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Sample records for ad model transgenic

  1. A non-transgenic mouse model (icv-STZ mouse) of Alzheimer's disease: similarities to and differences from the transgenic model (3xTg-AD mouse).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanxing; Liang, Zhihou; Blanchard, Julie; Dai, Chun-Ling; Sun, Shenggang; Lee, Moon H; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be divided into sporadic AD (SAD) and familial AD (FAD). Most AD cases are sporadic and result from multiple etiologic factors, including environmental, genetic, and metabolic factors, whereas FAD is caused by mutations in the presenilins or amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) genes. A commonly used animal model for AD is the 3xTg-AD transgenic mouse model, which harbors mutated presenilin 1, APP, and tau genes and thus represents a model of FAD. There is an unmet need in the field to characterize animal models representing different AD mechanisms, so that potential drugs for SAD can be evaluated preclinically in these animal models. A mouse model generated by intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of streptozocin (STZ), the icv-STZ mouse, shows many aspects of SAD. In this study, we compared the non-cognitive and cognitive behaviors as well as biochemical and immunohistochemical alterations between the icv-STZ mouse and the 3xTg-AD mouse. We found that both mouse models showed increased exploratory activity as well as impaired learning and spatial memory. Both models also demonstrated neuroinflammation, altered synaptic proteins and insulin/IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1) signaling, and increased hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain. The most prominent brain abnormality in the icv-STZ mouse was neuroinflammation, and in the 3xTg-AD mouse it was elevation of hyperphosphorylated tau. These observations demonstrate the behavioral and neuropathological similarities and differences between the icv-STZ mouse and the 3xTg-AD mouse models and will help guide future studies using these two mouse models for the development of AD drugs.

  2. Nobiletin, a citrus flavonoid, improves cognitive impairment and reduces soluble Aβ levels in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (3XTg-AD).

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Akira; Aoyama, Yuki; Shin, Eun-Joo; Nam, Yunsung; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Nagai, Taku; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia among the elderly, is characterized by the progressive decline of cognitive function. Increasing evidence indicates that the production and accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ), particularly soluble Aβ oligomers, is central to the pathogenesis of AD. Our recent studies have demonstrated that nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavone from citrus peels, ameliorates learning and memory impairment in olfactory-bulbectomized mice, amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice, NMDA receptor antagonist-treated mice, and senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8. Here, we present evidence that this natural compound improves cognitive impairment and reduces soluble Aβ levels in a triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3XTg-AD) that progressively develops amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and cognitive impairments. Treatment with nobiletin (30 mg/kg) for 3 months reversed the impairment of short-term memory and recognition memory in 3XTg-AD mice. Our ELISA analysis also showed that nobiletin reduced the levels of soluble Aβ1-40 in the brain of 3XTg-AD mice. Furthermore, nobiletin reduced ROS levels in the hippocampus of 3XTg-AD as well as wild-type mice. These results suggest that this natural compound has potential to become a novel drug for the treatment and prevention of AD.

  3. Deficits in odor-guided behaviors in the transgenic 3xTg-AD female mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Coronas-Sámano, G; Portillo, W; Beltrán Campos, V; Medina-Aguirre, G I; Paredes, R G; Diaz-Cintra, S

    2014-07-14

    Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) is characterized by a number of alterations including those in cognition and olfaction. An early symptom of AD is decreased olfactory ability, which may affect odor-guided behaviors. To test this possibility we evaluated alterations in sexual incentive motivation, sexual olfactory preference, sexual olfactory discrimination, nursing-relevant olfactory preference and olfactory discrimination in female mice. We tested 3xTg-AD (a triple transgenic model, which is a "knock in" of PS1M146V, APPSwe, and tauP300L) and wild type (WT) female mice when receptive (estrous) and non-receptive (anestrous). Subjects were divided into three groups of different ages: (1) 4-5 months, (2) 10-11 months, and (3) 16-18 months. In the sexual incentive motivation task, the receptive 3xTg-AD females showed no preference for a sexually active male at any age studied, in contrast to the WT females. In the sexual olfactory preference test, the receptive WT females were able to identify sexually active male secretions at all ages, but the oldest (16-18 months old) 3xTg-AD females could not. In addition, the oldest 3xTg-AD females showed no preference for nursing-relevant odors in dam secretions and were unable to discriminate between cinnamon and strawberry odors, indicating olfactory alterations. Thus, the present study suggests that the olfactory deficits in this mouse model are associated with changes in sexual incentive motivation and discrimination of food-related odors.

  4. Whole body exposure to 2.4 GHz WIFI signals: effects on cognitive impairment in adult triple transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (3xTg-AD).

    PubMed

    Banaceur, Sana; Banasr, Sihem; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2013-03-01

    The present investigation aimed at evaluating the effects of long-term exposure to WIFI type radiofrequency (RF) signals (2.40 GHz), two hours per day during one month at a Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of 1.60 W/kg. The effects of RF exposure were studied on wildtype mice and triple transgenic mice (3xTg-AD) destined to develop Alzheimer's-like cognitive impairment. Mice were divided into four groups: two sham groups (WT, TG; n=7) and two exposed groups (WTS, TGS; n=7). The cognitive interference task used in this study was designed from an analogous human cognitive interference task including the Flex field activity system test, the two-compartment box test and the Barnes maze test. Our data demonstrate for the first time that RF improves cognitive behavior of 3xTg-AD mice. We conclude that RF exposure may represent an effective memory-enhancing approach in Alzheimer's disease.

  5. [Research progress of transgenic Drosophila model of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan; Ji, Yu-Bin; Zhao, Jian

    2013-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease. Drosophila has been regard as one of the ideal models for Alzheimer because of its unique advantage on genetic manipulation. AD transgenic drosophila models not only help to elucidate the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease, but also provide potential screening models for drugs to treat the disease. In this review, we summarize the recent research progress using AD transgenic drosophila.

  6. [Enhancement of artemisinin biosynthesis in transgenic Artemisia annua L. by overexpressed HDR and ADS genes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Xiong; Long, Shi-Ping; Zeng, Li-Xia; Xiang, Li-En; Lin, Zhi; Chen, Min; Liao, Zhi-Hua

    2014-09-01

    Artemisnin is a novel sesquiterpene lactone with an internal peroxide bridge structure, which is extracted from traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua L. (Qinghao). Recommended by World Health Organization, artemisinin is the first-line drug in the treatment of encephalic and chloroquine-resistant malaria. In the present study, transgenic A. annua plants were developed by overexpressing the key enzymes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of artemisinin. Based on Agrobacterium-mediated transformation methods, transgenic plants of A. annua with overexpression of both HDR and ADS were obtained through hygromycin screening. The genomic PCR analysis confirmed six transgenic lines in which both HDR and ADS were integrated into genome. The gene expression analysis given by real-time quantitative PCR showed that all the transgenic lines had higher expression levels of HDR and ADS than the non-transgenic control (except ah3 in which the expression level of ADS showed no significant difference compared with control); and the HPLC analysis of artemisinin demonstrated that transgenic A. annua plants produced artemisinin at significantly higher level than non-transgenic plants. Especially, the highest content of artemisinin was found in transgenic line ah70, in which the artemisinin content was 3.48 times compared with that in non-transgenic lines. In summary, overexpression of HDR and ADS facilitated artemisinin biosynthesis and this method could be applied to develop transgenic plants of A. annua with higher yield of artemisinin.

  7. Transgenic animal models of neurodegeneration based on human genetic studies

    PubMed Central

    Richie, Christopher T.; Hoffer, Barry J.; Airavaara, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    The identification of genes linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington's disease (HD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) has led to the development of animal models for studying mechanism and evaluating potential therapies. None of the transgenic models developed based on disease-associated genes have been able to fully recapitulate the behavioral and pathological features of the corresponding disease. However, there has been enormous progress made in identifying potential therapeutic targets and understanding some of the common mechanisms of neurodegeneration. In this review, we will discuss transgenic animal models for AD, ALS, HD and PD that are based on human genetic studies. All of the diseases discussed have active or complete clinical trials for experimental treatments that benefited from transgenic models of the disease. PMID:20931247

  8. An Antidepressant Decreases CSF Aβ Production in Healthy Individuals and in Transgenic AD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sheline, Yvette I.; West, Tim; Yarasheski, Kevin; Swarm, Robert; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Fisher, Jonathan R.; Ficker, Whitney D.; Yan, Ping; Xiong, Chengjie; Frederiksen, Christine; Grzelak, Monica V.; Chott, Robert; Bateman, Randall J.; Morris, John C.; Mintun, Mark A.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Cirrito, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin signaling suppresses generation of amyloid-β (Aβ) in vitro and in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We show that in an aged transgenic AD mouse model (APP/PS1 plaque-bearing mice), the antidepressant citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), decreased Aβ in brain interstitial fluid (ISF) in a dose-dependent manner. Growth of individual amyloid plaques was assessed in plaque-bearing mice that were chronically administered citalopram. Citalopram arrested the growth of pre-existing plaques and reduced the appearance of new plaques by 78%. In healthy human volunteers, citalopram’s effects on Aβ production and Aβ concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured prospectively using stable-isotope labeling kinetics (SILK), with CSF sampling during acute dosing of citalopram. Aβ production in CSF was slowed by 37% in the citalopram group compared to placebo. This change was associated with a 38% decrease in total CSF Aβ concentrations in the drug-treated group. The ability to safely decrease Aβ concentrations is potentially important as a preventive strategy for AD. This study demonstrates key target engagement for future AD prevention trials. PMID:24828079

  9. Transgenic Expression of Ad4BP/SF-1 in Fetal Adrenal Progenitor Cells Leads to Ectopic Adrenal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Mohamad; Oka, Sanae; Parker, Keith L.; Morohashi, Ken-ichirou

    2009-01-01

    Deficiency of adrenal 4 binding protein/steroidogenic factor 1 (Ad4BP/SF-1; NR5A1) impairs adrenal development in a dose-dependent manner, whereas overexpression of Ad4BP/SF-1 is associated with adrenocortical tumorigenesis. Despite its essential roles in adrenal development, the mechanism(s) by which Ad4BP/SF-1 regulates this process remain incompletely understood. We previously identified a fetal adrenal enhancer (FAdE) that stimulates Ad4BP/SF-1 expression in the fetal adrenal gland by a two-step mechanism in which homeobox proteins initiate Ad4BP/SF-1 expression, which then maintains FAdE activity in an autoregulatory loop. In the present study, we examined the effect of transgenic expression of Ad4BP/SF-1 controlled by FAdE on adrenal development. When Ad4BP/SF-1 was overexpressed using a FAdE-Ad4BP/SF-1 transgene, FAdE activity expanded outside of its normal field, resulting in increased adrenal size and the formation of ectopic adrenal tissue in the thorax. The increased size of the adrenal gland did not result from a corresponding increase in cell proliferation, suggesting rather that the increased levels of Ad4BP/SF-1 may divert uncommitted precursors to the steroidogenic lineage. The effects of FAdE-controlled Ad4BP/SF-1 overexpression in mice provide a novel model of ectopic adrenal formation that further supports the critical role of Ad4BP/SF-1 in the determination of steroidogenic cell fate in vivo. PMID:19628584

  10. Phenylbutyric acid reduces amyloid plaques and rescues cognitive behavior in AD transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jesse C; Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Ladiges, Warren C

    2011-06-01

    Trafficking through the secretory pathway is known to regulate the maturation of the APP-cleaving secretases and APP proteolysis. The coupling of stress signaling and pathological deterioration of the brain in Alzheimer's disease (AD) supports a mechanistic connection between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and neurodegeneration. Consequently, small molecular chaperones, which promote protein folding and minimize ER stress, might be effective in delaying or attenuating the deleterious progression of AD. We tested this hypothesis by treating APPswePS1delta9 AD transgenic mice with the molecular chaperone phenylbutyric acid (PBA) for 14 months at a dose of 1 mg PBA g(-1) of body weight in the drinking water. Phenylbutyric acid treatment increased secretase-mediated APP cleavage, but was not associated with any increase in amyloid biosynthesis. The PBA-treated AD transgenic mice had significantly decreased incidence and size of amyloid plaques throughout the cortex and hippocampus. There was no change in total amyloid levels suggesting that PBA modifies amyloid aggregation or pathogenesis independently of biogenesis. The decrease in amyloid plaques was paralleled by increased memory retention, as PBA treatment facilitated cognitive performance in a spatial memory task in both wild-type and AD transgenic mice. The molecular mechanism underlying the cognitive facilitation of PBA is not clear; however, increased levels of both metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors, as well as ADAM10 and TACE, were observed in the cortex and hippocampus of PBA-treated mice. The data suggest that PBA ameliorates the cognitive and pathological features of AD and supports the investigation of PBA as a therapeutic for AD.

  11. Transgenic Drosophila models of Alzheimer's disease and tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of senile dementia. Aggregation of the amyloid- β42 peptide (Aβ42) and tau proteins are pathological hallmarks in AD brains. Accumulating evidence suggests that Aβ42 plays a central role in the pathogenesis of AD, and tau acts downstream of Aβ42 as a modulator of the disease progression. Tau pathology is also observed in frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) and other related diseases, so called tauopathies. Although most cases are sporadic, genes associated with familial AD and FTDP-17 have been identified, which led to the development of transgenic animal models. Drosophila has been a powerful genetic model system used in many fields of biology, and recently emerges as a model for human neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we will summarize key features of transgenic Drosophila models of AD and tauopathies and a number of insights into disease mechanisms as well as therapeutic implications gained from these models. PMID:19967412

  12. Immunotherapeutic approaches for Alzheimer's disease in transgenic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Thomas; Boutajangout, Allal

    2010-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a member of a category of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the conformational change of a normal protein into a pathological conformer with a high beta-sheet content that renders it resistant to degradation and neurotoxic. In the case of AD the normal soluble amyloid beta (sAbeta) peptide is converted into oligomeric/fibrillar Abeta. The oligomeric forms of Abeta are thought to be the most toxic, while fibrillar Abeta becomes deposited as amyloid plaques and congophilic angiopathy, which both serve as neuropathological markers of the disease. In addition, the accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau as soluble toxic oligomers and as neurofibrillary tangles is an essential part of the pathology. Many therapeutic interventions are under investigation to prevent and treat AD. The testing of these diverse approaches to ameliorate AD pathology has been made possible by the existence of numerous transgenic mouse models which each mirror different aspects of AD pathology. Perhaps the most exciting of these approaches is immunomodulation. Vaccination is currently being tried for a range of age associated CNS disorders with great success being reported in many transgenic mouse models. However, there is a discrepancy between these results and current human clinical trials which highlights the limitations of current models and also uncertainties in our understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of AD. No current AD Tg mouse model exactly reflects all aspects of the human disease. Since the underlying etiology of sporadic AD is unknown, the process of creating better Tg models is in constant evolution. This is an essential goal since it will be necessary to develop therapeutic approaches which will be highly effective in humans.

  13. Oral Administration of Thioflavin T Prevents Beta Amyloid Plaque Formation in Double Transgenic AD Mice.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Paule, Merle G; Schmued, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and most common cause of adult-onset dementia. The major hallmarks of AD are the formation of senile amyloid plaques made of beta amyloid and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) which are primarily composed of phosphorylated tau protein. Although numerous agents have been considered as providing protection against AD, identification of potential agents with neuroprotective ability is limited. Thioflavin T has been used in the past to stain amyloid beta plaques in brain. In this study, Thioflavin T (ThT) and vehicle (infant formula) were administered orally by gavage to transgenic (B6C3 APP PS1; AD-Tg) mice beginning at 4 months age and continuing until sacrifice at 9 months of age at 40 mg/kg dose. The number of amyloid plaques was reduced dramatically by ThT treatment in both male and female transgenic mice compared to those in control mice. Additionally, GFAP and Amylo-Glo labeling suggest that astrocytic hypertrophy is minimized in ThT-treated animals. Similarly, CD68 labeling, which detects activated microglia, along with Amylo-Glo labeling, suggests that microglial activation is significantly less in ThT-treated mice. Both Aβ-40 and Aβ-42 concentrations in blood rose significantly in the ThT-treated animals suggesting that ThT may inhibit the deposition, degradation, and/or clearance of Aβ plaques in brain.

  14. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  15. Transgenic Animal Models of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shang-Hsun; Chan, Anthony W S

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that currently has no cure. In order to develop effective treatment, an understanding of HD pathogenesis and the evaluation of therapeutic efficacy of novel medications with the aid of animal models are critical steps. Transgenic animals sharing similar genetic defects that lead to HD have provided important discoveries in HD mechanisms that cell models are not able to replicate, which include psychiatric impairment, cognitive behavioral impact, and motor functions. Although transgenic HD rodent models have been widely used in HD research, it is clear that an animal model with comparable physiology to man, similar genetic defects that lead to HD, and the ability to develop similar cognitive and behavioral impairments is critical for explaining HD pathogenesis and the development of cures. Compared to HD rodents, HD transgenic nonhuman primates have not only developed comparable neuropathology but also present HD clinical features such as rigidity, seizure, dystonia, bradykinesia, and chorea that no other animal model has been able to replicate. Distinctive degenerating neurons and the accumulation of neuropil aggregates observed in HD monkey brain strongly support the hypothesis that the unique neuropathogenic events seen in HD monkey brain recapitulate HD in man. The latest development of transgenic HD primates has opened a new era of animal modeling that better represents human genetic disorders such as HD, which will accelerate the development of diagnostic tools and identifying novel biomarkers through longitudinal studies including gene expression and metabolite profiling, and noninvasive imaging. Furthermore, novel treatments with predictable efficacy in human patients can be developed using HD monkeys because of comparable neuropathology and clinical features.

  16. Using empirical data to model transgene dispersal.

    PubMed Central

    Meagher, T R; Belanger, F C; Day, P R

    2003-01-01

    One element of the current public debate about genetically modified crops is that gene flow from transgenic cultivars into surrounding weed populations will lead to more problematic weeds, particularly for traits such as herbicide resistance. Evolutionary biologists can inform this debate by providing accurate estimates of gene flow potential and subsequent ecological performance of resulting hybrids. We develop a model for gene flow incorporating exponential distance and directional effects to be applied to windpollinated species. This model is applied to previously published data on gene flow in experimental plots of Agrostis stolonifera L. (creeping bentgrass), which assessed gene flow from transgenic plants resistant to the herbicide glufosinate to surrounding non-transgenic plants. Our results show that although pollen dispersal can be limited in some sites, it may be extensive in others, depending on local conditions such as exposure to wind. Thus, hybridization under field conditions is likely to occur. Given the nature of the herbicide resistance trait, we regard this trait as unlikely to persist in the absence of herbicide, and suggest that the ecological consequences of such gene flow are likely to be minimal. PMID:12831482

  17. Using empirical data to model transgene dispersal.

    PubMed

    Meagher, T R; Belanger, F C; Day, P R

    2003-06-29

    One element of the current public debate about genetically modified crops is that gene flow from transgenic cultivars into surrounding weed populations will lead to more problematic weeds, particularly for traits such as herbicide resistance. Evolutionary biologists can inform this debate by providing accurate estimates of gene flow potential and subsequent ecological performance of resulting hybrids. We develop a model for gene flow incorporating exponential distance and directional effects to be applied to windpollinated species. This model is applied to previously published data on gene flow in experimental plots of Agrostis stolonifera L. (creeping bentgrass), which assessed gene flow from transgenic plants resistant to the herbicide glufosinate to surrounding non-transgenic plants. Our results show that although pollen dispersal can be limited in some sites, it may be extensive in others, depending on local conditions such as exposure to wind. Thus, hybridization under field conditions is likely to occur. Given the nature of the herbicide resistance trait, we regard this trait as unlikely to persist in the absence of herbicide, and suggest that the ecological consequences of such gene flow are likely to be minimal.

  18. Impulsivity trait in the early symptomatic BACHD transgenic rat model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Manfré, Giuseppe; Doyère, Valérie; Bossi, Simon; Riess, Olaf; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; El Massioui, Nicole

    2016-02-15

    Impulsivity trait was characterized in 3-5 months old BACHD rats, a transgenic model of Huntington disease, using (1) the delay discounting task to assess cognitive/choice impulsivity, and (2) the Differential Reinforcement of Low Rate of Responding task to evaluate motor/action impulsivity. Transgenic animals showed a high level of choice impulsivity and, to a lesser extent, action impulsivity. Our results provide the first evidence that the transgenic BACHD rat (TG5 line) displays impulsivity disorder as early as 3 months old, as described in early symptomatic HD patients, thus adding to the face validity of the rat model.

  19. Heavy quark potential from deformed AdS5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zi-qiang; Hou, De-fu; Chen, Gang

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the heavy quark potential in some holographic QCD models. The calculation relies on a modified renormalization scheme mentioned in a previous work of Albacete et al. After studying the heavy quark potential in Pirner-Galow model and Andreev-Zakharov model, we extend the discussion to a general deformed AdS5 case. It is shown that the obtained potential is negative definite for all quark-antiquark separations, differs from that using the usual renormalization scheme.

  20. Age-dependent phenotypic characteristics of a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Susanna; Feldon, Joram; Yee, Benjamin K

    2008-08-01

    The triple-transgenic mouse line (3 x Tg-AD) harboring PS1M146V, APPSwe, and taup301L transgenes represents the only transgenic model for Alzheimer's disease (AD) to date capturing both beta-amyloid and tau neuropathology. The present study provides an extensive behavioral characterization of the 3 x Tg-AD mouse line, evaluating the emergence of noncognitive and cognitive AD-like symptoms at two ages corresponding to the early (6-7 months) and advanced (12-13 months) stages of AD-pathology. Enhanced responsiveness to aversive stimulation was detected in mutant mice at both ages: the 3 x Tg-AD genotype enhanced acoustic startle response and facilitated performance in the cued-version of the water maze. These noncognitive phenotypes were accompanied by hyperactivity and reduced locomotor habituation in the open field at the older age. Signs of cognitive aberrations were also detected at both ages, but they were limited to associative learning. The present study suggests that this popular transgenic mouse model of AD has clear phenotypes beyond the cognitive domain, and their potential relationship to the cognitive phenotypes should be further explored.

  1. A Transgenic Mouse Model of Poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Koike, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice (tg mice) that express the human poliovirus receptor (PVR), CD155, are susceptible to poliovirus and develop a neurological disease that resembles human poliomyelitis. Assessment of the neurovirulence levels of poliovirus strains, including mutant viruses produced by reverse genetics, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, and vaccine candidates, is useful for basic research of poliovirus pathogenicity, the surveillance of circulating polioviruses, and the quality control of oral live poliovirus vaccines, and does not require the use of monkeys. Furthermore, PVR-tg mice are useful for studying poliovirus tissue tropism and host immune responses. PVR-tg mice can be bred with mice deficient in the genes involved in viral pathogenicity. This report describes the methods used to analyze the pathogenicity and immune responses of poliovirus using the PVR-tg mouse model.

  2. Expression of a pathogen-induced cysteine protease (AdCP) in tapetum results in male sterility in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pawan; Singh, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Dilip; Vijayan, Sambasivam; Ahmed, Israr; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2014-06-01

    Usable male sterility systems have immense potential in developing hybrid varieties in crop plants, which can also be used as a biological safety containment to prevent horizontal transgene flow. Barnase-Barstar system developed earlier was the first approach to engineer male sterility in plants. In an analogous situation, we have evolved a system of inducing pollen abortion and male sterility in transgenic tobacco by expressing a plant gene coding for a protein with known developmental function in contrast to the Barnase-Barstar system, which deploys genes of prokaryotic origin, i.e., from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. We have used a plant pathogen-induced gene, cysteine protease for inducing male sterility. This gene was identified in the wild peanut, Arachis diogoi differentially expressed when it was challenged with the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata. Arachis diogoi cysteine protease (AdCP) was expressed under the strong tapetum-specific promoter (TA29) and tobacco transformants were generated. Morphological and histological analysis of AdCP transgenic plants showed ablated tapetum and complete pollen abortion in three transgenic lines. Furthermore, transcript analysis displayed the expression of cysteine protease in these male sterile lines and the expression of the protein was identified in western blot analysis using its polyclonal antibody raised in the rabbit system.

  3. Age-related changes in core body temperature and activity in triple-transgenic Alzheimer's disease (3xTgAD) mice.

    PubMed

    Knight, Elysse M; Brown, Timothy M; Gümüsgöz, Sarah; Smith, Jennifer C M; Waters, Elizabeth J; Allan, Stuart M; Lawrence, Catherine B

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterised, not only by cognitive deficits and neuropathological changes, but also by several non-cognitive behavioural symptoms that can lead to a poorer quality of life. Circadian disturbances in core body temperature and physical activity are reported in AD patients, although the cause and consequences of these changes are unknown. We therefore characterised circadian patterns of body temperature and activity in male triple transgenic AD mice (3xTgAD) and non-transgenic (Non-Tg) control mice by remote radiotelemetry. At 4 months of age, daily temperature rhythms were phase advanced and by 6 months of age an increase in mean core body temperature and amplitude of temperature rhythms were observed in 3xTgAD mice. No differences in daily activity rhythms were seen in 4- to 9-month-old 3xTgAD mice, but by 10 months of age an increase in mean daily activity and the amplitude of activity profiles for 3xTgAD mice were detected. At all ages (4-10 months), 3xTgAD mice exhibited greater food intake compared with Non-Tg mice. The changes in temperature did not appear to be solely due to increased food intake and were not cyclooxygenase dependent because the temperature rise was not abolished by chronic ibuprofen treatment. No β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques or neurofibrillary tangles were noted in the hypothalamus of 3xTgAD mice, a key area involved in temperature regulation, although these pathological features were observed in the hippocampus and amygdala of 3xTgAD mice from 10 months of age. These data demonstrate age-dependent changes in core body temperature and activity in 3xTgAD mice that are present before significant AD-related neuropathology and are analogous to those observed in AD patients. The 3xTgAD mouse might therefore be an appropriate model for studying the underlying mechanisms involved in non-cognitive behavioural changes in AD.

  4. Metabonomic Profiling of TASTPM Transgenic Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zeping; Browne, Edward R.; Liu, Tao; Angel, Thomas E.; Ho, Paul C.; Chun Yong Chan, Eric

    2012-12-07

    Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying early stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is important for the development of new therapies against and diagnosis of AD. In this study, non-targeted metabotyping of TASTPM transgenic AD mice was performed. The metabolic profiles of both brain and plasma of TASTPM mice were characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared to those of wild type C57BL/6J mice. TASTPM mice were metabolically distinct compared to wild type mice (Q28 Y = 0.587 and 0.766 for PLS-DA models derived from brain and plasma, respectively). A number of metabolites were found to be perturbed in TASTPM mice in both brain (D11 fructose, L-valine, L-serine, L-threonine, zymosterol) and plasma (D-glucose, D12 galactose, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, palmitic acid and D-gluconic acid). In addition, enzyme immunoassay confirmed that selected endogenous steroids were significantly perturbed in brain (androstenedione and 17-OH-progesterone) and plasma (cortisol and testosterone) of TASTPM mice. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that perturbations related to amino acid metabolism (brain), steroid biosynthesis (brain), linoleic acid metabolism (plasma) and energy metabolism (plasma) accounted for the differentiation of TASTPM and wild-type

  5. Adding immigrants to microsimulation models.

    PubMed

    Duleep, Harriet Orcutt; Dowhan, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    Forecasts of the financial status of Social Security's Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) programs and forecasts of the effects of various OASDI policy options on Americans would be improved if information about the earnings and labor force behavior of various population subgroups were included in projection models. Focusing on the projection of immigrant earnings, this article proffers a conceptual basis for incorporating immigration into microsimulation models. Key results from research on immigrant earnings, as described in the first article in this trilogy--"Research on Immigrant Earnings"--are linked to methods for forecasting individual earnings in microsimulation models. The research on immigrant earnings also inspires new methods for forecasting earnings in microsimulation models as well as the projection of immigrant emigration. Forecasting immigrant earnings and emigration is discussed in the context of a "closed system"--that is, forecasts are only made for a given population, which is represented in the base sample of the microsimulation model. The third article in our trilogy--"Incorporating Immigrant Flows into Microsimulation Models"--explores how to project immigrant earnings in the context of an "open system," which includes future immigrants.

  6. Revisiting the thermodynamic relations in AdS /CMT models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Seungjoon; Park, Sang-A.; Yi, Sang-Heon

    2017-03-01

    Motivated by the recent unified approach to the Smarr-like relation of anti-de Sitter (AdS) planar black holes in conjunction with the quasilocal formalism on conserved charges, we revisit the quantum statistical and thermodynamic relations of hairy AdS planar black holes. By extending the previous results, we identify the hairy contribution in the bulk and show that the holographic computation can be improved so that it is consistent with the bulk computation. We argue that the first law can be retained in its universal form and that the relation between the on-shell renormalized Euclidean action and its free energy interpretation in gravity may also be undeformed even with the hairy contribution in hairy AdS black holes.

  7. The problem of genotype and sex differences in life expectancy in transgenic AD mice.

    PubMed

    Rae, Eric A; Brown, Richard E

    2015-10-01

    The lifespan of mice shows genotype, sex and laboratory effects, but little is known about genotype or sex differences in life expectancy of mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This paper examines the lifespan of males and females of different mouse models of AD and their wildtype strains. Genotype and sex dependent differences in longevity have important implications for designing experiments with Alzheimer's mouse models, comparing genotype and sex differences in aging mouse models, designing drug treatment regimes and the translation of mouse data to human clinical studies. We conclude that the concept of aging and age-related disorders in mice must be reconsidered based on genotype and sex differences in mouse life expectancy data. Use of concepts such as relative age, prospective lifespan and proportion of lifespan remaining should be included in studies of age-related changes in mouse brains and behavior. Finally, measures such as the Frailty Index, which is independent of chronological age might be used to determine a common scale of aging for all mouse strains.

  8. Novel Transgenic Mouse Model for Testing the Effect of Circulating IGF-I on Mammary Stem/Progenitor Cell Number and Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0628 TITLE: Novel Transgenic Mouse Model for Testing ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Novel Transgenic Mouse Model for Testing the Effect of Circulating IGF-I on Mammary Stem/Progenitor Cell...tumorigenesis. We found no difference in time to tumor formation in ErbB2 vs. TTR-IGF-I/ErbB2 transgenic mice . Our conclusion is either that ErbB2

  9. Chronic Microdose Lithium Treatment Prevented Memory Loss and Neurohistopathological Changes in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Marielza Andrade; Schöwe, Natalia Mendes; Monteiro-Silva, Karla Cristina; Baraldi-Tornisielo, Ticiana; Souza, Suzzanna Ingryd Gonçalves; Balthazar, Janaina; Albuquerque, Marilia Silva; Caetano, Ariadiny Lima; Viel, Tania Araujo; Buck, Hudson Sousa

    2015-01-01

    The use of lithium is well established in bipolar disorders and the benefits are being demonstrated in neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, our group showed that treatment with microdose lithium stabilized the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. In order to verify the lithium microdose potential in preventing the disease development, the aim of this work was to verify the effects of chronic treatment with microdose lithium given before and after the appearance of symptoms in a mouse model of a disease similar to AD. Transgenic mice (Cg-Tg(PDGFB-APPSwInd)20Lms/2J) and their non-transgenic litter mate genetic controls were treated with lithium carbonate (0.25mg/Kg/day in drinking water) for 16 or 8 months starting at two and ten months of age, respectively [corrected]. Similar groups were treated with water. At the end of treatments, both lithium treated transgenic groups and non-transgenic mice showed no memory disruption, different from what was observed in the water treated transgenic group. Transgenic mice treated with lithium since two months of age showed decreased number of senile plaques, no neuronal loss in cortex and hippocampus and increased BDNF density in cortex, when compared to non-treated transgenic mice. It is suitable to conclude that these data support the use of microdose lithium in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, once the neurohistopathological characteristics of the disease were modified and the memory of transgenic animals was maintained.

  10. Chronic Microdose Lithium Treatment Prevented Memory Loss and Neurohistopathological Changes in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro-Silva, Karla Cristina; Baraldi-Tornisielo, Ticiana; Souza, Suzzanna Ingryd Gonçalves; Balthazar, Janaina; Albuquerque, Marilia Silva; Caetano, Ariadiny Lima; Viel, Tania Araujo; Buck, Hudson Sousa

    2015-01-01

    The use of lithium is well established in bipolar disorders and the benefits are being demonstrated in neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, our group showed that treatment with microdose lithium stabilized the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. In order to verify the lithium microdose potential in preventing the disease development, the aim of this work was to verify the effects of chronic treatment with microdose lithium given before and after the appearance of symptoms in a mouse model of a disease similar to AD. Transgenic mice (Cg-Tg(PDGFB-APPSwInd)20Lms/2J) and their non-transgenic litter mate genetic controls were treated with lithium carbonate (1.2 mg/Kg/day in drinking water) for 16 or 8 months starting at two and ten months of age, respectively. Similar groups were treated with water. At the end of treatments, both lithium treated transgenic groups and non-transgenic mice showed no memory disruption, different from what was observed in the water treated transgenic group. Transgenic mice treated with lithium since two months of age showed decreased number of senile plaques, no neuronal loss in cortex and hippocampus and increased BDNF density in cortex, when compared to non-treated transgenic mice. It is suitable to conclude that these data support the use of microdose lithium in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, once the neurohistopathological characteristics of the disease were modified and the memory of transgenic animals was maintained. PMID:26605788

  11. Proteomic profiling of brain cortex tissues in a Tau transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Seong-Hun; Jung, In-Soo; Han, Gi-Yeon; Kim, Nam-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A transgenic mouse model expressing NSE-htau23 was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D-gel electrophoresis to analyze the cortex proteins of transgenic mice was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentially expressed spots in different stages of AD were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GSTP1 and CAII were downregulated with the progression of AD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SCRN1 and ATP6VE1 were up regulated and down regulated differentially. -- Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves regionalized neuronal death, synaptic loss, and an accumulation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular senile plaques. Although there have been numerous studies on tau proteins and AD in various stages of neurodegenerative disease pathology, the relationship between tau and AD is not yet fully understood. A transgenic mouse model expressing neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-controlled human wild-type tau (NSE-htau23), which displays some of the typical Alzheimer-associated pathological features, was used to analyze the brain proteome associated with tau tangle deposition. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was performed to compare the cortex proteins of transgenic mice (6- and 12-month-old) with those of control mice. Differentially expressed spots in different stages of AD were identified with ESI-Q-TOF (electrospray ionization quadruple time-of-flight) mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Among the identified proteins, glutathione S-transferase P 1 (GSTP1) and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) were down-regulated with the progression of AD, and secerin-1 (SCRN1) and V-type proton ATPase subunit E 1 (ATP6VE1) were up-regulated only in the early stages, and down-regulated in the later stages of AD. The proteins, which were further confirmed by RT-PCR at the mRNA level and with western blotting at the protein level, are expected to be good candidates as drug targets for AD. The study

  12. AdS5×S(5) mirror model as a string sigma model.

    PubMed

    Arutyunov, Gleb; van Tongeren, Stijn J

    2014-12-31

    Doing a double Wick rotation in the world sheet theory of the light cone AdS5×S(5) superstring results in an inequivalent, so-called mirror theory that plays a central role in the field of integrability in the AdS-CFT correspondence. We show that this mirror theory can be interpreted as the light cone theory of a free string on a different background. This background is related to dS5×H(5) by a double T-duality, and has hidden supersymmetry. The geometry can also be extracted from an integrable deformation of the AdS5×S(5) sigma model, and we prove the observed mirror duality of these deformed models at the bosonic level as a byproduct. While we focus on AdS5×S(5), our results apply more generally.

  13. Genetic suppression of transgenic APP rescues Hypersynchronous network activity in a mouse model of Alzeimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Born, Heather A; Kim, Ji-Yoen; Savjani, Ricky R; Das, Pritam; Dabaghian, Yuri A; Guo, Qinxi; Yoo, Jong W; Schuler, Dorothy R; Cirrito, John R; Zheng, Hui; Golde, Todd E; Noebels, Jeffrey L; Jankowsky, Joanna L

    2014-03-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with an elevated risk for seizures that may be fundamentally connected to cognitive dysfunction. Supporting this link, many mouse models for AD exhibit abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG) activity in addition to the expected neuropathology and cognitive deficits. Here, we used a controllable transgenic system to investigate how network changes develop and are maintained in a model characterized by amyloid β (Aβ) overproduction and progressive amyloid pathology. EEG recordings in tet-off mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein (APP) from birth display frequent sharp wave discharges (SWDs). Unexpectedly, we found that withholding APP overexpression until adulthood substantially delayed the appearance of epileptiform activity. Together, these findings suggest that juvenile APP overexpression altered cortical development to favor synchronized firing. Regardless of the age at which EEG abnormalities appeared, the phenotype was dependent on continued APP overexpression and abated over several weeks once transgene expression was suppressed. Abnormal EEG discharges were independent of plaque load and could be extinguished without altering deposited amyloid. Selective reduction of Aβ with a γ-secretase inhibitor has no effect on the frequency of SWDs, indicating that another APP fragment or the full-length protein was likely responsible for maintaining EEG abnormalities. Moreover, transgene suppression normalized the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory innervation in the cortex, whereas secretase inhibition did not. Our results suggest that APP overexpression, and not Aβ overproduction, is responsible for EEG abnormalities in our transgenic mice and can be rescued independently of pathology.

  14. Striatal neurochemical changes in transgenic models of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Ariano, Marjorie A; Aronin, Neil; Difiglia, Marian; Tagle, Danilo A; Sibley, David R; Leavitt, Blair R; Hayden, Michael R; Levine, Michael S

    2002-06-15

    Transgenic mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD) were examined following the onset of overt behavioral symptoms. The HD transgenic mice demonstrated profound striatal losses in D1, D2, and D3 dopamine (DA) receptor proteins in comparison with their nonsymptomatic, age-matched littermate controls. In parallel, a robust increase in the striatal D5 DA receptor subtype occurred in the transgenic compared with the wild-type control mice. This receptor elevation was accompanied by heightened cyclic AMP levels, which may be induced by the adenylyl cyclase-linked D5 receptor. This is a unique result; normal striatal D5 protein levels are modest and not thought to contribute substantially to cyclic AMP-mediated DA signaling mechanisms. Simple compensatory up-regulation of D5 DA receptors in response to D1 receptor subtype loss does not explain our findings, because genetic inactivation of the D1 DA receptor does not alter levels of D5 DA receptor expression. Immunofluorescent detection of tyrosine hydroxylase showed that nigrostriatal DA containing terminals were reduced, further supporting that disturbances in DA signaling occurred in HD transgenic models. The substance P-containing striatal efferent pathway was more resistant to the HD mutation than met-enkephalin-producing striatal projection neurons in the transgenics, based on neuropeptide immunofluorescent staining. Analogous findings in multiple transgenic models suggest that these changes are due to the presence of the transgene and are not dependent on its composition, promotor elements, or mouse strain background. These findings suggest modifications in the striatal DA system and that its downstream signaling through cyclic AMP mechanisms is disrupted severely in HD following onset of motor symptoms.

  15. [Development of a hepatitis B virus carrier transgenic mice model].

    PubMed

    Caner, Müge; Arat, Sezen; Bircan, Rifat

    2008-01-01

    The studies for the development of transgenic mice models which provide important profits for the studies concerning immunopathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are in progress since 20 years. For this purpose different lineages bearing whole HBV genome or selected viral genes have been developed and their usage in clarifying the HBV replication and pathogenesis mechanisms have been emphasized. The aim of this study was to develop and breed a HBV carrier mice model. In the study the full HBV genome has been transferred to mouse embryos by microinjection procedure. Following transgenic manipulation, the HBV carriers among the daughter mice have been detected by molecular methods in which HBV-DNA replication and expression have been shown. The manipulations for transgene transfers have been performed in TUBITAK Marmara Research Center Transgene Laboratory, Gebze, Istanbul. The HBV-DNA carrier mice have been demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the DNA samples obtained from tail tissues and also by dot-blot hybridization of the mice sera. Integrated HBV-DNA has been detected by applying in-situ hybridization to the liver tissue sections. HBV-DNA expression has been shown by reverse transcriptase PCR method with total RNA molecules that have been isolated from the liver tissues of the HBV-DNA carrier mice. HBsAg has been detected in the liver by immunohistochemical method, and HBsAg and HBeAg have additionally been demonstrated by ELISA. HBV genome, expression of the genome and the expression products have been determined in approximately 10% of the mice of which HBV-DNA have been transferred. By inbreeding heterozygote carrier mice, homozygote HBV transgenic mice line have been obtained. These HBV transgenic mice are the first lineages developed in our country. It is hopefully thought that this HBV carrier transgenic mouse model may contribute to the studies on the pathogenesis of HBV infections which are important health problems in the

  16. Transcriptional dysregulation in a transgenic model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Yacoubian, Talene A; Cantuti-Castelvetri, Ippolita; Bouzou, Bérengère; Asteris, Georgios; McLean, Pamela J; Hyman, Bradley T; Standaert, David G

    2008-03-01

    Alpha-synuclein has been implicated in Parkinson disease, yet the mechanism by which alpha-synuclein causes cell injury is not understood. Using a transgenic mouse model, we evaluated the effect of alpha-synuclein overexpression on gene expression in the substantia nigra. Nigral mRNA from wild type and alpha-synuclein transgenic mice was analyzed using Affymetrix gene arrays. At 3 months, before pathological changes are apparent, we observed modest alterations in gene expression. However, nearly 200 genes were altered in expression at 9 months, when degenerative changes are more apparent. Functional genomic analysis revealed that the genes altered at 9 months were predominantly involved in gene transcription. As in human Parkinson disease, gene expression changes in the transgenic model were also modulated by gender. These data demonstrate that alterations of gene expression are widespread in this animal model, and suggest that transcriptional dysregulation may be a disease mechanism that can be targeted therapeutically.

  17. Metabolic disruption identified in the Huntington's disease transgenic sheep model.

    PubMed

    Handley, Renee R; Reid, Suzanne J; Patassini, Stefano; Rudiger, Skye R; Obolonkin, Vladimir; McLaughlan, Clive J; Jacobsen, Jessie C; Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Waldvogel, Henry J; Bawden, C Simon; Faull, Richard L M; Snell, Russell G

    2016-02-11

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited, progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion within exon 1 of HTT, encoding huntingtin. There are no therapies that can delay the progression of this devastating disease. One feature of HD that may play a critical role in its pathogenesis is metabolic disruption. Consequently, we undertook a comparative study of metabolites in our transgenic sheep model of HD (OVT73). This model does not display overt symptoms of HD but has circadian rhythm alterations and molecular changes characteristic of the early phase disease. Quantitative metabolite profiles were generated from the motor cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum and liver tissue of 5 year old transgenic sheep and matched controls by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Differentially abundant metabolites were evident in the cerebellum and liver. There was striking tissue-specificity, with predominantly amino acids affected in the transgenic cerebellum and fatty acids in the transgenic liver, which together may indicate a hyper-metabolic state. Furthermore, there were more strong pair-wise correlations of metabolite abundance in transgenic than in wild-type cerebellum and liver, suggesting altered metabolic constraints. Together these differences indicate a metabolic disruption in the sheep model of HD and could provide insight into the presymptomatic human disease.

  18. Transgenic mouse model for the fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kooy, R.F.; Reyniers, E.; De Boulle, K.

    1996-08-09

    Transgenic fragile X knockout mice have been constructed to provide an animal model to study the physiologic function of the fragile X gene (FMR1) and to gain more insight into the clinical phenotype caused by the absence of the fragile X protein. Initial experiments suggested that the knockout mice show macroorchidism and cognitive and behavioral deficits, abnormalities comparable to those of human fragile X patients. In the present study, we have extended our experiments, and conclude that the Fmr1 knockout mouse is a reliable transgenic model to study the fragile X syndrome. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Studies on the correlation with olfactory dysfunction in a transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Ameer; Lee, Ji Hye; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Moon, Cheil

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressively debilitating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presence of proteinaceous deposits in the brain. AD often results in olfactory dysfunction and impaired olfactory perceptual acuity may be a potential biomarker for early diagnosis of AD. Until recently, there is no Alzheimer's nanoscope or any other high-end microscope developed to be capable of seeing buried feature of AD clearly. Modern neuroimaging techniques are more effective only after the occurrence of cognitive impairment. Therefore, early detection of Alzheimer's disease is critical in developing effective treatment of AD. H and E (Haematoxyline and Eosin) staining is performed for examining gross morphological changes, while TUNEL (transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) staining for monitoring neuronal death in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Furthermore, immunohistochemistry and western blot are performed to examine β-amyloid protein expression. AD model animals were Tg2576 (transgenic mice that overexpress a mutated form of the Aβ precursor protein), and 6 month (before onset of AD symptoms) and 14 month (after onset of AD symptoms) old WT (wild type) and transgenic mice were compared in their olfactory system. We found that in OE of Tg2576 mice, thickness and total number of cells were decreased, while the numbers of TUNEL-positive neurons, caspase-3 activation were significantly increased compared with age-matched WT. Our results demonstrate that the olfactory system may get deteriorated before onset of AD symptoms. Our findings imply that an olfactory biopsy could be served as an early and relatively simple diagnostic tool for potential AD patients.

  20. Development of Alzheimer-disease neuroimaging-biomarkers using mouse models with amyloid-precursor protein-transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Teipel, Stefan J; Buchert, Ralph; Thome, Johannes; Hampel, Harald; Pahnke, Jens

    2011-12-01

    There are important recent developments in Alzheimer's disease (AD) translational research, especially with respect to the imaging of amyloid pathology in vivo using MRI and PET technologies. Here we exploit the most widely used transgenic mouse models of amyloid pathology in order to relate the imaging findings to our knowledge about the histopathological phenotype of these models. The development of new diagnostic criteria of AD necessitates the use of biological markers to diagnose AD even in the absence of overt dementia or early symptomatic mild cognitive impairment. The validity of the diagnosis will depend on the availability of an in vivo marker to reflect underlying neurobiological changes of AD. Transgenic models with essential features of AD pathology and mechanisms provide a test setting for the development and evaluation of new biological imaging markers. Among the best established imaging markers of amyloid pathology in transgenic animals are high-field MRI of brain atrophy, proton spectroscopy of neurochemical changes, high-field MRI of amyloid plaque load, and in vivo plaque imaging using radio-labelled ligands with PET. We discuss the implications of the findings as well as the methodological limitations and the specific requirements of these technologies. We furthermore outline future directions of transgene-imaging research. Transgene imaging is an emerging area of translational research that implies strong multi- and interdisciplinary collaborations. It will become ever more valuable with the introduction of new diagnostic standards and novel treatment approaches which will require valid and reliable biological markers to improve the diagnosis and early treatment of AD patients.

  1. A New Human DSG2-Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying the Tropism and Pathology of Human Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie; Beyer, Ines; Persson, Jonas; Song, Hui; Li, ZongYi; Richter, Maximilian; Cao, Hua; van Rensburg, Ruan; Yao, Xiaoying; Hudkins, Kelly; Yumul, Roma; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Yu, Mujun; Fender, Pascal; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-01-01

    We have recently reported that a group of human adenoviruses (HAdVs) uses desmoglein 2 (DSG2) as a receptor for infection. Among these are the widely distributed serotypes HAdV-B3 and HAdV-B7, as well as a newly emerged strain derived from HAdV-B14. These serotypes do not infect rodent cells and could not up until now be studied in small-animal models. We therefore generated transgenic mice containing the human DSG2 locus. These mice expressed human DSG2 (hDSG2) at a level and in a pattern similar to those found for humans and nonhuman primates. As an initial application of hDSG2-transgenic mice, we used a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing HAdV-B3 vector (Ad3-GFP) and studied GFP transgene expression by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry subsequent to intranasal and intravenous virus application. After intranasal application, we found efficient transduction of bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells in hDSG2-transgenic mice. Intravenous Ad3-GFP injection into hDSG2-transgenic mice resulted in hDSG2-dependent transduction of epithelial cells in the intestinal and colon mucosa. Our findings give an explanation for clinical symptoms associated with infection by DSG2-interacting HAdVs and provide a rationale for using Ad3-derived vectors in gene therapy. PMID:22457526

  2. Ocular Changes in TgF344-AD Rat Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yuchun; Lu, Bin; Ljubimov, Alexander V.; Girman, Sergey; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Svendsen, Clive N.; Cohen, Robert M.; Wang, Shaomei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive decline in learning, memory, and executive functions. In addition to cognitive and behavioral deficits, vision disturbances have been reported in early stage of AD, well before the diagnosis is clearly established. To further investigate ocular abnormalities, a novel AD transgenic rat model was analyzed. Methods. Transgenic (Tg) rats (TgF344-AD) heterozygous for human mutant APPswe/PS1ΔE9 and age-matched wild type (WT) rats, as well as 20 human postmortem retinal samples from both AD and healthy donors were used. Visual function in the rodent was analyzed using the optokinetic response. Immunohistochemistry on retinal and brain sections was used to detect various markers including amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques. Results. As expected, Aβ plaques were detected in the hippocampus, cortex, and retina of Tg rats. Plaque-like structures were also found in two AD human whole-mount retinas. The choroidal thickness was significantly reduced in both Tg rat and in AD human eyes when compared with age-matched controls. Tg rat eyes also showed hypertrophic retinal pigment epithelial cells, inflammatory cells, and upregulation of complement factor C3. Although visual acuity was lower in Tg than in WT rats, there was no significant difference in the retinal ganglion cell number and retinal vasculature. Conclusions. Further studies are needed to elucidate the significance and mechanisms of this pathological change and luminance threshold recording from the superior colliculus. PMID:24398104

  3. Voluntary running and environmental enrichment restores impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J J; Noristani, H N; Olabarria, M; Fletcher, J; Somerville, T D D; Yeh, C Y; Verkhratsky, A

    2011-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects memory and neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis plays an important role in memory function and impaired neurogenesis contributes to cognitive deficits associated with AD. Increased physical/ cognitive activity is associated with both reduced risk of dementia and increased neurogenesis. Previous attempts to restore hippocampal neurogenesis in transgenic mice by voluntary running (RUN) and environmental enrichment (ENR) provided controversial results due to lack of non-transgenic (non-Tg) control and inclusion of social isolation as "standard" housing environment. Here, we determine the effect of RUN and ENR upon hippocampal neurogenesis in a triple transgenic (3xTg-AD) mouse model of AD, which mimics AD pathology in humans. We used single and double immunohistochemistry to determine the area density of hippocampal proliferating cells, measured by the presence of phosphorylated Histone H3 (HH3), and their potential neuronal and glial phenotype by co-localizing the proliferating cells with the immature neuronal marker doublecortin (DCX), mature neuronal marker (NeuN) and specific astroglial marker (GFAP). Our results show that 3xTg-AD mice in control environment exhibit impaired hippocampal neurogenesis compared to non-Tg animals at 9 months of age. Exposure to RUN and ENR housing restores hippocampal neurogenesis in 3xTg-AD animals to non-Tg control levels. Differentiation into neurones and glial cells is affected neither by transgenic status nor by housing environment. These results suggest that hippocampus of 3xTg-AD animals maintains the potential for cellular plasticity. Increase in physical activity and/or cognitive experience enhances neurogenesis and provides a potential for stimulation of cognitive function in AD.

  4. Beneficial effects of caffeine in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease-like tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Cyril; Eddarkaoui, Sabiha; Derisbourg, Maxime; Leboucher, Antoine; Demeyer, Dominique; Carrier, Sébastien; Schneider, Marion; Hamdane, Malika; Müller, Christa E; Buée, Luc; Blum, David

    2014-09-01

    Tau pathology found in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is crucial in cognitive decline. Epidemiologic evidences support that habitual caffeine intake prevents memory decline during aging and reduces the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease. So far, experimental studies addressed the impact of caffeine in models mimicking the amyloid pathology of AD. However, in vivo effects of caffeine in a model of AD-like tauopathy remain unknown. Here, we evaluated effects of chronic caffeine intake (0.3 g/L through drinking water), given at an early pathologic stage, in the THY-Tau22 transgenic mouse model of progressive AD-like tau pathology. We found that chronic caffeine intake prevents from the development of spatial memory deficits in tau mice. Improved memory was associated with reduced hippocampal tau phosphorylation and proteolytic fragments. Moreover, caffeine treatment mitigated several proinflammatory and oxidative stress markers found upregulated in the hippocampus of THY-Tau22 animals. Together, our data support that moderate caffeine intake is beneficial in a model of AD-like tau pathology, paving the way for future clinical evaluation in AD patients.

  5. Increased expression of miRNA-146a in Alzheimer’s disease transgenic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.Y.; Cui, J.G.; Hill, J.M.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Zhao, Y.; Lukiw, W.J.

    2017-01-01

    A mouse and human brain-enriched micro-RNA-146a (miRNA-146a) is known to be important in modulating the innate immune response and inflammatory signaling in certain immunological and brain cell types. In this study we examined miRNA-146a levels in early-, moderate- and late-stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neocortex and hippocampus, in several human primary brain and retinal cell lines, and in 5 different transgenic mouse models of AD including Tg2576, TgCRND8, PSAPP, 3xTg-AD and 5xFAD. Inducible expression of miRNA-146a was found to be significantly up-regulated in a primary co-culture of human neuronal–glial (HNG) cells stressed using interleukin1-beta (IL-1β), and this up-regulation was quenched using specific NF-κB inhibitors including curcumin. Expression of miRNA-146a correlated with senile plaque density and synaptic pathology in Tg2576 and in 5xFAD transgenic mouse models used in the study of this common neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:20934487

  6. Relative transgene expression frequencies in homozygous versus hemizygous transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Su-Ping; Opsahl, Margaret L; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Morley, Steven D; West, John D

    2013-12-01

    We have used a simple binomial model of stochastic transgene inactivation at the level of the chromosome or transgene, rather than the cellular level, for the analysis of two mouse transgenic lines that show variegated patterns of expression. This predicts the percentages of cells that express one, both or neither alleles of the transgene in homozygotes from the observed percentages of cells, which express the transgene in hemizygotes. It adequately explained the relationship between the numbers of cells expressing the transgene in hemizygous and homozygous mosaic 21OH/LacZ mouse adrenals and mosaic BLG/7 mouse mammary glands. The binomial model also predicted that a small proportion of cells in mosaic mammary glands of BLG/7 homozygotes would express both BLG/7 alleles but published data indicated that all cells expressing the transgene showed monoallelic expression. Although it didn't fit all of the BLG/7 data as precisely as a more complex model, which used several ad hoc assumptions to explain these results, the simple binomial model was able to explain the relationship in observed transgene expression frequencies between hemizygous and homozygous mosaic tissues for both 21OH/LacZ and BLG/7 mice. It may prove to be a useful general model for analysing other transgenic animals showing mosaic transgene expression.

  7. Transgenic models in xenobiotic metabolism and toxicology.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Frank J

    2002-12-27

    There exist in animals a large number of enzymes that primarily metabolize xenobiotics including drugs, toxins and carcinogens. While these enzymes are known to activate or inactivate toxins and carcinogens in vitro, it had not been demonstrated until recently whether they are responsible for the biological effects of these chemicals in intact animal models. In order to determine the biological affects of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, gene knockout mice were made that lack expression of certain P450s (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1 and CYP2E1), microsomal and cytosolic epoxide hydrolases, and NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase. These mice have no deleterious phenotypes indicating that xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes have no direct role in mammalian development and physiological homeostasis even though all the genes and enzymes examined are conserved in mammals. However, in many cases, mice lacking certain xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes confer resistance to acute toxicities and chemical carcinogenesis thus demonstrating that these enzymes mediate the deleterious effects of chemicals. The use of xenobiotic metabolism null animal models to study the mechanisms of actions of toxins and carcinogens will be reviewed.

  8. Adenovirus serotype 35 vector-induced innate immune responses in dendritic cells derived from wild-type and human CD46-transgenic mice: Comparison with a fiber-substituted Ad vector containing fiber proteins of Ad serotype 35.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Nakashima, Kazuko; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Ichinose, Takako; Kawabata, Kenji; Hayakawa, Takao; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2010-12-01

    Recently, much attention has focused on replication-incompetent adenovirus (Ad) vectors containing fiber proteins derived from species B Ad serotype 35 (Ad35) (Ad5F35) and Ad vectors fully constructed from Ad35 as vaccine vectors expressing antigens. However, differences in the transduction properties, including the induction of innate immunity, of Ad5F35 and Ad35 vectors have not been properly and fully examined, partly because the transduction properties of these Ad vectors should be evaluated using nonhuman primates or human CD46-transgenic (CD46TG) mice, which ubiquitously express the primary receptor of Ad35, human CD46, in a pattern similar to that of humans. In the present study, we evaluated innate immune responses of mouse dendritic cells (mDCs) derived from bone marrow cells of wild-type (WT) and CD46TG mice following transduction with Ad serotype 5 (Ad5), fiber-substituted Ad5F35, or Ad35 vectors. Ad5F35 and Ad35 vectors mediated more efficient transduction in mDCs derived from CD46TG mice (CD46TG-mDCs) than did Ad5 vectors. Upregulation of costimulatory molecules and inflammatory cytokine induction by Ad5F35 and Ad35 vectors were significantly higher than those by Ad5 vectors in CD46TG-mDCs. However, the induction properties of the innate immune responses were different between Ad5F35 and Ad35 vectors. Ad35 vectors induced higher levels of costimulatory molecule expression and inflammatory cytokine production than did Ad5F35 vectors in CD46TG-mDCs. Furthermore, intravenous administration of Ad35 vectors in WT and CD46TG mice resulted in higher levels of serum interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-12 compared with administration of Ad5F35 vectors, which exhibited almost mock-transduced levels of these inflammatory cytokines. This study indicates that innate immune responses by Ad35 and Ad5F35 vectors are distinct even although both Ad vectors recognize human CD46 as a receptor.

  9. Comparison of Model Predictions and Laboratory Observations of Transgene Frequencies in Continuously-Breeding Mosquito Populations

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Laura; North, Ace; Collins, C. Matilda; Mumford, John D.; Facchinelli, Luca; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Benedict, Mark Q.

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of transgenes in the environment is a consideration in risk assessments of transgenic organisms. Combining mathematical models that predict the frequency of transgenes and experimental demonstrations can validate the model predictions, or can detect significant biological deviations that were neither apparent nor included as model parameters. In order to assess the correlation between predictions and observations, models were constructed to estimate the frequency of a transgene causing male sexual sterility in simulated populations of a malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae that were seeded with transgenic females at various proportions. Concurrently, overlapping-generation laboratory populations similar to those being modeled were initialized with various starting transgene proportions, and the subsequent proportions of transgenic individuals in populations were determined weekly until the transgene disappeared. The specific transgene being tested contained a homing endonuclease gene expressed in testes, I-PpoI, that cleaves the ribosomal DNA and results in complete male sexual sterility with no effect on female fertility. The transgene was observed to disappear more rapidly than the model predicted in all cases. The period before ovipositions that contained no transgenic progeny ranged from as little as three weeks after cage initiation to as long as 11 weeks. PMID:27669312

  10. Comparison of Model Predictions and Laboratory Observations of Transgene Frequencies in Continuously-Breeding Mosquito Populations.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Laura; North, Ace; Collins, C Matilda; Mumford, John D; Facchinelli, Luca; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Benedict, Mark Q

    2016-09-22

    The persistence of transgenes in the environment is a consideration in risk assessments of transgenic organisms. Combining mathematical models that predict the frequency of transgenes and experimental demonstrations can validate the model predictions, or can detect significant biological deviations that were neither apparent nor included as model parameters. In order to assess the correlation between predictions and observations, models were constructed to estimate the frequency of a transgene causing male sexual sterility in simulated populations of a malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae that were seeded with transgenic females at various proportions. Concurrently, overlapping-generation laboratory populations similar to those being modeled were initialized with various starting transgene proportions, and the subsequent proportions of transgenic individuals in populations were determined weekly until the transgene disappeared. The specific transgene being tested contained a homing endonuclease gene expressed in testes, I-PpoI, that cleaves the ribosomal DNA and results in complete male sexual sterility with no effect on female fertility. The transgene was observed to disappear more rapidly than the model predicted in all cases. The period before ovipositions that contained no transgenic progeny ranged from as little as three weeks after cage initiation to as long as 11 weeks.

  11. APP transgenic modeling of Alzheimer's disease: mechanisms of neurodegeneration and aberrant neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Crews, Leslie; Rockenstein, Edward; Masliah, Eliezer

    2010-03-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders of the aging population affect over 5 million people in the US and Europe alone. The common feature is the progressive accumulation of misfolded proteins with the formation of toxic oligomers. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by cognitive impairment, progressive degeneration of neuronal populations in the neocortex and limbic system, and formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Amyloid-beta (Abeta) is the product of proteolysis of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta and gamma-secretase enzymes. The neurodegenerative process in AD initiates with axonal and synaptic damage and is associated with progressive accumulation of toxic Abeta oligomers in the intracellular and extracellular space. In addition, neurodegeneration in AD is associated with alterations in neurogenesis. Abeta accumulation is the consequence of an altered balance between protein synthesis, aggregation rate, and clearance. Identification of genetic mutations in APP associated with familial forms of AD and gene polymorphisms associated with the more common sporadic variants of AD has led to the development of transgenic (tg) and knock out rodents as well as viral vector driven models of AD. While APP tg murine models with mutations in the N- and C-terminal flanking regions of Abeta are characterized by increased Abeta production with plaque formation, mutations in the mid-segment of Abeta result in increased formation of oligomers, and mutations toward the C-terminus (E22Q) segment results in amyloid angiopathy. Similar to AD, in APP tg models bearing familial mutations, formation of Abeta oligomers results in defective plasticity in the perforant pathway, selective neuronal degeneration, and alterations in neurogenesis. Promising results have been obtained utilizing APP tg models of AD to develop therapies including the use of beta- and gamma-secretase inhibitors, immunization, and stimulating neurogenesis.

  12. Transgenic Mouse Models of Childhood Onset Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Holly R.; Feng, Guoping

    2011-01-01

    Childhood onset psychiatric disorders, such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Mood Disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (OCSD), and Schizophrenia (SZ), affect many school age children leading to a lower quality of life, including difficulties in school and personal relationships that persists into adulthood. Currently, the causes of these psychiatric disorders are poorly understood resulting in difficulty diagnosing affected children, and insufficient treatment options. Family and twin studies implicate a genetic contribution for ADHD, ASD, Mood Disorders, OCSD, and SZ. Identification of candidate genes and chromosomal regions associated with a particular disorder provide targets for directed research, and understanding how these genes influence the disease state will provide valuable insights for improving the diagnosis and treatment of children with psychiatric disorders. Animal models are one important approach in the study of human diseases, allowing for the use of a variety of experimental approaches to dissect the contribution of a specific chromosomal or genetic abnormality in human disorders. While it is impossible to model an entire psychiatric disorder in a single animal model, these models can be extremely valuable in dissecting out the specific role of a gene, pathway, neuron subtype, or brain region in a particular abnormal behavior. In this review we discuss existing transgenic mouse models for childhood onset psychiatric disorders. We compare the strength and weakness of various transgenic animal models proposed for each of the common childhood onset psychiatric disorders, and discuss future directions for the study of these disorders using cutting-edge genetic tools. PMID:21309772

  13. PGC-1α overexpression exacerbates β-amyloid and tau deposition in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Magali; Stack, Cliona; Elipenahli, Ceyhan; Jainuddin, Shari; Launay, Nathalie; Gerges, Meri; Starkova, Natalia; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Calingasan, Noel Y.; Tampellini, Davide; Pujol, Aurora; Beal, M. Flint

    2014-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α) interacts with various transcription factors involved in energy metabolism and in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. PGC-1α mRNA levels are reduced in a number of neurodegenerative diseases and contribute to disease pathogenesis, since increased levels ameliorate behavioral defects and neuropathology of Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PGC-1α and its downstream targets are reduced both in postmortem brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in transgenic mouse models of AD. Therefore, we investigated whether increased expression of PGC-1α would exert beneficial effects in the Tg19959 transgenic mouse model of AD; Tg19959 mice express the human amyloid precursor gene (APP) with 2 familial AD mutations and develop increased β-amyloid levels, plaque deposition, and memory deficits by 2–3 mo of age. Rather than an improvement, the cross of the Tg19959 mice with mice overexpressing human PGC-1α exacerbated amyloid and tau accumulation. This was accompanied by an impairment of proteasome activity. PGC-1α overexpression induced mitochondrial abnormalities, neuronal cell death, and an exacerbation of behavioral hyperactivity in the Tg19959 mice. These findings show that PGC-1α overexpression exacerbates the neuropathological and behavioral deficits that occur in transgenic mice with mutations in APP that are associated with human AD.—Dumont, M., Stack, C., Elipenahli, C., Jainuddin, S., Launay, N., Gerges, M., Starkova, N., Starkov, A. A., Calingasan, N. Y., Tampellini, D., Pujol, A., Beal, M. F. PGC-1α overexpression exacerbates β-amyloid and tau deposition in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24398293

  14. Sodium selenate regulates the brain ionome in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lin; Zhu, Hua-Zhang; Wang, Bing-Tao; Zhao, Qiong-Hui; Du, Xiu-Bo; Zheng, Yi; Jiang, Liang; Ni, Jia-Zuan; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that imbalance of mineral metabolism may play an important role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression. It was recently reported that selenium could reverse memory deficits in AD mouse model. We carried out multi-time-point ionome analysis to investigate the interactions among 15 elements in the brain by using a triple-transgenic mouse model of AD with/without high-dose sodium selenate supplementation. Except selenium, the majority of significantly changed elements showed a reduced level after 6-month selenate supplementation, especially iron whose levels were completely reversed to normal state at almost all examined time points. We then built the elemental correlation network for each time point. Significant and specific elemental correlations and correlation changes were identified, implying a highly complex and dynamic crosstalk between selenium and other elements during long-term supplementation with selenate. Finally, we measured the activities of two important anti-oxidative selenoenzymes, glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase, and found that they were remarkably increased in the cerebrum of selenate-treated mice, suggesting that selenoenzyme-mediated protection against oxidative stress might also be involved in the therapeutic effect of selenate in AD. Overall, this study should contribute to our understanding of the mechanism related to the potential use of selenate in AD treatment. PMID:28008954

  15. Spontaneous and transgenic rodent models of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Jurjus, Abdo

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder with many different putative influences mediating disease onset, severity, progression and diminution. Spontaneous natural IBD is classically expressed as Crohn's Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC) commonly found in primates; lymphoplasmocytic enteritis, eosinophilic gastritis and colitis, and ulcerative colitis with neuronal hyperplasia in dogs; and colitis in horses. Spontaneous inflammatory bowel disease has been noted in a number of rodent models which differ in genetic strain background, induced mutation, microbiota influences and immunopathogenic pathways. Histological lesions in Crohn's Disease feature noncaseating granulomatous inflammation while UC lesions typically exhibit ulceration, lamina propria inflammatory infiltrates and lack of granuloma development. Intestinal inflammation caused by CD and UC is also associated with increased incidence of intestinal neoplasia. Transgenic murine models have determined underlying etiological influences and appropriate therapeutic targets in IBD. This literature review will discuss current opinion and findings in spontaneous IBD, highlight selected transgenic rodent models of IBD and discuss their respective pathogenic mechanisms. It is very important to provide accommodation of induced putative deficits in activities of daily living and to assess discomfort and pain levels in the face of significant morbidity and/or mortality in these models. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis, and evaluating ways in which they influence disease expression represent potential investigative approaches with the greatest potential for new discoveries. PMID:26155200

  16. Generation of transgenic mouse model using PTTG as an oncogene.

    PubMed

    Kakar, Sham S; Kakar, Cohin

    2015-01-01

    The close physiological similarity between the mouse and human has provided tools to understanding the biological function of particular genes in vivo by introduction or deletion of a gene of interest. Using a mouse as a model has provided a wealth of resources, knowledge, and technology, helping scientists to understand the biological functions, translocation, trafficking, and interaction of a candidate gene with other intracellular molecules, transcriptional regulation, posttranslational modification, and discovery of novel signaling pathways for a particular gene. Most importantly, the generation of the mouse model for a specific human disease has provided a powerful tool to understand the etiology of a disease and discovery of novel therapeutics. This chapter describes in detail the step-by-step generation of the transgenic mouse model, which can be helpful in guiding new investigators in developing successful models. For practical purposes, we will describe the generation of a mouse model using pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) as the candidate gene of interest.

  17. Massive quiver matrix models for massive charged particles in AdS

    SciTech Connect

    Asplund, Curtis T.; Denef, Frederik; Dzienkowski, Eric

    2016-01-11

    Here, we present a new class of N = 4 supersymmetric quiver matrix models and argue that it describes the stringy low-energy dynamics of internally wrapped D-branes in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) flux compactifications. The Lagrangians of these models differ from previously studied quiver matrix models by the presence of mass terms, associated with the AdS gravitational potential, as well as additional terms dictated by supersymmetry. These give rise to dynamical phenomena typically associated with the presence of fluxes, such as fuzzy membranes, internal cyclotron motion and the appearance of confining strings. We also show how these models can be obtained by dimensional reduction of four-dimensional supersymmetric quiver gauge theories on a three-sphere.

