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Sample records for ad neuroimaging initiative

  1. Worldwide Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Maria C; Bain, Lisa J; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Weiner, Michael W

    2012-07-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) was launched in 2003 to speed drug development by validating imaging and blood/cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease clinical treatment trials. ADNI is a naturalistic (nontreatment) multisite longitudinal study. A true public-private partnership, the first phase of ADNI (ADNI 1) set a new standard for data sharing without embargo. In addition, it has been extended to 2017 by additional funding (North American-ADNI Grand Opportunities and ADNI 2) as well as multiple projects around the world, collectively known as Worldwide ADNI (WW-ADNI). The goal of WW-ADNI is to harmonize projects and results across different geographical sites and to encourage and harmonize data management and availability to investigators around the world. WW-ADNI projects are currently underway in North America, Europe, Japan, Australia, Korea, Taiwan, and Argentina, with a nascent program in China and a possible future program in Brazil. PMID:22748939

  2. The Worldwide Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: An update.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, James A; Finger, Brad; Weiner, Michael W; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Rowe, Christopher C; Kim, Seong Yoon; Guinjoan, Salvador M; Sevlever, Gustavo; Carrillo, Maria C

    2015-07-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), launched in 2004, has worked to accelerate drug development by validating imaging and blood/cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease clinical treatment trials. ADNI is a naturalistic (nontreatment) multisite longitudinal study. A true public-private partnership, the initiative has set a new standard for data sharing without embargo and for the use of biomarkers in dementia research. The ADNI effort in North America is not the only such effort in the world. The Alzheimer's Association recognized these global efforts and formed Worldwide ADNI (WW-ADNI). By creating a platform for international collaboration and cooperation, WW-ADNI's goals are to harmonize projects and results across geographical regions and to facilitate data management and availability to investigators around the world. WW-ADNI projects include those based in North America, Europe, Japan, Australia, Korea, and Argentina. PMID:26194318

  3. Clinical Core of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: progress and plans.

    PubMed

    Aisen, Paul S; Petersen, Ronald C; Donohue, Michael C; Gamst, Anthony; Raman, Rema; Thomas, Ronald G; Walter, Sarah; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M; Beckett, Laurel A; Jack, Clifford R; Jagust, William; Toga, Arthur W; Saykin, Andrew J; Morris, John C; Green, Robert C; Weiner, Michael W

    2010-05-01

    The Clinical Core of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has provided clinical, operational, and data management support to ADNI since its inception. This article reviews the activities and accomplishments of the core in support of ADNI aims. These include the enrollment and follow-up of more than 800 subjects in the three original cohorts: healthy controls, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (now referred to as late MCI, or LMCI), and mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the first phase of ADNI (ADNI 1), with baseline longitudinal, clinical, and cognitive assessments. These data, when combined with genetic, neuroimaging, and cerebrospinal fluid measures, have provided important insights into the neurobiology of the AD spectrum. Furthermore, these data have facilitated the development of novel clinical trial designs. ADNI has recently been extended with funding from an NIH Grand Opportunities (GO) award, and the new ADNI GO phase has been launched; this includes the enrollment of a new cohort, called early MCI, with milder episodic memory impairment than the LMCI group. An application for a further 5 years of ADNI funding (ADNI 2) was recently submitted. This funding would support ongoing follow-up of the original ADNI 1 and ADNI GO cohorts, as well as additional recruitment into all categories. The resulting data would provide valuable data on the earliest stages of AD, and support the development of interventions in these critically important populations. PMID:20451872

  4. Impact of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, 2004 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Michael W.; Veitch, Dallas P.; Aisen, Paul S.; Beckett, Laurel A.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Cedarbaum, Jesse; Donohue, Michael C.; Green, Robert C.; Harvey, Danielle; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Morris, John C.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shaw, Leslie; Thompson, Paul M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) was established in 2004 to facilitate the development of effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by validating biomarkers for AD clinical trials. Methods We searched for ADNI publications using established methods. Results ADNI has (1) developed standardized biomarkers for use in clinical trial subject selection and as surrogate outcome measures; (2) standardized protocols for use across multiple centers; (3) initiated worldwide ADNI; (4) inspired initiatives investigating traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder in military populations, and depression, respectively, as an AD risk factor; (5) acted as a data-sharing model; (6) generated data used in over 600 publications, leading to the identification of novel AD risk alleles, and an understanding of the relationship between biomarkers and AD progression; and (7) inspired other public-private partnerships developing biomarkers for Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis. Discussion ADNI has made myriad impacts in its first decade. A competitive renewal of the project in 2015 would see the use of newly developed tau imaging ligands, and the continued development of recruitment strategies and outcome measures for clinical trials. PMID:26194320

  5. The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: Progress report and future plans

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Michael W.; Aisen, Paul S.; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William J.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John C.; Cairns, Nigel; Beckett, Laurel A.; Toga, Arthur; Green, Robert; Walter, Sarah; Soares, Holly; Snyder, Peter; Siemers, Eric; Potter, William; Cole, Patricia E.; Schmidt, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) beginning in October 2004, is a 6-year re-search project that studies changes of cognition, function, brain structure and function, and biomarkers in elderly controls, subjects with mild cognitive impairment, and subjects with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A major goal is to determine and validate MRI, PET images, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/blood biomarkers as predictors and outcomes for use in clinical trials of AD treatments. Structural MRI, FDG PET, C-11 Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) PET, CSF measurements of amyloid β (Aβ) and species of tau, with clinical/cognitive measurements were performed on elderly controls, subjects with mild cognitive impairment, and subjects with AD. Structural MRI shows high rates of brain atrophy, and has high statistical power for determining treatment effects. FDG PET, C-11 Pittsburgh compound B PET, and CSF measurements of Aβ and tau were significant predictors of cognitive decline and brain atrophy. All data are available at UCLA/LONI/ADNI, without embargo. ADNI-like projects started in Australia, Europe, Japan, and Korea. ADNI provides significant new information concerning the progression of AD. PMID:20451868

  6. Intrinsic Functional Component Analysis via Sparse Representation on Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Database

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia (accounting for 60% to 80%) and is the fifth leading cause of death for those people who are 65 or older. By 2050, one new case of AD in United States is expected to develop every 33 sec. Unfortunately, there is no available effective treatment that can stop or slow the death of neurons that causes AD symptoms. On the other hand, it is widely believed that AD starts before development of the associated symptoms, so its prestages, including mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or even significant memory concern (SMC), have received increasing attention, not only because of their potential as a precursor of AD, but also as a possible predictor of conversion to other neurodegenerative diseases. Although these prestages have been defined clinically, accurate/efficient diagnosis is still challenging. Moreover, brain functional abnormalities behind those alterations and conversions are still unclear. In this article, by developing novel sparse representations of whole-brain resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signals and by using the most updated Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset, we successfully identified multiple functional components simultaneously, and which potentially represent those intrinsic functional networks involved in the resting-state activities. Interestingly, these identified functional components contain all the resting-state networks obtained from traditional independent-component analysis. Moreover, by using the features derived from those functional components, it yields high classification accuracy for both AD (94%) and MCI (92%) versus normal controls. Even for SMC we can still have 92% accuracy. PMID:24846640

  7. The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Informatics Core: A Decade in Review

    PubMed Central

    Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    The Informatics Core of the Alzheimer’s Diseases Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has coordinated data integration and dissemination for a continually growing and complex dataset in which both data contributors and recipients span institutions, scientific disciplines and geographic boundaries. This article provides an update on the accomplishments and future plans. PMID:26194316

  8. The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: A review of papers published since its inception

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Michael W.; Veitch, Dallas P.; Aisen, Paul S.; Beckett, Laurel A.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Green, Robert C.; Harvey, Danielle; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Liu, Enchi; Morris, John C.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schmidt, Mark E.; Shaw, Leslie; Siuciak, Judith A.; Soares, Holly; Toga, Arthur W.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2012-01-01

    The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is an ongoing, longitudinal, multicenter study designed to develop clinical, imaging, genetic and biochemical biomarkers for the early detection and tracking of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The study aimed to enroll 400 subjects with early mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 200 subjects with early AD and 200 normal controls and $67 million funding was provided by both the public and private sectors including the National Institutes on Aging, thirteen pharmaceutical companies and two Foundations that provided support through the Foundation for NIH (FNIH). This article reviews all papers published since the inception of the initiative and summarizes the results as of February, 2011. The major accomplishments of ADNI have been 1) the development of standardized methods for clinical, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in a multi-center setting; 2) elucidation of the patterns and rates of change of imaging and CSF biomarker measurements in control, MCI and AD patients. CSF biomarkers are consistent with disease trajectories predicted by β amyloid (Aβ) cascade [1] and tau mediated neurodegeneration hypotheses for AD while brain atrophy and hypometabolism levels show predicted patterns but exhibit differing rates of change depending on region and disease severity; 3) the assessment of alternative methods of diagnostic categorization. Currently, the best classifiers combine optimum features from multiple modalities including MRI, FDG-PET, CSF biomarkers and clinical tests; 4) the development of methods for the early detection of AD. CSF biomarkers, Aβ42 and tau as well as amyloid PET may reflect the earliest steps in AD pathology in mildly or even non-symptomatic subjects and are leading candidates for the detection of AD in its preclinical stages; 5) the improvement of clinical trial efficiency through the identification of subjects most

  9. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: A review of papers published since its inception

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Michael W.; Veitch, Dallas P.; Aisen, Paul S.; Beckett, Laurel A.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Green, Robert C.; Harvey, Danielle; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Liu, Enchi; Morris, John C.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schmidt, Mark E.; Shaw, Leslie; Shen, Li; Siuciak, Judith A.; Soares, Holly; Toga, Arthur W.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2014-01-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is an ongoing, longitudinal, multicenter study designed to develop clinical, imaging, genetic, and biochemical biomarkers for the early detection and tracking of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The study aimed to enroll 400 subjects with early mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 200 subjects with early AD, and 200 normal control subjects; $67 million funding was provided by both the public and private sectors, including the National Institute on Aging, 13 pharmaceutical companies, and 2 foundations that provided support through the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. This article reviews all papers published since the inception of the initiative and summarizes the results as of February 2011. The major accomplishments of ADNI have been as follows: (1) the development of standardized methods for clinical tests, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in a multicenter setting; (2) elucidation of the patterns and rates of change of imaging and CSF biomarker measurements in control subjects, MCI patients, and AD patients. CSF biomarkers are consistent with disease trajectories predicted by β-amyloid cascade (Hardy, J Alzheimers Dis 2006;9(Suppl 3):151–3) and tau-mediated neurodegeneration hypotheses for AD, whereas brain atrophy and hypometabolism levels show predicted patterns but exhibit differing rates of change depending on region and disease severity; (3) the assessment of alternative methods of diagnostic categorization. Currently, the best classifiers combine optimum features from multiple modalities, including MRI, [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, CSF biomarkers, and clinical tests; (4) the development of methods for the early detection of AD. CSF biomarkers, β-amyloid 42 and tau, as well as amyloid PET may reflect the earliest steps in AD pathology in mildly symptomatic or even nonsymptomatic subjects, and are leading candidates

  10. Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative biomarkers as quantitative phenotypes: Genetics core aims, progress, and plans

    PubMed Central

    Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Swaminathan, Shanker; Kim, Sungeun; Risacher, Shannon L.; Nho, Kwangsik; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Craig, David W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Stein, Jason L.; Moore, Jason H.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Green, Robert C.; Bertram, Lars; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    The role of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Genetics Core is to facilitate the investigation of genetic influences on disease onset and trajectory as reflected in structural, functional, and molecular imaging changes; fluid biomarkers; and cognitive status. Major goals include (1) blood sample processing, genotyping, and dissemination, (2) genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of longitudinal phenotypic data, and (3) providing a central resource, point of contact and planning group for genetics within Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Genome-wide array data have been publicly released and updated, and several neuroimaging GWAS have recently been reported examining baseline magnetic resonance imaging measures as quantitative phenotypes. Other preliminary investigations include copy number variation in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease and GWAS of baseline cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and longitudinal changes on magnetic resonance imaging. Blood collection for RNA studies is a new direction. Genetic studies of longitudinal phenotypes hold promise for elucidating disease mechanisms and risk, development of therapeutic strategies, and refining selection criteria for clinical trials. PMID:20451875

  11. Tensor-Based Morphometry as a Neuroimaging Biomarker for Alzheimer’s Disease: An MRI Study of 676 AD, MCI, and Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xue; Leow, Alex D.; Parikshak, Neelroop; Lee, Suh; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    In one of the largest brain MRI studies to date, we used tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to create 3D maps of structural atrophy in 676 subjects with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy elderly controls, scanned as part of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Using inverse-consistent 3D non-linear elastic image registration, we warped 676 individual brain MRI volumes to a population mean geometric template. Jacobian determinant maps were created, revealing the 3D profile of local volumetric expansion and compression. We compared the anatomical distribution of atrophy in 165 AD patients (age: 75.6 ± 7.6 years), 330 MCI subjects (74.8 ± 7.5), and 181 controls (75.9 ± 5.1). Brain atrophy in selected regions-of-interest was correlated with clinical measurements - the sum-of-boxes clinical dementia rating (CDR-SB), mini-mental state examination (MMSE), and the logical memory test scores - at voxel level followed by correction for multiple comparisons. Baseline temporal lobe atrophy correlated with current cognitive performance, future cognitive decline, and conversion from MCI to AD over the following year; it predicted future decline even in healthy subjects. Over half of the AD and MCI subjects carried the ApoE4 (apolipoprotein E4) gene, which increases risk for AD; they showed greater hippocampal and temporal lobe deficits than non-carriers. ApoE2 gene carriers - 1/6 of the normal group - showed reduced ventricular expansion, suggesting a protective effect. As an automated image analysis technique, TBM reveals 3D correlations between neuroimaging markers, genes, and future clinical changes, and is highly efficient for large-scale MRI studies. PMID:18691658

  12. Low plasma ApoE levels are associated with smaller hippocampal size in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Edmond; Chow, Nicole; Hwang, Kristy S.; Thompson, Paul M.; Gylys, Karen H.; Cole, Gregory M.; Jack, Clifford R.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Soares, Holly D.; Weiner, Michael W.; Apostolova, Liana G.

    2014-01-01

    Apoliproprotein E (APOE) genotype is the strongest known genetic risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but the utility of plasma ApoE levels for assessing the severity of underlying neurodegenerative changes remains uncertain. Here we examined cross-sectional associations between plasma ApoE levels and volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indices of the hippocampus from 541 participants [57 with normal cognition (NC), 375 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 109 with mild AD] who were enrolled in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Across the NC and MCI groups, lower plasma ApoE levels were significantly correlated with smaller hippocampal size, as measured by either hippocampal volume or hippocampal radial distance. These associations were driven primarily by findings from carriers of an APOE ε4 allele, and are consistent with prior reports that lower plasma ApoE levels correlate with greater global cortical Pittsburgh Compound B retention. In this high-risk group, plasma ApoE levels may represent a peripheral marker of underlying AD neuropathology in nondemented elderly individuals. PMID:25547651

  13. Perspective: The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and the role and contributions of the Private Partner Scientific Board (PPSB).

    PubMed

    Liu, Enchi; Luthman, Johan; Cedarbaum, Jesse M; Schmidt, Mark E; Cole, Patricia E; Hendrix, James; Carrillo, Maria C; Jones-Davis, Dorothy; Tarver, Erika; Novak, Gerald; De Santi, Susan; Soares, Holly D; Potter, William Z; Siemers, Eric; Schwarz, Adam J

    2015-07-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) Private Partner Scientific Board (PPSB) is comprised of representatives of private, for-profit entities (including pharmaceutical, biotechnology, diagnostics, imaging companies, and imaging contract research organizations), and nonprofit organizations that provide financial and scientific support to ADNI through the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. The PPSB serves as an independent, open, and precompetitive forum in which all private sector and not-for-profit partners in ADNI can collaborate, share information, and offer scientific and private-sector perspectives and expertise on issues relating to the ADNI project. In this article, we review and highlight the role, activities, and contributions of the PPSB within the ADNI project, and provide a perspective on remaining unmet needs and future directions. PMID:26194317

  14. Clinical neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains chapters on neuroimaging. Included are the following chapters: diagnostic neuroimaging in stroke, position emission tomography in cerebrovascular disease: clinical applications, and neuroradiologic work-up of brain tumors.

  15. Higher homocysteine associated with thinner cortical gray matter in 803 participants from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Sarah K; Rajagopalan, Priya; Joshi, Shantanu H; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    A significant portion of our risk for dementia in old age is associated with lifestyle factors (diet, exercise, and cardiovascular health) that are modifiable, at least in principle. One such risk factor, high-homocysteine levels in the blood, is known to increase risk for Alzheimer's disease and vascular disorders. Here, we set out to understand how homocysteine levels relate to 3D surface-based maps of cortical gray matter distribution (thickness, volume, and surface area) computed from brain magnetic resonance imaging in 803 elderly subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative data set. Individuals with higher plasma levels of homocysteine had lower gray matter thickness in bilateral frontal, parietal, occipital, and right temporal regions and lower gray matter volumes in left frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital regions, after controlling for diagnosis, age, and sex and after correcting for multiple comparisons. No significant within-group associations were found in cognitively healthy people, patients with mild cognitive impairment, or patients with Alzheimer's disease. These regional differences in gray matter structure may be useful biomarkers to assess the effectiveness of interventions, such as vitamin B supplements, that aim to prevent homocysteine-related brain atrophy by normalizing homocysteine levels. PMID:25444607

  16. Cognitive reserve and Aβ1-42 in mild cognitive impairment (Argentina-Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative)

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Paula; Fernandez Suarez, Marcos; Surace, Ezequiel I; Chrem Méndez, Patricio; Martín, María Eugenia; Clarens, María Florencia; Tapajóz, Fernanda; Russo, Maria Julieta; Campos, Jorge; Guinjoan, Salvador M; Sevlever, Gustavo; Allegri, Ricardo F

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cognitive reserve and concentration of Aβ1-42 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with mild cognitive impairment, those with Alzheimer’s disease, and in control subjects. Methods Thirty-three participants from the Argentina-Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database completed a cognitive battery, the Cognitive Reserve Questionnaire (CRQ), and an Argentinian accentuation reading test (TAP-BA) as a measure of premorbid intelligence, and underwent lumbar puncture for CSF biomarker quantification. Results The CRQ significantly correlated with TAP-BA, education, and Aβ1-42. When considering Aβ1-42 levels, significant differences were found in CRQ scores; higher levels of CSF Aβ1-42 were associated with higher CRQ scores. Conclusion Reduced Aβ1-42 in CSF is considered as evidence of amyloid deposition in the brain. Previous results suggest that individuals with higher education, higher occupational attainment, and participation in leisure activities (cognitive reserve) have a reduced risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Our results support the notion that enhanced neural activity has a protective role in mild cognitive impairment, as evidenced by higher CSF Aβ1-42 levels in individuals with more cognitive reserve. PMID:26504392

  17. Neuropathologic assessment of participants in two multi-center longitudinal observational studies: the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN).

    PubMed

    Cairns, Nigel J; Perrin, Richard J; Franklin, Erin E; Carter, Deborah; Vincent, Benjamin; Xie, Mingqiang; Bateman, Randall J; Benzinger, Tammie; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brooks, William S; Halliday, Glenda M; McLean, Catriona; Ghetti, Bernardino; Morris, John C

    2015-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that the relatively rare autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) may be a useful model of the more frequent, sporadic, late-onset AD (LOAD). Individuals with ADAD have a predictable age at onset and the biomarker profile of ADAD participants in the preclinical stage may be used to predict disease progression and clinical onset. However, the extent to which the pathogenesis and neuropathology of ADAD overlaps with that of LOAD is equivocal. To address this uncertainty, two multicenter longitudinal observational studies, the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN), leveraged the expertise and resources of the existing Knight Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC) at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, to establish a Neuropathology Core (NPC). The ADNI/DIAN-NPC is systematically examining the brains of all participants who come to autopsy at the 59 ADNI sites in the USA and Canada and the 14 DIAN sites in the USA (eight), Australia (three), UK (one) and Germany (two). By 2014, 41 ADNI and 24 DIAN autopsies (involving nine participants and 15 family members) had been performed. The autopsy rate in the ADNI cohort in the most recent year was 93% (total since NPC inception: 70%). In summary, the ADNI/DIAN NPC has implemented a standard protocol for all sites to solicit permission for brain autopsy and to send brain tissue to the NPC for a standardized, uniform and state-of-the-art neuropathologic assessment. The benefit to ADNI and DIAN of the implementation of the NPC is very clear. The NPC provides final "gold standard" neuropathological diagnoses and data against which the antecedent observations and measurements of ADNI and DIAN can be compared. PMID:25964057

  18. Neuropathologic assessment of participants in two multi-center longitudinal observational studies: the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN)

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Nigel J.; Perrin, Richard J.; Franklin, Erin E.; Carter, Deborah; Vincent, Benjamin; Xie, Mingqiang; Bateman, Randall J.; Benzinger, Tammie; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brooks, William S; Halliday, Glenda M.; McLean, Catriona; Ghetti, Bernardino; Morris, John C.

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the relatively rare autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) may be a useful model of the more frequent, sporadic, late-onset AD (LOAD). Individuals with ADAD have a predictable age at onset and the biomarker profile of ADAD participants in the preclinical stage may be used to predict disease progression and clinical onset. However, the extent to which the pathogenesis and neuropathology of ADAD overlaps with that of LOAD is equivocal. To address this uncertainty, two multicenter longitudinal observational studies, the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN), leveraged the expertise and resources of the existing Knight Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC) at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, to establish a Neuropathology Core (NPC). The ADNI/DIAN-NPC is systematically examining the brains of all participants who come to autopsy at the 59 ADNI sites in the USA and Canada and the 14 DIAN sites in the USA (8), Australia (3), UK (1), and Germany (2). By 2014, 41 ADNI and 24 DIAN autopsies (involving 9 participants and 15 family members) had been performed. The autopsy rate in the ADNI cohort in the most recent year was 93% (total since NPC inception: 70%). In summary, the ADNI/DIAN NPC has implemented a standard protocol for all sites to solicit permission for brain autopsy and to send brain tissue to the NPC for a standardized, uniform, and state-of-the-art neuropathologic assessment. The benefit to ADNI and DIAN of the implementation of the NPC is very clear. The NPC provides final ‘gold standard’ neuropathological diagnoses and data against which the antecedent observations and measurements of ADNI and DIAN can be compared. PMID:25964057

  19. Soluble BACE-1 Activity and sAβPPβ Concentrations in Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Healthy Control Cerebrospinal Fluid from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 Baseline Cohort.

