peltonen, Leena; Raitakari, Olli T.; Salem, Rany M.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Shaw, Marian; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Topol, Eric J.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies have pinpointed many loci associated with CVD risk factors in adults. It is unclear, however, if these loci predict trait levels at all ages, if they are associated with how a trait develops over time, or if they could be used to screen individuals who are pre-symptomatic to provide the opportunity for preventive measures before disease onset. We completed a genome-wide association study on participants in the longitudinal Bogalusa Heart Study (BHS) and have characterized the association between genetic factors and the development of CVD risk factors from childhood to adulthood. We report 7 genome-wide significant associations involving CVD risk factors, two of which have been previously reported. Top regions were tested for replication in the Young Finns Study (YF) and two associations strongly replicated: rs247616 in CETP with HDL levels (combined P = 9.7×10−24), and rs445925 at APOE with LDL levels (combined P = 8.7×10−19). We show that SNPs previously identified in adult cross-sectional studies tend to show age-independent effects in the BHS with effect sizes consistent with previous reports. Previously identified variants were associated with adult trait levels above and beyond those seen in childhood; however, variants with time-dependent effects were also promising predictors. This is the first GWA study to evaluate the role of common genetic variants in the development of CVD risk factors in children as they advance through adulthood and highlights the utility of using longitudinal studies to identify genetic predictors of adult traits in children. PMID:20838585

  3. A GENOME WIDE ASSOCIATION STUDY FOR DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY GENES IN AFRICAN AMERICANS

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Caitrin W.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Roh, Bong H.; An, S. Sandy; Cooke, Jessica N.; Hester, Jessica M.; Wing, Maria R.; Bostrom, Meredith A.; Rudock, Megan E.; Lewis, Joshua P.; Talbert, Matthew E.; Blevins, Rebecca A.; Lu, Lingyi; Ng, Maggie C.Y.; Sale, Michele M.; Divers, Jasmin; Langefeld, Carl D.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide association study was performed using the Affymetrix 6.0 chip to identify genes associated with diabetic nephropathy in African Americans. Association analysis was performed adjusting for admixture in 965 type 2 diabetic African American patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and in 1029 African Americans without type 2 diabetes or kidney disease as controls. The top 724 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with evidence of association to diabetic nephropathy were then genotyped in a replication sample of an additional 709 type 2 diabetes-ESRD patients and 690 controls. SNPs with evidence of association in both the original and replication studies were tested in additional African American cohorts consisting of 1246 patients with type 2 diabetes without kidney disease and 1216 with non-diabetic ESRD to differentiate candidate loci for type 2 diabetes-ESRD, type 2 diabetes, and/or all-cause ESRD. Twenty-five SNPs were significantly associated with type 2 diabetes-ESRD in the genome-wide association and initial replication. Although genome-wide significance with type 2 diabetes was not found for any of these 25 SNPs, several genes, including RPS12, LIMK2, and SFI1 are strong candidates for diabetic nephropathy. A combined analysis of all 2890 patients with ESRD showed significant association SNPs in LIMK2 and SFI1 suggesting that they also contribute to all-cause ESRD. Thus, our results suggest that multiple loci underlie susceptibility to kidney disease in African Americans with type 2 diabetes and some may also contribute to all-cause ESRD. PMID:21150874

  4. Genome-wide association study of personality traits in the long life family study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Harold T; Sebastiani, Paola; Sun, Jenny X; Andersen, Stacy L; Daw, E Warwick; Terracciano, Antonio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Perls, Thomas T

    2013-01-01

    Personality traits have been shown to be associated with longevity and healthy aging. In order to discover novel genetic modifiers associated with personality traits as related with longevity, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on personality factors assessed by NEO-five-factor inventory in individuals enrolled in the Long Life Family Study (LLFS), a study of 583 families (N up to 4595) with clustering for longevity in the United States and Denmark. Three SNPs, in almost perfect LD, associated with agreeableness reached genome-wide significance (p < 10(-8)) and replicated in an additional sample of 1279 LLFS subjects, although one (rs9650241) failed to replicate and the other two were not available in two independent replication cohorts, the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging and the New England Centenarian Study. Based on 10,000,000 permutations, the empirical p-value of 2 × 10(-7) was observed for the genome-wide significant SNPs. Seventeen SNPs that reached marginal statistical significance in the two previous GWASs (p-value <10(-4) and 10(-5)), were also marginally significantly associated in this study (p-value <0.05), although none of the associations passed the Bonferroni correction. In addition, we tested age-by-SNP interactions and found some significant associations. Since scores of personality traits in LLFS subjects change in the oldest ages, and genetic factors outweigh environmental factors to achieve extreme ages, these age-by-SNP interactions could be a proxy for complex gene-gene interactions affecting personality traits and longevity.

  5. Genome-wide association study of blood lead shows multiple associations near ALAD

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Nicole M.; Zhu, Gu; Dy, Veronica; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Hemani, Gibran; Kemp, John P.; Mcmahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Taylor, Caroline M.; Golding, Jean; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Steer, Colin; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Davey Smith, George; Evans, David M.; Whitfield, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of environmental lead, or biomarker evidence of high body lead content, is associated with anaemia, developmental and neurological deficits in children, and increased mortality in adults. Adverse effects of lead still occur despite substantial reduction in environmental exposure. There is genetic variation between individuals in blood lead concentration but the polymorphisms contributing to this have not been defined. We measured blood or erythrocyte lead content, and carried out genome-wide association analysis, on population-based cohorts of adult volunteers from Australia and UK (N = 5433). Samples from Australia were collected in two studies, in 1993–1996 and 2002–2005 and from UK in 1991–1992. One locus, at ALAD on chromosome 9, showed consistent association with blood lead across countries and evidence for multiple independent allelic effects. The most significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs1805313 (P = 3.91 × 10−14 for lead concentration in a meta-analysis of all data), is known to have effects on ALAD expression in blood cells but other SNPs affecting ALAD expression did not affect blood lead. Variants at 12 other loci, including ABO, showed suggestive associations (5 × 10−6 > P > 5 × 10−8). Identification of genetic polymorphisms affecting blood lead reinforces the view that genetic factors, as well as environmental ones, are important in determining blood lead levels. The ways in which ALAD variation affects lead uptake or distribution are still to be determined. PMID:25820613

  6. Genome-wide association analyses identify multiple loci associated with central corneal thickness and keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Vitart, Veronique; Burdon, Kathryn P; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Mirshahi, Alireza; Hewitt, Alex W; Koehn, Demelza; Hysi, Pirro G; Ramdas, Wishal D; Zeller, Tanja; Vithana, Eranga N; Cornes, Belinda K; Tay, Wan-Ting; Tai, E Shyong; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Liu, Jianjun; Foo, Jia-Nee; Saw, Seang Mei; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Stefansson, Kari; Dimasi, David P; Mills, Richard A; Mountain, Jenny; Ang, Wei; Hoehn, René; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Grus, Franz; Wolfs, Roger; Castagne, Raphaële; Lackner, Karl J; Springelkamp, Henriët; Yang, Jian; Jonasson, Fridbert; Leung, Dexter Y L; Chen, Li J; Tham, Clement C Y; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Hayward, Caroline; Gibson, Jane; Cree, Angela J; MacLeod, Alex; Ennis, Sarah; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Wilson, James F; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Fleck, Brian; Li, Xiaohui; Siscovick, David; Taylor, Kent D; Rotter, Jerome I; Yazar, Seyhan; Ulmer, Megan; Li, Jun; Yaspan, Brian L; Ozel, Ayse B; Richards, Julia E; Moroi, Sayoko E; Haines, Jonathan L; Kang, Jae H; Pasquale, Louis R; Allingham, R Rand; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Wright, Alan F; Pennell, Craig; Spector, Timothy D; Young, Terri L; Klaver, Caroline C W; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Anderson, Michael G; Aung, Tin; Willoughby, Colin E; Wiggs, Janey L; Pang, Chi P; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Lotery, Andrew J; Hammond, Christopher J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hauser, Michael A; Rabinowitz, Yaron S; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Mackey, David A; Craig, Jamie E; Macgregor, Stuart; Wong, Tien Y

    2013-01-01

    Central corneal thickness (CCT) is associated with eye conditions including keratoconus and glaucoma. We performed a meta-analysis on >20,000 individuals in European and Asian populations that identified 16 new loci associated with CCT at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8). We further showed that 2 CCT-associated loci, FOXO1 and FNDC3B, conferred relatively large risks for keratoconus in 2 cohorts with 874 cases and 6,085 controls (rs2721051 near FOXO1 had odds ratio (OR) = 1.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.4–1.88, P = 2.7 × 10−10, and rs4894535 in FNDC3B had OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.29–1.68, P = 4.9 × 10−9). FNDC3B was also associated with primary open-angle glaucoma (P = 5.6 × 10−4; tested in 3 cohorts with 2,979 cases and 7,399 controls). Further analyses implicate the collagen and extracellular matrix pathways in the regulation of CCT. PMID:23291589

  7. Genome-wide analyses of HTLV-1aD strains from Cape Verde, Africa

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Louise; de Pina-Araujo I, Isabel; Morgado, Mariza G; Vicente, Ana Carolina

    2016-01-01

    We characterised and reported the first full-length genomes of Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 subgroup HTLV-1aD (CV21 and CV79). This subgroup is one of the major determinants of HTLV-1 infections in North and West Africa, and recombinant strains involving this subgroup have been recently demonstrated. The CV21 and CV79 strains from Cape Verde/Africa were characterised as pure HTLV-1aD genomes, comparative analyses including HTLV-1 subtypes and subgroups revealed HTLV-1aD signatures in the envelope, pol, and pX regions. These genomes provide original information that will contribute to further studies on HTLV-1a epidemiology and evolution. PMID:27653363

  8. Genome-wide analyses of HTLV-1aD strains from Cape Verde, Africa.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Louise; Pina-Araujo I, Isabel de; Morgado, Mariza G; Vicente, Ana Carolina

    2016-09-01

    We characterised and reported the first full-length genomes of Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 subgroup HTLV-1aD (CV21 and CV79). This subgroup is one of the major determinants of HTLV-1 infections in North and West Africa, and recombinant strains involving this subgroup have been recently demonstrated. The CV21 and CV79 strains from Cape Verde/Africa were characterised as pure HTLV-1aD genomes, comparative analyses including HTLV-1 subtypes and subgroups revealed HTLV-1aD signatures in the envelope, pol, and pX regions. These genomes provide original information that will contribute to further studies on HTLV-1a epidemiology and evolution.

  9. A genome-wide association study identifies novel alleles associated with hair color and skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiali; Kraft, Peter; Nan, Hongmei; Guo, Qun; Chen, Constance; Qureshi, Abrar; Hankinson, Susan E; Hu, Frank B; Duffy, David L; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Hayward, Nicholas K; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N; Chanock, Stephen; Hunter, David J

    2008-05-16

    We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study of natural hair color in more than 10,000 men and women of European ancestry from the United States and Australia. An initial analysis of 528,173 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped on 2,287 women identified IRF4 and SLC24A4 as loci highly associated with hair color, along with three other regions encompassing known pigmentation genes. We confirmed these associations in 7,028 individuals from three additional studies. Across these four studies, SLC24A4 rs12896399 and IRF4 rs12203592 showed strong associations with hair color, with p = 6.0x10(-62) and p = 7.46x10(-127), respectively. The IRF4 SNP was also associated with skin color (p = 6.2x10(-14)), eye color (p = 6.1x10(-13)), and skin tanning response to sunlight (p = 3.9x10(-89)). A multivariable analysis pooling data from the initial GWAS and an additional 1,440 individuals suggested that the association between rs12203592 and hair color was independent of rs1540771, a SNP between the IRF4 and EXOC2 genes previously found to be associated with hair color. After adjustment for rs12203592, the association between rs1540771 and hair color was not significant (p = 0.52). One variant in the MATP gene was associated with hair color. A variant in the HERC2 gene upstream of the OCA2 gene showed the strongest and independent association with hair color compared with other SNPs in this region, including three previously reported SNPs. The signals detected in a region around the MC1R gene were explained by MC1R red hair color alleles. Our results suggest that the IRF4 and SLC24A4 loci are associated with human hair color and skin pigmentation.

  10. Genome-wide association studies and genetic architecture of common human diseases.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Grant W

    2011-06-03

    Genome-wide association scans provide the first successful method to identify genetic variation contributing to risk for common complex disease. Progress in identifying genes associated with melanoma show complex relationships between genes for pigmentation and the development of melanoma. Novel risk loci account for only a small fraction of the genetic variation contributing to this and many other diseases. Large meta-analyses find additional variants, but there is current debate about the contribution of common polymorphisms, rare polymorphisms or mutations to disease risk.

  11. Pharmacogenetic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of LDL cholesterol response to statins.

    PubMed

    Postmus, Iris; Trompet, Stella; Deshmukh, Harshal A; Barnes, Michael R; Li, Xiaohui; Warren, Helen R; Chasman, Daniel I; Zhou, Kaixin; Arsenault, Benoit J; Donnelly, Louise A; Wiggins, Kerri L; Avery, Christy L; Griffin, Paula; Feng, QiPing; Taylor, Kent D; Li, Guo; Evans, Daniel S; Smith, Albert V; de Keyser, Catherine E; Johnson, Andrew D; de Craen, Anton J M; Stott, David J; Buckley, Brendan M; Ford, Ian; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Slagboom, P Eline; Sattar, Naveed; Munroe, Patricia B; Sever, Peter; Poulter, Neil; Stanton, Alice; Shields, Denis C; O'Brien, Eoin; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Chen, Y-D Ida; Nickerson, Deborah A; Smith, Joshua D; Dubé, Marie Pierre; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Hovingh, G Kees; Kastelein, John J P; McKeigue, Paul M; Betteridge, John; Neil, Andrew; Durrington, Paul N; Doney, Alex; Carr, Fiona; Morris, Andrew; McCarthy, Mark I; Groop, Leif; Ahlqvist, Emma; Bis, Joshua C; Rice, Kenneth; Smith, Nicholas L; Lumley, Thomas; Whitsel, Eric A; Stürmer, Til; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ngwa, Julius S; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wei, Wei-Qi; Wilke, Russell A; Liu, Ching-Ti; Sun, Fangui; Guo, Xiuqing; Heckbert, Susan R; Post, Wendy; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Arnold, Alice M; Stafford, Jeanette M; Ding, Jingzhong; Herrington, David M; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Launer, Leonore J; Harris, Tamara B; Chu, Audrey Y; Giulianini, Franco; MacFadyen, Jean G; Barratt, Bryan J; Nyberg, Fredrik; Stricker, Bruno H; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Emilsson, Valur; Franco, Oscar H; Ridker, Paul M; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Liu, Yongmei; Denny, Joshua C; Ballantyne, Christie M; Rotter, Jerome I; Adrienne Cupples, L; Psaty, Bruce M; Palmer, Colin N A; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Colhoun, Helen M; Hitman, Graham; Krauss, Ronald M; Wouter Jukema, J; Caulfield, Mark J

    2014-10-28

    Statins effectively lower LDL cholesterol levels in large studies and the observed interindividual response variability may be partially explained by genetic variation. Here we perform a pharmacogenetic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in studies addressing the LDL cholesterol response to statins, including up to 18,596 statin-treated subjects. We validate the most promising signals in a further 22,318 statin recipients and identify two loci, SORT1/CELSR2/PSRC1 and SLCO1B1, not previously identified in GWAS. Moreover, we confirm the previously described associations with APOE and LPA. Our findings advance the understanding of the pharmacogenetic architecture of statin response.

  12. Genome-Wide Association Analysis of Blood Biomarkers in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog Kyeom; Cho, Michael H.; Hersh, Craig P.; Lomas, David A.; Miller, Bruce E.; Kong, Xiangyang; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Agustí, Alvar; Wouters, Emiel; Celli, Bartolome; Coxson, Harvey; Vestbo, Jørgen; MacNee, William; Yates, Julie C.; Rennard, Stephen; Litonjua, Augusto; Qiu, Weiliang; Beaty, Terri H.; Crapo, James D.; Riley, John H.; Tal-Singer, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: A genome-wide association study (GWAS) for circulating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) biomarkers could identify genetic determinants of biomarker levels and COPD susceptibility. Objectives: To identify genetic variants of circulating protein biomarkers and novel genetic determinants of COPD. Methods: GWAS was performed for two pneumoproteins, Clara cell secretory protein (CC16) and surfactant protein D (SP-D), and five systemic inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α) in 1,951 subjects with COPD. For genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (P < 1 × 10−8), association with COPD susceptibility was tested in 2,939 cases with COPD and 1,380 smoking control subjects. The association of candidate SNPs with mRNA expression in induced sputum was also elucidated. Measurements and Main Results: Genome-wide significant susceptibility loci affecting biomarker levels were found only for the two pneumoproteins. Two discrete loci affecting CC16, one region near the CC16 coding gene (SCGB1A1) on chromosome 11 and another locus approximately 25 Mb away from SCGB1A1, were identified, whereas multiple SNPs on chromosomes 6 and 16, in addition to SNPs near SFTPD, had genome-wide significant associations with SP-D levels. Several SNPs affecting circulating CC16 levels were significantly associated with sputum mRNA expression of SCGB1A1 (P = 0.009–0.03). Several SNPs highly associated with CC16 or SP-D levels were nominally associated with COPD in a collaborative GWAS (P = 0.001–0.049), although these COPD associations were not replicated in two additional cohorts. Conclusions: Distant genetic loci and biomarker-coding genes affect circulating levels of COPD-related pneumoproteins. A subset of these protein quantitative trait loci may influence their gene expression in the lung and/or COPD susceptibility. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00292552). PMID

  13. [Genome-wide association study(GWAS) and genetic risk of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Akamatsu, Shusuke; Takata, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    It is evident that genetic factors play critical roles in prostate cancer development. GWAS (genome-wide association studies) in multiple ethnic groups have been identifying more than 100 loci or genes which was significantly associated with prostate cancer susceptibility. They include several loci at 8q24, prostate-specific gene, inflammation gene, and metabolism-related genes. Risk prediction for prostate cancer by combining multiple SNPs is still primitive and not sufficiently accurate for clinical use, but this model could have a potential to affect clinical decision when it is applied to patients with gray-zone PSA or very high risk of prostate cancer.

  14. A novel bayesian graphical model for genome-wide multi-SNP association mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Most disease association mapping algorithms are based on hypothesis testing procedures that test one variant at a time. Those methods lose power when the disease mutations are jointly tagged by multiple variants, or when gene-gene interaction exist. Nearby variants are also correlated, for which procedures ignoring the dependence between variants will inevitably produce redundant results. With a large number of variants genotyped in current genome-wide disease association studies, simultaneous multivariant association mapping algorithms are strongly desired. We present a novel Bayesian method for automatic detection of multivariant joint association in genome-wide case-control studies. Our method has improved power and specificity over existing tools. We fit a joint probabilistic model to the entire data and identify disease variants simultaneously. The method dynamically accounts for the strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) between variants. As a result, only the primary disease variants will be identified, with all secondary associations due to LD effects filtered out. Our method better pinpoints the disease variants with improved resolution. The method is also computationally efficient for genome-wide studies. When applied to a real data set of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) containing 401,473 variants in 4,720 individuals, our method detected all previously reported IBD loci in the same data, and recovered two missed loci. We further detected two novel interchromosome interactions. The first is between STAT3 and PARD6G, and the second is between DLG5 and an intergenic region at 5p14. We further validated the two interactions in an independent study.

  15. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Influencing Normal Human Facial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Raffensperger, Zachary D.; Heike, Carrie L.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Kau, Chung How; Moreno, Lina M.; Wehby, George L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Santorico, Stephanie; Klein, Ophir; Feingold, Eleanor; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Spritz, Richard A.; Marazita, Mary L.; Weinberg, Seth M.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence point to a genetic basis for facial morphology in humans, yet little is known about how specific genetic variants relate to the phenotypic expression of many common facial features. We conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of 20 quantitative facial measurements derived from the 3D surface images of 3118 healthy individuals of European ancestry belonging to two US cohorts. Analyses were performed on just under one million genotyped SNPs (Illumina OmniExpress+Exome v1.2 array) imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference panel (Phase 3). We observed genome-wide significant associations (p < 5 x 10−8) for cranial base width at 14q21.1 and 20q12, intercanthal width at 1p13.3 and Xq13.2, nasal width at 20p11.22, nasal ala length at 14q11.2, and upper facial depth at 11q22.1. Several genes in the associated regions are known to play roles in craniofacial development or in syndromes affecting the face: MAFB, PAX9, MIPOL1, ALX3, HDAC8, and PAX1. We also tested genotype-phenotype associations reported in two previous genome-wide studies and found evidence of replication for nasal ala length and SNPs in CACNA2D3 and PRDM16. These results provide further evidence that common variants in regions harboring genes of known craniofacial function contribute to normal variation in human facial features. Improved understanding of the genes associated with facial morphology in healthy individuals can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms controlling normal and abnormal facial morphogenesis. PMID:27560520

  16. Genome-wide association scan in psoriasis: new insights into chronic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Schrodi, Steven J

    2008-09-01

    Evaluation of: Liu Y, Helms C, Liao W et al. A genome-wide association study of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis identifies new disease loci. PLoS Genet. 4, e1000041 (2008). Genome-wide association scans have delivered on their promise of revealing susceptibility polymorphisms underlying common diseases. This comprehensive psoriasis study by Liu and colleagues reports confirmation of previously identified genes (HLA-C, IL12B and IL23R), identifies several novel psoriasis loci and is the first to report psoriatic arthritis association on a genome-wide scale. Along with other recent studies, this work gives further evidence that IL-23-mediated signaling is a key component of both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis pathogenesis. Importantly, this study provides evidence of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), 35 kb upstream of HLA-C, which is stronger than Cw 0602 - the variant traditionally attributed to the MHC-linked psoriasis-susceptibility effect. Within this region, the authors also discovered an independent SNP with very strong predisposing effects. SNPs in the COG6 region and the USP8-TNFAIP8l3 region are among the novel psoriasis associations reported. In addition, a region showing linkage on chromosome 1q demonstrated association in the epidermal differentiation complex. Four SNPs over a 439-kb region on chromosome 4q27, where KIAA1109, ADAD1 and two cytokine-encoding genes (IL2 and IL21) reside, exhibit intriguing correlation with psoriatic arthritis, although the signal strength is moderate. These results, while still preliminary, may substantially expand our knowledge of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis genetics, opening new avenues of chronic inflammatory disease research.

  17. A genome-wide association study of osteochondritis dissecans in the Thoroughbred.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Laura J; Blott, Sarah C; Swinburne, June E; Sibbons, Charlene; Fox-Clipsham, Laura Y; Helwegen, Maud; Parkin, Tim D H; Newton, J Richard; Bramlage, Lawrence R; McIlwraith, C Wayne; Bishop, Stephen C; Woolliams, John A; Vaudin, Mark

    2012-04-01

    Osteochondrosis is a developmental orthopaedic disease that occurs in horses, other livestock species, companion animal species, and humans. The principal aim of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) in the Thoroughbred using a genome-wide association study. A secondary objective was to test the effect of previously identified QTL in the current population. Over 300 horses, classified as cases or controls according to clinical findings, were genotyped for the Illumina Equine SNP50 BeadChip. An animal model was first implemented in order to adjust each horse's phenotypic status for average relatedness among horses and other potentially confounding factors which were present in the data. The genome-wide association test was then conducted on the residuals from the animal model. A single SNP on chromosome 3 was found to be associated with OCD at a genome-wide level of significance, as determined by permutation. According to the current sequence annotation, the SNP is located in an intergenic region of the genome. The effects of 24 SNPs, representing QTL previously identified in a sample of Hanoverian Warmblood horses, were tested directly in the animal model. When fitted alongside the significant SNP on ECA3, two of these SNPs were found to be associated with OCD. Confirmation of the putative QTL identified on ECA3 requires validation in an independent sample. The results of this study suggest that a significant challenge faced by equine researchers is the generation of sufficiently large data sets to effectively study complex diseases such as osteochondrosis.

  18. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Circulating Phospho- and Sphingolipid Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Kirichenko, Anatoly V.; Janssens, A. Cecile J. W.; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Gnewuch, Carsten; Domingues, Francisco S.; Pattaro, Cristian; Wild, Sarah H.; Jonasson, Inger; Polasek, Ozren; Zorkoltseva, Irina V.; Hofman, Albert; Karssen, Lennart C.; Struchalin, Maksim; Floyd, James; Igl, Wilmar; Biloglav, Zrinka; Broer, Linda; Pfeufer, Arne; Pichler, Irene; Campbell, Susan; Zaboli, Ghazal; Kolcic, Ivana; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Huffman, Jennifer; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Uitterlinden, Andre; Franke, Lude; Franklin, Christopher S.; Vitart, Veronique; Nelson, Christopher P.; Preuss, Michael; Bis, Joshua C.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Franceschini, Nora; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Axenovich, Tatiana; Oostra, Ben A.; Meitinger, Thomas; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Schmitz, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Phospho- and sphingolipids are crucial cellular and intracellular compounds. These lipids are required for active transport, a number of enzymatic processes, membrane formation, and cell signalling. Disruption of their metabolism leads to several diseases, with diverse neurological, psychiatric, and metabolic consequences. A large number of phospholipid and sphingolipid species can be detected and measured in human plasma. We conducted a meta-analysis of five European family-based genome-wide association studies (N = 4034) on plasma levels of 24 sphingomyelins (SPM), 9 ceramides (CER), 57 phosphatidylcholines (PC), 20 lysophosphatidylcholines (LPC), 27 phosphatidylethanolamines (PE), and 16 PE-based plasmalogens (PLPE), as well as their proportions in each major class. This effort yielded 25 genome-wide significant loci for phospholipids (smallest P-value = 9.88×10−204) and 10 loci for sphingolipids (smallest P-value = 3.10×10−57). After a correction for multiple comparisons (P-value<2.2×10−9), we observed four novel loci significantly associated with phospholipids (PAQR9, AGPAT1, PKD2L1, PDXDC1) and two with sphingolipids (PLD2 and APOE) explaining up to 3.1% of the variance. Further analysis of the top findings with respect to within class molar proportions uncovered three additional loci for phospholipids (PNLIPRP2, PCDH20, and ABDH3) suggesting their involvement in either fatty acid elongation/saturation processes or fatty acid specific turnover mechanisms. Among those, 14 loci (KCNH7, AGPAT1, PNLIPRP2, SYT9, FADS1-2-3, DLG2, APOA1, ELOVL2, CDK17, LIPC, PDXDC1, PLD2, LASS4, and APOE) mapped into the glycerophospholipid and 12 loci (ILKAP, ITGA9, AGPAT1, FADS1-2-3, APOA1, PCDH20, LIPC, PDXDC1, SGPP1, APOE, LASS4, and PLD2) to the sphingolipid pathways. In large meta-analyses, associations between FADS1-2-3 and carotid intima media thickness, AGPAT1 and type 2 diabetes, and APOA1 and coronary artery disease were observed. In conclusion, our

  19. Genome-wide association analyses identify 18 new loci associated with serum urate concentrations.

    PubMed

    Köttgen, Anna; Albrecht, Eva; Teumer, Alexander; Vitart, Veronique; Krumsiek, Jan; Hundertmark, Claudia; Pistis, Giorgio; Ruggiero, Daniela; O'Seaghdha, Conall M; Haller, Toomas; Yang, Qiong; Tanaka, Toshiko; Johnson, Andrew D; Kutalik, Zoltán; Smith, Albert V; Shi, Julia; Struchalin, Maksim; Middelberg, Rita P S; Brown, Morris J; Gaffo, Angelo L; Pirastu, Nicola; Li, Guo; Hayward, Caroline; Zemunik, Tatijana; Huffman, Jennifer; Yengo, Loic; Zhao, Jing Hua; Demirkan, Ayse; Feitosa, Mary F; Liu, Xuan; Malerba, Giovanni; Lopez, Lorna M; van der Harst, Pim; Li, Xinzhong; Kleber, Marcus E; Hicks, Andrew A; Nolte, Ilja M; Johansson, Asa; Murgia, Federico; Wild, Sarah H; Bakker, Stephan J L; Peden, John F; Dehghan, Abbas; Steri, Maristella; Tenesa, Albert; Lagou, Vasiliki; Salo, Perttu; Mangino, Massimo; Rose, Lynda M; Lehtimäki, Terho; Woodward, Owen M; Okada, Yukinori; Tin, Adrienne; Müller, Christian; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Putku, Margus; Czamara, Darina; Kraft, Peter; Frogheri, Laura; Thun, Gian Andri; Grotevendt, Anne; Gislason, Gauti Kjartan; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; McArdle, Patrick; Shuldiner, Alan R; Boerwinkle, Eric; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Helena; Schallert, Michael; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Munroe, Patricia B; Samani, Nilesh J; Jacobs, David R; Liu, Kiang; D'Adamo, Pio; Ulivi, Sheila; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Campbell, Susan; Devuyst, Olivier; Navarro, Pau; Kolcic, Ivana; Hastie, Nicholas; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Esko, Tõnu; Salumets, Andres; Khaw, Kay Tee; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; Isaacs, Aaron; Kraja, Aldi; Zhang, Qunyuan; Wild, Philipp S; Scott, Rodney J; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Org, Elin; Viigimaa, Margus; Bandinelli, Stefania; Metter, Jeffrey E; Lupo, Antonio; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Sorice, Rossella; Döring, Angela; Lattka, Eva; Strauch, Konstantin; Theis, Fabian; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wichmann, H-Erich; Davies, Gail; Gow, Alan J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Stolk, Ronald P; Kooner, Jaspal S; Zhang, Weihua; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Boehm, Bernhard O; Lucae, Susanne; Penninx, Brenda W; Smit, Johannes H; Curhan, Gary; Mudgal, Poorva; Plenge, Robert M; Portas, Laura; Persico, Ivana; Kirin, Mirna; Wilson, James F; Mateo Leach, Irene; van Gilst, Wiek H; Goel, Anuj; Ongen, Halit; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Imboden, Medea; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Cucca, Francesco; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Piras, Maria Grazia; Nauck, Matthias; Schurmann, Claudia; Budde, Kathrin; Ernst, Florian; Farrington, Susan M; Theodoratou, Evropi; Prokopenko, Inga; Stumvoll, Michael; Jula, Antti; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Shin, So-Youn; Spector, Tim D; Sala, Cinzia; Ridker, Paul M; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Hengstenberg, Christian; Nelson, Christopher P; Meschia, James F; Nalls, Michael A; Sharma, Pankaj; Singleton, Andrew B; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Zeller, Tanja; Burnier, Michel; Attia, John; Laan, Maris; Klopp, Norman; Hillege, Hans L; Kloiber, Stefan; Choi, Hyon; Pirastu, Mario; Tore, Silvia; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Völzke, Henry; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Parsa, Afshin; Schmidt, Reinhold; Whitfield, John B; Fornage, Myriam; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David S; Polašek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Metspalu, Andres; Loos, Ruth J F; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gambaro, Giovanni; Deary, Ian J; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Chambers, John C; März, Winfried; Pramstaller, Peter P; Snieder, Harold; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wright, Alan F; Navis, Gerjan; Watkins, Hugh; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Sanna, Serena; Schipf, Sabine; Dunlop, Malcolm G; Tönjes, Anke; Ripatti, Samuli; Soranzo, Nicole; Toniolo, Daniela; Chasman, Daniel I; Raitakari, Olli; Kao, W H Linda; Ciullo, Marina; Fox, Caroline S; Caulfield, Mark; Bochud, Murielle; Gieger, Christian

    2013-02-01

    Elevated serum urate concentrations can cause gout, a prevalent and painful inflammatory arthritis. By combining data from >140,000 individuals of European ancestry within the Global Urate Genetics Consortium (GUGC), we identified and replicated 28 genome-wide significant loci in association with serum urate concentrations (18 new regions in or near TRIM46, INHBB, SFMBT1, TMEM171, VEGFA, BAZ1B, PRKAG2, STC1, HNF4G, A1CF, ATXN2, UBE2Q2, IGF1R, NFAT5, MAF, HLF, ACVR1B-ACVRL1 and B3GNT4). Associations for many of the loci were of similar magnitude in individuals of non-European ancestry. We further characterized these loci for associations with gout, transcript expression and the fractional excretion of urate. Network analyses implicate the inhibins-activins signaling pathways and glucose metabolism in systemic urate control. New candidate genes for serum urate concentration highlight the importance of metabolic control of urate production and excretion, which may have implications for the treatment and prevention of gout.

  20. Genome-wide association analyses identify 18 new loci associated with serum urate concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Köttgen, Anna; Albrecht, Eva; Teumer, Alexander; Vitart, Veronique; Krumsiek, Jan; Hundertmark, Claudia; Pistis, Giorgio; Ruggiero, Daniela; O’Seaghdha, Conall M; Haller, Toomas; Yang, Qiong; Tanaka, Toshiko; Johnson, Andrew D; Kutalik, Zoltán; Smith, Albert V; Shi, Julia; Struchalin, Maksim; Middelberg, Rita P S; Brown, Morris J; Gaffo, Angelo L; Pirastu, Nicola; Li, Guo; Hayward, Caroline; Zemunik, Tatijana; Huffman, Jennifer; Yengo, Loic; Zhao, Jing Hua; Demirkan, Ayse; Feitosa, Mary F; Liu, Xuan; Malerba, Giovanni; Lopez, Lorna M; van der Harst, Pim; Li, Xinzhong; Kleber, Marcus E; Hicks, Andrew A; Nolte, Ilja M; Johansson, Asa; Murgia, Federico; Wild, Sarah H; Bakker, Stephan J L; Peden, John F; Dehghan, Abbas; Steri, Maristella; Tenesa, Albert; Lagou, Vasiliki; Salo, Perttu; Mangino, Massimo; Rose, Lynda M; Lehtimäki, Terho; Woodward, Owen M; Okada, Yukinori; Tin, Adrienne; Müller, Christian; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Putku, Margus; Czamara, Darina; Kraft, Peter; Frogheri, Laura; Thun, Gian Andri; Grotevendt, Anne; Gislason, Gauti Kjartan; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; McArdle, Patrick; Shuldiner, Alan R; Boerwinkle, Eric; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Helena; Schallert, Michael; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Munroe, Patricia B; Samani, Nilesh J; Jacobs, David R; Liu, Kiang; D’Adamo, Pio; Ulivi, Sheila; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Campbell, Susan; Devuyst, Olivier; Navarro, Pau; Kolcic, Ivana; Hastie, Nicholas; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Esko, Tõnu; Salumets, Andres; Khaw, Kay Tee; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; Isaacs, Aaron; Kraja, Aldi; Zhang, Qunyuan; Wild, Philipp S; Scott, Rodney J; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Org, Elin; Viigimaa, Margus; Bandinelli, Stefania; Metter, Jeffrey E; Lupo, Antonio; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Sorice, Rossella; Döring, Angela; Lattka, Eva; Strauch, Konstantin; Theis, Fabian; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wichmann, H-Erich; Davies, Gail; Gow, Alan J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Study, LifeLines Cohort; Stolk, Ronald P; Kooner, Jaspal S; Zhang, Weihua; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Boehm, Bernhard O; Lucae, Susanne; Penninx, Brenda W; Smit, Johannes H; Curhan, Gary; Mudgal, Poorva; Plenge, Robert M; Portas, Laura; Persico, Ivana; Kirin, Mirna; Wilson, James F; Leach, Irene Mateo; van Gilst, Wiek H; Goel, Anuj; Ongen, Halit; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Imboden, Medea; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Cucca, Francesco; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Piras, Maria Grazia; Nauck, Matthias; Schurmann, Claudia; Budde, Kathrin; Ernst, Florian; Farrington, Susan M; Theodoratou, Evropi; Prokopenko, Inga; Stumvoll, Michael; Jula, Antti; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Shin, So-Youn; Spector, Tim D; Sala, Cinzia; Ridker, Paul M; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Hengstenberg, Christian; Nelson, Christopher P; Consortium, CARDIoGRAM; Consortium, DIAGRAM; Consortium, ICBP; Consortium, MAGIC; Meschia, James F; Nalls, Michael A; Sharma, Pankaj; Singleton, Andrew B; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Zeller, Tanja; Burnier, Michel; Attia, John; Laan, Maris; Klopp, Norman; Hillege, Hans L; Kloiber, Stefan; Choi, Hyon; Pirastu, Mario; Tore, Silvia; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Völzke, Henry; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Parsa, Afshin; Schmidt, Reinhold; Whitfield, John B; Fornage, Myriam; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David S; Polašek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Metspalu, Andres; Loos, Ruth J F; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gambaro, Giovanni; Deary, Ian J; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Chambers, John C; März, Winfried; Pramstaller, Peter P; Snieder, Harold; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wright, Alan F; Navis, Gerjan; Watkins, Hugh; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Sanna, Serena; Schipf, Sabine; Dunlop, Malcolm G; Tönjes, Anke; Ripatti, Samuli; Soranzo, Nicole; Toniolo, Daniela; Chasman, Daniel I; Raitakari, Olli; Kao, W H Linda; Ciullo, Marina; Fox, Caroline S; Caulfield, Mark; Bochud, Murielle; Gieger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Elevated serum urate concentrations can cause gout, a prevalent and painful inflammatory arthritis. By combining data from >140,000 individuals of European ancestry within the Global Urate Genetics Consortium (GUGC), we identified and replicated 28 genome-wide significant loci in association with serum urate concentrations (18 new regions in or near TRIM46, INHBB, SFMBT1, TMEM171, VEGFA, BAZ1B, PRKAG2, STC1, HNF4G, A1CF, ATXN2, UBE2Q2, IGF1R, NFAT5, MAF, HLF, ACVR1B-ACVRL1 and B3GNT4). Associations for many of the loci were of similar magnitude in individuals of non-European ancestry. We further characterized these loci for associations with gout, transcript expression and the fractional excretion of urate. Network analyses implicate the inhibins-activins signaling pathways and glucose metabolism in systemic urate control. New candidate genes for serum urate concentration highlight the importance of metabolic control of urate production and excretion, which may have implications for the treatment and prevention of gout. PMID:23263486

  1. Genome-wide association studies for multiple diseases of the German Shepherd Dog

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Kate L.; Noorai, Rooksana E.; Starr-Moss, Alison N.; Quignon, Pascale; Rinz, Caitlin J.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Steiner, Jörg M.; Murphy, Keith E.

    2012-01-01

    The German Shepherd Dog (GSD) is a popular working and companion breed for which over 50 hereditary diseases have been documented. Herein, SNP profiles for 197 GSDs were generated using the Affymetrix v2 canine SNP array for a genome-wide association study to identify loci associated with four diseases: pituitary dwarfism, degenerative myelopathy (DM), congenital megaesophagus (ME), and pancreatic acinar atrophy (PAA). A locus on Chr 9 is strongly associated with pituitary dwarfism and is proximal to a plausible candidate gene, LHX3. Results for DM confirm a major locus encompassing SOD1, in which an associated point mutation was previously identified, but do not suggest modifier loci. Several SNPs on Chr 12 are associated with ME and a 4.7 Mb haplotype block is present in affected dogs. Analysis of additional ME cases for a SNP within the haplotype provides further support for this association. Results for PAA indicate more complex genetic underpinnings. Several regions on multiple chromosomes reach genome-wide significance. However, no major locus is apparent and only two associated haplotype blocks, on Chrs 7 and 12 are observed. These data suggest that PAA may be governed by multiple loci with small effects, or it may be a heterogeneous disorder. PMID:22105877

  2. A genome-wide association study of gestational diabetes mellitus in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Soo Heon; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Cho, Young Min; Go, Min Jin; Cho, Yoon Shin; Choi, Sung Hee; Moon, Min Kyong; Jung, Hye Seung; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Kang, Hyun Min; Cho, Nam H; Lee, In Kyu; Kim, Seong Yeon; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jang, Hak C; Park, Kyong Soo

    2012-02-01

    Knowledge regarding the genetic risk loci for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is still limited. In this study, we performed a two-stage genome-wide association analysis in Korean women. In the stage 1 genome scan, 468 women with GDM and 1,242 nondiabetic control women were compared using 2.19 million genotyped or imputed markers. We selected 11 loci for further genotyping in stage 2 samples of 931 case and 783 control subjects. The joint effect of stage 1 plus stage 2 studies was analyzed by meta-analysis. We also investigated the effect of known type 2 diabetes variants in GDM. Two loci known to be associated with type 2 diabetes had a genome-wide significant association with GDM in the joint analysis. rs7754840, a variant in CDKAL1, had the strongest association with GDM (odds ratio 1.518; P=6.65×10(-16)). A variant near MTNR1B, rs10830962, was also significantly associated with the risk of GDM (1.454; P=2.49×10(-13)). We found that there is an excess of association between known type 2 diabetes variants and GDM above what is expected under the null hypothesis. In conclusion, we have confirmed that genetic variants in CDKAL1 and near MTNR1B are strongly associated with GDM in Korean women. There seems to be a shared genetic basis between GDM and type 2 diabetes.

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study in Immunocompetent Patients with Delayed Hypersensitivity to Sulfonamide Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Dickey, Allison; Yale, Steven; Trepanier, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypersensitivity (HS) reactions to sulfonamide antibiotics occur uncommonly, but with potentially severe clinical manifestations. A familial predisposition to sulfonamide HS is suspected, but robust predictive genetic risk factors have yet to be identified. Strongly linked genetic polymorphisms have been used clinically as screening tests for other HS reactions prior to administration of high-risk drugs. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate for genetic risk of sulfonamide HS in the immunocompetent population using genome-wide association. Methods Ninety-one patients with symptoms after trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) attributable to “probable” drug HS based on medical record review and the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale, and 184 age- and sex-matched patients who tolerated a therapeutic course of TMP-SMX, were included in a genome-wide association study using both common and rare variant techniques. Additionally, two subgroups of HS patients with a more refined clinical phenotype (fever and rash; or fever, rash and eosinophilia) were evaluated separately. Results For the full dataset, no single nucleotide polymorphisms were suggestive of or reached genome-wide significance in the common variant analysis, nor was any genetic locus significant in the rare variant analysis. A single, possible gene locus association (COL12A1) was identified in the rare variant analysis for patients with both fever and rash, but the sample size was very small in this subgroup (n = 16), and this may be a false positive finding. No other significant associations were found for the subgroups. Conclusions No convincing genetic risk factors for sulfonamide HS were identified in this population. These negative findings may be due to challenges in accurately confirming the phenotype in exanthematous drug eruptions, or to unidentified gene-environment interactions influencing sulfonamide HS. PMID:27272151

  4. Utilizing twins as controls for non-twin case-materials in genome wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Ganna, Andrea; Ortega-Alonso, Alfredo; Havulinna, Aki; Salomaa, Veikko; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sullivan, Patrick F; Ingelsson, Erik; Hultman, Christina M; Magnusson, Patrik K E

    2013-01-01

    Twin registries around the globe have collected DNA samples from large numbers of monozygotic and dizygotic twins. The twin sample collections are frequently used as controls in disease-specific studies together with non-twins. This approach is unbiased under the hypothesis that twins and singletons are comparable in terms of allele frequencies; i.e. there are no genetic variants associated with being a twin per se. To test this hypothesis we performed a genome-wide association study comparing the allele frequency of 572,352 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1,413 monozygotic (MZ) and 5,451 dizygotic (DZ) twins with 3,720 healthy singletons. Twins and singletons have been genotyped using the same platform. SNPs showing association with being a twin at P-value < 1 × 10(-5) were selected for replication analysis in 1,492 twins (463 MZ and 1,029 DZ) and 1,880 singletons from Finland. No SNPs reached genome-wide significance (P-value < 5 × 10(-8)) in the main analysis combining MZ and DZ twins. In a secondary analysis including only DZ twins two SNPs (rs2033541 close to ADAMTSL1 and rs4149283 close to ABCA1) were genome-wide significant after meta-analysis with the Finnish population. The estimated proportion of variance on the liability scale explained by all SNPs was 0.08 (P-value=0.003) when MZ and DZ were considered together and smaller for MZ (0.06, P-value=0.10) compared to DZ (0.09, P-value=0.003) when analyzed separately. In conclusion, twins and singletons can be used in genetic studies together with general population samples without introducing large bias. Further research is needed to explore genetic variances associated with DZ twinning.

  5. Discovery and validation of sub-threshold genome-wide association study loci using epigenomic signatures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinchen; Tucker, Nathan R; Rizki, Gizem; Mills, Robert; Krijger, Peter HL; de Wit, Elzo; Subramanian, Vidya; Bartell, Eric; Nguyen, Xinh-Xinh; Ye, Jiangchuan; Leyton-Mange, Jordan; Dolmatova, Elena V; van der Harst, Pim; de Laat, Wouter; Ellinor, Patrick T; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Milan, David J; Kellis, Manolis; Boyer, Laurie A

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies explain only a modest proportion of heritability, suggesting that meaningful associations lie 'hidden' below current thresholds. Here, we integrate information from association studies with epigenomic maps to demonstrate that enhancers significantly overlap known loci associated with the cardiac QT interval and QRS duration. We apply functional criteria to identify loci associated with QT interval that do not meet genome-wide significance and are missed by existing studies. We demonstrate that these 'sub-threshold' signals represent novel loci, and that epigenomic maps are effective at discriminating true biological signals from noise. We experimentally validate the molecular, gene-regulatory, cellular and organismal phenotypes of these sub-threshold loci, demonstrating that most sub-threshold loci have regulatory consequences and that genetic perturbation of nearby genes causes cardiac phenotypes in mouse. Our work provides a general approach for improving the detection of novel loci associated with complex human traits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10557.001 PMID:27162171

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis Identifies Germ-Line Risk Factors Associated with Canine Mammary Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Melin, Malin; Murén, Eva; Gustafson, Ulla; Starkey, Mike; Borge, Kaja Sverdrup; Lingaas, Frode; Saellström, Sara; Rönnberg, Henrik; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Canine mammary tumours (CMT) are the most common neoplasia in unspayed female dogs. CMTs are suitable naturally occurring models for human breast cancer and share many characteristics, indicating that the genetic causes could also be shared. We have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in English Springer Spaniel dogs and identified a genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 11 (praw = 5.6x10-7, pperm = 0.019). The most associated haplotype spans a 446 kb region overlapping the CDK5RAP2 gene. The CDK5RAP2 protein has a function in cell cycle regulation and could potentially have an impact on response to chemotherapy treatment. Two additional loci, both on chromosome 27, were nominally associated (praw = 1.97x10-5 and praw = 8.30x10-6). The three loci explain 28.1±10.0% of the phenotypic variation seen in the cohort, whereas the top ten associated regions account for 38.2±10.8% of the risk. Furthermore, the ten GWAS loci and regions with reduced genetic variability are significantly enriched for snoRNAs and tumour-associated antigen genes, suggesting a role for these genes in CMT development. We have identified several candidate genes associated with canine mammary tumours, including CDK5RAP2. Our findings enable further comparative studies to investigate the genes and pathways in human breast cancer patients. PMID:27158822

  7. A genome-wide analysis of putative functional and exonic variation associated with extremely high intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Spain, S L; Pedroso, I; Kadeva, N; Miller, M B; Iacono, W G; McGue, M; Stergiakouli, E; Smith, G D; Putallaz, M; Lubinski, D; Meaburn, E L; Plomin, R; Simpson, M A

    2016-01-01

    Although individual differences in intelligence (general cognitive ability) are highly heritable, molecular genetic analyses to date have had limited success in identifying specific loci responsible for its heritability. This study is the first to investigate exome variation in individuals of extremely high intelligence. Under the quantitative genetic model, sampling from the high extreme of the distribution should provide increased power to detect associations. We therefore performed a case–control association analysis with 1409 individuals drawn from the top 0.0003 (IQ >170) of the population distribution of intelligence and 3253 unselected population-based controls. Our analysis focused on putative functional exonic variants assayed on the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. We did not observe any individual protein-altering variants that are reproducibly associated with extremely high intelligence and within the entire distribution of intelligence. Moreover, no significant associations were found for multiple rare alleles within individual genes. However, analyses using genome-wide similarity between unrelated individuals (genome-wide complex trait analysis) indicate that the genotyped functional protein-altering variation yields a heritability estimate of 17.4% (s.e. 1.7%) based on a liability model. In addition, investigation of nominally significant associations revealed fewer rare alleles associated with extremely high intelligence than would be expected under the null hypothesis. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that rare functional alleles are more frequently detrimental than beneficial to intelligence. PMID:26239293

  8. Genetic Control of Canine Leishmaniasis: Genome-Wide Association Study and Genomic Selection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Quilez, Javier; Martínez, Verónica; Woolliams, John A.; Sanchez, Armand; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Kennedy, Lorna J.; Quinnell, Rupert J.; Ollier, William E. R.; Roura, Xavier; Ferrer, Lluís; Altet, Laura; Francino, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Background The current disease model for leishmaniasis suggests that only a proportion of infected individuals develop clinical disease, while others are asymptomatically infected due to immune control of infection. The factors that determine whether individuals progress to clinical disease following Leishmania infection are unclear, although previous studies suggest a role for host genetics. Our hypothesis was that canine leishmaniasis is a complex disease with multiple loci responsible for the progression of the disease from Leishmania infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Genome-wide association and genomic selection approaches were applied to a population-based case-control dataset of 219 dogs from a single breed (Boxer) genotyped for ∼170,000 SNPs. Firstly, we aimed to identify individual disease loci; secondly, we quantified the genetic component of the observed phenotypic variance; and thirdly, we tested whether genome-wide SNP data could accurately predict the disease. Conclusions/Significance We estimated that a substantial proportion of the genome is affecting the trait and that its heritability could be as high as 60%. Using the genome-wide association approach, the strongest associations were on chromosomes 1, 4 and 20, although none of these were statistically significant at a genome-wide level and after correcting for genetic stratification and lifestyle. Amongst these associations, chromosome 4: 61.2–76.9 Mb maps to a locus that has previously been associated with host susceptibility to human and murine leishmaniasis, and genomic selection estimated markers in this region to have the greatest effect on the phenotype. We therefore propose these regions as candidates for replication studies. An important finding of this study was the significant predictive value from using the genomic information. We found that the phenotype could be predicted with an accuracy of ∼0.29 in new samples and that the affection status was correctly predicted in 60

  9. Genome-wide Association Studies from the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) Initiative | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    CGEMS identifies common inherited genetic variations associated with a number of cancers, including breast and prostate. Data from these genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are available through the Division of Cancer Epidemiology & Genetics website.

