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Sample records for ad model mice

  1. Small molecule LX2343 ameliorates cognitive deficits in AD model mice by targeting both amyloid β production and clearance

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiao-dan; Sun, Guang-long; Zhou, Ting-ting; Xu, Xin; Zhu, Zhi-yuan; Rukachaisirikul, Vatcharin; Hu, Li-hong; Shen, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Streptozotocin (STZ) is widely used to induce oxidative damage and to impair glucose metabolism, apoptosis, and tau/Aβ pathology, eventually leading to cognitive deficits in both in vitro and in vivo models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we constructed a cell-based platform using STZ to induce stress conditions mimicking the complicated pathologies of AD in vitro, and evaluated the anti-amyloid effects of a small molecule, N-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-[5-chloro-2-methoxy(phenylsulfonyl)anilino]acetamide (LX2343) in the amelioration of cognitive deficits in AD model mice. Methods: Cell-based assays for screening anti-amyloid compounds were established by assessing Aβ accumulation in HEK293-APPsw and CHO-APP cells, and Aβ clearance in primary astrocytes and SH-SY5Y cells after the cells were treated with STZ in the presence of the test compounds. Autophagic flux was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. APP/PS1 transgenic mice were administered LX2343 (10 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) for 100 d. After LX2343 administration, cognitive ability of the mice was evaluated using Morris water maze test, and senile plaques in the brains were detected using Thioflavine S staining. ELISA assay was used to evaluate Aβ and sAPPβ levels, while Western blot analysis was used to measure the signaling proteins in both cell and animal brains. Results: LX2343 (5–20 μmol/L) dose-dependently decreased Aβ accumulation in HEK293-APPsw and CHO-APP cells, and promoted Aβ clearance in SH-SY5Y cells and primary astrocytes. The anti-amyloid effects of LX2343 were attributed to suppressing JNK-mediated APPThr668 phosphorylation, thus inhibiting APP cleavage on one hand, and inhibiting BACE1 enzymatic activity with an IC50 value of 11.43±0.36 μmol/L, on the other hand. Furthermore, LX2343 acted as a non-ATP competitive PI3K inhibitor to negatively regulate AKT/mTOR signaling, thus promoting autophagy, and increasing Aβ clearance. Administration of LX2343 in APP

  2. Aromatase Expression in the Hippocampus of AD Patients and 5xFAD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Prange-Kiel, Janine; Dudzinski, Danuta A.; Pröls, Felicitas; Glatzel, Markus; Matschke, Jakob; Rune, Gabriele M.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies show that 17β-estradiol (E2) protects against Alzheimer's disease (AD) induced neurodegeneration. The E2-synthesizing enzyme aromatase is expressed in healthy hippocampi, but although the hippocampus is severely affected in AD, little is known about the expression of hippocampal aromatase in AD. To better understand the role of hippocampal aromatase in AD, we studied its expression in postmortem material from patients with AD and in a mouse model for AD (5xFAD mice). In human hippocampi, aromatase-immunoreactivity was observed in the vast majority of principal neurons and signal quantification revealed higher expression of aromatase protein in AD patients compared to age- and sex-matched controls. The tissue-specific first exons of aromatase I.f, PII, I.3, and I.6 were detected in hippocampi of controls and AD patients by RT-PCR. In contrast, 3-month-old, female 5xFAD mice showed lower expression of aromatase mRNA and protein (measured by qRT-PCR and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry) than WT controls; no such differences were observed in male mice. Our findings stress the importance of hippocampal aromatase expression in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27298742

  3. Heavy quark potential from deformed AdS5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zi-qiang; Hou, De-fu; Chen, Gang

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the heavy quark potential in some holographic QCD models. The calculation relies on a modified renormalization scheme mentioned in a previous work of Albacete et al. After studying the heavy quark potential in Pirner-Galow model and Andreev-Zakharov model, we extend the discussion to a general deformed AdS5 case. It is shown that the obtained potential is negative definite for all quark-antiquark separations, differs from that using the usual renormalization scheme.

  4. Adding immigrants to microsimulation models.

    PubMed

    Duleep, Harriet Orcutt; Dowhan, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    Forecasts of the financial status of Social Security's Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) programs and forecasts of the effects of various OASDI policy options on Americans would be improved if information about the earnings and labor force behavior of various population subgroups were included in projection models. Focusing on the projection of immigrant earnings, this article proffers a conceptual basis for incorporating immigration into microsimulation models. Key results from research on immigrant earnings, as described in the first article in this trilogy--"Research on Immigrant Earnings"--are linked to methods for forecasting individual earnings in microsimulation models. The research on immigrant earnings also inspires new methods for forecasting earnings in microsimulation models as well as the projection of immigrant emigration. Forecasting immigrant earnings and emigration is discussed in the context of a "closed system"--that is, forecasts are only made for a given population, which is represented in the base sample of the microsimulation model. The third article in our trilogy--"Incorporating Immigrant Flows into Microsimulation Models"--explores how to project immigrant earnings in the context of an "open system," which includes future immigrants.

  5. Revisiting the thermodynamic relations in AdS /CMT models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Seungjoon; Park, Sang-A.; Yi, Sang-Heon

    2017-03-01

    Motivated by the recent unified approach to the Smarr-like relation of anti-de Sitter (AdS) planar black holes in conjunction with the quasilocal formalism on conserved charges, we revisit the quantum statistical and thermodynamic relations of hairy AdS planar black holes. By extending the previous results, we identify the hairy contribution in the bulk and show that the holographic computation can be improved so that it is consistent with the bulk computation. We argue that the first law can be retained in its universal form and that the relation between the on-shell renormalized Euclidean action and its free energy interpretation in gravity may also be undeformed even with the hairy contribution in hairy AdS black holes.

  6. An Antidepressant Decreases CSF Aβ Production in Healthy Individuals and in Transgenic AD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sheline, Yvette I.; West, Tim; Yarasheski, Kevin; Swarm, Robert; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Fisher, Jonathan R.; Ficker, Whitney D.; Yan, Ping; Xiong, Chengjie; Frederiksen, Christine; Grzelak, Monica V.; Chott, Robert; Bateman, Randall J.; Morris, John C.; Mintun, Mark A.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Cirrito, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin signaling suppresses generation of amyloid-β (Aβ) in vitro and in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We show that in an aged transgenic AD mouse model (APP/PS1 plaque-bearing mice), the antidepressant citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), decreased Aβ in brain interstitial fluid (ISF) in a dose-dependent manner. Growth of individual amyloid plaques was assessed in plaque-bearing mice that were chronically administered citalopram. Citalopram arrested the growth of pre-existing plaques and reduced the appearance of new plaques by 78%. In healthy human volunteers, citalopram’s effects on Aβ production and Aβ concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured prospectively using stable-isotope labeling kinetics (SILK), with CSF sampling during acute dosing of citalopram. Aβ production in CSF was slowed by 37% in the citalopram group compared to placebo. This change was associated with a 38% decrease in total CSF Aβ concentrations in the drug-treated group. The ability to safely decrease Aβ concentrations is potentially important as a preventive strategy for AD. This study demonstrates key target engagement for future AD prevention trials. PMID:24828079

  7. PAK Inactivation Impairs Social Recognition in 3xTg-AD Mice without Increasing Brain Deposition of Tau and Aβ

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Dany; Dal-Pan, Alexandre; Tremblay, Cyntia; Bennett, David A.; Guitton, Matthieu J.; De Koninck, Yves; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    Defects in p21-activated kinase (PAK) are suspected to play a role in cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Dysfunction in PAK leads to cofilin activation, drebrin displacement from its actin-binding site, actin depolymerization/severing, and, ultimately, defects in spine dynamics and cognitive impairment in mice. To determine the role of PAK in AD, we first quantified PAK by immunoblotting in homogenates from the parietal neocortex of subjects with a clinical diagnosis of no cognitive impairment (n = 12), mild cognitive impairment (n = 12), or AD (n = 12). A loss of total PAK, detected in the cortex of AD patients (−39% versus controls), was correlated with cognitive impairment (r2 = 0.148, p = 0.027) and deposition of total and phosphorylated tau (r2 = 0.235 and r2 = 0.206, respectively), but not with Aβ42 (r2 = 0.056). Accordingly, we found a decrease of total PAK in the cortex of 12- and 20-month-old 3xTg-AD mice, an animal model of AD-like Aβ and tau neuropathologies. To determine whether PAK dysfunction aggravates AD phenotype, 3xTg-AD mice were crossed with dominant-negative PAK mice. PAK inactivation led to obliteration of social recognition in old 3xTg-AD mice, which was associated with a decrease in cortical drebrin (−25%), but without enhancement of Aβ/tau pathology or any clear electrophysiological signature. Overall, our data suggest that PAK decrease is a consequence of AD neuropathology and that therapeutic activation of PAK may exert symptomatic benefits on high brain function. PMID:23804095

  8. The problem of genotype and sex differences in life expectancy in transgenic AD mice.

    PubMed

    Rae, Eric A; Brown, Richard E

    2015-10-01

    The lifespan of mice shows genotype, sex and laboratory effects, but little is known about genotype or sex differences in life expectancy of mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This paper examines the lifespan of males and females of different mouse models of AD and their wildtype strains. Genotype and sex dependent differences in longevity have important implications for designing experiments with Alzheimer's mouse models, comparing genotype and sex differences in aging mouse models, designing drug treatment regimes and the translation of mouse data to human clinical studies. We conclude that the concept of aging and age-related disorders in mice must be reconsidered based on genotype and sex differences in mouse life expectancy data. Use of concepts such as relative age, prospective lifespan and proportion of lifespan remaining should be included in studies of age-related changes in mouse brains and behavior. Finally, measures such as the Frailty Index, which is independent of chronological age might be used to determine a common scale of aging for all mouse strains.

  9. DHA Improves Cognition and Prevents Dysfunction of Entorhinal Cortex Neurons in 3xTg-AD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Dany; Julien, Carl; Tremblay, Cyntia; Calon, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Defects in neuronal activity of the entorhinal cortex (EC) are suspected to underlie the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whereas neuroprotective effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been described, the effects of DHA on the physiology of EC neurons remain unexplored in animal models of AD. Here, we show that DHA consumption improved object recognition (↑12%), preventing deficits observed in old 3xTg-AD mice (↓12%). Moreover, 3xTg-AD mice displayed seizure-like akinetic episodes, not detected in NonTg littermates and partly prevented by DHA (↓50%). Patch-clamp recording revealed that 3xTg-AD EC neurons displayed (i) loss of cell capacitance (CC), suggesting reduced membrane surface area; (ii) increase of firing rate versus injected current (F-I) curve associated with modified action potentials, and (iii) overactivation of glutamatergic synapses, without changes in synaptophysin levels. DHA consumption increased CC (↑12%) and decreased F-I slopes (↓21%), thereby preventing the opposite alterations observed in 3xTg-AD mice. Our results indicate that cognitive performance and basic physiology of EC neurons depend on DHA intake in a mouse model of AD. PMID:21383850

  10. AdS5×S(5) mirror model as a string sigma model.

    PubMed

    Arutyunov, Gleb; van Tongeren, Stijn J

    2014-12-31

    Doing a double Wick rotation in the world sheet theory of the light cone AdS5×S(5) superstring results in an inequivalent, so-called mirror theory that plays a central role in the field of integrability in the AdS-CFT correspondence. We show that this mirror theory can be interpreted as the light cone theory of a free string on a different background. This background is related to dS5×H(5) by a double T-duality, and has hidden supersymmetry. The geometry can also be extracted from an integrable deformation of the AdS5×S(5) sigma model, and we prove the observed mirror duality of these deformed models at the bosonic level as a byproduct. While we focus on AdS5×S(5), our results apply more generally.

  11. Autoimmune Manifestations in the 3xTg-AD Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marchese, Monica; Cowan, David; Head, Elizabeth; Ma, Donglai; Karimi, Khalil; Ashthorpe, Vanessa; Kapadia, Minesh; Zhao, Hui; Davis, Paulina; Sakic, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Background Immune system activation is frequently reported in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unknown whether this is a cause, a consequence, or an epiphenomenon of brain degeneration. Objective The present study examines whether immunological abnormalities occur in a well-established murine AD model and if so, how they relate temporally to behavioral deficits and neuropathology. Methods A broad battery of tests was employed to assess behavioral performance and autoimmune/inflammatory markers in 3xTg-AD (AD) mice and wild type controls from 1.5 to 12 months of age. Results Aged AD mice displayed severe manifestations of systemic autoimmune/inflammatory disease, as evidenced by splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, elevated serum levels of anti-nuclear/anti-dsDNA antibodies, low hematocrit, and increased number of double-negative T splenocytes. However, anxiety-related behavior and altered spleen function were evident as early as 2 months of age, thus preceding typical AD-like brain pathology. Moreover, AD mice showed altered olfaction and impaired “cognitive” flexibility in the first 6 months of life, suggesting mild cognitive impairment-like manifestations before general learning/memory impairments emerged at an older age. Interestingly, all of these features were present in 3xTg-AD mice prior to significant amyloid-β or tau pathology. Conclusion The results indicate that behavioral deficits in AD mice develop in parallel with systemic autoimmune/inflammatory disease. These changes antedate AD-like neuropathology, thus supporting a causal link between autoimmunity and aberrant behavior. Consequently, 3xTg-AD mice may be a useful model in elucidating the role of immune system in the etiology of AD. PMID:24150111

  12. Physical exercise protects against Alzheimer's disease in 3xTg-AD mice.

    PubMed

    García-Mesa, Yoelvis; López-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Revilla, Susana; Guerra, Rafael; Gruart, Agnès; Laferla, Frank M; Cristòfol, Rosa; Delgado-García, José M; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2011-01-01

    Physical exercise is considered to exert a positive neurophysiological effect that helps to maintain normal brain activity in the elderly. Expectations that it could help to fight Alzheimer's disease (AD) were recently raised. This study analyzed the effects of different patterns of physical exercise on the 3xTg-AD mouse. Male and female 3xTg-AD mice at an early pathological stage (4-month-old) have had free access to a running wheel for 1 month, whereas mice at a moderate pathological stage(7-month-old) have had access either during 1 or 6 months. The non-transgenic mouse strain was used as a control. Parallel animal groups were housed in conventional conditions. Cognitive loss and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD)-like behaviors were present in the 3xTg-AD mice along with alteration in synaptic function and ong-term potentiation impairment in vivo. Brain tissue showed AD-pathology and oxidative-related changes. Disturbances were more severe at the older age tested. Oxidative stress was higher in males but other changes were similar or higher in females. Exercise treatment ameliorated cognitive deterioration and BPSD-like behaviors such as anxiety and the startle response. Synaptic changes were partially protected by exercise. Oxidative stress was reduced. The best neuroprotection was generally obtained after 6 months of exercise in 7-month-old 3xTg-AD mice. Improved sensorimotor function and brain tissue antioxidant defence were induced in both 3xTg-AD and NonTg mice. Therefore, the benefits of aerobic physical exercise on synapse, redox homeostasis, and general brain function demonstrated in the 3xTg-AD mouse further support the value of this healthy life-style against neurodegeneration.

  13. Short-term modern life-like stress exacerbates Aβ-pathology and synapse loss in 3xTg-AD mice

    PubMed Central

    Baglietto-Vargas, David; Chen, Yuncai; Suh, Dongjin; Ager, Rahasson R.; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Carlos J.; Mederios, Rodrigo; Myczek, Kristoffer; Green, Kim N.; Baram, Tallie Z.; LaFerla, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurological disorder that impairs memory and other cognitive functions in the elderly. The social and financial impacts of AD are overwhelming and are escalating exponentially as a result of population aging. Therefore, identifying AD-related risk factors and the development of more efficacious therapeutic approaches are critical to cure this neurological disorder. Current epidemiological evidence indicates that life experiences, including chronic stress, are a risk for AD. However, it is unknown if short-term stress, lasting for hours, influences the onset or progression of AD. Here, we determined the effect of short-term, multi-modal ‘modern life-like’ stress on AD pathogenesis and synaptic plasticity in mice bearing three AD mutations (the 3xTg-AD mouse model). We found that combined emotional and physical stress lasting 5 h severely impaired memory in wild-type mice and tended to impact it in already low-performing 3xTg-AD mice. This stress reduced the number of synapse-bearing dendritic spines in 3xTg-AD mice and increased Aβ levels by augmenting AβPP processing. Thus, short-term stress simulating modern-life conditions may exacerbate cognitive deficits in preclinical AD by accelerating amyloid pathology and reducing synapse numbers. PMID:26077803

  14. Age-related changes in core body temperature and activity in triple-transgenic Alzheimer's disease (3xTgAD) mice.

    PubMed

    Knight, Elysse M; Brown, Timothy M; Gümüsgöz, Sarah; Smith, Jennifer C M; Waters, Elizabeth J; Allan, Stuart M; Lawrence, Catherine B

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterised, not only by cognitive deficits and neuropathological changes, but also by several non-cognitive behavioural symptoms that can lead to a poorer quality of life. Circadian disturbances in core body temperature and physical activity are reported in AD patients, although the cause and consequences of these changes are unknown. We therefore characterised circadian patterns of body temperature and activity in male triple transgenic AD mice (3xTgAD) and non-transgenic (Non-Tg) control mice by remote radiotelemetry. At 4 months of age, daily temperature rhythms were phase advanced and by 6 months of age an increase in mean core body temperature and amplitude of temperature rhythms were observed in 3xTgAD mice. No differences in daily activity rhythms were seen in 4- to 9-month-old 3xTgAD mice, but by 10 months of age an increase in mean daily activity and the amplitude of activity profiles for 3xTgAD mice were detected. At all ages (4-10 months), 3xTgAD mice exhibited greater food intake compared with Non-Tg mice. The changes in temperature did not appear to be solely due to increased food intake and were not cyclooxygenase dependent because the temperature rise was not abolished by chronic ibuprofen treatment. No β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques or neurofibrillary tangles were noted in the hypothalamus of 3xTgAD mice, a key area involved in temperature regulation, although these pathological features were observed in the hippocampus and amygdala of 3xTgAD mice from 10 months of age. These data demonstrate age-dependent changes in core body temperature and activity in 3xTgAD mice that are present before significant AD-related neuropathology and are analogous to those observed in AD patients. The 3xTgAD mouse might therefore be an appropriate model for studying the underlying mechanisms involved in non-cognitive behavioural changes in AD.

  15. Marble-burying is enhanced in 3xTg-AD mice, can be reversed by risperidone and it is modulable by handling.

    PubMed

    Torres-Lista, Virginia; López-Pousa, Secundino; Giménez-Llort, Lydia

    2015-07-01

    Translational research on behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) is relevant to the study the neuropsychiatric symptoms that strongly affect the quality of life of the human Alzheimer's disease (AD) patient and caregivers, frequently leading to early institutionalization. Among the ethological behavioural tests for rodents, marble burying is considered to model the spectrum of anxiety, psychotic and obsessive-compulsive like symptoms. The present work was aimed to study the behavioural interactions of 12 month-old male 3xTg-AD mice with small objects using the marble-burying test, as compared to the response elicited in age-matched non-transgenic (NTg) mice. The distinction of the classical 'number of buried marbles' but also those left 'intact' and those 'changed' of position of marbles or partially buried (the transitional level of interaction) provided new insights into the modelling of BPSD-like alterations in this AD model. The analysis revealed genotype differences in the behavioural patterns and predominant behaviors. In the NTg mice, predominance was shown in the 'changed or partially buried', while interactions with marble were enhanced in 3xTg-AD mice resulting in an increase of marble burying. Besides, genotype-dependent meaningful correlations were found, with the marble test pattern of 3xTg-AD mice being directly related to neophobia in the corner tests. In both genotypes, the increase of burying was reversed by chronic treatment with risperidone (1mg/kg, s.c.). In 3xTg-AD mice, the repetitive handling of animals during the treatment also exerted modulatory effects. These distinct patterns further characterize the modelling of BPSD-like symptoms in the 3xTg-AD mice, and provide another behavioural tool to assess the benefits of preventive and/or therapeutic strategies, as well as the potential action of risk factors for AD, in this animal model.

  16. Neophobia, NQO1 and SIRT1 as premorbid and prodromal indicators of AD in 3xTg-AD mice.

    PubMed

    Torres-Lista, Virginia; Parrado-Fernández, Cristina; Alvarez-Montón, Ismael; Frontiñán-Rubio, Javier; Durán-Prado, Mario; Peinado, Juan Ramón; Johansson, Björn; Alcaín, Francisco Javier; Giménez-Llort, Lydia

    2014-09-01

    Increased oxidative stress seems to be a key factor underlying natural processes of aging, but also to occur prior to neuropathological hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases. The present work studied the temporal variation of three key antioxidant enzymes in cortex and hippocampus during the development of behavioral and cognitive symptoms in 3xTg-AD mice, and as compared to age-matched controls. At 2 months of age, when no intraneuronal Aβ immunoreactivity has been reported, increased neophobia shown as a delayed and reduced rearing, evidenced the onset of BPSD-like symptoms at premorbid stages of disease. In these animals, NQO1 was found increased in both the hippocampus (800%) and cortex (400%) and progressively diminished at older ages. SOD1 was increased in the hippocampus at 4 months of age, when neuronal Aβ accumulation has been established. These hippocampal increases of antioxidants before the prodromal emergence of cognitive symptoms support their role as defense mechanisms. SIRT1 levels showed opposite age-dependent changes in cortex (increase) and hippocampus (decrease) relative to controls. Prodromal cognitive deficits emerged at 6 months of age, concomitantly to cortical overexpression of SIRT1 but down-regulation of NQO1 and SIRT1 in the hippocampus, suggesting inadequate antioxidative protection to prevent or delay the subjacent neuronal damage. The present data further support the link between oxidative status and the anxious profile. Their crosstalk may underline AD-pathological mechanisms that may lead to deranged physiology and selective neuronal degeneration. It also points out increased neophobia and high expression of NQO1 among the first indicators of disease in the 3xTg-AD mice.

  17. Persistence of behaviours in the Forced Swim Test in 3xTg-AD mice at advanced stages of disease.

    PubMed

    Torres-Lista, Virginia; Giménez-Llort, Lydia

    2014-07-01

    Forced Swimming Test (FST) models behavioural despair in animals by loss of motivation to respond or the refusal to escape. The present study characterizes the behavioural responses of 12-month-old male 3xTg-AD mice in FST as compared to age-matched no-transgenic (NTg) mice. Paradoxical results were consistently found from what would be expected from their BPSD (Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia)-like profile. The comprehensive analysis of the ethogram shown in the FST considered the intervals of the test (0-2 and 2-6min), all the elicited behavioural responses (immobility, swimming and climbing) and their features (total duration, frequency of episodes and mean duration). Both genotypes showed equal number of swimming episodes and climbing attempts during the first interval, that resulted in high swimming times, short climbing and scarce immobility. Thereafter, the NTg mice showed a behavioural shift over time and the immobility response showed up. In contrast, all the measures consistently evidenced that 3xTg-AD persisted with the previous behavioural pattern. Genotype differences consisted in less number of episodes of immobility and swimming, and a low immobility time in favour of swimming. No differences were found in 'climbing' attempts. The behavioural response observed is discussed as a lack of ability of 3xTg-AD mice to shift behaviour over time that may result of poorest cognitive flexibility and copying with stress strategies more than behavioural despair per se.

  18. Intranasal insulin restores insulin signaling, increases synaptic proteins, and reduces Aβ level and microglia activation in the brains of 3xTg-AD mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanxing; Zhao, Yang; Dai, Chun-Ling; Liang, Zhihou; Run, Xiaoqin; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2014-11-01

    Decreased brain insulin signaling has been found recently in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Intranasal administration of insulin, which delivers the drug directly into the brain, improves memory and cognition in both animal studies and small clinical trials. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we treated 9-month-old 3xTg-AD mice, a commonly used mouse model of AD, with daily intranasal administration of insulin for seven days and then studied brain abnormalities of the mice biochemically and immunohistochemically. We found that intranasal insulin restored insulin signaling, increased the levels of synaptic proteins, and reduced Aβ40 level and microglia activation in the brains of 3xTg-AD mice. However, this treatment did not affect the levels of glucose transporters and O-GlcNAcylation or tau phosphorylation. Our findings provide a mechanistic insight into the beneficial effects of intranasal insulin treatment and support continuous clinical trials of intranasal insulin for the treatment of AD.

  19. Phenylbutyric acid reduces amyloid plaques and rescues cognitive behavior in AD transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jesse C; Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Ladiges, Warren C

    2011-06-01

    Trafficking through the secretory pathway is known to regulate the maturation of the APP-cleaving secretases and APP proteolysis. The coupling of stress signaling and pathological deterioration of the brain in Alzheimer's disease (AD) supports a mechanistic connection between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and neurodegeneration. Consequently, small molecular chaperones, which promote protein folding and minimize ER stress, might be effective in delaying or attenuating the deleterious progression of AD. We tested this hypothesis by treating APPswePS1delta9 AD transgenic mice with the molecular chaperone phenylbutyric acid (PBA) for 14 months at a dose of 1 mg PBA g(-1) of body weight in the drinking water. Phenylbutyric acid treatment increased secretase-mediated APP cleavage, but was not associated with any increase in amyloid biosynthesis. The PBA-treated AD transgenic mice had significantly decreased incidence and size of amyloid plaques throughout the cortex and hippocampus. There was no change in total amyloid levels suggesting that PBA modifies amyloid aggregation or pathogenesis independently of biogenesis. The decrease in amyloid plaques was paralleled by increased memory retention, as PBA treatment facilitated cognitive performance in a spatial memory task in both wild-type and AD transgenic mice. The molecular mechanism underlying the cognitive facilitation of PBA is not clear; however, increased levels of both metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors, as well as ADAM10 and TACE, were observed in the cortex and hippocampus of PBA-treated mice. The data suggest that PBA ameliorates the cognitive and pathological features of AD and supports the investigation of PBA as a therapeutic for AD.

  20. Oral Administration of Thioflavin T Prevents Beta Amyloid Plaque Formation in Double Transgenic AD Mice.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Paule, Merle G; Schmued, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and most common cause of adult-onset dementia. The major hallmarks of AD are the formation of senile amyloid plaques made of beta amyloid and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) which are primarily composed of phosphorylated tau protein. Although numerous agents have been considered as providing protection against AD, identification of potential agents with neuroprotective ability is limited. Thioflavin T has been used in the past to stain amyloid beta plaques in brain. In this study, Thioflavin T (ThT) and vehicle (infant formula) were administered orally by gavage to transgenic (B6C3 APP PS1; AD-Tg) mice beginning at 4 months age and continuing until sacrifice at 9 months of age at 40 mg/kg dose. The number of amyloid plaques was reduced dramatically by ThT treatment in both male and female transgenic mice compared to those in control mice. Additionally, GFAP and Amylo-Glo labeling suggest that astrocytic hypertrophy is minimized in ThT-treated animals. Similarly, CD68 labeling, which detects activated microglia, along with Amylo-Glo labeling, suggests that microglial activation is significantly less in ThT-treated mice. Both Aβ-40 and Aβ-42 concentrations in blood rose significantly in the ThT-treated animals suggesting that ThT may inhibit the deposition, degradation, and/or clearance of Aβ plaques in brain.

  1. Intracerebroventricular streptozotocin exacerbates Alzheimer-like changes of 3xTg-AD mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanxing; Liang, Zhihou; Tian, Zhu; Blanchard, Julie; Dai, Chun-Ling; Chalbot, Sonia; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves several possible molecular mechanisms, including impaired brain insulin signaling and glucose metabolism. To investigate the role of metabolic insults in AD, we injected streptozotocin (STZ), a diabetogenic compound if used in the periphery, into the lateral ventricle of the 6-month-old 3xTg-AD mice and studied the cognitive function as well as AD-like brain abnormalities, such as tau phosphorylation and Aβ accumulation, 3-6 weeks later. We found that STZ exacerbated impairment of short-term and spatial reference memory in 3xTg-AD mice. We also observed an increase in tau hyperphosphorylation and neuroinflammation, a disturbance of brain insulin signaling, and a decrease in synaptic plasticity and amyloid β peptides in the brain after STZ treatment. The expression of 20 AD-related genes, including those involved in the processing of amyloid precursor protein, cytoskeleton, glucose metabolism, insulin signaling, synaptic function, protein kinases, and apoptosis, was altered, suggesting that STZ disturbs multiple metabolic and cell signaling pathways in the brain. These findings provide experimental evidence of the role of metabolic insult in AD.

  2. Human-relevant levels of added sugar consumption increase female mortality and lower male fitness in mice.

    PubMed

    Ruff, James S; Suchy, Amanda K; Hugentobler, Sara A; Sosa, Mirtha M; Schwartz, Bradley L; Morrison, Linda C; Gieng, Sin H; Shigenaga, Mark K; Potts, Wayne K

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of added sugar has increased over recent decades and is correlated with numerous diseases. Rodent models have elucidated mechanisms of toxicity, but only at concentrations beyond typical human exposure. Here we show that comparatively low levels of added sugar consumption have substantial negative effects on mouse survival, competitive ability, and reproduction. Using Organismal Performance Assays--in which mice fed human-relevant concentrations of added sugar (25% kcal from a mixture of fructose and glucose, modeling high fructose corn syrup) and control mice compete in seminatural enclosures for territories, resources and mates--we demonstrate that fructose/glucose-fed females experience a twofold increase in mortality while fructose/glucose-fed males control 26% fewer territories and produce 25% less offspring. These findings represent the lowest level of sugar consumption shown to adversely affect mammalian health. Clinical defects of fructose/glucose-fed mice were decreased glucose clearance and increased fasting cholesterol. Our data highlight that physiological adversity can exist when clinical disruptions are minor, and suggest that Organismal Performance Assays represent a promising technique for unmasking negative effects of toxicants.

  3. Massive quiver matrix models for massive charged particles in AdS

    SciTech Connect

    Asplund, Curtis T.; Denef, Frederik; Dzienkowski, Eric

    2016-01-11

    Here, we present a new class of N = 4 supersymmetric quiver matrix models and argue that it describes the stringy low-energy dynamics of internally wrapped D-branes in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) flux compactifications. The Lagrangians of these models differ from previously studied quiver matrix models by the presence of mass terms, associated with the AdS gravitational potential, as well as additional terms dictated by supersymmetry. These give rise to dynamical phenomena typically associated with the presence of fluxes, such as fuzzy membranes, internal cyclotron motion and the appearance of confining strings. We also show how these models can be obtained by dimensional reduction of four-dimensional supersymmetric quiver gauge theories on a three-sphere.

  4. Massive quiver matrix models for massive charged particles in AdS

    DOE PAGES

    Asplund, Curtis T.; Denef, Frederik; Dzienkowski, Eric

    2016-01-11

    Here, we present a new class of N = 4 supersymmetric quiver matrix models and argue that it describes the stringy low-energy dynamics of internally wrapped D-branes in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) flux compactifications. The Lagrangians of these models differ from previously studied quiver matrix models by the presence of mass terms, associated with the AdS gravitational potential, as well as additional terms dictated by supersymmetry. These give rise to dynamical phenomena typically associated with the presence of fluxes, such as fuzzy membranes, internal cyclotron motion and the appearance of confining strings. We also show how these models can bemore » obtained by dimensional reduction of four-dimensional supersymmetric quiver gauge theories on a three-sphere.« less

  5. Upregulation of miR-181 decreases c-Fos and SIRT-1 in the hippocampus of 3xTg-AD mice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ortiz, Carlos J; Baglietto-Vargas, David; Martinez-Coria, Hilda; LaFerla, Frank M; Kitazawa, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a group of small RNAs that regulate diverse cellular processes including neuronal function. Recent studies have shown that dysregulation of specific microRNAs is critically involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Most of these reports have focused on microRNAs implicated in alterations of amyloid-β and tau. However, studies exploring the relation between microRNAs dysregulation in AD and synaptic plasticity are scarce despite the well-known involvement of microRNAs in synaptic plasticity. Since impairments in synaptic plasticity and neuronal loss are two important features displayed in AD patients, it is feasible to hypothesize that alterations in plasticity-related microRNAs underlie AD progression. Here, levels of a small number of microRNAs implicated in normal neuronal function and/or plasticity were examined in an AD model. Twelve-month old 3xTg-AD mice with plaques and tangles presented a significant upregulation of miR-181 in the hippocampus compared to age-matched wild type mice. Increased miR-181 was not detected in pre-pathological 3xTg-AD mice. Analysis of predicted targets of miR-181 identified c-Fos and SIRT-1, proteins critically involved in memory formation. Both c-Fos and SIRT-1 levels were significantly decreased in the ventral hippocampus of twelve-month old 3xTg-AD mice. Overexpression of miR-181 in SH-SY5Y cells significantly decreased c-Fos and SIRT-1, strongly suggesting that miR-181 directly regulates the expression of these two proteins. These findings indicate a connection between miR-181 and proteins involve in synaptic plasticity and memory processing in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Our results suggest that microRNAs involved in synaptic plasticity might be an important factor that contributes to AD neuropathology.

  6. Dietary zinc supplementation of 3xTg-AD mice increases BDNF levels and prevents cognitive deficits as well as mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Corona, C; Masciopinto, F; Silvestri, E; Viscovo, A Del; Lattanzio, R; Sorda, R La; Ciavardelli, D; Goglia, F; Piantelli, M; Canzoniero, L M T; Sensi, S L

    2010-10-28

    The overall effect of brain zinc (Zn(2+)) in the progression and development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still not completely understood. Although an excess of Zn(2+) can exacerbate the pathological features of AD, a deficit of Zn(2+) intake has also been shown to increase the volume of amyloid plaques in AD transgenic mice. In this study, we investigated the effect of dietary Zn(2+) supplementation (30 p.p.m.) in a transgenic mouse model of AD, the 3xTg-AD, that expresses both β amyloid (Aβ)- and tau-dependent pathology. We found that Zn(2+) supplementation greatly delays hippocampal-dependent memory deficits and strongly reduces both Aβ and tau pathology in the hippocampus. We also evaluated signs of mitochondrial dysfunction and found that Zn(2+) supplementation prevents the age-dependent respiratory deficits we observed in untreated 3xTg-AD mice. Finally, we found that Zn(2+) supplementation greatly increases the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) of treated 3xTg-AD mice. In summary, our data support the idea that controlling the brain Zn(2+) homeostasis may be beneficial in the treatment of AD.

  7. AdS black disk model for small-x DIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornalba, Lorenzo; Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João

    2011-05-01

    Using the approximate conformal invariance of QCD at high energies we consider a simple AdS black disk model to describe saturation in DIS. Deep inside saturation the structure functions have the same power law scaling, FT˜FL˜x-ω, where ω is related to the expansion rate of the black disk with energy. Furthermore, the ratio FL/FT is given by the universal value 1+ω/3+ω, independently of the target.

  8. Stress inoculation modeled in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brockhurst, J; Cheleuitte-Nieves, C; Buckmaster, C L; Schatzberg, A F; Lyons, D M

    2015-01-01

    Stress inoculation entails intermittent exposure to mildly stressful situations that present opportunities to learn, practice and improve coping in the context of exposure psychotherapies and resiliency training. Here we investigate behavioral and hormonal aspects of stress inoculation modeled in mice. Mice randomized to stress inoculation or a control treatment condition were assessed for corticosterone stress hormone responses and behavior during open-field, object-exploration and tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation training sessions that acutely increased plasma levels of corticosterone diminished subsequent immobility as a measure of behavioral despair on tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation also decreased subsequent freezing in the open field despite comparable levels of thigmotaxis in mice from both treatment conditions. Stress inoculation subsequently decreased novel-object exploration latencies and reduced corticosterone responses to repeated restraint. These results demonstrate that stress inoculation acutely stimulates glucocorticoid signaling and then enhances subsequent indications of active coping behavior in mice. Unlike mouse models that screen for the absence of vulnerability to stress or presence of traits that occur in resilient individuals, stress inoculation training reflects an experience-dependent learning-like process that resembles interventions designed to build resilience in humans. Mouse models of stress inoculation may provide novel insights for new preventive strategies or therapeutic treatments of human psychiatric disorders that are triggered and exacerbated by stressful life events. PMID:25826112

  9. Cognitive and emotional profiles of aged Alzheimer's disease (3×TgAD) mice: effects of environmental enrichment and sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, Gloria; Cañete, Toni; Tobeña, Adolf; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2014-07-15

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with age which represents the most common cause of dementia. It is characterized by an accelerated memory loss compared to normal aging, and deterioration of other cognitive abilities that interfere with mood, reason, judgment and language. The main neuropathological hallmarks of the disorder are β-amyloid (βA) plaques and neurofibrillary Tau tangles. Triple transgenic 3×TgAD mouse model develops βA and Tau pathologies in a progressive manner, with a specific temporal and anatomic profile mimicking the pattern that takes place in the human brain with AD, and showing cognitive alterations characteristic of the disease. Environmental enrichment treatment in mice induces behavioral and emotional reactivity changes, including cognitive improvements in some AD-related transgenic mice. The present work intended to characterize the behavioral profile of 3×TgAD mice at advanced stages of neuropathological development (12 and 15 months of age) and to investigate whether environmental enrichment administered during adulthood was able to modify some of their behavioral and cognitive alterations. Results show that, at advanced stages of the disease 3×TgAD mice show deficits of spatial learning acquisition, as well as short-term and working memory deficits, while displaying increased levels of anxiety/fearfulness and normal sensorimotor functions. 3×TgAD mice also show sexual dimorphism, as reflected by increased cognitive deficits in females and increased levels of novelty-induced behavioral inhibition in males. Environmental enrichment exerts some slight positive effects, by mainly improving the initial acquisition of the spatial learning and working memory in 12-month-old 3×TgAD mice. Such effects vary depending on the gender.

  10. Measuring Teacher Quality with Value-Added Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marder, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Using computers to evaluate teachers based on student test scores is more difficult than it seems. Value-added modeling is a genuinely serious attempt to grapple with the difficulties. Value-added modeling carries the promise of measuring teacher quality automatically and objectively, and improving school systems at minimal cost. The essence of…

  11. Using School Lotteries to Evaluate the Value-Added Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutsch, Jonah

    2013-01-01

    There has been an active debate in the literature over the validity of value-added models. In this study, the author tests the central assumption of value-added models that school assignment is random relative to expected test scores conditional on prior test scores, demographic variables, and other controls. He uses a Chicago charter school's…

  12. The Guinea Pig as a Model for Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease (AD): The Impact of Cholesterol Intake on Expression of AD-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Daniel; Wijaya, Linda; Laws, Simon M.; Taddei, Kevin; Newman, Morgan; Lardelli, Michael; Martins, Ralph N.; Verdile, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the guinea pig, Cavia porcellus, as a model for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), both in terms of the conservation of genes involved in AD and the regulatory responses of these to a known AD risk factor - high cholesterol intake. Unlike rats and mice, guinea pigs possess an Aβ peptide sequence identical to human Aβ. Consistent with the commonality between cardiovascular and AD risk factors in humans, we saw that a high cholesterol diet leads to up-regulation of BACE1 (β-secretase) transcription and down-regulation of ADAM10 (α-secretase) transcription which should increase release of Aβ from APP. Significantly, guinea pigs possess isoforms of AD-related genes found in humans but not present in mice or rats. For example, we discovered that the truncated PS2V isoform of human PSEN2, that is found at raised levels in AD brains and that increases γ-secretase activity and Aβ synthesis, is not uniquely human or aberrant as previously believed. We show that PS2V formation is up-regulated by hypoxia and a high-cholesterol diet while, consistent with observations in humans, Aβ concentrations are raised in some brain regions but not others. Also like humans, but unlike mice, the guinea pig gene encoding tau, MAPT, encodes isoforms with both three and four microtubule binding domains, and cholesterol alters the ratio of these isoforms. We conclude that AD-related genes are highly conserved and more similar to human than the rat or mouse. Guinea pigs represent a superior rodent model for analysis of the impact of dietary factors such as cholesterol on the regulation of AD-related genes. PMID:23805206

  13. Value-Added Models for the Pittsburgh Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Matthew; Lipscomb, Stephen; Gill, Brian; Booker, Kevin; Bruch, Julie

    2012-01-01

    At the request of Pittsburgh Public Schools (PPS) and the Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers (PFT), Mathematica has developed value-added models (VAMs) that aim to estimate the contributions of individual teachers, teams of teachers, and schools to the achievement growth of their students. The authors' work in estimating value-added in Pittsburgh…

  14. Age-Dependent Modifications of AMPA Receptor Subunit Expression Levels and Related Cognitive Effects in 3xTg-AD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cantanelli, Pamela; Sperduti, Samantha; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Stuppia, Liborio; Gatta, Valentina; Sensi, Stefano Luca

    2014-01-01

    GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4 are the constitutive subunits of amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs), the major mediators of fast excitatory transmission in the mammalian central nervous system. Most AMPARs are Ca2+-impermeable because of the presence of the GluA2 subunit. GluA2 mRNA undergoes an editing process that results in a Q–R substitution, a key factor in the regulation of AMPAR Ca2+-permeability. AMPARs lacking GluA2 or containing the unedited subunit are permeable to Ca2+ and Zn2+. The phenomenon physiologically modulates synaptic plasticity while, in pathologic conditions, leads to increased vulnerability to excitotoxic neuronal death. Given the importance of these subunits, we have therefore evaluated possible associations between changes in expression levels of AMPAR subunits and development of cognitive deficits in 3xTg-AD mice, a widely investigated transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). With quantitative real-time PCR analysis, we assayed hippocampal mRNA expression levels of GluA1–4 subunits occurring in young [3 months of age (m.o.a.)] and old (12 m.o.a) Tg-AD mice and made comparisons with levels found in age-matched wild type (WT) mice. Efficiency of GluA2 RNA editing was also analyzed. All animals were cognitively tested for learning short- and long-term spatial memory with the Morris Water Maze (MWM) navigation task. 3xTg-AD mice showed age-dependent decreases of mRNA levels for all the AMPAR subunits, with the exception of GluA2. Editing remained fully efficient with aging in 3xTg-AD and WT mice. A one-to-one correlation analysis between MWM performances and GluA1–4 mRNA expression profiles showed negative correlations between GluA2 levels and MWM performances in young 3xTg-AD mice. On the contrary, positive correlations between GluA2 mRNA and MWM performances were found in young WT mice. Our data suggest that increases of AMPARs that contain GluA1, GluA3, and GluA4 subunits may help in

  15. Expression profiles for macrophage alternative activation genes in AD and in mouse models of AD

    PubMed Central

    Colton, Carol A; Mott, Ryan T; Sharpe, Hayley; Xu, Qing; Van Nostrand, William E; Vitek, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Background Microglia are associated with neuritic plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD) and serve as a primary component of the innate immune response in the brain. Neuritic plaques are fibrous deposits composed of the amyloid beta-peptide fragments (Abeta) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Numerous studies have shown that the immune cells in the vicinity of amyloid deposits in AD express mRNA and proteins for pro-inflammatory cytokines, leading to the hypothesis that microglia demonstrate classical (Th-1) immune activation in AD. Nonetheless, the complex role of microglial activation has yet to be fully explored since recent studies show that peripheral macrophages enter an "alternative" activation state. Methods To study alternative activation of microglia, we used quantitative RT-PCR to identify genes associated with alternative activation in microglia, including arginase I (AGI), mannose receptor (MRC1), found in inflammatory zone 1 (FIZZ1), and chitinase 3-like 3 (YM1). Results Our findings confirmed that treatment of microglia with anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 induces a gene profile typical of alternative activation similar to that previously observed in peripheral macrophages. We then used this gene expression profile to examine two mouse models of AD, the APPsw (Tg-2576) and Tg-SwDI, models for amyloid deposition and for cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) respectively. AGI, MRC1 and YM1 mRNA levels were significantly increased in the Tg-2576 mouse brains compared to age-matched controls while TNFα and NOS2 mRNA levels, genes commonly associated with classical activation, increased or did not change, respectively. Only TNFα mRNA increased in the Tg-SwDI mouse brain. Alternative activation genes were also identified in brain samples from individuals with AD and were compared to age-matched control individuals. In AD brain, mRNAs for TNFα, AGI, MRC1 and the chitinase-3 like 1 and 2 genes (CHI3L1; CHI3L2) were significantly increased

  16. Teacher Effects, Value-Added Models, and Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konstantopoulos, Spyros

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the last decade, the effects of teachers on student performance (typically manifested as state-wide standardized tests) have been re-examined using statistical models that are known as value-added models. These statistical models aim to compute the unique contribution of the teachers in promoting student achievement gains from grade…

  17. Quercetin ameliorates Aβ toxicity in Drosophila AD model by modulating cell cycle-related protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yan; Li, Ke; Fu, Tingting; Wan, Chao; Zhang, Dongdong; Song, Hang; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Na; Gan, Zhenji; Yuan, Liudi

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a prevalent neurodegenerative disorder characterized by β amyloid (Aβ) deposition and neurofibril tangles. It has been reported that a bioflavonoid, quercetin, could ameliorate AD phenotypes in C. elegans and mice. However, the mechanism underlying the ameliorative effect of quercetin is not fully understood yet. Drosophila models could recapitulate AD-like phenotypes, such as shortened lifespan, impaired locomotive ability as well as defects in learning and memory. So in this study, we investigated the effects of quercetin on AD in Drosophila model and explored the underlying mechanisms. We found quercetin could effectively intervene in AD pathogenesis in vivo. Mechanism study showed quercetin could restore the expression of genes perturbed by Aβ accumulation, such as those involved in cell cycle and DNA replication. Cyclin B, an important cell cycle protein, was chosen to test whether it participated in the AD ameliorative effects of quercetin. We found that cyclin B RNAi in the brain could alleviate AD phenotypes. Taken together, the current study suggested that the neuroprotective effects of quercetin were mediated at least partially by targeting cell cycle-related proteins. PMID:27626494

  18. Quercetin ameliorates Aβ toxicity in Drosophila AD model by modulating cell cycle-related protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yan; Li, Ke; Fu, Tingting; Wan, Chao; Zhang, Dongdong; Song, Hang; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Na; Gan, Zhenji; Yuan, Liudi

    2016-10-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a prevalent neurodegenerative disorder characterized by β amyloid (Aβ) deposition and neurofibril tangles. It has been reported that a bioflavonoid, quercetin, could ameliorate AD phenotypes in C. elegans and mice. However, the mechanism underlying the ameliorative effect of quercetin is not fully understood yet. Drosophila models could recapitulate AD-like phenotypes, such as shortened lifespan, impaired locomotive ability as well as defects in learning and memory. So in this study, we investigated the effects of quercetin on AD in Drosophila model and explored the underlying mechanisms. We found quercetin could effectively intervene in AD pathogenesis in vivo. Mechanism study showed quercetin could restore the expression of genes perturbed by Aβ accumulation, such as those involved in cell cycle and DNA replication. Cyclin B, an important cell cycle protein, was chosen to test whether it participated in the AD ameliorative effects of quercetin. We found that cyclin B RNAi in the brain could alleviate AD phenotypes. Taken together, the current study suggested that the neuroprotective effects of quercetin were mediated at least partially by targeting cell cycle-related proteins.

  19. Matrix model maps and reconstruction of AdS supergravity interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cremonini, Sera; Mello Koch, Robert de; Jevicki, Antal

    2008-05-15

    We consider the question of reconstructing (cubic) SUGRA interactions in AdS/CFT. The method we introduce is based on the matrix model maps (MMP) which were previously successfully employed at the linearized level. The strategy is to start with the map for 1/2 BPS configurations, which is exactly known (to all orders) in the Hamiltonian framework. We then use the extension of the matrix model map with the corresponding Ward identities to completely specify the interaction. A central point in this construction is the nonvanishing of off-shell interactions (even for highest-weight states)

  20. Exenatide promotes cognitive enhancement and positive brain metabolic changes in PS1-KI mice but has no effects in 3xTg-AD animals

    PubMed Central

    Bomba, M; Ciavardelli, D; Silvestri, E; Canzoniero, L MT; Lattanzio, R; Chiappini, P; Piantelli, M; Di Ilio, C; Consoli, A; Sensi, S L

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor for cognitive dysfunction or dementia. Insulin resistance is often associated with T2DM and can induce defective insulin signaling in the central nervous system as well as increase the risk of cognitive impairment in the elderly. Glucagone like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone and, like GLP-1 analogs, stimulates insulin secretion and has been employed in the treatment of T2DM. GLP-1 and GLP-1 analogs also enhance synaptic plasticity and counteract cognitive deficits in mouse models of neuronal dysfunction and/or degeneration. In this study, we investigated the potential neuroprotective effects of long-term treatment with exenatide, a GLP-1 analog, in two animal models of neuronal dysfunction: the PS1-KI and 3xTg-AD mice. We found that exenatide promoted beneficial effects on short- and long-term memory performances in PS1-KI but not in 3xTg-AD animals. In PS1-KI mice, the drug increased brain lactate dehydrogenase activity leading to a net increase in lactate levels, while no effects were observed on mitochondrial respiration. On the contrary, exenatide had no effects on brain metabolism of 3xTg-AD mice. In summary, our data indicate that exenatide improves cognition in PS1-KI mice, an effect likely driven by increasing the brain anaerobic glycolysis rate. PMID:23640454

  1. Matrix model maps in AdS/CFT correspondence

    SciTech Connect

    Donos, Aristomenis; Jevicki, Antal; Rodrigues, Joao P.

    2005-12-15

    We discuss an extension of a map between BPS states and free fermions. The extension involves states associated with a full two matrix problem which are constructed using a sequence of integral equations. A two parameter set of matrix model eigenstates is then related to states in SUGRA. Their wave functions are characterized by nontrivial dependence on the radial coordinate of AdS and of the Sphere, respectively. A kernel defining a one to one map between these states is then constructed.

  2. Effects of long-term treatment with pioglitazone on cognition and glucose metabolism of PS1-KI, 3xTg-AD, and wild-type mice

    PubMed Central

    Masciopinto, F; Di Pietro, N; Corona, C; Bomba, M; Pipino, C; Curcio, M; Di Castelnuovo, A; Ciavardelli, D; Silvestri, E; Canzoniero, L MT; Sekler, I; Pandolfi, A; Sensi, S L

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of long-term (9-month) treatment with pioglitazone (PIO; 20 mg/kg/d) in two animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related neural dysfunction and pathology: the PS1-KIM146V (human presenilin-1 M146V knock-in mouse) and 3xTg-AD (triple transgenic mouse carrying AD-linked mutations) mice. We also investigated the effects on wild-type (WT) mice. Mice were monitored for body mass changes, fasting glycemia, glucose tolerance, and studied for changes in brain mitochondrial enzyme activity (complexes I and IV) as well as energy metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)). Cognitive effects were investigated with the Morris water maze (MWM) test and the object recognition task (ORT). Behavioral analysis revealed that PIO treatment promoted positive cognitive effects in PS1-KI female mice. These effects were associated with normalization of peripheral gluco-regulatory abnormalities that were found in untreated PS1-KI females. PIO-treated PS1-KI females also showed no statistically significant alterations in brain mitochondrial enzyme activity but significantly increased reverse LDH activity.PIO treatment produced no effects on cognition, glucose metabolism, or mitochondrial functioning in 3xTg-AD mice. Finally, PIO treatment promoted enhanced short-term memory performance in WT male mice, a group that did not show deregulation of glucose metabolism but that showed decreased activity of complex I in hippocampal and cortical mitochondria. Overall, these results indicate metabolically driven cognitive-enhancing effects of PIO that are differentially gender-related among specific genotypes. PMID:23254291

  3. [Model of meningococcal sepsis in mice].

    PubMed

    Krasnoproshina, L I; Ermakova, L G; Belova, T N; Filippov, Iu V; Efimov, D D

    1978-11-01

    The authors studied a possibility of obtaining experimental meningococcus sepsis model on mice. The use of cyclophosphane, iron compounds, yolk medium produced no significant organism. When 4--5% mucine was injected intraperitoneally together with meningococcus culture mice died with sepsis phenomena. Differences were revealed in the sensitivity of linear and mongrel mice to meningococcus infection--AKR mice proved to be more sensitive. At the same time it was found that mongrel mice weighing from 10 to 12 g could be used to induce meningococcus sepsis.

  4. The Preventive Effects of Nanopowdered Peanut Sprout-added Caciocavallo Cheese on Collagen-induced Arthritic Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hwi; Chang, Yoon Hyuk; Kwak, Hae-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (NPCC) on the prevention and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in DBA/IJ mice immunized with type II collagen. After the induction of arthritis, the mice were being divided into five groups: (1) normal, no immunization; (2) CIA, collagen-induced arthritis; (3) MTX, collagen-induced arthritis treated with methotrexate (0.3 mg/kg body weight); (4) CC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d); (5) NPCC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d). Nanopowdered peanut sprout was ranged from 300 to 350 nm, while regular powdered peanut sprouts were ranged from 50 to 150 μm. The NPCC group had considerable reductions of clinical scores and paw thicknesses at the end of experiment as compared to the CIA group. In the serum analysis, the TNF-α, IL-1β, IL- 6 and IgG1 levels in the NPCC group have decreased by 69.4, 75.9, 66.6, and 61.9%, respectively, when compared to the CIA group. The histological score and spleen index of the NPCC group were significantly lower than the CIA group. In conclusion, the feeding NPCC method could delay and/or prevent the rheumatoid arthritis in the collagen-induced arthritis mouse model. Based on this study, nanopowdered peanut sprouts could be applied to various functional cheeses.

  5. The Preventive Effects of Nanopowdered Peanut Sprout-added Caciocavallo Cheese on Collagen-induced Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoon Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (NPCC) on the prevention and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in DBA/IJ mice immunized with type II collagen. After the induction of arthritis, the mice were being divided into five groups: (1) normal, no immunization; (2) CIA, collagen-induced arthritis; (3) MTX, collagen-induced arthritis treated with methotrexate (0.3 mg/kg body weight); (4) CC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d); (5) NPCC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d). Nanopowdered peanut sprout was ranged from 300 to 350 nm, while regular powdered peanut sprouts were ranged from 50 to 150 μm. The NPCC group had considerable reductions of clinical scores and paw thicknesses at the end of experiment as compared to the CIA group. In the serum analysis, the TNF-α, IL-1β, IL- 6 and IgG1 levels in the NPCC group have decreased by 69.4, 75.9, 66.6, and 61.9%, respectively, when compared to the CIA group. The histological score and spleen index of the NPCC group were significantly lower than the CIA group. In conclusion, the feeding NPCC method could delay and/or prevent the rheumatoid arthritis in the collagen-induced arthritis mouse model. Based on this study, nanopowdered peanut sprouts could be applied to various functional cheeses. PMID:26760745

  6. Myelin injury induces axonal transport impairment but not AD-like pathology in the hippocampus of cuprizone-fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Junjun; Zhou, Hong; Bai, Feng; Ren, Qingguo; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Both multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are progressive neurological disorders with myelin injury and memory impairment. However, whether myelin impairment could cause AD-like neurological pathology remains unclear. To explore neurological pathology following myelin injury, we assessed cognitive function, the expression of myelin proteins, axonal transport-associated proteins, axonal structural proteins, synapse-associated proteins, tau and beta amyloid and the status of neurons, using the cuprizone mouse model of demyelination. We found the mild impairment of learning ability in cuprizone-fed mice and the decreased expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the hippocampus. And anti-LINGO-1 improved learning ability and partly restored MBP level. Furthermore, we also found kinesin light chain (KLC), neurofilament light chain (NFL) and neurofilament heavy chain (NF200) were declined in demyelinated hippocampus, which could be partly improved by treatment with anti-LINGO-1. However, we did not observe the increased expression of beta amyloid, hyperphosphorylation of tau and loss of neurons in demyelinated hippocampus. Our results suggest that demyelination might lead to the impairment of neuronal transport, but not cause increased level of hyperphosphorylated tau and beta amyloid. Our research demonstrates remyelination might be an effective pathway to recover the function of neuronal axons and cognition in MS. PMID:27129150

  7. 3xTg-AD Mice Exhibit an Activated Central Stress Axis during Early-Stage Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hebda-Bauer, Elaine K.; Simmons, Tracy A.; Sugg, Andrew; Ural, Eren; Stewart, James A.; Beals, James L.; Wei, Qiang; Watson, Stanley J.; Akil, Huda

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis occurs in response to the organism’s innate need for homeostasis. The glucocorticoids (GCs) that are released into the circulation upon acute activation of the HPA axis perform stress-adaptive functions and provide negative feedback to turn off the HPA axis, but can be detrimental when in excess. Long-term activation of the HPA axis (such as with chronic stress) enhances susceptibility to neuronal dysfunction and death, and increases vulnerability to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, little is known how components of the HPA axis, upstream of GCs, impact vulnerability to AD. This study examined basal gene expression of stress-related molecules in brains of 3xTg-AD mice during early-stage pathology. Basal glucocorticoid levels and mRNA expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and corticotropic releasing hormone (CRH) in several stress- and emotionality-related brain regions were measured in 3–4-month-old 3xTg-AD mice. Despite normal glucocorticoid levels, young 3xTg-AD mice exhibit an activated central HPA axis, with altered mRNA levels of MR and GR in the hippocampus, GR and CRH in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, GR and CRH in the central nucleus of the amygdala, and CRH in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. This HPA axis activation is present during early-stage neuropathology when 3xTg-AD mice show mild behavioral changes, suggesting an ongoing neuroendocrine regulation that precedes the onset of severe AD-like pathology and behavioral deficits. PMID:22976078

  8. Evaluating Value-Added Models for Teacher Accountability. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Lockwood, J. R.; Koretz, Daniel M.; Hamilton, Laura S.

    2003-01-01

    Value-added modeling (VAM) to estimate school and teacher effects is currently of considerable interest to researchers and policymakers. Recent reports suggest that VAM demonstrates the importance of teachers as a source of variance in student outcomes. Policymakers see VAM as a possible component of education reform through improved teacher…

  9. Value-Added Models: What the Experts Say

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrein-Beardsley, Audrey; Pivovarova, Margarita; Geiger, Tray J.

    2016-01-01

    Being an expert involves explaining how things are supposed to work, and, perhaps more important, why things might not work as supposed. In this study, researchers surveyed scholars with expertise in value-added models (VAMs) to solicit their opinions about the uses and potential of VAMs for teacher-level accountability purposes (for example, in…

  10. Adenovirus serotype 35 vector-induced innate immune responses in dendritic cells derived from wild-type and human CD46-transgenic mice: Comparison with a fiber-substituted Ad vector containing fiber proteins of Ad serotype 35.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Nakashima, Kazuko; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Ichinose, Takako; Kawabata, Kenji; Hayakawa, Takao; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2010-12-01

    Recently, much attention has focused on replication-incompetent adenovirus (Ad) vectors containing fiber proteins derived from species B Ad serotype 35 (Ad35) (Ad5F35) and Ad vectors fully constructed from Ad35 as vaccine vectors expressing antigens. However, differences in the transduction properties, including the induction of innate immunity, of Ad5F35 and Ad35 vectors have not been properly and fully examined, partly because the transduction properties of these Ad vectors should be evaluated using nonhuman primates or human CD46-transgenic (CD46TG) mice, which ubiquitously express the primary receptor of Ad35, human CD46, in a pattern similar to that of humans. In the present study, we evaluated innate immune responses of mouse dendritic cells (mDCs) derived from bone marrow cells of wild-type (WT) and CD46TG mice following transduction with Ad serotype 5 (Ad5), fiber-substituted Ad5F35, or Ad35 vectors. Ad5F35 and Ad35 vectors mediated more efficient transduction in mDCs derived from CD46TG mice (CD46TG-mDCs) than did Ad5 vectors. Upregulation of costimulatory molecules and inflammatory cytokine induction by Ad5F35 and Ad35 vectors were significantly higher than those by Ad5 vectors in CD46TG-mDCs. However, the induction properties of the innate immune responses were different between Ad5F35 and Ad35 vectors. Ad35 vectors induced higher levels of costimulatory molecule expression and inflammatory cytokine production than did Ad5F35 vectors in CD46TG-mDCs. Furthermore, intravenous administration of Ad35 vectors in WT and CD46TG mice resulted in higher levels of serum interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-12 compared with administration of Ad5F35 vectors, which exhibited almost mock-transduced levels of these inflammatory cytokines. This study indicates that innate immune responses by Ad35 and Ad5F35 vectors are distinct even although both Ad vectors recognize human CD46 as a receptor.

  11. Nobiletin, a citrus flavonoid, improves cognitive impairment and reduces soluble Aβ levels in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (3XTg-AD).

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Akira; Aoyama, Yuki; Shin, Eun-Joo; Nam, Yunsung; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Nagai, Taku; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia among the elderly, is characterized by the progressive decline of cognitive function. Increasing evidence indicates that the production and accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ), particularly soluble Aβ oligomers, is central to the pathogenesis of AD. Our recent studies have demonstrated that nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavone from citrus peels, ameliorates learning and memory impairment in olfactory-bulbectomized mice, amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice, NMDA receptor antagonist-treated mice, and senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8. Here, we present evidence that this natural compound improves cognitive impairment and reduces soluble Aβ levels in a triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3XTg-AD) that progressively develops amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and cognitive impairments. Treatment with nobiletin (30 mg/kg) for 3 months reversed the impairment of short-term memory and recognition memory in 3XTg-AD mice. Our ELISA analysis also showed that nobiletin reduced the levels of soluble Aβ1-40 in the brain of 3XTg-AD mice. Furthermore, nobiletin reduced ROS levels in the hippocampus of 3XTg-AD as well as wild-type mice. These results suggest that this natural compound has potential to become a novel drug for the treatment and prevention of AD.

  12. Age-related intraneuronal elevation of αII-spectrin breakdown product SBDP120 in rodent forebrain accelerates in 3×Tg-AD mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yan; Zhu, Hai-Xia; Li, Jian-Ming; Luo, Xue-Gang; Patrylo, Peter R; Rose, Gregory M; Streeter, Jackson; Hayes, Ron; Wang, Kevin K W; Yan, Xiao-Xin; Jeromin, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Spectrins line the intracellular surface of plasmalemma and play a critical role in supporting cytoskeletal stability and flexibility. Spectrins can be proteolytically degraded by calpains and caspases, yielding breakdown products (SBDPs) of various molecular sizes, with SBDP120 being largely derived from caspase-3 cleavage. SBDPs are putative biomarkers for traumatic brain injury. The levels of SBDPs also elevate in the brain during aging and perhaps in Alzheimer's disease (AD), although the cellular basis for this change is currently unclear. Here we examined age-related SBDP120 alteration in forebrain neurons in rats and in the triple transgenic model of AD (3×Tg-AD) relative to non-transgenic controls. SBDP120 immunoreactivity (IR) was found in cortical neuronal somata in aged rats, and was prominent in the proximal dendrites of the olfactory bulb mitral cells. Western blot and densitometric analyses in wild-type mice revealed an age-related elevation of intraneuronal SBDP120 in the forebrain which was more robust in their 3×Tg-AD counterparts. The intraneuronal SBDP120 occurrence was not spatiotemporally correlated with transgenic amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression, β-amyloid plaque development, or phosphorylated tau expression over various forebrain regions or lamina. No microscopically detectable in situ activated caspase-3 was found in the nuclei of SBDP120-containing neurons. The present study demonstrates the age-dependent intraneuronal presence of an αII-spectrin cleavage fragment in mammalian forebrain which is exacerbated in a transgenic model of AD. This novel neuronal alteration indicates that impairments in membrane protein metabolism, possibly due to neuronal calcium mishandling and/or enhancement of calcium sensitive proteolysis, occur during aging and in transgenic AD mice.

  13. Impaired thermoregulation and beneficial effects of thermoneutrality in the 3×Tg-AD model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vandal, Milene; White, Philip J; Tournissac, Marine; Tremblay, Cyntia; St-Amour, Isabelle; Drouin-Ouellet, Janelle; Bousquet, Melanie; Traversy, Marie-Thérèse; Planel, Emmanuel; Marette, Andre; Calon, Frederic

    2016-07-01

    The sharp rise in the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) at an old age coincides with a reduction in energy metabolism and core body temperature. We found that the triple-transgenic mouse model of AD (3×Tg-AD) spontaneously develops a lower basal body temperature and is more vulnerable to a cold environment compared with age-matched controls. This was despite higher nonshivering thermogenic activity, as evidenced by brown adipose tissue norepinephrine content and uncoupling protein 1 expression. A 24-hour exposure to cold (4 °C) aggravated key neuropathologic markers of AD such as: tau phosphorylation, soluble amyloid beta concentrations, and synaptic protein loss in the cortex of 3×Tg-AD mice. Strikingly, raising the body temperature of aged 3×Tg-AD mice via exposure to a thermoneutral environment improved memory function and reduced amyloid and synaptic pathologies within a week. Our results suggest the presence of a vicious cycle between impaired thermoregulation and AD-like neuropathology, and it is proposed that correcting thermoregulatory deficits might be therapeutic in AD.

  14. Down-regulation of serum gonadotropins but not estrogen replacement improves cognition in aged-ovariectomized 3xTg AD female mice.

    PubMed

    Palm, Russell; Chang, Jaewon; Blair, Jeffrey; Garcia-Mesa, Yoelvis; Lee, Hyoung-Gon; Castellani, Rudy J; Smith, Mark A; Zhu, Xiongwei; Casadesus, Gemma

    2014-07-01

    Development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been linked to the de-regulation of estrogen and gonadotropins such as luteinizing hormone (LH). In this study, we found increases in AD pathology in the hippocampi of aged female 3xTg AD mice after ovariectomy that were unable to be reduced by estrogen therapy or down-regulation of serum LH levels. Despite the lack of effect of these treatments on AD pathology, down-regulation of serum LH but not estrogen improved factors associated with neuronal plasticity such as spatial memory, inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta, expression of beta-catenin, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription. Contrasting previous studies in younger mice, estrogen replacement was not able to rescue behavioral deficits, reduced glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta inhibition and increased hippocampal phosphorylation of tau. Of critical importance, serum LH was negatively correlated with brain LH in regions associated with spatial memory, and increases in brain LH correlated with cognitive improvement. This paralleled changes in human female AD brains which showed a significant reduction in brain LH mRNA compared to healthy age- and PMI-matched controls. Taken together, these findings should promote further research into the LH-dependent mechanisms associated with AD cognitive deficits as well as the effects of estrogen within the aged brain. In the aged triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model (3xAD-Tg), estrogen replacement after ovariectomy does not improve cognitive function, increases phosphorylated Tau levels and decreases inhibition of GSK3 beta. Luprolide acetate rescues ovariectomy-dependent cognitive function, increases signaling events associated with synaptic plasticity including GSK3 beta inhibition, but does not alter AD pathology. In the human AD female brain, luteinizing hormone (LH) mRNA levels are reduced. In the 3XAD-tg model, brain LH protein levels are reduced by ovariectomy and normalized by

  15. Characterisation of element profile changes induced by long-term dietary supplementation of zinc in the brain and cerebellum of 3xTg-AD mice by alternated cool and normal plasma ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Ciavardelli, Domenico; Consalvo, Ada; Caldaralo, Valentina; Di Vacri, Maria Laura; Nisi, Stefano; Corona, Carlo; Frazzini, Valerio; Sacchetta, Paolo; Urbani, Andrea; Di Ilio, Carmine; Sensi, Stefano L

    2012-12-01

    Metal dyshomeostasis plays a crucial role in promoting several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), a condition that has been linked to deregulation of brain levels of Al, Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn. Thus, quantitative multi-element profiling of brain tissues from AD models can be of great value in assessing the pathogenic role of metals as well as the value of therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring metal homeostasis in the brain. In this study, we employed low resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to evaluate levels of ultra-trace, trace, and major elements in brains and cerebella of 3xTg-AD mice, a well characterized transgenic (Tg) AD model. This method is based on alternated cool and hot plasma ICP-MS. The essay fulfilled analytical requirements for the quantification of 14 elements in the Central Nervous System (CNS) of our Tg model. Quantification of Li, Al, Cr, and Co, a procedure that requires a pre-concentration step, was validated by high resolution ICP-MS. Changes in element profiles occurring in 3xTg-AD mice were compared to the ones observed in wild type (WT) mice. We also investigated variations in element profiles in 3xTg-AD mice receiving a long-term (17 months) dietary supplementation of Zn. Our data indicate that, compared to WT animals, 3xTg-AD mice displayed signs of altered brain metal homeostasis. We also found that long-term Zn administration promoted decreased brain levels of some metals (K, Ca, and Fe) and restored levels of Al, Cr, and Co to values found in WT mice.

  16. Realistic Mobility Modeling for Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akay, Hilal; Tugcu, Tuna

    2009-08-01

    Simulations used for evaluating the performance of routing protocols for Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks (VANET) are mostly based on random mobility and fail to consider individual behaviors of the vehicles. Unrealistic assumptions about mobility produce misleading results about the behavior of routing protocols in real deployments. In this paper, a realistic mobility modeling tool, Mobility for Vehicles (MOVE), which considers the basic mobility behaviors of vehicles, is proposed for a more accurate evaluation. The proposed model is tested against the Random Waypoint (RWP) model using AODV and OLSR protocols. The results show that the mobility model significantly affects the number of nodes within the transmission range of a node, the volume of control traffic, and the number of collisions. It is shown that number of intersections, grid size, and node density are important parameters when dealing with VANET performance.