    PubMed

    Savage, Mary J; Holder, Daniel J; Wu, Guoxin; Kaplow, June; Siuciak, Judith A; Potter, William Z

    2015-01-01

    β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), freeing the amyloid-β (Aβ) N-terminus from the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), the first step in Aβ formation. Increased BACE1 activity in AD brain or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been reported. Other studies, however, found either no change or a decrease with AD diagnosis in either BACE1 activity or sAβPPβ, the N-terminal secreted product of BACE1 (sBACE1) activity on AβPP. Here, sBACE1 enzymatic activity and secreted AβPPβ (sAβPPβ) were measured in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1) baseline CSF samples and no statistically significant changes were found in either measure comparing healthy control, mild cognitively impaired, or AD individual samples. While CSF sBACE1 activity and sAβPPβ demonstrated a moderate yet significant degree of correlation with each other, there was no correlation of either analyte to CSF Aβ peptide ending at residue 42. Surprisingly, a stronger correlation was demonstrated between CSF sBACE1 activity and tau, which was comparable to that between CSF Aβ₄₂ and tau. Unlike for these latter two analytes, receiver-operator characteristic curves demonstrate that neither CSF sBACE1 activity nor sAβPPβ concentrations can be used to differentiate between healthy elderly and AD individuals. PMID:25790831

  20. A review of neuroimaging biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Tinu; Sheelakumari, R; James, Jija S; Mathuranath, PS

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging biomarkers have potential role in the early diagnosis as well as periodic follow-up of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Structural imaging biomarkers can be used to predict those who are at risk or in preclinical stages of AD. It could possibly be useful even in predicting the conversion of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) an early stage of AD to AD. In addition there has been a lot of progress in molecular imaging in AD. This article presents a review of recent progress in selected imaging biomarkers for early diagnosis, classification, and progression, of AD. A comprehensive integrative strategy initiated early in the cognitive decline is perhaps the most effective method of controlling progression to Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25431627

  1. Neuroimaging features of tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sobri, M; Merican, J S; Nordiyana, M; Valarmathi, S; Ai-Edrus, S A

    2006-03-01

    Tuberculous meningitis leads to a high mortality rate. However, it responds well to chemotherapy if the treatment is started early. Neuroimaging is one of the most important initial investigations. There were 42 patients diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis in Kuala Lumpur Hospital based on clinical criteria, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and response to anti-tuberculous treatment over a 7 year period. Relevant information was obtained from patients' medical case notes and neuroimaging findings were evaluated. Male to female ratio was 3:1. The three major ethnics and the immigrant groups in Malaysia were represented in this study. The majority of the cases involved the Malays followed by immigrants, Chinese and Indians. The patients' age ranged from 18 to 62 years old with the mean age of 34.4 years. There were 95.2% (n = 40) of patients who presented with various neuroimaging abnormalities and only 2 (4.8%) patients had normal neuroimaging findings. Hydrocephalus and meningeal enhancement were the two commonest neuroimaging features. Other features include infarction, enhancing lesion, tuberculoma, abcess, oedema and calcification. Contrasted CT scan is an adequate neuroimaging tool to unmask abnormal findings in tuberculous meningitis. PMID:16708732

  2. Neuroimaging Biomarkers of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders leading to dementia are common diseases that affect many older and some young adults. Neuroimaging methods are important tools for assessing and monitoring pathological brain changes associated with progressive neurodegenerative conditions. In this review, the authors describe key findings from neuroimaging studies (magnetic resonance imaging and radionucleotide imaging) in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and prodromal stages, familial and atypical AD syndromes, frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with and without dementia, Parkinson’s disease with and without dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, and prion protein associated diseases (i.e., Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease). The authors focus on neuroimaging findings of in vivo pathology in these disorders, as well as the potential for neuroimaging to provide useful information for differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24234359

  3. Disease progression model for Clinical Dementia Rating–Sum of Boxes in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s subjects from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Samtani, Mahesh N; Raghavan, Nandini; Novak, Gerald; Nandy, Partha; Narayan, Vaibhav A

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this analysis was to develop a nonlinear disease progression model, using an expanded set of covariates that captures the longitudinal Clinical Dementia Rating Scale–Sum of Boxes (CDR–SB) scores. These were derived from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative ADNI-1 study, of 301 Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment patients who were followed for 2–3 years. Methods The model describes progression rate and baseline disease score as a function of covariates. The covariates that were tested fell into five groups: a) hippocampal volume; b) serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers; c) demographics and apolipoprotein Epsilon 4 (ApoE4) allele status; d) baseline cognitive tests; and e) disease state and comedications. Results Covariates associated with baseline disease severity were disease state, hippocampal volume, and comedication use. Disease progression rate was influenced by baseline CSF biomarkers, Trail-Making Test part A score, delayed logical memory test score, and current level of impairment as measured by CDR–SB. The rate of disease progression was dependent on disease severity, with intermediate scores around the inflection point score of 10 exhibiting high disease progression rate. The CDR–SB disease progression rate in a typical patient, with late mild cognitive impairment and mild Alzheimer’s disease, was estimated to be approximately 0.5 and 1.4 points/year, respectively. Conclusions In conclusion, this model describes disease progression in terms of CDR–SB changes in patients and its dependency on novel covariates. The CSF biomarkers included in the model discriminate mild cognitive impairment subjects as progressors and nonprogressors. Therefore, the model may be utilized for optimizing study designs, through patient population enrichment and clinical trial simulations. PMID:24926196

  4. Neuroimaging in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Jain, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis is a serious infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Early diagnosis is the key to success of treatment. Neuroimaging plays a crucial role in the early and accurate diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis and its disabling complications. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered superior to computed tomography. Neuroimaging characteristics include leptomeningeal and basal cisternal enhancement, hydrocephalus, periventricular infarcts, and tuberculoma. Partially treated pyogenic meningitis, cryptococcal meningitis, viral encephalitis, carcinomatous, and lymphomatous meningitis may have many similar neuroimaging characteristics, and differentiation from tuberculous meningitis at times on the basis of neuroimaging characteristics becomes difficult. PMID:26954796

  5. Neuroimaging of the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Elliott, Mark A.; Ruparel, Kosha; Loughead, James; Prabhakaran, Karthik; Calkins, Monica E.; Hopson, Ryan; Jackson, Chad; Keefe, Jack; Riley, Marisa; Mensh, Frank D.; Sleiman, Patrick; Verma, Ragini; Davatzikos, Christos; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2013-01-01

    The Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort (PNC) is a large-scale, NIMH funded initiative to understand how brain maturation mediates cognitive development and vulnerability to psychiatric illness, and understand how genetics impacts this process. As part of this study, 1,445 adolescents ages 8–21 at enrollment underwent multimodal neuroimaging. Here, we highlight the conceptual basis for the effort, the study design, and measures available in the dataset. We focus on neuroimaging measures obtained, including T1-weighted structural neuroimaging, diffusion tensor imaging, perfusion neuroimaging using arterial spin labeling, functional imaging tasks of working memory and emotion identification, and resting state imaging of functional connectivity. Furthermore, we provide characteristics regarding the final sample acquired. Finally, we describe mechanisms in place for data sharing that will allow the PNC to become a freely available public resource to advance our understanding of normal and pathological brain development. PMID:23921101

  6. Value-added predictors of expressive and receptive language growth in initially nonverbal preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Paul; Watson, Linda R; Lambert, Warren

    2015-05-01

    Eighty-seven preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders who were initially nonverbal (under 6 words in language sample and under 21 parent-reported words said) were assessed at five time points over 16 months. Statistical models that accounted for the intercorrelation among nine theoretically- and empirically-motivated predictors, as well as two background variables (i.e., cognitive impairment level, autism severity), were applied to identify value-added predictors of expressive and receptive spoken language growth and outcome. The results indicate that responding to joint attention, intentional communication, and parent linguistic responses were value-added predictors of both expressive and receptive spoken language growth. In addition, consonant inventory was a value-added predictor of expressive growth; early receptive vocabulary and autism severity were value-added predictors of receptive growth. PMID:25344152

  7. Value-Added Predictors of Expressive and Receptive Language Growth in Initially Nonverbal Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Linda R.; Lambert, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Eighty-seven preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders who were initially nonverbal (under 6 words in language sample and under 21 parent-reported words said) were assessed at five time points over 16 months. Statistical models that accounted for the intercorrelation among nine theoretically- and empirically-motivated predictors, as well as two background variables (i.e., cognitive impairment level, autism severity), were applied to identify value-added predictors of expressive and receptive spoken language growth and outcome. The results indicate that responding to joint attention, intentional communication, and parent linguistic responses were value-added predictors of both expressive and receptive spoken language growth. In addition, consonant inventory was a value-added predictor of expressive growth; early receptive vocabulary and autism severity were value-added predictors of receptive growth. PMID:25344152

  8. Multiple Effect of APOE Genotype on Clinical and Neuroimaging Biomarkers Across Alzheimer's Disease Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Tan, Lan; Wang, Hui-Fu; Liu, Yong; Hao, Xiao-Ke; Tan, Chen-Chen; Jiang, Teng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Dao-Qiang; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-09-01

    The apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE ε4) allele is the most important genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, the underlying mechanisms responsible for it remain controversial. We used the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database to examine the influence of APOE ε4 dose on clinical and neuroimaging biomarkers across the AD spectrum (from cognitive normal to AD patients with severe cognitive impairment). A total of 1718 participants from the ADNI cohort were selected, and we evaluated the impact of ε4 dose on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels' Abeta1-42 (Aβ1-42), tau, and phosphorylated-tau (p-tau); cortical amyloid deposition (Florbetapir-PET-AV45); brain atrophy (MRI); brain metabolism (FDG-PET); hippocampal metabolism; and cognitive declines, through different cognitive subgroups. We found that (1) ε4 was associated with decreased CSF beta-amyloid (Aβ1-42) and increased cerebral Aβ deposition across the AD spectrum; (2) increased CSF tau, P-tau and cerebral hypometabolism, hippocampal atrophy, and cognition decline were all associated with APOE ε4 in prodromal AD stage; (3) increased CSF tau, P-tau and cerebral hypometabolism appear to begin earlier than hippocampal atrophy and cognitive decline. We hypothesized that APOE ε4 increases cerebral amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in all the stages of AD development, and also influences Aβ-initiated cascade of downstream neurodegenerative effects, thereby increasing the risk of AD. PMID:26298664

  9. Neuroimaging of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Cendes, Fernando; Theodore, William H; Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cascino, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is pivotal in the evaluation and management of patients with seizure disorders. Elegant structural neuroimaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may assist in determining the etiology of focal epilepsy and demonstrating the anatomical changes associated with seizure activity. The high diagnostic yield of MRI to identify the common pathological findings in individuals with focal seizures including mesial temporal sclerosis, vascular anomalies, low-grade glial neoplasms and malformations of cortical development has been demonstrated. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most commonly performed interictal functional neuroimaging technique that may reveal a focal hypometabolic region concordant with seizure onset. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies may assist performance of ictal neuroimaging in patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy being considered for neurosurgical treatment. This chapter highlights neuroimaging developments and innovations, and provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used to improve the care and management of people with epilepsy. PMID:27430454

  10. Functional neuroimaging in psychiatry.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, C H; McGuire, P K

    1999-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging is one of the most powerful means available for investigating the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. In this review, we shall focus on the different ways that it can be employed to this end, describing the major findings in the field in the context of different methodological approaches. We will also discuss practical issues that are particular to studying psychiatric disorders and the potential contribution of functional neuroimaging to future psychiatric research. PMID:10466156

  11. Neuroimaging of scoliosis in childhood.

    PubMed

    Kim, F M; Poussaint, T Y; Barnes, P D

    1999-02-01

    A curvature abnormality may be the initial or major presenting feature in a child with disease of the spinal column or spinal neuraxis. A simplified classification of common spinal curvature abnormalities of childhood include idiopathic, congenital/dysraphic, skeletal dysplasia, neurofibromatosis, and painful. The great majority of childhood scoliosis falls into the idiopathic category. Atypical clinical or radiographic features in a presumed idiopathic scoliosis may indicate an otherwise occult tumor or hydrosyringomyelia, or may be a consequence of increasing curvature with disk protrusion, nerve impingement, or cord attenuation. Neuroimaging beyond plain films is commonly necessary for atypical idiopathic scoliosis and for the other categories of scoliosis listed. PMID:9974506

  12. Neuroimaging and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Andria L.; Crocker, Nicole; Mattson, Sarah N.; Riley, Edward P.

    2009-01-01

    The detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing brain include structural brain anomalies as well as cognitive and behavioral deficits. Initial neuroimaging studies of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed previous autopsy reports of overall reduction in brain volume and…

  13. Neuroimaging of neurocutaneous diseases.

    PubMed

    Nandigam, Kaveer; Mechtler, Laszlo L; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2014-02-01

    An in-depth knowledge of the imaging characteristics of the common neurocutaneous diseases (NCD) described in this article will help neurologists understand the screening imaging modalities in these patients. The future of neuroimaging is geared towards developing and refining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. The detection of tumors in NCD has greatly improved with availability of high-field strength 3T MRI machines. Neuroimaging will remain at the heart and soul of the multidisciplinary care of such complex diagnoses to guide early detection and monitor treatment. PMID:24287389

  14. Adding value to stretched communities through nursing actions: the Wellington South Nursing Initiative.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Katherine M; Christensen, Signe; Aspros, Beverley; McKinlay, Eileen; Arcus, Kerri

    2011-12-01

    Nurses provide health services to many groups with unmet health needs. Communities with consistently unmet needs are generally 'stretched' as they are under pressure. For children and families this pressure impacts their ability to live healthy lifestyles. The Wellington South Nursing Initiative involves two nurses providing an innovative population-based nursing service to stretched urban communities, particularly children and families, predominantly through networking and project work. Projects are specifically focused activities developed and implemented to address areas of health need. The projects cluster around five overarching areas: enhancing individual and community potential, growing safer families and communities, minimising negative harmful or risky behaviour, maximising general health and wellbeing and addressing specific health needs. Critical elements of the nurses' practice are the use of public health principles combined with a community development approach, relational practice and working for sustainability. The initiative provides important insights into how nurses can enter and work with communities and enhance the potential of children, families and the wider community. PMID:22545908

  15. Introduction to neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Orrison, W.W.

    1989-01-01

    The author focuses on neuroradiology with emphasis on the current imaging modalities. There are chapters on angiography, myelography, nuclear medicine, ultrasonography, computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The other chapters are dedicated to the spine, skull, head and neck, and pediatric neuroimaging.

  16. Neuroimaging and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Pliszka, Steve R.

    2005-01-01

    This review presents the most recent research concerning neuroimaging in developmental disabilities. Changes in structure and activation have been found in children with ADHD and learning disabilities, following intervention. For the children with learning disabilities changes in activation have been found following intensive behavioral and…

  17. Rapid self-organised initiation of ad hoc sensor networks close above the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsnes, Reinert

    2010-07-01

    This work shows potentials for rapid self-organisation of sensor networks where nodes collaborate to relay messages to a common data collecting unit (sink node). The study problem is, in the sense of graph theory, to find a shortest path tree spanning a weighted graph. This is a well-studied problem where for example Dijkstra’s algorithm provides a solution for non-negative edge weights. The present contribution shows by simulation examples that simple modifications of known distributed approaches here can provide significant improvements in performance. Phase transition phenomena, which are known to take place in networks close to percolation thresholds, may explain these observations. An initial method, which here serves as reference, assumes the sink node starts organisation of the network (tree) by transmitting a control message advertising its availability for its neighbours. These neighbours then advertise their current cost estimate for routing a message to the sink. A node which in this way receives a message implying an improved route to the sink, advertises its new finding and remembers which neighbouring node the message came from. This activity proceeds until there are no more improvements to advertise to neighbours. The result is a tree network for cost effective transmission of messages to the sink (root). This distributed approach has potential for simple improvements which are of interest when minimisation of storage and communication of network information are a concern. Fast organisation of the network takes place when the number k of connections for each node ( degree) is close above its critical value for global network percolation and at the same time there is a threshold for the nodes to decide to advertise network route updates.

  18. Effects of traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder on Alzheimer’s disease in veterans, using the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Michael W.; Veitch, Dallas P.; Hayes, Jacqueline; Neylan, Thomas; Grafman, Jordan; Aisen, Paul S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Harvey, Danielle; Toga, Arthur W.; Friedl, Karl E.; Pacifico, Anthony; Sheline, Yvette; Yaffe, Kristine; Mohlenoff, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Both traumatic brain injury (TBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common problems resulting from military service, and both have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia resulting from Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or other causes. This study aims to use imaging techniques and biomarker analysis to determine whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or PTSD resulting from combat or other traumas increase the risk for AD and decrease cognitive reserve in Veteran subjects, after accounting for age. Using military and Department of Veterans Affairs records, 65 Vietnam War veterans with a history of moderate or severe TBI with or without PTSD, 65 with ongoing PTSD without TBI, and 65 control subjects are being enrolled in this study at 19 sites. The study aims to select subject groups that are comparable in age, gender, ethnicity, and education. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia are being excluded. However, a new study just beginning, and similar in size, will study subjects with TBI, subjects with PTSD, and control subjects with MCI. Baseline measurements of cognition, function, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid bio-markers; magnetic resonance images (structural, diffusion tensor, and resting state blood-level oxygen dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging); and amyloid positron emission tomographic (PET) images with florbetapir are being obtained. One-year follow-up measurements will be collected for most of the baseline procedures, with the exception of the lumbar puncture, the PET imaging, and apolipoprotein E genotyping. To date, 19 subjects with TBI only, 46 with PTSD only, and 15 with TBI and PTSD have been recruited and referred to 13 clinics to undergo the study protocol. It is expected that cohorts will be fully recruited by October 2014. This study is a first step toward the design and statistical powering of an AD prevention trial using at-risk veterans as subjects, and provides the

  19. Retrospective study on structural neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Silva-dos-Santos, Amilcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    Background. No consensus between guidelines exists regarding neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis. The purpose of this study is to assess anomalies found in structural neuroimaging exams (brain computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) in the initial medical work-up of patients presenting first-episode psychosis. Methods. The study subjects were 32 patients aged 18–48 years (mean age: 29.6 years), consecutively admitted with first-episode psychosis diagnosis. Socio-demographic and clinical data and neuroimaging exams (CT and MRI) were retrospectively studied. Diagnostic assessments were made using the Operational Criteria Checklist +. Neuroimaging images (CT and MRI) and respective reports were analysed by an experienced consultant psychiatrist. Results. None of the patients had abnormalities in neuroimaging exams responsible for psychotic symptoms. Thirty-seven percent of patients had incidental brain findings not causally related to the psychosis (brain atrophy, arachnoid cyst, asymmetric lateral ventricles, dilated lateral ventricles, plagiocephaly and falx cerebri calcification). No further medical referral was needed for any of these patients. No significant differences regarding gender, age, diagnosis, duration of untreated psychosis, in-stay and cannabis use were found between patients who had neuroimaging abnormalities versus those without. Discussion. This study suggests that structural neuroimaging exams reveal scarce abnormalities in young patients with first-episode psychosis. Structural neuroimaging is especially useful in first-episode psychosis patients with neurological symptoms, atypical clinical picture and old age. PMID:27257547

  20. Retrospective study on structural neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    Coentre, Ricardo; Silva-Dos-Santos, Amilcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    Background. No consensus between guidelines exists regarding neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis. The purpose of this study is to assess anomalies found in structural neuroimaging exams (brain computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) in the initial medical work-up of patients presenting first-episode psychosis. Methods. The study subjects were 32 patients aged 18-48 years (mean age: 29.6 years), consecutively admitted with first-episode psychosis diagnosis. Socio-demographic and clinical data and neuroimaging exams (CT and MRI) were retrospectively studied. Diagnostic assessments were made using the Operational Criteria Checklist +. Neuroimaging images (CT and MRI) and respective reports were analysed by an experienced consultant psychiatrist. Results. None of the patients had abnormalities in neuroimaging exams responsible for psychotic symptoms. Thirty-seven percent of patients had incidental brain findings not causally related to the psychosis (brain atrophy, arachnoid cyst, asymmetric lateral ventricles, dilated lateral ventricles, plagiocephaly and falx cerebri calcification). No further medical referral was needed for any of these patients. No significant differences regarding gender, age, diagnosis, duration of untreated psychosis, in-stay and cannabis use were found between patients who had neuroimaging abnormalities versus those without. Discussion. This study suggests that structural neuroimaging exams reveal scarce abnormalities in young patients with first-episode psychosis. Structural neuroimaging is especially useful in first-episode psychosis patients with neurological symptoms, atypical clinical picture and old age. PMID:27257547

  1. Early neuroimaging diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jianling; Liu, Timon C.; Li, Yan; Liu, Songhao

    2002-04-01

    Neuroimaging has played an important role in evaluating the Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and its uses are growing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may show the presence of cerebral infarcts and white matter disease. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), which visualize such cerebral functions as glucose metabolism and blood flow, may provide positive evidence to support the diagnosis of AD. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a recently developed technique which enables the internal impedance of an object to be imaged noninvasively.

  2. [Functional neuroimaging of addiction].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2015-09-01

    Positron emission tomography studies investigating dopamine release by drug or reward demonstrated blunted dopamine release in relation to addiction to psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. However, recent studies reported that nicotine and gambling addiction showed opposite results. Several factors such as illness stage or neurotoxicity of substances could be considered for this discrepancy. Behavioral addiction such as gambling disorder is a good target of neuroimaging because it is free from overt neurotoxicity. However, even in gambling disorder, the results of fMRI studies investigating neural response to reward are mixed. Neuroimaging together with taking the various backgrounds of patients into account should contribute not only to a better understanding of the neurobiology of addiction but also to the development of more effective and individually tailored treatment strategies for addiction. PMID:26394506

  3. Lactobacillus plantarum IFPL935 favors the initial metabolism of red wine polyphenols when added to a colonic microbiota.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Elvira; Sánchez-Patán, Fernando; Martín-Alvarez, Pedro J; Bartolomé, Begoña; Moreno-Arribas, María Victoria; Peláez, Carmen; Requena, Teresa; van de Wiele, Tom; Martínez-Cuesta, M Carmen

    2013-10-23

    This work aimed to unravel the role of Lactobacillus plantarum IFPL935 strain in the colonic metabolism of a polyphenolic red wine extract, when added to a complex human colonic microbiota from the dynamic simulator of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem (SHIME). The concentration of microbial-derived phenolic metabolites and microbial community changes along with fermentative and proteolytic activities were monitored. The results showed that L. plantarum IFPL935 significantly increased the concentration of the initial microbial ring-fission catabolite of catechins and procyanidins, diphenylpropanol, and, similarly, 4-hydroxy-5-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)valeric acid production. Overall, the addition of L. plantarum IFPL935 did not have an impact on the total concentration of phenolic metabolites, except for batches inoculated with colonic microbiota from the effluent compartment (EC), where the figures were significantly higher when L. plantarum IFPL935 was added (24 h). In summary, the data highlighted that L. plantarum IFPL935 may have an impact on the bioavailability of these dietary polyphenols. Some of the microbial-derived metabolites may play a key role in the protective effects that have been linked to a polyphenol-rich diet. PMID:24073689

  4. Effect of HMGCR genetic variation on neuroimaging biomarkers in healthy, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lin; Sun, Fu-Rong; Tan, Meng-Shan; Tan, Chen-Chen; Jiang, Teng; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become a considerable public health issue. The mechanisms underlying AD onset and progression remain largely unclear. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) is a strong functional AD candidate gene because it encodes part of the statin-binding domain of the enzyme, which serves as the rate-limiting step in cholesterol synthesis in all mammalian cells. Here, we evaluated the potential role of HMGCR (rs3846662) in AD-related pathology by assessing neuroimaging biomarkers. We enrolled in 812 subjects from the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative dataset. In general, it is possible that HMGCR (rs3846662) could be involved in preventing the atrophy of right entorhinal (P=0.03385) and left hippocampus (P=0.01839) in the follow-up research of two years. What's more, it lowered the drop rate of glucose metabolism in right temporal. We then further validated them in the AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), normal control (NC) sub-groups. All the results in the MCI groups confirmed the association. The results of our study indicated that HMGCR (rs3846662) plays a vital role in AD pathology mainly by influencing brain structure and glucose metabolism during AD progression. PMID:26950278

  5. Systematic Redaction for Neuroimage Data

    PubMed Central

    Matlock, Matt; Schimke, Nakeisha; Kong, Liang; Macke, Stephen; Hale, John

    2013-01-01

    In neuroscience, collaboration and data sharing are undermined by concerns over the management of protected health information (PHI) and personal identifying information (PII) in neuroimage datasets. The HIPAA Privacy Rule mandates measures for the preservation of subject privacy in neuroimaging studies. Unfortunately for the researcher, the management of information privacy is a burdensome task. Wide scale data sharing of neuroimages is challenging for three primary reasons: (i) A dearth of tools to systematically expunge PHI/PII from neuroimage data sets, (ii) a facility for tracking patient identities in redacted datasets has not been produced, and (iii) a sanitization workflow remains conspicuously absent. This article describes the XNAT Redaction Toolkit—an integrated redaction workflow which extends a popular neuroimage data management toolkit to remove PHI/PII from neuroimages. Quickshear defacing is also presented as a complementary technique for deidentifying the image data itself. Together, these tools improve subject privacy through systematic removal of PII/PHI. PMID:24179597