  18. Massive quiver matrix models for massive charged particles in AdS

    DOE PAGES

    Asplund, Curtis T.; Denef, Frederik; Dzienkowski, Eric

    2016-01-11

    Here, we present a new class of N = 4 supersymmetric quiver matrix models and argue that it describes the stringy low-energy dynamics of internally wrapped D-branes in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) flux compactifications. The Lagrangians of these models differ from previously studied quiver matrix models by the presence of mass terms, associated with the AdS gravitational potential, as well as additional terms dictated by supersymmetry. These give rise to dynamical phenomena typically associated with the presence of fluxes, such as fuzzy membranes, internal cyclotron motion and the appearance of confining strings. We also show how these models can bemore » obtained by dimensional reduction of four-dimensional supersymmetric quiver gauge theories on a three-sphere.« less

  19. A transgenic zebrafish model for monitoring glucocorticoid receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Randall G.; Poshusta, Tanya L.; Skuster, Kimberly J.; Berg, MaKayla R.; Gardner, Samantha L.; Clark, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    Gene regulation resulting from glucocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid response element interactions is a hallmark feature of stress response signaling. Imbalanced glucocorticoid production and glucocorticoid receptor activity have been linked to socio-economically crippling neuropsychiatric disorders, and accordingly there is a need to develop in vivo models to help understand disease progression and management. Therefore, we developed the transgenic SR4G zebrafish reporter line with six glucocorticoid response elements used to promote expression of a short half-life green fluorescent protein following glucocorticoid receptor activation. Herein, we document the ability of this reporter line to respond to both chronic and acute exogenous glucocorticoid treatment. The green fluorescent protein expression in response to transgene activation was high in a variety of tissues including the brain, and provided single cell resolution in the effected regions. The specificity of these responses is demonstrated using the partial agonist mifepristone and mutation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Importantly, the reporter line also modeled the temporal dynamics of endogenous stress response signaling, including the increased production of the glucocorticoid cortisol following hyperosmotic stress and the fluctuations of basal cortisol concentrations with the circadian rhythm. Taken together, these results characterize our newly developed reporter line for elucidating environmental or genetic modifiers of stress response signaling, which may provide insights to the neuronal mechanisms underlying neuropsychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder. PMID:24679220

  20. Brain inflammation and oxidative stress in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer-like brain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuemang; Chinnici, Cinzia; Tang, Hanguan; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia MY; Praticò, Domenico

    2004-01-01

    Background An increasing body of evidence implicates both brain inflammation and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The relevance of their interaction in vivo, however, is unknown. Previously, we have shown that separate pharmacological targeting of these two components results in amelioration of the amyloidogenic phenotype of a transgenic mouse model of AD-like brain amyloidosis (Tg2576). Methods In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of a combination of an anti-inflammatory agent, indomethacin, and a natural anti-oxidant, vitamin E, in the Tg2576 mice. For this reason, animals were treated continuously from 8 (prior to Aβ deposition) through 15 (when Aβ deposits are abundant) months of age. Results At the end of the study, these therapeutic interventions suppressed brain inflammatory and oxidative stress responses in the mice. This effect was accompanied by significant reductions of soluble and insoluble Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 in neocortex and hippocampus, wherein the burden of Aβ deposits also was significantly decreased. Conclusions The results of the present study support the concept that brain oxidative stress and inflammation coexist in this animal model of AD-like brain amyloidosis, but they represent two distinct therapeutic targets in the disease pathogenesis. We propose that a combination of anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant drugs may be a useful strategy for treating AD. PMID:15500684

  1. Impaired satiation and increased feeding behaviour in the triple-transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Adebakin, Adedolapo; Bradley, Jenna; Gümüsgöz, Sarah; Waters, Elizabeth J; Lawrence, Catherine B

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with non-cognitive symptoms such as changes in feeding behaviour that are often characterised by an increase in appetite. Increased food intake is observed in several mouse models of AD including the triple transgenic (3×TgAD) mouse, but the mechanisms underlying this hyperphagia are unknown. We therefore examined feeding behaviour in 3×TgAD mice and tested their sensitivity to exogenous and endogenous satiety factors by assessing food intake and activation of key brain regions. In the behavioural satiety sequence (BSS), 3×TgAD mice consumed more food after a fast compared to Non-Tg controls. Feeding and drinking behaviours were increased and rest decreased in 3×TgAD mice, but the overall sequence of behaviours in the BSS was maintained. Exogenous administration of the satiety factor cholecystokinin (CCK; 8-30 µg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently reduced food intake in Non-Tg controls and increased inactive behaviour, but had no effect on food intake or behaviour in 3×TgAD mice. CCK (15 µg/kg, i.p.) increased c-Fos protein expression in the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus, and the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and area postrema of the brainstem to the same extent in Non-Tg and 3×TgAD mice, but less c-Fos positive cells were detected in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus of CCK-treated 3×TgAD compared to Non-Tg mice. In response to a fast or a period of re-feeding, there was no difference in the number of c-Fos-positive cells detected in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, NTS and area postrema of 3×TgAD compared to Non-Tg mice. The degree of c-Fos expression in the NTS was positively correlated to food intake in Non-Tg mice, however, this relationship was absent in 3×TgAD mice. These data demonstrate that 3×TgAD mice show increased feeding behaviour and insensitivity to satiation, which is possibly due to defective gut-brain signalling in response to endogenous satiety factors released by food

  2. Data on amyloid precursor protein accumulation, spontaneous physical activity, and motor learning after traumatic brain injury in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yasushi; Shishido, Hajime; Sawanishi, Mayumi; Toyota, Yasunori; Ueno, Masaki; Kubota, Takashi; Kirino, Yutaka; Tamiya, Takashi; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    This data article contains supporting information regarding the research article entitled "Traumatic brain injury accelerates amyloid-β deposition and impairs spatial learning in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease" (H. Shishido, Y. Kishimoto, N. Kawai, Y. Toyota, M. Ueno, T. Kubota, Y. Kirino, T. Tamiya, 2016) [1]. Triple-transgenic (3×Tg)-Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) model mice exhibited significantly poorer spatial learning than sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Correspondingly, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition within the hippocampus was significantly greater in 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after TBI. However, data regarding the short-term and long-term influences of TBI on amyloid precursor protein (APP) accumulation in AD model mice remain limited. Furthermore, there is little data showing whether physical activity and motor learning are affected by TBI in AD model mice. Here, we provide immunocytochemistry data confirming that TBI induces significant increases in APP accumulation in 3×Tg-AD mice at both 7 days and 28 days after TBI. Furthermore, 3×Tg-AD model mice exhibit a reduced ability to acquire conditioned responses (CRs) during delay eyeblink conditioning compared to sham-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice 28 days after TBI. However, physical activity and motor performance are not significantly changed in TBI-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice.

  3. AdS black disk model for small-x DIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornalba, Lorenzo; Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João

    2011-05-01

    Using the approximate conformal invariance of QCD at high energies we consider a simple AdS black disk model to describe saturation in DIS. Deep inside saturation the structure functions have the same power law scaling, FT˜FL˜x-ω, where ω is related to the expansion rate of the black disk with energy. Furthermore, the ratio FL/FT is given by the universal value 1+ω/3+ω, independently of the target.

  4. Grape seed polyphenols and curcumin reduce genomic instability events in a transgenic mouse model for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Philip; Wang, Yan-Jiang; Zhong, Jin-Hua; Kosaraju, Shantha; O'Callaghan, Nathan J; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Fenech, Michael

    2009-02-10

    The study set out to determine (a) whether DNA damage is elevated in mice that carry mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP695swe) and presenilin 1 (PSEN1-dE9) that predispose to Alzheimer's disease (AD) relative to non-transgenic control mice, and (b) whether increasing the intake of dietary polyphenols from curcumin or grape seed extract could reduce genomic instability events in a transgenic mouse model for AD. DNA damage was measured using the micronucleus (MN) assay in both buccal mucosa and erythrocytes and an absolute telomere length assay for both buccal mucosa and olfactory bulb tissue. MN frequency tended to be higher in AD mice in both buccal mucosa (1.7-fold) and polychromatic erythrocytes (1.3-fold) relative to controls. Telomere length was significantly reduced by 91% (p=0.04) and non-significantly reduced by 50% in buccal mucosa and olfactory bulbs respectively in AD mice relative to controls. A significant 10-fold decrease in buccal MN frequency (p=0.01) was found for AD mice fed diets containing curcumin (CUR) or micro-encapsulated grape seed extract (MGSE) and a 7-fold decrease (p=0.02) for AD mice fed unencapsulated grape seed extract (GSE) compared to the AD group on control diet. Similarly, in polychromatic erythrocytes a significant reduction in MN frequency was found for the MGSE cohort (65.3%) (p<0.05), whereas the AD CUR and AD GSE groups were non-significantly reduced by 39.2 and 34.8% respectively compared to the AD Control. A non-significant 2-fold increase in buccal cell telomere length was evident for the CUR, GSE and MGSE groups compared to the AD control group. Olfactory bulb telomere length was found to be non-significantly 2-fold longer in mice fed on the CUR diet compared to controls. These results suggest potential protective effects of polyphenols against genomic instability events in different somatic tissues of a transgenic mouse model for AD.

  5. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Moyer, E. L.; Kumar, A.; Tahimic, Candice C. G.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss can occur due to many challenges such age, radiation, microgravity, and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) play a critical role in bone resorption by osteoclasts (Bartell et al. 2014). We hypothesize that suppression of excess ROS in skeletal cells, both osteoblasts and osteoclasts, regulates skeletal growth and remodeling. To test our hypothesis, we used transgenic mCAT mice which overexpress the human anti-oxidant catalase gene targeted to the mitochondria, the main site for endogenous ROS production. mCAT mice have a longer life-span than wildtype controls and have been used to study various age-related disorders. To stimulate remodeling, 16 week old mCAT mice or wildtype mice were exposed to treatment (hindlimb-unloading and total body-irradiation) or sham treatment conditions (control). Tissues were harvested 2 weeks later for skeletal analysis (microcomputed tomography), biochemical analysis (gene expression and oxidative damage measurements), and ex vivo bone marrow derived cell culture (osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis). mCAT mice expressed the transgene and displayed elevated catalase activity in skeletal tissue and marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclasts grown ex vivo. In addition, when challenged with treatment, bone tissues from wildtype mice showed elevated levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), indicating oxidative damage) whereas mCAT mice did not. Correlation analysis revealed that increased catalase activity significantly correlated with decreased MDA levels and that increased oxidative damage correlated with decreased percent bone volume (BVTV). In addition, ex-vivo cultured osteoblast colony growth correlated with catalase activity in the osteoblasts. Thus, we showed that these transgenic mice can be used as a model to study the relationship between markers of oxidative damage and skeletal properties. mCAT mice displayed reduced BVTV and trabecular number relative to wildtype mice, as well as increased structural model index in the

  6. Fibrillar Amyloid-β Accumulation Triggers an Inflammatory Mechanism Leading to Hyperphosphorylation of the Carboxyl-Terminal End of Tau Polypeptide in the Hippocampal Formation of the 3×Tg-AD Transgenic Mouse.

    PubMed

    Ontiveros-Torres, Miguel Ángel; Labra-Barrios, María Luisa; Díaz-Cintra, Sofía; Aguilar-Vázquez, Azucena Ruth; Moreno-Campuzano, Samadhi; Flores-Rodríguez, Paola; Luna-Herrera, Claudia; Mena, Raúl; Perry, George; Florán-Garduño, Benjamín; Luna-Muñoz, José; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro

    2016-03-22

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative and irreversible disorder whose progressiveness is dependent on age. It is histopathologically characterized by the massive accumulation of insoluble forms of tau and amyloid-β (Aβ) asneurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques, respectively. Many studies have documented that these two polypeptides suffer several posttranslational modifications employing postmortem tissue sections from brains of patients with AD. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the posttranslational modifications of key players in this disease, including Aβ and tau, several transgenic mouse models have been developed. One of these models is the 3×Tg-AD transgenic mouse, carrying three transgenes encoding APPSWE, S1M146V, and TauP301L proteins. To further characterize this transgenicmouse, we determined the accumulation of fibrillar Aβ as a function of age in relation to the hyperphosphorylation patterns of TauP301L at both its N- and C-terminus in the hippocampal formation by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Moreover, we searched for the expression of activated protein kinases and mediators of inflammation by western blot of wholeprotein extracts from hippocampal tissue sections since 3 to 28 months as well. Our results indicate that the presence of fibrillar Aβ deposits correlates with a significant activation of astrocytes and microglia in subiculum and CA1 regions of hippocampus. Accordingly, we also observed a significant increase in the expression of TNF-α associated to neuritic plaques and glial cells. Importantly, there is an overexpression of the stress activated protein kinases SAPK/JNK and Cdk-5 in pyramidal neurons, which might phosphorylate several residues at the C-terminus of TauP301L. Therefore, the accumulation of Aβ oligomers results in an inflammatory environment that upregulates kinases involved in hyperphosphorylation of TauP301L polypeptide.

  7. Measuring Teacher Quality with Value-Added Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marder, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Using computers to evaluate teachers based on student test scores is more difficult than it seems. Value-added modeling is a genuinely serious attempt to grapple with the difficulties. Value-added modeling carries the promise of measuring teacher quality automatically and objectively, and improving school systems at minimal cost. The essence of…

  8. Using School Lotteries to Evaluate the Value-Added Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutsch, Jonah

    2013-01-01

    There has been an active debate in the literature over the validity of value-added models. In this study, the author tests the central assumption of value-added models that school assignment is random relative to expected test scores conditional on prior test scores, demographic variables, and other controls. He uses a Chicago charter school's…

  9. P53/Rb inhibition induces metastatic adrenocortical carcinomas in a preclinical transgenic model.

    PubMed

    Batisse-Lignier, M; Sahut-Barnola, I; Tissier, F; Dumontet, T; Mathieu, M; Drelon, C; Pointud, J-C; Damon-Soubeyrand, C; Marceau, G; Kemeny, J-L; Bertherat, J; Tauveron, I; Val, P; Martinez, A; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-M

    2017-04-03

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare cancer with poor prognosis. Pan-genomic analyses identified p53/Rb and WNT/β-catenin signaling pathways as main contributors to the disease. However, isolated β-catenin constitutive activation failed to induce malignant progression in mouse adrenocortical tumors. Therefore, there still was a need for a relevant animal model to study ACC pathogenesis and to test new therapeutic approaches. Here, we have developed a transgenic mice model with adrenocortical specific expression of SV40 large T-antigen (AdTAg mice), to test the oncogenic potential of p53/Rb inhibition in the adrenal gland. All AdTAg mice develop large adrenal carcinomas that eventually metastasize to the liver and lungs, resulting in decreased overall survival. Consistent with ACC in patients, adrenal tumors in AdTAg mice autonomously produce large amounts of glucocorticoids and spontaneously activate WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway during malignant progression. We show that this activation is associated with downregulation of secreted frizzled related proteins (Sfrp) and Znrf3 that act as inhibitors of the WNT signaling. We also show that mTORC1 pathway activation is an early event during neoplasia expansion and further demonstrate that mTORC1 pathway is activated in ACC patients. Preclinical inhibition of mTORC1 activity induces a marked reduction in tumor size, associated with induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation that results in normalization of corticosterone plasma levels in AdTAg mice. Altogether, these data establish AdTAg mice as the first preclinical model for metastatic ACC.Oncogene advance online publication, 3 April 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.54.

  10. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, A.-S.; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Kumar, A.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to musculoskeletal disuse and radiation result in bone loss; we hypothesized that these catabolic treatments cause excess reactive oxygen species (ROS), and thereby alter the tight balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used transgenic mice which over-express the human gene for catalase, targeted to mitochondria (MCAT). Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts the ROS hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. MCAT mice were shown previously to display reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress and radiosensitivity of the CNS compared to wild type controls (WT). As expected, MCAT mice expressed the transgene in skeletal tissue, and in marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors cultured ex vivo, and also showed greater catalase activity compared to wildtype (WT) mice (3-6 fold). Colony expansion in marrow cells cultured under osteoblastogenic conditions was 2-fold greater in the MCAT mice compared to WT mice, while the extent of mineralization was unaffected. MCAT mice had slightly longer tibiae than WT mice (2%, P less than 0.01), although cortical bone area was slightly lower in MCAT mice than WT mice (10%, p=0.09). To challenge the skeletal system, mice were treated by exposure to combined disuse (2 wk Hindlimb Unloading) and total body irradiation Cs(137) (2 Gy, 0.8 Gy/min), then bone parameters were analyzed by 2-factor ANOVA to detect possible interaction effects. Treatment caused a 2-fold increase (p=0.015) in malondialdehyde levels of bone tissue (ELISA) in WT mice, but had no effect in MCAT mice. These findings indicate that the transgene conferred protection from oxidative damage caused by treatment. Unexpected differences between WT and MCAT mice emerged in skeletal responses to treatment.. In WT mice, treatment did not alter osteoblastogenesis, cortical bone area, moment of inertia, or bone perimeter, whereas in MCAT mice, treatment increased these

  11. Increased Calcium-Sensing Receptor Immunoreactivity in the Hippocampus of a Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Gardenal, Emanuela; Chiarini, Anna; Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Prà, Ilaria; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez, José J

    2017-01-01

    The Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein coupled, 7-transmembrane domain receptor ubiquitously expressed throughout the body, brain including. The role of CaSR in the CNS is not well understood; its expression is increasing during development, which has been implicated in memory formation and consolidation, and CaSR localization in nerve terminals has been related to synaptic plasticity and neurotransmission. There is an emerging evidence of CaSR involvement in neurodegenerative disorders and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular, where the over-production of β-amyloid peptides was reported to activate CaSR. In the present study, we performed CaSR immunohistochemical and densitometry analysis in the triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD). We found an increase in the expression of CaSR in hippocampal CA1 area and in dentate gyrus in the 3xTg-AD mice when compared to non-transgenic control animals. This increase was significant at 9 months of age and further increased at 12 and 18 months of age. This increase paralleled the accumulation of β-amyloid plaques with age. Increased expression of CaSR favors β-amyloidogenic pathway following direct interactions between β-amyloid and CaSR and hence may contribute to the pathological evolution of the AD. In the framework of this paradigm CaSR may represent a novel therapeutic target.

  12. Increased Calcium-Sensing Receptor Immunoreactivity in the Hippocampus of a Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gardenal, Emanuela; Chiarini, Anna; Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Prà, Ilaria; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez, José J.

    2017-01-01

    The Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein coupled, 7-transmembrane domain receptor ubiquitously expressed throughout the body, brain including. The role of CaSR in the CNS is not well understood; its expression is increasing during development, which has been implicated in memory formation and consolidation, and CaSR localization in nerve terminals has been related to synaptic plasticity and neurotransmission. There is an emerging evidence of CaSR involvement in neurodegenerative disorders and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular, where the over-production of β-amyloid peptides was reported to activate CaSR. In the present study, we performed CaSR immunohistochemical and densitometry analysis in the triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD). We found an increase in the expression of CaSR in hippocampal CA1 area and in dentate gyrus in the 3xTg-AD mice when compared to non-transgenic control animals. This increase was significant at 9 months of age and further increased at 12 and 18 months of age. This increase paralleled the accumulation of β-amyloid plaques with age. Increased expression of CaSR favors β-amyloidogenic pathway following direct interactions between β-amyloid and CaSR and hence may contribute to the pathological evolution of the AD. In the framework of this paradigm CaSR may represent a novel therapeutic target. PMID:28261055

  13. Transgenic mouse models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    PubMed

    Katsuno, M; Adachi, H; Inukai, A; Sobue, G

    2003-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a late-onset motor neuron disease characterized by proximal muscle atrophy, weakness, contraction fasciculations, and bulbar involvement. Only males develop symptoms, while female carriers usually are asymptomatic. A specific treatment for SBMA has not been established. The molecular basis of SBMA is the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat, which encodes the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract, in the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The pathologic hallmark is nuclear inclusions (NIs) containing the mutant and truncated AR with expanded polyQ in the residual motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord as well as in some other visceral organs. Several transgenic (Tg) mouse models have been created for studying the pathogenesis of SBMA. The Tg mouse model carrying pure 239 CAGs under human AR promoter and another model carrying truncated AR with expanded CAGs show motor impairment and nuclear NIs in spinal motor neurons. Interestingly, Tg mice carrying full-length human AR with expanded polyQ demonstrate progressive motor impairment and neurogenic pathology as well as sexual difference of phenotypes. These models recapitulate the phenotypic expression observed in SBMA. The ligand-dependent nuclear localization of the mutant AR is found to be involved in the disease mechanism, and hormonal therapy is suggested to be a therapeutic approach applicable to SBMA.

  14. Vascular Dysfunction in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease: Effects of CB1R and CB2R Cannabinoid Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Villalba, Nuria; Prieto, Dolores; Brera, Begoña; Martín-Moreno, Ana M.; Tejerina, Teresa; de Ceballos, María L.

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence of altered vascular function, including cerebrovascular, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and transgenic models of the disease. Indeed vasoconstrictor responses are increased, while vasodilation is reduced in both conditions. β-Amyloid (Aβ) appears to be responsible, at least in part, of alterations in vascular function. Cannabinoids, neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agents, induce vasodilation both in vivo and in vitro. We have demonstrated a beneficial effect of cannabinoids in models of AD by preventing glial activation. In this work we have studied the effects of these compounds on vessel density in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice, line 2576, and on altered vascular responses in aortae isolated ring. First we showed increased collagen IV positive vessels in AD brain compared to control subjects, with a similar increase in TgAPP mice, which was normalized by prolonged oral treatment with the CB1/CB2 mixed agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) and the CB2 selective agonist JWH-133 (JWH). In Tg APP mice the vasoconstriction induced by phenylephrine and the thromboxane agonist U46619 was significantly increased, and no change in the vasodilation to acetylcholine (ACh) was observed. Tg APP displayed decreased vasodilation to both cannabinoid agonists, which were able to prevent decreased ACh relaxation in the presence of Aβ. In summary, we have confirmed and extended the existence of altered vascular responses in Tg APP mice. Moreover, our results suggest that treatment with cannabinoids may ameliorate the vascular responses in AD-type pathology. PMID:27695396

  15. Value-Added Models for the Pittsburgh Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Matthew; Lipscomb, Stephen; Gill, Brian; Booker, Kevin; Bruch, Julie

    2012-01-01

    At the request of Pittsburgh Public Schools (PPS) and the Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers (PFT), Mathematica has developed value-added models (VAMs) that aim to estimate the contributions of individual teachers, teams of teachers, and schools to the achievement growth of their students. The authors' work in estimating value-added in Pittsburgh…

  16. The HIV-1 transgenic rat model of neuroHIV

    PubMed Central

    Vigorito, Michael; Connaghan, Kaitlyn P.; Chang, Sulie L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ability of current combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) to limit the progression of HIV-1 to AIDS, HIV-positive individuals continue to experience neuroHIV in the form of HIV-associated neurological disorders (HAND), which can range from subtle to substantial neurocognitive impairment. NeuroHIV may also influence substance use, abuse, and dependence in HIV-positive individuals. Because of the nature of the virus, variables such as mental health co-morbidities make it difficult to study the interaction between HIV and substance abuse in human populations. Several rodent models have been developed in an attempt to study the transmission and pathogenesis of the HIV-1 virus. The HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rat is a reliable model of neuroHIV because it mimics the condition of HIV-infected patients on cART. Research using this model supports the hypothesis that the presence of HIV-1 viral proteins in the central nervous system increases the sensitivity and susceptibility of HIV-positive individuals to substance abuse. PMID:25733103

  17. Use of the transgenic mouse in models of AIDS cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, William

    2003-04-01

    Heart disease in AIDS, particularly cardiomyopathy (CM), is an increasingly recognized clinical problem with as yet undefined pathogenetic mechanisms. Among the potential etiologies of AIDS CM are HIV-1 infection of cardiac myocytes and subsequent cardiac dysfunction, opportunistic infection, inflammatory reactions, cytokine effects, and cardiotoxicity of prescribed or illicit drugs. It seems probable that multiple factors may impact on the development of CM in AIDS. Transgenic mice (TG) are useful biological tools to explore mechanisms of cardiac function and disease. In AIDS models, TG offer novel ways to elucidate mechanisms of AIDS CM through combined in vivo and in vitro studies. With targeted and non-targeted TG, structural and functional effects of specific HIV-1 gene products on heart tissue may be addressed. The impact of environmental agents including therapeutics or cardiotoxins may also be defined. To address the complexity of AIDS CM using TG, an experimental approach has been employed in our laboratories to model the clinical condition. We utilize AIDS TG with generalized expression of HIV-1 gene products in CM models with combined antiretroviral regimens to define the cardiovascular effects of AIDS and its therapy on the structure and function of the murine heart. We are developing a series of cardiac specific TG bearing selected HIV-1 genes. These TG target the selected HIV-1 genes expressed in cardiac ventricular myocytes. Tissue-specific targeting of this type enables us to define structural and functional effects of specific HIV-1 gene products on the cardiac myocyte.

  18. Comparative studies using the Morris water maze to assess spatial memory deficits in two transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Stephen R; Hamlin, Adam S; Marks, Nicola; Coulson, Elizabeth J; Smith, Maree T

    2014-10-01

    Evaluation of the efficacy of novel therapeutics for potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) requires an animal model that develops age-related cognitive deficits reproducibly between independent groups of investigators. Herein we assessed comparative temporal changes in spatial memory function in two commercially available transgenic mouse models of AD using the Morris water maze (MWM), incorporating both visible and hidden platform training. Individual cohorts of cDNA-based 'line 85'-derived double-transgenic mice coexpressing the 'Swedish' mutation of amyloid precursor protein (APPSwe) and the presenillin 1 (PS1) 'dE9' mutation were assessed in the MWM at mean ages of 3.6, 9.3 and 14.8 months. We found significant deficits in spatial memory retention in APPSwe/PS1dE9 mice aged 3.6 months and robust deficits in spatial memory acquisition and retention in APPSwe/PS1dE9 mice aged 9.3 months, with a further significant decline by age 14.8 months. β-Amyloid deposits were present in brain sections by 7.25 months of age. In contrast, MWM studies with individual cohorts (aged 4-21 months) of single-transgenic genomic-based APPSwe mice expressing APPSwe on a yeast artificial chromosomal (YAC) construct showed no significant deficits in spatial memory acquisition until 21 months of age. There were no significant deficits in spatial memory retention up to 21 months of age and β-amyloid deposits were not present in brain sections up to 24 months of age. These data, generated using comprehensive study designs, show that APPSwe/PS1dE9 but not APPSwe YAC mice appear to provide a suitably robust model of AD for efficacy assessment of novel AD treatments in development.

  19. Onset of hippocampus-dependent memory impairments in 5XFAD transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Girard, Stéphane D; Jacquet, Marlyse; Baranger, Kévin; Migliorati, Martine; Escoffier, Guy; Bernard, Anne; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Féron, François; Rivera, Santiago; Roman, François S; Marchetti, Evelyne

    2014-07-01

    The 5XFAD mice are an early-onset transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in which amyloid plaques are first observed between two and four months of age in the cortical layer five and in the subiculum of the hippocampal formation. Although cognitive alterations have been described in these mice, there are no studies that focused on the onset of hippocampus-dependent memory deficits, which are a hallmark of the prodromal stage of AD. To identify when the first learning and memory impairments appear, 5XFAD mice of two, four, and six months of age were compared with their respective wild-type littermates using the olfactory tubing maze, which is a very sensitive hippocampal-dependent task. Deficits in learning and memory started at four months with a substantial increase at six months of age while no olfactory impairments were observed. The volumetric study using magnetic resonance imaging of the whole brain and specific areas (olfactory bulb, striatum, and hippocampus) did not reveal neuro-anatomical difference. Slight memory deficits appeared at 4 months of age in correlation with an increased astrogliosis and amyloid plaque formation. This early impairment in learning and memory related to the hippocampal dysfunction is particularly suited to assess preclinical therapeutic strategies aiming to delay or suppress the onset of AD.

  20. Adenovirus replication-competent vectors (KD1, KD3) complement the cytotoxicity and transgene expression from replication-defective vectors (Ad-GFP, Ad-Luc).

    PubMed

    Habib, Nagy A; Mitry, Ragai; Seth, Prem; Kuppuswamy, Mohan; Doronin, Konstantin; Toth, Karoly; Krajcsi, Peter; Tollefson, Ann E; Wold, William S M

    2002-08-01

    The successful clinical application of adenovirus (Ad) in cancer control has been of limited success because of the current inability to infect the majority of cancer cells with a large amount of vector. In this study, we show that when human lung tumors growing in immunodeficient nude mice were coinfected with a replication-defective (RD) Ad vector expressing green fluorescent protein and a replication-competent (RC) Ad vector named KD3, KD3 enhanced the expression of green fluorescent protein throughout the tumor. Also, KD3 and another RC vector named KD1 complemented the expression of luciferase from a RD vector in a human liver tumor xenotransplant in nude mice. Altogether, these results suggest that the combination of a RD vector with a RC vector might be a more effective treatment for cancer than either vector alone due to more widespread dissemination of the virus.

  1. Reducing Endogenous α-Synuclein Mitigates the Degeneration of Selective Neuronal Populations in an Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Brian; Desplats, Paula A.; Overk, Cassia R.; Valera-Martin, Elvira; Rissman, Robert A.; Wu, Chengbiao; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Florio, Jazmin; Rockenstein, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the progressive accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) and microtubule associate protein tau, leading to the selective degeneration of neurons in the neocortex, limbic system, and nucleus basalis, among others. Recent studies have shown that α-synuclein (α-syn) also accumulates in the brains of patients with AD and interacts with Aβ and tau, forming toxic hetero-oligomers. Although the involvement of α-syn has been investigated extensively in Lewy body disease, less is known about the role of this synaptic protein in AD. Here, we found that reducing endogenous α-syn in an APP transgenic mouse model of AD prevented the degeneration of cholinergic neurons, ameliorated corresponding deficits, and recovered the levels of Rab3a and Rab5 proteins involved in intracellular transport and sorting of nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Together, these results suggest that α-syn might participate in mechanisms of vulnerability of selected neuronal populations in AD and that reducing α-syn might be a potential approach to protecting these populations from the toxic effects of Aβ. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Reducing endogenous α-synuclein (α-syn) in an APP transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) prevented the degeneration of cholinergic neurons, ameliorated corresponding deficits, and recovered the levels of Rab3a and Rab5 proteins involved in intracellular transport and sorting of nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. These results suggest that α-syn might participate in mechanisms of vulnerability of selected neuronal populations in AD and that reducing α-syn might be a potential approach to protecting these populations from the toxic effects of amyloid β. PMID:27466341

  2. L1 integration in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Babushok, Daria V.; Ostertag, Eric M.; Courtney, Christine E.; Choi, Janice M.; Kazazian, Haig H.

    2006-01-01

    To study integration of the human LINE-1 retrotransposon (L1) in vivo, we developed a transgenic mouse model of L1 retrotransposition that displays de novo somatic L1 insertions at a high frequency, occasionally several insertions per mouse. We mapped 3′ integration sites of 51 insertions by Thermal Asymmetric Interlaced PCR (TAIL–PCR). Analysis of integration locations revealed a broad genomic distribution with a modest preference for intergenic regions. We characterized the complete structures of 33 de novo retrotransposition events. Our results highlight the large number of highly truncated L1s, as over 52% (27/51) of total integrants were <1/3 the length of a full-length element. New integrants carry all structural characteristics typical of genomic L1s, including a number with inversions, deletions, and 5′-end microhomologies to the target DNA sequence. Notably, at least 13% (7/51) of all insertions contain a short stretch of extra nucleotides at their 5′ end, which we postulate result from template-jumping by the L1-encoded reverse transcriptase. We propose a unified model of L1 integration that explains all of the characteristic features of L1 retrotransposition, such as 5′ truncations, inversions, extra nucleotide additions, and 5′ boundary and inversion point microhomologies. PMID:16365384

  3. A new transgenic mouse model for conditional overexpression of the Polycomb Group protein EZH2.

    PubMed

    Koppens, Martijn A J; Tanger, Ellen; Nacerddine, Karim; Westerman, Bart; Song, Ji-Ying; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    2017-04-01

    The Polycomb Group protein EZH2 is upregulated in most prostate cancers, and its overexpression is associated with poor prognosis. Most insights into the functional role of EZH2 in prostate cancer have been gained using cell lines and EZH2 inactivation studies. However, the question remains whether overexpression of EZH2 can initiate prostate tumourigenesis or drive tumour progression. Appropriate transgenic mouse models that are required to answer such questions are lacking. We developed one such transgenic mouse model for conditional overexpression of Ezh2. In this transgene, Ezh2 and Luciferase are transcribed from a single open reading frame. The latter gene enables intravital bioluminescent imaging of tissues expressing this transgene, allowing the detection of tumour outgrowth and potential metastatic progression over time. Prostate-specific Ezh2 overexpression by crossbreeding with Probasin-Cre mice led to neoplastic prostate lesions at low incidence and with a long latency. Compounding a previously described Bmi1-transgene and Pten-deficiency prostate cancer mouse model with the Ezh2 transgene did not enhance tumour progression or drive metastasis formation. In conclusion, we here report the generation of a wildtype Ezh2 overexpression mouse model that allows for intravital surveillance of tissues with activated transgene. This model will be an invaluable tool for further unravelling the role of EZH2 in cancer.

  4. [The Function of REM Sleep: Implications from Transgenic Mouse Models].

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Mitsuaki; Hayashi, Yu

    2016-10-01

    Our sleep is composed of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep. REM sleep is the major source of dreams, whereas synchronous cortical oscillations, called slow waves, are observed during NREM sleep. Both stages are unique to certain vertebrate species, and therefore, REM and NREM sleep are thought to be involved in higher-order brain functions. While several studies have revealed the importance of NREM sleep in growth hormone secretion, memory consolidation and brain metabolite clearance, the functions of REM sleep are currently almost totally unknown. REM sleep functions cannot be easily indicated from classical REM sleep deprivation experiments, where animals are forced to wake up whenever they enter REM sleep, because such experiments produce extreme stress due to the stimuli and because REM sleep is under strong homeostatic regulation. To overcome these issues, we developed a novel transgenic mouse model in which REM sleep can be manipulated. Using these mice, we found that REM sleep enhances slow wave activity during the subsequent NREM sleep. Slow wave activity is known to contribute to memory consolidation and synaptic plasticity. Thus, REM sleep might be involved in higher-order brain functions through its role in enhancing slow wave activity.

  5. Fluoro-Jade B staining as useful tool to identify activated microglia and astrocytes in a mouse transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Damjanac, Milena; Rioux Bilan, Agnès; Barrier, Laurence; Pontcharraud, Raymond; Anne, Cantereau; Hugon, Jacques; Page, Guylène

    2007-01-12

    Fluoro-Jade B is known as a high affinity fluorescent marker for the localization of neuronal degeneration during acute neuronal distress. However, one study suggested that fluoro-Jade B stains reactive astroglia in the primate cerebral cortex. In this study, we analyzed the staining of fluoro-Jade B alone or combined with specific markers for detection of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or activated CD68 microglia in the double APP(SL)/PS1 KI transgenic mice of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which display a massive neuronal loss in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Our results showed that fluoro-Jade B did not stain normal and degenerating neurons in this double mouse transgenic model. Fluoro-Jade B was co-localized with Abeta in the core of amyloid deposits and in glia-like cells expressing Abeta. Furthermore, fluoro-Jade B was co-localized with CD68/macrosialin, a specific marker of activated microglia, and with GFAP for astrocytes in APP(SL)/PS1 KI transgenic mice of AD. Taken together, these findings showed that fluoro-Jade B can be used to label activated microglia and astrocytes which are abundant in the brain of these AD transgenic mice. It could stain degenerating neurons as a result of acute insult while it could label activated microglia and astrocytes during a chronic neuronal degenerative process such as AD for example.

  6. Expression profiles for macrophage alternative activation genes in AD and in mouse models of AD

    PubMed Central

    Colton, Carol A; Mott, Ryan T; Sharpe, Hayley; Xu, Qing; Van Nostrand, William E; Vitek, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Background Microglia are associated with neuritic plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD) and serve as a primary component of the innate immune response in the brain. Neuritic plaques are fibrous deposits composed of the amyloid beta-peptide fragments (Abeta) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Numerous studies have shown that the immune cells in the vicinity of amyloid deposits in AD express mRNA and proteins for pro-inflammatory cytokines, leading to the hypothesis that microglia demonstrate classical (Th-1) immune activation in AD. Nonetheless, the complex role of microglial activation has yet to be fully explored since recent studies show that peripheral macrophages enter an "alternative" activation state. Methods To study alternative activation of microglia, we used quantitative RT-PCR to identify genes associated with alternative activation in microglia, including arginase I (AGI), mannose receptor (MRC1), found in inflammatory zone 1 (FIZZ1), and chitinase 3-like 3 (YM1). Results Our findings confirmed that treatment of microglia with anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 induces a gene profile typical of alternative activation similar to that previously observed in peripheral macrophages. We then used this gene expression profile to examine two mouse models of AD, the APPsw (Tg-2576) and Tg-SwDI, models for amyloid deposition and for cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) respectively. AGI, MRC1 and YM1 mRNA levels were significantly increased in the Tg-2576 mouse brains compared to age-matched controls while TNFα and NOS2 mRNA levels, genes commonly associated with classical activation, increased or did not change, respectively. Only TNFα mRNA increased in the Tg-SwDI mouse brain. Alternative activation genes were also identified in brain samples from individuals with AD and were compared to age-matched control individuals. In AD brain, mRNAs for TNFα, AGI, MRC1 and the chitinase-3 like 1 and 2 genes (CHI3L1; CHI3L2) were significantly increased

  7. Teacher Effects, Value-Added Models, and Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konstantopoulos, Spyros

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the last decade, the effects of teachers on student performance (typically manifested as state-wide standardized tests) have been re-examined using statistical models that are known as value-added models. These statistical models aim to compute the unique contribution of the teachers in promoting student achievement gains from grade…

  8. Inflammatory cytokine levels correlate with amyloid load in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nikunj S; Paris, Daniel; Mathura, Venkatarajan; Quadros, Amita N; Crawford, Fiona C; Mullan, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    Background Inflammation is believed to play an important role in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cytokine production is a key pathologic event in the progression of inflammatory cascades. The current study characterizes the cytokine expression profile in the brain of two transgenic mouse models of AD (TgAPPsw and PS1/APPsw) and explores the correlations between cytokine production and the level of soluble and insoluble forms of Aβ. Methods Organotypic brain slice cultures from 15-month-old mice (TgAPPsw, PS1/APPsw and control littermates) were established and multiple cytokine levels were analyzed using the Bio-plex multiple cytokine assay system. Soluble and insoluble forms of Aβ were quantified and Aβ-cytokine relationships were analyzed. Results Compared to control littermates, transgenic mice showed a significant increase in the following pro-inflammatory cytokines: TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12p40, IL-1β, IL-1α and GM-CSF. TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1α and GM-CSF showed a sequential increase from control to TgAPPsw to PS1/APPsw suggesting that the amplitude of this cytokine response is dependent on brain Aβ levels, since PS1/APPsw mouse brains accumulate more Aβ than TgAPPsw mouse brains. Quantification of Aβ levels in the same slices showed a wide range of Aβ soluble:insoluble ratio values across TgAPPsw and PS1/APPsw brain slices. Aβ-cytokine correlations revealed significant relationships between Aβ1–40, 1–42 (both soluble and insoluble) and all the above cytokines that changed in the brain slices. Conclusion Our data confirm that the brains of transgenic APPsw and PS1/APPsw mice are under an active inflammatory stress, and that the levels of particular cytokines may be directly related to the amount of soluble and insoluble Aβ present in the brain suggesting that pathological accumulation of Aβ is a key driver of the neuroinflammatory response. PMID:15762998

  9. Oxidative stress accelerates amyloid deposition and memory impairment in a double-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Takuya; Kamimura, Naomi; Yokota, Takashi; Iuchi, Katsuya; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Takami, Shinya; Akashiba, Hiroki; Shitaka, Yoshitsugu; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Kimura, Kazumi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2015-02-05

    Oxidative stress is known to play a prominent role in the onset and early stage progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). For example, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation levels are increased in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Here, we created a double-transgenic mouse model of AD to explore the pathological and behavioral effects of oxidative stress. Double transgenic (APP/DAL) mice were constructed by crossing Tg2576 (APP) mice, which express a mutant form of human amyloid precursor protein (APP), with DAL mice expressing a dominant-negative mutant of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), in which oxidative stress is enhanced. Y-maze and object recognition tests were performed at 3 and 6 months of age to evaluate learning and memory. The accumulation of amyloid plaques, deposition of phosphorylated-tau protein, and number of astrocytes in the brain were assessed histopathologically at 3, 6, 9, and 12-15 months of age. The life span of APP/DAL mice was significantly shorter than that of APP or DAL mice. In addition, they showed accelerated amyloid deposition, tau phosphorylation, and gliosis. Furthermore, these mice showed impaired performance on Y-maze and object recognition tests at 3 months of age. These data suggest that oxidative stress accelerates cognitive dysfunction and pathological insults in the brain. APP/DAL mice could be a useful model for exploring new approaches to AD treatment.

  10. Matrix model maps and reconstruction of AdS supergravity interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cremonini, Sera; Mello Koch, Robert de; Jevicki, Antal

    2008-05-15

    We consider the question of reconstructing (cubic) SUGRA interactions in AdS/CFT. The method we introduce is based on the matrix model maps (MMP) which were previously successfully employed at the linearized level. The strategy is to start with the map for 1/2 BPS configurations, which is exactly known (to all orders) in the Hamiltonian framework. We then use the extension of the matrix model map with the corresponding Ward identities to completely specify the interaction. A central point in this construction is the nonvanishing of off-shell interactions (even for highest-weight states)

  11. Matrix model maps in AdS/CFT correspondence

    SciTech Connect

    Donos, Aristomenis; Jevicki, Antal; Rodrigues, Joao P.

    2005-12-15

    We discuss an extension of a map between BPS states and free fermions. The extension involves states associated with a full two matrix problem which are constructed using a sequence of integral equations. A two parameter set of matrix model eigenstates is then related to states in SUGRA. Their wave functions are characterized by nontrivial dependence on the radial coordinate of AdS and of the Sphere, respectively. A kernel defining a one to one map between these states is then constructed.

  12. Hereditary and Sporadic Forms of Aβ-Cerebrovascular Amyloidosis and Relevant Transgenic Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Kumar-Singh, Samir

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) refers to the specific deposition of amyloid fibrils in the leptomeningeal and cerebral blood vessel walls, often causing secondary vascular degenerative changes. Although many kinds of peptides are known to be deposited as vascular amyloid, amyloid-β (Aβ)-CAA is the most common type associated with normal aging, sporadic CAA, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Down’s syndrome. Moreover, Aβ-CAA is also associated with rare hereditary cerebrovascular amyloidosis due to mutations within the Aβ domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) such as Dutch and Flemish APP mutations. Genetics and clinicopathological studies on these familial diseases as well as sporadic conditions have already shown that CAA not only causes haemorrhagic and ischemic strokes, but also leads to progressive dementia. Transgenic mouse models based on familial AD mutations have also successfully reproduced many of the features found in human disease, providing us with important insights into the pathogenesis of CAA. Importantly, such studies have pointed out that specific vastopic Aβ variants or an unaltered Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio favor vascular Aβ deposition over parenchymal plaques, but higher than critical levels of Aβ40 are also observed to be anti-amyloidogenic. These data would be important in the development of therapies targeting amyloid in vessels. PMID:19468344

  13. Function of dopamine transporter is compromised in DYT1 transgenic animal model in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hewett, Jeff; Johansen, Peter; Sharma, Nutan; Standaert, David; Balcioglu, Aygul

    2011-01-01

    Early onset torsion dystonia (DYT1), the most common form of hereditary primary dystonia, is caused by a mutation in the TOR1A gene, which codes for the protein, torsinA. We previously examined the effect of the human mutant torsinA on striatal dopaminergic function in a conventional transgenic mouse model of DYT1 dystonia (hMT1), in which human mutant torsinA is expressed under the cytomegalovirus promotor. Systemic administration of amphetamine did not increase dopamine (DA) release as efficiently in these mice as compared with wild-type transgenic and non-transgenic mice. We, now, studied the contribution of the DA transporter (DAT) to amphetamine-induced DA release in hMT1 transgenic mice using in vivo no-net flux microdialysis. This method applies different concentrations of DA through the microdialysis probe and measures DA concentration at the output of the probe following an equilibrium period. The slope (extraction fraction) is the measure of the DAT activity in vivo. The slope for hMT1 transgenic mice was 0.58 ± 0.07 and for non-transgenic animals, 0.87 ± 0.06 (p < 0.05). We further investigated the efficacy of nomifensine (a specific DAT inhibitor) in inhibiting amphetamine-induced DA release. Local application of nomifensine 80 min before the systemic application of amphetamine inhibited DA release in both transgenic mice and their non-transgenic littermates. The efficiency of the inhibition appeared to be different, with mean values of 48% for hMT1 transgenic mice versus 84% for non-transgenic littermates. Moreover, we have evaluated basal and amphetamine-induced locomotion in hMT1 transgenic mice compared with their non-transgenic littermates, using an O-maze behavioral chamber. Basal levels of locomotion in the hMT1 transgenic mice showed that they moved much less than their non-transgenic littermates (0.9 ± 0.3 m for transgenic mice vs. 2.4 ± 0.7 m for non-transgenic littermates, p < 0.05). This relative reduction in locomotion was also observed

  14. Novel Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying Human Serum Albumin as a Biomarker of Carcinogenic Exposure.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jonathan; Wang, Yi; Turesky, Robert J; Kluetzman, Kerri; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Ding, Xinxin

    2016-05-16

    Albumin is a commonly used serum protein for studying human exposure to xenobiotic compounds, including therapeutics and environmental pollutants. Often, the reactivity of albumin with xenobiotic compounds is studied ex vivo with human albumin or plasma/serum samples. Some studies have characterized the reactivity of albumin with chemicals in rodent models; however, differences between the orthologous peptide sequences of human and rodent albumins can result in the formation of different types of chemical-protein adducts with different interaction sites or peptide sequences. Our goal is to generate a human albumin transgenic mouse model that can be used to establish human protein biomarkers of exposure to hazardous xenobiotics for human risk assessment via animal studies. We have developed a human albumin transgenic mouse model and characterized the genotype and phenotype of the transgenic mice. The presence of the human albumin gene in the genome of the model mouse was confirmed by genomic PCR analysis, whereas liver-specific expression of the transgenic human albumin mRNA was validated by RT-PCR analysis. Further immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the transgenic human albumin protein is a full-length, mature protein, which is less abundant than the endogenous mouse albumin that coexists in the serum of the transgenic mouse. The transgenic protein was able to form ex vivo adducts with a genotoxic metabolite of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine, a procarcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic amine formed in cooked meat. This novel human albumin transgenic mouse model will facilitate the development and validation of albumin-carcinogen adducts as biomarkers of xenobiotic exposure and/or toxicity in humans.

  15. Hippocampal neurogenesis in the APP/PS1/nestin-GFP triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Q; Zheng, M; Zhang, T; He, G

    2016-02-09

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common causes of dementia. Although the exact mechanisms of AD are not entirely clear, the impairment in adult hippocampal neurogenesis has been reported to play a role in AD. To assess the relationship between AD and neurogenesis, we studied APP/PS1/nestin-green fluorescent protein (GFP) triple transgenic mice, a well-characterized mouse model of AD, which express GFP under the control of the nestin promoter. Different ages of AD mice and their wild-type littermates (WT) were used in our study. Immunofluorescent staining showed that neurogenesis occurred mainly in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) and subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LVs). The expression of neural stem cells (NSCs) (nestin) and neural precursors such as doublecortin (DCX) and GFAP in AD mice were decreased with age, as well as there being a reduction in 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells, when compared to WT. However, the number of maturate neurons (NeuN) was not significantly different between AD mice and wild-type controls, and NeuN changed only slightly with age. By Golgi-Cox staining, the morphologies of dendrites were observed, and significant differences existed between AD mice and wild-type controls. These results suggest that AD has a far-reaching influence on the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, leading to a gradual decrease in the generation of neural progenitors (NPCs), and inhibition of the differentiation and maturation of neurons.

  16. Neural stem cell transplantation enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Gu, Guo-Jun; Shen, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Gang-Min; Wang, Pei-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, especially a defect in mitochondrial biogenesis, is an early and prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies demonstrated that the number of mitochondria is significantly reduced in susceptible hippocampal neurons from AD patients. Neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation in AD-like mice can compensate for the neuronal loss resulting from amyloid-beta protein deposition. The effects of NSC transplantation on mitochondrial biogenesis and cognitive function in AD-like mice, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we injected NSCs or vehicle into 12-month-old amyloid precursor protein (APP)/PS1 transgenic mice, a mouse model of AD-like pathology. The effects of NSC transplantation on cognitive function, the amount of mitochondrial DNA, the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors and mitochondria-related proteins, and mitochondrial morphology were investigated. Our results show that in NSC-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-NSC) mice, the cognitive function, number of mitochondria, and expression of mitochondria-related proteins, specifically the mitochondrial fission factors (dynamin-related protein 1 [Drp1] and fission 1 [Fis1]) and the mitochondrial fusion factor optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), were significantly increased compared with those in age-matched vehicle-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-Veh) mice, whereas the expression of mitochondrial fusion factors mitofusion 1 (Mfn1) and Mfn2 was significantly decreased. These data indicate that NSC transplantation may enhance mitochondria biogenesis and further rescue cognitive deficits in AD-like mice.

  17. Longitudinal analysis of the behavioral phenotype in a novel transgenic rat model of early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Galeano, Pablo; Martino Adami, Pamela V; Do Carmo, Sonia; Blanco, Eduardo; Rotondaro, Cecilia; Capani, Francisco; Castaño, Eduardo M; Cuello, A Claudio; Morelli, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid β (iAβ) has been linked to mild cognitive impairment that may precede Alzheimer's disease (AD) onset. This neuropathological trait was recently mimicked in a novel animal model of AD, the hemizygous transgenic McGill-R-Thy1-APP (Tg(+/-)) rat. The characterization of the behavioral phenotypes in this animal model could provide a baseline of efficacy for earlier therapeutic interventions. The aim of the present study was to undertake a longitudinal study of Aβ accumulation and a comprehensive behavioral evaluation of this transgenic rat model. We assessed exploratory activity, anxiety-related behaviors, recognition memory, working memory, spatial learning and reference memory at 3, 6, and 12 months of age. In parallel, we measured Aβ by ELISA, Western blots and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry in hippocampal samples. SDS-soluble Aβ peptide accumulated at low levels (~9 pg/mg) without differences among ages. However, Western blots showed SDS-resistant Aβ oligomers (~30 kDa) at 6 and 12 months, but not at 3 months. When compared to wild-type (WT), male Tg(+/-) rats exhibited a spatial reference memory deficit in the Morris Water Maze (MWM) as early as 3 months of age, which persisted at 6 and 12 months. In addition, Tg(+/-) rats displayed a working memory impairment in the Y-maze and higher anxiety levels in the Open Field (OF) at 6 and 12 months of age, but not at 3 months. Exploratory activity in the OF was similar to that of WT at all-time points. Spatial learning in the MWM and the recognition memory, as assessed by the Novel Object Recognition Test, were unimpaired at any time point. The data from the present study demonstrate that the hemizygous transgenic McGill-R-Thy1-APP rat has a wide array of behavioral and cognitive impairments from young adulthood to middle-age. The low Aβ burden and early emotional and cognitive deficits in this transgenic rat model supports its potential use for drug discovery purposes in

  18. Longitudinal analysis of the behavioral phenotype in a novel transgenic rat model of early stages of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Galeano, Pablo; Martino Adami, Pamela V.; Do Carmo, Sonia; Blanco, Eduardo; Rotondaro, Cecilia; Capani, Francisco; Castaño, Eduardo M.; Cuello, A. Claudio; Morelli, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid β (iAβ) has been linked to mild cognitive impairment that may precede Alzheimer's disease (AD) onset. This neuropathological trait was recently mimicked in a novel animal model of AD, the hemizygous transgenic McGill-R-Thy1-APP (Tg+/−) rat. The characterization of the behavioral phenotypes in this animal model could provide a baseline of efficacy for earlier therapeutic interventions. The aim of the present study was to undertake a longitudinal study of Aβ accumulation and a comprehensive behavioral evaluation of this transgenic rat model. We assessed exploratory activity, anxiety-related behaviors, recognition memory, working memory, spatial learning and reference memory at 3, 6, and 12 months of age. In parallel, we measured Aβ by ELISA, Western blots and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry in hippocampal samples. SDS-soluble Aβ peptide accumulated at low levels (~9 pg/mg) without differences among ages. However, Western blots showed SDS-resistant Aβ oligomers (~30 kDa) at 6 and 12 months, but not at 3 months. When compared to wild-type (WT), male Tg+/− rats exhibited a spatial reference memory deficit in the Morris Water Maze (MWM) as early as 3 months of age, which persisted at 6 and 12 months. In addition, Tg+/− rats displayed a working memory impairment in the Y-maze and higher anxiety levels in the Open Field (OF) at 6 and 12 months of age, but not at 3 months. Exploratory activity in the OF was similar to that of WT at all-time points. Spatial learning in the MWM and the recognition memory, as assessed by the Novel Object Recognition Test, were unimpaired at any time point. The data from the present study demonstrate that the hemizygous transgenic McGill-R-Thy1-APP rat has a wide array of behavioral and cognitive impairments from young adulthood to middle-age. The low Aβ burden and early emotional and cognitive deficits in this transgenic rat model supports its potential use for drug discovery purposes in

  19. Pomegranate from Oman Alleviates the Brain Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Selvaraju; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Al-Asmi, Abdullah; Al-Adawi, Samir; Vaishnav, Ragini; Braidy, Nady; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress may play a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. Pomegranates (石榴 Shí Liú) contain very high levels of antioxidant polyphenolic substances, as compared to other fruits and vegetables. Polyphenols have been shown to be neuroprotective in different model systems. Here, the effects of the antioxidant-rich pomegranate fruit grown in Oman on brain oxidative stress status were tested in the AD transgenic mouse. The 4-month-old mice with double Swedish APP mutation (APPsw/Tg2576) were purchased from Taconic Farm, NY, USA. Four-month-old Tg2576 mice were fed with 4% pomegranate or control diet for 15 months and then assessed for the influence of diet on oxidative stress. Significant increase in oxidative stress was found in terms of enhanced levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonyls. Concomitantly, decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes was observed in Tg2576 mice treated with control diet. Supplementation with 4% pomegranate attenuated oxidative damage, as evidenced by decreased LPO and protein carbonyl levels and restoration in the activities of the antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione (GSH), and Glutathione S transferase (GST)]. The activities of membrane-bound enzymes [Na+ K+-ATPase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE)] were altered in the brain regions of Tg2576 mouse treated with control diet, and 4% pomegranate supplementation was able to restore the activities of enzymes to comparable values observed in controls. The results suggest that the therapeutic potential of 4% pomegranate in the treatment of AD might be associated with counteracting the oxidative stress by the presence of active phytochemicals in it. PMID:25379464

  20. Evaluating Value-Added Models for Teacher Accountability. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Lockwood, J. R.; Koretz, Daniel M.; Hamilton, Laura S.

    2003-01-01

    Value-added modeling (VAM) to estimate school and teacher effects is currently of considerable interest to researchers and policymakers. Recent reports suggest that VAM demonstrates the importance of teachers as a source of variance in student outcomes. Policymakers see VAM as a possible component of education reform through improved teacher…

  1. Value-Added Models: What the Experts Say

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrein-Beardsley, Audrey; Pivovarova, Margarita; Geiger, Tray J.

    2016-01-01

    Being an expert involves explaining how things are supposed to work, and, perhaps more important, why things might not work as supposed. In this study, researchers surveyed scholars with expertise in value-added models (VAMs) to solicit their opinions about the uses and potential of VAMs for teacher-level accountability purposes (for example, in…

  2. Impaired thermoregulation and beneficial effects of thermoneutrality in the 3×Tg-AD model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vandal, Milene; White, Philip J; Tournissac, Marine; Tremblay, Cyntia; St-Amour, Isabelle; Drouin-Ouellet, Janelle; Bousquet, Melanie; Traversy, Marie-Thérèse; Planel, Emmanuel; Marette, Andre; Calon, Frederic

    2016-07-01

    The sharp rise in the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) at an old age coincides with a reduction in energy metabolism and core body temperature. We found that the triple-transgenic mouse model of AD (3×Tg-AD) spontaneously develops a lower basal body temperature and is more vulnerable to a cold environment compared with age-matched controls. This was despite higher nonshivering thermogenic activity, as evidenced by brown adipose tissue norepinephrine content and uncoupling protein 1 expression. A 24-hour exposure to cold (4 °C) aggravated key neuropathologic markers of AD such as: tau phosphorylation, soluble amyloid beta concentrations, and synaptic protein loss in the cortex of 3×Tg-AD mice. Strikingly, raising the body temperature of aged 3×Tg-AD mice via exposure to a thermoneutral environment improved memory function and reduced amyloid and synaptic pathologies within a week. Our results suggest the presence of a vicious cycle between impaired thermoregulation and AD-like neuropathology, and it is proposed that correcting thermoregulatory deficits might be therapeutic in AD.

  3. Progressive neuropathology and cognitive decline in a single Arctic APP transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rönnbäck, Annica; Zhu, Shunwei; Dillner, Karin; Aoki, Mikio; Lilius, Lena; Näslund, Jan; Winblad, Bengt; Graff, Caroline

    2011-02-01

    The Arctic APP mutation (E693G) leads to dementia with clinical features similar to Alzheimer disease (AD), but little is known about the pathogenic mechanism of this mutation. To address this question, we have generated a transgenic mouse model, TgAPParc, with neuron-specific expression of human APP with the Arctic mutation (hAPParc). Heterozygous mice from two separate founder lines with different levels of expression of hAPParc were analyzed with respect to brain morphology and behavior every 3 months until the age of 18 months. Standard histological stainings and immunohistochemistry using a panel of Aβ antibodies showed an age- and dose-dependant progression of amyloid deposition in the brain, starting in the subiculum and spreading to the thalamus. Cognitive behavioral testing revealed deficits in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze test. This study demonstrates that the Arctic APP mutation is sufficient to cause amyloid deposition and cognitive dysfunction, and thus the TgAPParc mouse model provides a valuable tool to study the effect of the Arctic mutation in vivo without possible confounding effect of other APP mutations.

  4. A transgenic mouse model of neuroepithelial cell specific inducible overexpression of dopamine D1-receptor

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Kumiko; Araki, Kiyomi; McCarthy, Deirdre M.; Sims, John R.; Ren, Jia-Qian; Zhang, Xuan; Bhide, Pradeep G.

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine and its receptors appear in the brain during early embryonic period suggesting a role for dopamine in brain development. In fact, dopamine receptor imbalance resulting from impaired physiological balance between D1- and D2-receptor activities can perturb brain development and lead to persisting changes in brain structure and function. Dopamine receptor imbalance can be produced experimentally using pharmacological or genetic methods. Pharmacological methods tend to activate or antagonize the receptors in all cell types. In the traditional gene knockout models the receptor imbalance occurs during development and also at maturity. Therefore, assaying the effects of dopamine imbalance on specific cell types (e.g. precursor versus postmitotic cells) or at specific periods of brain development (e.g. pre- or postnatal periods) is not feasible in these models. We describe a novel transgenic mouse model based on the tetracycline dependent inducible gene expression system in which dopamine D1-receptor transgene expression is induced selectively in neuroepithelial cells of the embryonic brain at experimenter-chosen intervals of brain development. In this model, doxycycline-induced expression of the transgene causes significant overexpression of the D1-receptor and significant reductions in the incorporation of the S-phase marker bromodeoxyuridine into neuroepithelial cells of the basal and dorsal telencephalon indicating marked effects on telencephalic neurogenesis. The D1-receptor overexpression occurs at higher levels in the medial ganglionic eminence than the lateral ganglionic eminence or cerebral wall. Moreover, although the transgene is induced selectively in the neuroepithelium, D1-receptor protein overexpression appears to persist in postmitotic cells. The mouse model can be modified for neuroepithelial cell-specific inducible expression of other transgenes or induction of the D1-receptor transgene in other cells in specific brain regions by crossbreeding

  5. Nicotinamide restores cognition in AD transgenic mice via a mechanism involving sirtuin inhibition and selective reduction of Thr231-phosphotau

    PubMed Central

    Green, Kim N.; Steffan, Joan S.; Martinez-Coria, Hilda; Sun, Xuemin; Schreiber, Steven S.; Thompson, Leslie Michels; LaFerla, Frank M.

    2008-01-01

    Memory loss is the signature feature of Alzheimer’s disease and therapies that prevent or delay its onset are urgently needed. Effective preventive strategies likely offer the greatest and most widespread benefits. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors increase histone acetylation and enhance memory and synaptic plasticity. We evaluated the efficacy of nicotinamide, a competitive inhibitor of the sirtuins or class III NAD+-dependent HDACs in 3xTg-AD mice, and found that it restored cognitive deficits associated with pathology. Nicotinamide selectively reduces a specific phospho-species of tau (Thr231) that is associated with microtubule depolymerization, in a manner similar to inhibition of SirT1. Nicotinamide also dramatically increased acetylated-α-tubulin, a primary substrate of SirT2, and MAP2c, both of which are linked to increased microtubule stability. Reduced phosphoThr231-tau was related to a reduction of mono-ubiquitin-conjugated tau, suggesting that this post-translationally modified form of tau may be rapidly degraded. Overexpression of a Thr231-phospho-mimic tau in vitro increased clearance and decreased accumulation of tau compared to wild-type tau. These preclinical findings suggest that oral nicotinamide may represent a safe treatment for AD and other tauopathies, and that phosphorylation of tau at Thr231 may regulate tau stability. PMID:18987186

  6. Transgenic LRRK2R1441G rats–a model for Parkinson disease?

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Komal T.; Yang, Alvin; Youshin, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder, characterized by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. While the cause of this disease is largely unknown, a rare autosomal dominant familial form of PD is caused by a genetic mutation in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene that presumably leads to a gain-of-function of LRRK2 kinase activity. Here, we explored the potential of over expression of this human gene in a new transgenic rat model to serve as an animal model for PD. Commercially available BAC transgenic rats expressing human LRRK2 with the familial PD mutation, R1441G, and their wild-type siblings were tested for deficits in motor function, sensorimotor gating, and higher cognitive function reminiscent of PD through the ages of 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. At 12 months of age, rats were exposed to intraperitoneal injections of the environmental toxin Paraquat or saline. Our results indicate that LRRK2R1441G transgenic rats do not show signs of neurodegeneration and do not develop significant motor or cognitive deficits until the age of 16 months. In addition, LRRK2R1441G transgenic rats did not show increased vulnerability to sub-toxic doses of Paraquat. Gene expression studies indicate that despite genomic presence and initial expression of the transgene, its expression was greatly reduced in our aged rats. We conclude that the transgenic LRRK2R1441G rat is not a valid model for studying the pathology of PD and discuss this in relation to other transgenic rat models. PMID:26020005

  7. Transgenic mouse model of hemifacial microsomia: Cloning and characterization of insertional mutation region on chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Naora, Hiroyuki; Otani, Hiroki; Tanaka, Osamu

    1994-10-01

    The 643 transgenic mouse line carries an autosomal dominant insertional mutation that results in hemifacial microsomia (HFM), including microtia and/or abnormal biting. In this paper, we characterize the transgene integration site in transgenic mice and preintegration site of wildtype mice. The locus, designated Hfm (hemifacial microsomia-associated locus), was mapped to chromosome 10, B1-3, by chromosome in situ hybridization. We cloned the transgene insertion site from the transgenic DNA library. By using the 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking sequences, the preintegration region was isolated. The analysis of these regions showed that a deletion of at least 23 kb DNA occurred in association with the transgene integration. Evolutionarily conserved regions were detected within and beside the deleted region. The result of mating between hemizygotes suggests that the phenotype of the homozygote is lethality in the prenatal period. These results suggests that the Hfm locus is necessary for prenatal development and that this strain is a useful animal model for investigating the genetic predisposition to HFM in humans.

  8. Intraneuronal pyroglutamate-Abeta 3-42 triggers neurodegeneration and lethal neurological deficits in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wirths, Oliver; Breyhan, Henning; Cynis, Holger; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Bayer, Thomas A

    2009-10-01

    It is well established that only a fraction of Abeta peptides in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients start with N-terminal aspartate (Abeta(1D)) which is generated by proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by BACE. N-terminally truncated and pyroglutamate modified Abeta starting at position 3 and ending with amino acid 42 [Abeta(3(pE)-42)] have been previously shown to represent a major species in the brain of AD patients. When compared with Abeta(1-42), this peptide has stronger aggregation propensity and increased toxicity in vitro. Although it is unknown which peptidases remove the first two N-terminal amino acids, the cyclization of Abeta at N-terminal glutamate can be catalyzed in vitro. Here, we show that Abeta(3(pE)-42) induces neurodegeneration and concomitant neurological deficits in a novel mouse model (TBA2 transgenic mice). Although TBA2 transgenic mice exhibit a strong neuronal expression of Abeta(3-42) predominantly in hippocampus and cerebellum, few plaques were found in the cortex, cerebellum, brain stem and thalamus. The levels of converted Abeta(3(pE)-42) in TBA2 mice were comparable to the APP/PS1KI mouse model with robust neuron loss and associated behavioral deficits. Eight weeks after birth TBA2 mice developed massive neurological impairments together with abundant loss of Purkinje cells. Although the TBA2 model lacks important AD-typical neuropathological features like tangles and hippocampal degeneration, it clearly demonstrates that intraneuronal Abeta(3(pE)-42) is neurotoxic in vivo.

  9. Metabolic disruption identified in the Huntington’s disease transgenic sheep model

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Renee. R.; Reid, Suzanne J.; Patassini, Stefano; Rudiger, Skye R.; Obolonkin, Vladimir; McLaughlan, Clive. J.; Jacobsen, Jessie C.; Gusella, James F.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Waldvogel, Henry J.; Bawden, C. Simon; Faull, Richard L. M.; Snell, Russell G.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited, progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion within exon 1 of HTT, encoding huntingtin. There are no therapies that can delay the progression of this devastating disease. One feature of HD that may play a critical role in its pathogenesis is metabolic disruption. Consequently, we undertook a comparative study of metabolites in our transgenic sheep model of HD (OVT73). This model does not display overt symptoms of HD but has circadian rhythm alterations and molecular changes characteristic of the early phase disease. Quantitative metabolite profiles were generated from the motor cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum and liver tissue of 5 year old transgenic sheep and matched controls by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Differentially abundant metabolites were evident in the cerebellum and liver. There was striking tissue-specificity, with predominantly amino acids affected in the transgenic cerebellum and fatty acids in the transgenic liver, which together may indicate a hyper-metabolic state. Furthermore, there were more strong pair-wise correlations of metabolite abundance in transgenic than in wild-type cerebellum and liver, suggesting altered metabolic constraints. Together these differences indicate a metabolic disruption in the sheep model of HD and could provide insight into the presymptomatic human disease. PMID:26864449

  10. Longitudinal behavioral changes in the APP/PS1 transgenic Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Sherry A; Sarkar, Sumit; Schmued, Larry C

    2013-04-01

    The APP/PS1 double transgenic mouse is an Alzheimer's Disease-like model. However, cognitive deficits measured at one age do not necessarily indicate age-related progressions. Further, results of the most widely used behavioral assessment, water maze performance, are generally limited to 1-2 endpoints. Here, male APP/PS1 and noncarrier wildtypes (n=11/group) were assessed at 7-15 months of age for water maze, open field, and motor coordination performance. Body weights and motor coordination were comparable for both groups throughout. Beginning at approximately 9 months of age, the transgenic group exhibited hypoactivity in the open field which continued throughout. Latency to locate the platform and swim path length were longer in the transgenic group; however, these appeared to be more related to increased floating and thigmotactic behavior and only partially related to a cognitive impairment. Age-related decrements in performance were not substantial; however, substantial plaque numbers were measured in six representative 16-month-old transgenic mice. The stability of water maze performance may be related to the longitudinal testing and repetitive experience, which previous research has demonstrated can confer beneficial effects on behavior and plaque deposition in transgenic Alzheimer's Disease models [1]. These results emphasize the importance of measuring multiple water maze endpoints and demonstrate the feasibility of longitudinal assessments in this model.

  11. Protective effects of positive lysosomal modulation in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Butler, David; Hwang, Jeannie; Estick, Candice; Nishiyama, Akiko; Kumar, Saranya Santhosh; Baveghems, Clive; Young-Oxendine, Hollie B; Wisniewski, Meagan L; Charalambides, Ana; Bahr, Ben A

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative pathology in which defects in proteolytic clearance of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) likely contribute to the progressive nature of the disorder. Lysosomal proteases of the cathepsin family exhibit up-regulation in response to accumulating proteins including Aβ(1-42). Here, the lysosomal modulator Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK) was used to test whether proteolytic activity can be enhanced to reduce the accumulation events in AD mouse models expressing different levels of Aβ pathology. Systemic PADK injections in APP(SwInd) and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice caused 3- to 8-fold increases in cathepsin B protein levels and 3- to 10-fold increases in the enzyme's activity in lysosomal fractions, while neprilysin and insulin-degrading enzyme remained unchanged. Biochemical analyses indicated the modulation predominantly targeted the active mature forms of cathepsin B and markedly changed Rab proteins but not LAMP1, suggesting the involvement of enhanced trafficking. The modulated lysosomal system led to reductions in both Aβ immunostaining as well as Aβ(x-42) sandwich ELISA measures in APP(SwInd) mice of 10-11 months. More extensive Aβ deposition in 20-22-month APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice was also reduced by PADK. Selective ELISAs found that a corresponding production of the less pathogenic Aβ(1-38) occurs as Aβ(1-42) levels decrease in the mouse models, indicating that PADK treatment leads to Aβ truncation. Associated with Aβ clearance was the elimination of behavioral and synaptic protein deficits evident in the two transgenic models. These findings indicate that pharmacologically-controlled lysosomal modulation reduces Aβ(1-42) accumulation, possibly through intracellular truncation that also influences extracellular deposition, and in turn offsets the defects in synaptic composition and cognitive functions. The selective modulation promotes clearance at different levels of Aβ pathology and provides proof

  12. Antroquinonol Lowers Brain Amyloid-β Levels and Improves Spatial Learning and Memory in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Miles C.; Cheng, Irene H.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The deposition of brain amyloid-β peptides (Aβ), which are cleaved from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is one of the pathological hallmarks of AD. Aβ-induced oxidative stress and neuroinflammation play important roles in the pathogenesis of AD. Antroquinonol, a ubiquinone derivative isolated from Antrodia camphorata, has been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines via activating the nuclear transcription factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway, which is downregulated in AD. Therefore, we examined whether antroquinonol could improve AD-like pathological and behavioral deficits in the APP transgenic mouse model. We found that antroquinonol was able to cross the blood-brain barrier and had no adverse effects via oral intake. Two months of antroquinonol consumption improved learning and memory in the Morris water maze test, reduced hippocampal Aβ levels, and reduced the degree of astrogliosis. These effects may be mediated through the increase of Nrf2 and the decrease of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) levels. These findings suggest that antroquinonol could have beneficial effects on AD-like deficits in APP transgenic mouse. PMID:26469245

  13. Assessing the Feasibility of Controlling Aedes aegypti with Transgenic Methods: A Model-Based Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Legros, Mathieu; Xu, Chonggang; Okamoto, Kenichi; Scott, Thomas W.; Morrison, Amy C.; Lloyd, Alun L.; Gould, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Suppression of dengue and malaria through releases of genetically engineered mosquitoes might soon become feasible. Aedes aegypti mosquitoes carrying a conditionally lethal transgene have recently been used to suppress local vector populations in small-scale field releases. Prior to releases of transgenic insects on a wider scale, however, most regulatory authorities will require additional evidence that suppression will be effective in natural heterogeneous habitats. We use a spatially explicit stochastic model of an Ae. aegypti population in Iquitos, Peru, along with an uncertainty analysis of its predictions, to quantitatively assess the outcome of varied operational approaches for releases of transgenic strains with conditional death of females. We show that population elimination might be an unrealistic objective in heterogeneous populations. We demonstrate that substantial suppression can nonetheless be achieved if releases are deployed in a uniform spatial pattern using strains combining multiple lethal elements, illustrating the importance of detailed spatial models for guiding genetic mosquito control strategies. PMID:23284949

  14. Safe composition levels of transgenic crops assessed via a clinical medicine model.

    PubMed

    Herman, Rod A; Scherer, Peter N; Phillips, Amy M; Storer, Nicholas P; Krieger, Mark

    2010-02-01

    Substantial equivalence has become established as a foundation concept in the safety evaluation of transgenic crops. In the case of a food and feed crop, no single variety is considered the standard for safety or nutrition, so the substantial equivalence of transgenic crops is investigated relative to the array of commercial crop varieties with a history of safe consumption. Although used extensively in clinical medicine to compare new generic drugs with brand-name drugs, equivalence limits are shown to be a poor model for comparing transgenic crops with an array of reference crop varieties. We suggest an alternate model, also analogous to that used in clinical medicine, where reference intervals are constructed for a healthy heterogeneous population. Specifically, we advocate the use of distribution-free tolerance intervals calculated across a large amount of publicly available compositional data such as is found in the International Life Sciences Institute Crop Composition Database.

