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Sample records for ad hybrid strains

  1. Genetic Diversity and Genomic Plasticity of Cryptococcus neoformans AD Hybrid Strains

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjun; Averette, Anna Floyd; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Ni, Min; Dromer, Françoise; Heitman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Natural hybridization between two strains, varieties, or species is a common phenomenon in both plants and animals. Although hybridization may skew established gene pools, it generates population diversity efficiently and sometimes results in the emergence of newly adapted genotypes. Cryptococcus neoformans, which causes the most frequent opportunistic fungal infection in immunocompromised hosts, has three serotypes: A, D, and AD. Serotype-specific multilocus sequence typing and serotype-specific comparative genome hybridization were applied to investigate the genetic variability and genomic organization of C. neoformans serotype AD isolates. We confirm that C. neoformans serotype AD isolates are hybrids of serotype A and D strains. Compared with haploid strains, most AD hybrid isolates exhibit unique multilocus sequence typing genotypes, suggesting that multiple independent hybridization events punctuated the origin and evolutionary trajectory of AD hybrids. The MATa alleles from both haploid and AD hybrid isolates group closely to form a cluster or subcluster in both the serotype A and D populations. The rare and unique distribution of MATa alleles may restrict sexual reproduction between isolates of opposite mating types. The genetic diversity of the serotype D population, including haploid strains and serotype D genomes of the AD hybrid, is significantly greater than that of serotype A, and there are signatures of recombination within the serotype D population. Given that MATa isolates are relatively rare, both opposite-sex and same-sex mating may contribute to genetic recombination of serotype D in nature. Extensive chromosome loss was observed in AD hybrid isolates, which results in loss of heterozygosity in the otherwise-heterozygous AD hybrid genome. Most AD hybrid isolates exhibit hybrid vigor and are resistant to the antifungal drug FK506. In addition, the C. neoformans AD hybrid genome is highly dynamic, with continuous chromosome loss, which may be a

  2. In silico strain optimization by adding reactions to metabolic models.

    PubMed

    Correia, Sara; Rocha, Miguel

    2012-07-24

    Nowadays, the concerns about the environment and the needs to increase the productivity at low costs, demand for the search of new ways to produce compounds with industrial interest. Based on the increasing knowledge of biological processes, through genome sequencing projects, and high-throughput experimental techniques as well as the available computational tools, the use of microorganisms has been considered as an approach to produce desirable compounds. However, this usually requires to manipulate these organisms by genetic engineering and/ or changing the enviromental conditions to make the production of these compounds possible. In many cases, it is necessary to enrich the genetic material of those microbes with hereologous pathways from other species and consequently adding the potential to produce novel compounds. This paper introduces a new plug-in for the OptFlux Metabolic Engineering platform, aimed at finding suitable sets of reactions to add to the genomes of selected microbes (wild type strain), as well as finding complementary sets of deletions, so that the mutant becomes able to overproduce compounds with industrial interest, while preserving their viability. The necessity of adding reactions to the metabolic model arises from existing gaps in the original model or motivated by the productions of new compounds by the organism. The optimization methods used are metaheuristics such as Evolutionary Algorithms and Simulated Annealing. The usefulness of this plug-in is demonstrated by a case study, regarding the production of vanillin by the bacterium E. coli.

  3. A Simple and Reliable Method for Hybridization of Homothallic Wine Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Manuel; Peréz, Francisco; Regodón, José A.

    1998-01-01

    A procedure was developed for the hybridization and improvement of homothallic industrial wine yeasts. Killer cycloheximide-sensitive strains were crossed with killer-sensitive cycloheximide-resistant strains to get killer cycloheximide-resistant hybrids, thereby enabling hybrid selection and identification. This procedure also allows backcrossing of spore colonies from the hybrids with parental strains. PMID:9835605

  4. Lamination residual strains and stresses in hybrid laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the effects of hybridization on the magnitude of lamination residual stresses. Eight-ply graphite/Kevlar 49/epoxy and graphite/S-glass/epoxy laminates were studied. The same matrix resin was selected for all basic materials to ensure compatibility and uniform curing of the various plies. The specimens, with inserted strain gages and thermocouples, were subjected to curing and postcuring cycles in an autoclave. Subsequently, the specimens were subjected to a thermal cycle from room temperature to 444 K and down to room temperature. It was found that hydridizing reduces apparently residual strains and stresses in the graphite plies. However, these strains were not affected much by the type and degree of hybridization.

  5. Strain sensor based on cellulose ZnO hybrid nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Hyun-U.; Yun, Gyu-Young; Kim, Joo Hyung; Kim, Jaehwan

    2014-04-01

    ZnO is well known semiconductor material with high band gap as well as piezoelectricity. Because of its high performance of electromechanical behavior, ZnO based piezoelectric devices have taken great attention from many research groups. However, ZnO should be grown on a flexible substrate so as to allow its flexibility. Since cellulose is renewable, flexible and biocompatible, ZnO is grown on cellulose by hydrothermal process, then a novel flexible piezoelectric material. We report the fabrication and strain sensor behavior of cellulose ZnO hybrid nanocomposite(CEZOHN) In this research, simple piezoelectric strain sensor based on CEZOHN is made by directly stretching it and by boding it on a cantilever. Its performance is measured in terms of longitudinal and bending strain. This strain sensor shows a good linearity.

  6. Periodic orbits of hybrid systems and parameter estimation via AD.

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenheimer, John.; Phipps, Eric Todd; Casey, Richard

    2004-07-01

    Rhythmic, periodic processes are ubiquitous in biological systems; for example, the heart beat, walking, circadian rhythms and the menstrual cycle. Modeling these processes with high fidelity as periodic orbits of dynamical systems is challenging because: (1) (most) nonlinear differential equations can only be solved numerically; (2) accurate computation requires solving boundary value problems; (3) many problems and solutions are only piecewise smooth; (4) many problems require solving differential-algebraic equations; (5) sensitivity information for parameter dependence of solutions requires solving variational equations; and (6) truncation errors in numerical integration degrade performance of optimization methods for parameter estimation. In addition, mathematical models of biological processes frequently contain many poorly-known parameters, and the problems associated with this impedes the construction of detailed, high-fidelity models. Modelers are often faced with the difficult problem of using simulations of a nonlinear model, with complex dynamics and many parameters, to match experimental data. Improved computational tools for exploring parameter space and fitting models to data are clearly needed. This paper describes techniques for computing periodic orbits in systems of hybrid differential-algebraic equations and parameter estimation methods for fitting these orbits to data. These techniques make extensive use of automatic differentiation to accurately and efficiently evaluate derivatives for time integration, parameter sensitivities, root finding and optimization. The boundary value problem representing a periodic orbit in a hybrid system of differential algebraic equations is discretized via multiple-shooting using a high-degree Taylor series integration method [GM00, Phi03]. Numerical solutions to the shooting equations are then estimated by a Newton process yielding an approximate periodic orbit. A metric is defined for computing the distance

  7. Hybrid exotic mesons in soft-wall AdS/QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellantuono, Loredana

    2014-11-01

    Hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers JPC = 1-+ are examined in soft-wall AdS/QCD. The predicted mass spectrum is compared to the measured values of the candidates π1(1400), π1(1600) and π1(2015). Thermal effects are analysed through the spectral function in the AdS-Black Hole model, and the differences with the Hawking-Page description are discussed.

  8. Tensile stress-strain behavior of hybrid composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the stress-strain response of several hybrid laminates, and the damage was correlated with nonlinear stress-strain response and ultimate strength. The fibers used in the laminates were graphite, S-glass, and Kevlar. Some laminates with graphite fibers had perforated Mylar film between plies, which lowered the interlaminar bond strength. The laminate configurations were chosen to be like those of buffer strips in large panels and fracture coupons. Longitudinal and transverse specimens were loaded in tension to failure. Some specimens were radiographed to reveal damage due to edge effects. Stress-strain response is discussed in terms of damage shown by the radiographs. Ultimate strengths are compared with simple failure criteria, one of which account for damage.

  9. Hybrid exotic meson with JPC = 1-+ in AdS/QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Chul; Kim, Youngman

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the hybrid exotic meson with JPC = 1-+ within the framework of an AdS/QCD model. Introducing a holographic field dual to the operator for hybrid exotic meson, we obtain the eigen-value equation for its mass. Fixing all free parameters by AdS/CFT dictionaries, we predict the masses of the hybrid exotic meson. The results turn out to be 1476 MeV for the ground state, and 2611 MeV for the first excited one. Being compared with the existing experimental data for the π1(1400), which is known to be mπ1 = 1351±30 MeV, the present result seems to be qualitative in agreement with it. We also predict the decay constant of π1(1400): Fπ1 = 10.6 MeV.

  10. Genome-wide analyses of HTLV-1aD strains from Cape Verde, Africa

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Louise; de Pina-Araujo I, Isabel; Morgado, Mariza G; Vicente, Ana Carolina

    2016-01-01

    We characterised and reported the first full-length genomes of Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 subgroup HTLV-1aD (CV21 and CV79). This subgroup is one of the major determinants of HTLV-1 infections in North and West Africa, and recombinant strains involving this subgroup have been recently demonstrated. The CV21 and CV79 strains from Cape Verde/Africa were characterised as pure HTLV-1aD genomes, comparative analyses including HTLV-1 subtypes and subgroups revealed HTLV-1aD signatures in the envelope, pol, and pX regions. These genomes provide original information that will contribute to further studies on HTLV-1a epidemiology and evolution. PMID:27653363

  11. Genome-wide analyses of HTLV-1aD strains from Cape Verde, Africa.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Louise; Pina-Araujo I, Isabel de; Morgado, Mariza G; Vicente, Ana Carolina

    2016-09-01

    We characterised and reported the first full-length genomes of Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 subgroup HTLV-1aD (CV21 and CV79). This subgroup is one of the major determinants of HTLV-1 infections in North and West Africa, and recombinant strains involving this subgroup have been recently demonstrated. The CV21 and CV79 strains from Cape Verde/Africa were characterised as pure HTLV-1aD genomes, comparative analyses including HTLV-1 subtypes and subgroups revealed HTLV-1aD signatures in the envelope, pol, and pX regions. These genomes provide original information that will contribute to further studies on HTLV-1a epidemiology and evolution.

  12. Characterization of Alcaligenes faecalis strain AD15 indicating biocontrol activity against plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Shin-ichiro; Adachi, Yoshitomi; Asakura, Shuichi; Kohyama, Erina

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial strain possessing both bacteriostatic and fungistatic activity (biocontrol activity) against pathogens of cyclamen (Cyclamen sp.) was isolated from the soil in Gifu Prefecture, Japan, and characterized with respect to its taxonomic and biocontrol properties. The sequence of its 16S rRNA gene, morphology, biochemistry, and fatty acid composition demonstrated that it is a strain most closely related to Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. faecalis LMG 1229(T). The isolate was named A. faecalis strain AD15. A. faecalis AD15 produced hydroxylamine at maximum yields of 33.3±1.7 mg/L after 16 h cultivation in LB medium and 19.0±0.44 mg/L after 19 h cultivation in synthetic medium. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentrations of hydroxylamine against the cyclamen pathogens Pantoea agglomerans and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides were 4.20±0.98 and 16.5±0.67 mg/L. These results indicated that the biocontrol activity of strain AD15 might be attributed to hydroxylamine, a metabolite in the culture medium, and it had the potential for biopesticide application.

  13. Hybrid Shiga Toxin-Producing and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia sp. Cryptic Lineage 1 Strain 7v Harbors a Hybrid Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Mammel, Mark K.; Rasko, David A.; Lacher, David W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hybrid isolates of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) encoding heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) are being reported with increasing frequency from a variety of sources. However, information regarding the plasmids that these strains harbor is scarce. In this study, we sequence and characterize a plasmid, p7v, from the STEC/ETEC hybrid strain 7v. Whole-genome phylogenetic analyses of STEC/ETEC hybrid strains and prototype E. coli isolates of other pathotypes placed 7v in the Escherichia sp. cryptic lineage 1 (CL1) clade. The complete plasmid, p7v, was determined to be 229,275 bp and encodes putative virulence factors that are typically carried on STEC plasmids as well as those often carried on ETEC plasmids, indicating that the hybrid nature of the strain extends beyond merely encoding the two toxins. Plasmid p7v carries two copies of sta with identical sequences, which were discovered to be divergent from the sta sequences found in the prototype human ETEC strains. Using a nomenclature scheme based on a phylogeny constructed from sta and stb sequences, the sta encoded on p7v is designated STa4. In silico analysis determined that p7v also encodes the K88 fimbria, a colonization factor usually associated with porcine ETEC plasmids. The p7v sequence and the presence of plasmid-encoded virulence factors are compared to those of other STEC/ETEC CL1 hybrid genomes and reveal gene acquisition/loss at the strain level. In addition, the interrogation of 24 STEC/ETEC hybrid genomes for identification of plasmid replicons, colonization factors, Stx and ST subtypes, and other plasmid-encoded virulence genes highlights the diversity of these hybrid strains. IMPORTANCE Hybrid Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli/enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC/ETEC) strains, which have been isolated from environmental, animal, and human clinical samples, may represent an emerging threat as food-borne pathogens. Characterization of these

  14. Strain-rate dependence for Ni/Al hybrid foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Anne; Larcher, Martin; Jirousek, Ondrej; Koudelka, Petr; Solomos, George

    2015-09-01

    Shock absorption often needs stiff but lightweight materials that exhibit a large kinetic energy absorption capability. Open-cell metal foams are artificial structures, which due to their plateau stress, including a strong hysteresis, can in principle absorb large amounts of energy. However, their plateau stress is too low for many applications. In this study, we use highly novel and promising Ni/Al hybrid foams which consist of standard, open-cell aluminium foams, where nanocrystalline nickel is deposited by electrodeposition as coating on the strut surface. The mechanical behaviour of cellular materials, including their behaviour under higher strain-rates, is governed by their microstructure due to the properties of the strut material, pore/strut geometry and mass distribution over the struts. Micro-inertia effects are strongly related to the microstructure. For a conclusive model, the exact real microstructure is needed. In this study a micro-focus computer tomography (μCT) system has been used for the analysis of the microstructure of the foam samples and for the development of a microstructural Finite Element (micro-FE) mesh. The microstructural FE models have been used to model the mechanical behaviour of the Ni/Al hybrid foams under dynamic loading conditions. The simulations are validated by quasi-static compression tests and dynamic split Hopkinson pressure bar tests.

  15. Microstructural evolution of Ti-added interstitial free steel in high strain deformation by hot torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholizadeh, R.; Shibata, A.; Terada, D.; Tsuji, N.

    2015-08-01

    The dynamically evolved microstructure under high strain deformation condition does still have many debatable aspects, particularly in the case of easy-recovery metals like bcc-iron. In this research, microstructural evolution in high strain deformation by hot torsion of Ti-added interstitial free (IF) steel was systematically investigated. Torsion specimens were deformed up to an equivalent strain of ∼ 7 at different temperatures (650 °C - 850 °C) and strain rates (0.01 s-1 - 1.0 s-1), i.e., under various values of the Zener-Hollomon (Z) parameter. Immediately after the deformation, samples were water-quenched and microstructures were investigated by electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) measurements and electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI). Flow stress-strain curves of the IF steel under various deformation conditions showed typical flow curves of high stacking fault energy metals at low Z values, i.e., a peak stress followed by slight softening. On the other hand, under the high-Z deformation conditions, the specimens showed a larger stress drop after a certain amount of deformation. EBSD-based quantitative analysis was used to study the microstructural transition between high and low Z values. At low Z values, the occurrence of strain induced boundary migration (SIBM) as an initiation of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) was clearly observed. On the other hand, at high Z values, grain subdivision phenomena led to very fine and elongated structures.

  16. Draft Genome Sequences for Clostridium thermocellum Wild-Type Strain YS and Derived Cellulose Adhesion-Defective Mutant Strain AD2

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Lamed, Raphael; Morag, Ely; Borovok, Ilya; Shoham, Yuval; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Johnson, Courtney M; Yang, Zamin; Land, Miriam L; Utturkar, Sagar M; Keller, Martin; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum wild-type strain YS is an anaerobic, thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium capable of directly converting cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Strain YS and a derived cellulose adhesion-defective mutant strain AD2 played pivotal roles in describing the original cellulosome concept. We present their draft genome sequences.

  17. Capacity-Delay Trade-Off in Collaborative Hybrid Ad-Hoc Networks with Coverage Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lingyu; Luo, Wenbin; Liu, Chen; Hong, Xuemin; Shi, Jianghong

    2017-01-01

    The integration of ad hoc device-to-device (D2D) communications and open-access small cells can result in a networking paradigm called hybrid the ad hoc network, which is particularly promising in delivering delay-tolerant data. The capacity-delay performance of hybrid ad hoc networks has been studied extensively under a popular framework called scaling law analysis. These studies, however, do not take into account aspects of interference accumulation and queueing delay and, therefore, may lead to over-optimistic results. Moreover, focusing on the average measures, existing works fail to give finer-grained insights into the distribution of delays. This paper proposes an alternative analytical framework based on queueing theoretic models and physical interference models. We apply this framework to study the capacity-delay performance of a collaborative cellular D2D network with coverage sensing and two-hop relay. The new framework allows us to fully characterize the delay distribution in the transform domain and pinpoint the impacts of coverage sensing, user and base station densities, transmit power, user mobility and packet size on the capacity-delay trade-off. We show that under the condition of queueing equilibrium, the maximum throughput capacity per device saturates to an upper bound of 0.7239 λb/λu bits/s/Hz, where λb and λu are the densities of base stations and mobile users, respectively. PMID:28134769

  18. Transformation of NIH 3T3 cells with cloned fragments of human cytomegalovirus strain AD169.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, J A; Fleckenstein, B; Galloway, D A; McDougall, J K

    1982-01-01

    NIH 3T3 cells were transfected with restriction endonuclease and cloned human cytomegalovirus DNA fragments to identify the transforming region(s). Cleavage of human cytomegalovirus strain AD169 DNA with XbaI and HindIII left a transforming region intact whereas EcoRI inactivated this function. Transfection of cells with cosmids containing human cytomegalovirus DNA spanning the entire genome resulted in transformation by one cosmid, pCM1058, with the AD169 HindIII DNA fragments E, R, T, and a'. Cells were selected for their growth in 1.2% methylcellulose. The clones isolated had a significant replating efficiency and were oncogenic in BALB/c nu/nu mice. Transfection of cosmids and plasmids containing subsets of the viral sequences in pCM1058 identified a common region possessed by all of the transforming recombinant molecules. This region was in the HindIII E fragment with the left boundary defined by the EcoRI d-R junction and the right boundary defined by the HindIII E-T junction. Further mapping and transfection experiments determined that the transforming region was contained without a 2.9-kilobase fragment between map units 0.123 and 0.14 on the prototype molecule of the AD169 strain. Images PMID:6287019

  19. Opportunistic Hybrid Transport Protocol (OHTP) for Cognitive Radio Ad Hoc Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Bin Zikria, Yousaf; Nosheen, Summera; Ishmanov, Farruh; Kim, Sung Won

    2015-12-15

    The inefficient assignment of spectrum for different communications purposes, plus technology enhancements and ever-increasing usage of wireless technology is causing spectrum scarcity. To address this issue, one of the proposed solutions in the literature is to access the spectrum dynamically or opportunistically. Therefore, the concept of cognitive radio appeared, which opens up a new research paradigm. There is extensive research on the physical, medium access control and network layers. The impact of the transport layer on the performance of cognitive radio ad hoc sensor networks is still unknown/unexplored. The Internet's de facto transport protocol is not well suited to wireless networks because of its congestion control mechanism. We propose an opportunistic hybrid transport protocol for cognitive radio ad hoc sensor networks. We developed a new congestion control mechanism to differentiate true congestion from interruption loss. After such detection and differentiation, we propose methods to handle them opportunistically. There are several benefits to window- and rate-based protocols. To exploit the benefits of both in order to enhance overall system performance, we propose a hybrid transport protocol. We empirically calculate the optimal threshold value to switch between window- and rate-based mechanisms. We then compare our proposed transport protocol to Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)-friendly rate control, TCP-friendly rate control for cognitive radio, and TCP-friendly window-based control. We ran an extensive set of simulations in Network Simulator 2. The results indicate that the proposed transport protocol performs better than all the others.

  20. Zygosaccharomyces rouxii strains CECT 11923 and Z. rouxii CECT 10425: Two new putative hybrids?

    PubMed

    Wrent, Petra; Rivas, Eva-María; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2017-01-16

    Based on IGS-PCR RFLP polymorphism, we previously detected two Z. rouxii strains (CECT 11923 and CECT 10425) that clustered with hybrid strains (NCYC 1682, NCYC 3060 and NCYC 3061). Given the recently recognized important industrial role of hybrids, their detection is very useful. Based on the IGS1 rDNA region alignment of hybrid strains and the Z. rouxii CECT 11923 and CECT 10425, in this work, we developed a pair of Zygosaccharomyces hybrid-specific primers, HibZF/HibZR. Positive amplicons were only obtained in the Zygosaccharomyces spp. hybrids included in this study and the CECT 11923 and CECT 10425 strains analyzed here. In the present study, we applied molecular tools to highlight the nature of these strains; they are quite different from each other as well as from Z. rouxii type strain. Based on the presence of two heterologous copies of nuclear-encoded genes (SOD2 and HIS3), the sequences of divergent 5.8S-ITS rDNA, D1/D2 26S rDNA copies and, the amplification with species-specific primer for Z. rouxii and Z. pseudorouxii, we hypothesize that the CECT 11923 strain might be a hybrid strain. Whereas, CECT 10425, the sequence analysis of 5.8S-ITS rDNA and D1/D2 26S rDNA copies presented 99-100% sequence identity with Zygosaccharomyces sp. NBRC 10669 (LN849119.1) and Z. sapae ABT 301(T). Nevertheless, we discard that it could be a Z. sapae strain based on the results obtained in this study. Namely, the amplification with hybrid-specific primer designed in this study, the number of divergent copies of HIS3 (2), the fact that it only possesses one SOD2 gene and the amplification with species-specific primer for Z. pseudorouxii, therefore it could be a new species or a hybrid strain.

  1. CATALASE ACTIVITY OF TWO STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS STRAINS AND ITS ENHANCEMENT BY AEROBIOSIS AND ADDED CATIONS1

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dorothy; Deibel, R. H.; Niven, C. F.

    1964-01-01

    Jones, Dorothy (American Meat Institute Foundation, Chicago, Ill.), R. H. Deibel, and C. F. Niven, Jr. Catalase activity of two Streptococcus faecalis strains and its enhancement by aerobiosis and added cations. J. Bacteriol. 88:602–610. 1964.—The nature of catalase activity noted in two unusual Streptococcus faecalis strains was determined. Enzyme activity was lost slowly when cultures were maintained by daily transfer in test tubes of broth media. Loss of activity could be prevented by aerobic culture. Supplementation of the growth medium with ferric, manganese, and zinc ions, as well as aerobiosis, enhanced catalase activity. However, addition of these cations to cell suspensions or to cell-free extracts did not increase catalase activity. Although oxygen was observed to be one of the reaction end products, the catalase activity was not inhibited by cyanide or azide, and the iron-porphyrin coenzyme of classical catalase was not detected. The enzyme was purified 185-fold by precipitation with ammonium sulfate, followed by chromotography on a diethylaminoethyl cellulose column. PMID:14208495

  2. Identification of Lactobacillus UFV H2B20 (probiotic strain) using DNA-DNA hybridization

    PubMed Central

    de Magalhães, J.T.; Uetanabaro, A.P. T.; de Moraes, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Sequence analyses of the 16S rDNA gene and DNA-DNA hybridization tests were performed for identification of the species of the probiotic Lactobacillus UFV H2b20 strain. Using these two tests, we concluded that this strain, originally considered Lact. acidophilus, should be classified as Lact. delbrueckii. PMID:24031263

  3. Nanowire-bacteria hybrids for unassisted solar carbon dioxide fixation to value-added chemicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chong; Gallagher, Joseph J; Sakimoto, Kelsey K; Nichols, Eva M; Chang, Christopher J; Chang, Michelle C Y; Yang, Peidong

    2015-05-13

    Direct solar-powered production of value-added chemicals from CO2 and H2O, a process that mimics natural photosynthesis, is of fundamental and practical interest. In natural photosynthesis, CO2 is first reduced to common biochemical building blocks using solar energy, which are subsequently used for the synthesis of the complex mixture of molecular products that form biomass. Here we report an artificial photosynthetic scheme that functions via a similar two-step process by developing a biocompatible light-capturing nanowire array that enables a direct interface with microbial systems. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that a hybrid semiconductor nanowire-bacteria system can reduce CO2 at neutral pH to a wide array of chemical targets, such as fuels, polymers, and complex pharmaceutical precursors, using only solar energy input. The high-surface-area silicon nanowire array harvests light energy to provide reducing equivalents to the anaerobic bacterium, Sporomusa ovata, for the photoelectrochemical production of acetic acid under aerobic conditions (21% O2) with low overpotential (η < 200 mV), high Faradaic efficiency (up to 90%), and long-term stability (up to 200 h). The resulting acetate (∼6 g/L) can be activated to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) by genetically engineered Escherichia coli and used as a building block for a variety of value-added chemicals, such as n-butanol, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) polymer, and three different isoprenoid natural products. As such, interfacing biocompatible solid-state nanodevices with living systems provides a starting point for developing a programmable system of chemical synthesis entirely powered by sunlight.

  4. Carbon fiber-ZnO nanowire hybrid structures for flexible and adaptable strain sensors.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qingliang; Mohr, Markus; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yue; Fecht, Hans-Jörg

    2013-12-21

    We report the flexible piezotronic strain sensors fabricated using carbon fiber-ZnO nanowire hybrid structures by a novel and reliable method. The I-V characteristic of the sensor shows high sensitivity to external strain due to the change in Schottky barrier height (SBH), which has a linear relationship with strain. This fabricated strain sensor has a quick, real-time current response under both static and dynamic mechanical loads. The change in SBH resulted from the strain-induced piezoelectric potential is investigated by band gap theory. In this work we develop a new feasible method to fabricate a flexible strain sensor within the fabric adapted to textile structures, able to measure their strain.

  5. Identification of Bacillus strains isolated from milk and cream with classical and nucleic acid hybridization methods.

    PubMed

    Tatzel, R; Ludwig, W; Schleifer, K H; Wallnöfer, P R

    1994-11-01

    A total of 529 bacterial strains have been isolated from milk and cream sampled at different sites in a dairy production plant under conditions selective for aerobic sporeforming bacteria. Identification with classical methods based on morphological, physiological and biochemical criteria showed Bacillus licheniformis to be the most frequently occurring Bacillus sp. The investigation also revealed 62 unidentified strains. Classical identification methods were time consuming (3-7 d), lacked specificity and--because of their dependence on phenotypic gene expression--sometimes produced ambiguous results. Consequently, a colony hybridization method developed for the identification of B. licheniformis strains and using nonradioactive labelled 23S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes was also used. Identification of B. licheniformis with both classical and hybridization methods revealed diverging identification results for 70 strains.

  6. Genomic Libraries and a Host Strain Designed for Highly Efficient Two-Hybrid Selection in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    James, P.; Halladay, J.; Craig, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    The two-hybrid system is a powerful technique for detecting protein-protein interactions that utilizes the well-developed molecular genetics of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the full potential of this technique has not been realized due to limitations imposed by the components available for use in the system. These limitations include unwieldy plasmid vectors, incomplete or poorly designed two-hybrid libraries, and host strains that result in the selection of large numbers of false positives. We have used a novel multienzyme approach to generate a set of highly representative genomic libraries from S. cerevisiae. In addition, a unique host strain was created that contains three easily assayed reporter genes, each under the control of a different inducible promoter. This host strain is extremely sensitive to weak interactions and eliminates nearly all false positives using simple plate assays. Improved vectors were also constructed that simplify the construction of the gene fusions necessary for the two-hybrid system. Our analysis indicates that the libraries and host strain provide significant improvements in both the number of interacting clones identified and the efficiency of two-hybrid selections. PMID:8978031

  7. Comparative genomics among Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces kudriavzevii natural hybrid strains isolated from wine and beer reveals different origins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Interspecific hybrids between S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii have frequently been detected in wine and beer fermentations. Significant physiological differences among parental and hybrid strains under different stress conditions have been evidenced. In this study, we used comparative genome hybridization analysis to evaluate the genome composition of different S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii natural hybrids isolated from wine and beer fermentations to infer their evolutionary origins and to figure out the potential role of common S. kudriavzevii gene fraction present in these hybrids. Results Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and ploidy analyses carried out in this study confirmed the presence of individual and differential chromosomal composition patterns for most S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids from beer and wine. All hybrids share a common set of depleted S. cerevisiae genes, which also are depleted or absent in the wine strains studied so far, and the presence a common set of S. kudriavzevii genes, which may be associated with their capability to grow at low temperatures. Finally, a maximum parsimony analysis of chromosomal rearrangement events, occurred in the hybrid genomes, indicated the presence of two main groups of wine hybrids and different divergent lineages of brewing strains. Conclusion Our data suggest that wine and beer S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids have been originated by different rare-mating events involving a diploid wine S. cerevisiae and a haploid or diploid European S. kudriavzevii strains. Hybrids maintain several S. kudriavzevii genes involved in cold adaptation as well as those related to S. kudriavzevii mitochondrial functions. PMID:22906207

  8. A hybrid Φ/B-OTDR for simultaneous vibration and strain measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Fei; Cao, Xuli

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometry (Φ-OTDR) and Brillouin optical time domain reflectometry (B-OTDR) system which can realize simultaneous measurement of both dynamic vibration and static strain is proposed. Because the Rayleigh scattering light and spontaneous Brilliouin scattering light are naturally frequency-multiplexed, the heterodyne asynchronous demodulation of frequency shift keying (FSK) in optical fiber communications is utilized, and the demodulations of the two scattering signals are synchronized. In addition, the forward Raman amplification is introduced to the system, which not only makes up for the deficiency of spontaneous Brilliouin scattering based distributed fiber sensor, but also has the merit of the single end measurement of B-OTDR. The designed Φ/B-OTDR hybrid system has the sensing range of 49 km with 10 m spatial resolution. The vibration and strain experiments show that this hybrid system has great potential for use in long-distance structural health monitoring.

  9. Streptococcus thermophilus core genome: comparative genome hybridization study of 47 strains.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Danielsen, Morten; Valina, Ondrej; Garrigues, Christel; Johansen, Eric; Pedersen, Martin Bastian

    2008-08-01

    A DNA microarray platform based on 2,200 genes from publicly available sequences was designed for Streptococcus thermophilus. We determined how single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the 65- to 75-mer oligonucleotide probe sequences affect the hybridization signals. The microarrays were then used for comparative genome hybridization (CGH) of 47 dairy S. thermophilus strains. An analysis of the exopolysaccharide genes in each strain confirmed previous findings that this class of genes is indeed highly variable. A phylogenetic tree based on the CGH data showed similar distances for most strains, indicating frequent recombination or gene transfer within S. thermophilus. By comparing genome sizes estimated from the microarrays and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, the amount of unknown DNA in each strain was estimated. A core genome comprised of 1,271 genes detected in all 47 strains was identified. Likewise, a set of noncore genes detected in only some strains was identified. The concept of an industrial core genome is proposed. This is comprised of the genes in the core genome plus genes that are necessary in an applied industrial context.

  10. Reconstruction of in-plane strain maps using hybrid dense sensor network composed of sensing skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, Austin; Laflamme, Simon; Ubertini, Filippo

    2016-12-01

    The authors have recently developed a soft-elastomeric capacitive (SEC)-based thin film sensor for monitoring strain on mesosurfaces. Arranged in a network configuration, the sensing system is analogous to a biological skin, where local strain can be monitored over a global area. Under plane stress conditions, the sensor output contains the additive measurement of the two principal strain components over the monitored surface. In applications where the evaluation of strain maps is useful, in structural health monitoring for instance, such signal must be decomposed into linear strain components along orthogonal directions. Previous work has led to an algorithm that enabled such decomposition by leveraging a dense sensor network configuration with the addition of assumed boundary conditions. Here, we significantly improve the algorithm’s accuracy by leveraging mature off-the-shelf solutions to create a hybrid dense sensor network (HDSN) to improve on the boundary condition assumptions. The system’s boundary conditions are enforced using unidirectional RSGs and assumed virtual sensors. Results from an extensive experimental investigation demonstrate the good performance of the proposed algorithm and its robustness with respect to sensors’ layout. Overall, the proposed algorithm is seen to effectively leverage the advantages of a hybrid dense network for application of the thin film sensor to reconstruct surface strain fields over large surfaces.

  11. Comparative Genomics and Characterization of Hybrid Shigatoxigenic and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC/ETEC) Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nyholm, Outi; Halkilahti, Jani; Wiklund, Gudrun; Okeke, Uche; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Haukka, Kaisa; Siitonen, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Background Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) cause serious foodborne infections in humans. These two pathogroups are defined based on the pathogroup-associated virulence genes: stx encoding Shiga toxin (Stx) for STEC and elt encoding heat-labile and/or est encoding heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) for ETEC. The study investigated the genomics of STEC/ETEC hybrid strains to determine their phylogenetic position among E. coli and to define the virulence genes they harbor. Methods The whole genomes of three STEC/ETEC strains possessing both stx and est genes were sequenced using PacBio RS sequencer. Two of the strains were isolated from the patients, one with hemolytic uremic syndrome, and one with diarrhea. The third strain was of bovine origin. Core genome analysis of the shared chromosomal genes and comparison with E. coli and Shigella spp. reference genomes was performed to determine the phylogenetic position of the STEC/ETEC strains. In addition, a set of virulence genes and ETEC colonization factors were extracted from the genomes. The production of Stx and ST were studied. Results The human STEC/ETEC strains clustered with strains representing ETEC, STEC, enteroaggregative E. coli, and commensal and laboratory-adapted E. coli. However, the bovine STEC/ETEC strain formed a remote cluster with two STECs of bovine origin. All three STEC/ETEC strains harbored several other virulence genes, apart from stx and est, and lacked ETEC colonization factors. Two STEC/ETEC strains produced both toxins and one strain Stx only. Conclusions This study shows that pathogroup-associated virulence genes of different E. coli can co-exist in strains originating from different phylogenetic lineages. The possibility of virulence genes to be associated with several E. coli pathogroups should be taken into account in strain typing and in epidemiological surveillance. Development of novel hybrid E. coli strains may cause a new public health risk, which

  12. Strain tuning of ferroelectric polarization in hybrid organic inorganic perovskite compounds.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Saurabh; Di Sante, Domenico; Stroppa, Alessandro

    2015-11-19

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are hybrid crystalline compounds comprised of an extended ordered network made up of organic molecules, organic linkers and metal cations. In particular, MOFs with the same topology as inorganic perovskites have been shown to possess interesting properties, e.g., coexistence of ferroelectric and magnetic ordering. Using first-principles density functional theory, we have investigated the effect of strain on the compounds C(NH2)3Cr(HCOO)3 and (CH3CH2NH3)Mn(HCOO)3. Here, we show that compressive strain can substantially increase the ferroelectric polarization by more than 300%, and we discuss the mechanism involved in the strain enhancement of polarization. Our study highlights the complex interplay between strain and organic cations' dipoles and put forward the possibility of tuning of ferroelectric polarization through appropriate thin film growing.

  13. Spontaneous mutants of the adenovirus-simian virus 40 hybrid, Ad2/sup +/ND3, that grow efficiently in monkey cells

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.

    1981-05-01

    An attempt was made to isolate spontaneous mutants of adenovirus type 2 and of the adenovirus-SV40 hybrids, Ad2/sup +/ND3 and Ad2/sup +/ND5, that would grow efficiently on monkey cells. Virus stocks were serially passaged through the semipermissive established monkey line CV-1. After five serial passages in the absence of intentional mutagenesis, only stocks of Ad2/sup +/ND3 yielded significant numbers of variants that plaqued with similar efficiency on human and on monkey cell monolayers. Four independent Ad2/sup +/ND3 variants, designated hr600, hr601, hr602, and hr603, have been isolated and partially characterized. No difference was found between the genomes of these variants and the genome of parental Ad2/sup +/ND3 by restriction enzyme analysis or by the analysis of heteroduplexes between Ad2/sup +/ND3 (or variant) DNA and DNA of the hybrid Ad2/sup +/ND1.

  14. Hybrid density functional theory studies of AlN and GaN under uniaxial strain.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lixia; Duan, Yifeng; Shi, Hongliang; Shi, Liwei; Tang, Gang

    2013-01-30

    The structural stability, spontaneous polarization, piezoelectric response, and electronic structure of AlN and GaN under uniaxial strain along the [0001] direction are systematically investigated using HSE06 range-separated hybrid functionals. Our results exhibit interesting behavior. (i) AlN and GaN share the same structural transition from wurtzite to a graphite-like phase at very large compressive strains, similarly to other wurtzite semiconductors. Our calculations further reveal that this well-known phase transition is driven by the transverse-acoustic soft phonon mode associated with elastic instabilities. (ii) The applied tensile strain can either drastically suppress or strongly enhance the polarization and piezoelectricity, based on the value of the strain. Furthermore, large enhancements of polarization and piezoelectricity close to the phase-transition regions at large compressive strains are predicted, similar to those previously predicted in ferroelectric fields. Our calculations indicate that such colossal enhancements are strongly correlated to phase transitions when large atomic displacements are generated by external strains. (iii) Under the same strain, AlN and GaN have significantly different electronic properties: both wurtzite and graphite-like AlN always display direct band structures, while the the bandgap of wurtzite GaN is always direct and that of graphite-like GaN always indirect. Furthermore, the bandgap of graphite-like AlN is greatly enhanced by large compressive strain, but that of wurtzite GaN is not sensitive to compressive strain. Our results are drastically different from those for equibiaxial strain (Duan et al 2012 Appl. Phys. Lett. 100 022104).

  15. Hybrid density functional theory studies of AlN and GaN under uniaxial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lixia; Duan, Yifeng; Shi, Hongliang; Shi, Liwei; Tang, Gang

    2013-01-01

    The structural stability, spontaneous polarization, piezoelectric response, and electronic structure of AlN and GaN under uniaxial strain along the [0001] direction are systematically investigated using HSE06 range-separated hybrid functionals. Our results exhibit interesting behavior. (i) AlN and GaN share the same structural transition from wurtzite to a graphite-like phase at very large compressive strains, similarly to other wurtzite semiconductors. Our calculations further reveal that this well-known phase transition is driven by the transverse-acoustic soft phonon mode associated with elastic instabilities. (ii) The applied tensile strain can either drastically suppress or strongly enhance the polarization and piezoelectricity, based on the value of the strain. Furthermore, large enhancements of polarization and piezoelectricity close to the phase-transition regions at large compressive strains are predicted, similar to those previously predicted in ferroelectric fields. Our calculations indicate that such colossal enhancements are strongly correlated to phase transitions when large atomic displacements are generated by external strains. (iii) Under the same strain, AlN and GaN have significantly different electronic properties: both wurtzite and graphite-like AlN always display direct band structures, while the the bandgap of wurtzite GaN is always direct and that of graphite-like GaN always indirect. Furthermore, the bandgap of graphite-like AlN is greatly enhanced by large compressive strain, but that of wurtzite GaN is not sensitive to compressive strain. Our results are drastically different from those for equibiaxial strain (Duan et al 2012 Appl. Phys. Lett. 100 022104).

  16. Strain-controlled magnetic domain wall propagation in hybrid piezoelectric/ferromagnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Na; Devolder, Thibaut; Agnus, Guillaume; Aubert, Pascal; Daniel, Laurent; Kim, Joo-Von; Zhao, Weisheng; Trypiniotis, Theodossis; Cowburn, Russell P.; Chappert, Claude; Ravelosona, Dafiné; Lecoeur, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The control of magnetic order in nanoscale devices underpins many proposals for integrating spintronics concepts into conventional electronics. A key challenge lies in finding an energy-efficient means of control, as power dissipation remains an important factor limiting future miniaturization of integrated circuits. One promising approach involves magnetoelectric coupling in magnetostrictive/piezoelectric systems, where induced strains can bear directly on the magnetic anisotropy. While such processes have been demonstrated in several multiferroic heterostructures, the incorporation of such complex materials into practical geometries has been lacking. Here we demonstrate the possibility of generating sizeable anisotropy changes, through induced strains driven by applied electric fields, in hybrid piezoelectric/spin-valve nanowires. By combining magneto-optical Kerr effect and magnetoresistance measurements, we show that domain wall propagation fields can be doubled under locally applied strains. These results highlight the prospect of constructing low-power domain wall gates for magnetic logic devices.

  17. Study of optical fibers strain-temperature sensitivities using hybrid Brillouin-Rayleigh system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishida, Kinzo; Yamauchi, Yoshiaki; Guzik, Artur

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the most recent progress as well as challenges of distributed optical fiber sensing (DOFS) in industrial applications is discussed. Compared to the vast market of sensors used to measure strain or temperature, the success of distributed optical fiber sensing (DOFS) at the industrial level is very limited, at best. One of the reasons for this lack of the wider acceptance is the mismatch between the commercially available systems and actual industrial requirements, especially for the spatial resolution and precision. These requirements are organized and clarified in the paper. It also describes the hybrid Brillouin-Rayleigh system, which exhibits capabilities surpassing those of strain gauges. The principles of the system are illustrated considering the fiber calibration methodology. Formulas required for determining strain, temperature, and hydro-pressure are derived and discussed. Finally, the examples of applications are presented.

  18. Strain-controlled magnetic domain wall propagation in hybrid piezoelectric/ferromagnetic structures

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Na; Devolder, Thibaut; Agnus, Guillaume; Aubert, Pascal; Daniel, Laurent; Kim, Joo-Von; Zhao, Weisheng; Trypiniotis, Theodossis; Cowburn, Russell P.; Chappert, Claude; Ravelosona, Dafiné; Lecoeur, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The control of magnetic order in nanoscale devices underpins many proposals for integrating spintronics concepts into conventional electronics. A key challenge lies in finding an energy-efficient means of control, as power dissipation remains an important factor limiting future miniaturization of integrated circuits. One promising approach involves magnetoelectric coupling in magnetostrictive/piezoelectric systems, where induced strains can bear directly on the magnetic anisotropy. While such processes have been demonstrated in several multiferroic heterostructures, the incorporation of such complex materials into practical geometries has been lacking. Here we demonstrate the possibility of generating sizeable anisotropy changes, through induced strains driven by applied electric fields, in hybrid piezoelectric/spin-valve nanowires. By combining magneto-optical Kerr effect and magnetoresistance measurements, we show that domain wall propagation fields can be doubled under locally applied strains. These results highlight the prospect of constructing low-power domain wall gates for magnetic logic devices. PMID:23340418

  19. Strain-controlled magnetic domain wall propagation in hybrid piezoelectric/ferromagnetic structures.

    PubMed

    Lei, Na; Devolder, Thibaut; Agnus, Guillaume; Aubert, Pascal; Daniel, Laurent; Kim, Joo-Von; Zhao, Weisheng; Trypiniotis, Theodossis; Cowburn, Russell P; Chappert, Claude; Ravelosona, Dafiné; Lecoeur, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The control of magnetic order in nanoscale devices underpins many proposals for integrating spintronics concepts into conventional electronics. A key challenge lies in finding an energy-efficient means of control, as power dissipation remains an important factor limiting future miniaturization of integrated circuits. One promising approach involves magnetoelectric coupling in magnetostrictive/piezoelectric systems, where induced strains can bear directly on the magnetic anisotropy. While such processes have been demonstrated in several multiferroic heterostructures, the incorporation of such complex materials into practical geometries has been lacking. Here we demonstrate the possibility of generating sizeable anisotropy changes, through induced strains driven by applied electric fields, in hybrid piezoelectric/spin-valve nanowires. By combining magneto-optical Kerr effect and magnetoresistance measurements, we show that domain wall propagation fields can be doubled under locally applied strains. These results highlight the prospect of constructing low-power domain wall gates for magnetic logic devices.

  20. Array-Based Genomic Comparative Hybridization Analysis of Field Strains of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Melissa L.; Oneal, Michael J.; Gardner, Stuart W.; Strait, Erin L.; Nettleton, Dan; Thacker, Eileen L.; Minion, F. Chris

    2007-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia and a major factor in the porcine respiratory disease complex. A clear understanding of the mechanisms of pathogenesis does not exist, although it is clear that M. hyopneumoniae adheres to porcine ciliated epithelium by action of a protein called P97. Previous studies have shown variation in the gene encoding the P97 cilium adhesin in different strains of M. hyopneumoniae, but the extent of genetic variation among field strains across the genome is not known. Since M. hyopneumoniae is a worldwide problem, it is reasonable to expect that a wide range of genetic variability may exist given all of the different breeds and housing conditions. This variation may impact the overall virulence of a single strain. Using microarray technology, this study examined the potential variation of 14 field strains compared to strain 232, on which the array was based. Genomic DNA was obtained, amplified with TempliPhi, and labeled indirectly with Alexa dyes. After genomic hybridization, the arrays were scanned and data were analyzed using a linear statistical model. The results indicated that genetic variation could be detected in all 14 field strains but across different loci, suggesting that variation occurs throughout the genome. Fifty-nine percent of the variable loci were hypothetical genes. Twenty-two percent of the lipoprotein genes showed variation in at least one field strain. A permutation test identified a location in the M. hyopneumoniae genome where there is spatial clustering of variability between the field strains and strain 232. PMID:17873054

  1. All-solid birefringent hybrid photonic crystal fiber based interferometric sensor for measurement of strain and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bobo; Yuan, Wu; Zhang, A. Ping; Bang, Ole

    2011-12-01

    A highly sensitive fiber-optic interferometric sensor based on an all-solid birefringent hybrid photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is demonstrated for measuring strain and temperature. A strain sensitivity of ~23.8 pm/μɛ and a thermal sensitivity of ~- 1.12 nm/°C are demonstrated in the experiment.

  2. Differentially expressed genes of virulent and nonvirulent Entamoeba histolytica strains identified by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Michelle A R; Alvarenga, Ângela C; Fernandes, Helen C; Gil, Frederico F; Melo, Maria N; Pesquero, Jorge L; Gomes, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a parasite which presents capacity to degrade tissues and therefore has a pathogenic behavior. As this behavior is not shown by all strains, there have been several studies investigating molecular basis of the cytotoxicity process. Using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technique, differential gene expressions of two E. histolytica strains, one virulent (EGG) and one nonvirulent (452), have been analyzed with the purpose of isolating genes which may be involved with amoebic virulence. Nine cDNA fragments presenting high homology with E. histolytica previously sequenced genes were subtracted. Of these, four genes were confirmed by RT-PCR. Two coding for hypothetical proteins, one for a cysteine-rich protein, expressed only in the virulent strain, EGG and another one, coding for grainin 2 protein, exclusive from 452 strain. This study provided new insight into the proteins differences in the virulent and nonvirulent E. histolytica strains. We believe that further studies with these proteins may prove association of them with tissue damage, providing new perceptions to improve treatment or diagnosis of the invasive disease.

  3. Interfacial strain and defects in asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayence, Arnaud; Wéry, Madeleine; Tran, Dung Trung; Wetterskog, Erik; Svedlindh, Peter; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Bergström, Lennart

    2016-07-01

    Asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles have been obtained by a seed-mediated thermal decomposition-based synthesis route. The use of benzyl ether as the solvent was found to promote the orientational growth of Mn1-xO onto the iron oxide nanocube seeds yielding mainly dimers and trimers whereas 1-octadecene yields large nanoparticles. HRTEM imaging and HAADF-STEM tomography performed on dimers show that the growth of Mn1-xO occurs preferentially along the edges of iron oxide nanocubes where both oxides share a common crystallographic orientation. Fourier filtering and geometric phase analysis of dimers reveal a lattice mismatch of 5% and a large interfacial strain together with a significant concentration of defects. The saturation magnetization is lower and the coercivity is higher for the Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles compared to the iron oxide nanocube seeds.Asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles have been obtained by a seed-mediated thermal decomposition-based synthesis route. The use of benzyl ether as the solvent was found to promote the orientational growth of Mn1-xO onto the iron oxide nanocube seeds yielding mainly dimers and trimers whereas 1-octadecene yields large nanoparticles. HRTEM imaging and HAADF-STEM tomography performed on dimers show that the growth of Mn1-xO occurs preferentially along the edges of iron oxide nanocubes where both oxides share a common crystallographic orientation. Fourier filtering and geometric phase analysis of dimers reveal a lattice mismatch of 5% and a large interfacial strain together with a significant concentration of defects. The saturation magnetization is lower and the coercivity is higher for the Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles compared to the iron oxide nanocube seeds. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials characterization, powder X-ray diffraction, EFTEM images, EELS spectra, HAADF-STEM. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01373b

  4. A pair of adjacent genes, cry5Ad and orf2-5Ad, encode the typical N- and C-terminal regions of a Cry5Adelta-endotoxin as two separate proteins in Bacillus thuringiensis strain L366.

    PubMed

    Lenane, Ian J; Bagnall, Neil H; Josh, Peter F; Pearson, Roger D; Akhurst, Ray J; Kotze, Andrew C

    2008-01-01

    A new DNA sequence cry5Ad/orf2-5Ad (GenBank accession number EF219060) was isolated from Bacillus thuringiensis strain L366. This DNA sequence contains two ORFs: cry5Ad (a previously unreported member of the cry5A gene family) and orf2-5Ad. cry5Ad is unique among cry5A genes in that it encodes only the N-terminal region of a typical Cry5Adelta-endotoxin. The cry5Ad sequence includes homology blocks 1-5, which are present in most B. thuringiensisdelta-endotoxins. The usual C-terminal region of a Cry5Adelta-endotoxin (including homology blocks 6-8) is encoded by orf2-5Ad. Both proteins encoded by cry5Ad and orf2-5Ad were found in IPTG-induced Escherichia coli, after a copy of cry5Ad/orf2-5Ad was cloned into the pQE32 expression vector and transformed into pREP4 E. coli cells. Both proteins were also found in parasporal crystal inclusions of B. thuringiensis L366. Sequencing of cDNA derived from transformed E. coli cells showed that the two ORFs are transcribed as a single mRNA. Extracts prepared from the recombinant E. coli expressing Cry5Ad and Orf2-5Ad were not toxic to nematode larvae (Haemonchus contortus), indicating that these two proteins are most likely not responsible for the nematocidal activity seen previously in the B. thuringiensis strain L366.

  5. Temperature-insensitive pressure or strain sensing technology with fiber optic hybrid Sagnac interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanhong; Lu, Lin; Liu, Shuo; Jin, Wei; Han, Zonghu; Cao, Yaohui

    2016-05-01

    The transmission spectrum characteristic of two-segment polarization maintaining fibers Sagnac interferometer was investigated and simulated in detail and a temperature-insensitive pressure or strain sensing technology was proposed. An experimental hybrid Sagnac interferometer was built and the solid core polarization maintaining photonic crystal fiber was taken as the sensing probe. The side pressure sensitive coefficients and the temperature crosstalk drift were measured and compared. The experimental results show that the side pressure sensitive coefficient was ~0.2877 nm/N and the temperature drift was less than 0.1 pm/°C.

  6. The adenovirus type 2-simian virus 40 hybrid virus Ad2+ND4 requires deletion variants to grow in monkey cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, A M; Westphal, H

    1983-01-01

    The Ad2+ND4 virus is an adenovirus type 2 (Ad2)-simian virus 40 (SV40) recombination. The Ad2 genome of this recombinant has a rearrangement within early region 3; Ad2 DNA sequences between map positions 81.3 and 85.5 have been deleted, and the SV40 DNA sequences between map positions 0.11 and 0.626 have been inserted into the deletion in an 81.3-0.626 orientation. Nonhybrid Ad2 is defective in monkey cells; however, the Ad2+ND4 virus can replicate in monkey cells due to the expression of the SV40-enhancing function encoded by the DNA insert. Stocks of the Ad2+ND4 hybrid were produced in primary monkey cells by using the progeny of a three-step plaque purification procedure and were considered to be homogeneous populations of Ad2+ND4 virions because they induced plaques in primary monkey cells by first-order kinetics. By studying the kinetics of plaque induction in continuous lines (BSC-1 and CV-1) of monkey cells, we have found that stocks (prepared with virions before and after plaque purification) of Ad2+ND4 are actually heterogeneous populations of Ad2+ND4 virions and Ad2+ND4 deletion variants that lack SV40 and frequently Ad2 DNA sequences at the left Ad2-SV40 junction. Due to the defectiveness of the Ad2+ND4 virus, the production of progeny in BSC-1 and CV-1 cells requires complementation between the Ad2+ND4 genome and the genome of an Ad2+ND4 deletion variant. Since the deletion variants that have been obtained from Ad2+ND4 stocks do not express the SV40-enhancing function in that they cannot produce progeny in monkey cells, we conclude that they are providing an Ad2 component that is essential for the production of Ad2+ND4 progeny. These data imply that the Ad2+ND4 virus is incapable of replicating in singly infected primary monkey cells without generating deletion variants that are missing various amounts of DNA around the left Ad2-SV40 junction in the hybrid genome. As the deletion variants that arise from the Ad2+ND4 virus are created by nonhomologous

  7. Colonization of a hybrid strain to restore male Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae) mating competitiveness for sterile insect technique programs.

    PubMed

    Rull, Juan; Barreda-Landa, Abraham

    2007-06-01

    To restore male mating competitiveness of Mexican fruit flies, Anastrepha ludens (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae), reared for sterile insect releases by the Mexican Fruit fly Eradication Campaign, two strain replacement techniques were evaluated. Field cage male competitiveness tests revealed that laboratory males of the Metapa strain mated 3 times less often with wild females than field-collected wild males. A strain developed from the cross of wild males and laboratory females (hybrid strain) was similar to a strain developed from the cross of laboratory males and females (laboratory strain) in that its females produced similar amounts of eggs and the eggs displayed similar levels of hatch and egg-to-pupa transformation in artificial diet. By contrast, a strain developed from the cross of wild males and females (wild strain), forced into artificial rearing, experienced a series of bottlenecks involving reduced egg laying and extremely poor development in diet. The male F1 progeny of the hybrid strain and field-collected wild males outcompeted Fl laboratory males in field cage tests for matings with field-collected wild females. In conclusion, we found that strains developed from the cross of wild males and laboratory females allowed us to restore male mating competitiveness of F1 Mexican fruit flies without compromising mass-rearing production.

  8. Hybrid Tip-Enhanced Nanospectroscopy and Nanoimaging of Monolayer WSe2 with Local Strain Control.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Khatib, Omar; Kravtsov, Vasily; Clark, Genevieve; Xu, Xiaodong; Raschke, Markus B

    2016-04-13

    Many classes of two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as potential platforms for novel electronic and optical devices. However, their physical properties are strongly influenced by nanoscale heterogeneities in the form of edges, twin boundaries, and nucleation sites. Using combined tip-enhanced Raman scattering and photoluminescence (PL) nanospectroscopy and nanoimaging, we study the associated effects on the excitonic properties in monolayer WSe2 grown by physical vapor deposition. With ∼15 nm spatial resolution, we resolve nanoscale correlations of PL spectral intensity and shifts with crystal edges and internal twin boundaries associated with the expected exciton diffusion length. Through an active atomic force tip interaction we can control the crystal strain on the nanoscale and tune the local bandgap in reversible (up to 24 meV shift) and irreversible (up to 48 meV shift) fashion. This allows us to distinguish the effect of strain from the dominant influence of defects on the PL modification at the different structural heterogeneities. Hybrid nano-optical spectroscopy and imaging with nanomechanical strain control thus enables the systematic study of the coupling of structural and mechanical degrees of freedom to the nanoscale electronic and optical properties in layered 2D materials.

  9. Impact of adding artificially generated alert sound to hybrid electric vehicles on their detectability by pedestrians who are blind.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Shik; Emerson, Robert Wall; Naghshineh, Koorosh; Pliskow, Jay; Myers, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    A repeated-measures design with block randomization was used for the study, in which 14 adults with visual impairments attempted to detect three different vehicles: a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) with an artificially generated sound (Vehicle Sound for Pedestrians [VSP]), an HEV without the VSP, and a comparable internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicle. The VSP vehicle (mean +/- standard deviation [SD] = 38.3 +/- 14.8 m) was detected at a significantly farther distance than the HEV (mean +/- SD = 27.5 +/- 11.5 m), t = 4.823, p < 0.001, but no significant difference existed between the VSP and ICE vehicles (mean +/- SD = 34.5 +/- 14.3 m), t = 1.787, p = 0.10. Despite the overall sound level difference between the two test sites (parking lot = 48.7 dBA, roadway = 55.1 dBA), no significant difference in detection distance between the test sites was observed, F(1, 13) = 0.025, p = 0.88. No significant interaction was found between the vehicle type and test site, F(1.31, 16.98) = 0.272, p = 0.67. The findings of the study may help us understand how adding an artificially generated sound to an HEV could affect some of the orientation and mobility tasks performed by blind pedestrians.

  10. Modified Bacillus thuringiensis toxins and a hybrid B. thuringiensis strain counter greenhouse-selected resistance in Trichoplusia ni.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Michelle T; Nieman, Christal L; Janmaat, Alida F; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Myers, Judith H

    2009-09-01

    Resistance of greenhouse-selected strains of the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni, to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki was countered by a hybrid strain of B. thuringiensis and genetically modified toxins Cry1AbMod and Cry1AcMod, which lack helix alpha-1. Resistance to Cry1AbMod and Cry1AcMod was >100-fold less than resistance to native toxins Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac.

  11. Large-scale hybrid monitoring system for temperature, strain, and vibration using fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Ryoichi; Sumita, Akio; Makino, Shunichiro; Maekawa, Tatsuyuki; Morimoto, Soichiro

    2002-09-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor systems have been widely developed and the feasibility of their application to various fields has been demonstrated. However, from the viewpoint of the combination of highly multiplexed system and hybrid sensing of static parameter and dynamic parameter, investigations are not adequate yet. In this paper an interrogation technique for static and dynamic FBG sensors is developed. We demonstrated that the method could measure the temperature within 1?strain and vibration.

  12. Vehicle surge detection and pathway discrimination by pedestrians who are blind: Effect of adding an alert sound to hybrid electric vehicles on performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Shik; Emerson, Robert Wall; Naghshineh, Koorosh; Pliskow, Jay; Myers, Kyle

    2012-05-01

    This study examined the effect of adding an artificially generated alert sound to a quiet vehicle on its detectability and localizability with 15 visually impaired adults. When starting from a stationary position, the hybrid electric vehicle with an alert sound was significantly more quickly and reliably detected than either the identical vehicle without such added sound or the comparable internal combustion engine vehicle. However, no significant difference was found between the vehicles in respect to how accurately the participants could discriminate the path of a given vehicle (straight vs. right turn). These results suggest that adding an artificial sound to a hybrid electric vehicle may help reduce delay in street crossing initiation by a blind pedestrian, but the benefit of such alert sound may not be obvious in determining whether the vehicle in his near parallel lane proceeds straight through the intersection or turns right in front of him.

  13. Next-generation sequencing analysis of lager brewing yeast strains reveals the evolutionary history of interspecies hybridization.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Miki; Kajitani, Rei; Ryusui, Rie; Morimoto, Hiroya; Kodama, Yukiko; Itoh, Takehiko

    2016-02-01

    The lager beer yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus is considered an allopolyploid hybrid species between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus. Many S. pastorianus strains have been isolated and classified into two groups according to geographical origin, but this classification remains controversial. Hybridization analyses and partial PCR-based sequence data have indicated a separate origin of these two groups, whereas a recent intertranslocation analysis suggested a single origin. To clarify the evolutionary history of this species, we analysed 10 S. pastorianus strains and the S. eubayanus type strain as a likely parent by Illumina next-generation sequencing. In addition to assembling the genomes of five of the strains, we obtained information on interchromosomal translocation, ploidy, and single-nucleotide variants (SNVs). Collectively, these results indicated that the two groups of strains share S. cerevisiae haploid chromosomes. We therefore conclude that both groups of S. pastorianus strains share at least one interspecific hybridization event and originated from a common parental species and that differences in ploidy and SNVs between the groups can be explained by chromosomal deletion or loss of heterozygosity.

  14. Strain-tunable half-metallicity in hybrid graphene-hBN monolayer superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanchao; Zhang, Shiqi; Lee, In-Ho; Jun, Sukky; Ciobanu, Cristian V.

    2016-07-01

    As research in 2-D materials evolves toward combinations of different materials, interesting electronic and spintronic properties are revealed and may be exploited in future devices. A way to combine materials is the formation of spatially periodic domain boundaries in an atom-thick monolayer: as shown in recent reports, when these domains are made of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, the resulting superlattice has half-metallic properties in which one spin component is (semi)metallic and the other is semiconductor. We explore here the range of spin-dependent electronic properties that such superlattices can develop for different type of domain boundaries, domain widths, and values of tensile strain applied to the monolayer. We show evidence of an interplay between strain and domain width in determining the electronic properties: while for armchair boundaries the bandgap is the same for both spin components, superlattices with zigzag boundaries exhibit rich spin-dependent behavior, including different bandgaps for each spin component, half-metallicity, and reversal of half-metallicity. These findings can lead to new ways of controlling the spintronic properties in hybrid-domain monolayers, which may be exploited in devices based on 2-D materials.

  15. Genetic differences between two Leishmania major-like strains revealed by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ângela C A; Freitas, Michelle A R; Silva, Soraia de O; Nogueira, Paula M; Soares, Rodrigo P; Pesquero, João Bosco; Gomes, Maria A; Pesquero, Jorge L; Melo, Maria N

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania major, the causative agent of zoonotic leishmaniasis, is restricted to Old World countries. Molecular and biochemical techniques have been used to identify some L. major-like isolated in South America including Brazil. Here, two L. major-like strains, one virulent (BH49) and one non-virulent (BH121), were subjected to suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technique in order to identify differentially expressed genes. SSH technique identified nine cDNA fragments exhibiting high homology to previously sequenced L. major genes. Five cDNAs (four specific for BH49 and one for BH121) were confirmed by RT-PCR. Among those differentially expressed subtracted genes, some were involved in physiological processes including metabolism, translation and destination of proteins, production of energy, virulence factors and unknown functions. Western-blot analysis confirmed a higher expression level of β-1,3-galactosyl residues in L. major-like lipophosphoglycan (LPG). This molecular analysis opens the possibility for identification of potential virulence factors not only in different strains, but also in others species of Leishmania.

  16. Interfacial strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (I-SPAAC) for the synthesis of nanomaterial hybrids.

    PubMed

    Gobbo, Pierangelo; Novoa, Samantha; Biesinger, Mark C; Workentin, Mark S

    2013-05-11

    An interfacial strain promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (I-SPACC) is introduced as a method to prepare robust nanomaterial hybrids. This is demonstrated with a reaction between a novel dibenzocyclooctyne-modified single walled carbon nanotubes (DBCO-SWCNT) and a versatile water-soluble azide modified gold nanoparticle (N3-EG4-AuNP).

  17. Occurrence of Hybrid Escherichia coli Strains Carrying Shiga Toxin and Heat-Stable Toxin in Livestock of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Johura, Fatema-Tuz; Parveen, Rozina; Islam, Atiqul; Sadique, Abdus; Rahim, Md Niaz; Monira, Shirajum; Khan, Anisur R; Ahsan, Sunjukta; Ohnishi, Makoto; Watanabe, Haruo; Chakraborty, Subhra; George, Christine M; Cravioto, Alejandro; Navarro, Armando; Hasan, Badrul; Alam, Munirul

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are important causes of diarrhea in humans and animals worldwide. Although ruminant animals are the main source of STEC, diarrhea due to this pathotype is very low in Bangladesh where ETEC remains the predominant group associated with childhood diarrhea. In the present study, E. coli strains (n = 35) isolated from Bangladesh livestock (goats, sheep, and cattle) and poultry (chicken and ducks) were analyzed for the presence of major virulence factors, such as Shiga toxins (STX-1 and STX-2), heat-labile toxin, and heat-stable toxins (STa and STb). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction results revealed 23 (66%) E. coli strains to be virulent possessing either sta (n = 5), stx (stx1, n = 8; stx2, n = 2), or both (n = 8) genes in varying combinations. Thirty-four percent (8/23) of strains from livestock were hybrid type that carried both stx (either stx1 or stx2) and ETEC-specific enterotoxin gene sta. Serotyping results revealed that the ETEC strains belonged to five serotypes, namely O36:H5, O174:H-, O152:H8, O109:H51, and O8:H21, while the STEC-producing strains belonged to serotypes O76:H19 (n = 3), O43:H2 (n = 2), O87:H16 (n = 2), OR:H2 (n = 1), O110:H16 (n = 1), and O152:H8 (n = 1). The STEC-ETEC hybrid strains belonged to serotypes O76:H19 (n = 3), O43:H2 (n = 2), O87:H16, OR:H2, and O152:H8. Forty percent (2/5) of the ETEC and 20% (2/10) of the STEC strains were multidrug resistant with the highest drug resistance (50%) being found in the hybrid strains. Molecular fingerprinting determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and cluster analyses by dendrogram revealed that, genetically, STEC-ETEC hybrid strains were highly heterogeneous. Multidrug-resistant E. coli STEC-ETEC hybrid strains in domesticated animals pose a public health threat for humans in Bangladesh.