  6. Early detection of Alzheimer's disease using neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, Lisa; Brys, Miroslaw; Glodzik-Sobanska, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J

    2007-01-01

    Neuroimaging is being increasingly used to complement clinical assessments in the early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and metabolic positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) are the most clinically used and promising modalities to detect brain abnormalities in individuals who might be at risk for AD but who have not yet developed symptoms. The knowledge of established risk factors for AD enabled investigators to develop enrichment strategies for longitudinal imaging studies to reduce the sample sizes and study duration. The present review focuses on the results obtained by MRI and FDG-PET studies that examined the preclinical AD stages in several at risk populations: (1) individuals from families with autosomal dominant early-onset AD (FAD), (2) patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), particularly in memory, who are at very high risk for declining to AD with an estimated decline rate of 10-30% per year, (3) normal young and middle-age subjects carriers of known susceptibility genes for late-onset AD such as the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) E4 allele, and (4) as age is the main risk factor for AD, normal elderly individuals followed to the onset of MCI and AD. Overall, these studies show that the use of imaging for the early detection of AD is successful even in the earlier stages of disease when clinical symptoms are not fully expressed and the regional brain damage may be limited. PMID:16839732

  7. A review of β-amyloid neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Adlard, Paul A.; Tran, Bob A.; Finkelstein, David I.; Desmond, Patricia M.; Johnston, Leigh A.; Bush, Ashley I.; Egan, Gary F.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. As advancing age is the greatest risk factor for developing AD, the number of those afflicted is expected to increase markedly with the aging of the world's population. The inability to definitively diagnose AD until autopsy remains an impediment to establishing effective targeted treatments. Neuroimaging has enabled in vivo visualization of pathological changes in the brain associated with the disease, providing a greater understanding of its pathophysiological development and progression. However, neuroimaging biomarkers do not yet offer clear advantages over current clinical diagnostic criteria for them to be accepted into routine clinical use. Nonetheless, current insights from neuroimaging combined with the elucidation of biochemical and molecular processes in AD are informing the ongoing development of new imaging techniques and their application. Much of this research has been greatly assisted by the availability of transgenic mouse models of AD. In this review we summarize the main efforts of neuroimaging in AD in humans and in mouse models, with a specific focus on β-amyloid, and discuss the potential of new applications and novel approaches. PMID:25400539

  8. Neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease: preclinical challenges toward clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Dustin, Derek; Hall, Benjamin M; Annapragada, Ananth; Pautler, Robia G

    2016-09-01

    The scope of this review focuses on recent applications in preclinical and clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) toward accomplishing the goals of early detection and responses to therapy in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Driven by the outstanding efforts of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), a truly invaluable resource, the initial use of MRI in AD imaging has been to assess changes in brain anatomy, specifically assessing brain shrinkage and regional changes in white matter tractography using diffusion tensor imaging. However, advances in MRI have led to multiple efforts toward imaging amyloid beta plaques first without and then with the use of MRI contrast agents. These technological advancements have met with limited success and are not yet appropriate for the clinic. Recent developments in molecular imaging inclusive of high-power liposomal-based MRI contrast agents as well as fluorine 19 ((19)F) MRI and manganese enhanced MRI have begun to propel promising advances toward not only plaque imaging but also using MRI to detect perturbations in subcellular processes occurring within the neuron. This review concludes with a discussion about the necessity for the development of novel preclinical models of AD that better recapitulate human AD for the imaging to truly be meaningful and for substantive progress to be made toward understanding and effectively treating AD. Furthermore, the continued support of outstanding programs such as ADNI as well as the development of novel molecular imaging agents and MRI fast scanning sequences will also be requisite to effectively translate preclinical findings to the clinic. PMID:27033146

  9. Neuroimaging of Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging, particularly that based upon functional magnetic resonance (fMRI), has become a dominant tool in cognitive neuroscience. This review provides a personal and selective perspective on its past, present, and future. Two trends currently characterize the field that broadly reflect a pursuit of “where”- and “how”-type questions. The latter addresses basic mechanisms related to the expression of task-induced neural activity and is likely to be an increasingly important theme in the future. This trend entails an enhanced symbiosis among investigators pursuing similar questions in fields such as computational and theoretical neuroscience as well as through the detailed analysis of microcircuitry. PMID:18995825

  10. The Extensible Neuroimaging Archive Toolkit: an informatics platform for managing, exploring, and sharing neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Daniel S; Olsen, Timothy R; Ramaratnam, Mohana; Buckner, Randy L

    2007-01-01

    The Extensible Neuroimaging Archive Toolkit (XNAT) is a software platform designed to facilitate common management and productivity tasks for neuroimaging and associated data. In particular, XNAT enables qualitycontrol procedures and provides secure access to and storage of data. XNAT follows a threetiered architecture that includes a data archive, user interface, and middleware engine. Data can be entered into the archive as XML or through data entry forms. Newly added data are stored in a virtual quarantine until an authorized user has validated it. XNAT subsequently maintains a history profile to track all changes made to the managed data. User access to the archive is provided by a secure web application. The web application provides a number of quality control and productivity features, including data entry forms, data-type-specific searches, searches that combine across data types, detailed reports, and listings of experimental data, upload/download tools, access to standard laboratory workflows, and administration and security tools. XNAT also includes an online image viewer that supports a number of common neuroimaging formats, including DICOM and Analyze. The viewer can be extended to support additional formats and to generate custom displays. By managing data with XNAT, laboratories are prepared to better maintain the long-term integrity of their data, to explore emergent relations across data types, and to share their data with the broader neuroimaging community. PMID:17426351

  11. Recent Advances in Neuroimaging Biomarkers in Geriatric Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Khandai, Abhisek C.; Aizenstein, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging, both structural and functional, serve as useful adjuncts to clinical assessment, and can provide objective, reliable means of assessing disease presence and process in the aging population. In the following review we briefly explain current imaging methodologies. Then, we analyze recent developments in developing neuroimaging biomarkers for two highly prevalent disorders in the elderly population- Alzheimer's disease (AD) and late-life depression (LLD). In AD, efforts are focused on early diagnosis through in vivo visualization of disease pathophysiology. In LLD, recent imaging evidence supports the role of white matter ischemic changes in the pathogenesis of depression in the elderly, the “vascular hypothesis.” Finally, we discuss potential roles for neuroimaging biomarkers in geriatric psychiatry in the future. PMID:23636984

  12. Data sharing in neuroimaging research

    PubMed Central

    Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Breeze, Janis L.; Ghosh, Satrajit; Gorgolewski, Krzysztof; Halchenko, Yaroslav O.; Hanke, Michael; Haselgrove, Christian; Helmer, Karl G.; Keator, David B.; Marcus, Daniel S.; Poldrack, Russell A.; Schwartz, Yannick; Ashburner, John; Kennedy, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Significant resources around the world have been invested in neuroimaging studies of brain function and disease. Easier access to this large body of work should have profound impact on research in cognitive neuroscience and psychiatry, leading to advances in the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric and neurological disease. A trend toward increased sharing of neuroimaging data has emerged in recent years. Nevertheless, a number of barriers continue to impede momentum. Many researchers and institutions remain uncertain about how to share data or lack the tools and expertise to participate in data sharing. The use of electronic data capture (EDC) methods for neuroimaging greatly simplifies the task of data collection and has the potential to help standardize many aspects of data sharing. We review here the motivations for sharing neuroimaging data, the current data sharing landscape, and the sociological or technical barriers that still need to be addressed. The INCF Task Force on Neuroimaging Datasharing, in conjunction with several collaborative groups around the world, has started work on several tools to ease and eventually automate the practice of data sharing. It is hoped that such tools will allow researchers to easily share raw, processed, and derived neuroimaging data, with appropriate metadata and provenance records, and will improve the reproducibility of neuroimaging studies. By providing seamless integration of data sharing and analysis tools within a commodity research environment, the Task Force seeks to identify and minimize barriers to data sharing in the field of neuroimaging. PMID:22493576

  13. Two-step regulation of Ad4BP/SF-1 gene transcription during fetal adrenal development: initiation by a Hox-Pbx1-Prep1 complex and maintenance via autoregulation by Ad4BP/SF-1.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Mohamad; Ishihara, Satoru; Oka, Sanae; Okumura, Katsuzumi; Morohashi, Ken-ichirou

    2006-06-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor Ad4BP/SF-1 (adrenal 4 binding protein/steroidogenic factor 1) is essential for the proper development and function of reproductive and steroidogenic tissues. Although the expression of Ad4BP/SF-1 is specific for those tissues, the mechanisms underlying this tissue-specific expression remain unknown. In this study, we used transgenic mouse assays to examine the regulation of the tissue-specific expression of Ad4BP/SF-1. An investigation of the entire Ad4BP/SF-1 gene locus revealed a fetal adrenal enhancer (FAdE) in intron 4 containing highly conserved binding sites for Pbx-Prep, Pbx-Hox, and Ad4BP/SF-1. Transgenic assays revealed that the Ad4 sites, together with Ad4BP/SF-1, develop an autoregulatory loop and thereby maintain transcription, while the Pbx/Prep and Pbx/Hox sites initiate transcription prior to the establishment of the autoregulatory loop. Indeed, a limited number of Hox family members were found to be expressed in the adrenal primordia. Whether a true fetal-type adrenal cortex is present in mice remained controversial, and this argument was complicated by the postnatal development of the so-called X zone. Using transgenic mice with lacZ driven by the FAdE, we clearly identified a fetal adrenal cortex in mice, and the X zone is the fetal adrenal cells accumulated at the juxtamedullary region after birth. PMID:16705164

  14. Neuroimaging of Graves' orbitopathy.

    PubMed

    Müller-Forell, Wibke; Kahaly, George J

    2012-06-01

    Neuroimaging of Graves' orbitopathy (GO) plays an important role in the differential diagnosis and interdisciplinary management of patients with GO. Orbital imaging is required in unclear or asymmetric proptosis, in suspected optic neuropathy and prior to decompression surgery. Especially computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging show the actual objective morphological findings, quantitative MR imaging giving additional information concerning the acuteness or chronicity of the disease. Major morphological diagnostic criteria include a spindle like spreading of the rectus muscles without involvement of the tendon, a compression of the optic nerve in the orbital apex (crowded orbital apex syndrome) and the absence of any space occupying intraorbital process. A longer lasting course of the disease may lead to a corresponding impression of the lamina papyracae, the normally parallel configured medial wall of the orbit, similar to a spontaneous decompression. PMID:22632363

  15. Provenance in neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie-Graham, Allan J; Van Horn, John D; Woods, Roger P; Crawford, Karen L; Toga, Arthur W

    2008-08-01

    Provenance, the description of the history of a set of data, has grown more important with the proliferation of research consortia-related efforts in neuroimaging. Knowledge about the origin and history of an image is crucial for establishing data and results quality; detailed information about how it was processed, including the specific software routines and operating systems that were used, is necessary for proper interpretation, high fidelity replication and re-use. We have drafted a mechanism for describing provenance in a simple and easy to use environment, alleviating the burden of documentation from the user while still providing a rich description of an image's provenance. This combination of ease of use and highly descriptive metadata should greatly facilitate the collection of provenance and subsequent sharing of data. PMID:18519166

  16. Neuroimaging in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, James D.; Hashemi, Nafiseh; Gelman, Rachel; Lee, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    In the past three decades, there have been countless advances in imaging modalities that have revolutionized evaluation, management, and treatment of neuro-ophthalmic disorders. Non-invasive approaches for early detection and monitoring of treatments have decreased morbidity and mortality. Understanding of basic methods of imaging techniques and choice of imaging modalities in cases encountered in neuro-ophthalmology clinic is critical for proper evaluation of patients. Two main imaging modalities that are often used are computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, variations of these modalities and appropriate location of imaging must be considered in each clinical scenario. In this article, we review and summarize the best neuroimaging studies for specific neuro-ophthalmic indications and the diagnostic radiographic findings for important clinical entities. PMID:23961025

  17. Schizophrenia, neuroimaging and connectomics.

    PubMed

    Fornito, Alex; Zalesky, Andrew; Pantelis, Christos; Bullmore, Edward T

    2012-10-01

    Schizophrenia is frequently characterized as a disorder of brain connectivity. Neuroimaging has played a central role in supporting this view, with nearly two decades of research providing abundant evidence of structural and functional connectivity abnormalities in the disorder. In recent years, our understanding of how schizophrenia affects brain networks has been greatly advanced by attempts to map the complete set of inter-regional interactions comprising the brain's intricate web of connectivity; i.e., the human connectome. Imaging connectomics refers to the use of neuroimaging techniques to generate these maps which, combined with the application of graph theoretic methods, has enabled relatively comprehensive mapping of brain network connectivity and topology in unprecedented detail. Here, we review the application of these techniques to the study of schizophrenia, focusing principally on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research, while drawing attention to key methodological issues in the field. The published findings suggest that schizophrenia is associated with a widespread and possibly context-independent functional connectivity deficit, upon which are superimposed more circumscribed, context-dependent alterations associated with transient states of hyper- and/or hypo-connectivity. In some cases, these changes in inter-regional functional coupling dynamics can be related to measures of intra-regional dysfunction. Topological disturbances of functional brain networks in schizophrenia point to reduced local network connectivity and modular structure, as well as increased global integration and network robustness. Some, but not all, of these functional abnormalities appear to have an anatomical basis, though the relationship between the two is complex. By comprehensively mapping connectomic disturbances in patients with schizophrenia across the entire brain, this work has provided important insights into the highly distributed character of neural

  18. Cross-View Neuroimage Pattern Analysis in Alzheimer's Disease Staging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sidong; Cai, Weidong; Pujol, Sonia; Kikinis, Ron; Feng, Dagan D.

    2016-01-01

    The research on staging of pre-symptomatic and prodromal phase of neurological disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease (AD), is essential for prevention of dementia. New strategies for AD staging with a focus on early detection, are demanded to optimize potential efficacy of disease-modifying therapies that can halt or slow the disease progression. Recently, neuroimaging are increasingly used as additional research-based markers to detect AD onset and predict conversion of MCI and normal control (NC) to AD. Researchers have proposed a variety of neuroimaging biomarkers to characterize the patterns of the pathology of AD and MCI, and suggested that multi-view neuroimaging biomarkers could lead to better performance than single-view biomarkers in AD staging. However, it is still unclear what leads to such synergy and how to preserve or maximize. In an attempt to answer these questions, we proposed a cross-view pattern analysis framework for investigating the synergy between different neuroimaging biomarkers. We quantitatively analyzed nine types of biomarkers derived from FDG-PET and T1-MRI, and evaluated their performance in a task of classifying AD, MCI, and NC subjects obtained from the ADNI baseline cohort. The experiment results showed that these biomarkers could depict the pathology of AD from different perspectives, and output distinct patterns that are significantly associated with the disease progression. Most importantly, we found that these features could be separated into clusters, each depicting a particular aspect; and the inter-cluster features could always achieve better performance than the intra-cluster features in AD staging. PMID:26941639

  19. Impact of Common Variations in PLD3 on Neuroimaging Phenotypes in Non-demented Elders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Wang, Hui-Fu; Tan, Meng-Shan; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Teng; Zhang, Dao-Qiang; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-09-01

    Rare variants of phospholipase D3 (PLD3) have been identified as Alzheimer's disease (AD) susceptibility loci, whereas little is known about the potential role of common variants in the progression of AD. To examine the impact of genetic variations in PLD3 on neuroimaging phenotypes in a large non-demented population. A total of 261 normal cognition (NC) and 456 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) individuals from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database are included in our analysis. Multiple linear regression models were applied to examine the association between four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs7249146, rs4490097, rs12151243, and rs10407447) with the florbetapir retention on florbetapir 18F amyloid positron emission tomography (AV45-PET), the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRgl) on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET), and regional volume on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline and in the cohort study. We did not detect any significant associations of PLD3 SNPs with florbetapir retention on AV45-PET. In the analysis of FDG-PET, rs10407447 was associated with the CMRgl in the left angular gyrus and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex in the MCI group. Regarding the MRI analysis, rs10407447 was also associated with bilateral inferior lateral ventricle and lateral ventricle volume in MCI group. The main findings of our study provide evidence that support the possible role of PLD3 common variants in influencing AD-related neuroimaging phenotypes. Nevertheless, further work is necessary to explain the functional mechanisms of differences and confirm the causal variants. PMID:26232066

  20. Benefits of adding Small Financial Incentives or Optional Group Meetings to a Web-based Statewide Obesity Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Leahey, Tricia M.; Subak, Leslee L.; Fava, Joseph; Schembri, Michael; Thomas, Graham; Xu, Xiaomeng; Krupel, Katie; Kent, Kimberly; Boguszewski, Katherine; Kumar, Rajiv; Weinberg, Brad; Wing, Rena

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine whether adding either small, variable financial incentives or optional group sessions improves weight losses in a community-based, Internet behavioral program. Design and methods Participants (N=268) from Shape Up Rhode Island 2012, a 3 month Web-based community wellness initiative, were randomized to: Shape Up+Internet behavioral program (SI), Shape Up+Internet program+Incentives (SII), or Shape Up+Internet program+Group sessions (SIG). Results At the end of the 3 month program, SII achieved significantly greater weight losses than SI (SII:6.4% [5.1-7.7]; SI:4.2% [3.0-5.6]; P=.03); weight losses in SIG were not significantly different from the other two conditions (SIG: 5.8% [4.5-7.1], P’s≥.10). However, at the 12 month no treatment follow-up visit, both SII and SIG had greater weight losses than SI (SII: 3.1% [1.8-4.4]; SIG: 4.5% [3.2-5.8]; SI: 1.2% [-0.1-2.6]; P’s≤.05). SII was the most cost-effective approach at both 3 (SII: $34/kg; SI: $34/kg; SIG: $87/kg) and 12 months (SII: $64/kg; SI: $140/kg; SIG: $113/kg). Conclusions Modest financial incentives enhance weight losses during a community campaign and both incentives and optional group meetings improved overall weight loss outcomes during the follow-up period. However, the use of the financial incentives is the most cost-effective approach. PMID:25384463

  1. Traumatic brain injury, neuroimaging, and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, Erin D.

    2012-01-01

    Depending on severity, traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces immediate neuropathological effects that in the mildest form may be transient but as severity increases results in neural damage and degeneration. The first phase of neural degeneration is explainable by the primary acute and secondary neuropathological effects initiated by the injury; however, neuroimaging studies demonstrate a prolonged period of pathological changes that progressively occur even during the chronic phase. This review examines how neuroimaging may be used in TBI to understand (1) the dynamic changes that occur in brain development relevant to understanding the effects of TBI and how these relate to developmental stage when the brain is injured, (2) how TBI interferes with age-typical brain development and the effects of aging thereafter, and (3) how TBI results in greater frontotemporolimbic damage, results in cerebral atrophy, and is more disruptive to white matter neural connectivity. Neuroimaging quantification in TBI demonstrates degenerative effects from brain injury over time. An adverse synergistic influence of TBI with aging may predispose the brain injured individual for the development of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders long after surviving the brain injury. PMID:23964217

  2. Neuroimaging in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Fredrikson, Mats; Faria, Vanda

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to evaluate neurofunctional and neurochemical alterations related to the generation and control of affect in patients with anxiety disorders are reviewed. We performed a meta-analysis of symptom provocation studies, where neural activity was measured using fMRI, PET or SPECT to test the hypothesis that prefrontal regions modulate amygdala activity. Data revealed that reactivity in the amygdala was enhanced in patients with phobia as well as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The dorsal anterior cingulate cortex was activated in concert with the amygdala, both in PTSD and in phobic states, suggesting a role in fear expression, rather than emotional control. Activity in emotion-regulating areas in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex including the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex and the medial orbitofrontal cortex was compromised in the symptomatic state in PTSD and phobic disorders, respectively. Increased amygdala reactivity was restored with psychological treatment. Treatment effects across different modalities including pharmacological and psychological interventions as well as with placebo regimens support that reduction of neural activity in the amygdala may be a final common pathway for successful therapeutic interventions irrespective of method, thereby linking neurotransmission to plasticity in a pivotal node of the core fear network of the brain. PMID:25225017

  3. Neuroimaging of spine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Nandor K; Pfiffner, Thomas J; Mechtler, Laszlo L

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary, intradural/extramedullary, and extradural spine tumors comprise a wide range of neoplasms with an even wider range of clinical symptoms and prognostic features. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), commonly used to evaluate the spine in patients presenting with pain, can further characterize lesions that may be encountered on other imaging studies, such as bone scintigraphy or computed tomography (CT). The advantage of the MRI is its multiplane capabilities, superior contrast agent resolution, and flexible protocols that play an important role in assessing tumor location, extent in directing biopsy, in planning proper therapy, and in evaluating therapeutic results. A multimodality approach can be used to fully characterize the lesion and the combination of information obtained from the different modalities usually narrows the diagnostic possibilities significantly. The diagnosis of spinal tumors is based on patient age, topographic features of the tumor, and lesion pattern, as seen at CT and MRI. The shift to high-end imaging incorporating diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, whole-body short tau inversion recovery, positron emission tomography, intraoperative and high-field MRI as part of the mainstream clinical imaging protocol has provided neurologists, neuro-oncologists, and neurosurgeons a window of opportunity to assess the biologic behavior of spine neoplasms. This chapter reviews neuroimaging of spine tumors, primary and secondary, discussing routine and newer modalities that can reduce the significant morbidity associated with these neoplasms. PMID:27430436

  4. 76 FR 9329 - Efficiency Initiative Effort To Reduce Non-Value-Added Costs Imposed on Industry by Department of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ...) Dr. Ashton Carter, dated September 14, 2010, Memorandum to Acquisition Professionals, DoD is... first stage of Undersecretary Carter's Better Buying Power Initiative. Many of these suggestions were... Undersecretary Carter's Efficiency Initiative. Trade secrets and commercial or financial information...