  17. Ground-based observations and AD HOC models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ground based observations of B stars in the visible, the infrared, and the radio region are described along with the ad hoc models proposed to interpret them. It is shown that these observations refer essentially to the photosphere and to the regions of the outer atmosphere where the gas is cool and at low velocity. The characteristics of the variability of the continuous and line spectrum are examined in general and in the cases of individual stars. Finally, linear polarization in the B stars is discussed.

  18. In silico strain optimization by adding reactions to metabolic models.

    PubMed

    Correia, Sara; Rocha, Miguel

    2012-07-24

    Nowadays, the concerns about the environment and the needs to increase the productivity at low costs, demand for the search of new ways to produce compounds with industrial interest. Based on the increasing knowledge of biological processes, through genome sequencing projects, and high-throughput experimental techniques as well as the available computational tools, the use of microorganisms has been considered as an approach to produce desirable compounds. However, this usually requires to manipulate these organisms by genetic engineering and/ or changing the enviromental conditions to make the production of these compounds possible. In many cases, it is necessary to enrich the genetic material of those microbes with hereologous pathways from other species and consequently adding the potential to produce novel compounds. This paper introduces a new plug-in for the OptFlux Metabolic Engineering platform, aimed at finding suitable sets of reactions to add to the genomes of selected microbes (wild type strain), as well as finding complementary sets of deletions, so that the mutant becomes able to overproduce compounds with industrial interest, while preserving their viability. The necessity of adding reactions to the metabolic model arises from existing gaps in the original model or motivated by the productions of new compounds by the organism. The optimization methods used are metaheuristics such as Evolutionary Algorithms and Simulated Annealing. The usefulness of this plug-in is demonstrated by a case study, regarding the production of vanillin by the bacterium E. coli.

  19. Infantile postnatal exposure to lead (Pb) enhances tau expression in the cerebral cortex of aged mice: relevance to AD.

    PubMed

    Bihaqi, Syed Waseem; Bahmani, Azadeh; Adem, Abdu; Zawia, Nasser H

    2014-09-01

    The sporadic nature in over 90% of Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases, the differential susceptibility and course of illness, and latent onset of the disease suggest involvement of an environmental component in the etiology of late onset AD (LOAD). Recent reports from our lab have demonstrated that molecular alterations favor abundant tau phosphorylation and immunoreactivity in the frontal cortex of aged primates with infantile lead (Pb) exposure (Bihaqi and Zawia, 2013). Here we report that developmental Pb exposure results in elevation of protein and mRNA levels of tau in aged mice. Western blot analysis revealed aberrant site-specific tau hyperphosphorylation accompanied by elevated cyclin dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) levels in aged mice with prior Pb exposure. Mice with developmental Pb exposure also displayed altered protein ratio of p35/p25 with more Serine/Threonine phosphatase activity at old age. These changes favored increase in tau phosphorylation, thus providing evidence that neurodegenerative diseases may be in part due to environmental influences that occur during development.

  20. Preferential survival in models of complex ad hoc networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Joseph S.; Roychowdhury, Vwani P.

    2008-05-01

    There has been a rich interplay in recent years between (i) empirical investigations of real-world dynamic networks, (ii) analytical modeling of the microscopic mechanisms that drive the emergence of such networks, and (iii) harnessing of these mechanisms to either manipulate existing networks, or engineer new networks for specific tasks. We continue in this vein, and study the deletion phenomenon in the web by the following two different sets of websites (each comprising more than 150,000 pages) over a one-year period. Empirical data show that there is a significant deletion component in the underlying web networks, but the deletion process is not uniform. This motivates us to introduce a new mechanism of preferential survival (PS), where nodes are removed according to the degree-dependent deletion kernel, D(k)∝k, with α≥0. We use the mean-field rate equation approach to study a general dynamic model driven by Preferential Attachment (PA), Double PA (DPA), and a tunable PS (i.e., with any α>0), where c nodes ( c<1) are deleted per node added to the network, and verify our predictions via large-scale simulations. One of our results shows that, unlike in the case of uniform deletion (i.e., where α=0), the PS kernel when coupled with the standard PA mechanism, can lead to heavy-tailed power-law networks even in the presence of extreme turnover in the network. Moreover, a weak DPA mechanism, coupled with PS, can help to make the network even more heavy-tailed, especially in the limit when deletion and insertion rates are almost equal, and the overall network growth is minimal. The dynamics reported in this work can be used to design and engineer stable ad hoc networks and explain the stability of the power-law exponents observed in real-world networks.

  1. Syrian hamster tumor model to study oncolytic Ad5-based vectors.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Debanjan; Toth, Karoly; Wold, William S M

    2012-01-01

    Oncolytic (replicating) adenovirus (Ad) vectors are emerging as a promising form of a cancer therapy agent. There has been a need for an appropriate animal model to study oncolytic Ad since human Ad -replication is usually species specific. We have shown that Syrian (golden) hamsters are an appropriate animal model to study human Ad5-based vectors. Syrian hamsters are immunocompetent, and they allow human Ad5 replication in normal tissues as well as in Syrian hamster cancer cells. The development of the Syrian hamster as a model to study oncolytic Ad vectors has opened avenues to explore the role of host immune response and preexisting immunity in Ad vector efficacy and toxicity/biodistribution following Ad vector administration. Since most of the normal tissues in the Syrian hamster are permissive for human Ad5 replication, Ad vectors can be studied in the context of orthotopic cancer model developed in Syrian hamsters.

  2. Tetracyclic Truncated Analogue of the Marine Toxin Gambierol Modifies NMDA, Tau, and Amyloid β Expression in Mice Brains: Implications in AD Pathology.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Eva; Vieira, Andrés C; Rodriguez, Inés; Alvariño, Rebeca; Gegunde, Sandra; Fuwa, Haruhiko; Suga, Yuto; Sasaki, Makoto; Alfonso, Amparo; Cifuentes, José Manuel; Botana, Luis M

    2017-02-13

    Gambierol and its two, tetra- and heptacyclic, analogues have been previously proved as promising molecules for the modulation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmarks in primary cortical neurons of 3xTg-AD fetuses. In this work, the effect of the tetracyclic analogue of gambierol was tested in vivo in 3xTg-AD mice (10 months old) after 1 month of weekly treatment with 50 μg/kg. Adverse effects were not reported throughout the whole treatment period and no pathological signs were observed for the analyzed organs. The compound was found in brain samples after intraperitoneal injection. The tetracyclic analogue of gambierol elicited a decrease of amyloid β1-42 levels and a dose-dependent inhibition of β-secretase enzyme-1 activity. Moreover, this compound also reduced the phosphorylation of tau at the 181 and 159/163 residues with an increase of the inactive isoform of the glycogen synthase kinase-3β. In accordance with our in vitro neuronal model, this compound produced a reduction in the N2A subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. The combined effect of this compound on amyloid β1-42 and tau phosphorylation represents a multitarget therapeutic approach for AD which might be more effective for this multifactorial and complex neurodegenerative disease than the current treatments.

  3. Model of the world oil market with an OPEC cartel. [1980 AD to 2040 AD

    SciTech Connect

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Horwedel, J.E.; Marshalla, R.A.; Nesbitt, D.M.; Haas, S.M.

    1984-08-01

    A world oil market model (WOM) with OPEC treated as a Stackelberg cartel has been developed within the framework of the Generalized Equilibrium Modeling System (GEMS) that is available from Decision Focus, Inc. The US sector of the model is represented by a Liquid Fuels Supply model that was presented previously. The WOM model is described and results obtained with the model for the period 1980 to 2040 are presented. For comparative purposes, results obtained with the model when OPEC is treated as a competitive producer are also presented. By comparing the world oil price as a function of time from the two calculations, the influence that OPEC may have on the oil market by exploiting all of its market power is quantified. The world oil price as obtained with the WOM model is also compared with world oil price projections from a variety of sources. 22 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Effects of ad libitum ingestion of monosodium glutamate on weight gain in C57BL6/J mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xueying; Ferreira, Jozélia G; Yeckel, Catherine W; Kondoh, Takashi; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2011-01-01

    Although the umami compound monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a widely used flavor enhancer, controversy still persists regarding the effects of MSG intake on body weight. It has been claimed, in particular, that chronic MSG intake may result in excessive body weight gain and obesity. In this study we assessed the effects of chronic (16 weeks) ad libitum MSG on body weight and metabolism of C57BL6/J mice. Adult male mice were divided in four experimental groups and fed with either a low-fat (LF) or high-fat (HF) diet and with either two bottles of plain water or one bottle containing 1% MSG and another one containing water according to a factorial design. Mice were monitored weekly for body weight and food/fluid intake for 15 weeks. At the end of the experiments, the circulating levels of leptin, insulin, total protein, total cholesterol, triglyceride, blood urea nitrogen, and non-esterified fatty acids were also analyzed. Our results show that MSG intake did not influence body weight in either LF or HF groups. Interestingly, although animals overall displayed strong preferences for MSG against water, preferences were relatively higher in LF compared to HF group. Consistent with the body weight data, while significant differences in leptin, insulin, total cholesterol, and non-esterified fatty acids were found between HF and LF groups, such an effect was not influenced by MSG intake. Finally, indirect calorimetry measurements revealed similar energy expenditure levels between animals being presented water only and MSG only. In summary, our data does not support the notion that ad libitum MSG intake should trigger the development of obesity or other metabolic abnormalities.

  5. Assessing the TARES as an ethical model for antismoking ads.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seow Ting; Cheng, I-Huei

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the ethical dimensions of public health communication, with a focus on antismoking public service announcements (PSAs). The content analysis of 826 television ads from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Media Campaign Resource Center is an empirical testing of Baker and Martinson's (2001) TARES Test that directly examines persuasive messages for truthfulness, authenticity, respect, equity, and social responsibility. In general, the antismoking ads score highly on ethicality. There are significant relationships between ethicality and message attributes (thematic frame, emotion appeal, source, and target audience). Ads that portrayed smoking as damaging to health and socially unacceptable score lower in ethicality than ads that focus on tobacco industry manipulation, addiction, dangers of secondhand smoke, and cessation. Emotion appeals of anger and sadness are associated with higher ethicality than shame and humor appeals. Ads targeting teen/youth audiences score lower on ethicality than ads targeting adult and general audiences. There are significant differences in ethicality based on source; ads produced by the CDC rate higher in ethicality than other sources. Theoretical implications and practical recommendations are discussed.

  6. Suppression of atopic dermatitis in mice model by reducing inflammation utilizing phosphatidylserine-coated biodegradable microparticles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Purnima; Hosain, Md Zahangir; Kang, Jeong-Hun; Takeo, Masafumi; Kishimura, Akihiro; Mori, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Controlling inflammatory response is important to avoid chronic inflammation in many diseases including atopic dermatitis (AD). In this research, we tried using a phosphatidylserine (PS)-coated microparticles in the AD mouse model for achieving the modulation of the macrophage phenotype to an anti-inflammatory state. Here, we prepared poly (D,L-lactic acid) microparticle coated with PS on the outside shell. We confirmed the cellular uptake of the PS-coated microparticle, which leads to the significant downregulation of the inflammatory cytokine production. In the mouse model of AD, the PS-coated microparticle was injected subcutaneously for a period of 12 days. The mice showed significant reduction in the development of AD symptoms comparing with the mice treated with the PC-coated microparticle.

  7. Impairment of autophagosome-lysosome fusion in the buff mutant mice with the VPS33AD251E mutation

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Yuanli; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The HOPS (homotypic fusion and protein sorting) complex functions in endocytic and autophagic pathways in both lower eukaryotes and mammalian cells through its involvement in fusion events between endosomes and lysosomes or autophagosomes and lysosomes. However, the differential molecular mechanisms underlying these fusion processes are largely unknown. Buff (bf) is a mouse mutant that carries an Asp251-to-Glu point mutation (D251E) in the VPS33A protein, a tethering protein and a core subunit of the HOPS complex. Bf mice showed impaired spontaneous locomotor activity, motor learning, and autophagic activity. Although the gross anatomy of the brain was apparently normal, the number of Purkinje cells was significantly reduced. Furthermore, we found that fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes was defective in bf cells without compromising the endocytic pathway. The direct association of mutant VPS33AD251E with the autophagic SNARE complex, STX17 (syntaxin 17)-VAMP8-SNAP29, was enhanced. In addition, the VPS33AD251E mutation enhanced interactions with other HOPS subunits, namely VPS41, VPS39, VPS18, and VPS11, except for VPS16. Reduction of the interactions between VPS33AY440D and several other HOPS subunits led to decreased association with STX17. These results suggest that the VPS33AD251E mutation plays dual roles by increasing the HOPS complex assembly and its association with the autophagic SNARE complex, which selectively affects the autophagosome-lysosome fusion that impairs basal autophagic activity and induces Purkinje cell loss. PMID:26259518

  8. Stereological investigation of the CA1 pyramidal cell layer in untreated and lithium-treated 3xTg-AD and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Evelin L; Catanozi, Sergio; West, Mark J; Gattaz, Wagner F

    2017-01-01

    Pyramidal neuron loss in the hippocampal CA1 region is a very early hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD). Lithium might be a therapeutic strategy for AD due to its neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties. This study used modern stereological techniques to investigate possible CA1 pyramidal neuron loss in 11-month-old triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice, and also the effects of therapeutic and subtherapeutic lithium doses on the number and density of CA1 pyramidal neurons and volume of CA1 pyramidal layer in 3xTg-AD and wild-type mice treated from 3 to 11 months of age. 3xTg-AD mice displayed CA1 pyramidal layer atrophy that is likely due to reduced neuronal volume because of the absence of neuronal loss. Both lithium treatments of 3xTg-AD mice, which already expressed AD-like pathology, had no effect on CA1 atrophy. However, lithium treatment of wild-type mice, at low (subtherapeutic) doses, induced a significant increase in total CA1 pyramidal neuron number that led to a significant increase in total CA1 pyramidal layer volume. The lithium-induced increase in CA1 neuron number is highly consistent with previous evidence that adult neurogenesis can be exogenously induced in the CA1 pyramidal layer with impact on total CA1 neuron number, thus raising the possibility of the chronic use of low-dose lithium as a strategy to help compensate for neuronal loss in CA1 and perhaps other typically non-neurogenic brain regions in various neurological diseases. With regard to AD, low-dose lithium intervention must be initiated as early as possible in the course of neuropathology for beneficial effects to occur.

  9. AdS Black Disk Model for Small-x Deep Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornalba, Lorenzo; Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João

    2010-08-01

    Using the approximate conformal invariance of QCD at high energies we consider a simple anti-de Sitter black disk model to describe saturation in deep inelastic scattering. Deep inside saturation the structure functions have the same power law scaling, FT˜FL˜x-ω, where ω is related to the expansion rate of the black disk with energy. Furthermore, the ratio FL/FT is given by the universal value (1+ω)/(3+ω), independently of the target. For γ*-γ* scattering at high energies we obtain explicit expressions and ratios for the total cross sections of transverse and longitudinal photons in terms of the single parameter ω.

  10. Lifshitz from AdS at finite temperature and top down models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovin, Yegor; Skenderis, Kostas; Taylor, Marika

    2013-11-01

    We construct analytically an asymptotically Lifshitz black brane with dynamical exponent z = 1 + ∈ 2 in an Einstein-Proca model, where ∈ is a small parameter. In previous work we showed that the holographic dual QFT is a deformation of a CFT by the time component of a vector operator and the parameter ∈ is the corresponding deformation parameter. In the black brane background this operator additionally acquires a vacuum expectation value. We explain how the QFT Ward identity associated with Lifshitz invariance leads to a conserved mass and compute analytically the thermodynamic quantities showing that they indeed take the form implied by Lifshitz invariance. In the second part of the paper we consider top down Lifshitz models with dynamical exponent close to one and show that they can be understood in terms of vector deformations of conformal field theories. However, in all known cases, both the conformal field theory and its Lifshitz deformations have modes that violate the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound.

  11. Peripherally administered sera antibodies recognizing amyloid-β oligomers mitigate Alzheimer's disease-like pathology and cognitive decline in aged 3× Tg-AD mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Chao; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Liu, Si; Zhao, Meng; Xu, Qing

    2016-04-04

    Active and passive immunotherapy targeting amyloid-β (Aβ) may be the most promising strategy to prevent or treat Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously, immunization with the recombinant 6Aβ15-T antigen generated robust anti-Aβ serum antibodies that strongly recognized Aβ42 oligomers in different mice, markedly reduced the amyloid burden, and improved behavioral performance of immunized older AD mice. Here, we further determined that these anti-6Aβ15-T serum antibodies from different strains of mice displayed anti-Aβ antibody responses against the same epitopes in the Aβ1-15 region. Peripheral administration of anti-6Aβ15-T serum antibodies was also effective to mitigate AD-like pathology and cognitive decline in aged 3× Tg-AD mice. Specifically, the levels of Aβ and tau in the brains of 3× Tg-AD mice were significantly reduced after passive immunotherapy, which seemed necessary or beneficial to ameliorate memory impairment. In addition, our results showed that this immunotherapy also prevented presynaptic dynamin 1 degradation, which might help to further protect synaptic functions and allow functional recovery of cognition. Moreover, immunization with 6Aβ15-T in rabbits induced a similar antibody response as that in mice, and the rabbit serum antibodies reacted strongly with Aβ42 oligomers and inhibited oligomer-mediated neurotoxicity. We concluded that passive immunization with Aβ42 oligomer conformation-sensitive anti-6Aβ15-T serum antibodies is effective in providing potentially therapeutic effects in aged 3× Tg-AD mice by reducing Aβ and tau.

  12. Chronic copper exposure exacerbates both amyloid and tau pathology and selectively dysregulates cdk5 in a mouse model of AD.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Cheng, David; Laferla, Frank M

    2009-03-01

    Excess copper exposure is thought to be linked to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. However, the mechanism by which copper affects the CNS remains unclear. To investigate the effect of chronic copper exposure on both beta-amyloid and tau pathologies, we treated young triple transgenic (3xTg-AD) mice with 250 ppm copper-containing water for a period of 3 or 9 months. Copper exposure resulted in altered amyloid precursor protein processing; increased accumulation of the amyloid precursor protein and its proteolytic product, C99 fragment, along with increased generation of amyloid-beta peptides and oligomers. These changes were found to be mediated via up-regulation of BACE1 as significant increases in BACE1 levels and deposits were detected around plaques in mice following copper exposure. Furthermore, tau pathology within hippocampal neurons was exacerbated in copper-exposed 3xTg-AD group. Increased tau phosphorylation was closely correlated with aberrant cdk5/p25 activation, suggesting a role for this kinase in the development of copper-induced tau pathology. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic copper exposure accelerates not only amyloid pathology but also tau pathology in a mouse model of AD.

  13. Defensive effect of lansoprazole in dementia of AD type in mice exposed to streptozotocin and cholesterol enriched diet.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Rupinder K; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the potential of lansoprazole (a proton pump inhibitor and agonist of liver x receptors) in experimental dementia of AD type. Streptozotocin [STZ, 3 mg/kg, injected intracerebroventricular (i.c.v), and high fat diet (HFD, administered for 90 days)] were used to induce dementia in separate groups of Swiss mice. Morris water maze (MWM) test was performed to assess learning and memory of the animals. A battery of biochemical and histopathological studies were also performed. Extent of oxidative stress was measured by estimating the levels of brain reduced glutathione (GSH) and thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS). Brain acetylcholinestrase (AChE) activity and serum cholesterol levels were also estimated. The brain level of myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured as a marker of inflammation. STZ and HFD produced a marked decline in MWM performance of the animals, reflecting impairment of learning and memory. STZ/HFD treated mice exhibited a marked accentuation of AChE activity, TBARS and MPO levels along with a fall in GSH levels. Further, the stained micrographs of STZ/HFD treated mice indicated pathological changes, severe neutrophilic infiltration and amyloid deposition. Lansoprazole treatment significantly attenuated STZ and HFD -induced memory deficits, biochemical and histopathological alterations. It also prevented HFD-induced rise in the cholesterol level. Therefore, the findings demonstrate potential of lansoprazole in memory dysfunctions which may probably be attributed to its anti-cholinesterase, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover, both cholesterol-dependent as well as cholesterol-independent effects of lansoprazole appear to play a role. In addition study indicates the role of liver x receptors in dementia.

  14. Humanized Mice as Preclinical Models in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Safinia, N; Becker, P D; Vaikunthanathan, T; Xiao, F; Lechler, R; Lombardi, G

    2016-01-01

    Animal models have been instrumental in our understanding of the mechanisms of rejection and the testing of novel treatment options in the context of transplantation. We have now entered an exciting era with research on humanized mice driving advances in translational studies and in our understanding of the function of human cells in response to pathogens and cancer as well as the recognition of human allogeneic tissues in vivo. In this chapter we provide a historical overview of humanized mouse models of transplantation to date, outlining the distinct strains and share our experiences in the study of human transplantation immunology.

  15. Nicotinamide restores cognition in AD transgenic mice via a mechanism involving sirtuin inhibition and selective reduction of Thr231-phosphotau

    PubMed Central

    Green, Kim N.; Steffan, Joan S.; Martinez-Coria, Hilda; Sun, Xuemin; Schreiber, Steven S.; Thompson, Leslie Michels; LaFerla, Frank M.

    2008-01-01

    Memory loss is the signature feature of Alzheimer’s disease and therapies that prevent or delay its onset are urgently needed. Effective preventive strategies likely offer the greatest and most widespread benefits. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors increase histone acetylation and enhance memory and synaptic plasticity. We evaluated the efficacy of nicotinamide, a competitive inhibitor of the sirtuins or class III NAD+-dependent HDACs in 3xTg-AD mice, and found that it restored cognitive deficits associated with pathology. Nicotinamide selectively reduces a specific phospho-species of tau (Thr231) that is associated with microtubule depolymerization, in a manner similar to inhibition of SirT1. Nicotinamide also dramatically increased acetylated-α-tubulin, a primary substrate of SirT2, and MAP2c, both of which are linked to increased microtubule stability. Reduced phosphoThr231-tau was related to a reduction of mono-ubiquitin-conjugated tau, suggesting that this post-translationally modified form of tau may be rapidly degraded. Overexpression of a Thr231-phospho-mimic tau in vitro increased clearance and decreased accumulation of tau compared to wild-type tau. These preclinical findings suggest that oral nicotinamide may represent a safe treatment for AD and other tauopathies, and that phosphorylation of tau at Thr231 may regulate tau stability. PMID:18987186

  16. BACE1 RNAi Restores the Composition of Phosphatidylethanolamine-Derivates Related to Memory Improvement in Aged 3xTg-AD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Villamil-Ortiz, Javier G.; Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Piedrahita, Diego; Velásquez-Rodríguez, Claudia M.; Arias-Londoño, Julian D.; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P.

    2016-01-01

    β-amyloid (Aβ) is produced by the β-secretase 1 (BACE1)-mediated enzymatic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein through the amyloidogenic pathway, making BACE1 a therapeutic target against Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Alterations in lipid metabolism are a risk factor for AD by an unknown mechanism. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of RNA interference against BACE1 (shBACEmiR) on the phospholipid profile in hippocampal CA1 area in aged 3xTg-AD mice after 6 and 12 months of treatment compared to aged PS1KI mice. The shBACEmiR treatment induced cognitive function recovery and restored mainly the fatty acid composition of lysophosphatidylethanolamine and etherphosphatidylethanolamine, reduced the cPLA2’s phosphorylation, down-regulated the levels of arachidonic acid and COX2 in the hippocampi of 3xTg-AD mice. Together, our findings suggest, for the first time, that BACE1 silencing restores phospholipids composition which could favor the recovery of cellular homeostasis and cognitive function in the hippocampus of triple transgenic AD mice. PMID:27891075

  17. Studies on the correlation with olfactory dysfunction in a transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Ameer; Lee, Ji Hye; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Moon, Cheil

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressively debilitating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presence of proteinaceous deposits in the brain. AD often results in olfactory dysfunction and impaired olfactory perceptual acuity may be a potential biomarker for early diagnosis of AD. Until recently, there is no Alzheimer's nanoscope or any other high-end microscope developed to be capable of seeing buried feature of AD clearly. Modern neuroimaging techniques are more effective only after the occurrence of cognitive impairment. Therefore, early detection of Alzheimer's disease is critical in developing effective treatment of AD. H and E (Haematoxyline and Eosin) staining is performed for examining gross morphological changes, while TUNEL (transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) staining for monitoring neuronal death in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Furthermore, immunohistochemistry and western blot are performed to examine β-amyloid protein expression. AD model animals were Tg2576 (transgenic mice that overexpress a mutated form of the Aβ precursor protein), and 6 month (before onset of AD symptoms) and 14 month (after onset of AD symptoms) old WT (wild type) and transgenic mice were compared in their olfactory system. We found that in OE of Tg2576 mice, thickness and total number of cells were decreased, while the numbers of TUNEL-positive neurons, caspase-3 activation were significantly increased compared with age-matched WT. Our results demonstrate that the olfactory system may get deteriorated before onset of AD symptoms. Our findings imply that an olfactory biopsy could be served as an early and relatively simple diagnostic tool for potential AD patients.

  18. β-Secretase 1’s Targeting Reduces Hyperphosphorilated Tau, Implying Autophagy Actors in 3xTg-AD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Piedrahita, Diego; Castro-Alvarez, John Fredy; Boudreau, Ryan L.; Villegas-Lanau, Andres; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Gallego-Gomez, Juan Carlos; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria Patricia

    2016-01-01

    β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) initiates APP cleavage, which has been reported to be an inducer of tau pathology by altering proteasome functions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the exact relationship between BACE1 and PHF (Paired Helical Filaments) formation is not clear. In this study, we confirm that BACE1 and Hsc70 are upregulated in the brains of AD patients, and we demonstrate that both proteins show enhanced expression in lipid rafts from AD-affected triple transgenic mouse brains. BACE1 targeting increased Hsc70 levels in the membrane and cytoplasm fractions and downregulated Hsp90 and CHIP in the nucleus in the hippocampi of 3xTg-AD mice. However, these observations occurred in a proteasome-independent manner in vitro. The BACE1miR-induced reduction of soluble hyperphosphorylated tau was associated with a decrease in MAPK activity. However, the BACE1 RNAi-mediated reduction of hyperphosphorylated tau was only blocked by 3-MA (3-methyladenine) in vitro, and it resulted in the increase of Hsc70 and LAMP2 in lipid rafts from hippocampi of 3xTg-AD mice, and upregulation of survival and homeostasis signaling. In summary, our findings suggest that BACE1 silencing neuroprotects reducing soluble hyperphosphorylated tau, modulating certain autophagy-related proteins in aged 3xTg-AD mice. PMID:26778963

  19. Early postnatal handling and environmental enrichment improve the behavioral responses of 17-month-old 3xTg-AD and non-transgenic mice in the Forced Swim Test in a gender-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Torres-Lista, Virginia; Giménez-Llort, Lydia

    2015-11-01

    Forced Swimming Test (FST) models behavioural despair in animals by loss of motivation to respond or the refusal to escape. The present study was aimed at characterizing genetic (genotype and gender) and environmental factors (age/stage of disease and rearing conditions: C, standard; H, early postnatal handling; EE, environmental enrichment consisting in physical exercise as well as social and object enrichment) that may modulate the poor behavioural and cognitive flexibility response we have recently described in 12-month-old male 3xTg-AD mice in the FST. The comprehensive analysis of the ethogram shown in the FST considered the intervals of the test (0-2 and 2-6min), all the elicited behavioural responses (immobility, swimming and climbing) and their features (total duration and frequency of episodes). The long persistence of behaviours found in 17-month-old (late-stages of disease) 3xTg-AD mice was comparable to that recently described in males at 12 months of age (beginning of advanced stages) but also suggested increased age-dependent frailty in both genotypes. The poor behavioral flexibility of 3xTg-AD mice to elicit the behavioural despair shown by the NTg mice, was also found in the female gender. Finally, the present work demonstrates that early-life interventions were able to improve the time and frequency of episodes of immobility, being more evident in the female gender of both old NTg and 3xTg-AD mice. Ontogenic modulation by early-postnatal handling resulted in a more effective long-term improvement of the elicited behaviours in the FST than that achieved by environmental enrichment. The results talk in favor of the beneficence of early-life interventions on ageing in both healthy and disease conditions.

  20. Arctigenin effectively ameliorates memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease model mice targeting both β-amyloid production and clearance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; Yan, Jianming; Jiang, Wei; Yao, Xin-gang; Chen, Jing; Chen, Lili; Li, Chenjing; Hu, Lihong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Xu

    2013-08-07

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) chiefly characterizes a progressively neurodegenerative disorder of the brain, and eventually leads to irreversible loss of intellectual abilities. The β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced neurodegeneration is believed to be the main pathological mechanism of AD, and Aβ production inhibition or its clearance promotion is one of the promising therapeutic strategies for anti-AD research. Here, we report that the natural product arctigenin from Arctium lappa (L.) can both inhibit Aβ production by suppressing β-site amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme 1 expression and promote Aβ clearance by enhancing autophagy through AKT/mTOR signaling inhibition and AMPK/Raptor pathway activation as investigated in cells and APP/PS1 transgenic AD model mice. Moreover, the results showing that treatment of arctigenin in mice highly decreased Aβ formation and senile plaques and efficiently ameliorated AD mouse memory impairment strongly highlight the potential of arctigenin in anti-AD drug discovery.

  1. A truncated peptide from p35, a Cdk5 activator, prevents Alzheimer's disease phenotypes in model mice

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Varsha; Zheng, Ya-Li; Mishra, Santosh K.; Amin, Niranjana D.; Steiner, Joseph; Grant, Philip; Kesavapany, Sashi; Pant, Harish C.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), one of the leading neurodegenerative disorders of older adults, which causes major socioeconomic burdens globally, lacks effective therapeutics without significant side effects. Besides the hallmark pathology of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), it has been reported that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), a critical neuronal kinase, is hyperactivated in AD brains and is, in part, responsible for the above pathology. Here we show that a modified truncated 24-aa peptide (TFP5), derived from the Cdk5 activator p35, penetrates the blood-brain barrier after intraperitoneal injections, inhibits abnormal Cdk5 hyperactivity, and significantly rescues AD pathology (up to 70–80%) in 5XFAD AD model mice. The mutant mice, injected with TFP5 exhibit behavioral rescue, whereas no rescue was observed in mutant mice injected with either saline or scrambled peptide. However, TFP5 does not inhibit cell cycle Cdks or normal Cdk5/p35 activity, and thereby has no toxic side effects (even at 200 mg/kg), a common problem in most current therapeutics for AD. In addition, treated mice displayed decreased inflammation, amyloid plaques, NFTs, cell death, and an extended life by 2 mo. These results suggest TFP5 as a potential therapeutic, toxicity-free candidate for AD.—Shukla, V., Zheng, Y.-L., Mishra, S. K., Amin, N. D., Steiner, J., Grant, P., Kesavapany, S., Pant, H. C. A truncated peptide from p35, a Cdk5 activator, prevents Alzheimer's disease phenotypes in model mice. PMID:23038754

  2. Value-Added Models of Assessment: Implications for Motivation and Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderman, Eric M.; Anderman, Lynley H.; Yough, Michael S.; Gimbert, Belinda G.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we examine the relations of value-added models of measuring academic achievement to student motivation. Using an achievement goal orientation theory perspective, we argue that value-added models, which focus on the progress of individual students over time, are more closely aligned with research on student motivation than are more…

  3. Interpreting incremental value of markers added to risk prediction models.

    PubMed

    Pencina, Michael J; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Pencina, Karol M; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Greenland, Philip

    2012-09-15

    The discrimination of a risk prediction model measures that model's ability to distinguish between subjects with and without events. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) is a popular measure of discrimination. However, the AUC has recently been criticized for its insensitivity in model comparisons in which the baseline model has performed well. Thus, 2 other measures have been proposed to capture improvement in discrimination for nested models: the integrated discrimination improvement and the continuous net reclassification improvement. In the present study, the authors use mathematical relations and numerical simulations to quantify the improvement in discrimination offered by candidate markers of different strengths as measured by their effect sizes. They demonstrate that the increase in the AUC depends on the strength of the baseline model, which is true to a lesser degree for the integrated discrimination improvement. On the other hand, the continuous net reclassification improvement depends only on the effect size of the candidate variable and its correlation with other predictors. These measures are illustrated using the Framingham model for incident atrial fibrillation. The authors conclude that the increase in the AUC, integrated discrimination improvement, and net reclassification improvement offer complementary information and thus recommend reporting all 3 alongside measures characterizing the performance of the final model.

  4. Strategies for fitting nonlinear ecological models in R, AD Model Builder, and BUGS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolker, Benjamin M.; Gardner, Beth; Maunder, Mark; Berg, Casper W.; Brooks, Mollie; Comita, Liza; Crone, Elizabeth; Cubaynes, Sarah; Davies, Trevor; de Valpine, Perry; Ford, Jessica; Gimenez, Olivier; Kéry, Marc; Kim, Eun Jung; Lennert-Cody, Cleridy; Magunsson, Arni; Martell, Steve; Nash, John; Nielson, Anders; Regentz, Jim; Skaug, Hans; Zipkin, Elise

    2013-01-01

    1. Ecologists often use nonlinear fitting techniques to estimate the parameters of complex ecological models, with attendant frustration. This paper compares three open-source model fitting tools and discusses general strategies for defining and fitting models. 2. R is convenient and (relatively) easy to learn, AD Model Builder is fast and robust but comes with a steep learning curve, while BUGS provides the greatest flexibility at the price of speed. 3. Our model-fitting suggestions range from general cultural advice (where possible, use the tools and models that are most common in your subfield) to specific suggestions about how to change the mathematical description of models to make them more amenable to parameter estimation. 4. A companion web site (https://groups.nceas.ucsb.edu/nonlinear-modeling/projects) presents detailed examples of application of the three tools to a variety of typical ecological estimation problems; each example links both to a detailed project report and to full source code and data.

  5. Adding ecosystem function to agent-based land use models

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, V.; Del Grosso, S.J.; Parton, W.J.; Malanson, G.P.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine issues in the inclusion of simulations of ecosystem functions in agent-based models of land use decision-making. The reasons for incorporating these simulations include local interests in land fertility and global interests in carbon sequestration. Biogeochemical models are needed in order to calculate such fluxes. The Century model is described with particular attention to the land use choices that it can encompass. When Century is applied to a land use problem the combinatorial choices lead to a potentially unmanageable number of simulation runs. Century is also parameter-intensive. Three ways of including Century output in agent-based models, ranging from separately calculated look-up tables to agents running Century within the simulation, are presented. The latter may be most efficient, but it moves the computing costs to where they are most problematic. Concern for computing costs should not be a roadblock. PMID:26191077

  6. ASC-AD penetration modeling FY05 status report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kistler, Bruce L.; Ostien, Jakob T.; Chiesa, Michael L.; Bhutani, Nipun; Ohashi, Yuki; Marin, Esteban B.; Korellis, John S.; Settgast, Randy; Antoun, Bonnie R.

    2006-04-01

    Sandia currently lacks a high fidelity method for predicting loads on and subsequent structural response of earth penetrating weapons. This project seeks to test, debug, improve and validate methodologies for modeling earth penetration. Results of this project will allow us to optimize and certify designs for the B61-11, Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator (RNEP), PEN-X and future nuclear and conventional penetrator systems. Since this is an ASC Advanced Deployment project the primary goal of the work is to test, debug, verify and validate new Sierra (and Nevada) tools. Also, since this project is part of the V&V program within ASC, uncertainty quantification (UQ), optimization using DAKOTA [1] and sensitivity analysis are an integral part of the work. This project evaluates, verifies and validates new constitutive models, penetration methodologies and Sierra/Nevada codes. In FY05 the project focused mostly on PRESTO [2] using the Spherical Cavity Expansion (SCE) [3,4] and PRESTO Lagrangian analysis with a preformed hole (Pen-X) methodologies. Modeling penetration tests using PRESTO with a pilot hole was also attempted to evaluate constitutive models. Future years work would include the Alegra/SHISM [5] and AlegrdEP (Earth Penetration) methodologies when they are ready for validation testing. Constitutive models such as Soil-and-Foam, the Sandia Geomodel [6], and the K&C Concrete model [7] were also tested and evaluated. This report is submitted to satisfy annual documentation requirements for the ASC Advanced Deployment program. This report summarizes FY05 work performed in the Penetration Mechanical Response (ASC-APPS) and Penetration Mechanics (ASC-V&V) projects. A single report is written to document the two projects because of the significant amount of technical overlap.

  7. Long-term exposure to ELF-MF ameliorates cognitive deficits and attenuates tau hyperphosphorylation in 3xTg AD mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu; Lai, Jinsheng; Wan, Baoquan; Liu, Xingfa; Zhang, Yemao; Zhang, Jiangong; Sun, Dongsheng; Ruan, Guoran; Liu, Enjie; Liu, Gong-Ping; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao Wen

    2016-03-01

    Although numerous studies have reported the influence of extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) exposure on human health, its effects on cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have remained under debate. Moreover, the influence of ELF-MF on hyperphosphorylated tau, which is one of the most common pathological hallmarks of AD, has not been reported to date. Therefore, transgenic mice (3xTg) were used in the present study. 3xTg mice, which express an APP/PS1 mutation combined with a tau (P301L) mutation and that develop cognitive deficits at 6 months of age, were subjected to ELF-MF (50Hz, 500μT) exposure or sham exposure daily for 3 months. We discovered that ELF-MF exposure ameliorated cognitive deficits and increased synaptic proteins in 3xTg mice. The protective effects of ELF-MF exposure may have also been caused by the inhibition of apoptosis and/or decreased oxidative stress levels that were observed in the hippocampus tissues of treated mice. Furthermore, tau hyperphosphorylation was decreased in vivo because of ELF-MF exposure, and this decrease was induced by the inhibition of GSK3β and CDK5 activities and activation of PP2Ac. We are the first to report that exposure to ELF-MF can attenuate tau phosphorylation. These findings suggest that ELF-MF exposure could act as a valid therapeutic strategy for ameliorating cognitive deficits and attenuating tau hyperphosphorylation in AD.

  8. Exercise Does Not Protect against Peripheral and Central Effects of a High Cholesterol Diet Given Ad libitum in Old ApoE−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Di Cataldo, Vanessa; Géloën, Alain; Langlois, Jean-Baptiste; Chauveau, Fabien; Thézé, Benoît; Hubert, Violaine; Wiart, Marlène; Chirico, Erica N.; Rieusset, Jennifer; Vidal, Hubert; Pialoux, Vincent; Canet-Soulas, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Advanced atherosclerosis increases inflammation and stroke risk in the cerebral vasculature. Exercise is known to improve cardio-metabolic profiles when associated with a caloric restriction, but it remains debated whether it is still beneficial without the dietary control. The aim of this study was to determine both the peripheral and central effects of exercise training combined with a cholesterol-rich diet given ad libitum in old ApoE−/− mice. Methods: Forty-five-weeks old obese ApoE−/− mice fed with a high cholesterol diet ad libitum were divided into Exercise-trained (EX; running wheel free access) and Sedentary (SED) groups. Insulin tolerance and brain imaging were performed before and after the twelve-weeks training. Tissue insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and inflammation markers in plasma, aorta, and brain were then assessed. Results: In EX ApoE−/− mice, no beneficial effect of exercise was observed on weight, abdominal fat, metabolic parameters, oxidative stress, or inflammation compared to SED. Despite the regular exercise training in ApoE−/− EX mice (mean of 12.5 km/week during 12 weeks), brain inflammation imaging score was significantly associated with increased blood brain barrier (BBB) leakage evaluated by imaging follow-up (r2 = 0.87; p = 0.049) with a faster evolution compared to SED ApoE−/−mice. Conclusion: We conclude that in a context of high cardio-metabolic risk, exercise does not provide any protective effect in old ApoE−/− animals under high cholesterol diet given ad libitum. Peripheral (insulin sensitivity and oxidative/inflammatory status) but also central features (BBB preservation and protection against inflammation) did not show any benefits of exercise. Indeed, there was a fast induction of irreversible brain damage that was more pronounced in exercise-trained ApoE−/− mice. PMID:27766082

  9. The Politics and Statistics of Value-Added Modeling for Accountability of Teacher Preparation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincove, Jane Arnold; Osborne, Cynthia; Dillon, Amanda; Mills, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Despite questions about validity and reliability, the use of value-added estimation methods has moved beyond academic research into state accountability systems for teachers, schools, and teacher preparation programs (TPPs). Prior studies of value-added measurement for TPPs test the validity of researcher-designed models and find that measuring…

  10. Rethinking Teacher Evaluation: A Conversation about Statistical Inferences and Value-Added Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callister Everson, Kimberlee; Feinauer, Erika; Sudweeks, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide a methodological critique of the current standard of value-added modeling forwarded in educational policy contexts as a means of measuring teacher effectiveness. Conventional value-added estimates of teacher quality are attempts to determine to what degree a teacher would theoretically contribute, on average,…

  11. Adding Missing-Data-Relevant Variables to FIML-Based Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, John W.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional wisdom in missing data research dictates adding variables to the missing data model when those variables are predictive of (a) missingness and (b) the variables containing missingness. However, it has recently been shown that adding variables that are correlated with variables containing missingness, whether or not they are related to…

  12. Bifurcation and Spike Adding Transition in Chay-Keizer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo; Liu, Shenquan; Liu, Xuanliang; Jiang, Xiaofang; Wang, Xiaohui

    Electrical bursting is an activity which is universal in excitable cells such as neurons and various endocrine cells, and it encodes rich physiological information. As burst delay identifies that the signal integration has reached the threshold at which it can generate an action potential, the number of spikes in a burst may have essential physiological implications, and the transition of bursting in excitable cells is associated with the bifurcation phenomenon closely. In this paper, we focus on the transition of the spike count per burst of the pancreatic β-cells within a mathematical model and bifurcation phenomenon in the Chay-Keizer model, which is utilized to simulate the pancreatic β-cells. By the fast-slow dynamical bifurcation analysis and the bi-parameter bifurcation analysis, the local dynamics of the Chay-Keizer system around the Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation is illustrated. Then the variety of the number of spikes per burst is discussed by changing the settings of a single parameter and bi-parameter. Moreover, results on the number of spikes within a burst are summarized in ISIs (interspike intervals) sequence diagrams, maximum and minimum, and the number of spikes under bi-parameter value changes.

  13. Brain and Plasma Molecular Characterization of the Pathogenic TBI-AD Interrelationship in Mouse Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0253 TITLE: Brain and Plasma Molecular Characterization of the Pathogenic TBI-AD Interrelationship in Mouse Models ... brain and plasma responses in mouse models of TBI, AD and other neurodegenerative conditions (Abdullah et al., 2014; Abdullah et al., 2013; Crawford...identify age/time-dependent expression of brain proteins and lipids in mouse models of AD (PSAPP and hTau) and of mTBI (single and repetitive mTBI in hTau

  14. Battery Performance Modelling ad Simulation: a Neural Network Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottavianelli, Giuseppe; Donati, Alessandro

    2002-01-01

    This project has developed on the background of ongoing researches within the Control Technology Unit (TOS-OSC) of the Special Projects Division at the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) of the European Space Agency. The purpose of this research is to develop and validate an Artificial Neural Network tool (ANN) able to model, simulate and predict the Cluster II battery system's performance degradation. (Cluster II mission is made of four spacecraft flying in tetrahedral formation and aimed to observe and study the interaction between sun and earth by passing in and out of our planet's magnetic field). This prototype tool, named BAPER and developed with a commercial neural network toolbox, could be used to support short and medium term mission planning in order to improve and maximise the batteries lifetime, determining which are the future best charge/discharge cycles for the batteries given their present states, in view of a Cluster II mission extension. This study focuses on the five Silver-Cadmium batteries onboard of Tango, the fourth Cluster II satellite, but time restrains have allowed so far to perform an assessment only on the first battery. In their most basic form, ANNs are hyper-dimensional curve fits for non-linear data. With their remarkable ability to derive meaning from complicated or imprecise history data, ANN can be used to extract patterns and detect trends that are too complex to be noticed by either humans or other computer techniques. ANNs learn by example, and this is why they can be described as an inductive, or data-based models for the simulation of input/target mappings. A trained ANN can be thought of as an "expert" in the category of information it has been given to analyse, and this expert can then be used, as in this project, to provide projections given new situations of interest and answer "what if" questions. The most appropriate algorithm, in terms of training speed and memory storage requirements, is clearly the Levenberg

  15. Long-term Ameliorative Effects of the Antidepressant Fluoxetine Exposure on Cognitive Deficits in 3 × TgAD Mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Li; Gao, Li-Feng; Sun, Dong-Sheng; Wu, Hao; Wang, Qun; Ke, Dan; Lei, Hao; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2016-06-21

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is neuroprotective; therefore, it has been applied to treat some neurodegenerative disorders. For instance, chronic fluoxetine exposure has short-term effects on Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the long-term ameliorative effects of fluoxetine exposure on AD have not been reported. In the present study, 6-month-old 3 × TgAD mice were treated with fluoxetine for 15 days, and then the influence of fluoxetine was detected at 20 days after the drug withdrawal. We found that chronic fluoxetine treatment ameliorated cognitive deficits of 3 × TgAD mice and increased the volume of the hippocampal CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) with increased neuron number and dendritic spine density. Meanwhile, fluoxetine exposure also stimulated the long-term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampal DG. The synaptic-related protein expression increased via activation of the cyclic AMP response element binding (CREB) protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling pathway induced by fluoxetine exposure. Lastly, we found that fluoxetine treatment decreased beta-amyloid (Aβ) levels. These results further certified that fluoxetine may be a potent effective drug for AD.

  16. Chronic treatment with the GLP1 analogue liraglutide increases cell proliferation and differentiation into neurons in an AD mouse model.

    PubMed

    Parthsarathy, Vadivel; Hölscher, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenesis is a life long process, but the rate of cell proliferation and differentiation decreases with age. In Alzheimer's patients, along with age, the presence of Aβ in the brain inhibits this process by reducing stem cell proliferation and cell differentiation. GLP-1 is a growth factor that has neuroprotective properties. GLP1 receptors are present on neuronal progenitor cells, and the GLP-1 analogue liraglutide has been shown to increase cell proliferation in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model. Here we investigated acute and chronic effects of liraglutide on progenitor cell proliferation, neuroblast differentiation and their subsequent differentiation into neurons in wild type and APP/PS-1 mice at different ages. APP/PS1 and their littermate controls, aged 3, 6, 12, 15 months were injected acutely or chronically with 25 nmol/kg liraglutide. Acute treatment with liraglutide showed an increase in cell proliferation in APP/PS1 mice, but not in controls whereas chronic treatment increased cell proliferation at all ages (BrdU and Ki67 markers). Moreover, numbers of immature neurons (DCX) were increased in both acute and chronic treated animals at all ages. Most newly generated cells differentiated into mature neurons (NeuN marker). A significant increase was observed with chronically treated 6, 12, 15 month APP/PS1 and WT groups. These results demonstrate that liraglutide, which is currently on the market as a treatment for type 2 diabetes (Victoza(TM)), increases neurogenesis, which may have beneficial effects in neurodegenerative disorders like AD.

  17. Voice Communications over 802.11 Ad Hoc Networks: Modeling, Optimization and Call Admission Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Changchun; Xu, Yanyi; Liu, Gan; Liu, Kezhong

    Supporting quality-of-service (QoS) of multimedia communications over IEEE 802.11 based ad hoc networks is a challenging task. This paper develops a simple 3-D Markov chain model for queuing analysis of IEEE 802.11 MAC layer. The model is applied for performance analysis of voice communications over IEEE 802.11 single-hop ad hoc networks. By using the model, we finish the performance optimization of IEEE MAC layer and obtain the maximum number of voice calls in IEEE 802.11 ad hoc networks as well as the statistical performance bounds. Furthermore, we design a fully distributed call admission control (CAC) algorithm which can provide strict statistical QoS guarantee for voice communications over IEEE 802.11 ad hoc networks. Extensive simulations indicate the accuracy of the analytical model and the CAC scheme.

  18. L-type Ca2+ currents at CA1 synapses, but not CA3 or dentate granule neuron synapses, are increased in 3xTgAD mice in an age-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Mattson, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal neuronal excitability and impaired synaptic plasticity might occur before the degeneration and death of neurons in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To elucidate potential biophysical alterations underlying aberrant neuronal network activity in AD, we performed whole-cell patch clamp analyses of L-type (nifedipine-sensitive) Ca2+ currents (L-VGCC), 4–aminopyridine-sensitive K+ currents, and AMPA (2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid) and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) currents in CA1, CA3, and dentate granule neurons in hippocampal slices from young, middle-age, and old 3xTgAD mice and age-matched wild type mice. 3xTgAD mice develop progressive widespread accumulation of amyloid b-peptide, and selective hyperphosphorylated tau pathology in hippocampal CA1 neurons, which are associated with cognitive deficits, but independent of overt neuronal degeneration. An age-related elevation of L-type Ca2+ channel current density occurred in CA1 neurons in 3xTgAD mice, but not in wild type mice, with the magnitude being significantly greater in older 3xTgAD mice. The NMDA current was also significantly elevated in CA1 neurons of old 3xTgAD mice compared with in old wild type mice. There were no differences in the amplitude of K+ or AMPA currents in CA1 neurons of 3xTgAD mice compared with wild type mice at any age. There were no significant differences in Ca2+, K+, AMPA, or NMDA currents in CA3 and dentate neurons from 3xTgAD mice compared with wild type mice at any age. Our results reveal an age-related increase of L-VGCC density in CA1 neurons, but not in CA3 or dentate granule neurons, of 3xTgAD mice. These findings suggest a potential contribution of altered L-VGCC to the selective vulnerability of CA1 neurons to tau pathology in the 3xTgAD mice and to their degeneration in AD patients. PMID:23932880

  19. Reduced Uterine Perfusion Pressure (RUPP) Model of Preeclampsia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fushima, Tomofumi; Sekimoto, Akiyo; Minato, Takahiro; Ito, Takuya; Oe, Yuji; Kisu, Kiyomi; Sato, Emiko; Funamoto, Kenichi; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Ito, Sadayoshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-induced hypertension with proteinuria that typically develops after 20 weeks of gestation. A reduction in uterine blood flow causes placental ischemia and placental release of anti-angiogenic factors such as sFlt-1 followed by PE. Although the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) model is widely used in rats, investigating the role of genes on PE using genetically engineered animals has been problematic because it has been difficult to make a useful RUPP model in mice. To establish a RUPP model of PE in mice, we bilaterally ligated ovarian vessels distal to ovarian branches, uterine vessels, or both in ICR-strain mice at 14.5 days post coitum (dpc). Consequently, these mice had elevated BP, increased urinary albumin excretion, severe endotheliosis, and mesangial expansion. They also had an increased incidence of miscarriage and premature delivery. Embryonic weight at 18.5 dpc was significantly lower than that in sham mice. The closer to the ligation site the embryos were, the higher the resorption rate and the lower the embryonic weight. The phenotype was more severe in the order of ligation at the ovarian vessels < uterine vessels < both. Unlike the RUPP models described in the literature, this model did not constrict the abdominal aorta, which allowed BP to be measured with a tail cuff. This novel RUPP model in mice should be useful for investigating the pathogenesis of PE in genetically engineered mice and for evaluating new therapies for PE. PMID:27187738

  20. NSG Mice Provide a Better Spontaneous Model of Breast Cancer Metastasis than Athymic (Nude) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Puchalapalli, Madhavi; Zeng, Xianke; Mu, Liang; Anderson, Aubree; Hix Glickman, Laura; Zhang, Ming; Sayyad, Megan R.; Mosticone Wangensteen, Sierra; Clevenger, Charles V.; Koblinski, Jennifer E.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the most common cause of mortality in breast cancer patients worldwide. To identify improved mouse models for breast cancer growth and spontaneous metastasis, we examined growth and metastasis of both estrogen receptor positive (T47D) and negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM1315, and CN34BrM) human breast cancer cells in nude and NSG mice. Both primary tumor growth and spontaneous metastases were increased in NSG mice compared to nude mice. In addition, a pattern of metastasis similar to that observed in human breast cancer patients (metastases to the lungs, liver, bones, brain, and lymph nodes) was found in NSG mice. Furthermore, there was an increase in the metastatic burden in NSG compared to nude mice that were injected with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in an intracardiac experimental metastasis model. This data demonstrates that NSG mice provide a better model for studying human breast cancer metastasis compared to the current nude mouse model. PMID:27662655

  1. The Protective Effect of Icariin on Mitochondrial Transport and Distribution in Primary Hippocampal Neurons from 3× Tg-AD Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yijing; Han, Shuangxue; Huang, Xiuxian; Ni, Jiazuan; He, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-27

    Icariin, a pharmacologically active component isolated from the Chinese herb Epimedium, has been shown to improve spatial learning and memory abilities in Alzheimer's disease (AD) rats through inhibition of Aβ production and tau protein hyperphosphorylation. However, the potential mechanism of icariin-induced protective effects against mitochondrial dysfunctions in AD still remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effect of icariin on the modulation of mitochondrial transport and distribution in primary hippocampal cultures from triple-transgenic (3× Tg) AD mice. The results showed that icariin enhanced mitochondrial motility and increased mitochondrial index and mitochondrial length and size in the diseased neurons. Additionally, the expression of the key mitochondrial enzyme, pyruvate dehydrogenase-E1α (PDHE1α), and the post synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), was preserved in AD neurons after icariin treatment, accompanied by a downregulation of Aβ and phosphorylated tau expression in the corresponding areas. Further study showed that icariin treatment resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and an increase in fusion protein Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2). These data indicate that icariin can promote mitochondrial transport, protect mitochondria against fragmentation and preserve the expression of mitochondrial and synaptic functional proteins in AD neurons. Thus, icariin may be a potential therapeutic complement for AD and other mitochondrial malfunction-related neuronal degenerative diseases.

  2. Reduction of the immunostainable length of the hippocampal dentate granule cells' primary cilia in 3xAD-transgenic mice producing human A{beta}{sub 1-42} and tau

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Balu; Gaudet, Chantal; Menard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Atkinson, Trevor; LaFerla, Frank M.; Ito, Shingo; Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Pra, Ilaria; Whitfield, James

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} and tau-induced neurofibrillary tangles play a key role in Alzheimer's disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}{sub 1-42} and mutant tau protein together reduce the primary cilium length. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This shortening likely reduces cilium-dependent neurogenesis and memory function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This provides a model of an A{beta}/tau targeting of a neuronal signaling organelle. -- Abstract: The hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of the two sites of continuous neurogenesis in adult rodents and humans. Virtually all dentate granule cells have a single immobile cilium with a microtubule spine or axoneme covered with a specialized cell membrane loaded with receptors such as the somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}). The signals from these receptors have been reported to stimulate neuroprogenitor proliferation and the post-mitotic maturation of newborn granule cells into functioning granule cells. We have found that in 6-24-months-old triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice (3xTg-AD) producing both A{beta}{sub 1-42} and the mutant human tau protein tau{sub P301L,} the dentate granule cells still had immunostainable SSTR3- and p75{sup NTR}-bearing cilia but they were only half the length of the immunostained cilia in the corresponding wild-type mice. However, the immunostainable length of the granule cell cilia was not reduced either in 2xTg-AD mice accumulating large amounts of A{beta}{sub 1-42} or in mice accumulating only a mutant human tau protein. Thus it appears that a combination of A{beta}{sub 1-42} and tau protein accumulation affects the levels of functionally important receptors in 3xTg-AD mice. These observations raise the important possibility that structural and functional changes in granule cell cilia might have a role in AD.

  3. Rosuvastatin reduces microglia in the brain of wild type and ApoE knockout mice on a high cholesterol diet; implications for prevention of stroke and AD.

    PubMed

    Famer, D; Wahlund, L-O; Crisby, M

    2010-11-12

    We have previously shown that a high cholesterol (HC) diet results in increases in microglia load and levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the brains of wild type (WT) and apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. In the present investigation, we analyzed whether treatment with rosuvastatin, an inhibitor of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, would prevent the increases in inflammatory microglia and IL-6 levels in the brain and plasma of WT and ApoE-/- mice. We report that a HC diet resulted in an increased microglia load in the brains of WT and ApoE-/- mice, in support of our previous study. Treatment with rosuvastatin significantly decreased the microglia load in the brains of WT and ApoE-/- mice on a HC diet. Rosuvastatin treatment resulted in lowered plasma IL-6 levels in WT mice on a HC diet. However, in the present study the number of IL-6 positive cells in the brain was not significantly affected by a HC diet. A recent clinical study has shown that rosuvastatin reduces risk of ischemic stroke in patients with high plasma levels of the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein by 50%. The results from our study show that rosuvastatin reduces inflammatory cells in the brain. This finding is essential for furthering the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and stroke.

  4. Leptonic color models from Z{sub 8} orbifolded AdS/CFT

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, K. S.; Kephart, Thomas W.; Paes, Heinrich

    2008-06-01

    We study orbifold compactifications of the type IIB superstring on AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the Abelian group Z{sub 8}, which can lead to non-supersymmetric three and four family models based on quartification. In particular, we focus on two models, one fully quartified model and one a model with two trinification families and one quartification family, which reduces to the standard model with a minimal leptonic color sector.

  5. Administration of bovine casein-derived peptide prevents cognitive decline in Alzheimer disease model mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsukuda, Kana; Yamada, Akio; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki; Iwanami, Jun; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in identifying natural food ingredients that may serve to prevent dementia such as that due to Alzheimer disease (AD). Peptides derived from food proteins have been demonstrated to have various physiological activities such as a hypotensive action. Recent findings have indicated possible associations of hypertension with AD progression, and suggest that angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors with potential to pass through the blood brain barrier (BBB) may reduce the risk of AD. In this study, we investigated the effect of milk peptide (CH-3) on cognitive function in AD model mice. CH-3 contains a tripeptide (methionine-lysine-proline, MKP) that has been found to have a strong ACE inhibitory effect and the potential to pass through the BBB. Adult male ddY mice were used in this study, and an animal model of AD was induced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of Aβ1–42. CH-3 (250 mg/kg/day) or MKP (0.5 mg/kg/day) was orally administered every day starting 2 days before ICV injection. At 3 weeks after ICV injection, cognitive function was evaluated by the Morris water maze test. Brain samples were obtained after behavioral testing, and expression of inflammatory cytokines and NADPH oxidase subunits was measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. ICV injection of Aβ1–42 significantly impaired cognitive function compared with that in PBS-injected mice. Daily administration of CH-3 markedly attenuated this Aβ1-42-induced cognitive decline. Aβ1–42 injection significantly enhanced the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and p22phox in the mouse hippocampus compared with PBS injection, and showed a tendency to increase the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), p47phox and gp91phox, whereas CH-3 treatment markedly reduced Aβ1-42-induced TNF-α, MCP-1, iNOS, p47phox and gp91phox expression. Finally, administration of MKP also attenuated Aβ1-42-induced

  6. [Establishment of endometriosis subcutaneous model in immunodeficient nude mice].

    PubMed

    Ni, H J; Zhang, Z; Dai, Y D; Zhang, S Y

    2016-09-06

    Objective: To establish a model of endometriosis in immunodeficient nude mice and compare the outcome of the model construction between two different techniques. Methods: Eighteen nude mice were divided into 2 groups, with 9 mice in each group. All nude mice received a subcutaneous transplantation of endometrial fragments, followed by sutured the wounded skin (sutured group) or not (no-sutured group). Then the success rate of the model construction, inflammation of the wounds and the animal survival rate in the two groups were analyzed. Result: In no-sutured group, the survival rate of animal and the success rate of the model construction were 9/9 and 8/9 respectively, with 8/9 survival rate and 7/9 success rate in sutured group. No significant difference was found between the two groups. And no obvious inflammation was presented in the wounds for both groups. Conclusion: It is an effective method to establish animal model of endometriosis by subcutaneous transplantation in nude mice. After transplantation, it does not affect the outcome of the survival rate of the animal and the success rate of the model construction whether we suture the wounded skin. Considering the shorter operation time, we found it's a simpler and time saving method to establish endometriosis by subcutaneously transplanting endometrial fragments in nude mice with no skin-sutured. And this model is worth of promotion.

  7. [Development of a hepatitis B virus carrier transgenic mice model].

    PubMed

    Caner, Müge; Arat, Sezen; Bircan, Rifat

    2008-01-01

    The studies for the development of transgenic mice models which provide important profits for the studies concerning immunopathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are in progress since 20 years. For this purpose different lineages bearing whole HBV genome or selected viral genes have been developed and their usage in clarifying the HBV replication and pathogenesis mechanisms have been emphasized. The aim of this study was to develop and breed a HBV carrier mice model. In the study the full HBV genome has been transferred to mouse embryos by microinjection procedure. Following transgenic manipulation, the HBV carriers among the daughter mice have been detected by molecular methods in which HBV-DNA replication and expression have been shown. The manipulations for transgene transfers have been performed in TUBITAK Marmara Research Center Transgene Laboratory, Gebze, Istanbul. The HBV-DNA carrier mice have been demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the DNA samples obtained from tail tissues and also by dot-blot hybridization of the mice sera. Integrated HBV-DNA has been detected by applying in-situ hybridization to the liver tissue sections. HBV-DNA expression has been shown by reverse transcriptase PCR method with total RNA molecules that have been isolated from the liver tissues of the HBV-DNA carrier mice. HBsAg has been detected in the liver by immunohistochemical method, and HBsAg and HBeAg have additionally been demonstrated by ELISA. HBV genome, expression of the genome and the expression products have been determined in approximately 10% of the mice of which HBV-DNA have been transferred. By inbreeding heterozygote carrier mice, homozygote HBV transgenic mice line have been obtained. These HBV transgenic mice are the first lineages developed in our country. It is hopefully thought that this HBV carrier transgenic mouse model may contribute to the studies on the pathogenesis of HBV infections which are important health problems in the

  8. Ocular Changes in TgF344-AD Rat Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yuchun; Lu, Bin; Ljubimov, Alexander V.; Girman, Sergey; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Svendsen, Clive N.; Cohen, Robert M.; Wang, Shaomei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive decline in learning, memory, and executive functions. In addition to cognitive and behavioral deficits, vision disturbances have been reported in early stage of AD, well before the diagnosis is clearly established. To further investigate ocular abnormalities, a novel AD transgenic rat model was analyzed. Methods. Transgenic (Tg) rats (TgF344-AD) heterozygous for human mutant APPswe/PS1ΔE9 and age-matched wild type (WT) rats, as well as 20 human postmortem retinal samples from both AD and healthy donors were used. Visual function in the rodent was analyzed using the optokinetic response. Immunohistochemistry on retinal and brain sections was used to detect various markers including amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques. Results. As expected, Aβ plaques were detected in the hippocampus, cortex, and retina of Tg rats. Plaque-like structures were also found in two AD human whole-mount retinas. The choroidal thickness was significantly reduced in both Tg rat and in AD human eyes when compared with age-matched controls. Tg rat eyes also showed hypertrophic retinal pigment epithelial cells, inflammatory cells, and upregulation of complement factor C3. Although visual acuity was lower in Tg than in WT rats, there was no significant difference in the retinal ganglion cell number and retinal vasculature. Conclusions. Further studies are needed to elucidate the significance and mechanisms of this pathological change and luminance threshold recording from the superior colliculus. PMID:24398104

  9. The Promise and Peril of Using Value-Added Modeling to Measure Teacher Effectiveness. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RAND Corporation, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Value-added modeling offers the possibility of estimating the effects of teachers and schools on student performance, a potentially important contribution in the current environment of concern for accountability in education. These techniques, however, are susceptible to a number of sources of bias, depending on decisions about how the modeling is…

  10. Giving a Structural Framework for Ohio's Value-Added Model: What All Educators Should Know?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quattrochi, David P.; Chapman, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    A qualitative case study of one rural elementary school in Ohio examined how faculty, administrators, students, and parents experienced Ohio's Value-added model. The findings generated from looking at planning and professional development to implementation of the model generated a close- up of a successful approach to helping teachers use multiple…

  11. Value-Added Models for Teacher Preparation Programs: Validity and Reliability Threats, and a Manageable Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Michael P.; Heiser, Lawrence A.; McCormick, Jazarae K.; Forgan, James

    2016-01-01

    High-stakes standardized student assessments are increasingly used in value-added evaluation models to connect teacher performance to P-12 student learning. These assessments are also being used to evaluate teacher preparation programs, despite validity and reliability threats. A more rational model linking student performance to candidates who…

  12. Differential immunogenicity between HAdV-5 and chimpanzee adenovirus vector ChAdOx1 is independent of fiber and penton RGD loop sequences in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dicks, Matthew D. J.; Spencer, Alexandra J.; Coughlan, Lynda; Bauza, Karolis; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Cottingham, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Replication defective adenoviruses are promising vectors for the delivery of vaccine antigens. However, the potential of a vector to elicit transgene-specific adaptive immune responses is largely dependent on the viral serotype used. HAdV-5 (Human adenovirus C) vectors are more immunogenic than chimpanzee adenovirus vectors from species Human adenovirus E (ChAdOx1 and AdC68) in mice, though the mechanisms responsible for these differences in immunogenicity remain poorly understood. In this study, superior immunogenicity was associated with markedly higher levels of transgene expression in vivo, particularly within draining lymph nodes. To investigate the viral factors contributing to these phenotypes, we generated recombinant ChAdOx1 vectors by exchanging components of the viral capsid reported to be principally involved in cell entry with the corresponding sequences from HAdV-5. Remarkably, pseudotyping with the HAdV-5 fiber and/or penton RGD loop had little to no effect on in vivo transgene expression or transgene-specific adaptive immune responses despite considerable species-specific sequence heterogeneity in these components. Our results suggest that mechanisms governing vector transduction after intramuscular administration in mice may be different from those described in vitro. PMID:26576856

  13. A novel recombinant 6Aβ15-THc-C chimeric vaccine (rCV02) mitigates Alzheimer’s disease-like pathology, cognitive decline and synaptic loss in aged 3 × Tg-AD mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Liu, Si; Wang, Hai-Chao; Shi, Dan-Yang; Xu, Qing; Zhou, Xiao-Wei; Sun, Zhi-Wei; Huang, Pei-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that impairs memory and cognition. Targeting amyloid-β (Aβ) may be currently the most promising immunotherapeutic strategy for AD. In this study, a recombinant chimeric 6Aβ15-THc-C immunogen was formulated with alum adjuvant as a novel Aβ B-cell epitope candidate vaccine (rCV02) for AD. We examined its efficacy in preventing the cognitive deficit and synaptic impairment in 3 × Tg-AD mice. Using a toxin-derived carrier protein, the rCV02 vaccine elicited robust Aβ-specific antibodies that markedly reduced AD-like pathology and improved behavioral performance in 3 × Tg-AD mice. Along with the behavioral improvement in aged 3 × Tg-AD mice, rCV02 significantly decreased calpain activation concurrent with reduced soluble Aβ or oligomeric forms of Aβ, probably by preventing dynamin 1 and PSD-95 degradation. Our data support the hypothesis that reducing Aβ levels in rCV02-immunized AD mice increases the levels of presynaptic dynamin 1 and postsynaptic PSD-95 allowing functional recovery of cognition. In conclusion, this novel and highly immunogenic rCV02 shows promise as a new candidate prophylactic vaccine for AD and may be useful for generating rapid and strong Aβ-specific antibodies in AD patients with pre-existing memory Th cells generated after immunization with conventional tetanus toxoid vaccine. PMID:27255752

  14. Effects of a dietary ketone ester on hippocampal glycolytic and TCA cycle intermediates and amino acids in a 3xTgAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pawlosky, Robert J; Kemper, Martin F; Kashiwaya, Yoshihero; King, M Todd; Mattson, Mark P; Veech, Richard L

    2017-01-18

    In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in a triple transgenic (3xTgAD) mouse model of AD low glucose metabolism in the brain precedes loss of memory and cognitive decline. The metabolism of ketones in the brain by-passes glycolysis and therefore may correct several deficiencies that are associated with glucose hypometabolism. A dietary supplement composed of an ester of D-β-hydroxybutyrate and R-1,3 butane diol referred to as ketone ester (KE) was incorporated into a rodent diet and fed to 3xTgAD mice for 8 months. At 16.5 months of age animals were euthanized and brains dissected. Analyses were carried out on the hippocampus and frontal cortex for glycolytic and TCA (Tricarboxylic Acid) cycle intermediates, amino acids, oxidized lipids and proteins, and enzymes. There were higher concentrations of D-β-hydroxybutyrate in the hippocampus of KE-fed mice where there were also higher concentrations of TCA cycle and glycolytic intermediates and the energy-linked biomarker, n-acetyl aspartate compared to controls. In the hippocampi of control-fed animals the free mitochondrial [NAD(+) ]/[NADH] ratio were highly oxidized, whereas, in KE-fed animals the mitochondria were reduced. Also, the levels of oxidized protein and lipids were lower and the energy of ATP hydrolysis was greater compared to controls. 3xTgAD mice maintained on a KE-supplemented diet had higher concentrations of glycolytic and TCA cycle metabolites, a more reduced mitochondrial redox potential, and lower amounts of oxidized lipids and proteins in their hippocampi compared to controls. The KE offers a potential therapy to counter fundamental metabolic deficits common to patients and transgenic models. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. A model-driven approach to qualitatively assessing the added value of community coalitions.