  10. Genome Wide Association for Addiction: Replicated Results and Comparisons of Two Analytic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Drgon, Tomas; Zhang, Ping-Wu; Johnson, Catherine; Walther, Donna; Hess, Judith; Nino, Michelle; Uhl, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Vulnerabilities to dependence on addictive substances are substantially heritable complex disorders whose underlying genetic architecture is likely to be polygenic, with modest contributions from variants in many individual genes. “Nontemplate” genome wide association (GWA) approaches can identity groups of chromosomal regions and genes that, taken together, are much more likely to contain allelic variants that alter vulnerability to substance dependence than expected by chance. Methodology/Principal Findings We report pooled “nontemplate” genome-wide association studies of two independent samples of substance dependent vs control research volunteers (n = 1620), one European-American and the other African-American using 1 million SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) Affymetrix genotyping arrays. We assess convergence between results from these two samples using two related methods that seek clustering of nominally-positive results and assess significance levels with Monte Carlo and permutation approaches. Both “converge then cluster” and “cluster then converge” analyses document convergence between the results obtained from these two independent datasets in ways that are virtually never found by chance. The genes identified in this fashion are also identified by individually-genotyped dbGAP data that compare allele frequencies in cocaine dependent vs control individuals. Conclusions/Significance These overlapping results identify small chromosomal regions that are also identified by genome wide data from studies of other relevant samples to extents much greater than chance. These chromosomal regions contain more genes related to “cell adhesion” processes than expected by chance. They also contain a number of genes that encode potential targets for anti-addiction pharmacotherapeutics. “Nontemplate” GWA approaches that seek chromosomal regions in which nominally-positive associations are found in multiple independent samples are

  11. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Otowa, Takeshi; Hek, Karin; Lee, Minyoung; Byrne, Enda M.; Mirza, Saira S.; Nivard, Michel G.; Bigdeli, Timothy; Aggen, Steven H.; Adkins, Daniel; Wolen, Aaron; Fanous, Ayman; Keller, Matthew C.; Castelao, Enrique; Kutalik, Zoltan; Van der Auwera, Sandra; Homuth, Georg; Nauck, Matthias; Teumer, Alexander; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Direk, Nese; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre; Mulder, Cornelis L.; Henders, Anjali K.; Medland, Sarah E.; Gordon, Scott; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Pergadia, Michelle; van der Most, Peter J.; Nolte, Ilja M.; van Oort, Floor V.A.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Preisig, Martin; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Penninx, Brenda WJH; Boomsma, Dorret; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant; Maher, Brion S.; van den Oord, Edwin J.; Wray, Naomi R.; Tiemeier, Henning; Hettema, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, namely generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and phobias, are common, etiologically complex conditions with a partially genetic basis. Despite differing on diagnostic definitions based upon clinical presentation, anxiety disorders likely represent various expressions of an underlying common diathesis of abnormal regulation of basic threat-response systems. We conducted genome-wide association analyses in nine samples of European ancestry from seven large, independent studies. To identify genetic variants contributing to genetic susceptibility shared across interview-generated DSM-based anxiety disorders, we applied two phenotypic approaches: (1) comparisons between categorical anxiety disorder cases and super-normal controls, and (2) quantitative phenotypic factor scores derived from a multivariate analysis combining information across the clinical phenotypes. We used logistic and linear regression, respectively, to analyze the association between these phenotypes and genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms. Meta-analysis for each phenotype combined results across the nine samples for over 18 000 unrelated individuals. Each meta-analysis identified a different genome-wide significant region, with the following markers showing the strongest association: for case-control contrasts, rs1709393 located in an uncharacterized non-coding RNA locus on chromosomal band 3q12.3 (P=1.65×10−8); for factor scores, rs1067327 within CAMKMT encoding the calmodulin-lysine N-methyltransferase on chromosomal band 2p21 (P=2.86×10−9). Independent replication and further exploration of these findings are needed to more fully understand the role of these variants in risk and expression of anxiety disorders. PMID:26754954

  12. Identification of Six Loci Associated With Pelvic Organ Prolapse Using Genome-Wide Association Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Allen-Brady, Kristina; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Farnham, James M.; Teerlink, Craig; Vierhout, Mark E.; van Kempen, Léon C.L.; Kluivers, Kirsten B.; Norton, Peggy A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective There is evidence that both environmental and genetic factors contribute to pelvic organ prolapse (POP). We conducted a genome-wide association study to investigate whether common genetic variants modify the risk of POP. Methods We recruited women who had been evaluated and treated for POP at the University of Utah from 1996–2008 and their affected female relatives. Cases were genotyped on the Illumina 550K platform. We genetically matched 2,976 Caucasian iControls available from Illumina as controls. Association tests were adjusted for related subjects using two different software programs: Efficient Mixed-Model Association eXpedited (EMMAX) and Genie. Confirmation of findings was performed in a cohort of Dutch women (n=76) with recurrent POP and family history of POP. Results The Utah study sample included 115 cases treated for POP, in most cases with surgery (n=78) or repeat surgery (n=35). Results from association analyses using EMMAX software identified five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with POP (p<1×10−7). Independent association analysis with Genie software identified three of the same SNPs and one additional SNP. The six SNPs were located at 4q21 (rs1455311), 8q24 (rs1036819), 9q22 (rs430794), 15q11 (rs8027714), 20p13 (rs1810636), and 21q22 (rs2236479). Nominally significant findings (p<0.05) or findings trending towards significance (p<0.1) were observed for five of the six SNPs in the Dutch cohort. Conclusion Six SNPs have been identified that are significantly associated with POP in high-risk familial cases and provide evidence for a genetic contribution to POP. PMID:22105264

  13. Genome-Wide Association for Sensitivity to Chronic Oxidative Stress in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Katherine W.; Craver, Kyle L.; Magwire, Michael M.; Cubilla, Carmen E.; Mackay, Trudy F. C.; Anholt, Robert R. H.

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a common byproduct of mitochondrial energy metabolism, and can also be induced by exogenous sources, including UV light, radiation, and environmental toxins. ROS generation is essential for maintaining homeostasis by triggering cellular signaling pathways and host defense mechanisms. However, an imbalance of ROS induces oxidative stress and cellular death and is associated with human disease, including age-related locomotor impairment. To identify genes affecting sensitivity and resistance to ROS-induced locomotor decline, we assessed locomotion of aged flies of the sequenced, wild-derived lines from the Drosophila melanogaster Genetics Reference Panel on standard medium and following chronic exposure to medium supplemented with 3 mM menadione sodium bisulfite (MSB). We found substantial genetic variation in sensitivity to oxidative stress with respect to locomotor phenotypes. We performed genome-wide association analyses to identify candidate genes associated with variation in sensitivity to ROS-induced decline in locomotor performance, and confirmed the effects for 13 of 16 mutations tested in these candidate genes. Candidate genes associated with variation in sensitivity to MSB-induced oxidative stress form networks of genes involved in neural development, immunity, and signal transduction. Many of these genes have human orthologs, highlighting the utility of genome-wide association in Drosophila for studying complex human disease. PMID:22715409

  14. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Wain, Louise V; Verwoert, Germaine C; O'Reilly, Paul F; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V; Ehret, Georg B; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Dörr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tõnu; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U; Webster, Rebecca J; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Chambers, John C; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kühnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M; Polašek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P; Morrison, Alanna C; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wang, Thomas J; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L; Taylor, Kent D; Harris, Tamara B; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sõber, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M; Penninx, Brenda W; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Melander, Olle; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; d'Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, Fabiola M; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S; Bergman, Richard N; Beilby, John P; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco J C; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N; Rose, Lynda M; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Döring, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H; Hoen, Peter A C 't; König, Inke R; Felix, Janine F; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stéphanie; Destefano, Anita L; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F; Smith, Nicholas L; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S; Stolk, Ronald P; Jukema, J Wouter; Wright, Alan F; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D; Palmer, Lyle J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J F; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J; Oostra, Ben A; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B; Psaty, Bruce M; Caulfield, Mark J; Rao, Dabeeru C; Tobin, Martin D; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2011-09-11

    Numerous genetic loci have been associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N = 74,064) and follow-up studies (N = 48,607), we identified at genome-wide significance (P = 2.7 × 10(-8) to P = 2.3 × 10(-13)) four new PP loci (at 4q12 near CHIC2, 7q22.3 near PIK3CG, 8q24.12 in NOV and 11q24.3 near ADAMTS8), two new MAP loci (3p21.31 in MAP4 and 10q25.3 near ADRB1) and one locus associated with both of these traits (2q24.3 near FIGN) that has also recently been associated with SBP in east Asians. For three of the new PP loci, the estimated effect for SBP was opposite of that for DBP, in contrast to the majority of common SBP- and DBP-associated variants, which show concordant effects on both traits. These findings suggest new genetic pathways underlying blood pressure variation, some of which may differentially influence SBP and DBP.

  15. CONAN: copy number variation analysis software for genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revolutionized our perception of the genetic regulation of complex traits and diseases. Copy number variations (CNVs) promise to shed additional light on the genetic basis of monogenic as well as complex diseases and phenotypes. Indeed, the number of detected associations between CNVs and certain phenotypes are constantly increasing. However, while several software packages support the determination of CNVs from SNP chip data, the downstream statistical inference of CNV-phenotype associations is still subject to complicated and inefficient in-house solutions, thus strongly limiting the performance of GWAS based on CNVs. Results CONAN is a freely available client-server software solution which provides an intuitive graphical user interface for categorizing, analyzing and associating CNVs with phenotypes. Moreover, CONAN assists the evaluation process by visualizing detected associations via Manhattan plots in order to enable a rapid identification of genome-wide significant CNV regions. Various file formats including the information on CNVs in population samples are supported as input data. Conclusions CONAN facilitates the performance of GWAS based on CNVs and the visual analysis of calculated results. CONAN provides a rapid, valid and straightforward software solution to identify genetic variation underlying the 'missing' heritability for complex traits that remains unexplained by recent GWAS. The freely available software can be downloaded at http://genepi-conan.i-med.ac.at. PMID:20546565

  16. Genome-wide mapping of IBD segments in an Ashkenazi PD cohort identifies associated haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Vacic, Vladimir; Ozelius, Laurie J; Clark, Lorraine N; Bar-Shira, Anat; Gana-Weisz, Mali; Gurevich, Tanya; Gusev, Alexander; Kedmi, Merav; Kenny, Eimear E; Liu, Xinmin; Mejia-Santana, Helen; Mirelman, Anat; Raymond, Deborah; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Desnick, Robert J; Atzmon, Gil; Burns, Edward R; Ostrer, Harry; Hakonarson, Hakon; Bergman, Aviv; Barzilai, Nir; Darvasi, Ariel; Peter, Inga; Guha, Saurav; Lencz, Todd; Giladi, Nir; Marder, Karen; Pe'er, Itsik; Bressman, Susan B; Orr-Urtreger, Avi

    2014-09-01

    The recent series of large genome-wide association studies in European and Japanese cohorts established that Parkinson disease (PD) has a substantial genetic component. To further investigate the genetic landscape of PD, we performed a genome-wide scan in the largest to date Ashkenazi Jewish cohort of 1130 Parkinson patients and 2611 pooled controls. Motivated by the reduced disease allele heterogeneity and a high degree of identical-by-descent (IBD) haplotype sharing in this founder population, we conducted a haplotype association study based on mapping of shared IBD segments. We observed significant haplotype association signals at three previously implicated Parkinson loci: LRRK2 (OR = 12.05, P = 1.23 × 10(-56)), MAPT (OR = 0.62, P = 1.78 × 10(-11)) and GBA (multiple distinct haplotypes, OR > 8.28, P = 1.13 × 10(-11) and OR = 2.50, P = 1.22 × 10(-9)). In addition, we identified a novel association signal on chr2q14.3 coming from a rare haplotype (OR = 22.58, P = 1.21 × 10(-10)) and replicated it in a secondary cohort of 306 Ashkenazi PD cases and 2583 controls. Our results highlight the power of our haplotype association method, particularly useful in studies of founder populations, and reaffirm the benefits of studying complex diseases in Ashkenazi Jewish cohorts.

  17. Conjunctival fibrosis and the innate barriers to Chlamydia trachomatis intracellular infection: a genome wide association study.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Chrissy h; Franklin, Christopher S; Makalo, Pateh; Joof, Hassan; Sarr, Isatou; Mahdi, Olaimatu S; Sillah, Ansumana; Bah, Momodou; Payne, Felicity; Jeffreys, Anna E; Bottomley, William; Natividad, Angels; Molina-Gonzalez, Sandra; Burr, Sarah E; Preston, Mark; Kwiatkowski, Dominic; Rockett, Kirk A; Clark, Taane G; Burton, Matthew J; Mabey, David C W; Bailey, Robin; Barroso, Inês; Holland, Martin J

    2015-11-30

    Chlamydia trachomatis causes both trachoma and sexually transmitted infections. These diseases have similar pathology and potentially similar genetic predisposing factors. We aimed to identify polymorphisms and pathways associated with pathological sequelae of ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infections in The Gambia. We report a discovery phase genome-wide association study (GWAS) of scarring trachoma (1090 cases, 1531 controls) that identified 27 SNPs with strong, but not genome-wide significant, association with disease (5 × 10(-6) > P > 5 × 10(-8)). The most strongly associated SNP (rs111513399, P = 5.38 × 10(-7)) fell within a gene (PREX2) with homology to factors known to facilitate chlamydial entry to the host cell. Pathway analysis of GWAS data was significantly enriched for mitotic cell cycle processes (P = 0.001), the immune response (P = 0.00001) and for multiple cell surface receptor signalling pathways. New analyses of published transcriptome data sets from Gambia, Tanzania and Ethiopia also revealed that the same cell cycle and immune response pathways were enriched at the transcriptional level in various disease states. Although unconfirmed, the data suggest that genetic associations with chlamydial scarring disease may be focussed on processes relating to the immune response, the host cell cycle and cell surface receptor signalling.

  18. Conjunctival fibrosis and the innate barriers to Chlamydia trachomatis intracellular infection: a genome wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Chrissy h.; Franklin, Christopher S.; Makalo, Pateh; Joof, Hassan; Sarr, Isatou; Mahdi, Olaimatu S.; Sillah, Ansumana; Bah, Momodou; Payne, Felicity; Jeffreys, Anna E.; Bottomley, William; Natividad, Angels; Molina-Gonzalez, Sandra; Burr, Sarah E.; Preston, Mark; Kwiatkowski, Dominic; Rockett, Kirk A.; Clark, Taane G.; Burton, Matthew J.; Mabey, David C. W.; Bailey, Robin; Barroso, Inês; Holland, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis causes both trachoma and sexually transmitted infections. These diseases have similar pathology and potentially similar genetic predisposing factors. We aimed to identify polymorphisms and pathways associated with pathological sequelae of ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infections in The Gambia. We report a discovery phase genome-wide association study (GWAS) of scarring trachoma (1090 cases, 1531 controls) that identified 27 SNPs with strong, but not genome-wide significant, association with disease (5 × 10−6 > P > 5 × 10−8). The most strongly associated SNP (rs111513399, P = 5.38 × 10−7) fell within a gene (PREX2) with homology to factors known to facilitate chlamydial entry to the host cell. Pathway analysis of GWAS data was significantly enriched for mitotic cell cycle processes (P = 0.001), the immune response (P = 0.00001) and for multiple cell surface receptor signalling pathways. New analyses of published transcriptome data sets from Gambia, Tanzania and Ethiopia also revealed that the same cell cycle and immune response pathways were enriched at the transcriptional level in various disease states. Although unconfirmed, the data suggest that genetic associations with chlamydial scarring disease may be focussed on processes relating to the immune response, the host cell cycle and cell surface receptor signalling. PMID:26616738

  19. Genome-wide association for sensitivity to chronic oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Katherine W; Craver, Kyle L; Magwire, Michael M; Cubilla, Carmen E; Mackay, Trudy F C; Anholt, Robert R H

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a common byproduct of mitochondrial energy metabolism, and can also be induced by exogenous sources, including UV light, radiation, and environmental toxins. ROS generation is essential for maintaining homeostasis by triggering cellular signaling pathways and host defense mechanisms. However, an imbalance of ROS induces oxidative stress and cellular death and is associated with human disease, including age-related locomotor impairment. To identify genes affecting sensitivity and resistance to ROS-induced locomotor decline, we assessed locomotion of aged flies of the sequenced, wild-derived lines from the Drosophila melanogaster Genetics Reference Panel on standard medium and following chronic exposure to medium supplemented with 3 mM menadione sodium bisulfite (MSB). We found substantial genetic variation in sensitivity to oxidative stress with respect to locomotor phenotypes. We performed genome-wide association analyses to identify candidate genes associated with variation in sensitivity to ROS-induced decline in locomotor performance, and confirmed the effects for 13 of 16 mutations tested in these candidate genes. Candidate genes associated with variation in sensitivity to MSB-induced oxidative stress form networks of genes involved in neural development, immunity, and signal transduction. Many of these genes have human orthologs, highlighting the utility of genome-wide association in Drosophila for studying complex human disease.

  20. Mapping the sensory perception of apple using descriptive sensory evaluation in a genome wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Amyotte, Beatrice; Bowen, Amy J.; Banks, Travis; Rajcan, Istvan; Somers, Daryl J.

    2017-01-01

    Breeding apples is a long-term endeavour and it is imperative that new cultivars are selected to have outstanding consumer appeal. This study has taken the approach of merging sensory science with genome wide association analyses in order to map the human perception of apple flavour and texture onto the apple genome. The goal was to identify genomic associations that could be used in breeding apples for improved fruit quality. A collection of 85 apple cultivars was examined over two years through descriptive sensory evaluation by a trained sensory panel. The trained sensory panel scored randomized sliced samples of each apple cultivar for seventeen taste, flavour and texture attributes using controlled sensory evaluation practices. In addition, the apple collection was subjected to genotyping by sequencing for marker discovery. A genome wide association analysis suggested significant genomic associations for several sensory traits including juiciness, crispness, mealiness and fresh green apple flavour. The findings include previously unreported genomic regions that could be used in apple breeding and suggest that similar sensory association mapping methods could be applied in other plants. PMID:28231290

  1. A genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci for variation in human ear morphology.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Reales, Guillermo; Smith, Andrew J P; Konka, Esra; Palmen, Jutta; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Fuentes, Macarena; Pizarro, María; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Calderón, Rosario; Rosique, Javier; Cheeseman, Michael; Bhutta, Mahmood F; Humphries, Steve E; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2015-06-24

    Here we report a genome-wide association study for non-pathological pinna morphology in over 5,000 Latin Americans. We find genome-wide significant association at seven genomic regions affecting: lobe size and attachment, folding of antihelix, helix rolling, ear protrusion and antitragus size (linear regression P values 2 × 10(-8) to 3 × 10(-14)). Four traits are associated with a functional variant in the Ectodysplasin A receptor (EDAR) gene, a key regulator of embryonic skin appendage development. We confirm expression of Edar in the developing mouse ear and that Edar-deficient mice have an abnormally shaped pinna. Two traits are associated with SNPs in a region overlapping the T-Box Protein 15 (TBX15) gene, a major determinant of mouse skeletal development. Strongest association in this region is observed for SNP rs17023457 located in an evolutionarily conserved binding site for the transcription factor Cartilage paired-class homeoprotein 1 (CART1), and we confirm that rs17023457 alters in vitro binding of CART1.

  2. A genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci for variation in human ear morphology

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Reales, Guillermo; Smith, Andrew J. P.; Konka, Esra; Palmen, Jutta; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Fuentes, Macarena; Pizarro, María; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria- Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Calderón, Rosario; Rosique, Javier; Cheeseman, Michael; Bhutta, Mahmood F.; Humphries, Steve E.; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a genome-wide association study for non-pathological pinna morphology in over 5,000 Latin Americans. We find genome-wide significant association at seven genomic regions affecting: lobe size and attachment, folding of antihelix, helix rolling, ear protrusion and antitragus size (linear regression P values 2 × 10−8 to 3 × 10−14). Four traits are associated with a functional variant in the Ectodysplasin A receptor (EDAR) gene, a key regulator of embryonic skin appendage development. We confirm expression of Edar in the developing mouse ear and that Edar-deficient mice have an abnormally shaped pinna. Two traits are associated with SNPs in a region overlapping the T-Box Protein 15 (TBX15) gene, a major determinant of mouse skeletal development. Strongest association in this region is observed for SNP rs17023457 located in an evolutionarily conserved binding site for the transcription factor Cartilage paired-class homeoprotein 1 (CART1), and we confirm that rs17023457 alters in vitro binding of CART1. PMID:26105758

  3. MAVEN: a tool for visualization and functional analysis of genome-wide association results

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Kanchana; Li, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Summary: We describe the features and implementation of a web application tool named MAVEN—for Management, Analysis, Visualization and rEsults shariNg of genome-wide association data using cutting edge technologies. Main capabilities include user data uploading and management, queries using a variety of criteria, visualization of results, interactive selections and seamless integration of users' data with databases at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) for functional annotations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genes. Availability: http://cbc.case.edu/maven Contact: jingli@case.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19933166

  4. A Pilot Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Potential Metabolic Pathways Involved in Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Gilles, Annick; Van Camp, Guy; Van de Heyning, Paul; Fransen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Tinnitus, the perception of an auditory phantom sound in the form of ringing, buzzing, roaring, or hissing in the absence of an external sound source, is perceived by ~15% of the population and 2.5% experiences a severely bothersome tinnitus. The contribution of genes on the development of tinnitus is still under debate. The current manuscript reports a pilot Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) into tinnitus, in a small cohort of 167 independent tinnitus subjects, and 749 non-tinnitus controls, who were collected as part of a cross-sectional study. After genotyping, imputation, and quality checking, the association between the tinnitus phenotype and 4,000,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was tested followed by gene set enrichment analysis. None of the SNPs reached the threshold for genome-wide significance (p < 5.0e–8), with the most significant SNPs, situated outside coding genes, reaching a p-value of 3.4e–7. By using the Genetic Analysis of Complex Traits (GACT) software, the percentage of the variance explained by all SNPs in the GWAS was estimated to be 3.2%, indicating that additive genetic effects explain only a small fraction of the tinnitus phenotype. Despite the lack of genome-wide significant SNPs, which is, at least in part, due to the limited sample size of the current study, evidence was found for a genetic involvement in tinnitus. Gene set enrichment analysis showed several metabolic pathways to be significantly enriched with SNPs having a low p-value in the GWAS. These pathways are involved in oxidative stress, endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress, and serotonin reception mediated signaling. These results are a promising basis for further research into the genetic basis of tinnitus, including GWAS with larger sample sizes and considering tinnitus subtypes for which a greater genetic contribution is more likely. PMID:28303087

  5. Potential assessment of genome-wide association study and genomic selection in Japanese pear Pyrus pyrifolia.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hiroyoshi; Hayashi, Takeshi; Terakami, Shingo; Takada, Norio; Sawamura, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2013-03-01

    Although the potential of marker-assisted selection (MAS) in fruit tree breeding has been reported, bi-parental QTL mapping before MAS has hindered the introduction of MAS to fruit tree breeding programs. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are an alternative to bi-parental QTL mapping in long-lived perennials. Selection based on genomic predictions of breeding values (genomic selection: GS) is another alternative for MAS. This study examined the potential of GWAS and GS in pear breeding with 76 Japanese pear cultivars to detect significant associations of 162 markers with nine agronomic traits. We applied multilocus Bayesian models accounting for ordinal categorical phenotypes for GWAS and GS model training. Significant associations were detected at harvest time, black spot resistance and the number of spurs and two of the associations were closely linked to known loci. Genome-wide predictions for GS were accurate at the highest level (0.75) in harvest time, at medium levels (0.38-0.61) in resistance to black spot, firmness of flesh, fruit shape in longitudinal section, fruit size, acid content and number of spurs and at low levels (<0.2) in all soluble solid content and vigor of tree. Results suggest the potential of GWAS and GS for use in future breeding programs in Japanese pear.

  6. Genome-Wide Association of Copy Number Polymorphisms and Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Man; Carey, Jacob; Cristiano, Stephen; Susztak, Katalin; Coresh, Josef; Boerwinkle, Eric; Beaty, Terri H.; Köttgen, Anna; Scharpf, Robert B.

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have identified more than 50 loci associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), a measure of kidney function. However, significant SNPs account for a small proportion of eGFR variability. Other forms of genetic variation have not been comprehensively evaluated for association with eGFR. In this study, we assess whether changes in germline DNA copy number are associated with GFR estimated from serum creatinine, eGFRcrea. We used hidden Markov models (HMMs) to identify copy number polymorphic regions (CNPs) from high-throughput SNP arrays for 2,514 African (AA) and 8,645 European ancestry (EA) participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Separately for the EA and AA cohorts, we used Bayesian Gaussian mixture models to estimate copy number at regions identified by the HMM or previously reported in the HapMap Project. We identified 312 and 464 autosomal CNPs among individuals of EA and AA, respectively. Multivariate models adjusted for SNP-derived covariates of population structure identified one CNP in the EA cohort near genome-wide statistical significance (Bonferroni-adjusted p = 0.067) located on chromosome 5 (876–880kb). Overall, our findings suggest a limited role of CNPs in explaining eGFR variability. PMID:28135296

  7. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies 10 loci influencing allergic sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Granell, Raquel; Strachan, David P; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Linneberg, Allan; Curtin, John A; Warrington, Nicole M; Standl, Marie; Kerkhof, Marjan; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Bukvic, Blazenka K; Kaakinen, Marika; Sleimann, Patrick; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Schramm, Katharina; Baltic, Svetlana; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Simpson, Angela; St Pourcain, Beate; Coin, Lachlan; Hui, Jennie; Walters, Eugene H; Tiesler, Carla M T; Duffy, David L; Jones, Graham; Ring, Susan M; McArdle, Wendy L; Price, Loren; Robertson, Colin F; Pekkanen, Juha; Tang, Clara S; Thiering, Elisabeth; Montgomery, Grant W; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Husemoen, Lise L; Herder, Christian; Kemp, John P; Elliot, Paul; James, Alan; Waldenberger, Melanie; Abramson, Michael J; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Knight, Julian C; Gupta, Ramneek; Thompson, Philip J; Holt, Patrick; Sly, Peter; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Blekic, Mario; Weidinger, Stephan; Hakonarsson, Hakon; Stefansson, Kari; Heinrich, Joachim; Postma, Dirkje S; Custovic, Adnan; Pennell, Craig E; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Koppelman, Gerard H; Timpson, Nicholas; Ferreira, Manuel A; Bisgaard, Hans; Henderson, A John

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific IgE (allergic sensitization) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. We performed the first large-scale genome wide association study (GWAS) of allergic sensitization in 5,789 affected individuals and 10,056 controls and followed up the top SNP from 26 loci in 6,114 affected individuals and 9,920 controls. We increased the number of susceptibility loci with genome-wide significant association to allergic sensitization from three to 10, including SNPs in or near TLR6, C11orf30, STAT6, SLC25A46, HLA-DQB1, IL1RL1, LPP, MYC, IL2 and HLA-B. All the top-SNPs were associated with allergic symptoms in an independent study. Risk variants at these 10 loci were estimated to account for at least 25% of allergic sensitization and allergic rhinitis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations may provide novel insight into the etiology of allergic disease. PMID:23817571

  8. Genome-wide association study identifies candidate markers for bull fertility in Holstein dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Peñagaricano, F; Weigel, K A; Khatib, H

    2012-07-01

    The decline in the reproductive efficiency of dairy cattle has become a challenging problem worldwide. Female fertility is now taken into account in breeding goals while generally less attention is given to male fertility. The objective of this study was to perform a genome-wide association study in Holstein bulls to identify genetic variants significantly related to sire conception rate (SCR), a new phenotypic evaluation of bull fertility. The analysis included 1755 sires with SCR data and 38,650 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the entire bovine genome. Associations between SNPs and SCR were analyzed using a mixed linear model that included a random polygenic effect and SNP genotype either as a linear covariate or as a categorical variable. A multiple testing correction approach was used to account for the correlation between SNPs because of linkage disequilibrium. After genome-wide correction, eight SNPs showed significant association with SCR. Some of these SNPs are located close to or in the middle of genes with functions related to male fertility, such as the sperm acrosome reaction, chromatin remodeling during the spermatogenesis, and the meiotic process during male germ cell maturation. Some SNPs showed marked dominance effects, which provide more evidence for the relevance of non-additive effects in traits closely related to fitness such as fertility. The results could contribute to the identification of genes and pathways associated with male fertility in dairy cattle.

  9. Genome-wide association studies of chronic kidney disease: what have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2015-01-01

    The past 3 years have witnessed a dramatic expansion in our knowledge of the genetic determinants of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, heritability estimates of eGFR indicate that we have only identified a small proportion of the total heritable contribution to the phenotypic variation. The majority of associations reported from genome-wide association studies identify genomic regions of interest and further work will be required to identify the causal variants responsible for a specific phenotype. Progress in this area is likely to stem from the identification of novel risk genotypes, which will offer insight into the pathogenesis of disease and potential novel therapeutic targets. Follow-up studies stimulated by findings from genome-wide association studies of kidney disease are already yielding promising results, such as the identification of an association between urinary uromodulin levels and incident CKD. Although this work is at an early stage, prospects for progress in our understanding of CKD and its treatment look more promising now than at any point in the past. PMID:22143329

  10. Genome-wide investigation of schizophrenia associated plasma Ndel1 enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Gadelha, Ary; Coleman, Jonathan; Breen, Gerome; Mazzoti, Diego Robles; Yonamine, Camila M; Pellegrino, Renata; Ota, Vanessa Kiyomi; Belangero, Sintia Iole; Glessner, Joseph; Sleiman, Patrick; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hayashi, Mirian A F; Bressan, Rodrigo A

    2016-04-01

    Ndel1 is a DISC1-interacting oligopeptidase that cleaves in vitro neuropeptides as neurotensin and bradykinin, and which has been associated with both neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth. We previously reported that plasma Ndel1 enzyme activity is lower in patients with schizophrenia (SCZ) compared to healthy controls (HCs). To our knowledge, no previous study has investigated the genetic factors associated with the plasma Ndel1 enzyme activity. In the current analyses, samples from 83 SCZ patients and 92 control subjects that were assayed for plasma Ndel1 enzyme activity were genotyped on Illumina Omni Express arrays. A genetic relationship matrix using genome-wide information was then used for ancestry correction, and association statistics were calculated genome-wide. Ndel1 enzyme activity was significantly lower in patients with SCZ (t=4.9; p<0.001) and was found to be associated with CAMK1D, MAGI2, CCDC25, and GABGR3, at a level of suggestive significance (p<10(-6)), independent of the clinical status. Then, we performed a model to investigate the observed differences for case/control measures. 2 SNPs at region 1p22.2 reached the p<10(-7) level. ZFPM2 and MAD1L1 were the only two genes with more than one hit at 10(-6) order of p value. Therefore, Ndel1 enzyme activity is a complex trait influenced by many different genetic variants that may contribute to SCZ physiopathology.

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Wain, Louise V; Verwoert, Germaine C; O’Reilly, Paul F; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V; Ehret, Georg B; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Dörr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tõnu; Janssens, A Cecile JW; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian’an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U; Webster, Rebecca J; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hotteng, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Chambers, John C; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kühnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M; Polašek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P; Morrison, Alanna C; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco US; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric JG; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wang, Thomas J; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L; Taylor, Kent D; Harris, Tamara B; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sõber, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M; Penninx, Brenda W; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Melander, Olle; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; d’Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, M Fabiola; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S; Bergman, Richard N; Beilby, John P; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco JC; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N; Rose, Lynda M; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Döring, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H; ’t Hoen, Peter AC; König, Inke R; Felix, Janine F; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stéphanie; DeStefano, Anita L; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F; Smith, Nicholas L; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S; Stolk, Ronald P; Jukema, J Wouter; Wright, Alan F; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D; Palmer, Lyle J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth JF; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J; Oostra, Ben A; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B; Psaty, Bruce M; Caulfield, Mark J; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic loci influence systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans 1-3. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N=74,064) and follow-up studies (N=48,607), we identified at genome-wide significance (P= 2.7×10-8 to P=2.3×10-13) four novel PP loci (at 4q12 near CHIC2/PDGFRAI, 7q22.3 near PIK3CG, 8q24.12 in NOV, 11q24.3 near ADAMTS-8), two novel MAP loci (3p21.31 in MAP4, 10q25.3 near ADRB1) and one locus associated with both traits (2q24.3 near FIGN) which has recently been associated with SBP in east Asians. For three of the novel PP signals, the estimated effect for SBP was opposite to that for DBP, in contrast to the majority of common SBP- and DBP-associated variants which show concordant effects on both traits. These findings indicate novel genetic mechanisms underlying blood pressure variation, including pathways that may differentially influence SBP and DBP. PMID:21909110

  12. Multi-generational genome wide association studies identify chromosomal regions associated with ascites phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, K J; Dey, S; Kinney, R; Anthony, N B; Rhoads, D D

    2017-02-21

    Ascites is a multi-faceted disease commonly observed in fast growing broilers, which is initiated when the body is insufficiently oxygenated. A series of events follow, including an increase in pulmonary artery pressure, right ventricle hypertrophy, and accumulation of fluid in the abdominal cavity and pericardium. Advances in management practices along with improved selection programs have decreased ascites incidence in modern broilers. However, ascites syndrome remains an economically important disease throughout the world, causing estimated losses of $100 million per year. In this study, a 60 K Illumina SNP BeadChip was used to perform a series of genome wide association studies (GWAS) on the 16th and 18th generation of our relaxed (REL) line descended from a commercial elite broiler line beginning in 1995. Regions significantly associated with ascites incidence were identified on chromosome 2 around 70 megabase pairs (Mbp) and on chromosome Z around 60 Mbp. Five candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were evaluated as indicators for these 2 regions in order to identify association with ascites and right ventricle to total ventricle weight (RVTV) ratios. Chromosome 2 SNP showed an association with RVTV ratios in males phenotyped as ascites resistant and ascites susceptible (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03, respectively). The chromosome Z region also indicates an association with resistant female RVTV values (P = 0.02). Regions of significance identified on chromosomes 2 and Z described in this study will be used as proposed candidate regions for further investigation into the genetics of ascites. This information will lead to a better understanding of the underlying genetics and gene networks contributing to ascites, and thus advances in ascites reduction through commercial breeding schemes.

  13. Genome-Wide Association of the Laboratory-Based Nicotine Metabolite Ratio in Three Ancestries

    PubMed Central

    Baurley, James W.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Pardamean, Carissa I.; Conti, David V.; Krasnow, Ruth; Javitz, Harold S.; Hops, Hyman; Swan, Gary E.; Benowitz, Neal L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Metabolic enzyme variation and other patient and environmental characteristics influence smoking behaviors, treatment success, and risk of related disease. Population-specific variation in metabolic genes contributes to challenges in developing and optimizing pharmacogenetic interventions. We applied a custom genome-wide genotyping array for addiction research (Smokescreen), to three laboratory-based studies of nicotine metabolism with oral or venous administration of labeled nicotine and cotinine, to model nicotine metabolism in multiple populations. The trans-3′-hydroxycotinine/cotinine ratio, the nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR), was the nicotine metabolism measure analyzed. Methods: Three hundred twelve individuals of self-identified European, African, and Asian American ancestry were genotyped and included in ancestry-specific genome-wide association scans (GWAS) and a meta-GWAS analysis of the NMR. We modeled natural-log transformed NMR with covariates: principal components of genetic ancestry, age, sex, body mass index, and smoking status. Results: African and Asian American NMRs were statistically significantly (P values ≤ 5E-5) lower than European American NMRs. Meta-GWAS analysis identified 36 genome-wide significant variants over a 43 kilobase pair region at CYP2A6 with minimum P = 2.46E-18 at rs12459249, proximal to CYP2A6. Additional minima were located in intron 4 (rs56113850, P = 6.61E-18) and in the CYP2A6-CYP2A7 intergenic region (rs34226463, P = 1.45E-12). Most (34/36) genome-wide significant variants suggested reduced CYP2A6 activity; functional mechanisms were identified and tested in knowledge-bases. Conditional analysis resulted in intergenic variants of possible interest (P values < 5E-5). Conclusions: This meta-GWAS of the NMR identifies CYP2A6 variants, replicates the top-ranked single nucleotide polymorphism from a recent Finnish meta-GWAS of the NMR, identifies functional mechanisms, and provides pan

  14. Genome-wide association study reveals sex-specific selection signals against autosomal nucleotide variants.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Dongchan; Ryu, Jihye; Lee, Chaeyoung

    2016-05-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted to examine genetic associations of common autosomal nucleotide variants with sex in a Korean population with 4183 males and 4659 females. Nine genetic association signals were identified in four intragenic and five intergenic regions (P<5 × 10(-8)). Further analysis with an independent data set confirmed two intragenic association signals in the genes encoding protein phosphatase 1, regulatory subunit 12B (PPP1R12B, intron 12, rs1819043) and dynein, axonemal, heavy chain 11 (DNAH11, intron 61, rs10255013), which are directly involved in the reproductive system. This study revealed autosomal genetic variants associated with sex ratio by GWAS for the first time. This implies that genetic variants in proximity to the association signals may influence sex-specific selection and contribute to sex ratio variation. Further studies are required to reveal the mechanisms underlying sex-specific selection.

  15. Genome-Wide Association for Nicotine Dependence and Smoking Cessation Success in NIH Research Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Drgon, Tomas; Montoya, Ivan; Johnson, Catherine; Liu, Qing-Rong; Walther, Donna; Hamer, Dean; Uhl, George R

    2009-01-01

    Phenotypes related to both nicotine dependence and ability to successfully quit smoking display substantial heritabilities in classical and molecular genetic studies. Twin studies suggest that some genetic components for dependence overlap with genetic components of ability to quit, but that many components do not overlap. Initial genome-wide association (GWA) studies have demonstrated haplotypes that distinguish nicotine-dependent from nondependent smokers. These haplotypes overlap partially with those that distinguish individuals who successfully quit smoking from those who were not able to quit smoking in clinical trials for smoking cessation. We now report novel genome-wide association results from National Institutes of Health research volunteers who reported smoking histories, symptoms of nicotine dependence, and ability to successfully quit smoking outside the context of a clinical trial. These results buttress data from several prior GWA studies. The data from these volunteers support the idea that previously reported studies of genes associated with smoking cessation success in clinical trial participants may also apply to smokers who are more or less able to initiate and sustain abstinence outside of clinical trial settings. PMID:19009022

  16. Genome-wide association and linkage analyses localize a progressive retinal atrophy locus in Persian cats.

    PubMed

    Alhaddad, Hasan; Gandolfi, Barbara; Grahn, Robert A; Rah, Hyung-Chul; Peterson, Carlyn B; Maggs, David J; Good, Kathryn L; Pedersen, Niels C; Lyons, Leslie A

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary eye diseases of animals serve as excellent models of human ocular disorders and assist in the development of gene and drug therapies for inherited forms of blindness. Several primary hereditary eye conditions affecting various ocular tissues and having different rates of progression have been documented in domestic cats. Gene therapy for canine retinopathies has been successful, thus the cat could be a gene therapy candidate for other forms of retinal degenerations. The current study investigates a hereditary, autosomal recessive, retinal degeneration specific to Persian cats. A multi-generational pedigree segregating for this progressive retinal atrophy was genotyped using a 63 K SNP array and analyzed via genome-wide linkage and association methods. A multi-point parametric linkage analysis localized the blindness phenotype to a ~1.75 Mb region with significant LOD scores (Z ≈ 14, θ = 0.00) on cat chromosome E1. Genome-wide TDT, sib-TDT, and case-control analyses also consistently supported significant association within the same region on chromosome E1, which is homologous to human chromosome 17. Using haplotype analysis, a ~1.3 Mb region was identified as highly associated for progressive retinal atrophy in Persian cats. Several candidate genes within the region are reasonable candidates as a potential causative gene and should be considered for molecular analyses.

  17. Genome-wide analyses identify common variants associated with macular telangiectasia type 2.

    PubMed

    Scerri, Thomas S; Quaglieri, Anna; Cai, Carolyn; Zernant, Jana; Matsunami, Nori; Baird, Lisa; Scheppke, Lea; Bonelli, Roberto; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Friedlander, Martin; Egan, Catherine A; Fruttiger, Marcus; Leppert, Mark; Allikmets, Rando; Bahlo, Melanie

    2017-02-27

    Idiopathic juxtafoveal retinal telangiectasis type 2 (macular telangiectasia type 2; MacTel) is a rare neurovascular degenerative retinal disease. To identify genetic susceptibility loci for MacTel, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with 476 cases and 1,733 controls of European ancestry. Genome-wide significant associations (P < 5 × 10(-8)) were identified at three independent loci (rs73171800 at 5q14.3, P = 7.74 × 10(-17); rs715 at 2q34, P = 9.97 × 10(-14); rs477992 at 1p12, P = 2.60 × 10(-12)) and then replicated (P < 0.01) in an independent cohort of 172 cases and 1,134 controls. The 5q14.3 locus is known to associate with variation in retinal vascular diameter, and the 2q34 and 1p12 loci have been implicated in the glycine/serine metabolic pathway. We subsequently found significant differences in blood serum levels of glycine (P = 4.04 × 10(-6)) and serine (P = 2.48 × 10(-4)) between MacTel cases and controls.

  18. Genome-Wide Association in Tomato Reveals 44 Candidate Loci for Fruit Metabolic Traits1[W

    PubMed Central

    Sauvage, Christopher; Segura, Vincent; Bauchet, Guillaume; Stevens, Rebecca; Do, Phuc Thi; Nikoloski, Zoran; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Causse, Mathilde

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in identifying genes involved in polygenic traits and are valuable for crop improvement. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a major crop and is highly appreciated worldwide for its health value. We used a core collection of 163 tomato accessions composed of S. lycopersicum, S. lycopersicum var cerasiforme, and Solanum pimpinellifolium to map loci controlling variation in fruit metabolites. Fruits were phenotyped for a broad range of metabolites, including amino acids, sugars, and ascorbate. In parallel, the accessions were genotyped with 5,995 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers spread over the whole genome. Genome-wide association analysis was conducted on a large set of metabolic traits that were stable over 2 years using a multilocus mixed model as a general method for mapping complex traits in structured populations and applied to tomato. We detected a total of 44 loci that were significantly associated with a total of 19 traits, including sucrose, ascorbate, malate, and citrate levels. These results not only provide a list of candidate loci to be functionally validated but also a powerful analytical approach for finding genetic variants that can be directly used for crop improvement and deciphering the genetic architecture of complex traits. PMID:24894148

  19. Genome-wide association scan suggests basis for microtia in Awassi sheep.

    PubMed

    Jawasreh, K; Boettcher, P J; Stella, A

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary underdevelopment of the ear, a condition also known as microtia, has been observed in several sheep breeds as well as in humans and other species. Its genetic basis in sheep is unknown. The Awassi sheep, a breed native to southwest Asia, carries this phenotype and was targeted for molecular characterization via a genome-wide association study. DNA samples were collected from sheep in Jordan. Eight affected and 12 normal individuals were genotyped with the Illumina OvineSNP50(®) chip. Multilocus analyses failed to identify any genotypic association. In contrast, a single-locus analysis revealed a statistically significant association (P = 0.012, genome-wide) with a SNP at basepair 34 647 499 on OAR23. This marker is adjacent to the gene encoding transcription factor GATA-6, which has been shown to play a role in many developmental processes, including chondrogenesis. The lack of extended homozygosity in this region suggests a fairly ancient mutation, and the time of occurrence was estimated to be approximately 3000 years ago. Many of the earless sheep breeds may thus share the causative mutation, especially within the subgroup of fat-tailed, wool sheep.

  20. Selecting instruments for Mendelian randomization in the wake of genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, Daniel I; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Shah, Sonia; Sofat, Reecha; Holmes, Michael V; White, Jon; Mindell, Jennifer S; Kivimaki, Mika; Brunner, Eric J; Whittaker, John C; Casas, Juan P; Hingorani, Aroon D

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian randomization (MR) studies typically assess the pathogenic relevance of environmental exposures or disease biomarkers, using genetic variants that instrument these exposures. The approach is gaining popularity—our systematic review reveals a greater than 10-fold increase in MR studies published between 2004 and 2015. When the MR paradigm was first proposed, few biomarker- or exposure-related genetic variants were known, most having been identified by candidate gene studies. However, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are now providing a rich source of potential instruments for MR analysis. Many early reviews covering the concept, applications and analytical aspects of the MR technique preceded the surge in GWAS, and thus the question of how best to select instruments for MR studies from the now extensive pool of available variants has received insufficient attention. Here we focus on the most common category of MR studies—those concerning disease biomarkers. We consider how the selection of instruments for MR analysis from GWAS requires consideration of: the assumptions underlying the MR approach; the biology of the biomarker; the genome-wide distribution, frequency and effect size of biomarker-associated variants (the genetic architecture); and the specificity of the genetic associations. Based on this, we develop guidance that may help investigators to plan and readers interpret MR studies. PMID:27342221

  1. Genome-wide association study on antipsychotic-induced weight gain in the CATIE sample.

    PubMed

    Brandl, E J; Tiwari, A K; Zai, C C; Nurmi, E L; Chowdhury, N I; Arenovich, T; Sanches, M; Goncalves, V F; Shen, J J; Lieberman, J A; Meltzer, H Y; Kennedy, J L; Müller, D J

    2016-08-01

    Antipsychotic-induced weight gain (AIWG) is a common side effect with a high genetic contribution. We reanalyzed genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) selecting a refined subset of patients most suitable for AIWG studies. The final GWAS was conducted in N=189 individuals. The top polymorphisms were analyzed in a second cohort of N=86 patients. None of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms was significant at the genome-wide threshold of 5x10(-8). We observed interesting trends for rs9346455 (P=6.49x10(-6)) upstream of OGFRL1, the intergenic variants rs7336345 (P=1.31 × 10(-5)) and rs1012650 (P=1.47 × 10(-5)), and rs1059778 (P=1.49x10(-5)) in IBA57. In the second cohort, rs9346455 showed significant association with AIWG (P=0.005). The combined meta-analysis P-value for rs9346455 was 1.09 × 10(-7). Our reanalysis of the CATIE GWAS data revealed interesting new variants associated with AIWG. As the functional relevance of these polymorphisms is yet to be determined, further studies are needed.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 1 September 2015; doi:10.1038/tpj.2015.59.

  2. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia: does bigger lead to better results?

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Sarah E.; Petryshen, Tracey L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Numerous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia have been published in the past six years, with a number of key reports published in the last year. The studies have evolved in scale from small individual samples to large collaborative endeavors. This review aims to critically assess whether the results have improved as the sample size and scale of genetic association studies has grown. Recent findings Genomic genotyping and increasing sample sizes for schizophrenia association studies has led to parallel increases in the number of risk genes discovered with high statistical confidence. Nearly 20 genes or loci have surpassed the genome-wide significance threshold (p = 5 × 10−8) in a single study, and several have been replicated in more than one GWAS. Summary Identifying the genetic underpinnings of complex diseases offers insight into the etiological mechanisms leading to manifestation of the disease. New and more effective treatments for schizophrenia are desperately needed, and the ability to target the relevant biological processes grows with our understanding of the genes involved. As the size of GWAS samples has increased, more genes have been identified with high confidence that have begun to provide insight into the etiological and pathophysiological foundations of this disorder. PMID:22277805

  3. Genome-wide association study in German patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Hinney, Anke; Scherag, André; Jarick, Ivonne; Albayrak, Özgür; Pütter, Carolin; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Dauvermann, Maria R; Beck, Sebastian; Weber, Heike; Scherag, Susann; Nguyen, Trang T; Volckmar, Anna-Lena; Knoll, Nadja; Faraone, Stephen V; Neale, Benjamin M; Franke, Barbara; Cichon, Sven; Hoffmann, Per; Nöthen, Markus M; Schreiber, Stefan; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Wichmann, H-Erich; Freitag, Christine; Lempp, Thomas; Meyer, Jobst; Gilsbach, Susanne; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Sinzig, Judith; Lehmkuhl, Gerd; Renner, Tobias J; Warnke, Andreas; Romanos, Marcel; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Reif, Andreas; Schimmelmann, Benno G; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2011-12-01

    The heritability of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is approximately 0.8. Despite several larger scale attempts, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not led to the identification of significant results. We performed a GWAS based on 495 German young patients with ADHD (according to DSM-IV criteria; Human660W-Quadv1; Illumina, San Diego, CA) and on 1,300 population-based adult controls (HumanHap550v3; Illumina). Some genes neighboring the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with the lowest P-values (best P-value: 8.38 × 10(-7)) have potential relevance for ADHD (e.g., glutamate receptor, metabotropic 5 gene, GRM5). After quality control, the 30 independent SNPs with the lowest P-values (P-values ≤ 7.57 × 10(-5) ) were chosen for confirmation. Genotyping of these SNPs in up to 320 independent German families comprising at least one child with ADHD revealed directionally consistent effect-size point estimates for 19 (10 not consistent) of the SNPs. In silico analyses of the 30 SNPs in the largest meta-analysis so far (2,064 trios, 896 cases, and 2,455 controls) revealed directionally consistent effect-size point estimates for 16 SNPs (11 not consistent). None of the combined analyses revealed a genome-wide significant result. SNPs in previously described autosomal candidate genes did not show significantly lower P-values compared to SNPs within random sets of genes of the same size. We did not find genome-wide significant results in a GWAS of German children with ADHD compared to controls. The second best SNP is located in an intron of GRM5, a gene located within a recently described region with an infrequent copy number variation in patients with ADHD.