  5. Graphical neuroimaging informatics: application to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H; Greer, Vaughan

    2014-06-01

    The Informatics Visualization for Neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework allows one to graphically display image and meta-data information from sizeable collections of neuroimaging data as a whole using a dynamic and compelling user interface. Users can fluidly interact with an entire collection of cortical surfaces using only their mouse. In addition, users can cluster and group brains according in multiple ways for subsequent comparison using graphical data mining tools. In this article, we illustrate the utility of INVIZIAN for simultaneous exploration and mining a large collection of extracted cortical surface data arising in clinical neuroimaging studies of patients with Alzheimer's Disease, mild cognitive impairment, as well as healthy control subjects. Alzheimer's Disease is particularly interesting due to the wide-spread effects on cortical architecture and alterations of volume in specific brain areas associated with memory. We demonstrate INVIZIAN's ability to render multiple brain surfaces from multiple diagnostic groups of subjects, showcase the interactivity of the system, and showcase how INVIZIAN can be employed to generate hypotheses about the collection of data which would be suitable for direct access to the underlying raw data and subsequent formal statistical analysis. Specifically, we use INVIZIAN show how cortical thickness and hippocampal volume differences between group are evident even in the absence of more formal hypothesis testing. In the context of neurological diseases linked to brain aging such as AD, INVIZIAN provides a unique means for considering the entirety of whole brain datasets, look for interesting relationships among them, and thereby derive new ideas for further research and study. PMID:24203652

  6. An expanded role for neuroimaging in the evaluation of memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Rahul S.; Rafii, Michael S.; Brewer, James B.; Hess, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) affects millions of people worldwide. The neuropathologic process underlying AD begins years, if not decades, before the onset of memory decline. Recent advances in neuroimaging suggest that it is now possible to detect AD-associated neuropathological changes well before dementia onset. Here, we evaluate the role of recently developed in vivo biomarkers in the clinical evaluation of AD. We discuss how assessment strategies might incorporate neuroimaging markers to better inform patients, families and clinicians when memory impairment prompts a search for diagnosis and management options. PMID:23764728

  7. Neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists: A survey of the state of current training and recommendations for trainees

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Andreana; Hassenstab, Jason; Bangen, Katherine J.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging has gained widespread use in neuropsychological research and practice. However, there are neither established guidelines on how neuropsychologists might become competent researchers or consumers of neuroimaging data, nor any published studies describing the state of neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists. We report the results of two online surveys, one of 13 expert neuropsychologist-neuroimagers, whose responses informed the formulation of a second, larger survey to neuropsychologists-at-large that were a random selection of a third of the members of the International Neuropsychological Society and American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology. 237 doctoral-level neuropsychologists, or 15.3% of potential participants, provided complete responses. Most respondents (69.2%) received training in neuroimaging, mostly at the post-doctoral level, largely through independent study, clinical conferences, instruction by clinical supervisors, and individualized mentoring, on topics such as neuroimaging modalities in neurology, neuroanatomy, and the appropriate information to glean from neuroradiology reports. Of the remaining respondents who did not receive training in neuroimaging, 64.4% indicated that such training would be very or extremely beneficial to one’s career as a neuropsychologist. Both neuropsychologist-neuroimagers and neuropsychologists-at-large provided specific recommendations for training. Findings from this initial effort will guide trainees who seek to develop competence in neuroimaging, and inform future formulations of neuropsychological training. PMID:24215451

  8. Neuroimaging, culture, and forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Neil K

    2009-01-01

    The spread of neuroimaging technologies around the world has led to diverse practices of forensic psychiatry and the emergence of neuroethics and neurolaw. This article surveys the neuroethics and neurolegal literature on the use of forensic neuroimaging within the courtroom. Next, the related literature within medical anthropology and science and technology studies is reviewed to show how debates about forensic neuroimaging reflect cultural tensions about attitudes regarding the self, mental illness, and medical expertise. Finally, recommendations are offered on how forensic psychiatrists can add to this research, given their professional interface between law and medicine. At stake are the fundamental concerns that surround changing conceptions of the self, sickness, and expectations of medicine. PMID:19535562

  9. Neurodevelopmental Precursors and Consequences of Substance Use during Adolescence: Promises and Pitfalls of Longitudinal Neuroimaging Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Diana H.; Rose, Emma J.; Darcey, Valerie L.; Belcher, Annabelle M.; VanMeter, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Neurocognitive and emotional regulatory deficits in substance users are often attributed to misuse; however most studies do not include a substance-naïve baseline to justify that conclusion. The etiological literature suggests that pre-existing deficits may contribute to the onset and escalation of use that are then exacerbated by subsequent use. To address this, there is burgeoning interest in conducting prospective, longitudinal neuroimaging studies to isolate neurodevelopmental precursors and consequences of adolescent substance misuse, as reflected in recent initiatives such as the NIH-led Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study and the National Consortium on Alcohol and Neurodevelopment (NCANDA). To distinguish neurodevelopmental precursors from the consequences of adolescent substance use specifically, prospective, longitudinal neuroimaging studies with substance-naïve pre-adolescents are needed. The exemplar described in this article—i.e., the ongoing Adolescent Development Study (ADS)—used a targeted recruitment strategy to bolster the numbers of pre-adolescent individuals who were at increased risk of substance use (i.e., “high-risk”) in a sample that was relatively small for longitudinal studies of similar phenomena, but historically large for neuroimaging (i.e., N = 135; 11–13 years of age). At baseline participants underwent MRI testing and a large complement of cognitive and behavioral assessments along with genetics, stress physiology and interviews. The study methods include repeating these measures at three time points (i.e., baseline/Wave 1, Wave 2 and Wave 3), 18 months apart. In this article, rather than outlining specific study outcomes, we describe the breadth of the numerous complexities and challenges involved in conducting this type of prospective, longitudinal neuroimaging study and “lessons learned” for subsequent efforts are discussed. While these types of large longitudinal neuroimaging studies present a

  10. Neurodevelopmental Precursors and Consequences of Substance Use during Adolescence: Promises and Pitfalls of Longitudinal Neuroimaging Strategies.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Diana H; Rose, Emma J; Darcey, Valerie L; Belcher, Annabelle M; VanMeter, John W

    2016-01-01

    Neurocognitive and emotional regulatory deficits in substance users are often attributed to misuse; however most studies do not include a substance-naïve baseline to justify that conclusion. The etiological literature suggests that pre-existing deficits may contribute to the onset and escalation of use that are then exacerbated by subsequent use. To address this, there is burgeoning interest in conducting prospective, longitudinal neuroimaging studies to isolate neurodevelopmental precursors and consequences of adolescent substance misuse, as reflected in recent initiatives such as the NIH-led Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study and the National Consortium on Alcohol and Neurodevelopment (NCANDA). To distinguish neurodevelopmental precursors from the consequences of adolescent substance use specifically, prospective, longitudinal neuroimaging studies with substance-naïve pre-adolescents are needed. The exemplar described in this article-i.e., the ongoing Adolescent Development Study (ADS)-used a targeted recruitment strategy to bolster the numbers of pre-adolescent individuals who were at increased risk of substance use (i.e., "high-risk") in a sample that was relatively small for longitudinal studies of similar phenomena, but historically large for neuroimaging (i.e., N = 135; 11-13 years of age). At baseline participants underwent MRI testing and a large complement of cognitive and behavioral assessments along with genetics, stress physiology and interviews. The study methods include repeating these measures at three time points (i.e., baseline/Wave 1, Wave 2 and Wave 3), 18 months apart. In this article, rather than outlining specific study outcomes, we describe the breadth of the numerous complexities and challenges involved in conducting this type of prospective, longitudinal neuroimaging study and "lessons learned" for subsequent efforts are discussed. While these types of large longitudinal neuroimaging studies present a number of

  11. The Co-evolution of Neuroimaging and Psychiatric Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Dyster, Timothy G; Mikell, Charles B; Sheth, Sameer A

    2016-01-01

    The role of neuroimaging in psychiatric neurosurgery has evolved significantly throughout the field's history. Psychiatric neurosurgery initially developed without the benefit of information provided by modern imaging modalities, and thus lesion targets were selected based on contemporary theories of frontal lobe dysfunction in psychiatric disease. However, by the end of the 20th century, the availability of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allowed for the development of mechanistic theories attempting to explain the anatamofunctional basis of these disorders, as well as the efficacy of stereotactic neuromodulatory treatments. Neuroimaging now plays a central and ever-expanding role in the neurosurgical management of psychiatric disorders, by influencing the determination of surgical candidates, allowing individualized surgical targeting and planning, and identifying network-level changes in the brain following surgery. In this review, we aim to describe the coevolution of psychiatric neurosurgery and neuroimaging, including ways in which neuroimaging has proved useful in elucidating the therapeutic mechanisms of neuromodulatory procedures. We focus on ablative over stimulation-based procedures given their historical precedence and the greater opportunity they afford for post-operative re-imaging, but also discuss important contributions from the deep brain stimulation (DBS) literature. We conclude with a discussion of how neuroimaging will transition the field of psychiatric neurosurgery into the era of precision medicine. PMID:27445706

  12. The Co-evolution of Neuroimaging and Psychiatric Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Dyster, Timothy G.; Mikell, Charles B.; Sheth, Sameer A.

    2016-01-01

    The role of neuroimaging in psychiatric neurosurgery has evolved significantly throughout the field’s history. Psychiatric neurosurgery initially developed without the benefit of information provided by modern imaging modalities, and thus lesion targets were selected based on contemporary theories of frontal lobe dysfunction in psychiatric disease. However, by the end of the 20th century, the availability of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allowed for the development of mechanistic theories attempting to explain the anatamofunctional basis of these disorders, as well as the efficacy of stereotactic neuromodulatory treatments. Neuroimaging now plays a central and ever-expanding role in the neurosurgical management of psychiatric disorders, by influencing the determination of surgical candidates, allowing individualized surgical targeting and planning, and identifying network-level changes in the brain following surgery. In this review, we aim to describe the coevolution of psychiatric neurosurgery and neuroimaging, including ways in which neuroimaging has proved useful in elucidating the therapeutic mechanisms of neuromodulatory procedures. We focus on ablative over stimulation-based procedures given their historical precedence and the greater opportunity they afford for post-operative re-imaging, but also discuss important contributions from the deep brain stimulation (DBS) literature. We conclude with a discussion of how neuroimaging will transition the field of psychiatric neurosurgery into the era of precision medicine. PMID:27445706

  13. Multiple testing for neuroimaging via hidden Markov random field.

    PubMed

    Shu, Hai; Nan, Bin; Koeppe, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Traditional voxel-level multiple testing procedures in neuroimaging, mostly p-value based, often ignore the spatial correlations among neighboring voxels and thus suffer from substantial loss of power. We extend the local-significance-index based procedure originally developed for the hidden Markov chain models, which aims to minimize the false nondiscovery rate subject to a constraint on the false discovery rate, to three-dimensional neuroimaging data using a hidden Markov random field model. A generalized expectation-maximization algorithm for maximizing the penalized likelihood is proposed for estimating the model parameters. Extensive simulations show that the proposed approach is more powerful than conventional false discovery rate procedures. We apply the method to the comparison between mild cognitive impairment, a disease status with increased risk of developing Alzheimer's or another dementia, and normal controls in the FDG-PET imaging study of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. PMID:26012881

  14. Advances in neuroimaging in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Elizabeth; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Fox, Nick C

    2016-08-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinically and neuroanatomically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder with multiple underlying genetic and pathological causes. Whilst initial neuroimaging studies highlighted the presence of frontal and temporal lobe atrophy or hypometabolism as the unifying feature in patients with FTD, more detailed studies have revealed diverse patterns across individuals, with variable frontal or temporal predominance, differing degrees of asymmetry, and the involvement of other cortical areas including the insula and cingulate, as well as subcortical structures such as the basal ganglia and thalamus. Recent advances in novel imaging modalities including diffusion tensor imaging, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and molecular positron emission tomography imaging allow the possibility of investigating alterations in structural and functional connectivity and the visualisation of pathological protein deposition. This review will cover the major imaging modalities currently used in research and clinical practice, focusing on the key insights they have provided into FTD, including the onset and evolution of pathological changes and also importantly their utility as biomarkers for disease detection and staging, differential diagnosis and measurement of disease progression. Validating neuroimaging biomarkers that are able to accomplish these tasks will be crucial for the ultimate goal of powering upcoming clinical trials by correctly stratifying patient enrolment and providing sensitive markers for evaluating the effects and efficacy of disease-modifying therapies. This review describes the key insights provided by research into the major neuroimaging modalities currently used in research and clinical practice, including what they tell us about the onset and evolution of FTD and how they may be used as biomarkers for disease detection and staging, differential diagnosis and measurement of disease progression. This article is

  15. Value-Added Predictors of Expressive and Receptive Language Growth in Initially Nonverbal Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Paul; Watson, Linda R.; Lambert, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Eighty-seven preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders who were initially nonverbal (under 6 words in language sample and under 21 parent-reported words said) were assessed at five time points over 16 months. Statistical models that accounted for the intercorrelation among nine theoretically- and empirically-motivated predictors, as well as two…

  16. Efficiency of Non-Contrast-Enhanced Liver Imaging Sequences Added to Initial Rectal MRI in Rectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Gene-hyuk; Kim, Kyung Ah; Hwang, Seong Su; Park, Soo Youn; Kim, Hyun A.; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Ji Woong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to estimate the value of addition of liver imaging to initial rectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of liver metastasis and evaluate imaging predictors of a high risk of liver metastasis on rectal MRI. Methods We enrolled 144 patients who from October 2010 to May 2013 underwent rectal MRI with T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) (b values = 50, 500, and 900 s/mm2) of the liver and abdominopelvic computed tomography (APCT) for the initial staging of rectal cancer. Two reviewers scored the possibility of liver metastasis on different sets of liver images (T2WI, DWI, and combined T2WI and DWI) and APCT and reached a conclusion by consensus for different analytic results. Imaging features from rectal MRI were also analyzed. The diagnostic performances of CT and an additional liver scan to detect liver metastasis were compared. Multivariate logistic regression to determine independent predictors of liver metastasis among rectal MRI features and tumor markers was performed. This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. Results All sets of liver images were more effective than APCT for detecting liver metastasis, and DWI was the most effective. Perivascular stranding and anal sphincter invasion were statistically significant for liver metastasis (p = 0.0077 and p = 0.0471), while extramural vascular invasion based on MRI (mrEMVI) was marginally significant (p = 0.0534). Conclusion The addition of non-contrast-enhanced liver imaging, particularly DWI, to initial rectal MRI in rectal cancer patients could facilitate detection of liver metastasis without APCT. Perivascular stranding, anal sphincter invasion, and mrEMVI detected on rectal MRI were important imaging predictors of liver metastasis. PMID:26348217

  17. Neuroimaging for psychotherapy research: Current trends

    PubMed Central

    WEINGARTEN, CAROL P.; STRAUMAN, TIMOTHY J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This article reviews neuroimaging studies that inform psychotherapy research. An introduction to neuroimaging methods is provided as background for the increasingly sophisticated breadth of methods and findings appearing in psychotherapy research. Method We compiled and assessed a comprehensive list of neuroimaging studies of psychotherapy outcome, along with selected examples of other types of studies that also are relevant to psychotherapy research. We emphasized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since it is the dominant neuroimaging modality in psychological research. Results We summarize findings from neuroimaging studies of psychotherapy outcome, including treatment for depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and schizophrenia. Conclusions The increasing use of neuroimaging methods in the study of psychotherapy continues to refine our understanding of both outcome and process. We suggest possible directions for future neuroimaging studies in psychotherapy research. PMID:24527694

  18. Quantitative Neuroimaging Software for Clinical Assessment of Hippocampal Volumes on MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahdidan, Jamila; Raji, Cyrus A.; DeYoe, Edgar A.; Mathis, Jedidiah; Noe, Karsten Ø.; Rimestad, Jens; Kjeldsen, Thomas K.; Mosegaard, Jesper; Becker, James T.; Lopez, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple neurological disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), mesial temporal sclerosis, and mild traumatic brain injury manifest with volume loss on brain MRI. Subtle volume loss is particularly seen early in AD. While prior research has demonstrated the value of this additional information from quantitative neuroimaging, very few applications have been approved for clinical use. Here we describe a US FDA cleared software program, NeuroreaderTM, for assessment of clinical hippocampal volume on brain MRI. Objective: To present the validation of hippocampal volumetrics on a clinical software program. Method: Subjects were drawn (n = 99) from the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study. Volumetric brain MR imaging was acquired in both 1.5 T (n = 59) and 3.0 T (n = 40) scanners in participants with manual hippocampal segmentation. Fully automated hippocampal segmentation and measurement was done using a multiple atlas approach. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) measured the level of spatial overlap between NeuroreaderTM and gold standard manual segmentation from 0 to 1 with 0 denoting no overlap and 1 representing complete agreement. DSC comparisons between 1.5 T and 3.0 T scanners were done using standard independent samples T-tests. Results: In the bilateral hippocampus, mean DSC was 0.87 with a range of 0.78–0.91 (right hippocampus) and 0.76–0.91 (left hippocampus). Automated segmentation agreement with manual segmentation was essentially equivalent at 1.5 T (DSC = 0.879) versus 3.0 T (DSC = 0.872). Conclusion: This work provides a description and validation of a software program that can be applied in measuring hippocampal volume, a biomarker that is frequently abnormal in AD and other neurological disorders. PMID:26484924

  19. Neuroimaging in Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Stein, Joel; Mohan, Suyash

    2016-08-01

    Leukemias are a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies that results from uncontrolled neoplastic proliferation of undifferentiated or partially differentiated hematopoietic cells. Patients with acute leukemia can have a variety of craniocerebral complications, which can result from direct leukemic involvement, secondary to cerebrovascular or infectious complications of leukemia, or can be treatment related. Imaging plays a central role in evaluating the central nervous system during treatment in patients with leukemia. CT scan is usually considered an effective initial imaging modality to evaluate for cerebrovascular complications. MRI is considered the imaging modality of choice due to its versatility. PMID:27443999

  20. Imago Mundi, Imago AD, Imago ADNI

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Since the launch in 2003 of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) in the USA, ever growing, similarly oriented consortia have been organized and assembled around the world. The various accomplishments of ADNI have contributed substantially to a better understanding of the underlying physiopathology of aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). These accomplishments are basically predicated in the trinity of multimodality, standardization and sharing. This multimodality approach can now better identify those subjects with AD-specific traits that are more likely to present cognitive decline in the near future and that might represent the best candidates for smaller but more efficient therapeutic trials – trials that, through gained and shared knowledge, can be more focused on a specific target or a specific stage of the disease process. In summary, data generated from ADNI have helped elucidate some of the pathophysiological mechanisms underpinning aging and AD pathology, while contributing to the international effort in setting the groundwork for biomarker discovery and establishing standards for early diagnosis of AD. PMID:25478022

  1. FUNCTIONAL NEUROIMAGING IN GERIATRIC DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Gunning, Faith M.; Smith, Gwenn S.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Abnormalities in specific cerebral networks likely confer vulnerability that increases the susceptibility for development of geriatric depression and impact the course of symptoms. Functional neuroimaging enables the in vivo identification of alterations in cerebral function that not only characterize disease vulnerability, but also may contribute to variability in depressive symptoms and antidepressant response. Judicious use of functional neuroimaging tools can advance pathophysiological models of geriatric depression. Furthermore, due to the age-related vulnerability of specific brain systems that have been implicated in mood disorders, geriatric depression provides a logical context within which to study the role of specific functional abnormalities in both antidepressant response and key behavioral and cognitive abnormalities of mood disorders. PMID:21536165

  2. Baseline MRI predictors of conversion from MCI to probable AD in the ADNI cohort.

    PubMed

    Risacher, Shannon L; Saykin, Andrew J; West, John D; Shen, Li; Firpi, Hiram A; McDonald, Brenna C

    2009-08-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is a multi-center study assessing neuroimaging in diagnosis and longitudinal monitoring. Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) often represents a prodromal form of dementia, conferring a 10-15% annual risk of converting to probable AD. We analyzed baseline 1.5T MRI scans in 693 participants from the ADNI cohort divided into four groups by baseline diagnosis and one year MCI to probable AD conversion status to identify neuroimaging phenotypes associated with MCI and AD and potential predictive markers of imminent conversion. MP-RAGE scans were analyzed using publicly available voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and automated parcellation methods. Measures included global and hippocampal grey matter (GM) density, hippocampal and amygdalar volumes, and cortical thickness values from entorhinal cortex and other temporal and parietal lobe regions. The overall pattern of structural MRI changes in MCI (n=339) and AD (n=148) compared to healthy controls (HC, n=206) was similar to prior findings in smaller samples. MCI-Converters (n=62) demonstrated a very similar pattern of atrophic changes to the AD group up to a year before meeting clinical criteria for AD. Finally, a comparison of effect sizes for contrasts between the MCI-Converters and MCI-Stable (n=277) groups on MRI metrics indicated that degree of neurodegeneration of medial temporal structures was the best antecedent MRI marker of imminent conversion, with decreased hippocampal volume (left > right) being the most robust. Validation of imaging biomarkers is important as they can help enrich clinical trials of disease modifying agents by identifying individuals at highest risk for progression to AD. PMID:19689234

  3. Structural neuroimaging in Altheimer's disease: do white matter hyperintensities matter?

    PubMed

    Brickman, Adam M; Muraskin, Jordan; Zimmerman, Molly E

    2009-01-01

    The targeted brain dysfunction that accompanies aging can have a devastating effect on cognitive and intellectual abilities. A significant proportion of older adults experience precipitous cognitive decline that negatively impacts functional activities. Such individuals meet clinical diagnostic criteria for dementia, which is commonly attributed to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Structural neuroimaging, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has contributed significantly to our understanding of the morphological and pathology-related changes that may underlie normal and disease-associated cognitive change in aging. White matter hyperintensities (WMH), which are distributed patches of increased hyperintense signal on T2-weighted MRI, are among the most common structural neuroimaging findings in older adults. In recent years, WMH have emerged as robust radiological correlates of cognitive decline. Studies suggest that WMH distributed in anterior brain regions are related to decline in executive abilities that is typical of normal aging, whereas WMH distributed in more posterior brain regions are common in AD. Although epidemiological, observational, and pathological studies suggest that WMH may be ischemic in origin and caused by consistent or variable hypoperfusion, there is emerging evidence that they may also reflect vascular deposition of beta-amyloid, particularly when they are distributed in posterior areas and are present in patients with AD. Findings from the literature highlight the potential contribution of small-vessel cerebrovascular disease to the pathogenesis of AD, and suggest a mechanistic interaction, but future longitudinal studies using multiple imaging modalities are required to fully understand the complex role of WMH in AD. PMID:19585953

  4. Publication trends in neuroimaging of minimally conscious states.

    PubMed

    Garnett, Alex; Lee, Grace; Illes, Judy

    2013-01-01

    We used existing and customized bibliometric and scientometric methods to analyze publication trends in neuroimaging research of minimally conscious states and describe the domain in terms of its geographic, contributor, and content features. We considered publication rates for the years 2002-2011, author interconnections, the rate at which new authors are added, and the domains that inform the work of author contributors. We also provided a content analysis of clinical and ethical themes within the relevant literature. We found a 27% growth in the number of papers over the period of study, professional diversity among a wide range of peripheral author contributors but only few authors who dominate the field, and few new technical paradigms and clinical themes that would fundamentally expand the landscape. The results inform both the science of consciousness as well as parallel ethics and policy studies of the potential for translational challenges of neuroimaging in research and health care of people with disordered states of consciousness. PMID:24109545

  5. Understanding the impact of TV commercials: electrical neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Vecchiato, Giovanni; Kong, Wanzeng; Maglione, Anton Giulio; Wei, Daming

    2012-01-01

    Today, there is a greater interest in the marketing world in using neuroimaging tools to evaluate the efficacy of TV commercials. This field of research is known as neuromarketing. In this article, we illustrate some applications of electrical neuroimaging, a discipline that uses electroencephalography (EEG) and intensive signal processing techniques for the evaluation of marketing stimuli. We also show how the proper usage of these methodologies can provide information related to memorization and attention while people are watching marketing-relevant stimuli. We note that temporal and frequency patterns of EEG signals are able to provide possible descriptors that convey information about the cognitive process in subjects observing commercial advertisements (ads). Such information could be unobtainable through common tools used in standard marketing research. Evidence of this research shows how EEG methodologies could be employed to better design new products that marketers are going to promote and to analyze the global impact of video commercials already broadcast on TV. PMID:22678840

  6. Current neuroimaging techniques in Alzheimer's disease and applications in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linda; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; Chu, Leung-Wing; Mak, Henry Ka-Fung