    PubMed

    Herman, Elizabeth Jane; Keller, Adrienne; Davis, Adam; Ehrensberger, Ryan; Telleen, Sharon; Kurz, Richard; Nesvold, Jill Heins; Findley, Sally; Bryant-Stephens, Tyra; Benson, Mindy; Fierro, Leslie

    2011-02-01

    Community-based coalitions are commonly formed to plan and to carry out public health interventions. The literature includes evaluations of coalition structure, composition, and functioning; evaluations of community-level changes achieved through coalition activities; and the association between coalition characteristics and various indicators of success. Little information is available on the comparative advantage or "added value" of conducting public health interventions through coalitions as opposed to less structured collaborative mechanisms. This paper describes a qualitative, iterative process carried out with site representatives of the Controlling Asthma in American Cities Project (CAACP) to identify outcomes directly attributable to coalitions. The process yielded 2 complementary sets of results. The first were criteria that articulated and limited the concept of "added value of coalitions". The criteria included consensus definitions, an organizing figure, a logic model, and inclusion/exclusion criteria. The second set of results identified site-specific activities that met the definitional criteria and were, by agreement, examples of CAACP coalitions' added value. Beyond the specific findings relevant to the added value of coalitions in this project, the use of a social ecological model to identify the components of added value and the placement of those components within a logic model specific to coalitions should provide useful tools for those planning and assessing coalition-based projects.

  16. Generation of gene-targeted mice using embryonic stem cells derived from a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Ooshima, Yuki; Nakata, Mitsugu; Yano, Takashi; Matsuoka, Kunio; Watanabe, Sayuri; Maeda, Ryouta; Takahashi, Hideki; Takeyama, Michiyasu; Matsumoto, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Tadatoshi

    2013-06-01

    Gene-targeting technology using mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells has become the "gold standard" for analyzing gene functions and producing disease models. Recently, genetically modified mice with multiple mutations have increasingly been produced to study the interaction between proteins and polygenic diseases. However, introduction of an additional mutation into mice already harboring several mutations by conventional natural crossbreeding is an extremely time- and labor-intensive process. Moreover, to do so in mice with a complex genetic background, several years may be required if the genetic background is to be retained. Establishing ES cells from multiple-mutant mice, or disease-model mice with a complex genetic background, would offer a possible solution. Here, we report the establishment and characterization of novel ES cell lines from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (3xTg-AD mouse, Oddo et al. in Neuron 39:409-421, 2003) harboring 3 mutated genes (APPswe, TauP301L, and PS1M146V) and a complex genetic background. Thirty blastocysts were cultured and 15 stable ES cell lines (male: 11; female: 4) obtained. By injecting these ES cells into diploid or tetraploid blastocysts, we generated germline-competent chimeras. Subsequently, we confirmed that F1 mice derived from these animals showed similar biochemical and behavioral characteristics to the original 3xTg-AD mice. Furthermore, we introduced a gene-targeting vector into the ES cells and successfully obtained gene-targeted ES cells, which were then used to generate knockout mice for the targeted gene. These results suggest that the present methodology is effective for introducing an additional mutation into mice already harboring multiple mutated genes and/or a complex genetic background.

  17. Lamellipodin-Deficient Mice: A Model of Rectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cassandra L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Shen, Zeli; Drees, Frauke; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Chen, Xiaowei; Gong, Guanyu; Nagar, Karan K.; Wang, Timothy C.; Gertler, Frank B.; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    During a survey of clinical rectal prolapse (RP) cases in the mouse population at MIT animal research facilities, a high incidence of RP in the lamellipodin knock-out strain, C57BL/6-Raph1tm1Fbg (Lpd-/-) was documented. Upon further investigation, the Lpd-/- colony was found to be infected with multiple endemic enterohepatic Helicobacter species (EHS). Lpd-/- mice, a transgenic mouse strain produced at MIT, have not previously shown a distinct immune phenotype and are not highly susceptible to other opportunistic infections. Predominantly male Lpd-/- mice with RP exhibited lesions consistent with invasive rectal carcinoma concomitant to clinically evident RP. Multiple inflammatory cytokines, CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) populations, and epithelial cells positive for a DNA damage biomarker, H2AX, were elevated in affected tissue, supporting their role in the neoplastic process. An evaluation of Lpd-/- mice with RP compared to EHS-infected, but clinically normal (CN) Lpd-/- animals indicated that all of these mice exhibit some degree of lower bowel inflammation; however, mice with prolapses had significantly higher degree of focal lesions at the colo-rectal junction. When Helicobacter spp. infections were eliminated in Lpd-/- mice by embryo transfer rederivation, the disease phenotype was abrogated, implicating EHS as a contributing factor in the development of rectal carcinoma. Here we describe lesions in Lpd-/- male mice consistent with a focal inflammation-induced neoplastic transformation and propose this strain as a mouse model of rectal carcinoma. PMID:27045955

  18. Loss of deep cerebellar nuclei neurons in the 3xTg-AD mice and protection by an anti-amyloid β antibody fragment

    PubMed Central

    Esquerda-Canals, Gisela; Marti, Joaquim; Rivera-Hernández, Geovanny; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Villegas, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of scFv-h3D6 has recently been shown in the 3xTg-AD mice. A clear effect on amyloid β (Aβ) oligomers and certain apolipoproteins in the brain was found, but no effect was seen in the cerebellum. Here, cellular vulnerability of the 3xTg-AD cerebellum is described for the first time, together with its protection by scFv-h3D6. Neuron depletion in the DCN was regionally variable and followed a mediolateral axis of involvement that was greatest in the fastigial nucleus, lesser in the interpositus and negligible in the dentate nucleus. A sole and low intraperitoneal dose of scFv-h3D6 protected 3xTg-AD DCN neurons from death. Further studies might provide interesting information about both the potential of scFv-h3D6 as a therapeutic agent and the role of the cerebellum in AD. PMID:23884149

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Preserve Working Memory in the 3xTg-AD Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Jiri; Kulijewicz-Nawrot, Magdalena; Rodrigez-Arellano, Jose Julio; Jendelova, Pavla; Sykova, Eva

    2016-01-25

    The transplantation of stem cells may have a therapeutic effect on the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study, we transplanted human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into the lateral ventricle of a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (3xTg-AD) at the age of eight months. We evaluated spatial reference and working memory after MSC treatment and the possible underlying mechanisms, such as the influence of transplanted MSCs on neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the expression levels of a 56 kDa oligomer of amyloid β (Aβ*56), glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate transporters (Glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) and Glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1)) in the entorhinal and prefrontal cortices and the hippocampus. At 14 months of age we observed the preservation of working memory in MSC-treated 3xTg-AD mice, suggesting that such preservation might be due to the protective effect of MSCs on GS levels and the considerable downregulation of Aβ*56 levels in the entorhinal cortex. These changes were observed six months after transplantation, accompanied by clusters of proliferating cells in the SVZ. Since the grafted cells did not survive for the whole experimental period, it is likely that the observed effects could have been transiently more pronounced at earlier time points than at six months after cell application.

  20. Deficits in odor-guided behaviors in the transgenic 3xTg-AD female mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Coronas-Sámano, G; Portillo, W; Beltrán Campos, V; Medina-Aguirre, G I; Paredes, R G; Diaz-Cintra, S

    2014-07-14

    Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) is characterized by a number of alterations including those in cognition and olfaction. An early symptom of AD is decreased olfactory ability, which may affect odor-guided behaviors. To test this possibility we evaluated alterations in sexual incentive motivation, sexual olfactory preference, sexual olfactory discrimination, nursing-relevant olfactory preference and olfactory discrimination in female mice. We tested 3xTg-AD (a triple transgenic model, which is a "knock in" of PS1M146V, APPSwe, and tauP300L) and wild type (WT) female mice when receptive (estrous) and non-receptive (anestrous). Subjects were divided into three groups of different ages: (1) 4-5 months, (2) 10-11 months, and (3) 16-18 months. In the sexual incentive motivation task, the receptive 3xTg-AD females showed no preference for a sexually active male at any age studied, in contrast to the WT females. In the sexual olfactory preference test, the receptive WT females were able to identify sexually active male secretions at all ages, but the oldest (16-18 months old) 3xTg-AD females could not. In addition, the oldest 3xTg-AD females showed no preference for nursing-relevant odors in dam secretions and were unable to discriminate between cinnamon and strawberry odors, indicating olfactory alterations. Thus, the present study suggests that the olfactory deficits in this mouse model are associated with changes in sexual incentive motivation and discrimination of food-related odors.

  1. Value-Added Model (VAM) Research for Educational Policy: Framing the Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrein-Beardsley, Audrey; Collins, Clarin; Polasky, Sarah A.; Sloat, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    In this manuscript, the guest editors of the EPAA Special Issue on "Value-Added Model (VAM) Research for Educational Policy" (1) introduce the background and policy context surrounding the increased use of VAMs for teacher evaluation and accountability purposes across the United States; (2) summarize the five research papers and one…

  2. Elementary School Data Issues for Value-Added Models: Implications for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenberg, Eric; Teh, Bing-ru; Walsh, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Researchers often presume that it is better to use administrative data from grades 4 and 5 than data from grades 6 through 8 for conducting research on teacher effectiveness that uses value-added models because (1) elementary school teachers teach all subjects to their students in self-contained classrooms and (2) classrooms are more homogenous at…

  3. Accounting for Co-Teaching: A Guide for Policymakers and Developers of Value-Added Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenberg, Eric; Walsh, Elias

    2015-01-01

    We outline the options available to policymakers for addressing co-teaching in a value-added model. Building on earlier work, we propose an improvement to a method of accounting for co-teaching that treats co-teachers as teams, with each teacher receiving equal credit for co-taught students. Hock and Isenberg (2012) described a method known as the…

  4. The Sensitivity of Value-Added Modeling to the Creation of a Vertical Score Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Weeks, Jonathan P.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of growth and value-added modeling to the way an underlying vertical score scale has been created. Longitudinal item-level data were analyzed with both student- and school-level identifiers for the entire state of Colorado between 2003 and 2006. Eight different vertical scales were…

  5. Methods for Accounting for Co-Teaching in Value-Added Models. Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hock, Heinrich; Isenberg, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Isolating the effect of a given teacher on student achievement (value-added modeling) is complicated when the student is taught the same subject by more than one teacher. We consider three methods, which we call the Partial Credit Method, Teacher Team Method, and Full Roster Method, for estimating teacher effects in the presence of co-teaching.…

  6. What Are Error Rates for Classifying Teacher and School Performance Using Value-Added Models?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.; Chiang, Hanley S.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses likely error rates for measuring teacher and school performance in the upper elementary grades using value-added models applied to student test score gain data. Using a realistic performance measurement system scheme based on hypothesis testing, the authors develop error rate formulas based on ordinary least squares and…

  7. Oral TNFα Modulation Alters Neutrophil Infiltration, Improves Cognition and Diminishes Tau and Amyloid Pathology in the 3xTgAD Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Gabbita, S. Prasad; Johnson, Ming F.; Kobritz, Naomi; Eslami, Pirooz; Poteshkina, Aleksandra; Varadarajan, Sridhar; Turman, John; Zemlan, Frank; Harris-White, Marni E.

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines such as TNFα can polarize microglia/macrophages into different neuroinflammatory types. Skewing of the phenotype towards a cytotoxic state is thought to impair phagocytosis and has been described in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Neuroinflammation can be perpetuated by a cycle of increasing cytokine production and maintenance of a polarized activation state that contributes to AD progression. In this study, 3xTgAD mice, age 6 months, were treated orally with 3 doses of the TNFα modulating compound isoindolin-1,3 dithione (IDT) for 10 months. We demonstrate that IDT is a TNFα modulating compound both in vitro and in vivo. Following long-term IDT administration, mice were assessed for learning & memory and tissue and serum were collected for analysis. Results demonstrate that IDT is safe for long-term treatment and significantly improves learning and memory in the 3xTgAD mouse model. IDT significantly reduced paired helical filament tau and fibrillar amyloid accumulation. Flow cytometry of brain cell populations revealed that IDT increased the infiltrating neutrophil population while reducing TNFα expression in this population. IDT is a safe and effective TNFα and innate immune system modulator. Thus small molecule, orally bioavailable modulators are promising therapeutics for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26436670

  8. [Genetically engineered mice: mouse models for cancer research].

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Hanna

    2007-10-26

    Genetically engineered mice (GEM) have been extensively used to model human cancer. Mouse models mimic the morphology, histopathology, phenotype, and genotype of the corresponding cancer in humans. GEM mice are created by random integration of a transgene into the genome, which results in gene overexpression (transgenic mice); gene deletion (knock-out mice); or targeted insertion of the transgene in a selected locus (knock-in mice). Knock-out may be constitutive, i.e. total inactivation of the gene of interest in any cell, or conditional, i.e. tissue-specific inactivation of the gene. Gene knock-down (RNAi) and humanization of the mouse are more sophisticated models of GEM mice. RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism in which double-stranded RNAs inhibits the respective gene expression by inducing degradation of its mRNA. Humanization is based on replacing a mouse gene by its human counterpart. The alterations in genes in GEM have to be heritable. The opportunities provided by employing GEM cancer models are: analysis of the role of specific cancer genes and modifier genes, evaluation of conventional cancer therapies and new drugs, identification of cancer markers of tumor growth, analysis of the influence of the tumor's microenvironment on tumor formation, and the definition of the pre-clinical, discrete steps of tumorigenesis. The validation of mouse models of human cancer is the task of the MMHCC (Mouse Models of Human Cancer Consortium). The GEM models of breast, pancreatic, intestinal and colon, and prostate cancer are the most actively explored. In contrast, the models of brain tumors and ovary, cervical, and skin cancer are in the early stage of investigation.

  9. Adding thermal and granularity effects to the effective density fluid model.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kevin L

    2013-05-01

    Previously, an effective density fluid model (EDFM) was developed by the author [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 2276-2281 (2001)] for unconsolidated granular sediments and applied to sand. The model is a simplification of the full Biot porous media model. Here two additional effects are added to the EDFM model: heat transfer between the liquid and solid at low frequencies and the granularity of the medium at high frequencies. The frequency range studied is 100 Hz-1 MHz. The analytical sound speed and attenuation expressions obtained have no free parameters. The resulting model is compared to ocean data.

  10. Scurfy mice: A model for autoimmune disease

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Autoimmune disease-the condition in which the body attacks its own tissue-has been an object of public concern recently. Former President George Bush and his wife Barbara both are afflicted with Graves' disease in which the body's own immune system attakcs the thyroid gland. The safety of breast implants was called into question because of evidence that some recipients had developed autoimmune disorders such a rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and scleroderma. Women, the media pointed out, have a higher-than-average incidence of many autoimmune disorders. These events suggest the need to know more about what makes the immune system work so well and what makes it go awry. At ORNL's Biology Division, progress is being in understanding the underlying causes of immune disease by studying mice having a disease that causes them to be underdeveloped; to have scaly skin, small ears, and large spleens; to open their eyes late; and to die early. These [open quotes]scurfy[close quotes]mice are helping us better understand the role of the thymus gland in autoimmune disease.

  11. An Ad-Hoc Adaptive Pilot Model for Pitch Axis Gross Acquisition Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curtis E.

    2012-01-01

    An ad-hoc algorithm is presented for real-time adaptation of the well-known crossover pilot model and applied to pitch axis gross acquisition tasks in a generic fighter aircraft. Off-line tuning of the crossover model to human pilot data gathered in a fixed-based high fidelity simulation is first accomplished for a series of changes in aircraft dynamics to provide expected values for model parameters. It is shown that in most cases, for this application, the traditional crossover model can be reduced to a gain and a time delay. The ad-hoc adaptive pilot gain algorithm is shown to have desirable convergence properties for most types of changes in aircraft dynamics.

  12. Modelling of Medium Access Control (MAC) Protocols for Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    Slot IP Internet Protocol LAN Local Area Network MAC Medium Access Control MACAW Medium Access Protocol for Wireless LANs MANET Mobile Ad-hoc...Unforced state – It waits after entering the state until it is invoked by another process or an interrupt. It is in dark grey on this report, and red ... green in OPNET. A MAC process model is built for general initialisations of the MAC module, and to invoke the selected MAC protocol process model

  13. Effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on (/sup 3/H)TdR incorporation into DNA in ad lib fed and fasted CD2F1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Scheving, L.A.; Tsai, T.H.; Scheving, L.E.; Hoke, W.S.

    1987-03-01

    The effect of EGF on the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)TdR into DNA (DNA synthesis) was determined in the esophagus, liver, pancreas, and kidney in mice standardized to 12 hours (hr) of light alternating with 12 hr of darkness. A question asked was whether intraperitoneally administered EGF could alter the circadian patterns of DNA synthesis in these organs. The most marked effects of EGF were: an increase in DNA synthesis but only after a specific duration of time after treatment, ranging from 8 to 23 hr, which differed for each tissue, a similarity in the response of the esophagus in both ad lib fed and fasted mice, but not in the response of the liver, where the stimulatory effect of EGF observed in fed mice was dramatically reduced in fasted ones, and an advance in the phasing of the circadian rhythm in DNA synthesis of the esophagus by about 12 hr. In addition, no sex differences in fasted animals were found under the conditions of this study.

  14. Vaccination to conserved influenza antigens in mice using a novel Simian adenovirus vector, PanAd3, derived from the bonobo Pan paniscus.

    PubMed

    Vitelli, Alessandra; Quirion, Mary R; Lo, Chia-Yun; Misplon, Julia A; Grabowska, Agnieszka K; Pierantoni, Angiolo; Ammendola, Virginia; Price, Graeme E; Soboleski, Mark R; Cortese, Riccardo; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Epstein, Suzanne L

    2013-01-01

    Among approximately 1000 adenoviruses from chimpanzees and bonobos studied recently, the Pan Adenovirus type 3 (PanAd3, isolated from a bonobo, Pan paniscus) has one of the best profiles for a vaccine vector, combining potent transgene immunogenicity with minimal pre-existing immunity in the human population. In this study, we inserted into a replication defective PanAd3 a transgene expressing a fusion protein of conserved influenza antigens nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix 1 (M1). We then studied antibody and T cell responses as well as protection from challenge infection in a mouse model. A single intranasal administration of PanAd3-NPM1 vaccine induced strong antibody and T cell responses, and protected against high dose lethal influenza virus challenge. Thus PanAd3 is a promising candidate vector for vaccines, including universal influenza vaccines.

  15. ApoB100/LDLR-/- Hypercholesterolaemic Mice as a Model for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Neuronal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Carlos; Sierra, Saleta; Tercero, Inmaculada; Vázquez, Jose Antonio; Pineda, Antonia; Manrique, Tatiana; Burgos, Javier S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent clinical findings support the notion that the progressive deterioration of cholesterol homeostasis is a central player in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological studies suggest that high midlife plasma total cholesterol levels are associated with an increased risk of AD. This paper reports the plasma cholesterol concentrations, cognitive performance, locomotor activity and neuropathological signs in a murine model (transgenic mice expressing apoB100 but knockout for the LDL receptor [LDLR]) of human familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). From birth, these animals have markedly elevated LDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) levels. These transgenic mice were confirmed to have higher plasma cholesterol concentrations than wild-type mice, an effect potentiated by aging. Further, 3-month-old transgenic mice showed cholesterol (total and fractions) concentrations considerably higher than those of 18-month-old wild-type mice. The hypercholesterolaemia of the transgenic mice was associated with a clear locomotor deficit (as determined by rotarod, grip strength and open field testing) and impairment of the episodic-like memory (determined by the integrated memory test). This decline in locomotor activity and cognitive status was associated with neuritic dystrophy and/or the disorganization of the neuronal microtubule network, plus an increase in astrogliosis and lipid peroxidation in the brain regions associated with AD, such as the motor and lateral entorhinal cortex, the amygdaloid basal nucleus, and the hippocampus. Aortic atherosclerotic lesions were positively correlated with age, although potentiated by the transgenic genotype, while cerebral β-amyloidosis was positively correlated with genetic background rather than with age. These findings confirm hypercholesterolaemia as a key biomarker for monitoring mild cognitive impairment, and shows these transgenic mice can be used as a model for cognitive and psycho-motor decline. PMID:21829488

  16. Diffractive deep inelastic scattering in an AdS/CFT inspired model: A phenomenological study

    SciTech Connect

    Betemps, M. A.; Goncalves, V. P.; Santana Amaral, J. T. de

    2010-05-01

    The analytical treatment of the nonperturbative QCD dynamics is one of the main open questions of the strong interactions. Currently, it is only possible to get some qualitative information about this regime considering other QCD-like theories, as, for example, the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory, where one can perform calculations in the nonperturbative limit of large 't Hooft coupling using the anti-de Sitter space/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT). Recently, the high energy scattering amplitude was calculated in the AdS/CFT approach, applied to deep-inelastic scattering and confronted with the F{sub 2} HERA data. In this work we extend the nonperturbative AdS/CFT inspired model for diffractive processes and compare its predictions with a perturbative approach based on the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation. We demonstrate that the AdS/CFT inspired model is not able to describe the current F{sub 2}{sup D(3)} HERA data and predicts a similar behavior to that from the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation in the range 10{sup -7} < or approx. x{sub P} < or approx. 10{sup -4}. At smaller values of x{sub P} the diffractive structure function is predicted to be energy independent.

  17. Effectiveness Measures for Cross-Sectional Studies: A Comparison of Value-Added Models and Contextualised Attainment Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenkeit, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Educational effectiveness research often appeals to "value-added models (VAM)" to gauge the impact of schooling on student learning net of the effect of student background variables. A huge amount of cross-sectional studies do not, however, meet VAM's requirement for longitudinal data. "Contextualised attainment models (CAM)"…

  18. The contrasting effects of ad libitum and restricted feeding of a diet very high in saturated fats on sex ratio and metabolic hormones in mice.

    PubMed

    Alexenko, Andrei P; Mao, Jiude; Ellersieck, Mark R; Davis, Angela M; Whyte, Jeffrey J; Rosenfeld, Cheryl S; Roberts, R Michael

    2007-10-01

    Skewing of the sex ratio towards males occurs among pups born to mice fed a very high saturated fat (VHF) diet. In the present study, we tested whether the fat content of the VHF diet rather than the number of calories consumed is responsible for this effect. Eight-week-old NIH Swiss mice were placed on the VHF diet either ad libitum (VHF) or in a restricted manner (VHF-R). The VHF-R mice gained weight at a similar rate to controls fed a standard chow diet. Mice were bred at 15 wk and subsequently at 26 wk and 35 wk of age. Overall, the VHF, VHF-R, and control groups delivered 244, 242, and 274 pups, respectively, with male proportions of 0.60, 0.43, and 0.48, respectively. The pup sex ratios of the VHF group (favoring males) and VHF-R group (favoring females) each differed from 0.5 (P < 0.01). The sex ratios also differed (P < 0.0001) between the VHF and control groups, and between the VHF and VHF-R groups. Within the diet groups, maternal body weight had no effect on sex ratio. Serum leptin concentrations among the dams were similar in the VHF and VHF-R groups but higher than in the control group, while the IGF1 and corticosterone levels were comparable in all three groups. Therefore, the atypical sex ratios of offspring born to dams on the VHF diet seem to be influenced by the amount of fat consumed. Since males fed the VHF diet had neither more Y-sperm nor sired more sons than daughters, the dietary effects are manifested exclusively through the female.

  19. Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor improves long-term memory in APP/PS1 transgenic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease as well as in wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Susanna; Lindholm, Päivi; Galli, Emilia; Lahtinen, Hanna-Maija; Koivisto, Henna; Hämäläinen, Elina; Saarma, Mart; Tanila, Heikki

    2015-09-15

    Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) protects and repairs dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson's disease, which motivated us to investigate its therapeutic effect in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We employed an established APP/PS1 mouse model of AD and gave intrahippocampal injections of CDNF protein or CDNF transgene in an AAV2 viral vector to 1-year-old animals. We performed a behavioral test battery 2 weeks after the injections and collected tissue samples after the 3-week test period. Intrahippocampal CDNF-therapy improved long-term memory in both APP/PS1 mice and wild-type controls, but did not affect spontaneous exploration, object neophobia or early stages of spatial learning. The memory improvement was not associated with decreased brain amyloid load or enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis. Intracranial CDNF treatment has beneficial effects on long-term memory and is well tolerated. The CDNF molecular mechanisms of action on memory await further studies.

  20. Full vector archaeomagnetic data and Bayesian modelling for 1300 to 1750 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepp, E.; Lanos, P.; Chauvin, A.

    2009-04-01

    The data base of geomagnetic palaeointensities obtained from archaeological artefacts is poor and very scattered for Western and Central Europe. High precision palaeointensities have been determined from a single archaeological site in Lübeck (Germany) where a sequence of 25 bread-oven-floors has been preserved in a bakery from medieval times until today. Age dating confines the time interval from about 1300 AD to about 1750 AD. Palaeomagnetic directions have been determined from each oven-floor (Schnepp et al., JGR, 2003). Palaeointensity was measured from selected specimens with the double-heating Thellier method and reliable palaeointensity results have been obtained. Tests for thermoremanent magnetisation anisotropy have been performed, but did not show a significant change, while a cooling rate correction was not necessary. 22 mean palaeointensity values derived from the oven-floors show maxima in the 15th and early 17th century AD, followed by a decrease of palaeointensity of about 25% until 1750 AD. The Thellier experiments provided also new characteristic remanent magnetisation directions which were included in the data set. Mean directions have been recalculated. Palaeointensity together with the directions represent a record of about 450 years full vector secular variation. From this full vector data set a secular variation curve has been calculated using a Bayesian modelling taking dating errors, all errors on the field vector and stratigraphy into account. A smooth curve with an error envelope was obtained which compares very well with the gufm1 geomagnetic model (Jackson et al., Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. A, 2000) obtained from historical observations starting at 1600 AD. Comparison of the marginal curve obtained for palaeointensity with a selected data set of archaeomagnetic intensities from Western and Central Europe will be discussed.

  1. Modelling tsunami sedimentation associated with the AD 1755 event in Algarve (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, P. J. M.; Gelfenbaum, G. R.; La Selle, S.; Costas, S.; Andrade, C.; Cascalho, J.; Freitas, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical models of tsunami inundation and sedimentation can provide useful insights into the dynamics of palaeotsunamis. We applied a coupled field data and numerical modelling approach for the AD1755 tsunami, the most destructive tsunami to affect the Atlantic coast of Europe in historical times. At Salgados, a lowland on the south coast of Portugal, tsunami deposits from AD1755 mostly consist of massive or normally-graded, landward thinning layers of shell-rich sand with an erosive base within the mud-dominated lowlands. Landward of the foredune, the AD1755 deposit is roughly 10cm thick and thins in the landward and alongshore directions. It is possible to ascribe the sediment source of this deposit to the dune and/or beach based on mineralogical and grain-size comparisons with modern surface samples. The present dune crest height is 6 m above MSL (mean sea level) near the seasonally-closed inlet of the lagoon, and rises alongshore towards the west up to 17m above MSL. From the combination of the spatial distribution of the deposit thickness landward of the sloping dune, and GPR data, which shows an erosional surface at approximately 6m above MSL, we infer that the maximum tsunami water level at the coast was between 6 and 10m. Regional tsunami historical records, however, suggest higher heights, up to 12m above MSL at the coast. We simulated tsunami inundation and sediment transport using Delft3D to examine these discrepancies. A 1D cross shore model was used to test flow height controls on deposit thickness and also to identify the sediment source of the AD1755 deposit. Four possible sediment sources were tested (nearshore, beach, dune and lagoon) using synthetic, long-period waves to simulate the AD1755 tsunami. The combination of geological studies with numerical modeling of inundation and sediment transport produces a better description of the AD1755 tsunami and its effects in coastal areas in the Algarve that will contribute to better hazard assessments.

  2. Value-Added Modeling of Teacher Effectiveness: An Exploration of Stability across Models and Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Xiaoxia A.; Darling-Hammond, Linda; Haertel, Edward; Thomas, Ewart

    2010-01-01

    Recent policy interest in tying student learning to teacher evaluation has led to growing use of value-added methods for assessing student learning gains linked to individual teachers. VAM analyses rely on complex assumptions about the roles of schools, multiple teachers, student aptitudes and efforts, homes and families in producing measured…

  3. Operant model of frustrated expected reward in mice.

    PubMed

    Burokas, Aurelijus; Gutiérrez-Cuesta, Javier; Martín-García, Elena; Maldonado, Rafael

    2012-07-01

    One aspect of the addictive process that has not been thoroughly investigated is the consequence of the frustrated state occurring when the drug is not available. The present study aimed to validate a novel operant model of frustrated expected reward in mice. C57BL/6J mice were trained in operant conditioning maintained by chocolate-flavoured pellets or cocaine. After the completion of high rates of responding on a progressive ratio schedule, the reward was unexpectedly withheld. The consequences of this frustrated behaviour on anxiety, aggressiveness, perseveration, extinction and reinstatement were investigated. Mice exposed to the frustrated event perseverated in the operant responses and showed increased aggressiveness in the resident-intruder test. These animals also showed higher rates of cue-induced reinstatement of drug seeking. The present study provides a reliable operant model in mice to evaluate a frustrated state following reward unavailability. This animal model could be useful to study the behavioural and neurochemical consequences related to the emotional states generated during the omission of a highly expected reward.

  4. The VIS-AD data model: Integrating metadata and polymorphic display with a scientific programming language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, William L.; Dyer, Charles R.; Paul, Brian E.

    1994-01-01

    The VIS-AD data model integrates metadata about the precision of values, including missing data indicators and the way that arrays sample continuous functions, with the data objects of a scientific programming language. The data objects of this data model form a lattice, ordered by the precision with which they approximate mathematical objects. We define a similar lattice of displays and study visualization processes as functions from data lattices to display lattices. Such functions can be applied to visualize data objects of all data types and are thus polymorphic.

  5. A Leasing Model to Deal with Partial Failures in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Boix, Elisa; van Cutsem, Tom; Vallejos, Jorge; de Meuter, Wolfgang; D'Hondt, Theo

    In mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) many partial failures are the result of temporary network partitions due to the intermittent connectivity of mobile devices. Some of these failures will be permanent and require application-level failure handling. However, it is impossible to distinguish a permanent from a transient failure. Leasing provides a solution to this problem based on the temporal restriction of resources. But to date no leasing model has been designed specifically for MANETs. In this paper, we identify three characteristics required for a leasing model to be usable in a MANET, discuss the issues with existing leasing models and then propose the leased object references model, which integrates leasing with remote object references. In addition, we describe an implementation of the model in the programming language AmbientTalk. Leased object references provide an extensible framework that allows programmers to express their own leasing patterns and enables both lease holders (clients) and lease grantors (services) to deal with permanent failures.

  6. Homoclinic Spike adding in a neuronal model in the presence of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuwape, Ibiyinka; Neiman, Alexander; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2008-03-01

    We study the influence of noise on a spike adding transitions within the bursting activity in a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of the leech heart interneuron. Spike adding in this model occur via homoclinic bifurcation of a saddle periodic orbit. Although narrow chaotic regions are observed near bifurcation transition, overall bursting dynamics is regular and is characterized by a constant number of spikes per burst. Experimental studies, however, show variability of bursting patterns whereby number of spikes per burst varies randomly. Thus, introduction of external synaptic noise is a necessary step to account for variability of burst durations observed experimentally. We show that near every such transition the neuron is highly sensitive to random perturbations that lead to and enhance broadly the regions of chaotic dynamics of the cell. For each spike adding transition there is a critical noise level beyond which the dynamics of the neuron becomes chaotic throughout the entire region of the given transition. Noise-induced chaotic dynamics is characterized in terms of the Lyapunov exponents and the Shannon entropy and reflects variability of firing patterns with various numbers of spikes per burst, traversing wide range of the neuron's parameters

  7. Constraints on tachyon inflationary models with an AdS/CFT correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouabdallaoui, Zahra; Errahmani, Ahmed; Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Ouali, Taoufik

    2016-12-01

    To study the effect of the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence (AdS/CFT) on the primordial inflationary era, we consider a universe filled with a tachyon field in a slow-roll regime. In this context, the background and perturbative parameters characterizing the inflationary era are related to the standard one by correction terms. We show a clear agreement between the theoretical prediction and the observational data for the above-mentioned model. The main results of our work are illustrated for an exponential potential. We show that, for a suitable conformal anomaly coefficient, AdS/CFT correspondence might leave its imprints on the spectrum of the gravitational waves amplitude with a tensor to scalar ratio, r , of the perturbations compatible with Planck data.

  8. Neuroprotective Effect of SLM, a Novel Carbazole-Based Fluorophore, on SH-SY5Y Cell Model and 3xTg-AD Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoli; Kosaraju, Jayasankar; Zhou, Wei; Tam, Kin Yip

    2017-03-15

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide aggregating to form a neurotoxic plaque, leading to cognitive deficits, is believed to be one of the plausible mechanisms for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Inhibiting Aβ aggregation is supposed to offer a neuroprotective effect to ameliorate AD. A previous report has shown that SLM, a carbazole-based fluorophore, binds to Aβ to inhibit the aggregation. However, it is not entirely clear whether the inhibition of Aβ aggregation alone would lead to the anticipated neuroprotective effects. In the current study, we intended to examine the protective action of SLM against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and to evaluate if SLM can decrease the cognitive and behavioral deficits observed in triple transgenic AD mouse model (3xTg-AD). In the in vitro study, neurotoxicity induced by Aβ42 in human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells was found to be reduced through the treatment with SLM. In the in vivo study, following one month SLM intraperitoneal injection (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg), 3xTg-AD mice were tested on Morris water maze (MWM) and Y-maze for their cognitive ability and sacrificed for biochemical estimations. Results show that SLM treatment improved the learning and memory ability in 3xTg-AD mice in MWM and Y-maze tasks. SLM also mitigated the amyloid burden by decreasing brain Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels and reduced tau phosphorylation, glycogen synthase kinase-3β activity, and neuro-inflammation. From our observations, SLM shows neuroprotection in SH-SY5Y cells against Aβ42 and also in 3xTg-AD mouse model by mitigating the pathological features and behavioral impairments.

  9. Spin Matrix theory: a quantum mechanical model of the AdS/CFT correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmark, Troels; Orselli, Marta

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a new quantum mechanical theory called Spin Matrix theory (SMT). The theory is interacting with a single coupling constant g and is based on a Hilbert space of harmonic oscillators with a spin index taking values in a Lie (super)algebra representation as well as matrix indices for the adjoint representation of U( N). We show that SMT describes super-Yang-Mills theory (SYM) near zero-temperature critical points in the grand canonical phase diagram. Equivalently, SMT arises from non-relativistic limits of SYM. Even though SMT is a non-relativistic quantum mechanical theory it contains a variety of phases mimicking the AdS/CFT correspondence. Moreover, the g → ∞ limit of SMT can be mapped to the supersymmetric sector of string theory on AdS5 × S 5. We study SU(2) SMT in detail. At large N and low temperatures it is a theory of spin chains that for small g resembles planar gauge theory and for large g a non-relativistic string theory. When raising the temperature a partial deconfinement transition occurs due to finite- N effects. For sufficiently high temperatures the partially deconfined phase has a classical regime. We find a matrix model description of this regime at any coupling g. Setting g = 0 it is a theory of N 2 + 1 harmonic oscillators while for large g it becomes 2 N harmonic oscillators.

  10. Perinatal Choline Supplementation Reduces Amyloidosis and Increases Choline Acetyltransferase Expression in the Hippocampus of the APPswePS1dE9 Alzheimer's Disease Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mellott, Tiffany J.; Huleatt, Olivia M.; Shade, Bethany N.; Pender, Sarah M.; Liu, Yi B.; Slack, Barbara E.; Blusztajn, Jan K.

    2017-01-01

    Prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a major goal of biomedical sciences. In previous studies we showed that high intake of the essential nutrient, choline, during gestation prevented age-related memory decline in a rat model. In this study we investigated the effects of a similar treatment on AD-related phenotypes in a mouse model of AD. We crossed wild type (WT) female mice with hemizygous APPswe/PS1dE9 (APP.PS1) AD model male mice and maintained the pregnant and lactating dams on a control AIN76A diet containing 1.1 g/kg of choline or a choline-supplemented (5 g/kg) diet. After weaning all offspring consumed the control diet. As compared to APP.PS1 mice reared on the control diet, the hippocampus of the perinatally choline-supplemented APP.PS1 mice exhibited: 1) altered levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolites–specifically elevated amounts of β-C-terminal fragment (β-CTF) and reduced levels of solubilized amyloid Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides; 2) reduced number and total area of amyloid plaques; 3) preserved levels of choline acetyltransferase protein (CHAT) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2) and 4) absence of astrogliosis. The data suggest that dietary supplementation of choline during fetal development and early postnatal life may constitute a preventive strategy for AD. PMID:28103298

  11. Inverse magnetic catalysis in the soft-wall model of AdS/QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Danning; Huang, Mei; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Pei-Hung

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic effects on chiral phase transition have been investigated in a modified soft-wall AdS/QCD model, in which the dilaton field is taken to be negative at the ultraviolet region and positive at the infrared region as in Phys. Rev. D 93 (2016) 101901 and JHEP 04 (2016) 036. The magnetic field is introduced into the background geometry by solving the Einstein-Maxwell system. After embedding the magnetized background geometry into the modified soft-wall model, the magnetic field dependent behavior of chiral condensate is worked out numerically. It is found that, in the chiral limit, the chiral phase transition remains as a second order at finite magnetic field B, while the symmetry restoration temperature and chiral condensate decrease with the increasing of magnetic field in small B region. When including finite quark mass effect, the phase transition turns to be a crossover one, and the transition temperature still decreases with increasing magnetic field B when B is not very large. In this sense, inverse magnetic catalysis effect is observed in this modified soft-wall AdS/QCD model.

  12. A mechanistic model for medulloblastoma induction in mice.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, W F; Saran, A; Atkinson, M; Pazzaglia, S

    2013-05-01

    Medulloblastomas in Patched heterozygous mice (Ptc1(+/-) mice) are induced with high probability by ionizing radiation applied in the immediate post-natal period. A mathematical model is described here that accommodates the dependence of the medulloblastoma incidence on dose, age at exposure and age. The model assumes that the first step in the development of the cancer is already present in all cells of the patched mouse due to germ-line inactivation of one allele of the patched tumor suppressor gene. The subsequent rate-limiting step is dependent linearly on dose at least up to 3 Gy. The observed strong decrease in carcinogenic effect of radiation between exposure on day 1 and day 10 is described by a physiological elimination of target cells during post-natal maturation of the brain. A single malignant cell develops into a tumor following a gamma-distribution with mean of about 160 days. The multiplicity of medulloblastomas is predicted.

  13. The value of adding optics to ecosystem models: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M.; Boss, E.; Chai, F.

    2007-05-01

    matter to the modeled properties. Coupling explicit optics to an ecosystem model provides several advantages in generating: (1) a more accurate subsurface light-field, which is important for light sensitive biogeochemical processes such as photosynthesis and photo-oxidation, (2) added constraints on model parameters that help to reduce uncertainties in ecosystem model simulations, and (3) model output which is comparable to basic remotely-sensed properties. In addition, the coupling of biogeochemical models and optics paves the road for future assimilation of ocean color and in-situ measured optical properties into the models.

  14. Homoclinic chaos in axisymmetric Bianchi-IX cosmological models with an ad hoc quantum potential

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, G. C.; Stuchi, T. J.; Joras, S. E.

    2010-04-15

    In this work we study the dynamics of the axisymmetric Bianchi-IX cosmological model with a term of quantum potential added. As it is well known, this class of Bianchi-IX models is homogeneous and anisotropic with two scale factors, A(t) and B(t), derived from the solution of Einstein's equation for general relativity. The model we use in this work has a cosmological constant and the matter content is dust. To this model we add a quantum-inspired potential that is intended to represent short-range effects due to the general relativistic behavior of matter in small scales and play the role of a repulsive force near the singularity. We find that this potential restricts the dynamics of the model to positive values of A(t) and B(t) and alters some qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the dynamics studied previously by several authors. We make a complete analysis of the phase space of the model finding critical points, periodic orbits, stable/unstable manifolds using numerical techniques such as Poincare section, numerical continuation of orbits, and numerical globalization of invariant manifolds. We compare the classical and the quantum models. Our main result is the existence of homoclinic crossings of the stable and unstable manifolds in the physically meaningful region of the phase space [where both A(t) and B(t) are positive], indicating chaotic escape to inflation and bouncing near the singularity.

  15. Discounting testimony with the argument ad hominem and a Bayesian congruent prior model.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Jaydeep-Singh; Oaksford, Mike

    2015-09-01

    When directed to ignore evidence of a witness's previous bad character because of a violation of the rules of evidence, are jurors' beliefs still affected? The intuition is that they will be because in everyday argumentation, fallacies, like the ad hominem, are effective argumentative strategies. An ad hominem argument (against the person) undermines a conclusion by questioning the character of the proposer. This intuition divides current theories of argumentation. According to pragmadialectical theory (e.g., Van Eemeren & Grootendorst, 2004), procedural rules exactly like the rules of evidence are part of our cognitive resources for evaluating arguments. If one of these rules is violated, an argument should be treated as a fallacy and so it should not alter someone's belief in the conclusion. Some recent experiments investigating how reasonable these arguments are perceived to be seem to support this account (van Eemeren, Garssen, & Meuffels, 2009). These experiments are critiqued from the perspective of the relevance (Walton, 2009, 2010) and epistemic (Hahn & Oaksford, 2006, 2007; Oaksford & Hahn, 2004) approaches to argumentation. An experiment investigates the predictions of these approaches for a graded belief change version of van Eemeren et al.'s (2009) experiment, and the results are modeled using a Bayesian congruent prior model. These results cannot be explained by the pragmadialectical approach and show that in everyday argument people are extremely sensitive to the epistemic relevance of evidence. Moreover, it seems highly unlikely that this can be switched off in more formal contexts such as the courtroom.

  16. Naringenin ameliorates Alzheimer's disease (AD)-type neurodegeneration with cognitive impairment (AD-TNDCI) caused by the intracerebroventricular-streptozotocin in rat model.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Badruzzaman; Khan, Mohd Moshahid; Khan, Andleeb; Ahmed, Md Ejaz; Ishrat, Tauheed; Tabassum, Rizwana; Vaibhav, Kumar; Ahmad, Ajmal; Islam, Fakhrul

    2012-12-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-type neurodegeneration with cognitive impairment (AD-TNDCI) as well as age related cognitive deficit. The present study was designed to investigate the pre-treatment effects of naringenin (NAR), a polyphenolic compound on cognitive dysfunction, oxidative stress in the hippocampus, and hippocampal neuron injury in a rat model of AD-TNDCI. The rats were pre-treated with NAR at a selective dose (50mg/kg, orally) for 2 weeks followed by intracerebroventricular-streptozotocin (ICV-STZ) (3mg/kg; 5μl per site) injection bilaterally. Behavioral alterations were monitored after 2 weeks from the lesion using passive avoidance test and Morris water maze paradigm. Three weeks after the lesion, the rats were sacrificed for measuring non-enzymatic [4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), malonaldehyde (MDA), thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), protein carbonyl (PC), reduced glutathione (GSH)] content and enzymatic [glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase] activity in the hippocampus, and expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) positive neuron, and histopathology of hippocampal neurons. The non-enzymatic level and enzymatic activity was significantly increased and decreased, respectively, with striking impairments in spatial learning and memory, loss of ChAT positive neuron and severe damage to hippocampal neurons in the rat induced by ICV-STZ. These abnormalities were significantly improved by NAR pre-treatment. The study suggests that NAR can protect against cognitive deficits, neuronal injury and oxidative stress induced by ICV-STZ, and may be used as a potential agent in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD-TNDCI.

  17. Assessing State Models of Value-Added Teacher Evaluations: Alignment of Policy, Instruments, and Literature-Based Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison-Lupardus, Tammy R.; Hatfield, Timothy E.; Snyder, Jennifer E.

    2012-01-01

    This problem-based learning project addressed the need to improve the construction and implementation of value-added teacher evaluation policies and instruments. State officials are constructing value-added teacher evaluation models due to accountability initiatives, while ignoring the holes and problems in its implementation. The team's…

  18. Does Student Sorting Invalidate Value-Added Models of Teacher Effectiveness? An Extended Analysis of the Rothstein Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedel, Cory; Betts, Julian R.

    2011-01-01

    Value-added modeling continues to gain traction as a tool for measuring teacher performance. However, recent research questions the validity of the value-added approach by showing that it does not mitigate student-teacher sorting bias (its presumed primary benefit). Our study explores this critique in more detail. Although we find that estimated…

  19. A Correlated Random Effects Model for Nonignorable Missing Data in Value-Added Assessment of Teacher Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karl, Andrew T.; Yang, Yan; Lohr, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Value-added models have been widely used to assess the contributions of individual teachers and schools to students' academic growth based on longitudinal student achievement outcomes. There is concern, however, that ignoring the presence of missing values, which are common in longitudinal studies, can bias teachers' value-added scores.…

  20. Open-Space Forced Swim Model of Depression for Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Eric A.; Lin, Yan

    2011-01-01

    This protocol describes a simplified method for inducing a chronic depression-like state in mice that is based on the repeated open-space forced swim method for rats originally developed by Sun and Alkon (2003). The method consists of swimming mice daily in lukewarm water (32-34°C) in rat tub cages 24 × 43 × 23 cm w × h × l, for 15 min/day for 4 days, and thereafter once per week. This procedure produces a progressive decrease in distance swum and a concomitant increase in immobility (floating) in about 70 percent of the mice (Swiss Webster males), both of which persist unaltered for weeks and generalize to other tests of depression (tail suspension). The model has predictive, face and construct validity in that it is responsive to chronic antidepressants and coping responses but not to anxiolytics or antipsychotics, represents an inescapable stress that produces generalized passivity, and is accompanied by changes in neural activity and brain cell proliferation that are characteristic of depression and believed to contribute to the disorder. It is less effective in producing anhedonia than other models probably because it is less stressful. The model has a number of advantages over previous methods in that it utilizes very mild stress, is short in duration, is easily standardized, requires only a video camera and either a manual or automatic behavioral scoring system to measure immobility and distance swum, and can be readily used for time course studies of onset of drug action. Moreover, since it utilizes a greater swimming area than the traditional (Porsolt) method it can be used to study interactions of depressive behavior with behavioral flexibility and perseveration. Finally, its use of mice makes it readily amenable to genetic and molecular analyses. PMID:21207368

  1. Test of the antiorthostatic suspension model on mice - Effects on the inflammatory cell response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenkrans, Charles F., Jr.; Chapes, Stephen K.; Fleming, Sherry D.

    1990-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model was tested for use as a 1G model to study the effects of factors that will be encountered during space travel on inflammation. No differences were found in inflammatory cells induced in antiorthostatically suspended mice. However, the superoxide response (used for oxidative killing of bacteria such as S. aureus) was impaired in antiorthostatically oriented mice compared to control mice. Elevated corticosterone levels were found in antiorthostatically suspended mice, indicating that stress may be a factor in the model. If the stress factor of the model correlates with the physiological stress of space flight, antiorthostatic suspension may be an acceptable model for studying inflammatory responses in mice.

  2. Prolonged TSH receptor A subunit immunization of female mice leads to a long-term model of Graves' disease, tachycardia, and cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Holthoff, Hans-Peter; Goebel, Sylvia; Li, Zhongmin; Faßbender, Julia; Reimann, Andreas; Zeibig, Stefan; Lohse, Martin J; Münch, Götz; Ungerer, Martin

    2015-04-01

    A transient model for human Graves' disease was successfully established in mice using up to 3 immunizations with recombinant adenovirus expressing the extracellular A-subunit of the human TSH receptor (TSHR) (Ad-TSHR). We studied extension of adenovirally induced TSHR A-subunit immunization in mice by using a novel protocol of long-term 3- and 4-weekly injections. Generation of TSHR binding stimulatory antibodies (capacity to stimulate cAMP activity in TSHR-expressing test cells), goiter, and histological thyroid alterations were maintained for at least 9 months in all Ad-TSHR-immunized mice. In response to injection of 10(10) plaque-forming units of Ad-TSHR, also elevated mean serum T4 levels were observed throughout the study. Moreover, cardiac organ involvement (tachycardia and hypertrophy) were consistently observed in these mice. Higher doses of Ad-TSHR (10(11) plaque-forming units) did not produce consistent elevation of T4 and were not associated with a clear increase in heart rate vs controls, probably because these high doses provoked an immune response-induced tachycardia on their own. In summary, a long-term model of Graves' disease induced by a relatively simple protocol of continuing monthly immunizations should allow to investigate long-term disease mechanisms and may possibly obviate the need for more complicated disease models. Moreover, the clinical outcome predictor of tachycardia and cardiac involvement was reliably detected in the model.

  3. Using mice to model Alzheimer's dementia: an overview of the clinical disease and the preclinical behavioral changes in 10 mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Scott J.; Bachstetter, Adam D.; Nelson, Peter T.; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Van Eldik, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this review is to discuss how behavioral tests in mice relate to the pathological and neuropsychological features seen in human Alzheimer's disease (AD), and present a comprehensive analysis of the temporal progression of behavioral impairments in commonly used AD mouse models that contain mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP). We begin with a brief overview of the neuropathological changes seen in the AD brain and an outline of some of the clinical neuropsychological assessments used to measure cognitive deficits associated with the disease. This is followed by a critical assessment of behavioral tasks that are used in AD mice to model the cognitive changes seen in the human disease. Behavioral tests discussed include spatial memory tests [Morris water maze (MWM), radial arm water maze (RAWM), Barnes maze], associative learning tasks (passive avoidance, fear conditioning), alternation tasks (Y-Maze/T-Maze), recognition memory tasks (Novel Object Recognition), attentional tasks (3 and 5 choice serial reaction time), set-shifting tasks, and reversal learning tasks. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each of these behavioral tasks, and how they may correlate with clinical assessments in humans. Finally, the temporal progression of both cognitive and non-cognitive deficits in 10 AD mouse models (PDAPP, TG2576, APP23, TgCRND8, J20, APP/PS1, TG2576 + PS1 (M146L), APP/PS1 KI, 5×FAD, and 3×Tg-AD) are discussed in detail. Mouse models of AD and the behavioral tasks used in conjunction with those models are immensely important in contributing to our knowledge of disease progression and are a useful tool to study AD pathophysiology and the resulting cognitive deficits. However, investigators need to be aware of the potential weaknesses of the available preclinical models in terms of their ability to model cognitive changes observed in human AD. It is our hope that this review will assist investigators in selecting an appropriate mouse model, and

  4. Erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E*) from Friend virus-infected mice undergo VVFe suicide in vitro in the absence of added erythropoietin

    SciTech Connect

    Del Rizzo, D.F.; Axelrad, A.A.

    1985-11-01

    The authors have investigated the effect of VVFe on the survival in suspension of erythropoietin (epo)-independent erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E*) induced by Friend polycythemia virus (FV). Spleen cells from C3Hf/Bi mice previously infected with FV were exposed to carrier-free VVFe, and the survival of CFU-E* as a function of time in liquid medium was determined from the number of erythroid colonies that developed from these cells seeded in plasma cultures without added epo. The results showed that spleen CFU-E* were highly vulnerable to VVFe. Marrow CFU-E* behaved in a similar manner. The VVFe responsible for their suicide had been presented to the progenitor cells only during the 4-h period of incubation, after which they were washed and plated in excess nonradioactive iron. They therefore conclude that CFU-E* themselves, and not only their progeny, are capable of actively incorporating iron. Under the same conditions in the absence of added epo, the effect of VVFe on the survival of normal spleen or marrow CFU-E could not be assessed because two few normal CFU-E survived the incubation period. Normal bone marrow cells incubated in complete medium containing epo retained their capacity for erythrocytic colony formation, and CFU-E could then be shown to be vulnerable to VVFe. Thus, either the iron-incorporating system of normal CFU-E was inducible by epo, or else epo permitted survival of the CFU-E so that the activity of a constitutive iron-incorporating system could be recognized.

  5. Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Models in Mice and Rats.

    PubMed

    Furman, Brian L

    2015-09-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ) is an antibiotic that produces pancreatic islet β-cell destruction and is widely used experimentally to produce a model of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Detailed in this unit are protocols for producing STZ-induced insulin deficiency and hyperglycemia in mice and rats. Also described are protocols for creating animal models for type 2 diabetes using STZ. These animals are employed for assessing the pathological consequences of diabetes and for screening potential therapies for the treatment of this condition.

  6. The added value of high-resolution climate modeling of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Berg, Willem Jan; van Meijgaard, Erik; van Ulft, Bert; Machguth, Horst; Noël, Brice; van den Broeke, Michiel

    2016-04-01

    The local surface mass balance (SMB) of glaciers and ice sheets is to a very high extent related to topography. Subsequently, spatial variability in the SMB is also related to the spatial scales in the topography. The typical topographic length scales on the Greenland Ice Sheet are from several to over hundred kilometers. Therefore, regional climate models with resolutions between 5 and 25 kilometers normally capture the SMB of the Greenland Ice Sheet well. In this study, we analyze the added value of high-resolution regional climate simulations compared to statistical downscaling. For this aim, the regional climate model RACMO2 has been run for South Greenland for the period 2007-2014 using resolutions of 60, 20, 6.6 and 2.2 kilometer. Modeled and downscaled SMB from these four simulations are analyzed and evaluated against ablation observations. Our results show that the strong correlation of runoff to elevation makes statistical downscaling a robust tool to refine modeled spatial SMB patterns. However, only high-resolution climate modeling can improve the physical representation of the SMB in lower ablation zone, because the summertime interaction between the warm air over the tundra and the colder air over the ice sheet starts to be resolved. As a result, the runoff in the lower ablation zone is more enhanced compared to lower resolution simulations and statistical downscaled SMB.

  7. SOA-based model for value-added ITS services delivery.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Quintero, Luis Felipe; Maciá-Pérez, Francisco; Marcos-Jorquera, Diego; Gilart-Iglesias, Virgilio

    2014-01-01

    Integration is currently a key factor in intelligent transportation systems (ITS), especially because of the ever increasing service demands originating from the ITS industry and ITS users. The current ITS landscape is made up of multiple technologies that are tightly coupled, and its interoperability is extremely low, which limits ITS services generation. Given this fact, novel information technologies (IT) based on the service-oriented architecture (SOA) paradigm have begun to introduce new ways to address this problem. The SOA paradigm allows the construction of loosely coupled distributed systems that can help to integrate the heterogeneous systems that are part of ITS. In this paper, we focus on developing an SOA-based model for integrating information technologies (IT) into ITS to achieve ITS service delivery. To develop our model, the ITS technologies and services involved were identified, catalogued, and decoupled. In doing so, we applied our SOA-based model to integrate all of the ITS technologies and services, ranging from the lowest-level technical components, such as roadside unit as a service (RSUAAS), to the most abstract ITS services that will be offered to ITS users (value-added services). To validate our model, a functionality case study that included all of the components of our model was designed.

  8. SOA-Based Model for Value-Added ITS Services Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Quintero, Luis Felipe; Maciá-Pérez, Francisco; Marcos-Jorquera, Diego; Gilart-Iglesias, Virgilio

    2014-01-01

    Integration is currently a key factor in intelligent transportation systems (ITS), especially because of the ever increasing service demands originating from the ITS industry and ITS users. The current ITS landscape is made up of multiple technologies that are tightly coupled, and its interoperability is extremely low, which limits ITS services generation. Given this fact, novel information technologies (IT) based on the service-oriented architecture (SOA) paradigm have begun to introduce new ways to address this problem. The SOA paradigm allows the construction of loosely coupled distributed systems that can help to integrate the heterogeneous systems that are part of ITS. In this paper, we focus on developing an SOA-based model for integrating information technologies (IT) into ITS to achieve ITS service delivery. To develop our model, the ITS technologies and services involved were identified, catalogued, and decoupled. In doing so, we applied our SOA-based model to integrate all of the ITS technologies and services, ranging from the lowest-level technical components, such as roadside unit as a service (RSUAAS), to the most abstract ITS services that will be offered to ITS users (value-added services). To validate our model, a functionality case study that included all of the components of our model was designed. PMID:25019101

  9. AdS and stabilized extra dimensions in multi-dimensional gravitational models with nonlinear scalar curvature terms R-1 and R4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Uwe; Zhuk, Alexander; Bezerra, Valdir B.; Romero, Carlos

    2005-08-01

    We study multi-dimensional gravitational models with scalar curvature nonlinearities of types R-1 and R4. It is assumed that the corresponding higher dimensional spacetime manifolds undergo a spontaneous compactification to manifolds with a warped product structure. Special attention has been paid to the stability of the extra-dimensional factor spaces. It is shown that for certain parameter regions the systems allow for a freezing stabilization of these spaces. In particular, we find for the R-1 model that configurations with stabilized extra dimensions do not provide a late-time acceleration (they are AdS), whereas the solution branch which allows for accelerated expansion (the dS branch) is incompatible with stabilized factor spaces. In the case of the R4 model, we obtain that the stability region in parameter space depends on the total dimension D = dim(M) of the higher dimensional spacetime M. For D > 8 the stability region consists of a single (absolutely stable) sector which is shielded from a conformal singularity (and an antigravity sector beyond it) by a potential barrier of infinite height and width. This sector is smoothly connected with the stability region of a curvature-linear model. For D < 8 an additional (metastable) sector exists which is separated from the conformal singularity by a potential barrier of finite height and width so that systems in this sector are prone to collapse into the conformal singularity. This second sector is not smoothly connected with the first (absolutely stable) one. Several limiting cases and the possibility of inflation are discussed for the R4 model.

  10. Developing a Conceptual Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Communications Mobile AD Hoc Network Simulation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    Elizabeth Royer described the Ad Hoc On-Demand Distance Vector (AODV) routing protocol as “providing quick and efficient route establishment between...Network.” Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School, December 2000. 8. Das, Samir R., Perkins, Charles E., and Royer, Elizabeth M. “ The Ad-hoc On-Demand...Lidong. “Securing Ad Hoc Networks.” Paper Cornell University, Itaca, New York, NY. 16. Corson , Scott S., and Macker, J. “Mobile Ad Hoc

  11. Assessing the effect of adding interactive modeling to the geoscience curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, A.; Marshall, J.; Cardenas, M.

    2013-12-01

    Technology and computer models enhance the learning experience when appropriately utilized. Moreover, learning is significantly improved when effective visualization is combined with models of processes allowing for inquiry-based problem solving. Still, hands-on experiences in real scenarios result in better contextualization of related problems compared to virtual laboratories. Therefore, the role of scientific visualization, technology, and computer modeling is to enhance, not displace, the learning experience by supplementing real-world problem solving and experiences, although in some circumstances, they can adequately serve to take the place of reality. The key to improving scientific education is to embrace an inquiry-based approach that favorably uses technology. This study will attempt to evaluate the effect of adding interactive modeling to the geological sciences curriculum. An assessment tool, designed to assess student understanding of physical hydrology, was used to evaluate a curriculum intervention based on student learning with a data- and modeling-driven approach using COMSOL Multiphysics software. This intervention was implemented in an upper division and graduate physical hydrology course in fall 2012. Students enrolled in the course in fall 2011 served as the control group. Interactive modeling was added to the curriculum in fall 2012 to replace the analogous mathematical modeling done by hand in fall 2011. Pre- and post-test results were used to assess and report its effectiveness. Student interviews were also used to probe student reactions to both the experimental and control curricula. The pre- and post-tests asked students to describe the significant processes in the hydrological cycle and describe the laws governing these processes. Their ability to apply their knowledge in a real-world problem was also assessed. Since the pre- and post-test data failed to meet the assumption of normality, a non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test was run to

  12. How One School Implements and Experiences Ohio's Value-Added Model: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quattrochi, David

    2009-01-01

    Ohio made value-added law in 2003 and incorporated value-added assessment to its operating standards for teachers and administrators in 2006. Value-added data is used to determine if students are making a year's growth at the end of each school year. Schools and districts receive a rating of "Below Growth, Met Growth, or Above Growth" on…

  13. Dietary mercury exposure resulted in behavioral differences in mice contaminated with fish-associated methylmercury compared to methylmercury chloride added to diet.

    PubMed

    Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Marumoto, Masumi; Yasutake, Akira; Fujimura, Masatake

    2012-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxin, and humans are mainly exposed to this pollutant through fish consumption. However, in classical toxicological studies, pure methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) is injected, given to drink or incorporated within feed assuming that its effects are identical to those of MeHg naturally associated to fish. In the present study, we wanted to address the question whether a diet containing MeHg associated to fish could result in observable adverse effects in mice as compared to a diet containing the same concentration of MeHg added pure to the diet and whether beneficial nutriments from fish were able to counterbalance the deleterious effects of fish-associated mercury, if any. After two months of feeding, the fish-containing diet resulted in significant observable effects as compared to the control and MeHg-containing diets, encompassing altered behavioral performances as monitored in a Y-shaped maze and an open field, and an increased dopamine metabolic turnover in hippocampus, despite the fact that the fish-containing diet was enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids and selenium compared to the fish-devoid diets.

  14. Intranasal inoculation with an adenovirus vaccine encoding ten repeats of Aβ3-10 reduces AD-like pathology and cognitive impairment in Tg-APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Ma, Ying; Zong, Li-Xia; Xing, Xiao-Na; Guo, Rong; Jiang, Tong-Zi; Sha, Sha; Liu, Li; Cao, Yun-Peng

    2012-08-15

    To develop a safe and efficient vaccine for AD treatment, we constructed an adenovirus vector vaccine encoding ten repeats of Aβ3-10 and CpG motif as a molecular adjuvant. We demonstrated that therapeutic immunization with Ad-10×Aβ3-10-CpG elicits Aβ3-10 specific Th2-polarized immune response with high titers of anti-Aβ antibodies in APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice, which in turn reduced Aβ deposits in brains and cognitive impairment. In addition, Ad-10×Aβ3-10-CpG reduced astrocytosis without increasing the incidence of microhemorrhage. Our findings of this study raise the possibility that the adenovirus vaccine Ad-10×Aβ3-10-CpG would be a safe and effective alternative for AD immunotherapy.

  15. Chronic consumption of a western diet induces robust glial activation in aging mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Graham, Leah C; Harder, Jeffrey M; Soto, Ileana; de Vries, Wilhelmine N; John, Simon W M; Howell, Gareth R

    2016-02-18

    Studies have assessed individual components of a western diet, but no study has assessed the long-term, cumulative effects of a western diet on aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, we have formulated the first western-style diet that mimics the fat, carbohydrate, protein, vitamin and mineral levels of western diets. This diet was fed to aging C57BL/6J (B6) mice to identify phenotypes that may increase susceptibility to AD, and to APP/PS1 mice, a mouse model of AD, to determine the effects of the diet in AD. Astrocytosis and microglia/monocyte activation were dramatically increased in response to diet and was further increased in APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet. This increase in glial responses was associated with increased plaque burden in the hippocampus. Interestingly, given recent studies highlighting the importance of TREM2 in microglia/monocytes in AD susceptibility and progression, B6 and APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet showed significant increases TREM2+ microglia/monocytes. Therefore, an increase in TREM2+ microglia/monocytes may underlie the increased risk from a western diet to age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. This study lays the foundation to fully investigate the impact of a western diet on glial responses in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Chronic consumption of a western diet induces robust glial activation in aging mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Leah C.; Harder, Jeffrey M.; Soto, Ileana; de Vries, Wilhelmine N.; John, Simon W. M.; Howell, Gareth R.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have assessed individual components of a western diet, but no study has assessed the long-term, cumulative effects of a western diet on aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Therefore, we have formulated the first western-style diet that mimics the fat, carbohydrate, protein, vitamin and mineral levels of western diets. This diet was fed to aging C57BL/6J (B6) mice to identify phenotypes that may increase susceptibility to AD, and to APP/PS1 mice, a mouse model of AD, to determine the effects of the diet in AD. Astrocytosis and microglia/monocyte activation were dramatically increased in response to diet and was further increased in APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet. This increase in glial responses was associated with increased plaque burden in the hippocampus. Interestingly, given recent studies highlighting the importance of TREM2 in microglia/monocytes in AD susceptibility and progression, B6 and APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet showed significant increases TREM2+ microglia/monocytes. Therefore, an increase in TREM2+ microglia/monocytes may underlie the increased risk from a western diet to age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. This study lays the foundation to fully investigate the impact of a western diet on glial responses in aging and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26888450

  17. Hybrid mice as genetic models of high alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Blednov, Y A; Ozburn, A R; Walker, D; Ahmed, S; Belknap, J K; Harris, R A

    2010-01-01

    We showed that F1 hybrid genotypes may provide a broader variety of ethanol drinking phenotypes than the inbred progenitor strains used to create the hybrids (Blednov et al. in Alcohol Clin Exp Res 29:1949-1958, 2005). To extend this work, we characterized alcohol consumption as well as intake of other tastants (saccharin, quinine and sodium chloride) in five inbred strains of mice (FVB, SJL, B6, BUB, NZB) and in their reciprocal F1 hybrids with B6 (FVBxB6; B6xFVB; NZBxB6; B6xNZB; BUBxB6; B6xBUB; SJLxB6; B6xSJL). We also compared ethanol intake in these mice for several concentrations before and after two periods of abstinence. F1 hybrid mice derived from the crosses of B6 and FVB and also B6 and SJL drank higher levels of ethanol than their progenitor strains, demonstrating overdominance for two-bottle choice drinking test. The B6 and NZB hybrid showed additivity in two-bottle choice drinking, whereas the hybrid of B6 and BUB demonstrated full or complete dominance. Genealogical origin, as well as non-alcohol taste preferences (sodium chloride), predicted ethanol consumption. Mice derived from the crosses of B6 and FVB showed high sustained alcohol preference and the B6 and NZB hybrids showed reduced alcohol preference after periods of abstinence. These new genetic models offer some advantages over inbred strains because they provide high, sustained, alcohol intake, and should allow mapping of loci important for the genetic architecture of these traits.

  18. Banana Resistant Starch and Its Effects on Constipation Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Huang, Ji Hong; Cheng, Yan Feng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Banana resistant starch (BRS) was extracted to investigate the structural properties of BRS, its effects on the gastrointestinal transit, and dejecta of normal and experimentally constipated mice. The mouse constipation model was induced by diphenoxylate administration. The BRS administered mice were divided into three groups and gavaged with 1.0, 2.0, or 4.0 g/kg body weight BRS per day. The small intestinal movement, time of the first black dejecta, dejecta granules, weight and their moisture content, body weight, and food intake of mice were studied. Results showed that the BRS particles were oval and spindly and some light cracks and pits were in the surface. The degree of crystallinity of BRS was 23.13%; the main diffraction peaks were at 2θ 15.14, 17.38, 20.08, and 22.51. The degree of polymerization of BRS was 81.16 and the number-average molecular weight was 13147.92 Da, as determined by the reducing terminal method. In animal experiments, BRS at the dose of 4.0 g/kg body weight per day was able to increase the gastrointestinal propulsive rate, and BRS at the doses of 2.0 and 4.0 g/kg body weight per day was found to shorten the start time of defecation by observing the first black dejecta exhaust. However, there were no influences of BRS on the dejecta moisture content, the dejecta granules and their weight, body weight, or daily food intake in mice. BRS was effective in accelerating the movement of the small intestine and in shortening the start time of defecation, but did not impact body weight and food intake. Therefore, BRS had the potential to be useful for improving intestinal motility during constipation. PMID:25046686

  19. Banana resistant starch and its effects on constipation model mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Huang, Ji Hong; Cheng, Yan Feng; Yang, Gong Ming

    2014-08-01

    Banana resistant starch (BRS) was extracted to investigate the structural properties of BRS, its effects on the gastrointestinal transit, and dejecta of normal and experimentally constipated mice. The mouse constipation model was induced by diphenoxylate administration. The BRS administered mice were divided into three groups and gavaged with 1.0, 2.0, or 4.0 g/kg body weight BRS per day. The small intestinal movement, time of the first black dejecta, dejecta granules, weight and their moisture content, body weight, and food intake of mice were studied. Results showed that the BRS particles were oval and spindly and some light cracks and pits were in the surface. The degree of crystallinity of BRS was 23.13%; the main diffraction peaks were at 2(θ) 15.14, 17.38, 20.08, and 22.51. The degree of polymerization of BRS was 81.16 and the number-average molecular weight was 13147.92 Da, as determined by the reducing terminal method. In animal experiments, BRS at the dose of 4.0 g/kg body weight per day was able to increase the gastrointestinal propulsive rate, and BRS at the doses of 2.0 and 4.0 g/kg body weight per day was found to shorten the start time of defecation by observing the first black dejecta exhaust. However, there were no influences of BRS on the dejecta moisture content, the dejecta granules and their weight, body weight, or daily food intake in mice. BRS was effective in accelerating the movement of the small intestine and in shortening the start time of defecation, but did not impact body weight and food intake. Therefore, BRS had the potential to be useful for improving intestinal motility during constipation.