  4. A genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with mathematics ability and disability.

    PubMed

    Docherty, S J; Davis, O S P; Kovas, Y; Meaburn, E L; Dale, P S; Petrill, S A; Schalkwyk, L C; Plomin, R

    2010-03-01

    Numeracy is as important as literacy and exhibits a similar frequency of disability. Although its etiology is relatively poorly understood, quantitative genetic research has demonstrated mathematical ability to be moderately heritable. In this first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of mathematical ability and disability, 10 out of 43 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations nominated from two high- vs. low-ability (n = 600 10-year-olds each) scans of pooled DNA were validated (P < 0.05) in an individually genotyped sample of (*)2356 individuals spanning the entire distribution of mathematical ability, as assessed by teacher reports and online tests. Although the effects are of the modest sizes now expected for complex traits and require further replication, interesting candidate genes are implicated such as NRCAM which encodes a neuronal cell adhesion molecule. When combined into a set, the 10 SNPs account for 2.9% (F = 56.85; df = 1 and 1881; P = 7.277e-14) of the phenotypic variance. The association is linear across the distribution consistent with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hypothesis; the third of children in our sample who harbour 10 or more of the 20 risk alleles identified are nearly twice as likely (OR = 1.96; df = 1; P = 3.696e-07) to be in the lowest performing 15% of the distribution. Our results correspond with those of quantitative genetic research in indicating that mathematical ability and disability are influenced by many genes generating small effects across the entire spectrum of ability, implying that more highly powered studies will be needed to detect and replicate these QTL associations.

  5. A genome-wide association study of heat stress-associated SNPs in catfish.

    PubMed

    Jin, Y; Zhou, T; Geng, X; Liu, S; Chen, A; Yao, J; Jiang, C; Tan, S; Su, B; Liu, Z

    2017-04-01

    Heat tolerance is a complex and economically important trait for catfish genetic breeding programs. With global climate change, it is becoming an increasingly important trait. To better understand the molecular basis of heat stress, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was carried out using the 250 K catfish SNP array with interspecific backcross progenies, which derived from crossing female channel catfish with male F1 hybrid catfish (female channel catfish × male blue catfish). Three significant associated SNPs were detected by performing an EMMAX approach for GWAS. The SNP located on linkage group 14 explained 12.1% of phenotypical variation. The other two SNPs, located on linkage group 16, explained 11.3 and 11.5% of phenotypical variation respectively. A total of 14 genes with heat stress related functions were detected within the significant associated regions. Among them, five genes-TRAF2, FBXW5, ANAPC2, UBR1 and KLHL29- have known functions in the protein degradation process through the ubiquitination pathway. Other genes related to heat stress include genes involved in protein biosynthesis (PRPF4 and SYNCRIP), protein folding (DNAJC25), molecule and iron transport (SLC25A46 and CLIC5), cytoskeletal reorganization (COL12A1) and energy metabolism (COX7A2, PLCB1 and PLCB4) processes. The results provide fundamental information about genes and pathways that is useful for further investigation into the molecular mechanisms of heat stress. The associated SNPs could be promising candidates for selecting heat-tolerant catfish lines after validating their effects on larger and various catfish populations.

  6. Comparative analysis of genome-wide divergence, domestication footprints and genome-wide association study of root traits for Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium barbadense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of 10,129 singleton SNPs of known genomic location in tetraploid cotton provided unique opportunities to characterize genome-wide diversity among 440 Gossypium hirsutum and 219 G. barbadense cultivars and landrace accessions of widespread origin. Using genome-wide distributed SNPs, we examined ...

  7. Genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies novel variants associated with fasting plasma glucose in East Asians.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Sim, Xueling; Wu, Ying; Liang, Jun; Tabara, Yasuharu; Hu, Cheng; Hara, Kazuo; Tam, Claudia H T; Cai, Qiuyin; Zhao, Qi; Jee, Sunha; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Go, Min Jin; Ong, Rick Twee Hee; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Kim, Young Jin; Zhang, Rong; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; So, Wing Yee; Long, Jirong; Gu, Dongfeng; Lee, Nanette R; Kim, Soriul; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Oh, Ji Hee; Liu, Jianjun; Umemura, Satoshi; Kim, Yeon-Jung; Jiang, Feng; Maeda, Shiro; Chan, Juliana C N; Lu, Wei; Hixson, James E; Adair, Linda S; Jung, Keum Ji; Nabika, Toru; Bae, Jae-Bum; Lee, Mi Hee; Seielstad, Mark; Young, Terri L; Teo, Yik Ying; Kita, Yoshikuni; Takashima, Naoyuki; Osawa, Haruhiko; Lee, So-Hyun; Shin, Min-Ho; Shin, Dong Hoon; Choi, Bo Youl; Shi, Jiajun; Gao, Yu-Tang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zheng, Wei; Kato, Norihiro; Yoon, Miwuk; He, Jiang; Shu, Xiao Ou; Ma, Ronald C W; Kadowaki, Takashi; Jia, Weiping; Miki, Tetsuro; Qi, Lu; Tai, E Shyong; Mohlke, Karen L; Han, Bok-Ghee; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Bong-Jo

    2015-01-01

    Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) has been recognized as an important indicator for the overall glycemic state preceding the onset of metabolic diseases. So far, most indentified genome-wide association loci for FPG were derived from populations with European ancestry, with a few exceptions. To extend a thorough catalog for FPG loci, we conducted meta-analyses of 13 genome-wide association studies in up to 24,740 nondiabetic subjects with East Asian ancestry. Follow-up replication analyses in up to an additional 21,345 participants identified three new FPG loci reaching genome-wide significance in or near PDK1-RAPGEF4, KANK1, and IGF1R. Our results could provide additional insight into the genetic variation implicated in fasting glucose regulation.

  8. Variance component model to account for sample structure in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun Min; Sul, Jae Hoon; Service, Susan K; Zaitlen, Noah A; Kong, Sit-Yee; Freimer, Nelson B; Sabatti, Chiara; Eskin, Eleazar

    2010-04-01

    Although genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified numerous loci associated with complex traits, imprecise modeling of the genetic relatedness within study samples may cause substantial inflation of test statistics and possibly spurious associations. Variance component approaches, such as efficient mixed-model association (EMMA), can correct for a wide range of sample structures by explicitly accounting for pairwise relatedness between individuals, using high-density markers to model the phenotype distribution; but such approaches are computationally impractical. We report here a variance component approach implemented in publicly available software, EMMA eXpedited (EMMAX), that reduces the computational time for analyzing large GWAS data sets from years to hours. We apply this method to two human GWAS data sets, performing association analysis for ten quantitative traits from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort and seven common diseases from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. We find that EMMAX outperforms both principal component analysis and genomic control in correcting for sample structure.

  9. Genome Wide Association Study Identifies New Loci Associated with Undesired Coat Color Phenotypes in Saanen Goats

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Pauline Marie; Palhière, Isabelle; Ricard, Anne; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Rupp, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a quantitative genetics and genomic analysis of undesirable coat color patterns in goats. Two undesirable coat colors have routinely been recorded for the past 15 years in French Saanen goats. One fifth of Saanen females have been phenotyped “pink” (8.0%) or “pink neck” (11.5%) and consequently have not been included in the breeding program as elite animals. Heritability of the binary “pink” and “pink neck” phenotype, estimated from 103,443 females was 0.26 for “pink” and 0.21 for “pink neck”. Genome wide association studies (using haplotypes or single SNPs) were implemented using a daughter design of 810 Saanen goats sired by 9 Artificial Insemination bucks genotyped with the goatSNP50 chip. A highly significant signal (-log10pvalue = 10.2) was associated with the “pink neck” phenotype on chromosome 11, suggesting the presence of a major gene. Highly significant signals for the “pink” phenotype were found on chromosomes 5 and 13 (-log10p values of 7.2 and, 7.7 respectively). The most significant SNP on chromosome 13 was in the ASIP gene region, well known for its association with coat color phenotypes. Nine significant signals were also found for both traits. The highest signal for each trait was detected by both single SNP and haplotype approaches, whereas the smaller signals were not consistently detected by the two methods. Altogether these results demonstrated a strong genetic control of the “pink” and “pink neck” phenotypes in French Saanen goats suggesting that SNP information could be used to identify and remove undesired colored animals from the breeding program. PMID:27030980

  10. Genome-wide Association Studies Identify Genetic Loci Associated With Albuminuria in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Gorski, Mathias; Yeo, Nan Cher; Chu, Audrey Y.; Li, Man; Li, Yong; Mijatovic, Vladan; Ko, Yi-An; Taliun, Daniel; Luciani, Alessandro; Chen, Ming-Huei; Yang, Qiong; Foster, Meredith C.; Olden, Matthias; Hiraki, Linda T.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Smith, Albert V.; Zappa, Allison M.; Lupo, Antonio; Kollerits, Barbara; Ponte, Belen; Stengel, Bénédicte; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Meisinger, Christa; Gieger, Christian; Shaffer, Christian M.; Müller, Christian; Langenberg, Claudia; Ackermann, Daniel; Siscovick, David; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kronenberg, Florian; Ehret, Georg B.; Homuth, Georg; Waeber, Gerard; Navis, Gerjan; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H. Erich; Grallert, Harald; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Herrmann; Kramer, Holly; Leach, I. Mateo; Rudan, Igor; Hillege, Hans L.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Lambert, Jean Charles; Luan, Jian'an; Zhao, Jing Hua; Chalmers, John; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C.; Butterbach, Katja; Launer, Lenore J.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Haun, Margot; Metzger, Marie; Woodward, Mark; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Nauck, Matthias; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Endlich, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Polasek, Ozren; van der Harst, Pim; Pramstaller, Peter Paul; Vollenweider, Peter; Wild, Philipp S.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Rettig, Rainer; Biffar, Reiner; Carroll, Robert J.; Katz, Ronit; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Coassin, Stefan; Bergmann, Sven; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B.; Corre, Tanguy; Zeller, Tanja; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Tanaka, Toshiko; Lendeckel, Uwe; Völker, Uwe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kutalik, Zoltan; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Parsa, Afshin; Heid, Iris M.; Paterson, Andrew D.; de Boer, Ian H.; Devuyst, Olivier; Lazar, Jozef; Endlich, Karlhans; Susztak, Katalin; Tremblay, Johanne; Hamet, Pavel; Jacob, Howard J.; Böger, Carsten A.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of albumin in the urine, albuminuria, are a hallmark of diabetic kidney disease and are associated with an increased risk for end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. To gain insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying albuminuria, we conducted meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies and independent replication in up to 5,825 individuals of European ancestry with diabetes and up to 46,061 without diabetes, followed by functional studies. Known associations of variants in CUBN, encoding cubilin, with the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) were confirmed in the overall sample (P = 2.4 × 10−10). Gene-by-diabetes interactions were detected and confirmed for variants in HS6ST1 and near RAB38/CTSC. Single nucleotide polymorphisms at these loci demonstrated a genetic effect on UACR in individuals with but not without diabetes. The change in the average UACR per minor allele was 21% for HS6ST1 (P = 6.3 × 10–7) and 13% for RAB38/CTSC (P = 5.8 × 10−7). Experiments using streptozotocin-induced diabetic Rab38 knockout and control rats showed higher urinary albumin concentrations and reduced amounts of megalin and cubilin at the proximal tubule cell surface in Rab38 knockout versus control rats. Relative expression of RAB38 was higher in tubuli of patients with diabetic kidney disease compared with control subjects. The loci identified here confirm known pathways and highlight novel pathways influencing albuminuria. PMID:26631737

  11. Evaluation of Genome Wide Association Study Associated Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Loci in Sub Saharan Africans

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, Adebowale A.; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Bentley, Amy R.; Chen, Guanjie; Huang, Hanxia; Zhou, Jie; Shriner, Daniel; Fasanmade, Olufemi; Okafor, Godfrey; Eghan, Benjamin; Agyenim-Boateng, Kofi; Adeleye, Jokotade; Balogun, Williams; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Owusu, Samuel; Amoah, Albert; Acheampong, Joseph; Johnson, Thomas; Oli, Johnnie; Adebamowo, Clement; Collins, Francis; Dunston, Georgia; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for type 2 diabetes (T2D) undertaken in European and Asian ancestry populations have yielded dozens of robustly associated loci. However, the genomics of T2D remains largely understudied in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where rates of T2D are increasing dramatically and where the environmental background is quite different than in these previous studies. Here, we evaluate 106 reported T2D GWAS loci in continental Africans. We tested each of these SNPs, and SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with these index SNPs, for an association with T2D in order to assess transferability and to fine map the loci leveraging the generally reduced LD of African genomes. The study included 1775 unrelated Africans (1035 T2D cases, 740 controls; mean age 54 years; 59% female) enrolled in Nigeria, Ghana, and Kenya as part of the Africa America Diabetes Mellitus (AADM) study. All samples were genotyped on the Affymetrix Axiom PanAFR SNP array. Forty-one of the tested loci showed transferability to this African sample (p < 0.05, same direction of effect), 11 at the exact reported SNP and 30 others at SNPs in LD with the reported SNP (after adjustment for the number of tested SNPs). TCF7L2 SNP rs7903146 was the most significant locus in this study (p = 1.61 × 10−8). Most of the loci that showed transferability were successfully fine-mapped, i.e., localized to smaller haplotypes than in the original reports. The findings indicate that the genetic architecture of T2D in SSA is characterized by several risk loci shared with non-African ancestral populations and that data from African populations may facilitate fine mapping of risk loci. The study provides an important resource for meta-analysis of African ancestry populations and transferability of novel loci. PMID:26635871

  12. Genome wide linkage disequilibrium in Chinese asparagus bean (Vigna. unguiculata ssp. sesquipedialis) germplasm: implications for domestication history and genome wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, P; Wu, X; Wang, B; Luo, J; Liu, Y; Ehlers, J D; Close, T J; Roberts, P A; Lu, Z; Wang, S; Li, G

    2012-07-01

    Association mapping of important traits of crop plants relies on first understanding the extent and patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the particular germplasm being investigated. We characterize here the genetic diversity, population structure and genome wide LD patterns in a set of asparagus bean (Vigna. unguiculata ssp. sesquipedialis) germplasm from China. A diverse collection of 99 asparagus bean and normal cowpea accessions were genotyped with 1127 expressed sequence tag-derived single nucleotide polymorphism markers (SNPs). The proportion of polymorphic SNPs across the collection was relatively low (39%), with an average number of SNPs per locus of 1.33. Bayesian population structure analysis indicated two subdivisions within the collection sampled that generally represented the 'standard vegetable' type (subgroup SV) and the 'non-standard vegetable' type (subgroup NSV), respectively. Level of LD (r(2)) was higher and extent of LD persisted longer in subgroup SV than in subgroup NSV, whereas LD decayed rapidly (0-2 cM) in both subgroups. LD decay distance varied among chromosomes, with the longest (≈ 5 cM) five times longer than the shortest (≈ 1 cM). Partitioning of LD variance into within- and between-subgroup components coupled with comparative LD decay analysis suggested that linkage group 5, 7 and 10 may have undergone the most intensive epistatic selection toward traits favorable for vegetable use. This work provides a first population genetic insight into domestication history of asparagus bean and demonstrates the feasibility of mapping complex traits by genome wide association study in asparagus bean using a currently available cowpea SNPs marker platform.

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies 12 new susceptibility loci for primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Mells, George F; Floyd, James A B; Morley, Katherine I; Cordell, Heather J; Franklin, Christopher S; Shin, So-Youn; Heneghan, Michael A; Neuberger, James M; Donaldson, Peter T; Day, Darren B; Ducker, Samantha J; Muriithi, Agnes W; Wheater, Elizabeth F; Hammond, Christopher J; Dawwas, Muhammad F; Jones, David E; Peltonen, Leena; Alexander, Graeme J; Sandford, Richard N; Anderson, Carl A

    2011-03-13

    In addition to the HLA locus, six genetic risk factors for primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) have been identified in recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To identify additional loci, we carried out a GWAS using 1,840 cases from the UK PBC Consortium and 5,163 UK population controls as part of the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). We followed up 28 loci in an additional UK cohort of 620 PBC cases and 2,514 population controls. We identified 12 new susceptibility loci (at a genome-wide significance level of P < 5 × 10⁻⁸) and replicated all previously associated loci. We identified three further new loci in a meta-analysis of data from our study and previously published GWAS results. New candidate genes include STAT4, DENND1B, CD80, IL7R, CXCR5, TNFRSF1A, CLEC16A and NFKB1. This study has considerably expanded our knowledge of the genetic architecture of PBC.

  14. Gene-based and pathway-based genome-wide association study of alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    ZUO, Lingjun; ZHANG, Clarence K.; SAYWARD, Frederick G.; CHEUNG, Kei-Hoi; WANG, Kesheng; KRYSTAL, John H.; ZHAO, Hongyu; LUO, Xingguang

    2015-01-01

    Background The organization of risk genes within signaling pathways may provide clues about the converging neurobiological effects of risk genes for alcohol dependence. Aim Identify risk genes and risk gene pathways for alcohol dependence. Methods We conducted a pathway-based genome-wide association study (GWAS) of alcohol dependence using a gene-set-rich analytic approach. Approximately one million genetic markers were tested in the discovery sample which included 1409 European-American (EA) alcohol dependent individuals and 1518 EA healthy comparison subjects. An additional 681 African-American (AA) cases and 508 AA healthy subjects served as the replication sample. Results We identified several genome-wide replicable risk genes and risk pathways that were significantly associated with alcohol dependence. After applying the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing, the ‘cellextracellular matrix interactions’ pathway (p<2.0E-4 in EAs) and the PXN gene (which encodes paxillin) (p=3.9E-7 in EAs) within this pathway were the most promising risk factors for alcohol dependence. There were also two nominally replicable pathways enriched in alcohol dependence-related genes in both EAs (0.015≤p≤0.035) and AAs (0.025≤p≤0.050): the ‘Na+/Cl- dependent neurotransmitter transporters’ pathway and the ‘other glycan degradation’ pathway. Conclusion These findings provide new evidence highlighting several genes and biological signaling processes that may be related to the risk for alcohol dependence. PMID:26120261

  15. Identifying Pleiotropic Genes in Genome-Wide Association Studies for Multivariate Phenotypes with Mixed Measurement Scales

    PubMed Central

    Williams, L. Keoki; Buu, Anne

    2017-01-01

    We propose a multivariate genome-wide association test for mixed continuous, binary, and ordinal phenotypes. A latent response model is used to estimate the correlation between phenotypes with different measurement scales so that the empirical distribution of the Fisher’s combination statistic under the null hypothesis is estimated efficiently. The simulation study shows that our proposed correlation estimation methods have high levels of accuracy. More importantly, our approach conservatively estimates the variance of the test statistic so that the type I error rate is controlled. The simulation also shows that the proposed test maintains the power at the level very close to that of the ideal analysis based on known latent phenotypes while controlling the type I error. In contrast, conventional approaches–dichotomizing all observed phenotypes or treating them as continuous variables–could either reduce the power or employ a linear regression model unfit for the data. Furthermore, the statistical analysis on the database of the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE) demonstrates that conducting a multivariate test on multiple phenotypes can increase the power of identifying markers that may not be, otherwise, chosen using marginal tests. The proposed method also offers a new approach to analyzing the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence as multivariate phenotypes in genome-wide association studies. PMID:28081206

  16. Identification of loci affecting teat number by genome-wide association studies on three pig populations

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianhong; Zhang, Zhiyan; Yang, Bin; Guo, Yuanmei; Ai, Huashui; Long, Yi; Su, Ying; Cui, Leilei; Zhou, Liyu; Wang, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Chengbin; Ren, Jun; Huang, Lusheng; Ding, Nengshui

    2017-01-01

    Objective Three genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and a meta-analysis of GWAS were conducted to explore the genetic mechanisms underlying variation in pig teat number. Methods We performed three GWAS and a meta-analysis for teat number on three pig populations, including a White Duroc×Erhualian F2 resource population (n = 1,743), a Chinese Erhualian pig population (n = 320) and a Chinese Sutai pig population (n = 383). Results We detected 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that surpassed the genome-wide significant level on Sus Scrofa chromosomes (SSC) 1, 7, and 12 in the F2 resource population, corresponding to four loci for pig teat number. We highlighted vertnin (VRTN) and lysine demethylase 6B (KDM6B) as two interesting candidate genes at the loci on SSC7 and SSC12. No significant associated SNPs were identified in the meta-analysis of GWAS. Conclusion The results verified the complex genetic architecture of pig teat number. The causative variants for teat number may be different in the three populations PMID:27165028

  17. Genome-wide association study identifies ZFHX1B as a susceptibility locus for severe myopia.

    PubMed

    Khor, Chiea Chuen; Miyake, Masahiro; Chen, Li Jia; Shi, Yi; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Qiao, Fan; Nakata, Isao; Yamashiro, Kenji; Zhou, Xin; Tam, Pancy O S; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Tai, E Shyong; Vithana, Eranga N; Aung, Tin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Wong, Tien-Yin; Moriyama, Muka; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Mochizuki, Manabu; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yong, Rita Y Y; Yap, Eric P H; Yang, Zhenglin; Pang, Chi Pui; Saw, Seang-Mei; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2013-12-20

    Severe myopia (defined as spherical equivalent < -6.0 D) is a predominant problem in Asian countries, resulting in substantial morbidity. We performed a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies (GWAS), all of East Asian descent totaling 1603 cases and 3427 controls. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs13382811 from ZFHX1B [encoding for ZEB2] and rs6469937 from SNTB1) showed highly suggestive evidence of association with disease (P < 1 × 10(-7)) and were brought forward for replication analysis in a further 1241 severe myopia cases and 3559 controls from a further three independent sample collections. Significant evidence of replication was observed, and both SNP markers surpassed the formal threshold for genome-wide significance upon meta-analysis of both discovery and replication stages (P = 5.79 × 10(-10), per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.26 for rs13382811 and P = 2.01 × 10(-9), per-allele OR = 0.79 for rs6469937). The observation at SNTB1 is confirmatory of a very recent GWAS on severe myopia. Both genes were expressed in the human retina, sclera, as well as the retinal pigmented epithelium. In an experimental mouse model for myopia, we observed significant alterations to gene and protein expression in the retina and sclera of the unilateral induced myopic eyes for Zfhx1b and Sntb1. These new data advance our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of severe myopia.

  18. Genome-wide association study of drought-related resistance traits in Aegilops tauschii

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Peng; Lin, Yu; Hu, Yaodong; Liu, Kun; Mao, Shuangshuang; Li, Zhanyi; Wang, Jirui; Liu, Yaxi; Wei, Yuming; Zheng, Youliang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The D-genome progenitor of wheat (Triticum aestivum), Aegilops tauschii, possesses numerous genes for resistance to abiotic stresses, including drought. Therefore, information on the genetic architecture of A. tauschii can aid the development of drought-resistant wheat varieties. Here, we evaluated 13 traits in 373 A. tauschii accessions grown under normal and polyethylene glycol-simulated drought stress conditions and performed a genome-wide association study using 7,185 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. We identified 208 and 28 SNPs associated with all traits using the general linear model and mixed linear model, respectively, while both models detected 25 significant SNPs with genome-wide distribution. Public database searches revealed several candidate/flanking genes related to drought resistance that were grouped into three categories according to the type of encoded protein (enzyme, storage protein, and drought-induced protein). This study provided essential information for SNPs and genes related to drought resistance in A. tauschii and wheat, and represents a foundation for breeding drought-resistant wheat cultivars using marker-assisted selection. PMID:27560650

  19. Bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy: A genome-wide association study on multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Campo, Chiara; da Silva Filho, Miguel Inacio; Weinhold, Niels; Mahmoudpour, Seyed Hamidreza; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hemminki, Kari; Merz, Maximilian; Försti, Asta

    2017-03-20

    The proteasome-inhibitor bortezomib was introduced into the treatment of multiple myeloma more than a decade ago. It is clinically beneficial, but peripheral neuropathy (PNP) is a side effect that may limit its use in some patients. To examine the possible genetic predisposing factors to PNP, we performed a genome-wide association study on 646 bortezomib-treated German multiple myeloma patients. Our aim was to identify genetic risk variants associated with the development of PNP as a serious side effect of the treatment. We identified 4 new promising loci for bortezomib-induced PNP at 4q34.3 (rs6552496), 5q14.1 (rs12521798), 16q23.3 (rs8060632), and 18q21.2 (rs17748074). Even though the results did not reach genome-wide significance level, they support the idea of previous studies, suggesting a genetic basis for neurotoxicity. The identified single nucleotide polymorphisms map to genes or next to genes involved in the development and function of the nervous system (CDH13, DCC, and TENM3). As possible functional clues, 2 of the variants, rs12521798 and rs17748074, affect enhancer histone marks in the brain. The rs12521798 may also impact expression of THBS4, which affects specific signal trasduction pathways in the nervous system. Further research is needed to clarify the mechanism of action of the identified single nucleotide polymorphisms in the development of drug-induced PNP and to functionally validate our in silico predictions.

  20. Genome-wide association studies for fatty acid metabolic traits in five divergent pig populations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wanchang; Bin Yang; Zhang, Junjie; Cui, Leilei; Ma, Junwu; Chen, Congying; Ai, Huashui; Xiao, Shijun; Ren, Jun; Huang, Lusheng

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid composition profiles are important indicators of meat quality and tasting flavor. Metabolic indices of fatty acids are more authentic to reflect meat nutrition and public acceptance. To investigate the genetic mechanism of fatty acid metabolic indices in pork, we conducted genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for 33 fatty acid metabolic traits in five pig populations. We identified a total of 865 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), corresponding to 11 genome-wide significant loci on nine chromosomes and 12 suggestive loci on nine chromosomes. Our findings not only confirmed seven previously reported QTL with stronger association strength, but also revealed four novel population-specific loci, showing that investigations on intermediate phenotypes like the metabolic traits of fatty acids can increase the statistical power of GWAS for end-point phenotypes. We proposed a list of candidate genes at the identified loci, including three novel genes (FADS2, SREBF1 and PLA2G7). Further, we constructed the functional networks involving these candidate genes and deduced the potential fatty acid metabolic pathway. These findings advance our understanding of the genetic basis of fatty acid composition in pigs. The results from European hybrid commercial pigs can be immediately transited into breeding practice for beneficial fatty acid composition. PMID:27097669

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies three novel loci in Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Afshari, Natalie A.; Igo, Robert P.; Morris, Nathan J.; Stambolian, Dwight; Sharma, Shiwani; Pulagam, V. Lakshmi; Dunn, Steven; Stamler, John F.; Truitt, Barbara J.; Rimmler, Jacqueline; Kuot, Abraham; Croasdale, Christopher R.; Qin, Xuejun; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Riazuddin, S. Amer; Mills, Richard; Klebe, Sonja; Minear, Mollie A.; Zhao, Jiagang; Balajonda, Elmer; Rosenwasser, George O.; Baratz, Keith H; Mootha, V. Vinod; Patel, Sanjay V.; Gregory, Simon G.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Price, Marianne O.; Price, Francis W.; Craig, Jamie E.; Fingert, John H.; Gottsch, John D.; Aldave, Anthony J.; Klintworth, Gordon K.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Li, Yi-Ju; Iyengar, Sudha K.

    2017-01-01

    The structure of the cornea is vital to its transparency, and dystrophies that disrupt corneal organization are highly heritable. To understand the genetic aetiology of Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD), the most prevalent corneal disorder requiring transplantation, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on 1,404 FECD cases and 2,564 controls of European ancestry, followed by replication and meta-analysis, for a total of 2,075 cases and 3,342 controls. We identify three novel loci meeting genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8): KANK4 rs79742895, LAMC1 rs3768617 and LINC00970/ATP1B1 rs1200114. We also observe an overwhelming effect of the established TCF4 locus. Interestingly, we detect differential sex-specific association at LAMC1, with greater risk in women, and TCF4, with greater risk in men. Combining GWAS results with biological evidence we expand the knowledge of common FECD loci from one to four, and provide a deeper understanding of the underlying pathogenic basis of FECD. PMID:28358029

  2. Ancestry informative markers for distinguishing between Thai populations based on genome-wide association datasets.

    PubMed

    Vongpaisarnsin, Kornkiat; Listman, Jennifer Beth; Malison, Robert T; Gelernter, Joel

    2015-07-01

    The main purpose of this work was to identify a set of AIMs that stratify the genetic structure and diversity of the Thai population from a high-throughput autosomal genome-wide association study. In this study, more than one million SNPs from the international HapMap database and the Thai depression genome-wide association study have been examined to identify ancestry informative markers (AIMs) that distinguish between Thai populations. An efficient strategy is proposed to identify and characterize such SNPs and to test high-resolution SNP data from international HapMap populations. The best AIMs are identified to stratify the population and to infer genetic ancestry structure. A total of 124 AIMs were clearly clustered geographically across the continent, whereas only 89 AIMs stratified the Thai population from East Asian populations. Finally, a set of 273 AIMs was able to distinguish northern from southern Thai subpopulations. These markers will be of particular value in identifying the ethnic origins in regions where matching by self-reports is unavailable or unreliable, which usually occurs in real forensic cases.

  3. Risk Prediction Using Genome-Wide Association Studies on Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sungkyoung; Bae, Sunghwan

    2016-01-01

    The success of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) has enabled us to improve risk assessment and provide novel genetic variants for diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. However, most variants discovered by GWASs have been reported to have very small effect sizes on complex human diseases, which has been a big hurdle in building risk prediction models. Recently, many statistical approaches based on penalized regression have been developed to solve the “large p and small n” problem. In this report, we evaluated the performance of several statistical methods for predicting a binary trait: stepwise logistic regression (SLR), least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), and Elastic-Net (EN). We first built a prediction model by combining variable selection and prediction methods for type 2 diabetes using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 5.0 from the Korean Association Resource project. We assessed the risk prediction performance using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the internal and external validation datasets. In the internal validation, SLR-LASSO and SLR-EN tended to yield more accurate predictions than other combinations. During the external validation, the SLR-SLR and SLR-EN combinations achieved the highest AUC of 0.726. We propose these combinations as a potentially powerful risk prediction model for type 2 diabetes. PMID:28154504

  4. Genome-wide polygenic scores for age at onset of alcohol dependence and association with alcohol-related measures

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, M; Chou, Y-L; Edenberg, H J; Foroud, T; Martin, N G; Madden, P A F; Wang, J C; Bertelsen, S; Wetherill, L; Brooks, A; Chan, G; Hesselbrock, V; Kuperman, S; Medland, S E; Montgomery, G; Tischfield, J; Whitfield, J B; Bierut, L J; Heath, A C; Bucholz, K K; Goate, A M; Agrawal, A

    2016-01-01

    Age at onset of alcohol dependence (AO-AD) is a defining feature of multiple drinking typologies. AO-AD is heritable and likely shares genetic liability with other aspects of alcohol consumption. We examine whether polygenic variation in AO-AD, based on a genome-wide association study (GWAS), was associated with AO-AD and other aspects of alcohol consumption in two independent samples. Genetic risk scores (GRS) were created based on AO-AD GWAS results from a discovery sample of 1788 regular drinkers from extended pedigrees from the Collaborative Study of the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). GRS were used to predict AO-AD, AD and Alcohol dependence symptom count (AD-SX), age at onset of intoxication (AO-I), as well as maxdrinks in regular drinking participants from two independent samples—the Study of Addictions: Genes and Environment (SAGE; n=2336) and an Australian sample (OZ-ALC; n=5816). GRS for AO-AD from COGA explained a modest but significant proportion of the variance in all alcohol-related phenotypes in SAGE. Despite including effect sizes associated with large numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; >110 000), GRS explained, at most, 0.7% of the variance in these alcohol measures in this independent sample. In OZ-ALC, significant but even more modest associations were noted with variance estimates ranging from 0.03 to 0.16%. In conclusion, there is modest evidence that genetic variation in AO-AD is associated with liability to other aspects of alcohol involvement. PMID:27003187

  5. Genome-wide association study of serum minerals levels in children of different ethnic background.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiao; Li, Jin; Guo, Yiran; Wei, Zhi; Mentch, Frank D; Hou, Cuiping; Zhao, Yan; Qiu, Haijun; Kim, Cecilia; Sleiman, Patrick M A; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2015-01-01

    Calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chloride and phosphorus are the major dietary minerals involved in various biological functions and are commonly measured in the blood serum. Sufficient mineral intake is especially important for children due to their rapid growth. Currently, the genetic mechanisms influencing serum mineral levels are poorly understood, especially for children. We carried out a genome-wide association (GWA) study on 5,602 European-American children and 4,706 African-American children who had mineral measures available in their electronic medical records (EMR). While no locus met the criteria for genome-wide significant association, our results demonstrated a nominal association of total serum calcium levels with a missense variant in the calcium -sensing receptor (CASR) gene on 3q13 (rs1801725, P = 1.96 × 10(-3)) in the African-American pediatric cohort, a locus previously reported in Caucasians. We also confirmed the association result in our pediatric European-American cohort (P = 1.38 × 10(-4)). We further replicated two other loci associated with serum calcium levels in the European-American cohort (rs780094, GCKR, P = 4.26 × 10(-3); rs10491003, GATA3, P = 0.02). In addition, we replicated a previously reported locus on 1q21, demonstrating association of serum magnesium levels with MUC1 (rs4072037, P = 2.04 × 10(-6)). Moreover, in an extended gene-based association analysis we uncovered evidence for association of calcium levels with the previously reported gene locus DGKD in both European-American children and African-American children. Taken together, our results support a role for CASR and DGKD mediated calcium regulation in both African-American and European-American children, and corroborate the association of calcium levels with GCKR and GATA3, and the association of magnesium levels with MUC1 in the European-American children.

  6. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies New Loci for Resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans in Canola

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Coombes, Neil; Song, Jie; Diffey, Simon; Kilian, Andrzej; Lindbeck, Kurt; Barbulescu, Denise M.; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Salisbury, Phil A.; Marcroft, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Key message “We identified both quantitative and quantitative resistance loci to Leptosphaeria maculans, a fungal pathogen, causing blackleg disease in canola. Several genome-wide significant associations were detected at known and new loci for blackleg resistance. We further validated statistically significant associations in four genetic mapping populations, demonstrating that GWAS marker loci are indeed associated with resistance to L. maculans. One of the novel loci identified for the first time, Rlm12, conveys adult plant resistance in canola.” Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is a significant disease which affects the sustainable production of canola (Brassica napus). This study reports a genome-wide association study based on 18,804 polymorphic SNPs to identify loci associated with qualitative and quantitative resistance to L. maculans. Genomic regions delimited with 694 significant SNP markers, that are associated with resistance evaluated using 12 single spore isolates and pathotypes from four canola stubble were identified. Several significant associations were detected at known disease resistance loci including in the vicinity of recently cloned Rlm2/LepR3 genes, and at new loci on chromosomes A01/C01, A02/C02, A03/C03, A05/C05, A06, A08, and A09. In addition, we validated statistically significant associations on A01, A07, and A10 in four genetic mapping populations, demonstrating that GWAS marker loci are indeed associated with resistance to L. maculans. One of the novel loci identified for the first time, Rlm12, conveys adult plant resistance and mapped within 13.2 kb from Arabidopsis R gene of TIR-NBS class. We showed that resistance loci are located in the vicinity of R genes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus on the sequenced genome of B. napus cv. Darmor-bzh. Significantly associated SNP markers provide a valuable tool to enrich germplasm for favorable alleles in order to improve the level of resistance to L. maculans in

  7. A genome-wide association study of brain lesion distribution in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Sdika, Michael; Khankhanian, Pouya; Henry, Roland G; Beheshtian, Azadeh; Matthews, Paul M; Hauser, Stephen L; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Pelletier, Daniel; Baranzini, Sergio E

    2013-04-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging is widely used as a diagnostic and monitoring tool in multiple sclerosis and provides a non-invasive, sensitive and reproducible way to track the disease. Topological characteristics relating to the distribution and shape of lesions are recognized as important neuroradiological markers in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, although these have been much less well characterized quantitatively than have traditional measures such as T2 hyperintense or T1 hypointense lesion volumes. Here, we used voxel-level 3 T magnetic resonance imaging T1-weighted scans to reconstruct the 3D topology of lesions in 284 subjects with multiple sclerosis and tested whether this is a heritable phenotype. To this end, we extracted the genotypes from a published genome-wide association study on these same individuals and searched for genetic associations with lesion load, shape and topological distribution. Lesion probability maps were created to identify frequently affected areas and to assess the overall distribution of T1 lesions in the subject population as a whole. We then developed an original algorithm to cluster adjacent lesional voxels (cluxels) in each subject and tested whether cluxel topology was significantly associated with any single-nucleotide polymorphism in our data set. To focus on patterns of lesion distribution, we computed the first 10 principal components. Although principal component 1 correlated with lesion load, none of the remaining orthogonal components correlated with any other known variable. We then conducted genome-wide association studies on each of these and found 31 significant associations (false discovery rate <0.01) with principal component 8, which represents a mode of variation of lesion topology in the population. The majority of the loci can be linked to genes related to immune cell function and to myelin and neural growth; some (SYK, MYT1L, TRAPPC9, SLITKR6 and RIC3) have been previously associated with the

  8. Genome-wide association study of 12 agronomic traits in peach

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ke; Zhou, Zhengkui; Wang, Qi; Guo, Jian; Zhao, Pei; Zhu, Gengrui; Fang, Weichao; Chen, Changwen; Wang, Xinwei; Wang, Xiaoli; Tian, Zhixi; Wang, Lirong

    2016-01-01

    Peach (Prunus persica L.) is a highly valuable crop species and is recognized by molecular researchers as a model fruit for the Rosaceae family. Using whole-genome sequencing data generated from 129 peach accessions, here we perform a comprehensive genome-wide association study for 12 key agronomic traits. We show that among the 10 qualitative traits investigated, nine exhibit consistent and more precise association signals than previously identified by linkage analysis. For two of the qualitative traits, we describe candidate genes, one potentially involved in cell death and another predicted to encode an auxin-efflux carrier, that are highly associated with fruit shape and non-acidity, respectively. Furthermore, we find that several genomic regions harbouring association signals for fruit weight and soluble solid content overlapped with predicted selective sweeps that occurred during peach domestication and improvement. Our findings contribute to the large-scale characterization of genes controlling agronomic traits in peach. PMID:27824331

  9. The identification of loci for polydactyly in chickens using a genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xihui; Chen, Yu; Jia, Yaxiong; Qi, Xiaolong; Feng, Yun; Huang, Zhen; Guo, Yong

    2015-09-01

    Polydactyly is a commonly observed limb malformation in humans and other vertebrates. The Beijing-You chicken expressing the polydactyly phenotype provides an opportunity to investigate the potential cause for polydactyly. Here we extensively exploited genetic determinants of the chicken polydactyly in a genome wide association study using over 580,000 SNPs characterized in a Beijing-You × Lohmann F1 cross, consisting of 79 animals. A total of 10 loci clustered on the short arm of chromosome 2 were identified to be significantly associated with the trait. Among the 10 significant SNPs, 7 were located in a linkage disequilibrium block of 1737kb. The strongest association signal (rs317674023, P=5.48×10(-8)) residing nearby Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor-Associated Molecule 1 (BRAM1) was identified in the genomic region. Our results provide insights to the genetic basis underlying chicken polydactyly and may facilitate studies of the limb malformation in humans and other species.

  10. Psychiatric genome-wide association study analyses implicate neuronal, immune and histone pathways

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of psychiatric disorders have identified multiple genetic associations with such disorders, but better methods are needed to derive the underlying biological mechanisms that these signals indicate. We sought to identify biological pathways in GWAS data from over 60,000 participants from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. We developed an analysis framework to rank pathways that requires only summary statistics. We combined this score across disorders to find common pathways across three adult psychiatric disorders: schizophrenia, major depression and bipolar disorder. Histone methylation processes showed the strongest association, and we also found statistically significant evidence for associations with multiple immune and neuronal signaling pathways and with the postsynaptic density. Our study indicates that risk variants for psychiatric disorders aggregate in particular biological pathways and that these pathways are frequently shared between disorders. Our results confirm known mechanisms and suggest several novel insights into the etiology of psychiatric disorders. PMID:25599223

  11. Psychiatric genome-wide association study analyses implicate neuronal, immune and histone pathways.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of psychiatric disorders have identified multiple genetic associations with such disorders, but better methods are needed to derive the underlying biological mechanisms that these signals indicate. We sought to identify biological pathways in GWAS data from over 60,000 participants from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. We developed an analysis framework to rank pathways that requires only summary statistics. We combined this score across disorders to find common pathways across three adult psychiatric disorders: schizophrenia, major depression and bipolar disorder. Histone methylation processes showed the strongest association, and we also found statistically significant evidence for associations with multiple immune and neuronal signaling pathways and with the postsynaptic density. Our study indicates that risk variants for psychiatric disorders aggregate in particular biological pathways and that these pathways are frequently shared between disorders. Our results confirm known mechanisms and suggest several novel insights into the etiology of psychiatric disorders.

  12. Genome-wide association study identified a narrow chromosome 1 region associated with chicken growth traits.

    PubMed

    Xie, Liang; Luo, Chenglong; Zhang, Chengguang; Zhang, Rong; Tang, Jun; Nie, Qinghua; Ma, Li; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Li, Ning; Da, Yang; Zhang, Xiquan

    2012-01-01

    Chicken growth traits are important economic traits in broilers. A large number of studies are available on finding genetic factors affecting chicken growth. However, most of these studies identified chromosome regions containing putative quantitative trait loci and finding causal mutations is still a challenge. In this genome-wide association study (GWAS), we identified a narrow 1.5 Mb region (173.5-175 Mb) of chicken (Gallus gallus) chromosome (GGA) 1 to be strongly associated with chicken growth using 47,678 SNPs and 489 F2 chickens. The growth traits included aggregate body weight (BW) at 0-90 d of age measured weekly, biweekly average daily gains (ADG) derived from weekly body weight, and breast muscle weight (BMW), leg muscle weight (LMW) and wing weight (WW) at 90 d of age. Five SNPs in the 1.5 Mb KPNA3-FOXO1A region at GGA1 had the highest significant effects for all growth traits in this study, including a SNP at 8.9 Kb upstream of FOXO1A for BW at 22-48 d and 70 d, a SNP at 1.9 Kb downstream of FOXO1A for WW, a SNP at 20.9 Kb downstream of ENSGALG00000022732 for ADG at 29-42 d, a SNP in INTS6 for BW at 90 d, and a SNP in KPNA3 for BMW and LMW. The 1.5 Mb KPNA3-FOXO1A region contained two microRNA genes that could bind to messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) of IGF1, FOXO1A and KPNA3. It was further indicated that the 1.5 Mb GGA1 region had the strongest effects on chicken growth during 22-42 d.

  13. The Association of Genome-Wide Significant Spirometric Loci with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Michael H.; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Anderson, Wayne; Beaty, Terri H.; Hokanson, John E.; Crapo, James D.; Laird, Nan; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2011-01-01

    Two recent metaanalyses of genome-wide association studies conducted by the CHARGE and SpiroMeta consortia identified novel loci yielding evidence of association at or near genome-wide significance (GWS) with FEV1 and FEV1/FVC. We hypothesized that a subset of these markers would also be associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility. Thirty-two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in or near 17 genes in 11 previously identified GWS spirometric genomic regions were tested for association with COPD status in four COPD case-control study samples (NETT/NAS, the Norway case-control study, ECLIPSE, and the first 1,000 subjects in COPDGene; total sample size, 3,456 cases and 1,906 controls). In addition to testing the 32 spirometric GWS SNPs, we tested a dense panel of imputed HapMap2 SNP markers from the 17 genes located near the 32 GWS SNPs and in a set of 21 well studied COPD candidate genes. Of the previously identified GWS spirometric genomic regions, three loci harbored SNPs associated with COPD susceptibility at a 5% false discovery rate: the 4q24 locus including FLJ20184/INTS12/GSTCD/NPNT, the 6p21 locus including AGER and PPT2, and the 5q33 locus including ADAM19. In conclusion, markers previously associated at or near GWS with spirometric measures were tested for association with COPD status in data from four COPD case-control studies, and three loci showed evidence of association with COPD susceptibility at a 5% false discovery rate. PMID:21659657

  14. A Genome-Wide Association Search for Type 2 Diabetes Genes in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Nicholette D.; McDonough, Caitrin W.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Roh, Bong H.; Wing, Maria R.; An, S. Sandy; Hester, Jessica M.; Cooke, Jessica N.; Bostrom, Meredith A.; Rudock, Megan E.; Talbert, Matthew E.; Lewis, Joshua P.; Ferrara, Assiamira; Lu, Lingyi; Ziegler, Julie T.; Sale, Michele M.; Divers, Jasmin; Shriner, Daniel; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N.; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2012-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately affected by type 2 diabetes (T2DM) yet few studies have examined T2DM using genome-wide association approaches in this ethnicity. The aim of this study was to identify genes associated with T2DM in the African American population. We performed a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) using the Affymetrix 6.0 array in 965 African-American cases with T2DM and end-stage renal disease (T2DM-ESRD) and 1029 population-based controls. The most significant SNPs (n = 550 independent loci) were genotyped in a replication cohort and 122 SNPs (n = 98 independent loci) were further tested through genotyping three additional validation cohorts followed by meta-analysis in all five cohorts totaling 3,132 cases and 3,317 controls. Twelve SNPs had evidence of association in the GWAS (P<0.0071), were directionally consistent in the Replication cohort and were associated with T2DM in subjects without nephropathy (P<0.05). Meta-analysis in all cases and controls revealed a single SNP reaching genome-wide significance (P<2.5×10−8). SNP rs7560163 (P = 7.0×10−9, OR (95% CI) = 0.75 (0.67–0.84)) is located intergenically between RND3 and RBM43. Four additional loci (rs7542900, rs4659485, rs2722769 and rs7107217) were associated with T2DM (P<0.05) and reached more nominal levels of significance (P<2.5×10−5) in the overall analysis and may represent novel loci that contribute to T2DM. We have identified novel T2DM-susceptibility variants in the African-American population. Notably, T2DM risk was associated with the major allele and implies an interesting genetic architecture in this population. These results suggest that multiple loci underlie T2DM susceptibility in the African-American population and that these loci are distinct from those identified in other ethnic populations. PMID:22238593

  15. Genome-wide haplotype association study identify TNFRSF1A, CASP7, LRP1B, CDH1 and TG genes associated with Alzheimer's disease in Caribbean Hispanic individuals.

    PubMed

    Shang, Zhenwei; Lv, Hongchao; Zhang, Mingming; Duan, Lian; Wang, Situo; Li, Jin; Liu, Guiyou; Ruijie, Zhang; Jiang, Yongshuai

    2015-12-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an acquired disorder of cognitive and behavioral impairment. It is considered to be caused by variety of factors, such as age, environment and genetic factors. In order to identify the genetic affect factors of AD, we carried out a bioinformatic approach which combined genome-wide haplotype-based association study with gene prioritization. The raw SNP genotypes data was downloaded from GEO database (GSE33528). It contains 615 AD patients and 560 controls of Caribbean Hispanic individuals. Firstly, we identified the linkage disequilibrium (LD) haplotype blocks and performed genome-wide haplotype association study to screen significant haplotypes that were associated with AD. Then we mapped these significant haplotypes to genes and obtained candidate genes set for AD. At last, we prioritized AD candidate genes based on their similarity with 36 known AD genes, so as to identify AD related genes. The results showed that 141 haplotypes on 134 LD blocks were significantly associated with AD (P<1E-4), and these significant haplotypes were mapped to 132 AD candidate genes. After prioritizing these candidate genes, we found seven AD related genes: APOE, APOC1, TNFRSF1A, LRP1B, CDH1, TG and CASP7. Among these genes, APOE and APOC1 are known AD risk genes. For the other five genes TNFRSF1A, CDH1, CASP7, LRP1B and TG, this is the first genetic association study which showed the significant association between these five genes and AD susceptibility in Caribbean Hispanic individuals. We believe that our findings can provide a new perspective to understand the genetic affect factors of AD.