  18. Occurrence of Hybrid Escherichia coli Strains Carrying Shiga Toxin and Heat-Stable Toxin in Livestock of Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Johura, Fatema-Tuz; Parveen, Rozina; Islam, Atiqul; Sadique, Abdus; Rahim, Md Niaz; Monira, Shirajum; Khan, Anisur R.; Ahsan, Sunjukta; Ohnishi, Makoto; Watanabe, Haruo; Chakraborty, Subhra; George, Christine M.; Cravioto, Alejandro; Navarro, Armando; Hasan, Badrul; Alam, Munirul

    2017-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are important causes of diarrhea in humans and animals worldwide. Although ruminant animals are the main source of STEC, diarrhea due to this pathotype is very low in Bangladesh where ETEC remains the predominant group associated with childhood diarrhea. In the present study, E. coli strains (n = 35) isolated from Bangladesh livestock (goats, sheep, and cattle) and poultry (chicken and ducks) were analyzed for the presence of major virulence factors, such as Shiga toxins (STX-1 and STX-2), heat-labile toxin, and heat-stable toxins (STa and STb). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction results revealed 23 (66%) E. coli strains to be virulent possessing either sta (n = 5), stx (stx1, n = 8; stx2, n = 2), or both (n = 8) genes in varying combinations. Thirty-four percent (8/23) of strains from livestock were hybrid type that carried both stx (either stx1 or stx2) and ETEC-specific enterotoxin gene sta. Serotyping results revealed that the ETEC strains belonged to five serotypes, namely O36:H5, O174:H−, O152:H8, O109:H51, and O8:H21, while the STEC-producing strains belonged to serotypes O76:H19 (n = 3), O43:H2 (n = 2), O87:H16 (n = 2), OR:H2 (n = 1), O110:H16 (n = 1), and O152:H8 (n = 1). The STEC–ETEC hybrid strains belonged to serotypes O76:H19 (n = 3), O43:H2 (n = 2), O87:H16, OR:H2, and O152:H8. Forty percent (2/5) of the ETEC and 20% (2/10) of the STEC strains were multidrug resistant with the highest drug resistance (50%) being found in the hybrid strains. Molecular fingerprinting determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and cluster analyses by dendrogram revealed that, genetically, STEC–ETEC hybrid strains were highly heterogeneous. Multidrug-resistant E. coli STEC–ETEC hybrid strains in domesticated animals pose a public health threat for humans in Bangladesh. PMID:28119905

  19. Reduction of physiological strain under a hot and humid environment by a hybrid cooling vest.

    PubMed

    Chan, Albert P C; Yang, Y; Wong, Francis K W; Yam, Michael C H; Wong, Del P; Song, W F

    2017-02-08

    Cooling treatment is regarded as one of good practices to provide safe training conditions to athletic trainers in the hot environment. The present study aimed to investigate whether wearing a commercial lightweight and portable hybrid cooling vest that combines air ventilation fans with frozen gel packs was an effective means to reduce participants' body heat strain. In this within-subject repeated measures study, 10 male volunteers participated in two heat-stress trials (one with the cooling vest - COOL condition, and another without - CON condition, in a randomized order) inside a climatic chamber with a controlled ambient temperature 33 °C and relative humidity (RH) 75% on an experimental day. Each trial included a progressively incremental running test, followed by a 40 min post-exercise recovery. Core temperature (Tc), heart rate (HR), sweat rate, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), exercise duration, running distance, power output, and sweat rate were measured. When comparing the two conditions, a non-statistically significant moderate cooling effect in rate of increase in Tc (0.03±0.02 °C/min for COOL vs. 0.04±0.02 °C/min for CON, p=0.054, d=0.57), HR (3±1 bpm/min for COOL vs. 4±1 bpm/min for CON, p=0.229, d=0.40), and physiological strain index (PSI) (0.20±0.06 unit/min for COOL vs. 0.23±0.06 unit/min for CON, p=0.072, d=0.50) was found in the COOL condition during exercise. A non-statistically significant (p>0.05) trivial cooling effect (d<0.2) was observed between the COOL and CON conditions for measures of exercise duration, running distance, power output, sweat rate and RPE. It is concluded that the use of the hybrid cooling vest achieved a moderate cooling effect in lowering the rate of increase in physiological strain without impeding the performance of progressively incremental exercise in the heat.

  20. Enhanced motility of a Proteus mirabilis strain expressing hybrid FlaAB flagella.

    PubMed

    Manos, Jim; Artimovich, Elena; Belas, Robert

    2004-05-01

    Proteus mirabilis has two tandemly arranged flagellin-encoding genes, flaA and flaB. flaA is transcribed from a sigma(28) promoter, while flaB is silent. flaA and flaB can undergo reversible rearrangement to produce a set of hybrid genes referred to as flaAB. Flagellins composed of FlaAB protein have a different amino acid sequence and are antigenically distinct from flagellin composed of FlaA, implicating flagellin gene conversion as a putative virulence mechanism for P. mirabilis. The change in amino acid sequence is also hypothesized to alter the filament helix and, hence, affect the motility of FlaAB-expressing strains. To test this hypothesis, the motility of wild-type P. mirabilis was compared with that of a strain, DF1003, locked into the FlaAB(+) hybrid phase, under conditions of altered ionic strength, pH and viscosity. Cell motion tracking analysis showed that DF1003 has wild-type swimming velocity at physiological conditions, but moves significantly faster and travels further compared to the wild-type at NaCl concentrations greater than 170 mM. DF1003 is also significantly faster than the wild-type at pH 5.2, 5.8 and 8.2, and at 5 and 10 % polyvinylpyrrolidone. Measurements of amplitude and wavelength for isolated flagella subjected to pH 5.8 or 425 mM NaCl showed a loss of helical structure in FlaA flagella compared to FlaAB filaments, a feature that could significantly affect motility under these conditions. These results support a hypothesis that FlaAB flagellin imparts a motile advantage to P. mirabilis in conditions that otherwise may impede bacterial movement. In a broader context, flagellar antigenic variation, commonly thought to serve as means to avoid host defences, may also enhance motility in other bacterial species, thus aiding in the adaptation and survival of the cells.

  1. Quantification of Gordona amarae Strains in Foaming Activated Sludge and Anaerobic Digester Systems with Oligonucleotide Hybridization Probes

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, M. Fiorella; de los Reyes, Francis L.; Hernandez, Mark; Raskin, Lutgarde

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the predominance of mycolic acid-containing filamentous actinomycetes (mycolata) in foam layers in activated sludge systems. Gordona (formerly Nocardia) amarae often is considered the major representative of this group in activated sludge foam. In this study, small-subunit rRNA genes of four G. amarae strains were sequenced, and the resulting sequences were compared to the sequence of G. amarae type strain SE-6. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the five strains used represent two lines of evolutionary descent; group 1 consists of strains NM23 and ASAC1, and group 2 contains strains SE-6, SE-102, and ASF3. The following three oligonucleotide probes were designed: a species-specific probe for G. amarae, a probe specific for group 1, and a probe targeting group 2. The probes were characterized by dissociation temperature and specificity studies, and the species-specific probe was evaluated for use in fluorescent in situ hybridizations. By using the group-specific probes, it was possible to place additional G. amarae isolates in their respective groups. The probes were used along with previously designed probes in membrane hybridizations to determine the abundance of G. amarae, group 1, group 2, bacterial, mycolata, and Gordona rRNAs in samples obtained from foaming activated sludge systems in California, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The target groups were present in significantly greater concentrations in activated sludge foam than in mixed liquor and persisted in anaerobic digesters. Hybridization results indicated that the presence of certain G. amarae strains may be regional or treatment plant specific and that previously uncharacterized G. amarae strains may be present in some systems. PMID:9647822

  2. Thermal resistance and compressive strain of underwater aerogel syntactic foam hybrid insulation at atmospheric and elevated hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardy, Erik; Mollendorf, Joseph; Pendergast, David

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a new underwater thermal insulation designed for flexibility and high thermal resistance. The insulation was a hybrid composite of two constituents: syntactic foam and an insulating aerogel blanket. Methods for treating and combining the constituents into a hybrid insulation of several designs are presented. A final configuration was selected based on high thermal resistance and was tested for thermal resistance and compressive strain to a pressure of 1.2 MPa (107 msw, meters of sea water) for five continuous pressure cycles. The thermal resistance and compressive strain results were compared to foam neoprene and underwater pipeline insulation. It was found that the hybrid insulation has a thermal resistance significantly higher than both foam neoprene and underwater pipeline insulation at atmospheric and elevated hydrostatic pressures (1.2 MPa). The total thermal resistance of the hybrid insulation decreased 32% at 1.2 MPa and returned to its initial value upon decompression. It was concluded that the hybrid insulation, with modifications, could be used for wetsuit construction, shallow underwater pipeline insulation, or any underwater application where high thermal resistance, flexibility, and resistance to compression are desired.

  3. Regulation of the L-arabinose operon in strains of Escherichia coli containing ColE1-ara hybrid plasmids.

    PubMed

    Wallace, L J; Wilcox, G

    1979-06-20

    Hybrid plasmids were constructed from fragments of F'ara episomes formed by the restriction endonuclease EcoRI and a linear form of the plasmid ColE1 created by cleavage with EcoRI. Hybrid plasmids were constructed containing the entire ara region or the ara region with various parts deleted. E. coli K12 host strains were constructed which contained different deletions of the ara region. The hybrid plasmids were transferred to those strains whose ara deletion complemented that of the plasmid. The initial differential rates of synthesis of L-arabinose isomerase, the product of the araA gene, were determined for the Ara+, plasmid containing strains. These studies demonstrated that strains containing delta(araOIBA)718 produce elevated levels of araC protein, suggesting the araC promoter has been altered by this deletion. Evidence is also presented which suggests that araC protein activates the ara-BAD operon to higher levels when it is present in cis rather than trans. Amplification of the products of the cloned genes is observed when compared to haploid levels in some cases.

  4. Virulence Markers and Phylogenetic Analysis of Escherichia coli Strains with Hybrid EAEC/UPEC Genotypes Recovered from Sporadic Cases of Extraintestinal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Flaviane B. M.; Nery, Danielly R.; de Oliveira, Pâmela M.; Araujo, Mayana L.; Carvalho, Fabiana R. Q.; Messias-Silva, Lorena C. F.; Ferreira, Leonardo B.; Faria-Junior, Celio; Pereira, Alex L.

    2017-01-01

    Virulence genes from different E. coli pathotypes are blended in hybrid strains. E. coli strains with hybrid enteroaggregative/uropathogenic (EAEC/UPEC) genotypes have sporadically emerged causing outbreaks of extraintestinal infections, however their association with routine infections is yet underappreciated. We assessed 258 isolates of E. coli recovered from 86 consecutive cases of extraintestinal infections seeking EAEC and hybrid genotype (EAEC/UPEC) strains. Extensive virulence genotyping was carried out to detect 21 virulence genes, including molecular predictors of EAEC and UPEC strains. Phylogenetic groups and sequence types (STs) were identified, as well as it was performed phylogenetic analyses in order to evaluate whether hybrid EAEC/UPEC strains belonged to intestinal or extraintestinal lineages of E. coli. Adhesion assays were performed to evaluate the biofilm formation by hybrid strains in human urine and cell culture medium (DMEM). Molecular predictors of UPEC were detected in more than 70% of the strains (chuA in 85% and fyuA in 78%). Otherwise, molecular predictors of EAEC (aatA and aggR) were detected in only 3.4% (9/258) of the strains and always along with the UPEC predictor fyuA. Additionally, the pyelonephritis-associated pilus (pap) gene was also detected in all of the hybrid EAEC/UPEC strains. EAEC/UPEC strains were recovered from two cases of community-onset urinary tract infections (UTI) and from a case of bacteremia. Analyses revealed that hybrid EAEC/UPEC strains were phylogenetically positioned in two different clades. Two representative strains, each recovered from UTI and bacteremia, were positioned into a characteristic UPEC clade marked by strains belonging to phylogenetic group D and ST3 (Warwick ST 69). Another hybrid EAEC/UPEC strain was classified as phylogroup A-ST478 and positioned in a commensal clade. Hybrid EAEC/UPEC strains formed biofilms at modest, but perceptible levels either in DMEM or in urine samples. We showed

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparison with Other Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T. Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site [Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains], Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  6. Crash simulation of hybrid structures considering the stress and strain rate dependent material behavior of thermoplastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Schöngart, M.; Weber, M.; Klein, J.

    2015-05-01

    Thermoplastic materials are more and more used as a light weight replacement for metal, especially in the automotive industry. Since these materials do not provide the mechanical properties, which are required to manufacture supporting elements like an auto body or a cross bearer, plastics are combined with metals in so called hybrid structures. Normally, the plastics components are joined to the metal structures using different technologies like welding or screwing. Very often, the hybrid structures are made of flat metal parts, which are stiffened by a reinforcement structure made of thermoplastic materials. The loads on these structures are very often impulsive, for example in the crash situation of an automobile. Due to the large stiffness variation of metal and thermoplastic materials, complex states of stress and very high local strain rates occur in the contact zone under impact conditions. Since the mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials is highly dependent on these types of load, the crash failure of metal plastic hybrid parts is very complex. The problem is that the normally used strain rate dependent elastic/plastic material models are not capable to simulate the mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials depended on the state of stress. As part of a research project, a method to simulate the mechanical behavior of hybrid structures under impact conditions is developed at the IKV. For this purpose, a specimen for the measurement of mechanical properties dependet on the state of stress and a method for the strain rate depended characterization of thermoplastic materials were developed. In the second step impact testing is performed. A hybrid structure made from a metal sheet and a reinforcement structure of a Polybutylenterephthalat Polycarbonate blend is tested under impact conditions. The measured stress and strain rate depended material data are used to simulate the mechanical behavior of the hybrid structure under highly dynamic load with

  7. Impact of adding Saccharomyces strains on fermentation, aerobic stability, nutritive value, and select lactobacilli populations in corn silage.

    PubMed

    Duniere, L; Jin, L; Smiley, B; Qi, M; Rutherford, W; Wang, Y; McAllister, T

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial inoculants can improve the conservation and nutritional quality of silages. Inclusion of the yeast Saccharomyces in the diet of dairy cattle has also been reported to be beneficial. The present study assessed the ability of silage to be used as a means of delivering Saccharomyces strains to ruminants. Two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain 1 and 3)and 1 strain of Saccharomyces paradoxus (strain 2) were inoculated (10(3) cfu/g) individually onto corn forage that was ensiled in mini silos for 90 d. Fermentation characteristics, aerobic stability, and nutritive value of silages were determined and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to quantify S. cerevisiae, S.paradoxus, total Saccharomyces, fungal, and bacterial populations. Fermentation characteristics of silage inoculated with S1 were similar to control silage. Although strain 3 inoculation increased ash and decreased OM contents of silage (P = 0.017), no differences were observed in nutrient composition or fermentation profiles after 90 d of ensiling. Inoculation with Saccharomyces had no detrimental effect on the aerobic stability of silage. In vitro DM disappearance, gas production, and microbial protein synthesis were not affected by yeast inoculation.Saccharomyces strain 1 was quantified throughout ensiling, whereas strain 2 was detected only immediately after inoculation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 3 was quantified until d 7 and detectable 90 d after ensiling. All inoculants were detected and quantified during aerobic exposure. Inoculation with Saccharomyces did not alter lactobacilli populations. Saccharomycetales were detected by RT-qPCR throughout ensiling in all silages. Both S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus populations increased during aerobic exposure, demonstrating that the density of these yeast strains would increase between the time that silage was removed from storage and the time it was fed.

  8. Transformation of steroids by Bacillus strains isolated from the foregut of water beetles (Coleoptera:Dytiscidae): I. Metabolism of androst-4-en-3,17-dione (AD).

    PubMed

    Schaaf, O; Dettner, K

    1998-12-01

    Two Bacillus strains were isolated from the foregut of the water beetle Agabus affinis (Payk.) and tested for their steroid transforming ability. After incubation with androst-4-en-3,17-dione (AD), 13 different transformation products were detected. AD was hydroxylated at C6, C7, C11 and C14, resulting in formation of 6beta-, 7alpha-, 11alpha- and 14alpha-hydroxy-AD. One strain also produced small amounts of 6beta,14alpha-dihydroxy-AD. Partly, the 6beta-hydroxy group was further oxidized to the corresponding 6-oxo steroids. In addition, a specific reduction of the delta4-double bond was observed, leading to the formation of 5alpha-androstane derivatives. In minor yields the carbonyl functions at C3 and C17 were reduced leading to the formation of 3zeta-OH or 17beta-OH steroids. EI mass spectra of the trimethylsilyl and O-methyloxime trimethylsilyl ether derivatives of some transformation products are presented for the first time.

  9. Total degradation of pentachloroethane by an engineered Alcaligenes strain expressing a modified camphor monooxygenase and a hybrid dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Ryo; Yoshihira, Kunichika; Ngadiman; Futagami, Taiki; Goto, Masatoshi; Furukawa, Kensuke

    2004-06-01

    We engineered biphenyl-degrading Alcaligenes sp. strain KF711 for total degradation of pentachloroethane (PCA), which expresses a modified camphor monooxygenase and a hybrid dioxygenase consisting of TodC1 (a large subunit of toluene dioxygenase of Pseudomonas putida F1) and BphA2-BphA3-pbhA4 (a small subunit, ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase of biphenyl dioxygenase, respectively, in strain KF707). Modified camphor monooxygenase genes (camCAB) were supplied as a plasmid and the todC1 gene was integrated within the chromosomal bph gene cluster by a single crossover recombination. The resultant strain KF711S-3cam dechlorinated PCA to trichloroethene by the action of the modified camphor monooxygenase under anaerobic conditions. The same strain subsequently degraded trichloroethene formed oxidatively by the action of the Tol-Bph hybrid dioxygenase under aerobic conditions. Thus sequential anaerobic and aerobic treatments of the KF711S-3cam resting cells resulted in efficient and total degradation of PCA.

  10. Identification of markers for Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from children with peptic ulcer disease by suppressive subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Oleastro, Mónica; Monteiro, Lurdes; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis; Ménard, Armelle

    2006-07-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) occurs after a long-term Helicobacter pylori infection. However, the disease can develop earlier, and rare cases have been observed in children, suggesting that these H. pylori strains may be more virulent. We used suppressive subtractive hybridization for comparative genomics between H. pylori strains isolated from a 5-year-old child with duodenal ulcer and from a sex- and age-matched child with gastritis only. The prevalence of the 30 tester-specific subtracted sequences was determined on a collection of H. pylori strains from children (15 ulcers and 30 gastritis) and from adults (46 ulcers and 44 gastritis). Two of these sequences, jhp0562 (80.0% versus 33.3%, P = 0.008) and jhp0870 (80.0% versus 36.7%, P = 0.015), were highly associated with PUD in children and a third sequence, jhp0828, was less associated (40.0% versus 10.0%, P = 0.048). Among adult strains, none of the 30 sequences was associated with PUD. However, both jhp0562 and jhp0870 were less prevalent in adenocarcinoma strains than in PUD strains from children and adults, the difference being statistically significant for jhp0870. In conclusion, two H. pylori genes were identified as being strongly associated with PUD in children, and their putative roles as an outer membrane protein for jhp0870 and in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis for jhp0562, suggest that they may be novel virulence factors of H. pylori.

  11. Purification of the insecticidal Cry2Ad protein from a Bt-isolated BRC-HZP10 strain and toxin assay to the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.).

    PubMed

    Liao, J Y; Gao, Y Q; Wu, Q Y; Zhu, Y C; You, M S

    2015-07-13

    The present study aims to characterize the Cry2Ad toxin protein isolated from a Bacillus thuringiensis strain, BRC-HZP10, which have a potential insecticidal activity against larvae of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). The crude Bt toxin proteins were isolated and purified by cation exchange chromatography, then equilibrated with 0.2 M NaOH buffer, pH 4.0, followed by ultraviolet detection at 280 nm and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A refined Cry2Ad toxin protein with 88.34% purity was eventually obtained and used for a bioassay by feeding it to P. xylostella. The results showed conspicuous insecticidal activity towards P. xylostella with 50% lethal concentration of 6.84 μg/mL and 95% confidence interval of 5.77-7.91 mg/mL. At a concentration of 16.38 μg/mL, the intake of Cry2Ad protein significantly shortened the oviposition period and larval developmental duration, but significantly reduced the fecundity and egg hatchability of the population compared to those of control (without treatment with Cry2Ad protein) (P < 0.05). These results indicate that the Cry2Ad protein plays an effective role in controlling the population of P. xylostella.

  12. Fermentation of cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) seeds with a hybrid Kluyveromyces marxianus strain improved product quality attributes.

    PubMed

    Leal, Gildemberg Amorim; Gomes, Luiz Humberto; Efraim, Priscilla; de Almeida Tavares, Flavio Cesar; Figueira, Antonio

    2008-08-01

    Fermentation of Theobroma cacao (cacao) seeds is an absolute requirement for the full development of chocolate flavor precursors. An adequate aeration of the fermenting cacao seed mass is a fundamental prerequisite for a satisfactory fermentation. Here, we evaluated whether a controlled inoculation of cacao seed fermentation using a Kluyveromyces marxianus hybrid yeast strain, with an increased pectinolytic activity, would improve an earlier liquid drainage ('sweatings') from the fermentation mass, developing a superior final product quality. Inoculation with K. marxianus increased by one third the volume of drained liquid and affected the microorganism population structure during fermentation, which was detectable up to the end of the process. Introduction of the hybrid yeast affected the profile of total seed protein degradation evaluated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with improved seed protein degradation, and reduction of titrable acidity. Sensorial evaluation of the chocolate obtained from beans fermented with the K. marxianus inoculation was more accepted by analysts in comparison with the one from cocoa obtained through natural fermentation. The increase in mass aeration during the first 24 h seemed to be fundamental for the improvement of fermentation quality, demonstrating the potential application of this improved hybrid yeast strain with superior exogenous pectinolytic activity.

  13. Genome‐scale diversity and niche adaptation analysis of Lactococcus lactis by comparative genome hybridization using multi‐strain arrays

    PubMed Central

    Siezen, Roland J.; Bayjanov, Jumamurat R.; Felis, Giovanna E.; van der Sijde, Marijke R.; Starrenburg, Marjo; Molenaar, Douwe; Wels, Michiel; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E. T.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Lactococcus lactis produces lactic acid and is widely used in the manufacturing of various fermented dairy products. However, the species is also frequently isolated from non‐dairy niches, such as fermented plant material. Recently, these non‐dairy strains have gained increasing interest, as they have been described to possess flavour‐forming activities that are rarely found in dairy isolates and have diverse metabolic properties. We performed an extensive whole‐genome diversity analysis on 39 L. lactis strains, isolated from dairy and plant sources. Comparative genome hybridization analysis with multi‐strain microarrays was used to assess presence or absence of genes and gene clusters in these strains, relative to all L. lactis sequences in public databases, whereby chromosomal and plasmid‐encoded genes were computationally analysed separately. Nearly 3900 chromosomal orthologous groups (chrOGs) were defined on basis of four sequenced chromosomes of L. lactis strains (IL1403, KF147, SK11, MG1363). Of these, 1268 chrOGs are present in at least 35 strains and represent the presently known core genome of L. lactis, and 72 chrOGs appear to be unique for L. lactis. Nearly 600 and 400 chrOGs were found to be specific for either the subspecies lactis or subspecies cremoris respectively. Strain variability was found in presence or absence of gene clusters related to growth on plant substrates, such as genes involved in the consumption of arabinose, xylan, α‐galactosides and galacturonate. Further niche‐specific differences were found in gene clusters for exopolysaccharides biosynthesis, stress response (iron transport, osmotolerance) and bacterial defence mechanisms (nisin biosynthesis). Strain variability of functions encoded on known plasmids included proteolysis, lactose fermentation, citrate uptake, metal ion resistance and exopolysaccharides biosynthesis. The present study supports the view of L. lactis as a species with a very flexible

  14. Long-term correction of glycogen storage disease type II with a hybrid Ad-AAV vector.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-dong; Chen, Y-T; Bird, Andrew; Amalfitano, Andrea; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2003-02-01

    We administered an adenovirus-adeno-associated virus (Ad-AAV) vector encoding human acid alpha-glucosidase (hGAA) to acid alpha-glucosidase-knockout (GAA-KO) mice on day 3 of life by gastrocnemius injection. In contrast to previous results for muscle-targeted Ad vector in adult GAA-KO mice, the muscles of the hindlimb showed reduced glycogen content and persistent hGAA for as long as 6 months after neonatal Ad-AAV vector administration. Not only the injected gastrocnemius muscles, but also the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles produced therapeutic levels of hGAA as a result of widespread transduction with the Ad-AAV vector; moreover, hGAA activity was 50-fold elevated as compared to normal mice. Vector RNA was detected in the hindlimb muscles, the hearts, and the livers by northern blot analysis and/or by RT-PCR for as long as 6 months. The low levels of hGAA detected in the heart were attributable to transduction with the Ad-AAV vector, not to secretion of hGAA by the injected muscle and uptake by the heart. Finally, although an antibody response to hGAA was present, it did not prevent the correction of glycogen storage in the skeletal muscle of GAA-KO mice.

  15. Synthesis of hybrid hollow sub-microspheres assisted by pre-added colloidal SiO2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ting; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Xinping; Wang, Chen; Li, Ailing; Qiu, Dong

    2015-03-01

    A novel method was developed to synthesize organic-inorganic hybrid hollow sub-microspheres (HHSs) through the addition of colloidal SiO2. The hydrolysis rate of 3-(methacryloyloxy)propyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) was accelerated by SiO2 particles; meanwhile, the condensation rate of the hydrolytic species was decelerated. Thus, the hydrolytic monomers and oligomers of MPS were preserved as emulsifiers. These emulsifiers can then emulsify the isopentyl acetate (PEA) to form a steady O/W emulsion. The HHSs were produced by subsequent free radical polymerization and removal of the oil core. The hydrolytic MPS acted as emulsifiers and polymerizable monomers at the emulsification and polymerization stage, respectively. Thus, extra emulsifiers, co-emulsifiers, and organic monomers were omitted, which simplified the synthesis process. The good dispersion of HHSs in water and oil, as well as the EDX results, indicated the organic-inorganic hybrid structure of HHSs.

  16. Hybridization of powdery mildew strains gives rise to pathogens on novel agricultural crop species.

    PubMed

    Menardo, Fabrizio; Praz, Coraline R; Wyder, Stefan; Ben-David, Roi; Bourras, Salim; Matsumae, Hiromi; McNally, Kaitlin E; Parlange, Francis; Riba, Andrea; Roffler, Stefan; Schaefer, Luisa K; Shimizu, Kentaro K; Valenti, Luca; Zbinden, Helen; Wicker, Thomas; Keller, Beat

    2016-02-01

    Throughout the history of agriculture, many new crop species (polyploids or artificial hybrids) have been introduced to diversify products or to increase yield. However, little is known about how these new crops influence the evolution of new pathogens and diseases. Triticale is an artificial hybrid of wheat and rye, and it was resistant to the fungal pathogen powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis) until 2001 (refs. 1,2,3). We sequenced and compared the genomes of 46 powdery mildew isolates covering several formae speciales. We found that B. graminis f. sp. triticale, which grows on triticale and wheat, is a hybrid between wheat powdery mildew (B. graminis f. sp. tritici) and mildew specialized on rye (B. graminis f. sp. secalis). Our data show that the hybrid of the two mildews specialized on two different hosts can infect the hybrid plant species originating from those two hosts. We conclude that hybridization between mildews specialized on different species is a mechanism of adaptation to new crops introduced by agriculture.

  17. Comparison of adhesive gut bacteria composition, immunity, and disease resistance in juvenile hybrid tilapia fed two different Lactobacillus strains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenshu; Ren, Pengfei; He, Suxu; Xu, Li; Yang, Yaling; Gu, Zemao; Zhou, Zhigang

    2013-07-01

    This study compares the effects of two Lactobacillus strains, highly adhesive Lactobacillus brevis JCM 1170 (HALB) and less-adhesive Lactobacillus acidophilus JCM 1132 (LALB), on the survival and growth, adhesive gut bacterial communities, immunity, and protection against pathogenic bacterial infection in juvenile hybrid tilapia. During a 5-week feeding trial the fish were fed a diet containing 0 to 10(9) cells/g feed of the two Lactobacillus strains. Samples of intestine, kidney, and spleen were taken at the start and at 10, 20, and 35 days for analysis of stress tolerance and cytokine gene mRNA levels and to assess the diversity of adhesive gut bacterial communities. A 14-day immersion challenge with Aeromonas hydrophila NJ-1 was also performed following the feeding trial. The results showed no significant differences in survival rate, weight gain, or feed conversion in the different dietary treatments. The adhesive gut bacterial communities were strikingly altered in the fish fed either the HALB or the LALB, but the response was more rapid and substantial with the adhesive strain. The two strains induced similar changes in the patterns (upregulation or downregulation) of intestinal, splenic or kidney cytokine expression, but they differed in the degree of response for these genes. Changes in intestinal HSP70 expression levels coincided with changes in the similarity coefficient of the adhesive gut bacterial communities between the probiotic treatments. The highest dose of the HALB appeared to protect against the toxic effects of immersion in A. hydrophila (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the degree to which Lactobacillus strains adhere to the gut may be a favorable criterion in selecting probiotic strain for aquaculture.

  18. Strain and electric field induced electronic properties of two-dimensional hybrid bilayers of transition-metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Munish E-mail: pk-ahluwalia7@yahoo.com; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K. E-mail: pk-ahluwalia7@yahoo.com; Pandey, Ravindra

    2014-08-14

    Tunability of the electronic properties of two-dimensional bilayer hetero structures of transition-metal dichalcogenides (i.e., MX{sub 2}-M′X′{sub 2} with (M, M′ = Mo, W; X, X′ = S, Se) is investigated. Application of both strain and electric field is found to modify the band gap and carrier effective mass in the hybrid bilayers considered. The calculated results based on density functional theory suggest that the tensile strain considerably changes the band gap of semiconducting bilayers; it makes the band gap to be indirect, and later initiates the semiconductor-to-metal transition. Application of the external electric fields, on the other hand, shows asymmetric variation in the band gap leading to the closure of the gap at about 0.5–1.0 V/Å. Tuning of the band gap and carrier effective mass in such a controlled manner makes the hybrid bilayers of transition metal dichalcogenides to be promising candidates for application in electronic devices at nanoscale.

  19. A hybrid NRPS-PKS gene cluster related to the bleomycin family of antitumor antibiotics in Alteromonas macleodii strains.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; Kimes, Nikole E; López-Pérez, Mario; Ausó, Eva; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Ghai, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Although numerous marine bacteria are known to produce antibiotics via hybrid NRPS-PKS gene clusters, none have been previously described in an Alteromonas species. In this study, we describe in detail a novel hybrid NRPS-PKS cluster identified in the plasmid of the Alteromonasmacleodii strain AltDE1 and analyze its relatedness to other similar gene clusters in a sequence-based characterization. This is a mobile cluster, flanked by transposase-like genes, that has even been found inserted into the chromosome of some Alteromonasmacleodii strains. The cluster contains separate genes for NRPS and PKS activity. The sole PKS gene appears to carry a novel acyltransferase domain, quite divergent from those currently characterized. The predicted specificities of the adenylation domains of the NRPS genes suggest that the final compound has a backbone very similar to bleomycin related compounds. However, the lack of genes involved in sugar biosynthesis indicates that the final product is not a glycopeptide. Even in the absence of these genes, the presence of the cluster appears to confer complete or partial resistance to phleomycin, which may be attributed to a bleomycin-resistance-like protein identified within the cluster. This also suggests that the compound still shares significant structural similarity to bleomycin. Moreover, transcriptomic evidence indicates that the NRPS-PKS cluster is expressed. Such sequence-based approaches will be crucial to fully explore and analyze the diversity and potential of secondary metabolite production, especially from increasingly important sources like marine microbes.

  20. Strain and electric field induced electronic properties of two-dimensional hybrid bilayers of transition-metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Munish; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Pandey, Ravindra

    2014-08-01

    Tunability of the electronic properties of two-dimensional bilayer hetero structures of transition-metal dichalcogenides (i.e., MX2-M'X'2 with (M, M' = Mo, W; X, X' = S, Se) is investigated. Application of both strain and electric field is found to modify the band gap and carrier effective mass in the hybrid bilayers considered. The calculated results based on density functional theory suggest that the tensile strain considerably changes the band gap of semiconducting bilayers; it makes the band gap to be indirect, and later initiates the semiconductor-to-metal transition. Application of the external electric fields, on the other hand, shows asymmetric variation in the band gap leading to the closure of the gap at about 0.5-1.0 V/Å. Tuning of the band gap and carrier effective mass in such a controlled manner makes the hybrid bilayers of transition metal dichalcogenides to be promising candidates for application in electronic devices at nanoscale.

  1. BCDP: Budget Constrained and Delay-Bounded Placement for Hybrid Roadside Units in Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Huang, Chuanhe; Liu, Qin

    2014-01-01

    In vehicular ad hoc networks, roadside units (RSUs) placement has been proposed to improve the the overall network performance in many ITS applications. This paper addresses the budget constrained and delay-bounded placement problem (BCDP) for roadside units in vehicular ad hoc networks. There are two types of RSUs: cable connected RSU (c-RSU) and wireless RSU (w-RSU). c-RSUs are interconnected through wired lines, and they form the backbone of VANETs, while w-RSUs connect to other RSUs through wireless communication and serve as an economical extension of the coverage of c-RSUs. The delay-bounded coverage range and deployment cost of these two cases are totally different. We are given a budget constraint and a delay bound, the problem is how to find the optimal candidate sites with the maximal delay-bounded coverage to place RSUs such that a message from any c-RSU in the region can be disseminated to the more vehicles within the given budget constraint and delay bound. We first prove that the BCDP problem is NP-hard. Then we propose several algorithms to solve the BCDP problem. Simulation results show the heuristic algorithms can significantly improve the coverage range and reduce the total deployment cost, compared with other heuristic methods. PMID:25436656

  2. Miniature multiplexed fiber-grating-array sensor for the interrogation of localized strain patterns during crack growth studies upon hybrid laminate panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakin, John P.; Austin, Timothy S. P.; Gregson, Peter J.; Guerrier, Daniel J.; Trundle, Keith J.

    1999-02-01

    As part of a project to optimize hybrid laminates for resistance to fatigue failure, arrays of fiber Bragg gratings are being used to monitor small-scale strain perturbations in composite materials. A remote multiplexed sensing system with 40 remote sensing sties using fiber optic technology, has been developed to monitor the strain field developed across the composite lamina of a hybrid laminate in the vicinity of a fatigue crack. Developed primarily for fatigue-critical aerospace applications, i.e. fuselage and lower wing skins, the hybrid laminates are orthotropic materials having lower density and higher strength than a simple alloy monolith without reinforcement. Fatigue crack growth in hybrid laminates is a complex process that involves a combination of delamination and fiber bridging. The fiber optic system has been applied to the problem of characterizing delamination zone development about a fatigue crack, initiated at a through-thickness fastener hole.

  3. A hybrid pulse combining topology utilizing the combination of modularized avalanche transistor Marx circuits, direct pulse adding, and transmission line transformer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiangtao; Zhao, Zheng; Sun, Yi; Liu, Yuhao; Ren, Ziyuan; He, Jiaxin; Cao, Hui; Zheng, Minjun

    2017-03-01

    Numerous applications driven by pulsed voltage require pulses to be with high amplitude, high repetitive frequency, and narrow width, which could be satisfied by utilizing avalanche transistors. The output improvement is severely limited by power capacities of transistors. Pulse combining is an effective approach to increase the output amplitude while still adopting conventional pulse generating modules. However, there are drawbacks in traditional topologies including the saturation tendency of combining efficiency and waveform oscillation. In this paper, a hybrid pulse combining topology was adopted utilizing the combination of modularized avalanche transistor Marx circuits, direct pulse adding, and transmission line transformer. The factors affecting the combining efficiency were determined including the output time synchronization of Marx circuits, and the quantity and position of magnetic cores. The numbers of the parallel modules and the stages were determined by the output characteristics of each combining method. Experimental results illustrated the ability of generating pulses with 2-14 kV amplitude, 7-11 ns width, and a maximum 10 kHz repetitive rate on a matched 50-300 Ω resistive load. The hybrid topology would be a convinced pulse combining method for similar nanosecond pulse generators based on the solid-state switches.

  4. A hybrid pulse combining topology utilizing the combination of modularized avalanche transistor Marx circuits, direct pulse adding, and transmission line transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangtao; Zhao, Zheng; Sun, Yi; Liu, Yuhao; Ren, Ziyuan; He, Jiaxin; Cao, Hui; Zheng, Minjun

    2017-03-01

    Numerous applications driven by pulsed voltage require pulses to be with high amplitude, high repetitive frequency, and narrow width, which could be satisfied by utilizing avalanche transistors. The output improvement is severely limited by power capacities of transistors. Pulse combining is an effective approach to increase the output amplitude while still adopting conventional pulse generating modules. However, there are drawbacks in traditional topologies including the saturation tendency of combining efficiency and waveform oscillation. In this paper, a hybrid pulse combining topology was adopted utilizing the combination of modularized avalanche transistor Marx circuits, direct pulse adding, and transmission line transformer. The factors affecting the combining efficiency were determined including the output time synchronization of Marx circuits, and the quantity and position of magnetic cores. The numbers of the parallel modules and the stages were determined by the output characteristics of each combining method. Experimental results illustrated the ability of generating pulses with 2-14 kV amplitude, 7-11 ns width, and a maximum 10 kHz repetitive rate on a matched 50-300 Ω resistive load. The hybrid topology would be a convinced pulse combining method for similar nanosecond pulse generators based on the solid-state switches.

  5. The added value of hybrid ventilation/perfusion SPECT/CT in patients with stable COPD or apparently healthy smokers. Cancer-suspected CT findings in the lungs are common when hybrid imaging is used.

    PubMed

    Jögi, Jonas; Markstad, Hanna; Tufvesson, Ellen; Bjermer, Leif; Bajc, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Ventilation/perfusion (V/P) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is recognized as a diagnostic method with potential beyond the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. V/P SPECT identifies functional impairment in diseases such as heart failure (HF), pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The development of hybrid SPECT/computed tomography (CT) systems, combining functional with morphological imaging through the addition of low-dose CT (LDCT), may be useful in COPD, as these patients are prone to lung cancer and other comorbidities. The aim of this study was to investigate the added value of LDCT among healthy smokers and patients with stable COPD, when examined with V/P SPECT/CT hybrid imaging. Sixty-nine subjects, 55 with COPD (GOLD I-IV) and 14 apparently healthy smokers, were examined with V/P SPECT and LDCT hybrid imaging. Spirometry was used to verify COPD grade. Only one apparently healthy smoker and three COPD patients had a normal or nearly normal V/P SPECT. All other patients showed various degrees of airway obstruction, even when spirometry was normal. The same interpretation was reached on both modalities in 39% of the patients. LDCT made V/P SPECT interpretation more certain in 9% of the patients and, in 52%, LDCT provided additional diagnoses. LDCT better characterized the type of emphysema in 12 patients. In 19 cases, tumor-suspected changes were reported. Three of these 19 patients (ie, 4.3% of all subjects) were in the end confirmed to have lung cancer. The majority of LDCT findings were not regarded as clinically significant. V/P SPECT identified perfusion patterns consistent with decompensated left ventricular HF in 14 COPD patients. In 16 patients (23%), perfusion defects were observed. HF and perfusion defects were not recognized with LDCT. In COPD patients and long-time smokers, hybrid imaging had added value compared to V/P SPECT alone, by identifying patients with lung malignancy and more clearly identifying

  6. Enological characterization of Spanish Saccharomyces kudriavzevii strains, one of the closest relatives to parental strains of winemaking and brewing Saccharomyces cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids.

    PubMed

    Peris, D; Pérez-Través, L; Belloch, C; Querol, A

    2016-02-01

    Wine fermentation and innovation have focused mostly on Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. However, recent studies have shown that other Saccharomyces species can also be involved in wine fermentation or are useful for wine bouquet, such as Saccharomyces uvarum and Saccharomyces paradoxus. Many interspecies hybrids have also been isolated from wine fermentation, such as S. cerevisiae × Saccharomyces kudriavzevii hybrids. In this study, we explored the genetic diversity and fermentation performance of Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains, which we compared to other S. kudriavzevii strains. Fermentations of red and white grape musts were performed, and the phenotypic differences between Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains under different temperature conditions were examined. An ANOVA analysis suggested striking similarity between strains for glycerol and ethanol production, although a high diversity of aromatic profiles among fermentations was found. The sources of these phenotypic differences are not well understood and require further investigation. Although the Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains showed desirable properties, particularly must fermentations, the quality of their wines was no better than those produced with a commercial S. cerevisiae. We suggest hybridization or directed evolution as methods to improve and innovate wine.

  7. Specific Detection of Arcobacter and Campylobacter Strains in Water and Sewage by PCR and Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Yolanda; Botella, Salut; Alonso, José Luis; Ferrús, María A.; Hernández, Manuel; Hernández, Javier

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques for detecting Arcobacter and Campylobacter strains in river water and wastewater samples. Both 16S and 23S rRNA sequence data were used to design specific primers and oligonucleotide probes for PCR and FISH analyses, respectively. In order to assess the suitability of the methods, the assays were performed on naturally and artificially contaminated samples and compared with the isolation of cells on selective media. The detection range of PCR and FISH assays varied between 1 cell/ml (after enrichment) to 103 cells/ml (without enrichment). According to our results, both rRNA-based techniques have the potential to be used as quick and sensitive methods for detection of campylobacters in environmental samples. PMID:12571045

  8. Strain and temperature sensing characteristics of asymmetric-twin-core PCF-based hybrid Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Khurram; Kim, Bongkyun; Chung, Youngjoo

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the strain and temperature sensing characteristics of an inline hybrid Mach-Zehnder interferometer (HMZI) formed by splicing a short section of asymmetric twin-core photonic crystal fiber (ATC-PCF) between two single mode fibers. For fixed polarization state of input light, two cores due to their asymmetric construction strongly support the propagation of few dominant core-modes, specifically, a lowest-order, and a set of lowest- and higher-order core-modes, respectively; this leads to a unique phase difference between inter-core and intra-core mode fiber interferometers in our ATC-PCF based HMZI. Experimental results reveal that, among different orders of interferometers involved in the HMZI, the interferometer with higher-value of modal refractive index difference exhibit larger phase-shift sensitivity to the surrounding perturbations.

  9. A Hybrid NRPS-PKS Gene Cluster Related to the Bleomycin Family of Antitumor Antibiotics in Alteromonas macleodii Strains

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; Kimes, Nikole E.; López-Pérez, Mario; Ausó, Eva; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Ghai, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Although numerous marine bacteria are known to produce antibiotics via hybrid NRPS-PKS gene clusters, none have been previously described in an Alteromonas species. In this study, we describe in detail a novel hybrid NRPS-PKS cluster identified in the plasmid of the Alteromonasmacleodii strain AltDE1 and analyze its relatedness to other similar gene clusters in a sequence-based characterization. This is a mobile cluster, flanked by transposase-like genes, that has even been found inserted into the chromosome of some Alteromonasmacleodii strains. The cluster contains separate genes for NRPS and PKS activity. The sole PKS gene appears to carry a novel acyltransferase domain, quite divergent from those currently characterized. The predicted specificities of the adenylation domains of the NRPS genes suggest that the final compound has a backbone very similar to bleomycin related compounds. However, the lack of genes involved in sugar biosynthesis indicates that the final product is not a glycopeptide. Even in the absence of these genes, the presence of the cluster appears to confer complete or partial resistance to phleomycin, which may be attributed to a bleomycin-resistance-like protein identified within the cluster. This also suggests that the compound still shares significant structural similarity to bleomycin. Moreover, transcriptomic evidence indicates that the NRPS-PKS cluster is expressed. Such sequence-based approaches will be crucial to fully explore and analyze the diversity and potential of secondary metabolite production, especially from increasingly important sources like marine microbes. PMID:24069455

  10. Thermodynamic theory of strain-mediated direct magnetoelectric effect in multiferroic film-substrate hybrids.

    PubMed

    Kukhar, V G; Pertsev, N A; Kholkin, A L

    2010-07-02

    A nonlinear thermodynamic theory is developed for the strain-mediated direct magnetoelectric (ME) effect displayed by ferroelectric-ferromagnetic nanostructures. This effect results from transmission of magnetic-field-induced deformations of a thick ferromagnetic substrate to a thin ferroelectric overlayer, where the polarization changes due to lattice strains. The strain-dependent polarization and permittivity of an epitaxial nanolayer (few tens of nm thick) are calculated using the thermodynamic theory of single-domain ferroelectric films. The substrate magnetostrictive deformations are described phenomenologically, taking into account their nonlinear variation with magnetic field. The calculations show that ME polarization and voltage coefficients strongly depend on the initial strain state of the film. For BaTiO(3) and PbTiO(3) films deposited on Co(0.8)Zn(0.2)Fe(2)O(4), the out-of-plane polarization and related ME coefficients are calculated numerically as a function of magnetic field parallel to the interface. For films stabilized in the monoclinic phase, this transverse ME response depends on the orientation of magnetic field relative to their in-plane crystallographic axes. The longitudinal ME coefficient is also evaluated and, for a substrate geometry minimizing the demagnetizing field, predicted to be comparable to the transverse one. For BaTiO(3) and PbTiO(3) films deposited on Terfenol-D, the calculations yield high ME polarization coefficients approximately 10(-7) s m(-1) and giant ME voltage coefficients approximately 50 V cm(-1) Oe(-1).

  11. Construction of a Pseudomonas hybrid strain that mineralizes 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene.

    PubMed Central

    Duque, E; Haidour, A; Godoy, F; Ramos, J L

    1993-01-01

    A bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain C1S1, able to grow on 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrotoluene, and 2-nitrotoluene as N sources, was isolated. The bacterium grew at 30 degrees C with fructose as a C source and accumulated nitrite. Through batch culture enrichment, we isolated a derivative strain, called Pseudomonas sp. clone A, which grew faster on TNT and did not accumulate nitrite in the culture medium. Use of TNT by these two strains as an N source involved the successive removal of nitro groups to yield 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2-nitrotoluene, and toluene. Transfer of the Pseudomonas putida TOL plasmid pWW0-Km to Pseudomonas sp. clone A allowed the transconjugant bacteria to grow on TNT as the sole C and N source. All bacteria in this study, in addition to removing nitro groups from TNT, reduced nitro groups on the aromatic ring via hydroxylamine to amino derivatives. Azoxy dimers probably resulting from the condensation of partially reduced TNT derivatives were also found. PMID:8468288

  12. Molecular characterization of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli hemolysin gene (EHEC-hlyA)-harboring isolates from cattle reveals a diverse origin and hybrid diarrheagenic strains.

    PubMed

    Askari Badouei, Mahdi; Morabito, Stefano; Najafifar, Arash; Mazandarani, Emad

    2016-04-01

    In the present study we investigated the occurrence of Escherichia coli strains harboring the gene encoding enterohemorrhagic E. coli hemolysin (EHEC-HlyA) in cattle and the association of this gene with various diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) pathotypes. First, the bovine E. coli isolates were screened for EHEC-hlyA gene by PCR, and then they were characterized for the phylogenetic groups and the presence of the major virulence genes of different DEC pathotypes. In total, 25 virulence gene profiles were observed in 54 EHEC-hlyA+ isolates that reflect a considerable heterogeneity. The EHEC-hlyA+ strains were mostly associated with EHEC (72%), while only 7.4% were enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). We also showed the presence of estA gene of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) in 6 isolates (11.1%). Interestingly, two of the estA+ strains showed hybrid pathotypes with one carrying eae/estA (EPEC/ETEC), and the other one stx2/astA/estA (EHEC/ETEC). None of the isolates were related to enteroaggregative E. coli (EAggEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), and necrotoxigenic E. coli (NTEC). The EHEC-plasmid encoded genes occurred in seven different combinations with EHEC-hlyA/saa/subA/espP being the most prevalent (46.3%). All stx-/eae+ strains carried O island 57 (OI-57) molecular marker(s) that may indicate these to be the progenitors of EHEC or strains losing stx. The most prevalent phylogroup was B1 (61.1%), but the most heterogeneous strains including the hybrid strains belonged to A phylogroup. Overall, our results indicate that cattle EHEC-hlyA encoding E. coli isolates consist of diverse diarrheagenic strains with the possible existence of hybrid pathotypes. Future studies are required to clarify the evolutionary aspects and clinical significance of these strains in humans and domestic animals.

  13. Suppression subtractive hybridization method for the identification of a new strain of murine hepatitis virus from xenografted SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammed M; Toohey, Brendan; Purcell, Damian F J; Kannourakis, George

    2015-12-01

    During attempts to clone retroviral determinants associated with a mouse model of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to identify unique viruses in the liver of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice transplanted with LCH tissues. A partial genomic sequence of a murine coronavirus was identified, and the whole genome (31428 bp) of the coronavirus was subsequently sequenced using PCR cloning techniques. Nucleotide sequence comparisons revealed that the genome sequence of the new virus was 91-93% identical to those of known murine hepatitis viruses (MHVs). The predicted open reading frame from the nucleotide sequence encoded all known proteins of MHVs. Analysis at the protein level showed that the virus was closely related to the highly virulent MHV-JHM strain. The virus strain was named MHV-MI. No type D retroviruses were found. Degenerate PCR targeting of type D retrovirus and 5'-RACE targeting of other types of retroviruses confirmed the absence of any retroviral association with the LCH xenografted SCID mice.

  14. Efficient formulation of robust hybrid elements using orthogonal stress/strain interpolants and admissible matrix formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, K. Y.

    1992-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation of using orthogonal constant and higher order stress modes in formulating efficient hybrid elements by equipping the primary idea of Bergan and Hanssen (1975). Two sample elements modified from Pian-Sumihara 5-beta plane and Pian-Tong 18-beta hexahedral assumed contravariant stress elements are derived. With the suggested admissible simplifications of the flexibility matrices incorporated into the two new elements, new plane and hexahedral elements requiring respectively no and a negligible amount of computing efforts for inverting the flexibility matrices are formed. All proposed elements are stable, invariant, contain no empirically determined factor and strictly pass the patch test. Popular benchmark problems are studied and the accuracy of the proposed elements is close to their parent models.

  15. Allelic variants of hexose transporter Hxt3p and hexokinases Hxk1p/Hxk2p in strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and interspecies hybrids.

    PubMed

    Zuchowska, Magdalena; Jaenicke, Elmar; König, Helmut; Claus, Harald

    2015-11-01

    The transport of sugars across the plasma membrane is a critical step in the utilization of glucose and fructose by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during must fermentations. Variations in the molecular structure of hexose transporters and kinases may affect the ability of wine yeast strains to finish sugar fermentation, even under stressful wine conditions. In this context, we sequenced and compared genes encoding the hexose transporter Hxt3p and the kinases Hxk1p/Hxk2p of Saccharomyces strains and interspecies hybrids with different industrial usages and regional backgrounds. The Hxt3p primary structure varied in a small set of amino acids, which characterized robust yeast strains used for the production of sparkling wine or to restart stuck fermentations. In addition, interspecies hybrid strains, previously isolated at the end of spontaneous fermentations, revealed a common amino acid signature. The location and potential influence of the amino acids exchanges is discussed by means of a first modelled Hxt3p structure. In comparison, hexokinase genes were more conserved in different Saccharomyces strains and hybrids. Thus, molecular variants of the hexose carrier Hxt3p, but not of kinases, correlate with different fermentation performances of yeast.

  16. Proteomic analyses of human cytomegalovirus strain AD169 derivatives reveal highly conserved patterns of viral and cellular proteins in infected fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Reyda, Sabine; Büscher, Nicole; Tenzer, Stefan; Plachter, Bodo

    2014-01-07

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) particle morphogenesis in infected cells is an orchestrated process that eventually results in the release of enveloped virions. Proteomic analysis has been employed to reveal the complexity in the protein composition of these extracellular particles. Only limited information is however available regarding the proteome of infected cells preceding the release of HCMV virions. We used quantitative mass spectrometry to address the pattern of viral and cellular proteins in cells, infected with derivatives of the AD169 laboratory strain. Our analyses revealed a remarkable conservation in the patterns of viral and of abundant cellular proteins in cells, infected for 2 hours, 2 days, or 4 days. Most viral proteins increased in abundance as the infection progressed over time. Of the proteins that were reliably detectable by mass spectrometry, only IE1 (pUL123), pTRS1, and pIRS1 were downregulated at 4 days after infection. In addition, little variation of viral proteins in the virions of the different viruses was detectable, independent of the expression of the major tegument protein pp65. Taken together these data suggest that there is little variation in the expression program of viral and cellular proteins in cells infected with related HCMVs, resulting in a conserved pattern of viral proteins ultimately associated with extracellular virions.

  17. Mitochondrial proteomics of the acetic acid - induced programmed cell death response in a highly tolerant Zygosaccharomyces bailii - derived hybrid strain

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Joana F.; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Soares, Renata; Coelho, Ana V.; Leão, Cecília; Ludovico, Paula; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Very high concentrations of acetic acid at low pH induce programmed cell death (PCD) in both the experimental model Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in Zygosaccharomyces bailii, the latter being considered the most problematic acidic food spoilage yeast due to its remarkable intrinsic resistance to this food preservative. However, while the mechanisms underlying S. cerevisiae PCD induced by acetic acid have been previously examined, the corresponding molecular players remain largely unknown in Z. bailii. Also, the reason why acetic acid concentrations known to be necrotic for S. cerevisiae induce PCD with an apoptotic phenotype in Z. bailii remains to be elucidated. In this study, a 2-DE-based expression mitochondrial proteomic analysis was explored to obtain new insights into the mechanisms involved in PCD in the Z. bailii derived hybrid strain ISA1307. This allowed the quantitative assessment of expression of protein species derived from each of the parental strains, with special emphasis on the processes taking place in the mitochondria known to play a key role in acetic acid - induced PCD. A marked decrease in the content of proteins involved in mitochondrial metabolism, in particular, in respiratory metabolism (Cor1, Rip1, Lpd1, Lat1 and Pdb1), with a concomitant increase in the abundance of proteins involved in fermentation (Pdc1, Ald4, Dld3) was registered. Other differentially expressed identified proteins also suggest the involvement of the oxidative stress response, protein translation, amino acid and nucleotide metabolism, among other processes, in the PCD response. Overall, the results strengthen the emerging concept of the importance of metabolic regulation of yeast PCD. PMID:28357336

  18. [Designing of hybrid human interferon alfa-2 strain-producers and the use of enteropeptidase for obtaining N-terminal methionine-free interferons].

    PubMed

    Shirokov, D A; Riabichenko, V V; Akishina, R I; Ospel'nikova, T P; Glazunov, A V; Chestukhina, G G; Veĭko, V P

    2011-01-01

    A system for production of human interferon-alpha2a (IFN-alpha2a) and IFN-alpha2b lacking N-terminal methionine has been developed. Plasmids containing genes of hybrid IFN-alpha2 under the control of different promoters were constructed; a sequence encoding the enteropeptidase hydrolysis site being introduced in proximal part of the genes. As the result, 4 strains of Escherichia coli producing hybrid IFN-alpha2 have been obtained. The methodology for IFN-alpha2 renaturation, hydrolysis of its N-terminal part, chromatographic purification of N-terminal methionine-free IFN-alpha2 has been developed.

  19. Population structure and comparative genome hybridization of European flor yeast reveal a unique group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with few gene duplications in their genome.

    PubMed

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Erny, Claude; Charpentier, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Wine biological aging is a wine making process used to produce specific beverages in several countries in Europe, including Spain, Italy, France, and Hungary. This process involves the formation of a velum at the surface of the wine. Here, we present the first large scale comparison of all European flor strains involved in this process. We inferred the population structure of these European flor strains from their microsatellite genotype diversity and analyzed their ploidy. We show that almost all of these flor strains belong to the same cluster and are diploid, except for a few Spanish strains. Comparison of the array hybridization profile of six flor strains originating from these four countries, with that of three wine strains did not reveal any large segmental amplification. Nonetheless, some genes, including YKL221W/MCH2 and YKL222C, were amplified in the genome of four out of six flor strains. Finally, we correlated ICR1 ncRNA and FLO11 polymorphisms with flor yeast population structure, and associate the presence of wild type ICR1 and a long Flo11p with thin velum formation in a cluster of Jura strains. These results provide new insight into the diversity of flor yeast and show that combinations of different adaptive changes can lead to an increase of hydrophobicity and affect velum formation.

  20. A Mechanoluminescent ZnS:Cu/Rhodamine/SiO2/PDMS and Piezoresistive CNT/PDMS Hybrid Sensor: Red-Light Emission and a Standardized Strain Quantification.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Kee-Sun; Timilsina, Suman; Singh, Satendra Pal; Lee, Jin-Woong; Kim, Ji Sik

    2016-12-21

    We developed a hybrid strain sensor by combining mechanoluminescent ZnS:Cu/rhodamine/SiO2/PDMS composites and piezoresistive CNT/PDMS for qualitative and quantitative analysis of onsite strain. The former guarantees a qualitative onsite measure of strain with red-light emission via mechanoluminescence (ML) and the latter takes part in accurate quantification of strain through the change in electrical resistance. The PDMS matrix enabled a strain sensing in a wider range of strain, spanning up to several hundred percent in comparison to the conventional rigid matrix composites and ceramic-based ML sensors. Red-light emission would be much more effective for the visualization of strain (or stress) when ML is used as a warning sign in actual applications such as social infrastructure safety diagnosis, emergency guide lighting, and more importantly, in biomedical applications such as in the diagnosis of motility and peristalsis disorders in the gastrointestinal tract. Despite the realization of an efficient red-light-emitting ML in a ZnS:Cu/rhodamine/SiO2/PDMS composite, the quantification and standardization of strain throughout the ML has been far from complete. In this regard, the piezoresistive CNT/PDMS compensated for this demerit of mechanoluminescent ZnS:Cu/rhodamine/SiO2/PDMS composites.

  1. Population Structure and Comparative Genome Hybridization of European Flor Yeast Reveal a Unique Group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains with Few Gene Duplications in Their Genome

    PubMed Central

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Erny, Claude; Charpentier, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Wine biological aging is a wine making process used to produce specific beverages in several countries in Europe, including Spain, Italy, France, and Hungary. This process involves the formation of a velum at the surface of the wine. Here, we present the first large scale comparison of all European flor strains involved in this process. We inferred the population structure of these European flor strains from their microsatellite genotype diversity and analyzed their ploidy. We show that almost all of these flor strains belong to the same cluster and are diploid, except for a few Spanish strains. Comparison of the array hybridization profile of six flor strains originating from these four countries, with that of three wine strains did not reveal any large segmental amplification. Nonetheless, some genes, including YKL221W/MCH2 and YKL222C, were amplified in the genome of four out of six flor strains. Finally, we correlated ICR1 ncRNA and FLO11 polymorphisms with flor yeast population structure, and associate the presence of wild type ICR1 and a long Flo11p with thin velum formation in a cluster of Jura strains. These results provide new insight into the diversity of flor yeast and show that combinations of different adaptive changes can lead to an increase of hydrophobicity and affect velum formation. PMID:25272156

  2. Implementation of a multiregion hybridization assay to characterize HIV-1 strains detected among injecting drug users in Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Roni; Sengupta, Satarupa; Mullick, Ranajoy; Singh, N Brajachand; Sarkar, Kamalesh; Chakrabarti, Sekhar

    2009-01-01

    We have implemented the latest technology of a multiregion hybridization assay (MHAbce, version 2) for the molecular characterization of HIV-1 among injecting drug users (IDUs) of Manipur, India. This study provides a more detailed analysis on the basis of probes designed from eight different genomic regions of HIV-1, to achieve a clear picture of HIV-1 genomic diversity in Manipur. Out of 30 samples, 15 were found to be of subtype C, 1 of subtype B, 5 with dual-probe reactivity, 8 with multigenomic recombination pattern and 1 sample showed both dual-probe reactivity and multigenomic variations. In contrast, the heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) with respect to gag and env genes revealed 21 samples to be of subtype C (gag C/env C), 3 samples of subtype B (gag B/env B) and 6 samples of B/C recombinants (gag C/env B). MHAbce illustrates the occurrence of inter- and intragenomic variants and dual infection in an IDU population from India. It also indicates the possibility of the presence of new circulating recombinant forms of HIV-1 strains, which might have been difficult to trace by HMA alone.

  3. The hybrid personal cooling system (PCS) could effectively reduce the heat strain while exercising in a hot and moderate humid environment.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenfang; Wang, Faming

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of a hybrid personal cooling system (PCS) in mitigating body heat stain while exercising in a hot environment. Eight subjects underwent two trials: PCS and CON (i.e. no cooling). All trials were conducted at an air temperature of 36 ± 0.5 °C and RH = 59 ± 5%. The key findings demonstrated that the PCS could significantly reduce the core temperature, mean skin temperature, heart rate and physiological strain index during both exercise and recovery periods (p < 0.05). Subjective perceptions were also significantly alleviated in PCS at the end of the exercise and during the recovery (p < 0.05). Besides, the PCS could also bring remarkable benefits in lowering local skin temperatures and in improving perceptual sensations in both upper and lower body during both exercise and recovery periods (p < 0.05). It was thus concluded that the hybrid PCS is effective in mitigating body heat strain while exercising in a hot environment. Practitioner Summary: In hot and humid environments, body heat dissipation through sweating is greatly restricted. Our newly developed hybrid PCS could effectively alleviate heat strain while exercising in hot environments. The findings contribute to the body of knowledge in improving the health and well-being of sportsmen while exercising in hot environments.

  4. Activity of cecropin A-melittin hybrid peptides against colistin-resistant clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii: molecular basis for the differential mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Saugar, José María; Rodríguez-Hernández, María Jesús; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Pachón-Ibañez, María Eugenia; Fernández-Reyes, María; Andreu, David; Pachón, Jerónimo; Rivas, Luis

    2006-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has successfully developed resistance against all common antibiotics, including colistin (polymyxin E), the last universally active drug against this pathogen. The possible widespread distribution of colistin-resistant A. baumannii strains may create an alarming clinical situation. In a previous work, we reported differences in lethal mechanisms between polymyxin B (PXB) and the cecropin A-melittin (CA-M) hybrid peptide CA(1-8)M(1-18) (KWKLFKKIGIGAVLKVLTTGLPALIS-NH2) on colistin-susceptible strains (J. M. Saugar, T. Alarcón, S. López-Hernández, M. López-Brea, D. Andreu, and L. Rivas, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 46:875-878, 2002). We now demonstrate that CA(1-8)M(1-18) and three short analogues, namely CA(1-7)M(2-9) (KWKLFKKIGAVLKVL-NH2), its Nalpha-octanoyl derivative (Oct-KWKLFKKIGAVLKVL-NH2), and CA(1-7)M(5-9) (KWKLLKKIGAVLKVL-NH2) are active against two colistin-resistant clinical strains. In vitro, resistance to colistin sulfate was targeted to the outer membrane, as spheroplasts were equally lysed by a given peptide, regardless of their respective level of colistin resistance. The CA-M hybrids were more efficient than colistin in displacing lipopolysaccharide-bound dansyl-polymyxin B from colistin-resistant but not from colistin-susceptible strains. Similar improved performance of the CA-M hybrids in permeation of the inner membrane was observed, regardless of the resistance pattern of the strain. These results argue in favor of a possible use of CA-M peptides, and by extension other antimicrobial peptides with similar features, as alternative chemotherapy in colistin-resistant Acinetobacter infections.

  5. Recovery of active beta-lactamases from Proteus vulgaris and RTEM-1 hybrid by random mutagenesis by using a dnaQ strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Mazinani, S M; Nakajima, E; Ihara, Y; Kameyama, K Z; Sugimoto, K

    1996-01-01

    Proteus vulgaris and RTEM-1 beta-lactamases that belong to molecular class A with 37% amino acid similarity were examined to find the relationship between amino acid residues and activity of enzymes. MICs of ampicillin were > 2,000 micrograms/ml for Escherichia coli cells producing these enzymes. We have made 18 hybrid genes by substituting the coding region of the P. vulgaris beta-lactamase gene with the equivalent portions from the RTEM-1 gene. Most of these hybrids produced inactive proteins, but a few hybrid enzymes had partial or trace activity. From one of the hybrid genes (MIC of ampicillin, 100 micrograms/ml), we recovered three kinds of active mutants which provided ampicillin MICs of 1,000 micrograms/ml by the selection of spontaneous mutations in a dnaQ strain of E. coli. In these mutants, Leu-148, Met-182, and Tyr-274 were replaced with Val, Thr, and His, respectively. These amino acids have not been identified as residues with functional roles in substrate hydrolysis. Furthermore, from these hybrid mutants, we obtained a second set of mutants which conferred ampicillin MICs of 1,500 micrograms/ml. Interestingly, the second mutations were limited to these three amino acid substitutions. These amino acid residues which do not directly interact with substrates have an effect on enzyme activity. These mutant enzymes exhibited lower K(m) values for cephaloridine than both parental enzymes. PMID:8878598

  6. Recovery of active beta-lactamases from Proteus vulgaris and RTEM-1 hybrid by random mutagenesis by using a dnaQ strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Mazinani, S M; Nakajima, E; Ihara, Y; Kameyama, K Z; Sugimoto, K

    1996-09-01

    Proteus vulgaris and RTEM-1 beta-lactamases that belong to molecular class A with 37% amino acid similarity were examined to find the relationship between amino acid residues and activity of enzymes. MICs of ampicillin were > 2,000 micrograms/ml for Escherichia coli cells producing these enzymes. We have made 18 hybrid genes by substituting the coding region of the P. vulgaris beta-lactamase gene with the equivalent portions from the RTEM-1 gene. Most of these hybrids produced inactive proteins, but a few hybrid enzymes had partial or trace activity. From one of the hybrid genes (MIC of ampicillin, 100 micrograms/ml), we recovered three kinds of active mutants which provided ampicillin MICs of 1,000 micrograms/ml by the selection of spontaneous mutations in a dnaQ strain of E. coli. In these mutants, Leu-148, Met-182, and Tyr-274 were replaced with Val, Thr, and His, respectively. These amino acids have not been identified as residues with functional roles in substrate hydrolysis. Furthermore, from these hybrid mutants, we obtained a second set of mutants which conferred ampicillin MICs of 1,500 micrograms/ml. Interestingly, the second mutations were limited to these three amino acid substitutions. These amino acid residues which do not directly interact with substrates have an effect on enzyme activity. These mutant enzymes exhibited lower K(m) values for cephaloridine than both parental enzymes.