  20. Standardized Herbal Formula PM012 Decreases Cognitive Impairment and Promotes Neurogenesis in the 3xTg AD Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ye, Minsook; Chung, Hwan-Suck; An, Yong Ho; Lim, Su-Jin; Choi, Won; Yu, A Ram; Kim, Jin Su; Kang, Manho; Cho, Seunghun; Shim, Insop; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a severe neurodegenerative disease for which there is currently no effective treatment. This study investigated whether treatment with the herbal formula PM012 would improve the cognitive function and the pathological features of AD in 3xTg-AD mice. The cognitive function of 3xTg-AD mice was assessed using the Morris water maze test and positron-emission tomography (PET) with 18 F-2 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([F-18] FDG) neuroimaging. The levels of the amyloid beta (Aβ) deposits in the hippocampus were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Neurogenesis was assessed by quantitative labeling with the DNA marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and the newborn neuron marker doublecortin (DCX). PM012 treatment significantly ameliorated memory deficit in AD mice, as shown by shortened escape latencies and increased time spent in the target zone during probe tests. In addition, PM012 significantly decreased Aβ deposits, up-regulated the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), increased neurogenesis, and improved brain glucose metabolism in the 3xTg-AD mice. These results suggest that PM012 could be a promising treatment for AD.

  1. Arctigenin Attenuates Learning and Memory Deficits through PI3k/Akt/GSK-3β Pathway Reducing Tau Hyperphosphorylation in Aβ-Induced AD Mice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yue; Dou, De-Qiang; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Bing-Bing; Qin, Wen-Yan; Kang, Kai; Zhang, Na; Jia, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Arctigenin is a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan compound possessing antitumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-influenza, antioxidant, antibacterial, and hypoglycaemic activities. Our previous study demonstrated that arctigenin exerts neuroprotective effects both in vitro and in vivo in a Parkinson's disease model. However, the exact mechanism through which arctigenin improves amyloid beta-induced memory impairment by inhibiting the production of the hyperphosphorylated tau protein is unknown. Amyloid β1-42 was slowly administered via the intracerebroventricular route in a volume of 3 µL (≈ 410 pmmol/mouse) to mice. The mice were administered arctigenin (10, 40, or 150 mg/kg) or vehicle starting from the second day after amyloid β1-42 injection to the end of the experiment. Behavioural tests were performed from days 9 to 15. On day 16 after the intracerebroventricular administration of amyloid β1-42, the mice were sacrificed for biochemical analysis. Arctigenin (10-150 mg/kg) significantly attenuated the impairment of spontaneous alternation behaviours in the Y-maze task, decreased the escape latency in the Morris water maze test, and increased the swimming times and swimming distances to the platform located in the probe test. Arctigenin attenuated the level of phosphorylated tau at the Thr-181, Thr-231, and Ser-404 sites in the hippocampus, and increased the phosphorylation levels of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, threonine/serine protein kinase B, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Arctigenin effectively provides protection against learning and memory deficits and in inhibits hyperphosphorylated tau protein expression in the hippocampus. The possible mechanism may occur via the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B-dependent glycogen synthase kinase-3β signalling pathway.

  2. The Will, Skill, Tool Model of Technology Integration: Adding Pedagogy as a New Model Construct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knezek, Gerald; Christensen, Rhonda

    2015-01-01

    An expansion of the Will, Skill, Tool Model of Technology Integration to include teacher's pedagogical style is proposed by the authors as a means of advancing the predictive power for level of classroom technology integration to beyond 90%. Suggested advantages to this expansion include more precise identification of areas to be targeted for…

  3. Ad Hoc modeling, expert problem solving, and R&T program evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, B. G.; Liebowitz, J.; Moustakis, V. S.

    1983-01-01

    A simplified cost and time (SCAT) analysis program utilizing personal-computer technology is presented and demonstrated in the case of the NASA-Goddard end-to-end data system. The difficulties encountered in implementing complex program-selection and evaluation models in the research and technology field are outlined. The prototype SCAT system described here is designed to allow user-friendly ad hoc modeling in real time and at low cost. A worksheet constructed on the computer screen displays the critical parameters and shows how each is affected when one is altered experimentally. In the NASA case, satellite data-output and control requirements, ground-facility data-handling capabilities, and project priorities are intricately interrelated. Scenario studies of the effects of spacecraft phaseout or new spacecraft on throughput and delay parameters are shown. The use of a network of personal computers for higher-level coordination of decision-making processes is suggested, as a complement or alternative to complex large-scale modeling.

  4. Adding local components to global functions for continuous covariates in multivariable regression modeling.

    PubMed

    Binder, H; Sauerbrei, W

    2010-03-30

    When global techniques, based on fractional polynomials (FPs), are employed for modeling potentially nonlinear effects of several continuous covariates on a response, accessible model equations are obtained. However, local features might be missed. Therefore, a procedure is introduced, which systematically checks model fits, obtained by the multivariable fractional polynomial (MFP) approach, for overlooked local features. Statistically significant local polynomials are then parsimoniously added. This approach, called MFP + L, is seen to result in an effective control of the Type I error with respect to the addition of local components in a small simulation study with univariate and multivariable settings. Prediction performance is compared with that of a penalized regression spline technique. In a setting unfavorable for FPs, the latter outperforms the MFP approach, if there is much information in the data. However, the addition of local features reduces this performance difference. There is only a small detrimental effect in settings where the MFP approach performs better. In an application example with children's respiratory health data, fits from the spline-based approach indicate many local features, but MFP + L adds only few significant features, which seem to have good support in the data. The proposed approach may be expected to be superior in settings with local features, but retains the good properties of the MFP approach in a large number of settings where global functions are sufficient.

  5. Th17 Inflammation Model of Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in Immunodeficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Weinberg, Aaron; Pandiyan, Pushpa

    2015-01-01

    Oropharyngeal Candidiasis (OPC) disease is caused not only due to the lack of host immune resistance, but also the absence of appropriate regulation of infection-induced immunopathology. Although Th17 cells are implicated in antifungal defense, their role in immunopathology is unclear. This study presents a method for establishing oral Th17 immunopathology associated with oral candidal infection in immunodeficient mice. The method is based on reconstituting lymphopenic mice with in vitro cultured Th17 cells, followed by oral infection with Candida albicans (C. albicans). Results show that unrestrained Th17 cells result in inflammation and pathology, and is associated with several measurable read-outs including weight loss, pro-inflammatory cytokine production, tongue histopathology and mortality, showing that this model may be valuable in studying OPC immunopathology. Adoptive transfer of regulatory cells (Tregs) controls and reduces the inflammatory response, showing that this model can be used to test new strategies to counteract oral inflammation. This model may also be applicable in studying oral Th17 immunopathology in general in the context of other oral diseases. PMID:25742163

  6. Th17 inflammation model of oropharyngeal candidiasis in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Weinberg, Aaron; Pandiyan, Pushpa

    2015-02-18

    Oropharyngeal Candidiasis (OPC) disease is caused not only due to the lack of host immune resistance, but also the absence of appropriate regulation of infection-induced immunopathology. Although Th17 cells are implicated in antifungal defense, their role in immunopathology is unclear. This study presents a method for establishing oral Th17 immunopathology associated with oral candidal infection in immunodeficient mice. The method is based on reconstituting lymphopenic mice with in vitro cultured Th17 cells, followed by oral infection with Candida albicans (C. albicans). Results show that unrestrained Th17 cells result in inflammation and pathology, and is associated with several measurable read-outs including weight loss, pro-inflammatory cytokine production, tongue histopathology and mortality, showing that this model may be valuable in studying OPC immunopathology. Adoptive transfer of regulatory cells (Tregs) controls and reduces the inflammatory response, showing that this model can be used to test new strategies to counteract oral inflammation. This model may also be applicable in studying oral Th17 immunopathology in general in the context of other oral diseases.

  7. Improving Accuracy in Arrhenius Models of Cell Death: Adding a Temperature-Dependent Time Delay.

    PubMed

    Pearce, John A

    2015-12-01

    The Arrhenius formulation for single-step irreversible unimolecular reactions has been used for many decades to describe the thermal damage and cell death processes. Arrhenius predictions are acceptably accurate for structural proteins, for some cell death assays, and for cell death at higher temperatures in most cell lines, above about 55 °C. However, in many cases--and particularly at hyperthermic temperatures, between about 43 and 55 °C--the particular intrinsic cell death or damage process under study exhibits a significant "shoulder" region that constant-rate Arrhenius models are unable to represent with acceptable accuracy. The primary limitation is that Arrhenius calculations always overestimate the cell death fraction, which leads to severely overoptimistic predictions of heating effectiveness in tumor treatment. Several more sophisticated mathematical model approaches have been suggested and show much-improved performance. But simpler models that have adequate accuracy would provide useful and practical alternatives to intricate biochemical analyses. Typical transient intrinsic cell death processes at hyperthermic temperatures consist of a slowly developing shoulder region followed by an essentially constant-rate region. The shoulder regions have been demonstrated to arise chiefly from complex functional protein signaling cascades that generate delays in the onset of the constant-rate region, but may involve heat shock protein activity as well. This paper shows that acceptably accurate and much-improved predictions in the simpler Arrhenius models can be obtained by adding a temperature-dependent time delay. Kinetic coefficients and the appropriate time delay are obtained from the constant-rate regions of the measured survival curves. The resulting predictions are seen to provide acceptably accurate results while not overestimating cell death. The method can be relatively easily incorporated into numerical models. Additionally, evidence is presented

  8. A non-transgenic mouse model (icv-STZ mouse) of Alzheimer's disease: similarities to and differences from the transgenic model (3xTg-AD mouse).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanxing; Liang, Zhihou; Blanchard, Julie; Dai, Chun-Ling; Sun, Shenggang; Lee, Moon H; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be divided into sporadic AD (SAD) and familial AD (FAD). Most AD cases are sporadic and result from multiple etiologic factors, including environmental, genetic, and metabolic factors, whereas FAD is caused by mutations in the presenilins or amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) genes. A commonly used animal model for AD is the 3xTg-AD transgenic mouse model, which harbors mutated presenilin 1, APP, and tau genes and thus represents a model of FAD. There is an unmet need in the field to characterize animal models representing different AD mechanisms, so that potential drugs for SAD can be evaluated preclinically in these animal models. A mouse model generated by intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of streptozocin (STZ), the icv-STZ mouse, shows many aspects of SAD. In this study, we compared the non-cognitive and cognitive behaviors as well as biochemical and immunohistochemical alterations between the icv-STZ mouse and the 3xTg-AD mouse. We found that both mouse models showed increased exploratory activity as well as impaired learning and spatial memory. Both models also demonstrated neuroinflammation, altered synaptic proteins and insulin/IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1) signaling, and increased hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain. The most prominent brain abnormality in the icv-STZ mouse was neuroinflammation, and in the 3xTg-AD mouse it was elevation of hyperphosphorylated tau. These observations demonstrate the behavioral and neuropathological similarities and differences between the icv-STZ mouse and the 3xTg-AD mouse models and will help guide future studies using these two mouse models for the development of AD drugs.

  9. Anterior circulation model of subarachnoid hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Attia, Mohammed Sabri; Loch Macdonald, R

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains one of the most morbid subtypes of stroke around the world and has been the focus of hemorrhagic stroke research for longer than five decades. Animal models have been instrumental in shaping the progress and advancement of SAH research, particularly models that allow for transgenic manipulation. The anterior circulation mouse model provides the research community with a rodent model that depicts very similar clinical findings of SAH; from the location of the hemorrhages to the secondary complications that arise after the hemorrhagic insult. The model allows for the recreation of clinically relevant findings such as large vessel vasospasm, oxidative stress, microcirculatory spasm and microthrombosis, and delayed neuronal injury - all of which appear in human cases of SAH. The model is also not technically demanding, is highly reproducible, and allows for an array of transgenic manipulation, which is essential for mechanistic investigations of the pathogenesis of SAH. The anterior circulation mouse model of SAH is one of a few models that are currently used in mice, and provides the research community with a relatively easy, reliable, and clinically relevant model of SAH - one that could be effectively be used to test for early brain injury (EBI) and delayed neurological injury after SAH.

  10. Quantum self-consistency of AdS×Σ brane models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flachi, Antonino; Pujolàs, Oriol

    2003-07-01

    Continuing our previous work, we consider a class of higher dimensional brane models with the topology of AdSD1+1×Σ, where Σ is a one-parameter compact manifold and two branes of codimension one are located at the orbifold fixed points. We consider a setup where such a solution arises from Einstein-Yang-Mills theory and evaluate the one-loop effective potential induced by gauge fields and by a generic bulk scalar field. We show that this type of brane model resolves the gauge hierarchy between the Planck and electroweak scales through redshift effects due to the warp factor a=e-πkr. The value of a is then fixed by minimizing the effective potential. We find that, as in the Randall-Sundrum case, the gauge field contribution to the effective potential stabilizes the hierarchy without fine-tuning as long as the Laplacian ΔΣ on Σ has a zero eigenvalue. Scalar fields can stabilize the hierarchy depending on the mass and the nonminimal coupling. We also address the quantum self-consistency of the solution, showing that the classical brane solution is not spoiled by quantum effects.

  11. Amyloid-β expression in retrosplenial cortex of 3xTg-AD mice: relationship to cholinergic axonal afferents from medial septum

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Richard T.; Baratta, Janie; Yu, Jen; LaFerla, Frank M.

    2009-01-01

    Triple transgenic (3xTg-AD) mice harboring the presenilin 1, amyloid precursor protein, and tau transgenes (Oddo et al., 2003) display prominent levels of amyloid-beta (Aβ) immunoreactivity in forebrain regions. The Aβ immunoreactivity is first seen intracellularly in neurons and later as extracellular plaque deposits. The present study examined Aβ immunoreactivity that occurs in layer III of the granular division of retrosplenial cortex (RSg). This pattern of Aβ immunoreactivity in layer III of RSg develops relatively late, and is seen in animals older than 14 mo. The appearance of the Aβ immunoreactivity is similar to an axonal terminal field and thus may offer a unique opportunity to study the relationship between afferent projections and the formation of Aβ deposits. Axonal tract tracing techniques demonstrated that the pattern of axon terminal labeling in layer III of RSg, following placement of DiI in medial septum, is remarkably similar to the pattern of cholinergic axons in RSg, as detected by acetylcholinesterase histochemical staining, choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity, or p75 receptor immunoreactivity; this pattern also is strikingly similar to the band of Aβ immunoreactivity. In animals sustaining early damage to the medial septal nucleus (prior to the advent of Aβ immunoreactivity), the band of Aβ in layer III of RSg does not develop; the corresponding band of cholinergic markers also is eliminated. In older animals (after the appearance of the Aβ immunoreactivity) damage to cholinergic afferents by electrolytic lesions, immunotoxin lesions, or cutting the cingulate bundle, result in a rapid loss of the cholinergic markers and a slower reduction of Aβ immunoreactivity. These results suggest that the septal cholinergic axonal projections transport Aβ or APP to layer III of RSg. PMID:19772895

  12. Generation of Pediatric Leukemia Xenograft Models in NSG-B2m Mice: Comparison with NOD/SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Bojja, Aruna Sri; Mason, Robert W; Corao, Diana; Barwe, Sonali P

    2016-01-01

    Generation of orthotopic xenograft mouse models of leukemia is important to understand the mechanisms of leukemogenesis, cancer progression, its cross talk with the bone marrow microenvironment, and for preclinical evaluation of drugs. In these models, following intravenous injection, leukemic cells home to the bone marrow and proliferate there before infiltrating other organs, such as spleen, liver, and the central nervous system. Moreover, such models have been shown to accurately recapitulate the human disease and correlate with patient response to therapy and prognosis. Thus, various immune-deficient mice strains have been used with or without recipient preconditioning to increase engraftment efficiency. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mutation and with non-obese diabetic background (NOD/SCID) have been used in the majority of leukemia xenograft studies. Later, NOD/SCID mice deficient for interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ) gene called NSG mice became the model of choice for leukemia xenografts. However, engraftment of leukemia cells without irradiation preconditioning still remained a challenge. In this study, we used NSG mice with null alleles for major histocompatibility complex class I beta2-microglobulin (β2m) called NSG-B2m. This is a first report describing the 100% engraftment efficiency of pediatric leukemia cell lines and primary samples in NSG-B2m mice in the absence of host preconditioning by sublethal irradiation. We also show direct comparison of the engraftment efficiency and growth rate of pediatric acute leukemia cells in NSG-B2m and NOD/SCID mice, which showed 80-90% engraftment efficiency. Secondary and tertiary xenografts in NSG-B2m mice generated by injection of cells isolated from the spleens of leukemia-bearing mice also behaved similar to the primary patient sample. We have successfully engrafted 25 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with

  13. Discounting Testimony with the Argument Ad Hominem and a Bayesian Congruent Prior Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Jaydeep-Singh; Oaksford, Mike

    2015-01-01

    When directed to ignore evidence of a witness's previous bad character because of a violation of the rules of evidence, are jurors' beliefs still affected? The intuition is that they will be because in everyday argumentation, fallacies, like the ad hominem, are effective argumentative strategies. An ad hominem argument (against the person)…

  14. Oleocanthal Enhances Amyloid-β Clearance from the Brains of TgSwDI Mice and in Vitro across a Human Blood-Brain Barrier Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Numerous clinical and preclinical studies have suggested several health promoting effects for the dietary consumption of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) that could protect and decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Moreover, recent studies have linked this protective effect to oleocanthal, a phenolic secoiridoid component of EVOO. This protective effect of oleocanthal against AD has been related to its ability to prevent amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau aggregation in vitro, and enhance Aβ clearance from the brains of wild type mice in vivo; however, its effect in a mouse model of AD is not known. In the current study, we investigated the effect of oleocanthal on pathological hallmarks of AD in TgSwDI, an animal model of AD. Mice treatment for 4 weeks with oleocanthal significantly decreased amyloid load in the hippocampal parenchyma and microvessels. This reduction was associated with enhanced cerebral clearance of Aβ across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Further mechanistic studies demonstrated oleocanthal to increase the expression of important amyloid clearance proteins at the BBB including P-glycoprotein and LRP1, and to activate the ApoE-dependent amyloid clearance pathway in the mice brains. The anti-inflammatory effect of oleocanthal in the brains of these mice was also obvious where it was able to reduce astrocytes activation and IL-1β levels. Finally, we could recapitulate the observed protective effect of oleocanthal in an in vitro human-based model, which could argue against species difference in response to oleocanthal. In conclusion, findings from in vivo and in vitro studies provide further support for the protective effect of oleocanthal against the progression of AD. PMID:26348065

  15. Modeling cognition and disease using human glial chimeric mice.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken; Windrem, Martha S

    2015-08-01

    As new methods for producing and isolating human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) have been developed, the disorders of myelin have become especially compelling targets for cell-based therapy. Yet as animal modeling of glial progenitor cell-based therapies has progressed, it has become clear that transplanted hGPCs not only engraft and expand within murine hosts, but dynamically outcompete the resident progenitors so as to ultimately dominate the host brain. The engrafted human progenitor cells proceed to generate parenchymal astrocytes, and when faced with a hypomyelinated environment, oligodendrocytes as well. As a result, the recipient brains may become inexorably humanized with regards to their resident glial populations, yielding human glial chimeric mouse brains. These brains provide us a fundamentally new tool by which to assess the species-specific attributes of glia in modulating human cognition and information processing. In addition, the cellular humanization of these brains permits their use in studying glial infectious and inflammatory disorders unique to humans, and the effects of those disorders on the glial contributions to cognition. Perhaps most intriguingly, by pairing our ability to construct human glial chimeras with the production of patient-specific hGPCs derived from pluripotential stem cells, we may now establish mice in which a substantial proportion of resident glia are both human and disease-derived. These mice in particular may provide us new opportunities for studying the human-specific contributions of glia to psychopathology, as well as to higher cognition. As such, the assessment of human glial chimeric mice may provide us new insight into the species-specific contributions of glia to human cognitive evolution, as well as to the pathogenesis of human neurological and neuropsychiatric disease.

  16. Modeling Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in Mice by Alteration of Expression of the BRCA1 and/or P53 Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    later by injection with 5 U of human chorionic gonadotropin (hormones purchased from Sigma, St. Louis, MO). 1.5 days following the last hormone...AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0063 TITLE: Modeling Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in Mice by Alteration of Expression of the BRCA1 and/or P53 Genes...FUNDING NUMBERS Modeling Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in Mice by W81XWH-04-1-0063 Alteration of Expression of the BRCAI and/or P53 Genes 6. AUTHOR(S

  17. Animal Models of Leptospirosis: Of Mice and Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Gomes-Solecki, Maria; Santecchia, Ignacio; Werts, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira sp. are spirochetal bacteria responsible for leptospirosis, an emerging worldwide zoonosis. These spirochetes are very successful pathogens that infect a wide range of hosts such as fish, reptiles, birds, marsupials, and mammals. Transmission occurs when chronically infected animals excrete live bacteria in their urine, contaminating the environment. Leptospira sp. enter their hosts through damaged skin and mucosa. Chronically infected rats and mice are asymptomatic and are considered as important reservoirs of the disease. Infected humans may develop either a flu-like, usually mild illness with or without chronic asymptotic renal colonization, or a severe acute disease with kidney, liver, and heart failure, potentially leading to death. Leptospirosis is an economic burden on society due to health-care costs related to elevated morbidity of humans and loss of animals of agricultural interest. There are no effective vaccines against leptospirosis. Leptospira sp. are difficult to genetically manipulate which delays the pace of research progress. In this review, we discuss in an historical perspective how animal models have contributed to further our knowledge of leptospirosis. Hamsters, guinea pigs, and gerbils have been instrumental to study the pathophysiology of acute lethal leptospirosis and the Leptospira sp. genes involved in virulence. Chronic renal colonization has been mostly studied using experimentally infected rats. A special emphasis will be placed on mouse models, long thought to be irrelevant since they survive lethal infection. However, mice have recently been shown to be good models of sublethal infection leading to chronic colonization. Furthermore, congenic and transgenic mice have proven essential to study how innate immune cells interact with the pathogen and to understand the role of the toll-like receptor 4, which is important to control Leptospira sp. load and disease. The use of inbred and transgenic mouse models opens

  18. Whole body exposure to 2.4 GHz WIFI signals: effects on cognitive impairment in adult triple transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (3xTg-AD).

    PubMed

    Banaceur, Sana; Banasr, Sihem; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2013-03-01

    The present investigation aimed at evaluating the effects of long-term exposure to WIFI type radiofrequency (RF) signals (2.40 GHz), two hours per day during one month at a Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of 1.60 W/kg. The effects of RF exposure were studied on wildtype mice and triple transgenic mice (3xTg-AD) destined to develop Alzheimer's-like cognitive impairment. Mice were divided into four groups: two sham groups (WT, TG; n=7) and two exposed groups (WTS, TGS; n=7). The cognitive interference task used in this study was designed from an analogous human cognitive interference task including the Flex field activity system test, the two-compartment box test and the Barnes maze test. Our data demonstrate for the first time that RF improves cognitive behavior of 3xTg-AD mice. We conclude that RF exposure may represent an effective memory-enhancing approach in Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Early intervention in the 3xTg-AD mice with an amyloid β-antibody fragment ameliorates first hallmarks of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Rivera-Hernández, Geovanny; Marin-Argany, Marta; Sánchez-Quesada, José L; Villegas, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    The single-chain variable fragment, scFv-h3D6, has been shown to prevent in vitro toxicity induced by the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide in neuroblastoma cell cultures by withdrawing Aβ oligomers from the amyloid pathway. Present study examined the in vivo effects of scFv-h3D6 in the triple-transgenic 3xTg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer disease. Prior to the treatment, five-month-old female animals, corresponding to early stages of the disease, showed the first behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia -like behaviors. Cognitive deficits included long- and short-term learning and memory deficits and high swimming navigation speed. After a single intraperitoneal dose of scFv-h3D6, the swimming speed was reversed to normal levels and the learning and memory deficits were ameliorated. Brain tissues of these animals revealed a global decrease of Aβ oligomers in the cortex and olfactory bulb after treatment, but this was not seen in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In the untreated 3xTg-AD animals, we observed an increase of both apoJ and apoE concentrations in the cortex, as well as an increase of apoE in the hippocampus. Treatment significantly recovered the non-pathological levels of these apolipoproteins. Our results suggest that the benefit of scFv-h3D6 occurs at both behavioral and molecular levels.

  20. Early intervention in the 3xTg-AD mice with an amyloid β-antibody fragment ameliorates first hallmarks of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Rivera-Hernández, Geovanny; Marín-Argany, Marta; Sánchez-Quesada, José L.; Villegas, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    The single-chain variable fragment, scFv-h3D6, has been shown to prevent in vitro toxicity induced by the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide in neuroblastoma cell cultures by withdrawing Aβ oligomers from the amyloid pathway. Present study examined the in vivo effects of scFv-h3D6 in the triple-transgenic 3xTg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer disease. Prior to the treatment, five-month-old female animals, corresponding to early stages of the disease, showed the first behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia -like behaviors. Cognitive deficits included long- and short-term learning and memory deficits and high swimming navigation speed. After a single intraperitoneal dose of scFv-h3D6, the swimming speed was reversed to normal levels and the learning and memory deficits were ameliorated. Brain tissues of these animals revealed a global decrease of Aβ oligomers in the cortex and olfactory bulb after treatment, but this was not seen in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In the untreated 3xTg-AD animals, we observed an increase of both apoJ and apoE concentrations in the cortex, as well as an increase of apoE in the hippocampus. Treatment significantly recovered the non-pathological levels of these apolipoproteins. Our results suggest that the benefit of scFv-h3D6 occurs at both behavioral and molecular levels. PMID:23884018

  1. Adding-point strategy for reduced-order hypersonic aerothermodynamics modeling based on fuzzy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Liu, Li; Zhou, Sida; Yue, Zhenjiang

    2016-09-01

    Reduced order models(ROMs) based on the snapshots on the CFD high-fidelity simulations have been paid great attention recently due to their capability of capturing the features of the complex geometries and flow configurations. To improve the efficiency and precision of the ROMs, it is indispensable to add extra sampling points to the initial snapshots, since the number of sampling points to achieve an adequately accurate ROM is generally unknown in prior, but a large number of initial sampling points reduces the parsimony of the ROMs. A fuzzy-clustering-based adding-point strategy is proposed and the fuzzy clustering acts an indicator of the region in which the precision of ROMs is relatively low. The proposed method is applied to construct the ROMs for the benchmark mathematical examples and a numerical example of hypersonic aerothermodynamics prediction for a typical control surface. The proposed method can achieve a 34.5% improvement on the efficiency than the estimated mean squared error prediction algorithm and shows same-level prediction accuracy.

  2. Effects of aging and genotype on circadian rhythms, sleep, and clock gene expression in APPxPS1 knock-in mice, a model for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Marilyn J; Smith, J Tyler; Franklin, Kathleen M; Beckett, Tina L; Murphy, M Paul; St Clair, Daret K; Donohue, Kevin D; Striz, Martin; O'Hara, Bruce F

    2012-08-01

    Profound disruptions of circadian rhythms and sleep/wake cycles constitute a major cause of institutionalization of AD patients. This study investigated whether a rodent model of AD, APP(NLH/NLH)/PS-1(P264L/264L) (APPxPS1) mice, exhibits circadian alterations. The APPxPS1 mice were generated using CD-1/129 mice and Cre-lox knock-in technology to "humanize" the mouse amyloid (A)β sequence and create a presenilin-1 mutation identified in familial early-onset AD patients. APPxPS1 and WT mice of several ages (~4, 11, and 15 months) were monitored for circadian rhythms in wheel running, cage activity, and sleep:wake behavior. After rhythm assessment, the mice were euthanized at zeitgeber time (ZT) 2 or 10 (i.e., 2 or 10 h after lights-on) and brains were dissected. Amyloidβ levels were measured in cortical samples and brain sections of the hypothalamus and hippocampus were prepared and used for in situ hybridization of circadian or neuropeptide genes. The most significant effects of the APPxPS1 transgenes were phase delays of ~2 h in the onset of daytime wakefulness bouts (P<0.005) and peak wakefulness (P<0.02), potentially relevant to phase delays previously reported in AD patients. However, genotype did not affect the major activity peaks or phases of wheel running, wake, or general movement, which were bimodal with dominant dawn and dusk activity. Expression of Period 2 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus was affected by ZT (P<0.0001) with a marginal interaction effect of age, genotype, and ZT (P<0.08). A separate analysis of the old animals indicated a robust interaction between ZT and genotype, as well as main effects of these parameters. Aging also altered sleep (e.g., bout length and amount of daytime sleep) and the amount of wheel running and cage activity. In conclusion, the APPxPS1 knock-in mice exhibit some alterations in their sleep:wake rhythm and clock gene expression, but do not show robust, genotype-related changes in activity rhythms. The prominent daytime

  3. Fabrication, Testing and Modeling of the MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Trillaud, F.; Zisman, M.S.

    2010-05-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), an international collaboration sited at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of realistic cooling channel using a muon beam. A five-coil superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region at each end of the cooling channel. Scintillating fiber trackers within the 400 mm diameter magnet bore tubes measure the emittance of the beam as it enters and exits the cooling channel. Each of the identical 3-meter long magnets incorporates a three-coil spectrometer magnet section and a two-coil section to match the solenoid uniform field into the other magnets of the MICE cooling channel. The cold mass, radiation shield and leads are currently kept cold by means of three two-stage cryocoolers and one single-stage cryocooler. Liquid helium within the cold mass is maintained by means of a re-condensation technique. After incorporating several design changes to improve the magnet cooling and reliability, the fabrication and acceptance testing of the spectrometer solenoids have proceeded. The key features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets, the development of a thermal model, the results of the recently completed tests, and the current status of the project are presented.

  4. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR intravenous and ingested DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMAV) IN MICE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the organoarsenical dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) was developed in mice. The model was calibrated using tissue time course data from multiple tissues in mice administered DMA(V) intravenously. The final model structure was ...

  5. Chronic rapamycin restores brain vascular integrity and function through NO synthase activation and improves memory in symptomatic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Zheng, Wei; Halloran, Jonathan J; Burbank, Raquel R; Hussong, Stacy A; Hart, Matthew J; Javors, Martin; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Muir, Eric; Solano Fonseca, Rene; Strong, Randy; Richardson, Arlan G; Lechleiter, James D; Fox, Peter T; Galvan, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Vascular pathology is a major feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. We recently showed that chronic administration of the target-of-rapamycin (TOR) inhibitor rapamycin, which extends lifespan and delays aging, halts the progression of AD-like disease in transgenic human (h)APP mice modeling AD when administered before disease onset. Here we demonstrate that chronic reduction of TOR activity by rapamycin treatment started after disease onset restored cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain vascular density, reduced cerebral amyloid angiopathy and microhemorrhages, decreased amyloid burden, and improved cognitive function in symptomatic hAPP (AD) mice. Like acetylcholine (ACh), a potent vasodilator, acute rapamycin treatment induced the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) and NO release in brain endothelium. Administration of the NOS inhibitor L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester reversed vasodilation as well as the protective effects of rapamycin on CBF and vasculature integrity, indicating that rapamycin preserves vascular density and CBF in AD mouse brains through NOS activation. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic reduction of TOR activity by rapamycin blocked the progression of AD-like cognitive and histopathological deficits by preserving brain vascular integrity and function. Drugs that inhibit the TOR pathway may have promise as a therapy for AD and possibly for vascular dementias. PMID:23801246

  6. A Robust Deep Model for Improved Classification of AD/MCI Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Tran, Loc; Thung, Kim-Han; Ji, Shuiwang; Shen, Dinggang; Li, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Accurate classification of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and its prodromal stage, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), plays a critical role in possibly preventing progression of memory impairment and improving quality of life for AD patients. Among many research tasks, it is of particular interest to identify noninvasive imaging biomarkers for AD diagnosis. In this paper, we present a robust deep learning system to identify different progression stages of AD patients based on MRI and PET scans. We utilized the dropout technique to improve classical deep learning by preventing its weight co-adaptation, which is a typical cause of over-fitting in deep learning. In addition, we incorporated stability selection, an adaptive learning factor, and a multi-task learning strategy into the deep learning framework. We applied the proposed method to the ADNI data set and conducted experiments for AD and MCI conversion diagnosis. Experimental results showed that the dropout technique is very effective in AD diagnosis, improving the classification accuracies by 5.9% on average as compared to the classical deep learning methods. PMID:25955998

  7. Peromyscus mice as a model for studying natural variation

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Nicole L; Hoekstra, Hopi E

    2015-01-01

    The deer mouse (genus Peromyscus) is the most abundant mammal in North America, and it occupies almost every type of terrestrial habitat. It is not surprising therefore that the natural history of Peromyscus is among the best studied of any small mammal. For decades, the deer mouse has contributed to our understanding of population genetics, disease ecology, longevity, endocrinology and behavior. Over a century's worth of detailed descriptive studies of Peromyscus in the wild, coupled with emerging genetic and genomic techniques, have now positioned these mice as model organisms for the study of natural variation and adaptation. Recent work, combining field observations and laboratory experiments, has lead to exciting advances in a number of fields—from evolution and genetics, to physiology and neurobiology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06813.001 PMID:26083802

  8. How Gas-dynamic Flare Models Powered by Petschek Reconnection Differ from Those with Ad Hoc Energy Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longcope, D. W.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    Aspects of solar flare dynamics, such as chromospheric evaporation and flare light curves, have long been studied using one-dimensional models of plasma dynamics inside a static flare loop, subjected to some energy input. While extremely successful at explaining the observed characteristics of flares, all such models so far have specified energy input ad hoc, rather than deriving it self-consistently. There is broad consensus that flares are powered by magnetic energy released through reconnection. Recent work has generalized Petschek’s basic reconnection scenario, topological change followed by field line retraction and shock heating, to permit its inclusion in a one-dimensional flare loop model. Here we compare the gas dynamics driven by retraction and shocking to those from more conventional static loop models energized by ad hoc source terms. We find significant differences during the first minute, when retraction leads to larger kinetic energies and produces higher densities at the loop top, while ad hoc heating tends to rarify the loop top. The loop-top density concentration is related to the slow magnetosonic shock, characteristic of Petschek’s model, but persists beyond the retraction phase occurring in the outflow jet. This offers an explanation for observed loop-top sources of X-ray and EUV emission, with advantages over that provided by ad hoc heating scenarios. The cooling phases of the two models are, however, notably similar to one another, suggesting that observations at that stage will yield little information on the nature of energy input.

  9. Intracellular Signaling and Desmoglein 2 Shedding Triggered by Human Adenoviruses Ad3, Ad14, and Ad14P1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie; Ducournau, Corinne; Saydaminova, Kamola; Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Ho, Martin; Carter, Darrick; Zubieta, Chloé

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently discovered that desmoglein 2 (DSG2) is a receptor for human adenovirus species B serotypes Ad3, Ad7, Ad11, and Ad14. Ad3 is considered to be a widely distributed human pathogen. Ad3 binding to DSG2 triggers the transient opening of epithelial junctions. Here, we further delineate the mechanism that leads to DSG2-mediated epithelial junction opening in cells exposed to Ad3 and recombinant Ad3 fiber proteins. We identified an Ad3 fiber knob-dependent pathway that involves the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases triggering the activation of the matrix-metalloproteinase ADAM17. ADAM17, in turn, cleaves the extracellular domain of DSG2 that links epithelial cells together. The shed DSG2 domain can be detected in cell culture supernatant and also in serum of mice with established human xenograft tumors. We then extended our studies to Ad14 and Ad14P1. Ad14 is an important research and clinical object because of the recent appearance of a new, more pathogenic strain (Ad14P1). In a human epithelial cancer xenograft model, Ad14P1 showed more efficient viral spread and oncolysis than Ad14. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a mutation in the Ad14P1 fiber knob could account for the differences between the two strains. While our X-ray crystallography studies suggested an altered three-dimensional (3D) structure of the Ad14P1 fiber knob in the F-G loop region, this did not significantly change the fiber knob affinity to DSG2 or the intracellular signaling and DSG2 shedding in epithelial cancer cells. IMPORTANCE A number of widely distributed adenoviruses use the epithelial junction protein DSG2 as a receptor for infection and lateral spread. Interaction with DSG2 allows the virus not only to enter cells but also to open epithelial junctions which form a physical barrier to virus spread. Our study elucidates the mechanism beyond virus-triggered junction opening with a focus on adenovirus serotype 3. Ad3 binds to DSG2 with its fiber

  10. A Simple Critical-sized Femoral Defect Model in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Clough, Bret H.; McCarley, Matthew R.; Gregory, Carl A.

    2015-01-01

    While bone has a remarkable capacity for regeneration, serious bone trauma often results in damage that does not properly heal. In fact, one tenth of all limb bone fractures fail to heal completely due to the extent of the trauma, disease, or age of the patient. Our ability to improve bone regenerative strategies is critically dependent on the ability to mimic serious bone trauma in test animals, but the generation and stabilization of large bone lesions is technically challenging. In most cases, serious long bone trauma is mimicked experimentally by establishing a defect that will not naturally heal. This is achieved by complete removal of a bone segment that is larger than 1.5 times the diameter of the bone cross-section. The bone is then stabilized with a metal implant to maintain proper orientation of the fracture edges and allow for mobility. Due to their small size and the fragility of their long bones, establishment of such lesions in mice are beyond the capabilities of most research groups. As such, long bone defect models are confined to rats and larger animals. Nevertheless, mice afford significant research advantages in that they can be genetically modified and bred as immune-compromised strains that do not reject human cells and tissue. Herein, we demonstrate a technique that facilitates the generation of a segmental defect in mouse femora using standard laboratory and veterinary equipment. With practice, fabrication of the fixation device and surgical implantation is feasible for the majority of trained veterinarians and animal research personnel. Using example data, we also provide methodologies for the quantitative analysis of bone healing for the model. PMID:25867551

  11. A simple critical-sized femoral defect model in mice.

    PubMed

    Clough, Bret H; McCarley, Matthew R; Gregory, Carl A

    2015-03-15

    While bone has a remarkable capacity for regeneration, serious bone trauma often results in damage that does not properly heal. In fact, one tenth of all limb bone fractures fail to heal completely due to the extent of the trauma, disease, or age of the patient. Our ability to improve bone regenerative strategies is critically dependent on the ability to mimic serious bone trauma in test animals, but the generation and stabilization of large bone lesions is technically challenging. In most cases, serious long bone trauma is mimicked experimentally by establishing a defect that will not naturally heal. This is achieved by complete removal of a bone segment that is larger than 1.5 times the diameter of the bone cross-section. The bone is then stabilized with a metal implant to maintain proper orientation of the fracture edges and allow for mobility. Due to their small size and the fragility of their long bones, establishment of such lesions in mice are beyond the capabilities of most research groups. As such, long bone defect models are confined to rats and larger animals. Nevertheless, mice afford significant research advantages in that they can be genetically modified and bred as immune-compromised strains that do not reject human cells and tissue. Herein, we demonstrate a technique that facilitates the generation of a segmental defect in mouse femora using standard laboratory and veterinary equipment. With practice, fabrication of the fixation device and surgical implantation is feasible for the majority of trained veterinarians and animal research personnel. Using example data, we also provide methodologies for the quantitative analysis of bone healing for the model.

  12. Early alterations in blood and brain RANTES and MCP-1 expression and the effect of exercise frequency in the 3xTg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Morgan; Jones, Terry E; Lu, Qun; Bareiss, Sonja K

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to protect against cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression, however the dose of exercise required to protect against AD is unknown. Recent studies show that the pathological processes leading to AD cause characteristic alterations in blood and brain inflammatory proteins that are associated with the progression of AD, suggesting that these markers could be used to diagnosis and monitor disease progression. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of exercise frequency on AD blood chemokine profiles, and correlate these findings with chemokine brain expression changes in the triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mouse model. Three month old 3xTg-AD mice were subjected to 12 weeks of moderate intensity wheel running at a frequency of either 1×/week or 3×/week. Blood and cortical tissue were analyzed for expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and regulated and normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES). Alterations in blood RANTES and MCP-1 expression were evident at 3 and 6 month old animals compared to WT animals. Three times per week exercise but not 1×/week exercise was effective at reversing serum and brain RANTES and MCP-1 expression to the levels of WT controls, revealing a dose dependent response to exercise. Analysis of these chemokines showed a strong negative correlation between blood and brain expression of RANTES. The results indicate that alterations in serum and brain inflammatory chemokines are evident as early signs of Alzheimer's disease pathology and that higher frequency exercise was necessary to restore blood and brain inflammatory expression levels in this AD mouse model.

  13. Therapeutic Effects of Microbubbles Added to Combined High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Chemotherapy in a Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mi Hye; Kim, Hae Ri; Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun-Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. Materials and Methods A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. Results The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. Conclusion High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model. PMID:27587968

  14. Mottled Mice and Non-Mammalian Models of Menkes Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lenartowicz, Małgorzata; Krzeptowski, Wojciech; Lipiński, Paweł; Grzmil, Paweł; Starzyński, Rafał; Pierzchała, Olga; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2015-01-01

    Menkes disease is a multi-systemic copper metabolism disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked ATP7A gene and characterized by progressive neurodegeneration and severe connective tissue defects. The ATP7A protein is a copper (Cu)-transporting ATPase expressed in all tissues and plays a critical role in the maintenance of copper homeostasis in cells of the whole body. ATP7A participates in copper absorption in the small intestine and in copper transport to the central nervous system (CNS) across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). Cu is essential for synaptogenesis and axonal development. In cells, ATP7A participates in the incorporation of copper into Cu-dependent enzymes during the course of its maturation in the secretory pathway. There is a high degree of homology (>80%) between the human ATP7A and murine Atp7a genes. Mice with mutations in the Atp7a gene, called mottled mutants, are well-established and excellent models of Menkes disease. Mottled mutants closely recapitulate the Menkes phenotype and are invaluable for studying Cu-metabolism. They provide useful models for exploring and testing new forms of therapy in Menkes disease. Recently, non-mammalian models of Menkes disease, Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio mutants were used in experiments which would be technically difficult to carry out in mammals. PMID:26732058

  15. Mottled Mice and Non-Mammalian Models of Menkes Disease.

    PubMed

    Lenartowicz, Małgorzata; Krzeptowski, Wojciech; Lipiński, Paweł; Grzmil, Paweł; Starzyński, Rafał; Pierzchała, Olga; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2015-01-01

    Menkes disease is a multi-systemic copper metabolism disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked ATP7A gene and characterized by progressive neurodegeneration and severe connective tissue defects. The ATP7A protein is a copper (Cu)-transporting ATPase expressed in all tissues and plays a critical role in the maintenance of copper homeostasis in cells of the whole body. ATP7A participates in copper absorption in the small intestine and in copper transport to the central nervous system (CNS) across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). Cu is essential for synaptogenesis and axonal development. In cells, ATP7A participates in the incorporation of copper into Cu-dependent enzymes during the course of its maturation in the secretory pathway. There is a high degree of homology (>80%) between the human ATP7A and murine Atp7a genes. Mice with mutations in the Atp7a gene, called mottled mutants, are well-established and excellent models of Menkes disease. Mottled mutants closely recapitulate the Menkes phenotype and are invaluable for studying Cu-metabolism. They provide useful models for exploring and testing new forms of therapy in Menkes disease. Recently, non-mammalian models of Menkes disease, Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio mutants were used in experiments which would be technically difficult to carry out in mammals.

  16. A derivative of the brain metabolite lanthionine ketimine improves cognition and diminishes pathology in the 3 × Tg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Kenneth; Gabbita, S Prasad; Venkova, Kalina; Hristov, Alexandar; Johnson, Ming F; Eslami, Pirooz; Harris-White, Marni E

    2013-10-01

    Lanthionine ketimine ([LK] 3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-thiazine-3,5-dicarboxylic acid) is the archetype for a family of naturally occurring brain sulfur amino acid metabolites, the physiologic function of which is unknown. Lanthionine ketimine and its synthetic derivatives have recently demonstrated neurotrophic, neuroprotective, and antineuroinflammatory properties in vitro through a proposed mechanism involving the microtubule-associated protein collapsin response mediator protein 2. Therefore, studies were undertaken to test the effects of a bioavailable LK ester in the 3 × Tg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer disease. Lanthionine ketimine ester treatment substantially diminished cognitive decline and brain amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide deposition and phospho-Tau accumulation in 3 × Tg-AD mice and also reduced the density of Iba1-positive microglia. Furthermore, LK ester treatment altered collapsin response mediator protein 2 phosphorylation. These findings suggest that LK may not be a metabolic waste but rather a purposeful neurochemical, the synthetic derivatives of which constitute a new class of experimental therapeutics for Alzheimer disease and related entities.

  17. Intracerebroventricular Streptozotocin as a Model of Alzheimer's Disease: Neurochemical and Behavioral Characterization in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ravelli, Katherine Garcia; Rosário, Barbara Dos Anjos; Camarini, Rosana; Hernandes, Marina Sorrentino; Britto, Luiz Roberto

    2017-04-01

    Streptozotocin has been widely used to mimic some aspects of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, especially in mice, several characteristics involved in the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced AD pathology are not well known. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate temporally the expression of AD-related proteins, such as amyloid-β (Aβ), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), synapsin, axonal neurofilaments, and phosphorylated Tau in the hippocampus following intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of STZ in adult mice. We also analyzed the impact of STZ on short- and long-term memory by novel object recognition test. Male mice were injected with STZ or citrate buffer, and AD-related proteins were evaluated by immunoblotting assays in the hippocampus at 7, 14, or 21 days after injection. No differences between the groups were found at 7 days. The majority of AD markers evaluated were found altered at 14 days, i.e., the STZ group showed increased amyloid-β protein and neurofilament expression, increased phosphorylation of Tau protein, and decreased synapsin expression levels compared to controls. Except for synapsin, all of these neurochemical changes were transient and did not last up to 21 days of STZ injection. Moreover, both short-term and long-term memory deficits were demonstrated after STZ treatment at 14 and 21 days after STZ treatment.

  18. Abnormal Population Responses in the Somatosensory Cortex of Alzheimer’s Disease Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Maatuf, Yossi; Stern, Edward A.; Slovin, Hamutal

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. One of the neuropathological hallmarks of AD is the accumulation of amyloid-β plaques. Overexpression of human amyloid precursor protein in transgenic mice induces hippocampal and neocortical amyloid-β accumulation and plaque deposition that increases with age. The impact of these effects on neuronal population responses and network activity in sensory cortex is not well understood. We used Voltage Sensitive Dye Imaging, to investigate at high spatial and temporal resolution, the sensory evoked population responses in the barrel cortex of aged transgenic (Tg) mice and of age-matched non-transgenic littermate controls (Ctrl) mice. We found that a whisker deflection evoked abnormal sensory responses in the barrel cortex of Tg mice. The response amplitude and the spatial spread of the cortical responses were significantly larger in Tg than in Ctrl mice. At the network level, spontaneous activity was less synchronized over cortical space than in Ctrl mice, however synchronization during evoked responses induced by whisker deflection did not differ between the two groups. Thus, the presence of elevated Aβ and plaques may alter population responses and disrupts neural synchronization in large-scale networks, leading to abnormalities in sensory processing. PMID:27079783

  19. AERA Statement on Use of Value-Added Models (VAM) for the Evaluation of Educators and Educator Preparation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this statement is to inform those using or considering the use of value-added models (VAM) about their scientific and technical limitations in the evaluation of educators and programs that prepare teachers. The statement briefly reviews the background and current context of using VAM for evaluations, enumerates specific psychometric…

  20. Propensity Score Methods as Alternatives to Value-Added Modeling for the Estimation of Teacher Contributions to Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Kimberlee Kaye Callister

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential for using propensity score-based matching methods to estimate teacher contributions to student learning. Value-added models are increasingly used in teacher accountability systems in the United States in spite of ongoing qualms about the validity of teacher quality estimates resulting from…

  1. Vascular pathology of 20-month-old hypercholesterolemia mice in comparison to triple-transgenic and APPSwDI Alzheimer’s disease mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Hohsfield, Lindsay A.; Daschil, Nina; Orädd, Greger; Strömberg, Ingrid; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that elevated plasma cholesterol levels (i.e. hypercholesterolemia) serve as a risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, it remains unclear how hypercholesterolemia may contribute to the onset and progression of AD pathology. In order to determine the role of hypercholesterolemia at various stages of AD, we evaluated the effects of high cholesterol diet (5% cholesterol) in wild-type (WT; C57BL6) and triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD; Psen1, APPSwe, tauB301L) mice at 7, 14, and 20 months. The transgenic APP-Swedish/Dutch/Iowa AD mouse model (APPSwDI) was used as a control since these animals are more pathologically-accelerated and are known to exhibit extensive plaque deposition and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Here, we describe the effects of high cholesterol diet on: (1) cognitive function and stress, (2) AD-associated pathologies, (3) neuroinflammation, (4) blood–brain barrier disruption and ventricle size, and (5) vascular dysfunction. Our data show that high dietary cholesterol increases weight, slightly impairs cognitive function, promotes glial cell activation and complement-related pathways, enhances the infiltration of blood-derived proteins and alters vascular integrity, however, it does not induce AD-related pathologies. While normal-fed 3xTg-AD mice display a typical AD-like pathology in addition to severe cognitive impairment and neuroinflammation at 20 months of age, vascular alterations are less pronounced. No microbleedings were seen by MRI, however, the ventricle size was enlarged. Triple-transgenic AD mice, on the other hand, fed a high cholesterol diet do not survive past 14 months of age. Our data indicates that cholesterol does not markedly potentiate AD-related pathology, nor does it cause significant impairments in cognition. However, it appears that high cholesterol diet markedly increases stress-related plasma corticosterone levels as well as some vessel pathologies. Together, our findings

  2. Hairy AdS solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru; Choque, David

    2016-11-01

    We construct exact hairy AdS soliton solutions in Einstein-dilaton gravity theory. We examine their thermodynamic properties and discuss the role of these solutions for the existence of first order phase transitions for hairy black holes. The negative energy density associated to hairy AdS solitons can be interpreted as the Casimir energy that is generated in the dual filed theory when the fermions are antiperiodic on the compact coordinate.

  3. Disease course in mdx:utrophin+/- mice: comparison of three mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Abby A; Hebert, Sadie L; Kunz, Matthew D; Ralles, Steven J; McLoon, Linda K

    2015-04-01

    The mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is used to study disease mechanisms and potential treatments, but its pathology is less severe than DMD patients. Other mouse models were developed to more closely mimic the human disease based on knowledge that upregulation of utrophin has a protective effect in mdx muscle. An mdx:utrophin(-/-) (dko) mouse was created, which had a severe disease phenotype and a shortened life span. An mdx:utrophin(+/-) mouse was also created, which had an intermediate disease phenotype compared to the mdx and dko mice. To determine the usefulness of mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice for long-term DMD studies, limb muscle pathology and function were assessed across the life span of wild-type, mdx, mdx:utrophin(+/-), and dko mice. Muscle function assessment, specifically grip duration and rotarod performance, demonstrated that mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice were weaker for a longer time than mdx mice. Mean myofiber area was smaller in mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice compared to mdx mice at 12 months. Mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice had a higher percentage of centrally nucleated myofibers compared to mdx mice at 6 and 12 months. Collagen I and IV density was significantly higher in mdx:utrophin(+/-) muscle compared to mdx at most ages examined. Generally, mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice showed an intermediate disease phenotype over a longer time course compared to the mdx and dko mice. While they do not genetically mirror human DMD, mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice may be a more useful animal model than mdx or dko mice for investigating long-term efficacy of potential treatments when fibrosis or muscle function is the focus.

  4. The flavonoid quercetin ameliorates Alzheimer’s disease pathology and protects cognitive and emotional function in aged triple transgenic Alzheimer’s disease model mice

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Sabogal-Guáqueta Angélica; Ignacio, Muñoz-Manco Juan; Ramírez-Pineda Jose, R; Marisol, Lamprea-Rodriguez; Edison, Osorio; Patricia, Cardona-Gómez Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common senile dementia in the world. Although important progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of AD, current therapeutic approaches provide only modest symptomatic relief. In this study, we evaluated the neuroprotective effect of quercetin (25 mg/kg) administration via i.p. injection every 48 hours for 3 months on aged (21–24 months old) triple transgenic AD model (3xTg-AD) mice. Our data show that quercetin decreases extracellular β-amyloidosis, tauopathy, astrogliosis and microgliosis in the hippocampus and the amygdala. These results were supported by a significant reduction in the paired helical filament (PHF), β-amyloid (βA) 1–40 and βA 1–42 levels and a decrease in BACE1-mediated cleavage of APP (into CTFβ). Additionally, quercetin induced improved performance on learning and spatial memory tasks and greater risk assessment behavior based on the elevated plus maze test. Together, these findings suggest that quercetin reverses histological hallmarks of AD and protects cognitive and emotional function in aged 3xTg-AD mice. PMID:25666032

  5. Beyond Traditional School Value-Added Models: A Multilevel Analysis of Complex School Effects in Chile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troncoso, Patricio; Pampaka, Maria; Olsen, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    School value-added studies have largely demonstrated the effects of socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of the schools and the pupils on performance in standardised tests. Traditionally, these studies have assessed the variation coming only from the schools and the pupils. However, recent studies have shown that the analysis of academic…

  6. A transient parabiosis skin transplantation model in mice

    PubMed Central

    Duyverman, Annique MMJ; Kohno, Mitsutomo; Duda, Dan G; Jain, Rakesh K; Fukumura, Dai

    2012-01-01

    Parabiosis—conjoined surgery to provide a shared circulation between two mice—has been previously developed to study the hematopoietic system. This protocol describes the use of parabiosis for efficient transplantation of skin from a transgenic to a wild-type mouse. It can be used to study the role of stromal cells in a spontaneous model of distant cancer dissemination (metastasis). We have recently shown that primary tumor-derived stromal cells may facilitate metastasis by providing a provisional stroma at the secondary site. Studying the role of primary tumor–derived stroma cells requires methods for distinguishing and targeting stromal cells originating from the primary tumor versus their counterparts in the metastatic site. Parabiosis may also be used, taking advantage of the shared circulation between the parabiosed mice, to study tumor metastasis from one parabiont to another, or to investigate the role of circulating inflammatory cells or stem cells. Studying the role of stromal cells in metastasis using this model typically takes up to 11 weeks. PMID:22441295

  7. Modeling the Study of DNA Damage Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Specks, Julia; Nieto-Soler, Maria; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Damaged DNA has a profound impact on mammalian health and overall survival. In addition to being the source of mutations that initiate cancer, the accumulation of toxic amounts of DNA damage can cause severe developmental diseases and accelerate ageing. Therefore, understanding how cells respond to DNA damage has become one of the most intense areas of biomedical research in the recent years. However, whereas most mechanistic studies derive from in vitro or in cellulo work, the impact of a given mutation on a living organism is largely unpredictable. For instance, why BRCA1 mutations preferentially lead to breast cancer whereas mutations compromising mismatch repair drive colon cancer is still not understood. In this context, evaluating the specific physiological impact of mutations that compromise genome integrity has become crucial for a better dimensioning of our knowledge. We here describe the various technologies that can be used for modeling mutations in mice, and provide a review of the genes and pathways that have been modeled so far in the context of DNA damage responses. PMID:25636482

  8. Peromyscus leucopus mice: a potential animal model for haematological studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Desierto, Marie J; Ueda, Yasutaka; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Chen, Jichun; Young, Neal S

    2014-10-01

    Peromyscus leucopus mice share physical similarities with laboratory mice Mus musculus (MM) but have higher agility and longer lifespan. We compared domesticated P. leucopus linville (PLL) and M. musculus C57BL/6 (MMB6) mice for cellular composition of peripheral blood (PB), bone marrow (BM) and spleen. PLL mice had significantly fewer platelets and significantly more monocytes in the blood, and notably fewer megakaryocytes in the BM. Spleens of PLL mice were significantly smaller, with 50% fewer cells and reduced 'red pulp'. There was no obvious haematological change in PLL mice between 2-8 and 16-26 months of age, except for a significant increase in blood monocytes. Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content showed no change with age but differed significantly between different cell types. Treating two to eight month-old PLL mice with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine in drinking water for three months did not affect cellular ROS content, but increased blood leucocytes especially the concentration of monocytes. The low platelets, low megakaryocytes, high monocytes and low splenic erythropoiesis in PLL mice resemble human measurements better than the values seen in MMB6.

  9. Peromyscus leucopus mice: a potential animal model for haematological studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Desierto, Marie J; Ueda, Yasutaka; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Chen, Jichun; Young, Neal S

    2014-01-01

    Peromyscus leucopus mice share physical similarities with laboratory mice Mus musculus (MM) but have higher agility and longer lifespan. We compared domesticated P. leucopus linville (PLL) and M. musculus C57BL/6 (MMB6) mice for cellular composition of peripheral blood (PB), bone marrow (BM) and spleen. PLL mice had significantly fewer platelets and significantly more monocytes in the blood, and notably fewer megakaryocytes in the BM. Spleens of PLL mice were significantly smaller, with 50% fewer cells and reduced ‘red pulp’. There was no obvious haematological change in PLL mice between 2–8 and 16–26 months of age, except for a significant increase in blood monocytes. Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content showed no change with age but differed significantly between different cell types. Treating two to eight month-old PLL mice with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine in drinking water for three months did not affect cellular ROS content, but increased blood leucocytes especially the concentration of monocytes. The low platelets, low megakaryocytes, high monocytes and low splenic erythropoiesis in PLL mice resemble human measurements better than the values seen in MMB6. PMID:25116892

  10. Humanized Androgen Receptor Mice: A Genetic Model for Differential Response to Prostate Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    For each Q tract allele, we have currently obtained at least 30 experimental and 30 control mice . Some have reached their time points and tissues...overexpression of ETV1). Experimental mice have been generated and prostates are being microdissected as animals reach their time points. Initial...TITLE: Humanized Androgen Receptor Mice : A Genetic Model for Differential Response to Prostate Cancer Therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Diane M

  11. Intraplacental gene therapy with Ad-IGF-1 corrects naturally occurring rabbit model of intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Keswani, Sundeep G; Balaji, Swathi; Katz, Anna B; King, Alice; Omar, Khaled; Habli, Mounira; Klanke, Charles; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2015-03-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) due to placental insufficiency is a leading cause of perinatal complications for which there is no effective prenatal therapy. We have previously demonstrated that intraplacental injection of adenovirus-mediated insulin-like growth factor-1 (Ad-IGF-1) corrects fetal weight in a murine IUGR model induced by mesenteric uterine artery branch ligation. This study investigated the effect of intraplacental Ad-IGF-1 gene therapy in a rabbit model of naturally occurring IUGR (runt) due to placental insufficiency, which is similar to the human IUGR condition with onset in the early third trimester, brain sparing, and a reduction in liver weight. Laparotomy was performed on New Zealand White rabbits on day 21 of 30 days of gestation and litters were divided into five groups: Control (first position)+phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), control+Ad-IGF-1, runt (third position)+PBS, runt+Ad-IGF-1, and runt+Ad-LacZ. The effect of IGF-1 gene therapy on fetal, placental, liver, heart, lung, and musculoskeletal weights of the growth-restricted pups was examined. Protein expression after gene transfer was seen along the maternal-fetal placenta interface (n=12) 48 hr after gene therapy. There was minimal gene transfer detected in the pups or maternal organs. At term, compared with the normally grown first-position control, the runted third-position pups demonstrated significantly lower fetal, placental, liver, lung, and musculoskeletal weights. The fetal, liver, and musculoskeletal weights were restored to normal by intraplacental Ad-IGF-1 gene therapy (p<0.01), with no change in the placental weight. Intraplacental gene therapy is a novel strategy for the treatment of IUGR caused by placental insufficiency that takes advantage of an organ that will be discarded at birth. Development of nonviral IGF-1 gene delivery using placenta-specific promoters can potentially minimize toxicity to the mother and fetus and facilitate clinical translation of

  12. A novel mice model of metabolic syndrome: the high-fat-high-fructose diet-fed ICR mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhuhua, Zhang; Zhiquan, Wang; Zhen, Yang; Yixin, Niu; Weiwei, Zhang; Xiaoyong, Li; Yueming, Liu; Hongmei, Zhang; Li, Qin; Qing, Su

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the metabolic syndrome (MS) is occurring at growing rates worldwide, raising extensive concerns on the mechanisms and therapeutic interventions for this disorder. Herein, we described a novel method of establishing MS model in rodents. Male Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice were fed with high-fat-high-fructose (HFHF) diet or normal chow (NC) respectively for 12 weeks. Metabolic phenotypes were assessed by glucose tolerance test, insulin tolerance test and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Blood pressure was measured by a tail-cuff system. At the end of the experiment, mice were sacrificed, and blood and tissues were harvested for subsequent analysis. Serum insulin levels were measured by ELISA, and lipid profiles were determined biochemically. The HFHF diet-fed ICR mice exhibited obvious characteristics of the components of MS, including obvious obesity, severe insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, dislipidemia, significant hypertension and hyperuricemia. Our data suggest that HFHF diet-fed ICR mice may be a robust and efficient animal model that could well mimic the basic pathogenesis of human MS. PMID:26134356

  13. The Use of a School Value-Added Model for Educational Improvement: A Case Study from the Portuguese Primary Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrão, Maria Eugénia; Couto, Alcino Pinto

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the use of a value-added approach for promoting school improvement. It presents yearly value-added estimates, analyses their stability over time, and discusses the contribution of this methodological approach for promoting school improvement programmes in the Portuguese system of evaluation. The value-added model is applied…

  14. HOW GAS-DYNAMIC FLARE MODELS POWERED BY PETSCHEK RECONNECTION DIFFER FROM THOSE WITH AD HOC ENERGY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Longcope, D. W.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2015-11-10

    Aspects of solar flare dynamics, such as chromospheric evaporation and flare light curves, have long been studied using one-dimensional models of plasma dynamics inside a static flare loop, subjected to some energy input. While extremely successful at explaining the observed characteristics of flares, all such models so far have specified energy input ad hoc, rather than deriving it self-consistently. There is broad consensus that flares are powered by magnetic energy released through reconnection. Recent work has generalized Petschek’s basic reconnection scenario, topological change followed by field line retraction and shock heating, to permit its inclusion in a one-dimensional flare loop model. Here we compare the gas dynamics driven by retraction and shocking to those from more conventional static loop models energized by ad hoc source terms. We find significant differences during the first minute, when retraction leads to larger kinetic energies and produces higher densities at the loop top, while ad hoc heating tends to rarify the loop top. The loop-top density concentration is related to the slow magnetosonic shock, characteristic of Petschek’s model, but persists beyond the retraction phase occurring in the outflow jet. This offers an explanation for observed loop-top sources of X-ray and EUV emission, with advantages over that provided by ad hoc heating scenarios. The cooling phases of the two models are, however, notably similar to one another, suggesting that observations at that stage will yield little information on the nature of energy input.

  15. Lateral Fluid Percussion: Model of Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alder, Janet; Fujioka, Wendy; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Crockett, David P.; Thakker-Varia, Smita

    2011-01-01

    skull 18. Among the TBI models, LFP is the most established and commonly used model to evaluate mixed focal and diffuse brain injury 19. It is reproducible and is standardized to allow for the manipulation of injury parameters. LFP recapitulates injuries observed in humans, thus rendering it clinically relevant, and allows for exploration of novel therapeutics for clinical translation 20. We describe the detailed protocol to perform LFP procedure in mice. The injury inflicted is mild to moderate, with brain regions such as cortex, hippocampus and corpus callosum being most vulnerable. Hippocampal and motor learning tasks are explored following LFP. PMID:21876530

  16. Lateral fluid percussion: model of traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Alder, Janet; Fujioka, Wendy; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Crockett, David P; Thakker-Varia, Smita

    2011-08-22

    mass on the closed skull (18). Among the TBI models, LFP is the most established and commonly used model to evaluate mixed focal and diffuse brain injury (19). It is reproducible and is standardized to allow for the manipulation of injury parameters. LFP recapitulates injuries observed in humans, thus rendering it clinically relevant, and allows for exploration of novel therapeutics for clinical translation (20). We describe the detailed protocol to perform LFP procedure in mice. The injury inflicted is mild to moderate, with brain regions such as cortex, hippocampus and corpus callosum being most vulnerable. Hippocampal and motor learning tasks are explored following LFP.

  17. Added Sugars

    MedlinePlus

    ... need sugar to function properly. Added sugars contribute zero nutrients but many added calories that can lead to extra pounds or even obesity, thereby reducing heart health. If you think of your daily calorie needs as a budget, you want to “spend” ...

  18. Value Added?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UCLA IDEA, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Value added measures (VAM) uses changes in student test scores to determine how much "value" an individual teacher has "added" to student growth during the school year. Some policymakers, school districts, and educational advocates have applauded VAM as a straightforward measure of teacher effectiveness: the better a teacher,…

  19. SENCAR mouse skin tumorigenesis model versus other strains and stocks of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Slaga, T J

    1986-01-01

    The SENCAR mouse stock was selectively bred for eight generations for sensitivity to skin tumor induction by the two-stage tumorigenesis protocol using 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) as the initiator and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as the promoter. The SENCAR mouse was derived by crossing Charles River CD-1 mice with skin-tumor-sensitive mice (STS). The SENCAR mice are much more sensitive to both DMBA tumor initiation and TPA tumor promotion than CD-1, BALB/c, and DBA/2 mice. An even greater difference in the sensitivity to two-stage skin tumorigenesis is apparent between SENCAR and C57BL/6 mice when using DMBA-TPA treatment. However, the SENCAR and C57BL/6 mice have a similar tumor response to DMBA-benzoyl peroxide treatment, suggesting that TPA is not an effective promoter in C57BL/6 mice. The DBA/2 mice respond in a similar manner to the SENCAR mice when using N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-TPA treatment. The SENCAR mouse model provides a good dose-response relationship for many carcinogens used as tumor initiators and for many compounds used as tumor promoter. When compared to other stocks and strains of mice, the SENCAR mouse has one of the largest data bases for carcinogens and promoters. PMID:3096709

  20. SENCAR mouse skin tumorigenesis model versus other strains and stocks of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Slaga, T.J.

    1986-09-01

    The SENCAR mouse stock was selectively bred for eight generations for sensitivity to skin tumor induction by the two-stage tumorigenesis protocol using 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) as the initiator and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as the promoter. The SENCAR mouse was derived by crossing Charles River CD-1 mice with skin-tumor-sensitive mice (STS). The SENCAR mice are much more sensitive to both DMBA tumor initiation and TPA tumor promotion than CD-1, BALB/c, and DBA/2 mice. An even greater difference in the sensitivity to two-stage skin tumorigenesis is apparent between SENCAR and C57BL/6 mice when using DMBA-TPA treatment. However, the SENCAR and C57BL/6 mice have a similar tumor response to DMBA-benzoyl peroxide treatment, suggesting that TPA is not an effective promoter in C57BL/6 mice. The DBA/2 mice respond in a similar manner to the SENCAR mice when using N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-TPA treatment. The SENCAR mouse model provides a good dose-response relationship for many carcinogens used as tumor initiators and for many compounds used as tumor promoter. When compared to other stocks and strains of mice, the SENCAR mouse has one of the largest data bases for carcinogens and promoters.

  1. Experimental transmission of systemic AA amyloidosis in autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus model mice

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Mayuko; Murakami, Tomoaki; Muhammad, Naeem; Inoshima, Yasuo; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    AA amyloidosis is a protein misfolding disease characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid A (AA) fibrils. AA amyloidosis has been identified in food animals, and it has been postulated that AA amyloidosis may be transmissible to different animal species. Since the precursor protein of AA fibrils is serum amyloid A (SAA), which is an inflammatory acute phase protein, AA amyloidosis is considered to be associated with inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Chronic diseases such as autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus could be potential factors for AA amyloidosis. In this study, to examine the relationship between the induction of AA amyloidosis and chromic abnormalities such as autoimmune disease or type 2 diabetes mellitus, amyloid fibrils from mice, cattle, or chickens were experimentally injected into disease model mice. Wild-type mice were used as controls. The concentrations of SAA, IL-6, and IL-10 in autoimmune disease model mice were higher than those of control mice. However, induction of AA amyloidosis in autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus model mice was lower than that in control mice, and the amount of amyloid deposits in the spleens of both mouse models was lower than that of control mice according to Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry. These results suggest that factors other than SAA levels, such as an inflammatory or anti-inflammatory environment in the immune response, may be involved in amyloid deposition. PMID:27321428

  2. Reference and working memory deficits in the 3xTg-AD mouse between 2 and 15-months of age: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Leanne M; Brown, Richard E

    2015-02-01

    Impairments in working memory (WM) can predict the shift from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the rate at which AD progresses with age. The 3xTg-AD mouse model develops both Aβ plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the neuro-pathological hallmarks of AD, by 6 months of age, but no research has investigated the age-related changes in WM in these mice. Using a cross-sectional design, we tested male and female 3xTg-AD and wildtype control (B6129SF2/J) mice between 2 and 15 months of age for reference and working memory errors in the 8-arm radial maze. The 3xTg-AD mice had deficits in both working and reference memory across the ages tested, rather than showing the predicted age-related memory deficits. Male 3xTg-AD mice showed more working and reference memory errors than females, but there were no sex differences in wildtype control mice. These results indicate that the 3xTg-AD mouse replicates the impairments in WM found in patients with AD. However, these mice show memory deficits as early as two months of age, suggesting that the genes underlying reference and working memory in these mice cause deficits from an early age. The finding that males were affected more than females suggests that more attention should be paid to sex differences in transgenic AD mice.