    2012-01-01

    With Alzheimer’s disease (AD) quickly becoming the most costly disease to society, and with no disease-modifying treatment currently, prevention and early detection have become key points in AD research. Important features within this research focus on understanding disease pathology, as well as finding biomarkers that can act as early indicators and trackers of disease progression or potential treatment. With the advances in neuroimaging technology and the development of new imaging techniques, the search for cheap, noninvasive, sensitive biomarkers becomes more accessible. Modern neuroimaging techniques are able to cover most aspects of disease pathology, including visualization of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, cortical atrophy, neuronal loss, vascular damage, and changes in brain biochemistry. These methods can provide complementary information, resulting in an overall picture of AD. Additionally, applying neuroimaging to animal models of AD could bring about greater understanding in disease etiology and experimental treatments whilst remaining in vivo. In this review, we present the current neuroimaging techniques used in AD research in both their human and animal applications, and discuss how this fits in to the overall goal of understanding AD. PMID:23133824

  7. Delirium and hypovitaminosis D: neuroimaging findings.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, James A; Hategan, Ana; Ford, Jennifer; Tisi, Daniel K; Xiong, Glen L

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the frequency of neuroimaging findings of cortical atrophy and/or cerebrovascular disease in patients with delirium with hypovitaminosis D and normal vitamin D levels. Of 32 patients with delirium with hypovitaminosis D who were neuroimaged, 91.4% had neuroimaging findings, despite only five cases having a comorbid diagnosis of dementia. Similar frequencies of cortical atrophy and/or cerebrovascular disease were found in patients with delirium with normal vitamin D levels. Further research with a larger sample size is needed to compare neuroimaging findings between normal patients and patients with hypovitaminosis D with delirium. PMID:25111282

  8. Neuroimaging Week: A Novel, Engaging, and Effective Curriculum for Teaching Neuroimaging to Junior Psychiatric Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downar, Jonathan; Krizova, Adriana; Ghaffar, Omar; Zaretsky, Ari

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Neuroimaging techniques are increasingly important in psychiatric research and clinical practice, but few postgraduate psychiatry programs offer formal training in neuroimaging. To address this need, the authors developed a course to prepare psychiatric residents to use neuroimaging techniques effectively in independent practice.…

  9. Tinnitus: perspectives from human neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Langguth, Berthold; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of phantom sound in the absence of a corresponding external source. It is a highly prevalent disorder, and most cases are caused by cochlear injury that leads to peripheral deafferentation, which results in adaptive changes in the CNS. In this article we critically assess the recent neuroimaging studies in individuals with tinnitus that suggest that the disorder is accompanied by functional and structural brain abnormalities in distributed auditory and non-auditory brain regions. Moreover, we consider how the identification of the neuronal mechanisms underlying the different forms of tinnitus would benefit from larger studies, replication and comprehensive clinical assessment of patients. PMID:26373470

  10. A simple tool for neuroimaging data sharing

    PubMed Central

    Haselgrove, Christian; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Kennedy, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Data sharing is becoming increasingly common, but despite encouragement and facilitation by funding agencies, journals, and some research efforts, most neuroimaging data acquired today is still not shared due to political, financial, social, and technical barriers to sharing data that remain. In particular, technical solutions are few for researchers that are not a part of larger efforts with dedicated sharing infrastructures, and social barriers such as the time commitment required to share can keep data from becoming publicly available. We present a system for sharing neuroimaging data, designed to be simple to use and to provide benefit to the data provider. The system consists of a server at the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF) and user tools for uploading data to the server. The primary design principle for the user tools is ease of use: the user identifies a directory containing Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data, provides their INCF Portal authentication, and provides identifiers for the subject and imaging session. The user tool anonymizes the data and sends it to the server. The server then runs quality control routines on the data, and the data and the quality control reports are made public. The user retains control of the data and may change the sharing policy as they need. The result is that in a few minutes of the user’s time, DICOM data can be anonymized and made publicly available, and an initial quality control assessment can be performed on the data. The system is currently functional, and user tools and access to the public image database are available at http://xnat.incf.org/. PMID:24904398

  11. Neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Pope, Whitney B; Djoukhadar, Ibrahim; Jackson, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is integral to the management of patients with brain tumors. Conventional structural imaging provides exquisite anatomic detail but remains limited in the evaluation of molecular characteristics of intracranial neoplasms. Quantitative and physiologic biomarkers derived from advanced imaging techniques have been increasingly utilized as problem-solving tools to identify glioma grade and assess response to therapy. This chapter provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used in the clinical assessment of patients with gliomas and describes how novel imaging biomarkers have the potential to improve patient management. PMID:26948347

  12. Neuroimaging of Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Alfonso; Herman, Talia; Tessitore, Alessandro; Strafella, Antonio P.; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Functional brain imaging techniques appear ideally suited to explore the pathophysiology of freezing of gait (FOG). In the last two decades, techniques based on magnetic resonance or nuclear medicine imaging have found a number of structural changes and functional disconnections between subcortical and cortical regions of the locomotor network in patients with FOG. FOG seems to be related in part to disruptions in the “executive-attention” network along with regional tissue loss including the premotor area, inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, the parietal and occipital areas involved in visuospatial functions of the right hemisphere. Several subcortical structures have been also involved in the etiology of FOG, principally the caudate nucleus and the locomotor centers in the brainstem. Maladaptive neural compensation may present transiently in the presence of acute conflicting motor, cognitive or emotional stimulus processing, thus causing acute network overload and resulting in episodic impairment of stepping. In this review we will summarize the state of the art of neuroimaging research for FOG. We will also discuss the limitations of current approaches and delineate the next steps of neuroimaging research to unravel the pathophysiology of this mysterious motor phenomenon. PMID:25757831

  13. What's new in neuroimaging methods?

    PubMed Central

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid advancement of neuroimaging methodology and availability has transformed neuroscience research. The answers to many questions that we ask about how the brain is organized depend on the quality of data that we are able to obtain about the locations, dynamics, fluctuations, magnitudes, and types of brain activity and structural changes. In this review, an attempt is made to take a snapshot of the cutting edge of a small component of the very rapidly evolving field of neuroimaging. For each area covered, a brief context is provided along with a summary of a few of the current developments and issues. Then, several outstanding papers, published in the past year or so, are described, providing an example of the directions in which each area is progressing. The areas covered include functional MRI (fMRI), voxel based morphometry (VBM), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), optical imaging, and positron emission tomography (PET). More detail is included on fMRI, as subsections include: functional MRI interpretation, new functional MRI contrasts, MRI technology, MRI paradigms and processing, and endogenous oscillations in functional MRI. PMID:19338512

  14. Neuroimaging in repetitive brain trauma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sports-related concussions are one of the major causes of mild traumatic brain injury. Although most patients recover completely within days to weeks, those who experience repetitive brain trauma (RBT) may be at risk for developing a condition known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). While this condition is most commonly observed in athletes who experience repetitive concussive and/or subconcussive blows to the head, such as boxers, football players, or hockey players, CTE may also affect soldiers on active duty. Currently, the only means by which to diagnose CTE is by the presence of phosphorylated tau aggregations post-mortem. Non-invasive neuroimaging, however, may allow early diagnosis as well as improve our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of RBT. The purpose of this article is to review advanced neuroimaging methods used to investigate RBT, including diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, functional magnetic resonance imaging, susceptibility weighted imaging, and positron emission tomography. While there is a considerable literature using these methods in brain injury in general, the focus of this review is on RBT and those subject populations currently known to be susceptible to RBT, namely athletes and soldiers. Further, while direct detection of CTE in vivo has not yet been achieved, all of the methods described in this review provide insight into RBT and will likely lead to a better characterization (diagnosis), in vivo, of CTE than measures of self-report. PMID:25031630

  15. Smoking and Neuroimaging: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Hedy; DeLeone, Cameron M.

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a significant public health concern, often resulting in nicotine dependence, a chronic-relapsing psychiatric diagnosis that is responsible for up to 10% of the global cardiovascular disease burden. Due to its significantly deleterious effects on health, much research has been dedicated to elucidating the underlying neurobiology of smoking. This brief article is intended to provide a digestible synopsis of the considerable research being conducted on the underlying neural bases of cigarette smoking and nicotine dependence, especially for cardiologists who are often at the front lines of treating nicotine dependence. To this end, we first review some of the most common neuroimaging methodologies used in the study of smoking, as well as the most recent findings from this exciting area of research. Then, we focus on several fundamental topics including the acute pharmacological effects, acute neurocognitive effects, and the long-term neurobiological effects associated with smoking. We finally review recent findings regarding the neuropsychological processes associated with smoking cessation, including cue-induced craving and regulation of craving. Research in this field beginning to uncover how some of these neuropsychological processes are similar across clinical disorders which cardiologists also encounter frequently, such as craving for food resulting in overeating. We conclude with recommendations for future neuroimaging work on these topics. PMID:24432182

  16. [Network analyses in neuroimaging studies].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Shigeki; Yamada, Makiko

    2013-06-01

    Neurons are anatomically and physiologically connected to each other, and these connections are involved in various neuronal functions. Multiple important neural networks involved in neurodegenerative diseases can be detected using network analyses in functional neuroimaging. First, the basic methods and theories of voxel-based network analyses, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, and seed-based analysis, are described. Disease- and symptom-specific brain networks have been identified using glucose metabolism images in patients with Parkinson's disease. These networks enable us to objectively evaluate individual patients and serve as diagnostic tools as well as biomarkers for therapeutic interventions. Many functional MRI studies have shown that "hub" brain regions, such as the posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, are deactivated by externally driven cognitive tasks; such brain regions form the "default mode network." Recent studies have shown that this default mode network is disrupted from the preclinical phase of Alzheimer's disease and is associated with amyloid deposition in the brain. Some recent studies have shown that the default mode network is also impaired in Parkinson's disease, whereas other studies have shown inconsistent results. These incongruent results could be due to the heterogeneous pharmacological status, differences in mesocortical dopaminergic impairment status, and concomitant amyloid deposition. Future neuroimaging network analysis studies will reveal novel and interesting findings that will uncover the pathomechanisms of neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:23735528

  17. Neuroimaging and plasticity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Tost, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a frequent and highly heritable brain disorder that typically manifests around or after puberty and has a fluctuating course. Multiple lines of evidence point to a neurodevelopmental origin of the illness and suggest that its (post) pubertal manifestation is related to genetic and environmental risk factors that interfere with the structural and functional reorganization of neural networks at this time. Longitudinal structural neuroimaging studies point to a progressive reduction in gray matter volume in many brain regions in schizophrenia. It has been proposed that these neuroimaging observations reflect an enduring disturbance of experience-dependent synaptic plasticity arising from developmental abnormalities in key neural circuits implicated in schizophrenia, including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampal formation. Recent work has identified genetic variants linked to neural plasticity that are associated with changes in these circuits. Furthermore, non-invasive interventions such as transcranial magnetic stimulation have been shown to impact some of these systems-level intermediate phenotypes, suggesting a modifiability of these core pathophysiological processes of schizophrenia that may be exploited by therapy. PMID:23902983

  18. Clinical use of amyloid-positron emission tomography neuroimaging: Practical and bioethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Witte, Michael M; Foster, Norman L; Fleisher, Adam S; Williams, Monique M; Quaid, Kimberly; Wasserman, Michael; Hunt, Gail; Roberts, J Scott; Rabinovici, Gil D; Levenson, James L; Hake, Ann Marie; Hunter, Craig A; Van Campen, Luann E; Pontecorvo, Michael J; Hochstetler, Helen M; Tabas, Linda B; Trzepacz, Paula T

    2015-09-01

    Until recently, estimation of β-amyloid plaque density as a key element for identifying Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology as the cause of cognitive impairment was only possible at autopsy. Now with amyloid-positron emission tomography (amyloid-PET) neuroimaging, this AD hallmark can be detected antemortem. Practitioners and patients need to better understand potential diagnostic benefits and limitations of amyloid-PET and the complex practical, ethical, and social implications surrounding this new technology. To complement the practical considerations, Eli Lilly and Company sponsored a Bioethics Advisory Board to discuss ethical issues that might arise from clinical use of amyloid-PET neuroimaging with patients being evaluated for causes of cognitive decline. To best address the multifaceted issues associated with amyloid-PET neuroimaging, we recommend this technology be used only by experienced imaging and treating physicians in appropriately selected patients and only in the context of a comprehensive clinical evaluation with adequate explanations before and after the scan. PMID:27239516

  19. Neuroimaging and Genetic Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease and Addiction-Related Degenerative Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Leonardo, Cassandra D.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging offers a powerful means to assess the trajectory of brain degeneration in a variety of disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we describe how multimodal imaging can be used to study the changing brain during the different stages of AD. We integrate findings from a range of studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Neuroimaging reveals how risk genes for degenerative disorders affect the brain, including several recently discovered genetic variants that may disrupt brain connectivity. We review some recent neuroimaging studies of genetic polymorphisms associated with increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD). Some genetic variants that increase risk for drug addiction may overlap with those associated with degenerative brain disorders. These common associations offer new insight into mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and addictive behaviors, and may offer new leads for treating them before severe and irreversible neurological symptoms appear. PMID:24142306

  20. Neuroimaging of Cognitive Load in Instructional Multimedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews research literature on cognitive load measurement in learning and neuroimaging, and describes a mapping between the main elements of cognitive load theory and findings in functional neuroanatomy. It is argued that these findings may lead to the improved measurement of cognitive load using neuroimaging. The paper describes how…

  1. Neuroimaging and Research into Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabourin, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging techniques are becoming not only more and more sophisticated but are also coming to be increasingly accessible to researchers. One thing that one should take note of is the potential of neuroimaging research within second language acquisition (SLA) to contribute to issues pertaining to the plasticity of the adult brain and to general…

  2. CATI: A Large Distributed Infrastructure for the Neuroimaging of Cohorts.

    PubMed

    Operto, Grégory; Chupin, Marie; Batrancourt, Bénédicte; Habert, Marie-Odile; Colliot, Olivier; Benali, Habib; Poupon, Cyril; Champseix, Catherine; Delmaire, Christine; Marie, Sullivan; Rivière, Denis; Pélégrini-Issac, Mélanie; Perlbarg, Vincent; Trebossen, Régine; Bottlaender, Michel; Frouin, Vincent; Grigis, Antoine; Orfanos, Dimitri Papadopoulos; Dary, Hugo; Fillon, Ludovic; Azouani, Chabha; Bouyahia, Ali; Fischer, Clara; Edward, Lydie; Bouin, Mathilde; Thoprakarn, Urielle; Li, Jinpeng; Makkaoui, Leila; Poret, Sylvain; Dufouil, Carole; Bouteloup, Vincent; Chételat, Gaël; Dubois, Bruno; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Mangin, Jean-François; Cointepas, Yann

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of CATI, a platform dedicated to multicenter neuroimaging. Initiated by the French Alzheimer's plan (2008-2012), CATI is a research project called on to provide service to other projects like an industrial partner. Its core mission is to support the neuroimaging of large populations, providing concrete solutions to the increasing complexity involved in such projects by bringing together a service infrastructure, the know-how of its expert academic teams and a large-scale, harmonized network of imaging facilities. CATI aims to make data sharing across studies easier and promotes sharing as much as possible. In the last 4 years, CATI has assisted the clinical community by taking charge of 35 projects so far and has emerged as a recognized actor at the national and international levels. PMID:27066973

  3. Functional neuroimaging of autobiographical memory.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Roberto; St Jacques, Peggy

    2007-05-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies of autobiographical memory have grown dramatically in recent years. These studies are important because they can investigate the neural correlates of processes that are difficult to study using laboratory stimuli, including: (i) complex constructive processes, (ii) recollective qualities of emotion and vividness, and (iii) remote memory retrieval. Constructing autobiographical memories involves search, monitoring and self-referential processes that are associated with activity in separable prefrontal regions. The contributions of emotion and vividness have been linked to the amygdala and visual cortex respectively. Finally, there is evidence that recent and remote autobiographical memories might activate the hippocampus equally, which has implications for memory-consolidation theories. The rapid development of innovative methods for eliciting personal memories in the scanner provides the opportunity to delve into the functional neuroanatomy of our personal past. PMID:17382578

  4. Neuroimaging studies of word reading

    PubMed Central

    Fiez, Julie A.; Petersen, Steven E.

    1998-01-01

    This review discusses how neuroimaging can contribute to our understanding of a fundamental aspect of skilled reading: the ability to pronounce a visually presented word. One contribution of neuroimaging is that it provides a tool for localizing brain regions that are active during word reading. To assess the extent to which similar results are obtained across studies, a quantitative review of nine neuroimaging investigations of word reading was conducted. Across these studies, the results converge to reveal a set of areas active during word reading, including left-lateralized regions in occipital and occipitotemporal cortex, the left frontal operculum, bilateral regions within the cerebellum, primary motor cortex, and the superior and middle temporal cortex, and medial regions in the supplementary motor area and anterior cingulate. Beyond localization, the challenge is to use neuroimaging as a tool for understanding how reading is accomplished. Central to this challenge will be the integration of neuroimaging results with information from other methodologies. To illustrate this point, this review will highlight the importance of spelling-to-sound consistency in the transformation from orthographic (word form) to phonological (word sound) representations, and then explore results from three neuroimaging studies in which the spelling-to-sound consistency of the stimuli was deliberately varied. Emphasis is placed on the pattern of activation observed within the left frontal cortex, because the results provide an example of the issues and benefits involved in relating neuroimaging results to behavioral results in normal and brain damaged subjects, and to theoretical models of reading. PMID:9448259

  5. Visual Attention and the Neuroimage Bias

    PubMed Central

    Baker, D. A.; Schweitzer, N. J.; Risko, Evan F.; Ware, Jillian M.

    2013-01-01

    Several highly-cited experiments have presented evidence suggesting that neuroimages may unduly bias laypeople’s judgments of scientific research. This finding has been especially worrisome to the legal community in which neuroimage techniques may be used to produce evidence of a person’s mental state. However, a more recent body of work that has looked directly at the independent impact of neuroimages on layperson decision-making (both in legal and more general arenas), and has failed to find evidence of bias. To help resolve these conflicting findings, this research uses eye tracking technology to provide a measure of attention to different visual representations of neuroscientific data. Finding an effect of neuroimages on the distribution of attention would provide a potential mechanism for the influence of neuroimages on higher-level decisions. In the present experiment, a sample of laypeople viewed a vignette that briefly described a court case in which the defendant’s actions might have been explained by a neurological defect. Accompanying these vignettes was either an MRI image of the defendant’s brain, or a bar graph depicting levels of brain activity–two competing visualizations that have been the focus of much of the previous research on the neuroimage bias. We found that, while laypeople differentially attended to neuroimagery relative to the bar graph, this did not translate into differential judgments in a way that would support the idea of a neuroimage bias. PMID:24040251

  6. Evolving Evidence for the Value of Neuroimaging Methods and Biological Markers in Subjects Categorized with Subjective Cognitive Decline.

    PubMed

    Lista, Simone; Molinuevo, Jose L; Cavedo, Enrica; Rami, Lorena; Amouyel, Philippe; Teipel, Stefan J; Garaci, Francesco; Toschi, Nicola; Habert, Marie-Odile; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; O'Bryant, Sid E; Johnson, Leigh; Galluzzi, Samantha; Bokde, Arun L W; Broich, Karl; Herholz, Karl; Bakardjian, Hovagim; Dubois, Bruno; Jessen, Frank; Carrillo, Maria C; Aisen, Paul S; Hampel, Harald

    2015-09-24

    There is evolving evidence that individuals categorized with subjective cognitive decline (SCD) are potentially at higher risk for developing objective and progressive cognitive impairment compared to cognitively healthy individuals without apparent subjective complaints. Interestingly, SCD, during advancing preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD), may denote very early, subtle cognitive decline that cannot be identified using established standardized tests of cognitive performance. The substantial heterogeneity of existing SCD-related research data has led the Subjective Cognitive Decline Initiative (SCD-I) to accomplish an international consensus on the definition of a conceptual research framework on SCD in preclinical AD. In the area of biological markers, the cerebrospinal fluid signature of AD has been reported to be more prevalent in subjects with SCD compared to healthy controls; moreover, there is a pronounced atrophy, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging, and an increased hypometabolism, as revealed by positron emission tomography, in characteristic brain regions affected by AD. In addition, SCD individuals carrying an apolipoprotein ɛ4 allele are more likely to display AD-phenotypic alterations. The urgent requirement to detect and diagnose AD as early as possible has led to the critical examination of the diagnostic power of biological markers, neurophysiology, and neuroimaging methods for AD-related risk and clinical progression in individuals defined with SCD. Observational studies on the predictive value of SCD for developing AD may potentially be of practical value, and an evidence-based, validated, qualified, and fully operationalized concept may inform clinical diagnostic practice and guide earlier designs in future therapy trials. PMID:26402088

  7. Defining the neurocircuitry of borderline personality disorder: functional neuroimaging approaches.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Gary R; Stern, Emily; Silbersweig, David A

    2005-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging recently has been used to localize brain dysfunction in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Initial studies have examined baseline activity or emotional reactivity, and our group has investigated what we consider to be a crucial interaction between negative emotion and behavioral (dys)control. This research is beginning to identify abnormal frontolimbic circuitry likely underlying core clinical features of this condition. We review the evidence for dysfunction in specific frontolimbic regions, leading to a mechanistic model of symptom formation in BPD. In addition, we offer an integration of these neuroimaging findings with developmental perspectives on the emergence of borderline psychopathology, focusing on the ways in which early psychosocial experience may interact with developing brain systems. We also consider possible mechanisms of psychotherapeutic change at the neural systems level in BPD. Finally, we propose that future neuroimaging studies of BPD should integrate multiple levels of observation (structural, functional, neurochemical, genetic, and clinical) in a model-driven fashion to further understand the dynamic relationship between biological and psychological factors in the development and treatment of this difficult condition. PMID:16613437

  8. Visual Systems for Interactive Exploration and Mining of Large-Scale Neuroimaging Data Archives

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Van Horn, John D.