  16. Genome-wide association analyses in East Asians identify new susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Ben; Matsuo, Keitaro; Shin, Aesun; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Jee, Sun Ha; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Ren, Zefang; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Shi, Jiajun; Wen, Wanqing; Yang, Gong; Delahanty, Ryan J.; Ji, Bu-Tian; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Gao, Yu-Tang; Oh, Jae Hwan; Ahn, Yoon-Ok; Park, Eun Jung; Li, Hong-Lan; Park, Ji Won; Jo, Jaeseong; Jeong, Jin-Young; Hosono, Satoyo; Casey, Graham; Peters, Ulrike; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zheng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    To identify novel genetic factors for colorectal cancer (CRC), we conducted a genome-wide association study in East Asians. By analyzing genome-wide data in 2,098 cases and 5,749 controls, we selected 64 promising SNPs for replication in an independent set of samples including up to 5,358 cases and 5,922 controls. We identified four SNPs with a P-value of 8.58 × 10−7 to 3.77 × 10−10 in the combined analysis of all East Asian samples. Three of the four SNPs were replicated in a study conducted among 26,060 European descendants with a combined P-value of 1.22 × 10−10 for rs647161 (5q31.1), 6.64 × 10−9 for rs2423279 (20p12.3), and 3.06 × 10−8 for rs10774214 (12p13.32 near the CCND2 gene), respectively, derived from the meta-analysis of data from both East Asian and European populations. This study identified three new CRC susceptibility loci and provides additional insight into the genetics and biology of CRC. PMID:23263487

  17. Genome-wide association study reveals two new risk loci for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Mühleisen, Thomas W; Leber, Markus; Schulze, Thomas G; Strohmaier, Jana; Degenhardt, Franziska; Treutlein, Jens; Mattheisen, Manuel; Forstner, Andreas J; Schumacher, Johannes; Breuer, René; Meier, Sandra; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Lacour, André; Witt, Stephanie H; Reif, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lucae, Susanne; Maier, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Markus; Vedder, Helmut; Kammerer-Ciernioch, Jutta; Pfennig, Andrea; Bauer, Michael; Hautzinger, Martin; Moebus, Susanne; Priebe, Lutz; Czerski, Piotr M; Hauser, Joanna; Lissowska, Jolanta; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D; Wright, Adam; Mitchell, Philip B; Fullerton, Janice M; Schofield, Peter R; Montgomery, Grant W; Medland, Sarah E; Gordon, Scott D; Martin, Nicholas G; Krasnow, Valery; Chuchalin, Alexander; Babadjanova, Gulja; Pantelejeva, Galina; Abramova, Lilia I; Tiganov, Alexander S; Polonikov, Alexey; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Alda, Martin; Grof, Paul; Rouleau, Guy A; Turecki, Gustavo; Laprise, Catherine; Rivas, Fabio; Mayoral, Fermin; Kogevinas, Manolis; Grigoroiu-Serbanescu, Maria; Propping, Peter; Becker, Tim; Rietschel, Marcella; Nöthen, Markus M; Cichon, Sven

    2014-03-11

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common and highly heritable mental illness and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have robustly identified the first common genetic variants involved in disease aetiology. The data also provide strong evidence for the presence of multiple additional risk loci, each contributing a relatively small effect to BD susceptibility. Large samples are necessary to detect these risk loci. Here we present results from the largest BD GWAS to date by investigating 2.3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of 24,025 patients and controls. We detect 56 genome-wide significant SNPs in five chromosomal regions including previously reported risk loci ANK3, ODZ4 and TRANK1, as well as the risk locus ADCY2 (5p15.31) and a region between MIR2113 and POU3F2 (6q16.1). ADCY2 is a key enzyme in cAMP signalling and our finding provides new insights into the biological mechanisms involved in the development of BD.

  18. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cerhan, James R; Berndt, Sonja I; Vijai, Joseph; Ghesquières, Hervé; McKay, James; Wang, Sophia S; Wang, Zhaoming; Yeager, Meredith; Conde, Lucia; de Bakker, Paul I W; Nieters, Alexandra; Cox, David; Burdett, Laurie; Monnereau, Alain; Flowers, Christopher R; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Lan, Qing; Severi, Gianluca; Melbye, Mads; Gu, Jian; Jackson, Rebecca D; Kane, Eleanor; Teras, Lauren R; Purdue, Mark P; Vajdic, Claire M; Spinelli, John J; Giles, Graham G; Albanes, Demetrius; Kelly, Rachel S; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Hutchinson, Amy; Zhi, Degui; Habermann, Thomas M; Link, Brian K; Novak, Anne J; Dogan, Ahmet; Asmann, Yan W; Liebow, Mark; Thompson, Carrie A; Ansell, Stephen M; Witzig, Thomas E; Weiner, George J; Veron, Amelie S; Zelenika, Diana; Tilly, Hervé; Haioun, Corinne; Molina, Thierry Jo; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Glimelius, Bengt; Adami, Hans-Olov; Bracci, Paige M; Riby, Jacques; Smith, Martyn T; Holly, Elizabeth A; Cozen, Wendy; Hartge, Patricia; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Tinker, Lesley F; North, Kari E; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; Staines, Anthony; Lightfoot, Tracy; Crouch, Simon; Smith, Alex; Roman, Eve; Diver, W Ryan; Offit, Kenneth; Zelenetz, Andrew; Klein, Robert J; Villano, Danylo J; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhang, Yawei; Holford, Theodore R; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Southey, Melissa C; Clavel, Jacqueline; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Boeing, Heiner; Tjonneland, Anne; Angelucci, Emanuele; Di Lollo, Simonetta; Rais, Marco; Birmann, Brenda M; Laden, Francine; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Huang, Jinyan; Ma, Baoshan; Ye, Yuanqing; Chiu, Brian C H; Sampson, Joshua; Liang, Liming; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chung, Charles C; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Slager, Susan L; Wu, Xifeng; de Sanjose, Silvia; Smedby, Karin E; Salles, Gilles; Skibola, Christine F; Rothman, Nathaniel; Chanock, Stephen J

    2014-11-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma subtype and is clinically aggressive. To identify genetic susceptibility loci for DLBCL, we conducted a meta-analysis of 3 new genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and 1 previous scan, totaling 3,857 cases and 7,666 controls of European ancestry, with additional genotyping of 9 promising SNPs in 1,359 cases and 4,557 controls. In our multi-stage analysis, five independent SNPs in four loci achieved genome-wide significance marked by rs116446171 at 6p25.3 (EXOC2; P = 2.33 × 10(-21)), rs2523607 at 6p21.33 (HLA-B; P = 2.40 × 10(-10)), rs79480871 at 2p23.3 (NCOA1; P = 4.23 × 10(-8)) and two independent SNPs, rs13255292 and rs4733601, at 8q24.21 (PVT1; P = 9.98 × 10(-13) and 3.63 × 10(-11), respectively). These data provide substantial new evidence for genetic susceptibility to this B cell malignancy and point to pathways involved in immune recognition and immune function in the pathogenesis of DLBCL.

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies three novel loci for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kazuo; Fujita, Hayato; Johnson, Todd A; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Yasuda, Kazuki; Horikoshi, Momoko; Peng, Chen; Hu, Cheng; Ma, Ronald C W; Imamura, Minako; Iwata, Minoru; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Morizono, Takashi; Shojima, Nobuhiro; So, Wing Yee; Leung, Ting Fan; Kwan, Patrick; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Jie; Yu, Weihui; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Hirose, Hiroshi; Kaku, Kohei; Ito, Chikako; Watada, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Yasushi; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Jia, Weiping; Chan, Juliana C N; Teo, Yik Ying; Shyong, Tai E; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kubo, Michiaki; Maeda, Shiro; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Although over 60 loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been identified, there still remains a large genetic component to be clarified. To explore unidentified loci for T2D, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 6 209 637 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which were directly genotyped or imputed using East Asian references from the 1000 Genomes Project (June 2011 release) in 5976 Japanese patients with T2D and 20 829 nondiabetic individuals. Nineteen unreported loci were selected and taken forward to follow-up analyses. Combined discovery and follow-up analyses (30 392 cases and 34 814 controls) identified three new loci with genome-wide significance, which were MIR129-LEP [rs791595; risk allele = A; risk allele frequency (RAF) = 0.080; P = 2.55 × 10(-13); odds ratio (OR) = 1.17], GPSM1 [rs11787792; risk allele = A; RAF = 0.874; P = 1.74 × 10(-10); OR = 1.15] and SLC16A13 (rs312457; risk allele = G; RAF = 0.078; P = 7.69 × 10(-13); OR = 1.20). This study demonstrates that GWASs based on the imputation of genotypes using modern reference haplotypes such as that from the 1000 Genomes Project data can assist in identification of new loci for common diseases.

  20. Genome-wide association analysis demonstrates the highly polygenic character of age-related hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    Fransen, Erik; Bonneux, Sarah; Corneveaux, Jason J; Schrauwen, Isabelle; Di Berardino, Federica; White, Cory H; Ohmen, Jeffrey D; Van de Heyning, Paul; Ambrosetti, Umberto; Huentelman, Matthew J; Van Camp, Guy; Friedman, Rick A

    2015-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify the genes responsible for age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), the most common form of hearing impairment in the elderly. Analysis of common variants, with and without adjustment for stratification and environmental covariates, rare variants and interactions, as well as gene-set enrichment analysis, showed no variants with genome-wide significance. No evidence for replication of any previously reported genes was found. A study of the genetic architecture indicates for the first time that ARHI is highly polygenic in nature, with probably no major genes involved. The phenotype depends on the aggregated effect of a large number of SNPs, of which the individual effects are undetectable in a modestly powered GWAS. We estimated that 22% of the variance in our data set can be explained by the collective effect of all genotyped SNPs. A score analysis showed a modest enrichment in causative SNPs among the SNPs with a P-value below 0.01. PMID:24939585

  1. [Analysis of population stratification using random SNPs in genome-wide association studies].

    PubMed

    Cao, Zong-Fu; Ma, Chuan-Xiang; Wang, Lei; Cai, Bin

    2010-09-01

    Since population genetic STRUCTURE can increase false-positive rate in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for complex diseases, the effect of population stratification should be taken into account in GWAS. However, the effect of randomly selected SNPs in population stratification analysis is underdetermined. In this study, based on the genotype data generated on Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 from unrelated individuals of HapMap Phase2, we randomly selected SNPs that were evenly distributed across the whole-genome, and acquired Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs) by the method of f value and allelic Fisher exact test. F-statistics and STRUCTURE analysis based on the select different sets of SNPs were used to evaluate the effect of distinguishing the populations from HapMap Phase3. We found that randomly selected SNPs that were evenly distributed across the whole-genome were able to be used to identify the population structure. This study further indicated that more than 3 000 randomly selected SNPs that were evenly distributed across the whole-genome were substituted for AIMs in population stratification analysis, when there were no available AIMs for spe-cific populations.

  2. A Genome-Wide Association Study for Regulators of Micronucleus Formation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Rebecca E.; Nicod, Jérôme; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Maciejowski, John; Cai, Na; Hill, Jennifer; Verstraten, Ruth; Iyer, Vivek; Rust, Alistair G.; Balmus, Gabriel; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan; Adams, David J.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals the regulation of genomic instability plays a key role in tumor suppression and also controls genome plasticity, which is important for recombination during the processes of immunity and meiosis. Most studies to identify regulators of genomic instability have been performed in cells in culture or in systems that report on gross rearrangements of the genome, yet subtle differences in the level of genomic instability can contribute to whole organism phenotypes such as tumor predisposition. Here we performed a genome-wide association study in a population of 1379 outbred Crl:CFW(SW)-US_P08 mice to dissect the genetic landscape of micronucleus formation, a biomarker of chromosomal breaks, whole chromosome loss, and extranuclear DNA. Variation in micronucleus levels is a complex trait with a genome-wide heritability of 53.1%. We identify seven loci influencing micronucleus formation (false discovery rate <5%), and define candidate genes at each locus. Intriguingly at several loci we find evidence for sexual dimorphism in micronucleus formation, with a locus on chromosome 11 being specific to males. PMID:27233670

  3. A Genome-Wide Association Study for Regulators of Micronucleus Formation in Mice.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Rebecca E; Nicod, Jérôme; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Maciejowski, John; Cai, Na; Hill, Jennifer; Verstraten, Ruth; Iyer, Vivek; Rust, Alistair G; Balmus, Gabriel; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan; Adams, David J

    2016-08-09

    In mammals the regulation of genomic instability plays a key role in tumor suppression and also controls genome plasticity, which is important for recombination during the processes of immunity and meiosis. Most studies to identify regulators of genomic instability have been performed in cells in culture or in systems that report on gross rearrangements of the genome, yet subtle differences in the level of genomic instability can contribute to whole organism phenotypes such as tumor predisposition. Here we performed a genome-wide association study in a population of 1379 outbred Crl:CFW(SW)-US_P08 mice to dissect the genetic landscape of micronucleus formation, a biomarker of chromosomal breaks, whole chromosome loss, and extranuclear DNA. Variation in micronucleus levels is a complex trait with a genome-wide heritability of 53.1%. We identify seven loci influencing micronucleus formation (false discovery rate <5%), and define candidate genes at each locus. Intriguingly at several loci we find evidence for sexual dimorphism in micronucleus formation, with a locus on chromosome 11 being specific to males.

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies FCGR2A as a susceptibility locus for Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Khor, Chiea Chuen; Davila, Sonia; Breunis, Willemijn B; Lee, Yi-Ching; Shimizu, Chisato; Wright, Victoria J; Yeung, Rae S M; Tan, Dennis E K; Sim, Kar Seng; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Yin; Pang, Junxiong; Mitchell, Paul; Cimaz, Rolando; Dahdah, Nagib; Cheung, Yiu-Fai; Huang, Guo-Ying; Yang, Wanling; Park, In-Sook; Lee, Jong-Keuk; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Levin, Michael; Burns, Jane C; Burgner, David; Kuijpers, Taco W; Hibberd, Martin L

    2011-11-13

    Kawasaki disease is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology, with clinical observations suggesting a substantial genetic contribution to disease susceptibility. We conducted a genome-wide association study and replication analysis in 2,173 individuals with Kawasaki disease and 9,383 controls from five independent sample collections. Two loci exceeded the formal threshold for genome-wide significance. The first locus is a functional polymorphism in the IgG receptor gene FCGR2A (encoding an H131R substitution) (rs1801274; P = 7.35 × 10(-11), odds ratio (OR) = 1.32), with the A allele (coding for histadine) conferring elevated disease risk. The second locus is at 19q13, (P = 2.51 × 10(-9), OR = 1.42 for the rs2233152 SNP near MIA and RAB4B; P = 1.68 × 10(-12), OR = 1.52 for rs28493229 in ITPKC), which confirms previous findings(1). The involvement of the FCGR2A locus may have implications for understanding immune activation in Kawasaki disease pathogenesis and the mechanism of response to intravenous immunoglobulin, the only proven therapy for this disease.

  5. Genome-wide association study identifies novel susceptibility loci for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Harvind S.; Lin, Yuan; Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Hinds, David A.; Wu, Wenting; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Tang, Jean Y.; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma represents the second most common cutaneous malignancy, affecting 7–11% of Caucasians in the United States. The genetic determinants of susceptibility to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma remain largely unknown. Here we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, totalling 7,404 cases and 292,076 controls. Eleven loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8) including seven previously confirmed pigmentation-related loci: MC1R, ASIP, TYR, SLC45A2, OCA2, IRF4 and BNC2. We identify an additional four susceptibility loci: 11q23.3 CADM1, a metastasis suppressor gene involved in modifying tumour interaction with cell-mediated immunity; 2p22.3; 7p21.1 AHR, the dioxin receptor involved in anti-apoptotic pathways and melanoma progression; and 9q34.3 SEC16A, a putative oncogene with roles in secretion and cellular proliferation. These susceptibility loci provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27424798

  6. Genome-wide association study implicates NDST3 in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lencz, Todd; Guha, Saurav; Liu, Chunyu; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Mukherjee, Semanti; DeRosse, Pamela; John, Majnu; Cheng, Lijun; Zhang, Chunling; Badner, Judith A.; Ikeda, Masashi; Iwata, Nakao; Cichon, Sven; Rietschel, Marcella; Nöthen, Markus M.; Cheng, A.T.A.; Hodgkinson, Colin; Yuan, Qiaoping; Kane, John M.; Lee, Annette T.; Pisanté, Anne; Gregersen, Peter K.; Pe’er, Itsik; Malhotra, Anil K.; Goldman, David; Darvasi, Ariel

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are major psychiatric disorders with high heritability and overlapping genetic variance. Here we perform a genome-wide association study in an ethnically homogeneous cohort of 904 schizophrenia cases and 1,640 controls drawn from the Ashkenazi Jewish population. We identify a novel genome-wide significant risk locus at chromosome 4q26, demonstrating the potential advantages of this founder population for gene discovery. The top single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs11098403) demonstrates consistent effects across 11 replication and extension cohorts, totalling 23, 191 samples across multiple ethnicities, regardless of diagnosis (schizophrenia or bipolar disorder), resulting in Pmeta=9.49 × 10−12 (odds ratio (OR)=1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08–1.17) across both disorders and Pmeta=2.67 × 10−8 (OR=1.15, 95% CI: 1.08–1.21) for schizophrenia alone. In addition, this intergenic SNP significantly predicts postmortem cerebellar gene expression of NDST3, which encodes an enzyme critical to heparan sulphate metabolism. Heparan sulphate binding is critical to neurite outgrowth, axon formation and synaptic processes thought to be aberrant in these disorders. PMID:24253340

  7. Meta-analysis of New Genome-wide Association Studies of Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Ulrike; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Hsu, Li; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Conti, David V.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Haile, Robert W.; Gallinger, Steven; Zanke, Brent W.; Lemire, Mathieu; Rangrej, Jagadish; Vijayaraghavan, Raakhee; Chan, Andrew T.; Hazra, Aditi; Hunter, David J.; Ma, Jing; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Kraft, Peter; Liu, Yan; Chen, Lin; Jiao, Shuo; Makar, Karen W.; Taverna, Darin; Gruber, Stephen B.; Rennert, Gad; Moreno, Victor; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Woods, Michael O.; Green, Roger C.; Parfrey, Patrick S.; Prentice, Ross L.; Kooperberg, Charles; Jackson, Rebecca D.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Caan, Bette J.; Hayes, Richard B.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Schoen, Robert E.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann; Frank, Bernd; Bézieau, Stéphane; Küry, Sébastien; Slattery, Martha L.; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Seminara, Daniela; Hudson, Thomas J.; Duggan, David J.; Potter, John D.; Casey, Graham

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified novel susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer. To follow-up on these findings, and try to identify novel colorectal cancer susceptibility loci, we present results for genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of colorectal cancer (2,906 cases, 3,416 controls) that have not previously published main associations. Specifically, we calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using log-additive models for each study. In order to improve our power to detect novel colorectal cancer susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis combining the results across studies. We selected the most statistically significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for replication using 10 independent studies (8,161 cases and 9,101 controls). We again used a meta-analysis to summarize results for the replication studies alone, and for a combined analysis of GWAS and replication studies. We measured 10 SNPs previously identified in colorectal cancer susceptibility loci and found eight to be associated with colorectal cancer (p-value range: 0.02 to 1.8 × 10−8). When we excluded studies that have previously published on these SNPs, five SNPs remained significant at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. No novel susceptibility loci were significant in the replication study after adjustment for multiple testing, and none reached genome-wide significance from a combined analysis of GWAS and replication. We observed marginally significant evidence for a second independent SNP in the BMP2 region at chromosomal location 20p12 (rs4813802; replication p-value 0.03; combined p-value 7.3 × 10−5). In a region on 5p33.15, which includes the coding regions of the TERT-CLPTM1L genes and has been identified in GWAS to be associated with susceptibility to at least seven other cancers, we observed a marginally significant

  8. Genome-wide association of serum bilirubin levels in Korean population.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae-Wook; Kim, Hee-Jin; Ju, Hyoungseok; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Jeon, Yeo-Jin; Lee, Han-Chul; Kim, Ka-Kyung; Kim, Jong-Won; Lee, Siwoo; Kim, Jong Yeol; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Yong Sung

    2010-09-15

    A large-scale, genome-wide association study was performed to identify genetic variations influencing serum bilirubin levels using 8841 Korean individuals. Significant associations were observed at UGT1A1 (rs11891311, P = 4.78 x 10(-148)) and SLCO1B3 (rs2417940, P = 1.03 x 10(-17)), which are two previously identified loci. The two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were replicated (rs11891311, P = 3.18 x 10(-15)) or marginally significant (rs2417940, P = 8.56 x 10(-4)) in an independent cohort of 1096 individuals. In a conditional analysis adjusted for the top UGT1A1 variant (rs11891311), another variant in UGT1A1 (rs4148323, P = 1.22 x 10(-121)) remained significant; this suggests that in UGT1A1 at least two independent genetic variations influence the bilirubin levels in the Korean population. The protein coding variant rs4148323, which is monomorphic in European-derived populations, may be specifically associated with serum bilirubin levels in Asians (P = 2.56 x 10(-70)). The SLCO1B3 variant (rs2417940, P = 1.67 x 10(-18)) remained significant in a conditional analysis for the top UGT1A1 variant. Interestingly, there were significant differences in the associated variations of SLCO1B3 between Koreans and European-derived populations. While the variant rs2417940 at intron 7 of SLCO1B3 was more significantly associated in Koreans, variants rs17680137 (P = 0.584) and rs2117032 (P = 2.76 x 10(-5)), two of the top-ranked SNPs in European-derived populations, did not reach the genome-wide significance level. Also, variants in SLCO1B1 did not reach genome-wide significance in Koreans. Our result supports the idea that there are considerable ethnic differences in genetic association of bilirubin levels between Koreans and European-derived populations.

  9. Genome-wide association screens for Achilles tendon and ACL tears and tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Thomas R.; Roos, Andrew K.; Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Goodlin, Gabrielle T.; Fredericson, Michael; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2017-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy or rupture and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture are substantial injuries affecting athletes, associated with delayed recovery or inability to return to competition. To identify genetic markers that might be used to predict risk for these injuries, we performed genome-wide association screens for these injuries using data from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort consisting of 102,979 individuals. We did not find any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with either of these injuries with a p-value that was genome-wide significant (p<5x10-8). We found, however, four and three polymorphisms with p-values that were borderline significant (p<10−6) for Achilles tendon injury and ACL rupture, respectively. We then tested SNPs previously reported to be associated with either Achilles tendon injury or ACL rupture. None showed an association in our cohort with a false discovery rate of less than 5%. We obtained, however, moderate to weak evidence for replication in one case; specifically, rs4919510 in MIR608 had a p-value of 5.1x10-3 for association with Achilles tendon injury, corresponding to a 7% chance of false replication. Finally, we tested 2855 SNPs in 90 candidate genes for musculoskeletal injury, but did not find any that showed a significant association below a false discovery rate of 5%. We provide data containing summary statistics for the entire genome, which will be useful for future genetic studies on these injuries. PMID:28358823

  10. Genome-wide association analysis of autoantibody positivity in type 1 diabetes cases.

    PubMed

    Plagnol, Vincent; Howson, Joanna M M; Smyth, Deborah J; Walker, Neil; Hafler, Jason P; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Jackson, Laura; Simmonds, Matthew J; Bingley, Polly J; Gough, Stephen C; Todd, John A

    2011-08-01

    The genetic basis of autoantibody production is largely unknown outside of associations located in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. The aim of this study is the discovery of new genetic associations with autoantibody positivity using genome-wide association scan single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data in type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients with autoantibody measurements. We measured two anti-islet autoantibodies, glutamate decarboxylase (GADA, n = 2,506), insulinoma-associated antigen 2 (IA-2A, n = 2,498), antibodies to the autoimmune thyroid (Graves') disease (AITD) autoantigen thyroid peroxidase (TPOA, n = 8,300), and antibodies against gastric parietal cells (PCA, n = 4,328) that are associated with autoimmune gastritis. Two loci passed a stringent genome-wide significance level (p<10(-10)): 1q23/FCRL3 with IA-2A and 9q34/ABO with PCA. Eleven of 52 non-MHC T1D loci showed evidence of association with at least one autoantibody at a false discovery rate of 16%: 16p11/IL27-IA-2A, 2q24/IFIH1-IA-2A and PCA, 2q32/STAT4-TPOA, 10p15/IL2RA-GADA, 6q15/BACH2-TPOA, 21q22/UBASH3A-TPOA, 1p13/PTPN22-TPOA, 2q33/CTLA4-TPOA, 4q27/IL2/TPOA, 15q14/RASGRP1/TPOA, and 12q24/SH2B3-GADA and TPOA. Analysis of the TPOA-associated loci in 2,477 cases with Graves' disease identified two new AITD loci (BACH2 and UBASH3A).

  11. Identification of seven new prostate cancer susceptibility loci through a genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Giles, Graham G; Guy, Michelle; Severi, Gianluca; Muir, Kenneth; Hopper, John L; Henderson, Brian E; Haiman, Christopher A; Schleutker, Johanna; Hamdy, Freddie C; Neal, David E; Donovan, Jenny L; Stanford, Janet L; Ostrander, Elaine A; Ingles, Sue A; John, Esther M; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Schaid, Daniel; Park, Jong Y; Spurdle, Amanda; Clements, Judith; Dickinson, Joanne L; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Dörk, Thilo; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Cooney, Kathleen A; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Chappuis, Pierre O; Hutter, Pierre; Zeegers, Maurice; Kaneva, Radka; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Lu, Yong-Jie; Foulkes, William D; English, Dallas R; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Morrison, Jonathan; Ardern-Jones, Audrey T; Hall, Amanda L; O'Brien, Lynne T; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Saunders, Edward J; Page, Elizabeth C; Sawyer, Emma J; Edwards, Stephen M; Dearnaley, David P; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A; Khoo, Vincent S; Parker, Christopher C; Van As, Nicholas; Woodhouse, Christopher J; Thompson, Alan; Christmas, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin S; Southey, Melissa C; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Liu, Jo-Fen; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L; Auvinen, Anssi; Lewis, Sarah J; Cox, Angela; FitzGerald, Liesel M; Koopmeiners, Joseph S; Karyadi, Danielle M; Kwon, Erika M; Stern, Mariana C; Corral, Roman; Joshi, Amit D; Shahabi, Ahva; McDonnell, Shannon K; Sellers, Thomas A; Pow-Sang, Julio; Chambers, Suzanne; Aitken, Joanne; Gardiner, R A Frank; Batra, Jyotsna; Kedda, Mary Anne; Lose, Felicity; Polanowski, Andrea; Patterson, Briony; Serth, Jürgen; Meyer, Andreas; Luedeke, Manuel; Stefflova, Klara; Ray, Anna M; Lange, Ethan M; Farnham, Jim; Khan, Humera; Slavov, Chavdar; Mitkova, Atanaska; Cao, Guangwen; Easton, Douglas F

    2009-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in males in developed countries. To identify common PrCa susceptibility alleles, we previously conducted a genome-wide association study in which 541,129 SNPs were genotyped in 1,854 PrCa cases with clinically detected disease and in 1,894 controls. We have now extended the study to evaluate promising associations in a second stage in which we genotyped 43,671 SNPs in 3,650 PrCa cases and 3,940 controls and in a third stage involving an additional 16,229 cases and 14,821 controls from 21 studies. In addition to replicating previous associations, we identified seven new prostate cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 2, 4, 8, 11 and 22 (with P = 1.6 x 10(-8) to P = 2.7 x 10(-33)).

  12. Insights from Genome-Wide Association Analyses of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kahali, Bratati; Halligan, Brian; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is caused by hepatic steatosis, which can progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in the absence of excessive alcohol consumption. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease will become the number one cause of liver disease worldwide by 2020. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is correlated albeit imperfectly with obesity and other metabolic diseases such as diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and cardiovascular disease, but exactly how having one of these diseases contributes to the development of other metabolic diseases is only now being elucidated. Development of NAFLD and related metabolic diseases is genetically influenced in the population, and recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have discovered genetic variants that associate with these diseases. These GWAS-associated variants cannot only help us to identify individuals at high risk of developing NAFLD, but also to better understand its pathophysiology so that we can develop more effective treatments for this disease and related metabolic diseases in the future. PMID:26676813

  13. Genome-Wide Association Studies: Contribution of Genomics to Understanding Blood Pressure and Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary genomic tools now allow the fast and reliable genotyping of hundreds of thousands of variants and permit an unbiased interrogation of the common variability across the human genome. These technical advances have been the basis of numerous recent investigations of genes underlying complex genetic traits, and the results for blood pressure and hypertension have been of particular interest. The pathophysiology of the complex genetic trait blood pressure and hypertension is unclear. The heritability of essential hypertension is high and insights can be gained by finding associated genes. Current genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 10 to 20 loci in or near genes that generally were not expected to be associated with blood pressure or essential hypertension; more significant variants will be discovered when even larger and more refined studies become available. This article gives a short introduction to GWAS and summarizes the current findings for blood pressure and hypertension. PMID:20425154

  14. A Genome Wide Association Study Links Glutamate Receptor Pathway to Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Juan, Pascual; Bishop, Matthew T.; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Calero, Miguel; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Ladogana, Anna; Boyd, Alison; Lewis, Victoria; Ponto, Claudia; Calero, Olga; Poleggi, Anna; Carracedo, Ángel; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ströbel, Thomas; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Haïk, Stéphane; Combarros, Onofre; Berciano, José; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Collins, Steven J.; Budka, Herbert; Brandel, Jean-Philippe; Laplanche, Jean Louis; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Zerr, Inga; Knight, Richard S. G.; Will, Robert G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association (GWA) study in 434 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients and 1939 controls from the United Kingdom, Germany and The Netherlands. The findings were replicated in an independent sample of 1109 sCJD and 2264 controls provided by a multinational consortium. From the initial GWA analysis we selected 23 SNPs for further genotyping in 1109 sCJD cases from seven different countries. Five SNPs were significantly associated with sCJD after correction for multiple testing. Subsequently these five SNPs were genotyped in 2264 controls. The pooled analysis, including 1543 sCJD cases and 4203 controls, yielded two genome wide significant results: rs6107516 (p-value=7.62x10-9) a variant tagging the prion protein gene (PRNP); and rs6951643 (p-value=1.66x10-8) tagging the Glutamate Receptor Metabotropic 8 gene (GRM8). Next we analysed the data stratifying by country of origin combining samples from the pooled analysis with genotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project and imputed genotypes from the Rotterdam Study (Total n=12967). The meta-analysis of the results showed that rs6107516 (p-value=3.00x10-8) and rs6951643 (p-value=3.91x10-5) remained as the two most significantly associated SNPs. Rs6951643 is located in an intronic region of GRM8, a gene that was additionally tagged by a cluster of 12 SNPs within our top100 ranked results. GRM8 encodes for mGluR8, a protein which belongs to the metabotropic glutamate receptor family, recently shown to be involved in the transduction of cellular signals triggered by the prion protein. Pathway enrichment analyses performed with both Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and ALIGATOR postulates glutamate receptor signalling as one of the main pathways associated with sCJD. In summary, we have detected GRM8 as a novel, non-PRNP, genome-wide significant marker associated with heightened disease risk, providing additional evidence supporting a role of glutamate receptors in sCJD pathogenesis. PMID:25918841

  15. Genome-wide association study of Parkinson's disease in East Asians.

    PubMed

    Foo, Jia Nee; Tan, Louis C; Irwan, Ishak D; Au, Wing-Lok; Low, Hui Qi; Prakash, Kumar-M; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Bei, Jinxin; Chan, Anne Yy; Chen, Chiung Mei; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chung, Sun Ju; Deng, Hao; Lim, Shen-Yang; Mok, Vincent; Pang, Hao; Pei, Zhong; Peng, Rong; Shang, Hui-Fang; Song, Kyuyoung; Tan, Ai Huey; Wu, Yih-Ru; Aung, Tin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chew, Fook Tim; Chew, Soo-Hong; Chong, Siow-Ann; Ebstein, Richard P; Lee, Jimmy; Saw, Seang-Mei; Seow, Adeline; Subramaniam, Mythily; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga N; Wong, Tien-Yin; Heng, Khai Koon; Meah, Wee-Yang; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen; Liu, Jianjun; Tan, Eng-King

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on Parkinson's disease (PD) have mostly been done in Europeans and Japanese. No study has been done in Han Chinese, which make up nearly a fifth of the world population. We conducted the first Han Chinese GWAS analysing a total of 22,729 subjects (5,125 PD cases and 17,604 controls) from Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Korea, mainland China and Taiwan. We performed imputation, merging and logistic regression analyses of 2,402,394 SNPs passing quality control filters in 779 PD cases, 13,227 controls, adjusted for the first three principal components. 90 SNPs with association P < 10-4 were validated in 9 additional sample collections and the results were combined using fixed-effects inverse-variance meta-analysis. We observed strong associations reaching genome-wide significance at SNCA, LRRK2 and MCCC1, confirming their important roles in both European and Asian PD. We also identified significant (P < 0.05) associations at 5 loci (DLG2, SIPA1L2, STK39, VPS13C and RIT2), and observed the same direction of associations at 9 other loci including BST1 and PARK16. Allelic heterogeneity was observed at LRRK2 while European risk SNPs at 6 other loci including MAPT and GBA-SYT11 were non-polymorphic or very rare in our cohort. Overall, we replicate associations at SNCA, LRRK2, MCCC1 and 14 other European PD loci but did not identify Asian-specific loci with large effects (OR > 1.45) on PD risk. Our results also demonstrate some differences in the genetic contribution to PD between Europeans and Asians. Further pan-ethnic meta-analysis with European GWAS cohorts may unravel new PD loci.

  16. Glutamate Networks Implicate Cognitive Impairments in Schizophrenia: Genome-Wide Association Studies of 52 Cognitive Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ohi, Kazutaka; Hashimoto, Ryota; Ikeda, Masashi; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Yasuda, Yuka; Fujimoto, Michiko; Umeda-Yano, Satomi; Fukunaga, Masaki; Fujino, Haruo; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Iwase, Masao; Kazui, Hiroaki; Iwata, Nakao; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairments are a core feature in patients with schizophrenia. These deficits could serve as effective tools for understanding the genetic architecture of schizophrenia. This study investigated whether genetic variants associated with cognitive impairments aggregate in functional gene networks related to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Here, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of a range of cognitive phenotypes relevant to schizophrenia were performed in 411 healthy subjects. We attempted to replicate the GWAS data using 257 patients with schizophrenia and performed a meta-analysis of the GWAS findings and the replicated results. Because gene networks, rather than a single gene or genetic variant, may be strongly associated with the susceptibility to schizophrenia and cognitive impairments, gene-network analysis for genes in close proximity to the replicated variants was performed. We observed nominal associations between 3054 variants and cognitive phenotypes at a threshold of P < 1.0 × 10− 4. Of the 3054 variants, the associations of 191 variants were replicated in the replication samples (P < .05). However, no variants achieved genome-wide significance in a meta-analysis (P > 5.0 × 10− 8). Additionally, 115 of 191 replicated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have genes located within 10 kb of the SNPs (60.2%). These variants were moderately associated with cognitive phenotypes that ranged from P = 2.50 × 10− 5 to P = 9.40 × 10− 8. The genes located within 10 kb from the replicated SNPs were significantly grouped in terms of glutamate receptor activity (false discovery rate (FDR) q = 4.49 × 10− 17) and the immune system related to major histocompatibility complex class I (FDR q = 8.76 × 10− 11) networks. Our findings demonstrate that genetic variants related to cognitive trait impairment in schizophrenia are involved in the N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate network. PMID:25537281

  17. Genome-wide interaction-based association analysis identified multiple new susceptibility Loci for common diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Haiming; Chen, Suchao; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Zhenguo; Zhu, Zhihong; Qin, Xueying; Hu, Landian; Zhu, Jun; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Kong, Xiangyin

    2011-03-01

    Genome-wide interaction-based association (GWIBA) analysis has the potential to identify novel susceptibility loci. These interaction effects could be missed with the prevailing approaches in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, no convincing loci have been discovered exclusively from GWIBA methods, and the intensive computation involved is a major barrier for application. Here, we developed a fast, multi-thread/parallel program named "pair-wise interaction-based association mapping" (PIAM) for exhaustive two-locus searches. With this program, we performed a complete GWIBA analysis on seven diseases with stringent control for false positives, and we validated the results for three of these diseases. We identified one pair-wise interaction between a previously identified locus, C1orf106, and one new locus, TEC, that was specific for Crohn's disease, with a Bonferroni corrected P < 0.05 (P = 0.039). This interaction was replicated with a pair of proxy linked loci (P = 0.013) on an independent dataset. Five other interactions had corrected P < 0.5. We identified the allelic effect of a locus close to SLC7A13 for coronary artery disease. This was replicated with a linked locus on an independent dataset (P = 1.09 × 10⁻⁷). Through a local validation analysis that evaluated association signals, rather than locus-based associations, we found that several other regions showed association/interaction signals with nominal P < 0.05. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the GWIBA approach was successful for identifying novel loci, and the results provide new insights into the genetic architecture of common diseases. In addition, our PIAM program was capable of handling very large GWAS datasets that are likely to be produced in the future.

  18. STAMS: STRING-assisted module search for genome wide association studies and application to autism

    PubMed Central

    Hillenmeyer, Sara; Davis, Lea K.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Cook, Edwin H.; Cox, Nancy J.; Altman, Russ B.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Analyzing genome wide association data in the context of biological pathways helps us understand how genetic variation influences phenotype and increases power to find associations. However, the utility of pathway-based analysis tools is hampered by undercuration and reliance on a distribution of signal across all of the genes in a pathway. Methods that combine genome wide association results with genetic networks to infer the key phenotype-modulating subnetworks combat these issues, but have primarily been limited to network definitions with yes/no labels for gene-gene interactions. A recent method (EW_dmGWAS) incorporates a biological network with weighted edge probability by requiring a secondary phenotype-specific expression dataset. In this article, we combine an algorithm for weighted-edge module searching and a probabilistic interaction network in order to develop a method, STAMS, for recovering modules of genes with strong associations to the phenotype and probable biologic coherence. Our method builds on EW_dmGWAS but does not require a secondary expression dataset and performs better in six test cases. Results: We show that our algorithm improves over EW_dmGWAS and standard gene-based analysis by measuring precision and recall of each method on separately identified associations. In the Wellcome Trust Rheumatoid Arthritis study, STAMS-identified modules were more enriched for separately identified associations than EW_dmGWAS (STAMS P-value 3.0 × 10−4; EW_dmGWAS- P-value = 0.8). We demonstrate that the area under the Precision-Recall curve is 5.9 times higher with STAMS than EW_dmGWAS run on the Wellcome Trust Type 1 Diabetes data. Availability and Implementation: STAMS is implemented as an R package and is freely available at https://simtk.org/projects/stams. Contact: rbaltman@stanford.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27542772

  19. Genome-wide association study of kidney function decline in individuals of European descent

    PubMed Central

    Gorski, Mathias; Tin, Adrienne; Garnaas, Maija; McMahon, Gearoid M.; Chu, Audrey Y.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chalmers, John; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; Woodward, Marc; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tammara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Smith, Albert V.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Li, Man; Freudenberger, Paul; Hofer, Edith; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; de Boer, Ian H.; Li, Guo; Siscovick, David S.; Kutalik, Zoltan; Corre, Tanguy; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Gupta, Jayanta; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Olden, Matthias; Yang, Qiong; de Andrade, Mariza; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Turner, Stephen T.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Ding, Jingzhong; Liu, Yongmei; Barlassina, Cristina; Cusi, Daniele; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A; Ridker, Paul M; Grallert, Harald; Meisinger, Christa; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Kramer, Holly; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Snieder, Harold; Del Greco, Fabiola; Franke, Andre; Nöthlings, Ute; Lieb, Wolfgang; Bakker, Stephan J.L.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; van der Harst, Pim; Dehghan, Abbas; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Uitterlinden, André G.; Coassin, Stefan; Haun, Margot; Kollerits, Barbara; Kronenberg, Florian; Paulweber, Bernhard; Aumann, Nicole; Endlich, Karlhans; Pietzner, Mike; Völker, Uwe; Rettig, Rainer; Chouraki, Vincent; Helmer, Catherine; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Metzger, Marie; Stengel, Benedicte; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Raitakari, Olli; Johnson, Andrew; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Goessling, Wolfram; Köttgen, Anna; Kao, H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.; Böger, Carsten A.

    2014-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple loci associated with cross-sectional eGFR, but a systematic genetic analysis of kidney function decline over time is missing. Here we conducted a GWAS meta-analysis among 63,558 participants of European descent, initially from 16 cohorts with serial kidney function measurements within the CKDGen Consortium, followed by independent replication among additional participants from 13 cohorts. In stage 1 GWAS meta-analysis, SNPs at MEOX2, GALNT11, IL1RAP, NPPA, HPCAL1 and CDH23 showed the strongest associations for at least one trait, in addition to the known UMOD locus which showed genome-wide significance with an annual change in eGFR. In stage 2 meta-analysis, the significant association at UMOD was replicated. Associations at GALNT11 with Rapid Decline (annual eGFRdecline of 3ml/min/1.73m2 or more), and CDH23 with eGFR change among those with CKD showed significant suggestive evidence of replication. Combined stage 1 and 2 meta-analyses showed significance for UMOD, GALNT11 and CDH23. Morpholino knockdowns of galnt11 and cdh23 in zebrafish embryos each had signs of severe edema 72 hours after gentamicin treatment compared to controls, but no gross morphological renal abnormalities before gentamicin administration. Thus, our results suggest a role in the deterioration of kidney function for the loci GALNT11 and CDH23, and show that the UMOD locus is significantly associated with kidney function decline. PMID:25493955

  20. Genome-wide association study of maternal and inherited effects on left-sided cardiac malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Laura E.; Agopian, A.J.; Bhalla, Angela; Glessner, Joseph T.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Swartz, Michael D.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Congenital left-sided lesions (LSLs) are serious, heritable malformations of the heart. However, little is known about the genetic causes of LSLs. This study was undertaken to identify common variants acting through the genotype of the affected individual (i.e. case) or the mother (e.g. via an in utero effect) that influence the risk of LSLs. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using data from 377 LSL case-parent triads, with follow-up studies in an independent sample of 224 triads and analysis of the combined data. Associations with both the case and maternal genotypes were assessed using log-linear analyses under an additive model. An association between LSLs and the case genotype for one intergenic SNP on chromosome 16 achieved genome-wide significance in the combined data (rs8061121, combined P = 4.0 × 10−9; relative risk to heterozygote: 2.6, 95% CI: 1.9–3.7). In the combined data, there was also suggestive evidence of association between LSLs and the case genotype for a variant in the synaptoporin gene (rs1975649, combined P = 3.4 × 10−7; relative risk to heterozygote: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.4–2.0) and between LSLs and the maternal genotype for an intergenic SNP on chromosome 10 (rs11008222, combined P = 6.3 × 10−7; relative risk to heterozygote: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.4–2.0). This is the first GWAS of LSLs to evaluate associations with both the case and maternal genotypes. The results of this study identify three candidate LSL susceptibility loci, including one that appears to be associated with the risk of LSLs via the maternal genotype. PMID:25138779

  1. Genome-wide linkage and association analysis of cardiometabolic phenotypes in Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Hellwege, Jacklyn N; Palmer, Nicholette D; Dimitrov, Latchezar; Keaton, Jacob M; Tabb, Keri L; Sajuthi, Satria; Taylor, Kent D; Ng, Maggie C Y; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Hawkins, Gregory A; Long, Jirong; Ida Chen, Yii-Der; Lorenzo, Carlos; Norris, Jill M; Rotter, Jerome I; Langefeld, Carl D; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Bowden, Donald W

    2017-02-01

    Linkage studies of complex genetic diseases have been largely replaced by genome-wide association studies, due in part to limited success in complex trait discovery. However, recent interest in rare and low-frequency variants motivates re-examination of family-based methods. In this study, we investigated the performance of two-point linkage analysis for over 1.6 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) combined with single variant association analysis to identify high impact variants, which are both strongly linked and associated with cardiometabolic traits in up to 1414 Hispanics from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS). Evaluation of all 50 phenotypes yielded 83 557 000 LOD (logarithm of the odds) scores, with 9214 LOD scores ⩾3.0, 845 ⩾4.0 and 89 ⩾5.0, with a maximal LOD score of 6.49 (rs12956744 in the LAMA1 gene for tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) receptor 2). Twenty-seven variants were associated with P<0.005 as well as having an LOD score >4, including variants in the NFIB gene under a linkage peak with TNFα receptor 2 levels on chromosome 9. Linkage regions of interest included a broad peak (31 Mb) on chromosome 1q with acute insulin response (max LOD=5.37). This region was previously documented with type 2 diabetes in family-based studies, providing support for the validity of these results. Overall, we have demonstrated the utility of two-point linkage and association in comprehensive genome-wide array-based SNP genotypes.

  2. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index.

    PubMed

    Felix, Janine F; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Monnereau, Claire; van der Valk, Ralf J P; Stergiakouli, Evie; Chesi, Alessandra; Gaillard, Romy; Feenstra, Bjarke; Thiering, Elisabeth; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Mahajan, Anubha; Pitkänen, Niina; Joro, Raimo; Cavadino, Alana; Huikari, Ville; Franks, Steve; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Cousminer, Diana L; Marsh, Julie A; Lehtimäki, Terho; Curtin, John A; Vioque, Jesus; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Myhre, Ronny; Price, Thomas S; Vilor-Tejedor, Natalia; Yengo, Loïc; Grarup, Niels; Ntalla, Ioanna; Ang, Wei; Atalay, Mustafa; Bisgaard, Hans; Blakemore, Alexandra I; Bonnefond, Amelie; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Eriksson, Johan; Flexeder, Claudia; Franke, Lude; Geller, Frank; Geserick, Mandy; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Haworth, Claire M A; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Holm, Jens-Christian; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huang, Jinyan; Kadarmideen, Haja N; Kähönen, Mika; Kiess, Wieland; Lakka, Hanna-Maaria; Lakka, Timo A; Lewin, Alexandra M; Liang, Liming; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Ma, Baoshan; Magnus, Per; McCormack, Shana E; McMahon, George; Mentch, Frank D; Middeldorp, Christel M; Murray, Clare S; Pahkala, Katja; Pers, Tune H; Pfäffle, Roland; Postma, Dirkje S; Power, Christine; Simpson, Angela; Sengpiel, Verena; Tiesler, Carla M T; Torrent, Maties; Uitterlinden, André G; van Meurs, Joyce B; Vinding, Rebecca; Waage, Johannes; Wardle, Jane; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zemel, Babette S; Dedoussis, George V; Pedersen, Oluf; Froguel, Philippe; Sunyer, Jordi; Plomin, Robert; Jacobsson, Bo; Hansen, Torben; Gonzalez, Juan R; Custovic, Adnan; Raitakari, Olli T; Pennell, Craig E; Widén, Elisabeth; Boomsma, Dorret I; Koppelman, Gerard H; Sebert, Sylvain; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hyppönen, Elina; McCarthy, Mark I; Lindi, Virpi; Harri, Niinikoski; Körner, Antje; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Heinrich, Joachim; Melbye, Mads; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ring, Susan M; Smith, George Davey; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Timpson, Nicholas J; Grant, Struan F A; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2016-01-15

    A large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex- and age-adjusted standard deviation scores. We included 35 668 children from 20 studies in the discovery phase and 11 873 children from 13 studies in the replication phase. In total, 15 loci reached genome-wide significance (P-value < 5 × 10(-8)) in the joint discovery and replication analysis, of which 12 are previously identified loci in or close to ADCY3, GNPDA2, TMEM18, SEC16B, FAIM2, FTO, TFAP2B, TNNI3K, MC4R, GPR61, LMX1B and OLFM4 associated with adult body mass index or childhood obesity. We identified three novel loci: rs13253111 near ELP3, rs8092503 near RAB27B and rs13387838 near ADAM23. Per additional risk allele, body mass index increased 0.04 Standard Deviation Score (SDS) [Standard Error (SE) 0.007], 0.05 SDS (SE 0.008) and 0.14 SDS (SE 0.025), for rs13253111, rs8092503 and rs13387838, respectively. A genetic risk score combining all 15 SNPs showed that each additional average risk allele was associated with a 0.073 SDS (SE 0.011, P-value = 3.12 × 10(-10)) increase in childhood body mass index in a population of 1955 children. This risk score explained 2% of the variance in childhood body mass index. This study highlights the shared genetic background between childhood and adult body mass index and adds three novel loci. These loci likely represent age-related differences in strength of the associations with body mass index.