  3. Smad3 knock-out mice as a useful model to study intestinal fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zanninelli, Giuliana; Vetuschi, Antonella; Sferra, Roberta; D’Angelo, Angela; Fratticci, Amato; Continenza, Maria Adelaide; Chiaramonte, Maria; Gaudio, Eugenio; Caprilli, Renzo; Latella, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the possible differences in morphology and immunohistochemical expression of CD3, transforming growth factor β1(TGF-β1), Smad7, α-smooth muscle actin (α-Sma), and collagen types I-VII of small and large intestine in Smad3 null and wild-type mice. METHODS: Ten null and ten wild-type adult mice were sacrificed at 4 mo of age and the organs (esophagus, small and large bowel, ureters) were collected for histology(hematoxylin and eosin, Masson thrichrome, silver staining), morphometry and immunohistochemistry analysis. TGF-β1 levels of intestinal tissue homogenates were assessed by ELISA. RESULTS: No macroscopic intestinal lesions were detected both in null and wild-type mice. Histological and morphometric evaluation revealed a significant reduction in muscle layer thickness of small and large intestine in null mice as compared to wild-type mice. Immunohistochemistry evaluation showed a significant increase of CD3+T cell, TGF-β1 and Smad7 staining in the small and large intestine mucosa of Smad3 null mice as compared to wild-type mice. α-Sma and collagen I-VII staining of small and large intestine did not differ between the two groups of mice. TGF-β1 levels of colonic tissue homogenates were significantly higher in null mice than in wild-type mice. In preliminary experiments a significant reduction of TNBS-induced intestinal fibrosis was observed in null mice as compared to wild-type mice. CONCLUSION: Smad3 null mice are a useful model to investigate the in vivo role of the TGF-β/Smad signalling pathway in intestinal inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:16534873

  4. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo of neurochemicals in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease: a longitudinal study of metabolites, relaxation time, and behavioral analysis in TASTPM and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Forster, Duncan; Davies, Karen; Williams, Steve

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. Due to ongoing advances in our understanding of the underlying pathology of AD, many potential new targets for therapeutics are becoming available. Transgenic mouse models of AD have helped in furthering our understanding of AD and also provide a vehicle for preclinical testing of new, putative disease-modifying therapeutics, which may have potential for translation to use in clinical trials. To identify possible translational biomarkers, we have studied the longitudinal cerebral metabolic pattern of the TASTPM transgenic AD mouse, a double transgenic mouse overexpressing human mutant amyloid precursor protein (hAPP695swe) and presenilin-1 (M146V) by (1) H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, along with concurrent brain T1 /T2 mapping and behavioral testing. We found significant differences in creatine, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, choline-containing compounds, and myo-inositol between TASTPM and wild-type mice. In the case of N-acetylaspartate and myo-inositol, there were similarities to differences detected in human AD. T1 /T2 values were shorter overall in TASTPM mice, indicating possible differences in water content between TASTPM and wild-type mice. In older TASTPM mice, exploratory behavior became more random, indicating a possible memory deficiency. The decrease in behavioral performance correlated in the transgenic group with higher expression of myo-inositol.

  5. Chronic GluN2B antagonism disrupts behavior in wild-type mice without protecting against synapse loss or memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jesse E; Meilandt, William J; Gogineni, Alvin; Reynen, Paul; Herrington, James; Weimer, Robby M; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Zhou, Qiang

    2014-06-11

    Extensive evidence implicates GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2B-NMDARs) in excitotoxic-insult-induced neurodegeneration and amyloid β (Aβ)-induced synaptic dysfunction. Therefore, inhibiting GluN2B-NMDARs would appear to be a potential therapeutic strategy to provide neuroprotection and improve cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are no reports of long-term in vivo treatment of AD mouse models with GluN2B antagonists. We used piperidine18 (Pip18), a potent and selective GluN2B-NMDAR antagonist with favorable pharmacokinetic properties, for long-term dosing in AD mouse models. Reduced freezing behavior in Tg2576 mice during fear conditioning was partially reversed after subchronic (17 d) Pip18 treatment. However, analysis of freezing behavior in different contexts indicated that this increased freezing likely involves elevated anxiety or excessive memory generalization in both nontransgenic (NTG) and Tg2576 mice. In PS2APP mice chronically fed with medicated food containing Pip18 for 4 months, spatial learning and memory deficits were not rescued, plaque-associated spine loss was not affected, and synaptic function was not altered. At the same time, altered open field activity consistent with increased anxiety and degraded performance in an active avoidance task were observed in NTG after chronic treatment. These results indicate that long-term treatment with a GluN2B-NMDAR antagonist does not provide a disease-modifying benefit and could cause cognitive liabilities rather than symptomatic benefit in AD mouse models. Therefore, these results challenge the expectation of the therapeutic potential for GluN2B-NMDAR antagonists in AD.

  6. Laxative effects of Salecan on normal and two models of experimental constipated mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Constipation is one of the most common gastrointestinal complaints with a highly prevalent and often chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder affecting health-related quality of life. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of Salecan on fecal output and small intestinal transit in normal and two models of drug-induced constipation mice. Methods ICR mice were administrated intragastrically (i.g.) by gavage with 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight (BW) of Salecan while the control mice were received saline. The constipated mice were induced by two types of drugs, loperamide (5 mg/kg BW, i.g.) and clonidine (200 μg/kg BW, i.g.), after Salecan treatment while the control mice were received saline. Number, weight and water content of feces were subsequently measured. Small intestinal transit was monitored by phenol red marker meal. Results Salecan (300 mg/kg BW) significantly increased the number and weight of feces in normal mice. In two models of drug-induced constipation, Salecan dose-dependently restored the fecal number and fecal weight. The water content of feces was markedly affected by loperamide, but not by clonidine. Treatment with Salecan significantly raised the fecal water content in loperamide-induced constipation mice. Moreover, Salecan markedly stimulated the small intestinal transit in both loperamide- and clonidine-induced constipation model mice. Conclusions These results suggest that Salecan has a potential to be used as a hydrophilic laxative for constipation. PMID:23514598

  7. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of mice liver treated with different AMPK activators in a mice model of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ang; Wang, Dongmei; An, Yuanyuan; Fang, Wei; Zhu, Haibo

    2017-02-02

    Atherosclerosis is known to be the primary underlying factor responsible for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Suppression of AMP-activated protein kinase stimulates arterial deposition of excess lipids, resulting in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. In this study we successfully developed the disease model of mice and mimicked the therapeutic effect, for that we chose three different AMP-activated protein kinase activators (IMM-H007, A-769662 and Metformin) to identify which one has a superior effect in the atherosclerosis model. We combined the transcriptomes of four groups of mice liver including high-fat diet group and the experimental groups treated with different AMP-activated protein kinase activators. We analyzed the increased genes to candidate metabolic and disease pathways. Compared to the high-fat diet group, a total of 799 differentially expressed genes were identified in treatment groups. There were 291, 473, and 323 differentially expressed genes in H007, Metformin, and A-769662 group respectively. And seven statistically significant pathways were observed in both H007 and Metformin groups. We expect that gene expression profiling in the mice model would extend our understanding of atherosclerosis in the molecular level. This study provides a fundamental framework for future clinical research on human atherosclerosis and new clues for developing novel drugs for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  8. Simulation of the blowing snow flux in Adélie Land, Antarctica, by a regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallée, Hubert; Amory, Charles; Agosta, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    The parameterization of blowing snow in the regional climate model MAR (Modèle Atmosphérique Régional) has been tested. The model is set-up over Adélie Land, Antarctica, with a fine horizontal resolution (5 km) and an improved vertical resolution near the surface (lowest level is now situated 0.15 m above the surface). The domain of the model covers the steepest slopes of Adélie Land, on an area of 500 times 500 km2. Simulations last 2 summer months (December 2010 and January 2011). The influence of model parameterizations on the simulated wind speed, relative humidity and horizontal blowing snow flux near the surface is assessed. It is found that model parameters influencing turbulence and in particular the parameterization of the roughness length are the main contributors to the sensitivity of the above-mentioned model variables. Therefore model sensitivity tests to various parameterizations of the roughness length are performed, allowing to define a new parameterization of the roughness length depending on snow erosion by the wind.

  9. The value of adding optics to ecosystem models: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M.; Boss, E.; Chai, F.

    2007-10-01

    Many ecosystem models have been developed to study the ocean's biogeochemical properties, but most of these models use simple formulations to describe light penetration and spectral quality. Here, an optical model is coupled with a previously published ecosystem model that explicitly represents two phytoplankton (picoplankton and diatoms) and two zooplankton functional groups, as well as multiple nutrients and detritus. Surface ocean color fields and subsurface light fields are calculated by coupling the ecosystem model with an optical model that relates biogeochemical standing stocks with inherent optical properties (absorption, scattering); this provides input to a commercially available radiative transfer model (Ecolight). We apply this bio-optical model to the equatorial Pacific upwelling region, and find the model to be capable of reproducing many measured optical properties and key biogeochemical processes in this region. Our model results suggest that non-algal particles largely contribute to the total scattering or attenuation (>50% at 660 nm) but have a much smaller contribution to particulate absorption (<20% at 440 nm), while picoplankton dominate the total phytoplankton absorption (>95% at 440 nm). These results are consistent with the field observations. In order to achieve such good agreement between data and model results, however, key model parameters, for which no field data are available, have to be constrained. Sensitivity analysis of the model results to optical parameters reveals a significant role played by colored dissolved organic matter through its influence on the quantity and quality of the ambient light. Coupling explicit optics to an ecosystem model provides advantages in generating: (1) a more accurate subsurface light-field, which is important for light sensitive biogeochemical processes such as photosynthesis and photo-oxidation, (2) additional constraints on model parameters that help to reduce uncertainties in ecosystem model

  10. Accuracy Assessment of Digital Surface Models Based on WorldView-2 and ADS80 Stereo Remote Sensing Data

    PubMed Central

    Hobi, Martina L.; Ginzler, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Digital surface models (DSMs) are widely used in forest science to model the forest canopy. Stereo pairs of very high resolution satellite and digital aerial images are relatively new and their absolute accuracy for DSM generation is largely unknown. For an assessment of these input data two DSMs based on a WorldView-2 stereo pair and a ADS80 DSM were generated with photogrammetric instruments. Rational polynomial coefficients (RPCs) are defining the orientation of the WorldView-2 satellite images, which can be enhanced with ground control points (GCPs). Thus two WorldView-2 DSMs were distinguished: a WorldView-2 RPCs-only DSM and a WorldView-2 GCP-enhanced RPCs DSM. The accuracy of the three DSMs was estimated with GPS measurements, manual stereo-measurements, and airborne laser scanning data (ALS). With GCP-enhanced RPCs the WorldView-2 image orientation could be optimised to a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.56 m in planimetry and 0.32 m in height. This improvement in orientation allowed for a vertical median error of −0.24 m for the WorldView-2 GCP-enhanced RPCs DSM in flat terrain. Overall, the DSM based on ADS80 images showed the highest accuracy of the three models with a median error of 0.08 m over bare ground. As the accuracy of a DSM varies with land cover three classes were distinguished: herb and grass, forests, and artificial areas. The study suggested the ADS80 DSM to best model actual surface height in all three land cover classes, with median errors <1.1 m. The WorldView-2 GCP-enhanced RPCs model achieved good accuracy, too, with median errors of −0.43 m for the herb and grass vegetation and −0.26 m for artificial areas. Forested areas emerged as the most difficult land cover type for height modelling; still, with median errors of −1.85 m for the WorldView-2 GCP-enhanced RPCs model and −1.12 m for the ADS80 model, the input data sets evaluated here are quite promising for forest canopy modelling. PMID:22778645

  11. CD38 gene knockout juvenile mice: a model of oxytocin signal defects in autism.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Haruhiro; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Munesue, Toshio; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Minabe, Yoshio; Lopatina, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) in the hypothalamus is the biological basis of social recognition, trust, and bonding. We showed that CD38, a leukaemia cell marker, plays an important role in the hypothalamus in the process of OXT release in adult mice. Disruption of Cd38 (Cd38(-/-)) produced impairment of maternal behavior and male social recognition in mice, similar to the behavior observed in Oxt and OXT receptor (Oxtr) gene knockout (Oxt(-/-) and Oxtr(-/-), respectively) mice. Locomotor activity induced by separation from the dam was higher and the number of ultrasonic vocalization (USV) calls was lower in Cd38(-/-) than Cd38(+/+) pups. These phenotypes seemed to be caused by the high plasma OXT levels during development from neonates to 3-week-old juvenile mice. ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity was markedly lower in the knockout mice from birth, suggesting that weaning for mice is a critical time window of differentiating plasma OXT. Contribution by breastfeeding was an important exogenous source for regulating plasma OXT before weaning by the presence of OXT in milk and the dam's mammary glands. The dissimilarity of Cd38(-/-) infant behaviour to Oxt(-/-) or Oxtr(-/-) mice can be explained partly by this exogenous source of OXT. These results suggest that secretion of OXT into the brain in a CD38-dependent manner may play an important role in the development of social behavior, and mice with OXT signalling deficiency, including Cd38(-/-), Oxt(-/-) and Oxtr(-/-) mice are good animal models for developmental disorders, such as autism.

  12. [Preliminary establishment of transplanted human chronic myeloid leukemia model in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Min; Ding, Xin; Zhang, Long-Zhen; Cen, Jian-Nong; Chen, Zi-Xing

    2011-12-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a malignant clonal disease derived from hematopoietic stem cells. CML stem cells were thought to be the root which could lead disease development and ultimately rapid change. However, a stable animal model for studying the characteristics of CML stem cells is currently lacking. This study was aimed to establish a transplanted human CML nude-mice model to further explore the biological behavior of CML stem cells in vivo, and to enrich CML stem cells in nude mice by series transplantation. The 4 - 6 weeks old BALB/c nude mice pretreated by splenectomy (S), cytoxan intraperitoneal injection (C) and sublethal irradiation (I) were transplanted intravenously with (5 - 7) × 10(7) of bone marrow mononuclear cells from CML patients in chronic phase. Alternatively, 4 - 6 weeks old BALB/c nude mice pretreated by lethal irradiation were transplanted intravenously with 5 × 10(6) homologous bone marrow cells of BALB/c nude mice together with (5 - 7) × 10(7) of bone marrow mononuclear cells from CML patients in chronic phase simultaneously. The leukemic cells engrafted and infiltrated in organs and bone marrow of the mice were tracked by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), plastic-embedded biopsy and flow cytometry. The results of these two methods were compared. The results showed that human CML cells engrafted and infiltrating into the bone marrow of two nude mice pretreated with SCI could be detected. In spite of the low successful rate, results suggested the feasibility of this method by using BALB/c nude mice as a human CML animal model. In contrast, in nude mice pretreated by the lethal dose irradiation, CML cells in the bone marrow could not be found. It is concluded that human bone marrow CML cells can results in leukemia in nude mice pretreated by SCI. Thus this study provides a new strategy for establishment of CML animal models which deserves further elaboration.

  13. MICE Models: Superior to the HERG Model in Predicting Torsade de Pointes

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, James; Obejero-Paz, Carlos A.; Myatt, Glenn; Kuryshev, Yuri A.; Bruening-Wright, Andrew; Verducci, Joseph S.; Brown, Arthur M.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced block of the cardiac hERG (human Ether-à-go-go-Related Gene) potassium channel delays cardiac repolarization and increases the risk of Torsade de Pointes (TdP), a potentially lethal arrhythmia. A positive hERG assay has been embraced by regulators as a non-clinical predictor of TdP despite a discordance of about 30%. To test whether assaying concomitant block of multiple ion channels (Multiple Ion Channel Effects or MICE) improves predictivity we measured the concentration-responses of hERG, Nav1.5 and Cav1.2 currents for 32 torsadogenic and 23 non-torsadogenic drugs from multiple classes. We used automated gigaseal patch clamp instruments to provide higher throughput along with accuracy and reproducibility. Logistic regression models using the MICE assay showed a significant reduction in false positives (Type 1 errors) and false negatives (Type 2 errors) when compared to the hERG assay. The best MICE model only required a comparison of the blocking potencies between hERG and Cav1.2. PMID:23812503

  14. Detailed OFDM Modeling in Network Simulation of Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Ptolemy II as the design environment, some of the widely used models of computation for control system design — continuous time...closer to reality. The Ptolemy approach is similar to the approach used in this thesis. Our method of integrating heterogeneous models to...errors by mapping it to a BER value. Notice that, the simulated receiver SINR from the model is used instead of the model BER because of the

  15. Using ICR and SCID mice as animal models for smallpox to assess antiviral drug efficacy.

    PubMed

    Titova, Ksenya A; Sergeev, Alexander A; Zamedyanskaya, Alena S; Galahova, Darya O; Kabanov, Alexey S; Morozova, Anastasia A; Bulychev, Leonid E; Sergeev, Artemiy A; Glotova, Tanyana I; Shishkina, Larisa N; Taranov, Oleg S; Omigov, Vladimir V; Zavjalov, Evgenii L; Agafonov, Alexander P; Sergeev, Alexander N

    2015-09-01

    The possibility of using immunocompetent ICR mice and immunodeficient SCID mice as model animals for smallpox to assess antiviral drug efficacy was investigated. Clinical signs of the disease did not appear following intranasal (i.n.) challenge of mice with strain Ind-3a of variola virus (VARV), even when using the highest possible dose of the virus (5.2 log10 p.f.u.). The 50 % infective doses (ID50) of VARV, estimated by the virus presence or absence in the lungs 3 and 4 days post-infection, were 2.7 ± 0.4 log10 p.f.u. for ICR mice and 3.5 ± 0.7 log10 p.f.u. for SCID mice. After i.n. challenge of ICR and SCID mice with VARV 30 and 50 ID50, respectively, steady reproduction of the virus occurred only in the respiratory tract (lungs and nose). Pathological inflammatory destructive changes were revealed in the respiratory tract and the primary target cells for VARV (macrophages and epithelial cells) in mice, similar to those in humans and cynomolgus macaques. The use of mice to assess antiviral efficacies of NIOCH-14 and ST-246 demonstrated the compliance of results with those described in scientific literature, which opens up the prospect of their use as an animal model for smallpox to develop anti-smallpox drugs intended for humans.

  16. Establishment of a model of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in different weekly-aged ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, K; Tokuno, M; Yamasaki, K; Kadowaki, D; Seo, H; Otagiri, M

    2015-10-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP), a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug, has the potential to cause lethal hepatotoxicity. Mice are widely used for developing murine models of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, and many researchers have used these models for APAP-related studies including the fields of biology, pharmacology and toxicology. Although drug-induced hepatotoxicity is dependent on a number of factors (species, gender and age), very few studies have investigated the effect of aging on APAP hepatotoxicity. In this study, we evaluated the effect of age on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in different weekly-aged mice to establish a model of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity that is an accurate reflection of general experimental conditions. Male ICR mice 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 weeks old were given APAP intraperitoneally, and mortality, hepatic damage and the plasma concentration of APAP metabolites were evaluated. It was found that younger male ICR mice were relatively resistant to hepatotoxicity induced by intraperitoneal APAP administration. In addition, the APAP-glucuronide concentration in plasma remained essentially the same among the differently-aged mice, while APAP-sulfate levels were dramatically decreased in an age-dependent manner. Thus, it is recommended that mice of the same ages be used in studies related to APAP-induced hepatotoxixity. These results provide evidence in support of not only the age-related changes in susceptibility to APAP-derived hepatotoxicity in mice but also in developing mouse models for APAP-related studies.

  17. Intraplacental Gene Therapy with Ad-IGF-1 Corrects Naturally Occurring Rabbit Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Keswani, Sundeep G.; Balaji, Swathi; Katz, Anna B.; King, Alice; Omar, Khaled; Habli, Mounira; Klanke, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) due to placental insufficiency is a leading cause of perinatal complications for which there is no effective prenatal therapy. We have previously demonstrated that intraplacental injection of adenovirus-mediated insulin-like growth factor-1 (Ad-IGF-1) corrects fetal weight in a murine IUGR model induced by mesenteric uterine artery branch ligation. This study investigated the effect of intraplacental Ad-IGF-1 gene therapy in a rabbit model of naturally occurring IUGR (runt) due to placental insufficiency, which is similar to the human IUGR condition with onset in the early third trimester, brain sparing, and a reduction in liver weight. Laparotomy was performed on New Zealand White rabbits on day 21 of 30 days of gestation and litters were divided into five groups: Control (first position)+phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), control+Ad-IGF-1, runt (third position)+PBS, runt+Ad-IGF-1, and runt+Ad-LacZ. The effect of IGF-1 gene therapy on fetal, placental, liver, heart, lung, and musculoskeletal weights of the growth-restricted pups was examined. Protein expression after gene transfer was seen along the maternal–fetal placenta interface (n=12) 48 hr after gene therapy. There was minimal gene transfer detected in the pups or maternal organs. At term, compared with the normally grown first-position control, the runted third-position pups demonstrated significantly lower fetal, placental, liver, lung, and musculoskeletal weights. The fetal, liver, and musculoskeletal weights were restored to normal by intraplacental Ad-IGF-1 gene therapy (p<0.01), with no change in the placental weight. Intraplacental gene therapy is a novel strategy for the treatment of IUGR caused by placental insufficiency that takes advantage of an organ that will be discarded at birth. Development of nonviral IGF-1 gene delivery using placenta-specific promoters can potentially minimize toxicity to the mother and fetus and facilitate clinical

  18. ApoE-directed therapeutics rapidly clear β-amyloid and reverse deficits in AD mouse models.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Paige E; Cirrito, John R; Wesson, Daniel W; Lee, C Y Daniel; Karlo, J Colleen; Zinn, Adriana E; Casali, Brad T; Restivo, Jessica L; Goebel, Whitney D; James, Michael J; Brunden, Kurt R; Wilson, Donald A; Landreth, Gary E

    2012-03-23

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with impaired clearance of β-amyloid (Aβ) from the brain, a process normally facilitated by apolipoprotein E (apoE). ApoE expression is transcriptionally induced through the action of the nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and liver X receptors in coordination with retinoid X receptors (RXRs). Oral administration of the RXR agonist bexarotene to a mouse model of AD resulted in enhanced clearance of soluble Aβ within hours in an apoE-dependent manner. Aβ plaque area was reduced more than 50% within just 72 hours. Furthermore, bexarotene stimulated the rapid reversal of cognitive, social, and olfactory deficits and improved neural circuit function. Thus, RXR activation stimulates physiological Aβ clearance mechanisms, resulting in the rapid reversal of a broad range of Aβ-induced deficits.

  19. The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) inhibits the inflammatory response in Raw 264.7 cells and atopic dermatitis (AD) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Li, Jianping; Qu, Hai'e; Song, Zhou; Yang, Zhanqing; Huo, Jinlong; Jiang, Huaizhi; Huang, Qinghua; Huo, Meixia; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Qiaoling

    2013-02-01

    The alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor (MC1R) is one of five G-protein coupled receptors belonging to the melanocortin subfamily, MC1R gene has been known to play a major role in regulating of fur color in mammals, and α-MSH and ACTH are endogenous nonselective agonists for MC1R. However, we found that MC1R was highly expressed in Raw 264.7 cells which were important inflammatory cells involved in the initiation of inflammatory responses. In addition, Cyclic AMP is not only a key molecule in the MC1R signal transduction pathway, but dampen innate immune-mediated responses. These intriguing biological results triggered the further conformation studies; it suggested that MC1R was very likely to be an important role in immunoregulation. In this study, we were to investigate the immunosuppressive effects of MC1R on inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated Raw 264.7 cells and LPS induced vivo 2-chloro-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNCB)-induced atopic dermatitis (AD) model. The effects of the MC1R antagonist psoralen on pro-inflammatory cytokines and signaling pathways were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, western blot, real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR and Histological analysis. Our results show a consistent and marked effect of high concentrations of MC1R antagonist psoralen increased the level of MC1R mRNA in Raw 264.7 cells by cumulative feedback regulation through preferential binding of MC1R. Moreover, as evidenced by inhibiting the LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6 and enhancing the expression level of cyclic AMP protein in vitro. In vivo study it was also observed that psoralen promoted on histopathologic changes in the skin tissue of TNCB-induced AD mice. Taken together, our results suggest that MC1R decrease the inflammation in vitro and vivo, and might be a therapeutic signaling pathway to against inflammatory diseases.

  20. Multiscale Snow/Icemelt Discharge Simulations into Alpine Reservoirs: adding Glacier Dynamics to a Hydrological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueller, Felix; Förster, Kristian; Hanzer, Florian; Huttenlau, Matthias; Marzeion, Ben; Strasser, Ulrich; Achleitner, Stefan; Kirnbauer, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Glacier and snow runoff in high alpine regions is an essential process in hydrological research for its high relevance on lower altitude areas and hydro-power generation. MUSICALS II (Multiscale Snow/Icemelt Discharge Simulations into Alpine Reservoirs) seeks to identify and quantify water availability and runoff in alpine headwater catchments. The focus is on future changes due to glacier retreat, altering the multi-day and seasonal runoff available for hydropower operations. Our aim is to investigate and improve runoff forecasts by coupling the semi-distributed hydrological model HQSim with a simple glacier evolution model. The glacier model MMBM (Marzeion Mass Balance Model) with its statistical nature allows for fast modelling of the dynamical properties of glaciers. We present the design of the coupled hydrological application for different hydro power headwater catchments in Tyrol. The capabilities of the glacier model to simulate the selected glaciers is shown. Simulated discharge with the original and the coupled model are compared to downstream gauge measurements. Using the multi-objective optimization algorithm AMALGAM (A Multi-ALgorithm, Genetically Adaptive Multiobjective model), we optimize the glacier module parameters fully automatically. The results show the improvements in runoff modelling for past periods, when altering of glaciated catchment parts is considered. This indicates consideration of this process is mandatory for simulating future developments.

  1. Pex gene deletions in Gy and Hyp mice provide mouse models for X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Strom, T M; Francis, F; Lorenz, B; Böddrich, A; Econs, M J; Lehrach, H; Meitinger, T

    1997-02-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets in humans is caused by mutations in the PEX gene which codes for a protein homologous to neutral endopeptidases. Hyp and Gy mice both have X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets, although genetic data and the different phenotypic spectra observed have previously suggested that two different genes are mutated. In addition to the metabolic disorder observed in Hyp mice, male Gy mice are sterile and show circling behavior and reduced viability. We now report the cloning of the mouse homolog of PEX which is highly conserved between man and mouse. The 3' end of this gene is deleted in Hyp mice. In Gy mice, the first three exons and the promotor region are deleted. Thus, Hyp and Gy are allelic mutations and both provide mouse models for X-linked hypophosphatemia.

  2. Development of a novel model of hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yiyuan; Li, Yong; Gao, Lin; Tong, Zhihui; Ye, Bo; Liu, Shufeng; Li, Baiqiang; Chen, Yizhe; Yang, Qi; Meng, Lei; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George; Lu, Guotao; Li, Weiqin; Li, Jieshou

    2017-01-01

    The morbidity rate of hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis (HTG-AP) increased rapidly over the last decade. However an appropriate animal model was lacking to recapitulate this complicated human disease. We established a novel mice model of HTG-AP by poloxamer 407 (P-407) combined with caerulein (Cae). In our study, serum triglyceride levels of P-407 induced mice were elevated in a dose-dependent manner, and the pancreatic and pulmonary injuries were much severer in HTG mice than normal mice when injected with conventional dose Cae (50 ug/kg), what’s more, the severity of AP was positively correlative with duration and extent of HTG. In addition, we found that a low dose Cae (5 ug/kg) could induce pancreatic injury in HTG mice while there was no obvious pathological injury in normal mice. Finally, we observed that HTG leaded to the increased infiltrations of macrophages and neutrophils in mice pancreatic tissues. In conclusion, we have developed a novel animal model of HTG-AP that can mimic physiological, histological, clinical features of human HTG-AP and it could promote the development of therapeutic strategies and advance the mechanism research on HTG-AP. PMID:28079184

  3. Modeling Energy Dynamics in Mice with Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy Fed High Calorie Diets

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Nichole D.; Guo, Juen; Hall, Kevin D.; McPherron, Alexandra C.

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective and prospective studies show that lean mass or strength is positively associated with metabolic health. Mice deficient in myostatin, a growth factor that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass, have increased muscle and body weights and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. Their leanness is often attributed to higher energy expenditure in the face of normal food intake. However, even obese animals have an increase in energy expenditure compared to normal weight animals suggesting this is an incomplete explanation. We have previously developed a computational model to estimate energy output, fat oxidation and respiratory quotient from food intake and body composition measurements to more accurately account for changes in body composition in rodents over time. Here we use this approach to understand the dynamic changes in energy output, intake, fat oxidation and respiratory quotient in muscular mice carrying a dominant negative activin receptor IIB expressed specifically in muscle. We found that muscular mice had higher food intake and higher energy output when fed either chow or a high-fat diet for 15 weeks compared to WT mice. Transgenic mice also matched their rate of fat oxidation to the rate of fat consumed better than WT mice. Surprisingly, when given a choice between high-fat diet and Ensure® drink, transgenic mice consumed relatively more calories from Ensure® than from the high-fat diet despite similar caloric intake to WT mice. When switching back and forth between diets, transgenic mice adjusted their intake more rapidly than WT to restore normal caloric intake. Our results show that mice with myostatin inhibition in muscle are better at adjusting energy intake and output on diets of different macronutrient composition than WT mice to maintain energy balance and resist weight gain. PMID:27076790

  4. Modeling Energy Dynamics in Mice with Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy Fed High Calorie Diets.

    PubMed

    Bond, Nichole D; Guo, Juen; Hall, Kevin D; McPherron, Alexandra C

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective and prospective studies show that lean mass or strength is positively associated with metabolic health. Mice deficient in myostatin, a growth factor that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass, have increased muscle and body weights and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. Their leanness is often attributed to higher energy expenditure in the face of normal food intake. However, even obese animals have an increase in energy expenditure compared to normal weight animals suggesting this is an incomplete explanation. We have previously developed a computational model to estimate energy output, fat oxidation and respiratory quotient from food intake and body composition measurements to more accurately account for changes in body composition in rodents over time. Here we use this approach to understand the dynamic changes in energy output, intake, fat oxidation and respiratory quotient in muscular mice carrying a dominant negative activin receptor IIB expressed specifically in muscle. We found that muscular mice had higher food intake and higher energy output when fed either chow or a high-fat diet for 15 weeks compared to WT mice. Transgenic mice also matched their rate of fat oxidation to the rate of fat consumed better than WT mice. Surprisingly, when given a choice between high-fat diet and Ensure® drink, transgenic mice consumed relatively more calories from Ensure® than from the high-fat diet despite similar caloric intake to WT mice. When switching back and forth between diets, transgenic mice adjusted their intake more rapidly than WT to restore normal caloric intake. Our results show that mice with myostatin inhibition in muscle are better at adjusting energy intake and output on diets of different macronutrient composition than WT mice to maintain energy balance and resist weight gain.

  5. An Agent-based Model Simulation of Multiple Collaborating Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANET)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    RESULTS: Agent Learning Profiles Discounted Positive Reinforcement Learning Learning and Forgetting Forgetting is triggered by task conditions that...disable rational and deliberate mental models –forcing the agent to ignore (or forget) routine processes. Positive reinforcement is earned by an...deliberate behavior of agents as rational entities (model-based functions). 6.Experiment with positive reinforcement learning (with incremental gain over

  6. An experimental seasonal hydrological forecasting system over the Yellow River basin - Part 2: The added value from climate forecast models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xing

    2016-06-01

    This is the second paper of a two-part series on introducing an experimental seasonal hydrological forecasting system over the Yellow River basin in northern China. While the natural hydrological predictability in terms of initial hydrological conditions (ICs) is investigated in a companion paper, the added value from eight North American Multimodel Ensemble (NMME) climate forecast models with a grand ensemble of 99 members is assessed in this paper, with an implicit consideration of human-induced uncertainty in the hydrological models through a post-processing procedure. The forecast skill in terms of anomaly correlation (AC) for 2 m air temperature and precipitation does not necessarily decrease over leads but is dependent on the target month due to a strong seasonality for the climate over the Yellow River basin. As there is more diversity in the model performance for the temperature forecasts than the precipitation forecasts, the grand NMME ensemble mean forecast has consistently higher skill than the best single model up to 6 months for the temperature but up to 2 months for the precipitation. The NMME climate predictions are downscaled to drive the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) land surface hydrological model and a global routing model regionalized over the Yellow River basin to produce forecasts of soil moisture, runoff and streamflow. And the NMME/VIC forecasts are compared with the Ensemble Streamflow Prediction method (ESP/VIC) through 6-month hindcast experiments for each calendar month during 1982-2010. As verified by the VIC offline simulations, the NMME/VIC is comparable to the ESP/VIC for the soil moisture forecasts, and the former has higher skill than the latter only for the forecasts at long leads and for those initialized in the rainy season. The forecast skill for runoff is lower for both forecast approaches, but the added value from NMME/VIC is more obvious, with an increase of the average AC by 0.08-0.2. To compare with the observed

  7. Adding Abstraction and Reuse to a Network Modelling Tool Using the Reuseware Composition Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Jendrik; Fernández, Miguel A.

    Domain-specific modelling (DSM) environments enable experts in a certain domain to actively participate in model-driven development. Developing DSM environments need to be cost-efficient, since they are only used by a limited group of domain experts. Different model-driven technologies promise to allow this cost-efficient development. [1] presented experiences in developing a DSM environment for telecommunication network modelling. There, challenges were identified that need to be addressed by other new modelling technologies. In this paper, we now present the results of addressing one of theses challenges - abstraction and reuse support - with the Reuseware Composition Framework. We show how we identified the abstraction and reuse features required in the telecommunication DSM environment in a case study and extended the existing environment with these features using Reuseware. We discuss the advantages of using this technology and propose a process for further improving the abstraction and reuse capabilities of the DSM environment in the future.

  8. A dynamic CSTT model for the effects of added nutrients in Loch Creran, a shallow fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Céline; Tett, Paul; Fernandes, Teresa; Gilpin, Linda; Jones, Ken

    2006-07-01

    Despite a tendency for the complexity of physical-biological models to increase, simple coupled models remain useful for some applications and can provide insights into crucial links between physical and biological processes. This argument is illustrated with an account of a simple 3-box model intended to help assess the capacity of fjords to assimilate nutrients from fish farms. The model, a dynamic version of the UK "Comprehensive Studies Task Team" (CSTT) steady-state model for eutrophication, was applied to Loch Creran (Scottish Western Highlands) and was implemented using Stella 8 and tested using historical data from 1975 (before the installation of a salmon farm) and field data collected in 2003, during the period of operation of the farm. The model's biological state variables are chlorophyll, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP), and it includes a simple run-off model to convert rainfall into river discharge. The physical processes involved in exchange between the loch and the adjacent waters of the Firth of Lorne were parameterised as a constant daily exchange rate. Between 1975 and 2003, local inputs of nutrient increased but, despite this, there was little apparent increase in nutrient concentrations in the loch, and observed chlorophyll concentrations decreased substantially. Model simulations of chlorophyll and DIN agreed well with observations in 1975, as did DIN simulations in 2003. However, simulated chlorophyll was overestimated in 2003. Some of the agreement between observations and simulations come from the use of observed boundary conditions to force the model. However, even when boundary conditions are subtracted from simulations and observations, the simulations in most cases retain a significant correlation with observations, demonstrating that the model's 'interior' processes do add to its ability to replicate conditions in the loch.

  9. The Effect of S-Adenosylmethionine on Cognitive Performance in Mice: An Animal Model Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Sarah E.; Sepehry, Amir A.; Wangsgaard, John D.; Koenig, Jeremy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most frequently diagnosed form of dementia resulting in cognitive impairment. Many AD mouse studies, using the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), report improved cognitive ability, but conflicting results between and within studies currently exist. To address this, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of SAM on cognitive ability as measured by Y maze performance. As supporting evidence, we include further discussion of improvements in cognitive ability, by SAM, as measured by the Morris water maze (MWM). Methods We conducted a comprehensive literature review up to April 2014 based on searches querying MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library and Proquest Theses and Dissertation databases. We identified three studies containing a total of 12 experiments that met our inclusion criteria and one study for qualitative review. The data from these studies were used to evaluate the effect of SAM on cognitive performance according to two scenarios: 1. SAM supplemented folate deficient (SFD) diet compared to a folate deficient (FD) diet and 2. SFD diet compared to a nutrient complete (NC) diet. Hedge's g was used to calculate effect sizes and mixed effects model meta-regression was used to evaluate moderating factors. Results Our findings showed that the SFD diet was associated with improvements in cognitive performance. SFD diet mice also had superior cognitive performance compared to mice on an NC diet. Further to this, meta-regression analyses indicated a significant positive effect of study quality score and treatment duration on the effect size estimate for both the FD vs SFD analysis and the SFD vs NC analysis. Conclusion The findings of this meta-analysis demonstrate efficacy of SAM in acting as a cognitive performance-enhancing agent. As a corollary, SAM may be useful in improving spatial memory in patients suffering from many dementia forms including AD. PMID:25347725

  10. Proteomic Alterations in B Lymphocytes of Sensitized Mice in a Model of Chemical-Induced Asthma

    PubMed Central

    De Vooght, Vanessa; Schoofs, Liliane; Nemery, Benoit; Clynen, Elke; Hoet, Peter H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aim The role of B-lymphocytes in chemical-induced asthma is largely unknown. Recent work demonstrated that transferring B lymphocytes from toluene diisocyanate (TDI)-sensitized mice into naïve mice, B cell KO mice and SCID mice, triggered an asthma-like response in these mice after a subsequent TDI-challenge. We applied two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) to describe the “sensitized signature” of B lymphocytes comparing TDI-sensitized mice with control mice. Results Sixteen proteins were identified that were significantly up- or down-regulated in B lymphocytes of sensitized mice. Particularly differences in the expression of cyclophilin A, cofilin 1 and zinc finger containing CCHC domain protein 11 could be correlated to the function of B lymphocytes as initiators of T lymphocyte independent asthma-like responses. Conclusion This study revealed important alterations in the proteome of sensitized B cells in a mouse model of chemical-induced asthma, which will have an important impact on the B cell function. PMID:26398101

  11. Are the numbers adding up? Exploiting discrepancies among complementary population models

    PubMed Central

    Stenglein, Jennifer L; Zhu, Jun; Clayton, Murray K; Van Deelen, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Large carnivores are difficult to monitor because they tend to be sparsely distributed, sensitive to human activity, and associated with complex life histories. Consequently, understanding population trend and viability requires conservationists to cope with uncertainty and bias in population data. Joint analysis of combined data sets using multiple models (i.e., integrated population model) can improve inference about mechanisms (e.g., habitat heterogeneity and food distribution) affecting population dynamics. However, unobserved or unobservable processes can also introduce bias and can be difficult to quantify. We developed a Bayesian hierarchical modeling approach for inference on an integrated population model that reconciles annual population counts with recruitment and survival data (i.e., demographic processes). Our modeling framework is flexible and enables a realistic form of population dynamics by fitting separate density-dependent responses for each demographic process. Discrepancies estimated from shared parameters among different model components represent unobserved additions (i.e., recruitment or immigration) or removals (i.e., death or emigration) when annual population counts are reliable. In a case study of gray wolves in Wisconsin (1980–2011), concordant with policy changes, we estimated that a discrepancy of 0% (1980–1995), −2% (1996–2002), and 4% (2003–2011) in the annual mortality rate was needed to explain annual growth rate. Additional mortality in 2003–2011 may reflect density-dependent mechanisms, changes in illegal killing with shifts in wolf management, and nonindependent censoring in survival data. Integrated population models provide insights into unobserved or unobservable processes by quantifying discrepancies among data sets. Our modeling approach is generalizable to many population analysis needs and allows for identifying dynamic differences due to external drivers, such as management or policy changes. PMID:25691964

  12. Deconfinement and chiral transition in AdS/QCD wall models supplemented with a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudal, David; Granado, Diego R.; Mertens, Thomas G.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss the phenomenon of (inverse) magnetic catalysis for both the deconfinement and chiral transition. We discriminate between the hard and soft wall model, which we suitably generalize to include a magnetic field. Our findings show a critical deconfinement temperature going down, in contrast with the chiral restoration temperature growing with increasing magnetic field. This is at odds with contemporary lattice data, so the quest for a holographic QCD model capable of capturing inverse magnetic catalysis in the chiral sector remains open.

  13. Are the numbers adding up? Exploiting discrepancies among complementary population models.

    PubMed

    Stenglein, Jennifer L; Zhu, Jun; Clayton, Murray K; Van Deelen, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Large carnivores are difficult to monitor because they tend to be sparsely distributed, sensitive to human activity, and associated with complex life histories. Consequently, understanding population trend and viability requires conservationists to cope with uncertainty and bias in population data. Joint analysis of combined data sets using multiple models (i.e., integrated population model) can improve inference about mechanisms (e.g., habitat heterogeneity and food distribution) affecting population dynamics. However, unobserved or unobservable processes can also introduce bias and can be difficult to quantify. We developed a Bayesian hierarchical modeling approach for inference on an integrated population model that reconciles annual population counts with recruitment and survival data (i.e., demographic processes). Our modeling framework is flexible and enables a realistic form of population dynamics by fitting separate density-dependent responses for each demographic process. Discrepancies estimated from shared parameters among different model components represent unobserved additions (i.e., recruitment or immigration) or removals (i.e., death or emigration) when annual population counts are reliable. In a case study of gray wolves in Wisconsin (1980-2011), concordant with policy changes, we estimated that a discrepancy of 0% (1980-1995), -2% (1996-2002), and 4% (2003-2011) in the annual mortality rate was needed to explain annual growth rate. Additional mortality in 2003-2011 may reflect density-dependent mechanisms, changes in illegal killing with shifts in wolf management, and nonindependent censoring in survival data. Integrated population models provide insights into unobserved or unobservable processes by quantifying discrepancies among data sets. Our modeling approach is generalizable to many population analysis needs and allows for identifying dynamic differences due to external drivers, such as management or policy changes.

  14. Enhancement and modeling of microparticle-added Rhizopus oryzae lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Coban, Hasan Bugra; Demirci, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Lactic acid has a wide industrial application area and can be produced by fungal strains. However, excessive bulk growth form of fungi during the fermentations is a major problem, which limits the fermentation performance. Microparticles are excellent tools to prevent bulk fungal growth and provide homogenized fermentation broth to increase uniformity and the prediction performance of the models. Therefore, in this study, addition of aluminum oxide and talcum microparticles into fermentations was evaluated to enhance the production of lactic acid by Rhizopus oryzae. The results showed that the bulk fungal growth was prevented and the lactic acid concentration increased from 6.02 to 13.88 and 24.01 g/L, when 15 g/L of aluminum oxide or 10 g/L of talcum was used, respectively, in the shake-flask fermentations. Additionally, substrate concentration, pH, and agitation were optimized in the bioreactors using response surface methodology, and optimum values were determined as 126 g/L of glucose, 6.22 pH, and 387 rpm, respectively. Under these conditions, lactic acid production further increased to 75.1 ± 1.5 g/L with 10 g/L of talcum addition. Also, lactic acid production and glucose consumption in the batch fermentation were successfully modeled with modified Gompertz model and modified logistic model. RMSE and MAE values for lactic acid production were calculated as 2.279 and 1.498 for the modified Gompertz model; 3.6 and 4.056 for the modified logistic model. Additionally, modified logistic model predicted glucose consumption with -2.088 MAE and 2.868 RMSE, whereas these values were calculated as 2.035 and 3.946 for the modified Gompertz model.

  15. Adding Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsini, Larry L.; Hudack, Lawrence R.; Zekan, Donald L.

    1999-01-01

    The value-added statement (VAS), relatively unknown in the United States, is used in financial reports by many European companies. Saint Bonaventure University (New York) has adapted a VAS to make it appropriate for not-for-profit universities by identifying stakeholder groups (students, faculty, administrators/support personnel, creditors, the…

  16. Use of Numerical Models as Data Proxies for Approximate Ad-Hoc Query Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kamimura, R; Abdulla, G; Baldwin, C; Critchlow, T; Lee, B; Lozares, I; Musick, R; Tang, N

    2003-05-19

    As datasets grow beyond the gigabyte scale, there is an increasing demand to develop techniques for dealing/interacting with them. To this end, the DataFoundry team at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a software prototype called Approximate Adhoc Query Engine for Simulation Data (AQSim). The goal of AQSim is to provide a framework that allows scientists to interactively perform adhoc queries over terabyte scale datasets using numerical models as proxies for the original data. The advantages of this system are several. The first is that by storing only the model parameters, each dataset occupies a smaller footprint compared to the original, increasing the shelf-life of such datasets before they are sent to archival storage. Second, the models are geared towards approximate querying as they are built at different resolutions, allowing the user to make the tradeoff between model accuracy and query response time. This allows the user greater opportunities for exploratory data analysis. Lastly, several different models are allowed, each focusing on a different characteristic of the data thereby enhancing the interpretability of the data compared to the original. The focus of this paper is on the modeling aspects of the AQSim framework.

  17. Effects of chronic doxepin and amitriptyline administration in naïve mice and in neuropathic pain mice model.

    PubMed

    Mika, J; Jurga, A M; Starnowska, J; Wasylewski, M; Rojewska, E; Makuch, W; Kwiatkowski, K; Malek, N; Przewlocka, B

    2015-05-21

    Neuropathic pain is a severe clinical problem, often appearing as a co-symptom of many diseases or manifesting as a result of damage to the nervous system. Many drugs and agents are currently used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, such as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). The aims of this paper were to test the effects of two classic TCAs, doxepin and amitriptyline, in naïve animals and in a model of neuropathic pain and to determine the role of cytokine activation in the effects of these drugs. All experiments were carried out with Albino-Swiss mice using behavioral tests (von Frey test and the cold plate test) and biochemical analyses (qRT-PCR and Western blot). In the mice subjected to chronic constriction injury (CCI), doxepin and amitriptyline attenuated the symptoms of neuropathic pain and diminished the CCI-induced increase in the levels of spinal interleukin (IL)-6 and -1β mRNA, but not the protein levels of these cytokines, measured on day 12. Unexpectedly, chronic administration of doxepin or amitriptyline for 12 days produced allodynia and hyperalgesia in naïve mice. The treatment with these drugs did not influence the spinal levels of IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA, however, the protein levels of these pronociceptive factors were increased. The administration of ondansetron (5-HT3 receptor antagonist) significantly weakened the allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by both antidepressants in naïve mice; in contrast, yohimbine (α2-adrenergic receptors antagonist) did not influence these effects. Allodynia and hyperalgesia induced in naïve animals by amitriptyline and doxepin may be associated with an increase in the levels of pronociceptive cytokines resulting from 5-HT3-induced hypersensitivity. Our results provide new and important information about the possible side effects of antidepressants. Further investigation of these mechanisms may help to guide decisions about the use of classic TCAs for therapy.

  18. Cold temperature improves mobility and survival in Drosophila models of autosomal-dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP).

    PubMed

    Baxter, Sally L; Allard, Denise E; Crowl, Christopher; Sherwood, Nina Tang

    2014-08-01

    Autosomal-dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) is a crippling neurodegenerative disease for which effective treatment or cure remains unknown. Victims experience progressive mobility loss due to degeneration of the longest axons in the spinal cord. Over half of AD-HSP cases arise from loss-of-function mutations in spastin, which encodes a microtubule-severing AAA ATPase. In Drosophila models of AD-HSP, larvae lacking Spastin exhibit abnormal motor neuron morphology and function, and most die as pupae. Adult survivors display impaired mobility, reminiscent of the human disease. Here, we show that rearing pupae or adults at reduced temperature (18°C), compared with the standard temperature of 24°C, improves the survival and mobility of adult spastin mutants but leaves wild-type flies unaffected. Flies expressing human spastin with pathogenic mutations are similarly rescued. Additionally, larval cooling partially rescues the larval synaptic phenotype. Cooling thus alleviates known spastin phenotypes for each developmental stage at which it is administered and, notably, is effective even in mature adults. We find further that cold treatment rescues larval synaptic defects in flies with mutations in Flower (a protein with no known relation to Spastin) and mobility defects in flies lacking Kat60-L1, another microtubule-severing protein enriched in the CNS. Together, these data support the hypothesis that the beneficial effects of cold extend beyond specific alleviation of Spastin dysfunction, to at least a subset of cellular and behavioral neuronal defects. Mild hypothermia, a common neuroprotective technique in clinical treatment of acute anoxia, might thus hold additional promise as a therapeutic approach for AD-HSP and, potentially, for other neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Investigation of modified AD/RANS models for wind turbine wake predictions in large wind farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, L. L.; Zhu, W. J.; Shen, W. Z.; Sørensen, J. N.; Zhao, N.

    2014-06-01

    Average power losses due to multiple wind turbine wakes in the large offshore wind farm is studied in this paper using properly modified k-ω SST turbulence models. The numerical simulations are carried out by the actuator disc methodology implemented in the flow solver EllipSys3D. In these simulations, the influence of different inflow conditions such as wind direction sectors are considered and discussed. Comparisons with measurements in terms of wake speed ratio and the corresponding power outputs show that the modified turbulence models had significant improvements; especially the SST-Csust model reflects the best ability in predicting the wake defect. The investigations of various inflow angles reveal that the agreement between predicted and measured data is improved for the wider sector case than the narrow case because of the wind direction uncertainty.

  20. Blocking the apoE/Aβ interaction ameliorates Aβ-related pathology in APOE ε2 and ε4 targeted replacement Alzheimer model mice.

    PubMed

    Pankiewicz, Joanna E; Guridi, Maitea; Kim, Jungsu; Asuni, Ayodeji A; Sanchez, Sandrine; Sullivan, Patrick M; Holtzman, David M; Sadowski, Martin J

    2014-06-28

    Accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain is essential to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Carriers of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele demonstrate greatly increased AD risk and enhanced brain Aβ deposition. In contrast, APOE ε2 allele carries show reduced AD risk, later age of disease onset, and lesser Aβ accumulation. However, it remains elusive whether the apoE2 isoform exerts truly protective effect against Aβ pathology or apoE2 plays deleterious role albeit less pronounced than the apoE4 isoform. Here, we characterized APPSW/PS1dE9/APOE ε2-TR (APP/E2) and APPSW/PS1dE9/APOE ε4-TR (APP/E4) mice, with targeted replacement (TR) of the murine Apoe for human ε2 or ε4 alleles, and used these models to investigate effects of pharmacological inhibition of the apoE/Aβ interaction on Aβ deposition and neuritic degeneration. APP/E2 and APP/E4 mice replicate differential effect of human apoE isoforms on Aβ pathology with APP/E4 mice showing a several-fold greater load of Aβ plaques, insoluble brain Aβ levels, Aβ oligomers, and density of neuritic plaques than APP/E2 mice. Furthermore, APP/E4 mice, but not APP/E2 mice, exhibit memory impairment on object recognition and radial arm maze tests. Between the age of 6 and 10 months APP/E2 and APP/E4 mice received treatment with Aβ12-28P, a non-toxic, synthetic peptide homologous to the apoE binding motif within the Aβ sequence, which competitively blocks the apoE/Aβ interaction. In both lines, the treatment significantly reduced brain Aβ accumulation, co-accumulation of apoE within Aβ plaques, and neuritic degeneration, and prevented memory deficit in APP/E4 mice. These results indicate that both apoE2 and apoE4 isoforms contribute to Aβ deposition and future therapies targeting the apoE/Aβ interaction could produce favorable outcome in APOE ε2 and ε4 allele carriers.

  1. [Establishment of EV71 animal models with 2-week-old BALB/c mice].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Qiang; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Li, Yu-Huan

    2013-03-01

    Animal model is very important for anti-EV71 (enterovirus 71) drug and vaccine development. 1-day-old suckling EV71 mouse model is the main in vivo model used in China. 1-day-old suckling EV71 mouse is too small to perform antiviral experiment. And the route of administration and dosage capacity are also restricted. A strong virulence EV71 virus strain was selected after screening from five EV71 strains with 1-day-old suckling mice. A mouse-adapted EV71 strain with increased virulence in 12-day-old suckling mice, EV71-M5, was generated after five serial passages of the parental EV71 strain in mice. Virus titers of EV71 infected mice heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, small intestine, brain and muscle tissue were determined by cytopathic effect (CPE) assay. The virus used in this model is the first isolated EV71 strain in China. And 2-week-old suckling mice were used in this model. This is a supplement for the EV71 animal model in China. Establishment of this EV71 model will provide an attractive platform for anti-EV71 vaccine and drug development.

  2. Adding Value through Program Integration: A Kayaking Model (Rental, Retail, Repair, Clinics and Outings).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poff, Raymond

    Outdoor programs can offset initial investment costs in services and products by developing integrated program areas. The experience of Outdoors Unlimited, a recently created kayaking program at Brigham Young University (Utah), is provided as a model. The purchase of 11 kayaks for rental was followed by the introduction of retail sales, repair…

  3. Energy and time modelling of kerbside waste collection: Changes incurred when adding source separated food waste.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Joel; Othman, Maazuza; Burn, Stewart; Crossin, Enda

    2016-10-01

    The collection of source separated kerbside municipal FW (SSFW) is being incentivised in Australia, however such a collection is likely to increase the fuel and time a collection truck fleet requires. Therefore, waste managers need to determine whether the incentives outweigh the cost. With literature scarcely describing the magnitude of increase, and local parameters playing a crucial role in accurately modelling kerbside collection; this paper develops a new general mathematical model that predicts the energy and time requirements of a collection regime whilst incorporating the unique variables of different jurisdictions. The model, Municipal solid waste collect (MSW-Collect), is validated and shown to be more accurate at predicting fuel consumption and trucks required than other common collection models. When predicting changes incurred for five different SSFW collection scenarios, results show that SSFW scenarios require an increase in fuel ranging from 1.38% to 57.59%. There is also a need for additional trucks across most SSFW scenarios tested. All SSFW scenarios are ranked and analysed in regards to fuel consumption; sensitivity analysis is conducted to test key assumptions.

  4. Historic Building Information Modelling - Adding intelligence to laser and image based surveys of European classical architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Maurice; McGovern, Eugene; Pavia, Sara

    2013-02-01

    Historic Building Information Modelling (HBIM) is a novel prototype library of parametric objects, based on historic architectural data and a system of cross platform programmes for mapping parametric objects onto point cloud and image survey data. The HBIM process begins with remote collection of survey data using a terrestrial laser scanner combined with digital photo modelling. The next stage involves the design and construction of a parametric library of objects, which are based on the manuscripts ranging from Vitruvius to 18th century architectural pattern books. In building parametric objects, the problem of file format and exchange of data has been overcome within the BIM ArchiCAD software platform by using geometric descriptive language (GDL). The plotting of parametric objects onto the laser scan surveys as building components to create or form the entire building is the final stage in the reverse engineering process. The final HBIM product is the creation of full 3D models including detail behind the object's surface concerning its methods of construction and material make-up. The resultant HBIM can automatically create cut sections, details and schedules in addition to the orthographic projections and 3D models (wire frame or textured) for both the analysis and conservation of historic objects, structures and environments.

  5. Historic Building Information Modelling - Adding Intelligence to Laser and Image Based Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M.; McGovern, E.; Pavia, S.

    2011-09-01

    Historic Building Information Modelling (HBIM) is a novel prototype library of parametric objects based on historic data and a system of cross platform programmes for mapping parametric objects onto a point cloud and image survey data. The HBIM process begins with remote collection of survey data using a terrestrial laser scanner combined with digital photo modelling. The next stage involves the design and construction of a parametric library of objects, which are based on the manuscripts ranging from Vitruvius to 18th century architectural pattern books. In building parametric objects, the problem of file format and exchange of data has been overcome within the BIM ArchiCAD software platform by using geometric descriptive language (GDL). The plotting of parametric objects onto the laser scan surveys as building components to create or form the entire building is the final stage in the reverse engin- eering process. The final HBIM product is the creation of full 3D models including detail behind the object's surface concerning its methods of construction and material make-up. The resultant HBIM can automatically create cut sections, details and schedules in addition to the orthographic projections and 3D models (wire frame or textured).

  6. A probabilistic dynamic energy model for ad-hoc wireless sensors network with varying topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Husseini, Amal

    In this dissertation we investigate the behavior of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) from the degree distribution and evolution perspective. In specific, we focus on implementation of a scale-free degree distribution topology for energy efficient WSNs. WSNs is an emerging technology that finds its applications in different areas such as environment monitoring, agricultural crop monitoring, forest fire monitoring, and hazardous chemical monitoring in war zones. This technology allows us to collect data without human presence or intervention. Energy conservation/efficiency is one of the major issues in prolonging the active life WSNs. Recently, many energy aware and fault tolerant topology control algorithms have been presented, but there is dearth of research focused on energy conservation/efficiency of WSNs. Therefore, we study energy efficiency and fault-tolerance in WSNs from the degree distribution and evolution perspective. Self-organization observed in natural and biological systems has been directly linked to their degree distribution. It is widely known that scale-free distribution bestows robustness, fault-tolerance, and access efficiency to system. Fascinated by these properties, we propose two complex network theoretic self-organizing models for adaptive WSNs. In particular, we focus on adopting the Barabasi and Albert scale-free model to fit into the constraints and limitations of WSNs. We developed simulation models to conduct numerical experiments and network analysis. The main objective of studying these models is to find ways to reducing energy usage of each node and balancing the overall network energy disrupted by faulty communication among nodes. The first model constructs the wireless sensor network relative to the degree (connectivity) and remaining energy of every individual node. We observed that it results in a scale-free network structure which has good fault tolerance properties in face of random node failures. The second model considers

  7. FVB/NJ Mice Are a Useful Model for Examining Cardiac Adaptations to Treadmill Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Andrew A.; McNally, Lindsey A.; Riggs, Daniel W.; Conklin, Daniel J.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Hill, Bradford G.

    2016-01-01

    Mice are commonly used to examine the mechanisms by which exercise improves cardiometabolic health; however, exercise compliance and adaptations are often strain-dependent or are variable due to inconsistency in exercise training protocols. In this study, we examined nocturnal/diurnal behavior, treadmill exercise compliance, and systemic as well as cardiac-specific exercise adaptations in two commonly used mouse strains, C57BL/6J, and FVB/NJ mice. Metabolic cage analysis indicated a strong nocturnal nature of C57BL/6J mice, whereas FVB/NJ mice showed no circadian element to activity, food or water intake, VO2, or VCO2. Initial exercise capacity tests revealed that, compared with C57BL/6J mice, FVB/NJ mice are capable of achieving nearly 2-fold higher workloads prior to exhaustion. FVB/NJ mice tested during the day were capable of achieving significantly more work compared with their night-tested counterparts. Following 4 weeks of training, FVB/NJ mice showed significant increases in exercise capacity as well as physiologic cardiac growth characterized by enlarged myocytes and higher mitochondrial DNA content. C57BL/6J mice showed no increases in exercise capacity or cardiac growth regardless of whether they exercised during the day or the night. This lack of adaptation in C57BL/6J mice was attributable, at least in part, to their progressive loss of compliance to the treadmill training protocol. We conclude that the FVB/NJ strain is a useful and robust mouse model for examining cardiac adaptations to treadmill exercise and that treadmill training during daytime hours does not negatively affect exercise compliance or capacity. PMID:28066267

  8. Lipid Emulsion Added to a Liquid High-Carbohydrate Diet and Voluntary Running Exercise Reduce Lipogenesis and Ameliorate Early-Stage Hepatic Steatosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Hsun; Hao, Lei; Smith, Philip B; Rogers, Connie J; Patterson, Andrew D; Ross, A Catharine

    2017-03-15

    Background: The use of parenteral nutrition formulas is often associated with the development of hepatic steatosis. We have shown previously that the addition of a lipid emulsion (LE) rich in n-6 (ω-6) fatty acids (FAs) ameliorated triglyceride (TG) accumulation in the livers of nonobese mice fed a high-carbohydrate diet (HCD) for 5 wk. However, it remains unclear how rapidly this condition develops and whether it can be prevented by LE with or without a running wheel for voluntary exercise (Exe).Objective: We investigated in an 8-d study whether mice develop steatosis and whether the administration of LE with or without Exe reduces the concentration of total FAs and prevents an increase in the expression of genes in the liver associated with lipogenesis.Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice aged 5 wk were randomized into 5 groups: standard feed pellet (SFP); a liquid HCD (77% of total energy from carbohydrates and 0.5% from fat); HCD + Exe; HCD + 13.5% LE (67% carbohydrates and 13.5% fat); or HCD + 13.5% LE + Exe. Hepatic TG concentration, lipogenic genes, and total FAs were measured on day 8.Results: Oil Red O staining and TG quantification showed hepatic TG accumulation on day 8; the addition of 13.5% LE either with or without Exe suppressed the TG accumulation compared with HCD (P < 0.005). With the use of quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis, the expression concentrations of lipogenic genes [ATP-citrate lyase, acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase 1, FA synthase (Fasn), and stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 (Scd1)] in the HCD + 13.5% LE group were 26-60% of HCD (P < 0.01) and 11-38% of HCD in the HCD + 13.5% LE + Exe group (P < 0.001), with interactions for Fasn and Scd1 (P < 0.05). With the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, the HCD + 13.5% LE group had lower monounsaturated fatty acids (38.7% of HCD) but higher polyunsaturated fatty acids (164% of HCD) (P < 0.001).Conclusions: In short-term studies designed to resemble the

  9. Effects of chitosan on xenograft models of melanoma in C57BL/6 mice and hepatoma formation in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ming-Yang; Wu, Ming-Fang; Shang, Hung-Sheng; Chang, Jin-Biou; Shih, Yung-Luen; Chen, Yung-Liang; Hung, Hsiao-Fang; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Yeh, Chun; Wood, W Gibson; Hung, Fang-Ming; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2013-11-01

    According to the World Health Organization, Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a comprehensive term referring to traditional medical treatments and various forms of indigenous medicines, also known as indigenous or folk medicine. Cancer patients often use CAM in the form of nutritional supplements, psychological techniques and natural medical approaches in the place of or in parallel to conventional medicine. The present study aimed to determine if Chitosan can inhibit lung metastasis and hepatoma formation, by studying xenograft of B16F10 melanoma cells in C57BL/6 mice and of Smmu 7721 cells in SCID mice, respectively. For the lung metastasis model, after a five-week treatment, the survival rates of B6 mice were 15% for the control group and 35%, 20%, 45% and 40% for the 320,000 kDa, 173,000 kDa, 86,000 kDa and 8,000 kDa molecular-weight treatment groups, respectively. Chitosan treatment dramatically increased lifespan and inhibited tumor metastasis especially in treatment groups of the low-molecular weight compound. For the hepatoma growth model, the size of the liver tumor mass was approximately >14 mm in the control group. In comparison to the control group, the tumor mass grew slowly with Chitosan treatment, especially at the low-molecular weight treatment group. Chitosan slowed-down the rate of tumor growth but did not inhibit tumor formation. Data presented herein demonstrate that Chitosan has anticancer effects and thus further study of the substance is warranted to examine for mechanisms of action and optimal dosage.

  10. Prolonged diet induced obesity has minimal effects towards brain pathology in mouse model of cerebral amyloid angiopathy: implications for studying obesity-brain interactions in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Fernandez-Kim, Sun-Ok; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Freeman, Linnea R; Pepping, Jennifer K; Beckett, Tina L; Murphy, M Paul; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2013-09-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) occurs in nearly every individual with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome, and is the second largest cause of intracerebral hemorrhage. Mouse models of CAA have demonstrated evidence for increased gliosis contributing to CAA pathology. Nearly two thirds of Americans are overweight or obese, with little known about the effects of obesity on the brain, although increasingly the vasculature appears to be a principle target of obesity effects on the brain. In the current study we describe for the first time whether diet induced obesity (DIO) modulates glial reactivity, amyloid levels, and inflammatory signaling in a mouse model of CAA. In these studies we identify surprisingly that DIO does not significantly increase Aβ levels, astrocyte (GFAP) or microglial (IBA-1) gliosis in the CAA mice. However, within the hippocampal gyri a localized increase in reactive microglia were increased in the CA1 and stratum oriens relative to CAA mice on a control diet. DIO was observed to selectively increase IL-6 in CAA mice, with IL-1β and TNF-α not increased in CAA mice in response to DIO. Taken together, these data show that prolonged DIO has only modest effects towards Aβ in a mouse model of CAA, but appears to elevate some localized microglial reactivity within the hippocampal gyri and selective markers of inflammatory signaling. These data are consistent with the majority of the existing literature in other models of Aβ pathology, which surprisingly show a mixed profile of DIO effects towards pathological processes in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease. The importance for considering the potential impact of ceiling effects in pathology within mouse models of Aβ pathogenesis, and the current experimental limitations for DIO in mice to fully replicate metabolic dysfunction present in human obesity, are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Animal Models of Disease.

  11. Adding ecology to particle capture models: numerical simulations of capture on a moving cylinder in crossflow.

    PubMed

    Krick, Julian; Ackerman, Josef Daniel

    2015-03-07

    The particle capture efficiency, η, of systems that remove suspended particles from ambient flow (e.g. suspension feeding, abiotic pollination) has been studied using static collectors in steady flows. Particle deposition on collectors moving due to fluid flow remains largely unknown, despite its ecological relevance. We used numerical modeling to simulate particle deposition on a 2D circular cylinder subject to flow-induced oscillation in a cross flow. Using parameter values relevant to wind pollination and other natural biological systems, we examined the influence of the direction, amplitude and frequency of the oscillation, the Stokes number (Stk=0.01-5, characterizing particle behavior), as well as the Reynolds number (Re=662 and 3309, characterizing flow regime) in steady and unsteady flow, on η. The numerical model was validated with empirical results for parts of the parameter space. Particle capture occurred via "inertial impaction", "direct interception" and "leeward deposition", as well as via a new mechanism, "collector chasing" for moving collectors. The η of an oscillating cylinder varied significantly relative to a static cylinder, depending on the parameters used, and on the magnitude of a numerical error that caused loss of particles. This variance of η was due to a change in relative momentum between the particle and the moving collector, which depends on Re, Stk and the oscillation parameters. Collector oscillation transverse to oncoming flow direction strongly increased η, whereas collector motion parallel to flow had little effect on capture efficiency. The oscillation also changed leeward capture significantly in some cases. For most conditions, however, leeward deposition was small. Results suggest that collector motion could have significant influence on the particle capture efficiency of natural systems, which indicates the need to incorporate these ecologically more relevant findings into current models. Empirical studies, however

  12. Ad-hoc model acquisition for combat simulation in urban terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatov, Dimitri; Solbrig, Peter; Wernerus, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Situation awareness in complex urban environments is an important component for a successful task fulfillment both in military and civil area of applications. In the first area, the fields of deployment of the members of the North Atlantic Alliance have been changed, in the past two decades, from the originally assigned task of acting as national and allied defense forces within the partners' own borders to out-of-area missions under conditions of an asymmetric conflict. Because of its complicated structure, urban terrain represents a particular difficulty of military missions such as patrolling. In the civil field of applications, police and rescue forces are also often strongly dependent on a local visibility and accessibility analysis. However, the process of decision-taking within a short time and under enormous pressure can be extensively trained in an environment that is tailored to the concrete situation. The contribution of this work consists of context-based modeling of urban terrain that can be then integrated into simulation software, for example, Virtual Battlespace 2 (VBS2). The input of our procedure is made up by the airborne sensor data, collected either by an active or a passive sensor. The latter is particularly important if the application is time-critical or the area to be explored is small. After description of our procedure for urban terrain modeling with a detailed focus on the recent innovations, the main steps of model integration into simulation software will be presented and two examples of missions for military and civil applications that can be easily created with VBS2 will be given.

  13. Adding Biotic Interactions into Paleodistribution Models: A Host-Cleptoparasite Complex of Neotropical Orchid Bees

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Daniel Paiva; Varela, Sara; Nemésio, André; De Marco, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Orchid bees compose an exclusive Neotropical pollinators group, with bright body coloration. Several of those species build their own nests, while others are reported as nest cleptoparasites. Here, the objective was to evaluate whether the inclusion of a strong biotic interaction, such as the presence of a host species, improved the ability of species distribution models (SDMs) to predict the geographic range of the cleptoparasite species. The target species were Aglae caerulea and its host species Eulaema nigrita. Additionally, since A. caerulea is more frequently found in the Amazon rather than the Cerrado areas, a secondary objective was to evaluate whether this species is increasing or decreasing its distribution given South American past and current climatic conditions. SDMs methods (Maxent and Bioclim), in addition with current and past South American climatic conditions, as well as the occurrences for A. caerulea and E. nigrita were used to generate the distribution models. The distribution of A. caerulea was generated with and without the inclusion of the distribution of E. nigrita as a predictor variable. The results indicate A. caerulea was barely affected by past climatic conditions and the populations from the Cerrado savanna could be at least 21,000 years old (the last glacial maximum), as well as the Amazonian ones. On the other hand, in this study, the inclusion of the host-cleptoparasite interaction complex did not statistically improve the quality of the produced models, which means that the geographic range of this cleptoparasite species is mainly constrained by climate and not by the presence of the host species. Nonetheless, this could also be caused by unknown complexes of other Euglossini hosts with A. caerulea, which still are still needed to be described by science. PMID:26069956

  14. Pion Form Factor in Chiral Limit of Hard-Wall AdS/QCD Model

    SciTech Connect

    Anatoly Radyushkin; Hovhannes Grigoryan

    2007-12-01

    We develop a formalism to calculate form factor and charge density distribution of pion in the chiral limit using the holographic dual model of QCD with hard-wall cutoff. We introduce two conjugate pion wave functions and present analytic expressions for these functions and for the pion form factor. They allow to relate such observables as the pion decay constant and the pion charge electric radius to the values of chiral condensate and hard-wall cutoff scale. The evolution of the pion form factor to large values of the momentum transfer is discussed, and results are compared to existing experimental data.