    2012-01-01

    While technological advancements in neuroimaging scanner engineering have improved the efficiency of data acquisition, electronic data capture methods will likewise significantly expedite the populating of large-scale neuroimaging databases. As they do and these archives grow in size, a particular challenge lies in examining and interacting with the information that these resources contain through the development of compelling, user-driven approaches for data exploration and mining. In this article, we introduce the informatics visualization for neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework for the graphical rendering of, and dynamic interaction with the contents of large-scale neuroimaging data sets. We describe the rationale behind INVIZIAN, detail its development, and demonstrate its usage in examining a collection of over 900 T1-anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image volumes from across a diverse set of clinical neuroimaging studies drawn from a leading neuroimaging database. Using a collection of cortical surface metrics and means for examining brain similarity, INVIZIAN graphically displays brain surfaces as points in a coordinate space and enables classification of clusters of neuroanatomically similar MRI images and data mining. As an initial step toward addressing the need for such user-friendly tools, INVIZIAN provides a highly unique means to interact with large quantities of electronic brain imaging archives in ways suitable for hypothesis generation and data mining. PMID:22536181

  9. Biochemical and neuroimaging studies in subjective cognitive decline: progress and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Yang, Fu-Chi; Lin, Ching-Po; Han, Ying

    2015-10-01

    Neurodegeneration due to Alzheimer's disease (AD) can progress over decades before dementia becomes apparent. Indeed, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) already demonstrate significant lesion loads. In most cases, MCI is preceded by subjective cognitive decline (SCD), which is applied to individuals who have self-reported memory-related complaints and has been associated with a higher risk of future cognitive decline and conversion to dementia. Based on the schema of a well-received model of biomarker dynamics in AD pathogenesis, it has been postulated that SCD symptoms may result from compensatory changes in response to β-amyloid accumulation and neurodegeneration. Although SCD is considered a prodromal stage of MCI, it is also a common manifestation in old age, independent of AD, and the predictive value of SCD for AD pathology remains controversial. Here, we provide a review focused on the contributions of cross-sectional and longitudinal analogical studies of biomarkers and neuroimaging evidence in disentangling under what conditions SCD may be attributable to AD pathology. In conclusion, there is promising evidence indicating that clinicians should be able to differentiate pre-AD SCD based on the presence of pathophysiological biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuroimaging. However, this neuroimaging approach is still at an immature stage without an established rubric of standards. A substantial amount of work remains in terms of replicating recent findings and validating the clinical utility of identifying SCD. PMID:25864576

  10. Ethics of neuroimaging after serious brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient outcome after serious brain injury is highly variable. Following a period of coma, some patients recover while others progress into a vegetative state (unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) or minimally conscious state. In both cases, assessment is difficult and misdiagnosis may be as high as 43%. Recent advances in neuroimaging suggest a solution. Both functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography have been used to detect residual cognitive function in vegetative and minimally conscious patients. Neuroimaging may improve diagnosis and prognostication. These techniques are beginning to be applied to comatose patients soon after injury. Evidence of preserved cognitive function may predict recovery, and this information would help families and health providers. Complex ethical issues arise due to the vulnerability of patients and families, difficulties interpreting negative results, restriction of communication to “yes” or “no” answers, and cost. We seek to investigate ethical issues in the use of neuroimaging in behaviorally nonresponsive patients who have suffered serious brain injury. The objectives of this research are to: (1) create an approach to capacity assessment using neuroimaging; (2) develop an ethics of welfare framework to guide considerations of quality of life; (3) explore the impact of neuroimaging on families; and, (4) analyze the ethics of the use of neuroimaging in comatose patients. Methods/Design Our research program encompasses four projects and uses a mixed methods approach. Project 1 asks whether decision making capacity can be assessed in behaviorally nonresponsive patients. We will specify cognitive functions required for capacity and detail their assessment. Further, we will develop and pilot a series of scenarios and questions suitable for assessing capacity. Project 2 examines the ethics of welfare as a guide for neuroimaging. It grounds an obligation to explore patients’ interests, and we

  11. Developments in functional neuroimaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Aine, C.J.

    1995-03-01

    A recent review of neuroimaging techniques indicates that new developments have primarily occurred in the area of data acquisition hardware/software technology. For example, new pulse sequences on standard clinical imagers and high-powered, rapidly oscillating magnetic field gradients used in echo planar imaging (EPI) have advanced MRI into the functional imaging arena. Significant developments in tomograph design have also been achieved for monitoring the distribution of positron-emitting radioactive tracers in the body (PET). Detector sizes, which pose a limit on spatial resolution, have become smaller (e.g., 3--5 mm wide) and a new emphasis on volumetric imaging has emerged which affords greater sensitivity for determining locations of positron annihilations and permits smaller doses to be utilized. Electromagnetic techniques have also witnessed growth in the ability to acquire data from the whole head simultaneously. EEG techniques have increased their electrode coverage (e.g., 128 channels rather than 16 or 32) and new whole-head systems are now in use for MEG. But the real challenge now is in the design and implementation of more sophisticated analyses to effectively handle the tremendous amount of physiological/anatomical data that can be acquired. Furthermore, such analyses will be necessary for integrating data across techniques in order to provide a truly comprehensive understanding of the functional organization of the human brain.

  12. Alzheimer's Disease Cerebrospinal Fluid and Neuroimaging Biomarkers: Diagnostic Accuracy and Relationship to Drug Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tapan K; Alkon, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Widely researched Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers include in vivo brain imaging with PET and MRI, imaging of amyloid plaques, and biochemical assays of Aβ 1 - 42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau (p-tau-181) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In this review, we critically evaluate these biomarkers and discuss their clinical utility for the differential diagnosis of AD. Current AD biomarker tests are either highly invasive (requiring CSF collection) or expensive and labor-intensive (neuroimaging), making them unsuitable for use in the primary care, clinical office-based setting, or to assess drug efficacy in clinical trials. In addition, CSF and neuroimaging biomarkers continue to face challenges in achieving required sensitivity and specificity and minimizing center-to-center variability (for CSF-Aβ 1 - 42 biomarkers CV = 26.5% ; http://www.alzforum.org/news/conference-coverage/paris-standardization-hurdle-spinal-fluid-imaging-markers). Although potentially useful for selecting patient populations for inclusion in AD clinical trials, the utility of CSF biomarkers and neuroimaging techniques as surrogate endpoints of drug efficacy needs to be validated. Recent trials of β- and γ-secretase inhibitors and Aβ immunization-based therapies in AD showed no significant cognitive improvements, despite changes in CSF and neuroimaging biomarkers. As we learn more about the dysfunctional cellular and molecular signaling processes that occur in AD, and how these processes are manifested in tissues outside of the brain, new peripheral biomarkers may also be validated as non-invasive tests to diagnose preclinical and clinical AD. PMID:26402622

  13. Molecular neuroimaging in degenerative dementias.

    PubMed

    Jiménez Bonilla, J F; Carril Carril, J M

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the limitations of structural imaging, brain perfusion and metabolism using SPECT and PET have provided relevant information for the study of cognitive decline. The introduction of the radiotracers for cerebral amyloid imaging has changed the diagnostic strategy regarding Alzheimer's disease, which is currently considered to be a "continuum." According to this new paradigm, the increasing amyloid load would be associated to the preclinical phase and mild cognitive impairment. It has been possible to observe "in vivo" images using 11C-PIB and PET scans. The characteristics of the 11C-PIB image include specific high brain cortical area retention in the positive cases with typical distribution pattern and no retention in the negative cases. This, in combination with 18F-FDG PET, is the basis of molecular neuroimaging as a biomarker. At present, its prognostic value is being evaluated in longitudinal studies. 11C-PIB-PET has become the reference radiotracer to evaluate the presence of cerebral amyloid. However, its availability is limited due to the need for a nearby cyclotron. Therefore, 18F labeled radiotracers are being introduced. Our experience in the last two years with 11C-PIB, first in the research phase and then as being clinically applied, has shown the utility of the technique in the clinical field, either alone or in combination with FDG. Thus, amyloid image is a useful tool for the differential diagnosis of dementia and it is a potentially useful method for early diagnosis and evaluation of future treatments. PMID:23933381

  14. Graphical Neuroimaging Informatics: Application to Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Greer, Vaughan

    2013-01-01

    The Informatics Visualization for Neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework allows one to graphically display image and meta-data information from sizeable collections of neuroimaging data as a whole using a dynamic and compelling user interface. Users can fluidly interact with an entire collection of cortical surfaces using only their mouse. In addition, users can cluster and group brains according in multiple ways for subsequent comparison using graphical data mining tools. In this article, we illustrate the utility of INVIZIAN for simultaneous exploration and mining a large collection of extracted cortical surface data arising in clinical neuroimaging studies of patients with Alzheimer’s Disease, mild cognitive impairment, as well as healthy control subjects. Alzheimer’s Disease is particularly interesting due to the wide-spread effects on cortical architecture and alterations of volume in specific brain areas associated with memory. We demonstrate INVIZIAN’s ability to render multiple brain surfaces from multiple diagnostic groups of subjects, showcase the interactivity of the system, and showcase how INVIZIAN can be employed to generate hypotheses about the collection of data which would be suitable for direct access to the underlying raw data and subsequent formal statistical analysis. Specifically, we use INVIZIAN show how cortical thickness and hippocampal volume differences between group are evident even in the absence of more formal hypothesis testing. In the context of neurological diseases linked to brain aging such as AD, INVIZIAN provides a unique means for considering the entirety of whole brain datasets, look for interesting relationships among them, and thereby derive new ideas for further research and study. PMID:24203652

  15. Miniaturized optical neuroimaging in unrestrained animals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hang; Senarathna, Janaka; Tyler, Betty M; Thakor, Nitish V; Pathak, Arvind P

    2015-06-01

    The confluence of technological advances in optics, miniaturized electronic components and the availability of ever increasing and affordable computational power have ushered in a new era in functional neuroimaging, namely, an era in which neuroimaging of cortical function in unrestrained and unanesthetized rodents has become a reality. Traditional optical neuroimaging required animals to be anesthetized and restrained. This greatly limited the kinds of experiments that could be performed in vivo. Now one can assess blood flow and oxygenation changes resulting from functional activity and image functional response in disease models such as stroke and seizure, and even conduct long-term imaging of tumor physiology, all without the confounding effects of anesthetics or animal restraints. These advances are shedding new light on mammalian brain organization and function, and helping to elucidate loss of this organization or 'dysfunction' in a wide array of central nervous system disease models. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the fabrication, characterization and application of miniaturized head-mounted optical neuroimaging systems pioneered by innovative investigators from a wide array of disciplines. We broadly classify these systems into those based on exogenous contrast agents, such as single- and two-photon microscopy systems; and those based on endogenous contrast mechanisms, such as multispectral or laser speckle contrast imaging systems. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches along with a perspective on the future of this exciting new frontier in neuroimaging. PMID:25791782

  16. Integration of Network Topological and Connectivity Properties for Neuroimaging Classification

    PubMed Central

    Jie, Biao; Gao, Wei; Wang, Qian; Wee, Chong-Yaw

    2014-01-01

    Rapid advances in neuroimaging techniques have provided an efficient and noninvasive way for exploring the structural and functional connectivity of the human brain. Quantitative measurement of abnormality of brain connectivity in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), have also been widely reported, especially at a group level. Recently, machine learning techniques have been applied to the study of AD and MCI, i.e., to identify the individuals with AD/MCI from the healthy controls (HCs). However, most existing methods focus on using only a single property of a connectivity network, although multiple network properties, such as local connectivity and global topological properties, can potentially be used. In this paper, by employing multikernel based approach, we propose a novel connectivity based framework to integrate multiple properties of connectivity network for improving the classification performance. Specifically, two different types of kernels (i.e., vector-based kernel and graph kernel) are used to quantify two different yet complementary properties of the network, i.e., local connectivity and global topological properties. Then, multikernel learning (MKL) technique is adopted to fuse these heterogeneous kernels for neuroimaging classification. We test the performance of our proposed method on two different data sets. First, we test it on the functional connectivity networks of 12 MCI and 25 HC subjects. The results show that our method achieves significant performance improvement over those using only one type of network property. Specifically, our method achieves a classification accuracy of 91.9%, which is 10.8% better than those by single network-property-based methods. Then, we test our method for gender classification on a large set of functional connectivity networks with 133 infants scanned at birth, 1 year, and 2 years, also demonstrating very promising results. PMID

  17. A System for Addressing Incidental Findings in Neuroimaging Research

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Steven C.; Wu, Jennifer; Hanson, Joseph A.; Nouri, Sarvenaz; Karnani, Diraj; Chuang, Tony M.; Le, Vu

    2011-01-01

    When healthy subjects undergo brain imaging, incidental findings are not rare. The optimal response to such findings has been the focus of considerable discussion. The current report describes the operations and results of a system that provides review of incidental findings by an appropriate medical professional. A web-based system was created whereby investigators performing brain MRI scans on healthy subjects could refer images with suspected concerns to a board certified radiologist who had a Certificate of Added Qualification in Neuroradiology. The specific details of this system are described. Among 27 scans suspected by an investigator of having a significant finding, all but one were referred by a researcher with a PhD. The most common concerns described by these investigators were for the possible presence of a cyst or of enlarged ventricles. The most common findings reported by the radiologist were Virchow-Robin spaces and cysts. Findings were generally of low clinical significance, with 1 major exception. Identifying the optimal response to incidental findings in neuroimaging research remains a challenge. The current report describes a system for providing expert assistance and so addresses these issues in the setting of suspected incidental findings. To our knowledge the current system is the first to provide a specific means for evaluation of incidental findings in neuroimaging research. PMID:21224007

  18. Methodological Approaches in Developmental Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Beatriz; Velanova, Katerina; Geier, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric neuroimaging is increasingly providing insights into the neural basis of cognitive development. Indeed, we have now arrived at a stage where we can begin to identify optimal methodological and statistical approaches to the acquisition and analysis of developmental imaging data. In this article, we describe a number of these approaches and how their selection impacts the ability to examine and interpret developmental effects. We describe preferred approaches to task selection, definition of age groups, selection of fMRI designs, definition of regions of interest (ROI), optimal baseline measures, and treatment of timecourse data. Consideration of these aspects of developmental neuroimaging reveals that unlike single-group neuroimaging studies, developmental studies pose unique challenges that impact study planning, task design, data analysis, and the interpretation of findings. PMID:20496377

  19. Neuroimaging Coordination Dynamics in the Sport Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Jantzen, Kelly J.; Oullier, Olivier; Kelso, J.A. Scott

    2008-01-01

    Key methodological issues for designing, analyzing, and interpreting neuroimaging experiments are presented from the perspective of the framework of Coordination Dynamics. To this end, a brief overview of Coordination Dynamics is introduced, including the main concepts of control parameters and collective variables, theoretical modeling, novel experimental paradigms, and cardinal empirical findings. Basic conceptual and methodological issues for the design and implementation of coordination experiments in the context of neuroimaging are discussed. The paper concludes with a presentation of neuroimaging findings central to understanding the neural basis of coordination and addresses their relevance for the sport sciences. The latter include but are not restricted to learning and practice-related issues, the role of mental imagery, and the recovery of function following brain injury. PMID:18602998

  20. Associations between Verbal Learning Slope and Neuroimaging Markers across the Cognitive Aging Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Katherine A; Phillips, Jeffrey S; Samuels, Lauren R; Lane, Elizabeth M; Bell, Susan P; Liu, Dandan; Hohman, Timothy J; Romano, Raymond R; Fritzsche, Laura R; Lu, Zengqi; Jefferson, Angela L

    2015-07-01

    A symptom of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a flat learning profile. Learning slope calculation methods vary, and the optimal method for capturing neuroanatomical changes associated with MCI and early AD pathology is unclear. This study cross-sectionally compared four different learning slope measures from the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (simple slope, regression-based slope, two-slope method, peak slope) to structural neuroimaging markers of early AD neurodegeneration (hippocampal volume, cortical thickness in parahippocampal gyrus, precuneus, and lateral prefrontal cortex) across the cognitive aging spectrum [normal control (NC); (n=198; age=76±5), MCI (n=370; age=75±7), and AD (n=171; age=76±7)] in ADNI. Within diagnostic group, general linear models related slope methods individually to neuroimaging variables, adjusting for age, sex, education, and APOE4 status. Among MCI, better learning performance on simple slope, regression-based slope, and late slope (Trial 2-5) from the two-slope method related to larger parahippocampal thickness (all p-values<.01) and hippocampal volume (p<.01). Better regression-based slope (p<.01) and late slope (p<.01) were related to larger ventrolateral prefrontal cortex in MCI. No significant associations emerged between any slope and neuroimaging variables for NC (p-values ≥.05) or AD (p-values ≥.02). Better learning performances related to larger medial temporal lobe (i.e., hippocampal volume, parahippocampal gyrus thickness) and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex in MCI only. Regression-based and late slope were most highly correlated with neuroimaging markers and explained more variance above and beyond other common memory indices, such as total learning. Simple slope may offer an acceptable alternative given its ease of calculation. PMID:26219209

  1. Sparse learning and stability selection for predicting MCI to AD conversion using baseline ADNI data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) are at high risk of progression to Alzheimer’s dementia. Identifying MCI individuals with high likelihood of conversion to dementia and the associated biosignatures has recently received increasing attention in AD research. Different biosignatures for AD (neuroimaging, demographic, genetic and cognitive measures) may contain complementary information for diagnosis and prognosis of AD. Methods We have conducted a comprehensive study using a large number of samples from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) to test the power of integrating various baseline data for predicting the conversion from MCI to probable AD and identifying a small subset of biosignatures for the prediction and assess the relative importance of different modalities in predicting MCI to AD conversion. We have employed sparse logistic regression with stability selection for the integration and selection of potential predictors. Our study differs from many of the other ones in three important respects: (1) we use a large cohort of MCI samples that are unbiased with respect to age or education status between case and controls (2) we integrate and test various types of baseline data available in ADNI including MRI, demographic, genetic and cognitive measures and (3) we apply sparse logistic regression with stability selection to ADNI data for robust feature selection. Results We have used 319 MCI subjects from ADNI that had MRI measurements at the baseline and passed quality control, including 177 MCI Non-converters and 142 MCI Converters. Conversion was considered over the course of a 4-year follow-up period. A combination of 15 features (predictors) including those from MRI scans, APOE genotyping, and cognitive measures achieves the best prediction with an AUC score of 0.8587. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the power of integrating various baseline data for prediction of the conversion from MCI to probable AD. Our

  2. Value Added?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UCLA IDEA, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Value added measures (VAM) uses changes in student test scores to determine how much "value" an individual teacher has "added" to student growth during the school year. Some policymakers, school districts, and educational advocates have applauded VAM as a straightforward measure of teacher effectiveness: the better a teacher, the better students…

  3. Neuroimaging of Central Sensitivity Syndromes: Key Insights from the Scientific Literature.

    PubMed

    Walitt, Brian; Ceko, Marta; Gracely, John L; Gracely, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes are characterized by distressing symptoms, such as pain and fatigue, in the absence of clinically obvious pathology. The scientific underpinnings of these disorders are not currently known. Modern neuroimaging techniques promise new insights into mechanisms mediating these postulated syndromes. We review the results of neuroimaging applied to five central sensitivity syndromes: fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular joint disorder, and vulvodynia syndrome. Neuroimaging studies of basal metabolism, anatomic constitution, molecular constituents, evoked neural activity, and treatment effect are compared across all of these syndromes. Evoked sensory paradigms reveal sensory augmentation to both painful and nonpainful stimulation. This is a transformative observation for these syndromes, which were historically considered to be completely of hysterical or feigned in origin. However, whether sensory augmentation represents the cause of these syndromes, a predisposing factor, an endophenotype, or an epiphenomenon cannot be discerned from the current literature. Further, the result from cross-sectional neuroimaging studies of basal activity, anatomy, and molecular constituency are extremely heterogeneous within and between the syndromes. A defining neuroimaging "signature" cannot be discerned for any of the particular syndromes or for an over-arching central sensitization mechanism common to all of the syndromes. Several issues confound initial attempts to meaningfully measure treatment effects in these syndromes. At this time, the existence of "central sensitivity syndromes" is based more soundly on clinical and epidemiological evidence. A coherent picture of a "central sensitization" mechanism that bridges across all of these syndromes does not emerge from the existing scientific evidence. PMID:26717948

  4. Neuroimaging in childhood headache: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, George A; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2013-07-01

    Headache is a common complaint in children, one that gives rise to considerable parental concern and fear of the presence of a space-occupying lesion. The evaluation and diagnosis of headache is very challenging for paediatricians, and neuroimaging by means of CT or MRI is often requested as part of the investigation. CT exposes children to radiation, while MRI is costly and sometimes requires sedation or general anaesthesia, especially in children younger than 6 years. This review of the literature on the value of neuroimaging in children with headache showed that the rate of pathological findings is generally low. Imaging findings that led to a change in patient management were in almost all cases reported in children with abnormal signs on neurological examination. Neuroimaging should be limited to children with a suspicious clinical history, abnormal neurological findings or other physical signs suggestive of intracranial pathology. Well-designed prospective studies are needed to better define the clinical findings that warrant neuroimaging in children with headache. PMID:23700196

  5. Functional neuroimaging: technical, logical, and social perspectives.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Geoffrey K

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscientists have long sought to study the dynamic activity of the human brain-what's happening in the brain, that is, while people are thinking, feeling, and acting. Ideally, an inside look at brain function would simultaneously and continuously measure the biochemical state of every cell in the central nervous system. While such a miraculous method is science fiction, a century of progress in neuroimaging technologies has made such simultaneous and continuous measurement a plausible fiction. Despite this progress, practitioners of modern neuroimaging struggle with two kinds of limitations: those that attend the particular neuroimaging methods we have today and those that would limit any method of imaging neural activity, no matter how powerful. In this essay, I consider the liabilities and potential of techniques that measure human brain activity. I am concerned here only with methods that measure relevant physiologic states of the central nervous system and relate those measures to particular mental states. I will consider in particular the preeminent method of functional neuroimaging: BOLD fMRI. While there are several practical limits on the biological information that current technologies can measure, these limits-as important as they are-are minor in comparison to the fundamental logical restraints on the conclusions that can be drawn from brain imaging studies. PMID:24634086

  6. Neuroimaging resilience to stress: a review

    PubMed Central

    van der Werff, S. J. A.; van den Berg, S. M.; Pannekoek, J. N.; Elzinga, B. M.; van der Wee, N. J. A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a high degree of intra-individual variation in how individuals respond to stress. This becomes evident when exploring the development of posttraumatic symptoms or stress-related disorders after exposure to trauma. Whether or not an individual develops posttraumatic symptoms after experiencing a traumatic event is partly dependent on a person's resilience. Resilience can be broadly defined as the dynamic process encompassing positive adaptation within the context of significant adversity. Even though research into the neurobiological basis of resilience is still in its early stages, these insights can have important implications for the prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders. Neuroimaging studies contribute to our knowledge of intra-individual variability in resilience and the development of posttraumatic symptoms or other stress-related disorders. This review provides an overview of neuroimaging findings related to resilience. Structural, resting-state, and task-related neuroimaging results associated with resilience are discussed. There are a limited number of studies available and neuroimaging research of resilience is still in its infancy. The available studies point at brain circuitries involved in stress and emotion regulation, with more efficient processing and regulation associated with resilience. PMID:23675330

  7. Functional Neuroimaging Studies of Written Sentence Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, David

    2004-01-01

    Sentences convey relationships between the meanings of words, such as who is accomplishing an action or receiving it. Functional neuroimaging based on positron-emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging has been used to identify areas of the brain involved in structuring sentences and determining aspects of meaning associated…

  8. Neuroimaging studies of social cognition in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hironobu; Yassin, Walid; Murai, Toshiya

    2015-05-01

    Impaired social cognition is considered a core contributor to unfavorable psychosocial functioning in schizophrenia. Rather than being a unitary process, social cognition is a collection of multifaceted processes that recruit multiple brain structures, thus structural and functional neuroimaging techniques are ideal methodologies for revealing the underlying pathophysiology of impaired social cognition. Many neuroimaging studies have suggested that in addition to white-matter deficits, schizophrenia is associated with decreased gray-matter volume in multiple brain areas, especially fronto-temporal and limbic regions. However, few schizophrenia studies have examined associations between brain abnormalities and social cognitive disabilities. During the last decade, we have investigated structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, and our findings have been confirmed by us and others. By assessing different types of social cognitive abilities, structural abnormalities in multiple brain regions have been found to be associated with disabilities in social cognition, such as recognition of facial emotion, theory of mind, and empathy. These structural deficits have also been associated with alexithymia and quality of life in ways that are closely related to the social cognitive disabilities found in schizophrenia. Here, we overview a series of neuroimaging studies from our laboratory that exemplify current research into this topic, and discuss how it can be further tackled using recent advances in neuroimaging technology. PMID:25418865

  9. Neuromarketing: the hope and hype of neuroimaging in business.

    PubMed

    Ariely, Dan; Berns, Gregory S

    2010-04-01

    The application of neuroimaging methods to product marketing - neuromarketing - has recently gained considerable popularity. We propose that there are two main reasons for this trend. First, the possibility that neuroimaging will become cheaper and faster than other marketing methods; and second, the hope that neuroimaging will provide marketers with information that is not obtainable through conventional marketing methods. Although neuroimaging is unlikely to be cheaper than other tools in the near future, there is growing evidence that it may provide hidden information about the consumer experience. The most promising application of neuroimaging methods to marketing may come before a product is even released - when it is just an idea being developed. PMID:20197790

  10. Neuroimaging biomarkers for early drug development in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tregellas, Jason R