  15. Dietary supplementation of walnuts improves memory deficits and learning skills in transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Muthaiyah, Balu; Essa, Musthafa M; Lee, Moon; Chauhan, Ved; Kaur, Kulbir; Chauhan, Abha

    2014-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies have shown that walnut extract can inhibit amyloid-β (Aβ) fibrillization, can solubilize its fibrils, and has a protective effect against Aβ-induced oxidative stress and cellular death. In this study, we analyzed the effect of dietary supplementation with walnuts on learning skills, memory, anxiety, locomotor activity, and motor coordination in the Tg2576 transgenic (tg) mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD-tg). From the age of 4 months, the experimental groups of AD-tg mice were fed custom-mixed diets containing 6% walnuts (T6) or 9% walnuts (T9), i.e., equivalent to 1 or 1.5 oz, respectively, of walnuts per day in humans. The control groups, i.e., AD-tg and wild-type mice, were fed a diet without walnuts (T0, Wt). These experimental and control mice were examined at the ages of 13-14 months by Morris water maze (for spatial memory and learning ability), T maze (for position discrimination learning ability), rotarod (for psychomotor coordination), and elevated plus maze (for anxiety-related behavior). AD-tg mice on the control diet (T0) showed memory deficit, anxiety-related behavior, and severe impairment in spatial learning ability, position discrimination learning ability, and motor coordination compared to the Wt mice on the same diet. The AD-tg mice receiving the diets with 6% or 9% walnuts (T6 and T9) showed a significant improvement in memory, learning ability, anxiety, and motor development compared to the AD-tg mice on the control diet (T0). There was no statistically significant difference in behavioral performance between the T6/T9 mice on walnuts-enriched diets and the Wt group on the control diet. These findings suggest that dietary supplementation with walnuts may have a beneficial effect in reducing the risk, delaying the onset, or slowing the progression of, or preventing AD.

  16. Vascular pathology of 20-month-old hypercholesterolemia mice in comparison to triple-transgenic and APPSwDI Alzheimer’s disease mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Hohsfield, Lindsay A.; Daschil, Nina; Orädd, Greger; Strömberg, Ingrid; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that elevated plasma cholesterol levels (i.e. hypercholesterolemia) serve as a risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, it remains unclear how hypercholesterolemia may contribute to the onset and progression of AD pathology. In order to determine the role of hypercholesterolemia at various stages of AD, we evaluated the effects of high cholesterol diet (5% cholesterol) in wild-type (WT; C57BL6) and triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD; Psen1, APPSwe, tauB301L) mice at 7, 14, and 20 months. The transgenic APP-Swedish/Dutch/Iowa AD mouse model (APPSwDI) was used as a control since these animals are more pathologically-accelerated and are known to exhibit extensive plaque deposition and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Here, we describe the effects of high cholesterol diet on: (1) cognitive function and stress, (2) AD-associated pathologies, (3) neuroinflammation, (4) blood–brain barrier disruption and ventricle size, and (5) vascular dysfunction. Our data show that high dietary cholesterol increases weight, slightly impairs cognitive function, promotes glial cell activation and complement-related pathways, enhances the infiltration of blood-derived proteins and alters vascular integrity, however, it does not induce AD-related pathologies. While normal-fed 3xTg-AD mice display a typical AD-like pathology in addition to severe cognitive impairment and neuroinflammation at 20 months of age, vascular alterations are less pronounced. No microbleedings were seen by MRI, however, the ventricle size was enlarged. Triple-transgenic AD mice, on the other hand, fed a high cholesterol diet do not survive past 14 months of age. Our data indicates that cholesterol does not markedly potentiate AD-related pathology, nor does it cause significant impairments in cognition. However, it appears that high cholesterol diet markedly increases stress-related plasma corticosterone levels as well as some vessel pathologies. Together, our findings

  17. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo of neurochemicals in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease: a longitudinal study of metabolites, relaxation time, and behavioral analysis in TASTPM and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Forster, Duncan; Davies, Karen; Williams, Steve

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. Due to ongoing advances in our understanding of the underlying pathology of AD, many potential new targets for therapeutics are becoming available. Transgenic mouse models of AD have helped in furthering our understanding of AD and also provide a vehicle for preclinical testing of new, putative disease-modifying therapeutics, which may have potential for translation to use in clinical trials. To identify possible translational biomarkers, we have studied the longitudinal cerebral metabolic pattern of the TASTPM transgenic AD mouse, a double transgenic mouse overexpressing human mutant amyloid precursor protein (hAPP695swe) and presenilin-1 (M146V) by (1) H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, along with concurrent brain T1 /T2 mapping and behavioral testing. We found significant differences in creatine, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, choline-containing compounds, and myo-inositol between TASTPM and wild-type mice. In the case of N-acetylaspartate and myo-inositol, there were similarities to differences detected in human AD. T1 /T2 values were shorter overall in TASTPM mice, indicating possible differences in water content between TASTPM and wild-type mice. In older TASTPM mice, exploratory behavior became more random, indicating a possible memory deficiency. The decrease in behavioral performance correlated in the transgenic group with higher expression of myo-inositol.

  18. Phenotypic Alterations in Hippocampal NPY- and PV-Expressing Interneurons in a Presymptomatic Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mahar, Ian; Albuquerque, Marilia Silva; Mondragon-Rodriguez, Siddhartha; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Davoli, Maria Antonietta; Chabot, Jean-Guy; Williams, Sylvain; Mechawar, Naguib; Quirion, Rémi; Krantic, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    Interneurons, key regulators of hippocampal neuronal network excitability and synchronization, are lost in advanced stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Given that network changes occur at early (presymptomatic) stages, we explored whether alterations of interneurons also occur before amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation. Numbers of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactive (IR) cells were decreased in the hippocampus of 1 month-old TgCRND8 mouse AD model in a sub-regionally specific manner. The most prominent change observed was a decrease in the number of PV-IR cells that selectively affected CA1/2 and subiculum, with the pyramidal layer (PY) of CA1/2 accounting almost entirely for the reduction in number of hippocampal PV-IR cells. As PV neurons were decreased selectively in CA1/2 and subiculum, and given that they are critically involved in the control of hippocampal theta oscillations, we then assessed intrinsic theta oscillations in these regions after a 4-aminopyridine (4AP) challenge. This revealed increased theta power and population bursts in TgCRND8 mice compared to non-transgenic (nTg) controls, suggesting a hyperexcitability network state. Taken together, our results identify for the first time AD-related alterations in hippocampal interneuron function as early as at 1 month of age. These early functional alterations occurring before amyloid deposition may contribute to cognitive dysfunction in AD.

  19. Realistic Mobility Modeling for Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akay, Hilal; Tugcu, Tuna

    2009-08-01

    Simulations used for evaluating the performance of routing protocols for Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks (VANET) are mostly based on random mobility and fail to consider individual behaviors of the vehicles. Unrealistic assumptions about mobility produce misleading results about the behavior of routing protocols in real deployments. In this paper, a realistic mobility modeling tool, Mobility for Vehicles (MOVE), which considers the basic mobility behaviors of vehicles, is proposed for a more accurate evaluation. The proposed model is tested against the Random Waypoint (RWP) model using AODV and OLSR protocols. The results show that the mobility model significantly affects the number of nodes within the transmission range of a node, the volume of control traffic, and the number of collisions. It is shown that number of intersections, grid size, and node density are important parameters when dealing with VANET performance.

  20. Cellular, Molecular and Functional Characterisation of YAC Transgenic Mouse Models of Friedreich Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Anjomani Virmouni, Sara; Sandi, Chiranjeevi; Al-Mahdawi, Sahar; Pook, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, caused by a GAA repeat expansion mutation within intron 1 of the FXN gene. We have previously established and performed preliminary characterisation of several human FXN yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) transgenic FRDA mouse models containing GAA repeat expansions, Y47R (9 GAA repeats), YG8R (90 and 190 GAA repeats) and YG22R (190 GAA repeats). Methodology/Principal Findings We now report extended cellular, molecular and functional characterisation of these FXN YAC transgenic mouse models. FXN transgene copy number analysis of the FRDA mice demonstrated that the YG22R and Y47R lines each have a single copy of the FXN transgene while the YG8R line has two copies. Single integration sites of all transgenes were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis of metaphase and interphase chromosomes. We identified significant functional deficits, together with a degree of glucose intolerance and insulin hypersensitivity, in YG8R and YG22R FRDA mice compared to Y47R and wild-type control mice. We also confirmed increased somatic GAA repeat instability in the cerebellum and brain of YG22R and YG8R mice, together with significantly reduced levels of FXN mRNA and protein in the brain and liver of YG8R and YG22R compared to Y47R. Conclusions/Significance Together these studies provide a detailed characterisation of our GAA repeat expansion-based YAC transgenic FRDA mouse models that will help investigations of FRDA disease mechanisms and therapy. PMID:25198290

  1. Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy of angiogenesis in a transgenic mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song; Oladipupo, Sunday; Yao, Junjie; Santeford, Andrea C.; Maslov, Konstantin; Kovalski, Joanna; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    A major obstacle in studying angiogenesis is the inability to noninvasively image neovascular development in an individual animal. We applied optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) to determine the kinetics of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)-mediated angiogenesis in a transgenic mouse model. During continuous 30-day activation of HIF-1α, we used OR-PAM to monitor alterations in microvasculature in transgenic mice compared to nontransgenic mice. OR-PAM has demonstrated the potential to precisely monitor antiangiogenic therapy of human cancers, allowing for rapid determinations of therapeutic efficacy or resistance.

  2. Fat-1 transgenic cattle as a model to study the function of ω-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tao; Liu, Xin F; Ding, Xiang B; Yang, Fei F; Nie, Yong W; An, Yu J; Guo, Hong

    2011-12-29

    ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been shown to play an important role in health. Enriched with ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate expression of a number of genes with such broad functions as cell proliferation, growth and apoptosis and cell signaling and transduction, these effects, seem to regulate coronary artery disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis, psychiatric disorders and various cancer. In this context, fat-1 transgenic cattle was designed to convert ω-6 to ω-3 fatty acids could form an ideal model to study the effect of ω-3 fatty acids on the above functions. This study focuses on the total genomic difference of gene expression between fat-1 transgenic cattle and wild-type using cDNA microarrays, several genes were found to be overexpressed or suppressed in transgenic cattle relative to wild-type, these discrepancy genes related with lipid metabolism, immunity, inflammation nervous development and fertility.

  3. Ground-based observations and AD HOC models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ground based observations of B stars in the visible, the infrared, and the radio region are described along with the ad hoc models proposed to interpret them. It is shown that these observations refer essentially to the photosphere and to the regions of the outer atmosphere where the gas is cool and at low velocity. The characteristics of the variability of the continuous and line spectrum are examined in general and in the cases of individual stars. Finally, linear polarization in the B stars is discussed.

  4. Bioenergetic Defects and Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Models of Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    This study aims to determine what roles bioenergetic dysfunction and oxidative stress play in the etiology of neurodegeneration in Huntington’s ... disease (HE) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), using transgenic mouse models. Studies in this first year employed C-14-2-deoxyglucose in

  5. Protective effect of tangeritin in transgenic Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Ambreen; Khanam, Saba; Rahul, Rahul; Jyoti, Smita; Naz, Falaq; Ali, Fahad; Siddique, Yasir Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused due to the loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra region of midbrain. The disease is characterized by the accumulation of alpha-synuclein into depositions known as lewy bodies. Till date there is no cure for PD but the limited number of medications may provide temporary relief from the PD symptoms. Flavonoids are a group of polyphenols found in plants. The health benefits of flavonoids have been universally accepted. Tangeritin is a pentamethoxy flavone found in the peels of Mandarin oranges (Citrus reticulata). The present study was conducted to study the effect of tangeritin on the symptoms of PD exhibited by the PD model transgenic flies (Drosophila melanogaster). Tangeritin at a final concentration of 5, 10 and 20 microM was added to the diet and the flies were allowed to feed on it for 24 days. At the same time other set of PD flies were allowed to feed on a diet having 10-3 M of L-Dopa. The effect of tangeritin was studied on the activity pattern, climbing ability, dopamine content, oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, glutathione-S-transferase, protein carbonyl content and monoamine oxidase activity) and on the histopathology of the brain of PD model flies. The study showed that the exposure of PD flies to different doses of tangeritin showed a marked delay in the loss of climbing ability and increase in the dopamine content. Tangeritin also showed a reduction in various oxidative stress markers. Hence it is concluded that tangeritin showed a marked reduction in the PD symptoms and thus could be of great importance for further research in treating PD.

  6. Massive CA1/2 Neuronal Loss with Intraneuronal and N-Terminal Truncated Aβ42 Accumulation in a Novel Alzheimer Transgenic Model

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Caty; Sergeant, Nicolas; Itier, Jean-Michel; Blanchard, Véronique; Wirths, Oliver; van der Kolk, Nicolien; Vingtdeux, Valérie; van de Steeg, Evita; Ret, Gwenaëlle; Canton, Thierry; Drobecq, Hervé; Clark, Allan; Bonici, Bruno; Delacourte, André; Benavides, Jesús; Schmitz, Christoph; Tremp, Günter; Bayer, Thomas A.; Benoit, Patrick; Pradier, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a substantial degeneration of pyramidal neurons and the appearance of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Here we present a novel transgenic mouse model, APPSLPS1KI that closely mimics the development of AD-related neuropathological features including a significant hippocampal neuronal loss. This transgenic mouse model carries M233T/L235P knocked-in mutations in presenilin-1 and overexpresses mutated human β-amyloid (Aβ) precursor protein. Aβx-42 is the major form of Aβ species present in this model with progressive development of a complex pattern of N-truncated variants and dimers, similar to those observed in AD brain. At 10 months of age, an extensive neuronal loss (>50%) is present in the CA1/2 hippocampal pyramidal cell layer that correlates with strong accumulation of intraneuronal Aβ and thioflavine-S-positive intracellular material but not with extracellular Aβ deposits. A strong reactive astrogliosis develops together with the neuronal loss. This loss is already detectable at 6 months of age and is PS1KI gene dosage-dependent. Thus, APPSLPS1KI mice further confirm the critical role of intraneuronal Aβ42 in neuronal loss and provide an excellent tool to investigate therapeutic strategies designed to prevent AD neurodegeneration. PMID:15466394

  7. A transgenic mouse model of hemoglobin S Antilles disease.

    PubMed

    Popp, R A; Popp, D M; Shinpock, S G; Yang, M Y; Mural, J G; Aguinaga, M P; Kopsombut, P; Roa, P D; Turner, E A; Rubin, E M

    1997-06-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) S Antilles is a naturally occurring form of sickling human Hb but causes a more severe phenotype than Hb S. Two homozygous viable Hb S Antilles transgene insertions from Tg58Ru and Tg98Ru mice were bred into MHOAH mice that express high oxygen affinity (P50 approximately 24.5 mm Hg) rather than normal (P50 approximately 40 mm Hg) mouse Hbs. The rationale was that the high oxygen affinity MHOAH Hb, the lower oxygen affinity of Hb S Antilles than Hb S (P50 approximately 40 v 26.5 mm Hg), and the lower solubility of deoxygenated Hb S Antilles than Hb S (approximately 11 v 18 g/dL) would favor deoxygenation and polymerization of human Hb S Antilles in MHOAH mouse red blood cells (RBCs). The Tg58 x Tg98 mice produced have a high and balanced expression (approximately 50% each) of h alpha and h beta(S Antilles) globins, 25% to 35% of their RBCs are misshapen in vivo, and in vitro deoxygenation of their blood induces 30% to 50% of the RBCs to form classical looking, elongated sickle cells with pointed ends. Tg58 x Tg98 mice exhibit reticulocytosis, an elevated white blood cell count and lung and kidney pathology commonly found in sickle cell patients, which should make these mice useful for experimental studies on possible therapeutic intervention of sickle cell disease.

  8. Transgenic mouse models of CMT1A and HNPP.

    PubMed

    Suter, U; Nave, K A

    1999-09-14

    We have generated several PMP22 animal mutants with altered PMP22 gene dosage. A moderate increase in the number of PMP22 genes led to hypomyelination comparable to CMT1A, whereas high copy numbers of transgenic PMP22 resulted in phenotypes resembling more severe forms of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies. In contrast, eliminating one of the two normal PMP22 genes by gene targeting caused unstable focal hypermyelination (tomacula) similar to the pathology in HNPP. A related but more severe phenotype was observed in mice that lack PMP22 completely. Detailed analysis of the different PMP22 mutants revealed, in addition to the obvious myelinopathy, distal axonopathy as a characteristic feature. We conclude that the maintenance of axons might be a promising target for therapeutic interventions in these demyelinating hereditary neuropathies. Furthermore, our results strongly support the concept that PMP22-related neuropathies (and most likely also other forms of inherited motor and sensory neuropathies) should be viewed as the consequence of impaired neuron-Schwann cell interactions that are likely already to be operative during development. Such considerations should be taken into account in the design of potential novel treatment strategies.

  9. Improved Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying HLA Class I Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Man; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jie; Wei, Xundong; Phiwpan, Krung; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Xuyu

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I (HLA-I) transgenic mice have proven to be useful models for studying human MHC-related immune responses over the last two decades. However, differences in the processing and presentation machinery between humans and mice may have profound effects on HLA-I restricted antigen presentation. In this study, we generated a novel human TAP-LMP (hTAP-LMP) gene cluster transgenic mouse model carrying an intact human TAP complex and two human immunoproteasome LMP subunits, PSMB8/PSMB9. By crossing the hTAP-LMP strain with different HLA-I transgenic mice, we found that the expression levels of human HLA-I molecules, especially the A3 supertype members (e.g., A11 and A33), were remarkably enhanced in corresponding HLA-I/hTAP-LMP transgenic mice. Moreover, we found that humanized processing and presentation machinery increased antigen presentation of HLA-A11-restricted epitopes and promoted the rapid reduction of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in HLA-A11/hTAP-LMP mice. Together, our study highlights that HLA-I/hTAP-LMP mice are an improved model for studying antigen presentation of HLA-I molecules and their related CTL responses. PMID:27634283

  10. Impaired Adult Neurogenesis in the Dentate Gyrus of a Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, José J.; Jones, Victoria C.; Tabuchi, Masashi; Allan, Stuart M.; Knight, Elysse M.; LaFerla, Frank M.; Oddo, Salvatore; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2008-01-01

    It has become generally accepted that new neurones are added and integrated mainly in two areas of the mammalian CNS, the subventricular zone and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, which is of central importance in learning and memory. The newly generated cells display neuronal morphology, are able to generate action potentials and receive functional synaptic inputs, i.e. their properties are similar to those found in mature neurones. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the primary and widespread cause of dementia and is an age-related, progressive and irreversible neurodegenerative disease that deteriorates cognitive functions. Here, we have used male and female triple transgenic mice (3xTg-AD) harbouring three mutant genes (β-amyloid precursor protein, presenilin-1 and tau) and their respective non-transgenic (non-Tg) controls at 2, 3, 4, 6, 9 and 12 months of age to establish the link between AD and neurogenesis. Using immunohistochemistry we determined the area density of proliferating cells within the SGZ of the DG, measured by the presence of phosphorylated Histone H3 (HH3), and their possible co-localisation with GFAP to exclude a glial phenotype. Less than 1% of the HH3 labeled cells co-localised with GFAP. Both non-Tg and 3xTg-AD showed an age-dependent decrease in neurogenesis. However, male 3xTg-AD mice demonstrated a further reduction in the production of new neurones from 9 months of age (73% decrease) and a complete depletion at 12 months, when compared to controls. In addition, female 3xTg-AD mice showed an earlier but equivalent decrease in neurogenesis at 4 months (reduction of 63%) with an almost inexistent rate at 12 months (88% decrease) compared to controls. This reduction in neurogenesis was directly associated with the presence of β-amyloid plaques and an increase in the number of β-amyloid containing neurones in the hippocampus; which in the case of 3xgTg females was directly correlated. These results suggest

  11. Three-Dimensional, Transgenic Cell Models to Quantify Space Genotoxic Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, S. R.; Sognier, M. A.; Wu, H.; Pingerelli, P. L.; Glickman, B. W.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The space environment contains radiation and chemical agents known to be mutagenic and carcinogenic to humans. Additionally, microgravity is a complicating factor that may modify or synergize induced genotoxic effects. Most in vitro models fail to use human cells (making risk extrapolation to humans more difficult), overlook the dynamic effect of tissue intercellular interactions on genotoxic damage, and lack the sensitivity required to measure low-dose effects. Currently a need exists for a model test system that simulates cellular interactions present in tissue, and can be used to quantify genotoxic damage induced by low levels of radiation and chemicals, and extrapolate assessed risk to humans. A state-of-the-art, three-dimensional, multicellular tissue equivalent cell culture model will be presented. It consists of mammalian cells genetically engineered to contain multiple copies of defined target genes for genotoxic assessment,. NASA-designed bioreactors were used to coculture mammalian cells into spheroids, The cells used were human mammary epithelial cells (H184135) and Stratagene's (Austin, Texas) Big Blue(TM) Rat 2 lambda fibroblasts. The fibroblasts were genetically engineered to contain -a high-density target gene for mutagenesis (60 copies of lacl/LacZ per cell). Tissue equivalent spheroids were routinely produced by inoculation of 2 to 7 X 10(exp 5) fibroblasts with Cytodex 3 beads (150 micrometers in diameter). at a 20:1 cell:bead ratio, into 50-ml HARV bioreactors (Synthecon, Inc.). Fibroblasts were cultured for 5 days, an equivalent number of epithelial cells added, and the fibroblast/epithelial cell coculture continued for 21 days. Three-dimensional spheroids with diameters ranging from 400 to 600 micrometers were obtained. Histological and immunohistochemical Characterization revealed i) both cell types present in the spheroids, with fibroblasts located primarily in the center, surrounded by epithelial cells; ii) synthesis of extracellular matrix

  12. In silico strain optimization by adding reactions to metabolic models.

    PubMed

    Correia, Sara; Rocha, Miguel

    2012-07-24

    Nowadays, the concerns about the environment and the needs to increase the productivity at low costs, demand for the search of new ways to produce compounds with industrial interest. Based on the increasing knowledge of biological processes, through genome sequencing projects, and high-throughput experimental techniques as well as the available computational tools, the use of microorganisms has been considered as an approach to produce desirable compounds. However, this usually requires to manipulate these organisms by genetic engineering and/ or changing the enviromental conditions to make the production of these compounds possible. In many cases, it is necessary to enrich the genetic material of those microbes with hereologous pathways from other species and consequently adding the potential to produce novel compounds. This paper introduces a new plug-in for the OptFlux Metabolic Engineering platform, aimed at finding suitable sets of reactions to add to the genomes of selected microbes (wild type strain), as well as finding complementary sets of deletions, so that the mutant becomes able to overproduce compounds with industrial interest, while preserving their viability. The necessity of adding reactions to the metabolic model arises from existing gaps in the original model or motivated by the productions of new compounds by the organism. The optimization methods used are metaheuristics such as Evolutionary Algorithms and Simulated Annealing. The usefulness of this plug-in is demonstrated by a case study, regarding the production of vanillin by the bacterium E. coli.

  13. Gastric Carcinogenesis in the miR-222/221 Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Boram; Yu, Jieun; Han, Tae-Su; Kim, Young-Kook; Hur, Keun; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Kim, Woo-Ho; Kim, Dae-Yong; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Kim, V. Narry; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate various cellular functions, including development, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Different signatures associated with various tissue types, diagnosis, progression, prognosis, staging, and treatment response have been identified by miRNA expression profiling of human tumors. miRNAs function as oncogenes or as tumor suppressors. The relationship between gastric cancer and miRNA garnered attention due to the high incidence of gastric cancer in Asian countries. miR-222/221 expression increases in gastric tumor tissues. The oncogenic effect of miR-222/221 was previously determined in functional studies and xenograft models. In this study, transgenic mice over-expressing miR-222/221 were generated to confirm the effect of miR-222/221 on gastric carcinogenesis. Materials and Methods At 6 weeks of age, 65 transgenic mice and 53 wild-type mice were given drinking water containing N-nitroso-N-methylurea (MNU) for 5 alternating weeks to induce gastric cancer. The mice were euthanized at 36 weeks of age and histologic analysis was performed. Results Hyperplasia was observed in 3.77% of the wild-type mice and in 18.46% of the transgenic mice (p=0.020). Adenoma was observed in 20.75% of the wild-type mice and 26.15% of the transgenic mice (p=0.522). Carcinoma was observed in 32.08% of the wild-type mice and 41.54% of the transgenic mice (p=0.341). The frequency of hyperplasia, adenoma, and carcinoma was higher in transgenic mice, but the difference was statistically significant only in hyperplasia. Conclusion These results suggest that hyperplasia, a gastric pre-cancerous lesion, is associated with miR-222/221 expression but miR-222/221 expression does not affect tumorigenesis itself. PMID:27338035

  14. AAV1/2-mediated BDNF gene therapy in a transgenic rat model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Connor, B; Sun, Y; von Hieber, D; Tang, S K; Jones, K S; Maucksch, C

    2016-03-01

    Reduced expression and disrupted corticostriatal transportation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is proposed to contribute to the selective vulnerability of medium spiny striatal projection neurons (MSNs) in Huntington's disease (HD). We have previously demonstrated that BDNF overexpression in the quinolinic acid lesioned rat striatum attenuates motor impairment and reduces the extent of MSN cell loss. To further investigate the potential therapeutic properties of BDNF for HD, the current study examines the effect of bilateral AAV1/2-mediated BDNF expression in the striatum of a transgenic rat model of HD. Transfer of the BDNF gene to striatal neurons using an AAV1/2 serotype vector enhanced BDNF protein levels in the striatum. Bilateral BDNF expression attenuated the impairment of both motor and cognitive function when compared with AAV1/2-vehicle- or YFP-treated transgenic HD rats. Interestingly, a gender effect was apparent with female transgenic HD rats exhibiting less functional impairment than males. Quantification of NeuN and DARRP32 immunoreactivity and striatal volume revealed limited disease phenotype between wild type and transgenic HD animals. However, AAV1/2-BDNF-treated transgenic HD rats showed evidence of greater striatal volume and increased NeuN+ cell numbers compared with wild-type vehicle- and AAV1/2-vehicle- or YFP-treated transgenic HD rats. We propose BDNF holds considerable therapeutic potential for alleviating behavioral dysfunction and neuronal degeneration in HD, with further work required to examine the role of BDNF-TrkB signaling and the preservation of axonal and synaptic function.

  15. Diet rich in date palm fruits improves memory, learning and reduces beta amyloid in transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Selvaraju; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Braidy, Nady; Awlad-Thani, Kathyia; Vaishnav, Ragini; Al-Adawi, Samir; Al-Asmi, Abdullah; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: At present, the treatment options available to delay the onset or slow down the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not effective. Recent studies have suggested that diet and lifestyle factors may represent protective strategies to minimize the risk of developing AD. Date palm fruits are a good source of dietary fiber and are rich in total phenolics and natural antioxidants, such as anthocyanins, ferulic acid, protocatechuic acid and caffeic acid. These polyphenolic compounds have been shown to be neuroprotective in different model systems. Objective: We investigated whether dietary supplementation with 2% and 4% date palm fruits (grown in Oman) could reduce cognitive and behavioral deficits in a transgenic mouse model for AD (amyloid precursor protein [APPsw]/Tg2576). Materials and Methods: The experimental groups of APP-transgenic mice from the age of 4 months were fed custom-mix diets (pellets) containing 2% and 4% date fruits. We assessed spatial memory and learning ability, psychomotor coordination, and anxiety-related behavior in all the animals at the age of 4 months and after 14 months of treatment using the Morris water maze test, rota-rod test, elevated plus maze test, and open-field test. We have also analyzed the levels of amyloid beta (Aβ) protein (1–40 and 1–42) in plasma of control and experimental animals. Results: Standard diet-fed Tg mice showed significant memory deficits, increased anxiety-related behavior, and severe impairment in spatial learning ability, position discrimination learning ability and motor coordination when compared to wild-type on the same diet and Tg mice fed 2% and 4% date supplementation at the age of 18 months. The levels of both Aβ proteins were significantly lowered in date fruits supplemented groups than the Tg mice without the diet supplement. The neuroprotective effect offered by 4% date fruits diet to AD mice is higher than 2% date fruits diet. Conclusions: Our results suggest that date

  16. Characterization of Kiss1 neurons using transgenic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Cravo, Roberta M.; Margatho, Lisandra O.; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Donato, José; Atkin, Stan; Bookout, Angie L.; Rovinsky, Sherry; Frazão, Renata; Lee, Charlotte E.; Gautron, Laurent; Zigman, Jeffrey M.; Elias, Carol F.

    2010-01-01

    Humans and mice with loss-of-function mutations of the genes encoding kisspeptins (Kiss1) or kisspeptin receptors (Kiss1r) are infertile due to hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Within the hypothalamus, Kiss1 mRNA is expressed in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) and the arcuate nucleus (Arc). In order to better study the different populations of kisspeptin cells we generated Kiss1-Cre transgenic mice. We obtained one line with Cre activity specifically within Kiss1 neurons (line J2-4), as assessed by generating mice with Cre-dependent expression of green fluorescent protein or β-galactosidase. Also, we demonstrated Kiss1 expression in the cerebral cortex and confirmed previous data showing Kiss1 mRNA in the medial nucleus of amygdala and anterodorsal preoptic nucleus. Kiss1 neurons were more concentrated towards the caudal levels of the Arc and higher leptin-responsivity was observed in the most caudal population of Arc Kiss1 neurons. No evidence for direct action of leptin in AVPV Kiss1 neurons was observed. Melanocortin fibers innervated subsets of Kiss1 neurons of the preoptic area and Arc, and both populations expressed MC4R. Specifically in the preoptic area, 18–28% of Kiss1 neurons expressed MC4R. In the Arc, 90% of Kiss1 neurons were glutamatergic, 50% of which also were GABAergic. In the AVPV, 20% of Kiss1 neurons were glutamatergic whereas 75% were GABAergic. The differences observed between the Kiss1 neurons in the preoptic area and the Arc likely represent neuronal evidence for their differential roles in metabolism and reproduction. PMID:21093546

  17. Establishment of a novel, eco-friendly transgenic pig model using porcine pancreatic amylase promoter-driven fungal cellulase transgenes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y S; Yang, C C; Hsu, C C; Hsu, J T; Wu, S C; Lin, C J; Cheng, W T K

    2015-02-01

    Competition between humans and livestock for cereal and legume grains makes it challenging to provide economical feeds to livestock animals. Recent increases in corn and soybean prices have had a significant impact on the cost of feed for pig producers. The utilization of byproducts and alternative ingredients in pig diets has the potential to reduce feed costs. Moreover, unlike ruminants, pigs have limited ability to utilize diets with high fiber content because they lack endogenous enzymes capable of breaking down nonstarch polysaccharides into simple sugars. Here, we investigated the feasibility of a transgenic strategy in which expression of the fungal cellulase transgene was driven by the porcine pancreatic amylase promoter in pigs. A 2,488 bp 5'-flanking region of the porcine pancreatic amylase gene was cloned by the genomic walking technique, and its structural features were characterized. Using GFP as a reporter, we found that this region contained promoter activity and had the potential to control heterologous gene expression. Transgenic pigs were generated by pronuclear microinjection. Founders and offspring were identified by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Cellulase mRNA and protein showed tissue-specific expression in the pancreas of F1 generation pigs. Cellulolytic enzyme activity was also identified in the pancreas of transgenic pigs. These results demonstrated the establishment of a tissue-specific promoter of the porcine pancreatic amylase gene. Transgenic pigs expressing exogenous cellulase may represent a way to increase the intake of low-cost, fiber-rich feeds.

  18. Intraneuronal APP and extracellular Aβ independently cause dendritic spine pathology in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chengyu; Montagna, Elena; Shi, Yuan; Peters, Finn; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Shi, Song; Filser, Severin; Dorostkar, Mario M; Herms, Jochen

    2015-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is thought to be caused by accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ), which is a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Transgenic mice overexpressing APP have been used to recapitulate amyloid-β pathology. Among them, APP23 and APPswe/PS1deltaE9 (deltaE9) mice are extensively studied. APP23 mice express APP with Swedish mutation and develop amyloid plaques late in their life, while cognitive deficits are observed in young age. In contrast, deltaE9 mice with mutant APP and mutant presenilin-1 develop amyloid plaques early but show typical cognitive deficits in old age. To unveil the reasons for different progressions of cognitive decline in these commonly used mouse models, we analyzed the number and turnover of dendritic spines as important structural correlates for learning and memory. Chronic in vivo two-photon imaging in apical tufts of layer V pyramidal neurons revealed a decreased spine density in 4-5-month-old APP23 mice. In age-matched deltaE9 mice, in contrast, spine loss was only observed on cortical dendrites that were in close proximity to amyloid plaques. In both cases, the reduced spine density was caused by decreased spine formation. Interestingly, the patterns of alterations in spine morphology differed between these two transgenic mouse models. Moreover, in APP23 mice, APP was found to accumulate intracellularly and its content was inversely correlated with the absolute spine density and the relative number of mushroom spines. Collectively, our results suggest that different pathological mechanisms, namely an intracellular accumulation of APP or extracellular amyloid plaques, may lead to spine abnormalities in young adult APP23 and deltaE9 mice, respectively. These distinct features, which may represent very different mechanisms of synaptic failure in AD, have to be taken into consideration when translating results from animal studies to the human disease.

  19. Neuroanatomical and functional characterization of CRF neurons of the amygdala using a novel transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    De Francesco, P N; Valdivia, S; Cabral, A; Reynaldo, M; Raingo, J; Sakata, I; Osborne-Lawrence, S; Zigman, J M; Perelló, M

    2015-03-19

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-producing neurons of the amygdala have been implicated in behavioral and physiological responses associated with fear, anxiety, stress, food intake and reward. To overcome the difficulties in identifying CRF neurons within the amygdala, a novel transgenic mouse line, in which the humanized recombinant Renilla reniformis green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) is under the control of the CRF promoter (CRF-hrGFP mice), was developed. First, the CRF-hrGFP mouse model was validated and the localization of CRF neurons within the amygdala was systematically mapped. Amygdalar hrGFP-expressing neurons were located primarily in the interstitial nucleus of the posterior limb of the anterior commissure, but also present in the central amygdala. Secondly, the marker of neuronal activation c-Fos was used to explore the response of amygdalar CRF neurons in CRF-hrGFP mice under different experimental paradigms. C-Fos induction was observed in CRF neurons of CRF-hrGFP mice exposed to an acute social defeat stress event, a fasting/refeeding paradigm or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. In contrast, no c-Fos induction was detected in CRF neurons of CRF-hrGFP mice exposed to restraint stress, forced swimming test, 48-h fasting, acute high-fat diet (HFD) consumption, intermittent HFD consumption, ad libitum HFD consumption, HFD withdrawal, conditioned HFD aversion, ghrelin administration or melanocortin 4 receptor agonist administration. Thus, this study fully characterizes the distribution of amygdala CRF neurons in mice and suggests that they are involved in some, but not all, stress or food intake-related behaviors recruiting the amygdala.

  20. Transgenic Monkey Model of the Polyglutamine Diseases Recapitulating Progressive Neurological Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Hidetoshi; Minakawa, Eiko N.; Motohashi, Hideyuki H.; Takayama, Osamu; Popiel, H. Akiko; Puentes, Sandra; Owari, Kensuke; Nakatani, Terumi; Nogami, Naotake; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yonekawa, Takahiro; Tanaka, Yoko; Fujita, Naoko; Suzuki, Hikaru; Aizawa, Shu; Nagano, Seiichi; Yamada, Daisuke; Wada, Keiji; Kohsaka, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Age-associated neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and the polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases, are becoming prevalent as a consequence of elongation of the human lifespan. Although various rodent models have been developed to study and overcome these diseases, they have limitations in their translational research utility owing to differences from humans in brain structure and function and in drug metabolism. Here, we generated a transgenic marmoset model of the polyQ diseases, showing progressive neurological symptoms including motor impairment. Seven transgenic marmosets were produced by lentiviral introduction of the human ataxin 3 gene with 120 CAG repeats encoding an expanded polyQ stretch. Although all offspring showed no neurological symptoms at birth, three marmosets with higher transgene expression developed neurological symptoms of varying degrees at 3–4 months after birth, followed by gradual decreases in body weight gain, spontaneous activity, and grip strength, indicating time-dependent disease progression. Pathological examinations revealed neurodegeneration and intranuclear polyQ protein inclusions accompanied by gliosis, which recapitulate the neuropathological features of polyQ disease patients. Consistent with neuronal loss in the cerebellum, brain MRI analyses in one living symptomatic marmoset detected enlargement of the fourth ventricle, which suggests cerebellar atrophy. Notably, successful germline transgene transmission was confirmed in the second-generation offspring derived from the symptomatic transgenic marmoset gamete. Because the accumulation of abnormal proteins is a shared pathomechanism among various neurodegenerative diseases, we suggest that this new marmoset model will contribute toward elucidating the pathomechanisms of and developing clinically applicable therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28374014

  1. Transgenic animal models for study of the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Renbao; Liu, Xudong; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is caused by a genetic mutation that results in polyglutamine expansion in the N-terminal regions of huntingtin. As a result, this polyQ expansion leads to the misfolding and aggregation of mutant huntingtin as well as age-dependent neurodegeneration. The genetic mutation in HD allows for generating a variety of animal models that express different forms of mutant huntingtin and show differential pathology. Studies of these animal models have provided an important insight into the pathogenesis of HD. Mouse models of HD include transgenic mice, which express N-terminal or full-length mutant huntingtin ubiquitously or selectively in different cell types, and knock-in mice that express full-length mutant Htt at the endogenous level. Large animals, such as pig, sheep, and monkeys, have also been used to generate animal HD models. This review focuses on the different features of commonly used transgenic HD mouse models as well as transgenic large animal models of HD, and also discusses how to use them to identify potential therapeutics. Since HD shares many pathological features with other neurodegenerative diseases, identification of therapies for HD would also help to develop effective treatment for different neurodegenerative diseases that are also caused by protein misfolding and occur in an age-dependent manner. PMID:25931812

  2. Transgenic animal models for study of the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease and therapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Renbao; Liu, Xudong; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a genetic mutation that results in polyglutamine expansion in the N-terminal regions of huntingtin. As a result, this polyQ expansion leads to the misfolding and aggregation of mutant huntingtin as well as age-dependent neurodegeneration. The genetic mutation in HD allows for generating a variety of animal models that express different forms of mutant huntingtin and show differential pathology. Studies of these animal models have provided an important insight into the pathogenesis of HD. Mouse models of HD include transgenic mice, which express N-terminal or full-length mutant huntingtin ubiquitously or selectively in different cell types, and knock-in mice that express full-length mutant Htt at the endogenous level. Large animals, such as pig, sheep, and monkeys, have also been used to generate animal HD models. This review focuses on the different features of commonly used transgenic HD mouse models as well as transgenic large animal models of HD, and also discusses how to use them to identify potential therapeutics. Since HD shares many pathological features with other neurodegenerative diseases, identification of therapies for HD would also help to develop effective treatment for different neurodegenerative diseases that are also caused by protein misfolding and occur in an age-dependent manner.

  3. Time course and progression of wild type α-Synuclein accumulation in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Progressive accumulation of α-synuclein (α-Syn) protein in different brain regions is a hallmark of synucleinopathic diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy. α-Syn transgenic mouse models have been developed to investigate the effects of α-Syn accumulation on behavioral deficits and neuropathology. However, the onset and progression of pathology in α-Syn transgenic mice have not been fully characterized. For this purpose we investigated the time course of behavioral deficits and neuropathology in PDGF-β human wild type α-Syn transgenic mice (D-Line) between 3 and 12 months of age. Results These mice showed progressive impairment of motor coordination of the limbs that resulted in significant differences compared to non-transgenic littermates at 9 and 12 months of age. Biochemical and immunohistological analyses revealed constantly increasing levels of human α-Syn in different brain areas. Human α-Syn was expressed particularly in somata and neurites of a subset of neocortical and limbic system neurons. Most of these neurons showed immunoreactivity for phosphorylated human α-Syn confined to nuclei and perinuclear cytoplasm. Analyses of the phenotype of α-Syn expressing cells revealed strong expression in dopaminergic olfactory bulb neurons, subsets of GABAergic interneurons and glutamatergic principal cells throughout the telencephalon. We also found human α-Syn expression in immature neurons of both the ventricular zone and the rostral migratory stream, but not in the dentate gyrus. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that the PDGF-β α-Syn transgenic mouse model presents with early and progressive accumulation of human α-Syn that is accompanied by motor deficits. This information is essential for the design of therapeutical studies of synucleinopathies. PMID:23302418

  4. Constitutive expression of SMAR1 confers susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Bhawna; Malonia, Sunil K.; Majumdar, Subeer S.; Gupta, Pushpa; Wadhwa, Neerja; Badhwar, Archana; Gupta, Umesh D.; Katoch, Vishwa M.; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Studies involving animal models of experimental tuberculosis have elucidated the predominant role of cytokines secreted by T cells and macrophages to be an essential component of the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The immune activities of CD4+ T cells are mediated in part by Th1 cytokine interferon gamma (IFN-γ) which is produced primarily by T cells and natural killer (NK) cells and critical for initiating the immune response against intracellular pathogen such as M. tuberculosis. Nuclear matrix protein SMAR1 plays an important role in V(D)J recombination, T helper cell differentiation and inflammatory diseases. In this study a transgenic mouse model was used to study the role of SMAR1 in M. tuberculosis infection. Methods: Wild type BALB/c, C57BL/6, BALB/c-EGFP-SMAR1 and C57BL/6-SMAR1 transgenic mice were infected with M. tuberculosis (H37Rv). A dose of 100 bacilli was used for infection via respiratory route. Bacterial load in lung and spleen of infected mice was determined at 2, 4, 6 and 8 wk post-infection. Gene expression analysis for Th1 cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was performed in infected lung tissues by quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Results: SMAR1 transgenic mice from both BALB/c and C57BL/6 genetic background displayed higher bacillary load and susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection compared to wild type mice. This susceptibility was attributed due to compromised of Th1 response exhibited by transgenic mice. Interpretation & conclusions: SMAR1 transgenic mice exhibited susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection in vivo irrespective of genetic background. This susceptibility was attributed to downregulation of Th1 response and its hallmark cytokine IFN-γ. Hence, SMAR1 plays an important role in modulating host immune response after M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:26831422

  5. The Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant MitoQ Prevents Loss of Spatial Memory Retention and Early Neuropathology in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Meagan J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Franklin, James L.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress contribute to the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We examined the ability of the novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ (mitoquinone mesylate: [10-(4,5-dimethoxy-2-methyl-3,6-dioxo-1,4-cycloheexadienlyl) decyl triphenylphosphonium methanesulfonate]) to prevent AD-like pathology in mouse cortical neurons in cell culture and in a triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD). MitoQ attenuated β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced neurotoxicity in cortical neurons and also prevented increased production of reactive species and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in them. To determine whether the mitochondrial protection conferred by MitoQ was sufficient to prevent the emergence of AD-like neuropathology in vivo, we treated young female 3xTg-AD mice with MitoQ for 5 months and analyzed the effect on the progression of AD-like pathologies. Our results show that MitoQ prevented cognitive decline in these mice as well as oxidative stress, Aβ accumulation, astrogliosis, synaptic loss, and caspase activation in their brains. The work presented herein suggests a central role for mitochondria in neurodegeneration and provides evidence supporting the use of mitochondria-targeted therapeutics in diseases involving oxidative stress and metabolic failure, namely AD. PMID:22049413

  6. Preferential survival in models of complex ad hoc networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Joseph S.; Roychowdhury, Vwani P.

    2008-05-01

    There has been a rich interplay in recent years between (i) empirical investigations of real-world dynamic networks, (ii) analytical modeling of the microscopic mechanisms that drive the emergence of such networks, and (iii) harnessing of these mechanisms to either manipulate existing networks, or engineer new networks for specific tasks. We continue in this vein, and study the deletion phenomenon in the web by the following two different sets of websites (each comprising more than 150,000 pages) over a one-year period. Empirical data show that there is a significant deletion component in the underlying web networks, but the deletion process is not uniform. This motivates us to introduce a new mechanism of preferential survival (PS), where nodes are removed according to the degree-dependent deletion kernel, D(k)∝k, with α≥0. We use the mean-field rate equation approach to study a general dynamic model driven by Preferential Attachment (PA), Double PA (DPA), and a tunable PS (i.e., with any α>0), where c nodes ( c<1) are deleted per node added to the network, and verify our predictions via large-scale simulations. One of our results shows that, unlike in the case of uniform deletion (i.e., where α=0), the PS kernel when coupled with the standard PA mechanism, can lead to heavy-tailed power-law networks even in the presence of extreme turnover in the network. Moreover, a weak DPA mechanism, coupled with PS, can help to make the network even more heavy-tailed, especially in the limit when deletion and insertion rates are almost equal, and the overall network growth is minimal. The dynamics reported in this work can be used to design and engineer stable ad hoc networks and explain the stability of the power-law exponents observed in real-world networks.

  7. Generation and characterization of a transgenic mouse model with hepatic expression of human CYP2A6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Yu; Gu, Jun; Su, Ting; Cui, Huadong; Zhang, Xiuling; D'Agostino, Jaime; Zhuo, Xiaoliang; Yang, Weizhu; Swiatek, Pamela J; Ding, Xinxin

    2005-12-09

    The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize a transgenic mouse model in which CYP2A6, a human P450 enzyme, is expressed specifically in the liver. CYP2A6, which is mainly expressed in human liver, is active toward many xenobiotics. Our transgene construct contained the mouse transthyretin promoter/enhancer, a full-length CYP2A6 cDNA, and a downstream neomycin-resistance gene for positive selection in embryonic stem cells. Hepatic expression of the CYP2A6 transgene was demonstrated by immunoblotting, whereas tissue specificity of CYP2A6 expression was confirmed by RNA-PCR. The transgenic mouse was further characterized after being backcrossed to the B6 strain for six generations. Hepatic microsomes from homozygous transgenic mice had activities significantly higher than those of B6 mice toward coumarin. The in vivo activity of transgenic CYP2A6 was also determined. Systemic clearance of coumarin was significantly higher in the transgenic mice than in B6 controls, consistent with the predicted role of CYP2A6 as the major coumarin hydroxylase in human liver. The CYP2A6-transgenic mouse model should be valuable for studying the in vivo function of this polymorphic human enzyme in drug metabolism and chemical toxicity.

  8. The effect of PN-1, a Traditional Chinese Prescription, on the Learning and Memory in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Ling; Liang, Liang; Liu, Yu; Yang, Ya-Jun; Huang, Lan; Zhu, Hua; Ma, Chun-Mei; Qin, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is a complete medical system that has been practiced for more than 3000 years. Prescription number 1 (PN-1) consists of several Chinese medicines and is designed according to TCM theories to treat patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. The evidence of clinical practice suggests the benefit effects of PN-1 on cognitive deficits of dementia patients. We try to prove and explain this by using contemporary methodology and transgenic animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The behavioral studies were developed to evaluate the memory of transgenic animals after intragastric administration of PN-1 for 3 months. Amyloid beta-protein (Aβ) neuropathology was quantified using immunohistochemistry and ELISA. The western blotting was used to detect the levels of plasticity associated proteins. The safety of PN-1 on mice was also assessed through multiple parameters. Results showed that PN-1 could effectively relieve learning and memory impairment of transgenic animals. Possible mechanisms showed that PN-1 could significantly reduce plaque burden and Aβ levels and boost synaptic plasticity. Our observations showed that PN-1 could improve learning and memory ability through multiple mechanisms without detectable side effects on mice. We propose that PN-1 is a promising alternative treatment for AD in the future. PMID:23476695

  9. Evaluation of oxidative stress in the brain of a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease by in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Akihiro; Emoto, Miho C; Suzuki, Syuuichirou; Iwahara, Naotoshi; Hisahara, Shin; Kawamata, Jun; Suzuki, Hiromi; Yamauchi, Ayano; Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada G; Shimohama, Shun

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized by progressive cognitive dysfunction. Deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides is the most important pathophysiological hallmark of AD. Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species is prominent in AD, and several reports suggest the relationship between a change in redox status and AD pathology containing progressive Aβ deposition, the activation of glial cells, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, we performed immunohistochemical analysis using a transgenic mouse model of AD (APdE9) and evaluated the activity of superoxide dismutase in brain tissue homogenates of APdE9 mice in vitro. Together with those analyses, in vivo changes in redox status with age in both wild-type (WT) and APdE9 mouse brains were measured noninvasively by three-dimensional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging using nitroxide (3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-yloxy) as a redox-sensitive probe. Both methods found similar changes in redox status with age, and in particular a significant change in redox status in the hippocampus was observed noninvasively by EPR imaging between APdE9 mice and age-matched WT mice from 9 to 18 months of age. EPR imaging clearly visualized the accelerated change in redox status of APdE9 mouse brain compared with WT. The evaluation of the redox status in the brain of AD model rodents by EPR imaging should be useful for diagnostic study of AD.

  10. Reduction of the immunostainable length of the hippocampal dentate granule cells' primary cilia in 3xAD-transgenic mice producing human A{beta}{sub 1-42} and tau

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Balu; Gaudet, Chantal; Menard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Atkinson, Trevor; LaFerla, Frank M.; Ito, Shingo; Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Pra, Ilaria; Whitfield, James

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} and tau-induced neurofibrillary tangles play a key role in Alzheimer's disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}{sub 1-42} and mutant tau protein together reduce the primary cilium length. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This shortening likely reduces cilium-dependent neurogenesis and memory function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This provides a model of an A{beta}/tau targeting of a neuronal signaling organelle. -- Abstract: The hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of the two sites of continuous neurogenesis in adult rodents and humans. Virtually all dentate granule cells have a single immobile cilium with a microtubule spine or axoneme covered with a specialized cell membrane loaded with receptors such as the somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}). The signals from these receptors have been reported to stimulate neuroprogenitor proliferation and the post-mitotic maturation of newborn granule cells into functioning granule cells. We have found that in 6-24-months-old triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice (3xTg-AD) producing both A{beta}{sub 1-42} and the mutant human tau protein tau{sub P301L,} the dentate granule cells still had immunostainable SSTR3- and p75{sup NTR}-bearing cilia but they were only half the length of the immunostained cilia in the corresponding wild-type mice. However, the immunostainable length of the granule cell cilia was not reduced either in 2xTg-AD mice accumulating large amounts of A{beta}{sub 1-42} or in mice accumulating only a mutant human tau protein. Thus it appears that a combination of A{beta}{sub 1-42} and tau protein accumulation affects the levels of functionally important receptors in 3xTg-AD mice. These observations raise the important possibility that structural and functional changes in granule cell cilia might have a role in AD.

  11. Accelerated Human Mutant Tau Aggregation by Knocking Out Murine Tau in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kunie; Leroy, Karelle; Héraud, Céline; Yilmaz, Zehra; Authelet, Michèle; Suain, Valèrie; De Decker, Robert; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Many models of human tauopathies have been generated in mice by expression of a human mutant tau with maintained expression of mouse endogenous tau. Because murine tau might interfere with the toxic effects of human mutant tau, we generated a model in which a pathogenic human tau protein is expressed in the absence of wild-type tau protein, with the aim of facilitating the study of the pathogenic role of the mutant tau and to reproduce more faithfully a human tauopathy. The Tg30 line is a tau transgenic mouse model overexpressing human 1N4R double-mutant tau (P301S and G272V) that develops Alzheimer's disease-like neurofibrillary tangles in an age-dependent manner. By crossing Tg30 mice with mice invalidated for their endogenous tau gene, we obtained Tg30xtau−/− mice that express only exogenous human double-mutant 1N4R tau. Although Tg30xtau−/− mice express less tau protein compared with Tg30, they exhibit signs of decreased survival, increased proportion of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in the brain and in the spinal cord, increased number of Gallyas-positive neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus, increased number of inclusions in the spinal cord, and a more severe motor phenotype. Deletion of murine tau accelerated tau aggregation during aging of this mutant tau transgenic model, suggesting that murine tau could interfere with the development of tau pathology in transgenic models of human tauopathies. PMID:21281813

  12. Small molecule LX2343 ameliorates cognitive deficits in AD model mice by targeting both amyloid β production and clearance

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiao-dan; Sun, Guang-long; Zhou, Ting-ting; Xu, Xin; Zhu, Zhi-yuan; Rukachaisirikul, Vatcharin; Hu, Li-hong; Shen, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Streptozotocin (STZ) is widely used to induce oxidative damage and to impair glucose metabolism, apoptosis, and tau/Aβ pathology, eventually leading to cognitive deficits in both in vitro and in vivo models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we constructed a cell-based platform using STZ to induce stress conditions mimicking the complicated pathologies of AD in vitro, and evaluated the anti-amyloid effects of a small molecule, N-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-[5-chloro-2-methoxy(phenylsulfonyl)anilino]acetamide (LX2343) in the amelioration of cognitive deficits in AD model mice. Methods: Cell-based assays for screening anti-amyloid compounds were established by assessing Aβ accumulation in HEK293-APPsw and CHO-APP cells, and Aβ clearance in primary astrocytes and SH-SY5Y cells after the cells were treated with STZ in the presence of the test compounds. Autophagic flux was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. APP/PS1 transgenic mice were administered LX2343 (10 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) for 100 d. After LX2343 administration, cognitive ability of the mice was evaluated using Morris water maze test, and senile plaques in the brains were detected using Thioflavine S staining. ELISA assay was used to evaluate Aβ and sAPPβ levels, while Western blot analysis was used to measure the signaling proteins in both cell and animal brains. Results: LX2343 (5–20 μmol/L) dose-dependently decreased Aβ accumulation in HEK293-APPsw and CHO-APP cells, and promoted Aβ clearance in SH-SY5Y cells and primary astrocytes. The anti-amyloid effects of LX2343 were attributed to suppressing JNK-mediated APPThr668 phosphorylation, thus inhibiting APP cleavage on one hand, and inhibiting BACE1 enzymatic activity with an IC50 value of 11.43±0.36 μmol/L, on the other hand. Furthermore, LX2343 acted as a non-ATP competitive PI3K inhibitor to negatively regulate AKT/mTOR signaling, thus promoting autophagy, and increasing Aβ clearance. Administration of LX2343 in APP

  13. Syrian hamster tumor model to study oncolytic Ad5-based vectors.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Debanjan; Toth, Karoly; Wold, William S M

    2012-01-01

    Oncolytic (replicating) adenovirus (Ad) vectors are emerging as a promising form of a cancer therapy agent. There has been a need for an appropriate animal model to study oncolytic Ad since human Ad -replication is usually species specific. We have shown that Syrian (golden) hamsters are an appropriate animal model to study human Ad5-based vectors. Syrian hamsters are immunocompetent, and they allow human Ad5 replication in normal tissues as well as in Syrian hamster cancer cells. The development of the Syrian hamster as a model to study oncolytic Ad vectors has opened avenues to explore the role of host immune response and preexisting immunity in Ad vector efficacy and toxicity/biodistribution following Ad vector administration. Since most of the normal tissues in the Syrian hamster are permissive for human Ad5 replication, Ad vectors can be studied in the context of orthotopic cancer model developed in Syrian hamsters.

  14. Plasma adiponectin levels are increased despite insulin resistance in corticotropin-releasing hormone transgenic mice, an animal model of Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shinahara, Masayuki; Nishiyama, Mitsuru; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Nakayama, Shuichi; Noguchi, Toru; Kambayashi, Machiko; Okada, Yasushi; Tsuda, Masayuki; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P; Hashimoto, Kozo; Terada, Yoshio

    2009-01-01

    Adiponectin (AdN), an adipokine derived from the adipose tissue, has an insulin-sensitizing effect, and plasma AdN is shown to be decreased in obesity and/or insulin resistant state. To clarify whether changes in AdN are also responsible for the development of glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance, we examined AdN concentration in plasma and AdN expression in the adipose tissue, using corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) transgenic mouse (CRH-Tg), an animal model of Cushing syndrome. We found, unexpectedly, that plasma AdN levels in CRHTg were significantly higher than those in wild-type littermates (wild-type: 19.7+/-2.5, CRH-Tg: 32.4+/-3.1 microg/mL, p<0.01). On the other hand, AdN mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in the adipose tissue of CRH-Tg. Bilateral adrenalectomy in CRH-Tg eliminated both their Cushing's phenotype and their increase in plasma AdN levels (wild-type/sham: 9.4+/-0.5, CRH-Tg/sham: 15.7+/-2.0, CRH-Tg/ADX: 8.5+/-0.4 microg/mL). These results strongly suggest that AdN is not a major factor responsible for the development of insulin resistance in Cushing syndrome. Our data also suggest that glucocorticoid increases plasma AdN levels but decreases AdN expression in adipocytes, the latter being explained possibly by the decrease in AdN metabolism in the Cushing state.

  15. An Intranasal Formulation of Erythropoietin (Neuro-EPO) Prevents Memory Deficits and Amyloid Toxicity in the APPSwe Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Cruz, Yamila; Strehaiano, Manon; Rodríguez Obaya, Teresita; García Rodríguez, Julío César; Maurice, Tangui

    2017-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a cytokine known to have effective cytoprotective action in the brain, particularly in ischemic, traumatic, inflammatory, and neurodegenerative conditions. We previously reported the neuroprotective effect of a low sialic form of EPO, Neuro-EPO, applied intranasally in rodent models of stroke or cerebellar ataxia and in a non-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we analyzed the protective effect of Neuro-EPO in APPSwe mice, a reference transgenic mouse model of AD. Mice were administered 3 times a day, 3 days in the week with Neuro-EPO (125, 250 μg/kg) intranasally, between 12 and 14 months of age. Motor responses, general activity, and memory responses were analyzed during and after treatment. The deficits in spontaneous alternation, place learning in the water-maze, and novel object recognition observed in APPSwe mice were alleviated by the low dose of Neuro-EPO. Oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, trophic factor levels, and a synaptic marker were analyzed in the hippocampus or cortex of the animals. The increases in lipid peroxidation or in GFAP and Iba-1 contents in APPSwe mice were significantly reduced after Neuro-EPO. Activation of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways was analyzed. The increases in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, TNFα, or Fas ligand levels observed in APPSwe mice were reduced by Neuro-EPO. Finally, immunohistochemical and ELISA analyses of Aβ1-42 levels in the APPSwe mouse cortex and hippocampus showed a marked reduction in Aβ deposits and in soluble and insoluble Aβ1-42 forms. This study therefore confirmed the neuroprotective activity of EPO, particularly for an intranasally deliverable formulation, devoid of erythropoietic side effects, in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Neuro-EPO alleviated memory alterations, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, apoptosis induction, and amyloid load in 14-month-old APPSwe mice.

  16. Hyperphosphorylated Tau in an α-synuclein-overexpressing transgenic model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Thomas; Credle, Joel; Rodriguez, Olga; Wills, Jonathan; Oaks, Adam W; Masliah, Eliezer; Sidhu, Anita

    2011-05-01

    Although clinically distinct diseases, tauopathies and synucleinopathies share a common genesis and mechanisms, leading to overlapping degenerative changes within neurons. In human postmortem striatum of Parkinson's disease (PD) and PD with dementia, we have recently described elevated levels of tauopathy, indexed as increased hyperphosphorylated Tau (p-Tau). Here we assessed tauopathy in striatum of a transgenic animal model of PD, overexpressing human α-synuclein under the platelet-derived growth factor promoter. At 11 months of age, large and progressive increases in p-Tau in transgenic mice, hyperphosphorylated at sites reminiscent of Alzheimer's disease, were noted, along with elevated levels of α-synuclein and glycogen synthase kinase 3β phosphorylated at Tyr216 (p-GSK-3β), a major kinase involved in the hyperphosphorylation of Tau. Differential Triton X-100 extraction of striata showed the presence of aggregated α-synuclein in the transgenic mice, along with p-Tau and p-GSK-3β, which was also confirmed through immunohistochemistry. After p-Tau formation, both Tau and microtubule-associated protein 1 (MAP1) dissociated from the cytoskeleton, consistent with the diminished ability of these cytoskeleton-binding proteins to bind microtubules. Increases in free tubulin and actin were also noted, indicative of cytoskeleton remodeling and destabilization. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging of the transgenic animals showed a reduction in brain volume of transgenic mice, indicating substantial atrophy. From immunohistochemical studies, α-synuclein, p-Tau and p-GSK-3β were found to be overexpressed and co-localized in large inclusion bodies, reminiscent of Lewy bodies. The elevated state of tauopathy seen in these platelet-derived growth factor-α-synuclein mice provides further confirmation that PD may be a tauopathic disease.

  17. Model of the world oil market with an OPEC cartel. [1980 AD to 2040 AD

    SciTech Connect

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Horwedel, J.E.; Marshalla, R.A.; Nesbitt, D.M.; Haas, S.M.

    1984-08-01

    A world oil market model (WOM) with OPEC treated as a Stackelberg cartel has been developed within the framework of the Generalized Equilibrium Modeling System (GEMS) that is available from Decision Focus, Inc. The US sector of the model is represented by a Liquid Fuels Supply model that was presented previously. The WOM model is described and results obtained with the model for the period 1980 to 2040 are presented. For comparative purposes, results obtained with the model when OPEC is treated as a competitive producer are also presented. By comparing the world oil price as a function of time from the two calculations, the influence that OPEC may have on the oil market by exploiting all of its market power is quantified. The world oil price as obtained with the WOM model is also compared with world oil price projections from a variety of sources. 22 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Bioenergetic Defects and Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Models of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    Neurology 40:1231-1234. Huntington’s disease. Ann. Neurol. 28:300-301. 57. Arenas, J., Campos , Y., Ribacoba, R., Martin, M. A., Rubio, J. C., 40. Djousse...ameliorate Vargas , M. E., Jokel, E. S., Carpenter, E. M., Zanjani, H., Hurst, motor deficits in a Huntington’s disease transgenic mouse model. R. S... Henri Beaufour, Les Ulis, France Abstract significantly reduced gross brain atrophy, neuronal atrophy There is substantial evidence that excitotoxicity

  19. Bioenergetic Defects and Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Models of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    disease. Neurology 40:1231-1234. Huntington’s disease. Ann. Neurol. 28:3(X)-301. 57. Arenas, J., Campos , Y., Ribacoba, R., Martin, M. A., Rubio, J. C...hydrochloride ameliorate Vargas , M. E., Jokel, E. S., Carpenter, E. M., Zanjani, H., Hurst, motor deficits in a Huntington’s disease transgenic mouse model. R...University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA 4.Department of Biochemical Pharmacology, Institute Henri Beaufour, Les Ulis, France Abstract

  20. Chronic copper exposure exacerbates both amyloid and tau pathology and selectively dysregulates cdk5 in a mouse model of AD.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Cheng, David; Laferla, Frank M

    2009-03-01

    Excess copper exposure is thought to be linked to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. However, the mechanism by which copper affects the CNS remains unclear. To investigate the effect of chronic copper exposure on both beta-amyloid and tau pathologies, we treated young triple transgenic (3xTg-AD) mice with 250 ppm copper-containing water for a period of 3 or 9 months. Copper exposure resulted in altered amyloid precursor protein processing; increased accumulation of the amyloid precursor protein and its proteolytic product, C99 fragment, along with increased generation of amyloid-beta peptides and oligomers. These changes were found to be mediated via up-regulation of BACE1 as significant increases in BACE1 levels and deposits were detected around plaques in mice following copper exposure. Furthermore, tau pathology within hippocampal neurons was exacerbated in copper-exposed 3xTg-AD group. Increased tau phosphorylation was closely correlated with aberrant cdk5/p25 activation, suggesting a role for this kinase in the development of copper-induced tau pathology. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic copper exposure accelerates not only amyloid pathology but also tau pathology in a mouse model of AD.

  1. A transgenic zebrafish model expressing KIT-D816V recapitulates features of aggressive systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Balci, Tugce B; Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Teh, Evelyn M; Da'as, Sahar I; McBride, Eileen; Liwski, Robert; Chute, Ian C; Leger, Daniel; Lewis, Stephen M; Berman, Jason N

    2014-10-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is a rare myeloproliferative disease without curative therapy. Despite clinical variability, the majority of patients harbour a KIT-D816V mutation, but efforts to inhibit mutant KIT with tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been unsatisfactory, indicating a need for new preclinical approaches to identify alternative targets and novel therapies in this disease. Murine models to date have been limited and do not fully recapitulate the most aggressive forms of SM. We describe the generation of a transgenic zebrafish model expressing the human KIT-D816V mutation. Adult fish demonstrate a myeloproliferative disease phenotype, including features of aggressive SM in haematopoeitic tissues and high expression levels of endopeptidases, consistent with SM patients. Transgenic embryos demonstrate a cell-cycle phenotype with corresponding expression changes in genes associated with DNA maintenance and repair, such as reduced dnmt1. In addition, epcam was consistently downregulated in both transgenic adults and embryos. Decreased embryonic epcam expression was associated with reduced neuromast numbers, providing a robust in vivo phenotypic readout for chemical screening in KIT-D816V-induced disease. This study represents the first zebrafish model of a mast cell disease with an aggressive adult phenotype and embryonic markers that could be exploited to screen for novel agents in SM.

  2. Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor improves long-term memory in APP/PS1 transgenic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease as well as in wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Susanna; Lindholm, Päivi; Galli, Emilia; Lahtinen, Hanna-Maija; Koivisto, Henna; Hämäläinen, Elina; Saarma, Mart; Tanila, Heikki

    2015-09-15

    Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) protects and repairs dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson's disease, which motivated us to investigate its therapeutic effect in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We employed an established APP/PS1 mouse model of AD and gave intrahippocampal injections of CDNF protein or CDNF transgene in an AAV2 viral vector to 1-year-old animals. We performed a behavioral test battery 2 weeks after the injections and collected tissue samples after the 3-week test period. Intrahippocampal CDNF-therapy improved long-term memory in both APP/PS1 mice and wild-type controls, but did not affect spontaneous exploration, object neophobia or early stages of spatial learning. The memory improvement was not associated with decreased brain amyloid load or enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis. Intracranial CDNF treatment has beneficial effects on long-term memory and is well tolerated. The CDNF molecular mechanisms of action on memory await further studies.

  3. Impairments in neurogenesis are not tightly linked to depressive behavior in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Iascone, Daniel M; Padidam, Sneha; Pyfer, Mark S; Zhang, Xiaohong; Zhao, Lijuan; Chin, Jeannie

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia, is also associated with depression. Although the precise mechanisms that lead to depression in AD are unknown, the impairments in adult hippocampal neurogenesis observed in AD may play a role. Adult-born neurons play a critical role in regulating both cognition and mood, and reduced hippocampal neurogenesis is associated with depression in other neurological disorders. To assess the relationship between Alzheimer's disease, neurogenesis, and depression, we studied human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) transgenic mice, a well-characterized model of AD. We report that reductions in hippocampal neurogenesis are evident early in disease progression in hAPP mice, but a mild depressive phenotype manifests only in later stages of disease. We found that hAPP mice exhibited a reduction in BrdU-positive cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus, as well as a reduction in doublecortin-expressing cells, relative to nontransgenic controls at 5-7 months of age. These alterations in neurogenesis appeared to worsen with age, as the magnitude of reduction in doublecortin-expressing cells was greater in hAPP mice at 13-15 months of age. Only 13-15 month old hAPP mice exhibited depressive behavior in the tail suspension test. However, mice at both age groups exhibited deficits in spatial memory, which was observed in the Morris water maze test for hippocampus-dependent memory. These findings indicate that neurogenesis impairments are accompanied by cognitive deficits, but are not tightly linked to depressive behavior in hAPP mice.

  4. Protective effects of intranasal losartan in the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Danielyan, Lusine; Klein, Roman; Hanson, Leah R; Buadze, Marine; Schwab, Matthias; Gleiter, Christoph H; Frey, William H

    2010-01-01

    The local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the brain is a multitasking system controlling a plethora of essential functions such as neurogenic hypertension, baroreflexes, and sympathetic activity. Aside from its vasoactive actions, brain angiotensin II (AT-II) has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of cognitive decline, and beneficial effects of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in Alzheimer (AD) and Parkinson diseases (PD) are suggested. However, the use of ARBs at antihypertensive dosages would lead to unwanted hypotensive reactions in AD patients. Here we treated the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD with the ARB losartan (10 mg/kg body weight) to determine whether blockade of the AT-II receptor subtype 1 (AT1-R) with intranasal losartan, using at a dosage far below its systemic antihypertensive dose, could maintain its neuroprotective effects independent of its systemic vasoactive action. Intranasal losartan treatment (10 mg/kg every other day for 2 months) of APP/PS1 mice decreased amyloid beta (Abeta) plaques 3.7-fold. Blood serum levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12)p40/p70, IL-1beta, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were increased in the vehicle-treated APP/PS1 mice. Intranasal losartan not only decreased IL-12p40/p70, IL-1beta, and GM-CSF, but also increased IL-10, which suppresses inflammation. Furthermore, losartan markedly increased tyrosine hydroxylase expression in the striatum and locus coeruleus. In conclusion, losartan exerts direct neuroprotective effects via its Abeta-reducing and antiinflammatory effects in the central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, intranasal losartan and potentially other ARBs, at concentrations below their threshold for altering systemic blood pressure, offer a new approach for the treatment of AD.