  15. Design of Value-Added Models for IMPACT and TEAM in DC Public Schools, 2010-2011 School Year. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenberg, Eric; Hock, Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the value-added models that will be used to measure school and teacher effectiveness in the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) in the 2010-2011 school year. It updates the earlier technical report, "Measuring Value Added for IMPACT and TEAM in DC Public Schools." The earlier report described the methods used…

  16. Decentralized Opportunistic Spectrum Resources Access Model and Algorithm toward Cooperative Ad-Hoc Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming; Xu, Yang; Mohammed, Abdul-Wahid

    2016-01-01

    Limited communication resources have gradually become a critical factor toward efficiency of decentralized large scale multi-agent coordination when both system scales up and tasks become more complex. In current researches, due to the agent’s limited communication and observational capability, an agent in a decentralized setting can only choose a part of channels to access, but cannot perceive or share global information. Each agent’s cooperative decision is based on the partial observation of the system state, and as such, uncertainty in the communication network is unavoidable. In this situation, it is a major challenge working out cooperative decision-making under uncertainty with only a partial observation of the environment. In this paper, we propose a decentralized approach that allows agents cooperatively search and independently choose channels. The key to our design is to build an up-to-date observation for each agent’s view so that a local decision model is achievable in a large scale team coordination. We simplify the Dec-POMDP model problem, and each agent can jointly work out its communication policy in order to improve its local decision utilities for the choice of communication resources. Finally, we discuss an implicate resource competition game, and show that, there exists an approximate resources access tradeoff balance between agents. Based on this discovery, the tradeoff between real-time decision-making and the efficiency of cooperation using these channels can be well improved. PMID:26727504

  17. The Use of L-sIDOL Transgenic Mice as a Murine Model to Study Hypercholesterolemia and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zerenturk, Eser J; Calkin, Anna C

    2017-01-01

    There are many advantages to the use of mice as a model to study the regulation of cholesterol metabolism. Common models of hypercholesterolemia include low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (LDLR -/-) mice and apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE) -/- mice. Herein, we describe the recently generated mouse model, L-sIDOL Tg mice, which express a dominant active form of Inducible Degrader Of the Low-density lipoprotein receptor (IDOL) in a liver-specific manner. This murine model offers significant advantages over previously established models for the study of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis.

  18. An assessment of the added value from data assimilation on modelled Nordic Seas hydrography and ocean transports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Vidar S.; Hjøllo, Solfrid S.; Skogen, Morten D.; Svendsen, Einar; Wehde, Henning; Bertino, Laurent; Counillon, Francois; Chevallier, Matthieu; Garric, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    The Nordic Seas is a hotspot both in terms of climate related processes, such as Atlantic-Arctic heat exchange, and natural marine resources. A sustainable management of the marine resources within the Nordic Seas, including the co-existence between fisheries and petroleum industries, requires detailed information on the state of the ocean within an operational framework and beyond what is obtainable from observations only. Numerical ocean models applying data assimilation techniques are utilized to address this need. Subsequently, comprehensive comparisons between model results and observations are required in order to assess the model performance. Here, we apply a set of objective statistics to quantitatively assess the added value of data assimilation in numerical ocean models that are currently used operationally. The results indicate that the inclusion of data assimilation improves the model performance both in terms of hydrographic properties and volume and heat transports. Furthermore, we find that increasing the resolution towards eddy resolving resolution performs similarly to coarser resolution models applying data assimilation in shelf areas.

  19. Effect of PCBs on the lactational transfer of methyl mercury in mice: PBPK modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Ku; Hamer, Dwayne; Bedwell, Cathy L.; Lohitnavy, Manupat; Yang, Raymond S. H.

    2009-01-01

    MeHg and PCB exposure to lactating mice were analyzed and a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to describe the lactational transfer of MeHg in mice. The influence of albumin on the lactational transfer of MeHg was incorporated into the PBPK model. Experimental results with lactating mice and their pups showed that co-exposure with PCB congeners increased the lactational transfer of MeHg to the pups, which was associated with the rise of albumin levels in maternal blood. Observed results were matched with PBPK model simulations conducted under the assumptions that (1) MeHg bound to plasma albumin is transferred to maternal milk, and (2) PCB congeners may increase the lactational transfer of MeHg by escalating albumin levels in maternal blood. Further refinement of PBPK model quantitatively described the pharmacokinetic changes of MeHg by co-exposure with PCBs in pup’s tissues. PMID:20046988

  20. Consumption of pomegranates improves synaptic function in a transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Poljak, Anne; Selvaraju, Subash; Al-Adawi, Samir; Manivasagm, Thamilarasan; Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy Justin; Ooi, Lezanne; Sachdev, Perminder; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extracellular plaques containing abnormal Amyloid Beta (Aβ) aggregates, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles containing hyperphosphorylated tau protein, microglia-dominated neuroinflammation, and impairments in synaptic plasticity underlying cognitive deficits. Therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AD are currently limited. In this study, we investigated the effects of dietary supplementation of 4% pomegranate extract to a standard chow diet on neuroinflammation, and synaptic plasticity in APPsw/Tg2576 mice brain. Treatment with a custom mixed diet (pellets) containing 4% pomegranate for 15 months ameliorated the loss of synaptic structure proteins, namely PSD-95, Munc18-1, and SNAP25, synaptophysin, phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin Dependent Protein Kinase IIα (p-CaMKIIα/ CaMKIIα), and phosphorylation of Cyclic AMP-Response Element Binding Protein (pCREB/CREB), inhibited neuroinflammatory activity, and enhanced autophagy, and activation of the phophoinositide-3-kinase-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway. These neuroprotective effects were associated with reduced β-site cleavage of Amyloid Precursor Protein in APPsw/Tg2576 mice. Therefore, long-term supplementation with pomegranates can attenuate AD pathology by reducing inflammation, and altering APP-dependent processes. PMID:27486879

  1. Extending JAGS: a tutorial on adding custom distributions to JAGS (with a diffusion model example).

    PubMed

    Wabersich, Dominik; Vandekerckhove, Joachim

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate how to add a custom distribution into the general-purpose, open-source, cross-platform graphical modeling package JAGS ("Just Another Gibbs Sampler"). JAGS is intended to be modular and extensible, and modules written in the way laid out here can be loaded at runtime as needed and do not interfere with regular JAGS functionality when not loaded. Writing custom extensions requires knowledge of C++, but installing a new module can be highly automatic, depending on the operating system. As a basic example, we implement a Bernoulli distribution in JAGS. We further present our implementation of the Wiener diffusion first-passage time distribution, which is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/jags-wiener/ .

  2. Morphological Alterations in Gastrocnemius and Soleus Muscles in Male and Female Mice in a Fibromyalgia Model

    PubMed Central

    Oezel, Lisa; Schwarzbach, Hans; Ocker, Matthias; Thieme, Kati; Di Fazio, Pietro; Kinscherf, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic musculoskeletal pain disorder, characterized by chronic widespread pain and bodily tenderness and is often accompanied by affective disturbances, however often with unknown etiology. According to recent reports, physical and psychological stress trigger FM. To develop new treatments for FM, experimental animal models for FM are needed to be development and characterized. Using a mouse model for FM including intermittent cold stress (ICS), we hypothesized that ICS leads to morphological alterations in skeletal muscles in mice. Methods Male and female ICS mice were kept under alternating temperature (4°C/room temperature [22°C]); mice constantly kept at room temperature served as control. After scarification, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were removed and snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen–cooled isopentane or fixed for electron microscopy. Results In gastrocnemius/soleus muscles of male ICS mice, we found a 21.6% and 33.2% decrease of fiber cross sectional area (FCSA), which in soleus muscle concerns the loss of type IIa and IIx FCSA. This phenomenon was not seen in muscles of female ICS mice. However, this loss in male ICS mice was associated with an increase in gastrocnemius of the density of MIF+ (8.6%)-, MuRF+ (14.7%)-, Fbxo32+ (17.8%)-cells, a 12.1% loss of capillary contacts/muscle fiber as well as a 30.7% increase of damaged mitochondria in comparison with male control mice. Moreover, significant positive correlations exist among densities (n/mm2) of MIF+, MuRF+, Fbxo32+-cells in gastrocnemius/ soleus muscles of male ICS mice; these cell densities inversely correlate with FCSA especially in gastrocnemius muscle of male ICS mice. Conclusion The ICS-induced decrease of FCSA mainly concerns gastrocnemius muscle of male mice due to an increase of inflammatory and atrogenic cells. In soleus muscle of male ICS and soleus/gastrocnemius muscles of female ICS mice morphological alterations seem to occur not at all or

  3. Sciatic nerve cuffing in mice: a model of sustained neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Benbouzid, Malika; Pallage, Viviane; Rajalu, Mathieu; Waltisperger, Elisabeth; Doridot, Stéphane; Poisbeau, Pierrick; Freund-Mercier, Marie José; Barrot, Michel

    2008-07-01

    Because of its severity, chronicity, resistance to usual therapy and its consequences on quality of life, neuropathic pain represents a real clinical challenge. Fundamental research on this pathology uses metabolic, pharmacological or traumatic models in rodents that reproduce the characteristic human pain symptoms. In 1996, Mosconi and Kruger morphologically described a model of peripheral neuropathy in which a cuff of polyethylene tubing was placed around the sciatic nerve in rats. In the present study, we evaluated the behavioral consequences of this neuropathic pain model in C57Bl/6J mice which is the main genetic background used for studies in transgenic mice. A short cuff of polyethylene tubing was unilaterally placed around the main branch of the sciatic nerve. It induced an ipsilateral heat thermal hyperalgesia lasting around 3 weeks, and a sustained ipsilateral mechanical allodynia lasting at least 2 months. We showed that this neuropathic pain model is insensitive to ketoprofen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Morphine treatment acutely suppressed the mechanical allodynia, but tolerance to this effect rapidly developed. The analysis of video recordings revealed that most aspects of spontaneous behavior remained unaffected on the long term, excepted for a decrease in the time spent at social interaction for the neuropathic mice. Using the elevated plus-maze and the marble-burying test, we also showed that neuropathic mice develop an anxiety phenotype. Our data indicate that sciatic nerve cuffing in mice is a pertinent model for the study of nociceptive and emotional consequences of sustained neuropathic pain.

  4. β-Adrenergic receptor antagonism in mice: a model for pediatric heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sucharov, Carmen C; Hijmans, Jamie G; Sobus, Rebecca D; Melhado, William F A; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Stauffer, Brian L

    2013-10-01

    Children with heart failure are treated with similar medical therapy as adults with heart failure. In contrast to adults with heart failure, these treatment regiments are not associated with improved outcomes in children. Recent studies have demonstrated age-related pathophysiological differences in the molecular mechanisms of heart failure between children and adults. There are no animal models of pediatric cardiomyopathy to allow mechanistic studies. The purpose of the current experiments was to develop a mouse model of pediatric heart disease and test whether the influence of β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) antagonism could be modeled in this system. We hypothesized that isoproterenol treatment of young mice would provide a model system of cardiac pathology, and that nonselective β-AR blockade would provide benefit in adult, but not young, mice, similar to clinical trial data. We found that isoproterenol treatment (through osmotic minipump implantation) of young and adult mice produced similar degrees of cardiac hypertrophy and recapitulated several age-related molecular abnormalities in human heart failure, including phospholamban phosphorylation and β-AR expression. We also found that nonselective β-AR blockade effectively prevented pathological cardiac growth and collagen expression in the adult but not young mice, and that selective β1-AR blockade was effective in both young and adult isoproterenol-treated mice. In conclusion, we have developed the first model system for β-AR-mediated pediatric heart disease. Furthermore, we have generated novel data suggesting beneficial effects of selective β1-AR blockade in the pediatric heart.

  5. An in vitro model for infection with Leishmania major that mimics the immune response in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Soares, M B; David, J R; Titus, R G

    1997-01-01

    By using a primary in vitro response specific for Leishmania major, normal T cells from resistant CBA/CaH-T6J and susceptible BALB/c mice commit to a Th1 and a Th2 response, respectively. Since commitment occurred, we measured the production of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-12, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), and nitric oxide in the first 7 days of the response to identify factors that are critical for Th1 and Th2 development. While cells from resistant CBA mice produced more IFN-gamma, IL-10, and nitric oxide, cells from susceptible BALB/c mice produced more IL-1alpha, IL-5, PGE2, and TGF-beta. Although substantial amounts of IL-12 were detected, IL-12 did not associate with either Th1 or Th2 development. We did not anticipate that cells from resistant CBA mice would make more IL-10 in vitro. However, this also occurred in vivo since CBA mice produced substantial amounts of IL-10 following infection with L. major. Moreover, adding anti-IL-10 to primary in vitro responses enhanced production of IFN-gamma and nitric oxide by cells from CBA and BALB/c mice. Therefore, IL-10 cannot be regarded as a cytokine that associates with susceptibility to infection with L. major. Finally, the data presented here suggest that a collection of factors that can be produced by accessory cells influence Th commitment (e.g., IL-1, PGE2, and TGF-beta favor Th2 development). PMID:9199457

  6. Detection of allergenic compounds using an IL-4/luciferase/CNS-1 transgenic mice model.

    PubMed

    Bae, Chang Joon; Lee, Jae Won; Bae, Hee Sook; Shim, Sun Bo; Jee, Seung Wan; Lee, Su Hae; Lee, Chang Kyu; Hong, Jin Tae; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2011-04-01

    The interleukin-4 (IL-4) signaling cascade has been identified as a potentially important pathway in the development of allergies. The principal objective of this study was to produce novel transgenic (Tg) mice harboring the luciferase gene under the control of the human IL-4 promoter and the enhancer of IL-4 (CNS-1), in an effort to evaluate three types of allergens including a respiratory sensitizer, vaccine additives, and crude extracts of natural allergens in vivo. A new lineage of Tg mice was generated by the microinjection of pIL-4/Luc/CNS-1 constructs into a fertilized mice egg. The luciferase activity was successfully regulated by the IL-4 promoter in splenocytes cultured from IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice. From the first five founder lines, one (#57) evidencing a profound response to ovalbumin was selected for use in evaluating the allergens. Additionally, the lungs, thymus, and lymph nodes of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice evidenced high luciferase activity in response to allergens such as phthalic anhydride (PA), trimellitic anhydride, ovalbumin, gelatin, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus extracts, and Japanese cedar pollen, whereas key allergy-related indicators including ear thickness, Immunoglobulin E concentration, and the infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes in response to PA were unaltered in the Tg mice relative to the non-Tg mice. Furthermore, the expression levels of endogenous type 2 helper T cells cytokines and proinflammatory cytokines were similarly increased in these organs of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice in response to allergens. These results indicate that IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice may be used as an animal model for the evaluation and prediction of the human body response to a variety of allergens originating from the environment and from certain industrial products.

  7. Learning disorders in thymectomized mice: a new screening model for cognitive enhancer.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Nishiyama, N; Zhang, Y; Abe, Y

    1997-02-01

    Although the close relationship between the thymus and neuroendocrine system during the aging process has been well documented, influence of the thymus on the cognitive function of the central nervous system remains unknown. Male ddY mice were thymectomized 3-4 weeks after birth. Learning behavior, tested in a step-down test and in a spatial memory task, was significantly impaired in thymectomized mice at 10 months, but not before 5 months, after thymectomy. Reduced immune response was also not obvious before 10 months. These results suggested that thymectomy in young adult life in mice not only impaired the immune response, but also deteriorated the learning and memory ability, and that learning disorders in thymectomized mice could be utilized as a new screening model for cognitive enhancer.

  8. Vitamin E and diabetic nephropathy in mice model and humans.

    PubMed

    Farid, Nakhoul; Inbal, Dahan; Nakhoul, Nakhoul; Evgeny, Farber; Miller-Lotan, Rachel; Levy, Andrew P; Rabea, Asleh

    2013-11-06

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with increased oxidative stress due to elevated glucose levels in the plasma. Glucose promotes glycosylation of both plasma and cellular proteins with increased risk for vascular events. Diabetic patients suffer from a higher incidence of cardiovascular complications such as diabetic nephropathy. Haptoglobin (Hp) is an antioxidant plasma protein which binds free hemoglobin, thus preventing heme-iron mediated oxidation. Two alleles exist at the Hp gene locus (1 and 2) encoding three possible Hp genotypes that differ in their antioxidant ability, and may respond differently to vitamin E treatment. Several clinical studies to have shown that Hp 1-1 genotype is a superior antioxidant to the Hp 2-2 genotype and Hp 2-2 genotype is associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease. Vitamin E was found to have beneficial effect in patient and mice with Hp 2-2 genotype. In this review we have summarized the results of our studies in patients with diabetic nephropathy treated with vitamin E and in diabetic mice with different haptoglobin genotypes.

  9. Evaluation of GCM Column Radiation Models Under Cloudy Conditions with The Arm BBHRP Value Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Norris, Peter M.

    2010-03-14

    The overarching goal of the project was to improve the transfer of solar and thermal radiation in the most sophisticated computer tools that are currently available for climate studies, namely Global Climate Models (GCMs). This transfer can be conceptually separated into propagation of radiation under cloudy and under cloudless conditions. For cloudless conditions, the factors that affect radiation propagation are gaseous absorption and scattering, aerosol particle absorption and scattering and surface albedo and emissivity. For cloudy atmospheres the factors are the various cloud properties such as cloud fraction, amount of cloud condensate, the size of the cloud particles, and morphological cloud features such as cloud vertical location, cloud horizontal and vertical inhomogeneity and cloud shape and size. The project addressed various aspects of the influence of the above contributors to atmospheric radiative transfer variability. In particular, it examined: (a) the quality of radiative transfer for cloudless and non-complex cloudy conditions for a substantial number of radiation algorithms used in current GCMs; (b) the errors in radiative fluxes from neglecting the horizontal variabiity of cloud extinction; (c) the statistical properties of cloud horizontal and vertical cloud inhomogeneity that can be incorporated into radiative transfer codes; (d) the potential albedo effects of changes in the particle size of liquid clouds; (e) the gaseous radiative forcing in the presence of clouds; and (f) the relative contribution of clouds of different sizes to the reflectance of a cloud field. To conduct the research in the various facets of the project, data from both the DOE ARM project and other sources were used. The outcomes of the project will have tangible effects on how the calculation of radiative energy will be approached in future editions of GCMs. With better calculations of radiative energy in GCMs more reliable predictions of future climate states will be

  10. Final report for the ASC gas-powder two-phase flow modeling project AD2006-09.

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Gregory Herbert; Winters, William S.

    2007-01-01

    This report documents activities performed in FY2006 under the ''Gas-Powder Two-Phase Flow Modeling Project'', ASC project AD2006-09. Sandia has a need to understand phenomena related to the transport of powders in systems. This report documents a modeling strategy inspired by powder transport experiments conducted at Sandia in 2002. A baseline gas-powder two-phase flow model, developed under a companion PEM project and implemented into the Sierra code FUEGO, is presented and discussed here. This report also documents a number of computational tests that were conducted to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of the new model. Although considerable progress was made in implementing the complex two-phase flow model, this project has identified two important areas that need further attention. These include the need to compute robust compressible flow solutions for Mach numbers exceeding 0.35 and the need to improve conservation of mass for the powder phase. Recommendations for future work in the area of gas-powder two-phase flow are provided.

  11. On the added value of the regional climate model REMO in the assessment of climate change signal over Central Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotso-Nguemo, Thierry C.; Vondou, Derbetini A.; Pokam, Wilfried M.; Djomou, Zéphirin Yepdo; Diallo, Ismaïla; Haensler, Andreas; Tchotchou, Lucie A. Djiotang; Kamsu-Tamo, Pierre H.; Gaye, Amadou T.; Tchawoua, Clément

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the regional climate model REMO is used to investigate the added value of downscaling low resolutions global climate models (GCMs) and the climate change projections over Central Africa. REMO was forced by two GCMs (EC-Earth and MPI-ESM), for the period from 1950 to 2100 under the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 scenario. The performance of the REMO simulations for current climate is compared first with REMO simulation driven by ERA-Interim reanalysis, then by the corresponding GCMs in order to determine whether REMO outputs are able to effectively lead to added value at local scale. We found that REMO is generally able to better represent some aspects of the rainfall inter-annual variability, the daily rainfall intensity distribution as well as the intra-seasonal variability of the Central African monsoon, though few biases are still evident. It is also found that the boundary conditions strongly influences the spatial distribution of seasonal 2-m temperature and rainfall. From the analysis of the climate change signal from the present period 1976-2005 to the future 2066-2095, we found that all models project a warming at the end of the twenty-first century although the details of the climate change differ between REMO and the driving GCMs, specifically in REMO where we observe a general decrease in rainfall. This rainfall decrease is associated with delayed onset and anticipated recession of the Central African monsoon and a shortening of the rainy season. Small-scales variability of the climate change signal for 2-m temperature are usually smaller than that of the large-scales climate change part. For rainfall however, small-scales induce change of about 70% compared to the present climate statistics.

  12. RC Model-based Comparison Tests of the Added Compliance Method with Computer Simulations and a Standard Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pałko, Krzysztof J.; Rogalski, Andrzej; Zieliński, Krzysztof; Glapiński, Jarosław; Kozarski, Maciej; Pałko, Tadeusz; Darowski, Marek

    2007-01-01

    Ventilation of the lungs involves the exchange of gases during inhalation and exhalation causing the movement of respiratory gases between alveolars and the atmosphere as a result of a pressure drop between alveolars and the atmosphere. During artificial ventilation what is most important is to keep specific mechanical parameters of the lungs such as total compliance of the respiratory system Cp (consisting of the lung and the thorax compliances) and the airway resistance Rp when the patient is ventilated. Therefore, as the main goal of this work and as the first step to use our earlier method of added lung compliance in clinical practice was: 1) to carry out computer simulations to compare the application of this method during different expiratory phases, and 2) to compare this method with the standard method for its accuracy. The primary tests of the added-compliance method of the main lung parameters measurement have been made using the RC mechanical model of the lungs.

  13. Intravenous Infusion of Monocytes Isolated from 2-Week-Old Mice Enhances Clearance of Beta-Amyloid Plaques in an Alzheimer Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hohsfield, Lindsay A.; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) senile plaques and tau-associated neurofibrillary tangles. Other disease features include neuroinflammation and cholinergic neurodegeneration, indicating their possible importance in disease propagation. Recent studies have shown that monocytic cells can migrate into the AD brain toward Aβ plaques and reduce plaque burden. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the administration of intravenous infusions of ‘young’ CD11b-positive (+) monocytes into an AD mouse model can enhance Aβ plaque clearance and attenuate cognitive deficits. Peripheral monocytes were isolated from two-week-old wildtype mice using the Pluriselect CD11b+ isolation method and characterized by FACS analysis for surface marker expression and effective phagocytosis of 1 μm fluorescent microspheres, FITC-Dextran or FITC-Aβ1–42. The isolated monocytes were infused via the tail vein into a transgenic AD mouse model, which expresses the Swedish, Dutch/Iowa APP mutations (APPSwDI). The infusions began when animals reached 5 months of age, when little plaque deposition is apparent and were repeated again at 6 and 7 months of age. At 8 months of age, brains were analyzed for Aβ+ plaques, inflammatory processes and microglial (Iba1) activation. Our data show that infusions of two-week-old CD11b+ monocytes into adult APPSwDI mice results in a transient improvement of memory function, a reduction (30%) in Aβ plaque load and significantly in small (<20 μm) and large (>40 μm) plaques. In addition, we observe a reduction in Iba1+ cells, as well as no marked elevations in cytokine levels or other indicators of inflammation. Taken together, our findings indicate that young CD11b+ monocytes may serve as therapeutic candidates for improved Aβ clearance in AD. PMID:25830951

  14. Modeling appetitive Pavlovian-instrumental interactions in mice.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Eoin C; Stephens, David N; Crombag, Hans S

    2010-10-01

    In appetitive Pavlovian associative learning, a stimulus (conditioned stimulus, CS) that has been associated with the delivery of a reinforcing event (unconditioned stimulus, US; e.g., food) can subsequently elicit or modulate goal-directed instrumental behaviors. For example, a Pavlovian CS can serve to reinforce (novel) instrumental behavior (conditioned reinforcement or CRf), or it can energize and potentiate ongoing instrumental responses when presented non-contingently (Pavlovian-instrumental transfer or PIT). Notably, these different effects of a Pavlovian CS on instrumental behavior are mediated by dissociable psychological and neurobiological mechanisms. Given the critical role that Pavlovian-instrumental interactions play in regulating motivated behavior and maladaptive manifestations of motivation such as eating disorders and addictions, understanding the underlying psychological and neurobiological mechanisms will be important. This unit describes behavioral protocols that produce robust and reliable PIT and CRf in mice and that open the door for future studies using transgenic approaches into the molecular mechanisms underlying associative learning and motivation.

  15. NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a model to test therapeutics targeting human signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal models of human inflammatory diseases have limited predictive quality for human clinical trials for various reasons including species specific activation mechanisms and the immunological background of the animals which markedly differs from the genetically heterogeneous and often aged patient population. Objective Development of an animal model allowing for testing therapeutics targeting pathways involved in the development of Atopic Dermatitis (AD) with better translatability to the patient. Methods NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) derived from patients suffering from AD and healthy volunteers were treated with IL-4 and the antagonistic IL-4 variant R121/Y124D (Pitrakinra). Levels of human (h)IgE, amount of B-, T- and plasma- cells and ratio of CD4 : CD8 positive cells served as read out for induction and inhibition of cell proliferation and hIgE secretion. Results were compared to in vitro analysis. Results hIgE secretion was induced by IL-4 and inhibited by the IL-4 antagonist Pitrakinra in vivo when formulated with methylcellulose. B-cells proliferated in response to IL-4 in vivo; the effect was abrogated by Pitrakinra. IL-4 shifted CD4 : CD8 ratios in vitro and in vivo when hPBMC derived from healthy volunteers were used. Pitrakinra reversed the effect. Human PBMC derived from patients with AD remained inert and engrafted mice reflected the individual responses observed in vitro. Conclusion NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human PBMC reflect the immunological history of the donors and provide a complementary tool to in vitro studies. Thus, studies in this model might provide data with better translatability from bench to bedside. PMID:23294516

  16. Development of a murine model for aerosolized ebolavirus infection using a panel of recombinant inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Zumbrun, Elizabeth E; Abdeltawab, Nourtan F; Bloomfield, Holly A; Chance, Taylor B; Nichols, Donald K; Harrison, Paige E; Kotb, Malak; Nalca, Aysegul

    2012-12-03

    Countering aerosolized filovirus infection is a major priority of biodefense research. Aerosol models of filovirus infection have been developed in knock-out mice, guinea pigs and non-human primates; however, filovirus infection of immunocompetent mice by the aerosol route has not been reported. A murine model of aerosolized filovirus infection in mice should be useful for screening vaccine candidates and therapies. In this study, various strains of wild-type and immunocompromised mice were exposed to aerosolized wild-type (WT) or mouse-adapted (MA) Ebola virus (EBOV). Upon exposure to aerosolized WT-EBOV, BALB/c, C57BL/6 (B6), and DBA/2 (D2) mice were unaffected, but 100% of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and 90% of signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat1) knock-out (KO) mice became moribund between 7-9 days post-exposure (dpe). Exposure to MA-EBOV caused 15% body weight loss in BALB/c, but all mice recovered. In contrast, 10-30% lethality was observed in B6 and D2 mice exposed to aerosolized MA-EBOV, and 100% of SCID, Stat1KO, interferon (IFN)-γ KO and Perforin KO mice became moribund between 7-14 dpe. In order to identify wild-type, inbred, mouse strains in which exposure to aerosolized MA-EBOV is uniformly lethal, 60 BXD (C57BL/6 crossed with DBA2) recombinant inbred (RI) and advanced RI (ARI) mouse strains were exposed to aerosolized MA-EBOV, and monitored for disease severity. A complete spectrum of disease severity was observed. All BXD strains lost weight but many recovered. However, infection was uniformly lethal within 7 to 12 days post-exposure in five BXD strains. Aerosol exposure of these five BXD strains to 10-fold less MA-EBOV resulted in lethality ranging from 0% in two strains to 90-100% lethality in two strains. Analysis of post-mortem tissue from BXD strains that became moribund and were euthanized at the lower dose of MA-EBOV, showed liver damage in all mice as well as lung lesions in two of the three strains. The two

  17. Constraining the Kinematics of the A.D. 900 Seattle Fault Earthquake With Geomechanical Modeling and LIDAR Surface Elevation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, J. R.; Harding, D. J.

    2005-05-01

    Within the Puget Sound region of Washington State, several lines of geological evidence suggest that the largest upper-crustal earthquake within the past 2500 years occurred on the Seattle fault system in A.D. 900. Constraining the rupture characteristics of this event is of singular importance in evaluating the upper-bound seismic hazard and tsunami threat posed by upper-crustal (non-subduction) earthquakes to the Puget Lowland region. It is only possible to model the fault geometry, slip distribution, and moment magnitude of this earthquake with a data set of the surface elevation changes caused by this event. Due to the historic age of this earthquake, we use elevations of an uplifted marine terrace, digitally extracted from LIDAR images, as a novel source of coseismic surface deformation data for this event. Ideal for this forested region, LIDAR images, acquired via airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM), offer a drastic improvement over earlier topographic mapping techniques due to its improved resolution and its ability to measure the ground surface beneath dense vegetative cover. The LIDAR images reveal a single uplifted terrace, dated to 1000 cal yr B.P. near Restoration Point, that is morphologically continuous along the southern shoreline of Bainbridge Island and is visible at comparable elevations within a 25 km by 12 km region encompassing coastlines of West Seattle, Bremerton, East Bremerton, Port Orchard, and Waterman Point. Considering sea level changes since A.D. 900, the maximum uplift magnitudes of shoreline inner edges approach nine meters and are located at the southernmost coastline of Bainbridge Island and the northern tip of Waterman Point, while tilt magnitudes are modest - approaching 0.1 degrees. Although the terrace is locally offset and tilted near the Toe Jam Hill and Waterman north-dipping, reverse fault scarps, the regional uplift pattern is a doubly-plunging antiform with steepened north limb, consistent with its location directly above

  18. Cholesterol Synthesis Increased in the MMI-Induced Subclinical Hypothyroidism Mice Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiujuan; Chen, Wenbin

    2017-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is defined as increased serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations and normal serum thyroid hormone (TH) levels as well as an increased serum cholesterol level, which is an important cause of secondary hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular diseases. Some studies have demonstrated a direct effect of TSH on cholesterol metabolism via in vivo and in vitro experiments. However, because no suitable SCH model has been established until now, the changes in cholesterol synthesis that occur in SCH patients remain unknown. Here, we establish an SCH mouse model by using long-term low-dose MMI administered in drinking water. Compared with the control group, the MMI-treated mice had elevated circulating TSH levels, but the serum FT3 levels in these mice did not change. Additionally, the TC levels increased in both the serum and liver of the experimental mice. Both the protein expression and activity of hepatic HMGCR, the rate-limiting enzyme for cholesterol synthesis in the liver, increased in these mice. We also found that the SCH mice had decreased phospho-HMGCR and phospho-AMPK expression, while the expression of AMPK showed no change. In conclusion, we established a suitable SCH model in which cholesterol synthesis is increased. PMID:28386276

  19. Cholesterol Synthesis Increased in the MMI-Induced Subclinical Hypothyroidism Mice Model.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongfeng; Zhang, Xiujuan; Chen, Wenbin; Gao, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is defined as increased serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations and normal serum thyroid hormone (TH) levels as well as an increased serum cholesterol level, which is an important cause of secondary hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular diseases. Some studies have demonstrated a direct effect of TSH on cholesterol metabolism via in vivo and in vitro experiments. However, because no suitable SCH model has been established until now, the changes in cholesterol synthesis that occur in SCH patients remain unknown. Here, we establish an SCH mouse model by using long-term low-dose MMI administered in drinking water. Compared with the control group, the MMI-treated mice had elevated circulating TSH levels, but the serum FT3 levels in these mice did not change. Additionally, the TC levels increased in both the serum and liver of the experimental mice. Both the protein expression and activity of hepatic HMGCR, the rate-limiting enzyme for cholesterol synthesis in the liver, increased in these mice. We also found that the SCH mice had decreased phospho-HMGCR and phospho-AMPK expression, while the expression of AMPK showed no change. In conclusion, we established a suitable SCH model in which cholesterol synthesis is increased.

  20. Arrhythmia and cardiac defects are a feature of spinal muscular atrophy model mice.

    PubMed

    Heier, Christopher R; Satta, Rosalba; Lutz, Cathleen; DiDonato, Christine J

    2010-10-15

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. Traditionally, SMA has been described as a motor neuron disease; however, there is a growing body of evidence that arrhythmia and/or cardiomyopathy may present in SMA patients at an increased frequency. Here, we ask whether SMA model mice possess such phenotypes. We find SMA mice suffer from severe bradyarrhythmia characterized by progressive heart block and impaired ventricular depolarization. Echocardiography further confirms functional cardiac deficits in SMA mice. Additional investigations show evidence of both sympathetic innervation defects and dilated cardiomyopathy at late stages of disease. Based upon these data, we propose a model in which decreased sympathetic innervation causes autonomic imbalance. Such imbalance would be characterized by a relative increase in the level of vagal tone controlling heart rate, which is consistent with bradyarrhythmia and progressive heart block. Finally, treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, a drug known to benefit phenotypes of SMA model mice, produces prolonged maturation of the SMA heartbeat and an increase in cardiac size. Treated mice maintain measures of motor function throughout extended survival though they ultimately reach death endpoints in association with a progression of bradyarrhythmia. These data represent the novel identification of cardiac arrhythmia as an early and progressive feature of murine SMA while providing several new, quantitative indices of mouse health. Together with clinical cases that report similar symptoms, this reveals a new area of investigation that will be important to address as we move SMA therapeutics towards clinical success.

  1. Binge-like consumption of caloric and non-caloric palatable substances in ad libitum-fed C57BL/6J mice: pharmacological and molecular evidence of orexin involvement.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz-Iborra, Manuel; Carvajal, Francisca; Lerma-Cabrera, José Manuel; Valor, Luis Miguel; Cubero, Inmaculada

    2014-10-01

    The orexin (OX) system has been implicated in food-reinforced behavior, food-seeking and food overconsumption. Recent evidence suggests that OX signaling might influence consumption of palatable foods with high reinforcing value depending upon the caloric status of the animal. The present study evaluates from a pharmacological and a molecular approach the contribution of OX to excessive binge-like consumption of highly preferred palatable substances (sucrose and saccharin) in ad libitum-fed C57BL/6J mice. The main findings of this study are: (1) intraperitoneal (ip) injection of SB-334867 (10, 20 or 30mg/kg), a selective OXR1 antagonist, significantly decreased binge-like consumption of sucrose (10%, w/v) and saccharin (0.15%, w/v) during the test day in a Drinking in the Dark procedure in ad libitum-fed animals, without evidence of any significant alteration of locomotor activity. (2) Four repetitive, 2-h daily episodes of sucrose and saccharin (but not water) binge-like drinking significantly dampened OX mRNA expression in the LH. Present findings show for the first time a role for OXR1 signaling in binge-like consumption of palatable substances in animals under no caloric needs. Targeting OXR1 could represent a novel pharmacological approach to treat binge-eating episodes.

  2. Amelioration of inflammation and tissue damage in sickle cell model mice by Nrf2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Keleku-Lukwete, Nadine; Suzuki, Mikiko; Otsuki, Akihito; Tsuchida, Kouhei; Katayama, Saori; Hayashi, Makiko; Naganuma, Eriko; Moriguchi, Takashi; Tanabe, Osamu; Engel, James Douglas; Imaizumi, Masue; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited disorder caused by a point mutation in the β-globin gene, leading to the production of abnormally shaped red blood cells. Sickle cells are prone to hemolysis and thereby release free heme into plasma, causing oxidative stress and inflammation that in turn result in damage to multiple organs. The transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2) is a master regulator of the antioxidant cell-defense system. Here we show that constitutive Nrf2 activation by ablation of its negative regulator Keap1 (kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1) significantly improves symptoms in SCD model mice. SCD mice exhibit severe liver damage and lung inflammation associated with high expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules compared with normal mice. Importantly, these symptoms subsided after Nrf2 activation. Although hemolysis and stress erythropoiesis did not change substantially in the Nrf2-activated SCD mice, Nrf2 promoted the elimination of plasma heme released by sickle cells’ hemolysis and thereby reduced oxidative stress and inflammation, demonstrating that Nrf2 activation reduces organ damage and segregates inflammation from prevention of hemolysis in SCD mice. Furthermore, administration of the Nrf2 inducer CDDO-Im (2-cyano-3, 12 dioxooleana-1, 9 diene-28-imidazolide) also relieved inflammation and organ failure in SCD mice. These results support the contention that Nrf2 induction may be an important means to protect organs from the pathophysiology of sickle cell-induced damage. PMID:26371321

  3. Pkd1 transgenic mice: adult model of polycystic kidney disease with extrarenal and renal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kurbegovic, Almira; Côté, Olivier; Couillard, Martin; Ward, Christopher J.; Harris, Peter C.; Trudel, Marie

    2010-01-01

    While high levels of Pkd1 expression are detected in tissues of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), it is unclear whether enhanced expression could be a pathogenetic mechanism for this systemic disorder. Three transgenic mouse lines were generated from a Pkd1-BAC modified by introducing a silent tag via homologous recombination to target a sustained wild-type genomic Pkd1 expression within the native tissue and temporal regulation. These mice specifically overexpressed the Pkd1 transgene in extrarenal and renal tissues from ∼2- to 15-fold over Pkd1 endogenous levels in a copy-dependent manner. All transgenic mice reproducibly developed tubular and glomerular cysts leading to renal insufficiency. Interestingly, Pkd1TAG mice also exhibited renal fibrosis and calcium deposits in papilla reminiscent of nephrolithiasis as frequently observed in ADPKD. Similar to human ADPKD, these mice consistently displayed hepatic fibrosis and ∼15% intrahepatic cysts of the bile ducts affecting females preferentially. Moreover, a significant proportion of mice developed cardiac anomalies with severe left-ventricular hypertrophy, marked aortic arch distention and/or valvular stenosis and calcification that had profound functional impact. Of significance, Pkd1TAG mice displayed occasional cerebral lesions with evidence of ruptured and unruptured cerebral aneurysms. This Pkd1TAG mouse model demonstrates that overexpression of wild-type Pkd1 can trigger the typical adult renal and extrarenal phenotypes resembling human ADPKD. PMID:20053665

  4. Continuous observation on heart-disease-model mice using biomagnetic measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Y.; Oikawa, T.; Saitoh, Y.; Ono, Y.; Ishiyama, A.; Kasai, N.; Odawara, A.; Chinone, K.

    2008-02-01

    Magnetocardiography (MCG) is a non-invasive method that can contribute to elucidating heart disease mechanisms and the verification of pharmacological effects. The object of our study is to show the potential of MCG for such study in mice. By using the developed MCG system, which adopts a single channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer with the spatial resolution of 500 μm, we continuously measured MCGs for 2 heart-disease-model mice with a high incidence of cardiac infarction from 7-weeks-old to death. An abnormal MCG appeared 1 or 2 weeks before death. The abnormal MCG changes indicate that the damaged place in the ventricles was different for each individual. In addition, we have developed a method to obtain MCGs for newborn mice in particular because they are small and frail. The MCGs of newborn mice were similar to those of adult mice. This study proved the potential of MCG for detecting abnormal cardiac excitation at the early stage of cardiac infarction and monitoring the progress of heart disease in detail from infancy to old age in mice.

  5. Amelioration of inflammation and tissue damage in sickle cell model mice by Nrf2 activation.

    PubMed

    Keleku-Lukwete, Nadine; Suzuki, Mikiko; Otsuki, Akihito; Tsuchida, Kouhei; Katayama, Saori; Hayashi, Makiko; Naganuma, Eriko; Moriguchi, Takashi; Tanabe, Osamu; Engel, James Douglas; Imaizumi, Masue; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-09-29

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited disorder caused by a point mutation in the β-globin gene, leading to the production of abnormally shaped red blood cells. Sickle cells are prone to hemolysis and thereby release free heme into plasma, causing oxidative stress and inflammation that in turn result in damage to multiple organs. The transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2) is a master regulator of the antioxidant cell-defense system. Here we show that constitutive Nrf2 activation by ablation of its negative regulator Keap1 (kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1) significantly improves symptoms in SCD model mice. SCD mice exhibit severe liver damage and lung inflammation associated with high expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules compared with normal mice. Importantly, these symptoms subsided after Nrf2 activation. Although hemolysis and stress erythropoiesis did not change substantially in the Nrf2-activated SCD mice, Nrf2 promoted the elimination of plasma heme released by sickle cells' hemolysis and thereby reduced oxidative stress and inflammation, demonstrating that Nrf2 activation reduces organ damage and segregates inflammation from prevention of hemolysis in SCD mice. Furthermore, administration of the Nrf2 inducer CDDO-Im (2-cyano-3, 12 dioxooleana-1, 9 diene-28-imidazolide) also relieved inflammation and organ failure in SCD mice. These results support the contention that Nrf2 induction may be an important means to protect organs from the pathophysiology of sickle cell-induced damage.

  6. Lethal graft-versus-host disease in nude mice. I. Establishment of model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kuribayashi, K.; Masuda, T.; Hanaoka, M.

    1988-08-01

    We examined whether nude mice, which are deficient in T cell function, could be used as a model for induction of lethal graft-versus-host disease. Nude mice injected with MHC-disparate spleen cells exhibited only transient GVH reaction such as splenomegaly. Inoculation of B6 spleen cells into BALB/c nude mice produced high titers of alloantibodies to the donor cells. These alloantibodies eliminated host-MHC-reactive donor T cells from the host. After abolition by 400 rads irradiation of the capacity of nude mice to produce antibody, lethal GVHD could be induced by allogeneic spleen cell transfer and was mediated by donor T cells. This lethal GVHD was prevented by prior administration of antidonor alloantibody to the irradiated recipients at least 24 hr before donor-cell grafting. The role of alloantibody was substantiated in 2 other combinations in which little or no alloantibodies to donor spleen cells were produced. Engraftment of either MHC-identical but non-MHC disparate donor spleen cells into BALB/c nude mice or of parental spleen cells into F1 nude mice resulted in death mediated by T cells. In addition, irradiated BALB/c nude mice inoculated with non-MHC-incompatible B10.D2 spleen cells were much more sensitive to alloaggression by the donor cells than were nonirradiated hosts, indicating the presence of some radiation-sensitive component(s) acting in nude mice against GVHD induction by donor T cells. Thus the nude mouse is considered to be a useful recipient for clarifying the basic mechanisms involved in lethal GVHD.

  7. Glucagon-like peptide-1 cleavage product GLP-1(9-36) amide rescues synaptic plasticity and memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease model mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tao; Du, Xueliang; Pick, Joseph E; Sui, Guangzhi; Brownlee, Michael; Klann, Eric

    2012-10-03

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an endogenous intestinal peptide that enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Its natural cleavage product GLP-1(9-36)(amide) possesses distinct properties and does not affect insulin secretion. Here we report that pretreatment of hippocampal slices with GLP-1(9-36)(amide) prevented impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) and enhanced long-term depression induced by exogenous amyloid β peptide Aβ((1-42)). Similarly, hippocampal LTP impairments in amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS1) mutant mice that model Alzheimer's disease (AD) were prevented by GLP-1(9-36)(amide). In addition, treatment of APP/PS1 mice with GLP-1(9-36)(amide) at an age at which they display impaired spatial and contextual fear memory resulted in a reversal of their memory defects. At the molecular level, GLP-1(9-36)(amide) reduced elevated levels of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species and restored dysregulated Akt-glycogen synthase kinase-3β signaling in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice. Our findings suggest that GLP-1(9-36)(amide) treatment may have therapeutic potential for AD and other diseases associated with cognitive dysfunction.

  8. Andrographolide suppresses thymic stromal lymphopoietin in phorbol myristate acetate/calcium ionophore A23187-activated mast cells and 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like mice model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-xiao; Li, Hua-guo; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Ru-hong; Li, Ming; Liang, Jian-ying; Gu, Yan; Ling, Bo; Yao, Zhi-rong; Yu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is one of the most common inflammatory cutaneous diseases. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has been demonstrated to be an important immunologic factor in the pathogenesis of AD. The production of TSLP can be induced by a high level of intracellular calcium concentration and activation of the receptor-interacting protein 2/caspase-1/NF-κB pathway. Andrographolide (ANDRO), a natural bicyclic diterpenoid lactone, has been found to exert anti-inflammatory effects in gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders through suppressing the NF-κB pathway. Objective To explore the effect of ANDRO on the production of TSLP in human mast cells and AD mice model. Methods We utilized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence staining assay to investigate the effects of ANDRO on AD. Results ANDRO ameliorated the increase in the intracellular calcium, protein, and messenger RNA levels of TSLP induced by phorbol myristate acetate/calcium ionophore A23187, through the blocking of the receptor-interacting protein 2/caspase-1/NF-κB pathway in human mast cell line 1 cells. ANDRO, via oral or local administration, also attenuated clinical symptoms in 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced AD mice model and suppressed the levels of TSLP in lesional skin. Conclusion Taken together, ANDRO may be a potential therapeutic agent for AD through suppressing the expression of TSLP. PMID:26929603

  9. Motor impulsivity in APP-SWE mice: a model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Adriani, Walter; Ognibene, Elisa; Heuland, Emilie; Ghirardi, Orlando; Caprioli, Antonio; Laviola, Giovanni

    2006-09-01

    Among transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, APP-SWE mice have been shown to develop beta-amyloid plaques and to exhibit progressive impairment of cognitive function. Human Alzheimer's disease, however, also includes secondary clinical manifestations, spanning from hyperactivity to agitation. The aim of this study was a better characterization of motor impulsivity in APP-SWE mice, observed at 12 months of age, when levels of soluble beta-amyloid are elevated and beta-amyloid neuritic plaques start to appear. Mice were tested for spatial learning abilities in the Morris water maze (seven daily sessions, four trials per day). The distance traveled to reach the hidden platform showed a learning curve in both groups. This profile, however, was somewhat delayed in APP-SWE mice, thus confirming slightly impaired spatial capacities. To evaluate motor impulsivity, animals were trained to nose-poke for a food reward, which was delivered after a waiting interval that increased over days (15-60 s). Further nose-poking during this signaled waiting interval resulted in food-reward loss and electric-shock punishment. APP-SWE mice received an increased quantity of punishment and were able to earn fewer food rewards, suggesting inability to wait already at the lowest delay. After the animals were killed, prefrontal cortex samples were assessed for neurochemical parameters. Serotonin turnover was elevated in the prefrontal cortex of APP-SWE mice compared with controls. The results clearly confirm cognitive deficits, and are consistent with the hypothesis of reduced behavioral-inhibition abilities. Together with recent findings, APP-SWE mice emerge as a suitable animal model, characterized by a number of specific behavioral alterations, resembling primary and secondary symptoms of human Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Kinetic modeling of hyperpolarized 13C 1-pyruvate metabolism in normal rats and TRAMP mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierhut, Matthew L.; Yen, Yi-Fen; Chen, Albert P.; Bok, Robert; Albers, Mark J.; Zhang, Vickie; Tropp, Jim; Park, Ilwoo; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Kurhanewicz, John; Hurd, Ralph E.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2010-01-01

    PurposeTo investigate metabolic exchange between 13C 1-pyruvate, 13C 1-lactate, and 13C 1-alanine in pre-clinical model systems using kinetic modeling of dynamic hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopic data and to examine the relationship between fitted parameters and dose-response. Materials and methodsDynamic 13C spectroscopy data were acquired in normal rats, wild type mice, and mice with transgenic prostate tumors (TRAMP) either within a single slice or using a one-dimensional echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (1D-EPSI) encoding technique. Rate constants were estimated by fitting a set of exponential equations to the dynamic data. Variations in fitted parameters were used to determine model robustness in 15 mm slices centered on normal rat kidneys. Parameter values were used to investigate differences in metabolism between and within TRAMP and wild type mice. ResultsThe kinetic model was shown here to be robust when fitting data from a rat given similar doses. In normal rats, Michaelis-Menten kinetics were able to describe the dose-response of the fitted exchange rate constants with a 13.65% and 16.75% scaled fitting error (SFE) for kpyr→lac and kpyr→ala, respectively. In TRAMP mice, kpyr→lac increased an average of 94% after up to 23 days of disease progression, whether the mice were untreated or treated with casodex. Parameters estimated from dynamic 13C 1D-EPSI data were able to differentiate anatomical structures within both wild type and TRAMP mice. ConclusionsThe metabolic parameters estimated using this approach may be useful for in vivo monitoring of tumor progression and treatment efficacy, as well as to distinguish between various tissues based on metabolic activity.

  11. Generating double knockout mice to model genetic intervention for diabetic cardiomyopathy in humans.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Vishalakshi; Nandi, Shyam Sundar; Singh, Shree Ram; Mishra, Paras Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a rapidly increasing disease that enhances the chances of heart failure twofold to fourfold (as compared to age and sex matched nondiabetics) and becomes a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. There are two broad classifications of diabetes: type1 diabetes (T1D) and type2 diabetes (T2D). Several mice models mimic both T1D and T2D in humans. However, the genetic intervention to ameliorate diabetic cardiomyopathy in these mice often requires creating double knockout (DKO). In order to assess the therapeutic potential of a gene, that specific gene is either overexpressed (transgenic expression) or abrogated (knockout) in the diabetic mice. If the genetic mice model for diabetes is used, it is necessary to create DKO with transgenic/knockout of the target gene to investigate the specific role of that gene in pathological cardiac remodeling in diabetics. One of the important genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling in diabetes is matrix metalloproteinase-9 (Mmp9). Mmp9 is a collagenase that remains latent in healthy hearts but induced in diabetic hearts. Activated Mmp9 degrades extracellular matrix (ECM) and increases matrix turnover causing cardiac fibrosis that leads to heart failure. Insulin2 mutant (Ins2+/-) Akita is a genetic model for T1D that becomes diabetic spontaneously at the age of 3-4 weeks and show robust hyperglycemia at the age of 10-12 weeks. It is a chronic model of T1D. In Ins2+/- Akita, Mmp9 is induced. To investigate the specific role of Mmp9 in diabetic hearts, it is necessary to create diabetic mice where Mmp9 gene is deleted. Here, we describe the method to generate Ins2+/-/Mmp9-/- (DKO) mice to determine whether the abrogation of Mmp9 ameliorates diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  12. Interferon α/β Receptor-Deficient Mice as a Model for Ebola Virus Disease.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Jennifer M; Froude, Jeffery W; Prugar, Laura I; Bakken, Russell R; Zak, Samantha E; Daye, Sharon P; Wilhelmsen, Catherine E; Dye, John M

    2015-10-01

    A major obstacle in ebolavirus research is the lack of a small-animal model for Sudan virus (SUDV), as well as other wild-type (WT) ebolaviruses. Here, we expand on research by Bray and by Lever et al suggesting that WT ebolaviruses are pathogenic in mice deficient for the type 1 interferon (IFN) α/β receptor (IFNα/βR-/-). We examined the disease course of several WT ebolaviruses: Boneface (SUDV/Bon) and Gulu variants of SUDV, Ebola virus (EBOV), Bundibugyo virus (BDBV), Taï Forest virus, and Reston virus (RESTV). We determined that exposure to WT SUDV or EBOV results in reproducible signs of disease in IFNα/βR-/- mice, as measured by weight loss and partial lethality. Vaccination with the SUDV or EBOV glycoprotein (GP)-expressing Venezuelan equine encephalitis viral replicon particle vaccine protected these mice from SUDV/Bon and EBOV challenge, respectively. Treatment with SUDV- or EBOV-specific anti-GP antibodies protected mice from challenge when delivered 1-3 days after infection. Serial sampling experiments revealed evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation in the livers of mice infected with the Boneface variant of SUDV, EBOV, and BDBV. Taken together, these data solidify the IFNα/βR-/- mouse as an important and useful model for the study of WT EBOV disease.

  13. Resistance to reinfection in mice as a vaccine model for giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Erqiu; Liu, Mingqiu; Singer, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Giardia is the most commonly diagnosed parasitic cause of diarrhea in the developed world, yet no vaccine exists for human use and a commercially available veterinary vaccine is of limited utility. We have used the adult C57BL/6 mouse model of infection with Giardia duodenalis to better understand immunity to secondary infections with this parasite. Mice were primed by infection with either the GS or WB strains of Giardia and treated with metronidazole on day 7-12 to eliminate the primary infections. Challenge infections on day 21 or day 60 after the primary infections resulted in ~50-fold fewer parasites at day 5 than were found in unprimed mice that only received the challenge infection. Resistance to challenge infections was also observed in B cell deficient µMT mice and when primed mice were challenged with parasites of a different strain. While primed mice developed IgA, mast cell, and T cell responses against the parasite, no specific responses correlated with protection against challenge infections. Together these data suggest that development of an effective vaccine for giardiasis should be feasible since strong immunity can be developed against reinfection in the adult mouse model. Moreover we show that antibody responses are not essential for a protective vaccine and that protection is not parasite strain-specific.

  14. Adding Multiple Adipokines into the Model do not Improve Weight Gain Prediction by Leptin Levels in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Treviño-Garza, Consuelo; Estrada-Zúñiga, Cynthia M.; Mancillas-Adame, Leonardo; Villarreal-Martínez, Laura; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Z.; Rodríguez-Balderrama, Isaías; Montes-Tapia, Fernando F.; de la O. Cavazos, Manuel E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Most adipose tissue programming is realized in early life. Also, the postnatal three months, rather than the later phases of infancy, may be more relevant in the development of an adverse cardiometabolic risk profile. The adipokines phenotype, as a predictor of early-life weight gain, has been recently explored in cord blood. To determine whether in addition to leptin levels in cord samples, adiponectin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), resistin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels improve weight gain prediction during the first three months of life. Methods: Adiponectin, IL-6, MCP-1, leptin, resistin, PAI-1, and TNF-α were measured by multiplex immunoassay in a subsample of 86 healthy term newborns. Results: Leptin levels significantly predicted weight gain at 3 months of follow-up (r2=0.09, p=0.006). In the multivariate analysis, including additional adipokines in the model, stepwise or all at once, did not increase the prediction of weight gain after the first three months of life. Conclusion: Adding adiponectin, IL-6, MCP-1, resistin, PAI-1, and TNF-α to the prediction model of weight gain in healthy newborns did not prove to be useful. It is probable that their relative contribution to weight gain is not important. Only leptin was relevant as a predictor of weight gain at the 3-month endpoint. PMID:27087431

  15. Added value of regional climate modeling over areas characterized by complex terrain—Precipitation over the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torma, Csaba; Giorgi, Filippo; Coppola, Erika

    2015-05-01

    We present an analysis of the added value (AV) of downscaling via regional climate model (RCM) nesting with respect to the driving global climate models (GCMs). We analyze ensembles of driving GCM and nested RCM (two resolutions, 0.44° and 0.11°) simulations for the late 20th and late 21st centuries from the CMIP5, EURO-CORDEX, and MED-CORDEX experiments, with a focus on the Alpine region. Different metrics of AV are investigated, measuring aspects of precipitation where substantial AV can be expected in mountainous terrains: spatial pattern of mean precipitation, daily precipitation intensity distribution, and daily precipitation extremes tails. Comparison with a high-quality, fine-scale (5 km) gridded observational data set shows substantial AV of RCM downscaling for all metrics selected, and results are mostly improved compared to the driving GCMs also when the RCM fields are upscaled at the scale of the GCM resolution. We also find consistent improvements in the high-resolution (0.11°) versus medium-resolution (0.44°) RCM simulations. Finally, we find that the RCM downscaling substantially modulates the GCM-produced precipitation change signal in future climate projections, particularly in terms of fine-scale spatial pattern associated with the complex topography of the region. Our results thus point to the important role that high-resolution nested RCMs can play in the study of climate change over areas characterized by complex topographical features.

  16. Geospatial modeling approach to monument construction using Michigan from A.D. 1000–1600 as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Howey, Meghan C. L.; Palace, Michael W.; McMichael, Crystal H.

    2016-01-01

    Building monuments was one way that past societies reconfigured their landscapes in response to shifting social and ecological factors. Understanding the connections between those factors and monument construction is critical, especially when multiple types of monuments were constructed across the same landscape. Geospatial technologies enable past cultural activities and environmental variables to be examined together at large scales. Many geospatial modeling approaches, however, are not designed for presence-only (occurrence) data, which can be limiting given that many archaeological site records are presence only. We use maximum entropy modeling (MaxEnt), which works with presence-only data, to predict the distribution of monuments across large landscapes, and we analyze MaxEnt output to quantify the contributions of spatioenvironmental variables to predicted distributions. We apply our approach to co-occurring Late Precontact (ca. A.D. 1000–1600) monuments in Michigan: (i) mounds and (ii) earthwork enclosures. Many of these features have been destroyed by modern development, and therefore, we conducted archival research to develop our monument occurrence database. We modeled each monument type separately using the same input variables. Analyzing variable contribution to MaxEnt output, we show that mound and enclosure landscape suitability was driven by contrasting variables. Proximity to inland lakes was key to mound placement, and proximity to rivers was key to sacred enclosures. This juxtaposition suggests that mounds met local needs for resource procurement success, whereas enclosures filled broader regional needs for intergroup exchange and shared ritual. Our study shows how MaxEnt can be used to develop sophisticated models of past cultural processes, including monument building, with imperfect, limited, presence-only data. PMID:27330115

  17. Value Added in English Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Andrew; McCormack, Tanya; Evans, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Value-added indicators are now a central part of school accountability in England, and value-added information is routinely used in school improvement at both the national and the local levels. This article describes the value-added models that are being used in the academic year 2007-8 by schools, parents, school inspectors, and other…

  18. Peroxisome proliferators reduce spatial memory impairment, synaptic failure, and neurodegeneration in brains of a double transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Carvajal, Francisco J; Zolezzi, Juan M; Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Serrano, Felipe; Karmelic, Daniel; Toledo, Enrique M; Toro, Andrés; Toro, Jessica; Santos, Manuel J

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities, accumulation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), increase of oxidative stress, and synaptic alterations. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species through their matrix enzyme catalase is one of the most recognized functions of peroxisomes. The induction of peroxisome proliferation is attained through different mechanisms by a set of structurally diverse molecules called peroxisome proliferators. In the present work, a double transgenic mouse model of AD that co-expresses a mutant human amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPPswe) and presenilin 1 without exon 9 (PS1dE9) was utilized in order to assess the effect of peroxisomal proliferation on Aβ neurotoxicity in vivo. Mice were tested for spatial memory and their brains analyzed by cytochemical, electrophysiological, and biochemical methods. We report here that peroxisomal proliferation significantly reduces (i) memory impairment, found in this model of AD; (ii) Aβ burden and plaque-associated acetylcholinesterase activity; (iii) neuroinflammation, measured by the extent of astrogliosis and microgliosis; and (iv) the decrease in postsynaptic proteins, while promoting synaptic plasticity in the form of long-term potentiation. We concluded that peroxisomal proliferation reduces various AD neuropathological markers and peroxisome proliferators may be considered as potential therapeutic agents against the disease.

  19. Modeling of the thermal state of Mount Vesuvius from 1631 A.D. to present and the role of CO2 degassing on the volcanic conduit closure after the 1944 A.D. eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quareni, Francesca; Moretti, Roberto; Piochi, Monica; Chiodini, Giovanni

    2007-03-01

    The last eruptive event at Mount Vesuvius occurred in 1944 A.D., ending a cycle of continuous eruptive activity started with the sub-Plinian event of 1631 A.D. The aim of this research is (1) to model the thermal evolution of the volcanic system from 1631 A.D. up to the present and (2) to investigate the possible process leading the volcano to the current state of quiescence. A finite element software is employed to solve the time-dependent energy equation and obtain the thermal field in the volcanic edifice and the surrounding medium. Volcanological, petrological, and geophysical constraints are used to define the crustal structure beneath the volcanic edifice, the magma supply system active since 1631 A.D., and the physico-chemical conditions of magma. Thermodynamic properties of magma and wall rocks have been evaluated from well-established thermo-chemical compilations and data from the literature. It is shown that heat transfer due to magma degassing is required in addition to the heat conduction in order to obtain transient depth-temperature fields consistent with geochemical observations, high crustal magnetization, and rigid behavior of the shallow crust as indicated by geophysical data. Surface data of carbon dioxide soil flux coming out from the Mount Vesuvius crater are taken to constrain such an additional heat flux. The agreement between modeled and measured temperatures at the crater since 1944 A.D. proves the consistency of the model. It is concluded that the present state of quiescence of Mount Vesuvius is mostly a consequence of the absence of magma supply from the deep reservoir into the shallower system. This allows the cooling of residual magma left within the volcanic conduit and the transition from continuous eruptive activity to the condition of conduit obstruction. In this scenario, the hydrothermal system may have developed subsequent to the cooling of the magma within the conduit. Our findings are a direct consequence of the high

  20. AdS2 holographic dictionary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Papadimitriou, Ioannis

    2016-12-01

    We construct the holographic dictionary for both running and constant dilaton solutions of the two dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theory that is obtained by a circle reduction from Einstein-Hilbert gravity with negative cosmological constant in three dimensions. This specific model ensures that the dual theory has a well defined ultraviolet completion in terms of a two dimensional conformal field theory, but our results apply qualitatively to a wider class of two dimensional dilaton gravity theories. For each type of solutions we perform holographic renormalization, compute the exact renormalized one-point functions in the presence of arbitrary sources, and derive the asymptotic symmetries and the corresponding conserved charges. In both cases we find that the scalar operator dual to the dilaton plays a crucial role in the description of the dynamics. Its source gives rise to a matter conformal anomaly for the running dilaton solutions, while its expectation value is the only non trivial observable for constant dilaton solutions. The role of this operator has been largely overlooked in the literature. We further show that the only non trivial conserved charges for running dilaton solutions are the mass and the electric charge, while for constant dilaton solutions only the electric charge is non zero. However, by uplifting the solutions to three dimensions we show that constant dilaton solutions can support non trivial extended symmetry algebras, including the one found by Compère, Song and Strominger [1], in agreement with the results of Castro and Song [2]. Finally, we demonstrate that any solution of this specific dilaton gravity model can be uplifted to a family of asymptotically AdS2 × S 2 or conformally AdS2 × S 2 solutions of the STU model in four dimensions, including non extremal black holes. The four dimensional solutions obtained by uplifting the running dilaton solutions coincide with the so called `subtracted geometries', while those obtained

  1. Differential Fmo3 Gene Expression in Various Liver Injury Models Involving Hepatic Oxidative Stress in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rudraiah, Swetha; Moscovitz, Jamie E.; Donepudi, Ajay C.; Campion, Sarah N.; Slitt, Angela L.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Manautou, José E.

    2015-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase-3 (FMO3) catalyzes metabolic reactions similar to cytochrome P450 monooxygenase however, most metabolites of FMO3 are considered non-toxic. Recent findings in our laboratory demonstrated Fmo3gene induction following toxic acetaminophen (APAP) treatment in mice.The goal of this study was to evaluate Fmo3gene expression in diverseother mouse models of hepatic oxidative stress and injury. Fmo3 gene regulation by Nrf2 was also investigated using Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2 KO) mice. In our studies, male C57BL/6J mice were treated with toxic dosesof hepatotoxicants or underwent bile duct ligation (BDL, 10d). Hepatotoxicants included APAP (400 mg/kg, 24 to 72h), alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT; 50 mg/kg, 2 to 48h), carbontetrachloride (CCl4;10 or 30 μL/kg, 24 and 48h) and allyl alcohol (AlOH; 30 or 60 mg/kg, 6 and 24h). Because oxidative stress activates nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), additional studies investigated Fmo3 gene regulation by Nrf2 using Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2 KO) mice. At appropriate time-points, blood and liver samples were collected for assessment of plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity, plasma and hepatic bile acid levels, as well as liver Fmo3 mRNA and protein expression. Fmo3 mRNA expression increased significantly by 43-fold at 12h after ANIT treatment,and this increase translates to a 4-fold change in protein levels. BDL also increased Fmo3 mRNA expression by 1899-fold, but with no change in protein levels. Treatment of mice with CCl4decreased liver Fmo3gene expression, whileno change in expression was detected with AlOH treatment. Nrf2 KO mice are more susceptible to APAP (400 mg/kg, 72h) treatment compared to their wild-type (WT) counterparts, which is evidenced by greater plasma ALT activity. Fmo3 mRNA and protein expression increased in Nrf2 KO mice after APAP treatment. Collectively, not all hepatotoxicantsthat produce oxidative stress alter Fmo3gene expression. Along with APAP, toxic ANIT

  2. FUS/TLS acts as an aggregation-dependent modifier of polyglutamine disease model mice

    PubMed Central

    Kino, Yoshihiro; Washizu, Chika; Kurosawa, Masaru; Yamada, Mizuki; Doi, Hiroshi; Takumi, Toru; Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Hicks, Geoffrey G.; Hattori, Nobutaka; Shimogori, Tomomi; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    FUS/TLS is an RNA/DNA-binding protein associated with neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Previously, we found that a prion-like domain in the N-terminus of FUS/TLS mediates co-aggregation between FUS/TLS and mutant huntingtin, the gene product of Huntington’s disease (HD). Here, we show that heterozygous knockout of FUS/TLS worsened the phenotypes of model mice of (HD, but not spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). This difference was correlated with the degree of pathological association between disease proteins and FUS/TLS. Co-aggregation between FUS/TLS and mutant huntingtin resulted in the depletion of free FUS/TLS protein in HD mice that was detected as a monomer in SDS-PAGE analysis. Recently, we found that FUS/TLS paralogs, TAF15 and EWS, were up-regulated in homozygous FUS/TLS knockout mice. These two proteins were up-regulated in both HD and FUS/TLS heterozygote mice, and were further elevated in HD-TLS+/− double mutant mice, consistent with the functional impairment of FUS/TLS. These results suggest that FUS/TLS sequestration by co-aggregation is a rate-limiting factor of disease phenotypes of HD and that inclusions may have an adverse aspect, rather than being simply benign or protective. In addition, our results highlight inclusions as repositories of potential modifiers of neurodegeneration. PMID:27739513

  3. Antinociceptive and hypnotic activities of pregabalin in a neuropathic pain-like model in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian-Xiao; Yin, Dou; Guo, Wei; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Ya-Dong; Qu, Wei-Min; Han, Wu-Jian; Hong, Zong-Yuan; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the antinociceptive and hypnotic effects of pregabalin, we established a neuropathic pain-like model in mice using partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL), and examined thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia, electroencephalogram, rota-rod testing, and c-Fos expression in the anterior cingulate cortex. Gabapentin was used as a reference drug in the study. Pregabalin administered i.g. at 12.5 and 25mg/kg prolonged the duration of thermal latencies by 1.4- and 1.6-fold and increased the mechanical threshold by 2.2- and 3.1-fold 3h after administration, respectively, but did not affect motor coordination in PSNL mice, compared with vehicle control. Pregabalin (12.5 and 25mg/kg) given at 6:30 increased the amount of non-rapid eye movement sleep in a 4-h period by 1.3- and 1.4-fold, respectively, in PSNL mice. However, pregabalin (25mg/kg) given at 20:30 did not alter the sleep pattern in normal mice. Immunohistochemical study showed that PSNL increased c-Fos expression in the neurons of anterior cingulate cortex by 2.1-fold, which could be reversed by pregabalin. These results indicate that pregabalin is an effective treatment for both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in PSNL mice.