  3. Genome-wide association analysis of anti-TNF drug response in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Mirkov, Maša Umiċeviċ; Cui, Jing; Vermeulen, Sita H; Stahl, Eli A.; Toonen, Erik JM; Makkinje, Remco R; Lee, Annette T; Huizinga, Tom WJ; Allaart, Renee; Barton, Anne; Mariette, Xavier; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Criswell, Lindsey A; Tak, Paul P; de Vries, Niek; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Padyukov, Leonid; Bridges, S. Louis; van Schaardenburg, Dirk-Jan; Jansen, Tim; Dutmer, Ellen AJ; van de Laar, Mart; Barrera, Pilar; Radstake, Timothy RDJ; van Riel, Piet LCM; Scheffer, Hans; Franke, Barbara; Brunner, Han G; Plenge, Robert M; Gregersen, Peter K; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Coenen, Marieke JH

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment strategies blocking tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) have proven very successful in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, a significant subset of patients does not respond for unknown reasons. Currently there are no means of identifying these patients prior to treatment. This study was aimed at identifying genetic factors predicting anti-TNF treatment outcome in patient with RA using a genome-wide association approach. Methods We conducted a multi-stage, genome-wide association study with a primary analysis of 2,557,253 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 882 RA patients receiving anti-TNF therapy included through the Dutch Rheumatoid Arthritis Monitoring (DREAM) registry and the database of Apotheekzorg. Linear regression analysis of changes in the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints after 14 weeks of treatment was performed using an additive model. Markers with a p<10−3 were selected for replication in 1,821 RA patients from three independent cohorts. Pathway analysis including all SNPs with a p-value < 10−3 was performed using Ingenuity. Results Seven hundred seventy two markers demonstrated evidence of association with treatment outcome in the initial stage. Eight genetic loci showed improved p-value in the overall meta-analysis compared to the first stage, three of which (rs1568885, rs1813443 and rs4411591) showed directional consistency over all four studied cohorts. We were unable to replicate markers previously reported to be associated with anti-TNF outcome. Network analysis indicated strong involvement of biological processes underlying inflammatory response and cell morphology. Conclusion Using a multi-stage strategy, we have identified 8 genetic loci associated with response to anti-TNF treatment. Further studies are required to validate these findings in additional patient collections. PMID:23233654

  4. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Janine F.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Monnereau, Claire; van der Valk, Ralf J.P.; Stergiakouli, Evie; Chesi, Alessandra; Gaillard, Romy; Feenstra, Bjarke; Thiering, Elisabeth; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Mahajan, Anubha; Pitkänen, Niina; Joro, Raimo; Cavadino, Alana; Huikari, Ville; Franks, Steve; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M.; Cousminer, Diana L.; Marsh, Julie A.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Curtin, John A.; Vioque, Jesus; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Myhre, Ronny; Price, Thomas S.; Vilor-Tejedor, Natalia; Yengo, Loïc; Grarup, Niels; Ntalla, Ioanna; Ang, Wei; Atalay, Mustafa; Bisgaard, Hans; Blakemore, Alexandra I.; Bonnefond, Amelie; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Eriksson, Johan; Flexeder, Claudia; Franke, Lude; Geller, Frank; Geserick, Mandy; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Haworth, Claire M.A.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Holm, Jens-Christian; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huang, Jinyan; Kadarmideen, Haja N.; Kähönen, Mika; Kiess, Wieland; Lakka, Hanna-Maaria; Lakka, Timo A.; Lewin, Alexandra M.; Liang, Liming; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Ma, Baoshan; Magnus, Per; McCormack, Shana E.; McMahon, George; Mentch, Frank D.; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Murray, Clare S.; Pahkala, Katja; Pers, Tune H.; Pfäffle, Roland; Postma, Dirkje S.; Power, Christine; Simpson, Angela; Sengpiel, Verena; Tiesler, Carla M. T.; Torrent, Maties; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Meurs, Joyce B.; Vinding, Rebecca; Waage, Johannes; Wardle, Jane; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zemel, Babette S.; Dedoussis, George V.; Pedersen, Oluf; Froguel, Philippe; Sunyer, Jordi; Plomin, Robert; Jacobsson, Bo; Hansen, Torben; Gonzalez, Juan R.; Custovic, Adnan; Raitakari, Olli T.; Pennell, Craig E.; Widén, Elisabeth; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Sebert, Sylvain; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hyppönen, Elina; McCarthy, Mark I.; Lindi, Virpi; Harri, Niinikoski; Körner, Antje; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Heinrich, Joachim; Melbye, Mads; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ring, Susan M.; Smith, George Davey; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.

    2016-01-01

    A large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex- and age-adjusted standard deviation scores. We included 35 668 children from 20 studies in the discovery phase and 11 873 children from 13 studies in the replication phase. In total, 15 loci reached genome-wide significance (P-value < 5 × 10−8) in the joint discovery and replication analysis, of which 12 are previously identified loci in or close to ADCY3, GNPDA2, TMEM18, SEC16B, FAIM2, FTO, TFAP2B, TNNI3K, MC4R, GPR61, LMX1B and OLFM4 associated with adult body mass index or childhood obesity. We identified three novel loci: rs13253111 near ELP3, rs8092503 near RAB27B and rs13387838 near ADAM23. Per additional risk allele, body mass index increased 0.04 Standard Deviation Score (SDS) [Standard Error (SE) 0.007], 0.05 SDS (SE 0.008) and 0.14 SDS (SE 0.025), for rs13253111, rs8092503 and rs13387838, respectively. A genetic risk score combining all 15 SNPs showed that each additional average risk allele was associated with a 0.073 SDS (SE 0.011, P-value = 3.12 × 10−10) increase in childhood body mass index in a population of 1955 children. This risk score explained 2% of the variance in childhood body mass index. This study highlights the shared genetic background between childhood and adult body mass index and adds three novel loci. These loci likely represent age-related differences in strength of the associations with body mass index. PMID:26604143

  5. Genome-wide association of pericardial fat identifies a unique locus for ectopic fat.

    PubMed

    Fox, Caroline S; White, Charles C; Lohman, Kurt; Heard-Costa, Nancy; Cohen, Paul; Zhang, Yingying; Johnson, Andrew D; Emilsson, Valur; Liu, Ching-Ti; Chen, Y-D Ida; Taylor, Kent D; Allison, Matthew; Budoff, Matthew; Rotter, Jerome I; Carr, J Jeffrey; Hoffmann, Udo; Ding, Jingzhong; Cupples, L Adrienne; Liu, Yongmei

    2012-01-01

    Pericardial fat is a localized fat depot associated with coronary artery calcium and myocardial infarction. We hypothesized that genetic loci would be associated with pericardial fat independent of other body fat depots. Pericardial fat was quantified in 5,487 individuals of European ancestry from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Genotyping was performed using standard arrays and imputed to ~2.5 million Hapmap SNPs. Each study performed a genome-wide association analysis of pericardial fat adjusted for age, sex, weight, and height. A weighted z-score meta-analysis was conducted, and validation was obtained in an additional 3,602 multi-ethnic individuals from the MESA study. We identified a genome-wide significant signal in our primary meta-analysis at rs10198628 near TRIB2 (MAF 0.49, p = 2.7 × 10(-08)). This SNP was not associated with visceral fat (p = 0.17) or body mass index (p = 0.38), although we observed direction-consistent, nominal significance with visceral fat adjusted for BMI (p = 0.01) in the Framingham Heart Study. Our findings were robust among African ancestry (n = 1,442, p = 0.001), Hispanic (n = 1,399, p = 0.004), and Chinese (n = 761, p = 0.007) participants from the MESA study, with a combined p-value of 5.4E-14. We observed TRIB2 gene expression in the pericardial fat of mice. rs10198628 near TRIB2 is associated with pericardial fat but not measures of generalized or visceral adiposity, reinforcing the concept that there are unique genetic underpinnings to ectopic fat distribution.

  6. A genome-wide association study implicates the APOE locus in nonpathological cognitive ageing.

    PubMed

    Davies, G; Harris, S E; Reynolds, C A; Payton, A; Knight, H M; Liewald, D C; Lopez, L M; Luciano, M; Gow, A J; Corley, J; Henderson, R; Murray, C; Pattie, A; Fox, H C; Redmond, P; Lutz, M W; Chiba-Falek, O; Linnertz, C; Saith, S; Haggarty, P; McNeill, G; Ke, X; Ollier, W; Horan, M; Roses, A D; Ponting, C P; Porteous, D J; Tenesa, A; Pickles, A; Starr, J M; Whalley, L J; Pedersen, N L; Pendleton, N; Visscher, P M; Deary, I J

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive decline is a feared aspect of growing old. It is a major contributor to lower quality of life and loss of independence in old age. We investigated the genetic contribution to individual differences in nonpathological cognitive ageing in five cohorts of older adults. We undertook a genome-wide association analysis using 549 692 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3511 unrelated adults in the Cognitive Ageing Genetics in England and Scotland (CAGES) project. These individuals have detailed longitudinal cognitive data from which phenotypes measuring each individual's cognitive changes were constructed. One SNP--rs2075650, located in TOMM40 (translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog)--had a genome-wide significant association with cognitive ageing (P=2.5 × 10(-8)). This result was replicated in a meta-analysis of three independent Swedish cohorts (P=2.41 × 10(-6)). An Apolipoprotein E (APOE) haplotype (adjacent to TOMM40), previously associated with cognitive ageing, had a significant effect on cognitive ageing in the CAGES sample (P=2.18 × 10(-8); females, P=1.66 × 10(-11); males, P=0.01). Fine SNP mapping of the TOMM40/APOE region identified both APOE (rs429358; P=3.66 × 10(-11)) and TOMM40 (rs11556505; P=2.45 × 10(-8)) as loci that were associated with cognitive ageing. Imputation and conditional analyses in the discovery and replication cohorts strongly suggest that this effect is due to APOE (rs429358). Functional genomic analysis indicated that SNPs in the TOMM40/APOE region have a functional, regulatory non-protein-coding effect. The APOE region is significantly associated with nonpathological cognitive ageing. The identity and mechanism of one or multiple causal variants remain unclear.

  7. Genome-wide Linkage and Association Analysis of Cardiometabolic Phenotypes in Hispanic Americans

    PubMed Central

    Hellwege, Jacklyn N.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Dimitrov, Latchezar; Keaton, Jacob M.; Tabb, Keri L.; Sajuthi, Satria; Taylor, Kent D.; Ng, Maggie C.Y.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Long, Jirong; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Lorenzo, Carlos; Norris, Jill M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2016-01-01

    Linkage studies of complex genetic diseases have been largely replaced by Genome-Wide Association studies (GWAS), due in part to limited success in complex trait discovery. However, recent interest in rare and low-frequency variants motivates reexamination of family-based methods. In this study we investigated the performance of two-point linkage analysis for over 1.6 million SNPs combined with single variant association analysis to identify high impact variants which are both strongly linked and associated with cardiometabolic traits in up to 1 414 Hispanics from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS). Evaluation of all 50 phenotypes yielded 83 557 000 LOD scores with 9 214 LOD scores ≥ 3.0, 845 ≥ 4.0, and 89 ≥ 5.0, with a maximal LOD score of 6.49 (rs12956744 in the LAMA1 gene for TNFα receptor 2). Twenty-seven variants were associated with p < 0.005 as well as having a LOD score > 4, including variants in the NFIB gene under a linkage peak with TNFα receptor 2 levels on chromosome 9. Linkage regions of interest included a broad peak (31Mb) on chromosome 1q with acute insulin response (max LOD = 5.37). This region was previously documented with type 2 diabetes in family-based studies, providing support for the validity of these results. Overall, we have demonstrated the utility of two-point linkage and association in comprehensive genome-wide array-based SNP genotypes. PMID:27535031

  8. Genome-wide Association Study of Autism Spectrum Disorder in the East Asian Populations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Shimada, Takafumi; Otowa, Takeshi; Wu, Yu-Yu; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Tochigi, Mamoru; Iwata, Yasuhide; Umekage, Tadashi; Toyota, Tomoko; Maekawa, Motoko; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Kakiuchi, Chihiro; Kuwabara, Hitoshi; Kano, Yukiko; Nishida, Hisami; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Kato, Nobumasa; Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Mori, Norio; Yamada, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Kasai, Kiyoto; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2016-03-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder with strong genetic basis. To identify common genetic variations conferring the risk of ASD, we performed a two-stage genome-wide association study using ASD family and healthy control samples obtained from East Asian populations. A total of 166 ASD families (n = 500) and 642 healthy controls from the Japanese population were used as the discovery cohort. Approximately 900,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP array 6.0 chips. In the replication stage, 205 Japanese ASD cases and 184 healthy controls, as well as 418 Chinese Han trios (n = 1,254), were genotyped by TaqMan platform. Case-control analysis, family based association test, and transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT) were then conducted to test the association. In the discovery stage, significant associations were suggested for 14 loci, including 5 known ASD candidate genes: GPC6, JARID2, YTHDC2, CNTN4, and CSMD1. In addition, significant associations were identified for several novel genes with intriguing functions, such as JPH3, PTPRD, CUX1, and RIT2. After a meta-analysis combining the Japanese replication samples, the strongest signal was found at rs16976358 (P = 6.04 × 10(-7)), which is located near the RIT2 gene. In summary, our results provide independent support to known ASD candidate genes and highlight a number of novel genes warranted to be further investigated in a larger sample set in an effort to improve our understanding of the genetic basis of ASD.

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Murphy, Elissa; Zhang, Weiming; Peljto, Anna L.; Brown, Kevin K.; Steele, Mark P.; Loyd, James E.; Cosgrove, Gregory P.; Lynch, David; Groshong, Steve; Collard, Harold R.; Wolters, Paul J.; Bradford, Williamson Z.; Kossen, Karl; Seiwert, Scott D.; du Bois, Roland M.; Garcia, Christine Kim; Devine, Megan S.; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Isaksson, Helgi J.; Kaminski, Naftali; Zhang, Yingze; Gibson, Kevin F.; Lancaster, Lisa H.; Cogan, Joy D.; Mason, Wendi R.; Maher, Toby M.; Molyneaux, Philip L.; Wells, Athol U.; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Selman, Moises; Pardo, Annie; Kim, Dong Soon; Crapo, James D.; Make, Barry J.; Regan, Elizabeth A.; Walek, Dinesha S.; Daniel, Jerry J.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Zelenika, Diana; Smith, Keith; McKean, David; Pedersen, Brent S.; Talbert, Janet; Kidd, Ravin N.; Markin, Cheryl R.; Beckman, Kenneth B.; Lathrop, Mark; Schwarz, Marvin I.; Schwartz, David A.

    2013-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study in non-Hispanic white subjects with fibrotic idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (N=1616) and controls (N=4683); replication was assessed in 876 cases and 1890 controls. We confirmed association with TERT and MUC5B on chromosomes 5p15 and 11p15, respectively, the chromosome 3q26 region near TERC, and identified 7 novel loci (PMeta = 2.4×10−8 to PMeta = 1.1×10−19). The novel loci include FAM13A (4q22), DSP (6p24), OBFC1 (10q24), ATP11A (13q34), DPP9 (19p13), and chromosomal regions 7q22 and 15q14-15. Our results demonstrate that genes involved in host defense, cell-cell adhesion, and DNA repair contribute to the risk of fibrotic IIP. PMID:23583980

  10. Utility of genome-wide association study findings: prostate cancer as a translational research paradigm.

    PubMed

    Turner, A R; Kader, A K; Xu, J

    2012-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified thousands of consistently replicated associations between genetic markers and complex disease risk, including cancers. Alone, these markers have limited utility in risk prediction; however, when several of these markers are used in combination, the predictive performance appears to be similar to that of many currently available clinical predictors. Despite this, there are divergent views regarding the clinical validity and utility of these genetic markers in risk prediction. There are valid concerns, thus providing a direction for new lines of research. Herein, we outline the debate and use the example of prostate cancer to highlight emerging evidence from studies that aim to address potential concerns. We also describe a translational framework that could be used to guide the development of a new generation of comprehensive research studies aimed at capitalizing on these exciting new discoveries.

  11. Pharmacogenetic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of LDL cholesterol response to statins

    PubMed Central

    Postmus, Iris; Trompet, Stella; Deshmukh, Harshal A.; Barnes, Michael R.; Li, Xiaohui; Warren, Helen R.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Zhou, Kaixin; Arsenault, Benoit J.; Donnelly, Louise A.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Avery, Christy L.; Griffin, Paula; Feng, QiPing; Taylor, Kent D.; Li, Guo; Evans, Daniel S.; Smith, Albert V.; de Keyser, Catherine E.; Johnson, Andrew D.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Stott, David J.; Buckley, Brendan M.; Ford, Ian; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; Eline Slagboom, P.; Sattar, Naveed; Munroe, Patricia B.; Sever, Peter; Poulter, Neil; Stanton, Alice; Shields, Denis C.; O’Brien, Eoin; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Ida Chen, Y.-D.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Smith, Joshua D.; Pierre Dubé, Marie; Matthijs Boekholdt, S.; Kees Hovingh, G.; Kastelein, John J. P.; McKeigue, Paul M.; Betteridge, John; Neil, Andrew; Durrington, Paul N.; Doney, Alex; Carr, Fiona; Morris, Andrew; McCarthy, Mark I.; Groop, Leif; Ahlqvist, Emma; Bis, Joshua C.; Rice, Kenneth; Smith, Nicholas L.; Lumley, Thomas; Whitsel, Eric A.; Stürmer, Til; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ngwa, Julius S.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wei, Wei-Qi; Wilke, Russell A.; Liu, Ching-Ti; Sun, Fangui; Guo, Xiuqing; Heckbert, Susan R; Post, Wendy; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Arnold, Alice M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Ding, Jingzhong; Herrington, David M.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Launer, Leonore J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Chu, Audrey Y.; Giulianini, Franco; MacFadyen, Jean G.; Barratt, Bryan J.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Stricker, Bruno H.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Emilsson, Valur; Franco, Oscar H.; Ridker, Paul M.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Liu, Yongmei; Denny, Joshua C.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Adrienne Cupples, L.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Colhoun, Helen M.; Hitman, Graham; Krauss, Ronald M.; Wouter Jukema, J; Caulfield, Mark J.; Donnelly, Peter; Barroso, Ines; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Deloukas, Panos; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Band, Gavin; Bellenguez, Céline; Freeman, Colin; Hellenthal, Garrett; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Pirinen, Matti; Pearson, Richard; Strange, Amy; Su, Zhan; Vukcevic, Damjan; Donnelly, Peter; Langford, Cordelia; Hunt, Sarah E.; Edkins, Sarah; Gwilliam, Rhian; Blackburn, Hannah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Dronov, Serge; Gillman, Matthew; Gray, Emma; Hammond, Naomi; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; McCann, Owen T.; Liddle, Jennifer; Potter, Simon C.; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Ricketts, Michelle; Waller, Matthew; Weston, Paul; Widaa, Sara; Whittaker, Pamela; Barroso, Ines; Deloukas, Panos; Mathew, Christopher G.; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Brown, Matthew A.; Corvin, Aiden; McCarthy, Mark I.; Spencer, Chris C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Statins effectively lower LDL cholesterol levels in large studies and the observed interindividual response variability may be partially explained by genetic variation. Here we perform a pharmacogenetic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in studies addressing the LDL cholesterol response to statins, including up to 18,596 statin-treated subjects. We validate the most promising signals in a further 22,318 statin recipients and identify two loci, SORT1/CELSR2/PSRC1 and SLCO1B1, not previously identified in GWAS. Moreover, we confirm the previously described associations with APOE and LPA. Our findings advance the understanding of the pharmacogenetic architecture of statin response. PMID:25350695

  12. Genome-wide association analyses identify three new susceptibility loci for primary angle closure glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Vithana, Eranga N; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Qiao, Chunyan; Nongpiur, Monisha E; George, Ronnie; Chen, Li-Jia; Do, Tan; Abu-Amero, Khaled; Huang, Chor Kai; Low, Sancy; Tajudin, Liza-Sharmini A; Perera, Shamira A; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Xu, Liang; Jia, Hongyan; Ho, Ching-Lin; Sim, Kar Seng; Wu, Ren-Yi; Tham, Clement C Y; Chew, Paul T K; Su, Daniel H; Oen, Francis T; Sarangapani, Sripriya; Soumittra, Nagaswamy; Osman, Essam A; Wong, Hon-Tym; Tang, Guangxian; Fan, Sujie; Meng, Hailin; Huong, Dao T L; Wang, Hua; Feng, Bo; Baskaran, Mani; Shantha, Balekudaru; Ramprasad, Vedam L; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Iyengar, Sudha K; How, Alicia C; Lee, Kelvin Y; Sivakumaran, Theru A; Yong, Victor H K; Ting, Serena M L; Li, Yang; Wang, Ya-Xing; Tay, Wan-Ting; Sim, Xueling; Lavanya, Raghavan; Cornes, Belinda K; Zheng, Ying-Feng; Wong, Tina T; Loon, Seng-Chee; Yong, Vernon K Y; Waseem, Naushin; Yaakub, Azhany; Chia, Kee-Seng; Allingham, R Rand; Hauser, Michael A; Lam, Dennis S C; Hibberd, Martin L; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Zhang, Mingzhi; Teo, Yik Ying; Tan, Donald T; Jonas, Jost B; Tai, E-Shyong; Saw, Seang-Mei; Hon, Do Nhu; Al-Obeidan, Saleh A; Liu, Jianjun; Chau, Tran Nguyen Bich; Simmons, Cameron P; Bei, Jin-Xin; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Foster, Paul J; Vijaya, Lingam; Wong, Tien-Yin; Pang, Chi-Pui; Wang, Ningli; Aung, Tin

    2012-10-01

    Primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) is a major cause of blindness worldwide. We conducted a genome-wide association study including 1,854 PACG cases and 9,608 controls across 5 sample collections in Asia. Replication experiments were conducted in 1,917 PACG cases and 8,943 controls collected from a further 6 sample collections. We report significant associations at three new loci: rs11024102 in PLEKHA7 (per-allele odds ratio (OR)=1.22; P=5.33×10(-12)), rs3753841 in COL11A1 (per-allele OR=1.20; P=9.22×10(-10)) and rs1015213 located between PCMTD1 and ST18 on chromosome 8q (per-allele OR=1.50; P=3.29×10(-9)). Our findings, accumulated across these independent worldwide collections, suggest possible mechanisms explaining the pathogenesis of PACG.

  13. A genome-wide association study reveals a QTL influencing caudal supernumerary teats in Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Joerg, H; Meili, C; Ruprecht, O; Bangerter, E; Burren, A; Bigler, A

    2014-12-01

    Supernumerary teats represent a common abnormality of the bovine udder. A genome-wide association study was performed based on the proportion of the occurrence of supernumerary teats in the daughters of 1097 Holstein bulls. The heritability of caudal supernumerary teats without mammary gland in this study was 0.604. The largest proportion of the heritability was attributable to BTA 20. The strongest evidence for association was with five SNPs on chromosome 20, referred to as a QTL. The mode of inheritance at this QTL was dominant. These findings reveal that the occurrence of caudal supernumerary teats without mammary gland in Holstein cattle is influenced by a QTL on chromosome 20 and a polygenic part. The data support the high potential of the SNPs in the QTL region as markers for breeding against caudal supernumerary teats.

  14. Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies with Multiple Outcomes Using Penalization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Huang, Jian; Ma, Shuangge

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been extensively conducted, searching for markers for biologically meaningful outcomes and phenotypes. Penalization methods have been adopted in the analysis of the joint effects of a large number of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and marker identification. This study is partly motivated by the analysis of heterogeneous stock mice dataset, in which multiple correlated phenotypes and a large number of SNPs are available. Existing penalization methods designed to analyze a single response variable cannot accommodate the correlation among multiple response variables. With multiple response variables sharing the same set of markers, joint modeling is first employed to accommodate the correlation. The group Lasso approach is adopted to select markers associated with all the outcome variables. An efficient computational algorithm is developed. Simulation study and analysis of the heterogeneous stock mice dataset show that the proposed method can outperform existing penalization methods. PMID:23272092

  15. Genome-Wide Association and Functional Follow-Up Reveals New Loci for Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Gao, Xiaoyi; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Smith, Albert V.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Johnson, Andrew D.; Gierman, Hinco J.; Feitosa, Mary; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Chouraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Cavalieri, Margherita; Rao, Madhumathi; Hu, Frank B.; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Kolcic, Ivana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Endlich, Karlhans; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Ketkar, Shamika; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Giulianini, Franco; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Metzger, Marie; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Kim, Stuart K.; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Siscovick, David S.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important public health problem with a genetic component. We performed genome-wide association studies in up to 130,600 European ancestry participants overall, and stratified for key CKD risk factors. We uncovered 6 new loci in association with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the primary clinical measure of CKD, in or near MPPED2, DDX1, SLC47A1, CDK12, CASP9, and INO80. Morpholino knockdown of mpped2 and casp9 in zebrafish embryos revealed podocyte and tubular abnormalities with altered dextran clearance, suggesting a role for these genes in renal function. By providing new insights into genes that regulate renal function, these results could further our understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD. PMID:22479191

  16. From Loci to Biology: Functional Genomics of Genome-Wide Association for Coronary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nurnberg, Sylvia T; Zhang, Hanrui; Hand, Nicholas J; Bauer, Robert C; Saleheen, Danish; Reilly, Muredach P; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided a rich collection of ~58 CAD loci that suggest the existence of previously unsuspected new biology relevant to atherosclerosis. However, these studies only identify genomic loci associated with CAD and many questions remain even after a genomic locus is definitively implicated, including the nature of the causal variant(s) and the causal gene(s), as well as the directionality of effect. There are a number of tools that can be employed for investigation of the functional genomics of these loci, and progress has been made on a limited number of novel CAD loci. New biology regarding atherosclerosis and CAD will be learned through the functional genomics of these loci and the hope is that at least some of these new pathways relevant to CAD pathogenesis will yield new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of CAD. PMID:26892960

  17. A Genome-Wide Association Study of the Human Metabolome in a Community-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Eugene P.; Ho, Jennifer E.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Shen, Dongxiao; Cheng, Susan; Larson, Martin G.; Ghorbani, Anahita; Shi, Xu; Helenius, Iiro T.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Souza, Amanda L.; Deik, Amy; Pierce, Kerry A.; Bullock, Kevin; Walford, Geoffrey A.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Florez, Jose C.; Clish, Clary; Yeh, J.-R. Joanna; Wang, Thomas J.; Gerszten, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Because metabolites are hypothesized to play key roles as markers and effectors of cardio-metabolic diseases, recent studies have sought to annotate the genetic determinants of circulating metabolite levels. We report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 217 plasma metabolites, including >100 not measured in prior GWAS, in 2,076 participants of the Framingham Heart Study. For the majority of analytes, we find that estimated heritability explains >20% of inter-individual variation, and that variation attributable to heritable factors is greater than that attributable to clinical factors. Further, we identify 31 genetic loci associated with plasma metabolites, including 23 that have not previously been reported. Importantly, we include GWAS results for all surveyed metabolites, and demonstrate how this information highlights a role for AGXT2 in cholesterol ester and triacylglycerol metabolism. Thus, our study outlines the relative contributions of inherited and clinical factors on the plasma metabolome and provides a resource for metabolism research. PMID:23823483

  18. Identification of new susceptibility loci for osteoarthritis (arcOGEN): a genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis worldwide and is a major cause of pain and disability in elderly people. The health economic burden of osteoarthritis is increasing commensurate with obesity prevalence and longevity. Osteoarthritis has a strong genetic component but the success of previous genetic studies has been restricted due to insufficient sample sizes and phenotype heterogeneity. Methods We undertook a large genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 7410 unrelated and retrospectively and prospectively selected patients with severe osteoarthritis in the arcOGEN study, 80% of whom had undergone total joint replacement, and 11 009 unrelated controls from the UK. We replicated the most promising signals in an independent set of up to 7473 cases and 42 938 controls, from studies in Iceland, Estonia, the Netherlands, and the UK. All patients and controls were of European descent. Findings We identified five genome-wide significant loci (binomial test p≤5·0×10−8) for association with osteoarthritis and three loci just below this threshold. The strongest association was on chromosome 3 with rs6976 (odds ratio 1·12 [95% CI 1·08–1·16]; p=7·24×10−11), which is in perfect linkage disequilibrium with rs11177. This SNP encodes a missense polymorphism within the nucleostemin-encoding gene GNL3. Levels of nucleostemin were raised in chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis in functional studies. Other significant loci were on chromosome 9 close to ASTN2, chromosome 6 between FILIP1 and SENP6, chromosome 12 close to KLHDC5 and PTHLH, and in another region of chromosome 12 close to CHST11. One of the signals close to genome-wide significance was within the FTO gene, which is involved in regulation of bodyweight—a strong risk factor for osteoarthritis. All risk variants were common in frequency and exerted small effects. Interpretation Our findings provide insight into the genetics of arthritis and identify new

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies genetic determinants of urine PCA3 levels in men.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Sun, Jielin; Kim, Seong-Tae; Groskopf, Jack; Feng, Junjie; Isaacs, William B; Rittmaster, Roger S; Condreay, Lynn D; Zheng, Siqun Lilly; Xu, Jianfeng

    2013-04-01

    Prostate cancer gene 3 (PCA3) is a non-coding gene specifically overexpressed in prostate cancer (PCa) that has great potential as a clinical biomarker for predicting prostate biopsy outcome. However, genetic determinants of PCA3 expression level remain unknown. To investigate the association between genetic variants and PCA3 mRNA level, a genome-wide association study was conducted in 1371 men of European descent in the REduction by DUtasteride of prostate Cancer Events trial. First-voided urine specimens containing prostate cells were obtained after digital rectal examination. The PROGENSA PCA3 assay was used to determine PCA3 score in the urinary samples. A linear regression model was used to detect the associations between (single nucleotide polymorphisms) SNPs and PCA3 score under an additive genetic model, adjusting for age and population stratification. Two SNPs, rs10993994 in β-microseminoprotein at 10q11.23 and rs10424878 in kallikrein-related peptidase 2 at 19q13.33, were associated with PCA3 score at genome-wide significance level (P = 1.22 x 10(-9) and 1.06 x 10(-8), respectively). Men carrying the rs10993994 "T" allele or rs10424878 "A" allele had higher PCA3 score compared with men carrying rs10993994 "C" allele or rs10424878 "G" allele (β = 1.25 and 1.24, respectively). This is the first comprehensive search for genetic determinants of PCA3 score. The novel loci identified may provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of PCA3 expression as a potential marker of PCa.

  20. Genome-wide linkage analysis and association study identifies loci for polydactyly in chickens.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanfa; Liu, Ranran; Zhao, Guiping; Zheng, Maiqing; Sun, Yan; Yu, Xiaoqiong; Li, Peng; Wen, Jie

    2014-04-21

    Polydactyly occurs in some chicken breeds, but the molecular mechanism remains incompletely understood. Combined genome-wide linkage analysis and association study (GWAS) for chicken polydactyly helps identify loci or candidate genes for the trait and potentially provides further mechanistic understanding of this phenotype in chickens and perhaps other species. The linkage analysis and GWAS for polydactyly was conducted using an F2 population derived from Beijing-You chickens and commercial broilers. The results identified two QTLs through linkage analysis and seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) through GWAS, associated with the polydactyly trait. One QTL located at 35 cM on the GGA2 was significant at the 1% genome-wise level and another QTL at the 1% chromosome-wide significance level was detected at 39 cM on GGA19. A total of seven SNPs, four of 5% genome-wide significance (P < 2.98 × 10(-6)) and three of suggestive significance (5.96 × 10(-5)) were identified, including two SNPs (GGaluGA132178 and Gga_rs14135036) in the QTL on GGA2. Of the identified SNPs, the eight nearest genes were sonic hedgehog (SHH), limb region 1 homolog (mouse) (LMBR1), dipeptidyl-peptidase 6, transcript variant 3 (DPP6), thyroid-stimulating hormone, beta (TSHB), sal-like 4 (Drosophila) (SALL4), par-6 partitioning defective 6 homolog beta (Caenorhabditis elegans) (PARD6B), coenzyme Q5 (COQ5), and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein, etapolypeptide (YWHAH). The GWAS supports earlier reports of the importance of SHH and LMBR1 as regulating genes for polydactyly in chickens and other species, and identified others, most of which have not previously been associated with limb development. The genes and associated SNPs revealed here provide detailed information for further exploring the molecular and developmental mechanisms underlying polydactyly.

  1. Genome-wide association study of age at menarche in African-American women

    PubMed Central

    Demerath, Ellen W.; Liu, Ching-Ti; Franceschini, Nora; Chen, Gary; Palmer, Julie R.; Smith, Erin N.; Chen, Christina T.L.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Arnold, Alice M.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bernstein, Leslie; Britton, Angela; Cappola, Anne R.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Wei; Chen, Zhao; Deming, Sandra L.; Elks, Cathy E.; Evans, Michelle K.; Gajdos, Zofia; Henderson, Brian E.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ingles, Sue; John, Esther M.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lu, Xiaoning; Millikan, Robert C.; Musani, Solomon K.; Nock, Nora L.; North, Kari; Nyante, Sarah; Press, Michael F.; Rodriquez-Gil, Jorge L.; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Woods, Nancy F.; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G.; Zonderman, Alan; Heiss, Gerardo; Gwen Windham, B.; Wellons, Melissa; Murray, Sarah S.; Nalls, Michael; Pastinen, Tomi; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Hirschhorn, Joel; Adrienne Cupples, L.; Kooperberg, Charles; Murabito, Joanne M.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    African-American (AA) women have earlier menarche on average than women of European ancestry (EA), and earlier menarche is a risk factor for obesity and type 2 diabetes among other chronic diseases. Identification of common genetic variants associated with age at menarche has a potential value in pointing to the genetic pathways underlying chronic disease risk, yet comprehensive genome-wide studies of age at menarche are lacking for AA women. In this study, we tested the genome-wide association of self-reported age at menarche with common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a total of 18 089 AA women in 15 studies using an additive genetic linear regression model, adjusting for year of birth and population stratification, followed by inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis (Stage 1). Top meta-analysis results were then tested in an independent sample of 2850 women (Stage 2). First, while no SNP passed the pre-specified P < 5 × 10−8 threshold for significance in Stage 1, suggestive associations were found for variants near FLRT2 and PIK3R1, and conditional analysis identified two independent SNPs (rs339978 and rs980000) in or near RORA, strengthening the support for this suggestive locus identified in EA women. Secondly, an investigation of SNPs in 42 previously identified menarche loci in EA women demonstrated that 25 (60%) of them contained variants significantly associated with menarche in AA women. The findings provide the first evidence of cross-ethnic generalization of menarche loci identified to date, and suggest a number of novel biological links to menarche timing in AA women. PMID:23599027

  2. Genome-Wide Association and Exome Sequencing Study of Language Disorder in an Isolated Population

    PubMed Central

    Kornilov, Sergey A.; Rakhlin, Natalia; Koposov, Roman; Lee, Maria; Yrigollen, Carolyn; Caglayan, Ahmet Okay; Magnuson, James S.; Mane, Shrikant; Chang, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Developmental language disorder (DLD) is a highly prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder associated with negative outcomes in different domains; the etiology of DLD is unknown. To investigate the genetic underpinnings of DLD, we performed genome-wide association and whole exome sequencing studies in a geographically isolated population with a substantially elevated prevalence of the disorder (ie, the AZ sample). METHODS: DNA samples were collected from 359 individuals for the genome-wide association study and from 12 severely affected individuals for whole exome sequencing. Multifaceted phenotypes, representing major domains of expressive language functioning, were derived from collected speech samples. RESULTS: Gene-based analyses revealed a significant association between SETBP1 and complexity of linguistic output (P = 5.47 × 10−7). The analysis of exome variants revealed coding sequence variants in 14 genes, most of which play a role in neural development. Targeted enrichment analysis implicated myocyte enhancer factor–2 (MEF2)-regulated genes in DLD in the AZ population. The main findings were successfully replicated in an independent cohort of children at risk for related disorders (n = 372). CONCLUSIONS: MEF2-regulated pathways were identified as potential candidate pathways in the etiology of DLD. Several genes (including the candidate SETBP1 and other MEF2-related genes) seem to jointly influence certain, but not all, facets of the DLD phenotype. Even when genetic and environmental diversity is reduced, DLD is best conceptualized as etiologically complex. Future research should establish whether the signals detected in the AZ population can be replicated in other samples and languages and provide further characterization of the identified pathway. PMID:27016271

  3. Genome-wide meta-analyses identify multiple loci associated with smoking behavior.

    PubMed

    2010-05-01

    Consistent but indirect evidence has implicated genetic factors in smoking behavior. We report meta-analyses of several smoking phenotypes within cohorts of the Tobacco and Genetics Consortium (n = 74,053). We also partnered with the European Network of Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE) and Oxford-GlaxoSmithKline (Ox-GSK) consortia to follow up the 15 most significant regions (n > 140,000). We identified three loci associated with number of cigarettes smoked per day. The strongest association was a synonymous 15q25 SNP in the nicotinic receptor gene CHRNA3 (rs1051730[A], beta = 1.03, standard error (s.e.) = 0.053, P = 2.8 x 10(-73)). Two 10q25 SNPs (rs1329650[G], beta = 0.367, s.e. = 0.059, P = 5.7 x 10(-10); and rs1028936[A], beta = 0.446, s.e. = 0.074, P = 1.3 x 10(-9)) and one 9q13 SNP in EGLN2 (rs3733829[G], beta = 0.333, s.e. = 0.058, P = 1.0 x 10(-8)) also exceeded genome-wide significance for cigarettes per day. For smoking initiation, eight SNPs exceeded genome-wide significance, with the strongest association at a nonsynonymous SNP in BDNF on chromosome 11 (rs6265[C], odds ratio (OR) = 1.06, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 1.04-1.08, P = 1.8 x 10(-8)). One SNP located near DBH on chromosome 9 (rs3025343[G], OR = 1.12, 95% Cl 1.08-1.18, P = 3.6 x 10(-8)) was significantly associated with smoking cessation.

  4. Genome-Wide Association Study for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Taiwanese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Chuang, Li-Chung; Su, Mei-Hsin; Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Yen, Chung-Jen; Wu, Yu-Yu; Liu, Shih-Kai; Chou, Miao-Chun; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Chiu, Yen-Nan; Tsai, Wen-Che; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with strong genetic components. Several recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies in Caucasian samples have reported a number of gene regions and loci correlated with the risk of ASD—albeit with very little consensus across studies. Methods A two-stage GWA study was employed to identify common genetic variants for ASD in the Taiwanese Han population. The discovery stage included 315 patients with ASD and 1,115 healthy controls, using the Affymetrix SNP array 6.0 platform for genotyping. Several gene regions were then selected for fine-mapping and top markers were examined in extended samples. Single marker, haplotype, gene-based, and pathway analyses were conducted for associations. Results Seven SNPs had p-values ranging from 3.4~9.9*10−6, but none reached the genome-wide significant level. Five of them were mapped to three known genes (OR2M4, STYK1, and MNT) with significant empirical gene-based p-values in OR2M4 (p = 3.4*10−5) and MNT (p = 0.0008). Results of the fine-mapping study showed single-marker associations in the GLIS1 (rs12082358 and rs12080993) and NAALADL2 (rs3914502 and rs2222447) genes, and gene-based associations for the OR2M3-OR2T5 (olfactory receptor genes, p = 0.02), and GLIPR1/KRR1 gene regions (p = 0.015). Pathway analyses revealed important pathways for ASD, such as olfactory and G protein–coupled receptors signaling pathways. Conclusions We reported Taiwanese Han specific susceptibility genes and variants for ASD. However, further replication in other Asian populations is warranted to validate our findings. Investigation in the biological functions of our reported genetic variants might also allow for better understanding on the underlying pathogenesis of autism. PMID:26398136

  5. Pharmacodynamic genome-wide association study identifies new responsive loci for glucocorticoid intervention in asthma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Tong, C; Wang, Z; Wang, Z; Mauger, D; Tantisira, K G; Israel, E; Szefler, S J; Chinchilli, V M; Boushey, H A; Lazarus, S C; Lemanske, R F; Wu, R

    2015-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic lung disease that has a high prevalence. The therapeutic intervention of this disease can be made more effective if genetic variability in patients' response to medications is implemented. However, a clear picture of the genetic architecture of asthma intervention response remains elusive. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify drug response-associated genes for asthma, in which 909 622 SNPs were genotyped for 120 randomized participants who inhaled multiple doses of glucocorticoids. By integrating pharmacodynamic properties of drug reactions, we implemented a mechanistic model to analyze the GWAS data, enhancing the scope of inference about the genetic architecture of asthma intervention. Our pharmacodynamic model observed associations of genome-wide significance between dose-dependent response to inhaled glucocorticoids (measured as %FEV1) and five loci (P=5.315 × 10(-7) to 3.924 × 10(-9)), many of which map to metabolic genes related to lung function and asthma risk. All significant SNPs detected indicate a recessive effect, at which the homozygotes for the mutant alleles drive variability in %FEV1. Significant associations were well replicated in three additional independent GWAS studies. Pooled together over these three trials, two SNPs, chr6 rs6924808 and chr11 rs1353649, display an increased significance level (P=6.661 × 10(-16) and 5.670 × 10(-11)). Our study reveals a general picture of pharmacogenomic control for asthma intervention. The results obtained help to tailor an optimal dose for individual patients to treat asthma based on their genetic makeup.

  6. Genetic variation at the CELF1 (CUGBP, elav-like family member 1 gene) locus is genome-wide associated with Alzheimer's disease and obesity.

    PubMed

    Hinney, Anke; Albayrak, Ozgür; Antel, Jochen; Volckmar, Anna-Lena; Sims, Rebecca; Chapman, Jade; Harold, Denise; Gerrish, Amy; Heid, Iris M; Winkler, Thomas W; Scherag, André; Wiltfang, Jens; Williams, Julie; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Deviations from normal body weight are observed prior to and after the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Midlife obesity confers increased AD risk in later life, whereas late-life obesity is associated with decreased AD risk. The role of underweight and weight loss for AD risk is controversial. Based on the hypothesis of shared genetic variants for both obesity and AD, we analyzed the variants identified for AD or obesity from genome-wide association meta-analyses of the GERAD (AD, cases = 6,688, controls = 13,685) and GIANT (body mass index [BMI] as measure of obesity, n = 123,865) consortia. Our cross-disorder analysis of genome-wide significant 39 obesity SNPs and 23 AD SNPs in these two large data sets revealed that: (1) The AD SNP rs10838725 (pAD  = 1.1 × 10(-08)) at the locus CELF1 is also genome-wide significant for obesity (pBMI  = 7.35 × 10(-09) ). (2) Four additional AD risk SNPs were nominally associated with obesity (rs17125944 at FERMT2, pBMI  = 4.03 × 10(-05), pBMI corr  = 2.50 × 10(-03) ; rs3851179 at PICALM; pBMI  = 0.002, rs2075650 at TOMM40/APOE, pBMI  = 0.024, rs3865444 at CD33, pBMI  = 0.024). (3) SNPs at two of the obesity risk loci (rs4836133 downstream of ZNF608; pAD  = 0.002 and at rs713586 downstream of RBJ/DNAJC27; pAD  = 0.018) were nominally associated with AD risk. Additionally, among the SNPs used for confirmation in both studies the AD risk allele of rs1858973, with an AD association just below genome-wide significance (pAD  = 7.20 × 10(-07)), was also associated with obesity (SNP at IQCK/GPRC5B; pBMI  = 5.21 × 10(-06) ; pcorr  = 3.24 × 10(-04)). Our first GWAS based cross-disorder analysis for AD and obesity suggests that rs10838725 at the locus CELF1 might be relevant for both disorders.

  7. Genome-Wide Detection of CNVs and Their Association with Meat Tenderness in Nelore Cattle.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vinicius Henrique da; Regitano, Luciana Correia de Almeida; Geistlinger, Ludwig; Pértille, Fábio; Giachetto, Poliana Fernanda; Brassaloti, Ricardo Augusto; Morosini, Natália Silva; Zimmer, Ralf; Coutinho, Luiz Lehmann

    2016-01-01

    Brazil is one of the largest beef producers and exporters in the world with the Nelore breed representing the vast majority of Brazilian cattle (Bos taurus indicus). Despite the great adaptability of the Nelore breed to tropical climate, meat tenderness (MT) remains to be improved. Several factors including genetic composition can influence MT. In this article, we report a genome-wide analysis of copy number variation (CNV) inferred from Illumina® High Density SNP-chip data for a Nelore population of 723 males. We detected >2,600 CNV regions (CNVRs) representing ≈6.5% of the genome. Comparing our results with previous studies revealed an overlap in ≈1400 CNVRs (>50%). A total of 1,155 CNVRs (43.6%) overlapped 2,750 genes. They were enriched for processes involving guanosine triphosphate (GTP), previously reported to influence skeletal muscle physiology and morphology. Nelore CNVRs also overlapped QTLs for MT reported in other breeds (8.9%, 236 CNVRs) and from a previous study with this population (4.1%, 109 CNVRs). Two CNVRs were also proximal to glutathione metabolism genes that were previously associated with MT. Genome-wide association study of CN state with estimated breeding values derived from meat shear force identified 6 regions, including a region on BTA3 that contains genes of the cAMP and cGMP pathway. Ten CNVRs that overlapped regions associated with MT were successfully validated by qPCR. Our results represent the first comprehensive CNV study in Bos taurus indicus cattle and identify regions in which copy number changes are potentially of importance for the MT phenotype.

  8. Genome-Wide Detection of CNVs and Their Association with Meat Tenderness in Nelore Cattle

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Vinicius Henrique; Regitano, Luciana Correia de Almeida; Geistlinger, Ludwig; Pértille, Fábio; Morosini, Natália Silva; Zimmer, Ralf; Coutinho, Luiz Lehmann

    2016-01-01

    Brazil is one of the largest beef producers and exporters in the world with the Nelore breed representing the vast majority of Brazilian cattle (Bos taurus indicus). Despite the great adaptability of the Nelore breed to tropical climate, meat tenderness (MT) remains to be improved. Several factors including genetic composition can influence MT. In this article, we report a genome-wide analysis of copy number variation (CNV) inferred from Illumina® High Density SNP-chip data for a Nelore population of 723 males. We detected >2,600 CNV regions (CNVRs) representing ≈6.5% of the genome. Comparing our results with previous studies revealed an overlap in ≈1400 CNVRs (>50%). A total of 1,155 CNVRs (43.6%) overlapped 2,750 genes. They were enriched for processes involving guanosine triphosphate (GTP), previously reported to influence skeletal muscle physiology and morphology. Nelore CNVRs also overlapped QTLs for MT reported in other breeds (8.9%, 236 CNVRs) and from a previous study with this population (4.1%, 109 CNVRs). Two CNVRs were also proximal to glutathione metabolism genes that were previously associated with MT. Genome-wide association study of CN state with estimated breeding values derived from meat shear force identified 6 regions, including a region on BTA3 that contains genes of the cAMP and cGMP pathway. Ten CNVRs that overlapped regions associated with MT were successfully validated by qPCR. Our results represent the first comprehensive CNV study in Bos taurus indicus cattle and identify regions in which copy number changes are potentially of importance for the MT phenotype. PMID:27348523

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies three new melanoma susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jennifer H; Iles, Mark M; Harland, Mark; Taylor, John C; Aitken, Joanne F; Andresen, Per Arne; Akslen, Lars A; Armstrong, Bruce K; Avril, Marie-Francoise; Azizi, Esther; Bakker, Bert; Bergman, Wilma; Bianchi-Scarrà, Giovanna; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Calista, Donato; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Corda, Eve; Cust, Anne E; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Duffy, David; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Friedman, Eitan; Galan, Pilar; Ghiorzo, Paola; Giles, Graham G; Hansson, Johan; Hocevar, Marko; Höiom, Veronica; Hopper, John L; Ingvar, Christian; Janssen, Bart; Jenkins, Mark A; Jönsson, Göran; Kefford, Richard F; Landi, Giorgio; Landi, Maria Teresa; Lang, Julie; Lubiński, Jan; Mackie, Rona; Malvehy, Josep; Martin, Nicholas G; Molven, Anders; Montgomery, Grant W; van Nieuwpoort, Frans A; Novakovic, Srdjan; Olsson, Håkan; Pastorino, Lorenza; Puig, Susana; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Randerson-Moor, Juliette; Snowden, Helen; Tuominen, Rainer; Van Belle, Patricia; van der Stoep, Nienke; Whiteman, David C; Zelenika, Diana; Han, Jiali; Fang, Shenying; Lee, Jeffrey E; Wei, Qingyi; Lathrop, G Mark; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Brown, Kevin M; Goldstein, Alisa M; Kanetsky, Peter A; Mann, Graham J; Macgregor, Stuart; Elder, David E; Amos, Christopher I; Hayward, Nicholas K; Gruis, Nelleke A; Demenais, Florence; Bishop, Julia A Newton; Bishop, D Timothy

    2011-10-09

    We report a genome-wide association study for melanoma that was conducted by the GenoMEL Consortium. Our discovery phase included 2,981 individuals with melanoma and 1,982 study-specific control individuals of European ancestry, as well as an additional 6,426 control subjects from French or British populations, all of whom were genotyped for 317,000 or 610,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Our analysis replicated previously known melanoma susceptibility loci. Seven new regions with at least one SNP with P < 10(-5) and further local imputed or genotyped support were selected for replication using two other genome-wide studies (from Australia and Texas, USA). Additional replication came from case-control series from the UK and The Netherlands. Variants at three of the seven loci replicated at P < 10(-3): an SNP in ATM (rs1801516, overall P = 3.4 × 10(-9)), an SNP in MX2 (rs45430, P = 2.9 × 10(-9)) and an SNP adjacent to CASP8 (rs13016963, P = 8.6 × 10(-10)). A fourth locus near CCND1 remains of potential interest, showing suggestive but inconclusive evidence of replication (rs1485993, overall P = 4.6 × 10(-7) under a fixed-effects model and P = 1.2 × 10(-3) under a random-effects model). These newly associated variants showed no association with nevus or pigmentation phenotypes in a large British case-control series.