  5. Criteria for the evaluation of studies in transgenic models.

    PubMed

    Popp, J A

    2001-01-01

    The generation, evaluation, and presentation of data from the ILSI Alternatives to Carcinogenicity Testing (ACT) program was standardized to ensure that the results of studies performed in multiple laboratories could be reliably compared. To this end, standardized experimental protocols, tissue collection procedures, histopathology nomenclature, diagnoses, and terminology were employed by study participants. In the experimental phase, this approach provided important cross-model consistency. To ensure comparability in the data evaluation phase of the project, interpretive criteria were defined to allow the characterization of study outcome as positive, negative, or equivocal in regards to carcinogenic response. These criteria helped to provide consistency across models because separate Assay Working Groups were established to evaluate the results of each model. To organize and compile the data from the ILSI ACT program, a database has been developed and data entered in standardized format to facilitate cross- and intramodel comparisons. In summary, the early development of standardized test protocols, evaluation procedures, and interpretive criteria has resulted in a data set in which users can have a high level of assurance that results in the database reflect consistently applied experimental and interpretive guidelines.

  6. Assessing the TARES as an ethical model for antismoking ads.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seow Ting; Cheng, I-Huei

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the ethical dimensions of public health communication, with a focus on antismoking public service announcements (PSAs). The content analysis of 826 television ads from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Media Campaign Resource Center is an empirical testing of Baker and Martinson's (2001) TARES Test that directly examines persuasive messages for truthfulness, authenticity, respect, equity, and social responsibility. In general, the antismoking ads score highly on ethicality. There are significant relationships between ethicality and message attributes (thematic frame, emotion appeal, source, and target audience). Ads that portrayed smoking as damaging to health and socially unacceptable score lower in ethicality than ads that focus on tobacco industry manipulation, addiction, dangers of secondhand smoke, and cessation. Emotion appeals of anger and sadness are associated with higher ethicality than shame and humor appeals. Ads targeting teen/youth audiences score lower on ethicality than ads targeting adult and general audiences. There are significant differences in ethicality based on source; ads produced by the CDC rate higher in ethicality than other sources. Theoretical implications and practical recommendations are discussed.

  7. Transgenic rescue of phenotypic deficits in a mouse model of alternating hemiplegia of childhood.

    PubMed

    Kirshenbaum, Greer S; Dachtler, James; Roder, John C; Clapcote, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Missense mutations in ATP1A3 encoding Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 are the primary cause of alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC). Most ATP1A3 mutations in AHC lie within a cluster in or near transmembrane α-helix TM6, including I810N that is also found in the Myshkin mouse model of AHC. These mutations all substantially reduce Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 activity. Herein, we show that Myshkin mice carrying a wild-type Atp1a3 transgene that confers a 16 % increase in brain-specific total Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity show significant phenotypic improvements compared with non-transgenic Myshkin mice. Interventions to increase the activity of wild-type Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 in AHC patients should be investigated further.

  8. Enhancement of β-amyloid oligomer accumulation after intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin, which involves central insulin signaling in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fangju; Jia, Jianping; Qin, Wei

    2014-11-12

    The β-amyloid (Aβ) oligomer rather than fibrillar Aβ has become the important focus of recent studies on the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Insulin signaling plays important roles in cognitive disease, such as AD. However, in-vivo evidence for the link between central insulin signaling and the Aβ oligomer are lacking, and the mechanisms underlying the effect of central insulin signaling on AD are still elusive. Our team has established the Presenilin-1 Val97Leu mutant transgenic (PS1V97L) AD mouse model with the intraneuronal Aβ oligomer as the potential initiator for other pathologies, but without extracellular amyloid plaque formation. Using this model, we investigated the roles of disturbed central insulin signaling induced by intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin (STZ) in the progression of AD. We observed that PS1V97L mice after intracerebroventricular injection of STZ showed increased Aβ oligomer accumulation and aggravated spatial learning and memory deficit in the absence of diabetes symptoms. Furthermore, STZ administration inhibited the activation of the insulin receptor and enhanced the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, which was accompanied by increased production of carboxy-terminal fragments from the amyloid precursor protein, in the brain of PS1V97L mice. Overall, our study provided in-vivo evidence for a role of central insulin signaling in AD progression.

  9. Embryonic fate map of first pharyngeal arch structures in the sox10: kaede zebrafish transgenic model.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Max; Kamel, George; Shubinets, Valeriy; Hickey, Graham; Grimaldi, Michael; Liao, Eric C

    2012-09-01

    Cranial neural crest cells follow stereotypic patterns of migration to form craniofacial structures. The zebrafish is a powerful vertebrate genetic model where transgenics with reporter proteins under the transcriptional regulation of lineage-specific promoters can be generated. Numerous studies demonstrate that the zebrafish ethmoid plate is embryologically analogous to the mammalian palate. A fate map correlating embryonic cranial neural crest to defined jaw structures would provide a useful context for the morphogenetic analysis of craniofacial development. To that end, the sox10:kaede transgenic was generated, where sox10 provides lineage restriction to the neural crest. Specific regions of neural crest were labeled at the 10-somite stage by photoconversion of the kaede reporter protein. Lineage analysis was carried out during pharyngeal development in wild-type animals, after miR140 injection, and after estradiol treatment. At the 10-somite stage, cranial neural crest cells anterior of the eye contributed to the median ethmoid plate, whereas cells medial to the eye formed the lateral ethmoid plate and trabeculae and a posterior population formed the mandible. miR-140 overexpression and estradiol inhibition of Hedgehog signaling resulted in cleft development, with failed migration of the anterior cell population to form the median ethmoid plate. The sox10:kaede transgenic line provides a useful tool for neural crest lineage analysis. These studies illustrate the advantages of the zebrafish model for application in morphogenetic studies of vertebrate craniofacial development.

  10. Safe composition levels of transgenic crops assessed via a clinical medicine model

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Rod A; Scherer, Peter N; Phillips, Amy M; Storer, Nicholas P; Krieger, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Re-use of this article is permitted in accordance with the Creative Commons Deed, Attribution 2.5, which does not permit commercial exploitation. Substantial equivalence has become established as a foundation concept in the safety evaluation of transgenic crops. In the case of a food and feed crop, no single variety is considered the standard for safety or nutrition, so the substantial equivalence of transgenic crops is investigated relative to the array of commercial crop varieties with a history of safe consumption. Although used extensively in clinical medicine to compare new generic drugs with brand-name drugs, equivalence limits are shown to be a poor model for comparing transgenic crops with an array of reference crop varieties. We suggest an alternate model, also analogous to that used in clinical medicine, where reference intervals are constructed for a healthy heterogeneous population. Specifically, we advocate the use of distribution-free tolerance intervals calculated across a large amount of publicly available compositional data such as is found in the International Life Sciences Institute Crop Composition Database. PMID:20084639

  11. Generation of an inducible, cardiomyocyte-specific transgenic mouse model with PPAR β/δ overexpression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Teayoun; Zhelyabovska, Olga; Liu, Jian; Yang, Qinglin

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) consist of three subtypes, each displaying distinctive tissue distribution. In general, the three PPAR subtypes exert overlapping function in transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism. However, each PPAR subtype possesses distinctive functions in different tissues dependent on their expression abundance, endogenous ligands, and the PPAR coregulators in a specific tissue. Transgenesis is an invaluable technique in defining the in vivo function of a particular gene and its protein. Cre/LoxP-mediated gene targeting has been extensively used to explore the tissue-specific function of PPARs. While this tissue-specific loss-of-function approach is extremely useful in determining the essential role of a PPAR, the tissue-specific gain-of-function approach is another important technique used to understand the effects of PPAR activation in a particular tissue. Transgenic overexpression of PPAR in a specific tissue has been used. However, this conventional technique requires generating the transgenic models individually for each target tissue. In this chapter, we describe the methodology for a more efficient generation of transgenic mouse models with a constitutively active form of PPARβ/δ in different tissues.

  12. Oct4-enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic pigs: a new large animal model for reprogramming studies.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Imialek, Monika; Kues, Wilfried A; Petersen, Bjoern; Lucas-Hahn, Andrea; Herrmann, Doris; Haridoss, Srividyameena; Oropeza, Marianne; Lemme, Erika; Schöler, Hans R; Carnwath, Joseph W; Niemann, Heiner

    2011-09-01

    The domesticated pig has emerged as an important tool for development of surgical techniques, advancement of xenotransplantation, creation of important disease models, and preclinical testing of novel cell therapies. However, germ line-competent pluripotent porcine stem cells have not yet been derived. This has been a major obstacle to genetic modification of pigs. The transcription factor Oct4 is essential for the maintenance of pluripotency and for reprogramming somatic cells to a pluripotent state. Here, we report the production of transgenic pigs carrying an 18 kb genomic sequence of the murine Oct4 gene fused to the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) cDNA (OG2 construct) to allow identification of pluripotent cells by monitoring Oct4 expression by EGFP fluorescence. Eleven viable transgenic piglets were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. Expression of the EGFP reporter construct was confined to germ line cells, the inner cell mass and trophectoderm of blastocysts, and testicular germ cells. Reprogramming of fibroblasts from these animals by fusion with pluripotent murine embryonic stem cells or viral transduction with human OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC cDNAs resulted in Oct4-EGFP reactivation. The OG2 pigs have thus proved useful for monitoring reprogramming and the induction and maintenance of pluripotency in porcine cells. In conclusion, the OG2 transgenic pigs are a new large animal model for studying the derivation and maintenance of pluripotent cells, and will be valuable for the development of cell therapy.

  13. New Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat transgenic models with ubiquitous expression of green fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Diaz, Ana Isabel; Moyon, Ben; Coan, Philip M.; Alfazema, Neza; Venda, Lara; Woollard, Kevin; Aitman, Tim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat and the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rat inbred strains are well-established models for human crescentic glomerulonephritis (CRGN) and metabolic syndrome, respectively. Novel transgenic (Tg) strains add research opportunities and increase scientific value to well-established rat models. We have created two novel Tg strains using Sleeping Beauty transposon germline transgenesis, ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the rat elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a) promoter on the WKY and SHR genetic backgrounds. The Sleeping Beauty system functioned with high transgenesis efficiency; 75% of new rats born after embryo microinjections were transgene positive. By ligation-mediated PCR, we located the genome integration sites, confirming no exonic disruption and defining a single or low copy number of the transgenes in the new WKY-GFP and SHR-GFP Tg lines. We report GFP-bright expression in embryos, tissues and organs in both lines and show preliminary in vitro and in vivo imaging data that demonstrate the utility of the new GFP-expressing lines for adoptive transfer, transplantation and fate mapping studies of CRGN, metabolic syndrome and other traits for which these strains have been extensively studied over the past four decades. PMID:26769799

  14. Therapeutic Effect of Berberine on Huntington’s Disease Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenxiao; Wei, Wenjie; Gaertig, Marta A.; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) represents a family of neurodegenerative diseases that are caused by misfolded proteins. The misfolded proteins accumulate in the affected brain regions in an age-dependent manner to cause late-onset neurodegeneration. Transgenic mouse models expressing the HD protein, huntingtin, have been widely used to identify therapeutics that may retard disease progression. Here we report that Berberine (BBR), an organic small molecule isolated from plants, has protective effects on transgenic HD (N171-82Q) mice. We found that BBR can reduce the accumulation of mutant huntingtin in cultured cells. More importantly, when given orally, BBR could effectively alleviate motor dysfunction and prolong the survival of transgenic N171-82Q HD mice. We found that BBR could promote the degradation of mutant huntingtin by enhancing autophagic function. Since BBR is an orally-taken drug that has been safely used to treat a number of diseases, our findings suggest that BBR can be tested on different HD animal models and HD patients to further evaluate its therapeutic effects. PMID:26225560

  15. GATA4 transgenic mice as an in vivo model of congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    HAN, HUA; CHEN, YU; LIU, GANG; HAN, ZENGQIANG; ZHAO, ZHOU; TANG, YIN

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that 8 patients from a family with a history of congenital heart disease had simple atrial septal defect (ASD) and carried the same mutation at codon 310 in the GATA4 gene. In the present study, to identify the functional defects caused by this mutation in an in vivo model, the transgene DNA constructs were microinjected into mice to generate a transgenic mouse model. The mice were genotyped using PCR and DNA sequencing. Protein expression was measured by western blot analysis. qPCR was used to determine the copy number of the transgenes. The heart tissue was fixed and sectioned by conventional procedures. The Vevo 2000 system was used to perform echocardiography on the mice. The expression of GATA4 target genes was measured using the real-time PCR system. The incidence of ASD in the heterozygous transgenic mice was found to be greater than that in the wild-type control mice (P<0.05). In addition, the expression of α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) in the heart tissues from the homozygous mice was lower than that in the heart tissues from their wild-type littermates (P<0.05). In conclusion, these results suggest that the introduction of GATA4 M310V negatively affects the normal expression of α-MHC. In accordance with previous findings on GATA4 mutation screening and in vitro experiments, this study confirms that GATA4 M310V mutation may lead to the development of the congenital heart defect, ASD. PMID:25873328

  16. Transgenic mouse models for alcohol metabolism, toxicity, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Heit, Claire; Dong, Hongbin; Chen, Ying; Shah, Yatrik M; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse leads to tissue damage including a variety of cancers; however, the molecular mechanisms by which this damage occurs remain to be fully understood. The primary enzymes involved in ethanol metabolism include alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), cytochrome P450 isoform 2E1, (CYP2E1), catalase (CAT), and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH). Genetic polymorphisms in human genes encoding these enzymes are associated with increased risks of alcohol-related tissue damage, as well as differences in alcohol consumption and dependence. Oxidative stress resulting from ethanol oxidation is one established pathogenic event in alcohol-induced toxicity. Ethanol metabolism generates free radicals, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), and has been associated with diminished glutathione (GSH) levels as well as changes in other antioxidant mechanisms. In addition, the formation of protein and DNA adducts associated with the accumulation of ethanol-derived aldehydes can adversely affect critical biological functions and thereby promote cellular and tissue pathology. Animal models have proven to be valuable tools for investigating mechanisms underlying pathogenesis caused by alcohol. In this review, we provide a brief discussion on several animal models with genetic defects in alcohol-metabolizing enzymes and GSH-synthesizing enzymes and their relevance to alcohol research.

  17. Transgenic Mouse Models for Alcohol Metabolism, Toxicity and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heit, Claire; Dong, Hongbin; Chen, Ying; Shah, Yatrik M.; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse leads to tissue damage including a variety of cancers; however, the molecular mechanisms by which this damage occurs remains to be fully understood. The primary enzymes involved in ethanol metabolism include alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), cytochrome P450 isoform 2E1, (CYP2E1), catalase (CAT), and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH). Genetic polymorphisms in human genes encoding these enzymes are associated with increased risks of alcohol-related tissue damage, as well as differences in alcohol consumption and dependence. Oxidative stress resulting from ethanol oxidation is one established pathogenic event in alcohol-induced toxicity. Ethanol metabolism generates free radicals, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), and has been associated with diminished glutathione (GSH) levels as well as changes in other antioxidant mechanisms. In addition, the formation of protein and DNA adducts associated with the accumulation of ethanol-derived aldehydes can adversely affect critical biological functions and thereby promote cellular and tissue pathology. Animal models have proven to be valuable tools for investigating mechanisms underlying pathogenesis caused by alcohol. In this review, we provide a brief discussion on several animal models with genetic defects in alcohol metabolizing enzymes and GSH synthesizing enzymes and their relevance to alcohol research. PMID:25427919

  18. Transgenic Mouse Models Enabling Photolabeling of Individual Neurons In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Manuel; Bathellier, Brice; Fontinha, Bruno; Pliota, Pinelopi; Haubensak, Wulf; Rumpel, Simon

    2013-01-01

    One of the biggest tasks in neuroscience is to explain activity patterns of individual neurons during behavior by their cellular characteristics and their connectivity within the neuronal network. To greatly facilitate linking in vivo experiments with a more detailed molecular or physiological analysis in vitro, we have generated and characterized genetically modified mice expressing photoactivatable GFP (PA-GFP) that allow conditional photolabeling of individual neurons. Repeated photolabeling at the soma reveals basic morphological features due to diffusion of activated PA-GFP into the dendrites. Neurons photolabeled in vivo can be re-identified in acute brain slices and targeted for electrophysiological recordings. We demonstrate the advantages of PA-GFP expressing mice by the correlation of in vivo firing rates of individual neurons with their expression levels of the immediate early gene c-fos. Generally, the mouse models described in this study enable the combination of various analytical approaches to characterize living cells, also beyond the neurosciences. PMID:23626779

  19. Pkd1 transgenic mice: adult model of polycystic kidney disease with extrarenal and renal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kurbegovic, Almira; Côté, Olivier; Couillard, Martin; Ward, Christopher J.; Harris, Peter C.; Trudel, Marie

    2010-01-01

    While high levels of Pkd1 expression are detected in tissues of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), it is unclear whether enhanced expression could be a pathogenetic mechanism for this systemic disorder. Three transgenic mouse lines were generated from a Pkd1-BAC modified by introducing a silent tag via homologous recombination to target a sustained wild-type genomic Pkd1 expression within the native tissue and temporal regulation. These mice specifically overexpressed the Pkd1 transgene in extrarenal and renal tissues from ∼2- to 15-fold over Pkd1 endogenous levels in a copy-dependent manner. All transgenic mice reproducibly developed tubular and glomerular cysts leading to renal insufficiency. Interestingly, Pkd1TAG mice also exhibited renal fibrosis and calcium deposits in papilla reminiscent of nephrolithiasis as frequently observed in ADPKD. Similar to human ADPKD, these mice consistently displayed hepatic fibrosis and ∼15% intrahepatic cysts of the bile ducts affecting females preferentially. Moreover, a significant proportion of mice developed cardiac anomalies with severe left-ventricular hypertrophy, marked aortic arch distention and/or valvular stenosis and calcification that had profound functional impact. Of significance, Pkd1TAG mice displayed occasional cerebral lesions with evidence of ruptured and unruptured cerebral aneurysms. This Pkd1TAG mouse model demonstrates that overexpression of wild-type Pkd1 can trigger the typical adult renal and extrarenal phenotypes resembling human ADPKD. PMID:20053665

  20. Doxycycline reduces fibril formation in a transgenic mouse model of AL amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Jennifer Ellis; Ren, Ruiyi; Toraldo, Gianluca; SooHoo, Pam; Guan, Jian; O'Hara, Carl; Jasuja, Ravi; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Liao, Ronglih; Connors, Lawreen H.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic AL amyloidosis results from the aggregation of an amyloidogenic immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain (LC) usually produced by a plasma cell clone in the bone marrow. AL is the most rapidly fatal of the systemic amyloidoses, as amyloid fibrils can rapidly accumulate in tissues including the heart, kidneys, autonomic or peripheral nervous systems, gastrointestinal tract, and liver. Chemotherapy is used to eradicate the cellular source of the amyloidogenic precursor. Currently, there are no therapies that target the process of LC aggregation, fibril formation, or organ damage. We developed transgenic mice expressing an amyloidogenic λ6 LC using the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter to circumvent the disruption of B cell development by premature expression of recombined LC. The CMV-λ6 transgenic mice develop neurologic dysfunction and Congophilic amyloid deposits in the stomach. Amyloid deposition was inhibited in vivo by the antibiotic doxycycline. In vitro studies demonstrated that doxycycline directly disrupted the formation of recombinant LC fibrils. Furthermore, treatment of ex vivo LC amyloid fibrils with doxycycline reduced the number of intact fibrils and led to the formation of large disordered aggregates. The CMV-λ6 transgenic model replicates the process of AL amyloidosis and is useful for testing the antifibril potential of orally available agents. PMID:21998211

  1. Outstanding Phenotypic Differences in the Profile of Amyloid-β between Tg2576 and APPswe/PS1dE9 Transgenic Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Allué, José Antonio; Sarasa, Leticia; Izco, María; Pérez-Grijalba, Virginia; Fandos, Noelia; Pascual-Lucas, María; Ogueta, Samuel; Pesini, Pedro; Sarasa, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    APPswe/PS1dE9 and Tg2576 are very common transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), used in many laboratories as tools to research the mechanistic process leading to the disease. In order to augment our knowledge about the amyloid-β (Aβ) isoforms present in both transgenic mouse models, we have developed two chromatographic methods, one acidic and the other basic, for the characterization of the Aβ species produced in the brains of the two transgenic mouse models. After immunoprecipitation and micro-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, 10 species of Aβ, surprisingly all of human origin, were detected in the brain of Tg2576 mouse, whereas 39 species, of both murine and human origin, were detected in the brain of the APP/PS1 mouse. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing the identification of such a high number of Aβ species in the brain of the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse, whereas, in contrast, a much lower number of Aβ species were identified in the Tg2576 mouse. Therefore, this study brings to light a relevant phenotypic difference between these two popular mice models of AD. PMID:27258422

  2. AdS Black Disk Model for Small-x Deep Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornalba, Lorenzo; Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João

    2010-08-01

    Using the approximate conformal invariance of QCD at high energies we consider a simple anti-de Sitter black disk model to describe saturation in deep inelastic scattering. Deep inside saturation the structure functions have the same power law scaling, FT˜FL˜x-ω, where ω is related to the expansion rate of the black disk with energy. Furthermore, the ratio FL/FT is given by the universal value (1+ω)/(3+ω), independently of the target. For γ*-γ* scattering at high energies we obtain explicit expressions and ratios for the total cross sections of transverse and longitudinal photons in terms of the single parameter ω.

  3. Lifshitz from AdS at finite temperature and top down models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovin, Yegor; Skenderis, Kostas; Taylor, Marika

    2013-11-01

    We construct analytically an asymptotically Lifshitz black brane with dynamical exponent z = 1 + ∈ 2 in an Einstein-Proca model, where ∈ is a small parameter. In previous work we showed that the holographic dual QFT is a deformation of a CFT by the time component of a vector operator and the parameter ∈ is the corresponding deformation parameter. In the black brane background this operator additionally acquires a vacuum expectation value. We explain how the QFT Ward identity associated with Lifshitz invariance leads to a conserved mass and compute analytically the thermodynamic quantities showing that they indeed take the form implied by Lifshitz invariance. In the second part of the paper we consider top down Lifshitz models with dynamical exponent close to one and show that they can be understood in terms of vector deformations of conformal field theories. However, in all known cases, both the conformal field theory and its Lifshitz deformations have modes that violate the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound.

  4. The flavonoid quercetin ameliorates Alzheimer’s disease pathology and protects cognitive and emotional function in aged triple transgenic Alzheimer’s disease model mice

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Sabogal-Guáqueta Angélica; Ignacio, Muñoz-Manco Juan; Ramírez-Pineda Jose, R; Marisol, Lamprea-Rodriguez; Edison, Osorio; Patricia, Cardona-Gómez Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common senile dementia in the world. Although important progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of AD, current therapeutic approaches provide only modest symptomatic relief. In this study, we evaluated the neuroprotective effect of quercetin (25 mg/kg) administration via i.p. injection every 48 hours for 3 months on aged (21–24 months old) triple transgenic AD model (3xTg-AD) mice. Our data show that quercetin decreases extracellular β-amyloidosis, tauopathy, astrogliosis and microgliosis in the hippocampus and the amygdala. These results were supported by a significant reduction in the paired helical filament (PHF), β-amyloid (βA) 1–40 and βA 1–42 levels and a decrease in BACE1-mediated cleavage of APP (into CTFβ). Additionally, quercetin induced improved performance on learning and spatial memory tasks and greater risk assessment behavior based on the elevated plus maze test. Together, these findings suggest that quercetin reverses histological hallmarks of AD and protects cognitive and emotional function in aged 3xTg-AD mice. PMID:25666032

  5. Dihydropyridine Derivatives Modulate Heat Shock Responses and have a Neuroprotective Effect in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kasza, Ágnes; Hunya, Ákos; Frank, Zsuzsa; Fülöp, Ferenc; Török, Zsolt; Balogh, Gábor; Sántha, Miklós; Bálind, Árpád; Bernáth, Sándor; Blundell, Katie L.I.M.; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Horváth, Ibolya; Zeiler, Hans-Joachim; Hooper, Philip L.; Vigh, László; Penke, Botond

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) have chaperone activity and play a pivotal role in the homeostasis of proteins by preventing misfolding, by clearing aggregated and damaged proteins from cells, and by maintaining proteins in an active state. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is thought to be caused by amyloid-β peptide that triggers tau hyperphosphorylation, which is neurotoxic. Although proteostasis capacity declines with age and facilitates the manifestation of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, the upregulation of chaperones improves prognosis. Our research goal is to identify potent Hsp co-inducers that enhance protein homeostasis for the treatment of AD, especially 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives optimized for their ability to modulate cellular stress responses. Based on favorable toxicological data and Hsp co-inducing activity, LA1011 was selected for the in vivo analysis of its neuroprotective effect in the APPxPS1 mouse model of AD. Here, we report that 6 months of LA1011 administration effectively improved the spatial learning and memory functions in wild type mice and eliminated neurodegeneration in double mutant mice. Furthermore, Hsp co-inducer therapy preserves the number of neurons, increases dendritic spine density, and reduces tau pathology and amyloid plaque formation in transgenic AD mice. In conclusion, the Hsp co-inducer LA1011 is neuroprotective and therefore is a potential pharmaceutical candidate for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases, particularly AD. PMID:27163800

  6. Humulus japonicus inhibits the progression of Alzheimer's disease in a APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae-Shin; Ryu, Young-Kyoung; Park, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Jae Yun; Go, Jun; Noh, Jung-Ran; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Choi, Dong-Hee; Oh, Won-Keun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Shim

    2017-01-01

    Humulus japonicus Siebold & Zucc. (HJ) has traditionally been administered to patients with pulmonary disease, skin disease and hypertension in Korea, and it is considered to exert anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti-mycobacterial effects. However, its effects against Alzheimer's disease (AD) have yet to be explored. Thus, this study was carried out to investigate whether HJ has a beneficial effect on the progression of AD in an animal model. A methanolic extract of HJ (500 mg/kg/day) was intragastrically administered to 5-month-old APP/PS1 transgenic (Tg-APP/PS1) mice for 2.5 months. Novel object recognition and Y-maze alteration tests were used to assess cognitive function, and an immunohistochemical assay was performed to assess amyloid β (Aβ) deposition, tau phosphorylation and gliosis. An in vitro assay using a microglial cell line was also performed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of HJ. Our results revealed that HJ significantly decreased the mRNA and protein expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) induced by lipopolysaccharide in the microglial cell line. The administration of HJ for 2 months improved the cognitive function of Tg-APP/PS1 mice. HJ notably reduced the area occupied by Aβ and neurofibrillary tangles, and the number of activated astrocytes and microglia in the cortex of Tg-APP/PS1 mice. The findings of our study suggest that HJ has the therapeutic potential to inhibit the progression of AD and to improve cognitive deterioration in Tg-APP/PS1 mice. PMID:28004107

  7. Allotopic expression of ATP6 in the mouse as a transgenic model of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Dunn, David A; Pinkert, Carl A

    2015-01-01

    Progress in animal modeling of polymorphisms and mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is not as developed as nuclear transgenesis due to a host of cellular and physiological distinctions. mtDNA mutation modeling is of critical importance as mutations in the mitochondrial genome give rise to a variety of pathological conditions and play a contributing role in many others. Nuclear localization and transcription of mtDNA genes followed by cytoplasmic translation and transport into mitochondria (allotopic expression, AE) provide an opportunity to create in vivo modeling of a targeted mutation in mitochondrial genes and has been suggested as a strategy for gene replacement therapy in patients harboring mitochondrial DNA mutations. Here, we use our AE approach to transgenic mouse modeling of the pathogenic human T8993G mutation in mtATP6 as a case study for designing AE animal models.

  8. Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0162 TITLE: Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc...CONTRACT NUMBER Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer...Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We previously generated a PB-Cre4/CAG-SMIL transgenic model allowing Cre

  9. Transgenic mouse model of IgM+ lymphoproliferative disease mimicking Waldenström macroglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, V S; Sompallae, R; Rosean, T R; Walsh, S; Acevedo, M; Kovalchuk, A L; Han, S-S; Jing, X; Holman, C; Rehg, J E; Herms, S; Sunderland, J S; Morse, H C; Janz, S

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a low-grade incurable immunoglobulin M+ (IgM+) lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma for which a genetically engineered mouse model of de novo tumor development is lacking. On the basis of evidence that the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 6 (IL6), and the survival-enhancing oncoprotein, B cell leukemia 2 (BCL2), have critical roles in the natural history of WM, we hypothesized that the enforced expression of IL6 and BCL2 in mice unable to perform immunoglobulin class switch recombination may result in a lymphoproliferative disease that mimics WM. To evaluate this possibility, we generated compound transgenic BALB/c mice that harbored the human BCL2 and IL6 transgenes, EμSV-BCL2-22 and H2-Ld-hIL6, on the genetic background of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deficiency. We designated these mice BCL2+IL6+AID− and found that they developed—with full genetic penetrance (100% incidence) and suitably short latency (93 days median survival)—a severe IgM+ lymphoproliferative disorder that recapitulated important features of human WM. However, the BCL2+IL6+AID− model also exhibited shortcomings, such as low serum IgM levels and histopathological changes not seen in patients with WM, collectively indicating that further refinements of the model are required to achieve better correlations with disease characteristics of WM. PMID:27813533

  10. Transgenic mouse model of IgM(+) lymphoproliferative disease mimicking Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, V S; Sompallae, R; Rosean, T R; Walsh, S; Acevedo, M; Kovalchuk, A L; Han, S-S; Jing, X; Holman, C; Rehg, J E; Herms, S; Sunderland, J S; Morse, H C; Janz, S

    2016-11-04

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a low-grade incurable immunoglobulin M(+) (IgM(+)) lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma for which a genetically engineered mouse model of de novo tumor development is lacking. On the basis of evidence that the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 6 (IL6), and the survival-enhancing oncoprotein, B cell leukemia 2 (BCL2), have critical roles in the natural history of WM, we hypothesized that the enforced expression of IL6 and BCL2 in mice unable to perform immunoglobulin class switch recombination may result in a lymphoproliferative disease that mimics WM. To evaluate this possibility, we generated compound transgenic BALB/c mice that harbored the human BCL2 and IL6 transgenes, EμSV-BCL2-22 and H2-L(d)-hIL6, on the genetic background of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deficiency. We designated these mice BCL2(+)IL6(+)AID(-) and found that they developed-with full genetic penetrance (100% incidence) and suitably short latency (93 days median survival)-a severe IgM(+) lymphoproliferative disorder that recapitulated important features of human WM. However, the BCL2(+)IL6(+)AID(-) model also exhibited shortcomings, such as low serum IgM levels and histopathological changes not seen in patients with WM, collectively indicating that further refinements of the model are required to achieve better correlations with disease characteristics of WM.

  11. Protective Effects of Dietary Supplementation with a Combination of Nutrients in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Xie, Wei; Ma, Lan; Zhu, Jinfeng; Zhang, Yan; Dang, Rui; Wang, Decai; Wu, Yonghui; Wu, Qunhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the effects of intervention with a combination of nutrients in the amyloid precursor protein-presenilin (APP-PSN) C57BL/6J double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Methods A total of 72 2-month-old APP-PSN mice were randomly assigned to three groups. The model group (MG) was fed regular, unsupplemented chow, while the low- and high-dose treatment groups (LG and HG, respectively) were given a combination of nutrients that included phosphatidylserine, blueberry extracts, docosahexaenoic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid as part of their diet. An additional 24 wild-type littermates that were fed unsupplemented chow served as the negative control group (NG). After 3 and 7 months of treatment, the cognitive performance was assessed with the Morris water maze and the shuttle box escape/avoidance task, and the biochemical parameters and oxidative stress were evaluated in both the blood and brain. Results An improvement in antioxidant capacity was observed in the treatment groups relative to the MG at 3 months, while superior behavioral test results were observed in the mice of the HG and NG groups. In the MG, pycnosis was detected in neuronal nuclei, and a loss of neurons was observed in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. At 7 months, the β-amyloid1–42 peptide accumulation was significantly elevated in the MG but was markedly lower in the mice fed the nutrient combination. The antioxidant capacity and behavioral test scores were also higher in these mice. Conclusions Early intervention with a combination of nutrients should be considered as a strategy for preventing cognitive decline and other symptoms associated with AD. PMID:26606074

  12. Transgenic zebrafish as a novel animal model to study tauopathies and other neurodegenerative disorders in vivo.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Dominik; Schmid, Bettina; Haass, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Our ageing society is confronted with a dramatic increase in patients suffering from tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia and others. Typical neuropathological lesions including tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau protein as well as severe neuronal cell death characterize these disorders. No mechanism-based cures are available at present. Genetically modified animals are invaluable models to understand the molecular disease mechanisms and to screen for modifying compounds. We recently introduced tau-transgenic zebrafish as a novel model for tauopathies. Our model allows recapitulating key pathological features of tauopathies within an extremely short time. Moreover, life imaging of tau-dependent neuronal cell death was performed for the very first time. This demonstrated tau-dependent neuronal cell loss independent of tangle formation. Finally, we exemplified that the zebrafish frontotemporal dementia model can be used to screen for drugs that prevent abnormal tau phosphorylation and neuronal cell death.

  13. Liver X Receptor Agonist Modifies the DNA Methylation Profile of Synapse and Neurogenesis-Related Genes in the Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Hernández, A G; Hernández, H G; Restrepo, A; Muñoz, J I; Bayon, G F; Fernández, A F; Fraga, M F; Cardona-Gómez, G P; Arboleda, H; Arboleda, Gonzalo H

    2016-02-01

    The liver X receptor agonist, GW3965, improves cognition in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse models. Here, we determined if short-term GW3965 treatment induces changes in the DNA methylation state of the hippocampus, which are associated with cognitive improvement. Twenty-four-month-old triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice were treated with GW3965 (50 mg/kg/day for 6 days). DNA methylation state was examined by modified bisulfite conversion and hybridization on Illumina Infinium Methylation BeadChip 450 k arrays. The Morris water maze was used for behavioral analysis. Our results show in addition to improvement in cognition methylation changes in 39 of 13,715 interrogated probes in treated 3xTg-AD mice compared with untreated 3xTg-AD mice. These changes in methylation probes include 29 gene loci. Importantly, changes in methylation status were mainly from synapse-related genes (SYP, SYN1, and DLG3) and neurogenesis-associated genes (HMGB3 and RBBP7). Thus, our results indicate that liver X receptors (LXR) agonist treatment induces rapid changes in DNA methylation, particularly in loci associated with genes involved in neurogenesis and synaptic function. Our results suggest a new potential mechanism to explain the beneficial effect of GW3965.

  14. Genetic deletion of TNFRII gene enhances the Alzheimer-like pathology in an APP transgenic mouse model via reduction of phosphorylated IκBα.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; He, Ping; Xie, Junxia; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Li, Rena; Shen, Yong

    2014-09-15

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor II (TNFRII) is one of the TNF receptor superfamily members and our recent pathological studies show that TNFRII is deficient in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms of TNFRII in AD pathogenesis remain unclear. In the present study, by using the gene-targeting approach to delete TNFRII in AD transgenic mouse model, we found that, in the brain of APP23 mice with TNFRII deletion (APP23/TNFRII(-/-)), AD-like pathology, i.e. plaque formation and microglial activation, occurs as early as 6 months of age. To test whether the increased levels of Aβ plaques was due to elevated Aβ, we measured Aβ and found that Aβ levels indeed were significantly increased at this age. Because β-secretase, BACE1, is critical enzyme for Aβ production, we have examined BACE1 and found that BACE1 is increased in both protein levels and enzymatic activity as early as 6 months of age; Having shown that BACE1 promoter region contains NF-κB binding sites, we found that cytoplasmic NF-κB was elevated and SUMO1 binding to IκBα was decreased. To further verify these findings, we have overexpressed TNFRII and identified that overexpressing TNFRII can reverse the findings from APP23/TNFRII(-/-) mice. Altogether, our results demonstrate novel roles of TNFRII in the regulation of Aβ production, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for AD by up-regulating TNFRII levels and elevating phosphorylated IκBα by SUMOylation.

  15. Neural stem cell transplants improve cognitive function without altering amyloid pathology in an APP/PS1 double transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Pei-Jun; Sha, Hong-ying; Ni, Jiong; Li, Ming-hua; Gu, Guo-jun

    2014-10-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are capable of self-renewal and are multipotent. Transplantation of NSCs may represent a promising approach for treating neurodegenerative disorders associated with cognitive decline, such as Alzheimer disease (AD) characterized by extensive loss of neurons. In this study, we investigated the effect of NSC transplantation on cognitive function in the amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 (APP/PS1) transgenic mouse, an AD mouse model with age-dependent cognitive deficits. We found that NSCs bilaterally transplanted into hippocampal regions improved spatial learning and memory function in these mice, but did not alter Aβ pathology. Immunohistochemical analyses determined that NSCs proliferated, migrated, and differentiated into three neuronal cell types. The improvement in cognitive function was correlated with enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP) and an increase in the neuron expression of proteins related to cognitive function: N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) 2B unit, synaptophysin (SYP), protein kinase C ζ subtypes (PKCζ), tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Taken together, our data indicated that injected NSCs can rescue cognitive deficits in APP/PS1 transgenic mice by replacing neuronal cell types expressing multiple cognition-related proteins that enhance LTP.

  16. Predictive imaging of chemotherapeutic response in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Yoo, Byunghee; Sherman, Sarah; Mukherjee, Pinku; Ross, Alana; Pantazopoulos, Pamela; Petkova, Victoria; Farrar, Christian; Medarova, Zdravka; Moore, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The underglycosylated mucin 1 tumor antigen (uMUC1) is a biomarker that forecasts the progression of adenocarcinomas. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a dual-modality molecular imaging approach based on targeting uMUC1 for monitoring chemotherapeutic response in a transgenic murine model of pancreatic cancer (KCM triple transgenic mice). An uMUC1-specific contrast agent (MN-EPPT) was synthesized for use with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence optical imaging. It consisted of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to the near infrared fluorescent dye Cy5.5 and to a uMUC1-specific peptide (EPPT). KCM triple transgenic mice were given gemcitabine as chemotherapy while control animals received saline injections following the same schedule. Changes in uMUC1 levels following chemotherapy were monitored using T2-weighted MRI and optical imaging before and 24 hr after injection of the MN-EPPT. uMUC1 expression in tumors from both groups was evaluated by histology and qRT-PCR. We observed that the average delta-T2 in the gemcitabine-treated group was significantly reduced compared to the control group indicating lower accumulation of MN-EPPT, and correspondingly, a lower level of uMUC1 expression. In vivo optical imaging confirmed the MRI findings. Fluorescence microscopy of pancreatic tumor sections showed a lower level of uMUC1 expression in the gemcitabine-treated group compared to the control, which was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Our data proved that changes in uMUC1 expression after gemcitabine chemotherapy could be evaluated using MN-EPPT-enhanced in vivo MR and optical imaging. These results suggest that the uMUC1-targeted imaging approach could provide a useful tool for the predictive assessment of therapeutic response. PMID:26996122

  17. Modeling evolution of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to transgenic corn with two insecticidal traits.

    PubMed

    Onstad, David W; Meinke, Lance J

    2010-06-01

    A simulation model of the population dynamics and genetics of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), was created to evaluate the use of refuges in the management of resistance to transgenic insecticidal corn, Zea mays L., expressing one or two toxin traits. Hypothetical scenarios and a case study of a corn hybrid pyramided with existing toxins are simulated. In the hypothetical situations, results demonstrated that evolution is generally delayed by pyramids compared with deployment of a single-toxin corn hybrid. However, soil insecticide use in the refuge reduced this delay and quickened the evolution of resistance. Results were sensitive to the degree of male beetle dispersal before mating and to the effectiveness of both toxins in the pyramid. Resistance evolved faster as fecundity increased for survivors of insecticidal corn. Thus, effects on fecundity must be measured to predict which resistance management plans will work well. Evolution of resistance also occurred faster if the survival rate due to exposure to the two toxins was not calculated by multiplication of two independent survival rates (one for each insect gene) but was equivalent to the minimum of the two. Furthermore, when single-trait and pyramided corn hybrids were planted within rootworm-dispersal distance of each other, the toxin traits lost efficacy more quickly than they did in scenarios without single-trait corn. For the case study involving transgenic corn expressing Cry34/35Ab1 and Cry3Bb1, the pyramid delayed evolution longer than a single trait corn hybrid and longer than a sequence of toxins based on at least one resistance-allele frequency remaining below 50%. Results are discussed within the context of a changing transgenic corn marketplace and the landscape dynamics of resistance management.

  18. Longitudinal assessment of a transgenic animal model of tauopathy by FDG-PET imaging.

    PubMed

    de Cristóbal, Javier; García-García, Luis; Delgado, Mercedes; Pérez, Mar; Pozo, Miguel A; Medina, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal levels and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein have been proposed as the underlying cause of a group of neurodegenerative disorders collectively known as 'tauopathies'. The detrimental consequence is the loss of affinity between this protein and the microtubules, increased production of fibrillary aggregates, and the accumulation of insoluble intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. A similar phenotype can be observed in various preclinical models, which have been generated to study the role of tau protein in neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we have analyzed the brain metabolic activity in an animal model of tauopathy (tauVLW transgenic mice), which has been previously reported to mimic some of the phenotypic features of these disorders. By using a non-invasive technique, positron emission tomography (PET), a longitudinal non-clinical follow up study was carried out during most of the lifespan of these transgenic mice, from the youth to the senescence stages. The results obtained point out to an aging-dependent decrease in 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in the cerebral areas analyzed, which was already significant at the adult age, i.e., 11 months, and became much more prominent in the oldest animals (19 months old). This observation correlates well with the histopathological observation of neurodegeneration in brain areas where there is overexpression of tau protein.

  19. Peroxisome proliferators reduce spatial memory impairment, synaptic failure, and neurodegeneration in brains of a double transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Carvajal, Francisco J; Zolezzi, Juan M; Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Serrano, Felipe; Karmelic, Daniel; Toledo, Enrique M; Toro, Andrés; Toro, Jessica; Santos, Manuel J

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities, accumulation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), increase of oxidative stress, and synaptic alterations. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species through their matrix enzyme catalase is one of the most recognized functions of peroxisomes. The induction of peroxisome proliferation is attained through different mechanisms by a set of structurally diverse molecules called peroxisome proliferators. In the present work, a double transgenic mouse model of AD that co-expresses a mutant human amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPPswe) and presenilin 1 without exon 9 (PS1dE9) was utilized in order to assess the effect of peroxisomal proliferation on Aβ neurotoxicity in vivo. Mice were tested for spatial memory and their brains analyzed by cytochemical, electrophysiological, and biochemical methods. We report here that peroxisomal proliferation significantly reduces (i) memory impairment, found in this model of AD; (ii) Aβ burden and plaque-associated acetylcholinesterase activity; (iii) neuroinflammation, measured by the extent of astrogliosis and microgliosis; and (iv) the decrease in postsynaptic proteins, while promoting synaptic plasticity in the form of long-term potentiation. We concluded that peroxisomal proliferation reduces various AD neuropathological markers and peroxisome proliferators may be considered as potential therapeutic agents against the disease.

  20. Insights into Alzheimer disease pathogenesis from studies in transgenic animal models.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Evelin L; Figueiro, Micheli; Gattaz, Wagner F

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common cause of dementia among the elderly, accounting for ~60-70% of all cases of dementia. The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease are senile plaques (mainly containing p-amyloid peptide derived from amyloid precursor protein) and neurofibrillary tangles (containing hyperphosphorylated Tau protein), along with neuronal loss. At present there is no effective treatment for Alzheimer disease. Given the prevalence and poor prognosis of the disease, the development of animal models has been a research priority to understand pathogenic mechanisms and to test therapeutic strategies. Most cases of Alzheimer disease occur sporadically in people over 65 years old, and are not genetically inherited. Roughly 5% of patients with Alzheimer disease have familial Alzheimer disease--that is, related to a genetic predisposition, including mutations in the amyloid precursor protein, presenilin 1, and presenilin 2 genes. The discovery of genes for familial Alzheimer disease has allowed transgenic models to be generated through the overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein and/or presenilins harboring one or several mutations found in familial Alzheimer disease. Although none of these models fully replicates the human disease, they have provided valuable insights into disease mechanisms as well as opportunities to test therapeutic approaches. This review describes the main transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer disease which have been adopted in Alzheimer disease research, and discusses the insights into Alzheimer disease pathogenesis from studies in such models. In summary, the Alzheimer disease mouse models have been the key to understanding the roles of soluble b-amyloid oligomers in disease pathogenesis, as well as of the relationship between p-amyloid and Tau pathologies.

  1. Transgenic Quail as a Model for Research in the Avian Nervous System – A Comparative Study of the Auditory Brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Seidl, Armin H.; Sanchez, Jason Tait; Schecterson, Leslayann; Tabor, Kathryn M.; Wang, Yuan; Kashima, Daniel T.; Poynter, Greg; Huss, David; Fraser, Scott E.; Lansford, Rusty; Rubel, Edwin W

    2012-01-01

    Research performed on transgenic animals has led to numerous advances in biological research. However, using traditional retroviral methods to generate transgenic avian research models has proven problematic. As a result, experiments aimed at genetic manipulations on birds remained difficult for this popular research tool. Recently, lentiviral methods have enabled production of transgenic birds, including a transgenic Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) line showing neuronal-specificity and stable expression of eGFP across generations (termed here as GFP quail). To test whether the GFP quail may serve as a viable alternative to the popular chicken model system, with the additional benefit of gene manipulation, we compared the development, organization, structure and function of a specific neuronal circuit in chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) to that of the GFP quail. This study focuses on a well-defined avian brain region, the principal nuclei of the sound localization circuit in the auditory brainstem, nucleus magnocellularis (NM) and nucleus laminaris (NL). Our results demonstrate that structural and functional properties of NM and NL neurons in the GFP quail, as well as their dynamic properties in response to changes in the environment, are nearly identical to those in chickens. These similarities demonstrate that the GFP quail, as well as other transgenic quail lines, can serve as an attractive avian model system, with the advantage of being able to build on the wealth of information already available from the chicken. PMID:22806400

  2. Diploid potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) as a model crop to study transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Nadolska-Orczyk, Anna; Pietrusinska, Aleksandra; Binka-Wyrwa, Agnieszka; Kuc, Dominik; Orczyk, Wacław

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation for two diploid breeding lines of potato, and gives a detailed analysis of reporter gene expression. In our lab, these lines were also used to obtain tetraploid somatic hybrids. We tested four newly prepared constructs based on the pGreen vector system containing the selection gene nptII or bar under the 35S or nos promoter. All these vectors carried gus under 35S. We also tested the pDM805 vector, with the bar and gus genes respectively under the Ubi1 and Act1 promoters, which are strong for monocots. The selection efficiency (about 17%) was highest in the stem and leaf explants after transformation with pGreen where nptII was under 35S. About half of the selected plants were confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis to be transgenic and, depending on the combination, 0 to 100% showed GUS expression. GUS expression was strongest in multi-copy transgenic plants where gus was under Act1. The same potato lines carrying multi-copy bar under Ubi1 were also highly resistant to the herbicide Basta. The suggestion of using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of diploid lines of potato as a model crop is discussed herein.

  3. Imaging corneal pathology in a transgenic mouse model using nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubovitsky, Julia G.; Spencer, Joel A.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Andersen, Bogi; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2006-01-01

    A transgenic mouse model with a Clim [co-factor of LIM (a combination of first letters of Lin-11 (C. elegans), ISL1 (rat), and Mec-3 (C. elegans) gene names) domain proteins] gene partially blocked in the epithelial compartment of its tissues is used to establish the sensitivity of intrinsic reflectance nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) to stromal and cellular perturbations in the cornea. Our results indicate dysplasia in the squamous epithelium, irregular collagen arrays in the stroma, and a compromised posterior endothelium in the corneas of these mice. As suggested by biochemical data, the collagen alterations are likely due to collagen III synthesis and deposition during healing and remodeling of transgenic mice corneal stromas. All of the topographic features seen in NLOM images of normal and aberrant corneas are confirmed by coregistration with histological sections. In this work, we also use ratiometric redox fluorometry based on two-photon excited cellular fluorescence from reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)(P)H and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) to study mitocondrial energy metabolism. Employing this method, we detect higher metabolic activity in the endothelial layer of cornea compared to an epithelial layer located further away from the metabolites. The combination of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF) with second harmonic generation (SHG) signals allows imaging to aid in understanding the relationship between alternation of specific genes and structural changes in cells and extracellular matrix.

  4. A novel model of demyelination and remyelination in a GFP-transgenic zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yangwu; Lei, Xudan; Li, Xiang; Chen, Yanan; Xu, Fei; Feng, Xizeng; Wei, Shihui; Li, Yuhao

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Demyelinating diseases consist of a variety of autoimmune conditions in which the myelin sheath is damaged due to genetic and/or environmental factors. During clinical treatment, some patients undergo partial remyelination, especially during the early disease stages. However, the mechanisms that regulate demyelination remain unclear. The myelin structure, myelin formation and myelin-related gene expression are highly conserved between mammals and zebrafish. Therefore, the zebrafish is an ideal model organism to study myelination. In this study, we generated a transgenic zebrafish Tg(mbp:nfsB-egfp) expressing a fusion protein composed of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and NTR from the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Tg(mbp:nfsB-egfp) expressed NTR-EGFP reproducibly and hereditarily in oligodendrocytes along the spinal cord. Treatment of zebrafish larvae Tg(mbp:nfsB-egfp) with metronidazole (Mtz) resulted in the selective ablation of oligodendrocytes and led to demyelination, accompanied by behavioral changes, including decreased total movement distance, velocity, total movement time and fast movement time. After withdrawal of Mtz for a seven day recovery period, the expression of EGFP and MBP protein was observed again which indicates remyelination. Additionally, locomotor capacity was restored. Collectively, Tg(mbp:nfsB-egfp), a heritable and stable transgenic line, provides a novel, powerful tool to study the mechanisms of demyelination and remyelination. PMID:25527642

  5. Soluble tau species, not neurofibrillary aggregates, disrupt neural system integration in a tau transgenic model.

    PubMed

    Fox, Leora M; William, Christopher M; Adamowicz, David H; Pitstick, Rose; Carlson, George A; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Hyman, Bradley T

    2011-07-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles are a feature of Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies, and although they are generally believed to be markers of neuronal pathology, there is little evidence evaluating whether tangles directly impact neuronal function. To investigate the response of cells in hippocampal circuits to complex behavioral stimuli, we used an environmental enrichment paradigm to induce expression of an immediate-early gene, Arc, in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy. These mice reversibly overexpress P301L tau and exhibit substantial neurofibrillary tangle deposition, neuronal loss, and memory deficits. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization to detect Arc messenger RNA, we found that rTg4510 mice have impaired hippocampal Arc expression both without stimulation and in response to environmental enrichment; this likely reflects the combination of functional impairments of existing neurons and loss of neurons. However, tangle-bearing cells were at least as likely as non-tangle-bearing neurons to exhibit Arc expression in response to enrichment. Transgene suppression with doxycycline for 6 weeks resulted in increased percentages of Arc-positive cells in rTg4510 brains compared with untreated transgenics, restoring enrichment-induced Arc messenger RNA levels to that of wild-type controls despite the continued presence of neurofibrillary pathology. We interpret these data to indicate that soluble tau contributes to impairment of hippocampal function, although tangles do not preclude neurons from responding in a functional circuit.

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Preserve Working Memory in the 3xTg-AD Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Jiri; Kulijewicz-Nawrot, Magdalena; Rodrigez-Arellano, Jose Julio; Jendelova, Pavla; Sykova, Eva

    2016-01-25

    The transplantation of stem cells may have a therapeutic effect on the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study, we transplanted human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into the lateral ventricle of a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (3xTg-AD) at the age of eight months. We evaluated spatial reference and working memory after MSC treatment and the possible underlying mechanisms, such as the influence of transplanted MSCs on neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the expression levels of a 56 kDa oligomer of amyloid β (Aβ*56), glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate transporters (Glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) and Glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1)) in the entorhinal and prefrontal cortices and the hippocampus. At 14 months of age we observed the preservation of working memory in MSC-treated 3xTg-AD mice, suggesting that such preservation might be due to the protective effect of MSCs on GS levels and the considerable downregulation of Aβ*56 levels in the entorhinal cortex. These changes were observed six months after transplantation, accompanied by clusters of proliferating cells in the SVZ. Since the grafted cells did not survive for the whole experimental period, it is likely that the observed effects could have been transiently more pronounced at earlier time points than at six months after cell application.

  7. Value-Added Models of Assessment: Implications for Motivation and Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderman, Eric M.; Anderman, Lynley H.; Yough, Michael S.; Gimbert, Belinda G.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we examine the relations of value-added models of measuring academic achievement to student motivation. Using an achievement goal orientation theory perspective, we argue that value-added models, which focus on the progress of individual students over time, are more closely aligned with research on student motivation than are more…

  8. Effects of a dietary ketone ester on hippocampal glycolytic and TCA cycle intermediates and amino acids in a 3xTgAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pawlosky, Robert J; Kemper, Martin F; Kashiwaya, Yoshihero; King, M Todd; Mattson, Mark P; Veech, Richard L

    2017-01-18

    In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in a triple transgenic (3xTgAD) mouse model of AD low glucose metabolism in the brain precedes loss of memory and cognitive decline. The metabolism of ketones in the brain by-passes glycolysis and therefore may correct several deficiencies that are associated with glucose hypometabolism. A dietary supplement composed of an ester of D-β-hydroxybutyrate and R-1,3 butane diol referred to as ketone ester (KE) was incorporated into a rodent diet and fed to 3xTgAD mice for 8 months. At 16.5 months of age animals were euthanized and brains dissected. Analyses were carried out on the hippocampus and frontal cortex for glycolytic and TCA (Tricarboxylic Acid) cycle intermediates, amino acids, oxidized lipids and proteins, and enzymes. There were higher concentrations of D-β-hydroxybutyrate in the hippocampus of KE-fed mice where there were also higher concentrations of TCA cycle and glycolytic intermediates and the energy-linked biomarker, n-acetyl aspartate compared to controls. In the hippocampi of control-fed animals the free mitochondrial [NAD(+) ]/[NADH] ratio were highly oxidized, whereas, in KE-fed animals the mitochondria were reduced. Also, the levels of oxidized protein and lipids were lower and the energy of ATP hydrolysis was greater compared to controls. 3xTgAD mice maintained on a KE-supplemented diet had higher concentrations of glycolytic and TCA cycle metabolites, a more reduced mitochondrial redox potential, and lower amounts of oxidized lipids and proteins in their hippocampi compared to controls. The KE offers a potential therapy to counter fundamental metabolic deficits common to patients and transgenic models. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Relaxin Treatment in an Ang-II-Based Transgenic Preeclamptic-Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Nadine; Golic, Michaela; Herse, Florian; Rugor, Julianna; Linz, Dominik; Solano, Maria Emilia; Müller, Dominik N.; Dechend, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Relaxin is a peptide related to pregnancy that induces nitric oxide-related and gelatinase-related effects, allowing vasodilation and pregnancy-related adjustments permitting parturition to occur. Relaxin controls the hemodynamic and renovascular adaptive changes that occur during pregnancy. Interest has evolved regarding relaxin and a therapeutic principle in preeclampsia and heart failure. Preeclampsia is a pregnancy disorder, featuring hypertension, proteinuria and placental anomalies. We investigated relaxin in an established transgenic rat model of preeclampsia, where the phenotype is induced by angiotensin (Ang)-II production in mid pregnancy. We gave recombinant relaxin to preeclamtic rats at day 9 of gestation. Hypertension and proteinuria was not ameliorated after relaxin administration. Intrauterine growth retardation of the fetus was unaltered by relaxin. Heart-rate responses and relaxin levels documented drug effects. In this Ang-II-based model of preeclampsia, we could not show a salubrious effect on preeclampsia. PMID:26963382

  10. Use of TSHβ:EGFP transgenic zebrafish as a rapid in vivo model for assessing thyroid-disrupting chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Cheng; Jin, Xia; He, Jiangyan; Yin, Zhan

    2012-07-15

    Accumulating evidence indicates that a wide range of chemicals have the ability to interfere with the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid (HPT) axis. Novel endpoints should be evaluated in addition to existing methods in order to effectively assess the effects of these chemicals on the HPT axis. Thyroid-stimulating hormone subunit β (TSHβ) plays central regulatory roles in the HPT system. We identified the regulatory region that determines the expression level of zebrafish TSHβ in the anterior pituitary. In the transgenic zebrafish with EGFP driven by the TSHβ promoter, the similar responsive patterns between the expression levels of TSHβ:EGFP and endogenous TSHβ mRNA in the pituitary are observed following treatments with goitrogen chemicals and exogenous thyroid hormones (THs). These results suggest that the TSHβ:EGFP transgenic reporter zebrafish may be a useful alternative in vivo model for the assessment of chemicals interfering with the HPT system. Highlights: ► The promoter of zebrafish TSHβ gene has been identified. ► The stable TSHβ:EGFP transgenic zebrafish reporter germline has been generated. ► The EGFP in the transgenic fish recapitulated the pattern of pituitary TSHβ mRNA. ► The transgenic zebrafish may be an in vivo model for EDC assessment.

  11. Interpreting incremental value of markers added to risk prediction models.

    PubMed

    Pencina, Michael J; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Pencina, Karol M; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Greenland, Philip

    2012-09-15

    The discrimination of a risk prediction model measures that model's ability to distinguish between subjects with and without events. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) is a popular measure of discrimination. However, the AUC has recently been criticized for its insensitivity in model comparisons in which the baseline model has performed well. Thus, 2 other measures have been proposed to capture improvement in discrimination for nested models: the integrated discrimination improvement and the continuous net reclassification improvement. In the present study, the authors use mathematical relations and numerical simulations to quantify the improvement in discrimination offered by candidate markers of different strengths as measured by their effect sizes. They demonstrate that the increase in the AUC depends on the strength of the baseline model, which is true to a lesser degree for the integrated discrimination improvement. On the other hand, the continuous net reclassification improvement depends only on the effect size of the candidate variable and its correlation with other predictors. These measures are illustrated using the Framingham model for incident atrial fibrillation. The authors conclude that the increase in the AUC, integrated discrimination improvement, and net reclassification improvement offer complementary information and thus recommend reporting all 3 alongside measures characterizing the performance of the final model.

  12. Strategies for fitting nonlinear ecological models in R, AD Model Builder, and BUGS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolker, Benjamin M.; Gardner, Beth; Maunder, Mark; Berg, Casper W.; Brooks, Mollie; Comita, Liza; Crone, Elizabeth; Cubaynes, Sarah; Davies, Trevor; de Valpine, Perry; Ford, Jessica; Gimenez, Olivier; Kéry, Marc; Kim, Eun Jung; Lennert-Cody, Cleridy; Magunsson, Arni; Martell, Steve; Nash, John; Nielson, Anders; Regentz, Jim; Skaug, Hans; Zipkin, Elise

    2013-01-01

    1. Ecologists often use nonlinear fitting techniques to estimate the parameters of complex ecological models, with attendant frustration. This paper compares three open-source model fitting tools and discusses general strategies for defining and fitting models. 2. R is convenient and (relatively) easy to learn, AD Model Builder is fast and robust but comes with a steep learning curve, while BUGS provides the greatest flexibility at the price of speed. 3. Our model-fitting suggestions range from general cultural advice (where possible, use the tools and models that are most common in your subfield) to specific suggestions about how to change the mathematical description of models to make them more amenable to parameter estimation. 4. A companion web site (https://groups.nceas.ucsb.edu/nonlinear-modeling/projects) presents detailed examples of application of the three tools to a variety of typical ecological estimation problems; each example links both to a detailed project report and to full source code and data.

  13. Intake of sucrose-sweetened water induces insulin resistance and exacerbates memory deficits and amyloidosis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dongfeng; Lu, Hailin; Lewis, Terry L; Li, Ling

    2007-12-14

    Compelling evidence indicates that excess consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages plays an important role in the epidemic of obesity, a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been associated with a higher incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD). High fat diets promote AD-like pathology in mice. It is not known whether consumption of excess sugar as in calorically sweetened beverages with an otherwise normal diet affects the development of AD. In the present study, we provided 10% sucrose-sweetened water to a transgenic mouse model of AD with a normal rodent diet. Compared with the control mice with no sucrose added in the water, the sucrose group gained more body weight and developed glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, and hypercholesterolemia. These metabolic changes were associated with the exacerbation of memory impairment and a 2-3-fold increase in insoluble amyloid-beta protein levels and deposition in the brain. We further showed that the levels of expression and secretase-cleaved products of amyloid-beta precursor protein were not affected by sucrose intake. The steady-state levels of insulin-degrading enzyme did not change significantly, whereas there was a 2.5-fold increase in brain apoE levels. Therefore, we concluded that the up-regulation of apoE accelerated the aggregation of Abeta, resulting in the exacerbation of cerebral amyloidosis in sucrose-treated mice. These data underscore the potential role of dietary sugar in the pathogenesis of AD and suggest that controlling the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages may be an effective way to curtail the risk of developing AD.

  14. Adding ecosystem function to agent-based land use models

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, V.; Del Grosso, S.J.; Parton, W.J.; Malanson, G.P.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine issues in the inclusion of simulations of ecosystem functions in agent-based models of land use decision-making. The reasons for incorporating these simulations include local interests in land fertility and global interests in carbon sequestration. Biogeochemical models are needed in order to calculate such fluxes. The Century model is described with particular attention to the land use choices that it can encompass. When Century is applied to a land use problem the combinatorial choices lead to a potentially unmanageable number of simulation runs. Century is also parameter-intensive. Three ways of including Century output in agent-based models, ranging from separately calculated look-up tables to agents running Century within the simulation, are presented. The latter may be most efficient, but it moves the computing costs to where they are most problematic. Concern for computing costs should not be a roadblock. PMID:26191077

  15. Phenotypic Alterations in Hippocampal NPY- and PV-Expressing Interneurons in a Presymptomatic Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahar, Ian; Albuquerque, Marilia Silva; Mondragon-Rodriguez, Siddhartha; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Davoli, Maria Antonietta; Chabot, Jean-Guy; Williams, Sylvain; Mechawar, Naguib; Quirion, Rémi; Krantic, Slavica

    2017-01-01

    Interneurons, key regulators of hippocampal neuronal network excitability and synchronization, are lost in advanced stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Given that network changes occur at early (presymptomatic) stages, we explored whether alterations of interneurons also occur before amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation. Numbers of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactive (IR) cells were decreased in the hippocampus of 1 month-old TgCRND8 mouse AD model in a sub-regionally specific manner. The most prominent change observed was a decrease in the number of PV-IR cells that selectively affected CA1/2 and subiculum, with the pyramidal layer (PY) of CA1/2 accounting almost entirely for the reduction in number of hippocampal PV-IR cells. As PV neurons were decreased selectively in CA1/2 and subiculum, and given that they are critically involved in the control of hippocampal theta oscillations, we then assessed intrinsic theta oscillations in these regions after a 4-aminopyridine (4AP) challenge. This revealed increased theta power and population bursts in TgCRND8 mice compared to non-transgenic (nTg) controls, suggesting a hyperexcitability network state. Taken together, our results identify for the first time AD-related alterations in hippocampal interneuron function as early as at 1 month of age. These early functional alterations occurring before amyloid deposition may contribute to cognitive dysfunction in AD. PMID:28154533

  16. Altered emotional and motivational processing in the transgenic rat model for Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Faure, A; Höhn, S; Von Hörsten, S; Delatour, B; Raber, K; Le Blanc, P; Desvignes, N; Doyère, V; El Massioui, N

    2011-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by an expansion of CAG repeat in the Huntingtin gene. Patients demonstrate a triad of motor, cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. A transgenic rat model (tgHD rats) carrying 51 CAG repeats demonstrate progressive striatal degeneration and polyglutamine aggregates in limbic structures. In this model, emotional function has only been investigated through anxiety studies. Our aim was to extend knowledge on emotional and motivational function in symptomatic tgHD rats. We subjected tgHD and wild-type rats to behavioral protocols testing motor, emotional, and motivational abilities. From 11 to 15 months of age, animals were tested in emotional perception of sucrose using taste reactivity, acquisition, extinction, and re-acquisition of discriminative Pavlovian fear conditioning as well as reactivity to changes in reinforcement values in a runway Pavlovian approach task. Motor tests detected the symptomatic status of tgHD animals from 11 months of age. In comparison to wild types, transgenic animals exhibited emotional blunting of hedonic perception for intermediate sucrose concentration. Moreover, we found emotional alterations with better learning and re-acquisition of discriminative fear conditioning due to a higher level of conditioned fear to aversive stimuli, and hyper-reactivity to a negative hedonic shift in reinforcement value interpreted in term of greater frustration. Neuropathological assessment in the same animals showed a selective shrinkage of the central nucleus of the amygdala. Our results showing emotional blunting and hypersensitivity to negative emotional situations in symptomatic tgHD animals extend the face validity of this model regarding neuropsychiatric symptoms as seen in manifest HD patients, and suggest that some of these symptoms may be related to amygdala dysfunction.

  17. Efficient and Rapid Development of Transgenic Hamster Models of TSEs Using a Radical New Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    high scrapie susceptibility genotype VVRRQQ. All three lines of the mouse transgenics carrying sheep, human, and elk PrP have been now re-derived. We...have observed the first transmission of the disease from our standard scrapie -infected sheep brain inoculum to the transgenic mice with sheep PrP and...already been distributed. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Transgenic, Mouse, Hamster, TSE, Sheep Scrapie , TOSK, transposon 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  18. Enlargement of the Axial Length and Altered Ultrastructural Features of the Sclera in a Mutant Lumican Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yanzheng; Zhang, Fengju; Zhao, Yanyan; Sun, Mingshen; Tao, Jun; Liang, Yanchuang; Ma, Ling; Yu, Yanqiu; Wang, Jianhua; Hao, Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    Lumican (LUM) is a candidate gene for myopia in the MYP3 locus. In this study, a mutant lumican (L199P) transgenic mouse model was established to investigate the axial length changes and ultrastructural features of the sclera. The mouse model was established by pronuclear microinjection. Transgenic mice and wild-type B6 mice were killed at eight weeks of age. Gene expression levels of LUM and collagen type I (COL1) in the sclera were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and the protein levels were assessed by Western blot analysis. Ocular axial lengths were measured on the enucleated whole eye under a dissecting microscope. Ultrastructural features of collagen fibrils in the sclera were examined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Lumican and collagen type I were both elevated at the transcriptional and protein levels. The mean axial length of eyes in the transgenic mice was significantly longer than that in the wild-type mice (3,231.0 ± 11.2 μm (transgenic group) vs 3,199.7 ± 11.1 μm (controls), p<0.05 =). Some ultrastructural changes were observed in the sclera of the transgenic mice under TEM, such as evident lamellar disorganizations and abnormal inter-fibril spacing. The average collagen fibril diameter was smaller than that in their wild-type counterparts. These results indicate that the ectopic mutant lumican (L199P) may induce enlargement of axial lengths and abnormal structures and distributions of collagen fibrils in mouse sclera. This transgenic mouse model can be used for the mechanistic study of myopia. PMID:27711221

  19. ASC-AD penetration modeling FY05 status report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kistler, Bruce L.; Ostien, Jakob T.; Chiesa, Michael L.; Bhutani, Nipun; Ohashi, Yuki; Marin, Esteban B.; Korellis, John S.; Settgast, Randy; Antoun, Bonnie R.

    2006-04-01

    Sandia currently lacks a high fidelity method for predicting loads on and subsequent structural response of earth penetrating weapons. This project seeks to test, debug, improve and validate methodologies for modeling earth penetration. Results of this project will allow us to optimize and certify designs for the B61-11, Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator (RNEP), PEN-X and future nuclear and conventional penetrator systems. Since this is an ASC Advanced Deployment project the primary goal of the work is to test, debug, verify and validate new Sierra (and Nevada) tools. Also, since this project is part of the V&V program within ASC, uncertainty quantification (UQ), optimization using DAKOTA [1] and sensitivity analysis are an integral part of the work. This project evaluates, verifies and validates new constitutive models, penetration methodologies and Sierra/Nevada codes. In FY05 the project focused mostly on PRESTO [2] using the Spherical Cavity Expansion (SCE) [3,4] and PRESTO Lagrangian analysis with a preformed hole (Pen-X) methodologies. Modeling penetration tests using PRESTO with a pilot hole was also attempted to evaluate constitutive models. Future years work would include the Alegra/SHISM [5] and AlegrdEP (Earth Penetration) methodologies when they are ready for validation testing. Constitutive models such as Soil-and-Foam, the Sandia Geomodel [6], and the K&C Concrete model [7] were also tested and evaluated. This report is submitted to satisfy annual documentation requirements for the ASC Advanced Deployment program. This report summarizes FY05 work performed in the Penetration Mechanical Response (ASC-APPS) and Penetration Mechanics (ASC-V&V) projects. A single report is written to document the two projects because of the significant amount of technical overlap.

  20. A novel transgenic mouse model to study the osteoblast lineage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Maes, Christa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2007-11-01

    Over the past few decades, osteoblast differentiation has been studied extensively in a variety of culture systems and findings from these experiments have shaped our understanding of the bone-forming cell lineage. However, in vitro assays are bound by intrinsic limitations and are unable to effectively mirror many aspects related to osteoblasts in vivo, including their origin, destiny, and life span. Therefore, these fundamental questions strongly advocate the need for novel models to characterize the osteoblast lineage in vivo. Here, we developed a transgenic mouse system to study stage-specific subsets of osteoblast lineage cells. We believe that this system will prove to be a helpful tool in deciphering multiple aspects of osteoblast biology in vivo.

  1. Targeting BACE1 with siRNAs ameliorates Alzheimer disease neuropathology in a transgenic model.

    PubMed

    Singer, Oded; Marr, Robert A; Rockenstein, Edward; Crews, Leslie; Coufal, Nicole G; Gage, Fred H; Verma, Inder M; Masliah, Eliezer

    2005-10-01

    In Alzheimer disease, increased beta-secretase (BACE1) activity has been associated with neurodegeneration and accumulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) products. Thus, inactivation of BACE1 could be important in the treatment of Alzheimer disease. In this study, we found that lowering BACE1 levels using lentiviral vectors expressing siRNAs targeting BACE1 reduced amyloid production and the neurodegenerative and behavioral deficits in APP transgenic mice, a model of Alzheimer disease. Our results suggest that lentiviral vector delivery of BACE1 siRNA can specifically reduce the cleavage of APP and neurodegeneration in vivo and indicate that this approach could have potential therapeutic value for treatment of Alzheimer disease.