  7. I-R system of hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster: analysis of the mitochondrial DNA in reactive strains exhibiting different potentials for I factor transposition.

    PubMed

    Azou, Y; Bregliano, J C

    2001-01-01

    In the I-R hybrid dysgenesis system, Drosophila melanogaster strains fall into two categories denoted inducer (I) and reactive (R). Among the reactive strains we can distinguish strains with weak, medium or strong reactivity levels. These levels are inherited in a complex way involving both chromosomal and nonchromosomal determinants, the nonchromosomal determinant being mainly maternally inherited. We were interested in determining the molecular basis of this maternal transmission. In this article we analyse the possible implication of the mitochondrial DNA in the determination of the reactivity levels. The mtDNA was analysed in lines with very different reactivity levels with the aim of correlating sequence differences with reactivity levels. The mtDNA was analysed by sequencing and restriction fragment length. No correlation was established between reactivity level and mtDNA sequence. This may favour the hypothesis that epigenetic changes would be responsible for the different reactivity levels and their transgenerational transmission.

  8. Strain-driven and ultrasensitive resistive sensor/switch based on conductive alginate/nitrogen-doped carbon-nanotube-supported Ag hybrid aerogels with pyramid design.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Songfang; Zhang, Guoping; Gao, Yongju; Deng, Libo; Li, Jinhui; Sun, Rong; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2014-12-24

    Flexible strain-driven sensor is an essential component in the flexible electronics. Especially, high durability and sensitivity to strain are required. Here, we present an efficient and low-cost fabrication strategy to construct a highly sensitive and flexible pressure sensor based on a conductive, elastic aerogel with pyramid design. When pressure is loaded, the contact area between the interfaces of the conductive aerogel and the copper electrode as well as among the building blocks of the nitrogen-doped carbon-nanotube-supported Ag (N-CNTs/Ag) aerogel monoliths, changes in reversible and directional manners. This contact resistance mechanism enables the hybrid aerogels to act as strain-driven sensors with high sensitivity and excellent on/off swithching behavior, and the gauge factor (GF) is ∼15 under strain of 3%, which is superior to those reported for other aerogels. In addition, robust, elastomeric and conductive nanocomposites can be fabricated by injecting polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) into alginate/N-CNTs/Ag aerogels. Importantly, the building blocks forming the aerogels retain their initial contact and percolation after undergoing large-strain deformation, PDMS infiltration, and cross-linking of PDMS, suggesting their potential applications as strain sensors.

  9. The Genome Sequence of the Highly Acetic Acid-Tolerant Zygosaccharomyces bailii-Derived Interspecies Hybrid Strain ISA1307, Isolated From a Sparkling Wine Plant

    PubMed Central

    Mira, Nuno P.; Münsterkötter, Martin; Dias-Valada, Filipa; Santos, Júlia; Palma, Margarida; Roque, Filipa C.; Guerreiro, Joana F.; Rodrigues, Fernando; Sousa, Maria João; Leão, Cecília; Güldener, Ulrich; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    In this work, it is described the sequencing and annotation of the genome of the yeast strain ISA1307, isolated from a sparkling wine continuous production plant. This strain, formerly considered of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii species, has been used to study Z. bailii physiology, in particular, its extreme tolerance to acetic acid stress at low pH. The analysis of the genome sequence described in this work indicates that strain ISA1307 is an interspecies hybrid between Z. bailii and a closely related species. The genome sequence of ISA1307 is distributed through 154 scaffolds and has a size of around 21.2 Mb, corresponding to 96% of the genome size estimated by flow cytometry. Annotation of ISA1307 genome includes 4385 duplicated genes (∼90% of the total number of predicted genes) and 1155 predicted single-copy genes. The functional categories including a higher number of genes are ‘Metabolism and generation of energy’, ‘Protein folding, modification and targeting’ and ‘Biogenesis of cellular components’. The knowledge of the genome sequence of the ISA1307 strain is expected to contribute to accelerate systems-level understanding of stress resistance mechanisms in Z. bailii and to inspire and guide novel biotechnological applications of this yeast species/strain in fermentation processes, given its high resilience to acidic stress. The availability of the ISA1307 genome sequence also paves the way to a better understanding of the genetic mechanisms underlying the generation and selection of more robust hybrid yeast strains in the stressful environment of wine fermentations. PMID:24453040

  10. The genome sequence of the highly acetic acid-tolerant Zygosaccharomyces bailii-derived interspecies hybrid strain ISA1307, isolated from a sparkling wine plant.

    PubMed

    Mira, Nuno P; Münsterkötter, Martin; Dias-Valada, Filipa; Santos, Júlia; Palma, Margarida; Roque, Filipa C; Guerreiro, Joana F; Rodrigues, Fernando; Sousa, Maria João; Leão, Cecília; Güldener, Ulrich; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2014-06-01

    In this work, it is described the sequencing and annotation of the genome of the yeast strain ISA1307, isolated from a sparkling wine continuous production plant. This strain, formerly considered of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii species, has been used to study Z. bailii physiology, in particular, its extreme tolerance to acetic acid stress at low pH. The analysis of the genome sequence described in this work indicates that strain ISA1307 is an interspecies hybrid between Z. bailii and a closely related species. The genome sequence of ISA1307 is distributed through 154 scaffolds and has a size of around 21.2 Mb, corresponding to 96% of the genome size estimated by flow cytometry. Annotation of ISA1307 genome includes 4385 duplicated genes (∼ 90% of the total number of predicted genes) and 1155 predicted single-copy genes. The functional categories including a higher number of genes are 'Metabolism and generation of energy', 'Protein folding, modification and targeting' and 'Biogenesis of cellular components'. The knowledge of the genome sequence of the ISA1307 strain is expected to contribute to accelerate systems-level understanding of stress resistance mechanisms in Z. bailii and to inspire and guide novel biotechnological applications of this yeast species/strain in fermentation processes, given its high resilience to acidic stress. The availability of the ISA1307 genome sequence also paves the way to a better understanding of the genetic mechanisms underlying the generation and selection of more robust hybrid yeast strains in the stressful environment of wine fermentations.

  11. Antibody response and protection against challenge in mice vaccinated intraperitoneally with a live aroA O4-O9 hybrid Salmonella dublin strain.

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, A A; Segall, T; Weintraub, A; Stocker, B A

    1993-01-01

    An auxotrophic Salmonella dublin (O9,12) strain, SL5631, with a deletion affecting gene aroA, was made into a partial diploid expressing the rfb (O-antigen-repeat-unit-specifying) gene cluster of Salmonella typhimurium (O4,12). By use of O4- and O9-specific antisera in indirect immunofluorescence assays, the resulting hybrid SL7103 was shown to express both the O4- and O9-antigen epitopes in the same bacterium. Qualitative and quantitative sugar analyses by gas-liquid chromatography on peralditol acetates of phenol-water-extracted lipopolysaccharides showed that the S. dublin and S. typhimurium repeating units (estimated on the basis of their tyvelose and abequose contents, respectively) were present in approximately equimolar amounts. The SL7103 hybrid auxotroph was avirulent when given intraperitoneally to NMRI mice in a dose of 10(8) CFU and elicited a protective immunity against intraperitoneal challenge with either virulent S. dublin (50% lethal dose of ca. 1.5 x 10(4) CFU versus < 1 x 10(1) CFU in nonimmunized mice) or virulent S. typhimurium (50% lethal dose of ca. 1 x 10(5) versus < 1 x 10(1) CFU in nonimmunized mice). Compared with the protection elicited in homologous systems (S. dublin SL5631 against S. dublin and S. typhimurium SL1479 against S. typhimurium), the protective efficacy of the hybrid was reduced approximately 70-fold against S. dublin challenge and 100-fold against S. typhimurium challenge. Vaccination with S. typhimurium SL1479 conferred no protection against S. dublin challenge, and vaccination with S. dublin SL5631 conferred no protection against S. typhimurium challenge. The protection elicited by the hybrid strain SL7103 is supposed to be mainly a consequence of serum antibodies directed against the immunodominant O4 and O9 epitopes. PMID:7681041

  12. Hairy AdS solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru; Choque, David

    2016-11-01

    We construct exact hairy AdS soliton solutions in Einstein-dilaton gravity theory. We examine their thermodynamic properties and discuss the role of these solutions for the existence of first order phase transitions for hairy black holes. The negative energy density associated to hairy AdS solitons can be interpreted as the Casimir energy that is generated in the dual filed theory when the fermions are antiperiodic on the compact coordinate.

  13. Identification of strain fields in pure Al and hybrid Ni/Al metal foams using X-ray micro-tomography under loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fíla, T.; Jiroušek, O.; Jung, A.; Kumpová, I.

    2016-11-01

    Hybrid foams are materials formed by a core from a standard open cell metal foam that is during the process of electrodeposition coated by a thin layer of different nanocrystalline metals. The material properties of the base metal foam are in this way modified resulting in higher plateau stress and, more importantly, by introduction of strain-rate dependence to its deformation response. In this paper, we used time-lapse X-ray micro-tomography for the mechanical characterization of Ni/Al hybrid foams (aluminium open cell foams with nickel coating layer). To fully understand the effects of the coating layer on the material's effective properties, we compared the compressive response of the base uncoated foam to the response of the material with coating thickness of 50 and 75 μm. Digital volume correlation (DVC) was applied to obtain volumetric strain fields of the deforming micro-structure up to the densification region of the deforming cellular structure. The analysis was performed as a compressive mechanical test with simultaneous observation using X-ray radiography and tomography. A custom design experimental device was used for compression of the foam specimens in several deformation states directly in the X-ray setup. Planar X-ray images were taken during the loading phases and a X-ray tomography was performed at the end of each loading phase (up to engineering strain 22%). The samples were irradiated using micro-focus reflection type X-ray tube and images were taken using a large area flat panel detector. Tomography reconstructions were used for an identification of a strain distribution in the foam using digital volumetric correlation. A comparison of the deformation response of the coated and the uncoated foam in uniaxial quasi-static compression is summarized in the paper.

  14. Regulatory concerns associated with use of value-added recombinant proteins and peptides screened in hgh-throughput for expression in fuel ethanol yeast strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant proteins expressed in animals have been a public concern as a risk to the consumer since the animals are genetically modified to obtain desired improvements (GMO animals). Similarly, various commercially valuable proteins or peptides expressed in fuel ethanol yeast strains under develop...

  15. Added Sugars

    MedlinePlus

    ... need sugar to function properly. Added sugars contribute zero nutrients but many added calories that can lead to extra pounds or even obesity, thereby reducing heart health. If you think of your daily calorie needs as a budget, you want to “spend” ...

  16. Value Added?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UCLA IDEA, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Value added measures (VAM) uses changes in student test scores to determine how much "value" an individual teacher has "added" to student growth during the school year. Some policymakers, school districts, and educational advocates have applauded VAM as a straightforward measure of teacher effectiveness: the better a teacher,…

  17. Hybridization probes for conventional DNA fingerprinting used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction to distinguish strains of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, W; Mitchell, T G; Freedman, E Z; Vilgalys, R

    1993-01-01

    In conventional DNA fingerprinting, hypervariable and repetitive sequences (minisatellite or microsatellite DNA) are detected with hybridization probes. As demonstrated here, these probes can be used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to generate individual fingerprints. Several conventional DNA fingerprinting probes were used to prime the PCR, yielding distinctive, hypervariable multifragment profiles for different strains of Cryptococcus neoformans. PCR fingerprinting with the oligonucleotide primers (GTG)5, (GACA)4, and the phage M13 core sequence (GAGGGTGGXGGXTCT), but not with (CA)8 or (CT)8, generated DNA polymorphisms with all 42 strains of C. neoformans investigated. PCR fingerprints produced by priming with (GTG)5, (GACA)4, or the M13 core sequence differentiated the two varieties of C. neoformans, C. neoformans var. neoformans (serotypes A and D) and C. neoformans var. gattii (serotypes B and C). Furthermore, strains of serotypes A, D, and B or C could be distinguished from each other by specific PCR fingerprint patterns. These primers, which also successfully amplified hypervariable DNA segments from other species, provide a convenient method of identification at the species or individual level. Amplification of polymorphic DNA patterns by PCR with these primers offers several advantages over classical DNA fingerprinting techniques, appears to be more reliable than other PCR-based methods for detecting polymorphic DNA, such as analysis of random-amplified polymorphic DNA, and should be applicable to many other organisms. Images PMID:8408543

  18. Fabrication of sensitive enzymatic biosensor based on multi-layered reduced graphene oxide added PtAu nanoparticles-modified hybrid electrode

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md Faruk; Park, Jae Y.

    2017-01-01

    A highly sensitive amperometric glucose sensor was developed by immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) onto multi-layer reduced graphene oxide (MRGO) sheets decorated with platinum and gold flower-like nanoparticles (PtAuNPs) modified Au substrate electrode. The fabricated MRGO/PtAuNPs modified hybrid electrode demonstrated high electrocatalytic activities toward oxidation of H2O2, to which it had a wide linear response that ranged from 0.5 to 8 mM (R2 = 0.997), and high sensitivity of 506.25 μA/mMcm2. Furthermore, glucose oxidase-chitosan composite and cationic polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) were assembled by a casting method on the surface of MRGO/PtAuNPs modified electrode. This as-fabricated hybrid biosensor electrode exhibited high electrocatalytic activity for the detection of glucose in PBS. It demonstrated good analytical properties in terms of a low detection limit of 1 μM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3), short response time (3 s), high sensitivity (17.85 μA/mMcm2), and a wide linear range (0.01–8 mM) for glucose sensing. These results reveal that the newly developed sensing electrode offers great promise for new type enzymatic biosensor applications. PMID:28333943

  19. Hybrid SPECT-CT with 99mTc-labeled red blood cell in a case of blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome: added value over planar scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Das, Kalpa Jyoti; Sharma, Punit; Naswa, Niraj; Soundararajan, Ramya; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Malhotra, Arun

    2013-01-01

    Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS) is a rare clinical entity characterized by multiple venous malformations (hemangiomas) of the skin and gastrointestinal tract. These hemangiomas usually cause episodes of occult gastrointestinal bleeding leading to iron deficiency anemia, and also carry a significant potential for serious hemorrhage. The 99mechnetium (99mTc)-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy has traditionally been utilized in the localization of occult bleeding sites in patients with suspected vascular malformations, angiodysplasia, and Meckel’s diverticulum. We report the incremental value of 99mTc-labeled red blood cell hybrid single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) over planar scintigraphy alone in a 12-year-old female patient with BRBNS.

  20. Strain-induced crystallization in elastomeric polymer networks prepared in solution and sol-gel derived high-temperature organic-inorganic hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premachandra, Jagath Kumara

    Cross-linking polymer chains in solution should bring about fewer inter-chain entanglements in the resulting network. The subsequent drying of this network should compress the chains into a "super-contracted" state. The opposing effects of these changes on strain-induced crystallization in cis-1,4-polyisoprene networks formed in solution were investigated. Higher elongations were required to achieve strain-induced crystallinity in the networks prepared at higher dilutions, suggesting that in this regard the compressed states of the chains was more important than their reduced entangling. The constrained-junction theory was applied to strain-induced crystallization in the above networks. The stress-strain isotherms generated from this theory were in satisfactory agreement with experiment. It was found that the constraint parameter kappa decreases with increase in dilution during cross-linking mainly due to the fact that cross-linking in solution decreases chain interpenetration. The dependence of hydrolysis and condensation of gamma-ureidopropyltrimethoxysilane on pH in the water-methanol system at 23sp°C was investigated by FTIR spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of rates of hydrolysis showed that gamma-ureidopropyltrimethoxysilane is most stable in the water-methanol system at pH 7.7. The rate of overall condensation of silanols produced by the hydrolysis was qualitatively analyzed. These silanol groups are relatively more stable around pH 4.87. The mechanical properties, thermal stability and water absorption of high-temperature sulfopolybenzobisthiazole-silica hybrid materials were investigated. The use of a bonding agent N,N-diethylaminopropyltrimethoxysilane facilitated the interfacial bonding between the organic and inorganic phases in these materials prepared through the sol-gel process. Tensile modulus, thermal stability and the resistant to water absorption were increased with increase in silica content in the resulting composites

  1. [Antibiotic resistance rates of Helicobacter pylori isolates and the comparison of E-test and fluorescent in situ hybridization methods for the detection of clarithromycin resistant strains].

    PubMed

    Bakir Ozbey, Saliha; Ozakin, Cüneyt; Keskin, Murat

    2009-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori which is one of the commonly seen chronic bacterial infections in the world, has been demonstrated to have a relationship with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Current management of H. pylori infection involves the use of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) and any two of amoxicillin, clarithromycin and metronidazole in combination. Antibiotic resistance which is in an increasing trend in H. pylori since the recent years, is the main cause of treatment failure. This study was conducted to determine the susceptibility of 31 H. pylori strains to several antibiotics by using E-test method (AB Biodisk, Sweden) and also to detect clarithromycin resistance by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH; SeaFAST, Hungary). The strains were isolated from the gastric biopsy specimens of patients who were admitted to Uludağ University Hospital, Bursa, Turkey with dyspeptic complaints. Clarithromycin, amoxycillin, metronidazole, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin resistance rates were as 41.9%, 3.2%, 41.9%, 3.2% and 45.2%, respectively. Resistance to single antibiotic was detected in 32.2% of the isolates whereas multiresistance was seen in 45.2%. For the hybridization process one probe specific for 16S rRNA and labeled with a fluorescein dye and the other probe specific for the mutations in 23S rRNA and labeled with Cy3 stain were used. Green signalling denoted presence of H. pylori in the specimen and red signalling was associated with clarithromycin resistance. All of the isolates yielded green signalling and the 13 isolates found to be resistant to clarithromycin by E-test, gave red signalling. No difference was detected between the two methods in terms of clarithromycin resistance determination. This was a preliminary study reporting the H. pylori resistance rates in our region, however, further larger scale studies are required for obtaining countrywide data.

  2. Adding Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsini, Larry L.; Hudack, Lawrence R.; Zekan, Donald L.

    1999-01-01

    The value-added statement (VAS), relatively unknown in the United States, is used in financial reports by many European companies. Saint Bonaventure University (New York) has adapted a VAS to make it appropriate for not-for-profit universities by identifying stakeholder groups (students, faculty, administrators/support personnel, creditors, the…

  3. Neurospora tetrasperma crosses heterozygous for hybrid translocation strains produce rare eight-spored asci-bearing heterokaryotic ascospores.

    PubMed

    Kasbekar, Durgadas P; Rekha, Selvam

    2017-03-01

    During ascogenesis in Neurospora, the ascospores are partitioned at the eight-nucleus stage that follows meiosis and a post-meiotic mitosis, and the ascospores that form in eight-spored asci are usually homokaryotic. We had previously created novel TNt strains by introgressing four Neurospora crassa insertional translocations (EB4, IBj5, UK14-1, and B362i) into N. tetrasperma. We now show that crosses of all the TNt strains with single-mating-type derivatives of the standard N. tetrasperma pseudohomothallic strain 85 (viz. T(Nt)a x 85A or T(Nt)A x 85a) can produce rare eight-spored asci that contain heterokaryotic ascospores, or ascospores with other unexpected genotypes. Our results suggest that these rare asci result from the interposition of additional mitoses between the post-meiotic mitosis and the partitioning of nuclei into ascospores, leading to the formation of supernumerary nuclei that then generate the heterokaryotic ascospores. The rare asci probably represent a background level of ascus dysgenesis wherein the partitioning of ascospores becomes uncoupled from the post-meiotic mitosis. Ordinarily, the severest effect of such dysgenesis, the production of mating-type heterokaryons, would be suppressed by the N. crassa tol (tolerant) gene, thus explaining why such dysgenesis remained undetected thus far.

  4. F1 (CBA×C57) mice show superior hearing in old age relative to their parental strains: hybrid vigor or a new animal model for "golden ears"?

    PubMed

    Frisina, Robert D; Singh, Ameet; Bak, Matthew; Bozorg, Sara; Seth, Rahul; Zhu, Xiaoxia

    2011-09-01

    Age-related hearing loss - presbycusis - is the most common communication problem and third most prevalent chronic medical disorder of the aged. The CBA and C57BL/6 mouse strains are useful for studying features of presbycusis. The CBA loses its hearing slowly, like most humans. Because the C57 develops a rapid, high frequency hearing loss by middle age, it has an "old" ear but a relatively young brain, a model that helps separate peripheral (cochlear) from central (brain) etiologies. This field of sensory neuroscience lacks a good mouse model for the 5-10% of aged humans with normal cochlear sensitivity, but who have trouble perceiving speech in background noise. We hypothesized that F1 (CBA×C57) hybrids would have better hearing than either parental strain. Measurements of peripheral auditory sensitivity supported this hypothesis, however, a rapid decline in the auditory efferent feedback system, did not. Therefore, F1s might be an optimal model for studying cases where the peripheral hearing is quite good in old age; thereby allowing isolation of central auditory changes due to brain neurodegeneration.

  5. Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of Near Full-Length HIV-1 Subtypes A, B, G and Unique Recombinant AC and AD Viral Strains Identified in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Eduan; Holzmayer, Vera; Jacobs, Graeme B.; de Oliveira, Tulio; Brennan, Catherine A.; Hackett, John; van Rensburg, Estrelita Janse

    2015-01-01

    Abstract By the end of 2012, more than 6.1 million people were infected with HIV-1 in South Africa. Subtype C was responsible for the majority of these infections and more than 300 near full-length genomes (NFLGs) have been published. Currently very few non-subtype C isolates have been identified and characterized within the country, particularly full genome non-C isolates. Seven patients from the Tygerberg Virology (TV) cohort were previously identified as possible non-C subtypes and were selected for further analyses. RNA was isolated from five individuals (TV047, TV096, TV101, TV218, and TV546) and DNA from TV016 and TV1057. The NFLGs of these samples were amplified in overlapping fragments and sequenced. Online subtyping tools REGA version 3 and jpHMM were used to screen for subtypes and recombinants. Maximum likelihood (ML) phylogenetic analysis (phyML) was used to infer subtypes and SimPlot was used to confirm possible intersubtype recombinants. We identified three subtype B (TV016, TV047, and TV1057) isolates, one subtype A1 (TV096), one subtype G (TV546), one unique AD (TV101), and one unique AC (TV218) recombinant form. This is the first NFLG of subtype G that has been described in South Africa. The subtype B sequences described also increased the NFLG subtype B sequences in Africa from three to six. There is a need for more NFLG sequences, as partial HIV-1 sequences may underrepresent viral recombinant forms. It is also necessary to continue monitoring the evolution and spread of HIV-1 in South Africa, because understanding viral diversity may play an important role in HIV-1 prevention strategies. PMID:25492033

  6. Cleavage of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4G by Exogenously Added Hybrid Proteins Containing Poliovirus 2Apro in HeLa Cells: Effects on Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Novoa, Isabel; Carrasco, Luis

    1999-01-01

    Efficient cleavage of both forms of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G-1 and eIF4G-2) has been achieved in HeLa cells by incubation with hybrid proteins containing poliovirus 2Apro. Entry of these proteins into cells is promoted by adenovirus particles. Substantial levels of ongoing translation on preexisting cellular mRNAs still continue for several hours after eIF4G degradation. Treatment of control HeLa cells with hypertonic medium causes an inhibition of translation that is reversed upon restoration of cells to normal medium. Protein synthesis is not restored in cells lacking intact eIF4G after hypertonic treatment. Notably, induction of synthesis of heat shock proteins still occurs in cells pretreated with poliovirus 2Apro, suggesting that transcription and translation of these mRNAs takes place even in the presence of cleaved eIF4G. Finally, the synthesis of luciferase was examined in a HeLa cell line bearing the luciferase gene under control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter. Transcription of the luciferase gene and transport of the mRNA to the cytoplasm occurs at control levels in eIF4G-deficient cells. However, luciferase synthesis is strongly inhibited in these cells. These findings indicate that intact eIF4G is necessary for the translation of mRNAs not engaged in translation with the exception of heat shock mRNAs but is not necessary for the translation of mRNAs that are being translated. PMID:10082510

  7. Source and magmatic evolution inferred from geochemical and Sr-O-isotope data on hybrid lavas of Arso, the last eruption at Ischia island (Italy; 1302 AD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovine, Raffaella Silvia; Mazzeo, Fabio Carmine; Arienzo, Ilenia; D'Antonio, Massimo; Wörner, Gerhard; Civetta, Lucia; Pastore, Zeudia; Orsi, Giovanni

    2017-02-01

    Geochemical and isotopic (87Sr/86Sr and 18O/16O) data have been acquired on whole rock and separated mineral samples from volcanic products of the 1302 AD Arso eruption, Ischia volcanic island (Gulf of Naples, Southern Italy), to investigate magmatic processes. Our results highlight petrographic and isotopic disequilibria between phenocrysts and their host rocks. Similar disequilibria are observed also for more mafic volcanic rocks from Ischia and in the Phlegraean Volcanic District in general. Moreover, 87Sr/86Sr and 18O/16O values suggest mixing between chemically and isotopically distinct batches of magma, and crystals cargo from an earlier magmatic phase. The radiogenic Sr isotope composition suggests that the mantle source was enriched by subduction-derived sediments. Furthermore, magmas extruded during the Arso eruption were affected by crustal contamination as suggested by high oxygen isotope ratios. Assimilation and fractional crystallization modelling of the Sr-O isotope compositions indicates that not more than 7% of granodioritic rocks from the continental crust have been assimilated by a mantle-derived mafic magma. Hence the recent volcanic activity of Ischia has been fed by distinct batches of magma, variably contaminated by continental crust, that mixed during their ascent towards the surface and remobilized phenocrysts left from earlier magmatic phases.

  8. A plasmid from S. citri strain M14 hybridizes with extrachromosomal DNAs from other spiroplasmas, including corn stunt spiroplasma E275, tick spiroplasma 277F, and coco spiroplasma N525.

    PubMed Central

    Mouches, C.; Bové, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A plasmid, pM41, has been isolated from the Spiroplasma citri strain M4 (group I-1) and characterized by restriction mapping. Using a 32P-labeled probe specific of the plasmid, we have shown by DNA-DNA hybridization that a plasmid identical to pM41 or a closely related plasmid, is present in several, but not all, S. citri strains. DNA sequences that hybridize to pM41 were also identified in three other spiroplasmas not belonging to the S. citri species. Protein patterns of several S. citri strains have been compared in order to investigate the effect of pM41 on the spiroplasma protein profiles or maps. In fact, the presence of pM41 does not appear to modify the protein pattern. Images FIG. 1 PMID:6679153

  9. Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization of and Differences in Gene Expression Content of Calcifying and Noncalcifying Cultures of Emiliania huxleyi Strain 1516

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Binh; Bowers, Robert M.; Wahlund, Thomas M.; Read, Betsy A.

    2005-01-01

    The marine coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi is a cosmopolitan alga intensely studied in relation to global carbon cycling, biogeochemistry, marine ecology, and biomineralization processes. The biomineralization capabilities of coccolithophorids have attracted the attention of scientists interested in exploiting this ability for the development of materials science and biomedical and biotechnological applications. Although it has been well documented that biomineralization in E. huxleyi is promoted by growth under phosphate-limited conditions, the genes and proteins that govern the processes of calcification and coccolithogenesis remain unknown. Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries were constructed from cultures grown in phosphate-limited and phosphate-replete media as tester and driver populations for reciprocal SSH procedures. Positive clones from each of the two libraries were randomly selected, and dot blotting was performed for the analysis of expression patterns. A total of 513 clones from the phosphate-replete library and 423 clones from the phosphate-limited library were sequenced, assembled, and compared to sequences in GenBank using BLASTX. Of the 103 differentially expressed gene fragments from the phosphate-replete library, 34% showed significant homology to other known proteins, while only 23% of the 65 differentially expressed gene fragments from the phosphate-limited library showed homology to other proteins. To further assess mRNA expression, real-time RT-PCR analysis was employed and expression profiles were generated over a 14-day time course for three clones from the phosphate-replete library and five clones from the phosphate-limited library. The fragments isolated provide the basis for future cloning of full-length genes and functional analysis. PMID:15870347

  10. Increased severity in patients presenting to hospital with diarrhea in Dhaka, Bangladesh Since emergence of the hybrid strain of Vibrio cholerae O1 is not unique to cholera patients

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Fahima; Kuchta, Alison; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Faruque, ASG; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Ryan, Edward T.; Qadri, Firdausi

    2015-01-01

    In 2001, a hybrid strain of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor that expresses a classical cholera toxin (CT) emerged and this hybrid variant rapidly replaced the previous El Tor strain around the world. The global emergence of this variant coincided with anecdotal reports that cholera patients were presenting with more severe dehydration and disease in many locations. We compared severity of disease in cholera patients from before and after emergence of the hybrid strain at a diarrheal hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. We did indeed find that cholera patients presented with more severe dehydration and severe disease in the latter period; however, this was also true for “all non-cholera patients” as well. In addition, in sub-analyses of patients who presented with rotavirus and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), we found similar results. Comparing the two periods for differences in patient characteristics, nutritional status, vaccination status and income, we were unable to detect a plausible cause for patients presenting with more severe disease in the latter period. Because we observed a shift in severity for both cholera and non-cholera, our results indicate that the altered El Tor strain cannot fully explain the differences in cholera severity before and after 2001 PMID:26409202

  11. Immunization of Mice with a Live Transconjugant Shigella Hybrid Strain Induced Th1 and Th17 Cell-Mediated Immune Responses and Confirmed Passive Protection Against Heterologous Shigellae.

    PubMed

    Nag, D; Koley, H; Sinha, R; Mukherjee, P; Sarkar, C; Withey, J H; Gachhui, R

    2016-02-01

    An avirulent, live transconjugant Shigella hybrid (LTSHΔstx) strain was constructed in our earlier study by introducing a plasmid vector, pPR1347, into a Shiga toxin gene deleted Shigella dysenteriae 1. Three successive oral administrations of LTSHΔstx to female adult mice produced comprehensive passive heterologous protection in their offspring against challenge with wild-type shigellae. Production of NO and different cytokines such asIL-12p70, IL-1β and IL-23 in peritoneal mice macrophages indicated that LTSHΔstx induced innate and adaptive immunity in mice. Furthermore, production of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 in LTSH-primed splenic CD4+ T cell suggested that LTSHΔstx may induce Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune responses. Exponential increase of the serum IgG and IgA titre against whole shigellae was observed in immunized adult mice during and after the immunization with the highest peak on day 35. Antigen-specific sIgA was also determined from intestinal lavage of immunized mice. The stomach extracts of neonates from immunized mice, mainly containing mother's milk, contained significant levels of anti-LTSHΔstx immunoglobulin. These studies suggest that the LTSHΔstx could be a new live oral vaccine candidate against shigellosis in the near future.

  12. Analysis of differentially expressed genes in the precocious line of Eimeria maxima and its parent strain using suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui; Lin, Jiaojiao; Han, Hongyu; Jiang, Lianlian; Zhao, Qiping; Zhu, Shunhai; Huang, Bing

    2011-04-01

    The precocious line of Eimeria spp., obtained by repeated passages of oocysts initially collected from feces of previously infected chickens, has unique phenotypes and plays an important role in immunizing chickens against coccidiosis. However, the genetic basis of precocious phenotype in Eimeria is still poorly understood. To investigate gene expression changes in sporulated oocysts between the precocious line of E. maxima and its parent strain, subtractive cDNA libraries were constructed by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). A total of 3,164 cDNA fragments were selected from the SSH cDNA libraries to fabricate cDNA microarrays and further identify the differentially expressed genes. The credibility of the microarray data was verified by real-time PCR. A total of 360 valid expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained, which represented 32 unique sequences. Twenty-one genes were validated as downregulated and 11 genes as upregulated in the precocious line. Homology searching of the public sequence database showed that six genes encoded proteins homologous with previously reported proteins, including rhomboid-like protein and transhydrogenase of E. tenella, serpin, and cation-transporting ATPase of E. acervulina, a heat-shock protein of E. maxima, and a conserved hypothetical protein of Toxoplasma gondii. Thus, the remaining 26 ESTs have not been previously reported. Further characterization of these differentially expressed genes will be useful in understanding the genetic basis for the precocious phenotype in Eimeria spp.

  13. Hybrid surface roughening modes during low-temperature heteroepitaxy: Growth of fully-strained metastable Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} alloys on Ge(001)2x1

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, P.; Spila, T.; Guerdal, O.; Taylor, N.; Greene, J. E.

    1999-12-15

    Fully-strained single-crystal metastable Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} alloys were grown on Ge(001) up to their critical epitaxial thickness values t{sub epi}(x) in order to probe surface roughening pathways leading to heteroepitaxial breakdown during low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy under large compressive strain. All films with x>0.09 have comparable roughnesses while films with x<0.09 are considerably rougher with larger lateral feature sizes. Roughening rates increase with increasing x for films with x>0.09 due to a new hybrid relaxation path which only becomes accessible under high strain as kinetic roughening provides surface oscillations on lateral length scales that allow bulk relaxation through strain-induced islanding at growth temperatures where it could not otherwise proceed. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  14. Comparative genomic analysis of single-molecule sequencing and hybrid approaches for finishing the Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1 strain DSM 10061 genome

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Nagaraju, Shilpa; Utturkar, Sagar M; De Tissera, Sashini; Segovia, Simón; Mitchell, Wayne; Land, Miriam L; Dassanayake, Asela; Köpke, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium autoethanogenum strain JA1-1 (DSM 10061) is an acetogen capable of fermenting CO, CO2 and H2 (e.g. from syngas or waste gases) into biofuel ethanol and commodity chemicals such as 2,3-butanediol. A draft genome sequence consisting of 100 contigs has been published. Results A closed, high-quality genome sequence for C. autoethanogenum DSM10061 was generated using only the latest single-molecule DNA sequencing technology and without the need for manual finishing. It is assigned to the most complex genome classification based upon genome features such as repeats, prophage, nine copies of the rRNA gene operons. It has a low G + C content of 31.1%. Illumina, 454, Illumina/454 hybrid assemblies were generated and then compared to the draft and PacBio assemblies using summary statistics, CGAL, QUAST and REAPR bioinformatics tools and comparative genomic approaches. Assemblies based upon shorter read DNA technologies were confounded by the large number repeats and their size, which in the case of the rRNA gene operons were ~5 kb. CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Paloindromic Repeats) systems among biotechnologically relevant Clostridia were classified and related to plasmid content and prophages. Potential associations between plasmid content and CRISPR systems may have implications for historical industrial scale Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) fermentation failures and future large scale bacterial fermentations. While C. autoethanogenum contains an active CRISPR system, no such system is present in the closely related Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528. A common prophage inserted into the Arg-tRNA shared between the strains suggests a common ancestor. However, C. ljungdahlii contains several additional putative prophages and it has more than double the amount of prophage DNA compared to C. autoethanogenum. Other differences include important metabolic genes for central metabolism (as an additional hydrogenase and the absence of a

  15. Orientifolded locally AdS3 geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loran, F.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing the analysis of [Loran F and Sheikh-Jabbari M M 2010 Phys. Lett. B 693 184-7], we classify all locally AdS3 stationary axi-symmetric unorientable solutions to AdS3 Einstein gravity and show that they are obtained by applying certain orientifold projection on AdS3, BTZ or AdS3 self-dual orbifold, respectively, O-AdS3, O-BTZ and O-SDO geometries. Depending on the orientifold fixed surface, the O-surface, which is either a space-like 2D plane or a cylinder, or a light-like 2D plane or a cylinder, one can distinguish four distinct cases. For the space-like orientifold plane or cylinder cases, these geometries solve AdS3 Einstein equations and are hence locally AdS3 everywhere except at the O-surface, where there is a delta-function source. For the light-like cases, the geometry is a solution to Einstein equations even at the O-surface. We discuss the causal structure for static, extremal and general rotating O-BTZ and O-SDO cases as well as the geodesic motion on these geometries. We also discuss orientifolding Poincaré patch AdS3 and AdS2 geometries as a way to geodesic completion of these spaces and comment on the 2D CFT dual to the O-geometries.

  16. Comparative hybridization reveals extensive genome variation in the AIDS-associated pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guanggan; Liu, Iris; Sham, Anita; Stajich, Jason E; Dietrich, Fred S; Kronstad, James W

    2008-01-01

    Background Genome variability can have a profound influence on the virulence of pathogenic microbes. The availability of genome sequences for two strains of the AIDS-associated fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans presented an opportunity to use comparative genome hybridization (CGH) to examine genome variability between strains of different mating type, molecular subtype, and ploidy. Results Initially, CGH was used to compare the approximately 100 kilobase MATa and MATα mating-type regions in serotype A and D strains to establish the relationship between the Log2 ratios of hybridization signals and sequence identity. Subsequently, we compared the genomes of the environmental isolate NIH433 (MATa) and the clinical isolate NIH12 (MATα) with a tiling array of the genome of the laboratory strain JEC21 derived from these strains. In this case, CGH identified putative recombination sites and the origins of specific segments of the JEC21 genome. Similarly, CGH analysis revealed marked variability in the genomes of strains representing the VNI, VNII, and VNB molecular subtypes of the A serotype, including disomy for chromosome 13 in two strains. Additionally, CGH identified differences in chromosome content between three strains with the hybrid AD serotype and revealed that chromosome 1 from the serotype A genome is preferentially retained in all three strains. Conclusion The genomes of serotypes A, D, and AD strains exhibit extensive variation that spans the range from small differences (such as regions of divergence, deletion, or amplification) to the unexpected disomy for chromosome 13 in haploid strains and preferential retention of specific chromosomes in naturally occurring diploids. PMID:18294377

  17. Warped AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anninos, Dionysios; Li, Wei; Padi, Megha; Song, Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Three dimensional topologically massive gravity (TMG) with a negative cosmological constant -l-2 and positive Newton constant G admits an AdS3 vacuum solution for any value of the graviton mass μ. These are all known to be perturbatively unstable except at the recently explored chiral point μl = 1. However we show herein that for every value of μl ≠ 3 there are two other (potentially stable) vacuum solutions given by SL(2,Bbb R) × U(1)-invariant warped AdS3 geometries, with a timelike or spacelike U(1) isometry. Critical behavior occurs at μl = 3, where the warping transitions from a stretching to a squashing, and there are a pair of warped solutions with a null U(1) isometry. For μl > 3, there are known warped black hole solutions which are asymptotic to warped AdS3. We show that these black holes are discrete quotients of warped AdS3 just as BTZ black holes are discrete quotients of ordinary AdS3. Moreover new solutions of this type, relevant to any theory with warped AdS3 solutions, are exhibited. Finally we note that the black hole thermodynamics is consistent with the hypothesis that, for μl > 3, the warped AdS3 ground state of TMG is holographically dual to a 2D boundary CFT with central charges c_R-formula and c_L-formula.

  18. Warped AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Anninos, Dionysios; Li, Wei; Padi, Megha; Strominger, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Three dimensional topologically massive gravity (TMG) with a negative cosmological constant -ell-2 and positive Newton constant G admits an AdS3 vacuum solution for any value of the graviton mass μ. These are all known to be perturbatively unstable except at the recently explored chiral point μell = 1. However we show herein that for every value of μell ≠ 3 there are two other (potentially stable) vacuum solutions given by SL(2,Bbb R) × U(1)-invariant warped AdS3 geometries, with a timelike or spacelike U(1) isometry. Critical behavior occurs at μell = 3, where the warping transitions from a stretching to a squashing, and there are a pair of warped solutions with a null U(1) isometry. For μell > 3, there are known warped black hole solutions which are asymptotic to warped AdS3. We show that these black holes are discrete quotients of warped AdS3 just as BTZ black holes are discrete quotients of ordinary AdS3. Moreover new solutions of this type, relevant to any theory with warped AdS3 solutions, are exhibited. Finally we note that the black hole thermodynamics is consistent with the hypothesis that, for μell > 3, the warped AdS3 ground state of TMG is holographically dual to a 2D boundary CFT with central charges c_R-formula and c_L-formula.

  19. Segmented strings in AdS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callebaut, Nele; Gubser, Steven S.; Samberg, Andreas; Toldo, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    We study segmented strings in flat space and in AdS 3. In flat space, these well known classical motions describe strings which at any instant of time are piecewise linear. In AdS 3, the worldsheet is composed of faces each of which is a region bounded by null geodesics in an AdS 2 subspace of AdS 3. The time evolution can be described by specifying the null geodesic motion of kinks in the string at which two segments are joined. The outcome of collisions of kinks on the worldsheet can be worked out essentially using considerations of causality. We study several examples of closed segmented strings in AdS 3 and find an unexpected quasi-periodic behavior. We also work out a WKB analysis of quantum states of yo-yo strings in AdS 5 and find a logarithmic term reminiscent of the logarithmic twist of string states on the leading Regge trajectory.

  20. Intracellular Signaling and Desmoglein 2 Shedding Triggered by Human Adenoviruses Ad3, Ad14, and Ad14P1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie; Ducournau, Corinne; Saydaminova, Kamola; Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Ho, Martin; Carter, Darrick; Zubieta, Chloé

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently discovered that desmoglein 2 (DSG2) is a receptor for human adenovirus species B serotypes Ad3, Ad7, Ad11, and Ad14. Ad3 is considered to be a widely distributed human pathogen. Ad3 binding to DSG2 triggers the transient opening of epithelial junctions. Here, we further delineate the mechanism that leads to DSG2-mediated epithelial junction opening in cells exposed to Ad3 and recombinant Ad3 fiber proteins. We identified an Ad3 fiber knob-dependent pathway that involves the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases triggering the activation of the matrix-metalloproteinase ADAM17. ADAM17, in turn, cleaves the extracellular domain of DSG2 that links epithelial cells together. The shed DSG2 domain can be detected in cell culture supernatant and also in serum of mice with established human xenograft tumors. We then extended our studies to Ad14 and Ad14P1. Ad14 is an important research and clinical object because of the recent appearance of a new, more pathogenic strain (Ad14P1). In a human epithelial cancer xenograft model, Ad14P1 showed more efficient viral spread and oncolysis than Ad14. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a mutation in the Ad14P1 fiber knob could account for the differences between the two strains. While our X-ray crystallography studies suggested an altered three-dimensional (3D) structure of the Ad14P1 fiber knob in the F-G loop region, this did not significantly change the fiber knob affinity to DSG2 or the intracellular signaling and DSG2 shedding in epithelial cancer cells. IMPORTANCE A number of widely distributed adenoviruses use the epithelial junction protein DSG2 as a receptor for infection and lateral spread. Interaction with DSG2 allows the virus not only to enter cells but also to open epithelial junctions which form a physical barrier to virus spread. Our study elucidates the mechanism beyond virus-triggered junction opening with a focus on adenovirus serotype 3. Ad3 binds to DSG2 with its fiber

  1. Hybrid Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo, David J.; Sridharan, Srikesh; Weinstock, Irvin

    2005-10-15

    HybSim (short for Hybrid Simulator) is a flexible, easy to use screening tool that allows the user to quanti the technical and economic benefits of installing a village hybrid generating system and simulates systems with any combination of —Diesel generator sets —Photovoltaic arrays -Wind Turbines and -Battery energy storage systems Most village systems (or small population sites such as villages, remote military bases, small communities, independent or isolated buildings or centers) depend on diesel generation systems for their source of energy. HybSim allows the user to determine other "sources" of energy that can greatly reduce the dollar to kilo-watt hour ratio. Supported by the DOE, Energy Storage Program, HybSim was initially developed to help analyze the benefits of energy storage systems in Alaskan villages. Soon after its development, other sources of energy were added providing the user with a greater range of analysis opportunities and providing the village with potentially added savings. In addition to village systems, HybSim has generated interest for use from military institutions in energy provisions and USAID for international village analysis.

  2. Influence of strain of sire on channel x blue F1 hybrid catfish embryo production and fingerling performance under commercial farm conditions.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel x blue hybrid catfish is presently the desired aquaculture species in US farm-raised catfish industry. Even though production and performance has improved over the last two decades, several production and performance parameters needs to be improved to maximize the genetic potential of this ...

  3. AdS duals of matrix strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Jose F.; Samtleben, Henning

    2003-06-01

    We review recent work on the holographic duals of type II and heterotic matrix string theories described by warped AdS3 supergravities. In particular, we compute the spectra of Kaluza-Klein primaries for type I, II supergravities on warped AdS3 × S7 and match them with the primary operators in the dual two-dimensional gauge theories. The presence of non-trivial warp factors and dilaton profiles requires a modification of the familiar dictionary between masses and 'scaling' dimensions of fields and operators. We present these modifications for the general case of domain wall/QFT correspondences between supergravities on warped AdSd+1 × Sq geometries and super Yang-Mills theories with 16 supercharges.

  4. Identification and Characterization of VNI/VNII and Novel VNII/VNIV Hybrids and Impact of Hybridization on Virulence and Antifungal Susceptibility Within the C. neoformans/C. gattii Species Complex.

    PubMed

    Aminnejad, Mojgan; Cogliati, Massimo; Duan, Shuyao; Arabatzis, Michael; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Castañeda, Elizabeth; Lazéra, Marcia; Velegraki, Aristea; Ellis, David; Sorrell, Tania C; Meyer, Wieland

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii are pathogenic basidiomycetous yeasts and the commonest cause of fungal infection of the central nervous system. Cryptococci are typically haploid but several inter-species, inter-varietal and intra-varietal hybrids have been reported. It has a bipolar mating system with sexual reproduction occurring normally between two individuals with opposite mating types, α and a. This study set out to characterize hybrid isolates within the C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex: seven unisexual mating intra-varietal VNI/VNII (αAAα) and six novel inter-varietal VNII/VNIV (aADα). The URA5-RFLP pattern for VNII/VNIV (aADα) differs from the VNIII (αADa) hybrids. Analysis of the allelic patterns of selected genes for AD hybrids showed 79% or more heterozygosis for the studied loci except for CBS132 (VNIII), which showed 50% of heterozygosity. MALDI-TOF MS was applied to hybrids belonging to different sero/mating type allelic patterns. All hybrid isolates were identified as belonging to the same hybrid group with identification scores ranging between 2.101 to 2.634. All hybrids were virulent when tested in the Galleria mellonella (wax moth) model, except for VNII/VNIV (aADα) hybrids. VNI/VGII hybrids were the most virulent hybrids. Hybrids recovered from larvae manifested a significant increase in capsule and total cell size and produced a low proportion (5-10%) of giant cells compared with the haploid control strains. All strains expressed the major virulence factors-capsule, melanin and phospholipase B-and grew well at 37°C. The minimal inhibitory concentration of nine drugs was measured by micro-broth dilution and compared with published data on haploid strains. MICs were similar amongst hybrids and haploid parental strains. This is the first study reporting natural same sex αAAα intra-varietal VNI/VNII hybrids and aADα inter-varietal VNII/VNIV hybrids.

  5. Identification and Characterization of VNI/VNII and Novel VNII/VNIV Hybrids and Impact of Hybridization on Virulence and Antifungal Susceptibility Within the C. neoformans/C. gattii Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Aminnejad, Mojgan; Cogliati, Massimo; Duan, Shuyao; Arabatzis, Michael; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Castañeda, Elizabeth; Lazéra, Marcia; Velegraki, Aristea; Ellis, David; Sorrell, Tania C.; Meyer, Wieland

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii are pathogenic basidiomycetous yeasts and the commonest cause of fungal infection of the central nervous system. Cryptococci are typically haploid but several inter-species, inter-varietal and intra-varietal hybrids have been reported. It has a bipolar mating system with sexual reproduction occurring normally between two individuals with opposite mating types, α and a. This study set out to characterize hybrid isolates within the C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex: seven unisexual mating intra-varietal VNI/VNII (αAAα) and six novel inter-varietal VNII/VNIV (aADα). The URA5-RFLP pattern for VNII/VNIV (aADα) differs from the VNIII (αADa) hybrids. Analysis of the allelic patterns of selected genes for AD hybrids showed 79% or more heterozygosis for the studied loci except for CBS132 (VNIII), which showed 50% of heterozygosity. MALDI-TOF MS was applied to hybrids belonging to different sero/mating type allelic patterns. All hybrid isolates were identified as belonging to the same hybrid group with identification scores ranging between 2.101 to 2.634. All hybrids were virulent when tested in the Galleria mellonella (wax moth) model, except for VNII/VNIV (aADα) hybrids. VNI/VGII hybrids were the most virulent hybrids. Hybrids recovered from larvae manifested a significant increase in capsule and total cell size and produced a low proportion (5–10%) of giant cells compared with the haploid control strains. All strains expressed the major virulence factors—capsule, melanin and phospholipase B—and grew well at 37°C. The minimal inhibitory concentration of nine drugs was measured by micro-broth dilution and compared with published data on haploid strains. MICs were similar amongst hybrids and haploid parental strains. This is the first study reporting natural same sex αAAα intra-varietal VNI/VNII hybrids and aADα inter-varietal VNII/VNIV hybrids. PMID:27764108

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF MICROCYSTIN TOXINS FROM A STRAIN OF MICROCYSTIS AERUGINOSA BY LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY INTRODUCTION INTO A HYBRID LINEAR ION TRAP-FOURIER TRANSFORM ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE MASS SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cyclic heptapeptide microcystin toxins produced by a strain of Microcystis aeruginosa that has not been investigated previously were separated by liquid chromatography and identified by high-accuracy m/z measurements of their [M + H]+ ions and the fragment i...

  7. Managing hybrid marketing systems.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, R T; Moran, U

    1990-01-01

    As competition increases and costs become critical, companies that once went to market only one way are adding new channels and using new methods - creating hybrid marketing systems. These hybrid marketing systems hold the promise of greater coverage and reduced costs. But they are also hard to manage; they inevitably raise questions of conflict and control: conflict because marketing units compete for customers; control because new indirect channels are less subject to management authority. Hard as they are to manage, however, hybrid marketing systems promise to become the dominant design, replacing the "purebred" channel strategy in all kinds of businesses. The trick to managing the hybrid is to analyze tasks and channels within and across a marketing system. A map - the hybrid grid - can help managers make sense of their hybrid system. What the chart reveals is that channels are not the basic building blocks of a marketing system; marketing tasks are. The hybrid grid forces managers to consider various combinations of channels and tasks that will optimize both cost and coverage. Managing conflict is also an important element of a successful hybrid system. Managers should first acknowledge the inevitability of conflict. Then they should move to bound it by creating guidelines that spell out which customers to serve through which methods. Finally, a marketing and sales productivity (MSP) system, consisting of a central marketing database, can act as the central nervous system of a hybrid marketing system, helping managers create customized channels and service for specific customer segments.

  8. An AdS Crunch in Supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertog, Thomas

    2004-12-01

    We review some properties of N=8 gauged supergravity in four dimensions with modified, but AdS invariant boundary conditions on the m2 = -2 scalars. There is a one-parameter class of asymptotic conditions on these fields and the metric components, for which the full AdS symmetry group is preserved. The generators of the asymptotic symmetries are finite, but acquire a contribution from the scalar fields. For a large class of such boundary conditions, we find there exist black holes with scalar hair that are specified by a single conserved charge. Since Schwarschild-AdS is a solution too for all boundary conditions, this provides an example of black hole non-uniqueness. We also show there exist solutions where smooth initial data evolve to a big crunch singularity. This opens up the possibility of using the dual conformal field theory to obtain a fully quantum description of the cosmological singularity, and we report on a preliminary study of this.

  9. The nature of the nitrogen source added to nitrogen depleted vinifications conducted by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain in synthetic must affects gene expression and the levels of several volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Martí, Elena; Aranda, Agustín; Mendes-Ferreira, Alexandra; Mendes-Faia, Arlete; del Olmo, Marcel Lí

    2007-07-01

    Nitrogen starvation may lead to stuck and sluggish fermentations. These undesirable situations result in wines with high residual sugar, longer vinification times, and risks of microbial contamination. The typical oenological method to prevent these problems is the early addition of ammonium salts to the grape juice, although excessive levels of these compounds may lead to negative consequences for the final product. This addition reduces the overall fermentation time, regardless of the time of addition, but the effect is more significant when nitrogen is added during the yeast exponential phase. In this work we analysed the effect of adding different nitrogen sources (ammonia, amino acids or a combination of both) under nitrogen depletion in order to understand yeast metabolic changes that lead to the adaptation to the new conditions. These studies were carried out in a synthetic must that mimics the composition of the natural must. Furthermore, we studied how this addition affects fermentative behaviour, the levels of several yeast volatile compounds in the final product, arginase activity, and the expression of several genes involved in stress response and nitrogen metabolism during vinification. We found that the nature of the nitrogen source added during yeast late exponential growth phase introduces changes to the volatile compounds profile and to the gene expression. On the other hand, arginase activity and the expression of the stress response gene ACA1 are useful to monitor nitrogen depletion/addition during growth of the wine yeast considered under our vinification conditions.

  10. Space-Time Processing for Tactical Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Sagnik Ghosh, Bhaskar D. Rao, and James R. Zeidler; "Outage-Efficient Strategies for Multiuser MIMO Networks with Channel Distribution Information... Distributed cooperative routing and hybrid ARQ in MIMO -BLAST ad hoc networks”, submitted to IEEE Transactions on Communications, 2009. Davide...mobile ad hoc networks using polling techniques for MIMO nodes. Centralized and distributed topology control algorithms have been develop to

  11. AdS3: the NHEK generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Heurtier, Lucien; Puhm, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    It was argued in [1] that the five-dimensional near-horizon extremal Kerr (NHEK) geometry can be embedded in String Theory as the infrared region of an infinite family of non-supersymmetric geometries that have D1, D5, momentum and KK monopole charges. We show that there exists a method to embed these geometries into asymptotically- {AdS}_3× {S}^3/{{Z}}_N solutions, and hence to obtain infinite families of flows whose infrared is NHEK. This indicates that the CFT dual to the NHEK geometry is the IR fixed point of a Renormalization Group flow from a known local UV CFT and opens the door to its explicit construction.

  12. AdS2 holographic dictionary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Papadimitriou, Ioannis

    2016-12-01

    We construct the holographic dictionary for both running and constant dilaton solutions of the two dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theory that is obtained by a circle reduction from Einstein-Hilbert gravity with negative cosmological constant in three dimensions. This specific model ensures that the dual theory has a well defined ultraviolet completion in terms of a two dimensional conformal field theory, but our results apply qualitatively to a wider class of two dimensional dilaton gravity theories. For each type of solutions we perform holographic renormalization, compute the exact renormalized one-point functions in the presence of arbitrary sources, and derive the asymptotic symmetries and the corresponding conserved charges. In both cases we find that the scalar operator dual to the dilaton plays a crucial role in the description of the dynamics. Its source gives rise to a matter conformal anomaly for the running dilaton solutions, while its expectation value is the only non trivial observable for constant dilaton solutions. The role of this operator has been largely overlooked in the literature. We further show that the only non trivial conserved charges for running dilaton solutions are the mass and the electric charge, while for constant dilaton solutions only the electric charge is non zero. However, by uplifting the solutions to three dimensions we show that constant dilaton solutions can support non trivial extended symmetry algebras, including the one found by Compère, Song and Strominger [1], in agreement with the results of Castro and Song [2]. Finally, we demonstrate that any solution of this specific dilaton gravity model can be uplifted to a family of asymptotically AdS2 × S 2 or conformally AdS2 × S 2 solutions of the STU model in four dimensions, including non extremal black holes. The four dimensional solutions obtained by uplifting the running dilaton solutions coincide with the so called `subtracted geometries', while those obtained

  13. Strain-induced magnetic domain wall control by voltage in hybrid piezoelectric BaTiO3 ferrimagnetic TbFe structures

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Olivier; Weil, Raphael; Rohart, Stanislas; Mougin, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the voltage dependence of the magnetization reversal of a thin amorphous ferromagnetic TbFe film grown on a ferroelectric and piezoelectric BaTiO3 single crystal. Magneto-optical measurements, at macroscopic scale or in a microscope, demonstrate how the ferroelectric BaTiO3 polarisation history influences the properties of the perpendicularly magnetized TbFe film. Unpolarised and twinned regions are obtained when the sample is zero voltage cooled whereas flat and saturated regions are obtained when the sample is voltage cooled through the ferroelectric ordering temperature of the BaTiO3 crystal, as supported by atomic force microscopy experiments. The two steps involved in the TbFe magnetization reversal, namely nucleation and propagation of magnetic domain walls, depend on the polarisation history. Nucleation is associated to coupling through strains with the piezoelectric BaTiO3 crystal and propagation to pinning with the ferroelastic surface patterns visible in the BaTiO3 topography. PMID:26987937

  14. Strain-induced magnetic domain wall control by voltage in hybrid piezoelectric BaTiO3 ferrimagnetic TbFe structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Olivier; Weil, Raphael; Rohart, Stanislas; Mougin, Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports on the voltage dependence of the magnetization reversal of a thin amorphous ferromagnetic TbFe film grown on a ferroelectric and piezoelectric BaTiO3 single crystal. Magneto-optical measurements, at macroscopic scale or in a microscope, demonstrate how the ferroelectric BaTiO3 polarisation history influences the properties of the perpendicularly magnetized TbFe film. Unpolarised and twinned regions are obtained when the sample is zero voltage cooled whereas flat and saturated regions are obtained when the sample is voltage cooled through the ferroelectric ordering temperature of the BaTiO3 crystal, as supported by atomic force microscopy experiments. The two steps involved in the TbFe magnetization reversal, namely nucleation and propagation of magnetic domain walls, depend on the polarisation history. Nucleation is associated to coupling through strains with the piezoelectric BaTiO3 crystal and propagation to pinning with the ferroelastic surface patterns visible in the BaTiO3 topography.

  15. Ionic electroactive hybrid transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akle, Barbar J.; Bennett, Matthew D.; Leo, Donald J.

    2005-05-01

    Ionic electroactive actuators have received considerable attention in the past ten years. Ionic electroactive polymers, sometimes referred to as artificial muscles, have the ability to generate large bending strain and moderate stress at low applied voltages. Typical types of ionic electroactive polymer transducers include ionic polymers, conducting polymers, and carbon nanotubes. Preliminary research combining multiple types of materials proved to enhance certain transduction properties such as speed of response, maximum strain, or quasi-static actuation. Recently it was demonstrated that ionomer-ionic liquid transducers can operate in air for long periods of time (>250,000 cycles) and showed potential to reduce or eliminate the back-relaxation issue associated with ionomeric polymers. In addition, ionic liquids have higher electrical stability window than those operated with water as the solvent thereby increasing the maximum strain that the actuator can produce. In this work, a new technique developed for plating metal particulates on the surface of ionomeric materials is applied to the development of hybrid transducers that incorporate carbon nanotubes and conducting polymers as electrode materials. The new plating technique, named the direct assembly process, consists of mixing a conducting powder with an ionomer solution. This technique has demonstrated improved response time and strain output as compared to previous methods. Furthermore, the direct assembly process is less costly to implement than traditional impregnation-reduction methods due to less dependence on reducing agents, it requires less time, and is easier to implement than other processes. Electrodes applied using this new technique of mixing RuO2 (surface area 45~65m2/g) particles and Nafion dispersion provided 5x the displacement and 10x the force compared to a transducer made with conventional methods. Furthermore, the study illustrated that the response speed of the transducer is optimized

  16. Flexural Properties of E Glass and TR50S Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Hybrid Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chensong; Sudarisman; Davies, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    A study on the flexural properties of E glass and TR50S carbon fiber reinforced hybrid composites is presented in this paper. Specimens were made by the hand lay-up process in an intra-ply configuration with varying degrees of glass fibers added to the surface of a carbon laminate. These specimens were then tested in the three-point bend configuration in accordance with ASTM D790-07 at three span-to-depth ratios: 16, 32, and 64. The failure modes were examined under an optical microscope. The flexural behavior was also simulated by finite element analysis, and the flexural modulus, flexural strength, and strain to failure were calculated. It is shown that although span-to-depth ratio shows an influence on the stress-strain relationship, it has no effect on the failure mode. The majority of specimens failed by either in-plane or out-of-plane local buckling followed by kinking and splitting at the compressive GFRP side and matrix cracking combined with fiber breakage at the CFRP tensile face. It is shown that positive hybrid effects exist for the flexural strengths of most of the hybrid configurations. The hybrid effect is noted to be more obvious when the hybrid ratio is small, which may be attributed to the relative position of the GFRP layer(s) with respect to the neutral plane. In contrast to this, flexural modulus seems to obey the rule of mixtures equation.

  17. AD(H)D.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher; Charles, Janice; Britt, Helena

    2008-06-01

    The BEACH program (Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health) shows that management of attention deficit (hyperactivity) disorder (AD(H)D) was rare in general practice, occurring only six times per 1,000 encounters with children aged 5-17 years, between April 2000 and December 2007. This suggests that general practitioners manage AD(H)D about 46,000 times for this age group nationally each year.

  18. ADS pilot program Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauson, J.; Heuser, J.

    1981-01-01

    The Applications Data Service (ADS) is a system based on an electronic data communications network which will permit scientists to share the data stored in data bases at universities and at government and private installations. It is designed to allow users to readily locate and access high quality, timely data from multiple sources. The ADS Pilot program objectives and the current plans for accomplishing those objectives are described.

  19. Incorporation of Listeria monocytogenes strains in raw milk biofilms.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Christiane; Ifland, Andrea; Naumann, Annette; Kleta, Sylvia; Noll, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Biofilms develop successively on devices of milk production without sufficient cleaning and originate from the microbial community of raw milk. The established biofilm matrices enable incorporation of pathogens like Listeria monocytogenes, which can cause a continuous contamination of food processing plants. L. monocytogenes is frequently found in raw milk and non-pasteurized raw milk products and as part of a biofilm community in milk meters and bulk milk tanks. The aim of this study was to analyze whether different L. monocytogenes strains are interacting with the microbial community of raw milk in terms of biofilm formation in the same manner, and to identify at which stage of biofilm formation a selected L. monocytogenes strain settles best. Bacterial community structure and composition of biofilms were analyzed by a cloning and sequencing approach and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) based on the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The chemical composition of biofilms was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), while settled L. monocytogenes cells were quantified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Addition of individual L. monocytogenes strains to raw milk caused significant shifts in the biofilm biomass, in the chemical as well as in the bacterial community composition. Biofilm formation and attachment of L. monocytogenes cells were not serotype but strain specific. However, the added L. monocytogenes strains were not abundant since mainly members of the genera Citrobacter and Lactococcus dominated the bacterial biofilm community. Overall, added L. monocytogenes strains led to a highly competitive interaction with the raw milk community and triggered alterations in biofilm formation.

  20. Role of added chloride ions in alteration of reaction pathway in the oxidation of cyclic ketones by dichloroisocyanuric acid—A kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshman Kumar, Y.; Venkata Nadh, R.; Radhakrishnamurti, P. S.

    2015-03-01

    Effect of added chloride ions on kinetics and pathway of reaction between cyclic ketones (five to eight membered rings) and dichloroisocyanuric acid (DCICA) was studied in aqueous acetic acid—perchloric acid medium. Formation of aliphatic dicarboxylic acids as the end products demonstrates the ring cleavage oxidation. Positive effect of acid and negative effect of dielectric constant on the reaction rate reveals a interaction between positive ion (oxidant in the form of H2OCl+) and dipolar substrate molecule. Zero and first orders by oxidant in absence and presence of added chloride ions illustrates the participation of substrate as enolic form of ketone and protonated ketone, respectively, in the rate determining steps. The observed order of reactivity of cyclic ketones (cyclohexanone > cyclooctanone > cyclopentanone > cycloheptanone) was explained on the bases of ring strain, change of hybridization and conformational considerations. The envisaged plausible mechanism based on order of reactants in presence and absence of added chloride ions was substantiated by the order of Arrhenius parameters.

  1. αADα Hybrids of Cryptococcus neoformans: Evidence of Same-Sex Mating in Nature and Hybrid Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaorong; Litvintseva, Anastasia P; Nielsen, Kirsten; Patel, Sweta; Floyd, Anna; Mitchell, Thomas G; Heitman, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a ubiquitous human fungal pathogen that causes meningoencephalitis in predominantly immunocompromised hosts. The fungus is typically haploid, and sexual reproduction involves two individuals with opposite mating types/sexes, α and a. However, the overwhelming predominance of mating type (MAT) α over a in C. neoformans populations limits α–a mating in nature. Recently it was discovered that C. neoformans can undergo same-sex mating under laboratory conditions, especially between α isolates. Whether same-sex mating occurs in nature and contributes to the current population structure was unknown. In this study, natural αADα hybrids that arose by fusion between two α cells of different serotypes (A and D) were identified and characterized, providing definitive evidence that same-sex mating occurs naturally. A novel truncated allele of the mating-type-specific cell identity determinant SXI1α was also identified as a genetic factor likely involved in this process. In addition, laboratory-constructed αADα strains exhibited hybrid vigor both in vitro and in vivo, providing a plausible explanation for their relative abundance in nature despite the fact that AD hybrids are inefficient in meiosis/sporulation and are trapped in the diploid state. These findings provide insights on the origins, genetic mechanisms, and fitness impact of unisexual hybridization in the Cryptococcus population. PMID:17953489

  2. Adding and Deleting Images

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Images are added via the Drupal WebCMS Editor. Once an image is uploaded onto a page, it is available via the Library and your files. You can edit the metadata, delete the image permanently, and/or replace images on the Files tab.

  3. What Value "Value Added"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Two quantitative measures of school performance are currently used, the average points score (APS) at Key Stage 2 and value-added (VA), which measures the rate of academic improvement between Key Stage 1 and 2. These figures are used by parents and the Office for Standards in Education to make judgements and comparisons. However, simple…

  4. ADS in a Nutshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Eichhorn, G.; Grant, C. S.; Accomazzi, A.; Murray, S. S.; Kurtz, M. J.