  4. Aerobic Exercise Decreases Lung Inflammation by IgE Decrement in an OVA Mice Model.

    PubMed

    Camargo Hizume-Kunzler, Deborah; Greiffo, Flavia R; Fortkamp, Bárbara; Ribeiro Freitas, Gabriel; Keller Nascimento, Juliana; Regina Bruggemann, Thayse; Melo Avila, Leonardo; Perini, Adenir; Bobinski, Franciane; Duarte Silva, Morgana; Rocha Lapa, Fernanda; Paula Vieira, Rodolfo; Vargas Horewicz, Verônica; Soares Dos Santos, Adair Roberto; Cattelan Bonorino, Kelly

    2017-04-07

    Aerobic exercise (AE) reduces lung function decline and risk of exacerbations in asthmatic patients. However, the inflammatory lung response involved in exercise during the sensitization remains unclear. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of exercise for 2 weeks in an experimental model of sensitization and single ovalbumin-challenge. Mice were divided into 4 groups: mice non-sensitized and not submitted to exercise (Sedentary, n=10); mice non-sensitized and submitted to exercise (Exercise, n=10); mice sensitized and exposed to ovalbumin (OVA, n=10); and mice sensitized, submitted to exercise and exposed to OVA (OVA+Exercise, n=10). 24 h after the OVA/saline exposure, we counted inflammatory cells from bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF), lung levels of total IgE, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-1ra, measurements of OVA-specific IgG1 and IgE, and VEGF and NOS-2 expression via western blotting. AE reduced cell counts from BALF in the OVA group (p<0.05), total IgE, IL-4 and IL-5 lung levels and OVA-specific IgE and IgG1 titers (p<0.05). There was an increase of NOS-2 expression, IL-10 and IL-1ra lung levels in the OVA groups (p<0.05). Our results showed that AE attenuated the acute lung inflammation, suggesting immunomodulatory properties on the sensitization process in the early phases of antigen presentation in asthma.

  5. Calpain Activation in Alzheimer's Model Mice Is an Artifact of APP and Presenilin Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Takashi; Matsuba, Yukio; Yamazaki, Naomi; Hashimoto, Shoko

    2016-01-01

    Intraneuronal calcium stimulates the calpain-dependent conversion of p35 to p25, a CDK5 activator. It is widely believed that amyloid β peptide (Aβ) induces this conversion that, in turn, has an essential role in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. However, in vivo studies on p25 generation used transgenic mice overexpressing mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin (PS). Here, using single App knock-in mice, we show that p25 generation is an artifact caused by membrane protein overexpression. We show that massive Aβ42 accumulation without overexpression of APP or presenilin does not produce p25, whereas p25 generation occurred with APP/PS overexpression and in postmortem mouse brain. We further support this finding using mice deficient for calpastatin, the sole calpain-specific inhibitor protein. Thus, the intracerebral environment of the APP/PS mouse brain and postmortem brain is an unphysiological state. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We recently estimated using single App knock-in mice that accumulate amyloid β peptide without transgene overexpression that 60% of the phenotypes observed in Alzheimer's model mice overexpressing mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) or APP and presenilin are artifacts (Saito et al., 2014). The current study further supports this estimate by invalidating key results from papers that were published in Cell. These findings suggest that more than 3000 publications based on APP and APP/PS overexpression must be reevaluated. PMID:27656030

  6. Chronic and progressive Parkinson's disease MPTP model in adult and aged mice.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Manchado, Ana B; Villadiego, Javier; Romo-Madero, Sonia; Suárez-Luna, Nela; Bermejo-Navas, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Gómez, José A; Garrido-Gil, Pablo; Labandeira-García, José L; Echevarría, Miriam; López-Barneo, José; Toledo-Aral, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the different animal models of Parkinson's disease developed during the last years, they still present limitations modelling the slow and progressive process of neurodegeneration. Here, we undertook a histological, neurochemical and behavioural analysis of a new chronic parkinsonian mouse model generated by the subcutaneous administration of low doses of MPTP (20 mg/kg, 3 times per week) for 3 months, using both young adult and aged mice. The MPTP-induced nigrostriatal neurodegeneration was progressive and was accompanied by a decrease in striatal dopamine levels and motor impairment. We also demonstrated the characteristic neuroinflammatory changes (microglial activation and astrogliosis) associated with the neurodegenerative process. Aged animals showed both a faster time course of neurodegeneration and an altered neuroinflammatory response. The long-term systemic application of low MPTP doses did not induce any increase in mortality in either young adult or aged mice and better resembles the slow evolution of the neurodegenerative process. This treatment could be useful to model different stages of Parkinson's disease, providing a better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and facilitating the testing of both protective and restorative treatments. Here, we show a new chronic and progressive parkinsonian mouse model, in young and aged mice. This model produces a stable degeneration of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway, continuous neuroinflammatory reaction and motor deficits. Aged animals showed a faster neurodegeneration and an altered neuroinflammatory response. This treatment could be useful to model different stages of PD and to test both protective and restorative therapeutic approaches.

  7. Disease course in mdx:utrophin+/− mice: comparison of three mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Abby A; Hebert, Sadie L; Kunz, Matthew D; Ralles, Steven J; McLoon, Linda K

    2015-01-01

    The mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is used to study disease mechanisms and potential treatments, but its pathology is less severe than DMD patients. Other mouse models were developed to more closely mimic the human disease based on knowledge that upregulation of utrophin has a protective effect in mdx muscle. An mdx:utrophin−/− (dko) mouse was created, which had a severe disease phenotype and a shortened life span. An mdx:utrophin+/− mouse was also created, which had an intermediate disease phenotype compared to the mdx and dko mice. To determine the usefulness of mdx:utrophin+/− mice for long-term DMD studies, limb muscle pathology and function were assessed across the life span of wild-type, mdx, mdx:utrophin+/−, and dko mice. Muscle function assessment, specifically grip duration and rotarod performance, demonstrated that mdx:utrophin+/− mice were weaker for a longer time than mdx mice. Mean myofiber area was smaller in mdx:utrophin+/− mice compared to mdx mice at 12 months. Mdx:utrophin+/− mice had a higher percentage of centrally nucleated myofibers compared to mdx mice at 6 and 12 months. Collagen I and IV density was significantly higher in mdx:utrophin+/− muscle compared to mdx at most ages examined. Generally, mdx:utrophin+/− mice showed an intermediate disease phenotype over a longer time course compared to the mdx and dko mice. While they do not genetically mirror human DMD, mdx:utrophin+/− mice may be a more useful animal model than mdx or dko mice for investigating long-term efficacy of potential treatments when fibrosis or muscle function is the focus. PMID:25921779

  8. Dystrophin and dysferlin double mutant mice: a novel model for rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Hosur, Vishnu; Kavirayani, Anoop; Riefler, Jennifer; Carney, Lisa M B; Lyons, Bonnie; Gott, Bruce; Cox, Gregory A; Shultz, Leonard D

    2012-05-01

    Although researchers have yet to establish a link between muscular dystrophy (MD) and sarcomas in human patients, literature suggests that the MD genes dystrophin and dysferlin act as tumor suppressor genes in mouse models of MD. For instance, dystrophin-deficient mdx and dysferlin-deficient A/J mice, models of human Duchenne MD and limb-girdle MD type 2B, respectively, develop mixed sarcomas with variable penetrance and latency. To further establish the correlation between MD and sarcoma development, and to test whether a combined deletion of dystrophin and dysferlin exacerbates MD and augments the incidence of sarcomas, we generated dystrophin and dysferlin double mutant mice (STOCK-Dysf(prmd)Dmd(mdx-5Cv)). Not surprisingly, the double mutant mice develop severe MD symptoms and, moreover, develop rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) at an average age of 12 months, with an incidence of >90%. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses, using a panel of antibodies against skeletal muscle cell proteins, electron microscopy, cytogenetics, and molecular analysis reveal that the double mutant mice develop RMS. The present finding bolsters the correlation between MD and sarcomas, and provides a model not only to examine the cellular origins but also to identify mechanisms and signal transduction pathways triggering development of RMS.

  9. GATA4 transgenic mice as an in vivo model of congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    HAN, HUA; CHEN, YU; LIU, GANG; HAN, ZENGQIANG; ZHAO, ZHOU; TANG, YIN

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that 8 patients from a family with a history of congenital heart disease had simple atrial septal defect (ASD) and carried the same mutation at codon 310 in the GATA4 gene. In the present study, to identify the functional defects caused by this mutation in an in vivo model, the transgene DNA constructs were microinjected into mice to generate a transgenic mouse model. The mice were genotyped using PCR and DNA sequencing. Protein expression was measured by western blot analysis. qPCR was used to determine the copy number of the transgenes. The heart tissue was fixed and sectioned by conventional procedures. The Vevo 2000 system was used to perform echocardiography on the mice. The expression of GATA4 target genes was measured using the real-time PCR system. The incidence of ASD in the heterozygous transgenic mice was found to be greater than that in the wild-type control mice (P<0.05). In addition, the expression of α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) in the heart tissues from the homozygous mice was lower than that in the heart tissues from their wild-type littermates (P<0.05). In conclusion, these results suggest that the introduction of GATA4 M310V negatively affects the normal expression of α-MHC. In accordance with previous findings on GATA4 mutation screening and in vitro experiments, this study confirms that GATA4 M310V mutation may lead to the development of the congenital heart defect, ASD. PMID:25873328

  10. Novel metastasis model of human lung cancer in SCID mice depleted of NK cells.

    PubMed

    Yano, S; Nishioka, Y; Izumi, K; Tsuruo, T; Tanaka, T; Miyasaka, M; Sone, S

    1996-07-17

    Metastasis is a critical problem in the treatment of human lung cancer. Thus, a suitable animal model of metastasis of human lung cancer is required for in vivo biological and preclinical studies. In this study, we tried to establish a suitable model for this, using SCID mice. Neither human SCLC H69/VP cells (5 x 10(6)) nor squamous-cell carcinoma RERF-LC-AI cells (1 x 10(6)), injected through a tail vein, formed metastases in untreated SCID mice. Pre-treatment of SCID mice with anti-asialo GM1 serum resulted in only a few metastases of H69/VP cells, but pre-treatment with anti-mouse IL-2 receptor beta chain Ab (TM-beta 1) resulted in numerous lymph-node metastases 56 days after tumor inoculation. H69/VP-M cells, an in vivo-selected variant line, formed significant numbers of lymph-node metastases even in SCID mice pre-treated with anti-asialo GM1 serum. SCID mice depleted of NK cells by treatment with TM-beta 1 showed different patterns of metastasis when inoculated intravenously with the 2 different human lung cancer cell lines (H69/VP and RERF-LC-AI cells): H69/VP cells formed metastases mainly in systemic lymph nodes and the liver, whereas RERF-LC-AI cells formed metastases mainly in the liver and kidneys, with only a few in lymph nodes. A histopathological study showed that the metastatic colonies consisted of cancer cells. The numbers of metastatic colonies formed by the 2 cell lines increased with the number of cells inoculated. TM-beta 1 treatment of SCID mice efficiently removed NK cells from peripheral blood for at least 6 weeks, whereas, after treatment of the mice with anti-asialo GM1 serum, NK cells were recovered within 9 days. These findings suggest that NK-cell-depleted SCID mice may be useful as a model in biological and pre-clinical studies on metastasis of human lung cancer.

  11. Alisertib added to rituximab and vincristine is synthetic lethal and potentially curative in mice with aggressive DLBCL co-overexpressing MYC and BCL2.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Daruka; Morales, Carla; Cooke, Laurence S; Manziello, Ann; Mount, David W; Persky, Daniel O; Fisher, Richard I; Miller, Thomas P; Qi, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    Pearson correlation coefficient for expression analysis of the Lymphoma/Leukemia Molecular Profiling Project (LLMPP) demonstrated Aurora A and B are highly correlated with MYC in DLBCL and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), while both Auroras correlate with BCL2 only in DLBCL. Auroras are up-regulated by MYC dysregulation with associated aneuploidy and resistance to microtubule targeted agents such as vincristine. Myc and Bcl2 are differentially expressed in U-2932, TMD-8, OCI-Ly10 and Granta-519, but only U-2932 cells over-express mutated p53. Alisertib [MLN8237 or M], a highly selective small molecule inhibitor of Aurora A kinase, was synergistic with vincristine [VCR] and rituximab [R] for inhibition of cell proliferation, abrogation of cell cycle checkpoints and enhanced apoptosis versus single agent or doublet therapy. A DLBCL (U-2932) mouse model showed tumor growth inhibition (TGI) of ∼ 10-20% (p = 0.001) for M, VCR and M-VCR respectively, while R alone showed ∼ 50% TGI (p = 0.001). M-R and VCR-R led to tumor regression [TR], but relapsed 10 days after discontinuing therapy. In contrast, M-VCR-R demonstrated TR with no relapse >40 days after stopping therapy with a Kaplan-Meier survival of 100%. Genes that are modulated by M-VCR-R (CENP-C, Auroras) play a role in centromere-kinetochore function in an attempt to maintain mitosis in the presence of synthetic lethality. Together, our data suggest that the interaction between alisertib plus VCR plus rituximab is synergistic and synthetic lethal in Myc and Bcl-2 co-expressing DLBCL. Alisertib plus vincristine plus rituximab [M-VCR-R] may represent a new strategy for DLBCL therapy.

  12. Alisertib Added to Rituximab and Vincristine Is Synthetic Lethal and Potentially Curative in Mice with Aggressive DLBCL Co-Overexpressing MYC and BCL2

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Daruka; Morales, Carla; Cooke, Laurence S.; Manziello, Ann; Mount, David W.; Persky, Daniel O.; Fisher, Richard I.; Miller, Thomas P.; Qi, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    Pearson correlation coefficient for expression analysis of the Lymphoma/Leukemia Molecular Profiling Project (LLMPP) demonstrated Aurora A and B are highly correlated with MYC in DLBCL and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), while both Auroras correlate with BCL2 only in DLBCL. Auroras are up-regulated by MYC dysregulation with associated aneuploidy and resistance to microtubule targeted agents such as vincristine. Myc and Bcl2 are differentially expressed in U-2932, TMD-8, OCI-Ly10 and Granta-519, but only U-2932 cells over-express mutated p53. Alisertib [MLN8237 or M], a highly selective small molecule inhibitor of Aurora A kinase, was synergistic with vincristine [VCR] and rituximab [R] for inhibition of cell proliferation, abrogation of cell cycle checkpoints and enhanced apoptosis versus single agent or doublet therapy. A DLBCL (U-2932) mouse model showed tumor growth inhibition (TGI) of ∼10–20% (p = 0.001) for M, VCR and M-VCR respectively, while R alone showed ∼50% TGI (p = 0.001). M-R and VCR-R led to tumor regression [TR], but relapsed 10 days after discontinuing therapy. In contrast, M-VCR-R demonstrated TR with no relapse >40 days after stopping therapy with a Kaplan-Meier survival of 100%. Genes that are modulated by M-VCR-R (CENP-C, Auroras) play a role in centromere-kinetochore function in an attempt to maintain mitosis in the presence of synthetic lethality. Together, our data suggest that the interaction between alisertib plus VCR plus rituximab is synergistic and synthetic lethal in Myc and Bcl-2 co-expressing DLBCL. Alisertib plus vincristine plus rituximab [M-VCR-R] may represent a new strategy for DLBCL therapy. PMID:24893165

  13. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for bisphenol A in pregnant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, Yuko; Matsuyama, Wakoto; Wada, Masahiro; Hishikawa, Junko; Chan, Melissa Pui Ling; Nakayama, Aki; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    2007-10-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used to produce polymers for food contact and other applications, so there is potential for oral exposure of humans to trace amounts via ingestion. To date, no physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been located for BPA in pregnant mice with or without fetuses. An estimate by a mathematical model is essential since information on humans is difficult to obtain experimentally. The PBPK model was constructed based on the pharmacokinetic data of our experiment following single oral administration of BPA to pregnant mice. The risk assessment of bisphenol A (BPA) on the development of human offspring is an important issue. There have been limited data on the exposure level of human fetuses to BPA (e.g. BPA concentration in cord blood) and no information is available on the pharmacokinetics of BPA in humans with or without fetuses. In the present study, we developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model describing the pharmacokinetics of BPA in a pregnant mouse with the prospect of future extrapolation to humans. The PBPK model was constructed based on the pharmacokinetic data of an experiment we executed on pregnant mice following single oral administration of BPA. The model could describe the rapid transfer of BPA through the placenta to the fetus and the slow disappearance from fetuses. The simulated time courses after three-time repeated oral administrations of BPA by the constructed model fitted well with the experimental data, and the simulation for the 10 times lower dose was also consistent with the experiment. This suggested that the PBPK model for BPA in pregnant mice was successfully verified and is highly promising for extrapolation to humans who are expected to be exposed more chronically to lower doses.

  14. Linear and Nonlinear Growth Models for Value-Added Assessment: An Application to Spanish Primary and Secondary Schools' Progress in Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Martin, Esther; Kuosmanen, Timo; Gaviria, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Value-added models are considered one of the best alternatives not only for accountability purposes but also to improve the school system itself. The estimates provided by these models measure the contribution of schools to students' academic progress, once the effect of other factors outside school control are eliminated. The functional form for…

  15. Pre-activated blood platelets and a pro-thrombotic phenotype in APP23 mice modeling Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jarre, Andrea; Gowert, Nina S; Donner, Lili; Münzer, Patrick; Klier, Meike; Borst, Oliver; Schaller, Martin; Lang, Florian; Korth, Carsten; Elvers, Margitta

    2014-09-01

    Platelet activation and thrombus formation play a critical role in primary hemostasis but also represent a pathophysiological mechanism leading to acute thrombotic vascular occlusions. Besides, platelets modulate cellular processes including inflammation, angiogenesis and neurodegeneration. On the other hand, platelet activation and thrombus formation are altered in different diseases leading to either bleeding complications or pathological thrombus formation. For many years platelets have been considered to play a role in neuroinflammatory diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is characterized by deposits of amyloid-β (Aβ) and strongly related to vascular diseases with platelets playing a critical role in the progression of AD because exposure of platelets to Aβ induces platelet activation, platelet Aβ release, and enhanced platelet adhesion to collagen in vitro and at the injured carotid artery in vivo. However, the molecular mechanisms and the relation between vascular pathology and amyloid-β plaque formation in the pathogenesis of AD are not fully understood. Compelling evidence is suggestive for altered platelet activity in AD patients. Thus we analyzed platelet activation and thrombus formation in aged AD transgenic mice (APP23) known to develop amyloid-β deposits in the brain parenchyma and cerebral vessels. As a result, platelets are in a pre-activated state in blood of APP23 mice and showed strongly enhanced integrin activation, degranulation and spreading kinetics on fibrinogen surfaces upon stimulation. This enhanced platelet signaling translated into almost unlimited thrombus formation on collagen under flow conditions in vitro and accelerated vessel occlusion in vivo suggesting that these mice are at high risk of arterial thrombosis leading to cerebrovascular and unexpectedly to cardiovascular complications that might be also relevant in AD patients.

  16. Impaired sensorimotor gating in Fmr1 knock out and Fragile X premutation model mice.

    PubMed

    Renoux, A J; Sala-Hamrick, K J; Carducci, N M; Frazer, M; Halsey, K E; Sutton, M A; Dolan, D F; Murphy, G G; Todd, P K

    2014-07-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a common inherited cause of intellectual disability that results from a CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene. Large repeat expansions trigger both transcriptional and translational suppression of Fragile X protein (FMRP) production. Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS) is an allelic neurodegenerative disease caused by smaller "pre-mutation" CGG repeat expansions that enhance FMR1 transcription but lead to translational inefficiency and reduced FMRP expression in animal models. Sensorimotor gating as measured by pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) is altered in both FXS patients and Fmr1 knock out (KO) mice. Similarly, FXTAS patients have demonstrated PPI deficits. Recent work suggests there may be overlapping synaptic defects between Fmr1 KO and CGG knock-in premutation mouse models (CGG KI). We therefore sought to interrogate PPI in CGG KI mice. Using a quiet PPI protocol more akin to human testing conditions, we find that Fmr1 KO animals have significantly impaired PPI. Using this same protocol, we find CGG KI mice demonstrate an age-dependent impairment in PPI compared to wild type (WT) controls. This study describes a novel phenotype in CGG KI mice that can be used in future therapeutic development targeting premutation associated symptoms.

  17. Antidepressant-like effect of mitragynine isolated from Mitragyna speciosa Korth in mice model of depression.

    PubMed

    Idayu, N Farah; Hidayat, M Taufik; Moklas, M A M; Sharida, F; Raudzah, A R Nurul; Shamima, A R; Apryani, Evhy

    2011-03-15

    Mitragyna speciosa Korth. leaves have been used for decades as a traditional medicine to treat diarrhea, diabetes and to improve blood circulation by natives of Malaysia, Thailand and other regions of Southeast Asia. Mitragynine is the major active alkaloid in the plant. To date, the role of mitragynine in psychological disorders such as depression is not scientifically evaluated. Hence, the present investigation evaluates the antidepressant effect of mitragynine in the mouse forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), two models predictive of antidepressant activity and the effect of mitragynine towards neuroendocrine system of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis by measuring the corticosterone concentration of mice exposed to FST and TST. An open-field test (OFT) was used to detect any association of immobility in the FST and TST with changes in motor activity of mice treated with mitragynine. In the present study, mitragynine at dose of 10 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg i.p. injected significantly reduced the immobility time of mice in both FST and TST without any significant effect on locomotor activity in OFT. Moreover, mitragynine significantly reduced the released of corticosterone in mice exposed to FST and TST at dose of 10 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg. Overall, the present study clearly demonstrated that mitragynine exerts an antidepressant effect in animal behavioral model of depression (FST and TST) and the effect appears to be mediated by an interaction with neuroendocrine HPA axis systems.

  18. Transgenic mice carrying the human poliovirus receptor: new animal models for study of poliovirus neurovirulence.

    PubMed Central

    Horie, H; Koike, S; Kurata, T; Sato-Yoshida, Y; Ise, I; Ota, Y; Abe, S; Hioki, K; Kato, H; Taya, C

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant viruses between the virulent Mahoney and attenuated Sabin 1 strains of poliovirus type 1 were subjected to neurovirulence tests using a transgenic (Tg) mouse line, ICR-PVRTg1, that carried the human poliovirus receptor gene. The Tg mice were inoculated intracerebrally with these recombinant viruses and observed for clinical signs, histopathological lesions, and viral antigens as parameters of neurovirulence of the viruses. These parameters observed in the Tg mice were different for different inoculated viruses. Dose-dependent incidences of paralysis and of death were observed in the Tg mice inoculated with any viruses used. This indicates that values of 50% lethal dose are useful to score a wide range of neurovirulence of poliovirus. The neurovirulence of individual viruses estimated by the Tg mouse model had a strong correlation with those estimated by monkey model. Consequently, the mouse tests identified the neurovirulence determinants on the genome of poliovirus that had been identified by monkey tests. In addition, the mouse tests revealed new neurovirulence determinants, that is, different nucleotides between the two strains at positions 189 and 21 and/or 935 in the 5'-proximal 1,122 nucleotides. The Tg mice used in this study may be suitable for replacing monkeys for investigating poliovirus neurovirulence. Images PMID:8289371

  19. Human Malaria in Immunocompromised Mice: New In Vivo Model for Chemotherapy Studies

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, A.; Badell, E.; Van Rooijen, N.; Druilhe, P.

    2001-01-01

    We have recently designed a new Plasmodium falciparum mouse model and documented its potential for the study of immune effector mechanisms. In order to determine its value for drug studies, we evaluated its response to existing antimalarial drugs compared to that observed in humans. Immunocompromised BXN (bg/bg xid/xid nu/nu) mice were infected with either the sensitive NF54 strain or the multiresistant T24 strain and then treated with chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine, or dihydroartemisinin. A parallelism was observed between previously reported human responses and P. falciparum-parasitized human red blood cell (huRBC)–BXN mouse responses to classical antimalarial drugs, measured in terms of speed of decrease in parasitemia and of morphological alterations of the parasites. Mice infected with the sensitive strain were successfully cured after treatment with either chloroquine or mefloquine. In contrast, mice infected with the multiresistant strain failed to be cured by chloroquine or quinine but thereafter responded to dihydroartemisinin treatment. The speed of parasite clearance and the morphological alterations induced differed for each drug and matched previously reported observations, hence stressing the relevance of the model. These data thus suggest that P. falciparum-huRBC–BXN mice can provide a valuable in vivo system and should be included in the short list of animals that can be used for the evaluation of P. falciparum responses to drugs. PMID:11353636

  20. Functional and muscular adaptations in an experimental model for isometric strength training in mice.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Karsten; Gessner, Denise K; Seimetz, Michael; Banisch, Jasmin; Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus; Weissmann, Norbert; Mooren, Frank C

    2013-01-01

    Exercise training induces muscular adaptations that are highly specific to the type of exercise. For a systematic study of the differentiated exercise adaptations on a molecular level mouse models have been used successfully. The aim of the current study was to develop a suitable mouse model of isometric strength exercise training characterized by specific adaptations known from strength training. C57BL/6 mice performed an isometric strength training (ST) for 10 weeks 5 days/week. Additionally, either a sedentary control group (CT) or a regular endurance training group (ET) groups were used as controls. Performance capacity was determined by maximum holding time (MHT) and treadmill spirometry, respectively. Furthermore, muscle fiber types and diameter, muscular concentration of phosphofructokinase 1 (PFK), succinate dehydrogenase (SDHa), and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) were determined. In a further approach, the effect of ST on glucose intolerance was tested in diabetic mice. In mice of the ST group we observed an increase of MHT in isometric strength tests, a type II fiber hypertrophy, and an increased GLUT4 protein content in the membrane fraction. In contrast, in mice of the ET group an increase of VO(2max), a shift to oxidative muscle fiber type and an increase of oxidative enzyme content was measured. Furthermore strength training was effective in reducing glucose intolerance in mice fed a high fat diet. An effective murine strength training model was developed and evaluated, which revealed marked differences in adaptations known from endurance training. This approach seems also suitable to test for therapeutical effects of strength training.

  1. Constipation enhances the propensity to seizure in pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure models of mice.

    PubMed

    Moezi, Leila; Pirsalami, Fatema; Inaloo, Soroor

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures and represents one of the most frequent neurological diseases, affecting about 60 million people worldwide. The cellular and neurocircuit bases of epilepsy are poorly understood. Constipation is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by symptoms such as straining, hard stool, and infrequent defecation. Population-based studies have shown that the prevalence of constipation is up to 30% of the population in developed countries. The causal link between seizure and constipation is a common belief among patients and physicians, but there are no scientific data to support this association. The current investigation evaluated the effects of constipation induced by loperamide (a peripheral μ-opioid receptor agonist without effect on central nervous system receptors) and clidinium (a quaternary amine antimuscarinic agent with reduced central nervous system effects) on two different seizure models of mice: (1) myoclonic, clonic, and generalized tonic seizures and death induced by intraperitoneal administration of pentylenetetrazole and (2) clonic seizure threshold induced by intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole. We demonstrated that the measured intestinal transit (%intestinal transit) decreased after loperamide or clidinium treatment for 3days. Constipation in mice which was induced by loperamide or clonidine caused a decrease in threshold to clonic seizure in the intravenous pentylenetetrazole seizure model. Moreover loperamide- or clidinium-induced constipation decreased latencies to, clonic, and tonic seizures and death in the intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole model of mice. Serum ammonia levels were slightly elevated in both loperamide- and clidinium-treated mice. In conclusion, loperamide- or clidinium-induced constipated mice are more prone to seizure which might confirm the belief of patients and physicians about constipation as a trigger of seizure.

  2. Mathematical modeling of left ventricular dimensional changes in mice during aging

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac aging is characterized by diastolic dysfunction of the left ventricle (LV), which is due in part to increased LV wall stiffness. In the diastolic phase, myocytes are relaxed and extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical determinant to the changes of LV wall stiffness. To evaluate the effects of ECM composition on cardiac aging, we developed a mathematical model to predict LV dimension and wall stiffness changes in aging mice by integrating mechanical laws and our experimental results. We measured LV dimension, wall thickness, LV mass, and collagen content for wild type (WT) C57/BL6J mice of ages ranging from 7.3 months to those of 34.0 months. The model was established using the thick wall theory and stretch-induced tissue growth to an isotropic and homogeneous elastic composite with mixed constituents. The initial conditions of the simulation were set based on the data from the young mice. Matlab simulations of this mathematical model demonstrated that the model captured the major features of LV remodeling with age and closely approximated experimental results. Specifically, the temporal progression of the LV interior and exterior dimensions demonstrated the same trend and order-of-magnitude change as our experimental results. In conclusion, we present here a validated mathematical model of cardiac aging that applies the thick-wall theory and stretch-induced tissue growth to LV remodeling with age. PMID:23281647

  3. Of mice and men: modelling post-stroke depression experimentally

    PubMed Central

    Kronenberg, G; Gertz, K; Heinz, A; Endres, M

    2014-01-01

    At least one-third of stroke survivors suffer from depression. The development of comorbid depression after stroke is clinically highly significant because post-stroke depression is associated with increased mortality, slows recovery and leads to worse functional outcomes. Here, we review the evidence that post-stroke depression can be effectively modelled in experimental rodents via a variety of approaches. This opens an exciting new window onto the neurobiology of depression and permits probing potential underlying mechanisms such as disturbed cellular plasticity, neuroendocrine dysregulation, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration in a novel context. From the point of view of translational stroke research, extending the scope of experimental investigations beyond the study of short-term end points and, in particular, acute lesion size, may help improve the relevance of preclinical results to human disease. Furthermore, accumulating evidence from both clinical and experimental studies offers the tantalizing prospect of 5-hydroxytryptaminergic antidepressants as the first pharmacological therapy for stroke that would be available during the subacute and chronic phases of recovery. Interdisciplinary neuropsychiatric research will be called on to dissect the mechanisms underpinning the beneficial effects of antidepressants on stroke recovery. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Animal Models in Psychiatry Research. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-20 PMID:24838087

  4. Orientifolded locally AdS3 geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loran, F.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing the analysis of [Loran F and Sheikh-Jabbari M M 2010 Phys. Lett. B 693 184-7], we classify all locally AdS3 stationary axi-symmetric unorientable solutions to AdS3 Einstein gravity and show that they are obtained by applying certain orientifold projection on AdS3, BTZ or AdS3 self-dual orbifold, respectively, O-AdS3, O-BTZ and O-SDO geometries. Depending on the orientifold fixed surface, the O-surface, which is either a space-like 2D plane or a cylinder, or a light-like 2D plane or a cylinder, one can distinguish four distinct cases. For the space-like orientifold plane or cylinder cases, these geometries solve AdS3 Einstein equations and are hence locally AdS3 everywhere except at the O-surface, where there is a delta-function source. For the light-like cases, the geometry is a solution to Einstein equations even at the O-surface. We discuss the causal structure for static, extremal and general rotating O-BTZ and O-SDO cases as well as the geodesic motion on these geometries. We also discuss orientifolding Poincaré patch AdS3 and AdS2 geometries as a way to geodesic completion of these spaces and comment on the 2D CFT dual to the O-geometries.

  5. ModObs: Atmospheric modelling for wind energy, climate and environment applications : exploring added value from new observation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempreviva, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    The EC FP6 Marie Curie Training Network "ModObs" http://www.modobs.windeng.net addresses the improvement of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) models to investigate the interplay of processes at different temporal and spatial scales, and to explore the added value from new observation techniques. The overall goal is to bring young scientists to work together with experienced researchers in developing a better interaction amongst scientific communities of modelers and experimentalists, using a comprehensive approach to "Climate Change", "Clean Energy assessment" and "Environmental Policies", issues. This poster describes the work in progress of ten students, funded by the network, under the supervision of a team of scientists within atmospheric physics, engineering and satellite remote sensing and end-users such as companies in the private sector, all with the appropriate expertise to integrate the most advanced research methods and techniques in the following topics. MODELING: GLOBAL-TO-MESO SCALE: Analytical and process oriented numerical models will be used to study the interaction between the atmosphere and the ocean on a regional scale. Initial results indicate an interaction between the intensity of polar lows and the subsurface warm core often present in the Nordic Seas (11). The presence of waves, mainly swell, influence the MABL fluxes and turbulence structure. The regional and global wave effect on the atmosphere will be also studied and quantified (7) MESO-SCALE: Applicability of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) parametrizations in the meso-scale WRF model to marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) over the North Sea is investigated. The most suitable existing PBL parametrization will be additionally improved and used for downscaling North Sea past and future climates (2). Application of the meso-scale model (MM5 and WRF) for the wind energy in off-shore and coastal area. Set-up of the meso-scale model, post-processing and verification of the data from

  6. Shank mutant mice as an animal model of autism.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Juyoun; Bakes, Joseph; Bradley, Clarrisa; Collingridge, Graham L; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2014-01-05

    In this review, we focus on the role of the Shank family of proteins in autism. In recent years, autism research has been flourishing. With genetic, molecular, imaging and electrophysiological studies being supported by behavioural studies using animal models, there is real hope that we may soon understand the fundamental pathology of autism. There is also genuine potential to develop a molecular-level pharmacological treatment that may be able to deal with the most severe symptoms of autism, and clinical trials are already underway. The Shank family of proteins has been strongly implicated as a contributing factor in autism in certain individuals and sits at the core of the alleged autistic pathway. Here, we analyse studies that relate Shank to autism and discuss what light this sheds on the possible causes of autism.

  7. Behavioral models in mice. Implication of the alpha noradrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Hascoët, M; Bourin, M; Bradwejn, J

    1991-01-01

    1. The mechanism of action of drugs might change according to the test used. Several noradrenergic drugs were tested in order to understand their implication in the mobility tests. 2. It was found that clonidine, an Alpha 2 agonist, acted differently according to the test used. It provoked sedation in spontaneous activity test, and anti-immobility effects in the other tests. 3. Tail suspension test is able to show the double acting of clonidine. 4. Idazoxan might act either as an alpha 2 antagonist or as partial alpha 2 agonist. TST shown the unexpected partial alpha agonist effect of the molecule. 5. Forced swimming test is more specific for predicting antidepressant activity than tail suspension test which is close to a spontaneous activity model.

  8. Beneficial effect of melatonin treatment on inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress on pancreas of a senescence accelerated mice model.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Sara; Kireev, Roman; García, Cruz; Forman, Katherine; Escames, Germaine; Vara, Elena; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2011-01-01

    This study has investigated the effect of aging on parameters of inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis in pancreas obtained from two types of male mice models: senescence-accelerated prone (SAMP8) and resistant mice (SAMR1). Animals of 2 (young) and 10 months of age (old) were used (n = 64). The influence of the administration of melatonin in the drinking water for one month at two different dosages (1 and 10mg/(kg day) on old SAMP8 mice on these parameters was also studied. SAMP8 mice showed with age a significant increase in the relative expression of pancreatic genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Furthermore the protein expression of several NFκB subunits was also enhanced. On the contrary aged SAMR1 mice did not show significant increases in these parameters. Melatonin administration to SAMP8 mice was able to reduce these age related alterations at the two used dosages.

  9. Genomic imprinting: an obsession with depilatory mice.

    PubMed

    Haig, David; Úbeda, Francisco

    2011-04-12

    Excessive grooming in mice has been promoted as a model of human obsessive-compulsive disorders. A recent paper adds Grb10 to the list of genes with effects on behavioral hair loss, with the added twist that this time the gene is imprinted.

  10. Optimization of a Clinically Relevant Model of White Matter Stroke in Mice: Histological and Functional Evidences

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Abdullah S.; Satriotomo, Irawan; Fazal, Jawad A.; Nadeau, Stephen E.; Doré, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose White matter (WM) injury during stroke increases the risk of disability and gloomy prognosis of post-stroke rehabilitation. However, modeling of WM loss in rodents has proven to be challenging. Methods We report improved WM injury models in male C57BL/6 mice. Mice were given either endothelin-1 (ET-1) or L-N5-(1-iminoethyl)ornitine (L-NIO) into the periventricular white matter (PVWM), in the corpus callosum (CC), or in the posterior limb of internal capsule (PLIC). Anatomical and functional outcomes were quantified on day 7 post injection. Results Injection of ET-1 or L-NIO caused a small focal lesion in the injection site in the PVWM. No significant motor function deficits were observed in the PVWM lesion model. We next targeted the PLIC by using single or double injections of L-NIO and found that this strategy induced small focal infarction. Interestingly, injection of L-NIO in the PLIC also resulted in gliosis, and significant motor function deficits. Conclusions By employing different agents, doses, and locations, this study shows the feasibility of inducing brain WM injury accompanied with functional deficits in mice. Selective targeting of the injury location, behavioral testing, and the agents chosen to induce WM injury are all keys to successfully develop a mouse model and subsequent testing of therapeutic interventions against WM injury. PMID:27512724

  11. An animal model of adult T-cell leukemia: humanized mice with HTLV-1-specific immunity.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Kenta; Xun, Runze; Tei, Mami; Ueno, Takaharu; Tanaka, Masakazu; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Fujisawa, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-16

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is causally associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy with a poor prognosis. To elucidate ATL pathogenesis in vivo, a variety of animal models have been established; however, the mechanisms driving this disorder remain poorly understood due to deficiencies in each of these animal models. Here, we report a novel HTLV-1-infected humanized mouse model generated by intra-bone marrow injection of human CD133(+) stem cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγc null (NOG) mice (IBMI-huNOG mice). Upon infection, the number of CD4(+) human T cells in the periphery increased rapidly, and atypical lymphocytes with lobulated nuclei resembling ATL-specific flower cells were observed 4 to 5 months after infection. Proliferation was seen in both CD25(-) and CD25(+) CD4 T cells with identical proviral integration sites; however, a limited number of CD25(+)-infected T-cell clones eventually dominated, indicating an association between clonal selection of infected T cells and expression of CD25. Additionally, HTLV-1-specific adaptive immune responses were induced in infected mice and might be involved in the control of HTLV-1-infected cells. Thus, the HTLV-1-infected IBMI-huNOG mouse model successfully recapitulated the development of ATL and may serve as an important tool for investigating in vivo mechanisms of ATL leukemogenesis and evaluating anti-ATL drug and vaccine candidates.

  12. [Establishment of a keloid model by transplanting human keloid onto the backs of nude mice].

    PubMed

    Philandrianos, C; Gonnelli, D; Andrac-Meyer, L; Bruno, M; Magalon, G; Mordon, S

    2014-08-01

    Keloid scar is a proliferative healing dysfunction formed by an excessive build-up of collagen fibers on the dermis. It is responsible of aesthetic and functional disabilities. There is no ideal treatment and recurrence occurs very often. Keloid scars occur only to human, that's why animal model needs to be made to study this pathology and new treatments. Few models have been described using human keloid scars implanted into subcutaneous tissue of nude mice or rat. To allow study of topical and laser treatment we have developed a new animal model using human keloid scar fragment with epidermal and dermal tissue implanted into back of nude mice like a full thickness skin graft. Keloid fragments from five donors have been grafted onto 40 nudes mice. Macroscopic and microscopic studies have been made at day 28, 56, 84 and 112. We observed integration of the fragments in all cases. Hyalinized collagen bundles were observed in all implant biopsies confirming the stability of the keloid architecture within 112 days. This model is easily reproducible and allows the study of topical treatment and laser due to the accessibility of the keloid.

  13. Impaired Maternal Behavior in Usp46 Mutant Mice: A Model for Trans-Generational Transmission of Maternal Care

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Ayumi; Fujiwara, Mari; Ebihara, Shizufumi

    2015-01-01

    Usp46 mutant mice (congenic strain on a B6 genetic background; MT mice) have a low weaning rate and display poor maternal behavior compared to C57BL/6J mice (B6 mice). Based on these observations, we examined how maternal behavior is shaped by cross-fostering and in-fostering MT and B6 mice. The experiments consisted of six groups: B6 mice fostered by their biological mother (B6-CO); MT mice fostered by their biological mother (MT-CO); B6 mice fostered by a different B6 mother (B6-IF); MT mice fostered by a different MT mother (MT-IF); B6 mice fostered by an MT mother (B6-CF); and MT mice fostered by a B6 mother (MT-CF). Maternal behavior was assessed using the pup-retrieval test in adult female offspring, and four parameters, time nursing pups in the nest, time sniffing or licking pups, rearing behavior, and latency to retrieve pups, were measured. Cross-fostering significantly reduced time spent nursing and sniffing/licking pup, and increased the number of instances of rearing in the B6-CF group, and improved three parameters of maternal behaviors (nursing, rearing and latency) in the MT-CF group. These results indicate that the level of maternal care is transmitted to their pups and proper maternal behaviors can be shaped if adequate postpartum maternal care is given, even in genetically vulnerable mice. However, the offspring’s genotype may also influence the development of maternal behaviors in adulthood. Thus, MT mice may prove useful as a model for trans-generational transmission of maternal care, and these findings may provide insight into the mechanisms of maltreating behaviors in human child abuse. PMID:26284364

  14. Acinar Cell Apoptosis in Serpini2-Deficient Mice Models Pancreatic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Stacie K; Cannons, Jennifer L; Incao, Arturo; Pak, Evgenia; Chen, Amy; Zerfas, Patricia M; Bryant, Mark A; Biesecker, Leslie G; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Pavan, William J

    2005-01-01

    Pancreatic insufficiency (PI) when left untreated results in a state of malnutrition due to an inability to absorb nutrients. Frequently, PI is diagnosed as part of a larger clinical presentation in cystic fibrosis or Shwachman–Diamond syndrome. In this study, a mouse model for isolated exocrine PI was identified in a mouse line generated by a transgene insertion. The trait is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, and homozygous animals are growth retarded, have abnormal immunity, and have reduced life span. Mice with the disease locus, named pequeño (pq), exhibit progressive apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells with severe exocrine acinar cell loss by 8 wk of age, while the islets and ductal tissue persist. The mutation in pq/pq mice results from a random transgene insertion. Molecular characterization of the transgene insertion site by fluorescent in situ hybridization and genomic deletion mapping identified an approximately 210-kb deletion on Chromosome 3, deleting two genes. One of these genes, Serpini2, encodes a protein that is a member of the serpin family of protease inhibitors. Reintroduction of only the Serpini2 gene by bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic complementation corrected the acinar cell defect as well as body weight and immune phenotypes, showing that deletion of Serpini2 causes the pequeño phenotype. Dietary supplementation of pancreatic enzymes also corrected body size, body weight, and immunodeficiency, and increased the life span of Serpini2-deficient mice, despite continued acinar cell loss. To our knowledge, this study describes the first characterized genetic animal model for isolated PI. Genetic complementation of the transgene insertion mutant demonstrates that Serpini2 deficiency directly results in the acinar cell apoptosis, malabsorption, and malnutrition observed in pq/pq mice. The rescue of growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and mortality by either Serpini2 bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic expression

  15. A Novel Animal Model of Borrelia recurrentis Louse-Borne Relapsing Fever Borreliosis Using Immunodeficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Christer; Lundqvist, Jenny; van Rooijen, Nico; Bergström, Sven

    2009-01-01

    Louse-borne relapsing fever (LBRF) borreliosis is caused by Borrelia recurrentis, and it is a deadly although treatable disease that is endemic in the Horn of Africa but has epidemic potential. Research on LBRF has been severely hampered because successful infection with B. recurrentis has been achieved only in primates (i.e., not in other laboratory or domestic animals). Here, we present the first non-primate animal model of LBRF, using SCID (-B, -T cells) and SCID BEIGE (-B, -T, -NK cells) immunocompromised mice. These animals were infected with B. recurrentis A11 or A17, or with B. duttonii 1120K3 as controls. B. recurrentis caused a relatively mild but persistent infection in SCID and SCID BEIGE mice, but did not proliferate in NUDE (-T) and BALB/c (wild-type) mice. B. duttonii was infectious but not lethal in all animals. These findings demonstrate that the immune response can limit relapsing fever even in the absence of humoral defense mechanisms. To study the significance of phagocytic cells in this context, we induced systemic depletion of such cells in the experimental mice by injecting them with clodronate liposomes, which resulted in uncontrolled B. duttonii growth and a one-hundred-fold increase in B. recurrentis titers in blood. This observation highlights the role of macrophages and other phagocytes in controlling relapsing fever infection. B. recurrentis evolved from B. duttonii to become a primate-specific pathogen that has lost the ability to infect immunocompetent rodents, probably through genetic degeneration. Here, we describe a novel animal model of B. recurrentis based on B- and T-cell-deficient mice, which we believe will be very valuable in future research on LBRF. Our study also reveals the importance of B-cells and phagocytes in controlling relapsing fever infection. PMID:19787030

  16. The lonely mouse: verification of a separation-induced model of depression in female mice.

    PubMed

    Martin, Alison L; Brown, Richard E

    2010-02-11

    Animal models of depression seldom test females, even though women are twice as likely as men to suffer from major depressive disorder. Since female mice are sensitive to social isolation, we tested a separation-based model of depression in three experiments. In experiment 1 female C57BL/6J mice were housed in three conditions: isolated (housed individually from 8 weeks of age), separated (housed in groups and then separated and housed individually at 23 weeks of age) and grouped (housed in groups from 8 weeks of age). At 24 weeks of age, there was a significant increase in weight and in immobility in individually housed mice in the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), a reduction in transitions in the L/D box, a reduced startle response and reduced prepulse inhibition, but no differences in cued or context fear conditioning. Experiment 2 showed that fluoxetine treatment administered via drinking water attenuated depressive-like behaviour in the FST and TST in individually housed female C57BL/6J mice, but had no effect on anxiety-like behaviour. Experiment 3 found that group-housed females had higher baseline corticosterone (CORT) levels than isolated females and fluoxetine had no effect on CORT levels. Thus, separation from group housing is a reliable and valid method for inducing depression-like behaviour in female mice. This procedure is both versatile, allowing for the study of genetic and environmental interactions, and accessible, making it useful for studying depression and testing new drugs for its treatment.

  17. Stress-Induced Executive Dysfunction in GDNF-Deficient Mice, A Mouse Model of Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Buhusi, Mona; Olsen, Kaitlin; Yang, Benjamin Z.; Buhusi, Catalin V.

    2016-01-01

    Maladaptive reactivity to stress is linked to improper decision making, impulsivity, and discounting of delayed rewards. Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) alters dopaminergic function, re-shapes dopaminergic circuits in key areas involved in decision making, and impairs prefrontal-cortex dependent response inhibition and working memory. Glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is essential for regulating dopamine (DA) release in the basal ganglia and for the survival of dopaminergic neurons; GDNF-deficient mice are considered an animal model for aging-related Parkinsonism. Recently, GDNF expression in the striatum has been linked to resilience to stress. Here we investigated the effects of CUS on decision making in GDNF-heterozygous (HET) mice and their wild-type littermate controls (WT). Before CUS no differences in temporal discounting (TD) were found between genotypes. However, following CUS GDNF HET mice, having a partial reduction of GDNF levels, showed increased impulsive choice indexed by a reduction in percent Larger-Later (LL) choices in the TD paradigm, and a reduction in area under the TD curve. Moreover, stressed GDNF HET mice, but not their WT controls, showed decreased neuronal activation (number of cFos positive neurons) in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), nucleus accumbens (NA) core, and NA shell, suggestive of a maladaptive response to stress. Interestingly, area under the TD curve positively correlated with cFos activation in the NA core, and NA shell, but not with orbitofrontal activity. These results provide further evidence of the differential involvement of the OFC, NA core, and NA shell in impulsive choice, and identify GDNF-deficient mice as a double-hit (gene × environment) model of stress-related executive dysfunction, particularly relevant to substance abuse and Parkinson’s disease (PD). PMID:27445722

  18. Stress-Induced Executive Dysfunction in GDNF-Deficient Mice, A Mouse Model of Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Buhusi, Mona; Olsen, Kaitlin; Yang, Benjamin Z; Buhusi, Catalin V

    2016-01-01

    Maladaptive reactivity to stress is linked to improper decision making, impulsivity, and discounting of delayed rewards. Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) alters dopaminergic function, re-shapes dopaminergic circuits in key areas involved in decision making, and impairs prefrontal-cortex dependent response inhibition and working memory. Glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is essential for regulating dopamine (DA) release in the basal ganglia and for the survival of dopaminergic neurons; GDNF-deficient mice are considered an animal model for aging-related Parkinsonism. Recently, GDNF expression in the striatum has been linked to resilience to stress. Here we investigated the effects of CUS on decision making in GDNF-heterozygous (HET) mice and their wild-type littermate controls (WT). Before CUS no differences in temporal discounting (TD) were found between genotypes. However, following CUS GDNF HET mice, having a partial reduction of GDNF levels, showed increased impulsive choice indexed by a reduction in percent Larger-Later (LL) choices in the TD paradigm, and a reduction in area under the TD curve. Moreover, stressed GDNF HET mice, but not their WT controls, showed decreased neuronal activation (number of cFos positive neurons) in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), nucleus accumbens (NA) core, and NA shell, suggestive of a maladaptive response to stress. Interestingly, area under the TD curve positively correlated with cFos activation in the NA core, and NA shell, but not with orbitofrontal activity. These results provide further evidence of the differential involvement of the OFC, NA core, and NA shell in impulsive choice, and identify GDNF-deficient mice as a double-hit (gene × environment) model of stress-related executive dysfunction, particularly relevant to substance abuse and Parkinson's disease (PD).

  19. Physiologically based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of 1,4-Dioxane in Rats, Mice, and Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Lisa M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Poet, Torka S.; Corley, Rick; Weber, Thomas J.; Locey, B. J.; Clarkson, Jacquelyn; Sager, S.; Gargas, M. L.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT 1,4-Dioxane (CAS No. 123-91-1) is used primarily as a solvent or as a solvent stabilizer. It can cause lung, liver and kidney damage at sufficiently high exposure levels. Two physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of 1,4-dioxane and its major metabolite, hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (HEAA), were published in 1990. These models have uncertainties and deficiencies that could be addressed and the model strengthened for use in a contemporary cancer risk assessment for 1,4-dioxane. Studies were performed to fill data gaps and reduce uncertainties pertaining to the pharmacokinetics of 1,4-dioxane and HEAA in rats, mice, and humans. Three types of studies were performed:partition coefficient measurements, blood time course in mice, and in vitro pharmacokinetics using rat, mouse, and human hepatocytes. Updated PBPK models were developed based on these new data and previously available data. The optimized rate of metabolism for the mouse was significantly higher than the value previously estimated. The optimized rat kinetic parameters were similar to those in the 1990 models. Only two human studies were identified. Model predictions were consistent with one study, but did not fit the second as well. In addition, a rat nasal exposure was completed. The results confirmed water directly contacts rat nasal tissues during drinking water under bioassays. Consistent with previous PBPK models, nasal tissues were not specifically included in the model. Use of these models will reduce the uncertainty in future 1,4-dioxane risk assessments.

  20. Initiation-promotion model of tumor prevalence in mice from space radiation exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    Exposures in space consist of low-level background components from galactic cosmic rays (GCR), occasional intense-energetic solar-particle events, periodic passes through geomagnetic-trapped radiation, and exposure from possible onboard nuclear-propulsion engines. Risk models for astronaut exposure from such diverse components and modalities must be developed to assure adequate protection in future NASA missions. The low-level background exposures (GCR), including relativistic heavy ions (HZE), will be the ultimate limiting factor for astronaut career exposure. We consider herein a two-mutation, initiation-promotion, radiation-carcinogenesis model in mice in which the initiation stage is represented by a linear kinetics model of cellular repair/misrepair, including the track-structure model for heavy ion action cross-sections. The model is validated by comparison with the harderian gland tumor experiments of Alpen et al. for various ion beams. We apply the initiation-promotion model to exposures from galactic cosmic rays, using models of the cosmic-ray environment and heavy ion transport, and consider the effects of the age of the mice prior to and after the exposure and of the length of time in space on predictions of relative risk. Our results indicate that biophysical models of age-dependent radiation hazard will provide a better understanding of GCR risk than models that rely strictly on estimates of the initial slopes of these radiations.

  1. From Mice to Men: research models of developmental programming.

    PubMed

    Rabadán-Diehl, C; Nathanielsz, P

    2013-02-01

    Developmental programming can be defined as a response to a specific challenge to the mammalian organism during a critical developmental time window that alters the trajectory of development with persistent effects on offspring phenotype and predisposition to future illness. We focus on the need for studies in relevant, well-characterized animal models in the context of recent research discoveries on the challenges, mechanisms and outcomes of developmental programming. We discuss commonalities and differences in general principles of developmental programming as they apply to several species, including humans. The consequences of these differences are discussed. Obesity, metabolic disorders and cardiovascular diseases are associated with the highest percentage of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although many of the causes are associated with lifestyle, high-energy diets and lack of physical activity, recent evidence has linked developmental programming to the epidemic of metabolic diseases. A better understanding of comparative systems physiology of mother, fetus and neonate using information provided by rapid advances in molecular biology has the potential to improve the lifetime health of future generations by providing better women's health, diagnostic tools and preventative and therapeutic interventions in individuals exposed during their development to programming influences.

  2. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for rats and mice orally exposed to chromium.

    PubMed

    Kirman, C R; Hays, S M; Aylward, L L; Suh, M; Harris, M A; Thompson, C M; Haws, L C; Proctor, D M

    2012-10-25

    A multi-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to describe the behavior of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in rats and mice following long-term oral exposure. Model compartments were included for GI lumen, oral mucosa, forestomach/stomach, small intestinal mucosa (duodenum, jejunum, ileum), blood, liver, kidney, bone, and a combined compartment for remaining tissues. Data from ex vivo Cr(VI) reduction studies were used to characterize reduction of Cr(VI) in fed rodent stomach fluid as a second-order, pH-dependent process. For model development, tissue time-course data for total chromium were collected from rats and mice exposed to Cr(VI) in drinking water for 90 days at six concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 180 mg Cr(VI)/L. These data were used to supplement the tissue time-course data collected in other studies with oral administration of Cr(III) and Cr(VI), including that from recent NTP chronic bioassays. Clear species differences were identified for chromium delivery to the target tissue (small intestines), with higher concentrations achieved in mice than in rats, consistent with small intestinal tumor formation, which was observed upon chronic exposures in mice but not in rats. Erythrocyte:plasma chromium ratios suggest that Cr(VI) entered portal circulation at drinking water concentrations equal to and greater than 60 mg/L in rodents. Species differences are described for distribution of chromium to the liver and kidney, with liver:kidney ratios higher in mice than in rats. Overall, the PBPK model provides a good description of chromium toxicokinetics, with model predictions for tissue chromium within a factor of 3 for greater than 80% of measurements evaluated. The tissue data and PBPK model predictions indicate a concentration gradient in the small intestines (duodenum > jejunum > ileum), which will be useful for assessing the tumor response gradient observed in mouse small intestines in terms of target tissue dose. The rodent PBPK

  3. Are Sema5a mutant mice a good model of autism? A behavioral analysis of sensory systems, emotionality and cognition.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Rhian K; Huentelman, Matthew J; Brown, Richard E

    2011-11-20

    Semaphorin 5A (Sema5A) expression is reduced in the brain of individuals with autism, thus mice with reduced Sema5A levels may serve as a model of this neurodevelopmental disorder. We tested male and female Sema5a knockout mice (B6.129P2SEMA5A(<)™(1DGEN>)/J) and C57BL/6J controls for emotionality, visual ability, prepulse inhibition, motor learning and cognition. Overall, there were only two genotype differences in emotionality: Sema5a mutant mice had more stretch-attend postures in the elevated plus-maze and more defecations in the open field. All mice could see, but Sema5a mice had better visual ability than C57BL/6J mice. There were no genotype differences in sensory-motor gating. Sema5a mice showed higher levels of activity in the elevated plus-maze and light/dark transition box, and there were sex by genotype differences in the Rotarod, suggesting a sex difference in balance and coordination differentially affected by Sema5a. There were no genotype effects on cognition: Sema5a mice did not differ from C57BL/6J in the Morris water maze, set-shifting or cued and contextual fear conditioning. In the social recognition test, all mice preferred social stimuli, but there was no preference for social novelty, thus the Sema5A mice do not have a deficit in social behavior. Overall, there were a number of sex differences, with females showing greater activity and males performing better in tests of spatial learning and memory, but no deficits in the behavior of Sema5A mice. We conclude that the Sema5a mice do not meet the behavioral criteria for a mouse model of autism.

  4. Sex differences in response to activity-based anorexia model in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Achamrah, Najate; Nobis, Séverine; Goichon, Alexis; Breton, Jonathan; Legrand, Romain; do Rego, Jean Luc; do Rego, Jean Claude; Déchelotte, Pierre; Fetissov, Sergueï O; Belmonte, Liliana; Coëffier, Moïse

    2017-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe eating disorder often associated with physical hyperactivity and is more frequently observed in female sex. Activity-Based Anorexia (ABA) model combines physical activity (PA) and reduced food intake and thus allows a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying anorexia nervosa. We aimed to assess sex differences in response to ABA model in C57Bl/6 mice. Twenty four male and 16 female C57BL/6 mice were studied. ABA mice were placed in individual cages with a continuously recorded activity wheel. ABA mice had a progressive limited food access from 6h/day (day 6) to 3h/day (day 9) until the end of the protocol (day 17). Body weight and food intake were daily measured. We studied physical activity during 24h, during the dark phase (D-PA) and the light phase (L-PA). We also evaluated the feeding anticipatory physical activity (A-PA), the physical activity during food intake period (FI-PA) and the post-prandial physical activity (PP-PA). We observed 16.7% of mortality in males (4 out of 24 mice) during ABA protocol while no female mice died (p=0.09). At day 17, food intake was significantly higher in females than in males (p<0.05) that was associated with a lower body weight loss than in females (p<0.05). Before limited food access, no gender differences in wheel running activity were observed. From day 9, A-PA significantly increased over time in males (p<0.05 vs females) while females exhibited higher FI-PA and PP-PA (p<0.05 vs males). Correlations between wheel running activities and, respectively, food intake and body weight loss showed gender differences, in particularly for L-PA and A-PA. Our results suggest a greater susceptibility of male mice to develop ABA, males and females exhibit different patterns of physical activity after limitation of food access. Underlying mechanisms should be further investigated.

  5. CRISPR-Cas9 Knockin Mice for Genome Editing and Cancer Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Randall J.; Chen, Sidi; Zhou, Yang; Yim, Michael J.; Swiech, Lukasz; Kempton, Hannah R.; Dahlman, James E.; Parnas, Oren; Eisenhaure, Thomas M.; Jovanovic, Marko; Graham, Daniel B.; Jhunjhunwala, Siddharth; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.; Hacohen, Nir; Regev, Aviv; Feng, Guoping; Sharp, Phillip A.; Zhang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY CRISPR-Cas9 is a versatile genome editing technology for studying the function of genetic elements. To broadly enable the application of Cas9 in vivo, we established a Cre-dependent Cas9 knockin mouse. We demonstrated in vivo as well as ex vivo genome editing using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-, lenti-virus-, or particle-mediated delivery of guide RNA in neurons, immune cells, and endothelial cells. Using these mice, we simultaneously modeled the dynamics of KRAS, p53, and LKB1, the top three significantly mutated genes in lung adenocarcinoma. Delivery of a single AAV vector in the lung generated loss-of-function mutations in p53 and LKB1, as well as homology-directed repair-mediated KRASG12D mutations, leading to macroscopic tumors of adeno-carcinoma pathology. Together, these results suggest that Cas9 mice empower a wide range of biological and disease modeling applications. PMID:25263330

  6. CRISPR-Cas9 knockin mice for genome editing and cancer modeling.

    PubMed

    Platt, Randall J; Chen, Sidi; Zhou, Yang; Yim, Michael J; Swiech, Lukasz; Kempton, Hannah R; Dahlman, James E; Parnas, Oren; Eisenhaure, Thomas M; Jovanovic, Marko; Graham, Daniel B; Jhunjhunwala, Siddharth; Heidenreich, Matthias; Xavier, Ramnik J; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Hacohen, Nir; Regev, Aviv; Feng, Guoping; Sharp, Phillip A; Zhang, Feng

    2014-10-09

    CRISPR-Cas9 is a versatile genome editing technology for studying the functions of genetic elements. To broadly enable the application of Cas9 in vivo, we established a Cre-dependent Cas9 knockin mouse. We demonstrated in vivo as well as ex vivo genome editing using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-, lentivirus-, or particle-mediated delivery of guide RNA in neurons, immune cells, and endothelial cells. Using these mice, we simultaneously modeled the dynamics of KRAS, p53, and LKB1, the top three significantly mutated genes in lung adenocarcinoma. Delivery of a single AAV vector in the lung generated loss-of-function mutations in p53 and Lkb1, as well as homology-directed repair-mediated Kras(G12D) mutations, leading to macroscopic tumors of adenocarcinoma pathology. Together, these results suggest that Cas9 mice empower a wide range of biological and disease modeling applications.

  7. Towards the modelling of ageing and atherosclerosis effects in ApoE(-/-) mice aortic tissue.

    PubMed

    Waffenschmidt, Tobias; Cilla, Myriam; Sáez, Pablo; Pérez, Marta M; Martínez, Miguel A; Menzel, Andreas; Peña, Estefanía

    2016-08-16

    The goal of this work consists in a quantitative analysis and constitutive modelling of ageing processes associated to plaque formation in mice arteries. Reliable information on the characteristic evolution of pressure-stretch curves due to the ageing effects is extracted from previous inflation test experiments. Furthermore, characteristic age-dependent material parameters are identified on the basis of a continuum-mechanics-based parameter optimisation technique. The results indicate that the aorta-stiffness of the healthy control mice remains basically constant irrespective of the diet-time and age. In contrast, significant differences exist within the material response and in consequence within the material parameters between the ApoE(-/-) and the control mice as well as for the different locations over the aorta which is underlined by our experimental observations. With regard to the temporal evolution of the material parameters, we observe that the material parameters for the ApoE(-/-) mice aortas exhibit a saturation-type increase with respect to age.

  8. Deficient Purposeful Use of Forepaws in Female Mice Modelling Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Bianca; Musto, Mattia; Altabella, Luisa; Romano, Emilia; Canese, Rossella; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioural and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) cause more than 95% of classic cases. Motor abnormalities represent a significant part of the spectrum of RTT symptoms. In the present study we investigated motor coordination and fine motor skill domains in MeCP2-308 female mice, a validated RTT model. This was complemented by the in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) analysis of metabolic profile in behaviourally relevant brain areas. MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice (Het, 10-12 months of age) were impaired in tasks validated for the assessment of purposeful and coordinated forepaw use (Morag test and Capellini handling task). A fine-grain analysis of spontaneous behaviour in the home-cage also revealed an abnormal handling pattern when interacting with the nesting material, reduced motivation to explore the environment, and increased time devoted to feeding in Het mice. The brain MRS evaluation highlighted decreased levels of bioenergetic metabolites in the striatal area in Het mice compared to controls. Present results confirm behavioural and brain alterations previously reported in MeCP2-308 males and identify novel endpoints on which the efficacy of innovative therapeutic strategies for RTT may be tested.

  9. Immune characteristics study of AG490, a signal pathway inhibitor, in EAE model mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhihua; Mao, Zhifeng; Yin, Junjie; Shu, Yaqing; Qiu, Wei; Lu, Zhengqi; Hu, Xueqiang

    2017-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by demyelination, axonal damage and progressive neurologic dysfunction in central nervous system (CNS). Many evidences show that B cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of MS. Follicular helper T cells (Tfh) secrete IL-21 to prompt the proliferation and differentiation of B cells in germinal center (GC) through clonal proliferation, somatic hypermutation, antibody class switching, antibody affinity maturation process. AG490 is a synthetic inhibitor to JAK-STAT signal pathway, which has been studied in inflammatory, tumor and autoimmune diseases. In the present study, the experimental mice were divided into 3 groups, vehicle group and AG490 group were given MOG35-55 to induce EAE model, from the third day after immunization, the mice were given vehicle or AG490 by intraperitoneal injection every other day. All mice were assessed clinical scores after immunization. On twentieth day, all mice were sacrificed, HE staining and solochrome cyanine staining were performed to evaluate inflammatory cells infiltration and demyelination, spleen sections were stained with PNA-FITC to analyze the difference in germinal center. Compared with vehicle group, the incidence of AG490 group was deceased, onset time was delayed, the severity was significantly reduced. The inflammatory cells and demyelination in AG490 group were lower than those in vehicle group. Immunofluorescence showed the fluorescence intensity of AG490 group was significantly lower than in the vehicle group, but higher than that of control group.

  10. Humanized Androgen Receptor Mice: A Genetic Model for Differential Response to Prostate Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    the androgen axis, including those encoding enzymes of testosterone synthesis ( cytochrome P450c17) and conversion (steroid-5--reductase type 2...J., Gronberg, H., 2006. Germ- line genetic variation in the key androgen-regulating genes androgen receptor, cytochrome P450 , and steroid-5-alpha...4 Humanized Androgen Receptor Mice: A Genetic Model for Differential Response to Prostate Cancer Therapy INTRODUCTION Androgen

  11. Establishment of a Segmental Femoral Critical-size Defect Model in Mice Stabilized by Plate Osteosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Manassero, Mathieu; Decambron, Adeline; Huu Thong, Bui Truong; Viateau, Véronique; Bensidhoum, Morad; Petite, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    The use of tissue-engineered bone constructs is an appealing strategy to overcome drawbacks of autografts for the treatment of massive bone defects. As a model organism, the mouse has already been widely used in bone-related research. Large diaphyseal bone defect models in mice, however, are sparse and often use bone fixation which fills the bone marrow cavity and does not provide optimal mechanical stability. The objectives of the current study were to develop a critical-size, segmental, femoral defect in nude mice. A 3.5-mm mid-diaphyseal femoral ostectomy (approximately 25% of the femur length) was performed using a dedicated jig, and was stabilized with an anterior located locking plate and 4 locking screws. The bone defect was subsequently either left empty or filled with a bone substitute (syngenic bone graft or coralline scaffold). Bone healing was monitored noninvasively using radiography and in vivo micro-computed-tomography and was subsequently assessed by ex vivo micro-computed-tomography and undecalcified histology after animal sacrifice, 10 weeks postoperatively. The recovery of all mice was excellent, a full-weight-bearing was observed within one day following the surgical procedure. Furthermore, stable bone fixation and consistent fixation of the implanted materials were achieved in all animals tested throughout the study. When the bone defects were left empty, non-union was consistently obtained. In contrast, when the bone defects were filled with syngenic bone grafts, bone union was always observed. When the bone defects were filled with coralline scaffolds, newly-formed bone was observed in the interface between bone resection edges and the scaffold, as well as within a short distance within the scaffold. The present model describes a reproducible critical-size femoral defect stabilized by plate osteosynthesis with low morbidity in mice. The new load-bearing segmental bone defect model could be useful for studying the underlying mechanisms in bone

  12. Different attentional abilities among inbred mice strains using virtual object recognition task (VORT): SNAP25⁺/⁻ mice as a model of attentional deficit.

    PubMed

    Braida, Daniela; Ponzoni, Luisa; Matteoli, Michela; Sala M, Mariaelvina

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease are characterized by attentional deficits. In the present study we first applied the virtual object recognition test (VORT), where 3D objects were replaced with highly discriminated geometrical shapes and presented on two 3.5-inch widescreen displays, in different inbred mice strains (C57BL/6N, DBA/2J, BALB/cJ), in comparison with the standard object recognition test (NOR). In both NOR and VORT, there was a progressive decay of performance in terms of reduced discrimination index from 5 min to 72 h of inter-trial delay in all strains. However, BALB/cJ inbred mice showed a better long lasting performance than C57BL/6N and DBA/2J, when tested in NOR. In VORT, BALB/cJ showed the best performance. Total exploration time was always higher in BALB/cJ than C57BL/6N and DBA/2J mice. C57BL/6N were less explorative strain than DBA/2J and BALB/cJ mice. When VORT was applied to SNAP-25(+/-) mice, an impairment in both NOR and VORT was shown. However, when moving shapes were applied, these heterozygous mice improved their performance, suggesting that the introduction of motion is a strong cue that makes the task more valuable to study attention deficits. Taken together, these data indicate that VORT provides a useful and rapid tool to identify the attentional deficit in different inbred strains and genetically modified mice, enhancing the value of psychiatric mouse models.

  13. A multiplicative reinforcement learning model capturing learning dynamics and interindividual variability in mice.

    PubMed

    Bathellier, Brice; Tee, Sui Poh; Hrovat, Christina; Rumpel, Simon

    2013-12-03

    Both in humans and in animals, different individuals may learn the same task with strikingly different speeds; however, the sources of this variability remain elusive. In standard learning models, interindividual variability is often explained by variations of the learning rate, a parameter indicating how much synapses are updated on each learning event. Here, we theoretically show that the initial connectivity between the neurons involved in learning a task is also a strong determinant of how quickly the task is learned, provided that connections are updated in a multiplicative manner. To experimentally test this idea, we trained mice to perform an auditory Go/NoGo discrimination task followed by a reversal to compare learning speed when starting from naive or already trained synaptic connections. All mice learned the initial task, but often displayed sigmoid-like learning curves, with a variable delay period followed by a steep increase in performance, as often observed in operant conditioning. For all mice, learning was much faster in the subsequent reversal training. An accurate fit of all learning curves could be obtained with a reinforcement learning model endowed with a multiplicative learning rule, but not with an additive rule. Surprisingly, the multiplicative model could explain a large fraction of the interindividual variability by variations in the initial synaptic weights. Altogether, these results demonstrate the power of multiplicative learning rules to account for the full dynamics of biological learning and suggest an important role of initial wiring in the brain for predispositions to different tasks.