  2. Evaluation of Listeria Monocytogenes Based Vaccines for HER-2/neu in Mouse Transgenic Models of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    surrounding vessels in commonly studied mouse tumors. We have identified two autochthonous mouse mammary tumor models, MMTV-infected and MMTV-neu mice , with...Generate mammary specific inducible Tie2Ex mice a. Cross MMTV-rtTA mice with TRE-Tie2Ex mice (FVB and C3H strain). The Transgenic Mouse Facility...at Penn generated C3H/HeN TRE-Tie2Ex and FVB TRE-Tie2Ex transgenic mice using a TRE-Tie2Ex plasmid. Mouse lines that stably transmitted the

  3. Regulatable transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer disease: onset, reversibility and spreading of Tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Hochgräfe, Katja; Sydow, Astrid; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria

    2013-09-01

    Accumulation of amyloidogenic proteins such as Tau is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease and fronto-temporal dementias. To link Tau pathology to cognitive impairments and defects in synaptic plasticity, we created four inducible Tau transgenic mouse models with expression of pro- and anti-aggregant variants of either full-length human Tau (hTau40/ΔK280 and hTau40/ΔK280/PP) or the truncated Tau repeat domain (Tau(RD)/ΔK280 and Tau(RD)/ΔK280/PP). Here we review the histopathological features caused by pro-aggregant Tau, and correlate them with behavioral deficits and impairments in synaptic transmission. Both pro-aggregant Tau variants cause Alzheimer-like features, including synapse loss, mis-localization of Tau into the somatodendritic compartment, conformational changes and hyperphosphorylation. However, there is a clear difference in the extent of Tau aggregation and neurotoxicity. While pro-aggregant full-length hTau40/ΔK280 leads to a 'pre-tangle' pathology, the repeat domain Tau(RD)/ΔK280 causes massive formation of neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal loss in the hippocampus. However, both Tau variants cause co-aggregation of human and mouse Tau and similar functional impairments. Thus, earlier Tau pathological stages and not necessarily neurofibrillary tangles are critical for the development of cognitive malfunctions. Most importantly, memory and synapses recover after switching off expression of pro-aggregant Tau. The rescue of functional impairments correlates with the rescue of most Tau pathological changes and most strikingly the recovery of synapses. This implies that tauopathies as such are reversible, provided that amyloidogenic Tau is removed. Therefore, our Tau transgenic mice may serve as model systems for in vivo validation of therapeutic strategies and drug candidates with regard to cognition and synaptic function.

  4. Modified impact of emotion on temporal discrimination in a transgenic rat model of Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Alexis; Es-seddiqi, Mouna; Brown, Bruce L.; Nguyen, Hoa P.; Riess, Olaf; von Hörsten, Stephan; Le Blanc, Pascale; Desvignes, Nathalie; Bozon, Bruno; El Massioui, Nicole; Doyère, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is characterized by triad of motor, cognitive, and emotional symptoms along with neuropathology in fronto-striatal circuit and limbic system including amygdala. Emotional alterations, which have a negative impact on patient well-being, represent some of the earliest symptoms of HD and might be related to the onset of the neurodegenerative process. In the transgenic rat model (tgHD rats), evidence suggest emotional alterations at the symptomatic stage along with neuropathology of the central nucleus of amygdala (CE). Studies in humans and animals demonstrate that emotion can modulate time perception. The impact of emotion on time perception has never been tested in HD, nor is it known if that impact could be part of the presymptomatic emotional phenotype of the pathology. The aim of this paper was to characterize the effect of emotion on temporal discrimination in presymptomatic tgHD animals. In the first experiment, we characterized the acute effect of an emotion (fear) conditioned stimulus on temporal discrimination using a bisection procedure, and tested its dependency upon an intact central amygdala. The second experiment was aimed at comparing presymptomatic homozygous transgenic animals at 7-months of age and their wild-type littermates (WT) in their performance on the modulation of temporal discrimination by emotion. Our principal findings show that (1) a fear cue produces a short-lived decrease of temporal precision after its termination, and (2) animals with medial CE lesion and presymptomatic tgHD animals demonstrate an alteration of this emotion-evoked temporal distortion. The results contribute to our knowledge about the presymptomatic phenotype of this HD rat model, showing susceptibility to emotion that may be related to dysfunction of the central nucleus of amygdala. PMID:24133419

  5. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD.

  6. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the ‘London’ (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and ‘Swedish’ mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD. PMID:27421117

  7. The Politics and Statistics of Value-Added Modeling for Accountability of Teacher Preparation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincove, Jane Arnold; Osborne, Cynthia; Dillon, Amanda; Mills, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Despite questions about validity and reliability, the use of value-added estimation methods has moved beyond academic research into state accountability systems for teachers, schools, and teacher preparation programs (TPPs). Prior studies of value-added measurement for TPPs test the validity of researcher-designed models and find that measuring…

  8. Rethinking Teacher Evaluation: A Conversation about Statistical Inferences and Value-Added Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callister Everson, Kimberlee; Feinauer, Erika; Sudweeks, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide a methodological critique of the current standard of value-added modeling forwarded in educational policy contexts as a means of measuring teacher effectiveness. Conventional value-added estimates of teacher quality are attempts to determine to what degree a teacher would theoretically contribute, on average,…

  9. Adding Missing-Data-Relevant Variables to FIML-Based Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, John W.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional wisdom in missing data research dictates adding variables to the missing data model when those variables are predictive of (a) missingness and (b) the variables containing missingness. However, it has recently been shown that adding variables that are correlated with variables containing missingness, whether or not they are related to…

  10. Transgenic Farm Animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of recombinant DNA technology has enabled scientists to isolate single genes, analyze and modify their nucleotide structure(s), make copies of these isolated genes, and insert copies of these genes into the genome of plants and animals. The transgenic technology of adding genes to li...

  11. Bifurcation and Spike Adding Transition in Chay-Keizer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo; Liu, Shenquan; Liu, Xuanliang; Jiang, Xiaofang; Wang, Xiaohui

    Electrical bursting is an activity which is universal in excitable cells such as neurons and various endocrine cells, and it encodes rich physiological information. As burst delay identifies that the signal integration has reached the threshold at which it can generate an action potential, the number of spikes in a burst may have essential physiological implications, and the transition of bursting in excitable cells is associated with the bifurcation phenomenon closely. In this paper, we focus on the transition of the spike count per burst of the pancreatic β-cells within a mathematical model and bifurcation phenomenon in the Chay-Keizer model, which is utilized to simulate the pancreatic β-cells. By the fast-slow dynamical bifurcation analysis and the bi-parameter bifurcation analysis, the local dynamics of the Chay-Keizer system around the Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation is illustrated. Then the variety of the number of spikes per burst is discussed by changing the settings of a single parameter and bi-parameter. Moreover, results on the number of spikes within a burst are summarized in ISIs (interspike intervals) sequence diagrams, maximum and minimum, and the number of spikes under bi-parameter value changes.

  12. Brain and Plasma Molecular Characterization of the Pathogenic TBI-AD Interrelationship in Mouse Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0253 TITLE: Brain and Plasma Molecular Characterization of the Pathogenic TBI-AD Interrelationship in Mouse Models ... brain and plasma responses in mouse models of TBI, AD and other neurodegenerative conditions (Abdullah et al., 2014; Abdullah et al., 2013; Crawford...identify age/time-dependent expression of brain proteins and lipids in mouse models of AD (PSAPP and hTau) and of mTBI (single and repetitive mTBI in hTau

  13. The potential impact of new generation transgenic methods on creating rabbit models of cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Bősze, Z; Major, P; Baczkó, I; Odening, K E; Bodrogi, L; Hiripi, L; Varró, A

    2016-07-01

    Since the creation of the first transgenic rabbit thirty years ago, pronuclear microinjection remained the single applied method and resulted in numerous important rabbit models of human diseases, including cardiac deficiencies, albeit with low efficiency. For additive transgenesis a novel transposon mediated method, e.g., the Sleeping Beauty transgenesis, increased the efficiency, and its application to create cardiac disease models is expected in the near future. The targeted genome engineering nuclease family, e.g., the zink finger nuclease (ZFN), the transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and the newest, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) with the CRISPR associated effector protein (CAS), revolutionized the non-mouse transgenesis. The latest gene-targeting technology, the CRISPR/CAS system, was proven to be efficient in rabbit to create multi-gene knockout models. In the future, the number of tailor-made rabbit models produced with one of the above mentioned methods is expected to exponentially increase and to provide adequate models of heart diseases.

  14. Huperzine A activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling and enhances the nonamyloidogenic pathway in an Alzheimer transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Tao; Xie, Jing-Wei; Wang, Si-Ling; Zhao, Bao-Lu; Teng, Wei-Ping; Wang, Zhan-You

    2011-04-01

    Huperzine A (HupA) is a reversible and selective inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and it has multiple targets when used for Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapy. In this study, we searched for new mechanisms by which HupA could activate Wnt signaling and reduce amyloidosis in AD brain. A nasal gel containing HupA was prepared. No obvious toxicity of intranasal administration of HupA was found in mice. HupA was administered intranasally to β-amyloid (Aβ) precursor protein and presenilin-1 double-transgenic mice for 4 months. We observed an increase in ADAM10 and a decrease in BACE1 and APP695 protein levels and, subsequently, a reduction in Aβ levels and Aβ burden were present in HupA-treated mouse brain, suggesting that HupA enhances the nonamyloidogenic APP cleavage pathway. Importantly, our results further showed that HupA inhibited GSK3α/β activity, and enhanced the β-catenin level in the transgenic mouse brain and in SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing Swedish mutation APP, suggesting that the neuroprotective effect of HupA is not related simply to its AChE inhibition and antioxidation, but also involves other mechanisms, including targeting of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in AD brain.

  15. Autoimmune Manifestations in the 3xTg-AD Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marchese, Monica; Cowan, David; Head, Elizabeth; Ma, Donglai; Karimi, Khalil; Ashthorpe, Vanessa; Kapadia, Minesh; Zhao, Hui; Davis, Paulina; Sakic, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Background Immune system activation is frequently reported in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unknown whether this is a cause, a consequence, or an epiphenomenon of brain degeneration. Objective The present study examines whether immunological abnormalities occur in a well-established murine AD model and if so, how they relate temporally to behavioral deficits and neuropathology. Methods A broad battery of tests was employed to assess behavioral performance and autoimmune/inflammatory markers in 3xTg-AD (AD) mice and wild type controls from 1.5 to 12 months of age. Results Aged AD mice displayed severe manifestations of systemic autoimmune/inflammatory disease, as evidenced by splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, elevated serum levels of anti-nuclear/anti-dsDNA antibodies, low hematocrit, and increased number of double-negative T splenocytes. However, anxiety-related behavior and altered spleen function were evident as early as 2 months of age, thus preceding typical AD-like brain pathology. Moreover, AD mice showed altered olfaction and impaired “cognitive” flexibility in the first 6 months of life, suggesting mild cognitive impairment-like manifestations before general learning/memory impairments emerged at an older age. Interestingly, all of these features were present in 3xTg-AD mice prior to significant amyloid-β or tau pathology. Conclusion The results indicate that behavioral deficits in AD mice develop in parallel with systemic autoimmune/inflammatory disease. These changes antedate AD-like neuropathology, thus supporting a causal link between autoimmunity and aberrant behavior. Consequently, 3xTg-AD mice may be a useful model in elucidating the role of immune system in the etiology of AD. PMID:24150111

  16. Transgenic medaka fish as models to analyze bone homeostasis under micro-gravity conditions in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, C.; Wagner, T.; Renn, J.; Goerlich, R.; Schartl, M.

    Long-term space flight and microgravity results in bone loss that can be explained by reduced activity of bone-forming osteoblast cells and/or an increase in activity of bone resorbing osteoclast cells. Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a secreted protein of 401 amino acids, has been shown to regulate the balance between osteoblast and osteoclast formation and thereby warrants constant bone mass under normal gravitational conditions. Consistent with this, earlier reports using transgenic mice have shown that increased activation of OPG leads to exc essive bone formation (osteopetrosis), while inactivation of OPG leads to bone loss (osteoporosis). Importantly, it has recently been reported that expression of murine OPG is regulated by vector averaged gravity (Kanematsu et al., 2002, Bone 30, p553). The small bony fish medaka (Oryzias latipes ) has attracted increasing attention as genetic model system to study developmental and pathological processes. To analyze the molecular mechanisms of bone formation in this small vertebrate, we have isolated two related genes, opr-1 and opr -2, from medaka. Our phylogenetic analysis revealed that both genes originated from a common ancestor by fish-specific gene duplication and represent the orthologs of the mammalian OPG gene. Both opr genes are differentially expressed during embryonic and larval development, in adult tissues and in cultured primary osteoblast cells. We have characterized their promoter regions and identified consensus binding sites for transcription factors of the bone-morphogenetic-protein (BMP) p thway and for core-binding-factor-1Aa (cbfa1). Cbfa1 has been shown to be the key regulator of OPG expression during several steps of osteoblast differentiation in mammals. This opens the possibility that the mechanisms controlling bone formation in teleost fish and higher vertebrates are regulated by related mechanisms. We are currently generating transgenic medakafish expressing a GFP reporter gene under control of the

  17. Wheel-running in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: protection or symptom?

    PubMed

    Richter, Helene; Ambrée, Oliver; Lewejohann, Lars; Herring, Arne; Keyvani, Kathy; Paulus, Werner; Palme, Rupert; Touma, Chadi; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Sachser, Norbert

    2008-06-26

    Several studies on both humans and animals reveal benefits of physical exercise on brain function and health. A previous study on TgCRND8 mice, a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease, reported beneficial effects of premorbid onset of long-term access to a running wheel on spatial learning and plaque deposition. Our study investigated the effects of access to a running wheel after the onset of Abeta pathology on behavioural, endocrinological, and neuropathological parameters. From day 80 of age, the time when Abeta deposition becomes apparent, TgCRND8 and wildtype mice were kept with or without running wheel. Home cage behaviour was analysed and cognitive abilities regarding object recognition memory and spatial learning in the Barnes maze were assessed. Our results show that, in comparison to Wt mice, Tg mice were characterised by impaired object recognition memory and spatial learning, increased glucocorticoid levels, hyperactivity in the home cage and high levels of stereotypic behaviour. Access to a running wheel had no effects on cognitive or neuropathological parameters, but reduced the amount of stereotypic behaviour in transgenics significantly. Furthermore, wheel-running was inversely correlated with stereotypic behaviour, suggesting that wheel-running may have stereotypic qualities. In addition, wheel-running positively correlated with plaque burden. Thus, in a phase when plaques are already present in the brain, it may be symptomatic of brain pathology, rather than protective. Whether or not access to a running wheel has beneficial effects on Alzheimer-like pathology and symptoms may therefore strongly depend on the exact time when the wheel is provided during development of the disease.

  18. Battery Performance Modelling ad Simulation: a Neural Network Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottavianelli, Giuseppe; Donati, Alessandro

    2002-01-01

    This project has developed on the background of ongoing researches within the Control Technology Unit (TOS-OSC) of the Special Projects Division at the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) of the European Space Agency. The purpose of this research is to develop and validate an Artificial Neural Network tool (ANN) able to model, simulate and predict the Cluster II battery system's performance degradation. (Cluster II mission is made of four spacecraft flying in tetrahedral formation and aimed to observe and study the interaction between sun and earth by passing in and out of our planet's magnetic field). This prototype tool, named BAPER and developed with a commercial neural network toolbox, could be used to support short and medium term mission planning in order to improve and maximise the batteries lifetime, determining which are the future best charge/discharge cycles for the batteries given their present states, in view of a Cluster II mission extension. This study focuses on the five Silver-Cadmium batteries onboard of Tango, the fourth Cluster II satellite, but time restrains have allowed so far to perform an assessment only on the first battery. In their most basic form, ANNs are hyper-dimensional curve fits for non-linear data. With their remarkable ability to derive meaning from complicated or imprecise history data, ANN can be used to extract patterns and detect trends that are too complex to be noticed by either humans or other computer techniques. ANNs learn by example, and this is why they can be described as an inductive, or data-based models for the simulation of input/target mappings. A trained ANN can be thought of as an "expert" in the category of information it has been given to analyse, and this expert can then be used, as in this project, to provide projections given new situations of interest and answer "what if" questions. The most appropriate algorithm, in terms of training speed and memory storage requirements, is clearly the Levenberg

  19. Chronic Dietary Supplementation of 4% Figs on the Modification of Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Al-Asmi, Abdullah; Vaishnav, Ragini

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the changes in the plasma Aβ, oxidative stress/antioxidants, and membrane bound enzymes in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease (AD) transgenic mice (Tg2576) after dietary supplementation of Omani figs fruits for 15 months along with spatial memory and learning test. AD Tg mice on control diet without figs showed significant impairment in spatial learning ability compared to the wild-type mice on same diet and figs fed Tg mice as well. Significant increase in oxidative stress and reduced antioxidant status were observed in AD Tg mice. 4% figs treated AD Tg mice significantly attenuated oxidative damage, as evident by decreased lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyls and restoration of antioxidant status. Altered activities of membrane bound enzymes (Na+ K+ ATPase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE)) in AD Tg mice brain regions and was restored by figs treatment. Further, figs supplementation might be able to decrease the plasma levels of Aβ (1–40, 1–42) significantly in Tg mice suggesting a putative delay in the formation of plaques, which might be due to the presence of high natural antioxidants in figs. But this study warrants further extensive investigation to find a novel lead for a therapeutic target for AD from figs. PMID:25050360

  20. Vaccination induced changes in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels as an early putative biomarker for cognitive improvement in a transgenic mouse model for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoyang; Bai, Ge; Lin, Linda; Wu, Hengyi; Cai, Jianfeng; Ugen, Kenneth E; Cao, Chuanhai

    2014-01-01

    Several pieces of experimental evidence suggest that administration of anti-β amyloid (Aβ) vaccines, passive anti-Aβ antibodies or anti-inflammatory drugs can reduce Aβ deposition as well as associated cognitive/behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer disease (AD) transgenic (Tg) mouse model and, as such, may have some efficacy in human AD patients as well. In the investigation reported here an Aβ 1-42 peptide vaccine was administered to 16-month old APP+PS1 transgenic (Tg) mice in which Aβ deposition, cognitive memory deficits as well as levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured in response to the vaccination regimen. After vaccination, the anti-Aβ 1-42 antibody-producing mice demonstrated a significant reduction in the sera levels of 4 pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1 α, and IL-12). Importantly, reductions in the cytokine levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were correlated with cognitive/behavioral improvement in the Tg mice. However, no differences in cerebral Aβ deposition in these mice were noted among the different control and experimental groups, i.e., Aβ 1-42 peptide vaccinated, control peptide vaccinated, or non-vaccinated mice. However, decreased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as improved cognitive performance were noted in mice vaccinated with the control peptide as well as those immunized with the Aβ 1-42 peptide. These findings suggest that reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in these mice may be utilized as an early biomarker for vaccination/treatment induced amelioration of cognitive deficits and are independent of Aβ deposition and, interestingly, antigen specific Aβ 1-42 vaccination. Since cytokine changes are typically related to T cell activation, the results imply that T cell regulation may have an important role in vaccination or other immunotherapeutic strategies in an AD mouse model and potentially in AD patients. Overall, these cytokine changes may serve as a predictive marker for AD

  1. High-Resolution Gene Flow Model for Assessing Environmental Impacts of Transgene Escape Based on Biological Parameters and Wind Speed

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Haccou, Patsy; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Environmental impacts caused by transgene flow from genetically engineered (GE) crops to their wild relatives mediated by pollination are longstanding biosafety concerns worldwide. Mathematical modeling provides a useful tool for estimating frequencies of pollen-mediated gene flow (PMGF) that are critical for assessing such environmental impacts. However, most PMGF models are impractical for this purpose because their parameterization requires actual data from field experiments. In addition, most of these models are usually too general and ignored the important biological characteristics of concerned plant species; and therefore cannot provide accurate prediction for PMGF frequencies. It is necessary to develop more accurate PMGF models based on biological and climatic parameters that can be easily measured in situ. Here, we present a quasi-mechanistic PMGF model that only requires the input of biological and wind speed parameters without actual data from field experiments. Validation of the quasi-mechanistic model based on five sets of published data from field experiments showed significant correlations between the model-simulated and field experimental-generated PMGF frequencies. These results suggest accurate prediction for PMGF frequencies using this model, provided that the necessary biological parameters and wind speed data are available. This model can largely facilitate the assessment and management of environmental impacts caused by transgene flow, such as determining transgene flow frequencies at a particular spatial distance, and establishing spatial isolation between a GE crop and its coexisting non-GE counterparts and wild relatives. PMID:26959240

  2. Voice Communications over 802.11 Ad Hoc Networks: Modeling, Optimization and Call Admission Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Changchun; Xu, Yanyi; Liu, Gan; Liu, Kezhong

    Supporting quality-of-service (QoS) of multimedia communications over IEEE 802.11 based ad hoc networks is a challenging task. This paper develops a simple 3-D Markov chain model for queuing analysis of IEEE 802.11 MAC layer. The model is applied for performance analysis of voice communications over IEEE 802.11 single-hop ad hoc networks. By using the model, we finish the performance optimization of IEEE MAC layer and obtain the maximum number of voice calls in IEEE 802.11 ad hoc networks as well as the statistical performance bounds. Furthermore, we design a fully distributed call admission control (CAC) algorithm which can provide strict statistical QoS guarantee for voice communications over IEEE 802.11 ad hoc networks. Extensive simulations indicate the accuracy of the analytical model and the CAC scheme.

  3. [Changes of ocular biological parameters and Lumican expression in the monocularly deprivation myopic model of mutant Lumican transgenic mice].

    PubMed

    Sun, M S; Song, Y Z; Zhang, F J; Tao, J; Liu, Y B

    2016-11-11

    Objective: To investigate ocular changes in the monocularly deprivation myopic model of mutant Lumican transgenic mice. Comparing influences on biological parameters and sclera development between Lumican transgenic and form deprivation mice, and to prepare for further study of pathogenesis of pathological myopia (PM). Methods: Experimental research. Lumican transgenic mice and wild mice were monocularly lid-sutured at ten days after birth. All eyes were divided into 6 groups, group A(32 eyes): control eyes in transgenic mice; group B(34 eyes): sutured eyes in transgenic mice; group C(34 eyes): fellow eyes in transgenic mice; group D(28 eyes): control eyes in wild mice; group E(32 eyes): sutured eyes in wild mice; group F(32 eyes): fellow eyes in wild mice. Refraction was measured by streak retinoscopye and axial length was measured by vernier caliper at 8 weeks (56 days) after birth. Lumican expression was detected by quantitative real-time PCR in all groups. Results: The refraction in group B and group E were (-0.38±1.10) D and (0.14±1.26)D respectively, which were significantly different compared with contralateral groups and normal control groups (F=9.525, 10.067; P<0.01). The mean axial length were also increased in group B ((3.28 ± 0.07)mm and group E (3.24 ± 0.09)mm, (F=7.183, 6.671; P<0.05). Expression level of Lumican mRNA in sclera was increased in group B, which was significantly different from group A and group C (F= 6.262; P<0.05). The expression of Lumican mRNA was increased in group B and C when compared with group E and F (t=4.772, 2.218, P<0.05). Conclusions: Form-deprivation in mutant Lumican transgenic mice causes myopic changes in deprived eyes. The gene expression level of Lumican in sclera of transgenic mice is significantly increased compared with contralateral eyes or that of wild group. Lumican mutation may effect the development of PM, and the interaction of genetic and environmental factors may lead to development of PM. (Chin J

  4. Retinal and choroidal neovascularization in a transgenic mouse model of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Lutty, G. A.; McLeod, D. S.; Pachnis, A.; Costantini, F.; Fabry, M. E.; Nagel, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    A complication of sickle cell disease is proliferative retinopathy. We investigated the eyes from a transgenic mouse model of sickle cell disease (alpha H beta S[beta MDD] type) to determine if pathological changes occurred in their retinas and choroids. One retina from each animal was processed by flat-embedding adenosine diphosphatase-reacted retinas in glycol methacrylate. The fellow eye from each animal was embedded whole in glycol methacrylate for histopathological analysis of all ocular structures. Retinal vascular occlusions resulted in nonperfused areas of retina and arterio-venous anastomoses. Intra- and extraretinal neovascularization was observed adjacent to nonperfused areas. Retinal pigmented lesions were formed by the migration of retinal pigment epithelial cells into sensory retina, often ensheathing choroidal neovascularization. The incidence of this bilateral chorioretinopathy was 30% in animals older than 15 months of age. The ocular histopathological changes we observed in the mouse model mimicked many aspects of human proliferative sickle cell retinopathy. Furthermore, this is the first genetically derived animal model for chorio-retinal neovascularization. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7519831

  5. Xmrk, Kras and Myc Transgenic Zebrafish Liver Cancer Models Share Molecular Signatures with Subsets of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Weiling; Li, Zhen; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Li, Caixia; Emelyanov, Alexander; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Previously three oncogene transgenic zebrafish lines with inducible expression of xmrk, kras or Myc in the liver have been generated and these transgenic lines develop oncogene-addicted liver tumors upon chemical induction. In the current study, comparative transcriptomic approaches were used to examine the correlation of the three induced transgenic liver cancers with human liver cancers. RNA profiles from the three zebrafish tumors indicated relatively small overlaps of significantly deregulated genes and biological pathways. Nevertheless, the three transgenic tumor signatures all showed significant correlation with advanced or very advanced human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Interestingly, molecular signature from each oncogene-induced zebrafish liver tumor correlated with only a small subset of human HCC samples (24–29%) and there were conserved up-regulated pathways between the zebrafish and correlated human HCC subgroup. The three zebrafish liver cancer models together represented nearly half (47.2%) of human HCCs while some human HCCs showed significant correlation with more than one signature defined from the three oncogene-addicted zebrafish tumors. In contrast, commonly deregulated genes (21 up and 16 down) in the three zebrafish tumor models generally showed accordant deregulation in the majority of human HCCs, suggesting that these genes might be more consistently deregulated in a broad range of human HCCs with different molecular mechanisms and thus serve as common diagnosis markers and therapeutic targets. Thus, these transgenic zebrafish models with well-defined oncogene-induced tumors are valuable tools for molecular classification of human HCCs and for understanding of molecular drivers in hepatocarcinogenesis in each human HCC subgroup. PMID:24633177

  6. Maternal thyroid hormones are transcriptionally active during embryo–foetal development: results from a novel transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Nucera, Carmelo; Muzzi, Patrizia; Tiveron, Cecilia; Farsetti, Antonella; Regina, Federico La; Foglio, Benedetta; Shih, Shou-Ching; Moretti, Fabiola; Pietra, Linda Della; Mancini, Francesca; Sacchi, Ada; Trimarchi, Francesco; Vercelli, Alessandro; Pontecorvi, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Even though several studies highlighted the role of maternal thyroid hormones (THs) during embryo–foetal development, direct evidence of their interaction with embryonic thyroid receptors (TRs) is still lacking. We generated a transgenic mouse model ubiquitously expressing a reporter gene tracing TH action during development. We engineered a construct (TRE2×) containing two TH-responsive elements controlling the expression of the LacZ reporter gene, which encodes β-galactosidase (β-gal). The specificity of the TRE2× activation by TH was evaluated in NIH3T3 cells by cotransfecting TRE2× along with TRs, retinoic or oestrogen receptors in the presence of their specific ligands. TRE2× transgene was microinjected into the zygotes, implanted in pseudopregnant BDF1 (a first-generation (F1) hybrid from a cross of C57BL/6 female and a DBA/2 male) mice and transgenic mouse models were developed. β-gal expression was assayed in tissue sections of transgenic mouse embryos at different stages of development. In vitro, TRE2× transactivation was observed only following physiological T3 stimulation, mediated exclusively by TRs. In vivo, β-gal staining, absent until embryonic day 9.5–10.5 (E9.5–E10.5), was observed as early as E11.5–E12.5 in different primordia (i.e. central nervous system, sense organs, intestine, etc.) of the TRE2× transgenic embryos, while the foetal thyroid function (FTF) was still inactive. Immunohistochemistry for TRs essentially colocalized with β-gal staining. No β-gal staining was detected in embryos of hypothyroid transgenic mice. Importantly, treatment with T3 in hypothyroid TRE2× transgenic mice rescued β-gal expression. Our results provide in vivo direct evidence that during embryonic life and before the onset of FTF, maternal THs are transcriptionally active through the action of embryonic TRs. This model may have clinical relevance and may be employed to design end-point assays for new molecules affecting THs action

  7. Enhanced neurofibrillary tangle formation, cerebral atrophy, and cognitive deficits induced by repetitive mild brain injury in a transgenic tauopathy mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yoshiyama, Yasumasa; Uryu, Kunihiro; Higuchi, Makoto; Longhi, Luca; Hoover, Rachel; Fujimoto, Scott; McIntosh, Tracy; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2005-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and repetitive TBI (rTBI) may culminate in dementia pugilistica (DP), a syndrome characterized by progressive dementia, parkinsonism, and the hallmark brain lesions of AD, including neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), formed by abnormal tau filaments and senile plaques (SPs) composed of Abeta fibrils. Previous study showed that mild rTBI (mrTBI) accelerated the deposition of Abeta in the brains of transgenic (Tg) mice (Tg2576) that over-express human Abeta precursor proteins with the familial AD Swedish mutations (APP695swe) and model of AD-like amyloidosis. Here, we report studies of the effects of mrTBI on AD-like tau pathologies in Tg mice expressing the shortest human tau isoform (T44) subjected to mrTBI, causing brain concussion without structural brain damage to simulate injuries linked to DP. Twelve-month-old Tg T44 (n = 18) and wild-type (WT; n = 24) mice were subjected to mrTBI (four times a day, 1 day per week, for 4 weeks; n = 24) or sham treatment (n = 18). Histopathological analysis of mice at 9 months after mrTBI revealed that one of the Tg T44 mice showed extensive telencephalic NFT and cerebral atrophy. Although statistical analysis of neurobehavioral tests at 6 months after mrTBI did not show any significant difference in any of groups of mice, the Tg T44 mouse with extensive NFT had an exceptionally low neurobehavioral score. The reasons for the augmentation of tau pathologies in only one T44 tau Tg mouse subjected to mrTBI remain to be elucidated.

  8. Intra-hippocampal transplantation of neural precursor cells with transgenic over-expression of IL-1 receptor antagonist rescues memory and neurogenesis impairments in an Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Ben-Menachem-Zidon, Ofra; Ben Menachem-Zidon, Ofra; Ben-Menahem, Yair; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Yirmiya, Raz

    2014-01-01

    Ample evidence implicates neuroinflammatory processes in the etiology and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To assess the specific role of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) in AD we examined the effects of intra-hippocampal transplantation of neural precursor cells (NPCs) with transgenic over-expression of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1raTG) on memory functioning and neurogenesis in a murine model of AD (Tg2576 mice). WT NPCs- or sham-transplanted Tg2576 mice, as well as naive Tg2576 and WT mice served as controls. To assess the net effect of IL-1 blockade (not in the context of NPCs transplantation), we also examined the effects of chronic (4 weeks) intra-cerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of IL-1ra. We report that 12-month-old Tg2576 mice exhibited increased mRNA expression of hippocampal IL-1β, along with severe disturbances in hippocampal-dependent contextual and spatial memory as well as in neurogenesis. Transplantation of IL-1raTG NPCs 1 month before the neurobehavioral testing completely rescued these disturbances and significantly increased the number of endogenous hippocampal cells expressing the plasticity-related molecule BDNF. Similar, but less-robust effects were also produced by transplantation of WT NPCs and by i.c.v. IL-1ra administration. NPCs transplantation produced alterations in hippocampal plaque formation and microglial status, which were not clearly correlated with the cognitive effects of this procedure. The results indicate that elevated levels of hippocampal IL-1 are causally related to some AD-associated memory disturbances, and provide the first example for the potential use of genetically manipulated NPCs with anti-inflammatory properties in the treatment of AD.

  9. S-SCAM, A Rare Copy Number Variation Gene, Induces Schizophrenia-Related Endophenotypes in Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nanyan; Zhong, Peng; Shin, Seung Min; Metallo, Jacob; Danielson, Eric; Olsen, Christopher M.; Liu, Qing-song

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating genetic evidence suggests that schizophrenia (SZ) is associated with individually rare copy number variations (CNVs) of diverse genes, often specific to single cases. However, the causality of these rare mutations remains unknown. One of the rare CNVs found in SZ cohorts is the duplication of Synaptic Scaffolding Molecule (S-SCAM, also called MAGI-2), which encodes a postsynaptic scaffolding protein controlling synaptic AMPA receptor levels, and thus the strength of excitatory synaptic transmission. Here we report that, in a transgenic mouse model simulating the duplication conditions, elevation of S-SCAM levels in excitatory neurons of the forebrain was sufficient to induce multiple SZ-related endophenotypes. S-SCAM transgenic mice showed an increased number of lateral ventricles and a reduced number of parvalbumin-stained neurons. In addition, the mice exhibited SZ-like behavioral abnormalities, including hyperlocomotor activity, deficits in prepulse inhibition, increased anxiety, impaired social interaction, and working memory deficit. Notably, the S-SCAM transgenic mice showed a unique sex difference in showing these behavioral symptoms, which is reminiscent of human conditions. These behavioral abnormalities were accompanied by hyperglutamatergic function associated with increased synaptic AMPA receptor levels and impaired long-term potentiation. Importantly, reducing glutamate release by the group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist LY379268 ameliorated the working memory deficits in the transgenic mice, suggesting that hyperglutamatergic function underlies the cognitive functional deficits. Together, these results contribute to validate a causal relationship of the rare S-SCAM CNV and provide supporting evidence for the rare CNV hypothesis in SZ pathogenesis. Furthermore, the S-SCAM transgenic mice provide a valuable new animal model for studying SZ pathogenesis. PMID:25653350

  10. Integration-independent Transgenic Huntington Disease Fragment Mouse Models Reveal Distinct Phenotypes and Life Span in Vivo.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Robert; DeGiacomo, Francesco; Holcomb, Jennifer; Bonner, Akilah; Ring, Karen L; Zhang, Ningzhe; Zafar, Khan; Weiss, Andreas; Lager, Brenda; Schilling, Birgit; Gibson, Bradford W; Chen, Sylvia; Kwak, Seung; Ellerby, Lisa M

    2015-07-31

    The cascade of events that lead to cognitive decline, motor deficits, and psychiatric symptoms in patients with Huntington disease (HD) is triggered by a polyglutamine expansion in the N-terminal region of the huntingtin (HTT) protein. A significant mechanism in HD is the generation of mutant HTT fragments, which are generally more toxic than the full-length HTT. The protein fragments observed in human HD tissue and mouse models of HD are formed by proteolysis or aberrant splicing of HTT. To systematically investigate the relative contribution of the various HTT protein proteolysis events observed in vivo, we generated transgenic mouse models of HD representing five distinct proteolysis fragments ending at amino acids 171, 463, 536, 552, and 586 with a polyglutamine length of 148. All lines contain a single integration at the ROSA26 locus, with expression of the fragments driven by the chicken β-actin promoter at nearly identical levels. The transgenic mice N171-Q148 and N552-Q148 display significantly accelerated phenotypes and a shortened life span when compared with N463-Q148, N536-Q148, and N586-Q148 transgenic mice. We hypothesized that the accelerated phenotype was due to altered HTT protein interactions/complexes that accumulate with age. We found evidence for altered HTT complexes in caspase-2 fragment transgenic mice (N552-Q148) and a stronger interaction with the endogenous HTT protein. These findings correlate with an altered HTT molecular complex and distinct proteins in the HTT interactome set identified by mass spectrometry. In particular, we identified HSP90AA1 (HSP86) as a potential modulator of the distinct neurotoxicity of the caspase-2 fragment mice (N552-Q148) when compared with the caspase-6 transgenic mice (N586-Q148).

  11. Integration-independent Transgenic Huntington Disease Fragment Mouse Models Reveal Distinct Phenotypes and Life Span in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Robert; DeGiacomo, Francesco; Holcomb, Jennifer; Bonner, Akilah; Ring, Karen L.; Zhang, Ningzhe; Zafar, Khan; Weiss, Andreas; Lager, Brenda; Schilling, Birgit; Gibson, Bradford W.; Chen, Sylvia; Kwak, Seung; Ellerby, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    The cascade of events that lead to cognitive decline, motor deficits, and psychiatric symptoms in patients with Huntington disease (HD) is triggered by a polyglutamine expansion in the N-terminal region of the huntingtin (HTT) protein. A significant mechanism in HD is the generation of mutant HTT fragments, which are generally more toxic than the full-length HTT. The protein fragments observed in human HD tissue and mouse models of HD are formed by proteolysis or aberrant splicing of HTT. To systematically investigate the relative contribution of the various HTT protein proteolysis events observed in vivo, we generated transgenic mouse models of HD representing five distinct proteolysis fragments ending at amino acids 171, 463, 536, 552, and 586 with a polyglutamine length of 148. All lines contain a single integration at the ROSA26 locus, with expression of the fragments driven by the chicken β-actin promoter at nearly identical levels. The transgenic mice N171-Q148 and N552-Q148 display significantly accelerated phenotypes and a shortened life span when compared with N463-Q148, N536-Q148, and N586-Q148 transgenic mice. We hypothesized that the accelerated phenotype was due to altered HTT protein interactions/complexes that accumulate with age. We found evidence for altered HTT complexes in caspase-2 fragment transgenic mice (N552-Q148) and a stronger interaction with the endogenous HTT protein. These findings correlate with an altered HTT molecular complex and distinct proteins in the HTT interactome set identified by mass spectrometry. In particular, we identified HSP90AA1 (HSP86) as a potential modulator of the distinct neurotoxicity of the caspase-2 fragment mice (N552-Q148) when compared with the caspase-6 transgenic mice (N586-Q148). PMID:26025364

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction in a transgenic mouse model expressing human amyloid precursor protein (APP) with the Arctic mutation.

    PubMed

    Rönnbäck, Annica; Pavlov, Pavel F; Mansory, Mansorah; Gonze, Prisca; Marlière, Nicolas; Winblad, Bengt; Graff, Caroline; Behbahani, Homira

    2016-02-01

    Accumulation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in the brain is an important event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. We have used a transgenic mouse model expressing human amyloid precursor protein (APP) with the Arctic mutation to investigate whether Aβ deposition is correlated with mitochondrial functions in these animals. We found evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (i.e., decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative DNA damage) at 6 months of age, when the mice showed very mild Aβ deposition. More pronounced mitochondrial abnormalities were present in 24-month-old TgAPParc mice with more extensive Aβ pathology. This study demonstrates for the first time mitochondrial dysfunction in transgenic mice with a mutation within the Aβ peptide (the Arctic APP mutation), and confirms previous studies suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress is an early event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. This study demonstrates mitochondrial dysfunction in transgenic mice with a mutation within the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide (the Arctic amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutation). We found evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (i.e. decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative DNA damage) at 6 months of age, when very mild Aβ deposition is present in the mice. Also, the cytochrome c (COX) activity was significantly decreased in mitochondria from transgenic mice at 24 months of age.

  13. Lithium prevents parkinsonian behavioral and striatal phenotypes in an aged parkin mutant transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lieu, Christopher A; Dewey, Colleen M; Chinta, Shankar J; Rane, Anand; Rajagopalan, Subramanian; Batir, Sean; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Andersen, Julie K

    2014-12-03

    Lithium has long been used as a treatment for the psychiatric disease bipolar disorder. However, previous studies suggest that lithium provides neuroprotective effects in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease. The exact mechanism by which lithium exerts these effects still remains unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of low-dose lithium treatment in an aged mouse model expressing a parkin mutation within dopaminergic neurons. We found that low-dose lithium treatment prevented motor impairment as demonstrated by the open field test, pole test, and rearing behavior. Furthermore, lithium prevented dopaminergic striatal degeneration in parkin animals. We also found that parkin-induced striatal astrogliosis and microglial activation were prevented by lithium treatment. Our results further corroborate the use of this parkin mutant transgenic mouse line as a model for PD for testing novel therapeutics. The findings of the present study also provide further validation that lithium could be re-purposed as a therapy for PD and suggest that anti-inflammatory effects may contribute to its neuroprotective mechanisms.

  14. Beyond the monoaminergic hypothesis: neuroplasticity and epigenetic changes in a transgenic mouse model of depression

    PubMed Central

    Massart, Renaud; Mongeau, Raymond; Lanfumey, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    The monoamine hypothesis of depression has dominated our understanding of both the pathophysiology of depression and the action of pharmacological treatments for the last decades, and it has led to the production of several generations of antidepressant agents. However, there are serious limitations to the current monoamine theory, and additional mechanisms, including hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunctions, as well as neurodegenerative and inflammatory alterations, are potentially associated with the pathogenesis of mood disorders. Moreover, new data have recently indicated that epigenetic mechanisms such as histone modifications and DNA methylation could affect diverse pathways leading to depression-like behaviours in animal models. In a transgenic mouse model of depression, in which a downregulation of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) causes a deficit in the HPA axis feedback control, besides alterations in monoamine neurotransmission and neuroplasticity, we found modifications in the expression of many proteins involved in epigenetic regulation, as well as clock genes, in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex, that might be central in the genesis of depressive-like behaviours. PMID:22826347

  15. Transgenic mice carrying the human poliovirus receptor: new animal models for study of poliovirus neurovirulence.

    PubMed Central

    Horie, H; Koike, S; Kurata, T; Sato-Yoshida, Y; Ise, I; Ota, Y; Abe, S; Hioki, K; Kato, H; Taya, C

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant viruses between the virulent Mahoney and attenuated Sabin 1 strains of poliovirus type 1 were subjected to neurovirulence tests using a transgenic (Tg) mouse line, ICR-PVRTg1, that carried the human poliovirus receptor gene. The Tg mice were inoculated intracerebrally with these recombinant viruses and observed for clinical signs, histopathological lesions, and viral antigens as parameters of neurovirulence of the viruses. These parameters observed in the Tg mice were different for different inoculated viruses. Dose-dependent incidences of paralysis and of death were observed in the Tg mice inoculated with any viruses used. This indicates that values of 50% lethal dose are useful to score a wide range of neurovirulence of poliovirus. The neurovirulence of individual viruses estimated by the Tg mouse model had a strong correlation with those estimated by monkey model. Consequently, the mouse tests identified the neurovirulence determinants on the genome of poliovirus that had been identified by monkey tests. In addition, the mouse tests revealed new neurovirulence determinants, that is, different nucleotides between the two strains at positions 189 and 21 and/or 935 in the 5'-proximal 1,122 nucleotides. The Tg mice used in this study may be suitable for replacing monkeys for investigating poliovirus neurovirulence. Images PMID:8289371

  16. Targeted skipping of human dystrophin exons in transgenic mouse model systemically for antisense drug development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Benrashid, Ehsan; Lu, Peijuan; Cloer, Caryn; Zillmer, Allen; Shaban, Mona; Lu, Qi Long

    2011-01-01

    Antisense therapy has recently been demonstrated with great potential for targeted exon skipping and restoration of dystrophin production in cultured muscle cells and in muscles of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) patients. Therapeutic values of exon skipping critically depend on efficacy of the drugs, antisense oligomers (AOs). However, no animal model has been established to test AO targeting human dystrophin exon in vivo systemically. In this study, we applied Vivo-Morpholino to the hDMD mouse, a transgenic model carrying the full-length human dystrophin gene, and achieved for the first time more than 70% efficiency of targeted human dystrophin exon skipping in vivo systemically. We also established a GFP-reporter myoblast culture to screen AOs targeting human dystrophin exon 50. Antisense efficiency for most AOs is consistent between the reporter cells, human myoblasts and in the hDMD mice in vivo. However, variation in efficiency was also clearly observed. A combination of in vitro cell culture and a Vivo-Morpholino based evaluation in vivo systemically in the hDMD mice therefore may represent a prudent approach for selecting AO drug and to meet the regulatory requirement.

  17. Thyroid Hormone Role on Cerebellar Development and Maintenance: A Perspective Based on Transgenic Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Faustino, Larissa C.; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania M.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellum development is sensitive to thyroid hormone (TH) levels, as THs regulate neuronal migration, differentiation, and myelination. Most effects of THs are mediated by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms TRβ1, TRβ2, and TRα1. Studies aimed at identifying TH target genes during cerebellum development have only achieved partial success, as some of these genes do not possess classical TH-responsive elements, and those that do are likely to be temporally and spatially regulated by THs. THs may also affect neurodevelopment by regulating transcription factors that control particular groups of genes. Furthermore, TH action can also be affected by TH transport, which is mediated mainly by monocarboxylate transporter family members. Studies involving transgenic animal models and genome-wide expression analyses have helped to address the unanswered questions regarding the role of TH in cerebellar development. Recently, a growing body of evidence has begun to clarify the molecular, cellular, and functional aspects of THs in the developing cerebellum. This review describes the current findings concerning the effects of THs on cerebellar development and maintenance as well as advances in the genetic animal models used in this field. PMID:24904526

  18. Behavioral, Neurophysiological, and Synaptic Impairment in a Transgenic Neuregulin1 (NRG1-IV) Murine Schizophrenia Model

    PubMed Central

    Papaleo, Francesco; Yang, Feng; Paterson, Clare; Palumbo, Sara; Carr, Gregory V.; Wang, Yanhong; Floyd, Kirsten; Huang, Wenwei; Thomas, Craig J.; Chen, Jingshan; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic, disabling neuropsychiatric disorder with complex genetic origins. The development of strategies for genome manipulation in rodents provides a platform for understanding the pathogenic role of genes and for testing novel therapeutic agents. Neuregulin 1 (NRG1), a critical developmental neurotrophin, is associated with schizophrenia. The NRG1 gene undergoes extensive alternative splicing and, to date, little is known about the neurobiology of a novel NRG1 isoform, NRG1-IV, which is increased in the brains of individuals with schizophrenia and associated with genetic risk variation. Here, we developed a transgenic mouse model (NRG1-IV/NSE-tTA) in which human NRG1-IV is selectively overexpressed in a neuronal specific manner. Using a combination of molecular, biochemical, electrophysiological, and behavioral analyses, we demonstrate that NRG1-IV/NSE-tTA mice exhibit abnormal behaviors relevant to schizophrenia, including impaired sensorimotor gating, discrimination memory, and social behaviors. These neurobehavioral phenotypes are accompanied by increases in cortical expression of the NRG1 receptor, ErbB4 and the downstream signaling target, PIK3-p110δ, along with disrupted dendritic development, synaptic pathology, and altered prefrontal cortical excitatory–inhibitory balance. Pharmacological inhibition of p110δ reversed sensorimotor gating and cognitive deficits. These data demonstrate a novel role for NRG1-IV in learning, memory, and neural circuit formation and a potential neurobiological mechanism for schizophrenia risk; show that deficits are pharmacologically reversible in adulthood; and further highlight p110δ as a target for antipsychotic drug development. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Schizophrenia is a disabling psychiatric disorder with neurodevelopmental origins. Genes that increase risk for schizophrenia have been identified. Understanding how these genes affect brain development and function is necessary. This work is the first

  19. CB2 receptor deficiency increases amyloid pathology and alters tau processing in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Jeremy; Vingtdeux, Valerie; Marambaud, Philippe; d'Abramo, Cristina; Jimenez, Heidy; Stauber, Mark; Friedman, Rachel; Davies, Peter

    2014-03-14

    The endocannabinoid CB2 receptor system has been implicated in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In order to investigate the impact of the CB2 receptor system on AD pathology, a colony of mice with a deleted CB2 receptor gene, CNR2, was established on a transgenic human mutant APP background for pathological comparison with CB2 receptor-sufficient transgenic mice. J20 APP (PDGFB-APPSwInd) mice were bred over two generations with CNR2(-/-) (Cnr2(tm1Dgen)/J) mice to produce a colony of J20 CNR2(+/+) and J20 CNR2(-/-) mice. Seventeen J20 CNR2(+/+) mice (12 females, 5 males) and 16 J20 CNR2(-/-) mice (11 females, 5 males) were killed at 12 months, and their brains were interrogated for AD-related pathology with both biochemistry and immunocytochemistry (ICC). In addition to amyloid-dependent endpoints such as soluble Aβ production and plaque deposition quantified with 6E10 staining, the effect of CB2 receptor deletion on total soluble mouse tau production was assayed by using a recently developed high-sensitivity assay. Results revealed that soluble Aβ42 and plaque deposition were significantly increased in J20 CNR2(-/-) mice relative to CNR2(+/+) mice. Microgliosis, quantified with ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1) staining, did not differ between groups, whereas plaque associated microglia was more abundant in J20 CNR2(-/-) mice. Total tau was significantly suppressed in J20 CNR2(-/-) mice relative to J20 CNR2(+/+) mice. The results confirm the constitutive role of the CB2 receptor system both in reducing amyloid plaque pathology in AD and also support tehpotential of cannabinoid therapies targeting CB2 to reduce Aβ; however, the results suggest that interventions may have a divergent effect on tau pathology.

  20. Noggin and BMP4 co-modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the APP(swe)/PS1(DeltaE9) transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Song, Min; Wang, Yanyan; Fan, Xiaotang; Xu, Haiwei; Bai, Yun

    2009-07-31

    In addition to the subventricular zone, the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few brain regions in which neurogenesis continues into adulthood. Perturbation of neurogenesis can alter hippocampal function, and previous studies have shown that neurogenesis is dysregulated in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) and its antagonist Noggin have been shown to play important roles both in embryonic development and in the adult nervous system, and may regulate hippocampal neurogenesis. Previous data indicated that increased expression of BMP4 mRNA within the dentate gyrus might contribute to decreased hippocampal cell proliferation in the APP(swe)/PS1(DeltaE9) mouse AD model. However, it is not known whether the BMP antagonist Noggin contributes to the regulation of neurogenesis. We therefore studied the relative expression levels and localization of BMP4 and its antagonist Noggin in the dentate gyrus and whether these correlated with changes in neurogenesis in 6-12 mo old APP(swe)/PS1(DeltaE9) transgenic mice. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label proliferative cells. We report that decreased neurogenesis in the APP/PS1 transgenic mice was accompanied by increased expression of BMP4 and decreased expression of Noggin at both the mRNA and protein levels; statistical analysis showed that the number of proliferative cells at different ages correlated positively with Noggin expression and negatively with BMP4 expression. Intraventricular administration of a chimeric Noggin/Fc protein was used to block the action of endogenous BMP4; this resulted in a significant increase in the number of BrdU-labeled cells in dentate gyrus subgranular zone and hilus in APP/PS1 mice. These results suggest that BMP4 and Noggin co-modulate neurogenesis.

  1. FLZ Alleviates the Memory Deficits in Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease via Decreasing Beta-Amyloid Production and Tau Hyperphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Kong, Xiang-Chen; Tai, Wen-Jiao; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide and mainly characterized by the aggregated β-amyloid (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau. FLZ is a novel synthetic derivative of natural squamosamide and has been proved to improve memory deficits in dementia animal models. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanisms of FLZ’s neuroprotective effect in APP/PS1 double transgenic mice and SH-SY5Y (APPwt/swe) cells. The results showed that treatment with FLZ significantly improved the memory deficits of APP/PS1 transgenic mice and decreased apoptosis of SH-SY5Y (APPwt/swe) cells. FLZ markedly attenuated Aβ accumulation and tau phosphorylation both in vivo and in vitro. Mechanistic study showed that FLZ interfered APP processing, i.e., FLZ decreased β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) phosphorylation, APP-carboxy-terminal fragment (APP-CTF) production and β-amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) expression. These results indicated that FLZ reduced Aβ production through inhibiting amyloidogenic pathway. The mechanistic study about FLZ’s inhibitory effect on tau phosphorylation revealed t the involvement of Akt/glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) pathway. FLZ treatment increased Akt activity and inhibited GSK3β activity both in vivo and in vitro. The inhibitory effect of FLZ on GSK3β activity and tau phosphorylation was suppressed by inhibiting Akt activity, indicating that Akt/GSK3β pathway might be the possible mechanism involved in the inhibitory effect of FLZ on tau hyperphosphorylation. These results suggested FLZ might be a potential anti-AD drug as it not only reduced Aβ production via inhibition amyloidogenic APP processing pathway, but also attenuated tau hyperphosphoylation mediated by Akt/GSK3β. PMID:24223757

  2. Quercetin ameliorates Aβ toxicity in Drosophila AD model by modulating cell cycle-related protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yan; Li, Ke; Fu, Tingting; Wan, Chao; Zhang, Dongdong; Song, Hang; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Na; Gan, Zhenji; Yuan, Liudi

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a prevalent neurodegenerative disorder characterized by β amyloid (Aβ) deposition and neurofibril tangles. It has been reported that a bioflavonoid, quercetin, could ameliorate AD phenotypes in C. elegans and mice. However, the mechanism underlying the ameliorative effect of quercetin is not fully understood yet. Drosophila models could recapitulate AD-like phenotypes, such as shortened lifespan, impaired locomotive ability as well as defects in learning and memory. So in this study, we investigated the effects of quercetin on AD in Drosophila model and explored the underlying mechanisms. We found quercetin could effectively intervene in AD pathogenesis in vivo. Mechanism study showed quercetin could restore the expression of genes perturbed by Aβ accumulation, such as those involved in cell cycle and DNA replication. Cyclin B, an important cell cycle protein, was chosen to test whether it participated in the AD ameliorative effects of quercetin. We found that cyclin B RNAi in the brain could alleviate AD phenotypes. Taken together, the current study suggested that the neuroprotective effects of quercetin were mediated at least partially by targeting cell cycle-related proteins. PMID:27626494

  3. Quercetin ameliorates Aβ toxicity in Drosophila AD model by modulating cell cycle-related protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yan; Li, Ke; Fu, Tingting; Wan, Chao; Zhang, Dongdong; Song, Hang; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Na; Gan, Zhenji; Yuan, Liudi

    2016-10-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a prevalent neurodegenerative disorder characterized by β amyloid (Aβ) deposition and neurofibril tangles. It has been reported that a bioflavonoid, quercetin, could ameliorate AD phenotypes in C. elegans and mice. However, the mechanism underlying the ameliorative effect of quercetin is not fully understood yet. Drosophila models could recapitulate AD-like phenotypes, such as shortened lifespan, impaired locomotive ability as well as defects in learning and memory. So in this study, we investigated the effects of quercetin on AD in Drosophila model and explored the underlying mechanisms. We found quercetin could effectively intervene in AD pathogenesis in vivo. Mechanism study showed quercetin could restore the expression of genes perturbed by Aβ accumulation, such as those involved in cell cycle and DNA replication. Cyclin B, an important cell cycle protein, was chosen to test whether it participated in the AD ameliorative effects of quercetin. We found that cyclin B RNAi in the brain could alleviate AD phenotypes. Taken together, the current study suggested that the neuroprotective effects of quercetin were mediated at least partially by targeting cell cycle-related proteins.

  4. Leptonic color models from Z{sub 8} orbifolded AdS/CFT

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, K. S.; Kephart, Thomas W.; Paes, Heinrich

    2008-06-01

    We study orbifold compactifications of the type IIB superstring on AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the Abelian group Z{sub 8}, which can lead to non-supersymmetric three and four family models based on quartification. In particular, we focus on two models, one fully quartified model and one a model with two trinification families and one quartification family, which reduces to the standard model with a minimal leptonic color sector.

  5. [F-18]FDDNP microPET imaging correlates with brain Aβ burden in a transgenic rat model of Alzheimer disease: effects of aging, in vivo blockade, and anti-Aβ antibody treatment.

    PubMed

    Teng, Edmond; Kepe, Vladimir; Frautschy, Sally A; Liu, Jie; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Yang, Fusheng; Chen, Ping-Ping; Cole, Graham B; Jones, Mychica R; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Flood, Dorothy G; Trusko, Stephen P; Small, Gary W; Cole, Gregory M; Barrio, Jorge R

    2011-09-01

    In vivo detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology in living patients using positron emission tomography (PET) in conjunction with high affinity molecular imaging probes for β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau has the potential to assist with early diagnosis, evaluation of disease progression, and assessment of therapeutic interventions. Animal models of AD are valuable for exploring the in vivo binding of these probes, particularly their selectivity for specific neuropathologies, but prior PET experiments in transgenic mice have yielded conflicting results. In this work, we utilized microPET imaging in a transgenic rat model of brain Aβ deposition to assess [F-18]FDDNP binding profiles in relation to age-associated accumulation of neuropathology. Cross-sectional and longitudinal imaging demonstrated that [F-18]FDDNP binding in the hippocampus and frontal cortex progressively increases from 9 to 18months of age and parallels age-associated Aβ accumulation. Specificity of in vivo [F-18]FDDNP binding was assessed by naproxen pretreatment, which reversibly blocked [F-18]FDDNP binding to Aβ aggregrates. Both [F-18]FDDNP microPET imaging and neuropathological analyses revealed decreased Aβ burden after intracranial anti-Aβ antibody administration. The combination of this non-invasive imaging method and robust animal model of brain Aβ accumulation allows for future longitudinal in vivo assessments of potential therapeutics for AD that target Aβ production, aggregation, and/or clearance. These results corroborate previous analyses of [F-18]FDDNP PET imaging in clinical populations.

  6. A Novel Transgenic Mouse Model of Cardiac Hypertrophy and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Michael A.; Das, Saumya; Pinzon, Pablo Quintero; Knight, Ashley C.; Sosnovik, David E.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Rosenzweig, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a major risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, there are few animal models of AF associated with cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, we describe the in vivo electrophysiological characteristics and histopathology of a mouse model of cardiac hypertrophy that develops AF. Myostatin is a well-known negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth that was recently found to additionally regulate cardiac muscle growth. Using cardiac-specific expression of the inhibitory myostatin pro-peptide, we generated transgenic (TG) mice with dominant-negative regulation of MSTN (DN-MSTN). One line (DN-MSTN TG13) displayed ventricular hypertrophy, as well as spontaneous AF on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG), and was further evaluated. DN-MSTN TG13 had normal systolic function, but displayed atrial enlargement on cardiac MRI, as well as atrial fibrosis histologically. Baseline ECG revealed an increased P wave duration and QRS interval compared with wild-type littermate (WT) mice. Seven of 19 DN-MSTN TG13 mice had spontaneous or inducible AF, while none of the WT mice had atrial arrhythmias (p<0.05). Connexin40 (Cx40) was decreased in DN-MSTN TG13 mice, even in the absence of AF or significant atrial fibrosis, raising the possibility that MSTN signaling may play a role in Cx40 down-regulation and the development of AF in this mouse model. In conclusion, DN-MSTN TG13 mice represent a novel model of AF, in which molecular changes including an initial loss of Cx40 are noted prior to fibrosis and the development of atrial arrhythmias. PMID:23243484

  7. In Situ FTIR Microspectroscopy of Brain Tissue from a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rak,M.; Del Bigio, M.; Mai, S.; Westaway, D.; Gough, K.

    2007-01-01

    Plaques composed of the A{beta} peptide are the main pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease. Dense-core plaques are fibrillar deposits of A{beta}, showing all the classical properties of amyloid including {beta}-sheet secondary structure, while diffuse plaques are amorphous deposits. We studied both plaque types, using synchrotron infrared (IR) microspectroscopy, a technique that allows the chemical composition and average protein secondary structure to be investigated in situ. We examined plaques in hippocampal, cortical and caudal tissue from 5- to 21-month-old TgCRND8 mice, a transgenic model expressing doubly mutant amyloid precursor protein, and displaying impaired hippocampal function and robust pathology from an early age. Spectral analysis confirmed that the congophilic plaque cores were composed of protein in a {beta}-sheet conformation. The amide I maximum of plaque cores was at 1623 cm-1, and unlike for in vitro A{beta} fibrils, the high-frequency (1680-1690 cm-1) component attributed to antiparallel {beta}-sheet was not observed. A significant elevation in phospholipids was found around dense-core plaques in TgCRND8 mice ranging in age from 5 to 21 months. In contrast, diffuse plaques were not associated with IR detectable changes in protein secondary structure or relative concentrations of any other tissue components.

  8. Titration of biologically active amyloid–β seeds in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Rodrigo; Bravo-Alegria, Javiera; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Soto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Experimental evidence in animal models suggests that misfolded Amyloid-β (Aβ) spreads in disease following a prion-like mechanism. Several properties characteristics of infectious prions have been shown for the induction of Aβ aggregates. However, a detailed titration of Aβ misfolding transmissibility and estimation of the minimum concentration of biologically active Aβ seeds able to accelerate pathological changes has not yet been performed. In this study, brain extracts from old tg2576 animals were serially diluted and intra-cerebrally injected into young subjects from the same transgenic line. Animals were sacrificed several months after treatment and brain slices were analyzed for amyloid pathology. We observed that administration of misfolded Aβ was able to significantly accelerate amyloid deposition in young mice, even when the original sample was diluted a million times. The titration curve obtained in this experiment was compared to the natural Aβ load spontaneously accumulated by these mice overtime. Our findings suggest that administration of the largest dose of Aβ seeds led to an acceleration of pathology equivalent to over a year. These results show that active Aβ seeds present in the brain can seed amyloidosis in a titratable manner, similarly as observed for infectious prions. PMID:25879692

  9. Optoacoustic characterization of prostate cancer in an in vivo transgenic murine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Michelle P.; Riley, Christopher B.; Kolios, Michael C.; Whelan, William M.

    2014-05-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) imaging was employed to distinguish normal from neoplastic tissues in a transgenic murine model of prostate cancer. OA images of five tumor-bearing mice and five age-matched controls across a 14 mm×14 mm region of interest (ROI) on the lower abdomen were acquired using a reverse-mode OA imaging system (Seno Medical Instruments Inc., San Antonio, Texas). Neoplastic prostate tissue was identified based on the OA signal amplitude in combination with spectral analysis of the OA radio frequency (RF) data. Integration of the signal amplitude images was performed to construct two-dimensional images of the ROI. The prostate tumors generated higher amplitude signals than those of the surrounding tissues, with contrast ratios ranging from 31 to 36 dB. The RF spectrum analysis showed significant differences between the tumor and the control mice. The midband fit was higher by 5 dB (62%), the intercept higher by 4 dB (57%) and the spectral slope higher by 0.4 dB/MHz (50%) for neoplastic prostate tissue compared to normal tissues in the control mice. The results demonstrate that OA offers high contrast imaging of prostate cancer in vivo.

  10. Beneficial effects of exercise in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like Tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Belarbi, Karim; Burnouf, Sylvie; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco-Jose; Laurent, Cyril; Lestavel, Sophie; Figeac, Martin; Sultan, Audrey; Troquier, Laetitia; Leboucher, Antoine; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Grosjean, Marie-Eve; Demeyer, Dominique; Obriot, Hélène; Brion, Ingrid; Barbot, Bérangère; Galas, Marie-Christine; Staels, Bart; Humez, Sandrine; Sergeant, Nicolas; Schraen-Maschke, Susanna; Muhr-Tailleux, Anne; Hamdane, Malika; Buée, Luc; Blum, David

    2011-08-01

    Tau pathology is encountered in many neurodegenerative disorders known as tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. Physical activity is a lifestyle factor affecting processes crucial for memory and synaptic plasticity. Whether long-term voluntary exercise has an impact on Tau pathology and its pathophysiological consequences is currently unknown. To address this question, we investigated the effects of long-term voluntary exercise in the THY-Tau22 transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease-like Tau pathology, characterized by the progressive development of Tau pathology, cholinergic alterations and subsequent memory impairments. Three-month-old THY-Tau22 mice and wild-type littermates were assigned to standard housing or housing supplemented with a running wheel. After 9 months of exercise, mice were evaluated for memory performance and examined for hippocampal Tau pathology, cholinergic defects, inflammation and genes related to cholesterol metabolism. Exercise prevented memory alterations in THY-Tau22 mice. This was accompanied by a decrease in hippocampal Tau pathology and a prevention of the loss of expression of choline acetyltransferase within the medial septum. Whereas the expression of most cholesterol-related genes remained unchanged in the hippocampus of running THY-Tau22 mice, we observed a significant upregulation in mRNA levels of NPC1 and NPC2, genes involved in cholesterol trafficking from the lysosomes. Our data support the view that long-term voluntary physical exercise is an effective strategy capable of mitigating Tau pathology and its pathophysiological consequences.

  11. NF-kB activation as a biomarker of light injury using a transgenic mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocock, Ginger M.; Boretsky, Adam; Wang, Heuy-Ching; Golden, Dallas; Gupta, Praveena; Vargas, Gracie; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Motamedi, Massoud

    2012-03-01

    The spatial and temporal activation of NF-kB (p65) was monitored in the retina of a transgenic mouse model (cis-NFkB-EGFP) in vivo after receiving varying grades of laser induced thermal injury in one eye. Baseline images of the retinas from 26 mice were collected prior to injury and up to five months post-exposure using a Heidelberg Spectralis HRA confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) with a spectral domain optical coherence tomographer (SDOCT). Injured and control eyes were enucleated at discrete time points following laser exposure for cryosectioning to determine localization of NF-kB dependent enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene expression within the retina using fluorescence microscopy. In addition, EGFP basal expression in brain and retinal tissue from the cis-NFkB-EGFP was characterized using two-photon imaging. Regions of the retina exposed to threshold and supra-threshold laser damage evaluated using fluorescence cSLO showed increased EGFP fluorescence localized to the exposed region for a duration that was dependent upon the degree of injury. Fluorescence microscopy of threshold damage revealed EGFP localized to the outer nuclear region and retinal pigment epithelial layer. Basal expression of EGFP imaged using two-photon microscopy was heterogeneously distributed throughout brain tissue and confined to the inner retina. Results show cis-NF-kB-EGFP reporter mouse can be used for in vivo studies of light induced injury to the retina and possibly brain injury.

  12. Erythropoietin and the use of a transgenic model of erythropoietin-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Pichon, Aurélien; Jeton, Florine; El Hasnaoui-Saadani, Raja; Hagström, Luciana; Launay, Thierry; Beaudry, Michèle; Marchant, Dominique; Quidu, Patricia; Macarlupu, Jose-Luis; Favret, Fabrice; Richalet, Jean-Paul; Voituron, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Despite its well-known role in red blood cell production, it is now accepted that erythropoietin (Epo) has other physiological functions. Epo and its receptors are expressed in many tissues, such as the brain and heart. The presence of Epo/Epo receptors in these organs suggests other roles than those usually assigned to this protein. Thus, the aim of this review is to describe the effects of Epo deficiency on adaptation to normoxic and hypoxic environments and to suggest a key role of Epo on main physiological adaptive functions. Our original model of Epo-deficient (Epo-TAgh) mice allowed us to improve our knowledge of the possible role of Epo in O2 homeostasis. The use of anemic transgenic mice revealed Epo as a crucial component of adaptation to hypoxia. Epo-TAgh mice survive well in hypoxic conditions despite low hematocrit. Furthermore, Epo plays a key role in neural control of ventilatory acclimatization and response to hypoxia, in deformability of red blood cells, in cerebral and cardiac angiogenesis, and in neuro- and cardioprotection. PMID:27800506

  13. Aberrant Wound Healing in an Epidermal Interleukin-4 Transgenic Mouse Model of Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Bao, Lei; Chan, Lawrence S; DiPietro, Luisa A; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing in a pre-existing Th2-dominated skin milieu was assessed by using an epidermal specific interleukin-4 (IL-4) transgenic (Tg) mouse model, which develops a pruritic inflammatory skin condition resembling human atopic dermatitis. Our results demonstrated that IL-4 Tg mice had delayed wound closure and re-epithelialization even though these mice exhibited higher degrees of epithelial cell proliferation. Wounds in IL-4 Tg mice also showed a marked enhancement in expression of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, elevated infiltration of inflammatory cells including neutrophils, macrophages, CD3+ lymphocytes, and epidermal dendritic T lymphocytes. In addition, these mice exhibited a significantly higher level of angiogenesis as compared to wild type mice. Furthermore, wounds in IL-4 Tg mice presented with larger amounts of granulation tissue, but had less expression and deposition of collagen. Taken together, an inflamed skin condition induced by IL-4 has a pronounced negative influence on the healing process. Understanding more about the pathogenesis of wound healing in a Th2- dominated environment may help investigators explore new potential therapeutic strategies.

  14. Multiple mechanisms of extracellular tau spreading in a non-transgenic tauopathy model

    PubMed Central

    Le, Meghan N; Kim, Wonhee; Lee, Sangmook; McKee, Ann C; Hall, Garth F

    2012-01-01

    While the interneuronal propagation of neurofibrillary lesions in Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies now appears to involve the spreading of tau-associated toxicity, little is known about its mechanism. We characterized the movement of human tau through the brain of a non-transgenic lower vertebrate tauopathy model in which full-length wild type and mutant human tau isoforms were expressed in identified neurons, thus permitting the identification and localization of EC tau sources. We describe two distinct patterns of tau spreading that correspond to tau species that lack (MTBR-) and contain (MTBR+) the tau microtubule-binding region. These patterns illustrate the production, migration and uptake of EC tau and resemble some of the extracellular tau deposits typically seen in human brain after repeated traumatic injury in cases of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We propose that misprocessed human tau can spread between CNS neurons via a variety of non-synaptic mechanisms as well as synaptically mediated mechanisms. PMID:23383401

  15. A transgenic mouse model expressing an ERα folding biosensor reveals the effects of Bisphenol A on estrogen receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sekar, Thillai V.; Foygel, Kira; Massoud, Tarik F.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-α (ERα) plays an important role in normal and abnormal physiology of the human reproductive system by interacting with the endogenous ligand estradiol (E2). However, other ligands, either analogous or dissimilar to E2, also bind to ERα. This may create unintentional activation of ER signaling in reproductive tissues that can lead to cancer development. We developed a transgenic mouse model that constitutively expresses a firefly luciferase (FLuc) split reporter complementation biosensor (NFLuc-ER-LBDG521T-CFLuc) to simultaneously evaluate the dynamics and potency of ligands that bind to ERα. We first validated this model using various ER ligands, including Raloxifene, Diethylstilbestrol, E2, and 4-hydroxytamoxifen, by employing FLuc-based optical bioluminescence imaging of living mice. We then used the model to investigate the carcinogenic property of Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental estrogen, by long-term exposure at full and half environmental doses. We showed significant carcinogenic effects on female animals while revealing activated downstream ER signaling as measured by bioluminescence imaging. BPA induced tumor-like outgrowths in female transgenic mice, histopathologically confirmed to be neoplastic and epithelial in origin. This transgenic mouse model expressing an ERα folding-biosensor is useful in evaluation of estrogenic ligands and their downstream effects, and in studying environmental estrogen induced carcinogenesis in vivo. PMID:27721470

  16. The development of an online database for interventions tested in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Egan, K J; Vesterinen, H M; McCann, S K; Sena, E S; MacLeod, M R

    2015-08-01

    Despite many efforts by the research community, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still an incurable neurodegenerative condition that affects an estimated 44 million individuals worldwide and this figure is expected to increase to 135 million by the year 2050. As the research community currently reflects on previous endeavours, it is essential that we maximize the use of existing knowledge to inform future trials in the field. This article describes the development of a systematically identified data set relating to over 300 interventions tested in over 10,000 animals. The data set includes cohort-level information for six structural outcomes and six behavioural assessments. We encourage others to use this dataset to inform the design of future animal experiments modelling AD and to promote effective translation to human health.