    2014-07-15

    Given the relative inability of currently available antipsychotic treatments to adequately provide sustained recovery and improve quality of life for patients with schizophrenia, new treatment strategies are urgently needed. One way to improve the therapeutic development process may be an increased use of biomarkers in early clinical trials. Reliable biomarkers that reflect aspects of disease pathophysiology can be used to determine if potential treatment strategies are engaging their desired biological targets. This review evaluates three potential neuroimaging biomarkers: hippocampal hyperactivity, gamma-band deficits, and default network abnormalities. These deficits have been widely replicated in the illness, correlate with measures of positive symptoms, are consistent with models of disease pathology, and have shown initial promise as biomarkers of biological response in early studies of potential treatment strategies. Two key features of these deficits, and a guiding rationale for the focus of this review, are that the deficits are not dependent upon patients' performance of specific cognitive tasks and they have analogues in animal models of schizophrenia, greatly increasing their appeal for use as biomarkers. Using neuroimaging biomarkers such as those proposed here to establish early in the therapeutic development process if treatment strategies are having their intended biological effect in humans may facilitate development of new treatments for schizophrenia. PMID:24094513

  11. Neuroimaging Biomarkers for Early Drug Development in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tregellas, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    Given the relative inability of currently available antipsychotic treatments to adequately provide sustained recovery and improve quality of life for patients with schizophrenia, new treatment strategies are urgently needed. One way to improve the therapeutic development process may be an increased use of biomarkers in early clinical trials. Reliable biomarkers that reflect aspects of disease pathophysiology can be used to determine if potential treatment strategies are engaging their desired biological targets. This review evaluates three potential neuroimaging biomarkers: hippocampal hyperactivity, gamma-band deficits and default network abnormalities. These deficits have been widely replicated in the illness, correlate with measures of positive symptoms, are consistent with models of disease pathology, and have shown initial promise as biomarkers of biological response in early studies of potential treatment strategies. Two key features of these deficits, and a guiding rational for the focus of this review, is that the deficits are not dependent upon patients' performance of specific cognitive tasks, and have analogues in animal models of schizophrenia, greatly increasing their appeal for use as biomarkers. Using neuroimaging biomarkers such as those proposed here to establish early in the therapeutic development process if treatment strategies are having their intended biological effect in humans may facilitate development of new treatments for schizophrenia. PMID:24094513

  12. MULTI-SOURCE FEATURE LEARNING FOR JOINT ANALYSIS OF INCOMPLETE MULTIPLE HETEROGENEOUS NEUROIMAGING DATA

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lei; Wang, Yalin; Thompson, Paul M.; Narayan, Vaibhav A.; Ye, Jieping

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of incomplete data is a big challenge when integrating large-scale brain imaging datasets from different imaging modalities. In the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), for example, over half of the subjects lack cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) measurements; an independent half of the subjects do not have fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans; many lack proteomics measurements. Traditionally, subjects with missing measures are discarded, resulting in a severe loss of available information. In this paper, we address this problem by proposing an incomplete Multi-Source Feature (iMSF) learning method where all the samples (with at least one available data source) can be used. To illustrate the proposed approach, we classify patients from the ADNI study into groups with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and normal controls, based on the multi-modality data. At baseline, ADNI’s 780 participants (172 AD, 397 MCI, 211 NC), have at least one of four data types: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), FDG-PET, CSF and proteomics. These data are used to test our algorithm. Depending on the problem being solved, we divide our samples according to the availability of data sources, and we learn shared sets of features with state-of-the-art sparse learning methods. To build a practical and robust system, we construct a classifier ensemble by combining our method with four other methods for missing value estimation. Comprehensive experiments with various parameters show that our proposed iMSF method and the ensemble model yield stable and promising results. PMID:22498655

  13. Adding Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsini, Larry L.; Hudack, Lawrence R.; Zekan, Donald L.

    1999-01-01

    The value-added statement (VAS), relatively unknown in the United States, is used in financial reports by many European companies. Saint Bonaventure University (New York) has adapted a VAS to make it appropriate for not-for-profit universities by identifying stakeholder groups (students, faculty, administrators/support personnel, creditors, the…

  14. Deep learning for neuroimaging: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Plis, Sergey M; Hjelm, Devon R; Salakhutdinov, Ruslan; Allen, Elena A; Bockholt, Henry J; Long, Jeffrey D; Johnson, Hans J; Paulsen, Jane S; Turner, Jessica A; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-01-01

    Deep learning methods have recently made notable advances in the tasks of classification and representation learning. These tasks are important for brain imaging and neuroscience discovery, making the methods attractive for porting to a neuroimager's toolbox. Success of these methods is, in part, explained by the flexibility of deep learning models. However, this flexibility makes the process of porting to new areas a difficult parameter optimization problem. In this work we demonstrate our results (and feasible parameter ranges) in application of deep learning methods to structural and functional brain imaging data. These methods include deep belief networks and their building block the restricted Boltzmann machine. We also describe a novel constraint-based approach to visualizing high dimensional data. We use it to analyze the effect of parameter choices on data transformations. Our results show that deep learning methods are able to learn physiologically important representations and detect latent relations in neuroimaging data. PMID:25191215

  15. Deep learning for neuroimaging: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Plis, Sergey M.; Hjelm, Devon R.; Salakhutdinov, Ruslan; Allen, Elena A.; Bockholt, Henry J.; Long, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Hans J.; Paulsen, Jane S.; Turner, Jessica A.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2014-01-01

    Deep learning methods have recently made notable advances in the tasks of classification and representation learning. These tasks are important for brain imaging and neuroscience discovery, making the methods attractive for porting to a neuroimager's toolbox. Success of these methods is, in part, explained by the flexibility of deep learning models. However, this flexibility makes the process of porting to new areas a difficult parameter optimization problem. In this work we demonstrate our results (and feasible parameter ranges) in application of deep learning methods to structural and functional brain imaging data. These methods include deep belief networks and their building block the restricted Boltzmann machine. We also describe a novel constraint-based approach to visualizing high dimensional data. We use it to analyze the effect of parameter choices on data transformations. Our results show that deep learning methods are able to learn physiologically important representations and detect latent relations in neuroimaging data. PMID:25191215

  16. Neuroimaging distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders†

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, Nicolas A.; Scott, Jessica; Ellison-Wright, Ian; Mechelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unclear to what extent the traditional distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders reflects biological differences. Aims To examine neuroimaging evidence for the distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders. Method We performed an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis on voxel-based morphometry studies reporting decreased grey matter in 14 neurological and 10 psychiatric disorders, and compared the regional and network-level alterations for these two classes of disease. In addition, we estimated neuroanatomical heterogeneity within and between the two classes. Results Basal ganglia, insula, sensorimotor and temporal cortex showed greater impairment in neurological disorders; whereas cingulate, medial frontal, superior frontal and occipital cortex showed greater impairment in psychiatric disorders. The two classes of disorders affected distinct functional networks. Similarity within classes was higher than between classes; furthermore, similarity within class was higher for neurological than psychiatric disorders. Conclusions From a neuroimaging perspective, neurological and psychiatric disorders represent two distinct classes of disorders. PMID:26045351

  17. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Recent Neuroimaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Moore, Eileen M; Migliorini, Robyn; Infante, M Alejandra; Riley, Edward P

    2014-09-01

    Since the identification of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome over 40 years ago, much has been learned about the detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing brain. This review highlights recent neuroimaging studies, within the context of previous work. Structural magnetic resonance imaging has described morphological differences in the brain and their relationships to cognitive deficits and measures of facial dysmorphology. Diffusion tensor imaging has elaborated on the relationship between white matter microstructure and behavior. Atypical neuromaturation across childhood and adolescence has been observed in longitudinal neuroimaging studies. Functional imaging has revealed differences in neural activation patterns underlying sensory processing, cognition and behavioral deficits. A recent functional connectivity analysis demonstrates reductions in global network efficiency. Despite this progress much remains unknown about the impact of prenatal alcohol exposure on the brain, and continued research efforts are essential. PMID:25346882

  18. Neuroimaging in human MDMA (Ecstasy) users.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Ronald L; Roberts, Deanne M; Joers, James M

    2008-10-01

    MDMA (3,4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine) has been used by millions of people worldwide as a recreational drug. The terms "MDMA" and "Ecstasy" are often used synonymously, but it is important to note that the purity of Ecstasy sold as MDMA is not certain. MDMA use is of public health concern, not so much because MDMA produces a common or severe dependence syndrome, but rather because rodent and nonhuman primate studies have indicated that MDMA (when administered at certain dosages and intervals) can cause long-lasting reductions in markers of brain serotonin (5-HT) that appear specific to fine-diameter axons arising largely from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR). Given the popularity of MDMA, the potential for the drug to produce long-lasting or permanent 5-HT axon damage or loss, and the widespread role of 5-HT function in the brain, there is a great need for a better understanding of brain function in human users of this drug. To this end, neuropsychological, neuroendocrine, and neuroimaging studies have all suggested that human MDMA users may have long-lasting changes in brain function consistent with 5-HT toxicity. Data from animal models leads to testable hypotheses regarding MDMA's effects on the human brain. Because neuropsychological and neuroimaging findings have focused on the neocortex, a cortical model is developed to provide a context for designing and interpreting neuroimaging studies in MDMA users. Aspects of the model are supported by the available neuroimaging data, but there are controversial findings in some areas and most findings have not been replicated across different laboratories and using different modalities. This paper reviews existing findings in the context of a cortical model and suggests directions for future research. PMID:18991874

  19. Testable Hypotheses for Unbalanced Neuroimaging Data

    PubMed Central

    McFarquhar, Martyn

    2016-01-01

    Unbalanced group-level models are common in neuroimaging. Typically, data for these models come from factorial experiments. As such, analyses typically take the form of an analysis of variance (ANOVA) within the framework of the general linear model (GLM). Although ANOVA theory is well established for the balanced case, in unbalanced designs there are multiple ways of decomposing the sums-of-squares of the data. This leads to several methods of forming test statistics when the model contains multiple factors and interactions. Although the Type I–III sums of squares have a long history of debate in the statistical literature, there has seemingly been no consideration of this aspect of the GLM in neuroimaging. In this paper we present an exposition of these different forms of hypotheses for the neuroimaging researcher, discussing their derivation as estimable functions of ANOVA models, and discussing the relative merits of each. Finally, we demonstrate how the different hypothesis tests can be implemented using contrasts in analysis software, presenting examples in SPM and FSL. PMID:27378839

  20. [Neuroimaging of psychiatric and pedopsychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mana, Stéphanie

    2011-01-01

    Over the last two decades, imaging techniques have allowed to establish the cerebral neurophysiologic correlates of psychiatric disorders and have highlighted the impact of psychopathologic events, therapeutic drugs, addictions, on the growth and plasticity of brain. In this review, we intend to illustrate how neuroimaging has improved our knowledge of such alterations in brain maturation (schizophrenia, autistic disorders), fronto-limbic (depressive syndromes) or fronto-striatal (compulsive disorders) regions in psychiatric illnesses, but also in psychopharmacology, or pedopsychiatry. Statistically significant alterations in the structure and/or function of brain are detected in all psychiatric disorders and these are often detectable already during childhood or teenage. Furthermore, neuroimaging has allowed to underline the importance of cerebral networks specific to each disorder, but also to uncover those which are common to different diseases provided that they share common clinical or cognitive features. Besides their value in basic research, neuroimaging findings have been key in changing the perception that society has of these diseases which contributed to their therapeutic approach. PMID:21718649

  1. Neuroimaging: beginning to appreciate its complexities.

    PubMed

    Parens, Erik; Johnston, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    For over a century, scientists have sought to see through the protective shield of the human skull and into the living brain. Today, an array of technologies allows researchers and clinicians to create astonishingly detailed images of our brain's structure as well as colorful depictions of the electrical and physiological changes that occur within it when we see, hear, think and feel. These technologies-and the images they generate-are an increasingly important tool in medicine and science. Given the role that neuroimaging technologies now play in biomedical research, both neuroscientists and nonexperts should aim to be as clear as possible about how neuroimages are made and what they can-and cannot-tell us. Add to this that neuroimages have begun to be used in courtrooms at both the determination of guilt and sentencing stages, that they are being employed by marketers to refine advertisements and develop new products, that they are being sold to consumers for the diagnosis of mental disorders and for the detection of lies, and that they are being employed in arguments about the nature (or absence) of powerful concepts like free will and personhood, and the need for citizens to have a basic understanding of how this technology works and what it can and cannot tell us becomes even more pressing. PMID:24634082

  2. Advanced Neuroimaging in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Edlow, Brian L.; Wu, Ona

    2013-01-01

    Advances in structural and functional neuroimaging have occurred at a rapid pace over the past two decades. Novel techniques for measuring cerebral blood flow, metabolism, white matter connectivity, and neural network activation have great potential to improve the accuracy of diagnosis and prognosis for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), while also providing biomarkers to guide the development of new therapies. Several of these advanced imaging modalities are currently being implemented into clinical practice, whereas others require further development and validation. Ultimately, for advanced neuroimaging techniques to reach their full potential and improve clinical care for the many civilians and military personnel affected by TBI, it is critical for clinicians to understand the applications and methodological limitations of each technique. In this review, we examine recent advances in structural and functional neuroimaging and the potential applications of these techniques to the clinical care of patients with TBI. We also discuss pitfalls and confounders that should be considered when interpreting data from each technique. Finally, given the vast amounts of advanced imaging data that will soon be available to clinicians, we discuss strategies for optimizing data integration, visualization and interpretation. PMID:23361483

  3. A review of neuroimaging findings of apathy in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Theleritis, Christos; Politis, Antonios; Siarkos, Kostas; Lyketsos, Costantine G

    2014-01-01

    Background Apathy is one of the most frequent ‘behavioral and psychological signs and symptoms of dementia’ (BPSD) encountered in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). There is a growing interest in the early diagnosis of apathetic elderly patients in the community since apathy has been associated with reduced daily functioning, caregiver distress, and poor outcome. The generalization of neuroimaging techniques might be able to offer help in this domain. Methods Within this context we conducted an extensive electronic search from the databases included in the National Library of Medicine as well as PsychInfo and Google Scholar for neuroimaging findings of apathy in Alzheimer’s Disease. Results Neuroimaging findings lend support to the notion that frontal-subcortical networks are involved in the occurrence of apathy in AD. Conclusions Longitudinal studies comparing patients and normal individuals might allow us to infer on the association between apathy and neurodegenerative diseases and what can brain imaging markers tell us about the characterization of this association, thus revealing disease patterns, helping to distinguish clinically distinct cognitive syndromes, and allowing predictions. PMID:24135083

  4. Neuropsychiatric deep brain stimulation for translational neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Höflich, Anna; Savli, Markus; Comasco, Erika; Moser, Ulrike; Novak, Klaus; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2013-10-01

    From a neuroimaging point of view, deep brain stimulation (DBS) in psychiatric disorders represents a unique source of information to probe results gained in functional, structural and molecular neuroimaging studies in vivo. However, the implementation has, up to now, been restricted by the heterogeneity of the data reported in DBS studies. The aim of the present study was therefore to provide a comprehensive and standardized database of currently used DBS targets in selected psychiatric disorders (obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), treatment-resistant depression (TRD), Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS)) to enable topological comparisons between neuroimaging results and stimulation areas. A systematic literature research was performed and all peer-reviewed publications until the year 2012 were included. Literature research yielded a total of 84 peer-reviewed studies including about 296 psychiatric patients. The individual stimulation data of 37 of these studies meeting the inclusion criteria which included a total of 202 patients (63 OCD, 89 TRD, 50 GTS) was translated into MNI stereotactic space with respect to AC origin in order to identify key targets. The created database can be used to compare DBS target areas in MNI stereotactic coordinates with: 1) activation patterns in functional brain imaging (fMRI, phfMRI, PET, MET, EEG); 2) brain connectivity data (e.g., MR-based DTI/tractography, functional and effective connectivity); 3) quantitative molecular distribution data (e.g., neuroreceptor PET, post-mortem neuroreceptor mapping); 4) structural data (e.g., VBM for neuroplastic changes). Vice versa, the structural, functional and molecular data may provide a rationale to define new DBS targets and adjust/fine-tune currently used targets in DBS based on this overview in stereotactic coordinates. Furthermore, the availability of DBS data in stereotactic space may facilitate the investigation and interpretation of treatment effects and side effect of DBS by

  5. Cerebral Microbleeds: A Review of Clinical, Genetic, and Neuroimaging Associations

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Paul A.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Ellis, Kathryn A.; Desmond, Patricia M.; Masters, Colin L.; Rowe, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (microbleeds) are small, punctuate hypointense lesions seen in T2* Gradient-Recall Echo (GRE) and Susceptibility-Weighted (SWI) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequences, corresponding to areas of hemosiderin breakdown products from prior microscopic hemorrhages. They occur in the setting of impaired small vessel integrity, commonly due to either hypertensive vasculopathy or cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Microbleeds are more prevalent in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia and in those with both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. However they are also found in asymptomatic individuals, with increasing prevalence with age, particularly in carriers of the Apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele. Other neuroimaging findings that have been linked with microbleeds include lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI, and increased cerebral β-amyloid burden using 11C-PiB Positron Emission Tomography. The presence of microbleeds has been suggested to confer increased risk of incident intracerebral hemorrhage – particularly in the setting of anticoagulation – and of complications of immunotherapy for AD. Prospective data regarding the natural history and sequelae of microbleeds are currently limited, however there is a growing evidence base that will serve to inform clinical decision-making in the future. PMID:24432010

  6. DIS in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albacete, Javier L.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Taliotis, Anastasios

    2009-03-01

    We calculate the total cross section for the scattering of a quark-anti-quark dipole on a large nucleus at high energy for a strongly coupled N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory using AdS/CFT correspondence. We model the nucleus by a metric of a shock wave in AdS5. We then calculate the expectation value of the Wilson loop (the dipole) by finding the extrema of the Nambu-Goto action for an open string attached to the quark and antiquark lines of the loop in the background of an AdS5 shock wave. We find two physically meaningful extremal string configurations. For both solutions we obtain the forward scattering amplitude N for the quark dipole-nucleus scattering. We study the onset of unitarity with increasing center-of-mass energy and transverse size of the dipole: we observe that for both solutions the saturation scale Qs is independent of energy/Bjorken-x and depends on the atomic number of the nucleus as Qs˜A1/3. Finally we observe that while one of the solutions we found corresponds to the pomeron intercept of αP = 2 found earlier in the literature, when extended to higher energy or larger dipole sizes it violates the black disk limit. The other solution we found respects the black disk limit and yields the pomeron intercept of αP = 1.5. We thus conjecture that the right pomeron intercept in gauge theories at strong coupling may be αP = 1.5.

  7. Neuroimaging Study Designs, Computational Analyses and Data Provenance Using the LONI Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo; Lozev, Kamen; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; Eggert, Paul; Pierce, Jonathan; Zamanyan, Alen; Chakrapani, Shruthi; Van Horn, John; Parker, D. Stott; Magsipoc, Rico; Leung, Kelvin; Gutman, Boris; Woods, Roger; Toga, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Modern computational neuroscience employs diverse software tools and multidisciplinary expertise to analyze heterogeneous brain data. The classical problems of gathering meaningful data, fitting specific models, and discovering appropriate analysis and visualization tools give way to a new class of computational challenges—management of large and incongruous data, integration and interoperability of computational resources, and data provenance. We designed, implemented and validated a new paradigm for addressing these challenges in the neuroimaging field. Our solution is based on the LONI Pipeline environment [3], [4], a graphical workflow environment for constructing and executing complex data processing protocols. We developed study-design, database and visual language programming functionalities within the LONI Pipeline that enable the construction of complete, elaborate and robust graphical workflows for analyzing neuroimaging and other data. These workflows facilitate open sharing and communication of data and metadata, concrete processing protocols, result validation, and study replication among different investigators and research groups. The LONI Pipeline features include distributed grid-enabled infrastructure, virtualized execution environment, efficient integration, data provenance, validation and distribution of new computational tools, automated data format conversion, and an intuitive graphical user interface. We demonstrate the new LONI Pipeline features using large scale neuroimaging studies based on data from the International Consortium for Brain Mapping [5] and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative [6]. User guides, forums, instructions and downloads of the LONI Pipeline environment are available at http://pipeline.loni.ucla.edu. PMID:20927408

  8. High-Dimensional Medial Lobe Morphometry: An Automated MRI Biomarker for the New AD Diagnostic Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Medial temporal lobe atrophy assessment via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed in recent criteria as an in vivo diagnostic biomarker of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, practical application of these criteria in a clinical setting will require automated MRI analysis techniques. To this end, we wished to validate our automated, high-dimensional morphometry technique to the hypothetical prediction of future clinical status from baseline data in a cohort of subjects in a large, multicentric setting, compared to currently known clinical status for these subjects. Materials and Methods. The study group consisted of 214 controls, 371 mild cognitive impairment (147 having progressed to probable AD and 224 stable), and 181 probable AD from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, with data acquired on 58 different 1.5 T scanners. We measured the sensitivity and specificity of our technique in a hierarchical fashion, first testing the effect of intensity standardization, then between different volumes of interest, and finally its generalizability for a large, multicentric cohort. Results. We obtained 73.2% prediction accuracy with 79.5% sensitivity for the prediction of MCI progression to clinically probable AD. The positive predictive value was 81.6% for MCI progressing on average within 1.5 (0.3 s.d.) year. Conclusion. With high accuracy, the technique's ability to identify discriminant medial temporal lobe atrophy has been demonstrated in a large, multicentric environment. It is suitable as an aid for clinical diagnostic of AD. PMID:25254139

  9. LSTGEE: longitudinal analysis of neuroimaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yimei; Zhu, Hongtu; Chen, Yasheng; An, Hongyu; Gilmore, John; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2009-02-01

    Longitudinal imaging studies are essential to understanding the neural development of neuropsychiatric disorders, substance use disorders, and normal brain. Using appropriate image processing and statistical tools to analyze the imaging, behavioral, and clinical data is critical for optimally exploring and interpreting the findings from those imaging studies. However, the existing imaging processing and statistical methods for analyzing imaging longitudinal measures are primarily developed for cross-sectional neuroimaging studies. The simple use of these cross-sectional tools to longitudinal imaging studies will significantly decrease the statistical power of longitudinal studies in detecting subtle changes of imaging measures and the causal role of time-dependent covariate in disease process. The main objective of this paper is to develop longitudinal statistics toolbox, called LSTGEE, for the analysis of neuroimaging data from longitudinal studies. We develop generalized estimating equations for jointly modeling imaging measures with behavioral and clinical variables from longitudinal studies. We develop a test procedure based on a score test statistic and a resampling method to test linear hypotheses of unknown parameters, such as associations between brain structure and function and covariates of interest, such as IQ, age, gene, diagnostic groups, and severity of disease. We demonstrate the application of our statistical methods to the detection of the changes of the fractional anisotropy across time in a longitudinal neonate study. Particularly, our results demonstrate that the use of longitudinal statistics can dramatically increase the statistical power in detecting the changes of neuroimaging measures. The proposed approach can be applied to longitudinal data with multiple outcomes and accommodate incomplete and unbalanced data, i.e., subjects with different number of measurements.