  10. A genome-wide association study of upper aerodigestive tract cancers conducted within the INHANCE consortium.

    PubMed

    McKay, James D; Truong, Therese; Gaborieau, Valerie; Chabrier, Amelie; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Byrnes, Graham; Zaridze, David; Shangina, Oxana; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Bucur, Alexandru; Bencko, Vladimir; Holcatova, Ivana; Janout, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Benhamou, Simone; Bouchardy, Christine; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Talamini, Renato; Barzan, Luigi; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Macfarlane, Gary J; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Simonato, Lorenzo; Canova, Cristina; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsagué, Xavier; Lowry, Ray; Conway, David I; McKinney, Patricia A; Healy, Claire M; Toner, Mary E; Znaor, Ariana; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Menezes, Ana; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Neto, José Eluf; Garrote, Leticia Fernández; Boccia, Stefania; Cadoni, Gabriella; Arzani, Dario; Olshan, Andrew F; Weissler, Mark C; Funkhouser, William K; Luo, Jingchun; Lubiński, Jan; Trubicka, Joanna; Lener, Marcin; Oszutowska, Dorota; Schwartz, Stephen M; Chen, Chu; Fish, Sherianne; Doody, David R; Muscat, Joshua E; Lazarus, Philip; Gallagher, Carla J; Chang, Shen-Chih; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M; Wang, Li-E; Franceschi, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Kelsey, Karl T; McClean, Michael D; Marsit, Carmen J; Nelson, Heather H; Romkes, Marjorie; Buch, Shama; Nukui, Tomoko; Zhong, Shilong; Lacko, Martin; Manni, Johannes J; Peters, Wilbert H M; Hung, Rayjean J; McLaughlin, John; Vatten, Lars; Njølstad, Inger; Goodman, Gary E; Field, John K; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Vineis, Paolo; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Krogh, Vittorio; Panico, Salvatore; González, Carlos A; Quirós, J Ramón; Martínez, Carmen; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Larrañaga, Nerea; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Key, Timothy; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H M; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Linseisen, Jakob; Boeing, Heiner; Hallmans, Göran; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Kumle, Merethe; Riboli, Elio; Välk, Kristjan; Vooder, Tõnu; Voodern, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Zelenika, Diana; Boland, Anne; Delepine, Marc; Foglio, Mario; Lechner, Doris; Blanché, Hélène; Gut, Ivo G; Galan, Pilar; Heath, Simon; Hashibe, Mia; Hayes, Richard B; Boffetta, Paolo; Lathrop, Mark; Brennan, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in identifying common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to etiologically complex disease. We conducted a GWAS to identify common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) cancers. Genome-wide genotyping was carried out using the Illumina HumanHap300 beadchips in 2,091 UADT cancer cases and 3,513 controls from two large European multi-centre UADT cancer studies, as well as 4,821 generic controls. The 19 top-ranked variants were investigated further in an additional 6,514 UADT cancer cases and 7,892 controls of European descent from an additional 13 UADT cancer studies participating in the INHANCE consortium. Five common variants presented evidence for significant association in the combined analysis (p ≤ 5 × 10⁻⁷). Two novel variants were identified, a 4q21 variant (rs1494961, p = 1×10⁻⁸) located near DNA repair related genes HEL308 and FAM175A (or Abraxas) and a 12q24 variant (rs4767364, p =2 × 10⁻⁸) located in an extended linkage disequilibrium region that contains multiple genes including the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene. Three remaining variants are located in the ADH gene cluster and were identified previously in a candidate gene study involving some of these samples. The association between these three variants and UADT cancers was independently replicated in 5,092 UADT cancer cases and 6,794 controls non-overlapping samples presented here (rs1573496-ADH7, p = 5 × 10⁻⁸); rs1229984-ADH1B, p = 7 × 10⁻⁹; and rs698-ADH1C, p = 0.02). These results implicate two variants at 4q21 and 12q24 and further highlight three ADH variants in UADT cancer susceptibility.

  11. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancers Conducted within the INHANCE Consortium

    PubMed Central

    McKay, James D.; Truong, Therese; Gaborieau, Valerie; Chabrier, Amelie; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Byrnes, Graham; Zaridze, David; Shangina, Oxana; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Bucur, Alexandru; Bencko, Vladimir; Holcatova, Ivana; Janout, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Benhamou, Simone; Bouchardy, Christine; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Talamini, Renato; Barzan, Luigi; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Macfarlane, Gary J.; Macfarlane, Tatiana V.; Simonato, Lorenzo; Canova, Cristina; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsagué, Xavier; Lowry, Ray; Conway, David I.; McKinney, Patricia A.; Healy, Claire M.; Toner, Mary E.; Znaor, Ariana; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Menezes, Ana; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Neto, José Eluf; Garrote, Leticia Fernández; Boccia, Stefania; Cadoni, Gabriella; Arzani, Dario; Olshan, Andrew F.; Weissler, Mark C.; Funkhouser, William K.; Luo, Jingchun; Lubiński, Jan; Trubicka, Joanna; Lener, Marcin; Oszutowska, Dorota; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Chen, Chu; Fish, Sherianne; Doody, David R.; Muscat, Joshua E.; Lazarus, Philip; Gallagher, Carla J.; Chang, Shen-Chih; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M.; Wang, Li-E; Franceschi, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Kelsey, Karl T.; McClean, Michael D.; Marsit, Carmen J.; Nelson, Heather H.; Romkes, Marjorie; Buch, Shama; Nukui, Tomoko; Zhong, Shilong; Lacko, Martin; Manni, Johannes J.; Peters, Wilbert H. M.; Hung, Rayjean J.; McLaughlin, John; Vatten, Lars; Njølstad, Inger; Goodman, Gary E.; Field, John K.; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Vineis, Paolo; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Krogh, Vittorio; Panico, Salvatore; González, Carlos A.; Quirós, J. Ramón; Martínez, Carmen; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Larrañaga, Nerea; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Key, Timothy; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Linseisen, Jakob; Boeing, Heiner; Hallmans, Göran; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Kumle, Merethe; Riboli, Elio; Välk, Kristjan; Voodern, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Zelenika, Diana; Boland, Anne; Delepine, Marc; Foglio, Mario; Lechner, Doris; Blanché, Hélène; Gut, Ivo G.; Galan, Pilar; Heath, Simon; Hashibe, Mia; Hayes, Richard B.; Boffetta, Paolo; Lathrop, Mark; Brennan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in identifying common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to etiologically complex disease. We conducted a GWAS to identify common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) cancers. Genome-wide genotyping was carried out using the Illumina HumanHap300 beadchips in 2,091 UADT cancer cases and 3,513 controls from two large European multi-centre UADT cancer studies, as well as 4,821 generic controls. The 19 top-ranked variants were investigated further in an additional 6,514 UADT cancer cases and 7,892 controls of European descent from an additional 13 UADT cancer studies participating in the INHANCE consortium. Five common variants presented evidence for significant association in the combined analysis (p≤5×10−7). Two novel variants were identified, a 4q21 variant (rs1494961, p = 1×10−8) located near DNA repair related genes HEL308 and FAM175A (or Abraxas) and a 12q24 variant (rs4767364, p = 2×10−8) located in an extended linkage disequilibrium region that contains multiple genes including the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene. Three remaining variants are located in the ADH gene cluster and were identified previously in a candidate gene study involving some of these samples. The association between these three variants and UADT cancers was independently replicated in 5,092 UADT cancer cases and 6,794 controls non-overlapping samples presented here (rs1573496-ADH7, p = 5×10−8; rs1229984-ADH1B, p = 7×10−9; and rs698-ADH1C, p = 0.02). These results implicate two variants at 4q21 and 12q24 and further highlight three ADH variants in UADT cancer susceptibility. PMID:21437268

  12. Analyse multiple disease subtypes and build associated gene networks using genome-wide expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the large increase of transcriptomic studies that look for gene signatures on diseases, there is still a need for integrative approaches that obtain separation of multiple pathological states providing robust selection of gene markers for each disease subtype and information about the possible links or relations between those genes. Results We present a network-oriented and data-driven bioinformatic approach that searches for association of genes and diseases based on the analysis of genome-wide expression data derived from microarrays or RNA-Seq studies. The approach aims to (i) identify gene sets associated to different pathological states analysed together; (ii) identify a minimum subset within these genes that unequivocally differentiates and classifies the compared disease subtypes; (iii) provide a measurement of the discriminant power of these genes and (iv) identify links between the genes that characterise each of the disease subtypes. This bioinformatic approach is implemented in an R package, named geNetClassifier, available as an open access tool in Bioconductor. To illustrate the performance of the tool, we applied it to two independent datasets: 250 samples from patients with four major leukemia subtypes analysed using expression arrays; another leukemia dataset analysed with RNA-Seq that includes a subtype also present in the previous set. The results show the selection of key deregulated genes recently reported in the literature and assigned to the leukemia subtypes studied. We also show, using these independent datasets, the selection of similar genes in a network built for the same disease subtype. Conclusions The construction of gene networks related to specific disease subtypes that include parameters such as gene-to-gene association, gene disease specificity and gene discriminant power can be very useful to draw gene-disease maps and to unravel the molecular features that characterize specific pathological states. The

  13. Genome-Wide Association for Smoking Cessation Success: Participants in a Trial with Adjunctive Denicotinized Cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Drgon, Tomas; Johnson, Catherine; Walther, Donna; Albino, Anthony P; Rose, Jed E; Uhl, George R

    2009-01-01

    The ability to quit smoking successfully displays substantial heritability in classical and molecular genetic studies. Twin studies suggest that some of the genetics for the ability to quit overlap with genetic components of nicotine dependence, but many do not. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have demonstrated haplotypes that distinguish successful quitters from individuals who were not able to quit smoking in: i) clinical trials that employed nicotine replacement; ii) clinical trials that employed bupropion; and iii) community quitter samples. We now report novel GWA results from participants in a clinical trial that document the efficacy of adjunctive use of denicotinized cigarettes. These results buttress data from our prior GWA studies of smoking cessation. They suggest that ability to change smoking behavior using denicotinized cigarettes shares substantial underlying genetics with the ability to change this behavior in community settings or in response to treatments with nicotine replacement or bupropion. PMID:19593411

  14. Open access resources for genome-wide association mapping in rice

    PubMed Central

    McCouch, Susan R.; Wright, Mark H.; Tung, Chih-Wei; Maron, Lyza G.; McNally, Kenneth L.; Fitzgerald, Melissa; Singh, Namrata; DeClerck, Genevieve; Agosto-Perez, Francisco; Korniliev, Pavel; Greenberg, Anthony J.; Naredo, Ma. Elizabeth B.; Mercado, Sheila Mae Q.; Harrington, Sandra E.; Shi, Yuxin; Branchini, Darcy A.; Kuser-Falcão, Paula R.; Leung, Hei; Ebana, Kowaru; Yano, Masahiro; Eizenga, Georgia; McClung, Anna; Mezey, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Increasing food production is essential to meet the demands of a growing human population, with its rising income levels and nutritional expectations. To address the demand, plant breeders seek new sources of genetic variation to enhance the productivity, sustainability and resilience of crop varieties. Here we launch a high-resolution, open-access research platform to facilitate genome-wide association mapping in rice, a staple food crop. The platform provides an immortal collection of diverse germplasm, a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism data set tailored for gene discovery, well-documented analytical strategies, and a suite of bioinformatics resources to facilitate biological interpretation. Using grain length, we demonstrate the power and resolution of our new high-density rice array, the accompanying genotypic data set, and an expanded diversity panel for detecting major and minor effect QTLs and subpopulation-specific alleles, with immediate implications for rice improvement. PMID:26842267

  15. A Genome-Wide Association Study for Nutritional Indices in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Unckless, Robert L.; Rottschaefer, Susan M.; Lazzaro, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals are genetically variable for the way in which they process nutrients and in the effects of dietary content on reproductive success, immunity, and development. Here, we surveyed genetic variation for nutrient stores (glucose, glycogen, glycerol, protein, triglycerides, and wet weight) in the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) after rearing the flies on either a low-glucose or high-glucose diet. We found significant genetic variation for these nutritional phenotypes and identified candidate genes that underlie that variation using genome-wide associations. In addition, we found several significant correlations between the nutritional phenotypes measured in this study and other previously published phenotypes, such as starvation stress resistance, oxidative stress sensitivity, and endoplasmic reticulum stress, which reinforce the notion that these lines can be used to robustly measure related phenotypes across distinct laboratories. PMID:25583649

  16. A genome-wide association study for nutritional indices in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Unckless, Robert L; Rottschaefer, Susan M; Lazzaro, Brian P

    2015-01-12

    Individuals are genetically variable for the way in which they process nutrients and in the effects of dietary content on reproductive success, immunity, and development. Here, we surveyed genetic variation for nutrient stores (glucose, glycogen, glycerol, protein, triglycerides, and wet weight) in the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) after rearing the flies on either a low-glucose or high-glucose diet. We found significant genetic variation for these nutritional phenotypes and identified candidate genes that underlie that variation using genome-wide associations. In addition, we found several significant correlations between the nutritional phenotypes measured in this study and other previously published phenotypes, such as starvation stress resistance, oxidative stress sensitivity, and endoplasmic reticulum stress, which reinforce the notion that these lines can be used to robustly measure related phenotypes across distinct laboratories.

  17. An Introduction to Genome-Wide Association Studies: GWAS for Dummies.

    PubMed

    Uitterlinden, A G

    2016-07-01

    Although the genetic origin of many human diseases and phenotypes has been long and widely recognized, identification of the causative gene alleles has been limited, slow, and cumbersome. This has changed substantially with the introduction of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) a decade ago, fueled by studies and reference projects of human genetic diversity and the development of novel DNA analysis technology applicable to high-throughput and large-scale data generation. Although GWASs essentially combine epidemiological study designs with molecular genetic analysis techniques, it has also fundamentally changed the way in which research was done in human genetics by the introduction of large consortia of collaborating investigators. GWASs have over flooded many clinical and basic research areas with gene discoveries, including those in reproductive medicine. This review describes aspects of GWAS methodology and how this field of human genetics is developing.

  18. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer identifies six new susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schmit, Stephanie L; Jiao, Shuo; Edlund, Christopher K; Wang, Hansong; Zhang, Ben; Hsu, Li; Huang, Shu-Chen; Fischer, Christopher P; Harju, John F; Idos, Gregory E; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Manion, Frank J; McDonnell, Kevin; McNeil, Caroline E; Melas, Marilena; Rennert, Hedy S; Shi, Wei; Thomas, Duncan C; Van Den Berg, David J; Hutter, Carolyn M; Aragaki, Aaron K; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J; Carlson, Christopher S; Chanock, Stephen J; Curtis, Keith R; Fuchs, Charles S; Gala, Manish; Giovannucc, Edward L; Giocannucci, Edward L; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Hayes, Richard B; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Rebecca D; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Küry, Sébastien; Kury, Sebastian; LaCroix, Andrea; Laurie, Cathy C; Laurie, Cecelia A; Lemire, Mathieu; Lemire, Mathiew; Levine, David; Ma, Jing; Makar, Karen W; Qu, Conghui; Taverna, Darin; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wu, Kana; Kono, Suminori; West, Dee W; Berndt, Sonja I; Bezieau, Stéphane; Brenner, Hermann; Campbell, Peter T; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Conti, David V; Duggan, David; Figueiredo, Jane C; Fortini, Barbara K; Gallinger, Steven J; Gauderman, W James; Giles, Graham; Green, Roger; Haile, Robert; Harrison, Tabitha A; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L; Hudson, Thomas J; Jacobs, Eric; Iwasaki, Motoki; Jee, Sun Ha; Jenkins, Mark; Jia, Wei-Hua; Joshi, Amit; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M; Matsuo, Keitaro; Moreno, Victor; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Raskin, Leon; Rennert, Gad; Rosse, Stephanie; Severi, Gianluca; Schoen, Robert E; Seminara, Daniela; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Slattery, Martha L; Tsugane, Shoichiro; White, Emily; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zanke, Brent W; Zheng, Wei; Le Marchand, Loic; Casey, Graham; Gruber, Stephen B; Peters, Ulrike

    2015-07-07

    Genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer is caused by rare pathogenic mutations and common genetic variants that contribute to familial risk. Here we report the results of a two-stage association study with 18,299 cases of colorectal cancer and 19,656 controls, with follow-up of the most statistically significant genetic loci in 4,725 cases and 9,969 controls from two Asian consortia. We describe six new susceptibility loci reaching a genome-wide threshold of P<5.0E-08. These findings provide additional insight into the underlying biological mechanisms of colorectal cancer and demonstrate the scientific value of large consortia-based genetic epidemiology studies.

  19. Estimation of effect size distribution from genome-wide association studies and implications for future discoveries

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju-Hyun; Wacholder, Sholom; Gail, Mitchell H; Peters, Ulrike; Jacobs, Kevin B; Chanock, Stephen J; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2015-01-01

    We report a set of tools to estimate the number of susceptibility loci and the distribution of their effect sizes for a trait on the basis of discoveries from existing genome-wide association studies (GWASs). We propose statistical power calculations for future GWASs using estimated distributions of effect sizes. Using reported GWAS findings for height, Crohn’s disease and breast, prostate and colorectal (BPC) cancers, we determine that each of these traits is likely to harbor additional loci within the spectrum of low-penetrance common variants. These loci, which can be identified from sufficiently powerful GWASs, together could explain at least 15–20% of the known heritability of these traits. However, for BPC cancers, which have modest familial aggregation, our analysis suggests that risk models based on common variants alone will have modest discriminatory power (63.5% area under curve), even with new discoveries. PMID:20562874

  20. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer identifies six new susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schmit, Stephanie L.; Jiao, Shuo; Edlund, Christopher K.; Wang, Hansong; Zhang, Ben; Hsu, Li; Huang, Shu-Chen; Fischer, Christopher P.; Harju, John F.; Idos, Gregory E.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Manion, Frank J.; McDonnell, Kevin; McNeil, Caroline E.; Melas, Marilena; Rennert, Hedy S.; Shi, Wei; Thomas, Duncan C.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Aragaki, Aaron K.; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Curtis, Keith R.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gala, Manish; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Küry, Sébastien; LaCroix, Andrea; Laurie, Cathy C.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Lemire, Mathieu; Levine, David; Ma, Jing; Makar, Karen W.; Qu, Conghui; Taverna, Darin; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Wu, Kana; Kono, Suminori; West, Dee W.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bezieau, Stéphane; Brenner, Hermann; Campbell, Peter T.; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Conti, David V.; Duggan, David; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Fortini, Barbara K.; Gallinger, Steven J.; Gauderman, W. James; Giles, Graham; Green, Roger; Haile, Robert; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jacobs, Eric; Iwasaki, Motoki; Jee, Sun Ha; Jenkins, Mark; Jia, Wei-Hua; Joshi, Amit; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Moreno, Victor; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Newcomb, Polly A.; Potter, John D.; Raskin, Leon; Rennert, Gad; Rosse, Stephanie; Severi, Gianluca; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Slattery, Martha L.; Tsugane, Shoichiro; White, Emily; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zanke, Brent W.; Zheng, Wei; Le Marchand, Loic; Casey, Graham; Gruber, Stephen B.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer is caused by rare pathogenic mutations and common genetic variants that contribute to familial risk. Here we report the results of a two-stage association study with 18,299 cases of colorectal cancer and 19,656 controls, with follow-up of the most statistically significant genetic loci in 4,725 cases and 9,969 controls from two Asian consortia. We describe six new susceptibility loci reaching a genome-wide threshold of P<5.0E-08. These findings provide additional insight into the underlying biological mechanisms of colorectal cancer and demonstrate the scientific value of large consortia-based genetic epidemiology studies. PMID:26151821

  1. Moving toward System Genetics through Multiple Trait Analysis in Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shriner, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Association studies are a staple of genotype–phenotype mapping studies, whether they are based on single markers, haplotypes, candidate genes, genome-wide genotypes, or whole genome sequences. Although genetic epidemiological studies typically contain data collected on multiple traits which themselves are often correlated, most analyses have been performed on single traits. Here, I review several methods that have been developed to perform multiple trait analysis. These methods range from traditional multivariate models for systems of equations to recently developed graphical approaches based on network theory. The application of network theory to genetics is termed systems genetics and has the potential to address long-standing questions in genetics about complex processes such as coordinate regulation, homeostasis, and pleiotropy. PMID:22303408

  2. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Loci for the Polled Phenotype in Yak

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Kun; Ding, Xuezhi; Wang, Mingcheng; Chu, Min; Xie, Xiuyue; Qiu, Qiang; Yan, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The absence of horns, known as the polled phenotype, is an economically important trait in modern yak husbandry, but the genomic structure and genetic basis of this phenotype have yet to be discovered. Here, we conducted a genome-wide association study with a panel of 10 horned and 10 polled yaks using whole genome sequencing. We mapped the POLLED locus to a 200-kb interval, which comprises three protein-coding genes. Further characterization of the candidate region showed recent artificial selection signals resulting from the breeding process. We suggest that expressional variations rather than structural variations in protein probably contribute to the polled phenotype. Our results not only represent the first and important step in establishing the genomic structure of the polled region in yak, but also add to our understanding of the polled trait in bovid species. PMID:27389700

  3. Genome wide association for substance dependence: convergent results from epidemiologic and research volunteer samples

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Catherine; Drgon, Tomas; Liu, Qing-Rong; Zhang, Ping-Wu; Walther, Donna; Li, Chuan-Yun; Anthony, James C; Ding, Yulan; Eaton, William W; Uhl, George R

    2008-01-01

    Background Dependences on addictive substances are substantially-heritable complex disorders whose molecular genetic bases have been partially elucidated by studies that have largely focused on research volunteers, including those recruited in Baltimore. Maryland. Subjects recruited from the Baltimore site of the Epidemiological Catchment Area (ECA) study provide a potentially-useful comparison group for possible confounding features that might arise from selecting research volunteer samples of substance dependent and control individuals. We now report novel SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) genome wide association (GWA) results for vulnerability to substance dependence in ECA participants, who were initially ascertained as members of a probability sample from Baltimore, and compare the results to those from ethnically-matched Baltimore research volunteers. Results We identify substantial overlap between the home address zip codes reported by members of these two samples. We find overlapping clusters of SNPs whose allele frequencies differ with nominal significance between substance dependent vs control individuals in both samples. These overlapping clusters of nominally-positive SNPs identify 172 genes in ways that are never found by chance in Monte Carlo simulation studies. Comparison with data from human expressed sequence tags suggests that these genes are expressed in brain, especially in hippocampus and amygdala, to extents that are greater than chance. Conclusion The convergent results from these probability sample and research volunteer sample datasets support prior genome wide association results. They fail to support the idea that large portions of the molecular genetic results for vulnerability to substance dependence derive from factors that are limited to research volunteers. PMID:19094236

  4. Genome-wide association study of coronary and aortic calcification in lung cancer screening CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Bob D.; van Setten, Jessica; de Jong, Pim A.; Mali, Willem P.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Arterial calcification has been related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and osteoporosis. However, little is known about the role of genetics and exact pathways leading to arterial calcification and its relation to bone density changes indicating osteoporosis. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide association study of arterial calcification burden, followed by a look-up of known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI), and bone mineral density (BMD) to test for a shared genetic basis between the traits. The study included a subcohort of the Dutch-Belgian lung cancer screening trial comprised of 2,561 participants. Participants underwent baseline CT screening in one of two hospitals participating in the trial. Low-dose chest CT images were acquired without contrast enhancement and without ECG-synchronization. In these images coronary and aortic calcifications were identified automatically. Subsequently, the detected calcifications were quantified using coronary artery calcium Agatston and volume scores. Genotype data was available for these participants. A genome-wide association study was conducted on 10,220,814 SNPs using a linear regression model. To reduce multiple testing burden, known CAD/MI and BMD SNPs were specifically tested (45 SNPs from the CARDIoGRAMplusC4D consortium and 60 SNPS from the GEFOS consortium). No novel significant SNPs were found. Significant enrichment for CAD/MI SNPs was observed in testing Agatston and coronary artery calcium volume scores. Moreover, a significant enrichment of BMD SNPs was shown in aortic calcium volume scores. This may indicate genetic relation of BMD SNPs and arterial calcification burden.

  5. Genome-wide detection of intervals of genetic heterogeneity associated with complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Llinares-López, Felipe; Grimm, Dominik G.; Bodenham, Dean A.; Gieraths, Udo; Sugiyama, Mahito; Rowan, Beth; Borgwardt, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Genetic heterogeneity, the fact that several sequence variants give rise to the same phenotype, is a phenomenon that is of the utmost interest in the analysis of complex phenotypes. Current approaches for finding regions in the genome that exhibit genetic heterogeneity suffer from at least one of two shortcomings: (i) they require the definition of an exact interval in the genome that is to be tested for genetic heterogeneity, potentially missing intervals of high relevance, or (ii) they suffer from an enormous multiple hypothesis testing problem due to the large number of potential candidate intervals being tested, which results in either many false positives or a lack of power to detect true intervals. Results: Here, we present an approach that overcomes both problems: it allows one to automatically find all contiguous sequences of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genome that are jointly associated with the phenotype. It also solves both the inherent computational efficiency problem and the statistical problem of multiple hypothesis testing, which are both caused by the huge number of candidate intervals. We demonstrate on Arabidopsis thaliana genome-wide association study data that our approach can discover regions that exhibit genetic heterogeneity and would be missed by single-locus mapping. Conclusions: Our novel approach can contribute to the genome-wide discovery of intervals that are involved in the genetic heterogeneity underlying complex phenotypes. Availability and implementation: The code can be obtained at: http://www.bsse.ethz.ch/mlcb/research/bioinformatics-and-computational-biology/sis.html. Contact: felipe.llinares@bsse.ethz.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26072488

  6. A genome-wide association study of antidepressant response in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Myung, W; Kim, J; Lim, S-W; Shim, S; Won, H-H; Kim, Seonwoo; Kim, Sangha; Lee, M-S; Chang, H S; Kim, J-W; Carroll, B J; Kim, D K

    2015-09-08

    We conducted a three-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of response to antidepressant drugs in an ethnically homogeneous sample of Korean patients in untreated episodes of nonpsychotic unipolar depression, mostly of mature onset. Strict quality control was maintained in case selection, diagnosis, verification of adherence and outcome assessments. Analyzed cases completed 6 weeks of treatment with adequate plasma drug concentrations. The overall successful completion rate was 85.5%. Four candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on three chromosomes were identified by genome-wide search in the discovery sample of 481 patients who received one of four allowed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant drugs (Stage 1). In a focused replication study of 230 SSRI-treated patients, two of these four SNP candidates were confirmed (Stage 2). Analysis of the Stage 1 and Stage 2 samples combined (n = 711) revealed GWAS significance (P = 1.60 × 10(-8)) for these two SNP candidates, which were in perfect linkage disequilibrium. These two significant SNPs were confirmed also in a focused cross-replication study of 159 patients treated with the non-SSRI antidepressant drug mirtazapine (Stage 3). Analysis of the Stage 1, Stage 2 and Stage 3 samples combined (n = 870) also revealed GWAS significance for these two SNPs, which was sustained after controlling for gender, age, number of previous episodes, age at onset and baseline severity (P = 3.57 × 10(-8)). For each SNP, the response rate decreased (odds ratio=0.31, 95% confidence interval: 0.20-0.47) as a function of the number of minor alleles (non-response alleles). The two SNPs significantly associated with antidepressant response are rs7785360 and rs12698828 of the AUTS2 gene, located on chromosome 7 in 7q11.22. This gene has multiple known linkages to human psychological functions and neurobehavioral disorders. Rigorous replication efforts in other ethnic populations are recommended.

  7. Genome-wide association study confirms SNPs in SNCA and the MAPT region as common risk factors for Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Todd L.; Scott, William K.; Almonte, Cherylyn; Burt, Amber; Powell, Eric H.; Beecham, Gary W.; Wang, Liyong; Züchner, Stephan; Konidari, Ioanna; Wang, Gaofeng; Singer, Carlos; Nahab, Fatta; Scott, Burton; Stajich, Jeffrey M.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Haines, Jonathan; Vance, Jeffery M.; Martin, Eden R.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder with a cumulative prevalence of greater than one per thousand. To date three independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have investigated the genetic susceptibility to PD. These studies have also implicated several genes as PD risk loci with strong, but not genome-wide significant, associations. In this study, we combined data from two previously published GWAS of Caucasian subjects with our GWAS of 604 cases and 619 controls for a joint analysis with a combined sample size of 1752 cases and 1745 controls. SNPs in SNCA (rs2736990, p-value = 6.7×10−8; genome-wide adjusted p = 0.0109, odds ratio (OR) = 1.29 [95% CI: 1.17–1.42] G vs. A allele, population attributable risk percent (PAR%) = 12%) and the MAPT region (rs11012, p-value = 5.6×10−8; genome-wide adjusted p = 0.0079, OR = 0.70 [95% CI: 0.62–0.79] T vs. C allele, PAR% = 8%) were genome-wide significant. No other SNPs were genome-wide significant in this analysis. This study confirms that SNCA and the MAPT region are major genes whose common variants are influencing risk of PD. PMID:20070850

  8. Genome-wide association study confirms SNPs in SNCA and the MAPT region as common risk factors for Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Todd L; Scott, William K; Almonte, Cherylyn; Burt, Amber; Powell, Eric H; Beecham, Gary W; Wang, Liyong; Züchner, Stephan; Konidari, Ioanna; Wang, Gaofeng; Singer, Carlos; Nahab, Fatta; Scott, Burton; Stajich, Jeffrey M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Haines, Jonathan; Vance, Jeffery M; Martin, Eden R

    2010-03-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder with a cumulative prevalence of greater than one per thousand. To date three independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have investigated the genetic susceptibility to PD. These studies implicated several genes as PD risk loci with strong, but not genome-wide significant, associations. In this study, we combined data from two previously published GWAS of Caucasian subjects with our GWAS of 604 cases and 619 controls for a joint analysis with a combined sample size of 1752 cases and 1745 controls. SNPs in SNCA (rs2736990, p-value = 6.7 x 10(-8); genome-wide adjusted p = 0.0109, odds ratio (OR) = 1.29 [95% CI: 1.17-1.42] G vs. A allele, population attributable risk percent (PAR%) = 12%) and the MAPT region (rs11012, p-value = 5.6 x 10(-8); genome-wide adjusted p = 0.0079, OR = 0.70 [95% CI: 0.62-0.79] T vs. C allele, PAR%= 8%) were genome-wide significant. No other SNPs were genome-wide significant in this analysis. This study confirms that SNCA and the MAPT region are major genes whose common variants are influencing risk of PD.

  9. Genome-wide association study of tick resistance in South African Nguni cattle.

    PubMed

    Mapholi, N O; Maiwashe, A; Matika, O; Riggio, V; Bishop, S C; MacNeil, M D; Banga, C; Taylor, J F; Dzama, K

    2016-04-01

    Ticks and tick-borne diseases are among the main causes of economic loss in the South African cattle industry through high morbidity and mortality rates. Concerns of the general public regarding chemical residues may tarnish their perceptions of food safety and environmental health when the husbandry of cattle includes frequent use of acaricides to manage ticks. The primary objective of this study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with host resistance to ticks in South African Nguni cattle. Tick count data were collected monthly from 586 Nguni cattle reared in four herds under natural grazing conditions over a period of two years. The counts were recorded for six species of ticks attached in eight anatomical locations on the animals and were summed by species and anatomical location. This gave rise to 63 measured phenotypes or traits, with results for 12 of these traits being reported here. Tick count (x) data were transformed using log10(x+1) and the resulting values were examined for normality. DNA was extracted from hair and blood samples and was genotyped using the Illumina BovineSNP50 assay. After quality control (call rate >90%, minor allele frequency >0.02), 40,436 SNPs were retained for analysis. Genetic parameters were estimated and association analysis for tick resistance was carried out using two approaches: a genome-wide association (GWA) analysis using the GenABEL package and a regional heritability mapping (RHM) analysis. The Bonferroni genome-wide (P<0.05) corrected significance threshold was 1.24×10(-6), with 2.47×10(-5) as the suggestive significance threshold (P<0.10) (i.e., one false positive per genome scan) in the GWA analysis. Likelihood ratio test (LRT) thresholds for genome-wide and suggestive significance were 13.5 and 9.15 for the RHM analysis. Six ixodid tick species were identified, with Amblyomma hebraeum (the vector for Heartwater disease) being the dominant species. Heritability estimates (h(2

  10. P-value based analysis for shared controls design in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Zaykin, Dmitri V; Kozbur, Damian O

    2010-11-01

    An appealing genome-wide association study design compares one large control group against several disease samples. A pioneering study by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium that employed such a design has identified multiple susceptibility regions, many of which have been independently replicated. While reusing a control sample provides effective utilization of data, it also creates correlation between association statistics across diseases. An observation of a large association statistic for one of the diseases may greatly increase chances of observing a spuriously large association for a different disease. Accounting for the correlation is also particularly important when screening for SNPs that might be involved in a set of diseases with overlapping etiology. We describe methods that correct association statistics for dependency due to shared controls, and we describe ways to obtain a measure of overall evidence and to combine association signals across multiple diseases. The methods we describe require no access to individual subject data, instead, they efficiently utilize information contained in P-values for association reported for individual diseases. P-value based combined tests for association are flexible and essentially as powerful as the approach based on aggregating the individual subject data.

  11. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Reorganization Associated with Senescence-to-Immortality Switch during Human Hepatocellular Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Konu, Ozlen; Yuzugullu, Haluk; Gursoy-Yuzugullu, Ozge; Ozturk, Nuri; Ozen, Cigdem; Ozdag, Hilal; Erdal, Esra; Karademir, Sedat; Sagol, Ozgul; Mizrak, Dilsa; Bozkaya, Hakan; Ilk, Hakki Gokhan; Ilk, Ozlem; Bilen, Biter; Cetin-Atalay, Rengul; Akar, Nejat; Ozturk, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Senescence is a permanent proliferation arrest in response to cell stress such as DNA damage. It contributes strongly to tissue aging and serves as a major barrier against tumor development. Most tumor cells are believed to bypass the senescence barrier (become “immortal”) by inactivating growth control genes such as TP53 and CDKN2A. They also reactivate telomerase reverse transcriptase. Senescence-to-immortality transition is accompanied by major phenotypic and biochemical changes mediated by genome-wide transcriptional modifications. This appears to happen during hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development in patients with liver cirrhosis, however, the accompanying transcriptional changes are virtually unknown. We investigated genome-wide transcriptional changes related to the senescence-to-immortality switch during hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Initially, we performed transcriptome analysis of senescent and immortal clones of Huh7 HCC cell line, and identified genes with significant differential expression to establish a senescence-related gene list. Through the analysis of senescence-related gene expression in different liver tissues we showed that cirrhosis and HCC display expression patterns compatible with senescent and immortal phenotypes, respectively; dysplasia being a transitional state. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that cirrhosis/senescence-associated genes were preferentially expressed in non-tumor tissues, less malignant tumors, and differentiated or senescent cells. In contrast, HCC/immortality genes were up-regulated in tumor tissues, or more malignant tumors and progenitor cells. In HCC tumors and immortal cells genes involved in DNA repair, cell cycle, telomere extension and branched chain amino acid metabolism were up-regulated, whereas genes involved in cell signaling, as well as in drug, lipid, retinoid and glycolytic metabolism were down-regulated. Based on these distinctive gene expression features we developed a 15-gene

  12. A genome-wide association study of early spontaneous preterm delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heping; Baldwin, Don A; Bukowski, Radek K; Parry, Samuel; Xu, Yaji; Song, Chi; Andrews, William W; Saade, George R; Esplin, M Sean; Sadovsky, Yoel; Reddy, Uma M; Ilekis, John; Varner, Michael; Biggio, Joseph R

    2015-03-01

    Preterm birth is the leading cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Despite extensive research, the genetic contributions to spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB) are not well understood. Term controls were matched with cases by race/ethnicity, maternal age, and parity prior to recruitment. Genotyping was performed using Affymetrix SNP Array 6.0 assays. Statistical analyses utilized PLINK to compare allele occurrence rates between case and control groups, and incorporated quality control and multiple-testing adjustments. We analyzed DNA samples from mother-infant pairs from early SPTB cases (20(0/7)-33(6/7) weeks, 959 women and 979 neonates) and term delivery controls (39(0/7)-41(6/7) weeks, 960 women and 985 neonates). For validation purposes, we included an independent validation cohort consisting of early SPTB cases (293 mothers and 243 infants) and term controls (200 mothers and 149 infants). Clustering analysis revealed no population stratification. Multiple maternal SNPs were identified with association P-values between 10×10(-5) and 10×10(-6). The most significant maternal SNP was rs17053026 on chromosome 3 with an odds ratio (OR) 0.44 with a P-value of 1.0×10(-6). Two neonatal SNPs reached the genome-wide significance threshold, including rs17527054 on chromosome 6p22 with a P-value of 2.7×10(-12) and rs3777722 on chromosome 6q27 with a P-value of 1.4×10(-10). However, we could not replicate these findings after adjusting for multiple comparisons in a validation cohort. This is the first report of a genome-wide case-control study to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that correlate with SPTB.

  13. Genome-wide transcriptional reorganization associated with senescence-to-immortality switch during human hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Gokhan; Arslan-Ergul, Ayca; Bagislar, Sevgi; Konu, Ozlen; Yuzugullu, Haluk; Gursoy-Yuzugullu, Ozge; Ozturk, Nuri; Ozen, Cigdem; Ozdag, Hilal; Erdal, Esra; Karademir, Sedat; Sagol, Ozgul; Mizrak, Dilsa; Bozkaya, Hakan; Ilk, Hakki Gokhan; Ilk, Ozlem; Bilen, Biter; Cetin-Atalay, Rengul; Akar, Nejat; Ozturk, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Senescence is a permanent proliferation arrest in response to cell stress such as DNA damage. It contributes strongly to tissue aging and serves as a major barrier against tumor development. Most tumor cells are believed to bypass the senescence barrier (become "immortal") by inactivating growth control genes such as TP53 and CDKN2A. They also reactivate telomerase reverse transcriptase. Senescence-to-immortality transition is accompanied by major phenotypic and biochemical changes mediated by genome-wide transcriptional modifications. This appears to happen during hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development in patients with liver cirrhosis, however, the accompanying transcriptional changes are virtually unknown. We investigated genome-wide transcriptional changes related to the senescence-to-immortality switch during hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Initially, we performed transcriptome analysis of senescent and immortal clones of Huh7 HCC cell line, and identified genes with significant differential expression to establish a senescence-related gene list. Through the analysis of senescence-related gene expression in different liver tissues we showed that cirrhosis and HCC display expression patterns compatible with senescent and immortal phenotypes, respectively; dysplasia being a transitional state. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that cirrhosis/senescence-associated genes were preferentially expressed in non-tumor tissues, less malignant tumors, and differentiated or senescent cells. In contrast, HCC/immortality genes were up-regulated in tumor tissues, or more malignant tumors and progenitor cells. In HCC tumors and immortal cells genes involved in DNA repair, cell cycle, telomere extension and branched chain amino acid metabolism were up-regulated, whereas genes involved in cell signaling, as well as in drug, lipid, retinoid and glycolytic metabolism were down-regulated. Based on these distinctive gene expression features we developed a 15-gene

  14. Replication of a Genome-Wide Association Study of Birth Weight in Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Ryckman, Kelli K; Feenstra, Bjarke; Shaffer, John R.; Bream, Elise NA; Geller, Frank; Feingold, Eleanor; Weeks, Daniel E; Gadow, Enrique; Cosentino, Viviana; Saleme, Cesar; Simhan, Hyagriv N; Merrill, David; Fong, Chin-To; Busch, Tamara; Berends, Susan K; Comas, Belen; Camelo, Jorge L; Boyd, Heather; Laurie, Cathy; Crosslin, David; Zhang, Qi; Doheny, Kim F; Pugh, Elizabeth; Melbye, Mads; Marazita, Mary L; Dagle, John M; Murray, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine associations in a preterm population between rs9883204 in ADCY5 and rs900400 near LEKR1 and CCNL1 with birth weight. Both markers were associated with birth weight in a term population in a recent genome-wide association (GWA) study by Freathy et al. Study design A meta-analysis of mother and infant samples was performed for associations of rs900400 and rs9883204 with birth weight in 393 families from the U.S., 265 families from Argentina and 735 mother-infant pairs from Denmark. Z scores adjusted for infant sex and gestational age were generated for each population separately and regressed on allele counts. Association evidence was combined across sites by inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis. Results Each additional C allele of rs900400 (LEKR1/CCNL1) in infants was marginally associated with a 0.069 standard deviation (SD) lower birth weight (95% CI = −0.159 – 0.022, P = 0.068). This result was slightly more pronounced after adjusting for smoking (P = 0.036). There were no significant associations identified with rs9883204 or in maternal samples. Conclusions These results indicate the potential importance of this marker on birth weight irrespective of gestational age. PMID:21885063

  15. Genome-wide association analysis of metabolic traits in a birth cohort from a founder population.

    PubMed

    Sabatti, Chiara; Service, Susan K; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Pouta, Anneli; Ripatti, Samuli; Brodsky, Jae; Jones, Chris G; Zaitlen, Noah A; Varilo, Teppo; Kaakinen, Marika; Sovio, Ulla; Ruokonen, Aimo; Laitinen, Jaana; Jakkula, Eveliina; Coin, Lachlan; Hoggart, Clive; Collins, Andrew; Turunen, Hannu; Gabriel, Stacey; Elliot, Paul; McCarthy, Mark I; Daly, Mark J; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Freimer, Nelson B; Peltonen, Leena

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of longitudinal birth cohorts enable joint investigation of environmental and genetic influences on complex traits. We report GWAS results for nine quantitative metabolic traits (triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, glucose, insulin, C-reactive protein, body mass index, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure) in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (NFBC1966), drawn from the most genetically isolated Finnish regions. We replicate most previously reported associations for these traits and identify nine new associations, several of which highlight genes with metabolic functions: high-density lipoprotein with NR1H3 (LXRA), low-density lipoprotein with AR and FADS1-FADS2, glucose with MTNR1B, and insulin with PANK1. Two of these new associations emerged after adjustment of results for body mass index. Gene-environment interaction analyses suggested additional associations, which will require validation in larger samples. The currently identified loci, together with quantified environmental exposures, explain little of the trait variation in NFBC1966. The association observed between low-density lipoprotein and an infrequent variant in AR suggests the potential of such a cohort for identifying associations with both common, low-impact and rarer, high-impact quantitative trait loci.