    1999-05-01

    The bibliographic databases maintained by the NASA Astrophysics Data System are updated approximately biweekly with records gathered from over 125 sources all over the world. Data are either sent to us electronically, retrieved by our staff via semi-automated procedures, or entered in our databases through supervised OCR procedures. PERL scripts are run on the data to convert them from their incoming format to our standard format so that they can be added to the master database at SAO. Once new data has been added, separate index files are created for authors, objects, title words, and text word, allowing these fields to be searched for individually or in combination with each other. During the indexing procedure, discipline-specific knowledge is taken into account through the use of rule-based procedures performing string normalization, context-sensitive word translation, and synonym and stop word replacement. Once the master text and index files have been updated at SAO, an automated procedure mirrors the changes in the database to the ADS mirror site via a secure network connection. The use of a public domain software tool called rsync allows incremental updating of the database files, with significant savings in the amount of data being transferred. In the past year, the ADS Abstract Service databases have grown by approximately 30%, including 50% growth in Physics, 25% growth in Astronomy and 10% growth in the Instrumentation datasets. The ADS Abstract Service now contains over 1.4 million abstracts (475K in Astronomy, 430K in Physics, 510K in Instrumentation, and 3K in Preprints), 175,000 journal abstracts, and 115,000 full text articles. In addition, we provide links to over 40,000 electronic HTML articles at other sites, 20,000 PDF articles, and 10,000 postscript articles, as well as many links to other external data sources.

  5. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a consistent and thorough development of the strain and strain-rate measures affiliated with Hencky. Natural measures for strain and strain-rate, as I refer to them, are first expressed in terms of of the fundamental body-metric tensors of Lodge. These strain and strain-rate measures are mixed tensor fields. They are mapped from the body to space in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian configurations, and then transformed from general to Cartesian fields. There they are compared with the various strain and strain-rate measures found in the literature. A simple Cartesian description for Hencky strain-rate in the Lagrangian state is obtained.

  6. Hybrid combustion with metallized fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Jianwen; Wygle, Brian S.; Bates, Ronald W.; Jones, Michael D.; Ramohalli, Kumar

    1993-01-01

    A chemical method of adding certain catalysts to improve the degradation process of a solid fuel is discussed. Thermogravimetric (TGA) analysis used to study the fundamental degradation behavior of a typical hybrid fuel (HTPB) shows that high surface temperatures increase the degradation rate. Fuels were tested in a laboratory-scale experimental hybrid rocket and their behavior was compared to a baseline behavior of HTPB fuel regression rates. It was found that a small amount of metal powder added to the fuel can significantly increase the regression rates.

  7. Characterization of Salmonella enteritidis strains.

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C; McFadden, K A; Brouwer, A M; Demczuk, W

    1993-01-01

    A study was conducted to characterize 318 Salmonella enteritidis strains that were mainly isolated from poultry and their environment in Canada. Biotype, phagetype (PT), plasmid profile (PP), hybridization with a plasmid-derived virulence sequence probe, antibiotic resistance, outer membrane proteins (OMPs), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) profiles were determined. Relationships of these properties to one another, and their diagnostic and pathogenic significance were assessed. Biotyping indicated that failure to ferment rhamnose was sometimes useful as a marker for epidemiologically related strains. Phagetyping was the most effective method for subdividing S. enteritidis; it distinguished 12 PTs. Phagetype 13 was occasionally associated with septicemia and mortality in chickens. The strains belonged to 15 PPs. A 36 megadalton (MDa) plasmid was found in 97% of the strains. Only the 36 MDa plasmid hybridized with the probe. Seventeen percent of the strains were drug resistant; all strains were sensitive to ciprofloxacin. Thirty-five of 36 strains possessed the same OMP profile, and 36 of 41 strains contained smooth LPS. Images Fig. 1. PMID:8358678

  8. A hybrid Michelson-FP interference fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhihai; Zhang, Yaxun; Wang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Enming; Zhou, Ai; Yuan, Libo

    2015-09-01

    A novel hybrid Michelson-FP (M-FP) interference fiber sensor based on a twin-core fiber has been proposed. It consists of an in-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer and an air FP cavities. The radial strain and axial strain sensing properties are explored and analyzed. By using this novel structure, we can measure radial strain and axial strain simultaneously.

  9. Mechanical property characterization of intraply hybrid composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to characterize the mechanical properties of intraply hybrids made from graphite fiber/epoxy matrix (primary composites) hybridized with varying amounts of secondary composites made from S-glass or Kevlar 49 fibers. The tests were conducted using thin laminates having the same thickness. The specimens for these tests were instrumented with strain gages to determine stress-strain behavior. Significant results are included.