  14. Social overcrowding as a chronic stress model that increases adiposity in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, En-Ju D; Sun, Meng; Choi, Eugene Y; Magee, Daniel; Stets, Colin W; During, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Stress is a widely recognized risk factor for psychiatric and metabolic disorders. A number of animal models utilizing various stressors have been developed to facilitate our understanding in the pathophysiology of stress-related dysfunctions. The most commonly used chronic stress paradigms include the unpredictable chronic mild stress paradigm, the social defeat paradigm and the social deprivation paradigm. Here we assess the potential of social crowding as an alternative chronic stress model to study the effects on affective behaviors and metabolic disturbances. Ten-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were housed in groups of four (control) or eight (social crowding; SC) in standard cage for 9 weeks. Exploration, anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors were assessed in the open field test, the elevated T-maze, the novelty-suppressed feeding test and the forced swim test. SC mice exhibited a modest anxiety-like phenotype without change in depressive-like behaviors. Nine weeks of social crowding did not affect the body weight, but robustly increased adiposity as determined by increased mass of fat depots. Consistent with the increased fat content, serum leptin was markedly elevated in the SC mice. Specific changes in gene expression were also observed in the hypothalamus and the white adipose tissue following SC housing. Our study demonstrates the potential of social crowding as an alternative model for the study of stress-related metabolic and behavioral dysfunctions.

  15. A multiplicative reinforcement learning model capturing learning dynamics and interindividual variability in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bathellier, Brice; Tee, Sui Poh; Hrovat, Christina; Rumpel, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Both in humans and in animals, different individuals may learn the same task with strikingly different speeds; however, the sources of this variability remain elusive. In standard learning models, interindividual variability is often explained by variations of the learning rate, a parameter indicating how much synapses are updated on each learning event. Here, we theoretically show that the initial connectivity between the neurons involved in learning a task is also a strong determinant of how quickly the task is learned, provided that connections are updated in a multiplicative manner. To experimentally test this idea, we trained mice to perform an auditory Go/NoGo discrimination task followed by a reversal to compare learning speed when starting from naive or already trained synaptic connections. All mice learned the initial task, but often displayed sigmoid-like learning curves, with a variable delay period followed by a steep increase in performance, as often observed in operant conditioning. For all mice, learning was much faster in the subsequent reversal training. An accurate fit of all learning curves could be obtained with a reinforcement learning model endowed with a multiplicative learning rule, but not with an additive rule. Surprisingly, the multiplicative model could explain a large fraction of the interindividual variability by variations in the initial synaptic weights. Altogether, these results demonstrate the power of multiplicative learning rules to account for the full dynamics of biological learning and suggest an important role of initial wiring in the brain for predispositions to different tasks. PMID:24255115

  16. INDUCTION OF CYP1A1 AD CYP1B1 AND FORMATION OF DNA ADDUCTS IN C57BL/6, BALB/C, AND F1 MICE FOLLOWING IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO 3-METHYLCHOLANTHRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fetal mice are more sensitive to chemical carcinogens than are adults. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated differences in the mutational spectrum induced in the Ki-ras gene from lung tumors isolated from [D2 x B6D2F1]F2 mice and Balb/c mice treated in utero with 3�m...

  17. Dietary DHA supplementation causes selective changes in phospholipids from different brain regions in both wild type mice and the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bascoul-Colombo, Cécile; Guschina, Irina A.; Maskrey, Benjamin H.; Good, Mark; O'Donnell, Valerie B.; Harwood, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of major concern in ageing populations and we have used the Tg2576 mouse model to understand connections between brain lipids and amyloid pathology. Because dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been identified as beneficial, we compared mice fed with a DHA-supplemented diet to those on a nutritionally-sufficient diet. Major phospholipids from cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were separated and analysed. Each phosphoglyceride had a characteristic fatty acid composition which was similar in cortex and hippocampus but different in the cerebellum. The biggest changes on DHA-supplementation were within ethanolamine phospholipids which, together with phosphatidylserine, had the highest proportions of DHA. Reciprocal alterations in DHA and arachidonate were found. The main diet-induced alterations were found in ethanolamine phospholipids, (and included their ether derivatives), as were the changes observed due to genotype. Tg mice appeared more sensitive to diet with generally lower DHA percentages when on the standard diet and higher relative proportions of DHA when the diet was supplemented. All four major phosphoglycerides analysed showed age-dependent decreases in polyunsaturated fatty acid contents. These data provide, for the first time, a detailed evaluation of phospholipids in different brain areas previously shown to be relevant to behaviour in the Tg2576 mouse model for AD. The lipid changes observed with genotype are consistent with the subtle alterations found in AD patients, especially for the ethanolamine phospholipid molecular species. They also emphasise the contrasting changes in fatty acid content induced by DHA supplementation within individual phospholipid classes. PMID:26968097

  18. GLAST Deficiency in Mice Exacerbates Gap Detection Deficits in a Model of Salicylate-Induced Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Vikhe Patil, Kim; Han, Chul; Fabella, Brian; Canlon, Barbara; Someya, Shinichi; Cederroth, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Gap detection or gap pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle (GPIAS) has been successfully used in rat and guinea pig models of tinnitus, yet this system has been proven to have low efficacy in CBA mice, with low basal GPIAS and subtle tinnitus-like effects. Here, we tested five mouse strains (CBA, BalbC, CD-1, C57BL/6 and 129sv) for pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) and gap detection with varying interstimulus intervals (ISI) and found that mice from a CBA genetic background had the poorest capacities of suppressing the startle response in the presence of a pre-pulse or a gap. CD-1 mice displayed variable responses throughout all ISI. Interestingly, C57BL/6, 129sv and BalbC showed efficient suppression with either pre-pulses or gaps with shorter ISI. The glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) is expressed in support cells from the cochlea and buffers the excess of glutamate. We hypothesized that loss of GLAST function could sensitize the ear to tinnitus-inducing agents, such as salicylate. Using shorter ISI to obtain a greater dynamic range to assess tinnitus-like effects, we found that disruption of gap detection by salicylate was exacerbated across various intensities of a 32-kHz narrow band noise gap carrier in GLAST knockout (KO) mice when compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) were performed to evaluate the effects on hearing functions. Salicylate caused greater auditory threshold shifts (near 15 dB) in GLAST KO mice than in WT mice across all tested frequencies, despite similarly reduced DPOAE. Despite these changes, inhibition using broad-band gap carriers and 32 kHz pre-pulses were not affected. Our study suggests that GLAST deficiency could become a useful experimental model to decipher the mechanisms underlying drug-induced tinnitus. Future studies addressing the neurological correlates of tinnitus in this model could provide additional insights into the

  19. Hydroxysafflor Yellow A Improves Motor Dysfunction in the Rotenone-Induced Mice Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian; Wang, Lijie; Li, Cuiting; Han, Bing; Wang, Zhenhua; Li, Ji; Lv, Yan; Wang, Shuyun; Fu, Fenghua

    2017-01-17

    Dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) is diminished in patients of Parkinson's disease (PD). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is responsible for regulating expression of the DRD3 in the brain. Our previous study showed that hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) could increase BDNF content in the striatum of PD mice. This experiment aimed to evaluate whether HSYA can improve the motor dysfunction induced by rotenone through regulating the BDNF/TrkB/DRD3 signaling pathway in mice. Male C57/BL6 mice were intraperitoneally treated with HSYA. Thirty minutes later, they were intragastrically administered with rotenone at a dose of 30 mg/kg. Pole, rotarod and open field tests were investigated at 28 d. Then, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in substantia nigra was observed by immunohistochemistry. Dopamine content was detected by high-performance liquid chromatography. The expressions of BDNF, phospho-tropomyosin-related kinase B (p-TrkB), tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), phospho-phosphoinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), phospho-protein kinase B (p-AKT), protein kinase B (AKT), and DRD3 were assayed by western blotting. Behavioral tests showed that rotenone-challenged mice displayed motor dysfunction. However, treatment with HSYA improved motor dysfunction induced by rotenone. HSYA treatment increased not only the number of TH-containing dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra, but also the dopamine content in the striatum in PD mice. Moreover, the expressions of BDNF, p-TrkB/TrkB, DRD3, p-PI3K/PI3K, p-AKT/AKT were significantly increased in rotenone plus HSYA group. Our results indicated that HSYA improved motor dysfunction in rotenone-induced PD model and the pharmacological action of HSYA was related to regulating BDNF/TrkB/DRD3 signaling pathway, at least, in part.

  20. Warped AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anninos, Dionysios; Li, Wei; Padi, Megha; Song, Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Three dimensional topologically massive gravity (TMG) with a negative cosmological constant -l-2 and positive Newton constant G admits an AdS3 vacuum solution for any value of the graviton mass μ. These are all known to be perturbatively unstable except at the recently explored chiral point μl = 1. However we show herein that for every value of μl ≠ 3 there are two other (potentially stable) vacuum solutions given by SL(2,Bbb R) × U(1)-invariant warped AdS3 geometries, with a timelike or spacelike U(1) isometry. Critical behavior occurs at μl = 3, where the warping transitions from a stretching to a squashing, and there are a pair of warped solutions with a null U(1) isometry. For μl > 3, there are known warped black hole solutions which are asymptotic to warped AdS3. We show that these black holes are discrete quotients of warped AdS3 just as BTZ black holes are discrete quotients of ordinary AdS3. Moreover new solutions of this type, relevant to any theory with warped AdS3 solutions, are exhibited. Finally we note that the black hole thermodynamics is consistent with the hypothesis that, for μl > 3, the warped AdS3 ground state of TMG is holographically dual to a 2D boundary CFT with central charges c_R-formula and c_L-formula.

  1. Warped AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Anninos, Dionysios; Li, Wei; Padi, Megha; Strominger, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Three dimensional topologically massive gravity (TMG) with a negative cosmological constant -ell-2 and positive Newton constant G admits an AdS3 vacuum solution for any value of the graviton mass μ. These are all known to be perturbatively unstable except at the recently explored chiral point μell = 1. However we show herein that for every value of μell ≠ 3 there are two other (potentially stable) vacuum solutions given by SL(2,Bbb R) × U(1)-invariant warped AdS3 geometries, with a timelike or spacelike U(1) isometry. Critical behavior occurs at μell = 3, where the warping transitions from a stretching to a squashing, and there are a pair of warped solutions with a null U(1) isometry. For μell > 3, there are known warped black hole solutions which are asymptotic to warped AdS3. We show that these black holes are discrete quotients of warped AdS3 just as BTZ black holes are discrete quotients of ordinary AdS3. Moreover new solutions of this type, relevant to any theory with warped AdS3 solutions, are exhibited. Finally we note that the black hole thermodynamics is consistent with the hypothesis that, for μell > 3, the warped AdS3 ground state of TMG is holographically dual to a 2D boundary CFT with central charges c_R-formula and c_L-formula.

  2. Oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin: An alternative experimental model of pulmonary fibrosis developed in Swiss mice

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Swarna; Sunkoju, Manoj; Reddy, Shiva Shankar; Swamy, Veerabhadra; Godugu, Chandraiah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is a progressive and predominantly lethal form of several interstitial lung diseases with limited current therapeutics; it is, therefore, essential to develop a simple, homogeneous, and noninvasive disease model to investigate possible anti-fibrotic approaches. The present study is designed to develop oropharyngeal aspiration (OPA) model of bleomycin (BLM)-induced PF as a simple and alternative to intratracheal (IT) administration of BLM in Swiss mice strain. Materials and Methods: Mice were divided into two groups, BLM-treated and normal control. BLM via OPA (2 IU/kg) was used to induce PF. Water for injection was used as a vehicle in control animals. Body weights were measured once in a week, and the study was continued for 21 days. At the end of the study, animals were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected and subjected to lymphocytes count, estimation of albumin and protein levels. Lung tissues were collected, and various biochemical assays (malondialdehyde, glutathione, nitric oxide, hydroxyproline) and molecular techniques including ELISA and Western blot were performed to investigate the effect of OPA-BLM. Further, histopathology and Masson's trichrome staining techniques were performed in lung sections. Results: OPA administration of BLM in Swiss mice significantly induced PF, evident from lung index and morphology. Several oxidative stress parameters and hydroxyproline assay revealed the significant (P < 0.05) induction of PF. Further results obtained from histopathology, Masson's trichrome staining, ELISA, and Western blot confirmed the significant induction of PF via OPA-BLM. Conclusion: BLM administration by OPA route in Swiss mice can be used as a simple, homogeneous, and noninvasive model of inducing PF and to investigate the effect of various anti-fibrotic agents as an alternative to IT-BLM. PMID:28066100

  3. Evidence for the Need to More Closely Examine School Effects in Value-Added Modeling and Related Accountability Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco, M. Suzanne; Seidel, Kent

    2014-01-01

    Value-added approaches for attributing student growth to teachers often use weighted estimates of building-level factors based on "typical" schools to represent a range of community, school, and other variables related to teacher and student work that are not easily measured directly. This study examines whether such estimates are likely…

  4. Glucose Transport into Everted Sacks of Intestine of Mice: A Model for the Study of Active Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deyrup-Olsen, Ingrith; Linder, Alison R.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a laboratory procedure which uses the small intestines of mice as models for the transport of glucose and other solutes. Demonstrations are suitable for either introductory or advanced physiology courses. (RE)

  5. ApoE-/-Fas-/- C57BL/6 mice: a novel murine model simultaneously exhibits lupus nephritis, atherosclerosis, and osteopenia.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xuebing; Li, Hongyun; Rumbin, Alexis A; Wang, Xuping; La Cava, Antonio; Brechtelsbauer, Katherine; Castellani, Lawrence W; Witztum, Joseph L; Lusis, Aldons J; Tsao, Betty P

    2007-04-01

    To establish a mouse model of accelerated atherosclerosis in lupus, we generated apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) and Fas(lpr/lpr) (Fas(-/-)) C57BL/6 mice. On a normal chow diet, 5 month old apoE(-/-)Fas(-/-) mice had enlarged glomerular tuft areas, severe proteinuria, increased circulating autoantibody levels, and increased apoptotic cells in renal and vascular lesions compared with either single knockout mice. Also, double knockout mice developed increased atherosclerotic lesions but decreased serum levels of total and non-HDL cholesterol compared with apoE(-/-)Fas(+/+) littermates. Moreover, female apoE(-/-)Fas(-/-) mice had lower vertebral bone mineral density (BMD) and bone volume density (BV/TV) than age-matched female apoE(-/-)Fas(+/+) mice. Compared with apoE(-/-)Fas(+/+) and apoE(+/+)Fas(-/-) mice, apoE(-/-)Fas(-/-) mice had decreased circulating oxidized phospholipid (OxPL) content on apoB-100 containing lipoprotein particles and increased serum IgG antibodies to OxPL, which were significantly correlated with aortic lesion areas (r = 0.58), glomerular tuft areas (r = 0.87), BMD (r = -0.57), and BV/TV (r = -0.72). These results suggest that the apoE(-/-)Fas(-/-) mouse model might be used to study atherosclerosis and osteopenia in lupus. Correlations of IgG anti-OxPL with lupus-like disease, atherosclerosis, and bone loss suggested a shared pathway of these disease processes.

  6. Subcutaneous Infection Model Facilitates Treatment Assessment of Secondary Alveolar Echinococcosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Küster, Tatiana; Hermann, Corina; Hemphill, Andrew; Gottstein, Bruno; Spiliotis, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) in humans is a parasitic disease characterized by severe damage to the liver and occasionally other organs. AE is caused by infection with the metacestode (larval) stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, usually infecting small rodents as natural intermediate hosts. Conventionally, human AE is chemotherapeutically treated with mebendazole or albendazole. There is, however still the need for improved chemotherapeutical options. Primary in vivo studies on drugs of interest are commonly performed in small laboratory animals such as mice and Mongolian jirds, and in most cases, a secondary infection model is used, whereby E. multilocularis metacestodes are directly injected into the peritoneal cavity or into the liver. Disadvantages of this methodological approach include risk of injury to organs during the inoculation and, most notably, a limitation in the macroscopic (visible) assessment of treatment efficacy. Thus, in order to monitor the efficacy of chemotherapeutical treatment, animals have to be euthanized and the parasite tissue dissected. In the present study, mice were infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes through the subcutaneous route and were then subjected to chemotherapy employing albendazole. Serological responses to infection were comparatively assessed in mice infected by the conventional intraperitoneal route. We demonstrate that the subcutaneous infection model for secondary AE facilitates the assessment of the progress of infection and drug treatment in the live animal. PMID:23717701

  7. The Effect of Nano-Silver on Allergic Rhinitis Model in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Mi-Kyung

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Silver has long been known as a strong antimicrobial and disinfectant. Several types of nano-silver coated products have been developed. However, the antimicrobial and disinfectant characteristics of nano-silver have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nano-silver on allergic inflammation in a mouse model. Methods Female BALB/C mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA) and aluminium hydroxide on days 0, 7, 14, and 21. Mice were challenged with intranasal instillation of OVA. Nano-silver was also administered nasally prior to intranasal instillation of OVA. Severity of allergic rhinitis was assessed according to nasal symptoms, serum OVA-specific IgE level, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, and interferon (INF)-γ levels in nasal lavage fluid. Hematoxylin-eosin stain and periodic acid-Schiff stain were performed for evaluation of histological change. Results Nano-silver attenuated manifestation of nasal symptoms in sensitized mice and inhibited production of OVA-specific IgE, IL-4, and IL-10, however, it had no effect on INF-γ level. In addition, the degree of inflammatory cell infiltration and goblet cell hyperplasia was attenuated by nano-silver. Conclusion These results suggest that nano-silver may effectively reduce allergic inflammation in a mouse model of allergic rhinitis. Through its properties as an anti-inflammatory agent, nano-silver may be a useful therapeutic strategy. PMID:23205228

  8. Senescence-accelerated Mice (SAMs) as a Model for Brain Aging and Immunosenescence

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Hasegawa-Ishii, Sanae

    2011-01-01

    The Senescence-Accelerated Mouse (SAM) represents a group of inbred mouse strains developed as a model for the study of human aging and age-related diseases. Senescence-prone (SAMP) strains exhibit an early onset of age-related decline in the peripheral immunity such as thymic involution, loss of CD4+ T cells, impaired helper T cell function, decreased antibody-forming capacity, dysfunction of antigen-presenting cells, decreased natural killer activity, increased auto-antibodies, and susceptibility to virus infection. Senescence-prone SAMP10 mice undergo age-related changes in the brain such as brain atrophy, shrinkage and loss of cortical neurons, retraction of cortical neuronal dendrites, loss of dendritic spines, loss of synapses, impaired learning and memory, depressive behavior, accumulation of neuronal DNA damage, neuronal ubiquitinated inclusions, reduced hippocampal cholinergic receptors, decreased neurotrophic factors, decreased hippocampal zinc and zinc transporters, increased sphyngomyelinase, and elevated oxidative-nitrative stress. Recent data indicating increased pro-inflammatory cytokines in the brain of SAMP10 mice are directing investigators toward an integration of immune and neural abnormalities to enhance understanding of the principles of brain aging. We highlight how mouse brain cells adopt cytokine-mediated responses and how SAMP10 mice are defective in these responses. SAMP10 model would be useful to study how age-related disturbances in peripheral immunity have an impact on dysregulation of brain tissue homeostasis, resulting in age-related neurodegeneration. PMID:22396891

  9. Salivary Gland Dysplasia in Fgf10 Heterozygous Mice: A New Mouse Model of Xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    May, A.J.; Chatzeli, L.; Proctor, G.B.; Tucker, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Xerostomia, or chronic dry mouth, is a common syndrome caused by a lack of saliva that can lead to severe eating difficulties, dental caries and oral candida infections. The prevalence of xerostomia increases with age and affects approximately 30% of people aged 65 or older. Given the large numbers of sufferers, and the potential increase in incidence given our aging population, it is important to understand the complex mechanisms that drive hyposalivation and the consequences for the dentition and oral mucosa. From this study we propose the Fgf10 +/- mouse as a model to investigate xerostomia. By following embryonic salivary gland development, in vivo and in vitro, we show that a reduction in Fgf10 causes a delay in branching of salivary glands. This leads to hypoplasia of the glands, a phenotype that is not rescued postnatally or by adulthood in both male and female Fgf10 +/- mice. Histological analysis of the glands showed no obvious defect in cellular differentiation or acini/ductal arrangements, however there was a significant reduction in their size and weight. Analysis of saliva secretion showed that hypoplasia of the glands led to a significant reduction in saliva production in Fgf10 +/- adults, giving rise to a reduced saliva pellicle in the oral cavity of these mice. Mature mice were shown to drink more and in many cases had severe tooth wear. The Fgf10 +/- mouse is therefore a useful model to explore the causes and effects of xerostomia.

  10. Modeling early-onset post-ischemic seizures in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chiping; Wang, Justin; Peng, Jessie; Patel, Nisarg; Huang, Yayi; Gao, Xiaoxing; Aljarallah, Salman; Eubanks, James H; McDonald, Robert; Zhang, Liang

    2015-09-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of seizures and epilepsy in the aged population, with post-stroke seizures being a poor prognostic factor. The pathological processes underlying post-stroke seizures are not well understood and studies of these seizures in aging/aged animals remain scarce. Therefore, our primary objective was to model post-stroke seizures in aging mice (C57 black strain, 16-20 months-old), with a focus on early-onset, convulsive seizures that occur within 24-hours of brain ischemia. We utilized a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and examined seizure activity and brain injury using combined behavioral and electroencephalographic monitoring and histological assessments. Aging mice exhibited vigorous convulsive seizures within hours of the middle cerebral artery occlusion. These seizures manifested with jumping, rapid running, barrel-rolling and/or falling all in the absence of hippocampal-cortical electrographic discharges. Seizure development was closely associated with severe brain injury and acute mortality. Anticonvulsive treatments after seizure occurrence offered temporary seizure control but failed to improve animal survival. A separate cohort of adult mice (6-8 months-old) exhibited analogous early-onset convulsive seizures following the middle cerebral artery occlusion but had better survival outcomes following anticonvulsive treatment. Collectively, our data suggest that early-onset convulsive seizures are a result of severe brain ischemia in aging animals.

  11. SU-E-T-664: Radiobiological Modeling of Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D; Debeb, B; Woodward, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is a clinical technique used to reduce the incidence of brain metastasis and improve overall survival in select patients with ALL and SCLC, and we have shown the potential of PCI in select breast cancer patients through a mouse model (manuscript in preparation). We developed a computational model using our experimental results to demonstrate the advantage of treating brain micro-metastases early. Methods: MATLAB was used to develop the computational model of brain metastasis and PCI in mice. The number of metastases per mouse and the volume of metastases from four- and eight-week endpoints were fit to normal and log-normal distributions, respectively. Model input parameters were optimized so that model output would match the experimental number of metastases per mouse. A limiting dilution assay was performed to validate the model. The effect of radiation at different time points was computationally evaluated through the endpoints of incidence, number of metastases, and tumor burden. Results: The correlation between experimental number of metastases per mouse and the Gaussian fit was 87% and 66% at the two endpoints. The experimental volumes and the log-normal fit had correlations of 99% and 97%. In the optimized model, the correlation between number of metastases per mouse and the Gaussian fit was 96% and 98%. The log-normal volume fit and the model agree 100%. The model was validated by a limiting dilution assay, where the correlation was 100%. The model demonstrates that cells are very sensitive to radiation at early time points, and delaying treatment introduces a threshold dose at which point the incidence and number of metastases decline. Conclusion: We have developed a computational model of brain metastasis and PCI in mice that is highly correlated to our experimental data. The model shows that early treatment of subclinical disease is highly advantageous.

  12. Models Of Lower Extremity Damage In Mice: Time Course of Organ Damage & Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Christoph L; Pfeifer, Roman; Darwiche, Sophie S; Kobbe, Philipp; Gill, Roop; Shapiro, Richard A; Loughran, Patricia; Vodovotz, Yoram; Scott, Melanie J; Zenati, Mazen S; Billiar, Timothy R; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Background Posttraumatic inflammatory changes have been identified as major causes of altered organ function and failure. Both hemorrhage and soft tissue damage induce these inflammatory changes. Exposure to heterologous bone in animal models has recently been shown to mimic this inflammatory response in a stable and reproducible fashion. This follow-up study tests the hypothesis that inflammatory responses are comparable between a novel trauma model (“pseudofracture”, PFx) and a bilateral femur fracture (BFF) model. Materials and Methods In C57BL/6 mice, markers for remote organ dysfunction and inflammatory responses were compared in 4 groups (control/sham/BFF/PFx) at the time points 2, 4, and 6 hours. Results Hepatocellular damage in BFF and PFx was highly comparable in extent and evolution, as shown by similar levels of NFκB activation and plasma ALT. Pulmonary inflammatory responses were also comparably elevated in both trauma models as early as 2h after trauma as measured by myeloperoxidase activity (MPO). Muscle damage was provoked in both BFF and PFx mice over the time course, although BFF induced significantly higher AST and CK levels. IL-6 levels were also similar with early and sustained increases over time in both trauma models. Conclusions Both BFF and PFx create similar reproducible inflammatory and remote organ responses. PFx will be a useful model to study longer term inflammatory effects that cannot be studied using BFF. PMID:21276982

  13. Urat1-Uox double knockout mice are experimental animal models of renal hypouricemia and exercise-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Hosoyamada, Makoto; Tsurumi, Yu; Hirano, Hidenori; Tomioka, Naoko H; Sekine, Yuko; Morisaki, Takayuki; Uchida, Shunya

    2016-12-01

    Renal hypouricemia (RHUC) is a hereditary disease characterized by a low level of plasma urate but with normal urinary urate excretion. RHUC type 1 is caused by mutations of the urate transporter URAT1 gene (SLC22A12). However, the plasma urate levels of URAT1 knockout mice are no different from those of wild-type mice. In the present study, a double knockout mouse, in which the URAT1 and uricase (Uox) genes were deleted (Urat1-Uox-DKO), were used as an experimental animal model of RHUC type 1 to investigate RHUC and excise-induced acute kidney injury (EIAKI). Mice were given a variable content of allopurinol for one week followed by HPLC measurement of urate and creatinine concentrations in spot urine and blood from the tail. The urinary excretion of urate in Urat1-Uox-DKO mice was approximately 25 times higher than those of humans. With allopurinol, the plasma urate levels of Urat1-Uox-DKO mice were lower than those of Uox-KO mice. There were no differences in the urinary urate excretions between Urat1-Uox-DKO and Uox-KO mice administered with 9 mg allopurinol /100 g feed. In the absence of allopurinol, plasma creatinine levels of some Urat1-Uox-DKO mice were higher than those of Uox-KO mice. Consequently, hypouricemia and normouricosuria may indicate that the Urat1-Uox-DKO mouse administered with allopurinol may represent a suitable animal model of RHUC type 1. Urat1-Uox-DKO mice without allopurinol exhibited acute kidney injury, thus providing additional benefit as a potential animal model for EIAKI. Finally, our data indicate that allopurinol appears to provide prophylactic effects for EIAKI.

  14. Impaired hippocampal neurogenesis and its enhancement with ghrelin in 5XFAD mice.

    PubMed

    Moon, Minho; Cha, Moon-Yong; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurological disorder characterized by the deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ), cognitive deficits, and neuronal loss. The decline in neurogenic capacity could participate in neuronal vulnerability and contribute to memory impairment in AD. In our longitudinal study with AD model mice (5XFAD mice), we found that the number of doublecortin (neurogenesis marker)-positive cells in 5XFAD mice was significantly decreased compared to wild-type littermate mice. Using Aβ immunostaining with 4G8 antibody, we observed that impairment in neurogenesis might be associated with the deposits of amyloid plaques. To investigate the effect of the neurogenic hormone ghrelin on defective neurogenesis in the AD brain, 5XFAD mice were administered peripherally with ghrelin. We found that treatment with ghrelin increased the number of doublecortin, HH3, and calretinin-stained cells in the hippocampus of 5XFAD mice. In 5XFAD mice treated with ghrelin, the 4G8-positive area was not significantly different from the saline-treated 5XFAD mice. Together, these findings suggest that hippocampal neurogenesis is impaired in 5XFAD mice and that treatment with ghrelin successfully rescued the abnormality of neurogenesis in 5XFAD mice without affecting Aβ pathology.

  15. FMR1 Knockout mice: A model to study fragile X mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Oostra, B.A.; Bakker, C.E.; Reyniers, E.

    1994-09-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most frequent form of inherited mental retardation in humans with an incidence of 1 in 1250 males and 1 in 2500 females. The clinical syndrome includes moderate to severe mental retardation, autistic behavior, macroorchidism, and facial features, such as long face with mandibular prognathism and large, everted ears. The molecular basis for this disease is a large expansion of a triplet repeat (CGG){sub n} in the 5{prime} untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. Due to this large expansion of the CGG repeat, the promoter region becomes methylated and the FMR1 gene is subsequently silenced. Hardly anything is known about the physiologic function of FMR1 and the pathologic mechanisms leading to these symptoms. Since the FMR1 gene is highly conserved in the mouse, we used the mouse to design a knockout model for the fragile X syndrome. These knockout mice lacking Fmrp have normal litter size suggesting that FMR1 is not essential in human gametogenesis and embryonic development. The knockout mice show the abnormalities also seen in the affected organs of human patients. Mutant mice show a gradual development through time of macroorchidism. In the knockout mice we observed cognitive defects in the form of deficits in learning (as shown by the hidden platform Morris water maze task) and behavioral abnormalities such as increased exploratory behavior and hyperactivity. Therefore this knockout mouse may serve as a valuable tool in studying the role of FMR1 in the fragile X syndrome and may serve as a model to elucidate the mechanisms involved in macroorchidism, abnormal behavior, and mental retardation.

  16. Highly stabilized curcumin nanoparticles tested in an in vitro blood-brain barrier model and in Alzheimer's disease Tg2576 mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kwok Kin; Yeung, Chin Fung; Ho, Shuk Wai; Chow, Shing Fung; Chow, Albert H L; Baum, Larry

    2013-04-01

    The therapeutic effects of curcumin in treating Alzheimer's disease (AD) depend on the ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier. The latest nanoparticle technology can help to improve the bioavailability of curcumin, which is affected by the final particle size and stability. We developed a stable curcumin nanoparticle formulation to test in vitro and in AD model Tg2576 mice. Flash nanoprecipitation of curcumin, polyethylene glycol-polylactic acid co-block polymer, and polyvinylpyrrolidone in a multi-inlet vortex mixer, followed by freeze drying with β-cyclodextrin, produced dry nanocurcumin with mean particle size <80 nm. Nanocurcumin powder, unformulated curcumin, or placebo was orally administered to Tg2576 mice for 3 months. Before and after treatment, memory was measured by radial arm maze and contextual fear conditioning tests. Nanocurcumin produced significantly (p=0.04) better cue memory in the contextual fear conditioning test than placebo and tendencies toward better working memory in the radial arm maze test than ordinary curcumin (p=0.14) or placebo (p=0.12). Amyloid plaque density, pharmacokinetics, and Madin-Darby canine kidney cell monolayer penetration were measured to further understand in vivo and in vitro mechanisms. Nanocurcumin produced significantly higher curcumin concentration in plasma and six times higher area under the curve and mean residence time in brain than ordinary curcumin. The P(app) of curcumin and tetrahydrocurcumin were 1.8×10(-6) and 1.6×10(-5)cm/s, respectively, for nanocurcumin. Our novel nanocurcumin formulation produced highly stabilized nanoparticles with positive treatment effects in Tg2576 mice.

  17. Diffusion and chaos from near AdS2 horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Mike; Donos, Aristomenis

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the thermal diffusivity D = κ/c ρ and butterfly velocity v B in holographic models that flow to AdS2 × R d fixed points in the infra-red. We show that both these quantities are governed by the same irrelevant deformation of AdS2 and hence establish a simple relationship between them. When this deformation corresponds to a universal dilaton mode of dimension Δ = 2 then this relationship is always given by D = v B 2 /(2 πT).

  18. Development of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model (PBPK) of BMP2 in Mice.

    PubMed

    Utturkar, Aditya; Paul, Bikram; Akkiraju, Hemanth; Bonor, Jeremy; Dhurjati, Prasad; Nohe, Anja

    2013-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic protein 2 holds great promise for potential applications in the clinic. It is a potent growth factor for the use in the cervical spine surgery (FDA approved 2002) and has been marketed as "Infuse" for treating open tibial shaft fractures (FDA approved 2004). However, its use is limited by several significant side effects that maybe due to its potency and effect on different stem cell populations in the spine. BMP2 is expressed throughout the human body in several tissues and at a very high concentration in the blood. BMP receptors, especially BMP receptor type Ia, is ubiquitously expressed in most tissues. Currently, it is difficult to determine how BMP2 is physiologically distributed in mice or humans and no quantitative models are available. A Physiologically-Based Pharmaco-Kinetic (PBPK) model has been developed to determine steady-state distribution of BMP2 in mice. The multi-compartmental PBPK model represents relevant organ/tissues with physiological accuracy. The organs/tissue compartments chosen were brain, lung, heart, liver, pancreas, kidney, uterus, bone and fat. A blood compartment maintained connectivity among the various organs. Four processes characterized the change in the concentration of the protein in every compartment: blood flow in, blood flow out, protein turnover and receptor binding in the organ. The unique aspects of the model are the determination of elimination using receptor kinetics and generation using protein turnover. The model also predicts steady state concentrations of BMP2 in tissues in mice and may be used for possible scale-up of dosage regimens in humans.

  19. Lessons learned from mice and man: mimicking human allergy through mouse models.

    PubMed

    Graham, Michelle T; Nadeau, Kari C

    2014-11-01

    The relevance of using mouse models to represent human allergic pathologies is still unclear. Recent studies suggest the limitations of using models as a standard for assessing immune response and tolerance mechanisms, as mouse models often do not sufficiently depict human atopic conditions. Allergy is a combination of aberrant responses to innocuous environmental agents and the subsequent TH2-mediated inflammatory responses. In this review, we will discuss current paradigms of allergy - specifically, TH2-mediated and IgE-associated immune responses - and current mouse models used to recreate these TH2-mediated pathologies. Our overall goal is to highlight discrepancies that exist between mice and men by examining the advantages and disadvantages of allergic mouse models with respect to the human allergic condition.

  20. Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Target-Mediated Drug Disposition of Bortezomib in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Mager, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Bortezomib is a reversible proteasome inhibitor with potent antineoplastic activity that exhibits dose- and time-dependent pharmacokinetics (PK). Proteasome-mediated bortezomib disposition is proposed as the primary source of its nonlinear and apparent nonstationary PK behavior. Single intravenous (IV) doses of bortezomib (0.25 and 1 mg/kg) were administrated to BALB/c mice, with blood and tissue samples obtained over 144 hours, which were analyzed by LC/MS/MS. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model incorporating tissue drug-target binding was developed to test the hypothesis of proteasome-mediated bortezomib disposition. The final model reasonably captured bortezomib plasma and tissue PK profiles, and parameters were estimated with good precision. The rank-order of model estimated tissue target density correlated well with experimentally measured proteasome concentrations reported in the literature, supporting the hypothesis that binding to proteasome influences bortezomib disposition. The PBPK model was further scaled-up to humans to assess the similarity of bortezomib disposition among species. Human plasma bortezomib PK profiles following multiple IV dosing (1.3 mg/m2) on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 were simulated by appropriately scaling estimated mouse parameters. Simulated and observed bortezomib concentrations after multiple dosing were in good agreement, suggesting target-mediated bortezomib disposition is likely for both mice and humans. Furthermore, the model predicts that renal impairment should exert minimal influence on bortezomib exposure in humans, confirming that bortezomib dose adjustment is not necessary for patients with renal impairment. PMID:26391023

  1. Modeled changes of cerebellar activity in mutant mice are predictive of their learning impairments

    PubMed Central

    Badura, Aleksandra; Clopath, Claudia; Schonewille, Martijn; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Translating neuronal activity to measurable behavioral changes has been a long-standing goal of systems neuroscience. Recently, we have developed a model of phase-reversal learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, a well-established, cerebellar-dependent task. The model, comprising both the cerebellar cortex and vestibular nuclei, reproduces behavioral data and accounts for the changes in neural activity during learning in wild type mice. Here, we used our model to predict Purkinje cell spiking as well as behavior before and after learning of five different lines of mutant mice with distinct cell-specific alterations of the cerebellar cortical circuitry. We tested these predictions by obtaining electrophysiological data depicting changes in neuronal spiking. We show that our data is largely consistent with the model predictions for simple spike modulation of Purkinje cells and concomitant behavioral learning in four of the mutants. In addition, our model accurately predicts a shift in simple spike activity in a mutant mouse with a brainstem specific mutation. This combination of electrophysiological and computational techniques opens a possibility of predicting behavioral impairments from neural activity. PMID:27805050

  2. Modeled changes of cerebellar activity in mutant mice are predictive of their learning impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badura, Aleksandra; Clopath, Claudia; Schonewille, Martijn; de Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-11-01

    Translating neuronal activity to measurable behavioral changes has been a long-standing goal of systems neuroscience. Recently, we have developed a model of phase-reversal learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, a well-established, cerebellar-dependent task. The model, comprising both the cerebellar cortex and vestibular nuclei, reproduces behavioral data and accounts for the changes in neural activity during learning in wild type mice. Here, we used our model to predict Purkinje cell spiking as well as behavior before and after learning of five different lines of mutant mice with distinct cell-specific alterations of the cerebellar cortical circuitry. We tested these predictions by obtaining electrophysiological data depicting changes in neuronal spiking. We show that our data is largely consistent with the model predictions for simple spike modulation of Purkinje cells and concomitant behavioral learning in four of the mutants. In addition, our model accurately predicts a shift in simple spike activity in a mutant mouse with a brainstem specific mutation. This combination of electrophysiological and computational techniques opens a possibility of predicting behavioral impairments from neural activity.

  3. Segmented strings in AdS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callebaut, Nele; Gubser, Steven S.; Samberg, Andreas; Toldo, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    We study segmented strings in flat space and in AdS 3. In flat space, these well known classical motions describe strings which at any instant of time are piecewise linear. In AdS 3, the worldsheet is composed of faces each of which is a region bounded by null geodesics in an AdS 2 subspace of AdS 3. The time evolution can be described by specifying the null geodesic motion of kinks in the string at which two segments are joined. The outcome of collisions of kinks on the worldsheet can be worked out essentially using considerations of causality. We study several examples of closed segmented strings in AdS 3 and find an unexpected quasi-periodic behavior. We also work out a WKB analysis of quantum states of yo-yo strings in AdS 5 and find a logarithmic term reminiscent of the logarithmic twist of string states on the leading Regge trajectory.

  4. Full-thickness splinted skin wound healing models in db/db and heterozygous mice: implications for wound healing impairment.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin Ae; Teixeira, Leandro B C; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Covert, Jill; Dubielzig, Richard R; Isseroff, Roslyn Rivkah; Schurr, Michael; Abbott, Nicholas L; McAnulty, Jonathan; Murphy, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    The excisional dorsal full-thickness skin wound model with or without splinting is widely utilized in wound healing studies using diabetic or normal mice. However, the effects of splinting on dermal wound healing have not been fully characterized, and there are limited data on the direct comparison of wound parameters in the splinted model between diabetic and normal mice. We compared full-thickness excisional dermal wound healing in db/db and heterozygous mice by investigating the effects of splinting, semi-occlusive dressing, and poly(ethylene glycol) treatment. Two 8-mm full-thickness wounds were made with or without splinting in db/db and heterozygous mice. Body weights, splint maintenance, wound contraction, wound closure, and histopathological parameters including reepithelialization, wound bed collagen deposition, and inflammation were compared between groups. Our results show that silicone splint application effectively reduced wound contraction in heterozygous and db/db mice. Splinted wounds, as opposed to nonsplinted wounds, exhibited no significant differences in wound closure between heterozygous and db/db mice. Finally, polyethylene glycol and the noncontact dressing had no significant effect on wound healing in heterozygous or db/db mice. We believe these findings will help investigators in selection of the appropriate wound model and data interpretation with fully defined parameters.

  5. Developing a model of limited-access nicotine consumption in C57Bl/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Kasten, C R; Frazee, A M; Boehm, S L

    2016-09-01

    Although United States smoking rates have been on the decline over the past few decades, cigarette smoking still poses a critical health and economic threat. Very few treatment options for smoking exist, and many of them do not lead to long-term abstinence. Preclinical models are necessary for understanding the effects of nicotine and developing treatments. Current self-administration models of nicotine intake may require surgical procedures and often result in low levels of intake. Further, they do not lend themselves to investigating treatments. The current study sought to develop a limited-access model of nicotine intake using the Drinking-in-the-Dark paradigm, which results in high levels of binge-like ethanol consumption that can be pharmacologically manipulated. The present study found that mice will consume nicotine under a range of parameters. Intakes under the preferred condition of 0.14mg/ml nicotine in 0.2% saccharin reached over 6mg/kg in two hours and were reduced by an injection of R(+)-baclofen. Mecamylamine did not significantly affect nicotine consumption. As nicotine and ethanol are often co-abused, nicotine intake was also tested in the presence of ethanol. When presented in the same bottle, mice altered nicotine intake under various concentrations to maintain consistent levels of ethanol intake. When nicotine and ethanol were presented in separate bottles, mice greatly reduced their nicotine intake while maintaining ethanol intake. In conclusion, these studies characterize a novel model of limited-access nicotine intake that can be pharmacologically manipulated.

  6. Proposed mechanistic description of dose-dependent BDE-47 urinary elimination in mice using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Emond, Claude; Sanders, J. Michael; Wikoff, Daniele; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2013-12-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been used in a wide variety of consumer applications as additive flame retardants. In North America, scientists have noted continuing increases in the levels of PBDE congeners measured in human serum. Some recent studies have found that PBDEs are associated with adverse health effects in humans, in experimental animals, and wildlife. This laboratory previously demonstrated that urinary elimination of 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) is saturable at high doses in mice; however, this dose-dependent urinary elimination has not been observed in adult rats or immature mice. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to examine the mechanism of urinary elimination of BDE-47 in adult mice using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. To support this objective, additional laboratory data were collected to evaluate the predictions of the PBPK model using novel information from adult multi-drug resistance 1a/b knockout mice. Using the PBPK model, the roles of mouse major urinary protein (a blood protein carrier) and P-glycoprotein (an apical membrane transporter in proximal tubule cells in the kidneys, brain, intestines, and liver) were investigated in BDE-47 elimination. The resulting model and new data supported the major role of m-MUP in excretion of BDE-47 in the urine of adult mice, and a lesser role of P-gp as a transporter of BDE-47 in mice. This work expands the knowledge of BDE-47 kinetics between species and provides information for determining the relevancy of these data for human risk assessment purposes. - Highlights: • We report the first study on PBPK model on flame retardant in mice for BDE-47. • We examine mechanism of urinary elimination of BDE-47 in mice using a PBPK model. • We investigated roles of m-MUP and P-gp as transporters in urinary elimination.

  7. A Biomathematical Model of Pneumococcal Lung Infection and Antibiotic Treatment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schirm, Sibylle; Ahnert, Peter; Wienhold, Sandra; Mueller-Redetzky, Holger; Nouailles-Kursar, Geraldine; Loeffler, Markus; Witzenrath, Martin; Scholz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is considered to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The outcome depends on both, proper antibiotic treatment and the effectivity of the immune response of the host. However, due to the complexity of the immunologic cascade initiated during infection, the latter cannot be predicted easily. We construct a biomathematical model of the murine immune response during infection with pneumococcus aiming at predicting the outcome of antibiotic treatment. The model consists of a number of non-linear ordinary differential equations describing dynamics of pneumococcal population, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, neutrophils and macrophages fighting the infection and destruction of alveolar tissue due to pneumococcus. Equations were derived by translating known biological mechanisms and assuming certain response kinetics. Antibiotic therapy is modelled by a transient depletion of bacteria. Unknown model parameters were determined by fitting the predictions of the model to data sets derived from mice experiments of pneumococcal lung infection with and without antibiotic treatment. Time series of pneumococcal population, debris, neutrophils, activated epithelial cells, macrophages, monocytes and IL-6 serum concentrations were available for this purpose. The antibiotics Ampicillin and Moxifloxacin were considered. Parameter fittings resulted in a good agreement of model and data for all experimental scenarios. Identifiability of parameters is also estimated. The model can be used to predict the performance of alternative schedules of antibiotic treatment. We conclude that we established a biomathematical model of pneumococcal lung infection in mice allowing predictions regarding the outcome of different schedules of antibiotic treatment. We aim at translating the model to the human situation in the near future. PMID:27196107

  8. Preliminary investigation of a mice model of Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Renois, Fanny; Jacques, Jérôme; Guillard, Thomas; Moret, Hélène; Pluot, Michel; Andreoletti, Laurent; de Champs, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    In the present study, we comparatively assessed the pathophysiological mechanisms developed during lung infection of BALB/C female mice infected by an original wild type Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae strain (CH137) or by a referent subspecies K. pneumoniae. subsp. pneumoniae strain (ATCC10031). The mice infected with 2.10⁶ CFU K. p. subsp. pneumoniae (n = 10) showed transient signs of infection and all of them recovered. All of those infected with 1.10⁶ CFU K. p. subsp. ozaenae (n = 10) developed pneumonia within 24 h and died between 48 and 72 h. Few macrophages, numerous polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes were observed in their lungs in opposite to K. p. subsp. pneumoniae. In bronchoalveolar lavage, a significant increase in MIP-2, IL-6, KC and MCP-1 levels was only observed in K. p. subsp. ozaenae infected mice whereas high levels of TNF-α were evidenced with the two subspecies. Our findings indicated a lethal effect of a wild type K. p. subsp. ozaenae strain by acute pneumonia reflecting an insufficient alveolar macrophage response. This model might be of a major interest to comparatively explore the pathogenicity of K. p. subsp ozaenae strains and to further explore the physiopathological mechanisms of gram-negative bacteria induced human pneumonia.

  9. Beneficial Effects of Schisandrin B on the Cardiac Function in Mice Model of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pengsheng; Pang, Sisi; Yang, Naiquan; Meng, Haoyu; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Ningtian; Zhang, Min; Xu, Zhihui; Gao, Wei; Chen, Bo; Tao, Zhengxian; Wang, Liansheng; Yang, Zhijian

    2013-01-01

    The fruit of Schisandra chinensis has been used in the traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Accumulating evidence suggests that Schisandrin B (Sch B) has cardioprotection effect on myocardial ischemia in vitro. However, it is unclear whether Sch B has beneficial effects on continuous myocardial ischemia in vivo. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether Sch B could improve cardiac function and attenuate myocardial remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI) in mice. Mice model of MI was established by permanent ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. Then the MI mice were randomly treated with Sch B or vehicle alone. After treatment for 3 weeks, Sch B could increase survival rate, improve heart function and decrease infarct size compared with vehicle. Moreover, Sch B could down-regulate some inflammatory cytokines, activate eNOS pathway, inhibit cell apoptosis, and enhance cell proliferation. Further in vitro study on H9c2 cells showed similar effects of Sch B on prevention of hypoxia-induced inflammation and cell apoptosis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Sch B can reduce inflammation, inhibit apoptosis, and improve cardiac function after ischemic injury. It represents a potential novel therapeutic approach for treatment of ischemic heart disease. PMID:24260217

  10. Modeling the molecular epigenetic profile of psychosis in prenatally stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Alessandro; Dong, Erbo; Tueting, Patricia; Grayson, Dennis R

    2014-01-01

    Based on postmortem brain studies, our overarching epigenetic hypothesis is that chronic schizophrenia (SZ) is a psychopathological condition involving dysregulation of the dynamic equilibrium among DNA methylation/demethylation network components and the expression of SZ target genes, including GABAergic and glutamatergic genes. SZ has a natural course, starting with a prodromal phase, a first episode that occurs in adolescents or in young adults, and later deterioration over the adult years. Hence, the epigenetic status at each neurodevelopmental stage of the disease cannot be studied just in postmortem brain of chronic SZ patients, but requires the use of neurodevelopmental animal models. We have directed the focus of our research toward studying the epigenetic signature of the SZ brain in the offspring of dams stressed during pregnancy (PRS mice). Adult PRS mice have behavioral deficits reminiscent of behaviors observed in psychotic patients. The adult PRS brain, like that of postmortem chronic SZ patients, is characterized by a significant increase in DNA methyltransferase 1, Tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 1 (TET1), 5-methylcytosine, and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at SZ candidate gene promoters and a reduction in the expression of glutamatergic and GABAergic genes. In PRS mice, measurements of epigenetic biomarkers for SZ can be assessed at different stages of development with the goal of further elucidating the pathophysiology of this disease and predicting treatment responses at specific stages of the illness, with particular attention to early detection and possibly early intervention.

  11. Modeling the molecular epigenetic profile of psychosis in prenatally stressed mice

    PubMed Central

    Guidotti, A.; Dong, E.; Tueting, P.; Grayson, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    Based on postmortem brain studies, our overarching epigenetic hypothesis is that chronic schizophrenia (SZ) is a psychopathological condition involving dysregulation of the dynamic equilibrium among DNA-methylation/demethylation network components and the expression of SZ target genes, including GABAergic and glutamatergic genes. SZ has a natural course, starting with a prodrome, a first episode that occurs in adolescence or in young adults, and later deterioration over the adult years. Hence, the epigenetic status at each neurodevelopmental stage of the disease cannot be studied just in postmortem brain of chronic SZ patients, but requires the use of a neurodevelopmental animal models. We have directed the focus of our research toward studying the epigenetic signature of SZ brain in the offspring of dams stressed during pregnancy (PRS mice). Adult PRS-mice have behavioral deficits reminiscent of behaviors observed in psychotic patients. The adult PRS brain, like that of postmortem chronic SZ patients, is characterized by a significant increase in DNA-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), Tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 1 (TET1), 5-methylcytosine (5MC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5HMC) at SZ candidate gene promoters, and a reduction in the expression of glutamatergic and GABAergic genes. In PRS mice, measurements of epigenetic biomarkers for SZ can be assessed at different stages of development with the goal of further elucidating the pathophysiology of this disease and predicting treatment responses at specific stages of the illness, with particular attention to early detection and possibly early intervention. PMID:25410542

  12. Erythropoietin and the use of a transgenic model of erythropoietin-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Pichon, Aurélien; Jeton, Florine; El Hasnaoui-Saadani, Raja; Hagström, Luciana; Launay, Thierry; Beaudry, Michèle; Marchant, Dominique; Quidu, Patricia; Macarlupu, Jose-Luis; Favret, Fabrice; Richalet, Jean-Paul; Voituron, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Despite its well-known role in red blood cell production, it is now accepted that erythropoietin (Epo) has other physiological functions. Epo and its receptors are expressed in many tissues, such as the brain and heart. The presence of Epo/Epo receptors in these organs suggests other roles than those usually assigned to this protein. Thus, the aim of this review is to describe the effects of Epo deficiency on adaptation to normoxic and hypoxic environments and to suggest a key role of Epo on main physiological adaptive functions. Our original model of Epo-deficient (Epo-TAgh) mice allowed us to improve our knowledge of the possible role of Epo in O2 homeostasis. The use of anemic transgenic mice revealed Epo as a crucial component of adaptation to hypoxia. Epo-TAgh mice survive well in hypoxic conditions despite low hematocrit. Furthermore, Epo plays a key role in neural control of ventilatory acclimatization and response to hypoxia, in deformability of red blood cells, in cerebral and cardiac angiogenesis, and in neuro- and cardioprotection. PMID:27800506

  13. Antinociceptive effect of matrine on vincristine-induced neuropathic pain model in mice.

    PubMed

    Linglu, Dun; Yuxiang, Li; Yaqiong, Xu; Ru, Zhou; Lin, Ma; Shaoju, Jin; Juan, Du; Tao, Sun; Jianqiang, Yu

    2014-06-01

    Chemotherapy drugs treatment causes neuropathic pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia are common components of neuropathic pain, so effectively therapeutic strategy is required. In this study, we evaluated the antinociceptive effects of matrine on vincristine-induced neuropathic pain in mice. Vincristine (100 μg/kg i.p.) was administered once per day for 7 days (day 0-6) in mice. Matrine (15, 30, 60 mg/kg, i.p.) was repeated administration in early phase (day 0-6) or late phase (day 7-13). Hyperalgesia and allodynia were evaluated by withdrawal response using von Frey filaments, plantar and cold-plate on 7, 14 and 21 day. Injection of vincristine produced mechanical hyperalgesia and cold allodynia. Matrine was found to produce a protective role in both von Frey filaments and cold-plate test. The analysis of the effect supports the hypothesis that matrine is useful in therapy of vincristine-induced neuropathic pain. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that administration of matrine is associated with antinociceptive effect on mechanical and cold stimuli in a mice model of vincristine-induced neuropathy pain.

  14. Ginsenoside Rh2 enhances the antitumor immunological response of a melanoma mice model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Yan, Shi-Ju; Zhang, Hong-Tao; Li, Nan; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Ying-Long ; Li, Xiao-Xiang; Ma, Qiong; Qiu, Xiu-Chun; Fan, Qing-Yu; Ma, Bao-An

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of malignant tumors following surgery is important in preventing relapse. Among all the post-surgery treatments, immunomodulators have demonstrated satisfactory effects on preventing recurrence according to recent studies. Ginsenoside is a compound isolated from panax ginseng, which is a famous traditional Chinese medicine. Ginsenoside aids in killing tumor cells through numerous processes, including the antitumor processes of ginsenoside Rh2 and Rg1, and also affects the inflammatory processes of the immune system. However, the role that ginsenoside serves in antitumor immunological activity remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study aimed to analyze the effect of ginsenoside Rh2 on the antitumor immunological response. With a melanoma mice model, ginsenoside Rh2 was demonstrated to inhibit tumor growth and improved the survival time of the mice. Ginsenoside Rh2 enhanced T-lymphocyte infiltration in the tumor and triggered cytotoxicity in spleen lymphocytes. In addition, the immunological response triggered by ginsenoside Rh2 could be transferred to other mice. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that ginsenoside Rh2 treatment enhanced the antitumor immunological response, which may be a potential therapy for melanoma. PMID:28356946

  15. Genetically inbred Balb/c mice differ from outbred Swiss Webster mice on discrete measures of sociability: relevance to a genetic mouse model of autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Jacome, Luis F; Burket, Jessica A; Herndon, Amy L; Deutsch, Stephen I

    2011-12-01

    The Balb/c mouse is proposed as a model of human disorders with prominent deficits of sociability, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) that may involve pathophysiological disruption of NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission. A standard procedure was used to measure sociability in 8-week-old male genetically inbred Balb/c and outbred Swiss Webster mice. Moreover, because impaired sociability may influence the social behavior of stimulus mice, we also measured the proportion of total episodes of social approach made by the stimulus mouse while test and stimulus mice were allowed to interact freely. Three raters with good inter-rater agreement evaluated operationally defined measures of sociability chosen because of their descriptive similarity to deficits of social behavior reported in persons with ASDs. The data support previous reports that the Balb/c mouse is a genetic mouse model of impaired sociability. The data also show that the behavior of the social stimulus mouse is influenced by the impaired sociability of the Balb/c strain. Interestingly, operationally defined measures of sociability did not necessarily correlate with each other within mouse strain and the profile of correlated measures differed between strains. Finally, "stereotypic" behaviors (i.e. rearing, grooming and wall climbing) recorded during the session of free interaction between the test and social stimulus mice were more intensely displayed by Swiss Webster than Balb/c mice, suggesting that the domains of sociability and "restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior" are independent of each other in the Balb/c strain.

  16. Animal models of physiologic markers of male reproduction: genetically defined infertile mice.

    PubMed Central

    Chubb, C

    1987-01-01

    The present report focuses on novel animal models of male infertility: genetically defined mice bearing single-gene mutations that induce infertility. The primary goal of our investigations was to identify the reproductive defects in these mutant mice. The phenotypic effects of the gene mutations were deciphered by comparing the mutant mice to their normal siblings. Initially testicular steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis were investigated. The physiologic markers for testicular steroidogenesis were steroid secretion by testes perifused in vitro, seminal vesicle weight, and Leydig cell histology. Spermatogenesis was evaluated by the enumeration of homogenization-resistant sperm/spermatids in testes and by morphometric analyses of germ cells in the seminiferous epithelium. If testicular function appeared normal, we investigated the sexual behavior of the mice. The parameters of male sexual behavior that were quantified included mount patency, mount frequency, intromission latency, thrusts per intromission, ejaculation latency, and ejaculation duration. Females of pairs breeding under normal circumstances were monitored for the presence of vaginal plugs and pregnancies. The patency of the ejaculatory process was determined by quantifying sperm in the female reproductive tract after sexual behavior tests. Sperm function was studied by quantitatively determining sperm motility during videomicroscopic observation. Also, the ability of epididymal sperm to function within the uterine environment was analyzed by determining sperm capacity to initiate pregnancy after artificial insemination. Together, the experimental results permitted the grouping of the gene mutations into three general categories. We propose that the same biological markers used in the reported studies can be implemented in the assessment of the impact that environmental toxins may have on male reproduction. PMID:3319549

  17. Animal models of physiologic markers of male reproduction: genetically defined infertile mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chubb, C.

    1987-10-01

    The present report focuses on novel animal models of male infertility: genetically defined mice bearing single-gene mutations that induce infertility. The primary goal of the investigations was to identify the reproductive defects in these mutant mice. The phenotypic effects of the gene mutations were deciphered by comparing the mutant mice to their normal siblings. Initially testicular steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis were investigated. The physiologic markers for testicular steroidogenesis were steroid secretion by testes perifused in vitro, seminal vesicle weight, and Leydig cell histology. Spermatogenesis was evaluated by the enumeration of homogenization-resistant sperm/spermatids in testes and by morphometric analyses of germ cells in the seminiferous epithelium. If testicular function appeared normal, the authors investigated the sexual behavior of the mice. The parameters of male sexual behavior that were quantified included mount patency, mount frequency, intromission latency, thrusts per intromission, ejaculation latency, and ejaculation duration. Females of pairs breeding under normal circumstances were monitored for the presence of vaginal plugs and pregnancies. The patency of the ejaculatory process was determined by quantifying sperm in the female reproductive tract after sexual behavior tests. Sperm function was studied by quantitatively determining sperm motility during videomicroscopic observation. Also, the ability of epididymal sperm to function within the uterine environment was analyzed by determining sperm capacity to initiate pregnancy after artificial insemination. Together, the experimental results permitted the grouping of the gene mutations into three general categories. They propose that the same biological markers used in the reported studies can be implemented in the assessment of the impact that environmental toxins may have on male reproduction.

  18. New model of pharmacoresistant seizures induced by 3-mercaptopropionic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Enrique, Andrea; Goicoechea, Sofía; Castaño, Rocío; Taborda, Facundo; Rocha, Luisa; Orozco, Sandra; Girardi, Elena; Bruno Blanch, Luis

    2017-01-01

    About 30% of the patients with epilepsy do not respond to clinically established anticonvulsants, despite having effective concentrations of the antiepileptic drug in plasma. Therefore, new preclinical models of epilepsy are needed to identify more efficacious treatments. We describe here a new drug-resistant seizure model in mice to be used at the early stages of pre-clinical trials. This model consists in inducing daily generalized seizures for 23 consecutive days by administration of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MP). As a result, 100% of animals become resistant to phenytoin and 80% to phenobarbital. Such resistance is strongly associated with the overexpression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp), observed in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum while resistance to Pgp nonsubstrate drugs such as carbamazepine, diazepam and levetiracetam is not observed. This model could be useful for screening novel anticonvulsant drugs with a potential effect on pharmacoresistant seizures treatment.

  19. [Antipneumococcal activity of erythromycin and spiramycin in 2 experimental models in mice].

    PubMed

    Rolin, O; Bouanchaud, D H

    1987-06-01

    Macrolides often remain the first intention treatment in many chest infections caused by S. pneumoniae. Antipneumococcal activities of spiramycin and erythromycin have then been tested in a septicaemia model and in a pulmonary infection model in mice. In the septicaemia model, spiramycin has been found 5 to 15 times more active than erythromycin by subcutaneous route and 1.5 to 6 times by oral route. In the pneumonia model, spiramycin has been found as active (one strain) to 5 times more active than erythromycin (three strains) by both subcutaneous and oral route. These data might indicate that better tissular penetration of spiramycin is responsible for better in vivo activity. These facts also support the statement that MIC should not be the only choice standard of infectious chemotherapy.

  20. Sensitivity to oxazolone induced dermatitis is transferable with gut microbiota in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zachariassen, Line Fisker; Krych, Lukasz; Engkilde, Kåre; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Kot, Witold; Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Hansen, Axel Kornerup

    2017-01-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) has been associated with gut microbiota (GM) dysbiosis in humans, indicating a causative role of GM in AD etiology. Furthermore, the GM strongly correlates to essential disease parameters in the well-known oxazolone-induced mouse model of AD. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to transfer both a high-responding and a low-responding AD phenotype with GM from conventional mice to germ-free mice. The mice inoculated with the high-responding GM had significantly higher clinical score, increased ear thickness, and increased levels of IL-1β, TNFα, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-6 compared to the mice inoculated with the low-responding GM. The inter-individual variation was in general not affected by this increase in effect size. Germ-free mice induced with AD revealed a high disease response as well as high inter-individual variation indicating protective properties of certain microbial taxa in this model. This study underlines that the GM has a strong impact on AD in mouse models, and that the power of studies may be increased by the application of mice inoculated with a specific GM from high responders to increase the effect size. PMID:28290517

  1. The alcohol deprivation effect model for studying relapse behavior: a comparison between rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Vengeliene, Valentina; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Spanagel, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the psychological mechanisms and underlying neurobiology of relapse behavior is essential for improving the treatment of addiction. Because the neurobiology of relapse behavior cannot be well studied in patients, we must rely on appropriate animal models. The alcohol deprivation effect (ADE) is a phenomenon in laboratory animals that models a relapse-like drinking situation, providing excellent face and predictive validity. In rodents, relapse-like behavior is largely influenced by the genetic make-up of an animal. It is not clear which other factors are responsible for variability of this behavior, but there seems to be no correlation between levels of baseline alcohol intake and the occurrence, duration, and robustness of the ADE. Rats that undergo long-term alcohol drinking for several months with repeated deprivation phases develop a compulsive drinking behavior during a relapse situation, characterized by insensitivity to taste adulteration with quinine, a loss of circadian drinking patterns during relapse-like drinking, and a shift toward drinking highly concentrated alcohol solutions to rapidly increase blood alcohol concentrations and achieve intoxication. Some mouse strains also exhibit an ADE, but this is usually of shorter duration than in rats. However, compulsive drinking in mice during a relapse situation has yet to be demonstrated. We extend our review section with original data showing that during long-term alcohol consumption, mice show a decline in alcohol intake, and the ADE fades with repeated deprivation phases. Furthermore, anti-relapse compounds that produce reliable effects on the ADE in rats produce paradoxical effects in mice. We conclude that the rat provides a better model system to study alcohol relapse and putative anti-relapse compounds.

  2. Enhancement of viral pathogenesis in mice maintained in an antiorthostatic suspension model - Coordination with effects on interferon production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, C. L.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1987-01-01

    Both rodents and men returning from spaceflight have exhibited alterations in immune responses and, in particular, interferon production. This work utilizes a model for antiorthostatic (20-deg head-down tilt), hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension of mice that simulates some aspects of weightlessness. Female Swiss/Webster mice that are normally resistant to infection with the D variant of encephalomyocarditis virus showed a marked increase in susceptibility to infection when suspended. This correlated with a drop in interferom production. Control, orthostatically suspended mice (no tilt) showed no increase in susceptibility to the virus.

  3. Animal models of depression in dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine transporter knockout mice: prominent effects of dopamine transporter deletions.

    PubMed

    Perona, Maria T G; Waters, Shonna; Hall, Frank Scott; Sora, Ichiro; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Murphy, Dennis L; Caron, Marc; Uhl, George R

    2008-09-01

    Antidepressant drugs produce therapeutic actions and many of their side effects via blockade of the plasma membrane transporters for serotonin (SERT/SLC6A2), norepinephrine (NET/SLC6A1), and dopamine (DAT/SLC6A3). Many antidepressants block several of these transporters; some are more selective. Mouse gene knockouts of these transporters provide interesting models for possible effects of chronic antidepressant treatments. To examine the role of monoamine transporters in models of depression DAT, NET, and SERT knockout (KO) mice and wild-type littermates were studied in the forced swim test (FST), the tail suspension test, and for sucrose consumption. To dissociate general activity from potential antidepressant effects three types of behavior were assessed in the FST: immobility, climbing, and swimming. In confirmation of earlier reports, both DAT KO and NET KO mice exhibited less immobility than wild-type littermates whereas SERT KO mice did not. Effects of DAT deletion were not simply because of hyperactivity, as decreased immobility was observed in DAT+/- mice that were not hyperactive as well as in DAT-/- mice that displayed profound hyperactivity. Climbing was increased, whereas swimming was almost eliminated in DAT-/- mice, and a modest but similar effect was seen in NET KO mice, which showed a modest decrease in locomotor activity. Combined increases in climbing and decreases in immobility are characteristic of FST results in antidepressant animal models, whereas selective effects on swimming are associated with the effects of stimulant drugs. Therefore, an effect on climbing is thought to more specifically reflect antidepressant effects, as has been observed in several other proposed animal models of reduced depressive phenotypes. A similar profile was observed in the tail suspension test, where DAT, NET, and SERT knockouts were all found to reduce immobility, but much greater effects were observed in DAT KO mice. However, to further determine whether

  4. Data on amyloid precursor protein accumulation, spontaneous physical activity, and motor learning after traumatic brain injury in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yasushi; Shishido, Hajime; Sawanishi, Mayumi; Toyota, Yasunori; Ueno, Masaki; Kubota, Takashi; Kirino, Yutaka; Tamiya, Takashi; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    This data article contains supporting information regarding the research article entitled "Traumatic brain injury accelerates amyloid-β deposition and impairs spatial learning in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease" (H. Shishido, Y. Kishimoto, N. Kawai, Y. Toyota, M. Ueno, T. Kubota, Y. Kirino, T. Tamiya, 2016) [1]. Triple-transgenic (3×Tg)-Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) model mice exhibited significantly poorer spatial learning than sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Correspondingly, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition within the hippocampus was significantly greater in 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after TBI. However, data regarding the short-term and long-term influences of TBI on amyloid precursor protein (APP) accumulation in AD model mice remain limited. Furthermore, there is little data showing whether physical activity and motor learning are affected by TBI in AD model mice. Here, we provide immunocytochemistry data confirming that TBI induces significant increases in APP accumulation in 3×Tg-AD mice at both 7 days and 28 days after TBI. Furthermore, 3×Tg-AD model mice exhibit a reduced ability to acquire conditioned responses (CRs) during delay eyeblink conditioning compared to sham-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice 28 days after TBI. However, physical activity and motor performance are not significantly changed in TBI-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice.

  5. A model of vascular tumour growth in mice combining longitudinal tumour size data with histological biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ribba, Benjamin; Watkin, Emmanuel; Tod, Michel; Girard, Pascal; Grenier, Emmanuel; You, Benoît; Giraudo, Enrico; Freyer, Gilles

    2011-02-01

    Optimising the delivery of antiangiogenic drugs requires the development of drug-disease models of vascular tumour growth that incorporate histological data indicative of cytostatic action. In this study, we formulated a model to analyse the dynamics of tumour progression in nude mice xenografted with HT29 or HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. In 30 mice, tumour size was periodically measured, and percentages of hypoxic and necrotic tissue were assessed using immunohistochemistry techniques on tumour samples after euthanasia. The simultaneous analysis of histological data together with longitudinal tumour size data prompted the development of a semi-mechanistic model integrating random effects of parameters. In this model, the peripheral non-hypoxic tissue proliferates according to a generalised-logistic equation where the maximal tumour size is represented by a variable called 'carrying capacity'. The ratio of the whole tumour size to the carrying capacity was used to define the hypoxic stress. As this stress increases, non-hypoxic tissue turns hypoxic. Hypoxic tissue does not stop proliferating, but hypoxia constitutes a transient stage before the tissue becomes necrotic. As the tumour grows, the carrying capacity increases owing to the process of angiogenesis. The model is shown to correctly predict tumour growth dynamics as well as percentages of necrotic and hypoxic tissues within the tumour. We show how the model can be used as a theoretical tool to investigate the effects of antiangiogenic treatments on tumour growth. This model provides a tool to analyse tumour size data in combination with histological biomarkers such as the percentages of hypoxic and necrotic tissue and is shown to be useful for gaining insight into the effects of antiangiogenic drugs on tumour growth and composition.

  6. A shorter and more specific oral sensitization-based experimental model of food allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Bailón, Elvira; Cueto-Sola, Margarita; Utrilla, Pilar; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Judith; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Xaus, Jordi; Gálvez, Julio; Comalada, Mònica

    2012-07-31

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is one of the most prevalent human food-borne allergies, particularly in children. Experimental animal models have become critical tools with which to perform research on new therapeutic approaches and on the molecular mechanisms involved. However, oral food allergen sensitization in mice requires several weeks and is usually associated with unspecific immune responses. To overcome these inconveniences, we have developed a new food allergy model that takes only two weeks while retaining the main characters of allergic response to food antigens. The new model is characterized by oral sensitization of weaned Balb/c mice with 5 doses of purified cow's milk protein (CMP) plus cholera toxin (CT) for only two weeks and posterior challenge with an intraperitoneal administration of the allergen at the end of the sensitization period. In parallel, we studied a conventional protocol that lasts for seven weeks, and also the non-specific effects exerted by CT in both protocols. The shorter protocol achieves a similar clinical score as the original food allergy model without macroscopically affecting gut morpholo