  16. Genome-wide Association Study of Dermatomyositis Reveals Genetic Overlap with other Autoimmune Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Frederick W.; Cooper, Robert G.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Rider, Lisa G.; Danko, Katalin; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Pachman, Lauren M.; Reed, Ann M.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Padyukov, Leonid; Selva-O’Callaghan, Albert; Radstake, Timothy; Isenberg, David A.; Chinoy, Hector; Ollier, William E. R.; O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Peng, Bo; Lee, Annette; Lamb, Janine A.; Chen, Wei; Amos, Christopher I.; Gregersen, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify new genetic associations with juvenile and adult dermatomyositis (DM). Methods We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of adult and juvenile DM patients of European ancestry (n = 1178) and controls (n = 4724). To assess genetic overlap with other autoimmune disorders, we examined whether 141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) outside the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, and previously associated with autoimmune diseases, predispose to DM. Results Compared to controls, patients with DM had a strong signal in the MHC region consisting of GWAS-level significance (P < 5x10−8) at 80 genotyped SNPs. An analysis of 141 non-MHC SNPs previously associated with autoimmune diseases showed that three SNPs linked with three genes were associated with DM, with a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05. These genes were phospholipase C like 1 (PLCL1, rs6738825, FDR=0.00089), B lymphoid tyrosine kinase (BLK, rs2736340, FDR=0.00031), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21, rs951005, FDR=0.0076). None of these genes was previously reported to be associated with DM. Conclusion Our findings confirm the MHC as the major genetic region associated with DM and indicate that DM shares non-MHC genetic features with other autoimmune diseases, suggesting the presence of additional novel risk loci. This first identification of autoimmune disease genetic predispositions shared with DM may lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:23983088

  17. Using the Gene Ontology to Scan Multi-Level Gene Sets for Associations in Genome Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Schaid, Daniel J.; Sinnwell, Jason P.; Jenkins, Gregory D.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Ingle, James N.; Kubo, Michiaki; Goss, Paul E.; Costantino, Joseph P.; Wickerham, D. Lawrence; Weinshilboum, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Gene-set analyses have been widely used in gene expression studies, and some of the developed methods have been extended to genome wide association studies (GWAS). Yet, complications due to linkage disequilibrium (LD) among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and variable numbers of SNPs per gene and genes per gene-set, have plagued current approaches, often leading to ad hoc “fixes”. To overcome some of the current limitations, we developed a general approach to scan GWAS SNP data for both gene-level and gene-set analyses, building on score statistics for generalized linear models, and taking advantage of the directed acyclic graph structure of the gene ontology when creating gene-sets. However, other types of gene-set structures can be used, such as the popular Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Our approach combines SNPs into genes, and genes into gene-sets, but assures that positive and negative effects of genes on a trait do not cancel. To control for multiple testing of many gene-sets, we use an efficient computational strategy that accounts for LD and provides accurate step-down adjusted p-values for each gene-set. Application of our methods to two different GWAS provide guidance on the potential strengths and weaknesses of our proposed gene-set analyses. PMID:22161999

  18. Frontotemporal dementia and its subtypes: a genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Hernandez, Dena G; Nalls, Michael A; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Kwok, John B J; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Brooks, William S; Schofield, Peter R; Halliday, Glenda M; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier; Bartley, Lauren; Thompson, Elizabeth; Haan, Eric; Hernández, Isabel; Ruiz, Agustín; Boada, Mercè; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Cruchaga, Carlos; Cairns, Nigel J; Benussi, Luisa; Binetti, Giuliano; Ghidoni, Roberta; Forloni, Gianluigi; Galimberti, Daniela; Fenoglio, Chiara; Serpente, Maria; Scarpini, Elio; Clarimón, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Blesa, Rafael; Waldö, Maria Landqvist; Nilsson, Karin; Nilsson, Christer; Mackenzie, Ian R A; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; Mann, David M A; Grafman, Jordan; Morris, Christopher M; Attems, Johannes; Griffiths, Timothy D; McKeith, Ian G; Thomas, Alan J; Pietrini, P; Huey, Edward D; Wassermann, Eric M; Baborie, Atik; Jaros, Evelyn; Tierney, Michael C; Pastor, Pau; Razquin, Cristina; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Alonso, Elena; Perneczky, Robert; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Kurz, Alexander; Rainero, Innocenzo; Rubino, Elisa; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; George-Hyslop, Peter St; Rossi, Giacomina; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Giaccone, Giorgio; Rowe, James B; Schlachetzki, J C M; Uphill, James; Collinge, John; Mead, S; Danek, Adrian; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Grossman, Murray; Trojanowsk, John Q; van der Zee, Julie; Deschamps, William; Van Langenhove, Tim; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Cappa, Stefano F; Le Ber, Isabelle; Hannequin, Didier; Golfier, Véronique; Vercelletto, Martine; Brice, Alexis; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Bagnoli, Silvia; Piaceri, Irene; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Hjermind, Lena E; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Mayhaus, Manuel; Ibach, Bernd; Gasparoni, Gilles; Pichler, Sabrina; Gu, Wei; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C; Warren, Jason D; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Morris, Huw R; Rizzu, Patrizia; Heutink, Peter; Snowden, Julie S; Rollinson, Sara; Richardson, Anna; Gerhard, Alexander; Bruni, Amalia C; Maletta, Raffaele; Frangipane, Francesca; Cupidi, Chiara; Bernardi, Livia; Anfossi, Maria; Gallo, Maura; Conidi, Maria Elena; Smirne, Nicoletta; Rademakers, Rosa; Baker, Matt; Dickson, Dennis W; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Petersen, Ronald C; Knopman, David; Josephs, Keith A; Boeve, Bradley F; Parisi, Joseph E; Seeley, William W; Miller, Bruce L; Karydas, Anna M; Rosen, Howard; van Swieten, John C; Dopper, Elise G P; Seelaar, Harro; Pijnenburg, Yolande AL; Scheltens, Philip; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Capozzo, Rosa; Novelli, Valeria; Puca, Annibale A; Franceschi, M; Postiglione, Alfredo; Milan, Graziella; Sorrentino, Paolo; Kristiansen, Mark; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Graff, Caroline; Pasquier, Florence; Rollin, Adeline; Deramecourt, Vincent; Lebert, Florence; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Ferrucci, Luigi; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Momeni, Parastoo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a complex disorder characterised by a broad range of clinical manifestations, differential pathological signatures, and genetic variability. Mutations in three genes—MAPT, GRN, and C9orf72—have been associated with FTD. We sought to identify novel genetic risk loci associated with the disorder. Methods We did a two-stage genome-wide association study on clinical FTD, analysing samples from 3526 patients with FTD and 9402 healthy controls. All participants had European ancestry. In the discovery phase (samples from 2154 patients with FTD and 4308 controls), we did separate association analyses for each FTD subtype (behavioural variant FTD, semantic dementia, progressive non-fluent aphasia, and FTD overlapping with motor neuron disease [FTD-MND]), followed by a meta-analysis of the entire dataset. We carried forward replication of the novel suggestive loci in an independent sample series (samples from 1372 patients and 5094 controls) and then did joint phase and brain expression and methylation quantitative trait loci analyses for the associated (p<5 × 10−8) and suggestive single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Findings We identified novel associations exceeding the genome-wide significance threshold (p<5 × 10−8) that encompassed the HLA locus at 6p21.3 in the entire cohort. We also identified a potential novel locus at 11q14, encompassing RAB38/CTSC, for the behavioural FTD subtype. Analysis of expression and methylation quantitative trait loci data suggested that these loci might affect expression and methylation incis. Interpretation Our findings suggest that immune system processes (link to 6p21.3) and possibly lysosomal and autophagy pathways (link to 11q14) are potentially involved in FTD. Our findings need to be replicated to better define the association of the newly identified loci with disease and possibly to shed light on the pathomechanisms contributing to FTD. Funding The National Institute of

  19. Genome-wide analysis of over 106 000 individuals identifies 9 neuroticism-associated loci.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Escott-Price, V; Davies, G; Bailey, M E S; Colodro-Conde, L; Ward, J; Vedernikov, A; Marioni, R; Cullen, B; Lyall, D; Hagenaars, S P; Liewald, D C M; Luciano, M; Gale, C R; Ritchie, S J; Hayward, C; Nicholl, B; Bulik-Sullivan, B; Adams, M; Couvy-Duchesne, B; Graham, N; Mackay, D; Evans, J; Smith, B H; Porteous, D J; Medland, S E; Martin, N G; Holmans, P; McIntosh, A M; Pell, J P; Deary, I J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-06-01

    Neuroticism is a personality trait of fundamental importance for psychological well-being and public health. It is strongly associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and several other psychiatric conditions. Although neuroticism is heritable, attempts to identify the alleles involved in previous studies have been limited by relatively small sample sizes. Here we report a combined meta-analysis of genome-wide association study (GWAS) of neuroticism that includes 91 370 participants from the UK Biobank cohort, 6659 participants from the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) and 8687 participants from a QIMR (Queensland Institute of Medical Research) Berghofer Medical Research Institute (QIMR) cohort. All participants were assessed using the same neuroticism instrument, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised (EPQ-R-S) Short Form's Neuroticism scale. We found a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based heritability estimate for neuroticism of ∼15% (s.e.=0.7%). Meta-analysis identified nine novel loci associated with neuroticism. The strongest evidence for association was at a locus on chromosome 8 (P=1.5 × 10(-15)) spanning 4 Mb and containing at least 36 genes. Other associated loci included interesting candidate genes on chromosome 1 (GRIK3 (glutamate receptor ionotropic kainate 3)), chromosome 4 (KLHL2 (Kelch-like protein 2)), chromosome 17 (CRHR1 (corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1) and MAPT (microtubule-associated protein Tau)) and on chromosome 18 (CELF4 (CUGBP elav-like family member 4)). We found no evidence for genetic differences in the common allelic architecture of neuroticism by sex. By comparing our findings with those of the Psychiatric Genetics Consortia, we identified a strong genetic correlation between neuroticism and MDD and a less strong but significant genetic correlation with schizophrenia, although not with bipolar disorder. Polygenic risk scores derived from the primary UK Biobank sample captured

  20. Genome-wide analysis of over 106 000 individuals identifies 9 neuroticism-associated loci

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D J; Escott-Price, V; Davies, G; Bailey, M E S; Colodro-Conde, L; Ward, J; Vedernikov, A; Marioni, R; Cullen, B; Lyall, D; Hagenaars, S P; Liewald, D C M; Luciano, M; Gale, C R; Ritchie, S J; Hayward, C; Nicholl, B; Bulik-Sullivan, B; Adams, M; Couvy-Duchesne, B; Graham, N; Mackay, D; Evans, J; Smith, B H; Porteous, D J; Medland, S E; Martin, N G; Holmans, P; McIntosh, A M; Pell, J P; Deary, I J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-01-01

    Neuroticism is a personality trait of fundamental importance for psychological well-being and public health. It is strongly associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and several other psychiatric conditions. Although neuroticism is heritable, attempts to identify the alleles involved in previous studies have been limited by relatively small sample sizes. Here we report a combined meta-analysis of genome-wide association study (GWAS) of neuroticism that includes 91 370 participants from the UK Biobank cohort, 6659 participants from the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) and 8687 participants from a QIMR (Queensland Institute of Medical Research) Berghofer Medical Research Institute (QIMR) cohort. All participants were assessed using the same neuroticism instrument, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised (EPQ-R-S) Short Form's Neuroticism scale. We found a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based heritability estimate for neuroticism of ∼15% (s.e.=0.7%). Meta-analysis identified nine novel loci associated with neuroticism. The strongest evidence for association was at a locus on chromosome 8 (P=1.5 × 10−15) spanning 4 Mb and containing at least 36 genes. Other associated loci included interesting candidate genes on chromosome 1 (GRIK3 (glutamate receptor ionotropic kainate 3)), chromosome 4 (KLHL2 (Kelch-like protein 2)), chromosome 17 (CRHR1 (corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1) and MAPT (microtubule-associated protein Tau)) and on chromosome 18 (CELF4 (CUGBP elav-like family member 4)). We found no evidence for genetic differences in the common allelic architecture of neuroticism by sex. By comparing our findings with those of the Psychiatric Genetics Consortia, we identified a strong genetic correlation between neuroticism and MDD and a less strong but significant genetic correlation with schizophrenia, although not with bipolar disorder. Polygenic risk scores derived from the primary UK Biobank sample captured

  1. Genome-Wide Association of Body Fat Distribution in African Ancestry Populations Suggests New Loci

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Leslie; Demerath, Ellen W.; Palmas, Walter; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Ellis, Jaclyn C.; Vitolins, Mara Z.; Liu, Simin; Papanicolaou, George J.; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Xue, Luting; Griffin, Paula J.; Nalls, Michael A.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Liu, Jiankang; Li, Guo; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A.; Chen, Wei-Min; Chen, Fang; Henderson, Brian E.; Millikan, Robert C.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Strom, Sara S.; Guo, Xiuqing; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Sun, Yan V.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Shriner, Daniel; Haritunians, Talin; Rotter, Jerome I.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Smith, Megan; Rosenberg, Lynn; Mychaleckyj, Josyf; Nayak, Uma; Spruill, Ida; Garvey, W. Timothy; Pettaway, Curtis; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V.; Britton, Angela F.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Ding, Jingzhong; Lohman, Kurt; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Zhao, Wei; Peyser, Patricia A.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Kabagambe, Edmond; Broeckel, Ulrich; Chen, Guanjie; Zhou, Jie; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Rampersaud, Evadnie; Psaty, Bruce; Kooperberg, Charles; Manson, JoAnn E.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Johnson, Karen C.; Sucheston, Lara; Ordovas, Jose M.; Palmer, Julie R.; Haiman, Christopher A.; McKnight, Barbara; Howard, Barbara V.; Becker, Diane M.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Liu, Yongmei; Allison, Matthew A.; Grant, Struan F. A.; Burke, Gregory L.; Patel, Sanjay R.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Evans, Michele K.; Taylor, Herman; Sale, Michele M.; Howard, Virginia; Carlson, Christopher S.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Cushman, Mary; Harris, Tamara B.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; North, Kari E.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2013-01-01

    Central obesity, measured by waist circumference (WC) or waist-hip ratio (WHR), is a marker of body fat distribution. Although obesity disproportionately affects minority populations, few studies have conducted genome-wide association study (GWAS) of fat distribution among those of predominantly African ancestry (AA). We performed GWAS of WC and WHR, adjusted and unadjusted for BMI, in up to 33,591 and 27,350 AA individuals, respectively. We identified loci associated with fat distribution in AA individuals using meta-analyses of GWA results for WC and WHR (stage 1). Overall, 25 SNPs with single genomic control (GC)-corrected p-values<5.0×10−6 were followed-up (stage 2) in AA with WC and with WHR. Additionally, we interrogated genomic regions of previously identified European ancestry (EA) WHR loci among AA. In joint analysis of association results including both Stage 1 and 2 cohorts, 2 SNPs demonstrated association, rs2075064 at LHX2, p = 2.24×10−8 for WC-adjusted-for-BMI, and rs6931262 at RREB1, p = 2.48×10−8 for WHR-adjusted-for-BMI. However, neither signal was genome-wide significant after double GC-correction (LHX2: p = 6.5×10−8; RREB1: p = 5.7×10−8). Six of fourteen previously reported loci for waist in EA populations were significant (p<0.05 divided by the number of independent SNPs within the region) in AA studied here (TBX15-WARS2, GRB14, ADAMTS9, LY86, RSPO3, ITPR2-SSPN). Further, we observed associations with metabolic traits: rs13389219 at GRB14 associated with HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting insulin, and rs13060013 at ADAMTS9 with HDL-cholesterol and fasting insulin. Finally, we observed nominal evidence for sexual dimorphism, with stronger results in AA women at the GRB14 locus (p for interaction = 0.02). In conclusion, we identified two suggestive loci associated with fat distribution in AA populations in addition to confirming 6 loci previously identified in populations of EA. These findings reinforce

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies PERLD1 as asthma candidate gene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for asthma have been successful in identifying novel associations which have been well replicated. The aim of this study is to identify the genetic variants that influence predisposition towards asthma in an ethnic Chinese population in Singapore using a GWAS approach. Methods A two-stage GWAS was performed in case samples with allergic asthma, and in control samples without asthma and atopy. In the discovery stage, 490 case and 490 control samples were analysed by pooled genotyping. Significant associations from the first stage were evaluated in a replication cohort of 521 case and 524 control samples in the second stage. The same 980 samples used in the discovery phase were also individually genotyped for purposes of a combined analysis. An additional 1445 non-asthmatic atopic control samples were also genotyped. Results 19 promising SNPs which passed our genome-wide P value threshold of 5.52 × 10-8 were individually genotyped. In the combined analysis of 1011 case and 1014 control samples, SNP rs2941504 in PERLD1 on chromosome 17q12 was found to be significantly associated with asthma at the genotypic level (P = 1.48 × 10-6, ORAG = 0.526 (0.369-0.700), ORAA = 0.480 (0.361-0.639)) and at the allelic level (P = 9.56 × 10-6, OR = 0.745 (0.654-0.848)). These findings were found to be replicated in 3 other asthma GWAS studies, thus validating our own results. Analysis against the atopy control samples suggested that the SNP was associated with allergic asthma and not to either the asthma or allergy components. Genotyping of additional SNPs in 100 kb flanking rs2941504 further confirmed that the association was indeed to PERLD1. PERLD1 is involved in the modification of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors for cell surface markers such as CD48 and CD59 which are known to play multiple roles in T-cell activation and proliferation. Conclusions These findings reveal the association of a PERLD1 as a novel

  3. Genome-Wide Association Mapping for Kernel and Malting Quality Traits Using Historical European Barley Records

    PubMed Central

    Röder, Marion S.; van Eeuwijk, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Malting quality is an important trait in breeding barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). It requires elaborate, expensive phenotyping, which involves micro-malting experiments. Although there is abundant historical information available for different cultivars in different years and trials, that historical information is not often used in genetic analyses. This study aimed to exploit historical records to assist in identifying genomic regions that affect malting and kernel quality traits in barley. This genome-wide association study utilized information on grain yield and 18 quality traits accumulated over 25 years on 174 European spring and winter barley cultivars combined with diversity array technology markers. Marker-trait associations were tested with a mixed linear model. This model took into account the genetic relatedness between cultivars based on principal components scores obtained from marker information. We detected 140 marker-trait associations. Some of these associations confirmed previously known quantitative trait loci for malting quality (on chromosomes 1H, 2H, and 5H). Other associations were reported for the first time in this study. The genetic correlations between traits are discussed in relation to the chromosomal regions associated with the different traits. This approach is expected to be particularly useful when designing strategies for multiple trait improvements. PMID:25372869

  4. Genome-wide association study reveals putative regulators of bioenergy traits in Populus deltoides

    DOE PAGES

    Fahrenkrog, Annette M.; Neves, Leandro G.; Resende, Jr., Marcio F. R.; ...

    2016-09-06

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been used extensively to dissect the genetic regulation of complex traits in plants. These studies have focused largely on the analysis of common genetic variants despite the abundance of rare polymorphisms in several species, and their potential role in trait variation. Here, we conducted the first GWAS in Populus deltoides, a genetically diverse keystone forest species in North America and an important short rotation woody crop for the bioenergy industry. We searched for associations between eight growth and wood composition traits, and common and low-frequency single-nucleotide polymorphisms detected by targeted resequencing of 18 153 genesmore » in a population of 391 unrelated individuals. To increase power to detect associations with low-frequency variants, multiple-marker association tests were used in combination with single-marker association tests. Significant associations were discovered for all phenotypes and are indicative that low-frequency polymorphisms contribute to phenotypic variance of several bioenergy traits. Our results suggest that both common and low-frequency variants need to be considered for a comprehensive understanding of the genetic regulation of complex traits, particularly in species that carry large numbers of rare polymorphisms. Lastly, these polymorphisms may be critical for the development of specialized plant feedstocks for bioenergy.« less

  5. Genome-wide association study reveals putative regulators of bioenergy traits in Populus deltoides.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkrog, Annette M; Neves, Leandro G; Resende, Márcio F R; Vazquez, Ana I; de Los Campos, Gustavo; Dervinis, Christopher; Sykes, Robert; Davis, Mark; Davenport, Ruth; Barbazuk, William B; Kirst, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been used extensively to dissect the genetic regulation of complex traits in plants. These studies have focused largely on the analysis of common genetic variants despite the abundance of rare polymorphisms in several species, and their potential role in trait variation. Here, we conducted the first GWAS in Populus deltoides, a genetically diverse keystone forest species in North America and an important short rotation woody crop for the bioenergy industry. We searched for associations between eight growth and wood composition traits, and common and low-frequency single-nucleotide polymorphisms detected by targeted resequencing of 18 153 genes in a population of 391 unrelated individuals. To increase power to detect associations with low-frequency variants, multiple-marker association tests were used in combination with single-marker association tests. Significant associations were discovered for all phenotypes and are indicative that low-frequency polymorphisms contribute to phenotypic variance of several bioenergy traits. Our results suggest that both common and low-frequency variants need to be considered for a comprehensive understanding of the genetic regulation of complex traits, particularly in species that carry large numbers of rare polymorphisms. These polymorphisms may be critical for the development of specialized plant feedstocks for bioenergy.

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis in German Shepherd Dogs Reveals Association of a Locus on CFA 27 with Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tengvall, Katarina; Kierczak, Marcin; Bergvall, Kerstin; Olsson, Mia; Frankowiack, Marcel; Farias, Fabiana H. G.; Pielberg, Gerli; Carlborg, Örjan; Leeb, Tosso; Andersson, Göran; Hammarström, Lennart; Hedhammar, Åke; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Humans and dogs are both affected by the allergic skin disease atopic dermatitis (AD), caused by an interaction between genetic and environmental factors. The German shepherd dog (GSD) is a high-risk breed for canine AD (CAD). In this study, we used a Swedish cohort of GSDs as a model for human AD. Serum IgA levels are known to be lower in GSDs compared to other breeds. We detected significantly lower IgA levels in the CAD cases compared to controls (p = 1.1×10−5) in our study population. We also detected a separation within the GSD cohort, where dogs could be grouped into two different subpopulations. Disease prevalence differed significantly between the subpopulations contributing to population stratification (λ = 1.3), which was successfully corrected for using a mixed model approach. A genome-wide association analysis of CAD was performed (n cases = 91, n controls = 88). IgA levels were included in the model, due to the high correlation between CAD and low IgA levels. In addition, we detected a correlation between IgA levels and the age at the time of sampling (corr = 0.42, p = 3.0×10−9), thus age was included in the model. A genome-wide significant association was detected on chromosome 27 (praw = 3.1×10−7, pgenome = 0.03). The total associated region was defined as a ∼1.5-Mb-long haplotype including eight genes. Through targeted re-sequencing and additional genotyping of a subset of identified SNPs, we defined 11 smaller haplotype blocks within the associated region. Two blocks showed the strongest association to CAD. The ∼209-kb region, defined by the two blocks, harbors only the PKP2 gene, encoding Plakophilin 2 expressed in the desmosomes and important for skin structure. Our results may yield further insight into the genetics behind both canine and human AD. PMID:23671420

  7. Family-based Association Analyses of Imputed Genotypes Reveal Genome-Wide Significant Association of Alzheimer’s disease with OSBPL6, PTPRG and PDCL3

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Christine; Hooli, Basavaraj V.; Mullin, Kristina; Liu, Tian; Roehr, Johannes T; Mattheisen, Manuel; Parrado, Antonio R.; Bertram, Lars; Lange, Christoph; Tanzi, Rudolph E.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is complex and heterogeneous. Over 200 highly penetrant pathogenic variants in the genes APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 cause a subset of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (EOFAD). On the other hand, susceptibility to late-onset forms of AD (LOAD) is indisputably associated to the ε4 allele in the gene APOE, and more recently to variants in more than two-dozen additional genes identified in the large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and meta-analyses reports. Taken together however, although the heritability in AD is estimated to be as high as 80%, a large proportion of the underlying genetic factors still remain to be elucidated. In this study we performed a systematic family-based genome-wide association and meta-analysis on close to 15 million imputed variants from three large collections of AD families (~3,500 subjects from 1,070 families). Using a multivariate phenotype combining affection status and onset age, meta-analysis of the association results revealed three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that achieved genome-wide significance for association with AD risk: rs7609954 in the gene PTPRG (P-value = 3.98·10−08), rs1347297 in the gene OSBPL6 (P-value = 4.53·10−08), and rs1513625 near PDCL3 (P-value = 4.28·10−08). In addition, rs72953347 in OSBPL6 (P-value = 6.36·10−07) and two SNPs in the gene CDKAL1 showed marginally significant association with LOAD (rs10456232, P-value: 4.76·10−07; rs62400067, P-value: 3.54·10−07). In summary, family-based GWAS meta-analysis of imputed SNPs revealed novel genomic variants in (or near) PTPRG, OSBPL6, and PDCL3 that influence risk for AD with genome-wide significance. PMID:26830138

  8. Genome-wide screening for DNA variants associated with reading and language traits

    PubMed Central

    Gialluisi, A; Newbury, D F; Wilcutt, E G; Olson, R K; DeFries, J C; Brandler, W M; Pennington, B F; Smith, S D; Scerri, T S; Simpson, N H; Luciano, M; Evans, D M; Bates, T C; Stein, J F; Talcott, J B; Monaco, A P; Paracchini, S; Francks, C; Fisher, S E

    2014-01-01

    Reading and language abilities are heritable traits that are likely to share some genetic influences with each other. To identify pleiotropic genetic variants affecting these traits, we first performed a genome-wide association scan (GWAS) meta-analysis using three richly characterized datasets comprising individuals with histories of reading or language problems, and their siblings. GWAS was performed in a total of 1862 participants using the first principal component computed from several quantitative measures of reading- and language-related abilities, both before and after adjustment for performance IQ. We identified novel suggestive associations at the SNPs rs59197085 and rs5995177 (uncorrected P ≈ 10–7 for each SNP), located respectively at the CCDC136/FLNC and RBFOX2 genes. Each of these SNPs then showed evidence for effects across multiple reading and language traits in univariate association testing against the individual traits. FLNC encodes a structural protein involved in cytoskeleton remodelling, while RBFOX2 is an important regulator of alternative splicing in neurons. The CCDC136/FLNC locus showed association with a comparable reading/language measure in an independent sample of 6434 participants from the general population, although involving distinct alleles of the associated SNP. Our datasets will form an important part of on-going international efforts to identify genes contributing to reading and language skills. PMID:25065397

  9. A multi-stage genome-wide association study of bladder cancer identifies multiple susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Nathaniel; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Malats, Nuria; Wu, Xifeng; Figueroa, Jonine; Real, Francisco X; Van Den Berg, David; Matullo, Giuseppe; Baris, Dalsu; Thun, Michael; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Vineis, Paolo; De Vivo, Immaculata; Albanes, Demetrius; Purdue, Mark P; Rafnar, Thorunn; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Kiltie, Anne E; Cussenot, Olivier; Golka, Klaus; Kumar, Rajiv; Taylor, Jack A; Mayordomo, Jose I; Jacobs, Kevin B; Kogevinas, Manolis; Hutchinson, Amy; Wang, Zhaoming; Fu, Yi-Ping; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Burdette, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Wheeler, William; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Johnson, Alison; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R; Schned, Alan; Andriole, Gerald; Grubb, Robert; Black, Amanda; Jacobs, Eric J; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Cortessis, Victoria K; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Pike, Malcolm C; Stern, Mariana C; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hunter, David; McGrath, Monica; Dinney, Colin P; Czerniak, Bogdan; Chen, Meng; Yang, Hushan; Vermeulen, Sita H; Aben, Katja K; Witjes, J Alfred; Makkinje, Remco R; Sulem, Patrick; Besenbacher, Soren; Stefansson, Kari; Riboli, Elio; Brennan, Paul; Panico, Salvatore; Navarro, Carmen; Allen, Naomi E; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria Teresa; Canzian, Federico; Ljungberg, Borje; Tjonneland, Anne; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Bishop, David T; Teo, Mark T W; Knowles, Margaret A; Guarrera, Simonetta; Polidoro, Silvia; Ricceri, Fulvio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Allione, Alessandra; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Selinski, Silvia; Hengstler, Jan G; Dietrich, Holger; Fletcher, Tony; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugen; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Bolick, Sophia C E; Godfrey, Ashley; Xu, Zongli; Sanz-Velez, José I; García-Prats, María D; Sanchez, Manuel; Valdivia, Gabriel; Porru, Stefano; Benhamou, Simone; Hoover, Robert N; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Silverman, Debra T; Chanock, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a multi-stage, genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bladder cancer with a primary scan of 589,299 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3,532 cases and 5,120 controls of European descent (5 studies) followed by a replication strategy, which included 8,381 cases and 48,275 controls (16 studies). In a combined analysis, we identified three new regions associated with bladder cancer on chromosomes 22q13.1, 19q12 and 2q37.1; rs1014971, (P=8×10−12) maps to a non-genic region of chromosome 22q13.1; rs8102137 (P=2×10−11) on 19q12 maps to CCNE1; and rs11892031 (P=1×10−7) maps to the UGT1A cluster on 2q37.1. We confirmed four previous GWAS associations on chromosomes 3q28, 4p16.3, 8q24.21 and 8q24.3, validated previous candidate associations for the GSTM1 deletion (P=4×10−11) and a tag SNP for NAT2 acetylation status (P=4×10−11), as well as demonstrated smoking interactions with both regions. Our findings on common variants associated with bladder cancer risk should provide new insights into mechanisms of carcinogenesis. PMID:20972438

  10. Genome-Wide Association Scan Meta-Analysis Identifies Three Loci Influencing Adiposity and Fat Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Lu; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Willer, Cristen J.; Herrera, Blanca M.; Jackson, Anne U.; Lim, Noha; Scheet, Paul; Soranzo, Nicole; Amin, Najaf; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Chambers, John C.; Drong, Alexander; Luan, Jian'an; Lyon, Helen N.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sanna, Serena; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Zhao, Jing Hua; Almgren, Peter; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Amanda J.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cherkas, Lynn; Chines, Peter; Coin, Lachlan; Cooper, Cyrus; Crawford, Gabriel; Doering, Angela; Dominiczak, Anna; Doney, Alex S. F.; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Erdos, Michael R.; Estrada, Karol; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Guido; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Groves, Christopher J.; Grundy, Scott; Guiducci, Candace; Hadley, David; Hamsten, Anders; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hofman, Albert; Holle, Rolf; Holloway, John W.; Illig, Thomas; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Leonie C.; Jameson, Karen; Jousilahti, Pekka; Karpe, Fredrik; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana; Lathrop, G. Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Meitinger, Thomas; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Munroe, Patricia; Narisu, Narisu; Nordström, Anna; Nordström, Peter; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Payne, Felicity; Peden, John F.; Prokopenko, Inga; Renström, Frida; Ruokonen, Aimo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Scott, Laura J.; Scuteri, Angelo; Silander, Kaisa; Song, Kijoung; Yuan, Xin; Stringham, Heather M.; Swift, Amy J.; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wallace, Chris; Walters, G. Bragi; Weedon, Michael N.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Zhang, Cuilin; Zhang, Weihua; Caulfield, Mark J.; Collins, Francis S.; Davey Smith, George; Day, Ian N. M.; Franks, Paul W.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hu, Frank B.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kong, Augustine; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Laakso, Markku; Lakatta, Edward; Mooser, Vincent; Morris, Andrew D.; Peltonen, Leena; Samani, Nilesh J.; Spector, Timothy D.; Strachan, David P.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins for the PROCARDIS consortia, Hugh; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Groop, Leif; Hunter, David J.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Schlessinger, David; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Stefansson, Kari; Mohlke, Karen L.; Barroso, Inês; McCarthy for the GIANT consortium, Mark I.

    2009-01-01

    To identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist–hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evidence of association with measures of central adiposity (WC and/or WHR) was strong and disproportionate to that for overall adiposity or height. Follow-up studies in a maximum of 70,689 individuals identified two loci strongly associated with measures of central adiposity; these map near TFAP2B (WC, P = 1.9×10−11) and MSRA (WC, P = 8.9×10−9). A third locus, near LYPLAL1, was associated with WHR in women only (P = 2.6×10−8). The variants near TFAP2B appear to influence central adiposity through an effect on overall obesity/fat-mass, whereas LYPLAL1 displays a strong female-only association with fat distribution. By focusing on anthropometric measures of central obesity and fat distribution, we have identified three loci implicated in the regulation of human adiposity. PMID:19557161

  11. Pathway-based analysis of primary biliary cirrhosis genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Kar, S P; Seldin, M F; Chen, W; Lu, E; Hirschfield, G M; Invernizzi, P; Heathcote, J; Cusi, D; Gershwin, M E; Siminovitch, K A; Amos, C I

    2013-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified several loci associated with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) risk. Pathway analysis complements conventional GWAS analysis. We applied the recently developed linear combination test for pathways to datasets drawn from independent PBC GWAS in Italian and Canadian subjects. Of the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and BioCarta pathways tested, 25 pathways in the Italian dataset (449 cases, 940 controls) and 26 pathways in the Canadian dataset (530 cases, 398 controls) were associated with PBC susceptibility (P<0.05). After correcting for multiple comparisons, only the eight most significant pathways in the Italian dataset had FDR <0.25 with tumor necrosis factor/stress-related signaling emerging as the top pathway (P=7.38 × 10⁻⁴, FDR=0.18). Two pathways, phosphatidylinositol signaling and hedgehog signaling, were replicated in both datasets (P<0.05), and subjected to two additional complementary pathway tests. Both pathway signals remained significant in the Italian dataset on modified gene set enrichment analysis (P<0.05). In both GWAS, variants nominally associated with PBC were significantly overrepresented in the phosphatidylinositol pathway (Fisher exact P<0.05). These results point to established and novel pathway-level associations with inherited predisposition to PBC that, on further independent replication and functional validation, may provide fresh insights into PBC etiology.

  12. Software engineering the mixed model for genome-wide association studies on large samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiwu; Buckler, Edward S; Casstevens, Terry M; Bradbury, Peter J

    2009-11-01

    Mixed models improve the ability to detect phenotype-genotype associations in the presence of population stratification and multiple levels of relatedness in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), but for large data sets the resource consumption becomes impractical. At the same time, the sample size and number of markers used for GWAS is increasing dramatically, resulting in greater statistical power to detect those associations. The use of mixed models with increasingly large data sets depends on the availability of software for analyzing those models. While multiple software packages implement the mixed model method, no single package provides the best combination of fast computation, ability to handle large samples, flexible modeling and ease of use. Key elements of association analysis with mixed models are reviewed, including modeling phenotype-genotype associations using mixed models, population stratification, kinship and its estimation, variance component estimation, use of best linear unbiased predictors or residuals in place of raw phenotype, improving efficiency and software-user interaction. The available software packages are evaluated, and suggestions made for future software development.

  13. Genome-wide association study for performance traits in chickens using genotype by sequencing approach

    PubMed Central

    Pértille, Fábio; Moreira, Gabriel Costa Monteiro; Zanella, Ricardo; Nunes, José de Ribamar da Silva; Boschiero, Clarissa; Rovadoscki, Gregori Alberto; Mourão, Gerson Barreto; Ledur, Mônica Corrêa; Coutinho, Luiz Lehmann

    2017-01-01

    Performance traits are economically important and are targets for selection in breeding programs, especially in the poultry industry. To identify regions on the chicken genome associated with performance traits, different genomic approaches have been applied in the last years. The aim of this study was the application of CornellGBS approach (134,528 SNPs generated from a PstI restriction enzyme) on Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) in an outbred F2 chicken population. We have validated 91.7% of these 134,528 SNPs after imputation of missed genotypes. Out of those, 20 SNPs were associated with feed conversion, one was associated with body weight at 35 days of age (P < 7.86E-07) and 93 were suggestively associated with a variety of performance traits (P < 1.57E-05). The majority of these SNPs (86.2%) overlapped with previously mapped QTL for the same performance traits and some of the SNPs also showed novel potential QTL regions. The results obtained in this study suggests future searches for candidate genes and QTL refinements as well as potential use of the SNPs described here in breeding programs. PMID:28181508

  14. Pathway-based analysis of primary biliary cirrhosis genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Kar, SP; Seldin, MF; Chen, W; Lu, E; Hirschfield, GM; Invernizzi, P; Heathcote, J; Cusi, D; Gershwin, ME; Siminovitch, KA; Amos, CI

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified several loci associated with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) risk. Pathway analysis complements conventional GWAS analysis. We applied the recently developed linear combination test for pathways to datasets drawn from independent PBC GWAS in Italian and Canadian subjects. Of the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and BioCarta pathways tested, 25 pathways in the Italian dataset (449 cases, 940 controls) and 26 pathways in the Canadian dataset (530 cases, 398 controls) were associated with PBC susceptibility (P < 0.05). After correcting for multiple comparisons, only the eight most significant pathways in the Italian dataset had FDR < 0.25 with tumor necrosis factor/stress-related signaling emerging as the top pathway (P = 7.38 × 10−4, FDR = 0.18). Two pathways, phosphatidylinositol signaling and hedgehog signaling, were replicated in both datasets (P < 0.05), and subjected to two additional complementary pathway tests. Both pathway signals remained significant in the Italian dataset on modified gene set enrichment analysis (P < 0.05). In both GWAS, variants nominally associated with PBC were significantly overrepresented in the phosphatidylinositol pathway (Fisher exact P < 0.05). These results point to established and novel pathway-level associations with inherited predisposition to PBC that on further independent replication and functional validation, may provide fresh insights into PBC etiology. PMID:23392275

  15. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals the Genetic Basis of Stalk Cell Wall Components in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaojiao; Liu, Zhifang; Wu, Yujin; Huang, Changling

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose are the three main components of the plant cell wall and can impact stalk quality by affecting cell wall structure and strength. In this study, we evaluated the lignin (LIG), cellulose (CEL) and hemicellulose (HC) contents in maize using an association mapping panel that included 368 inbred lines in seven environments. A genome-wide association study using approximately 0.56 million SNPs with a minor allele frequency of 0.05 identified 22, 18 and 24 loci significantly associated with LIG, CEL and HC at P < 1.0×10−4, respectively. The allelic variation of each significant association contributed 4 to 7% of the phenotypic variation. Candidate genes identified by GWAS mainly encode enzymes involved in cell wall metabolism, transcription factors, protein kinase and protein related to other biological processes. Among the association signals, six candidate genes had pleiotropic effects on lignin and cellulose content. These results provide valuable information for better understanding the genetic basis of stalk cell wall components in maize. PMID:27479588

  16. A genome wide association study of pulmonary tuberculosis susceptibility in Indonesians

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is reason to expect strong genetic influences on the risk of developing active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) among latently infected individuals. Many of the genome wide linkage and association studies (GWAS) to date have been conducted on African populations. In order to identify additional targets in genetically dissimilar populations, and to enhance our understanding of this disease, we performed a multi-stage GWAS in a Southeast Asian cohort from Indonesia. Methods In stage 1, we used the Affymetrix 100 K SNP GeneChip marker set to genotype 259 Indonesian samples. After quality control filtering, 108 cases and 115 controls were analyzed for association of 95,207 SNPs. In stage 2, we attempted validation of 2,453 SNPs with promising associations from the first stage, in 1,189 individuals from the same Indonesian cohort, and finally in stage 3 we selected 251 SNPs from this stage to test TB association in an independent Caucasian cohort (n = 3,760) from Russia. Results Our study suggests evidence of association (P = 0.0004-0.0067) for 8 independent loci (nominal significance P < 0.05), which are located within or near the following genes involved in immune signaling: JAG1, DYNLRB2, EBF1, TMEFF2, CCL17, HAUS6, PENK and TXNDC4. Conclusions Mechanisms of immune defense suggested by some of the identified genes exhibit biological plausibility and may suggest novel pathways involved in the host containment of infection with TB. PMID:22239941

  17. Genome-wide common and rare variant analysis provides novel insights into clozapine-associated neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Legge, Sophie E; Hamshere, Marian L; Ripke, Stephan; Pardinas, Antonio F; Goldstein, Jacqueline I; Rees, Elliott; Richards, Alexander L; Leonenko, Ganna; Jorskog, L Fredrik; Chambert, Kimberly D; Collier, David A; Genovese, Giulio; Giegling, Ina; Holmans, Peter; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Kirov, George; McCarroll, Steven A; MacCabe, James H; Mantripragada, Kiran; Moran, Jennifer L; Neale, Benjamin M; Stefansson, Hreinn; Rujescu, Dan; Daly, Mark J; Sullivan, Patrick F; Owen, Michael J; O’Donovan, Michael C; Walters, James T R

    2016-01-01

    The antipsychotic clozapine is uniquely effective in the management of schizophrenia, but its use is limited by its potential to induce agranulocytosis. The causes of this, and of its precursor neutropenia, are largely unknown although genetic factors play an important role. We sought risk alleles for clozapine-associated neutropenia in a sample of 66 cases and 5583 clozapine-treated controls, through a genome-wide association study (GWAS), imputed HLA alleles, exome array, and copy number variation analyses. We then combined associated variants in a meta-analysis with data from the Clozapine-Induced Agranulocytosis Consortium (up to 163 cases and 7970 controls). In the largest combined sample to date, we identified a novel association with rs149104283 (OR=4.32, P=1.79×10-8), intronic to transcripts of SLCO1B3 and SLCO1B7, members of a family of hepatic transporter genes previously implicated in adverse drug reactions including simvastatin-induced myopathy and docetaxel-induced neutropenia. Exome array analysis identified gene-wide associations of uncommon non-synonymous variants within UBAP2 and STARD9. We additionally provide independent replication of a previously identified variant in HLA-DQB1 (OR=15.6, P = 0.015, positive predictive value = 35.1%). These results implicate biological pathways through which clozapine may act to cause this serious adverse effect. PMID:27400856

  18. FAPI: Fast and accurate P-value Imputation for genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Johnny S H; Li, Miao-Xin; Deng, Jia-En; Sham, Pak C

    2016-05-01

    Imputing individual-level genotypes (or genotype imputation) is now a standard procedure in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to examine disease associations at untyped common genetic variants. Meta-analysis of publicly available GWAS summary statistics can allow more disease-associated loci to be discovered, but these data are usually provided for various variant sets. Thus imputing these summary statistics of different variant sets into a common reference panel for meta-analyses is impossible using traditional genotype imputation methods. Here we develop a fast and accurate P-value imputation (FAPI) method that utilizes summary statistics of common variants only. Its computational cost is linear with the number of untyped variants and has similar accuracy compared with IMPUTE2 with prephasing, one of the leading methods in genotype imputation. In addition, based on the FAPI idea, we develop a metric to detect abnormal association at a variant and showed that it had a significantly greater power compared with LD-PAC, a method that quantifies the evidence of spurious associations based on likelihood ratio. Our method is implemented in a user-friendly software tool, which is available at http://statgenpro.psychiatry.hku.hk/fapi.

  19. A genome-wide meta-analysis identifies novel loci associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Sheng; Liu, Xue-Feng; Aragam, Nagesh

    2010-12-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder both have strong inherited components. Recent studies have indicated that schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may share more than half of their genetic determinants. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis (combined analysis) for genome-wide association data of the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP array 6.0 to detect genetic variants influencing both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using European-American samples (653 bipolar cases and 1034 controls, 1172 schizophrenia cases and 1379 controls). The best associated SNP rs11789399 was located at 9q33.1 (p=2.38 × 10(-6), 5.74 × 10(-4), and 5.56 × 10(-9), for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and meta-analysis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, respectively), where one flanking gene, ASTN2 (220kb away) has been associated with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. The next best SNP was rs12201676 located at 6q15 (p=2.67 × 10(-4), 2.12 × 10(-5), 3.88 × 10(-8) for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and meta-analysis, respectively), near two flanking genes, GABRR1 and GABRR2 (15 and 17kb away, respectively). The third interesting SNP rs802568 was at 7q35 within CNTNAP2 (p=8.92 × 10(-4), 1.38 × 10(-5), and 1.62 × 10(-7) for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and meta-analysis, respectively). Through meta-analysis, we found two additional associated genes NALCN (the top SNP is rs2044117, p=4.57 × 10(-7)) and NAP5 (the top SNP is rs10496702, p=7.15 × 10(-7)). Haplotype analyses of above five loci further supported the associations with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. These results provide evidence of common genetic variants influencing schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. These findings will serve as a resource for replication in other populations to elucidate the potential role of these genetic variants in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

  20. Genome Wide Association Study to Identify SNPs and CNPs Associated with Development of Radiation Injury in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Development of Erectile Dysfunction Following...32 A Two-Stage Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Change in American Urological...of DNA repair and steroid metabolism gene polymorphisms with clinical late toxicity in patients treated with conformal radiotherapy for prostate

  1. A genome-wide association study yields five novel thyroid cancer risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Gudmundsson, Julius; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Sigurdsson, Jon K.; Stefansdottir, Lilja; Jonasson, Jon G.; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Masson, Gisli; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Halldorsson, Gisli H.; Stacey, Simon N.; Helgason, Hannes; Sulem, Patrick; Senter, Leigha; He, Huiling; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Ringel, Matthew D.; Aguillo, Esperanza; Panadero, Angeles; Prats, Enrique; Garcia-Castaño, Almudena; De Juan, Ana; Rivera, Fernando; Xu, Li; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I.; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Olafsson, Isleifur; Kristvinsson, Hoskuldur; Netea-Maier, Romana T.; Jonsson, Thorvaldur; Mayordomo, Jose I.; Plantinga, Theo S.; Hjartarson, Hannes; Hrafnkelsson, Jon; Sturgis, Erich M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Rafnar, Thorunn; de la Chapelle, Albert; Stefansson, Kari

    2017-01-01

    The great majority of thyroid cancers are of the non-medullary type. Here we report findings from a genome-wide association study of non-medullary thyroid cancer, including in total 3,001 patients and 287,550 controls from five study groups of European descent. Our results yield five novel loci (all with Pcombined<3 × 10−8): 1q42.2 (rs12129938 in PCNXL2), 3q26.2 (rs6793295 a missense mutation in LRCC34 near TERC), 5q22.1 (rs73227498 between NREP and EPB41L4A), 10q24.33 (rs7902587 near OBFC1), and two independently associated variants at 15q22.33 (rs2289261 and rs56062135; both in SMAD3). We also confirm recently published association results from a Chinese study of a variant on 5p15.33 (rs2736100 near the TERT gene) and present a stronger association result for a moderately correlated variant (rs10069690; OR=1.20, P=3.2 × 10−7) based on our study of individuals of European ancestry. In combination, these results raise several opportunities for future studies of the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer. PMID:28195142

  2. A Genome Wide Association Scan of Bovine Tuberculosis Susceptibility in Holstein-Friesian Dairy Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, Emma K.; Berry, Donagh P.; Wickham, Brian; Gormley, Eamonn P.; Bradley, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bovine tuberculosis is a significant veterinary and financial problem in many parts of the world. Although many factors influence infection and progression of the disease, there is a host genetic component and dissection of this may enlighten on the wider biology of host response to tuberculosis. However, a binary phenotype of presence/absence of infection presents a noisy signal for genomewide association study. Methodology/Principal Findings We calculated a composite phenotype of genetic merit for TB susceptibility based on disease incidence in daughters of elite sires used for artificial insemination in the Irish dairy herd. This robust measure was compared with 44,426 SNP genotypes in the most informative 307 subjects in a genome wide association analysis. Three SNPs in a 65 kb genomic region on BTA 22 were associated (i.e. p<10−5, peaking at position 59588069, p = 4.02×10−6) with tuberculosis susceptibility. Conclusions/Significance A genomic region on BTA 22 was suggestively associated with tuberculosis susceptibility; it contains the taurine transporter gene SLC6A6, or TauT, which is known to function in the immune system but has not previously been investigated for its role in tuberculosis infection. PMID:22355315

  3. A genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies new childhood obesity loci.

    PubMed

    Bradfield, Jonathan P; Taal, H Rob; Timpson, Nicholas J; Scherag, André; Lecoeur, Cecile; Warrington, Nicole M; Hypponen, Elina; Holst, Claus; Valcarcel, Beatriz; Thiering, Elisabeth; Salem, Rany M; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Cousminer, Diana L; Sleiman, Patrick M A; Zhao, Jianhua; Berkowitz, Robert I; Vimaleswaran, Karani S; Jarick, Ivonne; Pennell, Craig E; Evans, David M; St Pourcain, Beate; Berry, Diane J; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; van der Valk, Ralf J P; de Jongste, Johan C; Postma, Dirkje S; Boomsma, Dorret I; Gauderman, W James; Hassanein, Mohamed T; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mägi, Reedik; Boreham, Colin A G; Neville, Charlotte E; Moreno, Luis A; Elliott, Paul; Pouta, Anneli; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Li, Mingyao; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Eriksson, Johan G; Palotie, Aarno; Dallongeville, Jean; Das, Shikta; Deloukas, Panos; McMahon, George; Ring, Susan M; Kemp, John P; Buxton, Jessica L; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Bustamante, Mariona; Guxens, Mònica; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Gillman, Matthew W; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Bisgaard, Hans; Gilliland, Frank D; Heinrich, Joachim; Wheeler, Eleanor; Barroso, Inês; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Power, Chris; Palmer, Lyle J; Hinney, Anke; Widen, Elisabeth; Farooqi, I Sadaf; McCarthy, Mark I; Froguel, Philippe; Meyre, David; Hebebrand, Johannes; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Smith, George Davey; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F A

    2012-05-01

    Multiple genetic variants have been associated with adult obesity and a few with severe obesity in childhood; however, less progress has been made in establishing genetic influences on common early-onset obesity. We performed a North American, Australian and European collaborative meta-analysis of 14 studies consisting of 5,530 cases (≥95th percentile of body mass index (BMI)) and 8,318 controls (<50th percentile of BMI) of European ancestry. Taking forward the eight newly discovered signals yielding association with P < 5 × 10(-6) in nine independent data sets (2,818 cases and 4,083 controls), we observed two loci that yielded genome-wide significant combined P values near OLFM4 at 13q14 (rs9568856; P = 1.82 × 10(-9); odds ratio (OR) = 1.22) and within HOXB5 at 17q21 (rs9299; P = 3.54 × 10(-9); OR = 1.14). Both loci continued to show association when two extreme childhood obesity cohorts were included (2,214 cases and 2,674 controls). These two loci also yielded directionally consistent associations in a previous meta-analysis of adult BMI(1).

  4. A genome-wide association study of neuroticism in a population-based sample.

    PubMed

    Calboli, Federico C F; Tozzi, Federica; Galwey, Nicholas W; Antoniades, Athos; Mooser, Vincent; Preisig, Martin; Vollenweider, Peter; Waterworth, Dawn; Waeber, Gerard; Johnson, Michael R; Muglia, Pierandrea; Balding, David J

    2010-07-09

    Neuroticism is a moderately heritable personality trait considered to be a risk factor for developing major depression, anxiety disorders and dementia. We performed a genome-wide association study in 2,235 participants drawn from a population-based study of neuroticism, making this the largest association study for neuroticism to date. Neuroticism was measured by the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. After Quality Control, we analysed 430,000 autosomal SNPs together with an additional 1.2 million SNPs imputed with high quality from the Hap Map CEU samples. We found a very small effect of population stratification, corrected using one principal component, and some cryptic kinship that required no correction. NKAIN2 showed suggestive evidence of association with neuroticism as a main effect (p < 10(-6)) and GPC6 showed suggestive evidence for interaction with age (p approximately = 10(-7)). We found support for one previously-reported association (PDE4D), but failed to replicate other recent reports. These results suggest common SNP variation does not strongly influence neuroticism. Our study was powered to detect almost all SNPs explaining at least 2% of heritability, and so our results effectively exclude the existence of loci having a major effect on neuroticism.

  5. Pathway Analysis Based on a Genome-Wide Association Study of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Unjin; Kim, Han-Na; Lee, Hyejin; Oh, Jee-Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women of reproductive age, and it is affected by both environmental and genetic factors. Although the genetic component of PCOS is evident, studies aiming to identify susceptibility genes have shown controversial results. This study conducted a pathway-based analysis using a dataset obtained through a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to elucidate the biological pathways that contribute to PCOS susceptibility and the associated genes. Methods We used GWAS data on 636,797 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 1,221 individuals (432 PCOS patients and 789 controls) for analysis. A pathway analysis was conducted using meta-analysis gene-set enrichment of variant associations (MAGENTA). Top-ranking pathways or gene sets associated with PCOS were identified, and significant genes within the pathways were analyzed. Results The pathway analysis of the GWAS dataset identified significant pathways related to oocyte meiosis and the regulation of insulin secretion by acetylcholine and free fatty acids (all nominal gene-set enrichment analysis (GSEA) P-values < 0.05). In addition, INS, GNAQ, STXBP1, PLCB3, PLCB2, SMC3 and PLCZ1 were significant genes observed within the biological pathways (all gene P-values < 0.05). Conclusions By applying MAGENTA pathway analysis to PCOS GWAS data, we identified significant pathways and candidate genes involved in PCOS. Our findings may provide new leads for understanding the mechanisms underlying the development of PCOS. PMID:26308735

  6. A Fast Implementation of a Scan Statistic for Identifying Chromosomal Patterns of Genome Wide Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan V; Jacobsen, Douglas M; Turner, Stephen T; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kardia, Sharon L R

    2009-03-15

    In order to take into account the complex genomic distribution of SNP variations when identifying chromosomal regions with significant SNP effects, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association scan statistic was developed. To address the computational needs of genome wide association (GWA) studies, a fast Java application, which combines single-locus SNP tests and a scan statistic for identifying chromosomal regions with significant clusters of significant SNP effects, was developed and implemented. To illustrate this application, SNP associations were analyzed in a pharmacogenomic study of the blood pressure lowering effect of thiazide-diuretics (N=195) using the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K Set. 55,335 tagSNPs (pair-wise linkage disequilibrium R(2)<0.5) were selected to reduce the frequency correlation between SNPs. A typical workstation can complete the whole genome scan including 10,000 permutation tests within 3 hours. The most significant regions locate on chromosome 3, 6, 13 and 16, two of which contain candidate genes that may be involved in the underlying drug response mechanism. The computational performance of ChromoScan-GWA and its scalability were tested with up to 1,000,000 SNPs and up to 4,000 subjects. Using 10,000 permutations, the computation time grew linearly in these datasets. This scan statistic application provides a robust statistical and computational foundation for identifying genomic regions associated with disease and provides a method to compare GWA results even across different platforms.

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies new prostate cancer susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Fredrick R; Berndt, Sonja I; Siddiq, Afshan; Jacobs, Kevin B; Wang, Zhaoming; Lindstrom, Sara; Stevens, Victoria L; Chen, Constance; Mondul, Alison M; Travis, Ruth C; Stram, Daniel O; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F; Giles, Graham; Hopper, John L; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L; Muir, Kenneth; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Guy, Michelle; Severi, Gianluca; Grönberg, Henrik; Isaacs, William B; Karlsson, Robert; Wiklund, Fredrik; Xu, Jianfeng; Allen, Naomi E; Andriole, Gerald L; Barricarte, Aurelio; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Crawford, E David; Diver, W Ryan; Gonzalez, Carlos A; Gaziano, J Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L; Johansson, Mattias; Le Marchand, Loic; Ma, Jing; Sieri, Sabina; Stattin, Pär; Stampfer, Meir J; Tjonneland, Anne; Vineis, Paolo; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vogel, Ulla; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Yeager, Meredith; Thun, Michael J; Kolonel, Laurence N; Henderson, Brian E; Albanes, Demetrius; Hayes, Richard B; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Riboli, Elio; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Haiman, Christopher A; Kraft, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most common non-skin cancer diagnosed among males in developed countries and the second leading cause of cancer mortality, yet little is known regarding its etiology and factors that influence clinical outcome. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of PrCa have identified at least 30 distinct loci associated with small differences in risk. We conducted a GWAS in 2782 advanced PrCa cases (Gleason grade ≥ 8 or tumor stage C/D) and 4458 controls with 571 243 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Based on in silico replication of 4679 SNPs (Stage 1, P < 0.02) in two published GWAS with 7358 PrCa cases and 6732 controls, we identified a new susceptibility locus associated with overall PrCa risk at 2q37.3 (rs2292884, P= 4.3 × 10(-8)). We also confirmed a locus suggested by an earlier GWAS at 12q13 (rs902774, P= 8.6 × 10(-9)). The estimated per-allele odds ratios for these loci (1.14 for rs2292884 and 1.17 for rs902774) did not differ between advanced and non-advanced PrCa (case-only test for heterogeneity P= 0.72 and P= 0.61, respectively). Further studies will be needed to assess whether these or other loci are differentially associated with PrCa subtypes.