  10. Multiplicative earthquake likelihood models incorporating strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoades, D. A.; Christophersen, A.; Gerstenberger, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARYWe examine the potential for <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rate variables to improve long-term earthquake likelihood models. We derive a set of multiplicative <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> earthquake likelihood models in which cell rates in a spatially uniform baseline model are scaled using combinations of covariates derived from earthquake catalogue data, fault data, and <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rates for the New Zealand region. Three components of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate estimated from GPS data over the period 1991-2011 are considered: the shear, rotational and dilatational <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> model parameters are optimised for earthquakes of M 5 and greater over the period 1987-2006 and tested on earthquakes from the period 2012-2015, which is independent of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate estimates. The shear <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate is overall the most informative individual covariate, as indicated by Molchan error diagrams as well as multiplicative modelling. Most models including <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates are significantly more informative than the best models excluding <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates in both the fitting and testing period. A <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> that combines the shear and dilatational <span class="hlt">strain</span> rates with a smoothed seismicity covariate is the most informative model in the fitting period, and a simpler model without the dilatational <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate is the most informative in the testing period. These results have implications for probabilistic seismic hazard analysis and can be used to improve the background model component of medium-term and short-term earthquake forecasting models.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5116011','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5116011"><span>Design, Synthesis and Microbiological Evaluation of Ampicillin Tetramic acid <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Antibiotics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cherian, Philip T.; Deshpande, Aditi; Cheramie, Martin N.; Bruhn, David F.; Hurdle, Julian G.; Lee, Richard E.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Exploiting iron-uptake pathways by conjugating β-lactam antibiotics with iron-chelators such as catechol and hydroxamic acid is a proven strategy to overcome permeability-related resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. Since naturally occurring iron chelating tetramic acids have not been previously examined for this purpose, an exploratory series of novel ampicillin-tetramic acid <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> that structurally resemble ureidopenicillins was designed and synthesized. The new analogs were evaluated for the ability to chelate iron and their MIC activities determined against a representative panel of clinically significant bacterial pathogens. The tetramic acid β-lactam <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> demonstrated a high affinity to iron in the order of 10−30 M3. The <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> were less active against Gram-positive bacteria. However, against Gram-negative bacteria, their activity was species dependent with several <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> displaying improved activity over ampicillin against wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The anti-Gram-negative activities of the <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> improved in the presence of clavulanic acid revealing that the tetramic acid moiety did not provide <span class="hlt">added</span> protection against β-lactamases. Additionally, the <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> were found to be efflux pump substrates as their activities markedly improved against pump-inactivated <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Unlike the catechol and hydroxamic acid siderophore β-lactam conjugates, the activities of the <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> did not improve under iron-deficient conditions. These results suggest that the tetramic acid <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> gain permeability via different membrane receptors, or they are out competed by native bacterial siderophores with stronger affinities for iron. This study provides a foundation for the further exploitation of the tetramic acid moiety to achieve novel β-lactam anti-Gram-negative agents, providing that efflux and β-lactamase mediated resistance is addressed. PMID:27189120</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhDT.........7Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhDT.........7Y"><span>Designing <span class="hlt">added</span> functions in engineered cementitious composites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yang, En-Hua</p> <p></p> <p>In this dissertation, a new and systematic material design approach is developed for ECC with <span class="hlt">added</span> functions through material microstructures linkage to composite macroscopic behavior. The thesis research embodies theoretical development by building on previous ECC micromechanical models, and experimental investigations into three specific new versions of ECC with <span class="hlt">added</span> functions aimed at addressing societal demands of our built infrastructure. Specifically, the theoretical study includes three important ECC modeling elements: Steady-state crack propagation analyses and simulation, predictive accuracy of the fiber bridging constitutive model, and development of the rate-dependent <span class="hlt">strain</span>-hardening criteria. The first element establishes the steady-state cracking criterion as a fundamental requirement for multiple cracking behavior in brittle matrix composites. The second element improves the accuracy of crack-width prediction in ECC. The third element establishes the micromechanics basis for impact-resistant ECC design. Three new ECCs with <span class="hlt">added</span> functions were developed and experimentally verified in this thesis research through the enhanced theoretical framework. A green ECC incorporating a large volume of industrial waste was demonstrated to possess reduced crack width and drying shrinkage. The self-healing ECC designed with tight crack width was demonstrated to recover transport and mechanical properties after microcrack damage when exposed to wet and dry cycles. The impact-resistant ECC was demonstrated to retain tensile ductility with increased strength under moderately high <span class="hlt">strain</span>-rate loading. These new versions of ECC with <span class="hlt">added</span> functions are expected to contribute greatly to enhancing the sustainability, durability, and safety of civil infrastructure built with ECC. This research establishes the effectiveness of micromechanics-based design and material ingredient tailoring for ECC with <span class="hlt">added</span> new attributes but without losing its basic tensile ductile</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1247661','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1247661"><span>Additive manufacturing of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> circuits</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher</p> <p>2016-03-26</p> <p>There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (<span class="hlt">AD</span>), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or <span class="hlt">AD</span> processes and conventional, established processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23934253','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23934253"><span>DNA-DNA <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> study of <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Chryseobacterium, Elizabethkingia and Empedobacter and of other usually indole-producing non-fermenters of CDC groups IIc, IIe, IIh and IIi, mostly from human clinical sources, and proposals of Chryseobacterium bernardetii sp. nov., Chryseobacterium carnis sp. nov., Chryseobacterium lactis sp. nov., Chryseobacterium nakagawai sp. nov. and Chryseobacterium taklimakanense comb. nov.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Holmes, B; Steigerwalt, A G; Nicholson, A C</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>The taxonomic classification of 182 phenotypically similar isolates was evaluated using DNA-DNA <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. These bacterial isolates were mainly derived from clinical sources; all were Gram-negative non-fermenters and most were indole-producing. Phenotypically, they resembled species from the genera Chryseobacterium, Elizabethkingia or Empedobacter or belonged to CDC groups IIc, IIe, IIh and IIi. Based on these analyses, four novel species are described: Chryseobacterium bernardetii sp. nov. (type <span class="hlt">strain</span> NCTC 13530(T) = CCUG 60564(T) = CDC G229(T)), Chryseobacterium carnis sp. nov. (type <span class="hlt">strain</span> NCTC 13525(T) = CCUG 60559(T) = CDC G81(T)), Chryseobacterium lactis sp. nov. (type <span class="hlt">strain</span> NCTC 11390(T) = CCUG 60566(T) = CDC KC1864(T)) and Chryseobacterium nakagawai sp. nov. (type <span class="hlt">strain</span> NCTC 13529(T) = CCUG 60563(T) = CDC G41(T)). The new combination Chryseobacterium taklimakanense comb. nov. (type <span class="hlt">strain</span> NCTC 13490(T) = X-65(T) = CCTCC AB 208154(T) = NRRL B-51322(T)) is also proposed to accommodate the reclassified Planobacterium taklimakanense.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22081254','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22081254"><span>Identification of novel <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> between Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii VNI and Cryptococcus gattii VGII.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aminnejad, Mojgan; Diaz, Mara; Arabatzis, Michael; Castañeda, Elizabeth; Lazera, Marcia; Velegraki, Aristea; Marriott, Deborah; Sorrell, Tania C; Meyer, Wieland</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii are pathogenic yeasts causing meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts. The fungus is typically haploid, and sexual reproduction occurs normally between individuals with opposite mating types, α and a. C. neoformans var. grubii (serotype A) is comprised of molecular types VNI, VNII, and VNB, and C. neoformans var. neoformans (serotype D) contains the molecular type VNIV. Additionally, diploid or aneuploid <span class="hlt">AD</span> <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> (VNIII) have been reported. C. gattii contains the molecular types VGI, VGII, VGIII, and VGIV, which encompass both serotypes B and C. To identify possible <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> <span class="hlt">strains</span>, URA5-RFLP analysis was performed on 350 globally obtained clinical, environmental, and veterinary isolates. Four clinical isolates from cerebrospinal fluid showed combination patterns of C. neoformans var. grubii and C. gattii: Brazil (n = 2), Colombia (n = 1), and India (n = 1). These <span class="hlt">strains</span> were monokaryotic and diploid or aneuploid. M13 PCR fingerprinting showed that they contained fragments of both proposed parental groups. Luminex IGS genotyping identified these isolates as <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> with two different molecular type combinations: three VNI/VGII and one VNI/VGI. Blue color development on CGB agar was delayed in three isolates and absent in one. C. gattii-specific PCR confirmed the presence of C. gattii in the <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>. CAP59 allele-specific PCR revealed that all the <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> contained both serotype A and B alleles. Determination of mating-type allelic patterns by PCR revealed that the isolates were αA aB. This is the first study discovering novel natural <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> between C. neoformans molecular type VNI and C. gattii molecular type VGII.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9057E..1IY','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9057E..1IY"><span>Smart <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> rotary damper</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yang, C. S. Walter; DesRoches, Reginald</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>This paper develops a smart <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> rotary damper using a re-centering smart shape memory alloy (SMA) material as well as conventional energy-dissipating metallic plates that are easy to be replaced. The ends of the SMA and steel plates are inserted in the hinge. When the damper rotates, all the plates bend, providing energy dissipating and recentering characteristics. Such smart <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> rotary dampers can be installed in structures to mitigate structural responses and to re-center automatically. The damaged energy-dissipating plates can be easily replaced promptly after an external excitation, reducing repair time and costs. An OpenSEES model of a smart <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> rotary was established and calibrated to reproduce the realistic behavior measured from a full-scale experimental test. Furthermore, the seismic performance of a 3-story moment resisting model building with smart <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> rotary dampers designed for downtown Los Angeles was also evaluated in the OpenSEES structural analysis software. Such a smart moment resisting frame exhibits perfect residual roof displacement, 0.006", extremely smaller than 18.04" for the conventional moment resisting frame subjected to a 2500 year return period ground motion for the downtown LA area (an amplified factor of 1.15 on Kobe earthquake). The smart <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> rotary dampers are also applied into an eccentric braced steel frame, which combines a moment frame system and a bracing system. The results illustrate that <span class="hlt">adding</span> smart <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> rotaries in this braced system not only completely restores the building after an external excitation, but also significantly reduces peak interstory drifts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JHEP...02..020B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JHEP...02..020B"><span>Supersymmetry of <span class="hlt">AdS</span> and flat IIB backgrounds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Beck, S.; Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>We present a systematic description of all warped <span class="hlt">AdS</span> n × w M 10- n and IIB backgrounds and identify the a priori number of supersymmetries N preserved by these solutions. In particular, we find that the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> n backgrounds preserve for n ≤ 4 and for 4 < n ≤ 6 supersymmetries and for suitably restricted. In addition under some assumptions required for the applicability of the maximum principle, we demonstrate that the Killing spinors of <span class="hlt">AdS</span> n backgrounds can be identified with the zero modes of Dirac-like operators on M 10- n establishing a new class of Lichnerowicz type theorems. Furthermore, we adapt some of these results to backgrounds with fluxes by taking the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> radius to infinity. We find that these backgrounds preserve for 2 < n ≤ 4 and for 4 < n ≤ 7 supersymmetries. We also demonstrate that the Killing spinors of <span class="hlt">AdS</span> n × w M 10- n do not factorize into Killing spinors on <span class="hlt">AdS</span> n and Killing spinors on M 10- n .</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED416134.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED416134.pdf"><span>[Value-<span class="hlt">Added--Adding</span> Economic Value in the Food Industry].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Welch, Mary A., Ed.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>This booklet focuses on the economic concept of "value <span class="hlt">added</span>" to goods and services. A student activity worksheet illustrates how the steps involved in processing food are examples of the concept of value <span class="hlt">added</span>. The booklet further links food processing to the idea of value <span class="hlt">added</span> to the Gross National Product (GNP). Discussion questions,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27885413','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27885413"><span>Novel brewing yeast <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>: creation and application.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Krogerus, Kristoffer; Magalhães, Frederico; Vidgren, Virve; Gibson, Brian</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The natural interspecies Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces eubayanus <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> yeast is responsible for global lager beer production and is one of the most important industrial microorganisms. Its success in the lager brewing environment is due to a combination of traits not commonly found in pure yeast species, principally low-temperature tolerance, and maltotriose utilization. Parental transgression is typical of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> organisms and has been exploited previously for, e.g., the production of wine yeast with beneficial properties. The parental <span class="hlt">strain</span> S. eubayanus has only been discovered recently and newly created lager yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span> have not yet been applied industrially. A number of reports attest to the feasibility of this approach and artificially created <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> are likely to have a significant impact on the future of lager brewing. De novo S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> outperform their parent <span class="hlt">strains</span> in a number of respects, including, but not restricted to, fermentation rate, sugar utilization, stress tolerance, and aroma formation. <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> genome function and stability, as well as different techniques for generating <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> and their relative merits are discussed. <span class="hlt">Hybridization</span> not only offers the possibility of generating novel non-GM brewing yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span> with unique properties, but is expected to aid in unraveling the complex evolutionary history of industrial lager yeast.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4727218','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4727218"><span>Detection and identification of intestinal pathogenic bacteria by <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> to oligonucleotide microarrays</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jin, Lian-Qun; Li, Jun-Wen; Wang, Sheng-Qi; Chao, Fu-Huan; Wang, Xin-Wei; Yuan, Zheng-Quan</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>AIM: To detect the common intestinal pathogenic bacteria quickly and accurately. METHODS: A rapid (<3 h) experimental procedure was set up based upon the gene chip technology. Target genes were amplified and <span class="hlt">hybridized</span> by oligonucleotide microarrays. RESULTS: One hundred and seventy <span class="hlt">strains</span> of bacteria in pure culture belonging to 11 genera were successfully discriminated under comparatively same conditions, and a series of specific <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> maps corresponding to each kind of bacteria were obtained. When this method was applied to 26 divided cultures, 25 (96.2%) were identified. CONCLUSION: Salmonella sp., Escherichia coli, Shigella sp., Listeria monocytogenes, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus sp., Bacillus cereus, Vibrio cholerae, Enterococcus faecalis, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Campylobacter jejuni can be detected and identified by our microarrays. The accuracy, range, and discrimination power of this assay can be continually improved by <span class="hlt">adding</span> further oligonucleotides to the arrays without any significant increase of complexity or cost. PMID:16437687</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020078392','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020078392"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> Gage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>HITEC Corporation developed a <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage application for DanteII, a mobile robot developed for NASA. The gage measured bending forces on the robot's legs and warned human controllers when acceptable forces were exceeded. HITEC further developed the technology for <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage services in creating transducers out of "Indy" racing car suspension pushrods, NASCAR suspension components and components used in motion control.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20729200','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20729200"><span><span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 Solutions of IIB Supergravity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kim, Nakwoo</p> <p>2005-12-02</p> <p>We consider pure D3-brane configurations of IIB string theory which lead to supergravity solutions containing an <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 factor. They can provide new examples of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3/CFT2 examples on D3-branes whose worldvolume is partially compactified. When the internal 7 dimensional space is non-compact, they are related to fluctuations of higher dimensional <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT duality examples, thus dual to the BPS operators of D = 4 superconformal field theories. We find that supersymmetry requires the 7 dimensional space is warped Hopf-fibration of (real) 6 dimensional Kahler manifolds.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4856110','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4856110"><span>Recent advances in echocardiography: <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mirea, Oana; Duchenne, Jurgen; Voigt, Jens-Uwe</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Deformation imaging by echocardiography is a well-established research tool which has been gaining interest from clinical cardiologists since the introduction of speckle tracking. Post-processing of echo images to analyze deformation has become readily available at the fingertips of the user. New parameters such as global longitudinal <span class="hlt">strain</span> have been shown to provide <span class="hlt">added</span> diagnostic value, and ongoing efforts of the imaging societies and industry aimed at harmonizing methods will improve the technique further. This review focuses on recent advances in the field of echocardiographic <span class="hlt">strain</span> and <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate imaging, and provides an overview on its current and potential future clinical applications. PMID:27158476</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...09..161C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...09..161C"><span>Action growth for <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cai, Rong-Gen; Ruan, Shan-Ming; Wang, Shao-Jiang; Yang, Run-Qiu; Peng, Rong-Hui</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Recently a Complexity-Action (CA) duality conjecture has been proposed, which relates the quantum complexity of a holographic boundary state to the action of a Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) patch in the anti-de Sitter (<span class="hlt">AdS</span>) bulk. In this paper we further investigate the duality conjecture for stationary <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes and derive some exact results for the growth rate of action within the Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) patch at late time approximation, which is supposed to be dual to the growth rate of quantum complexity of holographic state. Based on the results from the general D-dimensional Reissner-Nordström (RN)-<span class="hlt">Ad</span>S black hole, rotating/charged Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole, Kerr-<span class="hlt">Ad</span>S black hole and charged Gauss-Bonnet-<span class="hlt">Ad</span>S black hole, we present a universal formula for the action growth expressed in terms of some thermodynamical quantities associated with the outer and inner horizons of the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes. And we leave the conjecture unchanged that the stationary <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black hole in Einstein gravity is the fastest computer in nature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=planning+AND+added&id=EJ863338','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=planning+AND+added&id=EJ863338"><span>Value <span class="hlt">Added</span> in English Schools</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ray, Andrew; McCormack, Tanya; Evans, Helen</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Value-<span class="hlt">added</span> indicators are now a central part of school accountability in England, and value-<span class="hlt">added</span> information is routinely used in school improvement at both the national and the local levels. This article describes the value-<span class="hlt">added</span> models that are being used in the academic year 2007-8 by schools, parents, school inspectors, and other…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JHEP...10..017C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JHEP...10..017C"><span>Constructing the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> dual of a Fermi liquid: <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes with Dirac hair</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Čubrović, Mihailo; Zaanen, Jan; Schalm, Koenraad</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>We provide evidence that the holographic dual to a strongly coupled charged Fermi liquid has a non-zero fermion density in the bulk. We show that the pole-strength of the stable quasiparticle characterizing the Fermi surface is encoded in the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> probability density of a single normalizable fermion wavefunction in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>. Recalling Migdal's theorem which relates the pole strength to the Fermi-Dirac characteristic discontinuity in the number density at ω F , we conclude that the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> dual of a Fermi liquid is described by occupied on-shell fermionic modes in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>. Encoding the occupied levels in the total spatially averaged probability density of the fermion field directly, we show that an <span class="hlt">AdS</span> Reissner-Nordström black holein a theory with charged fermions has a critical temperature, at which the system undergoes a first-order transition to a black hole with a non-vanishing profile for the bulk fermion field. Thermodynamics and spectral analysis support that the solution with non-zero <span class="hlt">AdS</span> fermion-profile is the preferred ground state at low temperatures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5832386','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5832386"><span>Detection of hemolytic Listeria monocytogenes by using DNA colony <span class="hlt">hybridization</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Datta, A.R.; Wentz, B.A.; Hill, W.E.</p> <p>1987-09-01</p> <p>A fragment of about 500 base pairs of the beta-hemolysin gene from Listeria monocytogenes was used to screen different bacterial <span class="hlt">strains</span> by DNA colony <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>. The cells in the colonies were lysed by microwaves in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Of 52 different <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Listeria species screened, only the DNA from beta-hemolytic (CAMP-positive) <span class="hlt">strains</span> of L. monocytogenes <span class="hlt">hybridized</span> with this probe.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3962301','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3962301"><span><span class="hlt">Hybridization</span> increases invasive knotweed success</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Parepa, Madalin; Fischer, Markus; Krebs, Christine; Bossdorf, Oliver</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Hybridization</span> is one of the fundamental mechanisms by which rapid evolution can occur in exotic species. If <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> show increased vigour, this could significantly contribute to invasion success. Here, we compared the success of the two invasive knotweeds, Fallopia japonica and F. sachalinensis, and their <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>, F. × bohemica, in competing against experimental communities of native plants. Using plant material from multiple clones of each taxon collected across a latitudinal gradient in Central Europe, we found that knotweed <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> performed significantly better in competition with a native community and that they more strongly reduced the growth of the native plants. One of the parental species, F. sachalinensis, regenerated significantly less well from rhizomes, and this difference disappeared if activated carbon was <span class="hlt">added</span> to the substrate, which suggests allelopathic inhibition of F. sachalinensis regeneration by native plants. We found substantial within-taxon variation in competitive success in all knotweed taxa, but variation was generally greatest in the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>. Interestingly, there was also significant variation within the genetically uniform F. japonica, possibly reflecting epigenetic differences. Our study shows that invasive knotweed <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> are indeed more competitive than their parents and that <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> increased the invasiveness of the exotic knotweed complex. PMID:24665343</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770017398','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770017398"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> receiver study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Stone, M. S.; Mcadam, P. L.; Saunders, O. W.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>The results are presented of a 4 month study to design a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> analog/digital receiver for outer planet mission probe communication links. The scope of this study includes functional design of the receiver; comparisons between analog and digital processing; hardware tradeoffs for key components including frequency generators, <span class="hlt">A/D</span> converters, and digital processors; development and simulation of the processing algorithms for acquisition, tracking, and demodulation; and detailed design of the receiver in order to determine its size, weight, power, reliability, and radiation hardness. In addition, an evaluation was made of the receiver's capabilities to perform accurate measurement of signal strength and frequency for radio science missions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JSV...375...19C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JSV...375...19C"><span>Robust <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> mass damper</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Collette, C.; Chesné, S.</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>In this paper, the design of a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> mass damper (HMD) is proposed for the reduction of the resonant vibration amplitude of a multiple degree-of-freedom structure. HMD includes both passive and active elements. Combining these elements the system is fail-safe and its performances are comparable to usual purely active systems. The control law is a revisited direct velocity feedback. Two zeros are <span class="hlt">added</span> to the controller to interact with the poles of the plant. The developed control law presents the particularity to be simple and hyperstable. The proposed HMD is compared to other classical control approaches for similar purpose in term of vibration attenuation, power consumption and stroke.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6791693','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6791693"><span>Stellarator <span class="hlt">hybrids</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Furth, H.P.; Ludescher, C.</p> <p>1984-08-01</p> <p>The present paper briefly reviews the subject of tokamak-stellarator and pinch-stellarator <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>, and points to two interesting new possibilities: compact-torus-stellarators and mirror-stellarators.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JMP....57k2303C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JMP....57k2303C"><span><span class="hlt">Ad</span>S-Carroll branes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Clark, T. E.; ter Veldhuis, T.</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Coset methods are used to determine the action of a co-dimension one brane (domain wall) embedded in (d + 1)-dimensional <span class="hlt">AdS</span> space in the Carroll limit in which the speed of light goes to zero. The action is invariant under the non-linearly realized symmetries of the <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S-Carroll spacetime. The Nambu-Goldstone field exhibits a static spatial distribution for the brane with a time varying momentum density related to the brane's spatial shape as well as the <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S-C geometry. The <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S-C vector field dual theory is obtained.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015RvAST...8...55P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015RvAST...8...55P"><span><span class="hlt">ADS</span> Based on Linear Accelerators</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pan, Weimin; Dai, Jianping</p> <p></p> <p>An accelerator-driven system (<span class="hlt">ADS</span>), which combines a particle accelerator with a subcritical core, is commonly regarded as a promising device for the transmutation of nuclear waste, as well as a potential scheme for thorium-based energy production. So far the predominant choice of the accelerator for <span class="hlt">ADS</span> is a superconducting linear accelerator (linac). This article gives a brief overview of <span class="hlt">ADS</span> based on linacs, including the motivation, principle, challenges and research activities around the world. The status and future plan of the Chinease <span class="hlt">ADS</span> (C-<span class="hlt">ADS</span>) project will be highlighted and discussed in depth as an example.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007CQGra..24.6267G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007CQGra..24.6267G"><span><span class="hlt">AdS</span> spacetimes from wrapped D3-branes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gauntlett, Jerome P.; MacConamhna, Oisín A. P.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>We derive a geometrical characterization of a large class of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 and <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2 supersymmetric spacetimes in type IIB supergravity with non-vanishing five-form flux using G-structures. These are obtained as special cases of a class of supersymmetric spacetimes with an {{\\bb R}}^{1,1} or {{\\bb R}} (time) factor that are associated with D3 branes wrapping calibrated two or three cycles, respectively, in manifolds with SU(2), SU(3), SU(4) and G2 holonomy. We show how two explicit <span class="hlt">AdS</span> solutions, previously constructed in gauged supergravity, satisfy our more general G-structure conditions. For each explicit solution, we also derive a special holonomy metric which, although singular, has an appropriate calibrated cycle. After analytic continuation, some of the classes of <span class="hlt">AdS</span> spacetimes give rise to known classes of BPS bubble solutions with {{\\bb R}}\\times {\\it SO}(4)\\times {\\it SO}(4), {{\\bb R}}\\times {\\it SO}(4)\\times U(1) and {{\\bb R}}\\times {\\it SO}(4) symmetry. These have 1/2, 1/4 and 1/8 supersymmetry, respectively. We present a new class of 1/8 BPS geometries with {{\\bb R}}\\times {\\it SU}(2) symmetry, obtained by analytic continuation of the class of <span class="hlt">AdS</span> spacetimes associated with D3-brane wrapped on associative three cycles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvD..95f6012H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvD..95f6012H"><span>Revisiting the thermodynamic relations in <span class="hlt">AdS</span> /CMT models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hyun, Seungjoon; Park, Sang-A.; Yi, Sang-Heon</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Motivated by the recent unified approach to the Smarr-like relation of anti-de Sitter (<span class="hlt">AdS</span>) planar black holes in conjunction with the quasilocal formalism on conserved charges, we revisit the quantum statistical and thermodynamic relations of hairy <span class="hlt">AdS</span> planar black holes. By extending the previous results, we identify the hairy contribution in the bulk and show that the holographic computation can be improved so that it is consistent with the bulk computation. We argue that the first law can be retained in its universal form and that the relation between the on-shell renormalized Euclidean action and its free energy interpretation in gravity may also be undeformed even with the hairy contribution in hairy <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...09..128S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...09..128S"><span>Entanglement entropy for free scalar fields in <span class="hlt">AdS</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sugishita, Sotaro</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>We compute entanglement entropy for free massive scalar fields in anti-de Sitter (<span class="hlt">AdS</span>) space. The entangling surface is a minimal surface whose boundary is a sphere at the boundary of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>. The entropy can be evaluated from the thermal free energy of the fields on a topological black hole by using the replica method. In odd-dimensional <span class="hlt">AdS</span>, exact expressions of the Rényi entropy S n are obtained for arbitrary n. We also evaluate 1-loop corrections coming from the scalar fields to holographic entanglement entropy. Applying the results, we compute the leading difference of entanglement entropy between two holographic CFTs related by a renormalization group flow triggered by a double trace deformation. The difference is proportional to the shift of a central charge under the flow.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhLB..706..106L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhLB..706..106L"><span>Solutions of free higher spins in <span class="hlt">AdS</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lü, H.; Shao, Kai-Nan</p> <p>2011-11-01</p> <p>We consider free massive and massless higher integer spins in <span class="hlt">AdS</span> backgrounds in general D dimensions. We obtain the solutions corresponding to the highest-weight state of the spin-ℓ representations of the SO (2 , D - 1) isometry groups. The solution for the spin-ℓ field is expressed recursively in terms of that for the spin- (ℓ - 1). Thus starting from the explicit spin-0, all the higher-spin solutions can be obtained. These solutions allow us to derive the generalized Breitenlohner-Freedman bound, and analyze the asymptotic falloffs. In particular, solutions with negative mass square in general have falloffs slower than those of the Schwarzschild <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes in the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> boundaries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MS%26E..115a2007T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MS%26E..115a2007T"><span>Studies on Effective Elastic Properties of CNT/Nano-Clay Reinforced Polymer <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Composite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Thakur, Arvind Kumar; Kumar, Puneet; Srinivas, J.</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>This paper presents a computational approach to predict elastic propertiesof <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> nanocomposite material prepared by <span class="hlt">adding</span> nano-clayplatelets to conventional CNT-reinforced epoxy system. In comparison to polymers alone/single-fiber reinforced polymers, if an additional fiber is <span class="hlt">added</span> to the composite structure, it was found a drastic improvement in resultant properties. In this regard, effective elastic moduli of a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> nano composite are determined by using finite element (FE) model with square representative volume element (RVE). Continuum mechanics based homogenization of the nano-filler reinforced composite is considered for evaluating the volumetric average of the stresses and the <span class="hlt">strains</span> under different periodic boundary conditions.A three phase Halpin-Tsai approach is selected to obtain the analytical result based on micromechanical modeling. The effect of the volume fractions of CNTs and nano-clay platelets on the mechanical behavior is studied. Two different RVEs of nano-clay platelets were used to investigate the influence of nano-filler geometry on composite properties. The combination of high aspect ratio of CNTs and larger surface area of clay platelets contribute to the stiffening effect of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> samples. Results of analysis are validated with Halpin-Tsai empirical formulae.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JHEP...02..013B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JHEP...02..013B"><span>Diffusion and chaos from near <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2 horizons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Blake, Mike; Donos, Aristomenis</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>We calculate the thermal diffusivity D = κ/c ρ and butterfly velocity v B in holographic models that flow to <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2 × R d fixed points in the infra-red. We show that both these quantities are governed by the same irrelevant deformation of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2 and hence establish a simple relationship between them. When this deformation corresponds to a universal dilaton mode of dimension Δ = 2 then this relationship is always given by D = v B 2 /(2 πT).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991Tectp.185..325B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991Tectp.185..325B"><span>Tests of <span class="hlt">strain</span> analysis by experimental deformation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Borradaile, G. J.; McArthur, J.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>The linearisation method and Robin's method of <span class="hlt">strain</span> analysis of granular materials yield accurate <span class="hlt">strain</span> estimates for a variety of materials deformed experimentally in pure shear. The breakdown of continuum behaviour at high pore fluid pressures causes the methods to overestimate the <span class="hlt">strain</span> because they do not take <span class="hlt">added</span> rigid-body rotation into account. Both methods tolerate some variation in initial shape ratio and some degree of initial preferred orientation at modest <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Results of tests on polymict sandstone indicate that the lower than average ductility of competent clasts may be balanced against an unfavourable degree of preferred orientation to yield an improved <span class="hlt">strain</span> estimate.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840053911&hterms=mystery&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dmystery','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840053911&hterms=mystery&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dmystery"><span>Mystery cloud of <span class="hlt">AD</span> 536</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Stothers, R. B.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>The possible cause of the densest and most persistent dry fog on record, which was observed in Europe and the Middle East during <span class="hlt">AD</span> 536 and 537, is discussed. The fog's long duration toward the south and the high sulfuric acid signal detected in Greenland in ice cores dated around <span class="hlt">AD</span> 540 support the theory that the fog was due to the explosion of the Rabaul volcano, the occurrence of which has been dated at about <span class="hlt">AD</span> 540 by the radiocarbon method.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3976317','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3976317"><span>On the Complexity of the Saccharomyces bayanus Taxon: <span class="hlt">Hybridization</span> and Potential <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Speciation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pérez-Través, Laura; Lopes, Christian A.; Querol, Amparo; Barrio, Eladio</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Although the genus Saccharomyces has been thoroughly studied, some species in the genus has not yet been accurately resolved; an example is S. bayanus, a taxon that includes genetically diverse lineages of pure and <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> <span class="hlt">strains</span>. This diversity makes the assignation and classification of <span class="hlt">strains</span> belonging to this species unclear and controversial. They have been subdivided by some authors into two varieties (bayanus and uvarum), which have been raised to the species level by others. In this work, we evaluate the complexity of 46 different <span class="hlt">strains</span> included in the S. bayanus taxon by means of PCR-RFLP analysis and by sequencing of 34 gene regions and one mitochondrial gene. Using the sequence data, and based on the S. bayanus var. bayanus reference <span class="hlt">strain</span> NBRC 1948, a hypothetical pure S. bayanus was reconstructed for these genes that showed alleles with similarity values lower than 97% with the S. bayanus var. uvarum <span class="hlt">strain</span> CBS 7001, and of 99–100% with the non S. cerevisiae portion in S. pastorianus Weihenstephan 34/70 and with the new species S. eubayanus. Among the S. bayanus <span class="hlt">strains</span> under study, different levels of homozygosity, <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> and introgression were found; however, no pure S. bayanus var. bayanus <span class="hlt">strain</span> was identified. These S. bayanus <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> can be classified into two types: homozygous (type I) and heterozygous <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> (type II), indicating that they have been originated by different <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> processes. Therefore, a putative evolutionary scenario involving two different <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> events between a S. bayanus var. uvarum and unknown European S. eubayanus-like <span class="hlt">strains</span> can be postulated to explain the genomic diversity observed in our S. bayanus var. bayanus <span class="hlt">strains</span>. PMID:24705561</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24705561','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24705561"><span>On the complexity of the Saccharomyces bayanus taxon: <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> and potential <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> speciation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pérez-Través, Laura; Lopes, Christian A; Querol, Amparo; Barrio, Eladio</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Although the genus Saccharomyces has been thoroughly studied, some species in the genus has not yet been accurately resolved; an example is S. bayanus, a taxon that includes genetically diverse lineages of pure and <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> <span class="hlt">strains</span>. This diversity makes the assignation and classification of <span class="hlt">strains</span> belonging to this species unclear and controversial. They have been subdivided by some authors into two varieties (bayanus and uvarum), which have been raised to the species level by others. In this work, we evaluate the complexity of 46 different <span class="hlt">strains</span> included in the S. bayanus taxon by means of PCR-RFLP analysis and by sequencing of 34 gene regions and one mitochondrial gene. Using the sequence data, and based on the S. bayanus var. bayanus reference <span class="hlt">strain</span> NBRC 1948, a hypothetical pure S. bayanus was reconstructed for these genes that showed alleles with similarity values lower than 97% with the S. bayanus var. uvarum <span class="hlt">strain</span> CBS 7001, and of 99-100% with the non S. cerevisiae portion in S. pastorianus Weihenstephan 34/70 and with the new species S. eubayanus. Among the S. bayanus <span class="hlt">strains</span> under study, different levels of homozygosity, <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> and introgression were found; however, no pure S. bayanus var. bayanus <span class="hlt">strain</span> was identified. These S. bayanus <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> can be classified into two types: homozygous (type I) and heterozygous <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> (type II), indicating that they have been originated by different <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> processes. Therefore, a putative evolutionary scenario involving two different <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> events between a S. bayanus var. uvarum and unknown European S. eubayanus-like <span class="hlt">strains</span> can be postulated to explain the genomic diversity observed in our S. bayanus var. bayanus <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JMP....58a2301H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JMP....58a2301H"><span>Coset construction of <span class="hlt">AdS</span> particle dynamics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Heinze, Martin; Jorjadze, George; Megrelidze, Luka</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>We analyze the dynamics of the <span class="hlt">Ad</span>SN+1 particle realized on the coset SO(2, N)/SO (1,N). Hamiltonian reduction provides the physical phase space in terms of the coadjoint orbit obtained by boosting a timelike element of 𝔰𝔬(2, N). We show equivalence of this approach to geometric quantization and to the SO(N) covariant oscillator description, for which the boost generators entail a complicated operator ordering. As an alternative scheme, we introduce dual oscillator variables and derive their algebra at the classical and the quantum levels. This simplifies the calculations of the commutators for the boost generators and leads to unitary irreducible representations of 𝔰𝔬(2, N) for all admissible values of the mass parameter. We furthermore discuss an SO(N) covariant supersymmetric extension of the oscillator quantization, with its realization for superparticles in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2 and <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 given by recent works.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93l6002L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93l6002L"><span>Entanglement temperature and perturbed <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 geometry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Levine, G. C.; Caravan, B.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>Generalizing the first law of thermodynamics, the increase in entropy density δ S (x ) of a conformal field theory (CFT) is proportional to the increase in energy density, δ E (x ) , of a subsystem divided by a spatially dependent entanglement temperature, TE(x ) , a fixed parameter determined by the geometry of the subsystem, crossing over to thermodynamic temperature at high temperatures. In this paper we derive a generalization of the thermodynamic Clausius relation, showing that deformations of the CFT by marginal operators are associated with spatial temperature variations, δ TE(x ) , and spatial energy correlations play the role of specific heat. Using <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT duality we develop a relationship between a perturbation in the local entanglement temperature of the CFT and the perturbation of the bulk <span class="hlt">AdS</span> metric. In two dimensions, we demonstrate a method through which direct diagonalizations of the boundary quantum theory may be used to construct geometric perturbations of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 .</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...06..126B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...06..126B"><span><span class="hlt">AdS</span>5 backgrounds with 24 supersymmetries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Beck, S.; Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>We prove a non-existence theorem for smooth <span class="hlt">AdS</span> 5 solutions with connected, compact without boundary internal space that preserve strictly 24 supersymmetries. In particular, we show that D = 11 supergravity does not admit such solutions, and that all such solutions of IIB supergravity are locally isometric to the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> 5 × S 5 maximally supersymmetric background. Furthermore, we prove that (massive) IIA supergravity also does not admit such solutions, provided that the homogeneity conjecture for massive IIA supergravity is valid. In the context of <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT these results imply that if gravitational duals for strictly mathcal{N}=3 superconformal theories in 4-dimensions exist, they are either singular or their internal spaces are not compact.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JNR....15.1938P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JNR....15.1938P"><span>The opposing nanoscale and macroscale effects of selected nanoparticle addition to AZ91/ZK60A <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> magnesium alloy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Paramsothy, Muralidharan; Gupta, Manoj</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>B4C and AlN nanoparticles were separately <span class="hlt">added</span> to solidification processed AZ91/ZK60A <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> magnesium alloy to improve tensile and compressive properties. In tension, both nanoparticles strengthened the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> alloy. However, only B4C nanoparticle addition significantly improved the ductility of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> alloy, while AlN nanoparticle addition slightly decreased the ductility of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> alloy. Comparing both nanocomposites as well as monolithic alloy, there was no significant difference in the grain size or crystallographic texture. However, it was possible that the AlN nanoparticle was more chemically reactive with the alloy matrix compared to the B4C nanoparticle. Also, it was observed that unlike AlN nanoparticle addition, B4C nanoparticle addition enabled the formation of numerous nanoscale stacking faults in the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> alloy matrix. Further, it was apparent that the B4C nanoparticle promoted the nanoscale precipitation of Al12Mg17 intermetallic particles (with particle coarsening thereafter), whereas the AlN nanoparticle did not alter the intermetallic precipitation characteristics in the alloy matrix. Consequently, nano/micro-particle induced high <span class="hlt">strain</span> zone (HSZ) formation during tensile deformation was more pronounced in the AZ91/ZK60A/B4C nanocomposite compared to the AZ91/ZK60A/AlN nanocomposite, rendering the B4C nanoparticle significantly greater capability (compared to the AlN nanoparticle) in enhancing the tensile ductility of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> alloy. The promotion of nanoscale precipitation of Al12Mg17 intermetallic particles (with particle coarsening thereafter) by the B4C nanoparticle also enabled the AZ91/ZK60A/B4C nanocomposite to have significantly higher compressive strength (per <span class="hlt">strain</span> level during deformation) compared to the AZ91/ZK60A/AlN nanocomposite.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2951977','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2951977"><span>Prion <span class="hlt">strain</span> interactions are highly selective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nilsson, K. Peter R.; Joshi-Barr, Shivanjali; Winson, Olivia; Sigurdson, Christina J.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Various misfolded and aggregated neuronal proteins commonly co-exist in neurodegenerative disease, but whether the proteins co-aggregate and alter the disease pathogenesis is unclear. Here we used mixtures of distinct prion <span class="hlt">strains</span>, which are believed to differ in conformation, to test the hypothesis that two different aggregates interact and change the disease in vivo. We tracked two prion <span class="hlt">strains</span> in mice histopathologically and biochemically, as well as by spectral analysis of plaque-bound polythiophene acetic acid (PTAA), a conformation-sensitive fluorescent amyloid ligand. We found that prion <span class="hlt">strains</span> interacted in a highly selective and <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific manner, with either (i) no interaction, (ii) <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> plaque formation, or (iii) blockage of one <span class="hlt">strain</span> by a second (interference). The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> plaques were maintained upon further passage in vivo and each <span class="hlt">strain</span> seemed to maintain its original conformational properties, suggesting that one <span class="hlt">strain</span> served only as a scaffold for aggregation of the second <span class="hlt">strain</span>. These findings not only further our understanding of prion <span class="hlt">strain</span> interactions, but also directly demonstrate interactions that may occur in other protein aggregate mixtures. PMID:20826672</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120013230','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120013230"><span>Shape Memory Composite <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Hinge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Fang, Houfei; Im, Eastwood; Lin, John; Scarborough, Stephen</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>There are two conventional types of hinges for in-space deployment applications. The first type is mechanically deploying hinges. A typical mechanically deploying hinge is usually composed of several tens of components. It is complicated, heavy, and bulky. More components imply higher deployment failure probability. Due to the existence of relatively moving components among a mechanically deploying hinge, it unavoidably has microdynamic problems. The second type of conventional hinge relies on <span class="hlt">strain</span> energy for deployment. A tape-spring hinge is a typical <span class="hlt">strain</span> energy hinge. A fundamental problem of a <span class="hlt">strain</span> energy hinge is that its deployment dynamic is uncontrollable. Usually, its deployment is associated with a large impact, which is unacceptable for many space applications. Some damping technologies have been experimented with to reduce the impact, but they increased the risks of an unsuccessful deployment. Coalescing <span class="hlt">strain</span> energy components with shape memory composite (SMC) components to form a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> hinge is the solution. SMCs are well suited for deployable structures. A SMC is created from a high-performance fiber and a shape memory polymer resin. When the resin is heated to above its glass transition temperature, the composite becomes flexible and can be folded or packed. Once cooled to below the glass transition temperature, the composite remains in the packed state. When the structure is ready to be deployed, the SMC component is reheated to above the glass transition temperature, and it returns to its as-fabricated shape. A <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> hinge is composed of two <span class="hlt">strain</span> energy flanges (also called tape-springs) and one SMC tube. Two folding lines are placed on the SMC tube to avoid excessive <span class="hlt">strain</span> on the SMC during folding. Two adapters are used to connect the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> hinge to its adjacent structural components. While the SMC tube is heated to above its glass transition temperature, a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> hinge can be folded and stays at folded status after the temperature</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21537607','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21537607"><span>Lorentzian <span class="hlt">AdS</span> geometries, wormholes, and holography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Arias, Raul E.; Silva, Guillermo A.; Botta Cantcheff, Marcelo</p> <p>2011-03-15</p> <p>We investigate the structure of two-point functions for the quantum field theory dual to an asymptotically Lorentzian Anti de Sitter (<span class="hlt">AdS</span>) wormhole. The bulk geometry is a solution of five-dimensional second-order Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity and causally connects two asymptotically <span class="hlt">AdS</span> spacetimes. We revisit the Gubser-Klebanov-Polyakov-Witten prescription for computing two-point correlation functions for dual quantum field theories operators O in Lorentzian signature and we propose to express the bulk fields in terms of the independent boundary values {phi}{sub 0}{sup {+-}} at each of the two asymptotic <span class="hlt">AdS</span> regions; along the way we exhibit how the ambiguity of normalizable modes in the bulk, related to initial and final states, show up in the computations. The independent boundary values are interpreted as sources for dual operators O{sup {+-}} and we argue that, apart from the possibility of entanglement, there exists a coupling between the degrees of freedom living at each boundary. The <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S{sub 1+1} geometry is also discussed in view of its similar boundary structure. Based on the analysis, we propose a very simple geometric criterion to distinguish coupling from entanglement effects among two sets of degrees of freedom associated with each of the disconnected parts of the boundary.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/315777','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/315777"><span>A Y chromosome associated factor in <span class="hlt">strain</span> BXSB producing accelerated autoimmunity and lymphoproliferation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Murphy, E D; Roths, J B</p> <p>1979-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Strain</span> BXSB/Mp mice develop a spontaneous lupus-like syndrome which is strikingly accelerated in males. The accelerated autoimmune disease occurs in male F1 <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> with <span class="hlt">strains</span> NZB/BINJ, SJL/J, and C57BL/6J when the male parent is BXSB but not in the reciprocal <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> male nor in females. The pattern is similar in F2 <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> with <span class="hlt">strains</span> NZB and SJL. The accelerated disease in males occurs only when the Y chromosome is derived from recombinant inbred <span class="hlt">strain</span> BXSB and ultimately from <span class="hlt">strain</span> SB/Le.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/972164','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/972164"><span>Analysis of <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Hydrogen Systems: Final Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dean, J.; Braun, R.; Munoz, D.; Penev, M.; Kinchin, C.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Report on biomass pathways for hydrogen production and how they can be <span class="hlt">hybridized</span> to support renewable electricity generation. Two <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> systems were studied in detail for process feasibility and economic performance. The best-performing system was estimated to produce hydrogen at costs ($1.67/kg) within Department of Energy targets ($2.10/kg) for central biomass-derived hydrogen production while also providing value-<span class="hlt">added</span> energy services to the electric grid.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004CQGra..21.5021G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004CQGra..21.5021G"><span>A deformation of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5 × S5</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gauntlett, Jerome P.; Gutowski, Jan B.; Suryanarayana, Nemani V.</p> <p>2004-11-01</p> <p>We analyse a one-parameter family of supersymmetric solutions of type IIB supergravity that includes <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5 × S5. For small values of the parameter the solutions are causally well behaved, but beyond a critical value closed timelike curves (CTCs) appear. The solutions are holographically dual to {\\cal N}=4 supersymmetric Yang Mills theory on a non-conformally flat background with non-vanishing R-currents. We compute the holographic energy momentum tensor for the spacetime and show that it remains finite even when the CTCs appear. The solutions, as well as the uplift of some recently discovered <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5 black-hole solutions, are shown to preserve precisely two supersymmetries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EPJC...75..484K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EPJC...75..484K"><span>Supersymmetric <span class="hlt">AdS</span>_6 solutions of type IIB supergravity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kim, Hyojoong; Kim, Nakwoo; Suh, Minwoo</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>We study the general requirement for supersymmetric <span class="hlt">AdS</span>_6 solutions in type IIB supergravity. We employ the Killing spinor technique and study the differential and algebraic relations among various Killing spinor bilinears to find the canonical form of the solutions. Our result agrees precisely with the work of Apruzzi et al. (JHEP 1411:099, 2014), which used the pure spinor technique. Hoping to identify the geometry of the problem, we also computed four-dimensional theory through the dimensional reduction of type IIB supergravity on <span class="hlt">AdS</span>_6. This effective action is essentially a non-linear sigma model with five scalar fields parametrizing {SL}(3,{R})/{SO}(2,1), modified by a scalar potential and coupled to Einstein gravity in Euclidean signature. We argue that the scalar potential can be explained by a subgroup CSO(1,1,1) subset {SL}(3,{R}) in a way analogous to gauged supergravity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..94l6002D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..94l6002D"><span>Universal isolation in the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> landscape</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Danielsson, U. H.; Dibitetto, G.; Vargas, S. C.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>We study the universal conditions for quantum nonperturbative stability against bubble nucleation for pertubatively stable <span class="hlt">AdS</span> vacua based on positive energy theorems. We also compare our analysis with the preexisting ones in the literature carried out within the thin-wall approximation. The aforementioned criterion is then tested in two explicit examples describing massive type IIA string theory compactified on S3 and S3×S3, respectively. The <span class="hlt">AdS</span> landscape of both classes of compactifications is known to consist of a set of isolated points. The main result is that all critical points respecting the Breitenlohner-Freedman (BF) bound also turn out be stable at a nonperturbative level. Finally, we speculate on the possible universal features that may be extracted from the above specific examples.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017IJMPA..3250039B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017IJMPA..3250039B"><span>Tachyon inflation in an <span class="hlt">AdS</span> braneworld with backreaction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bilić, Neven; Dimitrijevic, Dragoljub D.; Djordjevic, Goran S.; Milosevic, Milan</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>We analyze the inflationary scenario based on the tachyon field coupled with the radion of the second Randall-Sundrum model (RSII). The tachyon Lagrangian is derived from the dynamics of a 3-brane moving in the five-dimensional bulk. The <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5 geometry of the bulk is extended to include the radion. Using the Hamiltonian formalism we find four nonlinear field equations supplemented by the modified Friedmann equations of the RSII braneworld cosmology. After a suitable rescaling we reduce the parameters of our model to only one free parameter related to the brane tension and the <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5 curvature. We solve the equations numerically assuming a reasonably wide range of initial conditions determined by physical considerations. Varying the free parameter and initial conditions we confront our results with the Planck 2015 data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhLB..762..415U','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhLB..762..415U"><span>Ambitwistors, oscillators and massless fields on <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Uvarov, D. V.</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Positive energy unitary irreducible representations of SU (2 , 2) can be constructed with the aid of bosonic oscillators in (anti)fundamental representation of SU(2)L × SU(2)R that are closely related to Penrose twistors. Starting with the correspondence between the doubleton representations, homogeneous functions on projective twistor space and on-shell generalized Weyl curvature SL (2 , C) spinors and their low-spin counterparts, we study in the similar way the correspondence between the massless representations, homogeneous functions on ambitwistor space and, via the Penrose transform, with the gauge fields on Minkowski boundary of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5. The possibilities of reconstructing massless fields on <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5 and some applications are also discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...11..092C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...11..092C"><span>Generalised structures for N=1 <span class="hlt">AdS</span> backgrounds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Coimbra, André; Strickland-Constable, Charles</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>We expand upon a claim made in a recent paper [arXiv:1411.5721] that generic minimally supersymmetric <span class="hlt">AdS</span> backgrounds of warped flux compactifications of Type II and M theory can be understood as satisfying a straightforward weak integrability condition in the language of {E}_{d(d)}× {R}+ generalised geometry. Namely, they are spaces admitting a generalised G-structure set by the Killing spinor and with constant singlet generalised intrinsic torsion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=129087&keyword=Pseudomonas+AND+alcaligenes&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=79985829&CFTOKEN=27291672','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=129087&keyword=Pseudomonas+AND+alcaligenes&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=79985829&CFTOKEN=27291672"><span>SEQUENCE SIMILARITIES IN THE GENES ENCODING POLY- CHLORINATED BIPHENYL DEGRADATION BY PSEUDOMONAS <span class="hlt">STRAIN</span> LB400 AND ALCALIGENES EUTROPHUS H850</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>DNA-DNA <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> was used to compare the Pseudomonas <span class="hlt">strain</span> LB400 genes for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degradation with those from seven other PCB-degrading <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Significant <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> was detected to the genome of Alcaligenes eutrophus H850, a <span class="hlt">strain</span> similar to L...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1326955-information-loss-ads3-cft2','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1326955-information-loss-ads3-cft2"><span>On information loss in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3/CFT2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Li, Daliang; ...</p> <p>2016-05-18</p> <p>We discuss information loss from black hole physics in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3, focusing on two sharp signatures infecting CFT2 correlators at large central charge c: ‘forbidden singularities’ arising from Euclidean-time periodicity due to the effective Hawking temperature, and late-time exponential decay in the Lorentzian region. We study an infinite class of examples where forbidden singularities can be resolved by non-perturbative effects at finite c, and we show that the resolution has certain universal features that also apply in the general case. Analytically continuing to the Lorentzian regime, we find that the non-perturbative effects that resolve forbidden singularities qualitatively change the behavior ofmore » correlators at times t ~SBH, the black hole entropy. This may resolve the exponential decay of correlators at late times in black hole backgrounds. By Borel resumming the 1/c expansion of exact examples, we explicitly identify ‘information-restoring’ effects from heavy states that should correspond to classical solutions in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3. Lastly, our results suggest a line of inquiry towards a more precise formulation of the gravitational path integral in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3.« less</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PThPS.187...96K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PThPS.187...96K"><span>Shock Wave Collisions and Thermalization in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>_5</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kovchegov, Y. V.</p> <p></p> <p>We study heavy ion collisions at strong 't Hooft coupling using<span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT correspondence. According to the <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT dictionary heavy ion collisions correspond to gravitational shock wave collisions in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>_5. We construct the metric in the forward light cone after the collision perturbatively through expansion of Einstein equations in graviton exchanges. We obtain an analytic expression for the metric including all-order graviton exchanges with one shock wave, while keeping the exchanges with another shock wave at the lowest order. We read off the corresponding energy-momentum tensor of the produced medium. Unfortunately this energy-momentum tensor does not correspond to ideal hydrodynamics, indicating that higher order graviton exchanges are needed to construct the full solution of the problem. We also show that shock waves must completely stop almost immediately after the collision in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>_5, which, on the field theory side, corresponds to complete nuclear stopping due to strong coupling effects, likely leading to Landau hydrodynamics. Finally, we perform trapped surface analysis of the shock wave collisions demonstrating that a bulk black hole, corresponding to ideal hydrodynamics on the boundary, has to be created in such collisions, thus constructing a proof of thermalization in heavy ion collisions at strong coupling.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=316260','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=316260"><span>Effect of paternal blue catfish <span class="hlt">strain</span> effects on hatchery fry production and performance of channel catfish X blue catfish F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> fry production and fingerling performance under commercial conditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Four hundred four-year old mature Gold Kist <span class="hlt">strain</span> channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus were induced to spawn with 10 mg common carp pituitary extract (CPE) /kg BW in 8 spawning trials. The stripped eggs were fertilized with sperm of either D&B or Rio Grande blue catfish, I.furcatus to produce D&B ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhFl...19e8103D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhFl...19e8103D"><span>The generalized <span class="hlt">added</span> mass revised</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>De Wilde, Juray</p> <p>2007-05-01</p> <p>The reformulation of the generalized or apparent <span class="hlt">added</span> mass presented by De Wilde [Phys. Fluids 17, 113304 (2005)] neglects the presence of a drag-type force in the gas and solid phase momentum equations. Reformulating the generalized <span class="hlt">added</span> mass accounting for the presence of a drag-type force, an apparent drag force appears next to the apparent distribution of the filtered gas phase pressure gradient over the phases already found by De Wilde in the above-cited reference. The reformulation of the generalized <span class="hlt">added</span> mass and the evaluation of a linear wave propagation speed test then suggest a generalized <span class="hlt">added</span> mass type closure approach to completely describe filtered gas-solid momentum transfer, that is, including both the filtered drag force and the correlation between the solid volume fraction and the gas phase pressure gradient.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800036784&hterms=composite+hybrid&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dcomposite%2Bhybrid','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800036784&hterms=composite+hybrid&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dcomposite%2Bhybrid"><span>Mechanical property characterization of intraply <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> composites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sinclair, J. H.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>An investigation of the mechanical properties of intraply <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> made from graphite fiber/epoxy matrix <span class="hlt">hybridized</span> with secondary S-glass or Kevlar 49 fiber composites is presented. The specimen stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> behavior was determined, showing that mechanical properties of intraply <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> composites can be measured with available methods such as the ten-degree off-axis test for intralaminar shear, and conventional tests for tensile, flexure, and Izod impact properties. The results also showed that combinations of high modulus graphite/S-glass/epoxy matrix composites exist which yield intraply <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> laminates with the best 'balanced' properties, and that the translation efficiency of mechanical properties from the constituent composites to intraply <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> may be assessed with a simple equation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23916596','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23916596"><span>Taxonomic study of a salt tolerant Streptomyces sp. <span class="hlt">strain</span> C-2012 and the effect of salt and ectoine on lon expression level.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sadeghi, Akram; Soltani, Bahram M; Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Karimi, Ebrahim; Nekouei, Mojtaba Khayam; Sadeghizadeh, Majid</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Streptomyces <span class="hlt">strain</span> C-2012 is a salt tolerant biocontrol PGPR that has been isolated from Iranian soil. The main aim of current study was finding <span class="hlt">strain</span> C-2012 taxonomic position and to find the genes which are potentially involved in salt tolerance phenotype. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> C-2012 chemotaxonomic, morphological and molecular characteristics indicate that this <span class="hlt">strain</span> is a member of the genus Streptomyces. Phylogenetic analyses based on an almost complete 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that this <span class="hlt">strain</span> is closely related to Streptomyces rimosus JCM 4667(T). Also, DNA-DNA <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> test estimated 74% relatedness between two <span class="hlt">strains</span> and confirmed that C-2012 is a <span class="hlt">strain</span> of S. rimosus. In order to find novel genes that are differentially expressed in response to the salt treatment, cDNA-AFLP was carried out. One of the selected expressed sequence tags (TDF-1) was found to be homologous to lon gene which produces a bacterial ATP-dependent proteases (proteases LA). Lon gene expression was induced following 450 mM salt (NaCl) treatment and its expression level was further (5.2-fold) increased in response to salt when ectoine was <span class="hlt">added</span> to the medium. These results suggest that two protein protection systems including ectoine and ATP-dependent proteases synergistically are related. NaCl stress also caused an enhancement in the activity of extracellular protease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=EM-0001-01&hterms=EMS&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DEMS','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=EM-0001-01&hterms=EMS&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DEMS"><span><span class="hlt">AD</span>-1 aircraft in flight</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>The Ames-Dryden (<span class="hlt">AD</span>)-1 was a research aircraft designed to investigate the concept of an oblique (or pivoting) wing. The movie clip runs about 17 seconds and has two air-to-air views of the <span class="hlt">AD</span>-1. The first shot is from slightly above as the wing pivots to 60 degrees. The other angle is almost directly below the aircraft when the wing is fully pivoted.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1609108','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1609108"><span>Expression profiles for macrophage alternative activation genes in <span class="hlt">AD</span> and in mouse models of <span class="hlt">AD</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Colton, Carol A; Mott, Ryan T; Sharpe, Hayley; Xu, Qing; Van Nostrand, William E; Vitek, Michael P</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p> while NOS2 and IL-1β mRNAs were unchanged. Conclusion Immune cells within the brain display gene profiles that suggest heterogeneous, functional phenotypes that range from a pro-inflammatory, classical activation state to an alternative activation state involved in repair and extracellular matrix remodeling. Our data suggest that innate immune cells in <span class="hlt">AD</span> may exhibit a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> activation state that includes characteristics of classical and alternative activation. PMID:17005052</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20870985','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20870985"><span>Euclidean and Noetherian entropies in <span class="hlt">AdS</span> space</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dutta, Suvankar; Gopakumar, Rajesh</p> <p>2006-08-15</p> <p>We examine the Euclidean action approach, as well as that of Wald, to the entropy of black holes in asymptotically <span class="hlt">AdS</span> spaces. From the point of view of holography these two approaches are somewhat complementary in spirit and it is not obvious why they should give the same answer in the presence of arbitrary higher derivative gravity corrections. For the case of the <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S{sub 5} Schwarzschild black hole, we explicitly study the leading correction to the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy in the presence of a variety of higher derivative corrections studied in the literature, including the Type IIB R{sup 4} term. We find a nontrivial agreement between the two approaches in every case. Finally, we give a general way of understanding the equivalence of these two approaches.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AAS...22124030A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AAS...22124030A"><span>New Features in <span class="hlt">ADS</span> Labs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Murray, S. S.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The NASA Astrophysics Data System (<span class="hlt">ADS</span>) has been working hard on updating its services and interfaces to better support our community's research needs. <span class="hlt">ADS</span> Labs is a new interface built on the old tried-and-true <span class="hlt">ADS</span> Abstract Databases, so all of <span class="hlt">ADS</span>'s content is available through it. In this presentation we highlight the new features that have been developed in <span class="hlt">ADS</span> Labs over the last year: new recommendations, metrics, a citation tool and enhanced fulltext search. <span class="hlt">ADS</span> Labs has long been providing article-level recommendations based on keyword similarity, co-readership and co-citation analysis of its corpus. We have now introduced personal recommendations, which provide a list of articles to be considered based on a individual user's readership history. A new metrics interface provides a summary of the basic impact indicators for a list of records. These include the total and normalized number of papers, citations, reads, and downloads. Also included are some of the popular indices such as the h, g and i10 index. The citation helper tool allows one to submit a set of records and obtain a list of top 10 papers which cite and/or are cited by papers in the original list (but which are not in it). The process closely resembles the network approach of establishing "friends of friends" via an analysis of the citation network. The full-text search service now covers more than 2.5 million documents, including all the major astronomy journals, as well as physics journals published by Springer, Elsevier, the American Physical Society, the American Geophysical Union, and all of the arXiv eprints. The full-text search interface interface allows users and librarians to dig deep and find words or phrases in the body of the indexed articles. <span class="hlt">ADS</span> Labs is available at http://adslabs.org</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017NuPhA.960....1Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017NuPhA.960....1Z"><span>Heavy quark potential from deformed <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5 models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Zi-qiang; Hou, De-fu; Chen, Gang</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>In this paper, we investigate the heavy quark potential in some holographic QCD models. The calculation relies on a modified renormalization scheme mentioned in a previous work of Albacete et al. After studying the heavy quark potential in Pirner-Galow model and Andreev-Zakharov model, we extend the discussion to a general deformed <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5 case. It is shown that the obtained potential is negative definite for all quark-antiquark separations, differs from that using the usual renormalization scheme.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhLB..705..260T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhLB..705..260T"><span>The <span class="hlt">AdS</span> central charge in string theory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Troost, Jan</p> <p>2011-11-01</p> <p>We evaluate the vacuum expectation value of the central charge operator in string theory in an <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 vacuum. Our calculation provides a rare non-zero one-point function on a spherical worldsheet. The evaluation involves the regularization both of a worldsheet ultraviolet divergence (associated to the infinite volume of the conformal Killing group), and a space-time infrared divergence (corresponding to the infinite volume of space-time). The two divergences conspire to give a finite result, which is the classical general relativity value for the central charge, corrected in bosonic string theory by an infinite series of tree level higher derivative terms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93l4029B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93l4029B"><span>Internal structure of charged <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bhattacharjee, Srijit; Sarkar, Sudipta; Virmani, Amitabh</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>When an electrically charged black hole is perturbed, its inner horizon becomes a singularity, often referred to as the Poisson-Israel mass inflation singularity. Ori constructed a model of this phenomenon for asymptotically flat black holes, in which the metric can be determined explicitly in the mass inflation region. In this paper we implement the Ori model for charged <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes. We find that the mass function inflates faster than the flat space case as the inner horizon is approached. Nevertheless, the mass inflation singularity is still a weak singularity: Although spacetime curvature becomes infinite, tidal distortions remain finite on physical objects attempting to cross it.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AAS...22325503A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AAS...22325503A"><span>Introducing <span class="hlt">ADS</span> 2.0</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Luker, J.; Chyla, R.; Murray, S. S.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>In the spring of 1993, the Smithsonian/NASA Astrophysics Data System (<span class="hlt">ADS</span>) first launched its bibliographic search system. It was known then as the <span class="hlt">ADS</span> Abstract Service, a component of the larger Astrophysics Data System effort which had developed an interoperable data system now seen as a precursor of the Virtual Observatory. As a result of the massive technological and sociological changes in the field of scholarly communication, the <span class="hlt">ADS</span> is now completing the most ambitious technological upgrade in its twenty-year history. Code-named <span class="hlt">ADS</span> 2.0, the new system features: an IT platform built on web and digital library standards; a new, extensible, industrial strength search engine; a public API with various access control capabilities; a set of applications supporting search, export, visualization, analysis; a collaborative, open source development model; and enhanced indexing of content which includes the full-text of astronomy and physics publications. The changes in the <span class="hlt">ADS</span> platform affect all aspects of the system and its operations, including: the process through which data and metadata are harvested, curated and indexed; the interface and paradigm used for searching the database; and the follow-up analysis capabilities available to the users. This poster describes the choices behind the technical overhaul of the system, the technology stack used, and the opportunities which the upgrade is providing us with, namely gains in productivity and enhancements in our system capabilities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3142293','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3142293"><span>Engineering microbial factories for synthesis of value-<span class="hlt">added</span> products</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Du, Jing; Shao, Zengyi; Zhao, Huimin</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Microorganisms have become an increasingly important platform for the production of drugs, chemicals, and biofuels from renewable resources. Advances in protein engineering, metabolic engineering, and synthetic biology enable redesigning microbial cellular networks and fine-tuning physiological capabilities, thus generating industrially viable <span class="hlt">strains</span> for the production of natural and unnatural value-<span class="hlt">added</span> compounds. In this review, we describe the recent progress on engineering microbial factories for synthesis of valued-<span class="hlt">added</span> products including alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, biofuels, and chemicals. Related topics on lignocellulose degradation, sugar utilization, and microbial tolerance improvement will also be discussed. PMID:21526386</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21526386','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21526386"><span>Engineering microbial factories for synthesis of value-<span class="hlt">added</span> products.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Du, Jing; Shao, Zengyi; Zhao, Huimin</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>Microorganisms have become an increasingly important platform for the production of drugs, chemicals, and biofuels from renewable resources. Advances in protein engineering, metabolic engineering, and synthetic biology enable redesigning microbial cellular networks and fine-tuning physiological capabilities, thus generating industrially viable <span class="hlt">strains</span> for the production of natural and unnatural value-<span class="hlt">added</span> compounds. In this review, we describe the recent progress on engineering microbial factories for synthesis of valued-<span class="hlt">added</span> products including alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, biofuels, and chemicals. Related topics on lignocellulose degradation, sugar utilization, and microbial tolerance improvement will also be discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AcMSn..29..543X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AcMSn..29..543X"><span>Control of surface wettability via <span class="hlt">strain</span> engineering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xiong, Wei; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Zhang, Zhi-Liang; Zhen, Quan-Shui</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>Reversible control of surface wettability has wide applications in lab-on-chip systems, tunable optical lenses, and microfluidic tools. Using a graphene sheet as a sample material and molecular dynamic simulations, we demonstrate that <span class="hlt">strain</span> engineering can serve as an effective way to control the surface wettability. The contact angles θ of water droplets on a graphene vary from 72.5° to 106° under biaxial <span class="hlt">strains</span> ranging from -10% to 10% that are applied on the graphene layer. For an intrinsic hydrophilic surface (at zero <span class="hlt">strain</span>), the variation of θ upon the applied <span class="hlt">strains</span> is more sensitive, i.e., from 0° to 74.8°. Overall the cosines of the contact angles exhibit a linear relation with respect to the <span class="hlt">strains</span>. In light of the inherent dependence of the contact angle on liquid-solid interfacial energy, we develop an analytic model to show the cos θ as a linear function of the adsorption energy E <span class="hlt">ads</span> of a single water molecule over the substrate surface. This model agrees with our molecular dynamic results very well. Together with the linear dependence of E <span class="hlt">ads</span> on biaxial <span class="hlt">strains</span>, we can thus understand the effect of <span class="hlt">strains</span> on the surface wettability. Thanks to the ease of reversibly applying mechanical <span class="hlt">strains</span> in micro/nano-electromechanical systems, we believe that <span class="hlt">strain</span> engineering can be a promising means to achieve the reversibly control of surface wettability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22525032','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22525032"><span>Primordial fluctuations from complex <span class="hlt">AdS</span> saddle points</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hertog, Thomas; Woerd, Ellen van der E-mail: ellen@itf.fys.kuleuven.be</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>One proposal for dS/CFT is that the Hartle-Hawking (HH) wave function in the large volume limit is equal to the partition function of a Euclidean CFT deformed by various operators. All saddle points defining the semiclassical HH wave function in cosmology have a representation in which their interior geometry is part of a Euclidean <span class="hlt">AdS</span> domain wall with complex matter fields. We compute the wave functions of scalar and tensor perturbations around homogeneous isotropic complex saddle points, turning on single scalar field matter only. We compare their predictions for the spectra of CMB perturbations with those of a different dS/CFT proposal based on the analytic continuation of inflationary universes to real asymptotically <span class="hlt">AdS</span> domain walls. We find the predictions of both bulk calculations agree to first order in the slow roll parameters, but there is a difference at higher order which, we argue, is a signature of the HH state of the fluctuations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..91l5006D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..91l5006D"><span>Conserved charges in timelike warped <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 spaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Donnay, L.; Fernández-Melgarejo, J. J.; Giribet, G.; Goya, A.; Lavia, E.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>We consider the timelike version of warped anti-de Sitter space (WAdS), which corresponds to the three-dimensional section of the Gödel solution of four-dimensional cosmological Einstein equations. This geometry presents closed timelike curves (CTCs), which are inherited from its four-dimensional embedding. In three dimensions, this type of solution can be supported without matter provided the graviton acquires mass. Here, among the different ways to consistently give mass to the graviton in three dimensions, we consider the parity-even model known as new massive gravity (NMG). In the bulk of timelike WAdS3 space, we introduce defects that, from the three-dimensional point of view, represent spinning massive particlelike objects. For this type of source, we investigate the definition of quasilocal gravitational energy as seen from infinity, far beyond the region where the CTCs appear. We also consider the covariant formalism applied to NMG to compute the mass and the angular momentum of spinning particlelike defects and compare the result with the one obtained by means of the quasilocal stress tensor. We apply these methods to special limits in which the WAdS3 solutions coincide with locally <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 and locally <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2×R spaces. Finally, we make some comments about the asymptotic symmetry algebra of asymptotically WAdS3 spaces in NMG.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CQGra..33wLT01D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CQGra..33wLT01D"><span><span class="hlt">AdS</span> nonlinear instability: moving beyond spherical symmetry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dias, Óscar J. C.; Santos, Jorge E.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Anti-de Sitter (<span class="hlt">AdS</span>) is conjectured to be nonlinear unstable to a weakly turbulent mechanism that develops a cascade towards high frequencies, leading to black hole formation (Dafermos and Holzegel 2006 Seminar at DAMTP (University of Cambridge) available at https://dpmms.cam.ac.uk/~md384/ADSinstability.pdf, Bizon and Rostworowski 2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 107 031102). We give evidence that the gravitational sector of perturbations behaves differently from the scalar one studied by Bizon and Rostworowski. In contrast with Bizon and Rostworowski, we find that not all gravitational normal modes of <span class="hlt">AdS</span> can be nonlinearly extended into periodic horizonless smooth solutions of the Einstein equation. In particular, we show that even seeds with a single normal mode can develop secular resonances, unlike the spherically symmetric scalar field collapse studied by Bizon and Rostworowski. Moreover, if the seed has two normal modes, more than one resonance can be generated at third order, unlike the spherical collapse of Bizon and Rostworowski. We also show that weak turbulent perturbative theory predicts the existence of direct and inverse cascades, with the former dominating the latter for equal energy two-mode seeds.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160004240','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160004240"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Gear</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Handschuh, Robert F. (Inventor); Roberts, Gary D. (Inventor)</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> gear consisting of metallic outer rim with gear teeth and metallic hub in combination with a composite lay up between the shaft interface (hub) and gear tooth rim is described. The composite lay-up lightens the gear member while having similar torque carrying capability and it attenuates the impact loading driven noise/vibration that is typical in gear systems. The gear has the same operational capability with respect to shaft speed, torque, and temperature as an all-metallic gear as used in aerospace gear design.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015CQGra..32b5005L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015CQGra..32b5005L"><span>Strings on <span class="hlt">AdS</span> wormholes and nonsingular black holes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lü, H.; Vázquez-Poritz, Justin F.; Zhang, Zhibai</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Certain <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes in the STU model can be conformally scaled to wormhole and black hole backgrounds which have two asymptotically <span class="hlt">AdS</span> regions and are completely free of curvature singularities. While there is a delta-function source for the dilaton, classical string probes are not sensitive to this singularity. According to the <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT correspondence, the dual field theory lives on the union of the disjoint boundaries. For the wormhole background, causal contact exists between the two boundaries and the structure of certain correlation functions is indicative of an interacting phase for which there is a coupling between the degrees of freedom living at each boundary. The nonsingular black hole describes an entangled state in two non-interacting identical conformal field theories. By studying the behavior of open strings on these backgrounds, we extract a number of features of the ‘quarks’ and ‘anti-quarks’ that live in the field theories. In the interacting phase, we find that there is a maximum speed with which the quarks can move without losing energy, beyond which energy is transferred from a quark in one field theory to a quark in the other. We also compute the rate at which moving quarks within entangled states lose energy to the two surrounding plasmas. While a quark-antiquark pair within a single field theory exhibits Coulomb interaction for small separation, a quark in one field theory exhibits spring-like confinement with an anti-quark in the other field theory. For the entangled states, we study how the quark-antiquark screening length depends on temperature and chemical potential.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23263113','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23263113"><span>Noise figure of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> optical parametric amplifiers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Marhic, Michel E</p> <p>2012-12-17</p> <p>Following a fiber optical parametric amplifier, used as a wavelength converter or in the phase-sensitive mode, by a phase-insensitive amplifier (PIA) can significantly reduce four-wave mixing between signals in broadband systems. We derive the quantum mechanical noise figures (NF) for these two <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> configurations, and show that <span class="hlt">adding</span> the PIA only leads to a moderate increase in NF.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1247661-additive-manufacturing-hybrid-circuits','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1247661-additive-manufacturing-hybrid-circuits"><span>Additive manufacturing of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> circuits</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; ...</p> <p>2016-03-26</p> <p>There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects.more » Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (<span class="hlt">AD</span>), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or <span class="hlt">AD</span> processes and conventional, established processes.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=planning+AND+added&id=EJ757413','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=planning+AND+added&id=EJ757413"><span>Separating Growth from Value <span class="hlt">Added</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yeagley, Raymond</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>This article discusses Rochester's two academic models that offer different tools for different purposes--measuring individual learning and measuring what affects learning. The main focus of currently available growth measures is formative assessment--providing data to inform instructional planning. Value-<span class="hlt">added</span> assessment is not a student…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED416142.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED416142.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Adding</span> Value to Indiana's Commodities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Welch, Mary A., Ed.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Food processing plants are <span class="hlt">adding</span> value to bulk and intermediate products to sell overseas. The Asian Pacific Rim economies constituted the largest market for consumer food products in 1993. This shift toward consumer food imports in this area is due to more women working outside the home, the internationalization of populations, and dramatic…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ151053.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ151053.pdf"><span>Courtship American Style: Newspaper <span class="hlt">Ads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cameron, Catherine; And Others</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>This study investigated an increasing social phenomenon--newspaper advertising for dating or marital partners--in terms of the bargaining process involved. Content analysis of personal <span class="hlt">ads</span> in a popular "respectable" singles newspaper revealed a pattern of offers and requests reminiscent of a heterosexual stock market. (Author)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=243249','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=243249"><span>Identification of in vitro upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent <span class="hlt">strain</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from a modified live vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> (AQUAVAC-ESC©, formerly RE-33) vs a virulent parent <span class="hlt">strain</span> (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> and t...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=247649','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=247649"><span>Identification of upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent <span class="hlt">strain</span> and characterization of novel DNA vaccine candidates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (EST's) were isolated from a modified live vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> (AQUAVAC-ESC formerly RD-33) vs a virulent parent <span class="hlt">strain</span> (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> and th...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...07..139E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...07..139E"><span>An investigation of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2 backreaction and holography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Engelsöy, Julius; Mertens, Thomas G.; Verlinde, Herman</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>We investigate a dilaton gravity model in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2 proposed by Almheiri and Polchinski [1] and develop a 1d effective description in terms of a dynamical boundary time with a Schwarzian derivative action. We show that the effective model is equivalent to a 1d version of Liouville theory, and investigate its dynamics and symmetries via a standard canonical framework. We include the coupling to arbitrary conformal matter and analyze the effective action in the presence of possible sources. We compute commutators of local operators at large time separation, and match the result with the time shift due to a gravitational shockwave interaction. We study a black hole evaporation process and comment on the role of entropy in this model.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017APS..APRX10005B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017APS..APRX10005B"><span>Supersymmetry Properties of <span class="hlt">AdS</span> Supergravity Backgrounds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Beck, Samuel; Gutowski, Jan; Papadopoulos, George</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Anti-de Sitter supergravity backgrounds are of particular interest in light of the <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT correspondence, which relates them to dual conformal field theories on the boundary of the anti-de Sitter space. We have investigated the forms of the supersymmetries these backgrounds preserve by solving the Killing spinor equations on the anti-de Sitter components of these spaces. We have found that a supersymmetric <span class="hlt">Ad</span>Sn background necessarily preserves 2⌊n/2⌋ k supersymmetries for n <= 4 and 2 ⌊n/2 ⌋ + 1 k supersymmetries for 4 < n <= 7 , k ∈N> 0 . Additionally, we have found that the Killing spinors of each background are exactly the zeroes of a Dirac-like operator constructed from the Killing spinor equations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013CMaPh.321...85W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013CMaPh.321...85W"><span>The Massive Wave Equation in Asymptotically <span class="hlt">AdS</span> Spacetimes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Warnick, C. M.</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>We consider the massive wave equation on asymptotically <span class="hlt">AdS</span> spaces. We show that the timelike F behaves like a finite timelike boundary, on which one may impose the equivalent of Dirichlet, Neumann or Robin conditions for a range of (negative) mass parameter which includes the conformally coupled case. We demonstrate well posedness for the associated initial-boundary value problems at the H 1 level of regularity. We also prove that higher regularity may be obtained, together with an asymptotic expansion for the field near F. The proofs rely on energy methods, tailored to the modified energy introduced by Breitenlohner and Freedman. We do not assume the spacetime is stationary, nor that the wave equation separates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhA...49Q4006H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhA...49Q4006H"><span>On jordanian deformations of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5 and supergravity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hoare, Ben; van Tongeren, Stijn J.</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>We consider various homogeneous Yang-Baxter deformations of the {{<span class="hlt">AdS</span>}}5× {{{S}}}5 superstring that can be obtained from the η-deformed superstring and related models by singular boosts. The jordanian deformations we obtain in this way behave similarly to the η-deformed model with regard to supergravity: T dualizing the classical sigma model it is possible to find corresponding solutions of supergravity, which, however, have dilatons that prevent T dualizing back. Hence the backgrounds of these jordanian deformations are not solutions of supergravity. Still, they do satisfy a set of recently found modified supergravity equations which implies that the corresponding sigma models are scale invariant. The abelian models that we obtain by singular boosts do directly correspond to solutions of supergravity. In addition to our main results we consider contraction limits of our main example, which do correspond to supergravity solutions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JHEP...04..055C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JHEP...04..055C"><span>Aspects of warped <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3/CFT2 correspondence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Bin; Zhang, Jia-Ju; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Zhong, De-Liang</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>In this paper we apply the thermodynamics method to investigate the holographic pictures for the BTZ black hole, the spacelike and the null warped black holes in three-dimensional topologically massive gravity (TMG) and new massive gravity (NMG). Even though there are higher derivative terms in these theories, the thermodynamics method is still effective. It gives consistent results with the ones obtained by using asymptotical symmetry group (ASG) analysis. In doing the ASG analysis we develop a brute-force realization of the Barnich-Brandt-Compere formalism with Mathematica code, which also allows us to calculate the masses and the angular momenta of the black holes. In particular, we propose the warped <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3/CFT2 correspondence in the new massive gravity, which states that quantum gravity in the warped spacetime could holographically dual to a two-dimensional CFT with {c_R}={c_L}=24 /{Gm{β^2√{{2( {21-4{β^2}} )}}}}.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3930512','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3930512"><span>Genomic Networks of <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Sterility</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Turner, Leslie M.; White, Michael A.; Tautz, Diethard; Payseur, Bret A.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> dysfunction, a common feature of reproductive barriers between species, is often caused by negative epistasis between loci (“Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities”). The nature and complexity of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> incompatibilities remain poorly understood because identifying interacting loci that affect complex phenotypes is difficult. With subspecies in the early stages of speciation, an array of genetic tools, and detailed knowledge of reproductive biology, house mice (Mus musculus) provide a model system for dissecting <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> incompatibilities. Male <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> between M. musculus subspecies often show reduced fertility. Previous studies identified loci and several X chromosome-autosome interactions that contribute to sterility. To characterize the genetic basis of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> sterility in detail, we used a systems genetics approach, integrating mapping of gene expression traits with sterility phenotypes and QTL. We measured genome-wide testis expression in 305 male F2s from a cross between wild-derived inbred <span class="hlt">strains</span> of M. musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus. We identified several thousand cis- and trans-acting QTL contributing to expression variation (eQTL). Many trans eQTL cluster into eleven ‘hotspots,’ seven of which co-localize with QTL for sterility phenotypes identified in the cross. The number and clustering of trans eQTL—but not cis eQTL—were substantially lower when mapping was restricted to a ‘fertile’ subset of mice, providing evidence that trans eQTL hotspots are related to sterility. Functional annotation of transcripts with eQTL provides insights into the biological processes disrupted by sterility loci and guides prioritization of candidate genes. Using a conditional mapping approach, we identified eQTL dependent on interactions between loci, revealing a complex system of epistasis. Our results illuminate established patterns, including the role of the X chromosome in <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> sterility. The integrated mapping approach we employed is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/965355','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/965355"><span>Systematics of Coupling Flows in <span class="hlt">AdS</span> Backgrounds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Goldberger, Walter D.; Rothstein, Ira Z.