  17. Liver BCATm transgenic mouse model reveals the important role of the liver in maintaining BCAA homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ananieva, Elitsa A; Van Horn, Cynthia G; Jones, Meghan R; Hutson, Susan M

    2017-02-01

    Unlike other amino acids, the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) largely bypass first-pass liver degradation due to a lack of hepatocyte expression of the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm). This sets up interorgan shuttling of BCAAs and liver-skeletal muscle cooperation in BCAA catabolism. To explore whether complete liver catabolism of BCAAs may impact BCAA shuttling in peripheral tissues, the BCATm gene was stably introduced into mouse liver. Two transgenic mouse lines with low and high hepatocyte expression of the BCATm transgene (LivTg-LE and LivTg-HE) were created and used to measure liver and plasma amino acid concentrations and determine whether the first two BCAA enzymatic steps in liver, skeletal muscle, heart and kidney were impacted. Expression of the hepatic BCATm transgene lowered the concentrations of hepatic BCAAs while enhancing the concentrations of some nonessential amino acids. Extrahepatic BCAA metabolic enzymes and plasma amino acids were largely unaffected, and no growth rate or body composition differences were observed in the transgenic animals as compared to wild-type mice. Feeding the transgenic animals a high-fat diet did not reverse the effect of the BCATm transgene on the hepatic BCAA catabolism, nor did the high-fat diet cause elevation in plasma BCAAs. However, the high-fat-diet-fed BCATm transgenic animals experienced attenuation in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the liver and had impaired blood glucose tolerance. These results suggest that complete liver BCAA metabolism influences the regulation of glucose utilization during diet-induced obesity.

  18. Transgenic rat model of childhood-onset dermatitis by overexpressing telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT).

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Ryosuke; Sato, Atsuko; Hamada, Shun; Yagi, Takeshi; Ohsawa, Ichiro; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Murakami, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Childhood-onset dermatitis is one of the most common skin disorders in children. Although various mouse models that mirror aspects of dermatitis have become available, there is still a need for an animal model that develops dermatitis in childhood and is more suitable for performing tissue transplantation experiments. There is emerging evidence that peripheral blood T lymphocytes from patients with dermatitis have significantly increased telomerase activity. Here, we developed telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT)-expressing transgenic (Tg) rats that spontaneously developed eczematous skin inflammation in childhood. Newborn TERT-Tg rats developed visible dermatitis in 56 % of cases, and the skin lesions microscopically showed spongiosis and acanthosis with infiltration of lymphocytes, eosinophils and mast cells. TERT-Tg rats with dermatitis exhibited increased CD4 (2.5-fold) and CD8 (fivefold) T cell numbers compared with dermatitis-free TERT-Tg rats. Stronger TERT activity was observed in the peripheral lymphocytes of dermatitis-positive TERT-Tg rats than those of dermatitis-free TERT-Tg rats. RT-PCR analysis revealed that IL-4 was markedly elevated in the spleen of dermatitis-positive TERT-Tg rats, and that interferon-gamma was increased in the dermatitis lesions. Moreover, skin grafting of TERT-Tg rats with dermatitis onto T cell-deficient nude rats demonstrated that the inflamed skin lesions could not be maintained. Taken together, the results suggest that TERT activation in T lymphocytes is one of the potential predisposing factors for dermatitis. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the TERT-Tg rats mirror aspects of human childhood-onset dermatitis and that these animals represent a potential animal model system for studying childhood-onset dermatitis.

  19. MDA-7/IL-24 functions as a tumor suppressor gene in vivo in transgenic mouse models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Mitchell E; Shen, Xue-Ning; Das, Swadesh K; Emdad, Luni; Guo, Chunqing; Yuan, Fang; Li, You-Jun; Archer, Michael C; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Windle, Jolene J; Subler, Mark A; Ben-David, Yaacov; Sarkar, Devanand; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Fisher, Paul B

    2015-11-10

    Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/Interleukin-24 (MDA-7/IL-24) is a novel member of the IL-10 gene family that selectively induces apoptosis and toxic autophagy in a broad spectrum of human cancers, including breast cancer, without harming normal cells or tissues. The ability to investigate the critical events underlying cancer initiation and progression, as well as the capacity to test the efficacy of novel therapeutics, has been significantly advanced by the development of genetically engineered mice (GEMs) that accurately recapitulate specific human cancers. We utilized three transgenic mouse models to better comprehend the in vivo role of MDA-7/IL-24 in breast cancer. Using the MMTV-PyMT spontaneous mammary tumor model, we confirmed that exogenously introducing MDA-7/IL-24 using a Cancer Terminator Virus caused a reduction in tumor burden and also produced an antitumor "bystander" effect. Next we performed xenograft studies in a newly created MMTV-MDA-7 transgenic model that over-expresses MDA-7/IL-24 in the mammary glands during pregnancy and lactation, and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed tumor growth following orthotopic injection of a murine PDX tumor cell line (mPDX) derived from a tumor formed in an MMTV-PyMT mouse. We also crossed the MMTV-MDA-7 line to MMTV-Erbb2 transgenic mice and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed the onset of mammary tumor development in this model of spontaneous mammary tumorigenesis as well. Finally, we assessed the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in immune regulation, which can potentially contribute to tumor suppression in vivo. Our findings provide further direct in vivo evidence for the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in tumor suppression in breast cancer in immune-competent transgenic mice.

  20. Efficient and Rapid Development of Transgenic Hamster Models of TSE’s Using a Radical New Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Mouse, Hamster, TSE, Sheep Scrapie , TOSK, Transposon 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION 18. NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON OF...proposed to accomplish the following goals: 1) Maintain a scrapie infected sheep flock in Idaho, 2) Use transgenic mice (with the sheep PrP gene) to titer...interests, 5)Continue to develop the short incubation time model of sheep scrapie by breeding for VVQQ genotype and infecting with inocula prepared from

  1. The Promise and Peril of Using Value-Added Modeling to Measure Teacher Effectiveness. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RAND Corporation, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Value-added modeling offers the possibility of estimating the effects of teachers and schools on student performance, a potentially important contribution in the current environment of concern for accountability in education. These techniques, however, are susceptible to a number of sources of bias, depending on decisions about how the modeling is…

  2. Giving a Structural Framework for Ohio's Value-Added Model: What All Educators Should Know?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quattrochi, David P.; Chapman, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    A qualitative case study of one rural elementary school in Ohio examined how faculty, administrators, students, and parents experienced Ohio's Value-added model. The findings generated from looking at planning and professional development to implementation of the model generated a close- up of a successful approach to helping teachers use multiple…

  3. Value-Added Models for Teacher Preparation Programs: Validity and Reliability Threats, and a Manageable Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Michael P.; Heiser, Lawrence A.; McCormick, Jazarae K.; Forgan, James

    2016-01-01

    High-stakes standardized student assessments are increasingly used in value-added evaluation models to connect teacher performance to P-12 student learning. These assessments are also being used to evaluate teacher preparation programs, despite validity and reliability threats. A more rational model linking student performance to candidates who…

  4. Neuregulin-1 attenuates cognitive function impairments in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, J; Hong, B-H; Kim, Y-J; Yang, E-J; Choi, M; Kim, H; Ahn, S; Baik, T-K; Woo, R-S; Kim, H-S

    2016-01-01

    The neuregulin (NRG) family of epidermal growth factor-related proteins is composed of a wide variety of soluble and membrane-bound proteins that exert their effects via the tyrosine kinase receptors ErbB2-ErbB4. In the nervous system, the functions of NRG1 are essential for peripheral myelination, the establishment and maintenance of neuromuscular and sensorimotor systems and the plasticity of cortical neuronal circuits. In the present study, we report that an intracerebroventricular infusion of NRG1 attenuated cognitive impairments in 13-month-old Tg2576 mice, an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition, according to Golgi-Cox staining, NRG1 rescued the reduction in the number of dendritic spines detected in the brains of Tg2576 mice compared with vehicle (PBS)-infused mice. This result was also corroborated in vitro as NRG1 attenuated the oligomeric amyloid beta peptide1-42 (Aβ1-42)-induced decrease in dendritic spine density in rat primary hippocampal neuron cultures. NRG1 also alleviated the decrease in neural differentiation induced by oligomeric Aβ1-42 in mouse fetal neural stem cells. Collectively, these results suggest that NRG1 has a therapeutic potential for AD by alleviating the reductions in dendritic spine density and neurogenesis found in AD brains. PMID:26913607

  5. Effect of rice-expressed amyloid β in the Tg2576 Alzheimer's disease transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Nojima, Jun; Maeda, Azusa; Aoki, Sho; Suo, Satoshi; Yanagihara, Dai; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Taiji; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2011-08-26

    One of the main hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is senile plaques composed of amyloid β (Aβ). We developed a new edible vaccine: rice expressing GFP-Aβ42. In a previous report, we described the production of anti-Aβ antibodies in B6 mice fed Aβ rice mixed with cholera toxin B subunit (CTB). In this report, we investigated whether Aβ rice had therapeutic effects in the Tg2576 AD model mice. The anti-Aβ antibody titer was increased and levels of intracerebral Aβ (soluble and insoluble) and serum Aβ decreased. Because the value of IgG1/IgG2a in the Aβ feeding group was >1, immunization via Aβ rice may induce a non-inflammatory Th2 reaction. We also found that the Aβ vaccine improved memory, as assessed in a Y-maze test. The number of arm entries in the Y-maze test was lower in the Aβ feeding group than in the control group. These results suggest that the new edible vaccine Aβ rice may have therapeutic effects in AD.

  6. Lymph Node Transplantation Decreases Swelling and Restores Immune Responses in a Transgenic Model of Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Hespe, Geoffrey E.; García Nores, Gabriela D.; Kataru, Raghu P.; Martínez-Corral, Inés; Ortega, Sagrario; Mehrara, Babak J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Secondary lymphedema is a common complication of cancer treatment and recent studies have demonstrated that lymph node transplantation (LNT) can decrease swelling, as well as the incidence of infections. However, although these results are exciting, the mechanisms by which LNT improves these pathologic findings of lymphedema remain unknown. Using a transgenic mouse model of lymphedema, this study sought to analyze the effect of LNT on lymphatic regeneration and T cell-mediated immune responses. Methods We used a mouse model in which the expression of the human diphtheria toxin receptor is driven by the FLT4 promoter to enable the local ablation of the lymphatic system through subdermal hindlimb diphtheria toxin injections. Popliteal lymph node dissection was subsequently performed after a two-week recovery period, followed by either orthotopic LNT or sham surgery after an additional two weeks. Hindlimb swelling, lymphatic vessel regeneration, immune cell trafficking, and T cell-mediated immune responses were analyzed 10 weeks later. Results LNT resulted in a marked decrease in hindlimb swelling, fibroadipose tissue deposition, and decreased accumulation of perilymphatic inflammatory cells, as compared to controls. In addition, LNT induced a marked lymphangiogenic response in both capillary and collecting lymphatic vessels. Interestingly, the resultant regenerated lymphatics were abnormal in appearance on lymphangiography, but LNT also led to a notable increase in dendritic cell trafficking from the periphery to the inguinal lymph nodes and improved adaptive immune responses. Conclusions LNT decreases pathological changes of lymphedema and was shown to potently induce lymphangiogenesis. Lymphatic vessels induced by LNT were abnormal in appearance, but were functional and able to transport antigen-presenting cells. Animals treated with LNT have an increased ability to mount T cell-mediated immune responses when sensitized to antigens in the affected

  7. T-cell brain infiltration and immature antigen-presenting cells in transgenic models of Alzheimer's disease-like cerebral amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, M T; Merlini, M; Späni, C; Gericke, C; Schweizer, N; Enzmann, G; Engelhardt, B; Kulic, L; Suter, T; Nitsch, R M

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral beta-amyloidosis, one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), elicits a well-characterised, microglia-mediated local innate immune response. In contrast, it is not clear whether cells of the adaptive immune system, in particular T-cells, react to cerebral amyloidosis in AD. Even though parenchymal T-cells have been described in post-mortem brains of AD patients, it is not known whether infiltrating T-cells are specifically recruited to the extracellular deposits of beta-amyloid, and whether they are locally activated into proliferating, effector cells upon interaction with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). To address these issues we have analysed by confocal microscopy and flow-cytometry the localisation and activation status of both T-cells and APCs in transgenic (tg) mice models of AD-like cerebral amyloidosis. Increased numbers of infiltrating T-cells were found in amyloid-burdened brain regions of tg mice, with concomitant up-regulation of endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, compared to non-tg littermates. The infiltrating T-cells in tg brains did not co-localise with amyloid plaques, produced less interferon-gamma than those in controls and did not proliferate locally. Bona-fide dendritic cells were virtually absent from the brain parenchyma of both non-tg and tg mice, and APCs from tg brains showed an immature phenotype, with accumulation of MHC-II in intracellular compartments. These results indicate that cerebral amyloidosis promotes T-cell infiltration but interferes with local antigen presentation and T-cell activation. The inability of the brain immune surveillance to orchestrate a protective immune response to amyloid-beta peptide might contribute to the accumulation of amyloid in the progression of the disease.

  8. Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer 3 Annual Progress Report W81XWH-13-1-0162 Using a Novel...Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer Feng Yang, Ph.D. Department of...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0162 TITLE: Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and

  9. Use of TSHβ:EGFP transgenic zebrafish as a rapid in vivo model for assessing thyroid-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng; Jin, Xia; He, Jiangyan; Yin, Zhan

    2012-07-15

    Accumulating evidence indicates that a wide range of chemicals have the ability to interfere with the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Novel endpoints should be evaluated in addition to existing methods in order to effectively assess the effects of these chemicals on the HPT axis. Thyroid-stimulating hormone subunit β (TSHβ) plays central regulatory roles in the HPT system. We identified the regulatory region that determines the expression level of zebrafish TSHβ in the anterior pituitary. In the transgenic zebrafish with EGFP driven by the TSHβ promoter, the similar responsive patterns between the expression levels of TSHβ:EGFP and endogenous TSHβ mRNA in the pituitary are observed following treatments with goitrogen chemicals and exogenous thyroid hormones (THs). These results suggest that the TSHβ:EGFP transgenic reporter zebrafish may be a useful alternative in vivo model for the assessment of chemicals interfering with the HPT system.

  10. Renal Anemia Model Mouse Established by Transgenic Rescue with an Erythropoietin Gene Lacking Kidney-Specific Regulatory Elements.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Ikuo; Suzuki, Norio; Yamazaki, Shun; Sekine, Hiroki; Minegishi, Naoko; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2017-02-15

    The erythropoietin (Epo) gene is under tissue-specific inducible regulation. Because the kidney is the primary EPO-producing tissue in adults, impaired EPO production in chronic kidney disorders results in serious renal anemia. The Epo gene contains a liver-specific enhancer in the 3' region, but the kidney-specific enhancer for gene expression in renal EPO-producing (REP) cells remains elusive. Here, we examined a conserved upstream element for renal Epo regulation (CURE) region that spans 17.4 kb to 3.6 kb upstream of the Epo gene and harbors several phylogenetically conserved elements. We prepared various Epo gene-reporter constructs utilizing a bacterial artificial chromosome and generated a number of transgenic-mouse lines. We observed that deletion of the CURE region (δCURE) abrogated Epo gene expression in REP cells. Although transgenic expression of the δCURE construct rescued Epo-deficient mice from embryonic lethality, the rescued mice had severe EPO-dependent anemia. These mouse lines serve as an elaborate model for the search for erythroid stimulatory activity and are referred to as AnRED (anemic model with renal EPO deficiency) mice. We also dissected the CURE region by exploiting a minigene harboring four phylogenetically conserved elements in reporter transgenic-mouse analyses. Our analyses revealed that Epo gene regulation in REP cells is a complex process that utilizes multiple regulatory influences.

  11. Generation and characterization of a novel CYP2A13--transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kunzhi; Li, Lei; Liu, Zhihua; Hartog, Matthew; Kluetzman, Kerri; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Ding, Xinxin

    2014-08-01

    CYP2A13, CYP2B6, and CYP2F1 are neighboring cytochrome P450 genes on human chromosome 19, and the enzymes that they encode overlap in substrate specificity. A CYP2A13/2B6/2F1-transgenic mouse, in which CYP2A13 and 2F1 are both expressed in the respiratory tract and CYP2B6 is expressed in the liver, was recently generated. We generated a CYP2A13 (only) transgenic mouse so that the specific activity of CYP2A13 can be determined. The CYP2B6 and CYP2F1 genes in the CYP2A13/2B6/2F1 genomic clone were inactivated via genetic manipulations, and CYP2A13 was kept intact. A CYP2A13 (only) transgenic (2A13-TG) mouse was generated using the engineered construct and then characterized to confirm transgene integrity and determine copy numbers. The 2A13-TG mice were normal in gross morphology, development, and fertility. As in the CYP2A13/2B6/2F1-transgenic mouse, CYP2A13 expression in the 2A13-TG mouse was limited to the respiratory tract; in contrast, CYP2B6 and 2F1 proteins were not detected. Additional studies using the CYP2A13-humanized (2A13-TG/Cyp2abfgs-null) mouse produced by intercrossing between 2A13-TG and Cyp2abfgs-null mice confirmed that the transgenic CYP2A13 is active in the bioactivation of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), a lung procarcinogen. The 2A13-TG mouse should be valuable for assessing specific roles of human CYP2A13 in xenobiotic toxicity in the respiratory tract.

  12. A model-driven approach to qualitatively assessing the added value of community coalitions.

    PubMed

    Herman, Elizabeth Jane; Keller, Adrienne; Davis, Adam; Ehrensberger, Ryan; Telleen, Sharon; Kurz, Richard; Nesvold, Jill Heins; Findley, Sally; Bryant-Stephens, Tyra; Benson, Mindy; Fierro, Leslie

    2011-02-01

    Community-based coalitions are commonly formed to plan and to carry out public health interventions. The literature includes evaluations of coalition structure, composition, and functioning; evaluations of community-level changes achieved through coalition activities; and the association between coalition characteristics and various indicators of success. Little information is available on the comparative advantage or "added value" of conducting public health interventions through coalitions as opposed to less structured collaborative mechanisms. This paper describes a qualitative, iterative process carried out with site representatives of the Controlling Asthma in American Cities Project (CAACP) to identify outcomes directly attributable to coalitions. The process yielded 2 complementary sets of results. The first were criteria that articulated and limited the concept of "added value of coalitions". The criteria included consensus definitions, an organizing figure, a logic model, and inclusion/exclusion criteria. The second set of results identified site-specific activities that met the definitional criteria and were, by agreement, examples of CAACP coalitions' added value. Beyond the specific findings relevant to the added value of coalitions in this project, the use of a social ecological model to identify the components of added value and the placement of those components within a logic model specific to coalitions should provide useful tools for those planning and assessing coalition-based projects.

  13. Parvalbumin overexpression alters immune-mediated increases in intracellular calcium, and delays disease onset in a transgenic model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, D. R.; Ho, B. K.; Siklos, L.; Alexianu, M. E.; Mosier, D. R.; Mohamed, A. H.; Otsuka, Y.; Kozovska, M. E.; McAlhany, R. E.; Smith, R. G.; Appel, S. H.

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular calcium is increased in vulnerable spinal motoneurons in immune-mediated as well as transgenic models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To determine whether intracellular calcium levels are influenced by the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, we developed transgenic mice overexpressing parvalbumin in spinal motoneurons. ALS immunoglobulins increased intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release at motoneuron terminals in control animals, but not in parvalbumin overexpressing transgenic mice. Parvalbumin transgenic mice interbred with mutant SOD1 (mSOD1) transgenic mice, an animal model of familial ALS, had significantly reduced motoneuron loss, and had delayed disease onset (17%) and prolonged survival (11%) when compared with mice with only the mSOD1 transgene. These results affirm the importance of the calcium binding protein parvalbumin in altering calcium homeostasis in motoneurons. The increased motoneuron parvalbumin can significantly attenuate the immune-mediated increases in calcium and to a lesser extent compensate for the mSOD1-mediated 'toxic-gain-of-function' in transgenic mice.

  14. Long-Term Dietary Supplementation of Pomegranates, Figs and Dates Alleviate Neuroinflammation in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Mohammed; Al-Adawi, Samir; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating age-related neurodegenerative disease with no specific treatment at present. The APPsw/Tg2576 mice exhibit age-related deterioration in memory and learning as well as amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation, and this mouse strain is considered an effective model for studying the mechanism of accelerated brain aging and senescence. The present study was aimed to investigate the beneficial effects of dietary supplements pomegranate, figs, or the dates on suppressing inflammatory cytokines in APPsw/Tg2576 mice. Changes in the plasma cytokines and Aβ, ATP, and inflammatory cytokines were investigated in the brain of transgenic mice. Significantly enhanced levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-9, IL-10, TNF-α and Eotaxin activity were decreased by administration of the diet supplements containing pomegranates, figs, or dates. In addition, putative delays in the formation of senile plaques, as indicated by a decreasing tendency of brain Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 contents, were observed. Thus, novel results mediated by reducing inflammatory cytokines during aging may represent one mechanism by which these supplements exert their beneficial effects against neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. PMID:25807081

  15. Neuro-peptide treatment with Cerebrolysin improves the survival of neural stem cell grafts in an APP transgenic model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rockenstein, Edward; Desplats, Paula; Ubhi, Kiren; Mante, Michael; Florio, Jazmin; Adame, Anthony; Winter, Stefan; Brandstaetter, Hemma; Meier, Dieter; Masliah, Eliezer

    2015-07-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have been considered as potential therapy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) but their use is hampered by the poor survival of grafted cells. Supply of neurotrophic factors to the grafted cells has been proposed as a way to augment survival of the stem cells. In this context, we investigated the utility of Cerebrolysin (CBL), a peptidergic mixture with neurotrophic-like properties, as an adjunct to stem cell therapy in an APP transgenic (tg) model of AD. We grafted murine NSCs into the hippocampus of non-tg and APP tg that were treated systemically with CBL and analyzed after 1, 3, 6 and 9months post grafting. Compared to vehicle-treated non-tg mice, in the vehicle-treated APP tg mice there was considerable reduction in the survival of the grafted NSCs. Whereas, CBL treatment enhanced the survival of NSCs in both non-tg and APP tg with the majority of the surviving NSCs remaining as neuroblasts. The NSCs of the CBL treated mice displayed reduced numbers of caspase-3 and TUNEL positive cells and increased brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and furin immunoreactivity. These results suggest that CBL might protect grafted NSCs and as such be a potential adjuvant therapy when combined with grafting.

  16. Developmental exposure to lead (Pb) alters the expression of the human tau gene and its products in a transgenic animal model.

    PubMed

    Dash, M; Eid, A; Subaiea, G; Chang, J; Deeb, R; Masoud, A; Renehan, W E; Adem, A; Zawia, N H

    2016-07-01

    Tauopathies are a class of neurodegenerative diseases associated with the pathological aggregation of the tau protein in the human brain. The best known of these illnesses is Alzheimer's disease (AD); a disease where the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) becomes hyperphosphorylated (lowering its binding affinity to microtubules) and aggregates within neurons in the form of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). In this paper we examine whether environmental factors play a significant role in tau pathogenesis. Our studies were conducted in a double mutant mouse model that expressed the human tau gene and lacked the gene for murine tau. The human tau mouse model was tested for the transgene's ability to respond to an environmental toxicant. Pups were developmentally exposed to lead (Pb) from postnatal day (PND) 1-20 with 0.2% Pb acetate. Mice were then sacrificed at PND 20, 30, 40 and 60. Protein and mRNA levels for tau and CDK5 as well as tau phosphorylation at Ser396 were determined. In addition, the potential role of miRNA in tau expression was investigated by measuring levels of miR-34c, a miRNA that targets the mRNA for human tau, at PND20 and 50. The expression of the human tau transgene was altered by developmental exposure to Pb. This exposure also altered the expression of miR-34c. Our findings are the first of their kind to test the responsiveness of the human tau gene to an environmental toxicant and to examine an epigenetic mechanism that may be involved in the regulation of this gene's expression.

  17. Modeling evolution of resistance of sugarcane borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) to transgenic Bt corn.

    PubMed

    Kang, J; Huang, F; Onstad, D W

    2014-08-01

    Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) is a target pest of transgenic corn expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) protein, and the first evidence of resistance by D. saccharalis to Cry1Ab corn was detected in a field population in northeast Louisiana in 2004. We used a model of population dynamics and genetics of D. saccharalis to 1) study the effect of interfield dispersal, the first date that larvae enter diapause for overwintering, toxin mortality, the proportion of non-Bt corn in the corn patch, and the area of a crop patch on Bt resistance evolution; and 2) to identify gaps in empirical knowledge for managing D. saccharalis resistance to Bt corn. Increasing, the proportion of corn refuge did not always improve the durability of Bt corn if the landscape also contained sugarcane, sorghum, or rice. In the landscape, which consisted of 90% corn area, 5% sorghum area, and 5% rice area, the durability of single-protein Bt corn was 40 yr when the proportion of corn refuge was 0.2 but 16 yr when the proportion of corn refuge was 0.5. The Bt resistance evolution was sensitive to a change (from Julian date 260 to 272) in the first date larvae enter diapause for overwintering and moth movement. In the landscapes with Bt corn, non-Bt corn, sugarcane, sorghum, and rice, the evolution of Bt resistance accelerated when larvae entered diapause for overwintering early. Intermediate rates of moth movement delayed evolution of resistance more than either extremely low or high rates. This study suggested that heterogeneity in the agrolandscapes may complicate the strategy for managing Bt resistance in D. saccharalis, and designing a Bt resistance management strategy for D. saccharalis is challenging because of a lack of empirical data about overwintering and moth movement.

  18. Detection of allergenic compounds using an IL-4/luciferase/CNS-1 transgenic mice model.

    PubMed

    Bae, Chang Joon; Lee, Jae Won; Bae, Hee Sook; Shim, Sun Bo; Jee, Seung Wan; Lee, Su Hae; Lee, Chang Kyu; Hong, Jin Tae; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2011-04-01

    The interleukin-4 (IL-4) signaling cascade has been identified as a potentially important pathway in the development of allergies. The principal objective of this study was to produce novel transgenic (Tg) mice harboring the luciferase gene under the control of the human IL-4 promoter and the enhancer of IL-4 (CNS-1), in an effort to evaluate three types of allergens including a respiratory sensitizer, vaccine additives, and crude extracts of natural allergens in vivo. A new lineage of Tg mice was generated by the microinjection of pIL-4/Luc/CNS-1 constructs into a fertilized mice egg. The luciferase activity was successfully regulated by the IL-4 promoter in splenocytes cultured from IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice. From the first five founder lines, one (#57) evidencing a profound response to ovalbumin was selected for use in evaluating the allergens. Additionally, the lungs, thymus, and lymph nodes of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice evidenced high luciferase activity in response to allergens such as phthalic anhydride (PA), trimellitic anhydride, ovalbumin, gelatin, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus extracts, and Japanese cedar pollen, whereas key allergy-related indicators including ear thickness, Immunoglobulin E concentration, and the infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes in response to PA were unaltered in the Tg mice relative to the non-Tg mice. Furthermore, the expression levels of endogenous type 2 helper T cells cytokines and proinflammatory cytokines were similarly increased in these organs of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice in response to allergens. These results indicate that IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice may be used as an animal model for the evaluation and prediction of the human body response to a variety of allergens originating from the environment and from certain industrial products.

  19. Hyperphosphorylation of RyRs Underlies Triggered Activity in Transgenic Rabbit Model of LQT2 Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Rees, Colin M.; Li, Weiyan; Cooper, Leroy L.; Jindal, Hitesh K.; Peng, Xuwen; Lu, Yichun; Terentyeva, Radmila; Odening, Katja E.; Daley, Jean; Bist, Kamana; Choi, Bum-Rak; Karma, Alain; Koren, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Loss-of function mutations in HERG potassium channels underlie long QT syndrome (LQTS) type 2 (LQT2), and are associated with fatal ventricular tachyarrhythmia. Previously, most studies focused on plasmamembrane-related pathways involved in arrhythmogenesis in LQTS, while pro-arrhythmic changes in intracellular Ca2+ handling remained unexplored. Objective We investigated the remodeling of Ca2+ homeostasis in ventricular cardiomyocytes derived from transgenic rabbit model of LQT2 in order to determine whether these changes contribute to triggered activity in the form of early afterdepolarizations (EADs). Methods and Results Confocal Ca2+ imaging revealed decrease in amplitude of Ca2+ transients and SR Ca2+ content in LQT2 myocytes. Experiments using SR-entrapped Ca2+ indicator demonstrated enhanced RyR-mediated SR Ca2+ leak in LQT2 cells. Western blot analyses showed increased phosphorylation of RyR in LQT2 myocytes vs. controls. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated loss of protein phosphatases type 1 and type 2 from the RyR complex. Stimulation of LQT2 cells with β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol resulted in prolongation of the plateau of action potentials accompanied by aberrant Ca2+ releases and EADs, which were abolished by inhibition of CaMKII. Computer simulations showed that late aberrant Ca2+ releases caused by RyR hyperactivity promote EADs and underlie the enhanced triggered activity through increased forward mode of NCX1. Conclusions Hyperactive, hyperphosphorylated RyRs due to reduced local phosphatase activity enhance triggered activity in LQT2 syndrome. EADs are promoted by aberrant RyR-mediated Ca2+ releases that are present despite a reduction of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) content. Those releases increase forward mode NCX1, thereby slowing repolarization and enabling L-type Ca2+ current reactivation. PMID:25249569

  20. Erythropoietin is Neuroprotective in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pallua, Anton; Stefanova, Nadia; Poewe, Werner; Wenning, Gregor K.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a markedly reduced life expectancy. Failure of symptomatic treatment raises an urgent need for disease-modifying strategies. We have investigated the neuroprotective potential of erythropoietin in (proteolipid protein)-α-synuclein transgenic mice exposed to 3-nitropropionic acid featuring multiple system atrophy-like pathology including oligodendroglial α-synuclein inclusions and selective neuronal degeneration. Mice were treated with erythropoietin starting before (early erythropoietin) and after (late erythropoietin) intoxication with 3-nitropropionic acid. Nonintoxicated animals receiving erythropoietin and intoxicated animals treated with saline served as control groups. Behavioral tests included pole test, open field activity, and motor behavior scale. Immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP-32) was analyzed stereologically. Animals receiving erythropoietin before and after 3-nitropropionic acid intoxication scored significantly lower on the motor behavior scale and they performed better in the pole test than controls with no significant difference between early and late erythropoietin administration. Similarly, rearing scores were worse in 3-nitropropionic acid-treated animals with no difference between the erythropoietin subgroups. Immunohistochemistry revealed significant attenuation of 3-nitropropionic acid-induced loss of tyrosine hydroxylase and DARPP-32 positive neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum, respectively, in both erythropoietin-treated groups without significant group difference in the substantia nigra. However, at striatal level, a significant difference between early and late erythropoietin administration was observed. In the combined (proteolipid protein)-α-synuclein 3-nitropropionic acid multiple system atrophy mouse model, erythropoietin appears to rescue

  1. Folic Acid potentiates the effect of memantine on spatial learning and neuronal protection in an Alzheimer's disease transgenic model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ta-Fu; Huang, Rwei-Fen S; Lin, Sey-En; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Tang, Ming-Chi; Chiu, Ming-Jang

    2010-01-01

    Folic acid deficiency and hyperhomocysteinemia potentiate amyloid-beta (Abeta) neuron toxicity. Memantine, an NMDA antagonist used in moderate to severe AD, is considered to be neuroprotective. We propose that folic acid might have a synergistic effect for memantine in protecting neurons from Abeta accumulation. We treated 8-month-old Tg2576 transgenic mice with memantine (30 mg/kg/day) with or without folic acid (8 mg/kg/day) for 4 months. Escape latencies in the Morris water maze were significantly shorter in the folic acid-memantine treatment group Tg(+)_M+F compared to both the non-treatment transgenic controls Tg(+) and the memantine-treatment group Tg(+)_M (both p < 0.05). Analysis of Abeta40 and Abeta42 showed lower brain loads in both treatment groups but this did not reach statistical significance. Histopathology analysis showed that Tg(+)_M+F had lower ratios of neuronal damage than Tg(+) (p < 0.001) and Tg(+)_M (p< 0.005). DNA analysis revealed that in the Tg(+)M_+F group, transcription was upregulated in 72 brain genes involved in neurogenesis, neural differentiation, memory, and neurotransmission compared to the Tg(+)_M group. In conclusion, we found that folic acid may potentiate the effect of memantine on spatial learning and neuronal protection. The benefit of combination therapy may be through co-action on the methylation-controlled Abeta production, and modification of brain gene expression.

  2. The Guinea Pig as a Model for Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease (AD): The Impact of Cholesterol Intake on Expression of AD-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Daniel; Wijaya, Linda; Laws, Simon M.; Taddei, Kevin; Newman, Morgan; Lardelli, Michael; Martins, Ralph N.; Verdile, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the guinea pig, Cavia porcellus, as a model for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), both in terms of the conservation of genes involved in AD and the regulatory responses of these to a known AD risk factor - high cholesterol intake. Unlike rats and mice, guinea pigs possess an Aβ peptide sequence identical to human Aβ. Consistent with the commonality between cardiovascular and AD risk factors in humans, we saw that a high cholesterol diet leads to up-regulation of BACE1 (β-secretase) transcription and down-regulation of ADAM10 (α-secretase) transcription which should increase release of Aβ from APP. Significantly, guinea pigs possess isoforms of AD-related genes found in humans but not present in mice or rats. For example, we discovered that the truncated PS2V isoform of human PSEN2, that is found at raised levels in AD brains and that increases γ-secretase activity and Aβ synthesis, is not uniquely human or aberrant as previously believed. We show that PS2V formation is up-regulated by hypoxia and a high-cholesterol diet while, consistent with observations in humans, Aβ concentrations are raised in some brain regions but not others. Also like humans, but unlike mice, the guinea pig gene encoding tau, MAPT, encodes isoforms with both three and four microtubule binding domains, and cholesterol alters the ratio of these isoforms. We conclude that AD-related genes are highly conserved and more similar to human than the rat or mouse. Guinea pigs represent a superior rodent model for analysis of the impact of dietary factors such as cholesterol on the regulation of AD-related genes. PMID:23805206

  3. Value-Added Model (VAM) Research for Educational Policy: Framing the Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrein-Beardsley, Audrey; Collins, Clarin; Polasky, Sarah A.; Sloat, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    In this manuscript, the guest editors of the EPAA Special Issue on "Value-Added Model (VAM) Research for Educational Policy" (1) introduce the background and policy context surrounding the increased use of VAMs for teacher evaluation and accountability purposes across the United States; (2) summarize the five research papers and one…

  4. Elementary School Data Issues for Value-Added Models: Implications for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenberg, Eric; Teh, Bing-ru; Walsh, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Researchers often presume that it is better to use administrative data from grades 4 and 5 than data from grades 6 through 8 for conducting research on teacher effectiveness that uses value-added models because (1) elementary school teachers teach all subjects to their students in self-contained classrooms and (2) classrooms are more homogenous at…

  5. Accounting for Co-Teaching: A Guide for Policymakers and Developers of Value-Added Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenberg, Eric; Walsh, Elias

    2015-01-01

    We outline the options available to policymakers for addressing co-teaching in a value-added model. Building on earlier work, we propose an improvement to a method of accounting for co-teaching that treats co-teachers as teams, with each teacher receiving equal credit for co-taught students. Hock and Isenberg (2012) described a method known as the…

  6. The Sensitivity of Value-Added Modeling to the Creation of a Vertical Score Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Weeks, Jonathan P.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of growth and value-added modeling to the way an underlying vertical score scale has been created. Longitudinal item-level data were analyzed with both student- and school-level identifiers for the entire state of Colorado between 2003 and 2006. Eight different vertical scales were…

  7. Methods for Accounting for Co-Teaching in Value-Added Models. Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hock, Heinrich; Isenberg, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Isolating the effect of a given teacher on student achievement (value-added modeling) is complicated when the student is taught the same subject by more than one teacher. We consider three methods, which we call the Partial Credit Method, Teacher Team Method, and Full Roster Method, for estimating teacher effects in the presence of co-teaching.…

  8. What Are Error Rates for Classifying Teacher and School Performance Using Value-Added Models?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.; Chiang, Hanley S.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses likely error rates for measuring teacher and school performance in the upper elementary grades using value-added models applied to student test score gain data. Using a realistic performance measurement system scheme based on hypothesis testing, the authors develop error rate formulas based on ordinary least squares and…

  9. Transgenic mice with increased Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase activity: animal model of dosage effects in Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, C.J.; Avraham, K.B.; Lovett, M.; Smith, S.; Elroy-Stein, O.; Rotman, G.; Bry, C.; Groner, Y.

    1987-11-01

    Down syndrome, the phenotypic expression of human trisomy 21, is presumed to result from a 1.5-fold increase in the expression of the genes on human chromosome 21. As an approach to the development of an animal model for Down syndrome, several strains of transgenic mice that carry the human Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase gene have been prepared. The animals express the transgene in a manner similar to that of humans, with 0.9- and 0.7-kilobase transcripts in a 1:4 ratio, and synthesize the human enzyme in an active form capable of forming human-mouse enzyme heterodimers. Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase activity is increased from 1.6- to 6.0-fold in the brains of four transgenic strains and to an equal or lesser extent in several other tissues. These animals provide a unique system for studying the consequences of increased dosage of the Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase gene in Down syndrome and the role of this enzyme in a variety of other pathological processes.

  10. Transgenic mice with increased Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase activity: animal model of dosage effects in Down syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, C J; Avraham, K B; Lovett, M; Smith, S; Elroy-Stein, O; Rotman, G; Bry, C; Groner, Y

    1987-01-01

    Down syndrome, the phenotypic expression of human trisomy 21, is presumed to result from a 1.5-fold increase in the expression of the genes on human chromosome 21. As an approach to the development of an animal model for Down syndrome, several strains of transgenic mice that carry the human Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase gene have been prepared. These animals express the transgene in a manner similar to that of humans, with 0.9- and 0.7-kilobase transcripts in a 1:4 ratio, and synthesize the human enzyme in an active form capable of forming human-mouse enzyme heterodimers. Cu/Zn-superoxide superoxide dismutase activity is increased from 1.6- to 6.0-fold in the brains of four transgenic strains and to an equal or lesser extent in several other tissues. These animals provide a unique system for studying the consequences of increased dosage of the Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase gene in Down syndrome and the role of this enzyme in a variety of other pathological processes. Images PMID:2960971

  11. Modulation of tolerance to the transgene product in a nonhuman primate model of AAV-mediated gene transfer to liver.

    PubMed

    Mingozzi, Federico; Hasbrouck, Nicole C; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Edmonson, Shyrie A; Hui, Daniel J; Sabatino, Denise E; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, J Fraser; Jiang, Haiyan; Pierce, Glenn F; Arruda, Valder R; High, Katherine A

    2007-10-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene transfer of factor IX (F.IX) to the liver results in long-term expression of transgene in experimental animals, but only short-term expression in humans. Loss of F.IX expression is likely due to a cytotoxic immune response to the AAV capsid, which results in clearance of transduced hepatocytes. We used a nonhuman primate model to assess the safety of AAV gene transfer coupled with an anti-T-cell regimen designed to block this immune response. Administration of a 3-drug regimen consisting of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), sirolimus, and the anti-IL-2 receptor antibody daclizumab consistently resulted in formation of inhibitory antibodies to human F.IX following hepatic artery administration of an AAV-hF.IX vector, whereas a 2-drug regimen consisting only of MMF and sirolimus did not. Administration of daclizumab was accompanied by a dramatic drop in the population of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). We conclude that choice of immunosuppression (IS) regimen can modulate immune responses to the transgene product upon hepatic gene transfer in subjects not fully tolerant; and that induction of transgene tolerance may depend on a population of antigen-specific Tregs.

  12. Using a generational time-step model to simulate dynamics of adaptation to transgenic corn and crop rotation by western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Crowder, D W; Onstad, D W

    2005-04-01

    We expanded a simulation model of the population dynamics and genetics of the western corn rootworm for a landscape of corn, soybean, and other crops to study the simultaneous development of resistance to both crop rotation and transgenic corn. Transgenic corn effective against corn rootworm was recently approved in 2003 and may be a very effective new technology for control of western corn rootworm in areas with or without the rotation-resistant variant. In simulations of areas with rotation-resistant populations, planting transgenic corn to only rotated cornfields was a robust strategy to prevent resistance to both traits. In these areas, planting transgenic corn to only continuous fields was not an effective strategy for preventing adaptation to crop rotation or transgenic corn. In areas without rotation-resistant phenotypes, gene expression of the allele for resistance to transgenic corn was the most important factor affecting the development of resistance to transgenic corn. If the allele for resistance to transgenic corn is recessive, resistance can be delayed longer than 15 yr, but if the resistant allele is dominant then resistance usually developed within 15 yr. In a sensitivity analysis, among the parameters investigated, initial allele frequency and density dependence were the two most important factors affecting the evolution of resistance. We compared the results of this simulation model with a more complicated model and results between the two were similar. This indicates that results from a simpler model with a generational time-step can compare favorably with a more complex model with a daily time-step.

  13. A New Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying the Neurotoxicity of Spermine Oxidase Dosage in the Response to Excitotoxic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cervelli, Manuela; Bellavia, Gabriella; D'Amelio, Marcello; Cavallucci, Virve; Moreno, Sandra; Berger, Joachim; Nardacci, Roberta; Marcoli, Manuela; Maura, Guido; Piacentini, Mauro; Amendola, Roberto; Cecconi, Francesco; Mariottini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Spermine oxidase is a FAD-containing enzyme involved in polyamines catabolism, selectively oxidizing spermine to produce H2O2, spermidine, and 3-aminopropanal. Spermine oxidase is highly expressed in the mouse brain and plays a key role in regulating the levels of spermine, which is involved in protein synthesis, cell division and cell growth. Spermine is normally released by neurons at synaptic sites where it exerts a neuromodulatory function, by specifically interacting with different types of ion channels, and with ionotropic glutamate receptors. In order to get an insight into the neurobiological roles of spermine oxidase and spermine, we have deregulated spermine oxidase gene expression producing and characterizing the transgenic mouse model JoSMOrec, conditionally overexpressing the enzyme in the neocortex. We have investigated the effects of spermine oxidase overexpression in the mouse neocortex by transcript accumulation, immunohistochemical analysis, enzymatic assays and polyamine content in young and aged animals. Transgenic JoSMOrec mice showed in the neocortex a higher H2O2 production in respect to Wild-Type controls, indicating an increase of oxidative stress due to SMO overexpression. Moreover, the response of transgenic mice to excitotoxic brain injury, induced by kainic acid injection, was evaluated by analysing the behavioural phenotype, the immunodistribution of neural cell populations, and the ultrastructural features of neocortical neurons. Spermine oxidase overexpression and the consequently altered polyamine levels in the neocortex affects the cytoarchitecture in the adult and aging brain, as well as after neurotoxic insult. It resulted that the transgenic JoSMOrec mouse line is more sensitive to KA than Wild-Type mice, indicating an important role of spermine oxidase during excitotoxicity. These results provide novel evidences of the complex and critical functions carried out by spermine oxidase and spermine in the mammalian brain. PMID

  14. Adding thermal and granularity effects to the effective density fluid model.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kevin L

    2013-05-01

    Previously, an effective density fluid model (EDFM) was developed by the author [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 2276-2281 (2001)] for unconsolidated granular sediments and applied to sand. The model is a simplification of the full Biot porous media model. Here two additional effects are added to the EDFM model: heat transfer between the liquid and solid at low frequencies and the granularity of the medium at high frequencies. The frequency range studied is 100 Hz-1 MHz. The analytical sound speed and attenuation expressions obtained have no free parameters. The resulting model is compared to ocean data.

  15. Identification of novel SHOX target genes in the developing limb using a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Beiser, Katja U; Glaser, Anne; Kleinschmidt, Kerstin; Scholl, Isabell; Röth, Ralph; Li, Li; Gretz, Norbert; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Karperien, Marcel; Marchini, Antonio; Richter, Wiltrud; Rappold, Gudrun A

    2014-01-01

    Deficiency of the human short stature homeobox-containing gene (SHOX) has been identified in several disorders characterized by reduced height and skeletal anomalies such as Turner syndrome, Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis and Langer mesomelic dysplasia as well as isolated short stature. SHOX acts as a transcription factor during limb development and is expressed in chondrocytes of the growth plates. Although highly conserved in vertebrates, rodents lack a SHOX orthologue. This offers the unique opportunity to analyze the effects of human SHOX expression in transgenic mice. We have generated a mouse expressing the human SHOXa cDNA under the control of a murine Col2a1 promoter and enhancer (Tg(Col2a1-SHOX)). SHOX and marker gene expression as well as skeletal phenotypes were characterized in two transgenic lines. No significant skeletal anomalies were found in transgenic compared to wildtype mice. Quantitative and in situ hybridization analyses revealed that Tg(Col2a1-SHOX), however, affected extracellular matrix gene expression during early limb development, suggesting a role for SHOX in growth plate assembly and extracellular matrix composition during long bone development. For instance, we could show that the connective tissue growth factor gene Ctgf, a gene involved in chondrogenic and angiogenic differentiation, is transcriptionally regulated by SHOX in transgenic mice. This finding was confirmed in human NHDF and U2OS cells and chicken micromass culture, demonstrating the value of the SHOX-transgenic mouse for the characterization of SHOX-dependent genes and pathways in early limb development.

  16. The GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide reduces pathology-specific tau phosphorylation and improves motor function in a transgenic hTauP301L mouse model of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Barkholt, Pernille; Fabricius, Katrine; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-03-01

    In addition to a prominent role in glycemic control, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists exhibit neuroprotective properties. There is mounting experimental evidence that GLP-1 receptor agonists, including liraglutide, may enhance synaptic plasticity, counteract cognitive deficits and ameliorate neurodegenerative features in preclinical models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), predominantly in the context of β-amyloid toxicity. Here we characterized the effects of liraglutide in a transgenic mutant tau (hTauP301L) mouse tauopathy model, which develops age-dependent pathology-specific neuronal tau phosphorylation and neurofibrillary tangle formation with progressively compromised motor function (limb clasping). Liraglutide (500 µg/kg/day, s.c., q.d., n=18) or vehicle (n=18) was administered to hTauP301L mice for 6 months from the age of three months. Vehicle-dosed wild-type FVB/N mice served as normal control (n=17). The onset and severity of hind limb clasping was markedly different in liraglutide and vehicle-dosed transgenic mice. Clasping behavior was observed in 61% of vehicle-dosed hTauP301L mice with a 55% survival rate in 9-month old transgenic mice. In contrast, liraglutide treatment reduced the clasping rate to 39% of hTauP301L mice, and fully prevented clasping-associated lethality resulting in a survival rate of 89%. Stereological analyses demonstrated that hTauP301L mice exhibited hindbrain-dominant neuronal accumulation of phosphorylated tau closely correlated to the severity of clasping behavior. In correspondence, liraglutide treatment significantly reduced neuronal phospho-tau load by 61.9±10.2% (p<0.001) in hTauP301L mice, as compared to vehicle-dosed controls. In conclusion, liraglutide significantly reduced tau pathology in a transgenic mouse tauopathy model.

  17. A Transgenic Drosophila melanogaster Model To Study Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Oncoprotein Tax-1-Driven Transformation In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Shirinian, Margret; Kambris, Zakaria; Hamadeh, Lama; Grabbe, Caroline; Journo, Chloé; Mahieux, Renaud; Bazarbachi, Ali

    2015-08-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is an aggressive malignancy. HTLV-2 is genetically related to HTLV-1 but does not cause any malignant disease. HTLV-1 Tax transactivator (Tax-1) contributes to leukemogenesis via NF-κB. We describe transgenic Drosophila models expressing Tax in the compound eye and plasmatocytes. We demonstrate that Tax-1 but not Tax-2 induces ommatidial perturbation and increased plasmatocyte proliferation and that the eye phenotype is dependent on Kenny (IKKγ/NEMO), thus validating this new in vivo model.

  18. An Ad-Hoc Adaptive Pilot Model for Pitch Axis Gross Acquisition Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curtis E.

    2012-01-01

    An ad-hoc algorithm is presented for real-time adaptation of the well-known crossover pilot model and applied to pitch axis gross acquisition tasks in a generic fighter aircraft. Off-line tuning of the crossover model to human pilot data gathered in a fixed-based high fidelity simulation is first accomplished for a series of changes in aircraft dynamics to provide expected values for model parameters. It is shown that in most cases, for this application, the traditional crossover model can be reduced to a gain and a time delay. The ad-hoc adaptive pilot gain algorithm is shown to have desirable convergence properties for most types of changes in aircraft dynamics.

  19. Modelling of Medium Access Control (MAC) Protocols for Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    Slot IP Internet Protocol LAN Local Area Network MAC Medium Access Control MACAW Medium Access Protocol for Wireless LANs MANET Mobile Ad-hoc...Unforced state – It waits after entering the state until it is invoked by another process or an interrupt. It is in dark grey on this report, and red ... green in OPNET. A MAC process model is built for general initialisations of the MAC module, and to invoke the selected MAC protocol process model

  20. The S100A4 Oncoprotein Promotes Prostate Tumorigenesis in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Hifzur R.; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Parray, Aijaz; Johnson, Jeremy J.; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Shekhani, Mohammad T.; Murtaza, Imtiyaz; Ambartsumian, Noona; Konety, Badrinath R.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    S100A4, a calcium-binding protein, is known for its role in the metastatic spread of tumor cells, a late event of cancer disease. This is the first report showing that S100A4 is not merely a metastatic protein but also an oncoprotein that plays a critical role in the development of tumors. We earlier showed that S100A4 expression progressively increases in prostatic tissues with the advancement of prostate cancer (CaP) in TRAMP, an autochthonous mouse model. To study the functional significance of S100A4 in CaP, we generated a heterozygously deleted S100A4 (TRAMP/S100A4+/−) genotype by crossing TRAMP with S100A4−/− mice. TRAMP/S100A4+/− did not show a lethal phenotype, and transgenes were functional. As compared to age-matched TRAMP littermates, TRAMP/S100A4+/− mice exhibited 1) an increased tumor latency period (P < 0.001), 2) a 0% incidence of metastasis, and 3) reduced prostatic weights (P < 0.001). We generated S100A4-positive clones from S100A4-negative CaP cells and tested their potential. S100A4-positive tumors grew at a faster rate than S100A4-negative tumors in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. The S100A4 protein exhibited growth factor–like properties in multimode (intracellular and extracellular) forms. We observed that 1) the growth-promoting effect of S100A4 is due to its activation of NFκB, 2) S100A4-deficient tumors exhibit reduced NFκB activity, 3) S100A4 regulates NFκB through the RAGE receptor, and 4) S100A4 and RAGE co-localize in prostatic tissues of mice. Keeping in view its growth-promoting role, we suggest that S100A4 qualifies as an excellent candidate to be exploited for therapeutic agents to treat CaP in humans. PMID:24069509

  1. CB₂ receptor deficiency increases amyloid pathology and alters tau processing in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Jeremy; Vingtdeux, Valerie; Marambaud, Philippe; d'Abramo, Cristina; Jimenez, Heidy; Stauber, Mark; Friedman, Rachel; Davies, Peter

    2013-11-08

    The endocannabinoid CB₂ receptor system has been implicated in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In order to investigate the impact of the CB₂ receptor system on AD pathology, a colony of mice with a deleted CB₂ receptor gene, CNR2, was established on a transgenic human mutant APP background for pathological comparison with CB₂ receptor-sufficient transgenic mice. J20 APP (PDGFB-APPSwInd) mice were bred over two generations with CNR2⁻/⁻ (Cnr2(tm1Dgen)/J) mice to produce a colony of J20 CNR2⁺/⁺ and J20 CNR2⁻/⁻ mice. Seventeen J20 CNR2⁺/⁺ mice (12 females, 5 males) and 16 J20 CNR2⁻/⁻ mice (11 females, 5 males) were killed at 12 months, and their brains were interrogated for AD-related pathology with both biochemistry and immunocytochemistry (ICC). In addition to amyloid-dependent endpoints such as soluble Aβ production and plaque deposition quantified with 6E10 staining, the effect of CB2 receptor deletion on total soluble mouse tau production was assayed by using a recently developed high-sensitivity assay. Results revealed that soluble Aβ42 and plaque deposition were significantly increased in J20 CNR2⁻/⁻ mice relative to CNR2⁺/⁺ mice. Microgliosis, quantified with ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1) staining, did not differ between groups, whereas plaque associated microglia was more abundant in J20 CNR2⁻/⁻ mice. Total tau was significantly suppressed in J20 CNR2⁻/⁻ mice relative to J20 CNR2⁺/⁺ mice. The results confirm the constitutive role of the CB₂ receptor system both in reducing amyloid plaque pathology in AD and also support tehpotential of cannabinoid therapies targeting CB₂ to reduce Aβ; however, the results suggest that interventions may have a divergent effect on tau pathology.

  2. Enalapril and ASS inhibit tumor growth in a transgenic mouse model of islet cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Fendrich, V; Lopez, C L; Manoharan, J; Maschuw, K; Wichmann, S; Baier, A; Holler, J P; Ramaswamy, A; Bartsch, D K; Waldmann, J

    2014-10-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role for angiotensin-converting enzymes involving the angiotensin II-receptor 1 (AT1-R) and the cyclooxygenase pathway in carcinogenesis. The effects of ASS and enalapril were assessed in vitro and in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs). The effects of enalapril and ASS on proliferation and expression of the AGTR1A and its target gene vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegfa) were assessed in the neuroendocrine cell line BON1. Rip1-Tag2 mice were treated daily with either 0.6 mg/kg bodyweight of enalapril i.p., 20 mg/kg bodyweight of ASS i.p., or a vehicle in a prevention (weeks 5-12) and a survival group (week 5 till death). Tumor surface, weight of pancreatic glands, immunostaining for AT1-R and nuclear factor kappa beta (NFKB), and mice survival were analyzed. In addition, sections from human specimens of 20 insulinomas, ten gastrinomas, and 12 non-functional pNENs were evaluated for AT1-R and NFKB (NFKB1) expression and grouped according to the current WHO classification. Proliferation was significantly inhibited by enalapril and ASS in BON1 cells, with the combination being the most effective. Treatment with enalapril and ASS led to significant downregulation of known target genes Vegf and Rela at RNA level. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by enalapril and ASS in the prevention group displayed by a reduction of tumor size (84%/67%) and number (30%/45%). Furthermore, daily treatment with enalapril and ASS prolonged the overall median survival compared with vehicle-treated Rip1-Tag2 (107 days) mice by 9 and 17 days (P=0.016 and P=0.013). The AT1-R and the inflammatory transcription factor NFKB were abolished completely upon enalapril and ASS treatment. AT1-R and NFKB expressions were observed in 80% of human pNENs. Enalapril and ASS may provide an approach for chemoprevention and treatment of pNENs.

  3. Diffractive deep inelastic scattering in an AdS/CFT inspired model: A phenomenological study

    SciTech Connect

    Betemps, M. A.; Goncalves, V. P.; Santana Amaral, J. T. de

    2010-05-01

    The analytical treatment of the nonperturbative QCD dynamics is one of the main open questions of the strong interactions. Currently, it is only possible to get some qualitative information about this regime considering other QCD-like theories, as, for example, the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory, where one can perform calculations in the nonperturbative limit of large 't Hooft coupling using the anti-de Sitter space/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT). Recently, the high energy scattering amplitude was calculated in the AdS/CFT approach, applied to deep-inelastic scattering and confronted with the F{sub 2} HERA data. In this work we extend the nonperturbative AdS/CFT inspired model for diffractive processes and compare its predictions with a perturbative approach based on the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation. We demonstrate that the AdS/CFT inspired model is not able to describe the current F{sub 2}{sup D(3)} HERA data and predicts a similar behavior to that from the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation in the range 10{sup -7} < or approx. x{sub P} < or approx. 10{sup -4}. At smaller values of x{sub P} the diffractive structure function is predicted to be energy independent.

  4. R-flurbiprofen improves tau, but not Aß pathology in a triple transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Carreras, Isabel; McKee, Ann C; Choi, Ji-Kyung; Aytan, Nurgul; Kowall, Neil W; Jenkins, Bruce G; Dedeoglu, Alpaslan

    2013-12-06

    We have previously reported that chronic ibuprofen treatment improves cognition and decreases intracellular Aß and phosphorylated-tau levels in 3xTg-AD mice. Ibuprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that independently of its anti-inflammatory effects has anti-amyloidogenic activity as a gamma-secretase modulator (GSM) and both activities have the potential to decrease Aß pathology. To further understand the effects of NSAIDs in 3xTg-AD mice, we treated 3xTg-AD mice with R-flurbiprofen, an enantiomer of the NSAID flurbiprofen that maintains the GSM activity but has greatly reduced anti-inflammatory activity, and analyzed its effect on cognition, Aß, tau, and the neurochemical profile of the hippocampus. Treatment with R-flurbiprofen from 5 to 7 months of age resulted in improved cognition on the radial arm water maze (RAWM) test and decreased the level of hyperphosphorylated tau immunostained with AT8 and PHF-1 antibodies. No significant changes in the level of Aß (using 6E10 and NU-1 antibodies) were detected. Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) we found that R-flurbiprofen treatment decreased the elevated level of glutamine in 3xTg-AD mice down to the level detected in non-transgenic mice. Glutamine levels correlated with PHF-1 immunostained hyperphosphorylated tau. We also found an inverse correlation between the concentration of glutamate and learning across all the mice in the study. Glutamine and glutamate, neurochemicals that shuttles between neurons and astrocytes to maintain glutamate homeostasis in the synapses, deserve further attention as MR markers of cognitive function.

  5. Neuroprotective Effect of SLM, a Novel Carbazole-Based Fluorophore, on SH-SY5Y Cell Model and 3xTg-AD Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoli; Kosaraju, Jayasankar; Zhou, Wei; Tam, Kin Yip

    2017-03-15

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide aggregating to form a neurotoxic plaque, leading to cognitive deficits, is believed to be one of the plausible mechanisms for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Inhibiting Aβ aggregation is supposed to offer a neuroprotective effect to ameliorate AD. A previous report has shown that SLM, a carbazole-based fluorophore, binds to Aβ to inhibit the aggregation. However, it is not entirely clear whether the inhibition of Aβ aggregation alone would lead to the anticipated neuroprotective effects. In the current study, we intended to examine the protective action of SLM against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and to evaluate if SLM can decrease the cognitive and behavioral deficits observed in triple transgenic AD mouse model (3xTg-AD). In the in vitro study, neurotoxicity induced by Aβ42 in human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells was found to be reduced through the treatment with SLM. In the in vivo study, following one month SLM intraperitoneal injection (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg), 3xTg-AD mice were tested on Morris water maze (MWM) and Y-maze for their cognitive ability and sacrificed for biochemical estimations. Results show that SLM treatment improved the learning and memory ability in 3xTg-AD mice in MWM and Y-maze tasks. SLM also mitigated the amyloid burden by decreasing brain Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels and reduced tau phosphorylation, glycogen synthase kinase-3β activity, and neuro-inflammation. From our observations, SLM shows neuroprotection in SH-SY5Y cells against Aβ42 and also in 3xTg-AD mouse model by mitigating the pathological features and behavioral impairments.

  6. Efficient and Rapid Development of Transgenic Hamster Models of TSEs Using a Radical New Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    We are breeding a flock of 50 genotyped sheep to select for the high scrapie susceptibility genotype VVRRQQ. All three lines of the mouse...transgenics carrying sheep, human, and elk PrP have been now re-derived. We have observed the first transmission of the disease from our standard scrapie ...Sheep Scrapie , TOSK, transposon 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b

  7. Effectiveness Measures for Cross-Sectional Studies: A Comparison of Value-Added Models and Contextualised Attainment Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenkeit, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Educational effectiveness research often appeals to "value-added models (VAM)" to gauge the impact of schooling on student learning net of the effect of student background variables. A huge amount of cross-sectional studies do not, however, meet VAM's requirement for longitudinal data. "Contextualised attainment models (CAM)"…

  8. Full vector archaeomagnetic data and Bayesian modelling for 1300 to 1750 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepp, E.; Lanos, P.; Chauvin, A.

    2009-04-01

    The data base of geomagnetic palaeointensities obtained from archaeological artefacts is poor and very scattered for Western and Central Europe. High precision palaeointensities have been determined from a single archaeological site in Lübeck (Germany) where a sequence of 25 bread-oven-floors has been preserved in a bakery from medieval times until today. Age dating confines the time interval from about 1300 AD to about 1750 AD. Palaeomagnetic directions have been determined from each oven-floor (Schnepp et al., JGR, 2003). Palaeointensity was measured from selected specimens with the double-heating Thellier method and reliable palaeointensity results have been obtained. Tests for thermoremanent magnetisation anisotropy have been performed, but did not show a significant change, while a cooling rate correction was not necessary. 22 mean palaeointensity values derived from the oven-floors show maxima in the 15th and early 17th century AD, followed by a decrease of palaeointensity of about 25% until 1750 AD. The Thellier experiments provided also new characteristic remanent magnetisation directions which were included in the data set. Mean directions have been recalculated. Palaeointensity together with the directions represent a record of about 450 years full vector secular variation. From this full vector data set a secular variation curve has been calculated using a Bayesian modelling taking dating errors, all errors on the field vector and stratigraphy into account. A smooth curve with an error envelope was obtained which compares very well with the gufm1 geomagnetic model (Jackson et al., Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. A, 2000) obtained from historical observations starting at 1600 AD. Comparison of the marginal curve obtained for palaeointensity with a selected data set of archaeomagnetic intensities from Western and Central Europe will be discussed.

  9. Noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging detection of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related microvascular alterations using superparamagnetic iron oxide particles in APP transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease: application to passive Abeta immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Nicolau; Gérard, Christelle; Abramowski, Dorothée; Cannet, Catherine; Staufenbiel, Matthias

    2011-01-19

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a common feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). More advanced stages are accompanied by microhemorrhages and vasculitis. Peripheral blood-borne macrophages are intimately linked to cerebrovascular pathology coincident with AD. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to noninvasively study microvascular lesions in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mouse AD models. Foci of signal attenuation were detected in cortical and thalamic brain regions of aged APP23 mice. Their strength and number was considerably enhanced by intravenous administration of iron oxide nanoparticles, which are taken up by macrophages through absorptive endocytosis, 24 h before image acquisition. The number of cortical sites displaying signal attenuation increased with age. Histology at these sites demonstrated the presence of iron-containing macrophages in the vicinity of CAA-affected blood vessels. A fraction of the sites additionally showed thickened vessel walls and vasculitis. Consistent with the visualization of CAA-associated lesions, MRI detected a much smaller number of attenuated signal sites in APP23xPS45 mice, for which a strong presenilin mutation caused a shift toward amyloid β(42), thus reducing vascular amyloid. Similar results were obtained with APP24 and APP51 mice, which develop significantly less CAA and microvascular pathology than APP23. In a longitudinal study, we noninvasively demonstrated the reinforced formation of microvascular pathology during passive amyloid β immunotherapy of APP23 mice. Histology confirmed that foci of signal attenuation reflected an increase in CAA-related lesions. Our data demonstrate that MRI has the sensitivity to noninvasively monitor the development of vascular pathology and its possible enhancement by amyloid β immunotherapy in transgenic mice modeling AD.

  10. Vulnerability of calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin in a transgenic/knock-in APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer disease together with disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Verdaguer, Ester; Brox, Susana; Petrov, Dmitry; Olloquequi, Jordi; Romero, Rafael; de Lemos, M Luisa; Camins, Antoni; Auladell, Carme

    2015-09-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of β-amyloid protein in the brain (in both soluble and insoluble forms) and by the presence of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), leading to neurotoxicity. The exact mechanisms whereby Aβ triggers brain alterations are unclear. However, accumulating evidence suggests that a deregulation of Ca(2+) signaling may play a major role in disease progression. Calcium-buffering proteins, including calbindin-D28K (CB), calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV), may offer neuroprotection by maintaining calcium homeostasis. Although marked reductions in these proteins have been observed in the brains of mice and humans with AD, their contribution to AD pathology remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to analyze distribution patterns of CB(+,) CR(+) and PV(+) interneurons in different areas of the hippocampus, a brain region that is severely affected in AD. A transgenic knock-in APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of familial AD was used. The data were obtained from the brains of 3- and 12-month-old animals. These ages roughly correspond to an early mature adult (prior to clinical manifestations) and a late middle-age (clinical symptoms readily detectable) phase in human AD patients. Immunostaining revealed increases in CB and PV immunoreactivity (IR) in the hippocampus of 3-month-old transgenic mice, compared to wild-type animals. Possibly, these proteins are upregulated in an attempt to control cellular homeostasis and synaptic plasticity. However, the pattern of CB-IR was reversed in 12-month-old animals, potentially indicating a loss of cellular capacity to respond to pathophysiological processes. In addition, at this age, a noticeable increase in PV-IR was observed, suggesting the presence of hippocampal network hyperactivity in older AD-like mice. Our results indicate that CaBP(+) neuronal subpopulations play a role in adult neurogenesis and in AD pathology, particularly at early disease

  11. Neurodegenerative phenotypes in an A53T α-synuclein transgenic mouse model are independent of LRRK2

    PubMed Central

    Daher, João Paulo L.; Pletnikova, Olga; Biskup, Saskia; Musso, Alessandra; Gellhaar, Sandra; Galter, Dagmar; Troncoso, Juan C.; Lee, Michael K.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Moore, Darren J.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding LRRK2 and α-synuclein cause autosomal dominant forms of familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Fibrillar forms of α-synuclein are a major component of Lewy bodies, the intracytoplasmic proteinaceous inclusions that are a pathological hallmark of idiopathic and certain familial forms of PD. LRRK2 mutations cause late-onset familial PD with a clinical, neurochemical and, for the most part, neuropathological phenotype that is indistinguishable from idiopathic PD. Importantly, α-synuclein-positive Lewy bodies are the most common pathology identified in the brains of PD subjects harboring LRRK2 mutations. These observations may suggest that LRRK2 functions in a common pathway with α-synuclein to regulate its aggregation. To explore the potential pathophysiological interaction between LRRK2 and α-synuclein in vivo, we modulated LRRK2 expression in a well-established human A53T α-synuclein transgenic mouse model with transgene expression driven by the hindbrain-selective prion protein promoter. Deletion of LRRK2 or overexpression of human G2019S-LRRK2 has minimal impact on the lethal neurodegenerative phenotype that develops in A53T α-synuclein transgenic mice, including premature lethality, pre-symptomatic behavioral deficits and human α-synuclein or glial neuropathology. We also find that endogenous or human LRRK2 and A53T α-synuclein do not interact together to influence the number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Taken together, our data suggest that α-synuclein-related pathology, which occurs predominantly in the hindbrain of this A53T α-synuclein mouse model, occurs largely independently from LRRK2 expression. These observations fail to provide support for a pathophysiological interaction of LRRK2 and α-synuclein in vivo, at least within neurons of the mouse hindbrain. PMID:22357653

  12. Early alterations in functional connectivity and white matter structure in a transgenic mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Joanes; Schroeter, Aileen; He, Pan; Tanadini, Matteo; Keist, Ruth; Krstic, Dimitrije; Konietzko, Uwe; Klohs, Jan; Nitsch, Roger M; Rudin, Markus

    2014-10-08

    Impairment of brain functional connectivity (FC) is thought to be an early event occurring in diseases with cerebral amyloidosis, such as Alzheimer's disease. Regions sustaining altered functional networks have been shown to colocalize with regions marked with amyloid plaques burden suggesting a strong link between FC and amyloidosis. Whether the decline in FC precedes amyloid plaque deposition or is a consequence thereof is currently unknown. The sequence of events during early stages of the disease is difficult to capture in humans due to the difficulties in providing an early diagnosis and also in view of the heterogeneity among patients. Transgenic mouse lines overexpressing amyloid precursor proteins develop cerebral amyloidosis and constitute an attractive model system for studying the relationship between plaque and functional changes. In this study, ArcAβ transgenic and wild-type mice were imaged using resting-state fMRI methods across their life-span in a cross-sectional design to analyze changes in FC in relation to the pathology. Transgenic mice show compromised development of FC during the first months of postnatal life compared with wild-type animals, resulting in functional impairments that affect in particular the sensory-motor cortex already in preplaque stage. These functional alterations were accompanied by structural changes as reflected by reduced fractional anisotropy values, as derived from diffusion tensor imaging. Our results suggest cerebral amyloidosis in mice is preceded by impairment of neuronal networks and white matter structures. FC analysis in mice is an attractive tool for studying the implications of impaired neuronal networks in models of cerebral amyloid pathology.

  13. Modelling tsunami sedimentation associated with the AD 1755 event in Algarve (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, P. J. M.; Gelfenbaum, G. R.; La Selle, S.; Costas, S.; Andrade, C.; Cascalho, J.; Freitas, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical models of tsunami inundation and sedimentation can provide useful insights into the dynamics of palaeotsunamis. We applied a coupled field data and numerical modelling approach for the AD1755 tsunami, the most destructive tsunami to affect the Atlantic coast of Europe in historical times. At Salgados, a lowland on the south coast of Portugal, tsunami deposits from AD1755 mostly consist of massive or normally-graded, landward thinning layers of shell-rich sand with an erosive base within the mud-dominated lowlands. Landward of the foredune, the AD1755 deposit is roughly 10cm thick and thins in the landward and alongshore directions. It is possible to ascribe the sediment source of this deposit to the dune and/or beach based on mineralogical and grain-size comparisons with modern surface samples. The present dune crest height is 6 m above MSL (mean sea level) near the seasonally-closed inlet of the lagoon, and rises alongshore towards the west up to 17m above MSL. From the combination of the spatial distribution of the deposit thickness landward of the sloping dune, and GPR data, which shows an erosional surface at approximately 6m above MSL, we infer that the maximum tsunami water level at the coast was between 6 and 10m. Regional tsunami historical records, however, suggest higher heights, up to 12m above MSL at the coast. We simulated tsunami inundation and sediment transport using Delft3D to examine these discrepancies. A 1D cross shore model was used to test flow height controls on deposit thickness and also to identify the sediment source of the AD1755 deposit. Four possible sediment sources were tested (nearshore, beach, dune and lagoon) using synthetic, long-period waves to simulate the AD1755 tsunami. The combination of geological studies with numerical modeling of inundation and sediment transport produces a better description of the AD1755 tsunami and its effects in coastal areas in the Algarve that will contribute to better hazard assessments.