  8. A genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies new childhood obesity loci

    PubMed Central

    Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Taal, H. Rob; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Scherag, André; Lecoeur, Cecile; Warrington, Nicole M.; Hypponen, Elina; Holst, Claus; Valcarcel, Beatriz; Thiering, Elisabeth; Salem, Rany M.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cousminer, Diana L.; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Zhao, Jianhua; Berkowitz, Robert I.; Vimaleswaran, Karani S.; Jarick, Ivonne; Pennell, Craig E.; Evans, David M.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Berry, Diane J.; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeinera, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van der Valk, Ralf J.P.; de Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Gauderman, William J.; Hassanein, Mohamed T.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Mägi, Reedik; Boreham, Colin A.G.; Neville, Charlotte E.; Moreno, Luis A.; Elliott, Paul; Pouta, Anneli; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Li, Mingyao; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Eriksson, Johan G.; Palotie, Aarno; Dallongeville, Jean; Das, Shikta; Deloukas, Panos; McMahon, George; Ring, Susan M.; Kemp, John P.; Buxton, Jessica L.; Blakemore, Alexandra I.F.; Bustamante, Mariona; Guxens, Mònica; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Gillman, Matthew W.; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Bisgaard, Hans; Gilliland, Frank D.; Heinrich, Joachim; Wheeler, Eleanor; Barroso, Inês; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Power, Chris; Palmer, Lyle J.; Hinney, Anke; Widen, Elisabeth; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; McCarthy, Mark I.; Froguel, Philippe; Meyre, David; Hebebrand, Johannes; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Smith, George Davey; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F.A.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple genetic variants have been associated with adult obesity and a few with severe obesity in childhood; however, less progress has been made to establish genetic influences on common early-onset obesity. We performed a North American-Australian-European collaborative meta-analysis of fourteen studies consisting of 5,530 cases (≥95th percentile of body mass index (BMI)) and 8,318 controls (<50th percentile of BMI) of European ancestry. Taking forward the eight novel signals yielding association with P < 5×10−6 in to nine independent datasets (n = 2,818 cases and 4,083 controls) we observed two loci that yielded a genome wide significant combined P-value, namely near OLFM4 on 13q14 (rs9568856; P=1.82×10−9; OR=1.22) and within HOXB5 on 17q21 (rs9299; P=3.54×10−9; OR=1.14). Both loci continued to show association when including two extreme childhood obesity cohorts (n = 2,214 cases and 2,674 controls). Finally, these two loci yielded directionally consistent associations in the GIANT meta-analysis of adult BMI1. PMID:22484627

  9. Pathway analysis of genome-wide association datasets of personality traits.

    PubMed

    Kim, H-N; Kim, B-H; Cho, J; Ryu, S; Shin, H; Sung, J; Shin, C; Cho, N H; Sung, Y A; Choi, B-O; Kim, H-L

    2015-04-01

    Although several genome-wide association (GWA) studies of human personality have been recently published, genetic variants that are highly associated with certain personality traits remain unknown, due to difficulty reproducing results. To further investigate these genetic variants, we assessed biological pathways using GWA datasets. Pathway analysis using GWA data was performed on 1089 Korean women whose personality traits were measured with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory for the 5-factor model of personality. A total of 1042 pathways containing 8297 genes were included in our study. Of these, 14 pathways were highly enriched with association signals that were validated in 1490 independent samples. These pathways include association of: Neuroticism with axon guidance [L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) interactions]; Extraversion with neuronal system and voltage-gated potassium channels; Agreeableness with L1CAM interaction, neurotransmitter receptor binding and downstream transmission in postsynaptic cells; and Conscientiousness with the interferon-gamma and platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta polypeptide pathways. Several genes that contribute to top-ranked pathways in this study were previously identified in GWA studies or by pathway analysis in schizophrenia or other neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we report the first pathway analysis of all five personality traits. Importantly, our analysis identified novel pathways that contribute to understanding the etiology of personality traits.

  10. Multi-locus Test and Correction for Confounding Effects in Genome-Wide Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Donglai; Liu, Chuanhai; Xie, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) examine a large number of genetic variants, e. g., single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), and associate them with a disease of interest. Traditional statistical methods for GWASs can produce spurious associations, due to limited information from individual SNPs and confounding effects. This paper develops two statistical methods to enhance data analysis of GWASs. The first is a multiple-SNP association test, which is a weighted chi-square test derived for big contingency tables. The test assesses combinatorial effects of multiple SNPs and improves conventional methods of single SNP analysis. The second is a method that corrects for confounding effects, which may come from population stratification as well as other ambiguous (unknown) factors. The proposed method identifies a latent confounding factor, using a profile of whole genome SNPs, and eliminates confounding effects through matching or stratified statistical analysis. Simulations and a GWAS of rheumatoid arthritis demonstrate that the proposed methods dramatically remove the number of significant tests, or false positives, and outperforms other available methods.

  11. Multi-locus Test and Correction for Confounding Effects in Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Donglai; Liu, Chuanhai; Xie, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) examine a large number of genetic variants, e.g., single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), and associate them with a disease of interest. Traditional statistical methods for GWASs can produce spurious associations, due to limited information from individual SNPs and confounding effects. This paper develops two statistical methods to enhance data analysis of GWASs. The first is a multiple-SNP association test, which is a weighted chi-square test derived for big contingency tables. The test assesses combinatorial effects of multiple SNPs and improves conventional methods of single SNP analysis. The second is a method that corrects for confounding effects, which may come from population stratification as well as other ambiguous (unknown) factors. The proposed method identifies a latent confounding factor, using a profile of whole genome SNPs, and eliminates confounding effects through matching or stratified statistical analysis. Simulations and a GWAS of rheumatoid arthritis demonstrate that the proposed methods dramatically remove the number of significant tests, or false positives, and outperforms other available methods. PMID:27232635

  12. Validating Genome-Wide Association Candidates Controlling Quantitative Variation in Nodulation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tiffin, Peter; Guhlin, Joseph; Atkins, Paul; Baltes, Nicholas J.; Denny, Roxanne

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies offer the opportunity to identify genes that contribute to naturally occurring variation in quantitative traits. However, GWA relies exclusively on statistical association, so functional validation is necessary to make strong claims about gene function. We used a combination of gene-disruption platforms (Tnt1 retrotransposons, hairpin RNA-interference constructs, and CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases) together with randomized, well-replicated experiments to evaluate the function of genes that an earlier GWA study in Medicago truncatula had identified as candidates contributing to variation in the symbiosis between legumes and rhizobia. We evaluated ten candidate genes found in six clusters of strongly associated single nucleotide polymorphisms, selected on the basis of their strength of statistical association, proximity to annotated gene models, and root or nodule expression. We found statistically significant effects on nodule production for three candidate genes, each validated in two independent mutants. Annotated functions of these three genes suggest their contributions to quantitative variation in nodule production occur through processes not previously connected to nodulation, including phosphorous supply and salicylic acid-related defense response. These results demonstrate the utility of GWA combined with reverse mutagenesis technologies to discover and validate genes contributing to naturally occurring variation in quantitative traits. The results highlight the potential for GWA to complement forward genetics in identifying the genetic basis of ecologically and economically important traits. PMID:28057894

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies new prostate cancer susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Siddiq, Afshan; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Wang, Zhaoming; Lindstrom, Sara; Stevens, Victoria L.; Chen, Constance; Mondul, Alison M.; Travis, Ruth C.; Stram, Daniel O.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Giles, Graham; Hopper, John L.; Neal, David E.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Muir, Kenneth; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Guy, Michelle; Severi, Gianluca; Grönberg, Henrik; Isaacs, William B.; Karlsson, Robert; Wiklund, Fredrik; Xu, Jianfeng; Allen, Naomi E.; Andriole, Gerald L.; Barricarte, Aurelio; Boeing, Heiner; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.; Crawford, E. David; Diver, W. Ryan; Gonzalez, Carlos A.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Johansson, Mattias; Le Marchand, Loic; Ma, Jing; Sieri, Sabina; Stattin, Pär; Stampfer, Meir J.; Tjonneland, Anne; Vineis, Paolo; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vogel, Ulla; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Yeager, Meredith; Thun, Michael J.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Albanes, Demetrius; Hayes, Richard B.; Spencer Feigelson, Heather; Riboli, Elio; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Kraft, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most common non-skin cancer diagnosed among males in developed countries and the second leading cause of cancer mortality, yet little is known regarding its etiology and factors that influence clinical outcome. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of PrCa have identified at least 30 distinct loci associated with small differences in risk. We conducted a GWAS in 2782 advanced PrCa cases (Gleason grade ≥ 8 or tumor stage C/D) and 4458 controls with 571 243 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Based on in silico replication of 4679 SNPs (Stage 1, P < 0.02) in two published GWAS with 7358 PrCa cases and 6732 controls, we identified a new susceptibility locus associated with overall PrCa risk at 2q37.3 (rs2292884, P= 4.3 × 10−8). We also confirmed a locus suggested by an earlier GWAS at 12q13 (rs902774, P= 8.6 × 10−9). The estimated per-allele odds ratios for these loci (1.14 for rs2292884 and 1.17 for rs902774) did not differ between advanced and non-advanced PrCa (case-only test for heterogeneity P= 0.72 and P= 0.61, respectively). Further studies will be needed to assess whether these or other loci are differentially associated with PrCa subtypes. PMID:21743057

  14. Genome-Wide Association of Stem Water Soluble Carbohydrates in Bread Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yan; Liu, Jindong; Zhang, Yan; Geng, Hongwei; Rasheed, Awais; Xiao, Yonggui; Cao, Shuanghe; Fu, Luping; Yan, Jun; Wen, Weie; Zhang, Yong; Jing, Ruilian; Xia, Xianchun; He, Zhonghu

    2016-01-01

    Water soluble carbohydrates (WSC) in stems play an important role in buffering grain yield in wheat against biotic and abiotic stresses; however, knowledge of genes controlling WSC is very limited. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using a high-density 90K SNP array to better understand the genetic basis underlying WSC, and to explore marker-based breeding approaches. WSC was evaluated in an association panel comprising 166 Chinese bread wheat cultivars planted in four environments. Fifty two marker-trait associations (MTAs) distributed across 23 loci were identified for phenotypic best linear unbiased estimates (BLUEs), and 11 MTAs were identified in two or more environments. Liner regression showed a clear dependence of WSC BLUE scores on numbers of favorable (increasing WSC content) and unfavorable alleles (decreasing WSC), indicating that genotypes with higher numbers of favorable or lower numbers of unfavorable alleles had higher WSC content. In silico analysis of flanking sequences of trait-associated SNPs revealed eight candidate genes related to WSC content grouped into two categories based on the type of encoding proteins, namely, defense response proteins and proteins triggered by environmental stresses. The identified SNPs and candidate genes related to WSC provide opportunities for breeding higher WSC wheat cultivars. PMID:27802269

  15. Genome-wide association study implicates immune activation of multiple integrin genes in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Katrina M; Moutsianas, Loukas; Lee, James C; Lamb, Christopher A; Luo, Yang; Kennedy, Nicholas A; Jostins, Luke; Rice, Daniel L; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Ji, Sun-Gou; Heap, Graham; Nimmo, Elaine R; Edwards, Cathryn; Henderson, Paul; Mowat, Craig; Sanderson, Jeremy; Satsangi, Jack; Simmons, Alison; Wilson, David C; Tremelling, Mark; Hart, Ailsa; Mathew, Christopher G; Newman, William G; Parkes, Miles; Lees, Charlie W; Uhlig, Holm; Hawkey, Chris; Prescott, Natalie J; Ahmad, Tariq; Mansfield, John C; Anderson, Carl A; Barrett, Jeffrey C

    2017-02-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 215 risk loci for inflammatory bowel disease, thereby uncovering fundamental aspects of its molecular biology. We performed a genome-wide association study of 25,305 individuals and conducted a meta-analysis with published summary statistics, yielding a total sample size of 59,957 subjects. We identified 25 new susceptibility loci, 3 of which contain integrin genes that encode proteins in pathways that have been identified as important therapeutic targets in inflammatory bowel disease. The associated variants are correlated with expression changes in response to immune stimulus at two of these genes (ITGA4 and ITGB8) and at previously implicated loci (ITGAL and ICAM1). In all four cases, the expression-increasing allele also increases disease risk. We also identified likely causal missense variants in a gene implicated in primary immune deficiency, PLCG2, and a negative regulator of inflammation, SLAMF8. Our results demonstrate that new associations at common variants continue to identify genes relevant to therapeutic target identification and prioritization.

  16. Genome-wide association study for cheese yield and curd nutrient recovery in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Dadousis, C; Biffani, S; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Nicolazzi, E L; Rosa, G J M; Gianola, D; Rossoni, A; Santus, E; Bittante, G; Cecchinato, A

    2017-02-01

    Cheese production and consumption are increasing in many countries worldwide. As a result, interest has increased in strategies for genetic selection of individuals for technological traits of milk related to cheese yield (CY) in dairy cattle breeding. However, little is known about the genetic background of a cow's ability to produce cheese. Recently, a relatively large panel (1,264 cows) of different measures of individual cow CY and milk nutrient and energy recoveries in the cheese (REC) became available. Genetic analyses showed considerable variation for CY and for aptitude to retain high proportions of fat, protein, and water in the coagulum. For the dairy industry, these characteristics are of major economic importance. Nevertheless, use of this knowledge in dairy breeding is hampered by high costs, intense labor requirement, and lack of appropriate technology. However, in the era of genomics, new possibilities are available for animal breeding and genetic improvement. For example, identification of genomic regions involved in cow CY might provide potential for marker-assisted selection. The objective of this study was to perform genome-wide association studies on different CY and REC measures. Milk and DNA samples from 1,152 Italian Brown Swiss cows were used. Three CY traits expressing the weight (wt) of fresh curd (%CYCURD), curd solids (%CYSOLIDS), and curd moisture (%CYWATER) as a percentage of weight of milk processed, and 4 REC (RECFAT, RECPROTEIN, RECSOLIDS, and RECENERGY, calculated as the % ratio between the nutrient in curd and the corresponding nutrient in processed milk) were analyzed. Animals were genotyped with the Illumina BovineSNP50 Bead Chip v.2. Single marker regressions were fitted using the GenABEL R package (genome-wide association using mixed model and regression-genomic control). In total, 103 significant associations (88 single nucleotide polymorphisms) were identified in 10 chromosomes (2, 6, 9, 11, 12, 14, 18, 19, 27, 28). For

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Flight Speed in Nellore Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Tiago Silva; Baldi, Fernando; Sant’Anna, Aline Cristina; Albuquerque, Lucia Galvão; Paranhos da Costa, Mateus José Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cattle temperament is an important factor that affects the profitability of beef cattle enterprises, due to its relationship with productivity traits, animal welfare and labor safety. Temperament is a complex phenotype often assessed by measuring a series of behavioral traits, which result from the effects of multiple environmental and genetic factors, and their interactions. The aims of this study were to perform a genome-wide association study and detect genomic regions, potential candidate genes and their biological mechanisms underlying temperament, measured by flight speed (FS) test in Nellore cattle. Materials and Methods The genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using a single-step procedure (ssGBLUP) which combined simultaneously all 16,600 phenotypes from genotyped and non-genotyped animals, full pedigree information of 162,645 animals and 1,384 genotyped animals in one step. The animals were genotyped with High Density Bovine SNP BeadChip which contains 777,962 SNP markers. After quality control (QC) a total of 455,374 SNPs remained. Results Heritability estimated for FS was 0.21 ± 0.02. Consecutive SNPs explaining 1% or more of the total additive genetic variance were considered as windows associated with FS. Nine candidate regions located on eight different Bos taurus chromosomes (BTA) (1 at 73 Mb, 2 at 65 Mb, 5 at 22 Mb and 119 Mb, 9 at 98 Mb, 11 at 67 Mb, 15 at 16 Mb, 17 at 63 Kb, and 26 at 47 Mb) were identified. The candidate genes identified in these regions were NCKAP5 (BTA2), PARK2 (BTA9), ANTXR1 (BTA11), GUCY1A2 (BTA15), CPE (BTA17) and DOCK1 (BTA26). Among these genes PARK2, GUCY1A2, CPE and DOCK1 are related to dopaminergic system, memory formation, biosynthesis of peptide hormone and neurotransmitter and brain development, respectively. Conclusions Our findings allowed us to identify nine genomic regions (SNP windows) associated with beef cattle temperament, measured by FS test. Within these windows, six promising

  18. Replication of celiac disease UK genome-wide association study results in a US population

    PubMed Central

    Garner, C.P.; Murray, J.A.; Ding, Y.C.; Tien, Z.; van Heel, D.A.; Neuhausen, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common disease with a prevalence of ∼1%. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) and follow-up study identified eight loci significantly associated with celiac disease risk. We genotyped the top 1020 non-HLA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the GWAS study that were genotyped in the previous follow-up study. After quality control assessments, 975 SNPs were analyzed for association with 906 celiac disease cases and 3819 controls, using logistic regression. Additional genotype data were generated by imputation and analyzed across the regions showing the strongest statistical evidence for association. Twenty SNPs were associated with celiac disease with P < 0.01 in the current study as well as in the previous follow-up study, of which 16 had P < 0.001 and 11 had P < 1 × 10−11. Five of eight regions identified in the follow-up study were strongly associated with celiac disease, including regions on 1q31, 3q25, 3q28, 4q27 and 12q24. The strongest associations were at 4q27, the region most strongly associated in the GWAS and follow-up study and containing IL2 and IL21, and at 3q28 harboring LPP. In addition, we provide new evidence for an association, not previously reported, on 2q31 harboring a strong candidate gene, ITGA4. In conclusion, in this first follow-up study of celiac cases from the USA, we provide additional evidence that five of eight previously identified regions harbor risk alleles for celiac disease, and new evidence for an association on 2q31. The underlying functional mutations responsible for these replicated associations need to be identified. PMID:19648293

  19. Genome-wide association study of smoking behaviors in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Siedlinski, Mateusz; Cho, Michael H.; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Anderson, Wayne; Kong, Xiangyang; Rennard, Stephen I.; Beaty, Terri H.; Hokanson, John E.; Crapo, James D.; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for COPD and COPD severity. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) and a Dopamine Beta-Hydroxylase (DBH) locus associated with smoking cessation in multiple populations. Objective To identify SNPs associated with lifetime average and current CPD, age at smoking initiation, and smoking cessation in COPD subjects. Methods GWAS were conducted in 4 independent cohorts encompassing 3,441 ever-smoking COPD subjects (GOLD stage II or higher). Untyped SNPs were imputed using HapMap (phase II) panel. Results from all cohorts were meta-analyzed. Results Several SNPs near the HLA region on chromosome 6p21 and in an intergenic region on chromosome 2q21 showed associations with age at smoking initiation, both with the lowest p=2×10−7. No SNPs were associated with lifetime average CPD, current CPD or smoking cessation with p<10−6. Nominally significant associations with candidate SNPs within alpha-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors 3/5 (CHRNA3/CHRNA5; e.g. p=0.00011 for SNP rs1051730) and Cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6; e.g. p=2.78×10−5 for a nonsynonymous SNP rs1801272) regions were observed for lifetime average CPD, however only CYP2A6 showed evidence of significant association with current CPD. A candidate SNP (rs3025343) in the DBH was significantly (p=0.015) associated with smoking cessation. Conclusion We identified two candidate regions associated with age at smoking initiation in COPD subjects. Associations of CHRNA3/CHRNA5 and CYP2A6 loci with CPD and DBH with smoking cessation are also likely of importance in the smoking behaviors of COPD patients. PMID:21685187

  20. Agronomic and Seed Quality Traits Dissected by Genome-Wide Association Mapping in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Körber, Niklas; Bus, Anja; Li, Jinquan; Parkin, Isobel A. P.; Wittkop, Benjamin; Snowdon, Rod J.; Stich, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    In Brassica napus breeding, traits related to commercial success are of highest importance for plant breeders. However, such traits can only be assessed in an advanced developmental stage. Molecular markers genetically linked to such traits have the potential to accelerate the breeding process of B. napus by marker-assisted selection. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to identify (i) genome regions associated with the examined agronomic and seed quality traits, (ii) the interrelationship of population structure and the detected associations, and (iii) candidate genes for the revealed associations. The diversity set used in this study consisted of 405 B. napus inbred lines which were genotyped using a 6K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and phenotyped for agronomic and seed quality traits in field trials. In a genome-wide association study, we detected a total of 112 associations between SNPs and the seed quality traits as well as 46 SNP-trait associations for the agronomic traits with a P < 1.28e-05 (Bonferroni correction of α = 0.05) for the inbreds of the spring and winter trial. For the seed quality traits, a single SNP-sulfur concentration in seeds (SUL) association explained up to 67.3% of the phenotypic variance, whereas for the agronomic traits, a single SNP-blossom color (BLC) association explained up to 30.2% of the phenotypic variance. In a basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) search within a distance of 2.5 Mbp around these SNP-trait associations, 62 hits of potential candidate genes with a BLAST-score of ≥100 and a sequence identity of ≥70% to A. thaliana or B. rapa could be found for the agronomic SNP-trait associations and 187 hits of potential candidate genes for the seed quality SNP-trait associations. PMID:27066036

  1. Genome-wide association study of smoking behaviours in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Siedlinski, Mateusz; Cho, Michael H; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A; Anderson, Wayne; Kong, Xiangyang; Rennard, Stephen I; Beaty, Terri H; Hokanson, John E; Crapo, James D; Silverman, Edwin K

    2011-10-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and COPD severity. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) and a dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) locus associated with smoking cessation in multiple populations. Objective To identify SNPs associated with lifetime average and current CPD, age at smoking initiation, and smoking cessation in patients with COPD. Methods GWAS were conducted in four independent cohorts encompassing 3441 ever-smoking patients with COPD (Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease stage II or higher). Untyped SNPs were imputed using the HapMap (phase II) panel. Results from all cohorts were meta-analysed. Results Several SNPs near the HLA region on chromosome 6p21 and in an intergenic region on chromosome 2q21 showed associations with age at smoking initiation, both with the lowest p=2×10(-7). No SNPs were associated with lifetime average CPD, current CPD or smoking cessation with p<10(-6). Nominally significant associations with candidate SNPs within cholinergic receptors, nicotinic, alpha 3/5 (CHRNA3/CHRNA5; eg, p=0.00011 for SNP rs1051730) and cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily A, polypeptide 6 (CYP2A6; eg, p=2.78×10(-5) for a non-synonymous SNP rs1801272) regions were observed for lifetime average CPD, however only CYP2A6 showed evidence of significant association with current CPD. A candidate SNP (rs3025343) in DBH was significantly (p=0.015) associated with smoking cessation. Conclusion The authors identified two candidate regions associated with age at smoking initiation in patients with COPD. Associations of CHRNA3/CHRNA5 and CYP2A6 loci with CPD and DBH with smoking cessation are also likely of importance in the smoking behaviours of patients with COPD.

  2. Genome-Wide Association Identifies SLC2A9 and NLN Gene Regions as Associated with Entropion in Domestic Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Mousel, Michelle R.; Reynolds, James O.; White, Stephen N.

    2015-01-01

    Entropion is an inward rolling of the eyelid allowing contact between the eyelashes and cornea that may lead to blindness if not corrected. Although many mammalian species, including humans and dogs, are afflicted by congenital entropion, no specific genes or gene regions related to development of entropion have been reported in any mammalian species to date. Entropion in domestic sheep is known to have a genetic component therefore, we used domestic sheep as a model system to identify genomic regions containing genes associated with entropion. A genome-wide association was conducted with congenital entropion in 998 Columbia, Polypay, and Rambouillet sheep genotyped with 50,000 SNP markers. Prevalence of entropion was 6.01%, with all breeds represented. Logistic regression was performed in PLINK with additive allelic, recessive, dominant, and genotypic inheritance models. Two genome-wide significant (empirical P<0.05) SNP were identified, specifically markers in SLC2A9 (empirical P = 0.007; genotypic model) and near NLN (empirical P = 0.026; dominance model). Six additional genome-wide suggestive SNP (nominal P<1x10-5) were identified including markers in or near PIK3CB (P = 2.22x10-6; additive model), KCNB1 (P = 2.93x10-6; dominance model), ZC3H12C (P = 3.25x10-6; genotypic model), JPH1 (P = 4.68x20-6; genotypic model), and MYO3B (P = 5.74x10-6; recessive model). This is the first report of specific gene regions associated with congenital entropion in any mammalian species, to our knowledge. Further, none of these genes have previously been associated with any eyelid traits. These results represent the first genome-wide analysis of gene regions associated with entropion and provide target regions for the development of sheep genetic markers for marker-assisted selection. PMID:26098909

  3. Genome-Wide Association Identifies SLC2A9 and NLN Gene Regions as Associated with Entropion in Domestic Sheep.

    PubMed

    Mousel, Michelle R; Reynolds, James O; White, Stephen N

    2015-01-01

    Entropion is an inward rolling of the eyelid allowing contact between the eyelashes and cornea that may lead to blindness if not corrected. Although many mammalian species, including humans and dogs, are afflicted by congenital entropion, no specific genes or gene regions related to development of entropion have been reported in any mammalian species to date. Entropion in domestic sheep is known to have a genetic component therefore, we used domestic sheep as a model system to identify genomic regions containing genes associated with entropion. A genome-wide association was conducted with congenital entropion in 998 Columbia, Polypay, and Rambouillet sheep genotyped with 50,000 SNP markers. Prevalence of entropion was 6.01%, with all breeds represented. Logistic regression was performed in PLINK with additive allelic, recessive, dominant, and genotypic inheritance models. Two genome-wide significant (empirical P<0.05) SNP were identified, specifically markers in SLC2A9 (empirical P = 0.007; genotypic model) and near NLN (empirical P = 0.026; dominance model). Six additional genome-wide suggestive SNP (nominal P<1x10(-5)) were identified including markers in or near PIK3CB (P = 2.22x10(-6); additive model), KCNB1 (P = 2.93x10(-6); dominance model), ZC3H12C (P = 3.25x10(-6); genotypic model), JPH1 (P = 4.68x20(-6); genotypic model), and MYO3B (P = 5.74x10(-6); recessive model). This is the first report of specific gene regions associated with congenital entropion in any mammalian species, to our knowledge. Further, none of these genes have previously been associated with any eyelid traits. These results represent the first genome-wide analysis of gene regions associated with entropion and provide target regions for the development of sheep genetic markers for marker-assisted selection.

  4. Genome-wide association study of perioperative myocardial infarction after coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kertai, Miklos D; Li, Yi-Ju; Li, Yen-Wei; Ji, Yunqi; Alexander, John; Newman, Mark F; Smith, Peter K; Joseph, Diane; Mathew, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Identification of patient subpopulations susceptible to develop myocardial infarction (MI) or, conversely, those displaying either intrinsic cardioprotective phenotypes or highly responsive to protective interventions remain high-priority knowledge gaps. We sought to identify novel common genetic variants associated with perioperative MI in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting using genome-wide association methodology. Setting 107 secondary and tertiary cardiac surgery centres across the USA. Participants We conducted a stage I genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 1433 ethnically diverse patients of both genders (112 cases/1321 controls) from the Genetics of Myocardial Adverse Outcomes and Graft Failure (GeneMAGIC) study, and a stage II analysis in an expanded population of 2055 patients (225 cases/1830 controls) combined from the GeneMAGIC and Duke Perioperative Genetics and Safety Outcomes (PEGASUS) studies. Patients undergoing primary non-emergent coronary bypass grafting were included. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome variable was perioperative MI, defined as creatine kinase MB isoenzyme (CK-MB) values ≥10× upper limit of normal during the first postoperative day, and not attributable to preoperative MI. Secondary outcomes included postoperative CK-MB as a quantitative trait, or a dichotomised phenotype based on extreme quartiles of the CK-MB distribution. Results Following quality control and adjustment for clinical covariates, we identified 521 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the stage I GWAS analysis. Among these, 8 common variants in 3 genes or intergenic regions met p<10−5 in stage II. A secondary analysis using CK-MB as a quantitative trait (minimum p=1.26×10−3 for rs609418), or a dichotomised phenotype based on extreme CK-MB values (minimum p=7.72×10−6 for rs4834703) supported these findings. Pathway analysis revealed that genes harbouring top-scoring variants cluster in pathways of

  5. Multistage genome-wide association meta-analyses identified two new loci for bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Choi, Hyung Jin; Estrada, Karol; Leo, Paul J; Li, Jian; Pei, Yu-Fang; Zhang, Yinping; Lin, Yong; Shen, Hui; Liu, Yao-Zhong; Liu, Yongjun; Zhao, Yingchun; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Tian, Qing; Wang, Yu-ping; Han, Yingying; Ran, Shu; Hai, Rong; Zhu, Xue-Zhen; Wu, Shuyan; Yan, Han; Liu, Xiaogang; Yang, Tie-Lin; Guo, Yan; Zhang, Feng; Guo, Yan-fang; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Xiangding; Tan, Lijun; Zhang, Lishu; Deng, Fei-Yan; Deng, Hongyi; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Duncan, Emma L; Lee, Jong Young; Han, Bok Ghee; Cho, Nam H; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; McCloskey, Eugene; Eastell, Richard; Prince, Richard L; Eisman, John A; Jones, Graeme; Reid, Ian R; Sambrook, Philip N; Dennison, Elaine M; Danoy, Patrick; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Hu, Tian; Xiang, Shuanglin; Papasian, Christopher J; Brown, Matthew A; Shin, Chan Soo; Uitterlinden, André G; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2014-04-01

    Aiming to identify novel genetic variants and to confirm previously identified genetic variants associated with bone mineral density (BMD), we conducted a three-stage genome-wide association (GWA) meta-analysis in 27 061 study subjects. Stage 1 meta-analyzed seven GWA samples and 11 140 subjects for BMDs at the lumbar spine, hip and femoral neck, followed by a Stage 2 in silico replication of 33 SNPs in 9258 subjects, and by a Stage 3 de novo validation of three SNPs in 6663 subjects. Combining evidence from all the stages, we have identified two novel loci that have not been reported previously at the genome-wide significance (GWS; 5.0 × 10(-8)) level: 14q24.2 (rs227425, P-value 3.98 × 10(-13), SMOC1) in the combined sample of males and females and 21q22.13 (rs170183, P-value 4.15 × 10(-9), CLDN14) in the female-specific sample. The two newly identified SNPs were also significant in the GEnetic Factors for OSteoporosis consortium (GEFOS, n = 32 960) summary results. We have also independently confirmed 13 previously reported loci at the GWS level: 1p36.12 (ZBTB40), 1p31.3 (GPR177), 4p16.3 (FGFRL1), 4q22.1 (MEPE), 5q14.3 (MEF2C), 6q25.1 (C6orf97, ESR1), 7q21.3 (FLJ42280, SHFM1), 7q31.31 (FAM3C, WNT16), 8q24.12 (TNFRSF11B), 11p15.3 (SOX6), 11q13.4 (LRP5), 13q14.11 (AKAP11) and 16q24 (FOXL1). Gene expression analysis in osteogenic cells implied potential functional association of the two candidate genes (SMOC1 and CLDN14) in bone metabolism. Our findings independently confirm previously identified biological pathways underlying bone metabolism and contribute to the discovery of novel pathways, thus providing valuable insights into the intervention and treatment of osteoporosis.

  6. Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Genes Related to Renal Mercury Concentrations in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alkaissi, Hammoudi; Ekstrand, Jimmy; Jawad, Aksa; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Havarinasab, Said; Soderkvist, Peter; Hultman, Per

    2016-01-01

    Background: Following human mercury (Hg) exposure, the metal accumulates in considerable concentrations in kidney, liver, and brain. Although the toxicokinetics of Hg have been studied extensively, factors responsible for interindividual variation in humans are largely unknown. Differences in accumulation of renal Hg between inbred mouse strains suggest a genetic interstrain variation regulating retention or/and excretion of Hg. A.SW, DBA/2 and BALB/C mouse strains accumulate higher amounts of Hg than B10.S. Objectives: We aimed to find candidate genes associated with regulation of renal Hg concentrations. Methods: A.SW, B10.S and their F1 and F2 offspring were exposed for 6 weeks to 2.0 mg Hg/L drinking water. Genotyping with microsatellites was conducted on 84 F2 mice for genome-wide scanning with ion pair reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (IP RP HPLC). Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were established. Denaturing HPLC was used to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms for haplotyping and fine mapping in 184 and 32 F2 mice, respectively. Candidate genes (Pprc1, Btrc and Nfkb2) verified by fine mapping and QTL were further investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Genes enhanced by Pprc1 (Nrf1 and Nrf2) were included for gene expression analysis. Results: Renal Hg concentrations differed significantly between A.SW and B10.S mice and between males and females within each strain. QTL analysis showed a peak logarithm of odds ratio score 5.78 on chromosome 19 (p = 0.002). Haplotype and fine mapping associated the Hg accumulation with Pprc1, which encodes PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC), a coactivator for proteins involved in detoxification. Pprc1 and two genes coactivated by Pprc1 (Nrf1 and Nrf2) had significantly lower gene expression in the A.SW strain than in the B10.S strain. Conclusions: This study supports Pprc1 as a key regulator for renal Hg excretion. Citation: Alkaissi H, Ekstrand J, Jawad A, Nielsen JB, Havarinasab S, Soderkvist P

  7. Multistage genome-wide association meta-analyses identified two new loci for bone mineral density

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Choi, Hyung Jin; Estrada, Karol; Leo, Paul J.; Li, Jian; Pei, Yu-Fang; Zhang, Yinping; Lin, Yong; Shen, Hui; Liu, Yao-Zhong; Liu, Yongjun; Zhao, Yingchun; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Tian, Qing; Wang, Yu-ping; Han, Yingying; Ran, Shu; Hai, Rong; Zhu, Xue-Zhen; Wu, Shuyan; Yan, Han; Liu, Xiaogang; Yang, Tie-Lin; Guo, Yan; Zhang, Feng; Guo, Yan-fang; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Xiangding; Tan, Lijun; Zhang, Lishu; Deng, Fei-Yan; Deng, Hongyi; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Duncan, Emma L; Lee, Jong Young; Han, Bok Ghee; Cho, Nam H.; Nicholson, Geoffrey C.; McCloskey, Eugene; Eastell, Richard; Prince, Richard L.; Eisman, John A.; Jones, Graeme; Reid, Ian R.; Sambrook, Philip N.; Dennison, Elaine M.; Danoy, Patrick; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Streeten, Elizabeth A.; Hu, Tian; Xiang, Shuanglin; Papasian, Christopher J.; Brown, Matthew A.; Shin, Chan Soo; Uitterlinden, André G.; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Aiming to identify novel genetic variants and to confirm previously identified genetic variants associated with bone mineral density (BMD), we conducted a three-stage genome-wide association (GWA) meta-analysis in 27 061 study subjects. Stage 1 meta-analyzed seven GWA samples and 11 140 subjects for BMDs at the lumbar spine, hip and femoral neck, followed by a Stage 2 in silico replication of 33 SNPs in 9258 subjects, and by a Stage 3 de novo validation of three SNPs in 6663 subjects. Combining evidence from all the stages, we have identified two novel loci that have not been reported previously at the genome-wide significance (GWS; 5.0 × 10−8) level: 14q24.2 (rs227425, P-value 3.98 × 10−13, SMOC1) in the combined sample of males and females and 21q22.13 (rs170183, P-value 4.15 × 10−9, CLDN14) in the female-specific sample. The two newly identified SNPs were also significant in the GEnetic Factors for OSteoporosis consortium (GEFOS, n = 32 960) summary results. We have also independently confirmed 13 previously reported loci at the GWS level: 1p36.12 (ZBTB40), 1p31.3 (GPR177), 4p16.3 (FGFRL1), 4q22.1 (MEPE), 5q14.3 (MEF2C), 6q25.1 (C6orf97, ESR1), 7q21.3 (FLJ42280, SHFM1), 7q31.31 (FAM3C, WNT16), 8q24.12 (TNFRSF11B), 11p15.3 (SOX6), 11q13.4 (LRP5), 13q14.11 (AKAP11) and 16q24 (FOXL1). Gene expression analysis in osteogenic cells implied potential functional association of the two candidate genes (SMOC1 and CLDN14) in bone metabolism. Our findings independently confirm previously identified biological pathways underlying bone metabolism and contribute to the discovery of novel pathways, thus providing valuable insights into the intervention and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:24249740

  8. Genome-wide association analysis of feed intake and residual feed intake in Nellore cattle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Feed intake plays an important economic role in beef cattle, and is related with feed efficiency, weight gain and carcass traits. However, the phenotypes collected for dry matter intake and feed efficiency are scarce when compared with other measures such as weight gain and carcass traits. The use of genomic information can improve the power of inference of studies on these measures, identifying genomic regions that affect these phenotypes. This work performed the genome-wide association study (GWAS) for dry matter intake (DMI) and residual feed intake (RFI) of 720 Nellore cattle (Bos taurus indicus). Results In general, no genomic region extremely associated with both phenotypic traits was observed, as expected for the variables that have their regulation controlled by many genes. Three SNPs surpassed the threshold for the Bonferroni multiple test for DMI and two SNPs for RFI. These markers are located on chromosomes 4, 8, 14 and 21 in regions near genes regulating appetite and ion transport and close to important QTL as previously reported to RFI and DMI, thus corroborating the literature that points these two processes as important in the physiological regulation of intake and feed efficiency. Conclusions This study showed the first GWAS of DMI to identify genomic regions associated with feed intake and efficiency in Nellore cattle. Some genes and QTLs previously described for DMI and RFI, in other subspecies (Bos taurus taurus), that influences these phenotypes are confirmed in this study. PMID:24517472

  9. Genome-wide and fine-resolution association analysis of malaria in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Jallow, Muminatou; Teo, Yik Ying; Small, Kerrin S; Rockett, Kirk A; Deloukas, Panos; Clark, Taane G; Kivinen, Katja; Bojang, Kalifa A; Conway, David J; Pinder, Margaret; Sirugo, Giorgio; Sisay-Joof, Fatou; Usen, Stanley; Auburn, Sarah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Campino, Susana; Coffey, Alison; Dunham, Andrew; Fry, Andrew E; Green, Angela; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hunt, Sarah E; Inouye, Michael; Jeffreys, Anna E; Mendy, Alieu; Palotie, Aarno; Potter, Simon; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Rogers, Jane; Rowlands, Kate; Somaskantharajah, Elilan; Whittaker, Pamela; Widden, Claire; Donnelly, Peter; Howie, Bryan; Marchini, Jonathan; Morris, Andrew; SanJoaquin, Miguel; Achidi, Eric Akum; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Allen, Angela; Amodu, Olukemi; Corran, Patrick; Djimde, Abdoulaye; Dolo, Amagana; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Drakeley, Chris; Dunstan, Sarah; Evans, Jennifer; Farrar, Jeremy; Fernando, Deepika; Hien, Tran Tinh; Horstmann, Rolf D; Ibrahim, Muntaser; Karunaweera, Nadira; Kokwaro, Gilbert; Koram, Kwadwo A; Lemnge, Martha; Makani, Julie; Marsh, Kevin; Michon, Pascal; Modiano, David; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Mueller, Ivo; Parker, Michael; Peshu, Norbert; Plowe, Christopher V; Puijalon, Odile; Reeder, John; Reyburn, Hugh; Riley, Eleanor M; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Singhasivanon, Pratap; Sirima, Sodiomon; Tall, Adama; Taylor, Terrie E; Thera, Mahamadou; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Williams, Thomas N; Wilson, Michael; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P

    2009-06-01

    We report a genome-wide association (GWA) study of severe malaria in The Gambia. The initial GWA scan included 2,500 children genotyped on the Affymetrix 500K GeneChip, and a replication study included 3,400 children. We used this to examine the performance of GWA methods in Africa. We found considerable population stratification, and also that signals of association at known malaria resistance loci were greatly attenuated owing to weak linkage disequilibrium (LD). To investigate possible solutions to the problem of low LD, we focused on the HbS locus, sequencing this region of the genome in 62 Gambian individuals and then using these data to conduct multipoint imputation in the GWA samples. This increased the signal of association, from P = 4 × 10(-7) to P = 4 × 10(-14), with the peak of the signal located precisely at the HbS causal variant. Our findings provide proof of principle that fine-resolution multipoint imputation, based on population-specific sequencing data, can substantially boost authentic GWA signals and enable fine mapping of causal variants in African populations.

  10. Big data challenges in bone research: genome-wide association studies and next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Nerea; Lucas, Gavin; Hysi, Pirro

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been developed as a practical method to identify genetic loci associated with disease by scanning multiple markers across the genome. Significant advances in the genetics of complex diseases have been made owing to advances in genotyping technologies, the progress of projects such as HapMap and 1000G and the emergence of genetics as a collaborative discipline. Because of its great potential to be used in parallel by multiple collaborators, it is important to adhere to strict protocols assuring data quality and analyses. Quality control analyses must be applied to each sample and each single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). The software package PLINK is capable of performing the whole range of necessary quality control tests. Genotype imputation has also been developed to substantially increase the power of GWAS methodology. Imputation permits the investigation of associations at genetic markers that are not directly genotyped. Results of individual GWAS reports can be combined through meta-analysis. Finally, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has gained popularity in recent years through its capacity to analyse a much greater number of markers across the genome. Although NGS platforms are capable of examining a higher number of SNPs compared with GWA studies, the results obtained by NGS require careful interpretation, as their biological correlation is incompletely understood. In this article, we will discuss the basic features of such protocols. PMID:25709812

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies five new susceptibility loci for primary angle closure glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Khor, Chiea Chuen; Do, Tan; Jia, Hongyan; Nakano, Masakazu; George, Ronnie; Abu-Amero, Khaled; Duvesh, Roopam; Chen, Li Jia; Li, Zheng; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Perera, Shamira A; Qiao, Chunyan; Wong, Hon-Tym; Sakai, Hiroshi; Barbosa de Melo, Mônica; Lee, Mei-Chin; Chan, Anita S; Azhany, Yaakub; Dao, Thi Lam Huong; Ikeda, Yoko; Perez-Grossmann, Rodolfo A; Zarnowski, Tomasz; Day, Alexander C; Jonas, Jost B; Tam, Pancy O S; Tran, Tuan Anh; Ayub, Humaira; Akhtar, Farah; Micheal, Shazia; Chew, Paul T K; Aljasim, Leyla A; Dada, Tanuj; Luu, Tam Thi; Awadalla, Mona S; Kitnarong, Naris; Wanichwecharungruang, Boonsong; Aung, Yee Yee; Mohamed-Noor, Jelinar; Vijayan, Saravanan; Sarangapani, Sripriya; Husain, Rahat; Jap, Aliza; Baskaran, Mani; Goh, David; Su, Daniel H; Wang, Huaizhou; Yong, Vernon K; Yip, Leonard W; Trinh, Tuyet Bach; Makornwattana, Manchima; Nguyen, Thanh Thu; Leuenberger, Edgar U; Park, Ki-Ho; Wiyogo, Widya Artini; Kumar, Rajesh S; Tello, Celso; Kurimoto, Yasuo; Thapa, Suman S; Pathanapitoon, Kessara; Salmon, John F; Sohn, Yong Ho; Fea, Antonio; Ozaki, Mineo; Lai, Jimmy S M; Tantisevi, Visanee; Khaing, Chaw Chaw; Mizoguchi, Takanori; Nakano, Satoko; Kim, Chan-Yun; Tang, Guangxian; Fan, Sujie; Wu, Renyi; Meng, Hailin; Nguyen, Thi Thuy Giang; Tran, Tien Dat; Ueno, Morio; Martinez, Jose Maria; Ramli, Norlina; Aung, Yin Mon; Reyes, Rigo Daniel; Vernon, Stephen A; Fang, Seng Kheong; Xie, Zhicheng; Chen, Xiao Yin; Foo, Jia Nee; Sim, Kar Seng; Wong, Tina T; Quek, Desmond T; Venkatesh, Rengaraj; Kavitha, Srinivasan; Krishnadas, Subbiah R; Soumittra, Nagaswamy; Shantha, Balekudaru; Lim, Boon-Ang; Ogle, Jeanne; de Vasconcellos, José P C; Costa, Vital P; Abe, Ricardo Y; de Souza, Bruno B; Sng, Chelvin C; Aquino, Maria C; Kosior-Jarecka, Ewa; Fong, Guillermo Barreto; Tamanaja, Vania Castro; Fujita, Ricardo; Jiang, Yuzhen; Waseem, Naushin; Low, Sancy; Pham, Huan Nguyen; Al-Shahwan, Sami; Craven, E Randy; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Dada, Rrima; Mohanty, Kuldeep; Faiq, Muneeb A; Hewitt, Alex W; Burdon, Kathryn P; Gan, Eng Hui; Prutthipongsit, Anuwat; Patthanathamrongkasem, Thipnapa; Catacutan, Mary Ann T; Felarca, Irene R; Liao, Chona S; Rusmayani, Emma; Istiantoro, Vira Wardhana; Consolandi, Giulia; Pignata, Giulia; Lavia, Carlo; Rojanapongpun, Prin; Mangkornkanokpong, Lerprat; Chansangpetch, Sunee; Chan, Jonathan C H; Choy, Bonnie N K; Shum, Jennifer W H; Than, Hlaing May; Oo, Khin Thida; Han, Aye Thi; Yong, Victor H; Ng, Xiao-Yu; Goh, Shuang Ru; Chong, Yaan Fun; Hibberd, Martin L; Seielstad, Mark; Png, Eileen; Dunstan, Sarah J; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Bei, Jinxin; Zeng, Yi Xin; Karkey, Abhilasha; Basnyat, Buddha; Pasutto, Francesca; Paoli, Daniela; Frezzotti, Paolo; Wang, Jie Jin; Mitchell, Paul; Fingert, John H; Allingham, R Rand; Hauser, Michael A; Lim, Soon Thye; Chew, Soo Hong; Ebstein, Richard P; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Park, Kyu Hyung; Ahn, Jeeyun; Boland, Greet; Snippe, Harm; Stead, Richard; Quino, Raquel; Zaw, Su Nyunt; Lukasik, Urszula; Shetty, Rohit; Zahari, Mimiwati; Bae, Hyoung Won; Oo, Nay Lin; Kubota, Toshiaki; Manassakorn, Anita; Ho, Wing Lau; Dallorto, Laura; Hwang, Young Hoon; Kiire, Christine A; Kuroda, Masako; Djamal, Zeiras Eka; Peregrino, Jovell Ian M; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Jeoung, Jin Wook; Hoan, Tung S; Srisamran, Nuttamon; Sandragasu, Thayanithi; Set, Saw Htoo; Doan, Vi Huyen; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Ho, Ching-Lin; Tan, Donald T; Sihota, Ramanjit; Loon, Seng-Chee; Mori, Kazuhiko; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Hollander, Anneke I den; Qamar, Raheel; Wang, Ya-Xing; Teo, Yik Y; Tai, E-Shyong; Hartleben-Matkin, Curt; Lozano-Giral, David; Saw, Seang Mei; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zenteno, Juan C; Pang, Chi Pui; Bui, Huong T T; Hee, Owen; Craig, Jamie E; Edward, Deepak P; Yonahara, Michiko; Neto, Jamil Miguel; Guevara-Fujita, Maria L; Xu, Liang; Ritch, Robert; Liza-Sharmini, Ahmad Tajudin; Wong, Tien Y; Al-Obeidan, Saleh; Do, Nhu Hon; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Tham, Clement C; Foster, Paul J; Vijaya, Lingam; Tashiro, Kei; Vithana, Eranga N; Wang, Ningli; Aung, Tin

    2016-05-01

    Primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) is a major cause of blindness worldwide. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) followed by replication in a combined total of 10,503 PACG cases and 29,567 controls drawn from 24 countries across Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America. We observed significant evidence of disease association at five new genetic loci upon meta-analysis of all patient collections. These loci are at EPDR1 rs3816415 (odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, P = 5.94 × 10(-15)), CHAT rs1258267 (OR = 1.22, P = 2.85 × 10(-16)), GLIS3 rs736893 (OR = 1.18, P = 1.43 × 10(-14)), FERMT2 rs7494379 (OR = 1.14, P = 3.43 × 10(-11)), and DPM2-FAM102A rs3739821 (OR = 1.15, P = 8.32 × 10(-12)). We also confirmed significant association at three previously described loci (P < 5 × 10(-8) for each sentinel SNP at PLEKHA7, COL11A1, and PCMTD1-ST18), providing new insights into the biology of PACG.

  12. Genome-wide association study identifies loci influencing concentrations of liver