</p> <p>2003-03-18</p> <p>We give an effective field theory derivation, based on the running of Planck brane gauge correlators, of the large logarithms that arise in the predictions for low energy gauge couplings in compactified <span class="hlt">AdS</span>}_5 backgrounds, including the one-loop effects of bulk scalars, fermions, and gauge bosons. In contrast to the case of charged scalars coupled to Abelian gauge fields that has been considered previously in the literature, the one-loop corrections are not dominated by a single 4D Kaluza-Klein mode. Nevertheless, in the case of gauge field loops, the amplitudes can be reorganized into a leading logarithmic contribution that is identical to the running in 4D non-Abelian gauge theory, and a term which is not logarithmically enhanced and is analogous to a two-loop effect in 4D. In a warped GUT model broken by the Higgs mechanism in the bulk,we show that the matching scale that appears in the large logarithms induced by the non-Abelian gauge fields is m_{XY}^2/k where m_{XY} is the bulk mass of the XY bosons and k is the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> curvature. This is in contrast to the UV scale in the logarithmic contributions of scalars, which is simply the bulk mass m. Our results are summarized in a set of simple rules that can be applied to compute the leading logarithmic predictions for coupling constant relations within a given warped GUT model. We present results for both bulk Higgs and boundary breaking of the GUT gauge</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22472372','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22472372"><span>Holography beyond conformal invariance and <span class="hlt">AdS</span> isometry?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Barvinsky, A. O.</p> <p>2015-03-15</p> <p>We suggest that the principle of holographic duality be extended beyond conformal invariance and <span class="hlt">AdS</span> isometry. Such an extension is based on a special relation between functional determinants of the operators acting in the bulk and on its boundary, provided that the boundary operator represents the inverse propagators of the theory induced on the boundary by the Dirichlet boundary value problem in the bulk spacetime. This relation holds for operators of a general spin-tensor structure on generic manifolds with boundaries irrespective of their background geometry and conformal invariance, and it apparently underlies numerous O(N{sup 0}) tests of the <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT correspondence, based on direct calculation of the bulk and boundary partition functions, Casimir energies, and conformal anomalies. The generalized holographic duality is discussed within the concept of the “double-trace” deformation of the boundary theory, which is responsible in the case of large-N CFT coupled to the tower of higher-spin gauge fields for the renormalization group flow between infrared and ultraviolet fixed points. Potential extension of this method beyond the one-loop order is also briefly discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3888119','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3888119"><span>Bioenergetic flux, mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial morphology dynamics in <span class="hlt">AD</span> and MCI cybrid cell lines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Silva, Diana F.; Selfridge, J. Eva; Lu, Jianghua; E, Lezi; Roy, Nairita; Hutfles, Lewis; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Michaelis, Elias K.; Yan, ShiDu; Cardoso, Sandra M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Bioenergetic dysfunction occurs in Alzheimer's disease (<span class="hlt">AD</span>) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a clinical syndrome that frequently precedes symptomatic <span class="hlt">AD</span>. In this study, we modeled <span class="hlt">AD</span> and MCI bioenergetic dysfunction by transferring mitochondria from MCI, <span class="hlt">AD</span> and control subject platelets to mtDNA-depleted SH-SY5Y cells. Bioenergetic fluxes and bioenergetics-related infrastructures were characterized in the resulting cytoplasmic <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> (cybrid) cell lines. Relative to control cybrids, <span class="hlt">AD</span> and MCI cybrids showed changes in oxygen consumption, respiratory coupling and glucose utilization. <span class="hlt">AD</span> and MCI cybrids had higher ADP/ATP and lower NAD+/NADH ratios. <span class="hlt">AD</span> and MCI cybrids exhibited differences in proteins that monitor, respond to or regulate cell bioenergetic fluxes including HIF1α, PGC1α, SIRT1, AMPK, p38 MAPK and mTOR. Several endpoints suggested mitochondrial mass increased in the <span class="hlt">AD</span> cybrid group and probably to a lesser extent in the MCI cybrid group, and that the mitochondrial fission–fusion balance shifted towards increased fission in the <span class="hlt">AD</span> and MCI cybrids. As many of the changes we observed in <span class="hlt">AD</span> and MCI cybrid models are also seen in <span class="hlt">AD</span> subject brains, we conclude reduced bioenergetic function is present during very early <span class="hlt">AD</span>, is not brain-limited and induces protean retrograde responses that likely have both adaptive and mal-adaptive consequences. PMID:23740939</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26077325','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26077325"><span>Magneto-Acoustic <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Nanomotor.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Jinxing; Li, Tianlong; Xu, Tailin; Kiristi, Melek; Liu, Wenjuan; Wu, Zhiguang; Wang, Joseph</p> <p>2015-07-08</p> <p>Efficient and controlled nanoscale propulsion in harsh environments requires careful design and manufacturing of nanomachines, which can harvest and translate the propelling forces with high spatial and time resolution. Here we report a new class of artificial nanomachine, named magneto-acoustic <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> nanomotor, which displays efficient propulsion in the presence of either magnetic or acoustic fields without <span class="hlt">adding</span> any chemical fuel. These fuel-free <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> nanomotors, which comprise a magnetic helical structure and a concave nanorod end, are synthesized using a template-assisted electrochemical deposition process followed by segment-selective chemical etching. Dynamic switching of the propulsion mode with reversal of the movement direction and digital speed regulation are demonstrated on a single nanovehicle. These <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> nanomotors exhibit a diverse biomimetic collective behavior, including stable aggregation, swarm motion, and swarm vortex, triggered in response to different field inputs. Such adaptive <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> operation and controlled collective behavior hold considerable promise for designing smart nanovehicles that autonomously reconfigure their operation mode according to their mission or in response to changes in their surrounding environment or in their own performance, thus holding considerable promise for diverse practical biomedical applications of fuel-free nanomachines.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6518E..1KB','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6518E..1KB"><span>Realizing "value-<span class="hlt">added</span>" metrology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bunday, Benjamin; Lipscomb, Pete; Allgair, John; Patel, Dilip; Caldwell, Mark; Solecky, Eric; Archie, Chas; Morningstar, Jennifer; Rice, Bryan J.; Singh, Bhanwar; Cain, Jason; Emami, Iraj; Banke, Bill, Jr.; Herrera, Alfredo; Ukraintsev, Vladamir; Schlessinger, Jerry; Ritchison, Jeff</p> <p>2007-03-01</p> <p>The conventional premise that metrology is a "non-value-<span class="hlt">added</span> necessary evil" is a misleading and dangerous assertion, which must be viewed as obsolete thinking. Many metrology applications are key enablers to traditionally labeled "value-<span class="hlt">added</span>" processing steps in lithography and etch, such that they can be considered integral parts of the processes. Various key trends in modern, state-of-the-art processing such as optical proximity correction (OPC), design for manufacturability (DFM), and advanced process control (APC) are based, at their hearts, on the assumption of fine-tuned metrology, in terms of uncertainty and accuracy. These trends are vehicles where metrology thus has large opportunities to create value through the engineering of tight and targetable process distributions. Such distributions make possible predictability in speed-sorts and in other parameters, which results in high-end product. Additionally, significant reliance has also been placed on defect metrology to predict, improve, and reduce yield variability. The necessary quality metrology is strongly influenced by not only the choice of equipment, but also the quality application of these tools in a production environment. The ultimate value <span class="hlt">added</span> by metrology is a result of quality tools run by a quality metrology team using quality practices. This paper will explore the relationships among present and future trends and challenges in metrology, including equipment, key applications, and metrology deployment in the manufacturing flow. Of key importance are metrology personnel, with their expertise, practices, and metrics in achieving and maintaining the required level of metrology performance, including where precision, matching, and accuracy fit into these considerations. The value of metrology will be demonstrated to have shifted to "key enabler of large revenues," debunking the out-of-date premise that metrology is "non-value-<span class="hlt">added</span>." Examples used will be from critical dimension (CD</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5256501','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5256501"><span>Sandia Laboratories <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> computer and motion simulator facilities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Curry, W. H.; French, R. E.</p> <p>1980-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> computer and motion simulator facilities at Sandia National Laboratories include an <span class="hlt">AD/FIVE-AD</span>10-PDP11/60, an <span class="hlt">AD</span>/FIVE-PDP11/45, an EAI7800-EAI640, an EAI580/TR48-Nova 800, and two Carco S-45OR-3/R-493A three-axis motion simulators. An EAI680 is used in the analog mode only. This report describes the current equipment.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1035120','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1035120"><span>Scattering States in <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fitzpatrick, A.Liam; Kaplan, Jared; /SLAC</p> <p>2012-02-14</p> <p>We show that suitably regulated multi-trace primary states in large N CFTs behave like 'in' and 'out' scattering states in the flat-space limit of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>. Their transition matrix elements approach the exact scattering amplitudes for the bulk theory, providing a natural CFT definition of the flat space S-Matrix. We study corrections resulting from the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> curvature and particle propagation far from the center of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>, and show that <span class="hlt">AdS</span> simply provides an IR regulator that disappears in the flat space limit.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25416267','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25416267"><span>Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wu, Hao; Altpeter, Fredy</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Genetic transformation of sugarcane has a tremendous potential to complement traditional breeding in crop improvement and will likely transform sugarcane into a bio-factory for value-<span class="hlt">added</span> products. We describe here Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of sugarcane. Embryogenic callus induced from immature leaf whorls was used as target for transformation with the hypervirulent Agrobacterium <span class="hlt">strain</span> AGL1 carrying a constitutive nptII expression cassette in vector pPZP200. Selection with 30 mg/L geneticin during the callus phase and 30 mg/L paromomycin during regeneration of shoots and roots effectively suppressed the development of non-transgenic plants. This protocol was successful with a commercially important sugarcane cultivar, CP-88-1762, at a transformation efficiency of two independent transgenic plants per g of callus.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18296532','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18296532"><span>Molecular characterization of new natural <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii in brewing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>González, Sara S; Barrio, Eladio; Querol, Amparo</p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p>We analyzed 24 beer <span class="hlt">strains</span> from different origins by using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of different gene regions, and six new Saccharomyces cerevisiae x Saccharomyces kudriavzevii <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> <span class="hlt">strains</span> were found. This is the first time that the presence in brewing of this new type of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> has been demonstrated. From the comparative molecular analysis of these natural <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> with respect to those described in wines, it can be concluded that these originated from at least two <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> events and that some brewing <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> share a common origin with wine <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>. Finally, a reduction of the S. kudriavzevii fraction of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> genomes was observed, but this reduction was found to vary among <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> regardless of the source of isolation. The fact that 25% of the <span class="hlt">strains</span> analyzed were discovered to be S. cerevisiae x S. kudriavzevii <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> suggests that an important fraction of brewing <span class="hlt">strains</span> classified as S. cerevisiae may correspond to <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>, contributing to the complexity of Saccharomyces diversity in brewing environments. The present study raises new questions about the prevalence of these new <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> in brewing as well as their contribution to the properties of the final product.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2293171','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2293171"><span>Molecular Characterization of New Natural <span class="hlt">Hybrids</span> of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii in Brewing▿ †</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>González, Sara S.; Barrio, Eladio; Querol, Amparo</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>We analyzed 24 beer <span class="hlt">strains</span> from different origins by using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of different gene regions, and six new Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces kudriavzevii <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> <span class="hlt">strains</span> were found. This is the first time that the presence in brewing of this new type of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> has been demonstrated. From the comparative molecular analysis of these natural <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> with respect to those described in wines, it can be concluded that these originated from at least two <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> events and that some brewing <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> share a common origin with wine <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>. Finally, a reduction of the S. kudriavzevii fraction of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> genomes was observed, but this reduction was found to vary among <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> regardless of the source of isolation. The fact that 25% of the <span class="hlt">strains</span> analyzed were discovered to be S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> suggests that an important fraction of brewing <span class="hlt">strains</span> classified as S. cerevisiae may correspond to <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>, contributing to the complexity of Saccharomyces diversity in brewing environments. The present study raises new questions about the prevalence of these new <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> in brewing as well as their contribution to the properties of the final product. PMID:18296532</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930004484','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930004484"><span>High temperature <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> compensation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Holmes, Harlan K.; Moore, T. C., Sr.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Once an installed <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage is connected to a <span class="hlt">strain</span> indicating device and the instrument is balanced, a subsequent change in temperature of the gage installation will generally produce a resistance change in the gage. This purely temperature-induced resistance will be registered by the indicating device as a <span class="hlt">strain</span> and is referred to as 'apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span>' to distinguish it from <span class="hlt">strain</span> due to applied stress. One desirable technique for apparent <span class="hlt">strain</span> compensation is to employ two identical gages with identical mounting procedures which are connected with a 'half bridge' configuration where gages see the same thermal environment but only one experiences a mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> input. Their connection in adjacent arms of the bridge will then balance the thermally induced apparent <span class="hlt">strains</span> and, in principle, only the mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> remains. Two approaches that implement this technique are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24794630','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24794630"><span>'<span class="hlt">Hybrid</span>' processing strategies for expanding and improving the synthesis of renewable bioproducts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thompson, Brian; Moon, Tae Seok; Nielsen, David R</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The versatile functionality of microbial biocatalysts offers a promising solution to the growing need to replace conventional, petroleum-derived fuels, chemicals, and materials with sustainable alternatives from renewable biomass. Whereas metabolic pathway engineering and <span class="hlt">strain</span> optimization have greatly expanded the range of attainable bioproducts, it is by coupling microbial biosynthesis with traditional chemical conversions that the diversity of products that can ultimately be derived from biomass is truly beginning to reach its full potential. As will be the focus of this short review, such '<span class="hlt">hybrid</span>' strategies are now facilitating the generation of new and useful value-<span class="hlt">added</span> bioproducts from renewable sources, the likes of which have previously been unattainable via biological routes alone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28334169','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28334169"><span>Characterization of Saccharomyces uvarum (Beijerinck, 1898) and related <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>: assessment of molecular markers that predict the parent and <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> genomes and a proposal to name yeast <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nguyen, Huu-Vang; Boekhout, Teun</p> <p>2017-03-03</p> <p>The use of the nuclear-DNA re-association technique has led taxonomists to consider Saccharomyces uvarum a synonym of S. bayanus. The latter, however, is not a species but a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> harbouring S. eubayanus (Seu) and S. uvarum (Su) sub-genomes with a minor DNA contribution from S. cerevisiae (Sc). To recognize genetically pure lines of S. uvarum and putative interspecies <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> among so-called S. bayanus <span class="hlt">strains</span> present in public culture collections, we propose the use of four markers that were defined from the S. bayanus CBS 380T composite genome, namely SeuNTS2 (rDNA), ScMAL31, MTY1 and SuMEL1. S. carlsbergensis CBS 1513 was found similar to S. bayanus except that it carries the SeuMEL1 allele. Different marker combinations revealed that among 33 <span class="hlt">strains</span> examined only few <span class="hlt">strains</span> were similar to CBS 380T, but many pure S. uvarum lines and putative Su/Seu-related <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> occurred. Our results demonstrated that these <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> were erroneously considered authentic S. bayanus and therefore the varietal state "Saccharomyces bayanus var. uvarum comb. nov. Naumov" is not valid. Our markers constitute a tool to get insights into the genomic makeup of Saccharomyces interspecies <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>. We also make a proposal to name those <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> that may also be applicable to other fungal <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...09..024A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...09..024A"><span>Stability of charged global <span class="hlt">AdS</span>4 spacetimes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Arias, Raúl; Mas, Javier; Serantes, Alexandre</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>We study linear and nonlinear stability of asymptotically <span class="hlt">AdS</span>4 solutions in Einstein-Maxwell-scalar theory. After summarizing the set of static solutions we first examine thermodynamical stability in the grand canonical ensemble and the phase transitions that occur among them. In the second part of the paper we focus on nonlinear stability in the microcanonical ensemble by evolving radial perturbations numerically. We find hints of an instability corner for vanishingly small perturbations of the same kind as the ones present in the uncharged case. Collapses are avoided, instead, if the charge and mass of the perturbations come to close the line of solitons. Finally we examine the soliton solutions. The linear spectrum of normal modes is not resonant and instability turns on at extrema of the mass curve. Linear stability extends to nonlinear stability up to some threshold for the amplitude of the perturbation. Beyond that, the soliton is destroyed and collapses to a hairy black hole. The relative width of this stability band scales down with the charge Q, and does not survive the blow up limit to a planar geometry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JHEP...03..140K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JHEP...03..140K"><span><span class="hlt">AdS</span>4/CFT3 squashed, stretched and warped</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Klebanov, Igor R.; Klose, Thomas; Murugan, Arvind</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>We use group theoretic methods to calculate the spectrum of short multiplets around the extremum of Script N = 8 gauged supergravity potential which possesses Script N = 2 supersymmetry and SU(3) global symmetry. Upon uplifting to M-theory, it describes a warped product of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>4 and a certain squashed and stretched 7-sphere. We find quantum numbers in agreement with those of the gauge invariant operators in the Script N = 2 superconformal Chern-Simons theory recently proposed to be the dual of this M-theory background. This theory is obtained from the U(N) × U(N) theory through deforming the superpotential by a term quadratic in one of the superfields. To construct this model explicitly, one needs to employ monopole operators whose complete understanding is still lacking. However, for the U(2) × U(2) gauge theory we make a proposal for the form of the monopole operators which has a number of desired properties. In particular, this proposal implies enhanced symmetry of the U(2) × U(2) ABJM theory for k = 1,2; it makes its similarity to and subtle difference from the BLG theory quite explicit.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011adap.prop..111G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011adap.prop..111G"><span>The <span class="hlt">ADS</span> All Sky Survey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Goodman, Alyssa</p> <p></p> <p>We will create the first interactive sky map of astronomers' understanding of the Universe over time. We will accomplish this goal by turning the NASA Astrophysics Data System (<span class="hlt">ADS</span>), widely known for its unrivaled value as a literature resource, into a data resource. GIS and GPS systems have made it commonplace to see and explore information about goings-on on Earth in the context of maps and timelines. Our proposal shows an example of a program that lets a user explore which countries have been mentioned in the New York Times, on what dates, and in what kinds of articles. By analogy, the goal of our project is to enable this kind of exploration-on the sky-for the full corpus of astrophysical literature available through <span class="hlt">ADS</span>. Our group's expertise and collaborations uniquely position us to create this interactive sky map of the literature, which we call the "<span class="hlt">ADS</span> All-Sky Survey." To create this survey, here are the principal steps we need to follow. First, by analogy to "geotagging," we will "astrotag," the <span class="hlt">ADS</span> literature. Many "astrotags" effectively already exist, thanks to curation efforts at both CDS and NED. These efforts have created links to "source" positions on the sky associated with each of the millions of articles in the <span class="hlt">ADS</span>. Our collaboration with <span class="hlt">ADS</span> and CDS will let us automatically extract astrotags for all existing and future <span class="hlt">ADS</span> holdings. The new <span class="hlt">ADS</span> Labs, which our group helps to develop, includes the ability for researchers to filter article search results using a variety of "facets" (e.g. sources, keywords, authors, observatories, etc.). Using only extracted astrotags and facets, we can create functionality like what is described in the Times example above: we can offer a map of the density of positions' "mentions" on the sky, filterable by the properties of those mentions. Using this map, researchers will be able to interactively, visually, discover what regions have been studied for what reasons, at what times, and by whom. Second, where</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1190919','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1190919"><span>Geobacteraceae <span class="hlt">strains</span> and methods</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Lovley, Derek R.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Yi, Hana</p> <p>2015-07-07</p> <p>Embodiments of the present invention provide a method of producing genetically modified <span class="hlt">strains</span> of electricigenic microbes that are specifically adapted for the production of electrical current in microbial fuel cells, as well as <span class="hlt">strains</span> produced by such methods and fuel cells using such <span class="hlt">strains</span>. In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides genetically modified <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Geobacter sulfurreducens and methods of using such <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26283378','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26283378"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> mimics and <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> vigor in Arabidopsis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Li; Greaves, Ian K; Groszmann, Michael; Wu, Li Min; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Peacock, W James</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>F1 <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> can outperform their parents in yield and vegetative biomass, features of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> vigor that form the basis of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> seed industry. The yield advantage of the F1 is lost in the F2 and subsequent generations. In Arabidopsis, from F2 plants that have a F1-like phenotype, we have by recurrent selection produced pure breeding F5/F6 lines, <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> mimics, in which the characteristics of the F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> are stabilized. These <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> mimic lines, like the F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>, have larger leaves than the parent plant, and the leaves have increased photosynthetic cell numbers, and in some lines, increased size of cells, suggesting an increased supply of photosynthate. A comparison of the differentially expressed genes in the F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> with those of eight <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> mimic lines identified metabolic pathways altered in both; these pathways include down-regulation of defense response pathways and altered abiotic response pathways. F6 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> mimic lines are mostly homozygous at each locus in the genome and yet retain the large F1-like phenotype. Many alleles in the F6 plants, when they are homozygous, have expression levels different to the level in the parent. We consider this altered expression to be a consequence of transregulation of genes from one parent by genes from the other parent. Transregulation could also arise from epigenetic modifications in the F1. The pure breeding <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> mimics have been valuable in probing the mechanisms of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> vigor and may also prove to be useful <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> vigor equivalents in agriculture.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6565562','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6565562"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> rate effects in stress corrosion cracking</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Parkins, R.N. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)</p> <p>1990-03-01</p> <p>Slow <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, <span class="hlt">ad</span> hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic <span class="hlt">strain</span> provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow <span class="hlt">strain</span> tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that <span class="hlt">strain</span> or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17070787','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17070787"><span>Sexual dimorphism in <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> rats.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Garcia-Falgueras, Alicia; Pinos, Helena; Fernández, Rosa; Collado, Paloma; Pasaro, Eduardo; Segovia, Santiago; Guillamon, Antonio</p> <p>2006-12-06</p> <p>Laboratory rat <span class="hlt">strains</span> descend from Wistar rats as a consequence of artificial selection. Previously we reported that the medial posterior division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTMP) was sexually dimorphic in Wistar and Long-Evans <span class="hlt">strains</span> while the medial anterior division (BSTMA) and the locus coeruleus (LC) only showed sex differences in the ancestor Wistar <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The lateral posterior division (BSTLP) was isomorphic in both <span class="hlt">strains</span>. The present work studies the number of neurons in the BSTMP, BSTMA, BSTLP and LC of male and female Wistar and Long-Evans rats (F(0)) and their <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> F(1) and F(2) generations. The BSTMP is sexually dimorphic in the F(0), F(1) and F(2) generations while sex differences in the LC are only seen in F(0) Wistar rats but not in the F(0) Long-Evans or the F(1) and F(2) <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> generations. Sex differences in the BSTMA are seen in F(0) Wistar but not in F(0) Long-Evans rats and completely disappear in the F(2) generations. The number of neurons in the LC of both males and females decreased in heterozygotic individuals (F(1)) but increased in homozygotic (F(2)). However, the number of neurons in the BSTMP changes significantly over the generations, although the ratio of neurons (female/male) is stable and unaffected in homo- or heterozygosis. Thus, the mechanism that regulates the neuronal female/male ratio would be different from the one that controls the number of neurons. The facts that sex differences in the BSTMP are not affected by homo- or heterozygosis and that they are seen in several mammalian orders suggest the existence of a "fixed" type of brain sex differences in the Mammalia Class.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=92533','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=92533"><span>Rapid Detection, Identification, and Enumeration of Escherichia coli Cells in Municipal Water by Chemiluminescent In Situ <span class="hlt">Hybridization</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Stender, Henrik; Broomer, Adam J.; Oliveira, Kenneth; Perry-O'Keefe, Heather; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens J.; Sage, Andrew; Coull, James</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>A new chemiluminescent in situ <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> (CISH) method provides simultaneous detection, identification, and enumeration of culturable Escherichia coli cells in 100 ml of municipal water within one working day. Following filtration and 5 h of growth on tryptic soy agar at 35°C, individual microcolonies of E. coli were detected directly on a 47-mm-diameter membrane filter using soybean peroxidase-labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes targeting a species-specific sequence in E. coli 16S rRNA. Within each microcolony, <span class="hlt">hybridized</span>, peroxidase-labeled PNA probe and chemiluminescent substrate generated light which was subsequently captured on film. Thus, each spot of light represented one microcolony of E. coli. Following probe selection based on 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence alignments and sample matrix interference, the sensitivity and specificity of the probe Eco16S07C were determined by dot <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> to RNA of eight bacterial species. Only the rRNA of E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were detected by Eco16S07C with the latter mismatch <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> being eliminated by a PNA blocker probe targeting P. aeruginosa 16S rRNA. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of E. coli by PNA CISH were then determined using 8 E. coli <span class="hlt">strains</span> and 17 other bacterial species, including closely related species. No bacterial <span class="hlt">strains</span> other than E. coli and Shigella spp. were detected, which is in accordance with 16S rDNA sequence information. Furthermore, the enumeration of microcolonies of E. coli represented by spots of light correlated 92 to 95% with visible colonies following overnight incubation. PNA CISH employs traditional membrane filtration and culturing techniques while providing the <span class="hlt">added</span> sensitivity and specificity of PNA probes in order to yield faster and more definitive results. PMID:11133438</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4104857','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4104857"><span>Serial propagation of distinct <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Aβ prions from Alzheimer’s disease patients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Watts, Joel C.; Condello, Carlo; Stöhr, Jan; Oehler, Abby; Lee, Joanne; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Lannfelt, Lars; Ingelsson, Martin; Giles, Kurt; Prusiner, Stanley B.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>An increasing number of studies argues that self-propagating protein conformations (i.e., prions) feature in the pathogenesis of several common neurodegenerative diseases. Mounting evidence contends that aggregates of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide become self-propagating in Alzheimer’s disease (<span class="hlt">AD</span>) patients. An important characteristic of prions is their ability to replicate distinct <span class="hlt">strains</span>, the biological information for which is enciphered within different conformations of protein aggregates. To investigate whether distinct <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Aβ prions can be discerned in <span class="hlt">AD</span> patients, we performed transmission studies in susceptible transgenic mice using brain homogenates from sporadic or heritable (Arctic and Swedish) <span class="hlt">AD</span> cases. Mice inoculated with the Arctic <span class="hlt">AD</span> sample exhibited a pathology that could be distinguished from mice inoculated with the Swedish or sporadic <span class="hlt">AD</span> samples, which was judged by differential accumulation of Aβ isoforms and the morphology of cerebrovascular Aβ deposition. Unlike Swedish <span class="hlt">AD</span>- or sporadic <span class="hlt">AD</span>-inoculated animals, Arctic <span class="hlt">AD</span>-inoculated mice, like Arctic <span class="hlt">AD</span> patients, displayed a prominent Aβ38-containing cerebral amyloid angiopathy. The divergent transmission behavior of the Arctic <span class="hlt">AD</span> sample compared with the Swedish and sporadic <span class="hlt">AD</span> samples was maintained during second passage in mice, showing that Aβ <span class="hlt">strains</span> are serially transmissible. We conclude that at least two distinct <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Aβ prions can be discerned in the brains of <span class="hlt">AD</span> patients and that <span class="hlt">strain</span> fidelity was preserved on serial passage in mice. Our results provide a potential explanation for the clinical and pathological heterogeneity observed in <span class="hlt">AD</span> patients. PMID:24982139</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JHEP...01..036M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JHEP...01..036M"><span>The inside outs of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3/CFT2: exact <span class="hlt">AdS</span> wormholes with entangled CFT duals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mandal, Gautam; Sinha, Ritam; Sorokhaibam, Nilakash</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We present the complete family of solutions of 3D gravity (Λ < 0) with two asymptotically <span class="hlt">AdS</span> exterior regions. The solutions are constructed from data at the two boundaries, which correspond to two independent and arbitrary stress tensors T R , , and T L , . The two exteriors are smoothly joined on to an interior region through a regular horizon. We find CFT duals of these geometries which are entangled states of two CFT's. We compute correlators between general operators at the two boundaries and find perfect agreement between CFT and bulk calculations. We calculate and match the CFT entanglement entropy (EE) with the holographic EE which involves geodesics passing through the wormhole. We also compute a holographic, non-equilibrium entropy for the CFT using properties of the regular horizon. The construction of the bulk solutions here uses an exact version of Brown-Henneaux type diffeomorphisms which are asymptotically nontrivial and transform the CFT states by two independent unitary operators on the two sides. Our solutions provide an infinite family of explicit examples of the ER=EPR relation of Maldacena and Susskind [1].</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27183995','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27183995"><span>Ploidy influences the functional attributes of de novo lager yeast <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Krogerus, Kristoffer; Arvas, Mikko; De Chiara, Matteo; Magalhães, Frederico; Mattinen, Laura; Oja, Merja; Vidgren, Virve; Yue, Jia-Xing; Liti, Gianni; Gibson, Brian</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>The genomes of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> organisms, such as lager yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces eubayanus), contain orthologous genes, the functionality and effect of which may differ depending on their origin and copy number. How the parental subgenomes in lager yeast contribute to important phenotypic traits such as fermentation performance, aroma production, and stress tolerance remains poorly understood. Here, three de novo lager yeast <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> with different ploidy levels (allodiploid, allotriploid, and allotetraploid) were generated through <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> techniques without genetic modification. The <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> were characterized in fermentations of both high gravity wort (15 °P) and very high gravity wort (25 °P), which were monitored for aroma compound and sugar concentrations. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> <span class="hlt">strains</span> with higher DNA content performed better during fermentation and produced higher concentrations of flavor-active esters in both worts. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> <span class="hlt">strains</span> also outperformed both the parent <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Genome sequencing revealed that several genes related to the formation of flavor-active esters (ATF1, ATF2¸ EHT1, EEB1, and BAT1) were present in higher copy numbers in the higher ploidy <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> <span class="hlt">strains</span>. A direct relationship between gene copy number and transcript level was also observed. The measured ester concentrations and transcript levels also suggest that the functionality of the S. cerevisiae- and S. eubayanus-derived gene products differs. The results contribute to our understanding of the complex molecular mechanisms that determine phenotypes in lager yeast <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> and are expected to facilitate targeted <span class="hlt">strain</span> development through interspecific <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28068587','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28068587"><span>Quantitative assessment of viable cells of Lactobacillus plantarum <span class="hlt">strains</span> in single, dual and multi-<span class="hlt">strain</span> biofilms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fernández Ramírez, Mónica D; Kostopoulos, Ioannis; Smid, Eddy J; Nierop Groot, Masja N; Abee, Tjakko</p> <p>2017-03-06</p> <p>Biofilms of Lactobacillus plantarum are a potential source for contamination and recontamination of food products. Although biofilms have been mostly studied using single species or even single <span class="hlt">strains</span>, it is conceivable that in a range of environmental settings including food processing areas, biofilms are composed of multiple species with each species represented by multiple <span class="hlt">strains</span>. In this study six spoilage related L. plantarum <span class="hlt">strains</span> FBR1-FBR6 and the model <span class="hlt">strain</span> L. plantarum WCFS1 were characterised in single, dual and multiple <span class="hlt">strain</span> competition models. A quantitative PCR approach was used with <span class="hlt">added</span> propidium monoazide (PMA) enabling quantification of intact cells in the biofilm, representing the viable cell fraction that determines the food spoilage risk. Our results show that the performance of individual <span class="hlt">strains</span> in multi-<span class="hlt">strain</span> cultures generally correlates with their performance in pure culture, and relative <span class="hlt">strain</span> abundance in multi-<span class="hlt">strain</span> biofilms positively correlated with the relative <span class="hlt">strain</span> abundance in suspended (planktonic) cultures. Performance of individual <span class="hlt">strains</span> in dual-<span class="hlt">strain</span> biofilms was highly influenced by the presence of the secondary <span class="hlt">strain</span>, and in most cases no correlation between the relative contributions of viable planktonic cells and viable cells in the biofilm was noted. The total biofilm quantified by CV staining of the dual and multi-<span class="hlt">strain</span> biofilms formed was mainly correlated to CV values of the dominant <span class="hlt">strain</span> obtained in single <span class="hlt">strain</span> studies. However, the combination of <span class="hlt">strain</span> FBR5 and <span class="hlt">strain</span> WCFS1 showed significantly higher CV values compared to the individual performances of both <span class="hlt">strains</span> indicating that total biofilm formation was higher in this specific condition. Notably, L. plantarum FBR5 was able to outgrow all other <span class="hlt">strains</span> and showed the highest relative abundance in dual and multi-<span class="hlt">strain</span> biofilms. All the dual and multi-<span class="hlt">strain</span> biofilms contained a considerable number of viable cells, representing a potential</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MRE.....2d5007S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MRE.....2d5007S"><span>Theoretical study on stability of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> bilayers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Silva, Thiago S.; de Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio; Azevedo, Sèrgio</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Motivated by the recent experimental realization of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> nanostructure of graphene and boron nitride (h-BN) sheet, and studies of gap modulation by <span class="hlt">strain</span>, we use first principles calculations based on density functional theory to investigate the effects of <span class="hlt">strain</span> in <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> bilayers composed of two monolayers of graphene with a nanodomain of {{B}3}{{N}3}. The calculations were made with two different approximations for the functional exchange-correlation, GGA and VDW-DF. We investigate the modification in the electronic structure and structural properties of various configurations of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> bilayers. Among the configurations, those with Bernal stacking are found to be more stable when compared to the others. Studies of the compressive <span class="hlt">strain</span> influence were made only in the structure that has been shown to be the most stable. We have found that the two approximations used in the calculations exhibit the same results for the electronic properties of all structures. The opening of the energy gap due to <span class="hlt">strain</span> was possible in the calculations by using the GGA approximation, but the same does not happen in the calculations using the VDW-DF approximation. Our analysis shows that the VDW-DF approximation is better suited for studies involving surfaces.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760035547&hterms=composite+hybrid&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dcomposite%2Bhybrid','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760035547&hterms=composite+hybrid&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dcomposite%2Bhybrid"><span>Super-<span class="hlt">hybrid</span> composites - An emerging structural material</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>Specimens of super-<span class="hlt">hybrids</span> and advanced fiber composites were subjected to extensive tests to determine their mechanical properties, including impact and thermal fatigue. The super-<span class="hlt">hybrids</span> were fabricated by a procedure similar to that reported by Chamis et al., (1975). Super-<span class="hlt">hybrids</span> subjected to 1000 cycles of thermal fatigue from -100 to 300 F retained over 90% of their longitudinal flexural strength and over 75% of their transverse flexural strength; their transverse flexural strength may be as high as 8 times that of a commercially supplied boron/1100-Al composite. The thin specimen Izod longitudinal impact resistance of the super-<span class="hlt">hybrids</span> was twice that of the boron/110-Al material. Super-<span class="hlt">hybrids</span> subjected to transverse tensile loads exhibited nonlinear stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> relationships. The experimentally determined initial membrane (in-plane) and bending elastic properties of super-<span class="hlt">hybrids</span> were predicted adequately by linear laminate analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002116.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002116.htm"><span>Muscle <span class="hlt">strain</span> treatment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Treatment - muscle <span class="hlt">strain</span> ... Question: How do you treat a muscle <span class="hlt">strain</span> ? Answer: Rest the <span class="hlt">strained</span> muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/ency/imagepages/19618.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/imagepages/19618.htm"><span>Muscle <span class="hlt">strain</span> (image)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A muscle <span class="hlt">strain</span> is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle <span class="hlt">strain</span> can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle <span class="hlt">strain</span> include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2293154','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2293154"><span>Development of a <span class="hlt">Strain</span>-Specific Molecular Method for Quantitating Individual Campylobacter <span class="hlt">Strains</span> in Mixed Populations▿</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Elvers, Karen T.; Helps, Christopher R.; Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Allen, Vivien M.; Newell, Diane G.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The identification of sites resulting in cross-contamination of poultry flocks in the abattoir and determination of the survival and persistence of campylobacters at these sites are essential for the development of intervention strategies aimed at reducing the microbial burden on poultry at retail. A novel molecule-based method, using <span class="hlt">strain</span>- and genus-specific oligonucleotide probes, was developed to detect and enumerate specific campylobacter <span class="hlt">strains</span> in mixed populations. <span class="hlt">Strain</span>-specific oligonucleotide probes were designed for the short variable regions (SVR) of the flaA gene in individual Campylobacter jejuni <span class="hlt">strains</span>. A 16S rRNA Campylobacter genus-specific probe was also used. Both types of probes were used to investigate populations of campylobacters by colony lift <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>. The specificity and proof of principle of the method were tested using <span class="hlt">strains</span> with closely related SVR sequences and mixtures of these <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Colony lifts of campylobacters were <span class="hlt">hybridized</span> sequentially with up to two labeled <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific probes, followed by the generic 16S rRNA probe. SVR probes were highly specific, differentiating down to 1 nucleotide in the target sequence, and were sufficiently sensitive to detect colonies of a single <span class="hlt">strain</span> in a mixed population. The 16S rRNA probe detected all Campylobacter spp. tested but not closely related species, such as Arcobacter skirrowi and Helicobacter pullorum. Preliminary field studies demonstrated the application of this technique to target <span class="hlt">strains</span> isolated from poultry transport crate wash tank water. This method is quantitative, sensitive, and highly specific and allows the identification and enumeration of selected <span class="hlt">strains</span> among all of the campylobacters in environmental samples. PMID:18281428</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPIE.6248E..0RP','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPIE.6248E..0RP"><span>Intelligent routing protocol for <span class="hlt">ad</span> hoc wireless network</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Peng, Chaorong; Chen, Chang Wen</p> <p>2006-05-01</p> <p>A novel routing scheme for mobile <span class="hlt">ad</span> hoc networks (MANETs), which combines <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> and multi-inter-routing path properties with a distributed topology discovery route mechanism using control agents is proposed in this paper. In recent years, a variety of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> routing protocols for Mobile <span class="hlt">Ad</span> hoc wireless networks (MANETs) have been developed. Which is proactively maintains routing information for a local neighborhood, while reactively acquiring routes to destinations beyond the global. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> protocol reduces routing discovery latency and the end-to-end delay by providing high connectivity without requiring much of the scarce network capacity. On the other side the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> routing protocols in MANETs likes Zone Routing Protocol still need route "re-discover" time when a route between zones link break. Sine the topology update information needs to be broadcast routing request on local zone. Due to this delay, the routing protocol may not be applicable for real-time data and multimedia communication. We utilize the advantages of a clustering organization and multi-routing path in routing protocol to achieve several goals at the same time. Firstly, IRP efficiently saves network bandwidth and reduces route reconstruction time when a routing path fails. The IRP protocol does not require global periodic routing advertisements, local control agents will automatically monitor and repair broke links. Secondly, it efficiently reduces congestion and traffic "bottlenecks" for ClusterHeads in clustering network. Thirdly, it reduces significant overheads associated with maintaining clusters. Fourthly, it improves clusters stability due to dynamic topology changing frequently. In this paper, we present the Intelligent Routing Protocol. First, we discuss the problem of routing in <span class="hlt">ad</span> hoc networks and the motivation of IRP. We describe the hierarchical architecture of IRP. We describe the routing process and illustrate it with an example. Further, we describe the control manage</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1819d0020T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1819d0020T"><span><span class="hlt">AD</span>, the ALICE diffractive detector</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tello, Abraham Villatoro</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>ALICE is one of the four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As a complement to its Heavy-Ion physics program, ALICE started during Run 1 of LHC an extensive program dedicated to the study of proton-proton diffractive processes. In order to optimize its trigger efficiencies and purities in selecting diffractive events, the ALICE Collaboration installed a very forward <span class="hlt">AD</span> detector during the Long Shut Down 1 of LHC. This new forward detector system consists of two stations made of two layers of scintillator pads, one station on each side of the interaction point. With this upgrade, ALICE has substantially increased its forward physics coverage, including the double rapidity gap based selection of central production, as well as the measurements of inclusive diffractive cross sections.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/960184','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/960184"><span>Stress-<span class="hlt">Strain</span> Relation and <span class="hlt">strain</span>-Induced Crystallization in Rubber</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Toki,S.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Rubber is composed of flexible chains and network points. Theory of rubber elasticity succeeds to elucidate stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> relation of rubber using the inverse Langevin equation of entropy modulus. However, actual rubber is much different from ideal networks composed of ideal rubber chains. Network points may not distribute homogeneously and the molecular weight between two network points may show wide distribution. Flexible chains show <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced crystallization. Recent synchrotron X-ray and simultaneous stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> measurements reveal that <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced crystallization reduces the stress by increasing the length of molecules along the stretching direction. Also, <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced crystals are created not at the middle of the network points, but at the close location to the network points. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> structure of <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced crystallites and network points may be stronger than network points alone. Therefore, <span class="hlt">strain</span> induced crystallization may increase the tensile strength of rubber by two mechanisms, they are, increase of elongation at break and reinforcement of network points. Natural rubber has biotic network points in nature. After vulcanization, the biotic network may contribute the superior toughness of NR, comparing to IR. Carbon filled NR also shows <span class="hlt">strain</span> induced crystallization. In order to acquire high tensile strength, molecules should have higher flexibility to perform <span class="hlt">strain</span> induced crystallization by selecting a kind of carbon blacks, an accelerator and a curing condition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5914335','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5914335"><span>Sequence similarities in the genes encoding polychlorinated biphenyl degradation by pseudomonas <span class="hlt">strain</span> LB400 and alcaligenes eutrophus H850</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Yates, J.R.; Mondello, F.J.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>DNA-DNA <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> was used to compare the Pseudomonas <span class="hlt">strain</span> LB400 genes for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degradation with those from seven other PCB-degrading <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Significant <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> was detected to the genome of Alcaligenes eutrophus H850, a <span class="hlt">strain</span> similar to LB400 in PCB-degrading capability. These two organisms showed a strong conservation of restriction sites in the region of DNA encoding PCB metabolism. No other sequence similarities were detected in the two genomes. DNA from the other PCB-degrading <span class="hlt">strains</span> showed no <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> to the probe, which demonstrated the existence of at least two distinct classes of genes encoding PCB degradation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18355270','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18355270"><span>Interspecies <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> and recombination in Saccharomyces wine yeasts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sipiczki, Matthias</p> <p>2008-11-01</p> <p>The ascomycetous yeasts traditionally referred to as the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex are a group of closely related species that are isolated by a postzygotic barrier. They can easily <span class="hlt">hybridize</span>; and their allodiploid <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> propagate by mitotic divisions as efficiently as the parental <span class="hlt">strains</span>, but can barely divide by meiosis, and thus rarely produce viable spores (sterile interspecies <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>). The postzygotic isolation is not effective in allotetraploids that are able to carry out meiosis and produce viable spores (fertile interspecies <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>). By application of molecular identification methods, double (Saccharomyces cerevisiae x Saccharomyces uvarum and S. cerevisiae x Saccharomyces kudriavzevii) and triple (S. cerevisiae x S. uvarum x S. kudriavzevii) <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> were recently identified in yeast populations of fermenting grape must and cider in geographically distinct regions. The genetic analysis of these isolates and laboratory-bred <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> revealed great variability of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> genome structures and demonstrated that the alloploid genome of the zygote can undergo drastic changes during mitotic and meiotic divisions of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> cells. This genome-stabilization process involves loss of chromosomes and genes and recombination between the partner genomes. This article briefly reviews the results of the analysis of interspecies <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>, proposes a model for the mechanism of genome stabilization and highlights the potential of interspecies <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> in winemaking.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7653E..3TR','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7653E..3TR"><span>Design of a surface attachable <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> fiber sensor packaged in a polyimide film for engineering applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald</p> <p>2010-09-01</p> <p>The design of a polyimide film packaged <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> fiber sensor for simultaneous <span class="hlt">strain</span> and temperature measurement is presented. This <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> sensor operates in the intensity domain by converting the polarization and wavelength information from a polarization maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF) sensor and fiber Bragg grating sensor (FBG) respectively into intensity variations. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensitivity of a polarimetric sensor for various lengths of the PM-PCF is studied. The effective <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensitivity of the FBG sensing system is adjusted to match that of the polarimetric sensor by varying the slope of the edge filter. The packaging aspects of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> fiber sensor are also presented in this paper.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22503711','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22503711"><span>Evaluation of different genetic procedures for the generation of artificial <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> in Saccharomyces genus for winemaking.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pérez-Través, Laura; Lopes, Christian A; Barrio, Eladio; Querol, Amparo</p> <p>2012-05-15</p> <p>Several methods based on recombinant DNA techniques have been proposed for yeast <span class="hlt">strain</span> improvement; however, the most relevant oenological traits depend on a multitude of loci, making these techniques difficult to apply. In this way, <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> techniques involving two complete genomes became interesting. Natural <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> <span class="hlt">strains</span> between different Saccharomyces species have been detected in diverse fermented beverages including wine, cider and beer. These <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> seem to be better adapted to fluctuating situations typically observed in fermentations due to the acquisition of particular physiological properties of both parental <span class="hlt">strains</span>. In this work we evaluated the usefulness of three different <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> methods: spore to spore mating, rare-mating and protoplast fusion for the generation of intra- and inter-specific stable <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>, being the first report about the comparison of different methods to obtain artificial <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> to be used in fermentations. Spore to spore mating is an easy but time-consuming method; <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> generated with this technique could lack some of the industrially relevant traits present in the parental <span class="hlt">strains</span> because of the segregation occurred during meiosis and spore generation prior to <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>. <span class="hlt">Hybrids</span> obtained by protoplast fusion get the complete information of both parents but they are currently considered as genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Finally, <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> obtained by rare-mating are easily obtained by the optimized methodology described in this work, they originally contain a complete set of chromosomes of both parents and they are not considered as GMOs. <span class="hlt">Hybrids</span> obtained by means of the three methodological approaches showed a high genetic variability; however, a loss of genetic material was detected in most of them. Based on these results, it became evident that a last crucial aspect to be considered in every <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> program is the genetic stabilization of recently generated <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> that guarantee its</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930012913','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930012913"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> rocket propulsion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Holzman, Allen L.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Topics addressed are: (1) comparison of the theoretical impulses; (2) comparison of the density-specific impulses; (3) general propulsion system features comparison; (4) <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> systems, booster applications; and (5) <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> systems, upper stage propulsion applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=305396','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=305396"><span>From <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> swarms to swarms of <span class="hlt">hybrids</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The introgression of modern humans (Homo sapiens) with Neanderthals 40,000 YBP after a half-million years of separation, may have led to the best example of a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> swarm on earth. Modern trade and transportation in support of the human <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> has continued to introduce additional species, genotyp...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12178920','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12178920"><span>The New York Times <span class="hlt">ad</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hunt, M E; Kissling, F</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Feminization of patriarchal institutions is necessary in order to eliminate the exclusivity and mutuality of hierarchical, gender, class, and race stratification. The aim of this paper is to explain the history and activities surrounding the New York Times <span class="hlt">ad</span> on Sunday, October 7, 1984 (the Catholic Statement on Pluralism and Abortion signed by Barbara Ferraro and Patricia Hussey of the Sisters of Note Dame de Namur, Rose Dominic Trapasso of the Maryknoll Sisters, and 67 other signers). The significance of this <span class="hlt">ad</span> for Roman Catholic feminists and suggestions for new models of relationships between feminists is given. The Statement was written by Daniel Maguire and Frances Kissling and reviewed by 20 Roman Catholic ethicists. A sponsoring committee of early signers sought other support. Catholics for a Free Choice sponsored the funding for circulation of the Statement among professional societies, but not necessarily canonical communities. Publication of the entire statement in the Times was at the height of the presidential campaign. Conservative Bishops Bernard Law of Boston and John O'Connor of Boston publicly denounced Ferraro's position. The first institutional church response came on November 14, 1984, and stated that the Statement was personal opinion and contradictory to clear and constant church teachings about abortion. On November 30, 1984, Cardinal Jean Jerome Hamer of the Congregation for Religious and Secular Institutes responded to most presidents of canonical communities to request a public retraction from signers under threat of dismissal. The issue was obedience to the church. Several members of the canonical community and priests published retractions; negotiations with the Vatican began. Freedom of conscience and empowerment of canonical communities, as agents of their own lives, were given as reasons for the challenge to paternalism. The response was that women were subject to obedience within their communities and had taken public vows and were</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1014662','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1014662"><span>Mesoscale <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> calibration artifact</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.</p> <p>2010-09-07</p> <p>A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> artifact, suitable for <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20378449','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20378449"><span>A <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> displacement estimation method for ultrasonic elasticity imaging.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Lujie; Housden, R; Treece, Graham; Gee, Andrew; Prager, Richard</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>Axial displacement estimation is fundamental to many freehand quasistatic ultrasonic <span class="hlt">strain</span> imaging systems. In this paper, we present a novel estimation method that combines the strengths of quality-guided tracking, multi-level correlation, and phase-zero search to achieve high levels of accuracy and robustness. The paper includes a full description of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> method, in vivo examples to illustrate the method's clinical relevance, and finite element simulations to assess its accuracy. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons are made with leading single- and multi-level alternatives. In the in vivo examples, the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> method produces fewer obvious peak-hopping errors, and in simulation, the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> method is found to reduce displacement estimation errors by 5 to 50%. With typical clinical data, the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> method can generate more than 25 <span class="hlt">strain</span> images per second on commercial hardware; this is comparable with the alternative approaches considered in this paper.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840023620&hterms=new+elements&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dnew%2Belements','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840023620&hterms=new+elements&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dnew%2Belements"><span>New Variational Formulations of <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Stress Elements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pian, T. H. H.; Sumihara, K.; Kang, D.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>In the variational formulations of finite elements by the Hu-Washizu and Hellinger-Reissner principles the stress equilibrium condition is maintained by the inclusion of internal displacements which function as the Lagrange multipliers for the constraints. These versions permit the use of natural coordinates and the relaxation of the equilibrium conditions and render considerable improvements in the assumed stress <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> elements. These include the derivation of invariant <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> elements which possess the ideal qualities such as minimum sensitivity to geometric distortions, minimum number of independent stress parameters, rank sufficient, and ability to represent constant <span class="hlt">strain</span> states and bending moments. Another application is the formulation of semiLoof thin shell elements which can yield excellent results for many severe test cases because the rigid body nodes, the momentless membrane <span class="hlt">strains</span>, and the inextensional bending modes are all represented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12345946','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12345946"><span>Condom <span class="hlt">ads</span> promote illicit sex.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kippley, J F</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Written in 1987, this opinion was republished in the wake of US President Bill Clinton's AIDS prevention media campaign promoting condom use which began January 1994, targeted at young adults aged 18-25. The author staunchly opposes condom use even though he admits that people do not consider abstinence from sex to be a serious option for the prevention of HIV/STD infection. He believes that there is no moral use of sex with a condom and that condoms have always been a sign of immorality, be it prostitution, adultery, fornication, or marital contraception. Likewise, the author laments the success enjoyed by Planned Parenthood in achieving the social acceptance of marital contraception and sex outside of marriage. The complete social acceptance of homosexual activity, however, remains to be achieved. Magazines, newspapers, and television receive income in exchange for publishing or airing advertisements. Finding offensive advertisements which promote the use of condoms against HIV infection, the author recommends writing letters of complaint to the responsible media sources. If the television stations or publications in question continue to advertise condoms to the public, stop watching them or end one's subscriptions to the particular printed media. Such action taken collectively among many individuals will reduce product sales and income, and potentially sway corporate policy against condom <span class="hlt">ads</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title16-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title16-vol1-sec460-18.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title16-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title16-vol1-sec460-18.pdf"><span>16 CFR 460.18 - Insulation <span class="hlt">ads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... INSULATION § 460.18 Insulation <span class="hlt">ads</span>. (a) If your <span class="hlt">ad</span> gives an R-value, you must give the type of insulation and... your <span class="hlt">ad</span> gives a price, you must give the type of insulation, the R-value at a specific thickness, the... you give the price per square foot, you do not have to give the coverage area. (c) If your <span class="hlt">ad</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title16-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title16-vol1-sec460-18.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title16-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title16-vol1-sec460-18.pdf"><span>16 CFR 460.18 - Insulation <span class="hlt">ads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... INSULATION § 460.18 Insulation <span class="hlt">ads</span>. (a) If your <span class="hlt">ad</span> gives an R-value, you must give the type of insulation and... your <span class="hlt">ad</span> gives a price, you must give the type of insulation, the R-value at a specific thickness, the... you give the price per square foot, you do not have to give the coverage area. (c) If your <span class="hlt">ad</span>...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED537053.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED537053.pdf"><span>Myths & Facts about Value-<span class="hlt">Added</span> Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>TNTP, 2011</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This paper presents myths as well as facts about value-<span class="hlt">added</span> analysis. These myths include: (1) "Value-<span class="hlt">added</span> isn't fair to teachers who work in high-need schools, where students tend to lag far behind academically"; (2) "Value-<span class="hlt">added</span> scores are too volatile from year-to-year to be trusted"; (3) "There's no research behind value-<span class="hlt">added</span>"; (4) "Using…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/868686','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/868686"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> armature projectile</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Hawke, Ronald S.; Asay, James R.; Hall, Clint A.; Konrad, Carl H.; Sauve, Gerald L.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Susoeff, Allan R.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>A projectile for a railgun that uses a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> armature and provides a seed block around part of the outer surface of the projectile to seed the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> plasma brush. In addition, the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> armature is continuously vaporized to replenish plasma in a plasma armature to provide a tandem armature and provides a unique ridge and groove to reduce plasama blowby.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860000142&hterms=composite+hybrid&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dcomposite%2Bhybrid','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860000142&hterms=composite+hybrid&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dcomposite%2Bhybrid"><span>Intraply <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Composite Design</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Several theoretical approaches combined in program. Intraply <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> composites investigated theoretically and experimentally at Lewis Research Center. Theories developed during investigations and corroborated by attendant experiments used to develop computer program identified as INHYD (Intraply <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Composite Design). INHYD includes several composites micromechanics theories, intraply <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> composite theories, and integrated hygrothermomechanical theory. Equations from theories used by program as appropriate for user's specific applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6252120','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6252120"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> armature projectile</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Hawke, R.S.; Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H.; Sauve, G.L.; Shahinpoor, M.; Susoeff, A.R.</p> <p>1993-03-02</p> <p>A projectile for a railgun that uses a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> armature and provides a seed block around part of the outer surface of the projectile to seed the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> plasma brush. In addition, the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> armature is continuously vaporized to replenish plasma in a plasma armature to provide a tandem armature and provides a unique ridge and groove to reduce plasma blowby.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22390659','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22390659"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> quantum information processing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Furusawa, Akira</p> <p>2014-12-04</p> <p>I will briefly explain the definition and advantage of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> quantum information processing, which is <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> of qubit and continuous-variable technologies. The final goal would be realization of universal gate sets both for qubit and continuous-variable quantum information processing with the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> technologies. For that purpose, qubit teleportation with a continuousvariable teleporter is one of the most important ingredients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=270046','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=270046"><span>Homoploid <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> expectations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Homoploid <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> speciation occurs when a stable, fertile, and reproductively isolated lineage results from <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> between two distinct species without a change in ploidy level. Reproductive isolation between a homoploid <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> species and its parents is generally attained via chromosomal re...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050166882&hterms=Guenther&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DGuenther','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050166882&hterms=Guenther&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DGuenther"><span>New Features in the <span class="hlt">ADS</span> Abstract Service</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Eichhorn, Guenther; Accomazzi, Alberto; Grant, Carolyn S.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Henneken, Edwin A.; Thompson, Donna M.; Murray, Stephen S.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The NASA-<span class="hlt">ADS</span> Abstract Service provides a sophisticated search capability for the literature in Astronomy, Planetary Sciences, Physics/Geophysics, and Space Instrumentation. The <span class="hlt">ADS</span> is funded by NASA and access to the <span class="hlt">ADS</span> services is free to anybody world-wide without restrictions. It allows the user to search the literature by author, title, and abstract text.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title27-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title27-vol1-sec19-456.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title27-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title27-vol1-sec19-456.pdf"><span>27 CFR 19.456 - <span class="hlt">Adding</span> denaturants.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false <span class="hlt">Adding</span> denaturants. 19.456... Denaturation § 19.456 <span class="hlt">Adding</span> denaturants. Denaturants and spirits shall be mixed in packages, tanks, or bulk... proprietor shall submit a flow diagram of the intended process or method of <span class="hlt">adding</span> denaturants. (Sec....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0061-weighing-claims-diet-ads','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0061-weighing-claims-diet-ads"><span>Weighing the Claims in Diet <span class="hlt">Ads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... página en español Weighing the Claims in Diet <span class="hlt">Ads</span> Related Items Weight Loss Challenge Diet <span class="hlt">Ads</span> and ... control Information Network .  The Truth Behind Weight Loss <span class="hlt">Ads</span> Claims to watch out for include: Lose weight ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6045619','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6045619"><span>Superlattice <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Noel, B.W.; Smith, D.L.; Sinha, D.N.</p> <p>1988-06-28</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage comprising a <span class="hlt">strained</span>-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a <span class="hlt">strained</span>-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for <span class="hlt">strain</span>. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the <span class="hlt">strain</span> in the element. 8 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867314','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867314"><span>Superlattice <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Noel, Bruce W.; Smith, Darryl L.; Sinha, Dipen N.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage comprising a <span class="hlt">strained</span>-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a <span class="hlt">strained</span>-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for <span class="hlt">strain</span>. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the <span class="hlt">strain</span> in the element.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA129045','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA129045"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Experimental-Numerical Stress Analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1983-04-01</p> <p>components# biomechanics and fracture mechanics. .4 ELASTIC ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS The numerical techniques used In modern <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> technique for...measured E24] relations of probe force versus probe area under applanation tonametry. ELASTIC-PASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS Fracture parameters governing...models of the crack. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> energy release rate and stress intensity factor in linear elastic fracture mechanics, which is a well established analog</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23323447','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23323447"><span>[Isolation, charcaterization of an anthracene degrading bacterium Martelella sp. <span class="hlt">AD</span>-3 and cloning of dioxygenase gene].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cui, Chang-Zheng; Feng, Tian-Cai; Yu, Ya-Qi; Dong, Fei; Yang, Xin-Mei; Feng, Yao-Yu; Liu, Yong-Di; Lin, Han-Ping</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>Anthracene, among the 16 US EPA polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), is a typical low molecular weight environmental contaminant, which gains concern on its biodegradation under hypersaline condition. In this study, an anthracene-degrading bacterial <span class="hlt">strain</span> was isolated from highly saline petroleum-contaminated soil. Based on its physiological, biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, the bacteria was preliminary identified and named as Martelella sp. <span class="hlt">AD</span>-3. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> was able to utilize anthracene as sole carbon source for growth and the degradation occurred under broad salinities (0.1% to 10%) and varying pHs (6.0 to 10.0). The optimized degradation conditions were initial concentration 25 mg x L(-1), culture temperature 30 degrees C, pH 9.0 and salinity 3%. And 94.6% of anthracene was degraded by <span class="hlt">strain</span> <span class="hlt">AD</span>-3 under the optimal conditions within 6 days. Degenerate primers design was performed with a reported dioxygenase alpha subunit homologous gene. A length of 307 bp fragment of the partial dioxygenase gene sequences (GenBank accession: JF823991.1) was amplified by nested PCR. The clones amino acid sequence from <span class="hlt">strain</span> <span class="hlt">AD</span>-3 showed 95% identity to that of the partial naphthalene dioxygenase large-subunit from Marinobacter sp. NCE312 (AF295033). The results lay a foundation for the further study of molecular mechanism involved in the PAHs biodegradation by <span class="hlt">strain</span> <span class="hlt">AD</span>-3.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=168565','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=168565"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span>-specific differentiation of lactococci in mixed starter culture populations using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-derived probes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Erlandson, K; Batt, C A</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>A hydrophobic grid membrane filtration (HGMF) colony <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> assay was developed that allows <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific differentiation of defined bacterial populations. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting technique was used to identify potential signature nucleic acid sequences unique to each member of a commercial cheese starter culture blend. The blend consisted of two closely related Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris <span class="hlt">strains</span>, 160 and 331, and one L. lactis subsp. lactis <span class="hlt">strain</span>, 210. Three RAPD primers (OPX 1, OPX 12, and OPX 15) generated a total of 32 products from these isolates, 20 of which were potential <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific markers. Southern <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> analyses revealed, that the RAPD-generated signature sequences OPX15-0.95 and a 0.36-kb HaeIII fragment of OPX1-1.0b were specific for <span class="hlt">strains</span> 331 and 210, respectively, within the context of the test starter culture blend. These <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific probes were used in a HGMF colony <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> assay. Colony lysis, <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>, and nonradioactive detection parameters were optimized to allow specific differentiation and quantitation of the target <span class="hlt">strains</span> in the mixed starter culture population. When the 210 and 331 probes were tested at their optimal <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> temperatures against single cultures, they detected 100% of the target <span class="hlt">strain</span> CFUs, without cross-reactivity to the other <span class="hlt">strains</span>. The probes for <span class="hlt">strains</span> 210 and 331 also successfully detected their targets in blended cultures even with a high background of the other two <span class="hlt">strains</span>. PMID:9212417</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9212417','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9212417"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span>-specific differentiation of lactococci in mixed starter culture populations using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-derived probes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Erlandson, K; Batt, C A</p> <p>1997-07-01</p> <p>A hydrophobic grid membrane filtration (HGMF) colony <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> assay was developed that allows <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific differentiation of defined bacterial populations. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting technique was used to identify potential signature nucleic acid sequences unique to each member of a commercial cheese starter culture blend. The blend consisted of two closely related Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris <span class="hlt">strains</span>, 160 and 331, and one L. lactis subsp. lactis <span class="hlt">strain</span>, 210. Three RAPD primers (OPX 1, OPX 12, and OPX 15) generated a total of 32 products from these isolates, 20 of which were potential <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific markers. Southern <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> analyses revealed, that the RAPD-generated signature sequences OPX15-0.95 and a 0.36-kb HaeIII fragment of OPX1-1.0b were specific for <span class="hlt">strains</span> 331 and 210, respectively, within the context of the test starter culture blend. These <span class="hlt">strain</span>-specific probes were used in a HGMF colony <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> assay. Colony lysis, <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>, and nonradioactive detection parameters were optimized to allow specific differentiation and quantitation of the target <span class="hlt">strains</span> in the mixed starter culture population. When the 210 and 331 probes were tested at their optimal <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> temperatures against single cultures, they detected 100% of the target <span class="hlt">strain</span> CFUs, without cross-reactivity to the other <span class="hlt">strains</span>. The probes for <span class="hlt">strains</span> 210 and 331 also successfully detected their targets in blended cultures even with a high background of the other two <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050163141','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050163141"><span><span class="hlt">Strained</span> Hydrocarbons as Potential Hypergolic Fuels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>A storable combination of high-energy hypergolic fuel and oxidizer is advantageous to the future of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs). The combination will allow an increase in energy per unit volume of fuel and eliminate the need for an external ignition system. <span class="hlt">Strained</span> systems have been studied as potential high-density fuels. <span class="hlt">Adding</span> hypergolic functional groups, such as amino groups, to these hydrocarbons will potentially allow auto ignition of <span class="hlt">strained</span> systems with hydrogen peroxide. Several straight chain amines and their <span class="hlt">strained</span> counterparts containing an equivalent number of carbon atoms have been purchased and synthesized. These amines provide initial studies to determine the effects of fuel vapor pressure, <span class="hlt">strain</span> energy, fuel miscibility, and amine substitution upon fuel ignition time and hypergolicity with hydrogen peroxide as an oxidizer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IPNPR.201B...1T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IPNPR.201B...1T"><span>RF/Optical <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Antenna</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Torrez, T. M.</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>This article details analyses performed on several variations of a proposed radio frequency (RF)/optical <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> antenna. The goal was to determine the structural impact of <span class="hlt">adding</span> an assembly of optical mirrors to the antenna; stresses in the structural members and reflector surface deformation were used to assess this impact. The results showed that the structure could handle the <span class="hlt">added</span> assembly, and the surface RMS increased, as expected, with larger increases seen as the antenna translates in elevation from the rigging angle of 45 deg (a predetermined location chosen to optimize panel settings during installation). In addition, actuators are located behind each optical mirror to reoptimize the mirror positions after they deflect due to the antenna being tipped in elevation. The necessary actuator motion was calculated for each mirror for a range of elevation angles, and it was found that the required motions are achievable by commonly used actuators. Resonant frequency analysis was also performed on the quadripod and tripod (for DSS-13 at Goldstone) to determine the effect that <span class="hlt">adding</span> optical components on the apex has on the structure and its first mode; it was found that the impact is minimal to both the stresses seen in the structure and its first mode.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997AAS...191.3502E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997AAS...191.3502E"><span>Historical Literature in the <span class="hlt">ADS</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Eichhorn, G.; Kurtz, M. J.; Accomazzi, A.; Grant, C. S.</p> <p>1997-12-01</p> <p>The Astrophysics Data System at http://adswww.harvard.edu is in the process of scanning the historical astronomical literature and making it available through the World Wide Web. We have scanned several volumes from the early 1800's of the "Astronomische Nachrichten", and the "Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society", the two oldest astronomical journals. We also have several of the early volumes of the "Astrophysical Journal" and the "Astronomical Journal" available. For all the journals that we cover, we have scanned volume 1. These early volumes can be accessed on a page-by-page basis. We plan to continue to scan this historical literature and complete these journals within the next year. We are also collaborating with a preservation project at Harvard University. This project will microfilm selected parts of astronomical Observatory reports. We plan to scan these microfilms to produce electronic images of these reports and put them on-line in the <span class="hlt">ADS</span>. We hope to eventually cover most of the astronomical literature. In order to organize the scanned pages into articles, we need tables of contents (ToC). The early issues of the journals did not have printed ToC pages, so this needs to be done by hand. We do not have the financial resources to build these ToCs. We are looking for collaborators who would be willing to work with us in building these ToCs for the older journals and observatory reports. If you are interested in such a project, please contact the first author at gei@cfa.harvard.edu.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhLA..380.3766Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhLA..380.3766Z"><span>A new <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> phononic crystal in low frequencies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Z.; Han, X. K.</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>A novel <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> phononic crystal is designed to obtain wider band gaps in low frequency range. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> phononic crystal consists of rubber slab with periodic holes and plumbum stubs. In comparison with the phononic crystal without periodic holes, the new designed phononic crystal can obtain wider band gaps and better vibration damping characteristics. The wider band gap can be attributed to the interaction of local resonance and Bragg scattering. The controlling of the BG is explained by the <span class="hlt">strain</span> energy of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> PC and the introduced effective mass. The effects of the geometrical parameters and the shapes of the stubs and holes on the controlling of waves are further studied.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DMP.C4002M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DMP.C4002M"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> engineering of diamond silicon vacancy centers in MEMS cantilevers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Meesala, Srujan; Sohn, Young-Ik; Atikian, Haig; Holzgrafe, Jeffrey; Zhang, Mian; Burek, Michael; Loncar, Marko</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>The silicon vacancy (SiV) center in diamond has recently attracted attention as a solid state quantum emitter due to its attractive optical properties. We fabricate diamond MEMS cantilevers, and use electrostatic actuation to apply controlled <span class="hlt">strain</span> fields to single SiV centers implanted in these devices. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> response of the four electronic transitions of the SiV at 737 nm is measured via cryogenic (4 K) photoluminescence excitation. We demonstrate over 300 GHz of tuning for the mean transition frequency between the ground and excited states, and over 100 GHz of tuning for the orbital splittings within the ground and excited states. The interaction Hamiltonian for <span class="hlt">strain</span> fields is inferred, and large <span class="hlt">strain</span> susceptibilities of the order 1 PHz/<span class="hlt">strain</span> are measured. We discuss prospects to utilize our device to reduce phonon-induced decoherence in SiV spin qubits, and to exploit the large <span class="hlt">strain</span> susceptibilities for <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> quantum systems based on nanomechanical resonators.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhDT.......129R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhDT.......129R"><span>Structural and Mechanical Properties of Silica and <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Aerogels and Xerogels Studied Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rivas Murillo, John Sandro</p> <p></p> <p>The structural and mechanical properties of silica and <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> aerogels and xerogels are studied using Molecular Dynamics simulations. <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> samples are created by <span class="hlt">adding</span> methyl groups (CH3) to the silica structure. Silica samples are generated expanding a dense silica glass in a simulation box of volume chosen to produce a porous sample of a specified density. The expanded glass is thermally treated using a combination of heating and cooling processes. The heating process increases the kinetic energy of the atoms in the system, which facilitates their movement throughout the system. The cooling process reduces the kinetic energy of the atoms and helps locking them in place forming the desired porous structure. A similar procedure is used to create the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> samples, but CH3-SiO2 molecules are randomly inserted in the expanded structure before the thermal treatment of the sample. The structures are characterized estimating the fractal dimension of the samples. It is calculated using its relationship with the decay of the Pair Distribution Function of the samples in the intermediate range of structural arrangement. The fractal dimension of the samples used for this study compares favorably to the values found reported in experimental studies, which validates the preparation processes used here. The mechanical properties of the samples are obtained by modeling a tension test performed by stretching the sample along one direction. The stress vs. <span class="hlt">strain</span> relationship is estimated for all the samples. The results reproduce trends similar to those reported from physical experiments. The computational models show that the addition of methyl groups reduces the stiffness of the structure allowing it to stretch more easily, and increasing the toughness of the samples. From the stress-<span class="hlt">strain</span> plots is concluded that as the amount of methyl groups in the structure is increased also does the compliance of the sample, effectively making the nature of the material similar to a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9710E..0OZ','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9710E..0OZ"><span>Robust <span class="hlt">strain</span> mapping in optical coherence elastography by combining local phase-resolved measurements and cumulative displacement tracking</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zaitsev, Vladimir Y.; Matveyev, Alexander L.; Matveev, Lev A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Gubarkova, Ekaterina; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Vitkin, Alex</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>We report a novel <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> method of robust <span class="hlt">strain</span> mapping in compressional optical coherence elastography using combined phase measurements on sub-wavelength-scale and cumulative pixel-scale displacement tracking. This <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> nature significantly extends the range of measurable displacements and <span class="hlt">strains</span> in comparison with conventional direct phase-resolved measurements. As a result, the proposed <span class="hlt">strain</span>-mapping method exhibits significantly increased robustness with respect to both additive noise and decorrelation noise produced by displacements and <span class="hlt">strains</span>. The main advantages of the proposed approach are illustrated by numerical simulations. Experimental examples of obtained <span class="hlt">strain</span> maps for phantoms and real biological tissues are also presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EPJC...77...24O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EPJC...77...24O"><span>Joule-Thomson expansion of the charged <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ökcü, Özgür; Aydıner, Ekrem</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>In this paper, we study Joule-Thomson effects for charged <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes. We obtain inversion temperatures and curves. We investigate similarities and differences between van der Waals fluids and charged <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes for the expansion. We obtain isenthalpic curves for both systems in the T- P plane and determine the cooling-heating regions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27925739','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27925739"><span>Static Einstein-Maxwell Black Holes with No Spatial Isometries in <span class="hlt">AdS</span> Space.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Herdeiro, Carlos A R; Radu, Eugen</p> <p>2016-11-25</p> <p>We explicitly construct static black hole solutions to the fully nonlinear, D=4, Einstein-Maxwell-anti-de Sitter (<span class="hlt">AdS</span>) equations that have no continuous spatial symmetries. These black holes have a smooth, topologically spherical horizon (section), but without isometries, and approach, asymptotically, global <span class="hlt">AdS</span> spacetime. They are interpreted as bound states of a horizon with the Einstein-Maxwell-<span class="hlt">Ad</span>S solitons recently discovered, for appropriate boundary data. In sharp contrast to the uniqueness results for a Minkowski electrovacuum, the existence of these black holes shows that single, equilibrium, black hole solutions in an <span class="hlt">AdS</span> electrovacuum admit an arbitrary multipole structure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19817565','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19817565"><span>Effects of <span class="hlt">ad</span> placement and type on consumer responses to podcast <span class="hlt">ads</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ritter, Eric A; Cho, Chang-Hoan</p> <p>2009-10-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to understand the effects of podcast <span class="hlt">ad</span> placement and podcast <span class="hlt">ad</span> type on consumers' perceived intrusiveness, perceived irritation, attitude toward the <span class="hlt">ad</span>, and <span class="hlt">ad</span> avoidance. Our 2 x 2 (traditional <span class="hlt">ad</span> vs. sponsorship by beginning vs. middle) experimental study found that sponsorships generated better consumer responses than did traditional <span class="hlt">ads</span> and that podcast <span class="hlt">ads</span> placed at the beginning of audio podcasts yielded better consumer responses than those placed in the middle. Implications for marketers and advertisers are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IJMPA..3050098O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IJMPA..3050098O"><span>Boundary conditions for conformally coupled scalar in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>4</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Oh, Jae-Hyuk</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>We consider conformally coupled scalar with ɸ4 coupling in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>4 and study its various boundary conditions on <span class="hlt">AdS</span> boundary. We have obtained perturbative solutions of equation of motion of the conformally coupled scalar with power expansion order by order in ɸ4 coupling λ up to λ2 order. In its dual CFT, we get 2, 4 and 6 point functions by using this solution with Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions via <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT dictionary. We also consider marginal deformation on <span class="hlt">AdS</span> boundary and get its on-shell and boundary effective actions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20991103','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20991103"><span>Inseparability of photon-<span class="hlt">added</span> Gaussian states</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Li Hongrong; Li Fuli; Zhu Shiyao</p> <p>2007-06-15</p> <p>The inseparability of photon-<span class="hlt">added</span> Gaussian states which are generated from two-mode Gaussian states by <span class="hlt">adding</span> photons is investigated. According to the established inseparability conditions [New J. Phys. 7, 211 (2005); Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 050503 (2006)], we find that even if a two-mode Gaussian state is separable, the photon-<span class="hlt">added</span> Gaussian state becomes entangled when the purity of the Gaussian state is larger than a certain value. The lower bound of entanglement of symmetric photon-<span class="hlt">added</span> Gaussian states is derived. The result shows that entanglement of the photon-<span class="hlt">added</span> Gaussian states is involved with high-order moment correlations. We find that fidelity of teleporting coherent states cannot be raised by employing the photon-<span class="hlt">added</span> Gaussian states as a quantum channel of teleportation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1815f0013K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1815f0013K"><span>Comparing the new generation accelerator driven subcritical reactor system (<span class="hlt">ADS</span>) to traditional critical reactors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kemah, Elif; Akkaya, Recep; Tokgöz, Seyit Rıza</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>In recent years, the accelerator driven subcritical reactors have taken great interest worldwide. The Accelerator Driven System (<span class="hlt">ADS</span>) has been used to produce neutron in subcritical state by the external proton beam source. These reactors, which are <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> systems, are important in production of clean and safe energy and conversion of radioactive waste. The <span class="hlt">ADS</span> with the selection of reliability and robust target materials have been the new generation of fission reactors. In addition, in the <span class="hlt">ADS</span> Reactors the problems of long-lived radioactive fission products and waste actinides encountered in the fission process of the reactor during incineration can be solved, and <span class="hlt">ADS</span> has come to the forefront of thorium as fuel for the reactors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24261149','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24261149"><span>Patient-centered care as value-<span class="hlt">added</span> service by compounding pharmacists.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McPherson, Timothy B; Fontane, Patrick E; Day, Jonathan R</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The term "value-<span class="hlt">added</span>" is widely used to describe business and professional services that complement a product or service or that differentiate it from competing products and services. The objective of this study was to determine compounding pharmacists' self-perceptions of the value-<span class="hlt">added</span> services they provide. A web-based survey method was used. Respondents' perceptions of their most important value-<span class="hlt">added</span> service frequently fell into one of two categories: (1) enhanced pharmacist contribution to developing and implementing patient therapeutic plans and (2) providing customized medications of high pharmaceutical quality. The results were consistent with a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> community clinical practice model for compounding pharmacists wherein personalization of the professional relationship is the value-<span class="hlt">added</span> characteristic.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880001762','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880001762"><span>Elevated temperature <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Brittain, J. O.; Geslin, D.; Lei, J. F.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Materials were evaluated that could be used in manufacturing electrical resistance <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages for static <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurements at temperatures at or above 1273 K. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> gage materials must have a characteristic response to <span class="hlt">strain</span>, temperature and time that is reproducible or that varies in a predictable manner within specified limits. Several metallic alloys were evaluated, as well as a series of transition metal carbides, nitrides and silicides.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19798565','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19798565"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> mice as genetic models of high alcohol consumption.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Blednov, Y A; Ozburn, A R; Walker, D; Ahmed, S; Belknap, J K; Harris, R A</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>We showed that F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> genotypes may provide a broader variety of ethanol drinking phenotypes than the inbred progenitor <span class="hlt">strains</span> used to create the <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> (Blednov et al. in Alcohol Clin Exp Res 29:1949-1958, 2005). To extend this work, we characterized alcohol consumption as well as intake of other tastants (saccharin, quinine and sodium chloride) in five inbred <span class="hlt">strains</span> of mice (FVB, SJL, B6, BUB, NZB) and in their reciprocal F1 <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> with B6 (FVBxB6; B6xFVB; NZBxB6; B6xNZB; BUBxB6; B6xBUB; SJLxB6; B6xSJL). We also compared ethanol intake in these mice for several concentrations before and after two periods of abstinence. F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> mice derived from the crosses of B6 and FVB and also B6 and SJL drank higher levels of ethanol than their progenitor <span class="hlt">strains</span>, demonstrating overdominance for two-bottle choice drinking test. The B6 and NZB <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> showed additivity in two-bottle choice drinking, whereas the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> of B6 and BUB demonstrated full or complete dominance. Genealogical origin, as well as non-alcohol taste preferences (sodium chloride), predicted ethanol consumption. Mice derived from the crosses of B6 and FVB showed high sustained alcohol preference and the B6 and NZB <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> showed reduced alcohol preference after periods of abstinence. These new genetic models offer some advantages over inbred <span class="hlt">strains</span> because they provide high, sustained, alcohol intake, and should allow mapping of loci important for the genetic architecture of these traits.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5723139','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5723139"><span>Stellarmak a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> stellarator: Spheromak</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hartman, C.W.</p> <p>1980-01-04</p> <p>This paper discusses <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> of modified Stellarator-like transform windings (T-windings) with a Spheromak or Field-Reversed-Mirror configuration. This configuration, Stellarmak, retains the important topological advantage of the Spheromak or FRM of having no plasma linking conductors or blankets. The T-windings provide rotational transformation in toroidal angle of the outer poloidal field lines, in effect creating a reversed B/sub Toroidal/ Spheromak or <span class="hlt">adding</span> average B/sub T/ to the FRM producing higher shear, increased limiting ..beta.., and possibly greater stability to kinks and tilt. The presence of field ripple in the toroidal direction may be sufficient to inhibit cancellation of directed ion current by electron drag to allow steady state operation with the toroidal as well as poloidal current maintained by neutral beams.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/sprainsandstrains.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/sprainsandstrains.html"><span>Sprains and <span class="hlt">Strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... happens. A <span class="hlt">strain</span> is a stretched or torn muscle or tendon. Tendons are tissues that connect muscle to bone. Twisting or pulling these tissues can ... suddenly or develop over time. Back and hamstring muscle <span class="hlt">strains</span> are common. Many people get <span class="hlt">strains</span> playing ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1259658','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1259658"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> radiator cooling system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.</p> <p>2016-03-15</p> <p>A method and <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA614376','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA614376"><span>Requirements for <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Cosimulation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-08-16</p> <p><span class="hlt">hybrid</span> cosimulation version of the Functional Mockup Interface ( FMI ) standard. A cosimulation standard de nes interfaces that enable diverse simulation...This <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> mixture is not well supported by existing cosimulation standards, and speci cally not by FMI 2.0, for reasons that are explained in this...cosimulation standards, and specifically provides guidance for development of a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> cosimulation version of the Functional Mockup Interface ( FMI ) standard</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA041560','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA041560"><span>Tensile Stress-<span class="hlt">Strain</span> Curves--III, Rolled Homogeneous Armor at a <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Rate of 0.042 per second</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1977-06-01</p> <p>adhesive. The gage resistance is nominally 120 ohms and the nominal gage factor is 2.03. One <span class="hlt">strain</span> gage pair measured the axial <span class="hlt">strain</span>, the second gage...Proving Ground , MD, November 1976. <span class="hlt">AD</span> #B0~6015L 8. G. E. Hauver, "The Alpha Phase Hugoniot of Rolled Homogeneous Armor ", BRL Memorandum Report No...1 i ’ ! .,: MEMORANDUM REPORT NO. 2760 "" ’ l TENSILE STRESS-<span class="hlt">STRAIN</span> CURVES--Ill, ROLLED HOMOGENEOUS ARMOR AT A <span class="hlt">STRAIN</span> RATE OF 0.42 S-l Ralph</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SMaS...24c5020M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SMaS...24c5020M"><span>Soft metal constructs for large <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor membrane</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Michaud, Hadrien O.; Teixidor, Joan; Lacour, Stéphanie P.