  14. Assessment of Motor Function, Sensory Motor Gating and Recognition Memory in a Novel BACHD Transgenic Rat Model for Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abada, Yah-se K.; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Schreiber, Rudy; Ellenbroek, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Huntington disease (HD) is frequently first diagnosed by the appearance of motor symptoms; the diagnosis is subsequently confirmed by the presence of expanded CAG repeats (> 35) in the HUNTINGTIN (HTT) gene. A BACHD rat model for HD carrying the human full length mutated HTT with 97 CAG-CAA repeats has been established recently. Behavioral phenotyping of BACHD rats will help to determine the validity of this model and its potential use in preclinical drug discovery studies. Objectives The present study seeks to characterize the progressive emergence of motor, sensorimotor and cognitive deficits in BACHD rats. Materials and Methods Wild type and transgenic rats were tested from 1 till 12 months of age. Motor tests were selected to measure spontaneous locomotor activity (open field) and gait coordination. Sensorimotor gating was assessed in acoustic startle response paradigms and recognition memory was evaluated in an object recognition test. Results Transgenic rats showed hyperactivity at 1 month and hypoactivity starting at 4 months of age. Motor coordination imbalance in a Rotarod test was present at 2 months and gait abnormalities were seen in a Catwalk test at 12 months. Subtle sensorimotor changes were observed, whereas object recognition was unimpaired in BACHD rats up to 12 months of age. Conclusion The current BACHD rat model recapitulates certain symptoms from HD patients, especially the marked motor deficits. A subtle neuropsychological phenotype was found and further studies are needed to fully address the sensorimotor phenotype and the potential use of BACHD rats for drug discovery purposes. PMID:23874679

  15. Development of a Conditional Transgenic Mouse Model to Test the Fallopian Tube Origin of Serous Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    transgene plasmid to follow up on this next strategy. KEY RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS: • molecular cloning of Ovgp1-lacZ reporter gene plasmid...high-expressing 242 line • molecular cloning of Ovgp1-Cre transgene plasmid REPORTABLE OUTCOMES: • generation of two Ovgp1-lacZ transgenic

  16. Transgenic Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaenisch, Rudolf

    1988-01-01

    Describes three methods and their advantages and disadvantages for introducing genes into animals. Discusses the predictability and tissue-specificity of the injected genes. Outlines the applications of transgenic technology for studying gene expression, the early stages of mammalian development, mutations, and the molecular nature of chromosomes.…

  17. A novel phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibitor: Yonkenafil modulates neurogenesis, gliosis to improve cognitive function and ameliorates amyloid burden in an APP/PS1 transgenic mice model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Jing-yu; Xue, Xue; Dong, Ying-xu; Liu, Yang; Miao, Feng-rong; Wang, Yong-feng; Xue, Hong; Wu, Chun-fu

    2015-09-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), activated microglia invade and surround β-amyloid plaques, possibly contributing to the aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ), which affect the survival of neurons and lead to memory loss. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitors have recently been shown a potential therapeutic effect on AD. In this study, the effects of yonkenafil (yonk), a novel PDE-5 inhibitor, on cognitive behaviors as well as the pathological features in transgenic AD mice were investigated. Seven-month-old APP/PS1 transgenic mice were treated with yonk (2, 6, or 18 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection (i.p.)) or sildenafil (sild) (6 mg/kg, i.p.) daily for 3 months and then behavioral tests were performed. The results demonstrated that yonk improved nesting-building ability, ameliorated working memory deficits in the Y-maze tasks, and significantly improved learning and memory function in the Morris water maze (MWM) tasks. In addition, yonk reduced the area of Aβ plaques, and inhibited over-activation of microglia and astrocytes. Furthermore, yonk increased neurogenesis in the dentate granule brain region of APP/PS1 mice, indicated by increased BrdU(+)/NeuN(+) and BrdU(+)/DCX(+) cells compared to vehicle-treated transgenic mice. These results suggest that yonk could rescue cognitive deficits by ameliorated amyloid burden through regulating APP processing, inhibited the over-activation of microglia and astrocytes as well as restored neurogenesis.

  18. Systemic overexpression of growth hormone (GH) in transgenic FVB/N inbred mice: an optimized model for holistic studies of molecular mechanisms underlying GH-induced kidney pathology.

    PubMed

    von Waldthausen, Dagmar C; Schneider, Marlon R; Renner-Müller, Ingrid; Rauleder, Dirk N; Herbach, Nadja; Aigner, Bernhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Wolf, Eckhard

    2008-08-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing growth hormone (GH) display a plethora of phenotypic alterations and provide unique models for studying and influencing consequences of chronic GH excess. Since the first report on GH transgenic mice was published in 1982, many different mouse models overexpressing GH from various species at different levels and with different tissue specificities were established, most of them on random-bred or hybrid genetic background. We have generated a new transgenic mouse model on FVB/N inbred background, expressing bovine (b) GH under the control of the chicken beta-actin promoter (cbetaa). cbetaa-bGH transgenic mice exhibit ubiquitous expression of bGH mRNA and protein and circulating bGH levels in the range of several microg/ml, resulting in markedly stimulated growth and the characteristic spectrum of pathological lesions which were described in previous GH overexpressing mouse models. Importantly, a consistent sequence of renal alterations is observed, mimicking progressive kidney disease in human patients. The novel, genetically standardized GH transgenic mouse model is ideal for holistic transcriptome and proteome studies aiming at the identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying GH-induced pathological alterations especially in the kidney. Moreover, genetically defined cbetaa-bGH mice facilitate random mutagenesis screens for modifier genes which influence the effects of chronic GH excess and associated pathological lesions.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of amyloid plaques using hollow manganese oxide nanoparticles conjugated with antibody aβ1-40 in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Ha, Tae Lin; Im, Geun Ho; Yang, Jehoon; Seo, Sang Won; Lee, In Su; Lee, Jung Hee

    2013-01-09

    In this study, we have shown the feasibility of hollow manganese oxide nanoparticles (HMON) conjugated with an antibody of Aβ1-40 peptide (abAβ40) (HMON-abAβ40) for MRI of amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. MR brain images in APP/PS1 transgenic mice and their nontransgenic littermates were acquired using a 7.0 T MRI system before, and 24 and 72 h after an injection of HMON-abAβ40. After the injection of HMON-abAβ40, we found hyperenhanced spots in the frontal cortex area on T1-weighted MR images for transgenic mice, which corresponded qualitatively to amyloid plaques detected by thioflavin-S staining. For quantitative analysis, percent MR signal changes in six brain regions (olfactory cortex, frontal cortex, cerebral cortex, thalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex) were compared between transgenic and wild-type mice. We found significant increases in the percent MR signal changes in the olfactory cortex, frontal cortex, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus, but there were no significant differences in the thalamus and cerebellar cortex for transgenic mice compared with wild-type mice. This unique strategy allowed us to detect brain regions subjected to amyloid plaque deposition in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mouse models and has a potential to be developed for human applications, which has a current utility in preclinical research, particularly in monitoring therapeutic response for drug development in Alzheimer's disease.

  20. An inducible transgenic mouse breast cancer model for the analysis of tumor antigen specific CD8+ T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Michael; Wanger, Jara; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Deppert, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In Simian virus 40 (SV40) transgenic BALB/c WAP-T mice tumor development and progression is driven by SV40 tumor antigens encoded by inducible transgenes. WAP-T mice constitute a well characterized mouse model for breast cancer with strong similarities to the corresponding human disease. BALB/c mice mount only a weak cellular immune response against SV40 T-antigen (T-Ag). For studying tumor antigen specific CD8+ T-cell responses against transgene expressing cells, we created WAP-TNP mice, in which the transgene additionally codes for the NP118–126-epitope contained within the nucleoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), the immune-dominant T-cell epitope in BALB/c mice. We then investigated in WAP-TNP mice the immune responses against SV40 tumor antigens and the NP-epitope within the chimeric T-Ag/NP protein (T-AgNP). Analysis of the immune-reactivity against T-Ag in WAP-T and of T-AgNP in WAP-TNP mice revealed that, in contrast to wild type (wt) BALB/c mice, WAP-T and WAP-TNP mice were non-reactive against T-Ag. However, like wtBALB/c mice, WAP-T as well as WAP-TNP mice were highly reactive against the immune-dominant LCMV NP-epitope, thereby allowing the analysis of NP-epitope specific cellular immune responses in WAP-TNP mice. LCMV infection of WAP-TNP mice induced a strong, LCMV NP-epitope specific CD8+ T-cell response, which was able to specifically eliminate T-AgNP expressing mammary epithelial cells both prior to tumor formation (i.e. in cells of lactating mammary glands), as well as in invasive tumors. Elimination of tumor cells, however, was only transient, even after repeated LCMV infections. Further studies showed that already non-infected WAP-TNP tumor mice contained LCMV NP-epitope specific CD8+ T-cells, albeit with strongly reduced, though measurable activity. Functional impairment of these ‘endogenous’ NP-epitope specific T-cells seems to be caused by expression of the programmed death-1 protein (PD1), as anti-PD1 treatment of

  1. Value-Added Modeling of Teacher Effectiveness: An Exploration of Stability across Models and Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Xiaoxia A.; Darling-Hammond, Linda; Haertel, Edward; Thomas, Ewart

    2010-01-01

    Recent policy interest in tying student learning to teacher evaluation has led to growing use of value-added methods for assessing student learning gains linked to individual teachers. VAM analyses rely on complex assumptions about the roles of schools, multiple teachers, student aptitudes and efforts, homes and families in producing measured…

  2. Modulation of hippocampal excitability by 5-HT4 receptor agonists persists in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Spencer, J P; Brown, J T; Richardson, J C; Medhurst, A D; Sehmi, S S; Calver, A R; Randall, A D

    2004-01-01

    5-HT(4) receptors are widely distributed in both peripheral and central nervous systems where they couple, via a G-protein, to the activation of adenylate cyclase. In the brain, the highest 5-HT(4) receptor densities are found in the limbic system, including the hippocampus and frontal cortex. It has been suggested that activation of these receptors may be of therapeutic benefit in diseases that produce cognitive deficits such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that the 5-HT(4) agonist, Zacopride, can increase population spike amplitude recorded in region CA1 of rat hippocampal slices in a cyclic AMP (cAMP)/cAMP-dependent protein kinase A-dependent manner. We report here that the 5-HT(4) agonist, Prucalopride, and the 5-HT(4) partial agonist, SL65.0155, produce a similar effect in rat hippocampal slices and that the specific 5-HT(4) antagonist, GR113808, blocks these effects. To investigate the potential use of 5-HT(4) agonists in the treatment of AD, Prucalopride was applied to hippocampal slices from a transgenic mouse line that overexpresses the Abeta peptide. Despite the deficit in synaptic transmission present in these mice, the percentage increase of the CA1 population spike induced by Prucalopride was the same as that observed in wild-type mice. These data support 5-HT(4) receptors as a target for cognitive enhancement and suggest that a partial agonist would be sufficient to produce benefits, while reducing potential peripheral side effects. In addition, we show that 5-HT(4) receptors remain functional in the presence of excess Abeta peptide and may therefore be a useful target in AD.

  3. A Novel mouse model of enhanced proteostasis: Full-length human heat shock factor 1 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Anson; Wei, Rochelle; Halade, Dipti; Yoo, Si-Eun; Ran, Qitao; Richardson, Arlan

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Development of mouse overexpressing native human HSF1 in all tissues including CNS. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances heat shock response at whole-animal and cellular level. {yields} HSF1 overexpression protects from polyglutamine toxicity and favors aggresomes. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances proteostasis at the whole-animal and cellular level. -- Abstract: The heat shock response (HSR) is controlled by the master transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 maintains proteostasis and resistance to stress through production of heat shock proteins (HSPs). No transgenic model exists that overexpresses HSF1 in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). We generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 and observed a 2-4-fold increase in HSF1 mRNA and protein expression in all tissues studied of HSF1 transgenic (HSF1{sup +/0}) mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates, including several regions of the CNS. Basal expression of HSP70 and 90 showed only mild tissue-specific changes; however, in response to forced exercise, the skeletal muscle HSR was more elevated in HSF1{sup +/0} mice compared to WT littermates and in fibroblasts following heat shock, as indicated by levels of inducible HSP70 mRNA and protein. HSF1{sup +/0} cells elicited a significantly more robust HSR in response to expression of the 82 repeat polyglutamine-YFP fusion construct (Q82YFP) and maintained proteasome-dependent processing of Q82YFP compared to WT fibroblasts. Overexpression of HSF1 was associated with fewer, but larger Q82YFP aggregates resembling aggresomes in HSF1{sup +/0} cells, and increased viability. Therefore, our data demonstrate that tissues and cells from mice overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 exhibit enhanced proteostasis.

  4. Toxicological aspects of treatment to remove cyanobacterial toxins from drinking water determined using the heterozygous P53 transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Senogles-Derham, P-J; Seawright, A; Shaw, G; Wickramisingh, W; Shahin, M

    2003-06-01

    The presence of toxic cyanobacteria in drinking water reservoirs renders the need to develop treatment methods for the 'safe' removal of their associated toxins. Chlorine has been shown to successfully remove a range of cyanotoxins including microcystins, cylindrospermopsin and saxitoxins. Each cyanotoxin requires specific treatment parameters, particularly solution pH and free chlorine residual. However, currently there has not been any investigation into the toxicological effect of solutions treated for the removal of these cyanotoxins by chlorine. Using the P53(def) transgenic mouse model male and female C57BL/6J hybrid mice were used to investigate potential cancer inducing effects from such oral dosing solutions. Both purified cyanotoxins and toxic cell-free extract cyanobacterial solutions were chlorinated and administered over 90 and 170 days (respectively) in drinking water. No increase in cancer was found in any treatment. The parent cyanotoxins, microcystins, cylindrospermopsin and saxitoxins were readily removed by chlorine. There was no significant increase in the disinfection by-products trihalomethanes or haloacetic acids, levels found were well below guideline values. Histological examination identified no effect of treatment solutions except male mice treated with chlorinated cylindrospermopsin (as a cell free extract). In this instance 40% of males were found to have fatty vacuolation in their livers, cause unknown. It is recommended that further toxicology be undertaken on chlorinated cyanobacterial solutions, particularly for non-genotoxic carcinogenic compounds, for example the Tg. AC transgenic mouse model.

  5. Molecular Targeting of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma With Fluorescently Labeled Ratiometric Activatable Cell Penetrating Peptides in a Transgenic Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    OROSCO, RYAN K.; SAVARIAR, ELAMPRAKASH N.; WEISSBROD, PHILIP A.; DIAZ-PEREZ, JULIO A.; BOUVET, MICHAEL; TSIEN, ROGER Y.; NGUYEN, QUYEN T.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Molecularly targeted fluorescent molecules may help detect tumors that are unseen by traditional white-light surgical techniques. We sought to evaluate a fluorescent ratiometric activatable cell penetrating peptide (RACPP) for tumor detection in a transgenic model of PTC. Methods Thirteen BRAFV600E mice with PTC were studied—seven injected intravenously with RACPP, four controls with saline. Total thyroidectomy was performed with microscopic white-light visualization. Fluorescent imaging of post-thyroidectomy fields was performed, and tissue with increased signal was removed and evaluated for PTC. Final samples were analyzed by a pathologist blinded to conditions. Vocal cord function was evaluated postoperatively with video laryngoscopy. Results The average in situ ratiometric (Cy5/Cy7) thyroid tumor-to-background contrast ratio was 2.27 +/−0.91. Fluorescence-guided clean-up following thyroidectomy identified additional tumor in 2 of 7 RACPP animals (smallest dimension 1.2 mm), and decreased the number of animals with residual tumor from 4 to 3. All retained tumor foci on final pathology were smaller than 0.76 mm. Intact vocal abduction was present in all of the RACPP animals. Conclusions RACPPs successfully targeted PTC in a transgenic thyroidectomy model, and allowed for residual tumor detection that reduced positive margins beyond what was possible with white-light surgery alone. PMID:26799257

  6. The VIS-AD data model: Integrating metadata and polymorphic display with a scientific programming language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, William L.; Dyer, Charles R.; Paul, Brian E.

    1994-01-01

    The VIS-AD data model integrates metadata about the precision of values, including missing data indicators and the way that arrays sample continuous functions, with the data objects of a scientific programming language. The data objects of this data model form a lattice, ordered by the precision with which they approximate mathematical objects. We define a similar lattice of displays and study visualization processes as functions from data lattices to display lattices. Such functions can be applied to visualize data objects of all data types and are thus polymorphic.

  7. A Leasing Model to Deal with Partial Failures in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Boix, Elisa; van Cutsem, Tom; Vallejos, Jorge; de Meuter, Wolfgang; D'Hondt, Theo

    In mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) many partial failures are the result of temporary network partitions due to the intermittent connectivity of mobile devices. Some of these failures will be permanent and require application-level failure handling. However, it is impossible to distinguish a permanent from a transient failure. Leasing provides a solution to this problem based on the temporal restriction of resources. But to date no leasing model has been designed specifically for MANETs. In this paper, we identify three characteristics required for a leasing model to be usable in a MANET, discuss the issues with existing leasing models and then propose the leased object references model, which integrates leasing with remote object references. In addition, we describe an implementation of the model in the programming language AmbientTalk. Leased object references provide an extensible framework that allows programmers to express their own leasing patterns and enables both lease holders (clients) and lease grantors (services) to deal with permanent failures.

  8. Homoclinic Spike adding in a neuronal model in the presence of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuwape, Ibiyinka; Neiman, Alexander; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2008-03-01

    We study the influence of noise on a spike adding transitions within the bursting activity in a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of the leech heart interneuron. Spike adding in this model occur via homoclinic bifurcation of a saddle periodic orbit. Although narrow chaotic regions are observed near bifurcation transition, overall bursting dynamics is regular and is characterized by a constant number of spikes per burst. Experimental studies, however, show variability of bursting patterns whereby number of spikes per burst varies randomly. Thus, introduction of external synaptic noise is a necessary step to account for variability of burst durations observed experimentally. We show that near every such transition the neuron is highly sensitive to random perturbations that lead to and enhance broadly the regions of chaotic dynamics of the cell. For each spike adding transition there is a critical noise level beyond which the dynamics of the neuron becomes chaotic throughout the entire region of the given transition. Noise-induced chaotic dynamics is characterized in terms of the Lyapunov exponents and the Shannon entropy and reflects variability of firing patterns with various numbers of spikes per burst, traversing wide range of the neuron's parameters

  9. Constraints on tachyon inflationary models with an AdS/CFT correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouabdallaoui, Zahra; Errahmani, Ahmed; Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Ouali, Taoufik

    2016-12-01

    To study the effect of the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence (AdS/CFT) on the primordial inflationary era, we consider a universe filled with a tachyon field in a slow-roll regime. In this context, the background and perturbative parameters characterizing the inflationary era are related to the standard one by correction terms. We show a clear agreement between the theoretical prediction and the observational data for the above-mentioned model. The main results of our work are illustrated for an exponential potential. We show that, for a suitable conformal anomaly coefficient, AdS/CFT correspondence might leave its imprints on the spectrum of the gravitational waves amplitude with a tensor to scalar ratio, r , of the perturbations compatible with Planck data.

  10. Generation and characterization of a CYP2A13/2B6/2F1-transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuan; Wu, Hong; Li, Lei; Liu, Zhihua; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Weng, Yan; D'Agostino, Jaime; Ling, Guoyu; Zhang, Xiuling; Kluetzman, Kerri; Yao, Yunyi; Ding, Xinxin

    2012-06-01

    CYP2A13, CYP2B6, and CYP2F1, which are encoded by neighboring cytochrome P450 genes on human chromosome 19, are active in the metabolic activation of many drugs, respiratory toxicants, and chemical carcinogens. To facilitate studies on the regulation and function of these human genes, we have generated a CYP2A13/2B6/2F1-transgenic (TG) mouse model (all *1 alleles). Homozygous transgenic mice are normal with respect to gross morphological features, development, and fertility. The tissue distribution of transgenic mRNA expression agreed well with the known respiratory tract-selective expression of CYP2A13 and CYP2F1 and hepatic expression of CYP2B6 in humans. CYP2A13 protein was detected through immunoblot analyses in the nasal mucosa (NM) (∼100 pmol/mg of microsomal protein; similar to the level of mouse CYP2A5) and the lung (∼0.2 pmol/mg of microsomal protein) but not in the liver of the TG mice. CYP2F1 protein, which could not be separated from mouse CYP2F2 in immunoblot analyses, was readily detected in the NM and lung but not the liver of TG/Cyp2f2-null mice, at levels 10- and 40-fold, respectively, lower than that of mouse CYP2F2 in the TG mice. CYP2B6 protein was detected in the liver (∼0.2 pmol/mg of microsomal protein) but not the NM or lung (with a detection limit of 0.04 pmol/mg of microsomal protein) of the TG mice. At least one transgenic protein (CYP2A13) seems to be active, because the NM of the TG mice had greater in vitro and in vivo activities in bioactivation of a CYP2A13 substrate, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (a lung carcinogen), than did the NM of wild-type mice.

  11. Linking immune-mediated arterial inflammation and cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Ludewig, Burkhard; Freigang, Stefan; Jäggi, Martin; Kurrer, Michael O.; Pei, Yao-Chang; Vlk, Lenka; Odermatt, Bernhard; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Hengartner, Hans

    2000-01-01

    Arterial inflammatory responses are thought to be a significant component of atherosclerotic disease. We describe here, using a transgenic approach, the mutual perpetuation of immune-mediated arterial inflammation and cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis. Mice expressing the bacterial transgene β-galactosidase exclusively in cardiomyocytes and in smooth muscle cells in lung arteries and the aorta (SM-LacZ), and hypercholesterolemic apolipoprotein E-deficient SM-LacZ mice (SM-LacZ/apoE−/−) developed myocarditis and arteritis after immunization with dendritic cells presenting a β-galactosidase-derived immunogenic peptide. Hypercholesterolemia amplified acute arteritis and perpetuated chronic arterial inflammation in SM-LacZ/apoE−/− mice, but had no major impact on acute myocarditis or the subsequent development of dilated cardiomyopathy. Conversely, arteritis significantly accelerated cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the linkage of immune-mediated arteritis and hypercholesterolemia favors initiation and maintenance of atherosclerotic lesion formation. Therapeutic strategies to prevent or disrupt such self-perpetuating vicious circles may be crucial for the successful treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:11050173

  12. Transgenic mouse models in the study of reproduction: insights into GATA protein function.

    PubMed

    Tevosian, Sergei G

    2014-07-01

    For the past 2 decades, transgenic technology in mice has allowed for an unprecedented insight into the transcriptional control of reproductive development and function. The key factor among the mouse genetic tools that made this rapid advance possible is a conditional transgenic approach, a particularly versatile method of creating gene deletions and substitutions in the mouse genome. A centerpiece of this strategy is an enzyme, Cre recombinase, which is expressed from defined DNA regulatory elements that are active in the tissue of choice. The regulatory DNA element (either genetically engineered or natural) assures Cre expression only in predetermined cell types, leading to the guided deletion of genetically modified (flanked by loxP or 'floxed' by loxP) gene loci. This review summarizes and compares the studies in which genes encoding GATA family transcription factors were targeted either globally or by Cre recombinases active in the somatic cells of ovaries and testes. The conditional gene loss experiments require detailed knowledge of the spatial and temporal expression of Cre activity, and the challenges in interpreting the outcomes are highlighted. These studies also expose the complexity of GATA-dependent regulation of gonadal gene expression and suggest that gene function is highly context dependent.

  13. Early alterations in blood and brain RANTES and MCP-1 expression and the effect of exercise frequency in the 3xTg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Morgan; Jones, Terry E; Lu, Qun; Bareiss, Sonja K

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to protect against cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression, however the dose of exercise required to protect against AD is unknown. Recent studies show that the pathological processes leading to AD cause characteristic alterations in blood and brain inflammatory proteins that are associated with the progression of AD, suggesting that these markers could be used to diagnosis and monitor disease progression. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of exercise frequency on AD blood chemokine profiles, and correlate these findings with chemokine brain expression changes in the triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mouse model. Three month old 3xTg-AD mice were subjected to 12 weeks of moderate intensity wheel running at a frequency of either 1×/week or 3×/week. Blood and cortical tissue were analyzed for expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and regulated and normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES). Alterations in blood RANTES and MCP-1 expression were evident at 3 and 6 month old animals compared to WT animals. Three times per week exercise but not 1×/week exercise was effective at reversing serum and brain RANTES and MCP-1 expression to the levels of WT controls, revealing a dose dependent response to exercise. Analysis of these chemokines showed a strong negative correlation between blood and brain expression of RANTES. The results indicate that alterations in serum and brain inflammatory chemokines are evident as early signs of Alzheimer's disease pathology and that higher frequency exercise was necessary to restore blood and brain inflammatory expression levels in this AD mouse model.

  14. Prediction of S-glutathionylated Proteins Progression in Alzheimer's Transgenic Mouse Model Using Principle Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Kuo, Ching-Chang; Chiu, Alan W.L.; Feng, June

    2014-01-01

    To date, prediction of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is mainly based on clinical criteria because no well-established biochemical biomarkers for routine clinical diagnosis of AD currently exist. We developed an approach to aid in the early diagnosis of AD by using principal component analysis (PCA)-based spectral analysis of oxidized protein electrophoretic profiling. We found that the combination of capillary electrophoresis and PCA analysis of S-glutathionylation distribution characterization can be used in the sample classification and molecular weight (Mw) prediction. The comparison of leave-one-out AD versus non-AD gives the sensitivity of 100% and 93.33% in brain tissues and blood samples, respectively, while the specificity of 100% in brain and 90.0% in blood samples. Our findings demonstrate that PCA of S-glutathionylation electrophoretic profiling detects AD pathology features, and that the molecular weight based electrophoretic profiling of blood and brain S-glutathionylated proteins are sensitive to change, even at the early stage of the disease. Our results offer a previously unexplored diagnostic approach by using electrophoretic characteristics of oxidized proteins to serve as a predictor of AD progression and early stage screening. PMID:22475799

  15. Development of a transgenic goat model wih cardiac-specific overexpression of transforming growth factor - {beta} 1 to study the relationship between atrial fibrosis and atrial fibrillation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies on patients, large animal models and transgenic mouse models have shown a strong association of atrial fibrosis with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is unclear whether there is a causal relationship between atrial fibrosis and AF or whether these events appear as a result of independen...

  16. Human Neural Progenitor Transplantation Rescues Behavior and Reduces α-Synuclein in a Transgenic Model of Dementia with Lewy Bodies.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Natalie R S; Marsh, Samuel E; Ochaba, Joseph; Shelley, Brandon C; Davtyan, Hayk; Thompson, Leslie M; Steffan, Joan S; Svendsen, Clive N; Blurton-Jones, Mathew

    2017-02-22

    Synucleinopathies are a group of neurodegenerative disorders sharing the common feature of misfolding and accumulation of the presynaptic protein α-synuclein (α-syn) into insoluble aggregates. Within this diverse group, Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) is characterized by the aberrant accumulation of α-syn in cortical, hippocampal, and brainstem neurons, resulting in multiple cellular stressors that particularly impair dopamine and glutamate neurotransmission and related motor and cognitive function. Recent studies show that murine neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation can improve cognitive or motor function in transgenic models of Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease, and DLB. However, examination of clinically relevant human NSCs in these models is hindered by the challenges of xenotransplantation and the confounding effects of immunosuppressant drugs on pathology and behavior. To address this challenge, we developed an immune-deficient transgenic model of DLB that lacks T-, B-, and NK-cells, yet exhibits progressive accumulation of human α-syn (h-α-syn)-laden inclusions and cognitive and motor impairments. We demonstrate that clinically relevant human neural progenitor cells (line CNS10-hNPCs) survive, migrate extensively and begin to differentiate preferentially into astrocytes following striatal transplantation into this DLB model. Critically, grafted CNS10-hNPCs rescue both cognitive and motor deficits after 1 and 3 months and, furthermore, restore striatal dopamine and glutamate systems. These behavioral and neurochemical benefits are likely achieved by reducing α-syn oligomers. Collectively, these results using a new model of DLB demonstrate that hNPC transplantation can impact a broad array of disease mechanisms and phenotypes and suggest a cellular therapeutic strategy that should be pursued. © Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017.

  17. Rosmarinic Acid Alleviates Neurological Symptoms in the G93A-SOD1 Transgenic Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji-Seon; Choi, Juli; Leem, Yea-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord, resulting in paralysis of voluntary skeletal muscles and eventually death, usually within 2~3 years of symptom onset. The pathophysiology mechanism underlying ALS is not yet clearly understood. Moreover the available medication for treating ALS, riluzole, only modestly improves neurological symptoms and increases survival by a few months. Therefore, improved therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In the present study, we investigated whether rosmarinic acid has a therapeutic potential to alleviate neurological deterioration in the G93A-SOD1 transgenic mouse model of ALS. Treatment of G93A-SOD1 transgenic mice with rosmarinic acid from 7 weeks of age at the dose of 400 mg/kg/day significantly extended survival, and relieved motor function deficits. Specifically, disease onset and symptom progression were delayed by more than one month. These symptomatic improvements were correlated with decreased oxidative stress and reduced neuronal loss in the ventral horns of G93A-SOD1 mice. These results support that rosmarinic acid is a potentially useful supplement for relieving ALS symptoms. PMID:26713081

  18. Transgenic Mouse Model Harboring the Transcriptional Fusion Ccl20-Luciferase as a Novel Reporter of Pro-Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Crispo, Martina; Van Maele, Laurye; Tabareau, Julien; Cayet, Delphine; Errea, Agustina; Ferreira, Ana María; Rumbo, Martin; Sirard, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    The chemokine CCL20, the unique ligand of CCR6 functions as an attractant of immune cells. Expression of CCL20 is induced by Toll-like Receptor (TLR) signaling or proinflammatory cytokine stimulation. However CCL20 is also constitutively produced at specific epithelial sites of mucosa. This expression profile is achieved by transcriptional regulation. In the present work we characterized regulatory features of mouse Ccl20 gene. Transcriptional fusions between the mouse Ccl20 promoter and the firefly luciferase (luc) encoding gene were constructed and assessed in in vitro and in vivo assays. We found that liver CCL20 expression and luciferase activity were upregulated by systemic administration of the TLR5 agonist flagellin. Using shRNA and dominant negative form specific for mouse TLR5, we showed that this expression was controlled by TLR5. To address in situ the regulation of gene activity, a transgenic mouse line harboring a functional Ccl20-luc fusion was generated. The luciferase expression was highly concordant with Ccl20 expression in different tissues. Our data indicate that the transgenic mouse model can be used to monitor activation of innate response in vivo. PMID:24265691

  19. Transgenic mouse model harboring the transcriptional fusion ccl20-luciferase as a novel reporter of pro-inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Crispo, Martina; Van Maele, Laurye; Tabareau, Julien; Cayet, Delphine; Errea, Agustina; Ferreira, Ana María; Rumbo, Martin; Sirard, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    The chemokine CCL20, the unique ligand of CCR6 functions as an attractant of immune cells. Expression of CCL20 is induced by Toll-like Receptor (TLR) signaling or proinflammatory cytokine stimulation. However CCL20 is also constitutively produced at specific epithelial sites of mucosa. This expression profile is achieved by transcriptional regulation. In the present work we characterized regulatory features of mouse Ccl20 gene. Transcriptional fusions between the mouse Ccl20 promoter and the firefly luciferase (luc) encoding gene were constructed and assessed in in vitro and in vivo assays. We found that liver CCL20 expression and luciferase activity were upregulated by systemic administration of the TLR5 agonist flagellin. Using shRNA and dominant negative form specific for mouse TLR5, we showed that this expression was controlled by TLR5. To address in situ the regulation of gene activity, a transgenic mouse line harboring a functional Ccl20-luc fusion was generated. The luciferase expression was highly concordant with Ccl20 expression in different tissues. Our data indicate that the transgenic mouse model can be used to monitor activation of innate response in vivo.

  20. A novel sulindac derivative lacking cyclooxygenase-inhibitory activities suppresses carcinogenesis in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Jinhui; Wang, Lei; Quealy, Emily; Gary, Bernard D; Reynolds, Robert C; Piazza, Gary A; Lü, Junxuan

    2010-07-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including sulindac are well documented to be highly effective for cancer chemoprevention. However, their cyclooxygenase (COX)-inhibitory activities cause severe gastrointestinal, renal, and cardiovascular toxicities, limiting their chronic use. Recent studies suggest that COX-independent mechanisms may be responsible for the chemopreventive benefits of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and support the potential for the development of a novel generation of sulindac derivatives lacking COX inhibition for cancer chemoprevention. A prototypic sulindac derivative with a N,N-dimethylammonium substitution called sulindac sulfide amide (SSA) was recently identified to be devoid of COX-inhibitory activity yet displays much more potent tumor cell growth-inhibitory activity in vitro compared with sulindac sulfide. In this study, we investigated the androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathway as a potential target for its COX-independent antineoplastic mechanism and evaluated its chemopreventive efficacy against prostate carcinogenesis using the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate model. The results showed that SSA significantly suppressed the growth of human and mouse prostate cancer cells expressing AR in strong association with G(1) arrest, and decreased AR level and AR-dependent transactivation. Dietary SSA consumption dramatically attenuated prostatic growth and suppressed AR-dependent glandular epithelial lesion progression through repressing cell proliferation in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate mice, whereas it did not significantly affect neuroendocrine carcinoma growth. Overall, the results suggest that SSA may be a chemopreventive candidate against prostate glandular epithelial carcinogenesis.

  1. DNA vaccine elicits an efficient antitumor response by targeting the mutant Kras in a transgenic mouse lung cancer model.

    PubMed

    Weng, T-Y; Yen, M-C; Huang, C-T; Hung, J-J; Chen, Y-L; Chen, W-C; Wang, C-Y; Chang, J-Y; Lai, M-D

    2014-10-01

    Mutant Kras (V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) is observed in more than 20% of non-small-cell lung cancers; however, no effective Kras target therapy is available at present. The Kras DNA vaccine may represent as a novel immunotherapeutic agent in lung cancer. In this study, we investigated the antitumor efficacy of the Kras DNA vaccine in a genetically engineered inducible mouse lung tumor model driven by Kras(G12D). Lung tumors were induced by doxycycline, and the therapeutic effects of Kras DNA vaccine were evaluated with delivery of Kras(G12D) plasmids. Mutant Kras(G12D) DNA vaccine significantly decreased the tumor nodules. A dominant-negative mutant Kras(G12D)N17, devoid of oncogenic activity, achieved similar therapeutic effects. The T-helper 1 immune response was enhanced in mice treated with Kras DNA vaccine. Splenocytes from mice receiving Kras DNA vaccine presented an antigen-specific response by treatment with peptides of Kras but not Hras or OVA. The number of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells increased after Kras vaccination. In contrast, Kras DNA vaccine was not effective in the lung tumor in transgenic mice, which was induced by mutant L858R epidermal growth factor receptor. Overall, these results indicate that Kras DNA vaccine produces an effective antitumor response in transgenic mice, and may be useful in treating lung cancer-carrying Ras mutation.

  2. High protein diet attenuates histopathologic organ damage and vascular leakage in transgenic murine model of sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Manci, Elizabeth Ann; Hyacinth, Hyacinth I; Capers, Patrice L; Archer, David R; Pitts, Sydney; Ghosh, Samit; Patrickson, John; Titford, Michael E; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F; Hibbert, Jacqueline M

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that a high protein diet improves weight gain and decreases expression of inflammatory markers in weanling Berkeley transgenic sickle cell mice. The effect of this diet on the underlying histopathology, however, has not been studied. Age-matched, male C57BL/6 controls (n=24), Berkley sickle mice (n=31) and Townes sickle mice (n=14) were randomized in a terminal experiment at weaning to isoenergetic diets, with either normal (20%) or high (35%) amount of energy from protein, by replacing dextrin. Tissue sampling for blinded histologic study and scoring of changes at baseline and after 3 months of feedings showed progressive siderosis and infarcts in spleen, kidney, and liver in all sickle groups, and no significant changes in age- and sex-matched normal controls. High-protein (35%) fed Berkeley sickle mice had significantly fewer (p<0.01) infarcts in spleen (35.7% less), liver (12.5% less), and kidney (28.6% less) and lower histopathologic scores (p<0.01) for chronic tissue injury in liver and spleen than matched normal-protein (20%) fed Berkeley sickle mice. In addition, high-protein fed Townes sickle mice had less vascular leakage (~36%) in the heart, lungs, and brain and a better survival rate (21%) than matched normal-protein Townes sickle mice. This is the first report of histopathologic evidence that a high protein:calorie diet attenuates sickle cell related chronic organ injury in transgenic sickle cell mouse models. PMID:24842894

  3. Spin Matrix theory: a quantum mechanical model of the AdS/CFT correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmark, Troels; Orselli, Marta

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a new quantum mechanical theory called Spin Matrix theory (SMT). The theory is interacting with a single coupling constant g and is based on a Hilbert space of harmonic oscillators with a spin index taking values in a Lie (super)algebra representation as well as matrix indices for the adjoint representation of U( N). We show that SMT describes super-Yang-Mills theory (SYM) near zero-temperature critical points in the grand canonical phase diagram. Equivalently, SMT arises from non-relativistic limits of SYM. Even though SMT is a non-relativistic quantum mechanical theory it contains a variety of phases mimicking the AdS/CFT correspondence. Moreover, the g → ∞ limit of SMT can be mapped to the supersymmetric sector of string theory on AdS5 × S 5. We study SU(2) SMT in detail. At large N and low temperatures it is a theory of spin chains that for small g resembles planar gauge theory and for large g a non-relativistic string theory. When raising the temperature a partial deconfinement transition occurs due to finite- N effects. For sufficiently high temperatures the partially deconfined phase has a classical regime. We find a matrix model description of this regime at any coupling g. Setting g = 0 it is a theory of N 2 + 1 harmonic oscillators while for large g it becomes 2 N harmonic oscillators.

  4. Progressive cognitive deficit, motor impairment and striatal pathology in a transgenic Huntington disease monkey model from infancy to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Chan, Anthony W S; Jiang, Jie; Chen, Yiju; Li, Chunxia; Prucha, Melinda S; Hu, Yijuan; Chi, Tim; Moran, Sean; Rahim, Tayeb; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiaojiang; Zola, Stuart M; Testa, Claudia M; Mao, Hui; Villalba, Rosa; Smith, Yoland; Zhang, Xiaodong; Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    2015-01-01

    One of the roadblocks to developing effective therapeutics for Huntington disease (HD) is the lack of animal models that develop progressive clinical traits comparable to those seen in patients. Here we report a longitudinal study that encompasses cognitive and motor assessment, and neuroimaging of a group of transgenic HD and control monkeys from infancy to adulthood. Along with progressive cognitive and motor impairment, neuroimaging revealed a progressive reduction in striatal volume. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 48 months of age revealed a decrease of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), further suggesting neuronal damage/loss in the striatum. Postmortem neuropathological analyses revealed significant neuronal loss in the striatum. Our results indicate that HD monkeys share similar disease patterns with HD patients, making them potentially suitable as a preclinical HD animal model.

  5. Progressive Cognitive Deficit, Motor Impairment and Striatal Pathology in a Transgenic Huntington Disease Monkey Model from Infancy to Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anthony W. S.; Prucha, Melinda S.; Hu, Yijuan; Chi, Tim; Moran, Sean; Rahim, Tayeb; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiaojiang; Zola, Stuart M.; Testa, Claudia M.; Mao, Hui; Villalba, Rosa; Smith, Yoland; Zhang, Xiaodong; Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    2015-01-01

    One of the roadblocks to developing effective therapeutics for Huntington disease (HD) is the lack of animal models that develop progressive clinical traits comparable to those seen in patients. Here we report a longitudinal study that encompasses cognitive and motor assessment, and neuroimaging of a group of transgenic HD and control monkeys from infancy to adulthood. Along with progressive cognitive and motor impairment, neuroimaging revealed a progressive reduction in striatal volume. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 48 months of age revealed a decrease of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), further suggesting neuronal damage/loss in the striatum. Postmortem neuropathological analyses revealed significant neuronal loss in the striatum. Our results indicate that HD monkeys share similar disease patterns with HD patients, making them potentially suitable as a preclinical HD animal model. PMID:25966278

  6. Ataxin-2 Regulates RGS8 Translation in a New BAC-SCA2 Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Karla P.; Rinehart, Marc D.; Wiest, Shaina; Pflieger, Lance T.; Scoles, Daniel R.; Pulst, Stefan M.

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder with progressive degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) and other neurons caused by expansion of a glutamine (Q) tract in the ATXN2 protein. We generated BAC transgenic lines in which the full-length human ATXN2 gene was transcribed using its endogenous regulatory machinery. Mice with the ATXN2 BAC transgene with an expanded CAG repeat (BAC-Q72) developed a progressive cellular and motor phenotype, whereas BAC mice expressing wild-type human ATXN2 (BAC-Q22) were indistinguishable from control mice. Expression analysis of laser-capture microdissected (LCM) fractions and regional expression confirmed that the BAC transgene was expressed in PCs and in other neuronal groups such as granule cells (GCs) and neurons in deep cerebellar nuclei as well as in spinal cord. Transcriptome analysis by deep RNA-sequencing revealed that BAC-Q72 mice had progressive changes in steady-state levels of specific mRNAs including Rgs8, one of the earliest down-regulated transcripts in the Pcp2-ATXN2[Q127] mouse line. Consistent with LCM analysis, transcriptome changes analyzed by deep RNA-sequencing were not restricted to PCs, but were also seen in transcripts enriched in GCs such as Neurod1. BAC-Q72, but not BAC-Q22 mice had reduced Rgs8 mRNA levels and even more severely reduced steady-state protein levels. Using RNA immunoprecipitation we showed that ATXN2 interacted selectively with RGS8 mRNA. This interaction was impaired when ATXN2 harbored an expanded polyglutamine. Mutant ATXN2 also reduced RGS8 expression in an in vitro coupled translation assay when compared with equal expression of wild-type ATXN2-Q22. Reduced abundance of Rgs8 in Pcp2-ATXN2[Q127] and BAC-Q72 mice supports our observations of a hyper-excitable mGluR1-ITPR1 signaling axis in SCA2, as RGS proteins are linked to attenuating mGluR1 signaling. PMID:25902068

  7. Inverse magnetic catalysis in the soft-wall model of AdS/QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Danning; Huang, Mei; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Pei-Hung

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic effects on chiral phase transition have been investigated in a modified soft-wall AdS/QCD model, in which the dilaton field is taken to be negative at the ultraviolet region and positive at the infrared region as in Phys. Rev. D 93 (2016) 101901 and JHEP 04 (2016) 036. The magnetic field is introduced into the background geometry by solving the Einstein-Maxwell system. After embedding the magnetized background geometry into the modified soft-wall model, the magnetic field dependent behavior of chiral condensate is worked out numerically. It is found that, in the chiral limit, the chiral phase transition remains as a second order at finite magnetic field B, while the symmetry restoration temperature and chiral condensate decrease with the increasing of magnetic field in small B region. When including finite quark mass effect, the phase transition turns to be a crossover one, and the transition temperature still decreases with increasing magnetic field B when B is not very large. In this sense, inverse magnetic catalysis effect is observed in this modified soft-wall AdS/QCD model.

  8. Early postnatal handling and environmental enrichment improve the behavioral responses of 17-month-old 3xTg-AD and non-transgenic mice in the Forced Swim Test in a gender-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Torres-Lista, Virginia; Giménez-Llort, Lydia

    2015-11-01

    Forced Swimming Test (FST) models behavioural despair in animals by loss of motivation to respond or the refusal to escape. The present study was aimed at characterizing genetic (genotype and gender) and environmental factors (age/stage of disease and rearing conditions: C, standard; H, early postnatal handling; EE, environmental enrichment consisting in physical exercise as well as social and object enrichment) that may modulate the poor behavioural and cognitive flexibility response we have recently described in 12-month-old male 3xTg-AD mice in the FST. The comprehensive analysis of the ethogram shown in the FST considered the intervals of the test (0-2 and 2-6min), all the elicited behavioural responses (immobility, swimming and climbing) and their features (total duration and frequency of episodes). The long persistence of behaviours found in 17-month-old (late-stages of disease) 3xTg-AD mice was comparable to that recently described in males at 12 months of age (beginning of advanced stages) but also suggested increased age-dependent frailty in both genotypes. The poor behavioral flexibility of 3xTg-AD mice to elicit the behavioural despair shown by the NTg mice, was also found in the female gender. Finally, the present work demonstrates that early-life interventions were able to improve the time and frequency of episodes of immobility, being more evident in the female gender of both old NTg and 3xTg-AD mice. Ontogenic modulation by early-postnatal handling resulted in a more effective long-term improvement of the elicited behaviours in the FST than that achieved by environmental enrichment. The results talk in favor of the beneficence of early-life interventions on ageing in both healthy and disease conditions.

  9. A transgenic-cloned pig model expressing non-fluorescent modified Plum

    PubMed Central

    NAGAYA, Masaki; WATANABE, Masahito; KOBAYASHI, Mirina; NAKANO, Kazuaki; ARAI, Yoshikazu; ASANO, Yoshinori; TAKEISHI, Toki; UMEKI, Ikuma; FUKUDA, Tooru; YASHIMA, Sayaka; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; WATANABE, Nobuyuki; ONODERA, Masafumi; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified pigs that express fluorescent proteins such as green and red fluorescent proteins have become indispensable biomedical research tools in recent years. Cell or tissue transplantation studies using fluorescent markers should be conducted, wherein the xeno-antigenicity of the fluorescent proteins does not affect engraftment or graft survival. Thus, we aimed to create a transgenic (Tg)-cloned pig that was immunologically tolerant to fluorescent protein antigens. In the present study, we generated a Tg-cloned pig harboring a derivative of Plum modified by a single amino acid substitution in the chromophore. The cells and tissues of this Tg-cloned pig expressing the modified Plum (mPlum) did not fluoresce. However, western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses clearly showed that the mPlum had the same antigenicity as Plum. Thus, we have obtained primary proof of principle for creating a cloned pig that is immunologically tolerant to fluorescent protein antigens. PMID:27396383

  10. The value of adding optics to ecosystem models: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M.; Boss, E.; Chai, F.

    2007-05-01

    matter to the modeled properties. Coupling explicit optics to an ecosystem model provides several advantages in generating: (1) a more accurate subsurface light-field, which is important for light sensitive biogeochemical processes such as photosynthesis and photo-oxidation, (2) added constraints on model parameters that help to reduce uncertainties in ecosystem model simulations, and (3) model output which is comparable to basic remotely-sensed properties. In addition, the coupling of biogeochemical models and optics paves the road for future assimilation of ocean color and in-situ measured optical properties into the models.

  11. The novel adaptive rotating beam test unmasks sensorimotor impairments in a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gerstenberger, Julia; Bauer, Anne; Helmschrodt, Christin; Richter, Angelika; Richter, Franziska

    2016-05-01

    Development of disease modifying therapeutics for Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, relies on availability of animal models which recapitulate the disease hallmarks. Only few transgenic mouse models, which mimic overexpression of alpha-synuclein, show dopamine loss, behavioral impairments and protein aggregation. Mice overexpressing human wildtype alpha-synuclein under the Thy-1 promotor (Thy1-aSyn) replicate these features. However, female mice do not exhibit a phenotype. This was attributed to a potentially lower transgene expression located on the X chromosome. Here we support that female mice overexpress human wildtype alpha-synuclein only about 1.5 fold in the substantia nigra, compared to about 3 fold in male mice. Since female Thy1-aSyn mice were shown previously to exhibit differences in corticostriatal communication and synaptic plasticity similar to their male counterparts we hypothesized that female mice use compensatory mechanisms and strategies to not show overt motor deficits despite an underlying endophenotype. In order to unmask these deficits we translated recent findings in PD patients that sensory abnormalities can enhance motor dysfunction into a novel behavioral test, the adaptive rotating beam test. We found that under changing sensory input female Thy1-aSyn mice showed an overt phenotype. Our data supports that the integration of sensorimotor information is likely a major contributor to symptoms of movement disorders and that even low levels of overexpression of human wildtype alpha-synuclein has the potential to disrupt processing of these information. The here described adaptive rotating beam test represents a sensitive behavioral test to detect moderate sensorimotor alterations in mouse models.

  12. Homoclinic chaos in axisymmetric Bianchi-IX cosmological models with an ad hoc quantum potential

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, G. C.; Stuchi, T. J.; Joras, S. E.

    2010-04-15

    In this work we study the dynamics of the axisymmetric Bianchi-IX cosmological model with a term of quantum potential added. As it is well known, this class of Bianchi-IX models is homogeneous and anisotropic with two scale factors, A(t) and B(t), derived from the solution of Einstein's equation for general relativity. The model we use in this work has a cosmological constant and the matter content is dust. To this model we add a quantum-inspired potential that is intended to represent short-range effects due to the general relativistic behavior of matter in small scales and play the role of a repulsive force near the singularity. We find that this potential restricts the dynamics of the model to positive values of A(t) and B(t) and alters some qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the dynamics studied previously by several authors. We make a complete analysis of the phase space of the model finding critical points, periodic orbits, stable/unstable manifolds using numerical techniques such as Poincare section, numerical continuation of orbits, and numerical globalization of invariant manifolds. We compare the classical and the quantum models. Our main result is the existence of homoclinic crossings of the stable and unstable manifolds in the physically meaningful region of the phase space [where both A(t) and B(t) are positive], indicating chaotic escape to inflation and bouncing near the singularity.

  13. Discounting testimony with the argument ad hominem and a Bayesian congruent prior model.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Jaydeep-Singh; Oaksford, Mike

    2015-09-01

    When directed to ignore evidence of a witness's previous bad character because of a violation of the rules of evidence, are jurors' beliefs still affected? The intuition is that they will be because in everyday argumentation, fallacies, like the ad hominem, are effective argumentative strategies. An ad hominem argument (against the person) undermines a conclusion by questioning the character of the proposer. This intuition divides current theories of argumentation. According to pragmadialectical theory (e.g., Van Eemeren & Grootendorst, 2004), procedural rules exactly like the rules of evidence are part of our cognitive resources for evaluating arguments. If one of these rules is violated, an argument should be treated as a fallacy and so it should not alter someone's belief in the conclusion. Some recent experiments investigating how reasonable these arguments are perceived to be seem to support this account (van Eemeren, Garssen, & Meuffels, 2009). These experiments are critiqued from the perspective of the relevance (Walton, 2009, 2010) and epistemic (Hahn & Oaksford, 2006, 2007; Oaksford & Hahn, 2004) approaches to argumentation. An experiment investigates the predictions of these approaches for a graded belief change version of van Eemeren et al.'s (2009) experiment, and the results are modeled using a Bayesian congruent prior model. These results cannot be explained by the pragmadialectical approach and show that in everyday argument people are extremely sensitive to the epistemic relevance of evidence. Moreover, it seems highly unlikely that this can be switched off in more formal contexts such as the courtroom.

  14. Naringenin ameliorates Alzheimer's disease (AD)-type neurodegeneration with cognitive impairment (AD-TNDCI) caused by the intracerebroventricular-streptozotocin in rat model.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Badruzzaman; Khan, Mohd Moshahid; Khan, Andleeb; Ahmed, Md Ejaz; Ishrat, Tauheed; Tabassum, Rizwana; Vaibhav, Kumar; Ahmad, Ajmal; Islam, Fakhrul

    2012-12-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-type neurodegeneration with cognitive impairment (AD-TNDCI) as well as age related cognitive deficit. The present study was designed to investigate the pre-treatment effects of naringenin (NAR), a polyphenolic compound on cognitive dysfunction, oxidative stress in the hippocampus, and hippocampal neuron injury in a rat model of AD-TNDCI. The rats were pre-treated with NAR at a selective dose (50mg/kg, orally) for 2 weeks followed by intracerebroventricular-streptozotocin (ICV-STZ) (3mg/kg; 5μl per site) injection bilaterally. Behavioral alterations were monitored after 2 weeks from the lesion using passive avoidance test and Morris water maze paradigm. Three weeks after the lesion, the rats were sacrificed for measuring non-enzymatic [4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), malonaldehyde (MDA), thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), protein carbonyl (PC), reduced glutathione (GSH)] content and enzymatic [glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase] activity in the hippocampus, and expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) positive neuron, and histopathology of hippocampal neurons. The non-enzymatic level and enzymatic activity was significantly increased and decreased, respectively, with striking impairments in spatial learning and memory, loss of ChAT positive neuron and severe damage to hippocampal neurons in the rat induced by ICV-STZ. These abnormalities were significantly improved by NAR pre-treatment. The study suggests that NAR can protect against cognitive deficits, neuronal injury and oxidative stress induced by ICV-STZ, and may be used as a potential agent in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD-TNDCI.

  15. Assessing State Models of Value-Added Teacher Evaluations: Alignment of Policy, Instruments, and Literature-Based Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison-Lupardus, Tammy R.; Hatfield, Timothy E.; Snyder, Jennifer E.

    2012-01-01

    This problem-based learning project addressed the need to improve the construction and implementation of value-added teacher evaluation policies and instruments. State officials are constructing value-added teacher evaluation models due to accountability initiatives, while ignoring the holes and problems in its implementation. The team's…

  16. Does Student Sorting Invalidate Value-Added Models of Teacher Effectiveness? An Extended Analysis of the Rothstein Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedel, Cory; Betts, Julian R.

    2011-01-01

    Value-added modeling continues to gain traction as a tool for measuring teacher performance. However, recent research questions the validity of the value-added approach by showing that it does not mitigate student-teacher sorting bias (its presumed primary benefit). Our study explores this critique in more detail. Although we find that estimated…

  17. A Correlated Random Effects Model for Nonignorable Missing Data in Value-Added Assessment of Teacher Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karl, Andrew T.; Yang, Yan; Lohr, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Value-added models have been widely used to assess the contributions of individual teachers and schools to students' academic growth based on longitudinal student achievement outcomes. There is concern, however, that ignoring the presence of missing values, which are common in longitudinal studies, can bias teachers' value-added scores.…

  18. Effect of various classes of pesticides on expression of stress genes in transgenic C. elegans model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jadiya, Pooja; Mir, Snober S; Nazir, Aamir

    2012-12-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are known to be associated with genetic and environmental factors. The multifactorial Parkinson's disease (PD) is triggered and/or further worsened by exposure to certain pesticides. Existing literature suggests a link between pesticide exposure and increased incidence of PD. We carried out the present study to look into the stress gene expression pattern of transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) model of PD after exposure to pesticides from different classes. Expression level of sod-1, sod-2, sod-3, hsp-70, hsp-60, and hsp-16.2 stress responsive genes was determined using qPCR. Our findings demonstrate that the expression of stress related genes does not follow a generalized pattern to different toxicants; rather each pesticide class has a specific expression signature.

  19. Dissection of human papillomavirus E6 and E7 function in transgenic mouse models of cervical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Riley, Rebeccah R; Duensing, Stefan; Brake, Tiffany; Münger, Karl; Lambert, Paul F; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2003-08-15

    Human cervix cancer is caused by high-risk human papillomaviruses encoding E6 and E7 oncoproteins, each of which alter function of distinct targets regulating the cell cycle, apoptosis, and differentiation. Here we determined the molecular contribution of E6 or E7 to neoplastic progression and malignant growth in a transgenic mouse model of cervical carcinogenesis. E7 increased proliferation and centrosome copy number, and produced progression to multifocal microinvasive cervical cancers. E6 elevated centrosome copy number and eliminated detectable p53 protein, but did not produce neoplasia or cancer. E6 plus E7 additionally elevated centrosome copy number and created large, extensively invasive cancers. Centrosome copy number increases and p53 loss likely contributed to malignant growth; however, dysregulated proliferation and differentiation were required for carcinogenic progression.

  20. Induction of Invasive Transitional Cell Bladder Carcinoma in Immune Intact Human MUC1 Transgenic Mice: A Model for Immunotherapy Development

    PubMed Central

    Vang, Daniel P.; Wurz, Gregory T.; Griffey, Stephen M.; Kao, Chiao-Jung; Gutierrez, Audrey M.; Hanson, Gregory K.; Wolf, Michael; DeGregorio, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    A preclinical model of invasive bladder cancer was developed in human mucin 1 (MUC1) transgenic (MUC1.Tg) mice for the purpose of evaluating immunotherapy and/or cytotoxic chemotherapy. To induce bladder cancer, C57BL/6 mice (MUC1.Tg and wild type) were treated orally with the carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (OH-BBN) at 3.0 mg/day, 5 days/week for 12 weeks. To assess the effects of OH-BBN on serum cytokine profile during tumor development, whole blood was collected via submandibular bleeds prior to treatment and every four weeks. In addition, a MUC1-targeted peptide vaccine and placebo were administered to groups of mice weekly for eight weeks. Multiplex fluorometric microbead immunoanalyses of serum cytokines during tumor development and following vaccination were performed. At termination, interferon gamma (IFN-γ)/interleukin-4 (IL-4) ELISpot analysis for MUC1 specific T-cell immune response and histopathological evaluations of tumor type and grade were performed. The results showed that: (1) the incidence of bladder cancer in both MUC1.Tg and wild type mice was 67%; (2) transitional cell carcinomas (TCC) developed at a 2:1 ratio compared to squamous cell carcinomas (SCC); (3) inflammatory cytokines increased with time during tumor development; and (4) administration of the peptide vaccine induces a Th1-polarized serum cytokine profile and a MUC1 specific T-cell response. All tumors in MUC1.Tg mice were positive for MUC1 expression, and half of all tumors in MUC1.Tg and wild type mice were invasive. In conclusion, using a team approach through the coordination of the efforts of pharmacologists, immunologists, pathologists and molecular biologists, we have developed an immune intact transgenic mouse model of bladder cancer that expresses hMUC1. PMID:24300078

  1. The added value of high-resolution climate modeling of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Berg, Willem Jan; van Meijgaard, Erik; van Ulft, Bert; Machguth, Horst; Noël, Brice; van den Broeke, Michiel

    2016-04-01

    The local surface mass balance (SMB) of glaciers and ice sheets is to a very high extent related to topography. Subsequently, spatial variability in the SMB is also related to the spatial scales in the topography. The typical topographic length scales on the Greenland Ice Sheet are from several to over hundred kilometers. Therefore, regional climate models with resolutions between 5 and 25 kilometers normally capture the SMB of the Greenland Ice Sheet well. In this study, we analyze the added value of high-resolution regional climate simulations compared to statistical downscaling. For this aim, the regional climate model RACMO2 has been run for South Greenland for the period 2007-2014 using resolutions of 60, 20, 6.6 and 2.2 kilometer. Modeled and downscaled SMB from these four simulations are analyzed and evaluated against ablation observations. Our results show that the strong correlation of runoff to elevation makes statistical downscaling a robust tool to refine modeled spatial SMB patterns. However, only high-resolution climate modeling can improve the physical representation of the SMB in lower ablation zone, because the summertime interaction between the warm air over the tundra and the colder air over the ice sheet starts to be resolved. As a result, the runoff in the lower ablation zone is more enhanced compared to lower resolution simulations and statistical downscaled SMB.

  2. SOA-based model for value-added ITS services delivery.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Quintero, Luis Felipe; Maciá-Pérez, Francisco; Marcos-Jorquera, Diego; Gilart-Iglesias, Virgilio

    2014-01-01

    Integration is currently a key factor in intelligent transportation systems (ITS), especially because of the ever increasing service demands originating from the ITS industry and ITS users. The current ITS landscape is made up of multiple technologies that are tightly coupled, and its interoperability is extremely low, which limits ITS services generation. Given this fact, novel information technologies (IT) based on the service-oriented architecture (SOA) paradigm have begun to introduce new ways to address this problem. The SOA paradigm allows the construction of loosely coupled distributed systems that can help to integrate the heterogeneous systems that are part of ITS. In this paper, we focus on developing an SOA-based model for integrating information technologies (IT) into ITS to achieve ITS service delivery. To develop our model, the ITS technologies and services involved were identified, catalogued, and decoupled. In doing so, we applied our SOA-based model to integrate all of the ITS technologies and services, ranging from the lowest-level technical components, such as roadside unit as a service (RSUAAS), to the most abstract ITS services that will be offered to ITS users (value-added services). To validate our model, a functionality case study that included all of the components of our model was designed.

  3. SOA-Based Model for Value-Added ITS Services Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Quintero, Luis Felipe; Maciá-Pérez, Francisco; Marcos-Jorquera, Diego; Gilart-Iglesias, Virgilio

    2014-01-01

    Integration is currently a key factor in intelligent transportation systems (ITS), especially because of the ever increasing service demands originating from the ITS industry and ITS users. The current ITS landscape is made up of multiple technologies that are tightly coupled, and its interoperability is extremely low, which limits ITS services generation. Given this fact, novel information technologies (IT) based on the service-oriented architecture (SOA) paradigm have begun to introduce new ways to address this problem. The SOA paradigm allows the construction of loosely coupled distributed systems that can help to integrate the heterogeneous systems that are part of ITS. In this paper, we focus on developing an SOA-based model for integrating information technologies (IT) into ITS to achieve ITS service delivery. To develop our model, the ITS technologies and services involved were identified, catalogued, and decoupled. In doing so, we applied our SOA-based model to integrate all of the ITS technologies and services, ranging from the lowest-level technical components, such as roadside unit as a service (RSUAAS), to the most abstract ITS services that will be offered to ITS users (value-added services). To validate our model, a functionality case study that included all of the components of our model was designed. PMID:25019101

  4. Central nervous system extracellular matrix changes in a transgenic mouse model of bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Costa, Carme; Tortosa, Raül; Vidal, Enric; Padilla, Danielle; Torres, Juan Maria; Ferrer, Isidre; Pumarola, Martí; Bassols, Anna

    2009-11-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy characterised by accumulation of resistant prion protein (PrP(BSE)), neuronal loss, spongiosus and glial cell proliferation. In this study, properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) were investigated in boTg110 transgenic mice over-expressing the bovine cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) and infected with BSE. Using immunohistochemistry with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin as a specific marker for perineuronal nets (PNNs) and antibodies against aggrecan and hyaluronic acid binding protein, loss of ECM was correlated with PrP(BSE) accumulation and activation of astrocytes and microglia. PrP(BSE) accumulation and glial cell activation were detected from the earliest stages of the disease and increased in the terminal stages. Decreases in PNNs, aggrecan and hyaluronic acid were observed only in the terminal stages and correlated with the distribution of PrP(BSE) and activated glial cells. This study suggests that the loss of PNNs, aggrecan and hyaluronic acid is a consequence of PrP(BSE) accumulation. Degradation of ECM in BSE may be due to secretion of degradative enzymes by activated glial cells.

  5. Modelling Aedes aegypti mosquito control via transgenic and sterile insect techniques: endemics and emerging outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Seirin Lee, S; Baker, R E; Gaffney, E A; White, S M

    2013-08-21

    The invasion of pest insects often changes or destroys a native ecosystem, and can result in food shortages and disease endemics. Issues such as the environmental effects of chemical control methods, the economic burden of maintaining control strategies and the risk of pest resistance still remain, and mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever prevail in many countries, infecting over 100 million worldwide in 2010. One environmentally friendly method for mosquito control is the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). This species-specific method of insect control relies on the mass rearing, sterilization and release of large numbers of sterile insects. An alternative transgenic method is the Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal (RIDL). Our objective is to consider contrasting control strategies for two invasive scenarios via SIT and RIDL: an endemic case and an emerging outbreak. We investigate how the release rate and size of release region influence both the potential for control success and the resources needed to achieve it, under a range of conditions and control strategies, and we discuss advantageous strategies with respect to reducing the release resources and strategy costs (in terms of control mosquito numbers) required to achieve complete eradication of wild-type mosquitoes.

  6. AdS and stabilized extra dimensions in multi-dimensional gravitational models with nonlinear scalar curvature terms R-1 and R4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Uwe; Zhuk, Alexander; Bezerra, Valdir B.; Romero, Carlos

    2005-08-01

    We study multi-dimensional gravitational models with scalar curvature nonlinearities of types R-1 and R4. It is assumed that the corresponding higher dimensional spacetime manifolds undergo a spontaneous compactification to manifolds with a warped product structure. Special attention has been paid to the stability of the extra-dimensional factor spaces. It is shown that for certain parameter regions the systems allow for a freezing stabilization of these spaces. In particular, we find for the R-1 model that configurations with stabilized extra dimensions do not provide a late-time acceleration (they are AdS), whereas the solution branch which allows for accelerated expansion (the dS branch) is incompatible with stabilized factor spaces. In the case of the R4 model, we obtain that the stability region in parameter space depends on the total dimension D = dim(M) of the higher dimensional spacetime M. For D > 8 the stability region consists of a single (absolutely stable) sector which is shielded from a conformal singularity (and an antigravity sector beyond it) by a potential barrier of infinite height and width. This sector is smoothly connected with the stability region of a curvature-linear model. For D < 8 an additional (metastable) sector exists which is separated from the conformal singularity by a potential barrier of finite height and width so that systems in this sector are prone to collapse into the conformal singularity. This second sector is not smoothly connected with the first (absolutely stable) one. Several limiting cases and the possibility of inflation are discussed for the R4 model.

  7. Developing a Conceptual Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Communications Mobile AD Hoc Network Simulation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    Elizabeth Royer described the Ad Hoc On-Demand Distance Vector (AODV) routing protocol as “providing quick and efficient route establishment between...Network.” Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School, December 2000. 8. Das, Samir R., Perkins, Charles E., and Royer, Elizabeth M. “ The Ad-hoc On-Demand...Lidong. “Securing Ad Hoc Networks.” Paper Cornell University, Itaca, New York, NY. 16. Corson , Scott S., and Macker, J. “Mobile Ad Hoc

  8. Assessing the effect of adding interactive modeling to the geoscience curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, A.; Marshall, J.; Cardenas, M.

    2013-12-01

    Technology and computer models enhance the learning experience when appropriately utilized. Moreover, learning is significantly improved when effective visualization is combined with models of processes allowing for inquiry-based problem solving. Still, hands-on experiences in real scenarios result in better contextualization of related problems compared to virtual laboratories. Therefore, the role of scientific visualization, technology, and computer modeling is to enhance, not displace, the learning experience by supplementing real-world problem solving and experiences, although in some circumstances, they can adequately serve to take the place of reality. The key to improving scientific education is to embrace an inquiry-based approach that favorably uses technology. This study will attempt to evaluate the effect of adding interactive modeling to the geological sciences curriculum. An assessment tool, designed to assess student understanding of physical hydrology, was used to evaluate a curriculum intervention based on student learning with a data- and modeling-driven approach using COMSOL Multiphysics software. This intervention was implemented in an upper division and graduate physical hydrology course in fall 2012. Students enrolled in the course in fall 2011 served as the control group. Interactive modeling was added to the curriculum in fall 2012 to replace the analogous mathematical modeling done by hand in fall 2011. Pre- and post-test results were used to assess and report its effectiveness. Student interviews were also used to probe student reactions to both the experimental and control curricula. The pre- and post-tests asked students to describe the significant processes in the hydrological cycle and describe the laws governing these processes. Their ability to apply their knowledge in a real-world problem was also assessed. Since the pre- and post-test data failed to meet the assumption of normality, a non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test was run to

  9. How One School Implements and Experiences Ohio's Value-Added Model: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quattrochi, David

    2009-01-01

    Ohio made value-added law in 2003 and incorporated value-added assessment to its operating standards for teachers and administrators in 2006. Value-added data is used to determine if students are making a year's growth at the end of each school year. Schools and districts receive a rating of "Below Growth, Met Growth, or Above Growth" on…

  10. Kava chalcone, flavokawain A, inhibits urothelial tumorigenesis in the UPII-SV40T transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongbo; Xu, Xia; Li, Xuesen; Liu, Shuman; Simoneau, Anne R; He, Feng; Wu, Xue-Ru; Zi, Xiaolin

    2013-12-01

    Flavokawain A (FKA) is the predominant chalcone identified from the kava plant. We have previously shown that FKA preferentially inhibits the growth of p53 defective bladder cancer cell lines. Here, we examined whether FKA could inhibit bladder cancer development and progression in vivo in the UPII-SV40T transgenic model that resembles human urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) with defects in the p53 and the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein pathways. Genotyped UPII-SV40T mice were fed orally with vehicle control (AIN-93M) or FKA (6 g/kg food; 0.6%) for 318 days starting at 28 days of age. More than 64% of the male mice fed with FKA-containing food survived beyond 318 days of age, whereas only about 38% of the male mice fed with vehicle control food survived to that age (P = 0.0383). The mean bladder weights of surviving male transgenic mice with the control diet versus the FKA diet were 234.6 ± 72.5 versus 96.1 ± 69.4 mg (P = 0.0002). FKA was excreted primarily through the urinary tract and concentrated in the urine up to 8.4 μmol/L, averaging about 38 times (males) and 15 times (females) more concentrated than in the plasma (P = 0.0001). FKA treatment inhibited the occurrence of high-grade papillary UCC, a precursor to invasive urothelial cancer, by 42.1%. A decreased expression of Ki67, survivin, and X-linked inhibitor of apoptotic proteins (XIAP) and increased expression of p27 and DR5, and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic cells were observed in the urothelial tissue of FKA-fed mice. These results suggest a potential of FKA in preventing the recurrence and progression of non-muscle-invasive UCC.

  11. Diet Influences Expression of Autoimmune Associated Genes and Disease Severity By Epigenetic Mechanisms in a Transgenic Lupus Model

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Faith M.; Hewagama, Anura; Wu, Ailing; Sawalha, Amr H.; Delaney, Colin; Hoeltzel, Mark F.; Yung, Raymond; Johnson, Kent; Mickelson, Barbara; Richardson, Bruce C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Lupus flares when genetically predisposed people encounter appropriate environmental agents. Current evidence indicates that the environment contributes by inhibiting T cell DNA methylation, causing overexpression of normally silenced genes. DNA methylation depends on both dietary transmethylation micronutrients and Erk-regulated DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) levels. We used transgenic mice to study interactions between diet, Dnmt1 levels and genetic predisposition on the development and severity of lupus. Methods A doxycycline-inducible Erk defect was bred into lupus-resistant (C57BL/6) or lupus-susceptible (C57BL/6xSJL) mouse strains. Doxycycline treated mice were fed a standard commercial diet for eighteen weeks then switched to diets supplemented(MS) or restricted(MR) intransmethylation micronutrients. Disease severity was assessed by anti-dsDNA antibodies, proteinuria, hematuria and histopathology of kidney tissues. Pyrosequencing was used to determine micronutrient effects on DNA methylation. Results Doxycycline induced modest levels of anti-dsDNA antibodies in C57BL/6 mice and higher levels in C57BL/6xSJL mice. Doxycycline-treated C57BL/6xSJL mice developed hematuria and glomerulonephritis on the MR and standard but not the MS diet. In contrast C57BL/6 mice developed kidney disease only on the MR diet. Decreasing Erk signaling and methyl donors also caused demethylation and overexpression of the CD40lg gene in female mice, consistent with demethylation of the second X chromosome. Both the dietary methyl donor content and duration of treatment influenced methylation and expression of the CD40lg gene. Conclusions Dietary micronutrients that affect DNA methylation can exacerbate or ameliorate SLE disease in this transgenic murine lupus model, and contribute to lupus susceptibility and severity through genetic/epigenetic interactions. PMID:23576011

  12. Construction of Transgenic Plasmodium berghei as a Model for Evaluation of Blood-Stage Vaccine Candidate of Plasmodium falciparum Chimeric Protein 2.9

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yi; Zhang, Dongmei; Pan, Weiqing

    2009-01-01

    Background The function of the 19 kDa C-terminal region of the merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1-19) expressed by Plasmodium has been demonstrated to be conserved across distantly related Plasmodium species. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a reporter protein that has been widely used because it can be easily detected in living organisms by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Methodology and Results In this study, we used gene targeting to generate transgenic P. berghei (Pb) parasites (designated as PfMSP1-19Pb) that express the MSP1-19 of P. falciparum (Pf) and the GFP reporter protein simultaneously. The replacement of the PbMSP1-19 locus by PfMSP1-19 was verified by PCR and Southern analysis. The expression of the chimeric PbfMSP-1 and the GFP was verified by Western blot and fluorescence microscopy, respectively. Moreover, GFP-expressing transgenic parasites in blood stages can be readily differentiated from other blood cells using flow cytometry. A comparion of growth rates between wild-type and the PfMSP1-19Pb transgenic parasite indicated that the replacement of the MSP1-19 region and the expression of the GFP protein were not deleterious to the transgenic parasites. We used this transgenic mouse parasite as a murine model to evaluate the protective efficacy in vivo of specific IgG elicited by a PfCP-2.9 malaria vaccine that contains the PfMSP1-19. The BALB/c mice passively transferred with purified rabbit IgG to the PfCP-2.9 survived a lethal challenge of the PfMSP1-19Pb transgenic murine parasites, but not the wild-type P. berghei whereas the control mice passively transferred with purified IgG obtained from adjuvant only-immunized rabbits were vulnerable to both transgenic and wild-type infections. Conclusions We generated a transgenic P. berghei line that expresses PfMSP1-19 and the GFP reporter gene simultaneously. The availability of this parasite line provides a murine model to evaluate the protective efficacy in vivo of anti-MSP1

  13. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells prevents memory impairment in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Takuya; Kamimura, Naomi; Yokota, Takashi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Iuchi, Katsuya; Lee, Hyunjin; Takami, Shinya; Akashiba, Hiroki; Shitaka, Yoshitsugu; Ueda, Masayuki; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Kimura, Kazumi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2015-04-24

    Stem cell transplantation therapy is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of ischemic stroke, and several beneficial aspects have been reported. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), stem cell therapy is expected to provide an efficient therapeutic approach. Indeed, the intracerebral transplantation of stem cells reduced amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and rescued memory deficits in AD model mice. Here, we show that intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMCs) improves cognitive function in two different AD mouse models, DAL and APP mice, and prevents neurodegeneration. GFP-positive BMMCs were isolated from tibiae and femurs of 4-week-old mice and then transplanted intravenously into DAL and APP mice. Transplantation of BMMCs suppressed neuronal loss and restored memory impairment of DAL mice to almost the same level as in wild-type mice. Transplantation of BMMCs to APP mice reduced Aβ deposition in the brain. APP mice treated with BMMCs performed significantly better on behavioral tests than vehicle-injected mice. Moreover, the effects were observed even with transplantation after the onset of cognitive impairment in DAL mice. Together, our results indicate that intravenous transplantation of BMMCs has preventive effects against the cognitive decline in AD model mice and suggest a potential therapeutic effect of BMMC transplantation therapy.

  14. An AANAT/ASMT transgenic animal model constructed with CRISPR/Cas9 system serving as the mammary gland bioreactor to produce melatonin-enrich milk in sheep.

    PubMed

    Ma, Teng; Tao, Jingli; Yang, Minghui; He, Changjiu; Tian, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Jinlong; Deng, Shoulong; Feng, Jianzhong; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Jing; Ji, Pengyun; Song, Yukun; He, Pingli; Han, Hongbing; Fu, Juncai; Lian, Zhengxing; Liu, Guoshi

    2017-03-08

    Melatonin as a potent antioxidant exhibits important nutritional and medicinal values. To produce melatonin-enriching milk will benefit to the consumers. In this study, a sheep bioreactor which generates melatonin-enriching milk has been successfully developed by the technology that combined CRISPR/Cas9 system and microinjection. The AANAT and ASMT were cloned from pineal gland of Dorper sheep (Ovis aries). The in vitro studies found that AANAT and ASMT were successfully transferred to the mammary epithelial cell lines and significantly increased melatonin production in the culture medium compared to the non-transgenic cell lines. In addition, the Cas9 mRNA, sgRNA and the linearized vectors pBC1-AANAT and pBC1-ASMT were co-injected into the cytoplasm of pronuclear embryos which were implanted into ewes by oviducts transferring. Thirty four transgenic sheep were generated with the transgenic positive rate being roughly 35% which were identified by southern-blot and sequencing. Seven carried transgenic AANAT, two carried ASMT and 25 carried both of AANAT and ASMT genes. RT-PCR and western-blot demonstrated that the lambs expressed these genes in their mammary epithelial cells and these animals produced melatonin-enriched milk. This is the first report to show a functional AANAT and ASMT transgenic animal model which produce significantly high levels of melatonin milk compared to their wild type counterparts. The advanced technologies used in the study laid a foundation for generating large transgenic livestock, for example the cows, which can produce high level of melatonin milk. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular Imaging of Vasa Vasorum Neovascularization via DEspR-targeted Contrast-enhanced Ultrasound Micro-imaging in Transgenic Atherosclerosis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Decano, Julius L.; Moran, Anne Marie; Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson; Herrera, Victoria L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Given that carotid vasa vasorum neovascularization is associated with increased risk for stroke and cardiac events, the present in vivo study was designed to investigate molecular imaging of carotid artery vasa vasorum neovascularization via target-specific contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) micro-imaging. Procedures Molecular imaging was performed in male transgenic rats with carotid artery disease and non-transgenic controls using dual endothelin1/VEGFsp receptor (DEspR)-targeted microbubbles (MBD) and the Vevo770 micro-imaging system and CEU imaging software. Results DEspR-targeted CEU-positive imaging exhibited significantly higher contrast intensity signal (CIS)-levels and pre-/post-destruction CIS-differences in seven of 13 transgenic rats, in contrast to significantly lower CIS-levels and differences in control isotype-targeted microbubble (MBC)-CEU imaging (n =8) and in MBD CEU-imaging of five non-transgenic control rats (P<0.0001). Ex vivo immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated binding of MBD to DEspR-positive endothelial cells; and association of DEspR-targeted increased contrast intensity signals with DEspR expression in vasa vasorum neovessel and intimal lesions. In vitro analysis demonstrated dose-dependent binding of MBD to DEspR-positive human endothelial cells with increasing %cells bound and number of MBD per cell, in contrast to MBC or non-labeled microbubbles (P<0.0001). Conclusion In vivo DEspR-targeted molecular imaging detected increased DEspR-expression in carotid artery lesions and in expanded vasa vasorum neovessels in transgenic rats with carotid artery disease. Future studies are needed to determine predictive value for stroke or heart disease in this transgenic atherosclerosis rat model and translational applications. PMID:20972637

  16. A transgenic mouse model with inducible Tyrosinase gene expression using the tetracycline (Tet-on) system allows regulated rescue of abnormal chiasmatic projections found in albinism.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Estela; Lavado, Alfonso; Giraldo, Patricia; Cozar, Patricia; Jeffery, Glen; Montoliu, Lluís

    2004-08-01

    Congenital defects in retinal pigmentation, as in oculocutaneous albinism Type I (OCA1), where tyrosinase is defective, result in visual abnormalities affecting the retina and pathways into the brain. Transgenic animals expressing a functional tyrosinase gene on an albino genetic background display a correction of all these abnormalities, implicating a functional role for tyrosinase in normal retinal development. To address the function of tyrosinase in the development of the mammalian visual system, we have generated a transgenic mouse model with inducible expression of the tyrosinase gene using the tetracycline (TET-ON) system. We have produced two types of transgenic mice: first, mice expressing the transactivator rtTA chimeric protein under the control of mouse tyrosinase promoter and its locus control region (LCR), and; second, transgenic mice expressing a mouse tyrosinase cDNA construct driven by a minimal promoter inducible by rtTA in the presence of doxycycline. Inducible experiments have been carried out with selected double transgenic mouse lines. Tyrosinase expression has been induced from early embryo development and its impact assessed with histological and biochemical methods in heterozygous and homozygous double transgenic individuals. We have found an increase of tyrosinase activity in the eyes of induced animals, compared with littermate controls. However, there was significant variability in the activation of this gene, as reported in analogous experiments. In spite of this, we could observe corrected uncrossed chiasmatic pathways, decreased in albinism, in animals induced from their first gestational week. These mice could be instrumental in revealing the role of tyrosinase in mammalian visual development.

  17. Analysis of the dynamics of adaptation to transgenic corn and crop rotation by western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) using a daily time-step model.

    PubMed

    Crowder, D W; Onstad, D W; Cray, M E; Pierce, C M F; Hager, A G; Ratcliffe, S T; Steffey, K L

    2005-04-01

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, has overcome crop rotation in several areas of the north central United States. The effectiveness of crop rotation for management of corn rootworm has begun to fail in many areas of the midwestern United States, thus new management strategies need to be developed to control rotation-resistant populations. Transgenic corn, Zea mays L., effective against western corn rootworm, may be the most effective new technology for control of this pest in areas with or without populations adapted to crop rotation. We expanded a simulation model of the population dynamics and genetics of the western corn rootworm for a landscape of corn; soybean, Glycine max (L.); and other crops to study the simultaneous development of resistance to both crop rotation and transgenic corn. Results indicate that planting transgenic corn to first-year cornfields is a robust strategy to prevent resistance to both crop rotation and transgenic corn in areas where rotation-resistant populations are currently a problem or may be a problem in the future. In these areas, planting transgenic corn only in continuous cornfields is not an effective strategy to prevent resistance to either trait. In areas without rotation-resistant populations, gene expression of the allele for resistance to transgenic corn, R, is the most important factor affecting the evolution of resistance. If R is recessive, resistance can be delayed longer than 15 yr. If R is dominant, resistance may be difficult to prevent. In a sensitivity analysis, results indicate that density dependence, rotational level in the landscape, and initial allele frequency are the three most important factors affecting the results.

  18. Consumption of pomegranates improves synaptic function in a transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Poljak, Anne; Selvaraju, Subash; Al-Adawi, Samir; Manivasagm, Thamilarasan; Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy Justin; Ooi, Lezanne; Sachdev, Perminder; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extracellular plaques containing abnormal Amyloid Beta (Aβ) aggregates, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles containing hyperphosphorylated tau protein, microglia-dominated neuroinflammation, and impairments in synaptic plasticity underlying cognitive deficits. Therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AD are currently limited. In this study, we investigated the effects of dietary supplementation of 4% pomegranate extract to a standard chow diet on neuroinflammation, and synaptic plasticity in APPsw/Tg2576 mice brain. Treatment with a custom mixed diet (pellets) containing 4% pomegranate for 15 months ameliorated the loss of synaptic structure proteins, namely PSD-95, Munc18-1, and SNAP25, synaptophysin, phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin Dependent Protein Kinase IIα (p-CaMKIIα/ CaMKIIα), and phosphorylation of Cyclic AMP-Response Element Binding Protein (pCREB/CREB), inhibited neuroinflammatory activity, and enhanced autophagy, and activation of the phophoinositide-3-kinase-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway. These neuroprotective effects were associated with reduced β-site cleavage of Amyloid Precursor Protein in APPsw/Tg2576 mice. Therefore, long-term supplementation with pomegranates can attenuate AD pathology by reducing inflammation, and altering APP-dependent processes. PMID:27486879

  19. Transgenic mouse model for imaging of ATF4 translational activation-related cellular stress responses in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Iwawaki, Takao; Akai, Ryoko; Toyoshima, Takae; Takeda, Naoki; Ishikawa, Tomo-o; Yamamura, Ken-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a translationally activated protein that plays a role in cellular adaptation to several stresses. Because these stresses are associated with various diseases, the translational control of ATF4 needs to be evaluated from the physiological and pathological points of view. We have developed a transgenic mouse model to monitor the translational activation of ATF4 in response to cellular stress. By using this mouse model, we were able to detect nutrient starvation response, antivirus response, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, and oxidative stress in vitro and ex vivo, as well as in vivo. The reporter system introduced into our mouse model was also shown to work in a stress intensity-dependent manner and a stress duration-dependent manner. The mouse model is therefore a useful tool for imaging ATF4 translational activation at various levels, from cell cultures to whole bodies, and it has a range of useful applications in investigations on the physiological and pathological roles of ATF4-related stress and in the development of clinical drugs for treating ATF4-associated diseases. PMID:28387317

  20. Enhanced antitumor activity and mechanism of biodegradable polymeric micelles-encapsulated chetomin in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinjie; Li, Guoyou; Deng, Senyi; Ouyang, Liang; Li, Ling; Liu, Lei; Luo, Na; Song, Xiangrong; He, Gu; Gong, Changyang; Wei, Yuquan

    2014-09-01

    Chetomin is a promising molecule with anti-tumor activities in the epipolythiodioxopiperazine family of fungal secondary metabolites; however, strong hydrophobicity has limited its further applications. In this work, chetomin was encapsulated into polymeric micelles to obtain an aqueous formulation, and the chetomin loaded micelles (Che-M) exhibited small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency. When the concentration of copolymer was higher than the critical gelation concentration, the Che-M could form a thermosensitive hydrogel (Che-H), which was free-flowing sol at ambient temperature and converted into a non-flowing gel at body temperature. The molecular modeling study has indicated that chetomin interacted with PCL as a core, which was embraced by PEG as a shell. Che-M showed equal cytotoxicity with free chetomin, but the apoptosis inducing effects of Che-M were more significant. Besides, Che-M could increase the GSSG level, decrease the GSH level, and increase the ROS in CT26 cells. Furthermore, stronger inhibitory effects of Che-M were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis and tumor growth in transgenic zebrafish models. In addition, Che-M was effective in inhibiting tumor growth and prolonging survival in a subcutaneous CT26 tumor model. In a colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis model, both Che-M and Che-H showed excellent therapeutic effects, but Che-H was more effective. In conclusion, Che-M and Che-H may serve as candidates for cancer therapy.

  1. Safety of striatal infusion of siRNA in a transgenic Huntington's disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Sarah; Mondo, Erica; Pfister, Edith; Mick, Eric; Friedline, Randall H.; Kim, Jason K.; Sapp, Ellen; DiFiglia, Marian; Aronin, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Background The immune system In Huntington's disease (HD) is activated and may overreact to some therapies. RNA interference using siRNA lowers mutant huntingtin (mHTT) protein but could increase immune responses. Objective To examine the innate immune response following siRNA infusion into the striatum of wild-type (WT) and HD transgenic (YAC128) mice. Methods siRNAs (2′-O-methyl phosphorothioated) were infused unilaterally into striatum of four month-old WT and YAC128 mice for 28 days. Microglia number and morphology (resting (normal), activated, dystrophic), cytokine levels, and DARPP32-positive neurons were measured in striatum immediately or 14 days post-infusion. Controls included contralateral untreated striatum, and PBS and sham treated striata. Results The striata of untreated YAC128 mice had significantly fewer resting microglia and more dystrophic microglia than WT mice, but no difference from WT in the proportion of activated microglia or total number of microglia. siRNA infusion increased the total number of microglia in YAC128 mice compared to PBS treated and untreated striata and increased the proportion of activated microglia in WT and YAC128 mice compared to untreated striata and sham treated groups. Cytokine levels were low and siRNA infusion resulted in only modest changes in those levels. siRNA infusion did not change the number of DARPP32-positive neurons. Conclusion Findings suggest that siRNA infusion may be a safe method for lowering mHTT levels in the striatum in young animals, since treatment does not produce a robust cytokine response or cause neurotoxicity. The potential long-term effects of a sustained increase in total and activated microglia after siRNA infusion in HD mice need to be explored. PMID:26444021

  2. Schizophrenia: a neurodevelopmental disorder--integrative genomic hypothesis and therapeutic implications from a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Stachowiak, M K; Kucinski, A; Curl, R; Syposs, C; Yang, Y; Narla, S; Terranova, C; Prokop, D; Klejbor, I; Bencherif, M; Birkaya, B; Corso, T; Parikh, A; Tzanakakis, E S; Wersinger, S; Stachowiak, E K

    2013-02-01

    Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder featuring complex aberrations in the structure, wiring, and chemistry of multiple neuronal systems. The abnormal developmental trajectory of the brain appears to be established during gestation, long before clinical symptoms of the disease appear in early adult life. Many genes are associated with schizophrenia, however, altered expression of no one gene has been shown to be present in a majority of schizophrenia patients. How does altered expression of such a variety of genes lead to the complex set of abnormalities observed in the schizophrenic brain? We hypothesize that the protein products of these genes converge on common neurodevelopmental pathways that affect the development of multiple neural circuits and neurotransmitter systems. One such neurodevelopmental pathway is Integrative Nuclear FGFR1 Signaling (INFS). INFS integrates diverse neurogenic signals that direct the postmitotic development of embryonic stem cells, neural progenitors and immature neurons, by direct gene reprogramming. Additionally, FGFR1 and its partner proteins link multiple upstream pathways in which schizophrenia-linked genes are known to function and interact directly with those genes. A th-fgfr1(tk-) transgenic mouse with impaired FGF receptor signaling establishes a number of important characteristics that mimic human schizophrenia - a neurodevelopmental origin, anatomical abnormalities at birth, a delayed onset of behavioral symptoms, deficits across multiple domains of the disorder and symptom improvement with typical and atypical antipsychotics, 5-HT antagonists, and nicotinic receptor agonists. Our research suggests that altered FGF receptor signaling plays a central role in the developmental abnormalities underlying schizophrenia and that nicotinic agonists are an effective class of compounds for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging for monitoring therapeutic response in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease using voxel-based analysis of amyloid plaques

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Ha, Tae Lin; Im, Geun Ho; Yang, Jehoon; Seo, Sang Won; Chung, Julius Juhyun; Chae, Sun Young; Lee, In Su

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have shown the potential of a voxel-based analysis for imaging amyloid plaques and its utility in monitoring therapeutic response in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) mice using manganese oxide nanoparticles conjugated with an antibody of Aβ1-40 peptide (HMON-abAβ40). T1-weighted MR brain images of a drug-treated AD group (n=7), a nontreated AD group (n=7), and a wild-type group (n=7) were acquired using a 7.0 T MRI system before (D−1), 24-h (D+1) after, and 72-h (D+3) after injection with an HMON-abAβ40 contrast agent. For the treatment of AD mice, DAPT was injected intramuscularly into AD transgenic mice (50 mg/kg of body weight). For voxel-based analysis, the skull-stripped mouse brain images were spatially normalized, and these voxels’ intensities were corrected to reduce voxel intensity differences across scans in different mice. Statistical analysis showed higher normalized MR signal intensity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of AD mice over wild-type mice on D+1 and D+3 (P<0.01, uncorrected for multiple comparisons). After the treatment of AD mice, the normalized MR signal intensity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus decreased significantly in comparison with nontreated AD mice on D+1 and D+3 (P<0.01, uncorrected for multiple comparisons). These results were confirmed by histological analysis using a thioflavin staining. This unique strategy allows us to detect brain regions that are subjected to amyloid plaque deposition and has the potential for human applications in monitoring therapeutic response for drug development in AD. PMID:24518227

  4. The Will, Skill, Tool Model of Technology Integration: Adding Pedagogy as a New Model Construct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knezek, Gerald; Christensen, Rhonda

    2015-01-01

    An expansion of the Will, Skill, Tool Model of Technology Integration to include teacher's pedagogical style is proposed by the authors as a means of advancing the predictive power for level of classroom technology integration to beyond 90%. Suggested advantages to this expansion include more precise identification of areas to be targeted for…

  5. Pathology associated memory deficits in Swedish mutant genome-based amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hock, Brian J; Lattal, K Matthew; Kulnane, Laura Shapiro; Abel, Ted; Lamb, Bruce T

    2009-12-01

    To gain insight into the relationship between pathological alterations and memory deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD), a number of amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic animal models have been generated containing familial AD mutations. The most commonly utilized method involves a cDNA-based approach, utilizing heterologous promoters to drive expression of specific APP isoforms. As a result of the assumptions inherent in the design of each model, the different cDNA-based transgenic mouse models have revealed different relationships between the biochemical, pathological and behavioral alterations observed in these models. Here we provide further characterization of a genomic-based, amyloid precursor protein yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of AD, R1.40, that makes few assumptions regarding disease pathogenesis to study the relationship between brain pathology and altered behavior. Aged R1.40 transgenic and control mice were tested for learning and memory in the Morris water maze and for working memory in the Y maze. Results from the water maze demonstrated intact learning in the both control and R1.40 mice, but impairments in the long-term retention of this information in the transgenic mice, but not controls. Interestingly, however, long-term memory deficits did not correlate with the presence of Abeta deposits within the group of animals examined. By contrast, age-related working memory impairments were also observed in the Y maze in the R1.40 mice, and these deficits correlated with the presence of Abeta deposits. Our results demonstrate unique behavioral alterations in the R1.40 mouse model of AD that are likely both dependent and independent of Abeta deposition.

  6. Ad Hoc modeling, expert problem solving, and R&T program evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, B. G.; Liebowitz, J.; Moustakis, V. S.

    1983-01-01

    A simplified cost and time (SCAT) analysis program utilizing personal-computer technology is presented and demonstrated in the case of the NASA-Goddard end-to-end data system. The difficulties encountered in implementing complex program-selection and evaluation models in the research and technology field are outlined. The prototype SCAT system described here is designed to allow user-friendly ad hoc modeling in real time and at low cost. A worksheet constructed on the computer screen displays the critical parameters and shows how each is affected when one is altered experimentally. In the NASA case, satellite data-output and control requirements, ground-facility data-handling capabilities, and project priorities are intricately interrelated. Scenario studies of the effects of spacecraft phaseout or new spacecraft on throughput and delay parameters are shown. The use of a network of personal computers for higher-level coordination of decision-making processes is suggested, as a complement or alternative to complex large-scale modeling.

  7. Adding local components to global functions for continuous covariates in multivariable regression modeling.

    PubMed

    Binder, H; Sauerbrei, W

    2010-03-30

    When global techniques, based on fractional polynomials (FPs), are employed for modeling potentially nonlinear effects of several continuous covariates on a response, accessible model equations are obtained. However, local features might be missed. Therefore, a procedure is introduced, which systematically checks model fits, obtained by the multivariable fractional polynomial (MFP) approach, for overlooked local features. Statistically significant local polynomials are then parsimoniously added. This approach, called MFP + L, is seen to result in an effective control of the Type I error with respect to the addition of local components in a small simulation study with univariate and multivariable settings. Prediction performance is compared with that of a penalized regression spline technique. In a setting unfavorable for FPs, the latter outperforms the MFP approach, if there is much information in the data. However, the addition of local features reduces this performance difference. There is only a small detrimental effect in settings where the MFP approach performs better. In an application example with children's respiratory health data, fits from the spline-based approach indicate many local features, but MFP + L adds only few significant features, which seem to have good support in the data. The proposed approach may be expected to be superior in settings with local features, but retains the good properties of the MFP approach in a large number of settings where global functions are sufficient.

  8. Generation of a Stable Transgenic Swine Model Expressing a Porcine Histone 2B-eGFP Fusion Protein for Cell Tracking and Chromosome Dynamics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Sean; Collins, Bruce; Sommer, Jeff; Petters, Robert M.; Caballero, Ignacio; Platt, Jeff L.

    2017-01-01

    Transgenic pigs have become an attractive research model in the field of translational research, regenerative medicine, and stem cell therapy due to their anatomic, genetic and physiological similarities with humans. The development of fluorescent proteins as molecular tags has allowed investigators to track cell migration and engraftment levels after transplantation. Here we describe the development of two transgenic pig models via SCNT expressing a fusion protein composed of eGFP and porcine Histone 2B (pH2B). This fusion protein is targeted to the nucleosomes resulting a nuclear/chromatin eGFP signal. The first model (I) was generated via random insertion of pH2B-eGFP driven by the CAG promoter (chicken beta actin promoter and rabbit Globin poly A; pCAG-pH2B-eGFP) and protected by human interferon-β matrix attachment regions (MARs). Despite the consistent, high, and ubiquitous expression of the fusion protein pH2B-eGFP in all tissues analyzed, two independently generated Model I transgenic lines developed neurodegenerative symptoms including Wallerian degeneration between 3–5 months of age, requiring euthanasia. A second transgenic model (II) was developed via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated homology-directed repair (HDR) of IRES-pH2B-eGFP into the endogenous β-actin (ACTB) locus. Model II transgenic animals showed ubiquitous expression of pH2B-eGFP on all tissues analyzed. Unlike the pCAG-pH2B-eGFP/MAR line, all Model II animals were healthy and multiple pregnancies have been established with progeny showing the expected Mendelian ratio for the transmission of the pH2B-eGFP. Expression of pH2B-eGFP was used to examine the timing of the maternal to zygotic transition after IVF, and to examine chromosome segregation of SCNT embryos. To our knowledge this is the first viable transgenic pig model with chromatin-associated eGFP allowing both cell tracking and the study of chromatin dynamics in a large animal model. PMID:28081156

  9. Simultaneous effects on parvalbumin-positive interneuron and dopaminergic system development in a transgenic rat model for sporadic schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hamburg, Hannah; Trossbach, Svenja V.; Bader, Verian; Chwiesko, Caroline; Kipar, Anja; Sauvage, Magdalena; Crum, William R.; Vernon, Anthony C.; Bidmon, Hans J.; Korth, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    To date, unequivocal neuroanatomical features have been demonstrated neither for sporadic nor for familial schizophrenia. Here, we investigated the neuroanatomical changes in a transgenic rat model for a subset of sporadic chronic mental illness (CMI), which modestly overexpresses human full-length, non-mutant Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), and for which aberrant dopamine homeostasis consistent with some schizophrenia phenotypes has previously been reported. Neuroanatomical analysis revealed a reduced density of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and reduced dopaminergic fibres in the striatum. Parvalbumin-positive interneuron occurrence in the somatosensory cortex was shifted from layers II/III to V/VI, and the number of calbindin-positive interneurons was slightly decreased. Reduced corpus callosum thickness confirmed trend-level observations from in vivo MRI and voxel-wise tensor based morphometry. These neuroanatomical changes help explain functional phenotypes of this animal model, some of which resemble changes observed in human schizophrenia post mortem brain tissues. Our findings also demonstrate how a single molecular factor, DISC1 overexpression or misassembly, can account for a variety of seemingly unrelated morphological phenotypes and thus provides a possible unifying explanation for similar findings observed in sporadic schizophrenia patients. Our anatomical investigation of a defined model for sporadic mental illness enables a clearer definition of neuroanatomical changes associated with subsets of human sporadic schizophrenia. PMID:27721451

  10. Use of Transgenic and Mutant Animal Models in the Study of Heterocyclic Amine-induced Mutagenesis and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dashwood, Roderick H.

    2008-01-01

    Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are potent mutagens generated during the cooking of meat and fish, and several of these compounds produce tumors in conventional experimental animals. During the past 5 years or so, HCAs have been tested in a number of novel in vivo murine models, including the following: lacZ, lacI, cII, c-myc/lacZ, rpsL, and gptΔ transgenics, XPA−/−, XPC−/−, Msh2+/−, Msh2−/− and p53+/− knock-outs, Apc mutant mice (ApcΔ716, Apc1638N, Apcmin), and A33ΔNβ-cat knock-in mice. Several of these models have provided insights into the mutation spectra induced in vivo by HCAs in target and non-target organs for tumorigenesis, as well as demonstrating enhanced susceptibility to HCA-induced tumors and preneoplastic lesions. This review describes several of the more recent reports in which novel animal models were used to examine HCA-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in vivo, including a number of studies which assessed the inhibitory activities of chemopreventive agents such as 1,2-dithiole-3-thione, conjugated linoleic acids, tea, curcumin, chlorophyllin-chitosan, and sulindac. PMID:12542973

  11. Anti-Parkinsonian effects of Bacopa monnieri: insights from transgenic and pharmacological Caenorhabditis elegans models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jadiya, Pooja; Khan, Asif; Sammi, Shreesh Raj; Kaur, Supinder; Mir, Snober S; Nazir, Aamir

    2011-10-07

    Neurodegenerative Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with aggregation of protein alpha synuclein and selective death of dopaminergic neurons, thereby leading to cognitive and motor impairment in patients. The disease has no complete cure yet; the current therapeutic strategies involve prescription of dopamine agonist drugs which turn ineffective after prolonged use. The present study utilized the powerful genetics of model system Caenorhabditis elegans towards exploring the anti-Parkinsonian effects of a neuro-protective botanical Bacopa monnieri. Two different strains of C. elegans; a transgenic model expressing "human" alpha synuclein [NL5901 (P(unc-54)::alphasynuclein::YFP+unc-119)], and a pharmacological model expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) specifically in the dopaminergic neurons [BZ555 (P(dat-1)::GFP)] treated with selective catecholaminergic neurotoxin 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), were employed for the study. B. monnieri was chosen for its known neuroprotective and cognition enhancing effects. The study examined the effect of the botanical, on aggregation of alpha synuclein, degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, content of lipids and longevity of the nematodes. Our studies show that B. monnieri reduces alpha synuclein aggregation, prevents dopaminergic neurodegeneration and restores the lipid content in nematodes, thereby proving its potential as a possible anti-Parkinsonian agent. These findings encourage further investigations on the botanical, and its active constituent compounds, as possible therapeutic intervention against Parkinson's disease.

  12. Improving Accuracy in Arrhenius Models of Cell Death: Adding a Temperature-Dependent Time Delay.

    PubMed

    Pearce, John A

    2015-12-01

    The Arrhenius formulation for single-step irreversible unimolecular reactions has been used for many decades to describe the thermal damage and cell death processes. Arrhenius predictions are acceptably accurate for structural proteins, for some cell death assays, and for cell death at higher temperatures in most cell lines, above about 55 °C. However, in many cases--and particularly at hyperthermic temperatures, between about 43 and 55 °C--the particular intrinsic cell death or damage process under study exhibits a significant "shoulder" region that constant-rate Arrhenius models are unable to represent with acceptable accuracy. The primary limitation is that Arrhenius calculations always overestimate the cell death fraction, which leads to severely overoptimistic predictions of heating effectiveness in tumor treatment. Several more sophisticated mathematical model approaches have been suggested and show much-improved performance. But simpler models that have adequate accuracy would provide useful and practical alternatives to intricate biochemical analyses. Typical transient intrinsic cell death processes at hyperthermic temperatures consist of a slowly developing shoulder region followed by an essentially constant-rate region. The shoulder regions have been demonstrated to arise chiefly from complex functional protein signaling cascades that generate delays in the onset of the constant-rate region, but may involve heat shock protein activity as well. This paper shows that acceptably accurate and much-improved predictions in the simpler Arrhenius models can be obtained by adding a temperature-dependent time delay. Kinetic coefficients and the appropriate time delay are obtained from the constant-rate regions of the measured survival curves. The resulting predictions are seen to provide acceptably accurate results while not overestimating cell death. The method can be relatively easily incorporated into numerical models. Additionally, evidence is presented

  13. Functional changes in the uterine artery precede the hypertensive phenotype in a transgenic model of hypertensive pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yamaleyeva, Liliya M.; Varagic, Jasmina; McGee, Carolynne; Bader, Michael; Dechend, Ralf; Brosnihan, K. Bridget

    2015-01-01

    The pregnant female human angiotensinogen (hAGN) transgenic rat mated with the male human renin (hREN) transgenic rat is a model of preeclampsia (TgA) with increased blood pressure, proteinuria, and placenta alterations of edema and necrosis at late gestation. We studied vascular responses and the role of COX-derived prostanoids in the uterine artery (UA) at early gestation in this model. TgA UA showed lower stretch response, similar smooth muscle α-actin content, and lower collagen content compared with Sprague-Dawley (SD) UA. Vasodilation to acetylcholine was similar in SD and TgA UA (64 ± 8 vs. 75 ± 6% of relaxation, P > 0.05), with an acetylcholine-induced contraction in TgA UA that was abolished by preincubation with indomethacin (78 ± 6 vs. 83 ± 11%, P > 0.05). No differences in the contraction to phenylephrine were observed (159 ± 11 vs. 134 ± 12 %KMAX, P > 0.05), although in TgA UA this response was greatly affected by preincubation with indomethacin (179 ± 16 vs. 134 ± 9 %KMAX, P < 0.05, pD2 5.92 ± 0.08 vs. 5.85 ± 0.03, P < 0.05). Endothelium-independent vasodilation was lower in TgA UA (92 ± 2 vs. 74 ± 5% preconstricted tone, P < 0.05), and preincubation with indomethacin restored the response to normal values (90 ± 3 vs. 84 ± 3%). Immunostaining showed similar signals for α-actin, COX-2, and eNOS between groups (P > 0.05). Plasma thromboxane levels were similar between groups. In summary, TgA UA displays functional alterations at early gestation before the preeclamptic phenotype is established. Inhibition of COX enzymes normalizes some of the functional defects in the TgA UA. An increased role for COX-derived prostanoids in this model of preeclampsia may contribute to the development of a hypertensive pregnancy. PMID:26394667

  14. Role of the 5HT3 Receptor in Alcohol Drinking and Aggression Using A Transgenic Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    F(1,35) = 33.85, P < 0.0005] and N5 generations [F(1,35) = 6.33, P < 0.017]. Interactions of background and transgene presence were found for N1 [F... interaction was found for the N5 generation as well [F(2,51) = 4.55, P < 0.15]. Figure 2. Contextual conditioning is influenced by 5-HT3 receptor...2,51) = 164.56, P < 0.0005] and transgene presence [F(1,51) = 51.66, P < 0.0005] were found, as was an interaction between background and transgene

  15. Intranasal formulation of erythropoietin (EPO) showed potent protective activity against amyloid toxicity in the Aβ₂₅₋₃₅ non-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Tangui; Mustafa, Muhammad-Hariri; Desrumaux, Catherine; Keller, Emeline; Naert, Gaëlle; de la C García-Barceló, María; Rodríguez Cruz, Yamila; Garcia Rodríguez, Julío César

    2013-11-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) promotes neurogenesis and neuroprotection. We here compared the protection induced by two EPO formulations in a rodent model of Alzheimer's disease (AD): rHu-EPO and a low sialic form, Neuro-EPO. We used the intracerebroventricular administration of aggregated Aβ₂₅₋₃₅ peptide, a non-transgenic AD model. rHu-EPO was tested at 125-500 µg/kg intraperitoneally and Neuro-EPO at 62-250 µg/kg intranasally (IN). Behavioural procedures included spontaneous alternation, passive avoidance, water-maze and object recognition, to address spatial and non-spatial, short- and long-term memories. Biochemical markers of Aβ₂₅₋₃₅ toxicity in the mouse hippocampus were examined and cell loss in the CA1 layer was determined. rHu-EPO and Neuro-EPO led to a significant prevention of Aβ₂₅₋₃₅-induced learning deficits. Both EPO formulations prevented the induction of lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus, showing an antioxidant activity. rHu-EPO (250 µg/kg) or Neuro-EPO (125 µg/kg) prevented the Aβ₂₅₋₃₅-induced increase in Bax level, TNFα and IL-1β production and decrease in Akt activation. A significant prevention of the Aβ₂₅₋₃₅-induced cell loss in CA1 was also observed. EPO is neuroprotective in the Aβ₂₅₋₃₅ AD model, confirming its potential as an endogenous neuroprotection system that could be boosted for therapeutic efficacy. We here identified a new IN formulation of EPO showing high neuroprotective activity. Considering its efficacy, ease and safety, IN Neuro-EPO is a new promising therapeutic agent in AD.

  16. Quantum self-consistency of AdS×Σ brane models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flachi, Antonino; Pujolàs, Oriol

    2003-07-01

    Continuing our previous work, we consider a class of higher dimensional brane models with the topology of AdSD1+1×Σ, where Σ is a one-parameter compact manifold and two branes of codimension one are located at the orbifold fixed points. We consider a setup where such a solution arises from Einstein-Yang-Mills theory and evaluate the one-loop effective potential induced by gauge fields and by a generic bulk scalar field. We show that this type of brane model resolves the gauge hierarchy between the Planck and electroweak scales through redshift effects due to the warp factor a=e-πkr. The value of a is then fixed by minimizing the effective potential. We find that, as in the Randall-Sundrum case, the gauge field contribution to the effective potential stabilizes the hierarchy without fine-tuning as long as the Laplacian ΔΣ on Σ has a zero eigenvalue. Scalar fields can stabilize the hierarchy depending on the mass and the nonminimal coupling. We also address the quantum self-consistency of the solution, showing that the classical brane solution is not spoiled by quantum effects.

  17. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated quercetin suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinjie; Deng, Senyi; Li, Ling; Sun, Lu; Yang, Xi; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Lei; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2013-11-01

    Quercetin (Que) loaded polymeric micelles were prepared to obtain an aqueous formulation of Que with enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activities. A simple solid dispersion method was used, and the obtained Que micelles had a small particle size (about 31 nm), high drug loading, and high encapsulation efficiency. Que micelles showed improved cellular uptake, an enhanced apoptosis induction effect, and stronger inhibitory effects on proliferation, migration, and invasion of 4T1 cells than free Que. The enhanced in vitro antiangiogenesis effects of Que micelles were proved by the results that Que micelles significantly suppressed proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Subsequently, transgenic zebrafish models were employed to investigate anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effects of Que micelles, in which stronger inhibitory effects of Que micelles were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor growth, and tumor metastasis. Furthermore, in a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor model, Que micelles were more effective in suppressing tumor growth and spontaneous pulmonary metastasis, and prolonging the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Besides, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent assays suggested that tumors in the Que micelle-treated group showed more apoptosis, fewer microvessels, and fewer proliferation-positive cells. In conclusion, Que micelles, which are synthesized as an aqueous formulation of Que, possess enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity, which can serve as potential candidates for cancer therapy.

  18. Modeling the integration of parasitoid, insecticide, and transgenic insecticidal crop for the long-term control of an insect pest.

    PubMed

    Onstad, David W; Liu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Mao; Roush, Rick; Shelton, Anthony M

    2013-06-01

    The tools of insect pest management include host plant resistance, biological control, and insecticides and how they are integrated will influence the durability of each. We created a detailed model of the population dynamics and population genetics of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella L., and its parasitoid, Diadegma insulare (Cresson), to study long-term pest management in broccoli Brassica oleracea L. Given this pest's history of evolving resistance to various toxins, we also evaluated the evolution of resistance to transgenic insecticidal Bt broccoli (expressing Cry1Ac) and two types of insecticides. Simulations demonstrated that parasitism provided the most reliable, long-term control of P. xylostella populations. Use of Bt broccoli with a 10% insecticide-free refuge did not reduce the long-term contribution of parasitism to pest control. Small refuges within Bt broccoli fields can delay evolution of resistance > 30 generations if resistance alleles are rare in the pest population. However, the effectiveness of these refuges can be compromised by insecticide use. Rainfall mortality during the pest's egg and neonate stages significantly influences pest control but especially resistance management. Our model results support the idea that Bt crops and biological control can be integrated in integrated pest management and actually synergistically support each other. However, the planting and maintenance of toxin-free refuges are critical to this integration.

  19. Reduced impact of emotion on choice behavior in presymptomatic BACHD rats, a transgenic rodent model for Huntington Disease.

    PubMed

    Adjeroud, Najia; Yagüe, Sara; Yu-Taeger, Libo; Bozon, Bruno; Leblanc-Veyrac, Pascale; Riess, Olaf; Allain, Philippe; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Doyère, Valérie; El Massioui, Nicole

    2015-11-01

    Executive dysfunction and psychiatric symptoms are hallmarks of Huntington disease (HD), a neurodegenerative disorder genetically characterized by expanded CAG repeats in the HTT gene. Using the BACHD rat model of HD (97 CAG-CAA repeats), the present research seeks to characterize the progressive emergence of decision-making impairments in a rat version of the Iowa Gambling Task (RGT) and the impact of emotional modulation, whether positive or negative, on choice behavior. The choice efficiency shown both by WT rats (independent of their age) and the youngest BACHD rats (2 and 8months old) evidenced that they are able to integrate outcomes of past decisions to determine expected reward values for each option. However, 18months old BACHD rats made fewer choices during the RGT session and were less efficient in choosing advantageous options than younger animals. Presenting either chocolate pellets or electrical footshocks half-way through a second RGT session reduced exploratory activity (inefficient nose-poking) and choices with a weaker effect on BACHD animals than on WT. Choice efficiency was left intact in transgenic rats. Our results bring new knowledge on executive impairments and impact of emotional state on decision-making at different stages of the disease, increasing the face-validity of the BACHD rat model.

  20. Transgenic tomato expressing interleukin-12 has a therapeutic effect in a murine model of progressive pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Elías-López, A L; Marquina, B; Gutiérrez-Ortega, A; Aguilar, D; Gomez-Lim, M; Hernández-Pando, R

    2008-10-01

    Host control of mycobacterial infection, in both human and mouse models, has been shown to be associated with the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma by CD4(+) T cells. Interleukin (IL)-12 is known to be a crucial cytokine in the differentiation of IFN-gamma-producing T helper 1 (Th1) cells. To determine whether continuous administration of IL-12 expressed in transgenic tomato (TT-IL-12) has therapeutic efficacy in a murine model of pulmonary tuberculosis, BALB/c mice were infected with either Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain or a multi-drug-resistant clinical isolate (MDR) and treated with a daily oral dose of TT-IL12 crude fruit extracts. For the early H37Rv infection, TT-IL-12 administration was started 1 day before infection and continued for 60 days. In the H37Rv or MDR late infection, treatment was started 60 days after infection and continued for another 60 days. In both phases of infection, TT-IL-12 administration resulted in a reduction of bacterial loads and tissue damage compared with wild-type tomato (non-TT). The Th1 response was increased and the Th2 response was reduced. In the late infection, a long-term treatment with TT-IL-12 was necessary. We demonstrate that TT-IL-12 increases resistance to infection and reduces lung tissue damage during early and late drug-sensitive and drug-resistant mycobacterial infection.

  1. Noggin and BMP4 co-modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jun; Song, Min; Wang, Yanyan; Fan, Xiaotang; Xu, Haiwei; Bai, Yun

    2009-07-31

    In addition to the subventricular zone, the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few brain regions in which neurogenesis continues into adulthood. Perturbation of neurogenesis can alter hippocampal function, and previous studies have shown that neurogenesis is dysregulated in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) and its antagonist Noggin have been shown to play important roles both in embryonic development and in the adult nervous system, and may regulate hippocampal neurogenesis. Previous data indicated that increased expression of BMP4 mRNA within the dentate gyrus might contribute to decreased hippocampal cell proliferation in the APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} mouse AD model. However, it is not known whether the BMP antagonist Noggin contributes to the regulation of neurogenesis. We therefore studied the relative expression levels and localization of BMP4 and its antagonist Noggin in the dentate gyrus and whether these correlated with changes in neurogenesis in 6-12 mo old APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} transgenic mice. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label proliferative cells. We report that decreased neurogenesis in the APP/PS1 transgenic mice was accompanied by increased expression of BMP4 and decreased expression of Noggin at both the mRNA and protein levels; statistical analysis showed that the number of proliferative cells at different ages correlated positively with Noggin expression and negatively with BMP4 expression. Intraventricular administration of a chimeric Noggin/Fc protein was used to block the action of endogenous BMP4; this resulted in a significant increase in the number of BrdU-labeled cells in dentate gyrus subgranular zone and hilus in APP/PS1 mice. These results suggest that BMP4 and Noggin co-modulate neurogenesis.

  2. Discounting Testimony with the Argument Ad Hominem and a Bayesian Congruent Prior Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Jaydeep-Singh; Oaksford, Mike

    2015-01-01

    When directed to ignore evidence of a witness's previous bad character because of a violation of the rules of evidence, are jurors' beliefs still affected? The intuition is that they will be because in everyday argumentation, fallacies, like the ad hominem, are effective argumentative strategies. An ad hominem argument (against the person)…

  3. Triple-transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice exhibit region-specific abnormalities in brain myelination patterns prior to appearance of amyloid and tau pathology

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Maya K.; Sudol, Kelly L.; Janelsins, Michelle C.; Mastrangelo, Michael A.; Frazer, Maria E.; Bowers, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressively debilitating brain disorder pathologically defined by extracellular amyloid plaques, intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles, and synaptic disintegrity. AD has not been widely considered a disease of white matter, but more recent evidence suggests the existence of abnormalities in myelination patterns and myelin attrition in AD-afflicted human brains. Herein, we demonstrate that triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice, which harbor the human amyloid precursor protein Swedish mutant transgene, presenilin knock-in mutation, and tau P301L mutant transgene, exhibit significant region-specific alterations in myelination patterns and in oligodendrocyte marker expression profiles at time points preceding the appearance of amyloid and tau pathology. These immunohistochemical signatures are coincident with age-related alterations in axonal and myelin sheath ultrastructure as visualized by comparative electron microscopic examination of 3xTg-AD and non-transgenic mouse brain tissue. Overall, these findings indicate 3xTg-AD mice represent a viable model in which to examine mechanisms underlying AD-related myelination and neural transmission defects that occur early during pre-symptomatic stages of the disease process. PMID:18661556

  4. Adding-point strategy for reduced-order hypersonic aerothermodynamics modeling based on fuzzy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Liu, Li; Zhou, Sida; Yue, Zhenjiang

    2016-09-01

    Reduced order models(ROMs) based on the snapshots on the CFD high-fidelity simulations have been paid great attention recently due to their capability of capturing the features of the complex geometries and flow configurations. To improve the efficiency and precision of the ROMs, it is indispensable to add extra sampling points to the initial snapshots, since the number of sampling points to achieve an adequately accurate ROM is generally unknown in prior, but a large number of initial sampling points reduces the parsimony of the ROMs. A fuzzy-clustering-based adding-point strategy is proposed and the fuzzy clustering acts an indicator of the region in which the precision of ROMs is relatively low. The proposed method is applied to construct the ROMs for the benchmark mathematical examples and a numerical example of hypersonic aerothermodynamics prediction for a typical control surface. The proposed method can achieve a 34.5% improvement on the efficiency than the estimated mean squared error prediction algorithm and shows same-level prediction accuracy.

  5. PR-Set7 is degraded in a conditional Cul4A transgenic mouse model of lung cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yang; Xu, Zhidong; Mao, Jian -Hua; ...

    2015-06-01

    Background and objective. Maintenance of genomic integrity is essential to ensure normal organismal development and to prevent diseases such as cancer. PR-Set7 (also known as Set8) is a cell cycle regulated enzyme that catalyses monomethylation of histone 4 at Lys20 (H4K20me1) to promote chromosome condensation and prevent DNA damage. Recent studies show that CRL4CDT2-mediated ubiquitylation of PR-Set7 leads to its degradation during S phase and after DNA damage. This might occur to ensure appropriate changes in chromosome structure during the cell cycle or to preserve genome integrity after DNA damage. Methods. We developed a new model of lung tumor developmentmore » in mice harboring a conditionally expressed allele of Cul4A. We have therefore used a mouse model to demonstrate for the first time that Cul4A is oncogenic in vivo. With this model, staining of PR-Set7 in the preneoplastic and tumor lesions in AdenoCre-induced mouse lungs was performed. Meanwhile we identified higher protein level changes of γ-tubulin and pericentrin by IHC. Results. The level of PR-Set7 down-regulated in the preneoplastic and adenocarcinomous lesions following over-expression of Cul4A. We also identified higher levels of the proteins pericentrin and γ-tubulin in Cul4A mouse lungs induced by AdenoCre. Conclusion. PR-Set7 is a direct target of Cul4A for degradation and involved in the formation of lung tumors in the conditional Cul4A transgenic mouse model.« less

  6. Thalidomide Effects in Patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia During Therapeutic Treatment and in Fli-EGFP Transgenic Zebrafish Model

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hong-Ling; Yi, Yi-Fang; Zhou, Shun-Ke; Xie, Si-Si; Zhang, Guang-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasia, and arteriovenous malformations. The efficacy of traditional treatments for HHT is very limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic role of thalidomide in HHT patients and the effect in FLI-EGFP transgenic zebrafish model. Methods: HHT was diagnosed according to Shovlin criteria. Five HHT patients were treated with thalidomide (100 mg/d). The Epistaxis Severity Score (ESS), telangiectasia spots, and hepatic computed tomography angiography (CTA) were used to assess the clinical efficacy of thalidomide. The Fli-EGFP zebrafish model was investigated for the effect of thalidomide on angiogenesis. Dynamic real-time polymerase chain reaction assay, ELISA and Western blotting from patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma were used to detect the expression of transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-β3) messenger RNA (mRNA) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein before and after 6 months of thalidomide treatment. Results: The average ESS before and after thalidomide were 6.966 ± 3.093 and 1.799 ± 0.627, respectively (P = 0.009). The “telangiectatic spot” on the tongue almost vanished; CTA examination of case 2 indicated a smaller proximal hepatic artery and decreased or ceased hepatic artery collateral circulation. The Fli-EGFP zebrafish model manifested discontinuous vessel development and vascular occlusion (7 of 10 fishes), and the TGF-β3 mRNA expression of five patients was lower after thalidomide therapy. The plasma VEGF protein expression was down-regulated in HHT patients. Conclusions: Thalidomide reverses telangiectasia and controls nosebleeds by down-regulating the expression of TGF-β3 and VEGF in HHT patients. It also leads to vascular remodeling in the zebrafish model. PMID:26608985

  7. Efficient adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into primary T cells and thymocytes in a new coxsackie/adenovirus receptor transgenic model

    PubMed Central

    Hurez, Vincent; Dzialo-Hatton, Robin; Oliver, James; Matthews, R James; Weaver, Casey T

    2002-01-01

    Background Gene transfer studies in primary T cells have suffered from the limitations of conventional viral transduction or transfection techniques. Replication-defective adenoviral vectors are an attractive alternative for gene delivery. However, naive lymphocytes are not readily susceptible to infection with adenoviruses due to insufficient expression of the coxsackie/adenovirus receptor. Results To render T cells susceptible to adenoviral gene transfer, we have developed three new murine transgenic lines in which expression of the human coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (hCAR) with a truncated cytoplasmic domain (hCARΔcyt) is limited to thymocytes and lymphocytes under direction of a human CD2 mini-gene. hCARΔcyt.CD2 transgenic mice were crossed with DO11.10 T cell receptor transgenic mice (DO11.hCARΔcyt) to allow developmental studies in a defined, clonal T cell population. Expression of hCARΔcyt enabled adenoviral transduction of resting primary CD4+ T cells, differentiated effector T cells and thymocytes from DO11.hCARΔcyt with high efficiency. Expression of hCARΔcyt transgene did not perturb T cell development in these mice and adenoviral transduction of DO11.hCARΔcyt T cells did not alter their activation status, functional responses or differentiative potential. Adoptive transfer of the transduced T cells into normal recipients did not modify their physiologic localization. Conclusion The DO11.hCARΔcyt transgenic model thus allows efficient gene transfer in primary T cell populations and will be valuable for novel studies of T cell activation and differentiation. PMID:12019030

  8. Three-dimensional analysis of abnormal ultrastructural alteration in mitochondria of hippocampus of APP/PSEN1 transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ki Ju; Kim, Mi Jeong; Je, A Reum; Jun, Sangmi; Lee, Chulhyun; Lee, Eunji; Jo, Mijung; Huh, Yang Hoon; Kweon, Hee-Seok

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The deterioration of subcellular organelles, including the mitochondria, is another major ultrastructural characteristic of AD pathogenesis, in addition to amyloid plaque deposition. However, the three-dimensional (3-D) study of mitochondrial structural alteration in AD remains poorly understood. Therefore, ultrastructural analysis, 3-D electron tomography, and immunogold electron microscopy were performed in the present study to clarify the abnormal structural alterations in mitochondria caused by the progression of AD in APP/PSEN1 transgenic mice, expressing human amyloid precursor protein, as a model for AD. Amyloid beta (A beta) plaques accumulated and dystrophic neurites (DN) developed in the hippocampus of transgenic AD mouse brains. We also identified the loss of peroxiredoxin 3, an endogenous cytoprotective antioxidant enzyme and the accumulation of A beta in the hippocampal mitochondria of transgenic mice, which differs from those in age-matched wild-type mice. The mitochondria in A beta plaque-detected regions were severely disrupted, and the patterns of ultrastructural abnormalities were classified into three groups: disappearance of cristae, swelling of cristae, and bulging of the outer membrane. These results demonstrated that morpho-functional alterations of mitochondria and AD progression are closely associated and may be beneficial in investigating the function of mitochondria in AD pathogenesis.

  9. Targeting FGF19 inhibits tumor growth in colon cancer xenograft and FGF19 transgenic hepatocellular carcinoma models.

    PubMed

    Desnoyers, L R; Pai, R; Ferrando, R E; Hötzel, K; Le, T; Ross, J; Carano, R; D'Souza, A; Qing, J; Mohtashemi, I; Ashkenazi, A; French, D M

    2008-01-03

    Although fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) can promote liver carcinogenesis in mice its involvement in human cancer is not well characterized. Here we report that FGF19 and its cognate receptor FGF receptor 4 (FGFR4) are coexpressed in primary human liver, lung and colon tumors and in a subset of human colon cancer cell lines. To test the importance of FGF19 for tumor growth, we developed an anti-FGF19 monoclonal antibody that selectively blocks the interaction of FGF19 with FGFR4. This antibody abolished FGF19-mediated activity in vitro and inhibited growth of colon tumor xenografts in vivo and effectively prevented hepatocellular carcinomas in FGF19 transgenic mice. The efficacy of the antibody in these models was linked to inhibition of FGF19-dependent activation of FGFR4, FRS2, ERK and beta-catenin. These findings suggest that the inactivation of FGF19 could be beneficial for the treatment of colon cancer, liver cancer and other malignancies involving interaction of FGF19 and FGFR4.

  10. Microscopic Delineation of Medulloblastoma Margins in a Transgenic Mouse Model Using a Topically Applied VEGFR-1 Probe1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danni; Chen, Ye; Leigh, Steven Y; Haeberle, Henry; Contag, Christopher H; Liu, Jonathan T C

    2012-01-01

    The unambiguous demarcation of tumor margins is critical at the final stages in the surgical treatment of brain tumors because patient outcomes have been shown to correlate with the extent of resection. Real-time high-resolution imaging with the aid of a tumor-targeting fluorescent contrast agent has the potential to enable intraoperative differentiation of tumor versus normal tissues with accuracy approaching the current gold standard of histopathology. In this study, a monoclonal antibody targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR-1) was conjugated to fluorophores and evaluated as a tumor contrast agent in a transgenic mouse model of medulloblastoma. The probe was administered topically, and its efficacy as an imaging agent was evaluated in vitro using flow cytometry, as well as ex vivo on fixed and fresh tissues through immunohistochemistry and dual-axis confocal microscopy, respectively. Results show a preferential binding to tumor versus normal tissue, suggesting that a topically applied VEGFR-1 probe can potentially be used with real-time intraoperative optical sectioning microscopy to guide brain tumor resections. PMID:23323155

  11. Metabolomic investigation of systemic manifestations associated with Alzheimer's disease in the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Raúl; García-Barrera, Tamara; Vitorica, Javier; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2015-09-01

    There is growing evidence that Alzheimer's disease may be a widespread systemic disorder, so peripheral organs could be affected by pathological mechanisms occurring in this neurodegenerative disease. For this reason, a double metabolomic platform based on the combination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used for the first time to investigate metabolic changes in liver and kidney from the transgenic mice APP/PS1 against wild-type controls. Multivariate statistics showed significant differences in levels of numerous metabolites including phospholipids, sphingolipids, acylcarnitines, steroids, amino acids and other compounds, which denotes that multiple pathways might be associated with systemic pathogenesis of Alzheimer's in this mouse model, such as bioenergetic failures, oxidative stress, altered metabolism of membrane lipids, hyperammonemia or impaired homeostasis of steroids. Furthermore, it is noteworthy that some novel pathological mechanisms were found, such as impaired gluconeogenesis, polyol pathway or metabolism of branched chain amino acids, not previously described for Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, these findings clearly support the hypothesis that Alzheimer's disease may be considered as a systemic disorder.

  12. Progressive synaptic pathology of motor cortical neurons in a BAC transgenic mouse model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Spampanato, Jay; Gu, Xiaofeng; Yang, X. William; Mody, Istvan

    2008-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion in huntingtin. A newly developed BAC transgenic mouse model (BACHD) reproduces phenotypic features of HD including predominantly neuropil associated protein aggregation and progressive motor dysfunction with selective neurodegeneration. Motor dysfunction has been shown to precede neuropathology in BACHD mice. We therefore investigated the progression of synaptic pathology in pyramidal cells and interneurons of the superficial motor cortex of BACHD mice. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed on layer 2/3 primary motor cortical pyramidal cells and PV interneurons from BACHD mice at 3 months, when the mice begin to demonstrate mild motor dysfunction, and at 6 months, when the motor dysfunction is more severe. Changes in synaptic variances were detectable at 3 months and at 6 months BACHD mice display progressive synaptic pathology in the form of reduced cortical excitation and loss of inhibition onto pyramidal cells. These results suggest that progressive alterations of the superficial cortical circuitry may contribute to the decline of motor function in BACHD mice. The synaptic pathology occurs prior to neuronal degeneration and may therefore prove useful as a target for future therapeutic design. PMID:18854207

  13. Genetic Ablation of Parietal Cells in Transgenic Mice: A New Model for Analyzing Cell Lineage Relationships in the Gastric Mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Victor; West, A. Brian; Goldenring, James R.; Levenson, Robert

    1996-03-01

    The gastric mucosa of mammalian stomach contains several differentiated cell types specialized for the secretion of acid, digestive enzymes, mucus, and hormones. Understanding whether each of these cell lineages is derived from a common stem cell has been a challenging problem. We have used a genetic approach to analyze the ontogeny of progenitor cells within mouse stomach. Herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase was targeted to parietal cells within the gastric mucosa of transgenic mice, and parietal cells were ablated by treatment of animals with the antiherpetic drug ganciclovir. Ganciclovir treatment produced complete ablation of parietal cells, dissolution of gastric glands, and loss of chief and mucus-producing cells. Termination of drug treatment led to the reemergence of all major gastric epithelial cell types and restoration of glandular architecture. Our results imply the existence of a pluripotent stem cell for the gastric mucosa. Parietal cell ablation should provide a model for analyzing cell lineage relationships within the stomach as well as mechanisms underlying gastric injury and repair.

  14. Transgenic mouse model expressing P53R172H, luciferase, EGFP, and KRASG12D in a single open reading frame for live imaging of tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Hye-Lim; Calvisi, Diego F.; Moon, Hyuk; Baek, Sinhwa; Ribback, Silvia; Dombrowski, Frank; Cho, Kyung Joo; Chung, Sook In; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ro, Simon Weonsang

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse cancer models allow tumors to be imaged in vivo via co-expression of a reporter gene with a tumor-initiating gene. However, differential transcriptional and translational regulation between the tumor-initiating gene and the reporter gene can result in inconsistency between the actual tumor size and the size indicated by the imaging assay. To overcome this limitation, we developed a transgenic mouse in which two oncogenes, encoding P53R172H and KRASG12D, are expressed together with two reporter genes, encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and firefly luciferase, in a single open reading frame following Cre-mediated DNA excision. Systemic administration of adenovirus encoding Cre to these mice induced specific transgene expression in the liver. Repeated bioluminescence imaging of the mice revealed a continuous increase in the bioluminescent signal over time. A strong correlation was found between the bioluminescent signal and actual tumor size. Interestingly, all liver tumors induced by P53R172H and KRASG12D in the model were hepatocellular adenomas. The mouse model was also used to trace cell proliferation in the epidermis via live fluorescence imaging. We anticipate that the transgenic mouse model will be useful for imaging tumor development in vivo and for investigating the oncogenic collaboration between P53R172H and KRASG12D. PMID:25623590

  15. An Abd transgene prevents diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice by inducing regulatory T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, S M; Tisch, R; Yang, X D; McDevitt, H O

    1993-01-01

    Susceptibility to the human autoimmune disease insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is strongly associated with particular haplotypes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Similarly, in a spontaneous animal model of this disease, the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, the genes of the MHC play an important role in the development of diabetes. We have produced transgenic NOD mice that express the class II MHC molecule I-Ad in addition to the endogenous I-Ag7 molecules in order to study the role of these molecules in the disease process. Although the inflammatory lesions within the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas appear similar in transgenic and nontransgenic animals, transgenic mice develop diabetes with greatly diminished frequency compared to their nontransgenic littermates (10% of transgenic females by 30 weeks of age compared to 45% of nontransgenic females). Furthermore, adoptive transfer experiments show that T cells present in the transgenic mice are able to interfere with the diabetogenic process caused by T cells from nontransgenic mice. Thus, the mechanism by which I-Ad molecules protect mice from diabetes includes selecting in the thymus and/or inducing in the periphery T cells capable of inhibiting diabetes development. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8415742

  16. Involvement of Peripheral Nerves in the Transgenic PLP-α-Syn Model of Multiple System Atrophy: Extending the Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kuzdas-Wood, Daniela; Irschick, Regina; Theurl, Markus; Malsch, Philipp; Mair, Norbert; Mantinger, Christine; Wanschitz, Julia; Klimaschewski, Lars; Poewe, Werner; Stefanova, Nadia; Wenning, Gregor K.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a fatal, rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disease with (oligodendro-)glial cytoplasmic α-synuclein (α-syn) inclusions (GCIs). Peripheral neuropathies have been reported in up to 40% of MSA patients, the cause remaining unclear. In a transgenic MSA mouse model featuring GCI-like inclusion pathology based on PLP-promoter driven overexpression of human α-syn in oligodendroglia motor and non-motor deficits are associated with MSA-like neurodegeneration. Since α-syn is also expressed in Schwann cells we aimed to investigate whether peripheral nerves are anatomically and functionally affected in the PLP-α-syn MSA mouse model. Results To this end, heat/cold as well as mechanical sensitivity tests were performed. Furthermore, in vivo and ex vivo nerve conduction and the G-ratios of the sciatic nerve were analyzed, and thermosensitive ion channel mRNA expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was assessed. The presence of human α-syn in Schwann cells was associated with subtle behavioral impairments. The G-ratio of the sciatic nerve, the conduction velocity of myelinated and unmyelinated primary afferents and the expression of thermosensitive ion channels in the sensory neurons, however, were similar to wildtype mice. Conclusion Our results suggest that the PNS appears to be affected by Schwann cell α-syn deposits in the PLP-α-syn MSA mouse model. However, there was no consistent evidence for functional PNS perturbations resulting from such α-syn aggregates suggesting a more central cause of the observed behavioral abnormalities. Nonetheless, our results do not exclude a causal role of α-syn in the pathogenesis of MSA associated peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26496712

  17. Effects of Neurotrophic Support and Amyloid-Targeted Combined Therapy on Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Mary E.; Aubert, Isabelle; McLaurin, JoAnne

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that multi-drug therapies may be necessary to combat AD, there is a paucity of preclinical proof of concept studies. We present a combination treatment paradigm, which temporally affects different aspects of Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-like pathology, specifically Aβ-toxicity and neurogenesis. At early stages of AD-like pathology, in TgCRND8 mice, we found that combating Aβ pathology with scyllo-inositol ameliorated deficits in neurogenesis. Older TgCRND8 mice with established amyloid load had decreased progenitor cell proliferation and survival compared to non-transgenic mice, regardless of scyllo-inositol treatment. The prolonged exposure to Aβ-pathology leads to deficits in the neurogenic niche, thus targeting Aβ alone is insufficient to rescue neurogenesis. To support the neurogenic niche, we combined scyllo-inositol treatment with leteprinim potassium (neotrofin), the latter of which stimulates neurotrophin expression. We show that the combination treatment of scyllo-inositol and neotrofin enhances neuronal survival and differentiation. We propose this proof of concept combination therapy of targeting Aβ-pathology and neurotrophin deficits as a potential treatment for AD. PMID:27768761

  18. Systematic behavioral evaluation of Huntington’s disease transgenic and knock-in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Menalled, Liliana; El-Khodor, Bassem F.; Patry, Monica; Suarez-Farinas, Mayte; Orenstein, Samantha; Zahasky, Benjamin; Leahy, Christina; Wheeler, Vanessa; Yang, X. William; MacDonald, Marcy; Morton, Jennifer A.; Bates, Gill; Leeds, Janet; Park, Larry; Howland, David; Signer, Ethan; Tobin, Allan; Brunner, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is one of the few neurodegenerative diseases with a known genetic cause, knowledge that has enabled the creation of animal models using genetic manipulations that aim to recapitulate HD pathology. The study of behavioral and neuropathological phenotypes of these HD models, however, has been plagued by inconsistent results across laboratories stemming from the lack of standardized husbandry and testing conditions, in addition to the intrinsic differences between the models. We have compared different HD models using standardized conditions to identify the most robust phenotypic differences, best suited for preclinical therapeutic efficacy studies. With a battery of tests of sensory-motor function, such as the open field and prepulse inhibition tests, we replicate previous results showing a strong and progressive behavioral deficit in the R6/2 line with an average of 129 CAG repeats in a mixed CBA/J and C57BL/6J background. We present the first behavioral characterization of a new model, an R6/2 line with an average of 248 CAG repeats in a pure C57BL/6J background, which also showed a progressive and robust phenotype. The BACHD in a FVB/N background showed robust and progressive behavioral phenotype, while the YAC128 full-length model on either an FVB/N or a C57BL/6J background generally showed milder deficits. Finally, the HdhQ111 knock-in mouse on a CD1 background showed very mild deficits. This first extensive standardized cross-characterization of several HD animal models under standardized conditions highlights several behavioral outcomes, such as hypoactivity, amenable to standardized preclinical therapeutic drug screening. PMID:19464370

  19. A Robust Deep Model for Improved Classification of AD/MCI Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Tran, Loc; Thung, Kim-Han; Ji, Shuiwang; Shen, Dinggang; Li, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Accurate classification of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and its prodromal stage, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), plays a critical role in possibly preventing progression of memory impairment and improving quality of life for AD patients. Among many research tasks, it is of particular interest to identify noninvasive imaging biomarkers for AD diagnosis. In this paper, we present a robust deep learning system to identify different progression stages of AD patients based on MRI and PET scans. We utilized the dropout technique to improve classical deep learning by preventing its weight co-adaptation, which is a typical cause of over-fitting in deep learning. In addition, we incorporated stability selection, an adaptive learning factor, and a multi-task learning strategy into the deep learning framework. We applied the proposed method to the ADNI data set and conducted experiments for AD and MCI conversion diagnosis. Experimental results showed that the dropout technique is very effective in AD diagnosis, improving the classification accuracies by 5.9% on average as compared to the classical deep learning methods. PMID:25955998

  20. How Gas-dynamic Flare Models Powered by Petschek Reconnection Differ from Those with Ad Hoc Energy Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longcope, D. W.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    Aspects of solar flare dynamics, such as chromospheric evaporation and flare light curves, have long been studied using one-dimensional models of plasma dynamics inside a static flare loop, subjected to some energy input. While extremely successful at explaining the observed characteristics of flares, all such models so far have specified energy input ad hoc, rather than deriving it self-consistently. There is broad consensus that flares are powered by magnetic energy released through reconnection. Recent work has generalized Petschek’s basic reconnection scenario, topological change followed by field line retraction and shock heating, to permit its inclusion in a one-dimensional flare loop model. Here we compare the gas dynamics driven by retraction and shocking to those from more conventional static loop models energized by ad hoc source terms. We find significant differences during the first minute, when retraction leads to larger kinetic energies and produces higher densities at the loop top, while ad hoc heating tends to rarify the loop top. The loop-top density concentration is related to the slow magnetosonic shock, characteristic of Petschek’s model, but persists beyond the retraction phase occurring in the outflow jet. This offers an explanation for observed loop-top sources of X-ray and EUV emission, with advantages over that provided by ad hoc heating scenarios. The cooling phases of the two models are, however, notably similar to one another, suggesting that observations at that stage will yield little information on the nature of energy input.

  1. Mathematical models as aids for design and development of experiments: the case of transgenic mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Robert, Michael A; Legros, Mathieu; Facchinelli, Luca; Valerio, Laura; Ramsey, Janine M; Scott, Thomas W; Gould, Fred; Lloyd, Alun L

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate the utility of models as aids in the design and development of experiments aimed at measuring the effects of proposed vector population control strategies. We describe the exploration of a stochastic, age-structured model that simulates field cage experiments that test the ability of a female-killing strain of the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) to suppress a wild-type population. Model output predicts that choices of release ratio and population size can impact mean extinction time and variability in extinction time among experiments. We find that unless fitness costs are >80% they will not be detectable in experiments with high release ratios. At lower release ratios, the predicted length of the experiment increases significantly for fitness costs >20%. Experiments with small populations may more accurately reflect field conditions, but extinction can occur even in the absence of a functional female-killing construct because of stochastic effects. We illustrate how the model can be used to explore experimental designs that aim to study the impact of density dependence and immigration; predictions indicate that cage population eradication may not always be obtainable in an operationally realistic time frame. We propose a method to predict the extinction time of a cage population based on the rate of population reduction with the goal of shortening the duration of the experiment. We discuss the model as a tool for exploring and assessing the utility of a wider range of scenarios than would be feasible to test experimentally because of financial and temporal restraints.

  2. The Construction of Transgenic and Gene Knockout/Knockin Mouse Models of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Alfred; McGarry, Michael P.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic and physiological similarities between mice and humans have focused considerable attention on rodents as potential models of human health and disease. Together with the wealth of resources, knowledge, and technologies surrounding the mouse as a model system, these similarities have propelled this species to the forefront of biomedical research. The advent of genomic manipulation has quickly led to the creation and use of genetically engineered mice as powerful tools for cutting edge studies of human disease research, including the discovery, refinement, and utility of many currently available therapeutic regimes. In particular, the creation of genetically modified mice as models of human disease has remarkably changed our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms and cellular pathways underlying disease states. Moreover, the mouse models resulting from gene transfer technologies have been important components correlating an individual’s gene expression profile to the development of disease pathologies. The objective of this review is to provide physician-scientists with an expansive historical and logistical overview of the creation of mouse models of human disease through gene transfer technologies. Our expectation is that this will facilitate on-going disease research studies and may initiate new areas of translational research leading to enhanced patient care. PMID:21800101

  3. Effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone on sleep and brain interstitial fluid amyloid-β in an APP transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Liao, Fan; Zhang, Tony J; Mahan, Thomas E; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by impairment of cognitive function, extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, and synaptic and neuronal loss. There is substantial evidence that the aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain plays a key role in the pathogenesis of AD and that Aβ aggregation is a concentration dependent process. Recently, it was found that Aβ levels in the brain interstitial fluid (ISF) are regulated by the sleep-wake cycle i