</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Thin gold films on silicone display large reversible change in electrical resistance upon stretching. Eutectic liquid metal conductors maintain bulk metal conductivity, even upon extensive elongation. When integrated together, the soft metals enable multidirectional, large <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor skin. Their fabrication process combines thermal evaporation of thin gold film patterns through stencil mask with microplotting of eutectic gallium indium microwires, and packaging in silicone rubber. Using three-element rectangular rosettes, we demonstrate a sensor skin that can reliably and locally quantify the plane <span class="hlt">strain</span> vector in surfaces subject to stretch (up to 50% <span class="hlt">strain</span>) and indentation. This <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> technology will find applications in soft robotics, prosthetics and wearable health monitoring systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010LNCS.6213...11D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010LNCS.6213...11D"><span>Mechanism Design for Multi-slot <span class="hlt">Ads</span> Auction in Sponsored Search Markets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Deng, Xiaotie; Sun, Yang; Yin, Ming; Zhou, Yunhong</p> <p></p> <p>In this paper, we study pricing models for multi-slot advertisements, where advertisers can bid to place links to their sales webpages at one or multiple slots on a webpage, called the multi-slot <span class="hlt">AD</span> auction problem. We develop and analyze several important mechanisms, including the VCG mechanism for multi-slot <span class="hlt">ads</span> auction, the optimal social welfare solution, as well as two weighted GSP-like protocols (mixed and <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>). Furthermore, we consider that forward-looking Nash equilibrium and prove its existence in the weighted GSP-like pricing protocols.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvD..95f6004M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvD..95f6004M"><span>From path integrals to tensor networks for the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> /CFT correspondence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Miyaji, Masamichi; Takayanagi, Tadashi; Watanabe, Kento</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>In this paper, we discuss tensor network descriptions of <span class="hlt">AdS</span> /CFT from two different viewpoints. First, we start with a Euclidean path-integral computation of ground state wave functions with a UV cutoff. We consider its efficient optimization by making its UV cutoff position dependent and define a quantum state at each length scale. We conjecture that this path integral corresponds to a time slice of anti-de Sitter (<span class="hlt">AdS</span>) spacetime. Next, we derive a flow of quantum states by rewriting the action of Killing vectors of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 in terms of the dual two-dimensional conformal field theory (CFT). Both approaches support a correspondence between the hyperbolic time slice H2 in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 and a version of continuous multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz. We also give a heuristic argument about why we can expect a sub-<span class="hlt">Ad</span>S scale bulk locality for holographic CFTs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JAP...121d4905D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JAP...121d4905D"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> powered antennas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Domann, John P.; Carman, Greg P.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>This paper proposes the creation of <span class="hlt">strain</span> powered antennas that radiate electromagnetic energy by mechanically vibrating a piezoelectric or piezomagnetic material. A closed form analytic model of electromagnetic radiation from a <span class="hlt">strain</span> powered electrically small antenna is derived and analyzed. Fundamental scaling laws and the frequency dependence of <span class="hlt">strain</span> powered antennas are discussed. The radiation efficiency of <span class="hlt">strain</span> powered electrically small antennas is contrasted with a conventional electric dipole. Analytical results show that operating at the first mechanical resonance produces the most efficient <span class="hlt">strain</span> powered radiation relative to electric dipole antennas. A resonant analysis is exploited to determine the material property space that produces efficient <span class="hlt">strain</span> powered antennas. These results show how a properly designed <span class="hlt">strain</span> powered antenna can radiate more efficiently than an equally sized electric dipole antenna.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JHEP...05..018K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JHEP...05..018K"><span>= 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kuzenko, Sergei M.; Tartaglino-Mazzucchelli, Gabriele</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>For all types of = 4 anti-de Sitter (<span class="hlt">AdS</span>) supersymmetry in three dimensions, we construct manifestly supersymmetric actions for Abelian vector multiplets and explain how to extend the construction to the non-Abelian case. Manifestly = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) actions are explicitly given in the cases of (2,2) and critical (4,0) <span class="hlt">AdS</span> supersymmetries. The = 4 vector multiplets and the corresponding actions are then reduced to (2,0) <span class="hlt">AdS</span> superspace, in which only = 2 supersymmetry is manifest. Using the off-shell structure of the = 4 vector multiplets, we provide complete = 4 SYM actions in (2,0) <span class="hlt">AdS</span> superspace for all types of = 4 <span class="hlt">AdS</span> supersymmetry. In the case of (4,0) <span class="hlt">AdS</span> supersymmetry, which admits a Euclidean counterpart, the resulting = 2 action contains a Chern-Simons term proportional to q/r, where r is the radius of <span class="hlt">AdS</span> 3 and q is the R-charge of a chiral scalar superfield. The R-charge is a linear inhomogeneous function of X, an expectation value of the = 4 Cotton superfield. Thus our results explain the mysterious structure of = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories on S 3 discovered in arXiv:1401.7952. In the case of (3,1) <span class="hlt">AdS</span> supersymmetry, which has no Euclidean counterpart, the SYM action contains both a Chern-Simons term and a chiral mass-like term. In the case of (2,2) <span class="hlt">AdS</span> supersymmetry, which admits a Euclidean counterpart, the SYM action has no Chern-Simons and chiral mass-like terms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.hrpub.org/journals/article_info.php?aid=2145','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://www.hrpub.org/journals/article_info.php?aid=2145"><span>From <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> swarms to swarms of <span class="hlt">hybrids</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Szalanski, Allen L; Gaskin, John F.; Young, Nicholas E.; West, Amanda; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Tripodi, Amber</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Science has shown that the introgression or <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> of modern humans (Homo sapiens) with Neanderthals up to 40,000 YBP may have led to the swarm of modern humans on earth. However, there is little doubt that modern trade and transportation in support of the humans has continued to introduce additional species, genotypes, and <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> to every country on the globe. We assessed the utility of species distributions modeling of genotypes to assess the risk of current and future invaders. We evaluated 93 locations of the genus Tamarix for which genetic data were available. Maxent models of habitat suitability showed that the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>, T. ramosissima x T. chinensis, was slightly greater than the parent taxa (AUCs > 0.83). General linear models of Africanized honey bees, a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> cross of Tanzanian Apis mellifera scutellata and a variety of European honey bee including A. m. ligustica, showed that the Africanized bees (AUC = 0.81) may be displacing European honey bees (AUC > 0.76) over large areas of the southwestern U.S. More important, Maxent modeling of sub-populations (A1 and A26 mitotypes based on mDNA) could be accurately modeled (AUC > 0.9), and they responded differently to environmental drivers. This suggests that rapid evolutionary change may be underway in the Africanized bees, allowing the bees to spread into new areas and extending their total range. Protecting native species and ecosystems may benefit from risk maps of harmful invasive species, <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>, and genotypes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fair+AND+value&pg=6&id=EJ874617','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fair+AND+value&pg=6&id=EJ874617"><span>Beyond Test Scores: <span class="hlt">Adding</span> Value to Assessment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rothman, Robert</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>At a time when teacher quality has emerged as a key factor in student learning, a statistical technique that determines the "value <span class="hlt">added</span>" that teachers bring to student achievement is getting new scrutiny. Value-<span class="hlt">added</span> measures compare students' growth in achievement to their expected growth, based on prior achievement and demographic…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhLB..765...67C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhLB..765...67C"><span>Thermodynamic geometry and phase transitions of <span class="hlt">AdS</span> braneworld black holes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Sengupta, Gautam</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>The thermodynamics and phase transitions of charged RN-<span class="hlt">Ad</span>S and rotating Kerr-<span class="hlt">Ad</span>S black holes in a generalized Randall-Sundrum braneworld are investigated in the framework of thermodynamic geometry. A detailed analysis of the thermodynamics, stability and phase structures in the canonical and the grand canonical ensembles for these <span class="hlt">AdS</span> braneworld black holes are described. The thermodynamic curvatures for both these <span class="hlt">AdS</span> braneworld black holes are computed and studied as a function of the thermodynamic variables. Through this analysis we illustrate an interesting dependence of the phase structures on the braneworld parameter for these black holes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110011871','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110011871"><span>Next-Generation <span class="hlt">A/D</span> Sampler <span class="hlt">ADS</span>3000+ for VLBI2010</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Masanori; Koyama, Yasuhiro</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>A high-speed <span class="hlt">A/D</span> sampler, called <span class="hlt">ADS</span>3000+, has been developed in 2008, which can sample one analog signal up to 4 Gbps to versatile Linux PC. After <span class="hlt">A/D</span> conversion, the <span class="hlt">ADS</span>3000+ can perform digital signal processing such as real-time DBBC (Digital Base Band Conversion) and FIR filtering such as simple CW RFI filtering using the installed FPGAs. A 4 Gsps fringe test with the <span class="hlt">ADS</span>3000+ has been successfully performed. The <span class="hlt">ADS</span>3000+ will not exclusively be used for VLBI but will also be employed in other applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhLB..766...94M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhLB..766...94M"><span>Holographic complexity and fidelity susceptibility as holographic information dual to different volumes in <span class="hlt">AdS</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mazhari, N. S.; Momeni, Davood; Bahamonde, Sebastian; Faizal, Mir; Myrzakulov, Ratbay</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>The holographic complexity and fidelity susceptibility have been defined as new quantities dual to different volumes in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>. In this paper, we will use these new proposals to calculate both of these quantities for a variety of interesting deformations of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>. We obtain the holographic complexity and fidelity susceptibility for an <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black hole, Janus solution, a solution with cylindrical symmetry, an inhomogeneous background and a hyperscaling violating background. It is observed that the holographic complexity depends on the size of the subsystem for all these solutions and the fidelity susceptibility does not have any such dependence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25736411','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25736411"><span>Revision of the taxonomic status of type <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Mesorhizobium loti and reclassification of <span class="hlt">strain</span> USDA 3471T as the type <span class="hlt">strain</span> of Mesorhizobiumerdmanii sp. nov. and ATCC 33669T as the type <span class="hlt">strain</span> of Mesorhizobiumjarvisii sp. nov.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; Flores-Félix, José David; Rivas, Raúl; Igual, José M; Mateos, Pedro F; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; León-Barrios, Milagros; Peix, Álvaro; Velázquez, Encarna</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>The species Mesorhizobim loti was isolated from nodules of Lotus corniculatus and its type <span class="hlt">strain</span> deposited in several collections. Some of these type <span class="hlt">strains</span>, such as those deposited in the USDA and ATCC collections before 1990, are not coincident with the original <span class="hlt">strain</span>, NZP 2213T, deposited in the NZP culture collection. The analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed that <span class="hlt">strains</span> USDA 3471T and ATCC 33669T formed independent branches from that occupied by Mesorhizobium loti NZP 2213T and related to those occupied by Mesorhizobium opportunistum WSM2075T and Mesorhizobium huakuii IFO 15243T, respectively, with 99.9 % similarity in both cases. However, the analysis of concatenated recA, atpD and glnII genes with similarities lower than 96, 98 and 94 %, respectively, between <span class="hlt">strains</span> USDA 3471T and M. opportunistum WSM2075T and between <span class="hlt">strains</span> ATCC 33669T and M. huakuii IFO 15243T, indicated that the <span class="hlt">strains</span> USDA 3471T and ATCC 33669T represent different species of the genus Mesorhizobium. These results were confirmed by DNA-DNA <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> experiments and phenotypic characterization. Therefore, the two <span class="hlt">strains</span> were reclassified as representatives of the two species Mesorhizobium erdmanii sp. nov. (type <span class="hlt">strain</span> USDA 3471T = CECT 8631T = LMG 17826t2T) and Mesorhizobium jarvisii sp. nov. (type <span class="hlt">strain</span> ATCC 33669T = CECT 8632T = LMG 28313T).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7039389','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7039389"><span>Micromechanical behavior of single-fiber type and <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> microcomposites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Qiu Yiping.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Single-fiber type and <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> microcomposites were fabricated using Kevlar {reg sign} 149 as the low elongation (LE) fiber and S-glass fibers as the high elongation fiber using a DER 331/DER 732 epoxy mixture (70/30, w/w). In tensile tests, it was found that Kevlar{reg sign} 149 fiber was significantly stronger in the microcomposite than as a single filament. For the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> microcomposite, Kevlar{reg sign} 149 fibers usually broke one by one. A positive <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> effect for the failure <span class="hlt">strain</span> but a negative <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> effect for the strength of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> were observed. The tensile modulus of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> microcomposite followed the rule of mixtures well. The fiber/matrix interface properties were investigated using the single-fiber pull-out from a microcomposite (SFPOM) test and the microbond test. SFPOM test reflected the feeling of the fibers in a real composite, showing the decrease of interfacial shear strength (IFSS) with fiber volume fraction increase. To predict the stress-rupture lifetime of a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> composite, a stochastic model was proposed assuming that the failure of LE fibers in a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> follows a continuous time Markov chain.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1228726','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1228726"><span>Final Technical Report for Terabit-scale <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> networking project.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Veeraraghavan, Malathi</p> <p>2015-12-12</p> <p>This report describes our accomplishments and activities for the project titled Terabit-Scale <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Networking. The key accomplishment is that we developed, tested and deployed an Alpha Flow Characterization System (AFCS) in ESnet. It is being run in production mode since Sept. 2015. Also, a new QoS class was <span class="hlt">added</span> to ESnet5 to support alpha flows.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21942021','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21942021"><span>[Rapid analysis of <span class="hlt">added</span> ingredients in heroin].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Ji-fen; Yu, Jing; Guo, Xin; Sun, Xing-long; Wang, Ding-fang</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>The method of rapid analysis of <span class="hlt">added</span> ingredients in heroin was studied in the present paper. <span class="hlt">Adding</span> sucrose, fructose, glucose, starch, caffeine and phenacetin to heroin with a certain percentage, the changes in the infrared spectrum with the concentration of heroin increasing and the detection limit of the additives were determined. Whether or not heroin can be detected in the sample with high concentration of <span class="hlt">added</span> ingredients was studied using Raman spectroscopy. Similarly, in high purity of heroin, whether or not Raman spectroscopy can detect the <span class="hlt">added</span> ingredients was tested. Through systematic experiments, the results showed that: using infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy to test the <span class="hlt">added</span> ingredients of heroin is a rapid and effective method. Each has both advantages and disadvantages. We should select the appropriate method according to the actual cases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930010016','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930010016"><span>The eleven observations of comets between 687 <span class="hlt">AD</span> and 1114 <span class="hlt">AD</span> recorded in the Anglo Saxon Chronicle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mardon, E. G.; Williams, J.; Mardon, A. A.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>This research paper is an examination of the eleven cometary references (679<span class="hlt">AD</span>, 729<span class="hlt">AD</span>, 892<span class="hlt">AD</span>, 950<span class="hlt">AD</span>, 975<span class="hlt">AD</span>, 995<span class="hlt">AD</span>, 1066<span class="hlt">AD</span>, 1097<span class="hlt">AD</span>, 1106<span class="hlt">AD</span>, 1110<span class="hlt">AD</span> and 1114<span class="hlt">AD</span>) found in the various manuscripts of The Anglo Saxon Chronicle between 678 <span class="hlt">AD</span> and 1114 <span class="hlt">AD</span>. The manuscripts contain more than 35 celestial observations. This is an examination of astronomical phenomena and other climatic or natural events, that are described in The Anglo Saxon Chronicle, which is also referred to as The Old English Annals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22488535','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22488535"><span>Quantitative evaluation of orbital <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> in carbon nanotubes under radial deformation using π-orbital axis vector</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ohnishi, Masato; Suzuki, Ken; Miura, Hideo</p> <p>2015-04-15</p> <p>When a radial <span class="hlt">strain</span> is applied to a carbon nanotube (CNT), the increase in local curvature induces orbital <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>. The effect of the curvature-induced orbital <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> on the electronic properties of CNTs, however, has not been evaluated quantitatively. In this study, the strength of orbital <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> in CNTs under homogeneous radial <span class="hlt">strain</span> was evaluated quantitatively. Our analyses revealed the detailed procedure of the change in electronic structure of CNTs. In addition, the dihedral angle, the angle between π-orbital axis vectors of adjacent atoms, was found to effectively predict the strength of local orbital <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> in deformed CNTs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/878087','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/878087"><span>Inflation in <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Freivogel, Ben; Hubeny, Veronika E.; Maloney, Alexander; Myers, Rob; Rangamani, Mukund; Shenker, Stephen; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.</p> <p>2005-10-07</p> <p>We study the realization of inflation within the <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT correspondence. We assume the existence of a string landscape containing at least one stable <span class="hlt">AdS</span> vacuum and a (nearby) metastable de Sitter state. Standard arguments imply that the bulk physics in the vicinity of the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> minimum is described by a boundary CFT. We argue that large enough bubbles of the dS phase, including those able to inflate, are described by mixed states in the CFT. Inflating degrees of freedom are traced over and do not appear explicitly in the boundary description. They nevertheless leave a distinct imprint on the mixed state. Analytic continuation allows us, in principle, to recover a large amount of nonperturbatively defined information about the inflating regime. Our work also shows that no scattering process can create an inflating region, even by quantum tunneling, since a pure state can never evolve into a mixed state under unitary evolution.We study the realization of inflation within the <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT correspondence. We assume the existence of a string landscape containing at least one stable <span class="hlt">AdS</span> vacuum and a (nearby) metastable de Sitter state. Standard arguments imply that the bulk physics in the vicinity of the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> minimum is described by a boundary CFT. We argue that large enough bubbles of the dS phase, including those able to inflate, are described by mixed states in the CFT. Inflating degrees of freedom are traced over and do not appear explicitly in the boundary description. They nevertheless leave a distinct imprint on the mixed state. Analytic continuation allows us, in principle, to recover a large amount of nonperturbatively defined information about the inflating regime. Our work also shows that no scattering process can create an inflating region, even by quantum tunneling, since a pure state can never evolve into a mixed state under unitary evolution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19070153','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19070153"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> production of oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq: Fries) Kummer.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gharehaghaji, A Nikzad; Goltapeh, E Mohammadi; Masiha, S; Gordan, H R</p> <p>2007-07-15</p> <p>Optimization of industrial mushroom production depends on improving the culture process and breeding new <span class="hlt">strains</span> with higher yields and productivities. So many works have been done on process improvement, Although few systematic studies of genetic breeding of Pleurotus ostreatus <span class="hlt">strains</span> have been reported. The major aim of <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> is to combine desirable characteristics from different <span class="hlt">strains</span> and create variability in the existing germ plasm. In this study, we used a breeding approach to <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> production from cultivated Oyster mushrooms Pleurotus ostreatus. Five <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq: Fries) Kummer were used in this research. Basidiospores were suspended in sterile distilled water and counted with a haemocytometer. After germination, colony of each isolate transferred into the PDA medium. Growth rate and colony type of each isolate was determined and then 17 monokaryons were selected. Consequently screening monokaryons were crossed to each other. Some characteristics such as morphological interaction in the contact zone of mycelium, increasing in growth rate of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>, change of colony morphology and the presence of clamp connections between dikaryotic cells used to distinction of monokaryons from dikaryons. We recognized 27 <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> by these characteristics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..92b4053D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..92b4053D"><span>Superradiance instability of small rotating <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes in arbitrary dimensions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Delice, Ã.-zgür; Durǧut, Türküler</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>We investigate the stability of D dimensional singly rotating Myers-Perry-<span class="hlt">Ad</span>S black holes under superradiance against scalar field perturbations. It is well known that small four dimensional rotating or charged Anti-de Sitter (<span class="hlt">AdS</span>) black holes are unstable against superradiance instability of a scalar field. Recent works extended the existence of this instability to five dimensional rotating charged <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes or static charged <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes in arbitrary dimensions. In this paper we analytically prove that rotating small <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes in arbitrary dimensions also shows superradiance instability irrespective of the value of the (positive) angular momentum quantum number. To do this we solve the Klein-Gordon equation in the slow rotation, low frequency limit. By using the asymptotic matching technique, we are able to calculate the real and imaginary parts of the correction terms to the frequency of the scalar field due to the presence of the black hole, confirming the presence of superradiance instability. We see that, unlike in the case of static <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes, the analytical method is valid for rotating <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes for any value of angular momentum number and spacetime dimensions. For comparison we derive the corresponding correction terms for Myers-Perry black holes in the black hole bomb formalism in the Appendix and see that the results are in agreement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hybrid+AND+organization&pg=4&id=EJ244388','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hybrid+AND+organization&pg=4&id=EJ244388"><span>The New Information <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Levitan, Karen B.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Discusses the creation and existence of "<span class="hlt">hybrid</span>" organizations, i.e., nonprofit companies sponsored by the government to provide extensive research and development services. Possibilities for <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> are brought about by government intervention in the information marketplace to produce social benefits. (SW)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24379167','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24379167"><span>Allelic asymmetry of the Lethal <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> rescue (Lhr) gene expression in the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans: confirmation by using genetic variations of D. melanogaster.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shirata, Mika; Araye, Quenta; Maehara, Kazunori; Enya, Sora; Takano-Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Sawamura, Kyoichi</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>In the cross between Drosophila melanogaster females and D. simulans males, <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> males die at the late larval stage, and the sibling females also die at later stages at high temperatures. Removing the D. simulans allele of the Lethal <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> rescue gene (Lhr (sim) ) improves the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> incompatibility phenotypes. However, the loss-of-function mutation of Lhr (sim) (Lhr (sim0) ) does not rescue the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> males in crosses with several D. melanogaster <span class="hlt">strains</span>. We first describe the genetic factor possessed by the D. melanogaster <span class="hlt">strains</span>. It has been suggested that removing the D. melanogaster allele of Lhr (Lhr (mel) ), that is Lhr (mel0) , does not have the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> male rescue effect, contrasting to Lhr (sim0) . Because the expression level of the Lhr gene is known to be Lhr (sim) > Lhr (mel) in the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>, Lhr (mel0) may not lead to enough of a reduction in total Lhr expression. Then, there is a possibility that the D. melanogaster factor changes the expression level to Lhr (sim) < Lhr (mel) . But in fact, the expression level was Lhr (sim) > Lhr (mel) in the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> irrespectively of the presence of the factor. At last, we showed that Lhr (mel0) slightly improves the viability of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> females, which was not realized previously. All of the present results are consistent with the allelic asymmetry model of the Lhr gene expression in the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NucFu..56l6002K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NucFu..56l6002K"><span>CORSICA modelling of ITER <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> operation scenarios</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kim, S. H.; Bulmer, R. H.; Campbell, D. J.; Casper, T. A.; LoDestro, L. L.; Meyer, W. H.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Snipes, J. A.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> operating mode observed in several tokamaks is characterized by further enhancement over the high plasma confinement (H-mode) associated with reduced magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) instabilities linked to a stationary flat safety factor (q ) profile in the core region. The proposed ITER <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> operation is currently aiming at operating for a long burn duration (>1000 s) with a moderate fusion power multiplication factor, Q , of at least 5. This paper presents candidate ITER <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> operation scenarios developed using a free-boundary transport modelling code, CORSICA, taking all relevant physics and engineering constraints into account. The ITER <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> operation scenarios have been developed by tailoring the 15 MA baseline ITER inductive H-mode scenario. Accessible operation conditions for ITER <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> operation and achievable range of plasma parameters have been investigated considering uncertainties on the plasma confinement and transport. ITER operation capability for avoiding the poloidal field coil current, field and force limits has been examined by applying different current ramp rates, flat-top plasma currents and densities, and pre-magnetization of the poloidal field coils. Various combinations of heating and current drive (H&CD) schemes have been applied to study several physics issues, such as the plasma current density profile tailoring, enhancement of the plasma energy confinement and fusion power generation. A parameterized edge pedestal model based on EPED1 <span class="hlt">added</span> to the CORSICA code has been applied to <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> operation scenarios. Finally, fully self-consistent free-boundary transport simulations have been performed to provide information on the poloidal field coil voltage demands and to study the controllability with the ITER controllers. Extended from Proc. 24th Int. Conf. on Fusion Energy (San Diego, 2012) IT/P1-13.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23709179','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23709179"><span>A stable <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> containing haploid genomes of two obligate diploid Candida species.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chakraborty, Uttara; Mohamed, Aiyaz; Kakade, Pallavi; Mugasimangalam, Raja C; Sadhale, Parag P; Sanyal, Kaustuv</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are diploid, predominantly asexual human-pathogenic yeasts. In this study, we constructed tetraploid (4n) <span class="hlt">strains</span> of C. albicans of the same or different lineages by spheroplast fusion. Induction of chromosome loss in the tetraploid C. albicans generated diploid or near-diploid progeny <span class="hlt">strains</span> but did not produce any haploid progeny. We also constructed stable heterotetraploid somatic <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> <span class="hlt">strains</span> (2n + 2n) of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis by spheroplast fusion. Heterodiploid (n + n) progeny <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> were obtained after inducing chromosome loss in a stable heterotetraploid <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>. To identify a subset of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> heterodiploid progeny <span class="hlt">strains</span> carrying at least one copy of all chromosomes of both species, unique centromere sequences of various chromosomes of each species were used as markers in PCR analysis. The reduction of chromosome content was confirmed by a comparative genome <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> (CGH) assay. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> <span class="hlt">strains</span> were found to be stably propagated. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays with antibodies against centromere-specific histones (C. albicans Cse4/C. dubliniensis Cse4) revealed that the centromere identity of chromosomes of each species is maintained in the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> genomes of the heterotetraploid and heterodiploid <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Thus, our results suggest that the diploid genome content is not obligatory for the survival of either C. albicans or C. dubliniensis. In keeping with the recent discovery of the existence of haploid C. albicans <span class="hlt">strains</span>, the heterodiploid <span class="hlt">strains</span> of our study can be excellent tools for further species-specific genome elimination, yielding true haploid progeny of C. albicans or C. dubliniensis in future.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JHEP...04..004D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JHEP...04..004D"><span>Space-like minimal surfaces in <span class="hlt">AdS</span> × S</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dorn, Harald; Drukker, Nadav; Jorjadze, George; Kalousios, Chrysostomos</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>We present a four parameter family of classical string solutions in <span class="hlt">AdS</span> 3 × S 3, which end along a light-like tetragon at the boundary of <span class="hlt">AdS</span> 3 and carry angular momentum along two cycles on the sphere. The string surfaces are space-like and their projections on <span class="hlt">AdS</span> 3 and on S 3 have constant mean curvature. The construction is based on the Pohlmeyer reduction of the related sigma model. After embedding in <span class="hlt">AdS</span> 5 × S 5, we calculate the regularized area and analyze conserved charges. Comments on possible relations to scattering amplitudes are presented. We also sketch time-like versions of our solutions.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..91h4056L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..91h4056L"><span>Quantum corrections to supergravity on <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2×S2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Larsen, Finn; Lisbão, Pedro</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>We compute the off-shell spectrum of supergravity on <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2×S2 by explicit diagonalization of the equations of motion for an effective <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2 theory where all fields are dualized to scalars and spin-1/2 fermions. We classify all bulk modes as physical, gauge violating, and pure gauge then compute the physical spectrum by explicit cancellation of unphysical modes. We identify boundary modes as physical fields on S2 that are formally pure gauge but with gauge function that is non-normalizable on <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2. As an application we compute the leading quantum correction to <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2×S2 as a sum over physical fields including boundary states. The result agrees with a previous computation by Sen [1] where unphysical modes were canceled by ghosts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1053006','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1053006"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> baryons in QCD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.</p> <p>2012-03-21</p> <p>In this study, we present the first comprehensive study of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> baryons using lattice QCD methods. Using a large basis of composite QCD interpolating fields we extract an extensive spectrum of baryon states and isolate those of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> character using their relatively large overlap onto operators which sample gluonic excitations. We consider the spectrum of Nucleon and Delta states at several quark masses finding a set of positive parity <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> baryons with quantum numbers $N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{3/2^+},\\, N_{3/2^+},\\,N_{5/2^+},\\,$ and $\\Delta_{1/2^+},\\, \\Delta_{3/2^+}$ at an energy scale above the first band of `conventional' excited positive parity baryons. This pattern of states is compatible with a color octet gluonic excitation having $J^{P}=1^{+}$ as previously reported in the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> meson sector and with a comparable energy scale for the excitation, suggesting a common bound-state construction for <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> mesons and baryons.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5092381','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5092381"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> reactors. [Fuel cycle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Moir, R.W.</p> <p>1980-09-09</p> <p>The rationale for <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> can produce 7200 kg of /sup 233/U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m/sup -2/, and the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> are usually rapid.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900017554','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900017554"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> propulsion technology program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Technology was identified which will enable application of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> propulsion to manned and unmanned space launch vehicles. Two design concepts are proposed. The first is a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> propulsion system using the classical method of regression (classical <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>) resulting from the flow of oxidizer across a fuel grain surface. The second system uses a self-sustaining gas generator (gas generator <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>) to produce a fuel rich exhaust that was mixed with oxidizer in a separate combustor. Both systems offer cost and reliability improvement over the existing solid rocket booster and proposed liquid boosters. The designs were evaluated using life cycle cost and reliability. The program consisted of: (1) identification and evaluation of candidate oxidizers and fuels; (2) preliminary evaluation of booster design concepts; (3) preparation of a detailed point design including life cycle costs and reliability analyses; (4) identification of those <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> specific technologies needing improvement; and (5) preperation of a technology acquisition plan and large scale demonstration plan.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NuPhB.910..685C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NuPhB.910..685C"><span>Supergravity background of the λ-deformed <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 × S3 supercoset</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chervonyi, Yuri; Lunin, Oleg</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>We construct the solution of type IIB supergravity describing the integrable λ-deformation of the <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 ×S3 supercoset. While the geometry corresponding to the deformation of the bosonic coset has been found in the past, our background is more natural for studying superstrings, and several interesting features distinguish our solution from its bosonic counterpart. We also report progress towards constructing the λ-deformation of the <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5 ×S5 supercoset.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20582271','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20582271"><span>The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> BCI.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pfurtscheller, Gert; Allison, Brendan Z; Brunner, Clemens; Bauernfeind, Gunther; Solis-Escalante, Teodoro; Scherer, Reinhold; Zander, Thorsten O; Mueller-Putz, Gernot; Neuper, Christa; Birbaumer, Niels</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Nowadays, everybody knows what a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> car is. A <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> car normally has two engines to enhance energy efficiency and reduce CO2 output. Similarly, a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> brain-computer interface (BCI) is composed of two BCIs, or at least one BCI and another system. A <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> BCI, like any BCI, must fulfill the following four criteria: (i) the device must rely on signals recorded directly from the brain; (ii) there must be at least one recordable brain signal that the user can intentionally modulate to effect goal-directed behaviour; (iii) real time processing; and (iv) the user must obtain feedback. This paper introduces <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> BCIs that have already been published or are in development. We also introduce concepts for future work. We describe BCIs that classify two EEG patterns: one is the event-related (de)synchronisation (ERD, ERS) of sensorimotor rhythms, and the other is the steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP). <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> BCIs can either process their inputs simultaneously, or operate two systems sequentially, where the first system can act as a "brain switch". For example, we describe a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> BCI that simultaneously combines ERD and SSVEP BCIs. We also describe a sequential <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> BCI, in which subjects could use a brain switch to control an SSVEP-based hand orthosis. Subjects who used this <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> BCI exhibited about half the false positives encountered while using the SSVEP BCI alone. A brain switch can also rely on hemodynamic changes measured through near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> BCIs can also use one brain signal and a different type of input. This additional input can be an electrophysiological signal such as the heart rate, or a signal from an external device such as an eye tracking system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1331170','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1331170"><span>Three dimensional <span class="hlt">strained</span> semiconductors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Voss, Lars; Conway, Adam; Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Leao, Cedric Rocha; Shao, Qinghui</p> <p>2016-11-08</p> <p>In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and at least one thin film in contact with at least one exterior surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a <span class="hlt">strain</span> in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced <span class="hlt">strain</span> of at least 0.05%, and an induced <span class="hlt">strain</span> in at least 5% of a volume of the three dimensional structure. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and depositing at least one thin film on at least one surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a <span class="hlt">strain</span> in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced <span class="hlt">strain</span> of at least 0.05%, and an induced <span class="hlt">strain</span> in at least 5% of a volume of the structure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17182757','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17182757"><span>GeneChip resequencing of the smallpox virus genome can identify novel <span class="hlt">strains</span>: a biodefense application.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sulaiman, Irshad M; Tang, Kevin; Osborne, John; Sammons, Scott; Wohlhueter, Robert M</p> <p>2007-02-01</p> <p>We developed a set of seven resequencing GeneChips, based on the complete genome sequences of 24 <span class="hlt">strains</span> of smallpox virus (variola virus), for rapid characterization of this human-pathogenic virus. Each GeneChip was designed to analyze a divergent segment of approximately 30,000 bases of the smallpox virus genome. This study includes the <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> results of 14 smallpox virus <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Of the 14 smallpox virus <span class="hlt">strains</span> <span class="hlt">hybridized</span>, only 7 had sequence information included in the design of the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips; similar information for the remaining <span class="hlt">strains</span> was not tiled as a reference in these GeneChips. By use of variola virus-specific primers and long-range PCR, 22 overlapping amplicons were amplified to cover nearly the complete genome and <span class="hlt">hybridized</span> with the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChip set. These GeneChips were successful in generating nucleotide sequences for all 14 of the smallpox virus <span class="hlt">strains</span> <span class="hlt">hybridized</span>. Analysis of the data indicated that the GeneChip resequencing by <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> was fast and reproducible and that the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips could differentiate the 14 smallpox virus <span class="hlt">strains</span> characterized. This study also suggests that high-density resequencing GeneChips have potential biodefense applications and may be used as an alternate tool for rapid identification of smallpox virus in the future.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=264136','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=264136"><span>Evolution and replacement of Candida albicans <span class="hlt">strains</span> during recurrent vaginitis demonstrated by DNA fingerprinting.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Schröppel, K; Rotman, M; Galask, R; Mac, K; Soll, D R</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Southern blot <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> with the Ca3 probe and the C fragment of the Ca3 probe was used to assess the genetic relatedness of Candida albicans <span class="hlt">strains</span> from one patient with recurrent C. albicans infection in whom the same <span class="hlt">strain</span> was maintained, one patient in whom the infecting <span class="hlt">strain</span> was replaced, and their male sexual partners. In the patient in whom the infecting <span class="hlt">strain</span> was maintained, the infecting <span class="hlt">strain</span> exhibited a minor genetic change in each successive episode of Candida vaginitis. These genetic changes occurred in the C-fragment bands of the Ca3 <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> pattern. In the patient in whom the infecting <span class="hlt">strain</span> was replaced by another infecting <span class="hlt">strain</span>, a transition infection involved a genetically mixed infecting population, and the replacement <span class="hlt">strain</span> appeared to have originated from the oral cavity of the male partner. The results demonstrate that the infecting <span class="hlt">strains</span> of recurrent Candida vaginitis are not genetically stable, that drug treatment can result in the selection of variants of the previously infecting <span class="hlt">strain</span> or replacement by a genetically unrelated <span class="hlt">strain</span>, and that the male partner can be the source of a replacement <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Images PMID:7852550</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950004983','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950004983"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> sensor comprising a <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensitive, two-mode optical</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor uses an optical fiber including a <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensitive portion and at least one <span class="hlt">strain</span> insensitive portion. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensitive portion is mounted on the surface of a structure at a location where a <span class="hlt">strain</span> is desired to be measured. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> insensitive portion(s) may be fused to the <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensitive portion to transmit light therethrough, so that the resulting pattern may be detected to determine the amount of <span class="hlt">strain</span> by comparison with a similar fiber not subjected to <span class="hlt">strain</span>, or with the light pattern produced when the fiber is not under <span class="hlt">strain</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16465589','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16465589"><span>Genotype-specific environmental impact on the variance of blood values in inbred and F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> mice.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Klempt, Martina; Rathkolb, Birgit; Fuchs, Edith; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Wolf, Eckhard; Aigner, Bernhard</p> <p>2006-02-01</p> <p>Mice are important models for biomedical research because of the possibility of standardizing genetic background and environmental conditions, which both affect phenotypic variability. Inbred mouse <span class="hlt">strains</span> as well as F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> mice are routinely used as genetically defined animal models; however, only a few studies investigated the variance of phenotypic parameters in inbred versus F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> mice and the potential interference of the genetic background with different housing conditions. Thus, we analyzed the ranges of clinical chemical and hematologic parameters in C3H and C57BL/6 inbred mice and their reciprocal F1 <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> (B6C3F1, C3B6F1) in two different mouse facilities. Two thirds of the blood parameters examined in the same <span class="hlt">strain</span> differed between the facilities for both the inbred <span class="hlt">strains</span> and the F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> lines. The relation of the values between inbred and F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> mice was also affected by the facility. The variance of blood parameters in F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> mice compared with their parental inbred <span class="hlt">strains</span> was inconsistent in one facility but generally smaller in the other facility. A subsequent study of F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> animals derived from the parental <span class="hlt">strains</span> C3H and BALB/c, which was done in the latter housing unit, detected no general difference in the variance of blood parameters between F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> and inbred mice. Our study clearly demonstrates the possibility of major interactions between genotype and environment regarding the variance of clinical chemical and hematologic parameters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840019946','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840019946"><span>Thin film <span class="hlt">strain</span> transducer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rand, J. L. (Inventor)</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">strain</span> transducer system and process for making the same is disclosed. A beryllium copper ring having four <span class="hlt">strain</span> gages is electrically connected in Wheatstone bridge fashion to the output instrumentation. Tabs are bonded to a balloon or like surface with <span class="hlt">strain</span> on the surface causing bending of a ring which provides an electrical signal through the gages proportional to the surface <span class="hlt">strain</span>. A photographic pattern of a one half ring segment as placed on a sheet of beryllium copper for chem-mill etch formation is illustrated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=184507','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=184507"><span>DNA <span class="hlt">Hybridization</span> Probe for Use in Determining Restricted Nodulation among Bradyrhizobium japonicum Serocluster 123 Field Isolates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sadowsky, Michael J.; Cregan, Perry B.; Keyser, Harold H.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Several soybean plant introduction (PI) genotypes have recently been described which restrict nodulation of Bradyrhizobium japonicum serocluster 123 in an apparently serogroup-specific manner. While PI 371607 restricts nodulation of <span class="hlt">strains</span> in serogroup 123 and some in serogroup 127, those in serogroup 129 are not restricted. When DNA regions within and around the B. japonicum I-110 common nodulation genes were used as probes to genomic DNA from the serogroup <span class="hlt">strains</span> USDA 123, USDA 127, and USDA 129, several of the probes differentially <span class="hlt">hybridized</span> to the nodulation-restricted and -unrestricted <span class="hlt">strains</span>. One of the gene regions, cloned in plasmid pMJS12, was subsequently shown to <span class="hlt">hybridize</span> to 4.6-kilobase EcoRI fragments from DNAs from nodulation-restricted <span class="hlt">strains</span> and to larger fragments in nodulation-unrestricted <span class="hlt">strains</span>. To determine if the different <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> patterns could be used to predict nodulation restriction, we <span class="hlt">hybridized</span> pMJS12 to EcoRI-digested genomic DNAs from uncharacterized serocluster 123 field isolates. Of the 36 <span class="hlt">strains</span> examined, 15 were found to have single, major, 4.6-kilobase <span class="hlt">hybridizing</span> EcoRI fragments. When tested for nodulation, 80% (12 of 15) of the <span class="hlt">strains</span> were correctly predicted to be restricted for nodulation of the PI genotypes. In addition, <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> patterns obtained with pMJS12 and nodulation phenotypes on PI 371607 indicated that there are at least three types of serogroup 127 <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Our results suggest that the pMJS12 gene probe may be useful in selecting compatible host-<span class="hlt">strain</span> combinations and in determining the suitability of field sites for the placement of soybean genotypes containing restrictive nodulation alleles. Images PMID:16348217</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4651086','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4651086"><span>A Large Set of Newly Created Interspecific Saccharomyces <span class="hlt">Hybrids</span> Increases Aromatic Diversity in Lager Beers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mertens, Stijn; Steensels, Jan; Saels, Veerle; De Rouck, Gert; Aerts, Guido</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Lager beer is the most consumed alcoholic beverage in the world. Its production process is marked by a fermentation conducted at low (8 to 15°C) temperatures and by the use of Saccharomyces pastorianus, an interspecific <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the cold-tolerant Saccharomyces eubayanus. Recent whole-genome-sequencing efforts revealed that the currently available lager yeasts belong to one of only two archetypes, “Saaz” and “Frohberg.” This limited genetic variation likely reflects that all lager yeasts descend from only two separate interspecific <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> events, which may also explain the relatively limited aromatic diversity between the available lager beer yeasts compared to, for example, wine and ale beer yeasts. In this study, 31 novel interspecific yeast <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> were developed, resulting from large-scale robot-assisted selection and breeding between carefully selected <span class="hlt">strains</span> of S. cerevisiae (six <span class="hlt">strains</span>) and S. eubayanus (two <span class="hlt">strains</span>). Interestingly, many of the resulting <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> showed a broader temperature tolerance than their parental <span class="hlt">strains</span> and reference S. pastorianus yeasts. Moreover, they combined a high fermentation capacity with a desirable aroma profile in laboratory-scale lager beer fermentations, thereby successfully enriching the currently available lager yeast biodiversity. Pilot-scale trials further confirmed the industrial potential of these <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> and identified one <span class="hlt">strain</span>, <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> H29, which combines a fast fermentation, high attenuation, and the production of a complex, desirable fruity aroma. PMID:26407881</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=107197','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=107197"><span>A Gene Cluster Encoding Steps in Conversion of Naphthalene to Gentisate in Pseudomonas sp. <span class="hlt">Strain</span> U2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fuenmayor, Sergio L.; Wild, Mark; Boyes, Alastair L.; Williams, Peter A.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Pseudomonas sp. <span class="hlt">strain</span> U2 was isolated from oil-contaminated soil in Venezuela by selective enrichment on naphthalene as the sole carbon source. The genes for naphthalene dioxygenase were cloned from the plasmid DNA of <span class="hlt">strain</span> U2 on an 8.3-kb BamHI fragment. The genes for the naphthalene dioxygenase genes nagAa (for ferredoxin reductase), nagAb (for ferredoxin), and nagAc and nag<span class="hlt">Ad</span> (for the large and small subunits of dioxygenase, respectively) were located by Southern <span class="hlt">hybridizations</span> and by nucleotide sequencing. The genes for nagB (for naphthalene cis-dihydrodiol dehydrogenase) and nagF (for salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase) were inferred from subclones by their biochemical activities. Between nagAa and nagAb were two open reading frames, homologs of which have also been identified in similar locations in two nitrotoluene-using <span class="hlt">strains</span> (J. V. Parales, A. Kumar, R. E. Parales, and D. T. Gibson, Gene 181:57–61, 1996; W.-C. Suen, B. Haigler, and J. C. Spain, J. Bacteriol. 178:4926–4934, 1996) and a naphthalene-using <span class="hlt">strain</span> (G. J. Zylstra, E. Kim, and A. K. Goyal, Genet. Eng. 19:257–269, 1997). Recombinant Escherichia coli <span class="hlt">strains</span> with plasmids carrying this region were able to convert salicylate to gentisate, which was identified by a combination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. The first open reading frame, designated nagG, encodes a protein with characteristics of a Rieske-type iron-sulfur center homologous to the large subunits of dihydroxylating dioxygenases, and the second open reading frame, designated nagH, encodes a protein with limited homology to the small subunits of the same dioxygenases. Cloned together in E. coli, nagG, nagH, and nagAb, were able to convert salicylate (2-hydroxybenzoate) into gentisate (2,5-dihydroxybenzoate) and therefore encode a salicylate 5-hydroxylase activity. Single-gene knockouts of nagG, nagH, and nagAb demonstrated their functional roles in the formation of gentisate. It is proposed</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6923562','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6923562"><span>Parametric systems analysis for tandem mirror <span class="hlt">hybrids</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lee, J.D.; Chapin, D.L.; Chi, J.W.H.</p> <p>1980-09-01</p> <p>Fusion fission systems, consisting of fissile producing fusion <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> combining a tandem mirror fusion driver with various blanket types and net fissile consuming LWR's, have been modeled and analyzed parametrically. Analysis to date indicates that <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> can be competitive with mined uranium when U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ cost is about 100 $/lb., <span class="hlt">adding</span> less than 25% to present day cost of power from LWR's. Of the three blanket types considered, uranium fast fission (UFF), thorium fast fission (ThFF), and thorium fission supressed (ThFS), the ThFS blanket has a modest economic advantage under most conditions but has higher support ratios and potential safety advantages under all conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1174785','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1174785"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Haaland, David M.</p> <p>2004-03-23</p> <p>A set of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are <span class="hlt">added</span> in a following prediction or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> method herein means a combination of an initial calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A spectral shape herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The shape can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/874212','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/874212"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Haaland, David M.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>A set of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are <span class="hlt">added</span> in a following estimation or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The "<span class="hlt">hybrid</span>" method herein means a combination of an initial classical least squares analysis calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A "spectral shape" herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The "shape" can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22222877','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22222877"><span>The molecular characterization of new types of Saccharomyces cerevisiae×S. kudriavzevii <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> yeasts unveils a high genetic diversity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Peris, David; Belloch, Carmela; Lopandić, Ksenija; Álvarez-Pérez, José Manuel; Querol, Amparo; Barrio, Eladio</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>New double- and triple-<span class="hlt">hybrid</span> Saccharomyces yeasts were characterized using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism of 35 nuclear genes, located on different chromosome arms, and the sequencing of one nuclear and one mitochondrial gene. Most of these new <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> were originally isolated from fermentations; however, two of them correspond to clinical and dietary supplement isolates. This is the first time that the presence of double-<span class="hlt">hybrid</span> S. cerevisiae×S. kudriavzevii in non-fermentative substrates has been reported and investigated. Phylogenetic analysis of the MET6 nuclear gene confirmed the double or triple parental origin of the new <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>. Restriction analysis of gene regions in these <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> revealed a high diversity of genome types. From these molecular characterizations, a reduction of the S. kudriavzevii fraction of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> genomes is observed in most <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>. Mitochondrial inheritance in <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> was deduced from the analysis of mitochondrial COX2 gene sequences, which showed that most <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> received the mitochondrial genome from the S. kudriavzevii parent. However, two <span class="hlt">strains</span> inherited a S. cerevisiae COX2, being the first report of S. cerevisiae×S. kudriavzevii <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> with S. cerevisiae mitochondrial genomes. These two <span class="hlt">strains</span> are those showing a higher S. kudriavzevii nuclear genome reduction, especially in the wine <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> AMH. This may be due to the release of selective pressures acting on the other <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> to maintain kudriavzevii mitochondria-interacting genes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21149240','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21149240"><span>Testing the <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT Correspondence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Klebanov, Igor R.</p> <p>2008-07-28</p> <p>This lecture begins with some history and basic facts about string theory and its connections with strong interactions. Comparisons of stacks of Dirichlet branes with curved backgrounds produced by them are used to motivate the <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT correspondence between superconformal gauge theory and string theory on a product of Anti-de Sitter space and a compact manifold. The ensuing duality between semi-classical spinning strings and long gauge theory operators is briefly reviewed. We go on to describe a recent test of the <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT correspondence using the Wilson loop cusp anomaly as a function of the coupling, which also enters dimensions of high-spin operators. Finally, strongly coupled thermal SYM theory is explored via a black hole in 5-dimensional <span class="hlt">AdS</span> space, which leads to explicit results for its entropy and shear viscosity.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AAS...211.4731G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AAS...211.4731G"><span>The Recent Data Explosion in the <span class="hlt">ADS</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Grant, Carolyn S.; Accomazzi, A.; Henneken, E.; Thompson, D.; Kurtz, M. J.; Murray, S. S.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>In the past 12 months, we have <span class="hlt">added</span> over a million records to the <span class="hlt">ADS</span> Abstract Service. This is the equivalent of a 20% increase, or about double the rate of increase that the <span class="hlt">ADS</span> has seen in recent years. This significant increase in size is due to the addition of several large datasets including historical data from many Springer astronomy and physics journals as well as bibliographic records from the full run of A&A Abstracts from the Astronomisches Rechen-Institut. The number of citations in the Abstract Service has seen an increase of more than 25%, bringing the total number of citations to over 25 million. Our recent agreement to index records from CrossRef will continue the data explosion in the <span class="hlt">ADS</span> into 2008.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26716360','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26716360"><span>Microbial production of value-<span class="hlt">added</span> nutraceuticals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Jian; Guleria, Sanjay; Koffas, Mattheos A G; Yan, Yajun</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Nutraceuticals are important natural bioactive compounds that confer health-promoting and medical benefits to humans. Globally growing demands for value-<span class="hlt">added</span> nutraceuticals for prevention and treatment of human diseases have rendered nutraceuticals a multi-billion dollar market. However, supply limitations and extraction difficulties from natural sources such as plants, animals or fungi, restrict the large-scale use of nutraceuticals. Metabolic engineering via microbial production platforms has been advanced as an eco-friendly alternative approach for production of value-<span class="hlt">added</span> nutraceuticals from simple carbon sources. Microbial platforms like the most widely used Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been engineered as versatile cell factories for production of diverse and complex value-<span class="hlt">added</span> chemicals such as phytochemicals, prebiotics, polysaccaharides and poly amino acids. This review highlights the recent progresses in biological production of value-<span class="hlt">added</span> nutraceuticals via metabolic engineering approaches.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9434E..0UM','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9434E..0UM"><span>Enhanced electromechanical behaviors of cellulose ZnO <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> nanocomposites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mun, Seongchoel; Min, Seung-Ki; Kim, Hyun Chan; Im, Jongbeom; Geddis, Demetris L.; Kim, Jaehwan</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Inorganic-organic <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> composite has attracted as its combined synergistic properties. Cellulose based inorganicorganic <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> composite was fabricated with semiconductive nanomaterials which has functionality of nanomaterial and biocompatibility piezoelectricity, high transparency and flexibility of cellulose electro active paper namely EAPap. ZnO is providing semiconductive functionality to EAPap for <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> nanocomposite by simple chemical reaction. Cellulose- ZnO <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> nanocomposite (CEZOHN) demonstrates novel electrical, photoelectrical and electromechanical behaviors. This paper deals with methods to improve electromechanical property of CEZOHN. The fabrication process is introduced briefly, charging mechanism and evaluation is studied with measured piezoelectric constant. And its candidate application will be discussed such as artificial muscle, energy harvester, <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor, flexible electrical device.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4850929','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4850929"><span>Maltodextrin Acceptance and Preference in Eight Mouse <span class="hlt">Strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Aleman, Tiffany R.; Ellis, Hillary T.; Tordoff, Michael G.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Rodents are strongly attracted to the taste(s) of maltodextrins. A first step toward discovery of the underlying genes involves identifying phenotypic differences among inbred <span class="hlt">strains</span> of mice. To do this, we used 5-s brief-access tests and 48-h 2-bottle choice tests to survey the avidity for the maltodextrin, Maltrin M040, of mice from 8 inbred <span class="hlt">strains</span> (129S1/SvImJ, A/J, CAST/EiJ, C57BL/6J, NOD/ShiLTJ, NZO/HlLtJ, PWK/PhJ, and WSB/EiJ). In brief-access tests, the CAST and PWK <span class="hlt">strains</span> licked significantly less maltodextrin than equivalent concentrations of sucrose, whereas the other <span class="hlt">strains</span> generally licked the 2 carbohydrates equally. Similarly, in 2-bottle choice tests, the CAST and PWK <span class="hlt">strains</span> drank less 4% maltodextrin than 4% sucrose, whereas the other <span class="hlt">strains</span> had similar intakes of these 2 solutions; the CAST and PWK <span class="hlt">strains</span> did not differ from the C57, NOD, or NZO <span class="hlt">strains</span> in 4% sucrose intake. In sum, we have identified <span class="hlt">strain</span> variation in maltodextrin perception that is distinct from variation in sucrose perception. The phenotypic variation characterized here will aid in identifying genes responsible for maltodextrin acceptance. Our results identify C57 × PWK mice or NZO × CAST mice as informative crosses to produce segregating <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> that will expose quantitative trait loci underlying maltodextrin acceptance and preference. PMID:26464499</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26464499','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26464499"><span>Maltodextrin Acceptance and Preference in Eight Mouse <span class="hlt">Strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Poole, Rachel L; Aleman, Tiffany R; Ellis, Hillary T; Tordoff, Michael G</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Rodents are strongly attracted to the taste(s) of maltodextrins. A first step toward discovery of the underlying genes involves identifying phenotypic differences among inbred <span class="hlt">strains</span> of mice. To do this, we used 5-s brief-access tests and 48-h 2-bottle choice tests to survey the avidity for the maltodextrin, Maltrin M040, of mice from 8 inbred <span class="hlt">strains</span> (129S1/SvImJ, A/J, CAST/EiJ, C57BL/6J, NOD/ShiLTJ, NZO/HlLtJ, PWK/PhJ, and WSB/EiJ). In brief-access tests, the CAST and PWK <span class="hlt">strains</span> licked significantly less maltodextrin than equivalent concentrations of sucrose, whereas the other <span class="hlt">strains</span> generally licked the 2 carbohydrates equally. Similarly, in 2-bottle choice tests, the CAST and PWK <span class="hlt">strains</span> drank less 4% maltodextrin than 4% sucrose, whereas the other <span class="hlt">strains</span> had similar intakes of these 2 solutions; the CAST and PWK <span class="hlt">strains</span> did not differ from the C57, NOD, or NZO <span class="hlt">strains</span> in 4% sucrose intake. In sum, we have identified <span class="hlt">strain</span> variation in maltodextrin perception that is distinct from variation in sucrose perception. The phenotypic variation characterized here will aid in identifying genes responsible for maltodextrin acceptance. Our results identify C57 × PWK mice or NZO × CAST mice as informative crosses to produce segregating <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> that will expose quantitative trait loci underlying maltodextrin acceptance and preference.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780024526','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780024526"><span><span class="hlt">Adding</span> stress plot function to NASTRAN</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Katoh, S.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Stress plot function was developed and <span class="hlt">added</span> to the NASTRAN level 15.5. Computed stress distribution can be displayed by this function, with vectors showing the principal stresses of the finite elements over the specified portions of the structure. NASTRAN is reviewed in the aspect of plotting capabilities. Stress tensor field is examined in preparation of stress display. Then the stress plot function as <span class="hlt">added</span> to the NASTRAN is described. A sample plotout by this function is shown.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26565821','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26565821"><span>Biperiodic nanostructured waveguides for wavelength-selectivity of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> photonic devices.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Talneau, A; Pommarède, X; Itawi, A; Pantzas, K; Lupu, A; Benisty, H</p> <p>2015-11-15</p> <p>A biperiodic nanostructuration consisting of a super-periodicity <span class="hlt">added</span> to a nanohole lattice of subwavelength pitch is demonstrated to provide both modal confinement and wavelength selectivity within a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> III-V on a silicon waveguide. The wavelength-selective behavior stems from finely tuned larger holes. Such biperiodic <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> waveguides have been fabricated by oxide-free bonding III-V material on silicon and display well-defined stop bands. Such nanostructured waveguides offer the versatility for designing advanced optical functions within <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> devices. Moreover, keeping the silicon waveguide surface planar, such nanostructured waveguides are compatible with electrical operation across the oxide-free <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> interface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25743788','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25743788"><span>S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus interspecific <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>, the best of both worlds and beyond.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hebly, Marit; Brickwedde, Anja; Bolat, Irina; Driessen, Maureen R M; de Hulster, Erik A F; van den Broek, Marcel; Pronk, Jack T; Geertman, Jan-Maarten; Daran, Jean-Marc; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Saccharomyces pastorianus lager-brewing yeasts have descended from natural <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> of S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus. Their alloploidy has undoubtedly contributed to successful domestication and industrial exploitation. To understand the early events that have led to the predominance of S. pastorianus as lager-brewing yeast, an interspecific <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus was experimentally constructed. Alloploidy substantially improved the performance of the S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> as compared to either parent regarding two cardinal features of brewing yeasts: tolerance to low temperature and oligosaccharide utilization. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>'s S. eubayanus subgenome conferred better growth rates and biomass yields at low temperature, both on glucose and on maltose. Conversely, the ability of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> to consume maltotriose, which was absent in the S. eubayanus CBS12357 type <span class="hlt">strain</span>, was inherited from its S. cerevisiae parent. The S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> even outperformed its parents, a phenomenon known as transgression, suggesting that fast growth at low temperature and oligosaccharide utilization may have been key selective advantages of the natural <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> in brewing environments. To enable sequence comparisons of the parental and <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> <span class="hlt">strains</span>, the genome of S. eubayanus CBS12357 type <span class="hlt">strain</span> (Patagonian isolate) was resequenced, resulting in an improved publicly available sequence assembly.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=advertising+AND+appeal&pg=5&id=EJ648644','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=advertising+AND+appeal&pg=5&id=EJ648644"><span>Image <span class="hlt">Ads</span> and Issue <span class="hlt">Ads</span> in U.S. Presidential Advertising: Using Videostyle To Explore Stylistic Differences in Televised Political <span class="hlt">Ads</span> From 1952 to 2000.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Johnston, Anne; Kaid, Lynda Lee</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Explores the differences in techniques, strategies, narratives, and symbols used in 1,213 television issue <span class="hlt">ads</span> and image <span class="hlt">ads</span> from 13 U.S. presidential campaigns. Concludes that although the majority of both types of <span class="hlt">ads</span> were positive, negative appeals dominated a higher percentage of issue <span class="hlt">ads</span> as compared with image <span class="hlt">ads</span>. (SG)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25615306','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25615306"><span><span class="hlt">AdS</span>5×S(5) mirror model as a string sigma model.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Arutyunov, Gleb; van Tongeren, Stijn J</p> <p>2014-12-31</p> <p>Doing a double Wick rotation in the world sheet theory of the light cone <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5×S(5) superstring results in an inequivalent, so-called mirror theory that plays a central role in the field of integrability in the <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S-CFT correspondence. We show that this mirror theory can be interpreted as the light cone theory of a free string on a different background. This background is related to dS5×H(5) by a double T-duality, and has hidden supersymmetry. The geometry can also be extracted from an integrable deformation of the <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5×S(5) sigma model, and we prove the observed mirror duality of these deformed models at the bosonic level as a byproduct. While we focus on <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5×S(5), our results apply more generally.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SMaS...24d5011P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SMaS...24d5011P"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> optical-fibre/geopolymer sensors for structural health monitoring of concrete structures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Perry, M.; Saafi, M.; Fusiek, G.; Niewczas, P.</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>In this work, we demonstrate <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> optical-fibre/geopolymer sensors for monitoring temperature, uniaxial <span class="hlt">strain</span> and biaxial <span class="hlt">strain</span> in concrete structures. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> sensors detect these measurands via changes in geopolymer electrical impedance, and via optical wavelength measurements of embedded fibre Bragg gratings. Electrical and optical measurements were both facilitated by metal-coated optical fibres, which provided the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> sensors with a single, shared physical path for both voltage and wavelength signals. The embedded fibre sensors revealed that geopolymer specimens undergo 2.7 mɛ of shrinkage after one week of curing at 42 °C. After curing, an axial 2 mɛ compression of the uniaxial <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> sensor led to impedance and wavelength shifts of 7 × 10-2 and -2 × 10-4 respectively. The typical <span class="hlt">strain</span> resolution in the uniaxial sensor was 100 μ \\varepsilon . The biaxial sensor was applied to the side of a concrete cylinder, which was then placed under 0.6 mɛ of axial, compressive <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Fractional shifts in impedance and wavelength, used to monitor axial and circumferential <span class="hlt">strain</span>, were 3 × 10-2 and 4 × 10-5 respectively. The biaxial sensor’s <span class="hlt">strain</span> resolution was approximately 10 μ \\varepsilon in both directions. Due to several design flaws, the uniaxial <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> sensor was unable to accurately measure ambient temperature changes. The biaxial sensor, however, successfully monitored local temperature changes with 0.5 °C resolution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27562593','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27562593"><span>Bacillus aryabhattai BA03: a novel approach to the production of natural value-<span class="hlt">added</span> compounds.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Paz, Alicia; Carballo, Julia; Pérez, María José; Domínguez, José Manuel</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">strain</span> designated as BA03, with the ability to transform ferulic acid into vanillin and 4-vinylguaiacol, was isolated from contaminated cryovials. The production of natural value-<span class="hlt">added</span> compounds was dependent on the media employed. The morphological and physiological characteristics of this <span class="hlt">strain</span> were compared with those of the typical vanillin-producer <span class="hlt">strain</span> Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116. According to a partial 16S rRNA sequence, we determined that BA03 belonged to Bacillus aryabhattai. In addition, analysis of the results showed that this <span class="hlt">strain</span> exhibited interesting enzymatic activity, including cellulases, laccases, lipases and pectinases. In light of this, we propose new functions for this multitasking microorganism. We suggest that it may be used for converting lignocellulosic wastes into byproducts with industrial uses, and also for treating disposal residues such as dyes in the textile industry. Hence, the possibility for novel research with B. aryabhattai opens up in the fields of biodegradation and/or revalorization of wastes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhDT.......443S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhDT.......443S"><span>Self-Repairing Polymer Optical Fiber <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Sensor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Song, Young Jun</p> <p></p> <p>This research develops a self-repairing polymer optical fiber <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor for structural health monitoring applications where the sensor network must survive under extreme conditions. Inspired by recent research in self-healing material systems, this dissertation demonstrates a self-repairing <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor waveguide, created by self-writing in a photopolymerizable resin system. In an initial configuration, the waveguide sensor was fabricated between two multi-mode (MM) optical fibers via ultraviolet (UV) lightwaves in the UV curable resin and operated as a <span class="hlt">strain</span> sensor by interrogation of the infrared (IR) power transmission through the waveguide. After failure of the sensor occurred due to loading, the waveguide re-bridged the gap between the two optical fibers through the UV resin. The response of the waveguide sensors was sensitive to the applied <span class="hlt">strain</span> and repeatable during multiple loading cycles with low observed hysteresis, however was not always monotonic. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> response of the original sensor and the self-repaired sensor showed similar behaviors. Packaging the sensor in a polymer capillary improved the performance of the sensor by removing previous "no-response" zones. The resulting sensor output was monotonic throughout the measurement range. The hysteresis in the sensor behavior between multiple loading cycles was also significantly reduced. However, a jump in sensor output voltage was observed after the sensor self-repair process, which presents challenges for calibration of the sensor. The sensor configuration was modified to a Fabry-Perot interferometer to improve the sensor response. The measurable <span class="hlt">strain</span> range was extended through multiple sensor self-repairs, and <span class="hlt">strain</span> measurements were demonstrated up to 150% applied tensile <span class="hlt">strain</span>. A <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> sensor was fabricated by splicing a short segment of MM optical fiber to the input single-mode (SM) optical fiber. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> sensor provided the high quality of waveguide fabrication previously</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1174399','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1174399"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> matrix fiber composites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.</p> <p>2003-07-15</p> <p><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/871702','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/871702"><span>Artificial mismatch <span class="hlt">hybridization</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Guo, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>An improved nucleic acid <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/113731','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/113731"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> electric vehicles TOPTEC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>1994-06-21</p> <p>This one-day TOPTEC session began with an overview of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> electric vehicle technology. Updates were given on alternative types of energy storage, APU control for low emissions, simulation programs, and industry and government activities. The keynote speech was about battery technology, a key element to the success of <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>. The TOPEC concluded with a panel discussion on the mission of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> electric vehicles, with a perspective from industry and government experts from United States and Canada on their view of the role of this technology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EPJC...77..127B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EPJC...77..127B"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Bloch brane</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bazeia, D.; Lima, Elisama E. M.; Losano, L.</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>This work reports on models described by two real scalar fields coupled with gravity in the five-dimensional spacetime, with a warped geometry involving one infinite extra dimension. Through a mechanism that smoothly changes a thick brane into a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> brane, one investigates the appearance of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> branes hosting internal structure, characterized by the splitting on the energy density and the volcano potential, induced by the parameter which controls interactions between the two scalar fields. In particular, we investigate distinct symmetric and asymmetric <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> brane scenarios.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011MsT.........13L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011MsT.........13L"><span><span class="hlt">ADS</span>-B and multilateration sensor fusion algorithm for air traffic control</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liang, Mengchen</p> <p></p> <p>Air traffic is expected to increase rapidly in the next decade. But, the current Air Traffic Control (ATC) system does not meet the demand of the future safety and efficiency. The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) is a transformation program for the ATC system in the United States. The latest estimates by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) show that by 2018 NextGen will reduce total delays in flight by 35 percent and provide 23 billion dollars in cumulative benefits. A satellite-based technology called the Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (<span class="hlt">ADS</span>-B) system is one of the most important elements in NextGen. FAA expects that <span class="hlt">ADS</span>-B systems will be available in the National Airspace System (NAS) by 2020. However, an alternative surveillance system is needed due to vulnerabilities that exist in <span class="hlt">ADS</span>-B systems. Multilateration has a high accuracy performance and is believed to be an ideal back-up strategy for <span class="hlt">ADS</span>-B systems. Thus, in this study, we develop the <span class="hlt">ADS</span>-B and multilateration sensor fusion algorithm for aircraft tracking applications in ATC. The algorithm contains a fault detection function for <span class="hlt">ADS</span>-B information monitoring by using Trajectory Change Points reports from <span class="hlt">ADS</span>-B and numerical vectors from a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> estimation algorithm. We consider two types of faults in the <span class="hlt">ADS</span>-B measurement model to show that the algorithm is able to deal with the bad data from <span class="hlt">ADS</span>-B systems and automatically select good data from multilateration systems. We apply fuzzy logic concepts and generate time variant parameters during the fusion process. The parameters play a role of weights for combining data from different sensors. The algorithm performance is validated through two aircraft tracking examples.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9483883','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9483883"><span>[Levels of thermostable direct hemolysin production by Vibrio parahaemolyticus <span class="hlt">strains</span> carrying both tdh and trh genes].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Suzuki, N; Hashimoto, S; Ishibashi, M; Kim, Y B; Okuda, J; Nishibuchi, M</p> <p>1997-12-01</p> <p>One hundred and twenty-five <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Vibrio parahaemolyticus carrying both the tdh and trh genes were selected from the <span class="hlt">strains</span> isolated from the travelers with diarrhea by an <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> test using polynucleotide probes. The levels of TDH produced by these <span class="hlt">strains</span> and the association between the TDH levels and related characteristics in these <span class="hlt">strains</span> were analyzed. The TDH level varied greatly from <span class="hlt">strain</span> to <span class="hlt">strain</span>, but none of the levels was as high as that of the typical Kanagawa phenomenon-positive <span class="hlt">strains</span>. The <span class="hlt">strains</span> were classified into "TDH producer" (18 <span class="hlt">strains</span>), "Low-level TDH producer" (85 <span class="hlt">strains</span>), and "No TDH producer" (22 <span class="hlt">strains</span>) based on the results of a modified Elek test and the hemolysis assay on Wagatsuma agar. The highest TDH level achieved by the "TDH producer" was twofold lower than that of the Kanagawa phenomenon-positive <span class="hlt">strains</span> as assayed by the RPLA method. All <span class="hlt">strains</span> possessed the toxR gene. The trh1 and trh2 genes were detected in, respectively, 105 and 20 <span class="hlt">strains</span>, and no correlation existed between the type of the trh gene and the levels of TDH produced. Considerable restriction fragment length polymorphism was observed with the tdh gene-bearing HindIII DNA fragment in different <span class="hlt">strains</span>, but it was not related with the TDH level.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19910012228','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19910012228"><span>Mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> isolator mount</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>James, Gordon E. (Inventor)</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Certain devices such as optical instruments must preserve their alignmental integrity while being subjected to mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span>. A mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> isolator mount is provided to preserve the alignmental integrity of an alignment sensitive instrument. An alignment sensitive instrument is mounted on a rectangular base. Flexural legs are connected at their proximal ends to the rectangular base. Flexural legs are also spaced parallel to the sides. Mounting pads are connected to the legs at the distal end and the mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> isolator mount is attached to the substrate by means of threaded bolts. When a mounting pad and its respective leg is subjected to lateral <span class="hlt">strain</span> in either the X or Y direction via the substrate, the respective leg relieves the <span class="hlt">strain</span> by bending in the direction of the <span class="hlt">strain</span>. An axial <span class="hlt">strain</span> on a mounting pad in the Z direction is relieved by a rotational motion of the legs in the direction of the <span class="hlt">strain</span>. When the substrate is stress free, the flexural legs return to their original condition and thus preserve the original alignment integrity of the alignment sensitive instrument.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730012013','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730012013"><span>Light intensity <span class="hlt">strain</span> analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Williams, J. G. (Inventor)</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>A process is described for the analysis of the <span class="hlt">strain</span> field of structures subjected to large deformations involving a low modulus substrate having a high modulus, relatively thin coating. The optical properties of transmittance and reflectance are measured for the coated substrate while stressed and unstressed to indicate the <span class="hlt">strain</span> field for the coated substrate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=130801','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=130801"><span>Fluorescence In Situ <span class="hlt">Hybridization</span> with Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Rapid Identification of Candida albicans Directly from Blood Culture Bottles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rigby, Susan; Procop, Gary W.; Haase, Gerhard; Wilson, Deborah; Hall, Geraldine; Kurtzman, Cletus; Oliveira, Kenneth; Von Oy, Sabina; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens J.; Coull, James; Stender, Henrik</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>A new fluorescence in situ <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> (FISH) method that uses peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from positive-blood-culture bottles in which yeast was observed by Gram staining (herein referred to as yeast-positive blood culture bottles) is described. The test (the C. albicans PNA FISH method) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe that targets C. albicans 26S rRNA. The PNA probe is <span class="hlt">added</span> to smears made directly from the contents of the blood culture bottle and <span class="hlt">hybridized</span> for 90 min at 55°C. Unhybridized PNA probe is removed by washing of the mixture (30 min), and the smears are examined by fluorescence microscopy. The specificity of the method was confirmed with 23 reference <span class="hlt">strains</span> representing phylogenetically related yeast species and 148 clinical isolates covering the clinically most significant yeast species, including C. albicans (n = 72), C. dubliniensis (n = 58), C. glabrata (n = 5), C. krusei (n = 2), C. parapsilosis (n = 4), and C. tropicalis (n = 3). The performance of the C. albicans PNA FISH method as a diagnostic test was evaluated with 33 routine and 25 simulated yeast-positive blood culture bottles and showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. It is concluded that this 2.5-h method for the definitive identification of C. albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles provides important information for optimal antifungal therapy and patient management. PMID:12037084</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14751256','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14751256"><span>Chaotic mixer improves microarray <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McQuain, Mark K; Seale, Kevin; Peek, Joel; Fisher, Timothy S; Levy, Shawn; Stremler, Mark A; Haselton, Frederick R</p> <p>2004-02-15</p> <p><span class="hlt">Hybridization</span> is an important aspect of microarray experimental design which influences array signal levels and the repeatability of data within an array and across different arrays. Current methods typically require 24h and use target inefficiently. In these studies, we compare <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> signals obtained in conventional static <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>, which depends on diffusional target delivery, with signals obtained in a dynamic <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> chamber, which employs a fluid mixer based on chaotic advection theory to deliver targets across a conventional glass slide array. Microarrays were printed with a pattern of 102 identical probe spots containing a 65-mer oligonucleotide capture probe. <span class="hlt">Hybridization</span> of a 725-bp fluorescently labeled target was used to measure average target <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> levels, local signal-to-noise ratios, and array <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> uniformity. Dynamic <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> for 1h with 1 or 10ng of target DNA increased <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> signal intensities approximately threefold over a 24-h static <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>. Similarly, a 10- or 60-min dynamic <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> of 10ng of target DNA increased <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> signal intensities fourfold over a 24h static <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>. In time course studies, static <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> reached a maximum within 8 to 12h using either 1 or 10ng of target. In time course studies using the dynamic <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> chamber, <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> using 1ng of target increased to a maximum at 4h and that using 10ng of target did not vary over the time points tested. In comparison to static <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>, dynamic <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> reduced the signal-to-noise ratios threefold and reduced spot-to-spot variation twofold. Therefore, we conclude that dynamic <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> based on a chaotic mixer design improves both the speed of <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> and the maximum level of <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> while increasing signal-to-noise ratios and reducing spot-to-spot variation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21176987','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21176987"><span>Monoterpene alcohols release and bioconversion by Saccharomyces species and <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gamero, A; Manzanares, P; Querol, A; Belloch, C</p> <p>2011-01-31</p> <p>Terpene profile of Muscat wines fermented by Saccharomyces species and <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> yeasts was investigated. The amount of geraniol decreased in most wines with respect to the initial must except for Saccharomyces bayanus wines. On the other hand, alpha-terpineol amount was higher in wines fermented by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> yeasts. The amount of linalool was similar in all wines and comparable to the amount in the initial must. Lower levels of beta-D-glucosidase activity were found in the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> yeasts with respect to S. cerevisiae. Moreover, no relationship between beta-D-glucosidase activity and terpenes profile in Muscat wines fermented with Saccharomyces species and <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> was found. Growth of yeasts on minimum medium supplemented with geraniol showed bioconversion of geraniol into linalool and alpha-terpineol. Percentages of geraniol uptake and bioconversion were different between Saccharomyces species and <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>. <span class="hlt">Strains</span> within S. bayanus, Saccharomyces kudriavzevii and <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> showed higher geraniol uptake than S. cerevisiae, whereas the percentage of produced linalool and alpha-terpineol was higher in S. cerevisiae and <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> yeasts than in S. bayanus and S. kudriavzevii. The relationship between geraniol uptake and adaptation of Saccharomyces species to grow at low temperature is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/909606','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/909606"><span>INEXPENSIVE, OFF THE SHELF <span class="hlt">HYBRID</span> MICROWAVE SYSTEM</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Walters, T; Paul Burket, P; John Scogin, J</p> <p>2007-06-21</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>-heating microwave oven provides the energy to heat small 10-gram samples of spent metal tritide storage bed material to release tenaciously held decay product {sup 3}He. Complete mass balance procedures require direct measurement of <span class="hlt">added</span> or produced gases on a tritide bed, and over 1100 C is necessary to release deep trapped {sup 3}He. The decomposition of non-radioactive CaCO{sub 3} and the quantitative measurement of CO{sub 2} within 3% of stoichiometry demonstrate the capabilities of the apparatus to capture generated (released) gases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12188863','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12188863"><span>Cluster <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> Monte Carlo simulation algorithms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Plascak, J A; Ferrenberg, Alan M; Landau, D P</p> <p>2002-06-01</p> <p>We show that addition of Metropolis single spin flips to the Wolff cluster-flipping Monte Carlo procedure leads to a dramatic increase in performance for the spin-1/2 Ising model. We also show that <span class="hlt">adding</span> Wolff cluster flipping to the Metropolis or heat bath algorithms in systems where just cluster flipping is not immediately obvious (such as the spin-3/2 Ising model) can substantially reduce the statistical errors of the simulations. A further advantage of these methods is that systematic errors introduced by the use of imperfect random-number generation may be largely healed by <span class="hlt">hybridizing</span> single spin flips with cluster flipping.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhRvE..65f6702P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhRvE..65f6702P"><span>Cluster <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> Monte Carlo simulation algorithms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Plascak, J. A.; Ferrenberg, Alan M.; Landau, D. P.</p> <p>2002-06-01</p> <p>We show that addition of Metropolis single spin flips to the Wolff cluster-flipping Monte Carlo procedure leads to a dramatic increase in performance for the spin-1/2 Ising model. We also show that <span class="hlt">adding</span> Wolff cluster flipping to the Metropolis or heat bath algorithms in systems where just cluster flipping is not immediately obvious (such as the spin-3/2 Ising model) can substantially reduce the statistical errors of the simulations. A further advantage of these methods is that systematic errors introduced by the use of imperfect random-number generation may be largely healed by <span class="hlt">hybridizing</span> single spin flips with cluster flipping.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23134337','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23134337"><span>Genetic analyses of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae <span class="hlt">strains</span> reveal distinct phylogenetic groups.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Donahoo, R S; Jones, J B; Lacy, G H; Stromberg, V K; Norman, D J</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>A comprehensive analysis of 175 Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae <span class="hlt">strains</span> isolated from 10 Araceae hosts was done to identify pathogen variation. The <span class="hlt">strains</span> were subjected to repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence polymerase chain reaction and four major phylogenetic clusters were generated. A subset of 40 <span class="hlt">strains</span> isolated from Anthurium, Dieffenbachia, and Syngonium was further defined by amplified fragment length polymorphism and fatty acid methyl ester analysis and the same four phylogenetic clusters were observed. Comparison of representative <span class="hlt">strains</span> in the first three clusters using DNA-DNA <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> and multilocus sequence analysis supports the previous reclassification of <span class="hlt">strains</span> in cluster I, including the X. axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae pathovar reference <span class="hlt">strain</span> (LMG695), to X. citri. Our research findings indicate that <span class="hlt">strains</span> in cluster I, isolated primarily from anthurium, probably represent an undescribed pathovar. Other phylogenetic subclusters consisting primarily of <span class="hlt">strains</span> isolated from xanthosoma and philodendron in clusters III and IV, respectively, may yet represent other undescribed species or pathovars of Xanthomonas.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9735317','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9735317"><span>Biological behavior of plasmid in Rhizobium sp. <span class="hlt">strain</span> S25 from Tephrosia candida.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zou, X; Feng, X L; Chen, W X; Li, F D</p> <p>1998-09-01</p> <p>Rhizobium sp. <span class="hlt">strain</span> S25 was isolated from the nodule on Tephrosia candida in Hainan Province, China. The <span class="hlt">strain</span> showed high stress tolerance. The plasmid profile of <span class="hlt">strain</span> S25, examined by the Eckhardt procedure, indicated that the <span class="hlt">strain</span> harbors only one plasmid with an estimated size of 150 kb. The plasmid was shown to carry nod and nif genes by <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> with probes of nodABC and nifHDK genes. Plasmid curing was carried out using the Bacillus subtilis sacB to generate derivatives of <span class="hlt">strain</span> S25. In comparison with the parent <span class="hlt">strain</span> S25, the cured derivative lost its ability to nodulate the host plant. Loss of the plasmid reduced significantly the <span class="hlt">strain</span>'s tolerance to acid, nitrous, and multiple antibiotics. The properties of the cured <span class="hlt">strain</span> also indicated that the plasmid was involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. Reintroduction of the plasmid from S25 in the cured derivative restored its original biological phenotypes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22273606','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22273606"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> stretchable circuits on silicone substrate</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Robinson, A. Aziz, A.; Liu, Q.; Suo, Z.; Lacour, S. P.</p> <p>2014-04-14</p> <p>When rigid and stretchable components are integrated onto a single elastic carrier substrate, large <span class="hlt">strain</span> heterogeneities appear in the vicinity of the deformable-non-deformable interfaces. In this paper, we report on a generic approach to manufacture <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> stretchable circuits where commercial electronic components can be mounted on a stretchable circuit board. Similar to printed circuit board development, the components are electrically bonded on the elastic substrate and interconnected with stretchable electrical traces. The substrate—a silicone matrix carrying concentric rigid disks—ensures both the circuit elasticity and the mechanical integrity of the most fragile materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22472357','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22472357"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> plasmachemical reactor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lelevkin, V. M. Smirnova, Yu. G.; Tokarev, A. V.</p> <p>2015-04-15</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> plasmachemical reactor on the basis of a dielectric barrier discharge in a transformer is developed. The characteristics of the reactor as functions of the dielectric barrier discharge parameters are determined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110008917','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110008917"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> adsorptive membrane reactor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800000208&hterms=microspheres&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dmicrospheres','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800000208&hterms=microspheres&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dmicrospheres"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> polymer microspheres</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rembaum, A.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>Techniques have been successfully tested for bonding polymeric spheres, typically 0.1 micron in diameter, to spheres with diameter up to 100 microns. <span class="hlt">Hybrids</span> are being developed as improved packing material for ion-exchange columns, filters, and separators.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1016557','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1016557"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> adsorptive membrane reactor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JHEP...03..115M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JHEP...03..115M"><span>Supersymmetric wrapped membranes, <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2 spaces, and bubbling geometries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>MacConamhna, Oisín A. P.; Colgáin, Eoin Ó.</p> <p>2007-03-01</p> <p>We perform a systematic study, in eleven dimensional supergravity, of the geometry of wrapped brane configurations admitting <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2 limits. Membranes wrapping holomorphic curves in Calabi-Yau manifolds are found to exhibit some novel features; in particular, for fourfolds or threefolds, the gravitational effect of the branes on the overall transverse space is only weakly restricted by the kinematics of the Killing spinor equation. We also study the <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2 limits of the wrapped brane supergravity descriptions. For membranes wrapped in a two-fold, we derive a set of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2 supersymmetry conditions which upon analytic continuation coincide precisely with those for the half-BPS bubbling geometries of LLM. From membranes wrapped in a three-fold, we obtain a set of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2 supersymmetry conditions which upon analytic continuation describe a class of spacetimes which we identify as quarter-BPS bubbling geometries in M-theory, with SO(4) × SO(3) × U(1) isometry in Riemannian signature. We also study fivebranes wrapping a special lagrangian five-cycle in a fivefold, in the presence of membranes wrapping holomorphic curves, and employ the wrapped brane supersymmetry conditions to derive a classification of the general minimally supersymmetric <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2 geometry in M-theory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..94f4005C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..94f4005C"><span><span class="hlt">AdS</span> and Lifshitz scalar hairy black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Bin; Fan, Zhong-Ying; Zhu, Lu-Yao</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>We consider Gauss-Bonnet (GB) gravity in general dimensions, which is nonminimally coupled to a scalar field. By choosing a scalar potential of the type V (ϕ )=2 Λ0+1/2 m2ϕ2+γ4ϕ4 , we first obtain large classes of scalar hairy black holes with spherical/hyperbolic/planar topologies that are asymptotic to locally anti- de Sitter (<span class="hlt">AdS</span>) space-times. We derive the first law of black hole thermodynamics using Wald formalism. In particular, for one class of the solutions, the scalar hair forms a thermodynamic conjugate with the graviton and nontrivially contributes to the thermodynamical first law. We observe that except for one class of the planar black holes, all these solutions are constructed at the critical point of GB gravity where there exist unique <span class="hlt">AdS</span> vacua. In fact, a Lifshitz vacuum is also allowed at the critical point. We then construct many new classes of neutral and charged Lifshitz black hole solutions for an either minimally or nonminimally coupled scalar and derive the thermodynamical first laws. We also obtain new classes of exact dynamical <span class="hlt">AdS</span> and Lifshitz solutions which describe radiating white holes. The solutions eventually become <span class="hlt">AdS</span> or Lifshitz vacua at late retarded times. However, for one class of the solutions, the final state is an <span class="hlt">AdS</span> space-time with a globally naked singularity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017APS..APRX10007D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017APS..APRX10007D"><span>Implementation of Recursion Relations in Gluon Scattering Amplitude Calculations in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>4 /CFT3</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dokmetzoglou, Nikolaos; Kharel, Savan</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The Anti-de Sitter/Conformal Field Theory (<span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT) correspondence is a duality between a theory of gravity in curved-space (<span class="hlt">AdS</span>) and a conformally-invariant quantum field theory in flat-space (CFT). Scattering amplitudes are observables associated with the probability of the interaction of a given assembly of particles. Gluons, being the exchange particles associated with the strong nuclear force, which holds quarks together to form protons, are abundant byproducts of fundamental particle collisions. Thus, studying gluon scattering amplitudes is an effective way of deepening our understanding of these observables in <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT. Traditionally, Feynman diagrams have been used to calculate such scattering amplitudes. In this project, we use factorization properties and recursion relations to simplify these calculations. More specifically, we calculate multiple (different helicity combinations) four-point gluon scattering amplitudes in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>4 /CFT3 (4-D <span class="hlt">AdS</span> and 3-D CFT) as sums of products of three-point amplitudes. And then we calculate a five-point gluon scattering amplitude in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>4 /CFT3 by decomposing it into a sum of products of these four-point and three-point amplitudes. Finally we comment on useful identities for checking these amplitudes. This work was supported by a Weinstein Davidson College Research Initiative Summer Research grant.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25946464','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25946464"><span><span class="hlt">Hybridization</span> within Saccharomyces Genus Results in Homoeostasis and Phenotypic Novelty in Winemaking Conditions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>da Silva, Telma; Albertin, Warren; Dillmann, Christine; Bely, Marina; la Guerche, Stéphane; Giraud, Christophe; Huet, Sylvie; Sicard, Delphine; Masneuf-Pomarede, Isabelle; de Vienne, Dominique; Marullo, Philippe</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Despite its biotechnological interest, <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>, which can result in <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> vigor, has not commonly been studied or exploited in the yeast genus. From a diallel design including 55 intra- and interspecific <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum grown at two temperatures in enological conditions, we analyzed as many as 35 fermentation traits with original statistical and modeling tools. We first showed that, depending on the types of trait--kinetics parameters, life-history traits, enological parameters and aromas -, the sources of variation (<span class="hlt">strain</span>, temperature and <span class="hlt">strain</span> * temperature effects) differed in a large extent. Then we compared globally three groups of <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> and their parents at two growth temperatures: intraspecific <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> S. cerevisiae * S. cerevisiae, intraspecific <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> S. uvarum * S. uvarum and interspecific <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> S. cerevisiae * S. uvarum. We found that <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> could generate multi-trait phenotypes with improved oenological performances and better homeostasis with respect to temperature. These results could explain why interspecific <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> is so common in natural and domesticated yeast, and open the way to applications for wine-making.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4422614','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4422614"><span><span class="hlt">Hybridization</span> within Saccharomyces Genus Results in Homoeostasis and Phenotypic Novelty in Winemaking Conditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dillmann, Christine; Bely, Marina; la Guerche, Stéphane; Giraud, Christophe; Huet, Sylvie; Sicard, Delphine; Masneuf-Pomarede, Isabelle; de Vienne, Dominique; Marullo, Philippe</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Despite its biotechnological interest, <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>, which can result in <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> vigor, has not commonly been studied or exploited in the yeast genus. From a diallel design including 55 intra- and interspecific <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum grown at two temperatures in enological conditions, we analyzed as many as 35 fermentation traits with original statistical and modeling tools. We first showed that, depending on the types of trait – kinetics parameters, life-history traits, enological parameters and aromas –, the sources of variation (<span class="hlt">strain</span>, temperature and <span class="hlt">strain</span> * temperature effects) differed in a large extent. Then we compared globally three groups of <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> and their parents at two growth temperatures: intraspecific <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> S. cerevisiae * S. cerevisiae, intraspecific <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> S. uvarum * S. uvarum and interspecific <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> S. cerevisiae * S. uvarum. We found that <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> could generate multi-trait phenotypes with improved oenological performances and better homeostasis with respect to temperature. These results could explain why interspecific <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> is so common in natural and domesticated yeast, and open the way to applications for wine-making. PMID:25946464</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26518477','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26518477"><span>A unique ecological niche fosters <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> of oak-tree and vineyard isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Clowers, Katie J; Will, Jessica L; Gasch, Audrey P</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Differential adaptation to distinct niches can restrict gene flow and promote population differentiation within a species. However, in some cases the distinction between niches can collapse, forming a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> niche with features of both environments. We previously reported that distinctions between vineyards and oak soil present an ecological barrier that restricts gene flow between lineages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Vineyard isolates are tolerant to stresses associated with grapes while North American oak <span class="hlt">strains</span> are particularly tolerant to freeze-thaw cycles. Here, we report the isolation of S. cerevisiae <span class="hlt">strains</span> from Wisconsin cherry trees, which display features common to vineyards (e.g. high sugar concentrations) and frequent freeze-thaw cycles. Genome sequencing revealed that the isolated <span class="hlt">strains</span> are highly heterozygous and represent recent <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> of the oak × vineyard lineages. We found that the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> <span class="hlt">strains</span> are phenotypically similar to vineyard <span class="hlt">strains</span> for some traits, but are more similar to oak <span class="hlt">strains</span> for other traits. The cherry <span class="hlt">strains</span> were exceptionally good at growing in cherry juice, raising the possibility that they have adapted to this niche. We performed transcriptome profiling in cherry, oak and vineyard <span class="hlt">strains</span> and show that the cherry-tree <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> display vineyard-like or oak-like expression, depending on the gene sets, and in some cases, the expression patterns linked back to shared stress tolerances. Allele-specific expression in these natural <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> suggested concerted cis-regulatory evolution at sets of functionally regulated genes. Our results raise the possibility that <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> of the two lineages provides a genetic solution to the thriving in this unique niche.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4824287','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4824287"><span>A unique ecological niche fosters <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> of oak-tree and vineyard isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Clowers, Katie J.; Will, Jessica L.; Gasch, Audrey P.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Differential adaptation to distinct niches can restrict gene flow and promote population differentiation within a species. However, in some cases the distinction between niches can collapse, forming a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> niche with features of both environments. We previously reported that distinctions between vineyards and oak soil present an ecological barrier that restricts gene flow between lineages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Vineyard isolates are tolerant to stresses associated with grapes while North American oak <span class="hlt">strains</span> are particularly tolerant to freeze-thaw cycles. Here, we report the isolation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae <span class="hlt">strains</span> from Wisconsin cherry trees, which display features common to vineyards (e.g. high sugar concentrations) and frequent freeze-thaw cycles. Genome sequencing revealed that the isolated <span class="hlt">strains</span> are highly heterozygous and represent recent <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> of the oak x vineyard lineages. We found that the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> <span class="hlt">strains</span> are phenotypically similar to vineyard <span class="hlt">strains</span> for some traits, but are more similar to oak <span class="hlt">strains</span> for other traits. The cherry <span class="hlt">strains</span> were exceptionally good at growing in cherry juice, raising the possibility that they have adapted to this niche. We performed transcriptome profiling in cherry, oak, and vineyard <span class="hlt">strains</span> and show that the cherry-tree <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> display vineyard-like or oak-like expression, depending on the gene sets, and in some cases the expression patterns linked back to shared stress tolerances. Allele-specific expression in these natural <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> suggested concerted cis-regulatory evolution at sets of functionally regulated genes. Our results raise the possibility that <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> of the two lineages provides a genetic solution to the thriving in this unique niche. PMID:26518477</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22043083','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22043083"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> Hardening and <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Softening of Reversibly Cross-linked Supramolecular Polymer Networks.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xu, Donghua; Craig, Stephen L</p> <p>2011-09-27</p> <p>The large amplitude oscillatory shear behavior of metallo-supramolecular polymer networks formed by <span class="hlt">adding</span> bis-Pd(II) cross-linkers to poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution is reported. The influence of scanning frequency, dissociation rate of cross-linkers, concentration of cross-linkers, and concentration of PVP solution on the large amplitude oscillatory shear behavior is explored. In semidilute unentangled PVP solutions, above a critical scanning frequency, <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening of both storage moduli and loss moduli is observed. In the semidilute entangled regime of PVP solution, however, <span class="hlt">strain</span> softening is observed for samples with faster cross-linkers (k(d) ∼ 1450 s(-1)), whereas <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening is observed for samples with slower cross-linkers (k(d) ∼ 17 s(-1)). The mechanism of <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening is attributed primarily to a <span class="hlt">strain</span>-induced increase in the number of elastically active chains, with possible contributions from non-Gaussian stretching of polymer chains at <span class="hlt">strains</span> approaching network fracture. The divergent <span class="hlt">strain</span> softening of samples with faster cross-linkers in semidilute entangled PVP solutions, relative to the <span class="hlt">strain</span> hardening of samples with slower cross-linkers, is consistent with observed shear thinning/shear thickening behavior reported previously and is attributed to the fact that the average time that a cross-linker remains detached is too short to permit the local relaxation of polymer chain segments that is necessary for a net conversion of elastically inactive to elastically active cross-linkers. These and other observations paint a picture in which <span class="hlt">strain</span> softening and shear thinning arise from the same set of molecular mechanisms, conceptually uniting the two nonlinear responses for this system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GReGr..46.1727K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GReGr..46.1727K"><span>Brick walls and <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kay, Bernard S.; Ortíz, L.</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>We discuss the relationship between the bulk-boundary correspondence in Rehren's algebraic holography (and in other `fixed-background', QFT-based, approaches to holography) and in mainstream string-theoretic `Maldacena <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT'. Especially, we contrast the understanding of black-hole entropy from the point of view of QFT in curved spacetime—in the framework of 't Hooft's `brick wall' model—with the understanding based on Maldacena <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT. We show that the brick-wall modification of a Klein-Gordon field in the Hartle-Hawking-Israel state on dimensional Schwarzschild <span class="hlt">AdS</span> has a well-defined boundary limit with the same temperature and entropy as the brick-wall-modified bulk theory. One of our main purposes is to point out a close connection, for general <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT situations, between the puzzle raised by Arnsdorf and Smolin regarding the relationship between Rehren's algebraic holography and mainstream <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT and the puzzle embodied in the `complementarity principle' proposed by Mukohyama and Israel in their work on the brick-wall approach to black hole entropy. Working on the assumption that similar results will hold for bulk QFT other than the Klein-Gordon field and for Schwarzschild <span class="hlt">AdS</span> in other dimensions, and recalling the first author's proposed resolution to the Mukohyama-Israel puzzle based on his `matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis', we argue that, in Maldacena <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT, the algebra of the boundary CFT is isomorphic only to a proper subalgebra of the bulk algebra, albeit (at non-zero temperature) the (GNS) Hilbert spaces of bulk and boundary theories are still the `same'—the total bulk state being pure, while the boundary state is mixed (thermal). We also argue from the finiteness of its boundary (and hence, on our assumptions, also bulk) entropy at finite temperature, that the Rehren dual of the Maldacena boundary CFT cannot itself be a QFT and must, instead, presumably be something like a string theory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004JPS...127....8B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004JPS...127....8B"><span>Systems for <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> cars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bitsche, Otmar; Gutmann, Guenter</p> <p></p> <p>Not only sharp competition but also legislation are pushing development of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> drive trains. Based on conventional internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, these drive trains offer a wide range of benefits from reduced fuel consumption and emission to multifaceted performance improvements. <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> electric drive trains may also facilitate the introduction of fuel cells (FC). The battery is the key component for all <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> drive trains, as it dominates cost and performance issues. The selection of the right battery technology for the specific automotive application is an important task with an impact on costs of development and use. Safety, power, and high cycle life are a must for all <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> applications. The greatest pressure to reduce cost is in soft <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>, where lead-acid embedded in a considerate management presents the cheapest solution, with a considerable improvement in performance needed. From mild to full <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>, an improvement in specific power makes higher costs more acceptable, provided that the battery's service life is equivalent to the vehicle's lifetime. Today, this is proven for the nickel-metal hydride system. Lithium ion batteries, which make use of a multiple safety concept, and with some development anticipated, provide even better prospects in terms of performance and costs. Also, their scalability permits their application in battery electric vehicles—the basis for better performance and enhanced user acceptance. Development targets for the batteries are discussed with a focus on system aspects such as electrical and thermal management and safety.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5443955','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5443955"><span>Human <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> hybridoma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tiebout, R.F.; van Boxtel-Oosterhof, F.; Stricker, E.A.M.; Zeijlemaker, W.P.</p> <p>1987-11-15</p> <p><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> hybridomas are obtained by fusion of two cells, each producing its own antibody. Several authors have reported the construction of murine <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> hybridomas with the aim to obtain bispecific monoclonal antibodies. The authors have investigated, in a model system, the feasibility of constructing a human <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> hybridoma. They fused two monoclonal cell lines: an ouabain-sensitive and azaserine/hypoxanthine-resistant Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human cell line that produces an IgG1kappa antibody directed against tetanus toxiod and an azaserine/hypoxanthine-sensitive and ouabain-resistant human-mouse xenohybrid cell line that produces a human IgG1lambda antibody directed against hepatitis-B surface antigen. <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> hybridoma cells were selected in culture medium containing azaserine/hypoxanthine and ouabain. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> nature of the secreted antibodies was analyzed by means of two antigen-specific immunoassay. The results show that it is possible, with the combined use of transformation and xenohybridization techniques, to construct human <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> hybridomas that produce bispecific antibodies. Bispecific antibodies activity was measured by means of two radioimmunoassays.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16345574','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16345574"><span>Method for Testing Degree of Infectivity of Rhizobium meliloti <span class="hlt">Strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Olivares, J; Casadesús, J; Bedmar, E J</p> <p>1980-05-01</p> <p>The infectiveness of different <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Rhizobium meliloti was tested with a technique that uses the addition of tetracycline to the root medium. To stop the infection, the antibiotic was <span class="hlt">added</span> some time after the inoculation of Medicago sativa plants. A coefficient of infectivity for each <span class="hlt">strain</span> was calculated according to the number of nodules that appeared with and without the addition of the antibiotic. This method seems useful in infectivity studies and is simpler and easier to perform than the test of competence between <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=291460','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=291460"><span>Method for Testing Degree of Infectivity of Rhizobium meliloti <span class="hlt">Strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Olivares, José; Casadesús, Josep; Bedmar, Eulogio J.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>The infectiveness of different <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Rhizobium meliloti was tested with a technique that uses the addition of tetracycline to the root medium. To stop the infection, the antibiotic was <span class="hlt">added</span> some time after the inoculation of Medicago sativa plants. A coefficient of infectivity for each <span class="hlt">strain</span> was calculated according to the number of nodules that appeared with and without the addition of the antibiotic. This method seems useful in infectivity studies and is simpler and easier to perform than the test of competence between <span class="hlt">strains</span>. PMID:16345574</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981sri..reptT....R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981sri..reptT....R"><span>Thin film <span class="hlt">strain</span> transducer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rand, J. L.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Previous attempts to develop an appropriate sensor for measuring the stress or <span class="hlt">strain</span> of high altitude balloons during flight are reviewed as well as the various conditions that must be met by such a device. The design, development and calibration of a transducer which promises to satisfy the necessary design constraints are described. The thin film <span class="hlt">strain</span> transducer has a low effective modulus so as not to interfere with the <span class="hlt">strain</span> that would naturally occur in the balloon. In addition, the transducer has a high sensitivity to longitudinal <span class="hlt">strain</span> (7.216 mV/V/unit <span class="hlt">strain</span>) which is constant for all temperature from room temperature to -80 C and all <span class="hlt">strains</span> from 5 percent compression to 10 percent tensile <span class="hlt">strain</span>. At the same time, the sensor is relatively insensitive (0.27 percent) to transverse forces. The device has a standard 350 ohm impedance which is compatible with available bridge balance, amplification and telemetry instrumentation now available for balloon flight. Recommendations are included for improved coatings to provide passive thermal control as well as model, tethered and full scale flight testing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JSMTE..07.3107G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JSMTE..07.3107G"><span>Photon gas thermodynamics in dS and <span class="hlt">AdS</span> momentum spaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gorji, M. A.; Hosseinzadeh, V.; Nozari, K.; Vakili, B.</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>In this paper, we study thermostatistical properties of a photon gas in the framework of two deformed special relativity models defined by the cosmological coordinatizations of the de Sitter (dS) and anti-de Sitter (<span class="hlt">AdS</span>) momentum spaces. The dS model is a doubly special relativity theory in which an ultraviolet length scale is invariant under the deformed Lorentz transformations. For the case of the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> model, however, the Lorentz symmetry breaks at the high energy regime. We show that the existence of a maximal momentum in dS momentum space leads to maximal pressure and temperature at the thermodynamical level, while maximal internal energy and entropy arise for the case of the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> momentum space due to the existence of a maximal kinematical energy. These results show that the thermodynamical duality of these models is very similar to their well-known kinematical duality.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...05..054B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...05..054B"><span>Black hole microstates in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>4 from supersymmetric localization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Benini, Francesco; Hristov, Kiril; Zaffaroni, Alberto</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>This paper addresses a long standing problem, the counting of the microstates of supersymmetric asymptotically <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes in terms of a holographically dual field theory. We focus on a class of asymptotically <span class="hlt">AdS</span>4 static black holes preserving two real supercharges which are dual to a topologically twisted deformation of the ABJM theory. We evaluate in the large N limit the topologically twisted index of the ABJM theory and we show that it correctly reproduces the entropy of the <span class="hlt">AdS</span>4 black holes. An extremization of the index with respect to a set of chemical potentials is required. We interpret it as the selection of the exact R-symmetry of the superconformal quantum mechanics describing the horizon of the black hole.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...12..077B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...12..077B"><span>A note on vectorial <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5/CFT4 duality for spin- j boundary theory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bae, Jin-Beom; Joung, Euihun; Lal, Shailesh</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>The vectorial holographic correspondences between higher-spin theories in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5 and free vector models on the boundary are extended to the cases where the latter is described by free massless spin- j field. The dual higher-spin theory in the bulk does not include gravity and can only be defined on rigid <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5 background with S 4 boundary. We discuss various properties of these rather special higher-spin theories and calculate their one-loop free energies. We show that the result is proportional to the same quantity for spin- j doubleton treated as if it is a <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5 field. Finally, we consider even more special case where the boundary theory itself is given by an infinite tower of massless higher-spin fields.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1120145','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1120145"><span>QCD Condensates and Holographic Wilson Loops for Asymptotically <span class="hlt">AdS</span> Spaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Quevedo, R. Carcasses; Goity, Jose L.; Trinchero, Roberto C.</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>The minimization of the Nambu-Goto (NG) action for a surface whose contour defines a circular Wilson loop of radius a placed at a finite value of the coordinate orthogonal to the border is considered. This is done for asymptotically <span class="hlt">AdS</span> spaces. The condensates of dimension n = 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 are calculated in terms of the coefficients in the expansion in powers of the radius a of the on-shell subtracted NG action for small a->0. The subtraction employed is such that it presents no conflict with conformal invariance in the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> case and need not introduce an additional infrared scale for the case of confining geometries. It is shown that the UV value of the gluon condensates is universal in the sense that it only depends on the first coefficients of the difference with the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> case.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JHEP...10..083A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JHEP...10..083A"><span>Stability of warped <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 vacua of topologically massive gravity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anninos, Dionysios; Esole, Mboyo; Guica, Monica</p> <p>2009-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 vacua of topologically massive gravity (TMG) have been shown to be perturbatively unstable for all values of the coupling constant except the chiral point μl = 1. We study the possibility that the warped vacua of TMG, which exist for all values of μ, are stable under linearized perturbations. In this paper, we show that spacelike warped <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 vacua with Compère-Detournay boundary conditions are indeed stable in the range μl>3. This is precisely the range in which black hole solutions arise as discrete identifications of the warped <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 vacuum. The situation somewhat resembles chiral gravity: although negative energy modes do exist, they are all excluded by the boundary conditions, and the perturbative spectrum solely consists of boundary (pure large gauge) gravitons.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26114256','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26114256"><span>Characterization of Mn-resistant endophytic bacteria from Mn-hyperaccumulator Phytolacca americana and their impact on Mn accumulation of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> penisetum.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Wen-Hui; Chen, Wei; He, Lin-Yan; Wang, Qi; Sheng, Xia-Fang</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Three hundred Mn-resistant endophytic bacteria were isolated from the Mn-hyperaccumulator, Phytolacca americana, grown at different levels of Mn (0, 1, and 10mM) stress. Under no Mn stress, 90%, 92%, and 11% of the bacteria produced indole acetic acid (IAA), siderophore, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, respectively. Under Mn stress, 68-94%, 91-92%, and 21-81% of the bacteria produced IAA, siderophore, and ACC deaminase, respectively. Greater percentages of ACC deaminase-producing bacteria were found in the Mn-treated P. americana. Furthermore, the ratios of IAA- and siderophore-producing bacteria were significantly higher in the Mn treated plant leaves, while the ratio of ACC deaminase-producing bacteria was significantly higher in the Mn treated-roots. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, Mn-resistant bacteria were affiliated with 10 genera. In experiments involving <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> penisetum grown in soils treated with 0 and 1000mgkg(-1) of Mn, inoculation with <span class="hlt">strain</span> 1Y31 was found to increase the root (ranging from 6.4% to 18.3%) and above-ground tissue (ranging from 19.3% to 70.2%) mass and total Mn uptake of above-ground tissues (64%) compared to the control. Furthermore, inoculation with <span class="hlt">strain</span> 1Y31 was found to increase the ratio of IAA-producing bacteria in the rhizosphere and bulk soils of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> penisetum grown in Mn-<span class="hlt">added</span> soils. The results showed the effect of Mn stress on the ratio of the plant growth-promoting factor-producing endophytic bacteria of P. americana and highlighted the potential of endophytic bacterium as an inoculum for enhanced phytoremediation of Mn-polluted soils by <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> penisetum plants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/871632','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/871632"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> gauge installation tool</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Conard, Lisa Marie</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>A tool and a method for attaching a <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge to a test specimen by maaining alignment of, and applying pressure to, the <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge during the bonding of the gauge to the specimen. The tool comprises rigid and compliant pads attached to a spring-loaded clamp. The pads are shaped to conform to the specimen surface to which the gauge is to be bonded. The shape of the pads permits the tool to align itself to the specimen and to maintain alignment of the gauge to the specimen during the bond curing process. A simplified method of attaching a <span class="hlt">strain</span> gauge is provided by use of the tool.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED559330.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED559330.pdf"><span>How Will Rhode Island's New <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Pension Plan Affect Teachers? A Report of the Public Pension Project</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Johnson, Richard W.; Butrica, Barbara A.; Haaga, Owen; Southgate, Benjamin G.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>In 2011 Rhode Island replaced the stand-alone defined benefit pension plan it provided to state employees with a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> plan that reduced the defined benefit component and <span class="hlt">added</span> a 401(k)-type, defined contribution component. Although controversial, the new <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> plan will boost retirement incomes for most of the states public school teachers. Our…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec201-62.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec201-62.pdf"><span>7 CFR 201.62 - Tests for determination of percentages of kind, variety, type, <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>, or offtype.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... following table, <span class="hlt">added</span> to one-half the required pure seed tol- erances determined in accordance with § 201.60, except that one-half the pure seed tolerance will not be applied in determining tolerances for <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> labeled on the basis of the percentage of pure seed which is <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>. Table 4—Tolerances for...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol3-sec201-62.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol3-sec201-62.pdf"><span>7 CFR 201.62 - Tests for determination of percentages of kind, variety, type, <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>, or offtype.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>... following table, <span class="hlt">added</span> to one-half the required pure seed tol- erances determined in accordance with § 201.60, except that one-half the pure seed tolerance will not be applied in determining tolerances for <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> labeled on the basis of the percentage of pure seed which is <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>. Table 4—Tolerances for...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26850542','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26850542"><span>Permissive growth of human adenovirus type 4 vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span>-based vector in porcine cell lines.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gao, Dong-sheng; Li, Xiao-jing; Wan, Wen-yan; Li, Hong-jie; Wang, Xiao-xue; Yang, Xia; Li, Yong-tao; Chang, Hong-tao; Chen, Lu; Wang, Chuan-qing; Zhao, Jun</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>In recent years, there has been considerable interest in using adenoviruses as live vectors to develop recombinant vaccines. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of HIV/SIV and influenza vaccine candidates based on human adenovirus type 4 (<span class="hlt">Ad</span>4) replication-competent vectors in rhesus macaque and human model. To explore the possibility of human <span class="hlt">Ad</span>4 vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> used as a vector in developing porcine vaccines, the growth properties of replication-competent human <span class="hlt">Ad</span>4 vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> recombinant encoding EGFP in different porcine cell lines were investigated. All tested cell lines are permissive for <span class="hlt">Ad</span>4 vaccine <span class="hlt">strain</span> vector with varied replication efficiency. Thus, human <span class="hlt">Ad</span>4 based vectors would be promising supplement to adenovirus vectors as a delivery vehicle for recombinant vaccines in swine industry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017GReGr..49...53W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017GReGr..49...53W"><span>The generalization of charged <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black hole specific volume and number density</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Zi-Liang; He, Miao; Fang, Chao; Sun, Dao-Quan; Deng, Jian-Bo</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>In this paper, by proposing a generalized specific volume, we restudy the P- V criticality of charged <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black holes in the extended phase space. The results show that most of the previous conclusions can be generalized without change, but the ratio {\\tilde{ρ }}_c should be 3 {\\tilde{α }}/16 in general case. Further research on the thermodynamical phase transition of black hole leads us to a natural interpretation of our assumption, and more black hole properties can be generalized. Finally, we study the number density for charged <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black hole in higher dimensions, the results show the necessity of our assumption.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..91j5029O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..91j5029O"><span>Warped <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 , dS3 , and flows from N =(0 ,2 ) SCFTs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>O'Colgáin, Eoin</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>We present the general form of all timelike supersymmetric solutions to three-dimensional U (1 )3 gauged supergravity, a known consistent truncation of string theory. We uncover a rich vacuum structure, including an infinite class of new timelike-warped <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 (Gödel) and timelike-warped dS3 critical points. We outline the construction of supersymmetric flows, driven by irrelevant scalar operators in the SCFT, which interpolate between critical points. For flows from <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 to Gödel, the natural candidate for the central charge decreases along the flow. Flows to timelike-warped dS3 exhibit topology change.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110003015','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110003015"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Composite Cryogenic Tank Structure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>DeLay, Thomas</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> lightweight composite tank has been created using specially designed materials and manufacturing processes. The tank is produced by using a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> structure consisting of at least two reinforced composite material systems. The inner composite layer comprises a distinct fiber and resin matrix suitable for cryogenic use that is a braided-sleeve (and/or a filamentwound layer) aramid fiber preform that is placed on a removable mandrel (outfitted with metallic end fittings) and is infused (vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded) with a polyurethane resin matrix with a high ductility at low temperatures. This inner layer is allowed to cure and is encapsulated with a filamentwound outer composite layer of a distinct fiber resin system. Both inner and outer layer are in intimate contact, and can also be cured at the same time. The outer layer is a material that performs well for low temperature pressure vessels, and it can rely on the inner layer to act as a liner to contain the fluids. The outer layer can be a variety of materials, but the best embodiment may be the use of a continuous tow of carbon fiber (T-1000 carbon, or others), or other high-strength fibers combined with a high ductility epoxy resin matrix, or a polyurethane matrix, which performs well at low temperatures. After curing, the mandrel can be removed from the outer layer. While the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> structure is not limited to two particular materials, a preferred version of the tank has been demonstrated on an actual test tank article cycled at high pressures with liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, and the best version is an inner layer of PBO (poly-pphenylenebenzobisoxazole) fibers with a polyurethane matrix and an outer layer of T-1000 carbon with a high elongation epoxy matrix suitable for cryogenic temperatures. A polyurethane matrix has also been used for the outer layer. The construction method is ideal because the fiber and resin of the inner layer has a high <span class="hlt">strain</span> to failure at cryogenic</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=212843&keyword=Distillation&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=78684484&CFTOKEN=42615183','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=212843&keyword=Distillation&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=78684484&CFTOKEN=42615183"><span>Energy Efficient <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Vapor Stripping-Vapor Permeation Process for Ethanol Recovery <span class="hlt">ad</span> Dehydration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Distillation combined with molecular sieve dehydration is the current state of the art for fuel grade ethanol production from fermentation broths. To improve the sustainability of bioethanol production, energy efficient separation alternatives are needed, particularly for lower f...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21513241','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21513241"><span>The Status of <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/QCD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Reece, Matthew</p> <p>2011-05-23</p> <p>In this talk I give a brief assessment of the '<span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/QCD correspondence', its successes, and its failures. I begin with a review of the <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT correspondence, with an emphasis on why the large N, large 't Hooft coupling limit is necessary for a calculable theory. I then briefly discuss attempts to extrapolate this correspondence to QCD-like theories, stressing why the failure of the large 't Hooft coupling limit is more important than the breakdown of the large N expansion. I sketch how event shapes can manifest stringy physics, and close with some brief remarks on the prospects for future improvements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA275663','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA275663"><span>Advanced Optical <span class="hlt">A/D</span> Converter</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1993-05-01</p> <p>before the receiver and separately by reducing the gain in the EDFA . It is important to note that the optical power level was varied while all the...could not exceed roughly 50% of the maximum power available at full gain from the EDFA . 4.2 Baseband-Mode Testing The single-channel system was also...<span class="hlt">AD</span>-A275 663 Advanced Optical <span class="hlt">A/D</span> Convert M.C. Hamilton, J.A. Bell, D.A. Leep, J.P. Lin The Boeing Company Boeing Defense and Space Group P.O. Box</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24131427','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24131427"><span>Enhanced chemical reactivity of graphene induced by mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bissett, Mark A; Konabe, Satoru; Okada, Susumu; Tsuji, Masaharu; Ago, Hiroki</p> <p>2013-11-26</p> <p>Control over chemical reactivity is essential in the field of nanotechnology. Graphene is a two-dimensional atomic sheet of sp(2) <span class="hlt">hybridized</span> carbon with exceptional properties that can be altered by chemical functionalization. Here, we transferred single-layer graphene onto a flexible substrate and investigated the functionalization using different aryl diazonium molecules while applying mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span>. We found that mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> can alter the structure of graphene, and dramatically increase the reaction rate, by a factor of up to 10, as well as increase the final degree of functionalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span> enables functionalization of graphene for both p- and n-type dopants, where unstrained graphene showed negligible reactivity. Theoretical calculations were also performed to support the experimental findings. Our findings offer a simple approach to control the chemical reactivity of graphene through the application of mechanical <span class="hlt">strain</span>, allowing for a tuning of the properties of graphene.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030068416','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030068416"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Propulsion Demonstration Program 250K <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Motor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Story, George; Zoladz, Tom; Arves, Joe; Kearney, Darren; Abel, Terry; Park, O.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Propulsion Demonstration Program (HPDP) program was formed to mature <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> propulsion technology to a readiness level sufficient to enable commercialization for various space launch applications. The goal of the HPDP was to develop and test a 250,000 pound vacuum thrust <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> booster in order to demonstrate <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> propulsion technology and enable manufacturing of large <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> boosters for current and future space launch vehicles. The HPDP has successfully conducted four tests of the 250,000 pound thrust <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> rocket motor at NASA's Stennis Space Center. This paper documents the test series.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT.......138P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT.......138P"><span>Responses of photonic crystal fibres to pressure, axial <span class="hlt">strain</span> and temperature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pang, Meng</p> <p></p> <p>Photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) show different elastic and optical properties from conventional silica fibres because they contain periodic transverse microstructures in their profiles. In this dissertation, the microstructure cladding of PCF is regarded as a honeycomb structure which has inhomogeneous elastic properties. Both Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this region are anisotropic, and are the functions of the air-filling ratio of the microstructure cladding. Based on this assumption, three theoretical models for three types of PCFs (solid-core PCF, hollow-core photonic bandgap fibre and <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> PCF) are constructed. Using the theoretical models, the responses of PCFs to axial <span class="hlt">strain</span>, acoustic pressure, temperature and lateral pressure are investigated respectively. The simulation results show that compared with conventional silica fibres, PCFs are predicted to have several novel or improved responses to external measurands, which can be used to enhance the performance of the fibre sensors or construct new PCF-based devices. <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> PCF guides light by a novel guiding mechanism, which is a combination of index-guiding and bandgap-guiding. Because the guiding mechanisms of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> PCF are different in two orthogonal directions, high birefringence property is expected. To our knowledge, there is no theoretical model that can simulate the birefringence properties of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> PCFs. In this dissertation, a theoretical model for <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> PCFs is constructed to simulate the birefringence property of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> PCFs and the responses of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> fibres' birefringence to axial <span class="hlt">strain</span> and temperature. Using this theoretical model, the birefringence/responses of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> PCFs are predicted, as the functions of their design parameters. In experiment, the birefringence of one type of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> PCF and its responses to axial <span class="hlt">strain</span> and temperature is measured. The experimental results agree well with the simulation results, which give us the confidence to use this theoretical model</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Sprains_Strains/default.asp','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Sprains_Strains/default.asp"><span>Sprains and <span class="hlt">Strains</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Typically, people with a <span class="hlt">strain</span> experience pain, limited motion, muscle spasms, and possibly muscle weakness. They also ... program designed to prevent stiffness, improve range of motion, and restore the joint's normal flexibility and strength. ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/strains-sprains-sheet.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/strains-sprains-sheet.html"><span><span class="hlt">Strains</span> and Sprains</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... in the joint or muscle swelling and bruising warmth and redness of the injured area difficulty moving ... looks "bent" or misshapen signs of infection (increased warmth, redness, streaks, swelling, and pain) a <span class="hlt">strain</span> or ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993JSG....15..383B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993JSG....15..383B"><span><span class="hlt">Strain</span> and magnetic remanence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Borradaile, Graham John</p> <p>1993-05-01</p> <p>Experimental data may be compatible with the hypothesis that a single direction of magnetic remanence rotates as a rigid marker with <span class="hlt">strains</span> up to 40% shortening in coaxial, perfect flattening ( X = Y > Z). Detailed agreement with the passive line model is relatively poor for the specimens in which remanance is carried by magnetite. However, for this range of <span class="hlt">strains</span> the differences with the passive line model (Wettstein's equation) are so slight that the latter model may be more easily employed to de-<span class="hlt">strain</span> or restore deformed remanance to its original attitude. In the case of hematite-bearing remanences, the differences between the passive line and rigid marker model are even smaller because of the higher aspect ratios of grains of hematite. Therefore it is suggested that Wettstein's equation may be safely used to restore remanence after even higher <span class="hlt">strains</span>, where the remanence is carried by hematite.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20010074019','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20010074019"><span>Suppression of Low <span class="hlt">Strain</span> Rate Nonpremixed Flames by an Agent</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hamins, A.; Bundy, M.; Puri, I. K.; McGrattan, K.; Park, W. C.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>The agent concentration required to achieve the suppression of low <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate nonpremixed flames is an important consideration for fire protection in a microgravity environment such as a space platform. Currently, there is a lack of understanding of the structure and extinction of low <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate (<20 s(exp -1)) nonpremixed flames. The exception to this statement is the study by Maruta et al., who reported measurements of low <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate suppression of methane-air diffusion flames with N2 <span class="hlt">added</span> to the fuel stream under microgravity conditions. They found that the nitrogen concentration required to achieve extinction increased as the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate decreased until a critical value was obtained. As the <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate was further decreased, the required N2 concentration decreased. This phenomenon was termed "turning point" behavior and was attributed to radiation-induced nonpremixed flame extinction. In terms of fire safety, a critical agent concentration assuring suppression under all flow conditions represents a fundamental limit for nonpremixed flames. Counterflow flames are a convenient configuration for control of the flame <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate. In high and moderately <span class="hlt">strained</span> near-extinction nonpremixed flames, analysis of flame structure typically neglects radiant energy loss because the flames are nonluminous and the hot gas species are confined to a thin reaction zone. In counterflowing CH4-air flames, for example, radiative heat loss fractions ranging from 1 to 6 percent have been predicted and measured. The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of radiative emission, flame <span class="hlt">strain</span>, agent addition, and buoyancy on the structure and extinction of low <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate nonpremixed flames through measurements and comparison with flame simulations. The suppression effectiveness of a number of suppressants (N2, CO2, or CF3Br) was considered as they were <span class="hlt">added</span> to either the fuel or oxidizer streams of low <span class="hlt">strain</span> rate methane-air diffusion flames.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4440740','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4440740"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Breakdown in Cichlid Fish</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Stelkens, Rike Bahati; Schmid, Corinne; Seehausen, Ole</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Studies from a wide diversity of taxa have shown a negative relationship between genetic compatibility and the divergence time of <span class="hlt">hybridizing</span> genomes. Theory predicts the main breakdown of fitness to happen after the F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> generation, when heterosis subsides and recessive allelic (Dobzhansky-Muller) incompatibilities are increasingly unmasked. We measured the fitness of F2 <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> of African haplochromine cichlid fish bred from species pairs spanning several thousand to several million years divergence time. F2 <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> consistently showed the lowest viability compared to F1 <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> and non-<span class="hlt">hybrid</span> crosses (crosses within the grandparental species), in agreement with <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> breakdown. Especially the short- and long-term survival (2 weeks to 6 months) of F2 <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> was significantly reduced. Overall, F2 <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> showed a fitness reduction of 21% compared to F1 <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>, and a reduction of 43% compared to the grandparental, non-<span class="hlt">hybrid</span> crosses. We further observed a decrease of F2 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> viability with the genetic distance between grandparental lineages, suggesting an important role for negative epistatic interactions in cichlid fish postzygotic isolation. The estimated time window for successful production of F2 <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> resulting from our data is consistent with the estimated divergence time between the multiple ancestral lineages that presumably <span class="hlt">hybridized</span> in three major adaptive radiations of African cichlids. PMID:25996870</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110003008','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110003008"><span>Full Piezoelectric Multilayer-Stacked <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Actuation/Transduction Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Su, Ji; Jiang, Xiaoning; Zu, Tian-Bing</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The Stacked HYBATS (<span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Actuation/Transduction system) demonstrates significantly enhanced electromechanical performance by using the cooperative contributions of the electromechanical responses of multilayer, stacked negative <span class="hlt">strain</span> components and positive <span class="hlt">strain</span> components. Both experimental and theoretical studies indicate that, for Stacked HYBATS, the displacement is over three times that of a same-sized conventional flextensional actuator/transducer. The coupled resonance mode between positive <span class="hlt">strain</span> and negative <span class="hlt">strain</span> components of Stacked HYBATS is much stronger than the resonance of a single element actuation only when the effective lengths of the two kinds of elements match each other. Compared with the previously invented <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> actuation system (HYBAS), the multilayer Stacked HYBATS can be designed to provide high mechanical load capability, low voltage driving, and a highly effective piezoelectric constant. The negative <span class="hlt">strain</span> component will contract, and the positive <span class="hlt">strain</span> component will expand in the length directions when an electric field is applied on the device. The interaction between the two elements makes an enhanced motion along the Z direction for Stacked-HYBATS. In order to dominate the dynamic length of Stacked-HYBATS by the negative <span class="hlt">strain</span> component, the area of the cross-section for the negative <span class="hlt">strain</span> component will be much larger than the total cross-section areas of the two positive <span class="hlt">strain</span> components. The transverse <span class="hlt">strain</span> is negative and longitudinal <span class="hlt">strain</span> positive in inorganic materials, such as ceramics/single crystals. Different piezoelectric multilayer stack configurations can make a piezoelectric ceramic/single-crystal multilayer stack exhibit negative <span class="hlt">strain</span> or positive <span class="hlt">strain</span> at a certain direction without increasing the applied voltage. The difference of this innovation from the HYBAS is that all the elements can be made from one-of-a-kind materials. Stacked HYBATS can provide an extremely effective piezoelectric</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22406859','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22406859"><span>Improvements in ethanol production from xylose by mating recombinant xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kato, Hiroko; Suyama, Hiroaki; Yamada, Ryosuke; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>To improve the ability of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae <span class="hlt">strains</span> to utilize the hemicellulose components of lignocellulosic feedstocks, the efficiency of xylose conversion to ethanol needs to be increased. In the present study, xylose-fermenting, haploid, yeast cells of the opposite mating type were <span class="hlt">hybridized</span> to produce a diploid <span class="hlt">strain</span> harboring two sets of xylose-assimilating genes encoding xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase, and xylulokinase. The <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> <span class="hlt">strain</span> MN8140XX showed a 1.3- and 1.9-fold improvement in ethanol production compared to its parent <span class="hlt">strains</span> MT8-1X405 and NBRC1440X, respectively. The rate of xylose consumption and ethanol production was also improved by the <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>. This study revealed that the resulting improvements in fermentation ability arose due to chromosome doubling as well as the increase in the copy number of xylose assimilation genes. Moreover, compared to the parent <span class="hlt">strain</span>, the MN8140XX <span class="hlt">strain</span> exhibited higher ethanol production under elevated temperatures (38 °C) and acidic conditions (pH 3.8). Thus, the simple <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> technique facilitated an increase in the xylose fermentation activity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5563952','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5563952"><span>Lack of complementation in somatic cell <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> between fibroblasts from patients with different forms of cystinosis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pellett, O.L.; Smith, M.L.; Greene, A.A.; Schneider, J.A. )</p> <p>1988-05-01</p> <p>Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disease in which three clinical forms are recognized: infantile nephropathic, with renal tubular damage by 1 year of age and progressive glomerular insufficiency; intermediate, with tubular and glomerular insufficiency beginning at a later age; benign, with no kidney damage. Skin fibroblasts cultured from patients with all types of cystinosis show increased intralysosomal free (nonprotein) cystine; however, fibroblasts from heterozygotes have normal free-cystine values. To determine whether genetic complementation occurs between the different forms, somatic cell <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> were constructed between cells from a patient with infantile nephropathic cystinosis and cells from patients with other types of cystinosis. If complementation occurred, the <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> would be expected to have normal cystine levels. To construct <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> cells, a universal parent cell type (TG1-neo), which was hypoxanthine/aminopterin/thymidine (HAT) sensitive and G418 resistant was constructed from an infantile nephropathic cystinosis fibroblast <span class="hlt">strain</span>. Polyethylene glycol fusion of TG1-neo with other cells that are not HAT sensitive or G418 resistant allowed for selection of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> cells in a medium containing HAT and the aminoglycoside G418. As indicated by elevated cystine levels, complementation did not occur between TG1-neo and two different benign cystinosis <span class="hlt">strains</span>, an intermediate cystinosis <span class="hlt">strain</span>, or another nephropathic cystinosis cell <span class="hlt">strain</span>. When a normal fibroblast <span class="hlt">strain</span> was fused with TG1-neo, all 15 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> clones studied contained normal amounts of intracellular free cystine.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3995920','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3995920"><span>Prdm9 Incompatibility Controls Oligospermia and Delayed Fertility but No Selfish Transmission in Mouse Intersubspecific <span class="hlt">Hybrids</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mihola, Ondřej; Piálek, Jaroslav; Forejt, Jiří; Trachtulec, Zdenek</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>PR-domain 9 (Prdm9) is the first <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> sterility gene identified in mammals. The incompatibility between Prdm9 from Mus musculus domesticus (Mmd; the B6 <span class="hlt">strain</span>) and the Hstx2 region of chromosome (Chr) X from M. m. musculus (Mmm; the PWD <span class="hlt">strain</span>) participates in the complete meiotic arrest of mouse intersubspecific (PWD×B6)F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> males. Other studies suggest that also semisterile intersubspecific <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> are relevant for mouse speciation, but the genes responsible remain unknown. To investigate the causes of this semisterility, we analyzed the role of Prdm9 and Chr X in <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> resulting from the crosses of PWK, another Mmm-derived inbred <span class="hlt">strain</span>. We demonstrate that Prdm9 and Chr X control the partial meiotic arrest and reduced sperm count in (PWK×B6)F1 males. Asynapsis of heterosubspecific chromosomes and semisterility were partially suppressed by removal of the B6 allele of Prdm9. Polymorphisms between PWK and PWD on Chr X but not in the Prdm9 region were responsible for the modification of the outcome of Prdm9 - Chr X F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> incompatibility. Furthermore, (PWK×B6)F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> males displayed delayed fertility dependent on the Prdm9 incompatibility. While the Drosophila <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> sterility gene Overdrive causes both delayed fertility and increased transmission of its own chromosome to the offspring, the segregation of Chr X and the Prdm9 region from the mouse (PWK×B6)F1 males was normal. Our results indicate extended functional consequences of Prdm9 - Chr X intersubspecific incompatibility on the fertility of <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> and should influence the design of fertility analyses in <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> zones and of laboratory crosses between Mmm and Mmd <span class="hlt">strains</span>. PMID:24756080</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24756080','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24756080"><span>Prdm9 incompatibility controls oligospermia and delayed fertility but no selfish transmission in mouse intersubspecific <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Flachs, Petr; Bhattacharyya, Tanmoy; Mihola, Ondřej; Piálek, Jaroslav; Forejt, Jiří; Trachtulec, Zdenek</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>PR-domain 9 (Prdm9) is the first <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> sterility gene identified in mammals. The incompatibility between Prdm9 from Mus musculus domesticus (Mmd; the B6 <span class="hlt">strain</span>) and the Hstx2 region of chromosome (Chr) X from M. m. musculus (Mmm; the PWD <span class="hlt">strain</span>) participates in the complete meiotic arrest of mouse intersubspecific (PWD×B6)F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> males. Other studies suggest that also semisterile intersubspecific <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> are relevant for mouse speciation, but the genes responsible remain unknown. To investigate the causes of this semisterility, we analyzed the role of Prdm9 and Chr X in <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> resulting from the crosses of PWK, another Mmm-derived inbred <span class="hlt">strain</span>. We demonstrate that Prdm9 and Chr X control the partial meiotic arrest and reduced sperm count in (PWK×B6)F1 males. Asynapsis of heterosubspecific chromosomes and semisterility were partially suppressed by removal of the B6 allele of Prdm9. Polymorphisms between PWK and PWD on Chr X but not in the Prdm9 region were responsible for the modification of the outcome of Prdm9-Chr X F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> incompatibility. Furthermore, (PWK×B6)F1 <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> males displayed delayed fertility dependent on the Prdm9 incompatibility. While the Drosophila <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> sterility gene Overdrive causes both delayed fertility and increased transmission of its own chromosome to the offspring, the segregation of Chr X and the Prdm9 region from the mouse (PWK×B6)F1 males was normal. Our results indicate extended functional consequences of Prdm9-Chr X intersubspecific incompatibility on the fertility of <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> and should influence the design of fertility analyses in <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> zones and of laboratory crosses between Mmm and Mmd <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24119212','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24119212"><span>Two interbreeding populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae <span class="hlt">strains</span> coexist in cachaça fermentations from Brazil.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Badotti, Fernanda; Vilaça, Sibelle T; Arias, Armando; Rosa, Carlos A; Barrio, Eladio</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>In this study, the phylogenetic relationships between cachaça <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from different geographical areas in Brazil were obtained on the basis of sequences of one mitochondrial (COX2) and three nuclear (EGT2, CAT8, and BRE5) genes. This analysis allowed us to demonstrate that different types of <span class="hlt">strains</span> coexist in cachaça fermentations: wine <span class="hlt">strains</span>, exhibiting alleles related or identical to those present in European wine <span class="hlt">strains</span>; native <span class="hlt">strains</span>, containing alleles similar to those found in <span class="hlt">strains</span> isolated from traditional fermentations from Latin America, North America, Malaysian, Japan, or West Africa; and their intraspecific <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> or 'mestizo' <span class="hlt">strains</span>, heterozygous for both types of alleles. Wine <span class="hlt">strains</span> and <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> with high proportions of wine-type alleles predominate in southern and southeastern Brazil, where cachaça production coexists with winemaking. The high frequency of 'wine-type' alleles in these regions is probably due to the arrival of wine immigrant <span class="hlt">strains</span> introduced from Europe in the nearby wineries due to the winemaking practices. However, in north and northeastern states, regions less suited or not suited for vine growing and winemaking, wine-type alleles are much less frequent because 'mestizo' <span class="hlt">strains</span> with intermediate or higher proportions of 'native-type' alleles are predominant.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=adn&pg=5&id=EJ165377','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=adn&pg=5&id=EJ165377"><span>The <span class="hlt">AD</span> Nurse: Prepared to be Prepared</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Beverly, Lynne; Junker, Mary H.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>It is not enough for the new associate degree (<span class="hlt">AD</span>) nursing graduate to know the theory and be willing to learn. She must also have some skill in providing basic nursing care. Examples of applicants, both ADNs and BSNs, are described to illustrate the nursing talent necessary to practice sensitively and effectively. (Editor/TA)</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=leap+AND+year&pg=5&id=EJ874618','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=leap+AND+year&pg=5&id=EJ874618"><span>Value-<span class="hlt">Added</span> Analysis in Instruction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Nicholson, Michael R.; Brown, Jeffrey R.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Value-<span class="hlt">added</span> data provide a viable alternative for gauging school effectiveness--one virtually free of the confounding effects of student demographics and other factors relating to student learning. How is it different from other measuring methods? It concentrates on growth, rather than attainment. This strengthens the concept and measurement of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19690000610','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19690000610"><span><span class="hlt">Adding</span> calcium improves lithium ferrite core</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lessoff, H.</p> <p>1969-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Adding</span> calcium increases uniformity of grain growth over a wide range of sintering temperatures and reduces porosity within the grain. Ferrite cores containing calcium have square hysteresis loops and high curie temperatures, making them useful in coincident current memories of digital electronic computers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=EXIT+AND+procedure&id=EJ1112552','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=EXIT+AND+procedure&id=EJ1112552"><span>Higher Education Value <span class="hlt">Added</span> Using Multiple Outcomes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Milla, Joniada; Martín, Ernesto San; Van Bellegem, Sébastien</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In this article we develop a methodology for the joint value <span class="hlt">added</span> analysis of multiple outcomes that takes into account the inherent correlation between them. This is especially crucial in the analysis of higher education institutions. We use a unique Colombian database on universities, which contains scores in five domains tested in a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=website+AND+design&id=EJ993509','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=website+AND+design&id=EJ993509"><span><span class="hlt">Adding</span> Users to the Website Design Process</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tomeo, Megan L.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Alden Library began redesigning its website over a year ago. Throughout the redesign process the students, faculty, and staff that make up the user base were <span class="hlt">added</span> to the conversation by utilizing several usability test methods. This article focuses on the usability testing conducted at Alden Library and delves into future usability testing, which…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20871526','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20871526"><span>Drag force in <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gubser, Steven S.</p> <p>2006-12-15</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT correspondence and a classical test string approximation are used to calculate the drag force on an external quark moving in a thermal plasma of N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory. This computation is motivated by the phenomenon of jet-quenching in relativistic heavy ion collisions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED506087.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED506087.pdf"><span>Value <span class="hlt">Added</span> School Review Field Guide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Alberta Education, 2009</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The "Value-<span class="hlt">Added</span> School Review (VSR)" is an analytical model designed to assist schools in identifying and addressing opportunities for school improvement. The model works best when it is focused purposefully on students and the student learning outcomes as defined in the "Guide to Education". It complements the processes…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=blunt&pg=2&id=EJ973151','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=blunt&pg=2&id=EJ973151"><span>"Value <span class="hlt">Added</span>" Proves Beneficial to Teacher Prep</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sawchuk, Stephen</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The use of "value <span class="hlt">added</span>" information appears poised to expand into the nation's teacher colleges, with more than a dozen states planning to use the technique to analyze how graduates of training programs fare in classrooms. Supporters say the data could help determine which teacher education pathways produce teachers who are at least as…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4255533','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4255533"><span>Imago Mundi, Imago <span class="hlt">AD</span>, Imago ADNI</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Since the launch in 2003 of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) in the USA, ever growing, similarly oriented consortia have been organized and assembled around the world. The various accomplishments of ADNI have contributed substantially to a better understanding of the underlying physiopathology of aging and Alzheimer’s disease (<span class="hlt">AD</span>). These accomplishments are basically predicated in the trinity of multimodality, standardization and sharing. This multimodality approach can now better identify those subjects with <span class="hlt">AD</span>-specific traits that are more likely to present cognitive decline in the near future and that might represent the best candidates for smaller but more efficient therapeutic trials – trials that, through gained and shared knowledge, can be more focused on a specific target or a specific stage of the disease process. In summary, data generated from ADNI have helped elucidate some of the pathophysiological mechanisms underpinning aging and <span class="hlt">AD</span> pathology, while contributing to the international effort in setting the groundwork for biomarker discovery and establishing standards for early diagnosis of <span class="hlt">AD</span>. PMID:25478022</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=free+AND+zone&pg=7&id=EJ511730','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=free+AND+zone&pg=7&id=EJ511730"><span>Making Schools <span class="hlt">Ad</span>-Free Zones.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Karpatkin, Rhoda H.; Holmes, Anita</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Advertisers spend billions to market so-called educational products, services, and viewpoints to vulnerable young consumers. Budget constraints are forcing educators to accept <span class="hlt">ads</span> and promotional materials. Several education and consumer-interest groups are developing guidelines for using commercial materials in schools. Consumers Union developed…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=District+AND+heating.&pg=3&id=EJ614830','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=District+AND+heating.&pg=3&id=EJ614830"><span>Cutting Budget Corners While <span class="hlt">Adding</span> Value.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Veile, Craig N.; Carpenter, Mark J.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Discusses how one school district saved money while <span class="hlt">adding</span> long- term value to its capital improvement project. Planning issues involving square footage requirements, quality of material to be used, and heating and cooling system selection are discussed as are concepts to increase student learning capacity for the same construction dollars. (GR)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Value+AND+added+AND+theory&pg=2&id=EJ863335','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Value+AND+added+AND+theory&pg=2&id=EJ863335"><span>Test Scaling and Value-<span class="hlt">Added</span> Measurement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ballou, Dale</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Conventional value-<span class="hlt">added</span> assessment requires that achievement be reported on an interval scale. While many metrics do not have this property, application of item response theory (IRT) is said to produce interval scales. However, it is difficult to confirm that the requisite conditions are met. Even when they are, the properties of the data that…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA473703','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA473703"><span>Distribution of Information in <span class="hlt">Ad</span> Hoc Networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-09-01</p> <p>INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT <span class="hlt">Ad</span>-hoc networks are distributed, self-organized networks which do not need a fixed infrastructure. Entities in...73 V . CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE WORK ............................75 A. OVERVIEW ..........................................75 B. CONCLUSIONS...statistical analysis on the results. Finally, Chapter V concludes the research and provides suggestions for further research. 7 II. BACKGROUND A</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=economic+AND+value+AND+added&pg=2&id=EJ864107','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=economic+AND+value+AND+added&pg=2&id=EJ864107"><span>"Value <span class="hlt">Added</span>" Gauge of Teaching Probed</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Viadero, Debra</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>A new study by a public and labor economist suggests that "value <span class="hlt">added</span>" methods for determining the effectiveness of classroom teachers are built on some shaky assumptions and may be misleading. The study, due to be published in February in the "Quarterly Journal of Economics," is the first of a handful of papers now in the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=wireless+AND+sensor+AND+networks&pg=2&id=ED513684','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=wireless+AND+sensor+AND+networks&pg=2&id=ED513684"><span>Anomaly Detection Techniques for <span class="hlt">Ad</span> Hoc Networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cai, Chaoli</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Anomaly detection is an important and indispensable aspect of any computer security mechanism. <span class="hlt">Ad</span> hoc and mobile networks consist of a number of peer mobile nodes that are capable of communicating with each other absent a fixed infrastructure. Arbitrary node movements and lack of centralized control make them vulnerable to a wide variety of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=generator&pg=5&id=EJ890149','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=generator&pg=5&id=EJ890149"><span><span class="hlt">Adding</span> Test Generation to the Teaching Machine</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bruce-Lockhart, Michael; Norvell, Theodore; Crescenzi, Pierluigi</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>We propose an extension of the Teaching Machine project, called Quiz Generator, that allows instructors to produce assessment quizzes in the field of algorithm and data structures quite easily. This extension makes use of visualization techniques and is based on new features of the Teaching Machine that allow third-party visualizers to be <span class="hlt">added</span> as…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1053006-hybrid-baryons-qcd','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1053006-hybrid-baryons-qcd"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> baryons in QCD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.</p> <p>2012-03-21</p> <p>In this study, we present the first comprehensive study of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> baryons using lattice QCD methods. Using a large basis of composite QCD interpolating fields we extract an extensive spectrum of baryon states and isolate those of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> character using their relatively large overlap onto operators which sample gluonic excitations. We consider the spectrum of Nucleon and Delta states at several quark masses finding a set of positive parity <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> baryons with quantum numbersmore » $$N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{3/2^+},\\, N_{3/2^+},\\,N_{5/2^+},\\,$$ and $$\\Delta_{1/2^+},\\, \\Delta_{3/2^+}$$ at an energy scale above the first band of `conventional' excited positive parity baryons. This pattern of states is compatible with a color octet gluonic excitation having $$J^{P}=1^{+}$$ as previously reported in the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> meson sector and with a comparable energy scale for the excitation, suggesting a common bound-state construction for <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> mesons and baryons.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1964517','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1964517"><span>Dating Phylogenies with <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Local Molecular Clocks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Aris-Brosou, Stéphane</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Background Because rates of evolution and species divergence times cannot be estimated directly from molecular data, all current dating methods require that specific assumptions be made before inferring any divergence time. These assumptions typically bear either on rates of molecular evolution (molecular clock hypothesis, local clocks models) or on both rates and times (penalized likelihood, Bayesian methods). However, most of these assumptions can affect estimated dates, oftentimes because they underestimate large amounts of rate change. Principal Findings A significant modification to a recently proposed <span class="hlt">ad</span> hoc rate-smoothing algorithm is described, in which local molecular clocks are automatically placed on a phylogeny. This modification makes use of <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> approaches that borrow from recent theoretical developments in microarray data analysis. An <span class="hlt">ad</span> hoc integration of phylogenetic uncertainty under these local clock models is also described. The performance and accuracy of the new methods are evaluated by reanalyzing three published data sets. Conclusions It is shown that the new maximum likelihood <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> methods can perform better than penalized likelihood and almost as well as uncorrelated Bayesian models. However, the new methods still tend to underestimate the actual amount of rate change. This work demonstrates the difficulty of estimating divergence times using local molecular clocks. PMID:17849008</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JHEP...02..128D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JHEP...02..128D"><span>Hairy black holes and the endpoint of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>4 charged superradiance</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dias, Óscar J. C.; Masachs, Ramon</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>We construct hairy black hole solutions that merge with the anti-de Sitter (<span class="hlt">AdS</span>4) Reissner-Nordström black hole at the onset of superradiance. These hairy black holes have, for a given mass and charge, higher entropy than the corresponding <span class="hlt">AdS</span>4-Reissner-Nordström black hole. Therefore, they are natural candidates for the endpoint of the charged superradiant instability. On the other hand, hairy black holes never dominate the canonical and grand-canonical ensembles. The zero-horizon radius of the hairy black holes is a soliton (i.e. a boson star under a gauge transformation). We construct our solutions perturbatively, for small mass and charge, so that the properties of hairy black holes can be used to testify and compare with the endpoint of initial value simulations. We further discuss the near-horizon scalar condensation instability which is also present in global <span class="hlt">AdS</span>4-Reissner-Nordström black holes. We highlight the different nature of the near-horizon and superradiant instabilities and that hairy black holes ultimately exist because of the non-linear instability of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA493551','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA493551"><span>Measuring the Value <span class="hlt">Added</span> of Management: A Knowledge Value <span class="hlt">Added</span> Approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-04-30</p> <p>Value <span class="hlt">Added</span> Approach Presenter: Dr. Thomas J. Housel specializes in valuing intellectual capital , telecommunications, information technology, value...Value-<span class="hlt">Added</span> methodology for objectively measuring the return generated by corporate knowledge assets/ intellectual capital . He received his PhD...measuring the value of intellectual capital has been featured in a Fortune cover story (October 3, 1994) and Investor’s Business Daily, numerous books</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21371378','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21371378"><span>Holographic Hydrodynamics with Baryon Chemical Potential for Charged <span class="hlt">AdS</span> Black Hole</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Takeuchi, Shingo</p> <p>2009-12-15</p> <p>We work out the decoupling problem and hydrodynamic analysis for the sound mode in charged <span class="hlt">AdS</span> black hole and calculate the sound velocity, the charge susceptibility and the electrical conductivity. We find that Einstein relation among the conductivity, the diffusion constant and the susceptibility holds exactly.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012IJTP...51..316S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012IJTP...51..316S"><span>Thermodynamics and Stability of Five Dimensional <span class="hlt">AdS</span> Reissner-Nordstrom Black Hole</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Saadat, Hassan</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>In this paper we consider five dimensional <span class="hlt">AdS</span> Reissner-Nordstrom black hole and calculate thermodynamical variables such as entropy, specific heat and free energy. In that case we can obtain stability conditions of the black hole and fix black hole charge and mass for phase transition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ad&pg=2&id=ED546210','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ad&pg=2&id=ED546210"><span>Avoiding <span class="hlt">Ad</span> Avoidance: Factors Affecting the Perception of Online Banner <span class="hlt">Ads</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Portnoy, Felix</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This dissertation examined the effect of search type, <span class="hlt">ad</span> saliency, and <span class="hlt">ad</span> repetition on the perception of online banner advertisements. In the first study, 48 student participants conducted simulated search tasks using mixed factorial design where search type (known-item vs. exploratory) was manipulated within-subject and the banner saliency level…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JHEP...01..024C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JHEP...01..024C"><span>Master symmetry in the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> 5 × S 5 pure spinor string</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chandía, Osvaldo; Linch, William Divine; Vallilo, Brenno Carlini</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>We lift the set of classical non-local symmetries recently studied by Klose, Loebbert, and Münkler in the context of ℤ 2 cosets to the pure spinor description of the superstring in the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> 5 × S 5 background.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24580587','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24580587"><span>Integrable deformation of the <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5×S5 superstring action.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Delduc, F; Magro, M; Vicedo, B</p> <p>2014-02-07</p> <p>An integrable deformation of the type IIB <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5×S5 superstring action is presented. The deformed field equations, Lax connection, and κ-symmetry transformations are given. The original psu(2,2|4) symmetry is expected to become q deformed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017NuPhB.914..234H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017NuPhB.914..234H"><span>D-branes from pure spinor superstring in <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5 × S5 background</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hanazawa, Sota; Sakaguchi, Makoto</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>We examine the surface term for the BRST transformation of the open pure spinor superstring in an <span class="hlt">AdS</span>5 ×S5 background. We find that the boundary condition to eliminate the surface term leads to a classification of possible configurations of 1/2 supersymmetric D-branes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JHEP...06..099K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JHEP...06..099K"><span>Partition functions in even dimensional <span class="hlt">AdS</span> via quasinormal mode methods</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Keeler, Cynthia; Ng, Gim Seng</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>In this note, we calculate the one-loop determinant for a massive scalar (with conformal dimension Δ) in even-dimensional <span class="hlt">AdS</span> d+1 space, using the quasinormal mode method developed in [1] by Denef, Hartnoll, and Sachdev. Working first in two dimensions on the related Euclidean hyperbolic plane H 2, we find a series of zero modes for negative real values of Δ whose presence indicates a series of poles in the one-loop partition function Z(Δ) in the Δ complex plane; these poles contribute temperature-independent terms to the thermal <span class="hlt">AdS</span> partition function computed in [1]. Our results match those in a series of papers by Camporesi and Higuchi, as well as Gopakumar et al. [2] and Banerjee et al. [3]. We additionally examine the meaning of these zero modes, finding that they Wick-rotate to quasinormal modes of the <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2 black hole. They are also interpretable as matrix elements of the discrete series representations of SO(2, 1) in the space of smooth functions on S 1. We generalize our results to general even dimensional <span class="hlt">AdS</span>2 n , again finding a series of zero modes which are related to discrete series representations of SO(2 n, 1), the motion group of H 2 n .</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JHEP...07..152B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JHEP...07..152B"><span>Geometry and supersymmetry of heterotic warped flux <span class="hlt">AdS</span> backgrounds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Beck, S.; Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>We classify the geometries of the most general warped, flux <span class="hlt">AdS</span> backgrounds of heterotic supergravity up to two loop order in sigma model perturbation theory. We show under some mild assumptions that there are no <span class="hlt">AdS</span> n backgrounds with n ≠ 3. Moreover the warp factor of <span class="hlt">AdS</span>3 backgrounds is constant, the geometry is a product <span class="hlt">AdS</span> 3 × M 7 and such solutions preserve, 2, 4, 6 and 8 supersymmetries. The geometry of M 7 has been specified in all cases. For 2 supersymmetries, it has been found that M 7 admits a suitably restricted G 2 structure. For 4 supersymmetries, M 7 has an SU(3) structure and can be described locally as a circle fibration over a 6-dimensional KT manifold. For 6 and 8 supersymmetries, M 7 has an SU(2) structure and can be described locally as a S 3 fibration over a 4-dimensional manifold which either has an anti-self dual Weyl tensor or a hyper-Kähler structure, respectively. We also demonstrate a new Lichnerowicz type theorem in the presence of α' corrections.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ammi.conf...72X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ammi.conf...72X"><span>Research on <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Vehicle Drivetrain</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xie, Zhongzhi</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> cars as a solution to energy saving, emission reduction measures, have received widespread attention. Motor drive system as an important part of the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> vehicles as an important object of study. Based on the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> electric vehicle powertrain control system for permanent magnet synchronous motor as the object of study. Can be applied to <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> car compares the characteristics of traction motors, chose permanent magnet synchronous Motors as drive motors for <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> vehicles. Building applications in <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> cars in MATLAB/Simulink simulation model of permanent-magnet synchronous motor speed control system and analysis of simulation results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...10..087D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...10..087D"><span>Black hole formation in <span class="hlt">AdS</span> Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Deppe, Nils; Kolly, Allison; Frey, Andrew R.; Kunstatter, Gabor</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">AdS</span> spacetime has been shown numerically to be unstable against a large class of arbitrarily small perturbations. In [1], the authors presented a preliminary study of the effects on stability of changing the local dynamics by <span class="hlt">adding</span> a Gauss-Bonnet term to the Einstein action. Here we provide further details as well as new results with improved numerical methods. In particular, we elucidate new structure in Choptuik scaling plots. We also provide evidence of chaotic behavior at the transition between immediate horizon formation and horizon formation after the matter pulse reflects from the <span class="hlt">AdS</span> conformal boundary. Finally, we present data suggesting the formation of naked singularities in spacetimes with ADM mass below the algebraic bound for black hole formation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=204375','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=204375"><span>Identification of Erwinia amylovora, the Fireblight Pathogen, by Colony <span class="hlt">Hybridization</span> with DNA from Plasmid pEA29</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Falkenstein, Hildegard; Bellemann, Peter; Walter, Sabine; Zeller, Wolfgang; Geider, Klaus</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>All <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Erwinia amylovora characterized carry a medium-size plasmid of 29 kilobases (pEA29). We mapped this plasmid with various restriction enzymes, cloned the whole DNA into an Escherichia coli plasmid, and subcloned restriction fragments. These DNA species were used for identification of E. amylovora after handling of <span class="hlt">strains</span> in the laboratory and also in field isolates. About 70 <span class="hlt">strains</span> of E. amylovora and 24 <span class="hlt">strains</span> from nine other species, mainly found in plant habitats, were checked in a colony <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> test. Virulent and avirulent E. amylovora <span class="hlt">strains</span> reacted positively, whereas the other species were negative. Apart from the <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> assay, the positive <span class="hlt">strains</span> were additionally tested for ooze production on rich agar with 5% sucrose and on immature-pear slices. Unspecific background <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> of non-E. amylovora <span class="hlt">strains</span> found for <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> with the whole E. amylovora plasmid was almost eliminated when a 5-kilobase SalI fragment from pEA29 was used as a probe and when the washes after the <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> procedure were done with high stringency. Under these conditions, E. amylovora could be readily identified from field isolates. Images PMID:16347778</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25237820','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25237820"><span>Kondo resonance from p-wave <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> in graphene.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jafari, S A; Tohyama, T</p> <p>2014-10-15</p> <p>The p-wave <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> in graphene present a distinct class of Kondo problem in pseudogap Fermi systems with bath density of states (DOS) ρ₀(ε) ∝ |ε|. The peculiar geometry of substitutional and hollow-site <span class="hlt">ad</span>-atoms, and effectively the vacancies allow for a p-wave form of momentum dependence in the <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> of the associated local orbital with the Dirac fermions of the graphene host which results in a different picture than the s-wave momentum independent <span class="hlt">hybridization</span>. For the p-wave <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> function, away from the Dirac point we find closed-form formulae for the Kondo temperature TK which in contrast to the s-wave case is non-zero for any value of <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> strength V of the single impurity Anderson model (SIAM). At the Dirac point where the DOS vanishes, we find a conceivably small value of Vmin above which the Kondo screening takes place even in the presence of particle-hole symmetry. We also show that the non-Lorentzian line shape of the local spectrum arising from anomalous <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> function leads to much larger TK in vacant graphene compared to a metallic host with similar bandwidth and SIAM parameters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030054522','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030054522"><span>Ames <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Combustion Facility</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Zilliac, Greg; Karabeyoglu, Mustafa A.; Cantwell, Brian; Hunt, Rusty; DeZilwa, Shane; Shoffstall, Mike; Soderman, Paul T.; Bencze, Daniel P. (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>The report summarizes the design, fabrication, safety features, environmental impact, and operation of the Ames <span class="hlt">Hybrid</span>-Fuel Combustion Facility (HCF). The facility is used in conducting research into the scalability and combustion processes of advanced paraffin-based <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> fuels for the purpose of assessing their applicability to practical rocket systems. The facility was designed to deliver gaseous oxygen at rates between 0.5 and 16.0 kg/sec to a combustion chamber operating at pressures ranging from 300 to 900. The required run times were of the order of 10 to 20 sec. The facility proved to be robust and reliable and has been used to generate a database of regression-rate measurements of paraffin at oxygen mass flux levels comparable to those of moderate-sized <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> rocket motors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989MolPh..67..303W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989MolPh..67..303W"><span><span class="hlt">Hybridization</span> schemes for clusters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wales, David J.</p> <p></p> <p>The concept of an optimum <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> scheme for cluster compounds is developed with particular reference to electron counting. The prediction of electron counts for clusters and the interpretation of the bonding is shown to depend critically upon the presumed <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> pattern of the cluster vertex atoms. This fact has not been properly appreciated in previous work, particularly in applications of Stone's tensor surface harmonic (TSH) theory, but is found to be a useful tool when dealt with directly. A quantitative definition is suggested for the optimum cluster <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> pattern based directly upon the ease of interpretation of the molecular orbitals, and results are given for a range of species. The relationship of this scheme to the detailed cluster geometry is described using Löwdin's partitioned perturbation theory, and the success and range of application of TSH theory are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18615860','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18615860"><span>Mitochondrial inheritance and fermentative : oxidative balance in <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces uvarum.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Solieri, Lisa; Antúnez, Oreto; Pérez-Ortín, Josè Enrique; Barrio, Eladio; Giudici, Paolo</p> <p>2008-07-01</p> <p>Breeding between Saccharomyces species is a useful tool for obtaining improved wine yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span>, combining fermentative features of parental species. In this work, 25 artificial Saccharomyces cerevisiae x Saccharomyces uvarum <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> were constructed by spore conjugation. A multi-locus PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis, targeting six nuclear gene markers and the ribosomal region including the 5.8S rRNA gene and the two internal transcribed spacers, showed that the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> genome is the result of two chromosome sets, one coming from S. cerevisiae and the other from S. uvarum. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) typing showed uniparental inheritance in all <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>. Furthermore, sibling <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>, obtained by repeated crosses between the same parental <span class="hlt">strains</span>, showed the same mtDNA, suggesting that the mitochondrial transmission is not stochastic or species-specific, but dependent on the parental <span class="hlt">strains</span>. Finally four <span class="hlt">hybrids</span>, two of which with S. cerevisiae mtDNA and two with S. uvarum mtDNA, were subjected to transcriptome analysis. Our results showed that the <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> bearing S. cerevisiae mtDNA exhibited less expression of genes involved in glycolysis/fermentation pathways and in hexose transport compared to <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> with S. uvarum mtDNA. Respiration assay confirmed the increased respiratory activity of <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> with the S. cerevisiae mtDNA genome. These findings suggest that mtDNA type and fermentative : respiratory performances are correlated in S. cerevisiae x S. uvarum <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> and the mtDNA type is an important trait for constructing new improved <span class="hlt">hybrids</span> for winemaking.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21409673','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21409673"><span><span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT connection between Boltzmann and Einstein equations: Kinetic theory and pure gravity in <span class="hlt">AdS</span> space</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Iyer, Ramakrishnan; Mukhopadhyay, Ayan</p> <p>2010-04-15</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Ad</span>S/CFT correspondence defines a sector with universal strongly coupled dynamics in the field theory as the dual of pure gravity in <span class="hlt">AdS</span> described by Einstein's equation with a negative cosmological constant. We explain here, from the field-theoretic viewpoint how the dynamics in this sector gets determined by the expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor alone. We first show that the Boltzmann equation has very special solutions which could be functionally completely determined in terms of the energy-momentum tensor alone. We call these solutions conservative solutions. We indicate why conservative solutions should also exist when we refine this kinetic description to go closer to the exact microscopic theory or even move away from the regime of weak coupling so that no kinetic description could be employed. We argue that these conservative solutions form the universal sector dual to pure gravity at strong coupling and large N. Based on this observation, we propose a regularity condition on the energy-momentum tensor so that the dual solution in pure gravity has a smooth future horizon. We also study if irreversibility emerges only at long time scales of observation, unlike the case of the Boltzmann equation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvB..95k5108T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvB..95k5108T"><span>Impact of <span class="hlt">strain</span> on the electronic properties of InAs/GaSb quantum well systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tiemann, L.; Mueller, S.; Wu, Q.-S.; Tschirky, T.; Ensslin, K.; Wegscheider, W.; Troyer, M.; Soluyanov, A. A.; Ihn, T.</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Electron-hole <span class="hlt">hybridization</span> in InAs/GaSb double quantum well structures leads to the formation of a mini-band-gap. We experimentally and theoretically studied the impact of <span class="hlt">strain</span> on the transport properties of this material system. Thinned samples were mounted to piezoelectric elements to exert <span class="hlt">strain</span> along the [011] and [001] crystal directions. When the Fermi energy is tuned through the minigap, the resistivity at the charge neutrality point is found to be susceptible to external <span class="hlt">strain</span>. In the electron and hole regimes, <span class="hlt">strain</span> influences the Landau level structure. By analyzing the intrinsic <span class="hlt">strain</span> from the epitaxial growth and the external <span class="hlt">strain</span> from the piezo elements and combining our experimental results with numerical simulations of <span class="hlt">strained</span> and unstrained quantum wells, we can illustrate why the InAs/GaSb material system is regularly found to be semimetallic.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8987701','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8987701"><span>Detection of maltose fermentation genes in the baking yeast <span class="hlt">strains</span> of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Oda, Y; Tonomura, K</p> <p>1996-10-01</p> <p>The presence of any one of the five unlinked MAL loci (MAL1, MAL2, MAL3, MAL4 and MAL6) confers the ability to ferment maltose on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each locus is composed of three genes encoding maltose permease, alpha-glucosidase and MAL activator. Chromosomal DNA of seven representative baking <span class="hlt">strains</span> has been separated by pulse-field gel electrophoresis and probed with three genes in MAL6 locus. The DNA bands to which all of the three MAL-derived probes simultaneously <span class="hlt">hybridized</span> were chromosome VII carrying MAL1 in all of the <span class="hlt">strains</span> tested, chromosome XI carrying MAL4 in six <span class="hlt">strains</span>, chromosome III carrying MAL2 in three <span class="hlt">strains</span> and chromosomes II and VIII carrying MAL3 and MAL6, respectively, in the one <span class="hlt">strain</span>. The number of MAL loci in baking <span class="hlt">strains</span> was comparable to those of brewing <span class="hlt">strains</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=235684','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=235684"><span>Conservation of Salmonella typhimurium deoxyribonucleic acid by chromosomal insertion in a partially diploid Escherichia coli <span class="hlt">hybrid</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Johnson, E M; Placek, B P; Snellings, N J; Baron, L S</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>A partially diploid Escherichia coli <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> recovered from mating with a Salmonella typhimurium donor was converted to an Hfr <span class="hlt">strain</span>, designated WR2080, as a means to examine the manner in which the <span class="hlt">added</span> Salmonella genetic material was conserved in it. The Salmonella argH-+, metB-+, and RHA-+ alleles contained as supernumerary genes in WR2080 were transferred together to E. coli recipients in interrupted mating experiments approximately 25 min after initial parental contact; transfer of the allelic E. coli genes by a haploid Hfr of the same transfer orientation occurred between 23.5 min (argH-+) and 25 min (rha-+) after initial contact. Entry of the E. coli ilv-+ marker of WR2080 in these experiments occurred at 29.5 min, 1.5 min later than the entry time of this marker from the haploid E. coli Hfr. When unselected inheritance of the recessive E. coli argH-minus and rha-minus alleles of WR2080 was examined among ilv-+ selected E. coli recipients in which unselected inheritance of the Salmonella donor genes was shown to be low (8%), inheritance of argH-minus was only 7%, whereas 51% inherited the neighboring rha-minus gene. In a comparative cross employing a haploid E. coli Hfr, in which rha inheritance was similar at 56%, argH inheritance was 41%. It was concluded that the Salmonella genes contained in WR2080 were conserved on a genetic segment about 1.5 min in length chromosomally inserted near the allelic E. coli genes, thus creating a duplication on that region within the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> chromosome. PMID:1095545</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA225583','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA225583"><span>The Application of Laser Speckle Interferometry to Measure <span class="hlt">Strain</span> at Elevated Temperatures and Various Loading Rates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1990-05-01</p> <p>MTL TR 90-23 l<span class="hlt">AD</span> IAD- A225 583 JILL COPY THE APPLICATION OF LASER SPECKLE INTERFEROMETRY TO MEASURE <span class="hlt">STRAIN</span> AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES AND VARIOUS...specimen was visable. Then LSI was used to measure further <span class="hlt">straining</span> in the necking regions. The second question to be answered was whc:’,- cr LSI</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4794157','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4794157"><span><span class="hlt">Hybrid</span> Dysgenesis in Drosophila simulans Associated with a Rapid Invasion of the P-Element</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hill, Tom; Schlötterer, Christian; Betancourt, Andrea J.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In a classic example of the invasion of a species by a selfish genetic element, the P-element was horizontally transferred from a distantly related species into Drosophila melanogaster. Despite causing ‘<span class="hlt">hybrid</span> dysgenesis’, a syndrome of abnormal phenotypes that include sterility, the P-element spread globally in the course of a few decades in D. melanogaster. Until recently, its sister species, including D. simulans, remained P-element free. Here, we find a <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> dysgenesis-like phenotype in the offspring of crosses between D. simulans <span class="hlt">strains</span> collected in different years; a survey of 181 <span class="hlt">strains</span> shows that around 20% of <span class="hlt">strains</span> induce <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> dysgenesis. Using genomic and transcriptomic data, we show that this dysgenesis-inducing phenotype is associated with the invasion of the P-element. To characterize this invasion temporally and geographically, we survey 631 D. simulans <span class="hlt">strains</span> collected on three continents and over 27 years for the presence of the P-element. We find that the D. simulans P-element invasion occurred rapidly and nearly simultaneously in the regions surveyed, with <span class="hlt">strains</span> containing P-elements being rare in 2006 and common by 2014. Importantly, as evidenced by their resistance to the <span class="hlt">hybrid</span> dysgenesis phenotype, <span class="hlt">strains</span> collected from the latter phase of this invasion have adapted to suppress the worst effects of the P-element. 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