  10. REX: response exploration for neuroimaging datasets.

    PubMed

    Duff, Eugene P; Cunnington, Ross; Egan, Gary F

    2007-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies produce large and complex datasets. The challenge of comprehensively analysing the recorded dynamics remains an important field of research. The whole-brain linear modelling of hypothesised response dynamics and experimental effects must utilise simple basis sets, which may not detect unexpected or complex signal effects. These unmodelled effects can influence statistical mapping results, and provide important additional clues to the underlying neural dynamics. They can be detected via exploration of the raw signal, however this can be difficult. Specialised visualisation tools are required to manage the huge number of voxels, events and scans. Many effects can be occluded by noise in individual voxel time-series. This paper describes a visualisation framework developed for the assessment of entire neuroimaging datasets. While currently available tools tend to be tied to a specific model of experimental effects, this framework includes a novel metadata schema that enables the rapid selection and processing of responses based on easily-adjusted classifications of scans, brain regions, and events. Flexible event-related averaging and process pipelining capabilities enable users to investigate the effects of preprocessing algorithms and to visualise power spectra and other transformations of the data. The framework has been implemented as a MATLAB package, REX (Response Exploration), which has been utilised within our lab and is now publicly available for download. Its interface enables the real-time control of data selection and processing, for very rapid visualisation. The concepts outlined in this paper have general applicability, and could provide significant further functionality to neuroimaging databasing and process pipeline environments. PMID:17985253

  11. Practical management of heterogeneous neuroimaging metadata by global neuroimaging data repositories.

    PubMed

    Neu, Scott C; Crawford, Karen L; Toga, Arthur W

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly evolving neuroimaging techniques are producing unprecedented quantities of digital data at the same time that many research studies are evolving into global, multi-disciplinary collaborations between geographically distributed scientists. While networked computers have made it almost trivial to transmit data across long distances, collecting and analyzing this data requires extensive metadata if the data is to be maximally shared. Though it is typically straightforward to encode text and numerical values into files and send content between different locations, it is often difficult to attach context and implicit assumptions to the content. As the number of and geographic separation between data contributors grows to national and global scales, the heterogeneity of the collected metadata increases and conformance to a single standardization becomes implausible. Neuroimaging data repositories must then not only accumulate data but must also consolidate disparate metadata into an integrated view. In this article, using specific examples from our experiences, we demonstrate how standardization alone cannot achieve full integration of neuroimaging data from multiple heterogeneous sources and why a fundamental change in the architecture of neuroimaging data repositories is needed instead. PMID:22470336

  12. Practical management of heterogeneous neuroimaging metadata by global neuroimaging data repositories

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Scott C.; Crawford, Karen L.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly evolving neuroimaging techniques are producing unprecedented quantities of digital data at the same time that many research studies are evolving into global, multi-disciplinary collaborations between geographically distributed scientists. While networked computers have made it almost trivial to transmit data across long distances, collecting and analyzing this data requires extensive metadata if the data is to be maximally shared. Though it is typically straightforward to encode text and numerical values into files and send content between different locations, it is often difficult to attach context and implicit assumptions to the content. As the number of and geographic separation between data contributors grows to national and global scales, the heterogeneity of the collected metadata increases and conformance to a single standardization becomes implausible. Neuroimaging data repositories must then not only accumulate data but must also consolidate disparate metadata into an integrated view. In this article, using specific examples from our experiences, we demonstrate how standardization alone cannot achieve full integration of neuroimaging data from multiple heterogeneous sources and why a fundamental change in the architecture of neuroimaging data repositories is needed instead. PMID:22470336

  13. Neuroimaging for patient selection for medial temporal lobe epilepsy surgery: Part 1 Structural neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Stylianou, Petros; Hoffmann, Chen; Blat, Ilan; Harnof, Sagi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of part one of this review is to present the structural neuroimaging techniques that are currently used to evaluate patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and to discuss their potential to define patient eligibility for medial temporal lobe surgery. A PubMed query, using Medline and Embase, and subsequent review, was performed for all English language studies published after 1990, reporting neuroimaging methods for the evaluation of patients with TLE. The extracted data included demographic variables, population and study design, imaging methods, gold standard methods, imaging findings, surgical outcomes and conclusions. Overall, 56 papers were reviewed, including a total of 1517 patients. This review highlights the following structural neuroimaging techniques: MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging, tractography, electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography. The developments in neuroimaging during the last decades have led to remarkable improvements in surgical precision, postsurgical outcome, prognosis, and the rate of seizure control in patients with TLE. The use of multiple imaging methods provides improved outcomes, and further improvements will be possible with future studies of larger patient cohorts. PMID:26362835

  14. Computational neuroimaging and population receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Wandell, Brian A; Winawer, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) noninvasively measures human brain activity at millimeter resolution. Scientists use different approaches to take advantage of the remarkable opportunities presented by fMRI. Here, we describe progress using the computational neuroimaging approach in human visual cortex, which aims to build models that predict the neural responses from the stimulus and task. We focus on a particularly active area of research, the use of population receptive field (pRF) models to characterize human visual cortex responses to a range of stimuli, in a variety of tasks and different subject populations. PMID:25850730

  15. Atypical neuroimaging in Wilson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Patell, Rushad; Dosi, Rupal; Joshi, Harshal K; Storz, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Wilson's disease is a rare metabolic disease involving copper metabolism. Neuroimaging plays an important part in evaluation of patients with a neuropsychiatric presentation. We present a case of a 14-year-old girl with atypical confluent white matter disease and cystic degeneration on MRI, with a rapidly progressive course, who succumbed to complications despite treatment with trientine. Wilson's disease should be considered as a differential for leucoencephalopathy in young patients with progressive neurological disease for its early recognition and optimum outcome. PMID:24907221

  16. Vitamin D and Risk of Neuroimaging Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Littlejohns, Thomas J.; Kos, Katarina; Henley, William E.; Lang, Iain A.; Annweiler, Cedric; Beauchet, Olivier; Chaves, Paulo H. M.; Kestenbaum, Bryan R.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Langa, Kenneth M.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Llewellyn, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked with an increased risk of incident all-cause dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. The aim of the current study was to explore the potential mechanisms underlying these associations by determining whether low vitamin D concentrations are associated with the development of incident cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative neuroimaging abnormalities. The population consisted of 1,658 participants aged ≥65 years from the US-based Cardiovascular Health Study who were free from prevalent cardiovascular disease, stroke and dementia at baseline in 1992–93. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry from blood samples collected at baseline. The first MRI scan was conducted between 1991–1994 and the second MRI scan was conducted between 1997–1999. Change in white matter grade, ventricular grade and presence of infarcts between MRI scan one and two were used to define neuroimaging abnormalities. During a mean follow-up of 5.0 years, serum 25(OH)D status was not significantly associated with the development of any neuroimaging abnormalities. Using logistic regression models, the multivariate adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for worsening white matter grade in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient (<25 nmol/L) and deficient (≥25–50 nmol/L) were 0.76 (0.35–1.66) and 1.09 (0.76–1.55) compared to participants with sufficient concentrations (≥50 nmol/L). The multivariate adjusted odds ratios for ventricular grade in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient and deficient were 0.49 (0.20–1.19) and 1.12 (0.79–1.59) compared to those sufficient. The multivariate adjusted odds ratios for incident infarcts in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient and deficient were 1.95 (0.84–4.54) and 0.73 (0.47–1.95) compared to those sufficient. Overall, serum vitamin D concentrations could not be shown to be associated with

  17. Vitamin D and Risk of Neuroimaging Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Littlejohns, Thomas J; Kos, Katarina; Henley, William E; Lang, Iain A; Annweiler, Cedric; Beauchet, Olivier; Chaves, Paulo H M; Kestenbaum, Bryan R; Kuller, Lewis H; Langa, Kenneth M; Lopez, Oscar L; Llewellyn, David J

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked with an increased risk of incident all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease. The aim of the current study was to explore the potential mechanisms underlying these associations by determining whether low vitamin D concentrations are associated with the development of incident cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative neuroimaging abnormalities. The population consisted of 1,658 participants aged ≥65 years from the US-based Cardiovascular Health Study who were free from prevalent cardiovascular disease, stroke and dementia at baseline in 1992-93. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry from blood samples collected at baseline. The first MRI scan was conducted between 1991-1994 and the second MRI scan was conducted between 1997-1999. Change in white matter grade, ventricular grade and presence of infarcts between MRI scan one and two were used to define neuroimaging abnormalities. During a mean follow-up of 5.0 years, serum 25(OH)D status was not significantly associated with the development of any neuroimaging abnormalities. Using logistic regression models, the multivariate adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for worsening white matter grade in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient (<25 nmol/L) and deficient (≥25-50 nmol/L) were 0.76 (0.35-1.66) and 1.09 (0.76-1.55) compared to participants with sufficient concentrations (≥50 nmol/L). The multivariate adjusted odds ratios for ventricular grade in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient and deficient were 0.49 (0.20-1.19) and 1.12 (0.79-1.59) compared to those sufficient. The multivariate adjusted odds ratios for incident infarcts in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient and deficient were 1.95 (0.84-4.54) and 0.73 (0.47-1.95) compared to those sufficient. Overall, serum vitamin D concentrations could not be shown to be associated with the development of

  18. Neuroimaging Features of San Luis Valley Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T.; Lee, Bonmyong

    2015-01-01

    A 14-month-old Hispanic female with a history of double-outlet right ventricle and developmental delay in the setting of recombinant chromosome 8 syndrome was referred for neurologic imaging. Brain MR revealed multiple abnormalities primarily affecting midline structures, including commissural dysgenesis, vermian and brainstem hypoplasia/dysplasia, an interhypothalamic adhesion, and an epidermoid between the frontal lobes that enlarged over time. Spine MR demonstrated hypoplastic C1 and C2 posterior elements, scoliosis, and a borderline low conus medullaris position. Presented herein is the first illustration of neuroimaging findings from a patient with San Luis Valley syndrome. PMID:26425383

  19. Hybrid MR-PET in Neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Bisdas, S; Lá Fougere, C; Ernemann, U

    2015-10-01

    Hybrid magnetic resonance (MR)-positron emission tomography (MR-PET) is a novel technology with advantages over sequential MR and PET imaging, allowing maintain full individual diagnostic performance with negligible mutual interference between the two hardware settings. Obvious synergies between MR and PET in acquisition of anatomical, functional, and molecular information for neurological diseases into one single image pave the way for establishing clear clinical indications for hybrid MR-PET as well as addressing unmet neuroimaging needs in future clinics and research. Further developments in attenuation correction, quantification, workflow, and effective MR-PET data management might unfold the full potential of integrated multimodality imaging. PMID:26227618

  20. DIS in AdS

    SciTech Connect

    Albacete, Javier L.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Taliotis, Anastasios

    2009-03-23

    We calculate the total cross section for the scattering of a quark-anti-quark dipole on a large nucleus at high energy for a strongly coupled N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory using AdS/CFT correspondence. We model the nucleus by a metric of a shock wave in AdS{sub 5}. We then calculate the expectation value of the Wilson loop (the dipole) by finding the extrema of the Nambu-Goto action for an open string attached to the quark and antiquark lines of the loop in the background of an AdS{sub 5} shock wave. We find two physically meaningful extremal string configurations. For both solutions we obtain the forward scattering amplitude N for the quark dipole-nucleus scattering. We study the onset of unitarity with increasing center-of-mass energy and transverse size of the dipole: we observe that for both solutions the saturation scale Q{sub s} is independent of energy/Bjorken-x and depends on the atomic number of the nucleus as Q{sub s}{approx}A{sup 1/3}. Finally we observe that while one of the solutions we found corresponds to the pomeron intercept of {alpha}{sub P} = 2 found earlier in the literature, when extended to higher energy or larger dipole sizes it violates the black disk limit. The other solution we found respects the black disk limit and yields the pomeron intercept of {alpha}{sub P} = 1.5. We thus conjecture that the right pomeron intercept in gauge theories at strong coupling may be {alpha}{sub P} = 1.5.

  1. Structural neuroimaging correlates of cognitive status in older adults: A person-oriented approach.

    PubMed

    Malpas, Charles B

    2016-08-01

    Person-oriented approaches to clinical research aim to uncover subgroups of patients with different patterns of clinically relevant variables. Such approaches, however, are not yet widely employed in clinical neuroimaging research. This paper demonstrates an accessible approach to person-oriented research using model-based clustering in high-dimensional structural neuroimaging data. Cortical thickness measurements for 369 older adults (182 women, 187 men) were obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Model-based cluster analysis was performed on these imaging variables and then validated using variables that were not used in the clustering process. Variable selection identified two specific regions that contributed to cluster formation: the left and right entorhinal cortices. Two subgroups were uncovered: a "typical" cluster with higher entorhinal thickness (M=3.59mm, 95% confidence interval=3.57, 3.62), and an "atypical" cluster with relatively lower thickness (M=2.84mm, 95% confidence interval=2.75, 2.92). Members of the atypical cluster also had lower hippocampal volumes, memory scores, and executive function scores, and were also more likely to be clinically classified as cognitively impaired. These findings demonstrate the utility of model-based clustering of structural neuroimaging data in studies of ageing. The role of the entorhinal cortices in cluster formation is consistent with the known pathological substrate of Alzheimer's disease. The entorhinal cortices are implicated in the early genesis of the disease and atrophy of these regions is strongly associated with the cognitive phenotype. Overall, this approach can be readily applied to future neuroimaging investigations. PMID:27056675

  2. Neuroimaging of Central Sensitivity Syndromes: Key Insights from the Scientific Literature

    PubMed Central

    Walitt, Brian; Čeko, Marta; Gracely, John L.; Gracely, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes are characterized by distressing symptoms, such as pain and fatigue, in the absence of clinically obvious pathology. The scientific underpinnings of these disorders are not currently known. Modern neuroimaging techniques promise new insights into mechanisms mediating these postulated syndromes. We review the results of neuroimaging applied to five central sensitivity syndromes: fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular joint disorder, and vulvodynia syndrome. Neuroimaging studies of basal metabolism, anatomic constitution, molecular constituents, evoked neural activity, and treatment effect are compared across all of these syndromes. Evoked sensory paradigms reveal sensory augmentation to both painful and non-painful stimulation. This is a transformative observation for these syndromes, which were historically considered to be completely of hysterical or feigned in origin. However, whether sensory augmentation represents the cause of these syndromes, a predisposing factor, an endophenotype, or an epiphenomenon cannot be discerned from the current literature. Further, the result from cross-sectional neuroimaging studies of basal activity, anatomy, and molecular constituency are extremely heterogeneous within and between the syndromes. A defining neuroimaging “signature” cannot be discerned for any of the particular syndromes or for an over-arching central sensitization mechanism common to all of the syndromes. Several issues confound initial attempts to meaningfully measure treatment effects in these syndromes. At this time, the existence of “central sensitivity syndromes” is based more soundly on clinical and epidemiological evidence. A coherent picture of a “central sensitization” mechanism that bridges across all of these syndromes does not emerge from the existing scientific evidence. PMID:26717948

  3. Bubbling AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, Dario; Morales, Jose F.

    2005-02-01

    In the light of the recent Lin, Lunin, Maldacena (LLM) results, we investigate 1/2-BPS geometries in minimal (and next to minimal) supergravity in D = 6 dimensions. In the case of minimal supergravity, solutions are given by fibrations of a two-torus T2 specified by two harmonic functions. For a rectangular torus the two functions are related by a non-linear equation with rare solutions: AdS3 × S3, the pp-wave and the multi-center string. ``Bubbling'', i.e. superpositions of droplets, is accommodated by allowing the complex structure of the T2 to vary over the base. The analysis is repeated in the presence of a tensor multiplet and similar conclusions are reached, with generic solutions describing D1D5 (or their dual fundamental string-momentum) systems. In this framework, the profile of the dual fundamental string-momentum system is identified with the boundaries of the droplets in a two-dimensional plane.

  4. J'accuse! depression as a likely culprit in cases of AD.

    PubMed

    Steffens, David C

    2016-09-01

    Clinicians have long appreciated the links between depression, cognitive impairment, and development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. More recently, investigators in the fields of epidemiology, genetics, neuroimaging, and neuropathology have sought to quantify the risk and to understand the underlying neurobiology of the relationship between depression and AD. PMID:27460509

  5. Reproducibility of neuroimaging analyses across operating systems

    PubMed Central

    Glatard, Tristan; Lewis, Lindsay B.; Ferreira da Silva, Rafael; Adalat, Reza; Beck, Natacha; Lepage, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Rousseau, Marc-Etienne; Sherif, Tarek; Deelman, Ewa; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Evans, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging pipelines are known to generate different results depending on the computing platform where they are compiled and executed. We quantify these differences for brain tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness (CT) extraction, using three of the main neuroimaging packages (FSL, Freesurfer and CIVET) and different versions of GNU/Linux. We also identify some causes of these differences using library and system call interception. We find that these packages use mathematical functions based on single-precision floating-point arithmetic whose implementations in operating systems continue to evolve. While these differences have little or no impact on simple analysis pipelines such as brain extraction and cortical tissue classification, their accumulation creates important differences in longer pipelines such as subcortical tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness extraction. With FSL, most Dice coefficients between subcortical classifications obtained on different operating systems remain above 0.9, but values as low as 0.59 are observed. Independent component analyses (ICA) of fMRI data differ between operating systems in one third of the tested subjects, due to differences in motion correction. With Freesurfer and CIVET, in some brain regions we find an effect of build or operating system on cortical thickness. A first step to correct these reproducibility issues would be to use more precise representations of floating-point numbers in the critical sections of the pipelines. The numerical stability of pipelines should also be reviewed. PMID:25964757

  6. The structural neuroimaging of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Emsell, Louise; McDonald, Colm

    2009-01-01

    There is an increasing body of literature fuelled by advances in high-resolution structural MRI acquisition and image processing techniques which implicates subtle neuroanatomical abnormalities in the aetiopathogenesis of bipolar disorder. This account reviews the main findings from structural neuroimaging research into regional brain abnormalities, the impact of genetic liability and mood stabilizing medication on brain structure in bipolar disorder, and the overlapping structural deviations found in the allied disorders of schizophrenia and depression. The manifold challenges extant within neuroimaging research are highlighted with accompanying recommendations for future studies. The most consistent findings include preservation of total cerebral volume with regional grey and white matter structural changes in prefrontal, midline and anterior limbic networks, non-contingent ventriculomegaly and increased rates of white matter hyperintensities, with more pronounced deficits in juveniles suffering from the illness. There is increasing evidence that medication has observable effects on brain structure, whereby lithium status is associated with volumetric increase in the medial temporal lobe and anterior cingulate gyrus. However, research continues to be confounded by the use of highly heterogeneous methodology and clinical populations, in studies employing small scale, low-powered, cross-sectional designs. Future work should investigate larger, clinically homogenous groups of patients and unaffected relatives, combining both categorical and dimensional approaches to illness classification in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs in order to elucidate trait versus state mechanisms, genetic effects and medication/illness progression effects over time. PMID:20374145

  7. Can Emotional and Behavioral Dysregulation in Youth Be Decoded from Functional Neuroimaging?

    PubMed Central

    Portugal, Liana C. L.; Rosa, Maria João; Rao, Anil; Bebko, Genna; Bertocci, Michele A.; Hinze, Amanda K.; Bonar, Lisa; Almeida, Jorge R. C.; Perlman, Susan B.; Versace, Amelia; Schirda, Claudiu; Travis, Michael; Gill, Mary Kay; Demeter, Christine; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A.; Ciuffetelli, Gary; Rodriguez, Eric; Forbes, Erika E.; Sunshine, Jeffrey L.; Holland, Scott K.; Kowatch, Robert A.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Horwitz, Sarah M.; Arnold, Eugene L.; Fristad, Mary A.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Findling, Robert L.; Pereira, Mirtes; Oliveira, Leticia; Phillips, Mary L.; Mourao-Miranda, Janaina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction High comorbidity among pediatric disorders characterized by behavioral and emotional dysregulation poses problems for diagnosis and treatment, and suggests that these disorders may be better conceptualized as dimensions of abnormal behaviors. Furthermore, identifying neuroimaging biomarkers related to dimensional measures of behavior may provide targets to guide individualized treatment. We aimed to use functional neuroimaging and pattern regression techniques to determine whether patterns of brain activity could accurately decode individual-level severity on a dimensional scale measuring behavioural and emotional dysregulation at two different time points. Methods A sample of fifty-seven youth (mean age: 14.5 years; 32 males) was selected from a multi-site study of youth with parent-reported behavioral and emotional dysregulation. Participants performed a block-design reward paradigm during functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Pattern regression analyses consisted of Relevance Vector Regression (RVR) and two cross-validation strategies implemented in the Pattern Recognition for Neuroimaging toolbox (PRoNTo). Medication was treated as a binary confounding variable. Decoded and actual clinical scores were compared using Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) and mean squared error (MSE) to evaluate the models. Permutation test was applied to estimate significance levels. Results Relevance Vector Regression identified patterns of neural activity associated with symptoms of behavioral and emotional dysregulation at the initial study screen and close to the fMRI scanning session. The correlation and the mean squared error between actual and decoded symptoms were significant at the initial study screen and close to the fMRI scanning session. However, after controlling for potential medication effects, results remained significant only for decoding symptoms at the initial study screen. Neural regions with the highest contribution to the pattern

  8. Turner Syndrome: Neuroimaging Findings--Structural and Functional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullaney, Ronan; Murphy, Declan

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of Turner syndrome can advance our understanding of the X chromosome in brain development, and the modulatory influence of endocrine factors. There is increasing evidence from neuroimaging studies that TX individuals have significant differences in the anatomy, function, and metabolism of a number of brain regions; including…

  9. Childhood-Onset Schizophrenia: Insights from Neuroimaging Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gogtay, Nitin; Rapoport, Judith L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of longitudinal neuroimaging to study the developmental perspectives of brain pathology in children with childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS) is described. Structural neuroimaging is capable of providing evidence of neurobiological specificity of COS to distinguish it from other brain abnormalities seen in neuropsychiatric illnesses like…

  10. Functional neuroimaging can support causal claims about brain function

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Matthew J.; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscientists habitually deny that functional neuroimaging can furnish causal information about the relationship between brain events and behavior. However, imaging studies do provide causal information about those relationships—though not causal certainty. Although popular portrayals of functional neuroimaging tend to attribute too much inferential power to the technique, we should restrain ourselves from ascribing it too little. PMID:20201629

  11. Neuroimaging in Communication Sciences and Disorders: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plante, Elena

    2001-01-01

    This introductory article introduces papers that present examples of neuroimaging applications in the field of communication sciences and disorders. It notes that neuroimaging studies were usually an outgrowth of earlier behavioral research or clinical observations with knowledge of the disorder's behavioral characteristic critical to development…

  12. Cognitive Neuroimaging: Cognitive Science out of the Armchair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Zubicaray, Greig I.

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive scientists were not quick to embrace the functional neuroimaging technologies that emerged during the late 20th century. In this new century, cognitive scientists continue to question, not unreasonably, the relevance of functional neuroimaging investigations that fail to address questions of interest to cognitive science. However, some…

  13. A Review on the Bioinformatics Tools for Neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Man, Mei Yen; Ong, Mei Sin; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; Deris, Safaai; Sulong, Ghazali; Yunus, Jasmy; Che Harun, Fauzan Khairi

    2015-12-01

    Neuroimaging is a new technique used to create images of the structure and function of the nervous system in the human brain. Currently, it is crucial in scientific fields. Neuroimaging data are becoming of more interest among the circle of neuroimaging experts. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a large amount of neuroimaging tools. This paper gives an overview of the tools that have been used to image the structure and function of the nervous system. This information can help developers, experts, and users gain insight and a better understanding of the neuroimaging tools available, enabling better decision making in choosing tools of particular research interest. Sources, links, and descriptions of the application of each tool are provided in this paper as well. Lastly, this paper presents the language implemented, system requirements, strengths, and weaknesses of the tools that have been widely used to image the structure and function of the nervous system. PMID:27006633

  14. Neuromarketing: the hope and hype of neuroimaging in business

    PubMed Central

    Ariely, Dan; Berns, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    The application of neuroimaging methods to product marketing — neuromarketing — has recently gained considerable popularity. We propose that there are two main reasons for this trend. First, the possibility that neuroimaging will become cheaper and faster than other marketing methods; and second, the hope that neuroimaging will provide marketers with information that is not obtainable through conventional marketing methods. Although neuroimaging is unlikely to be cheaper than other tools in the near future, there is growing evidence that it may provide hidden information about the consumer experience. The most promising application of neuroimaging methods to marketing may come before a product is even released — when it is just an idea being developed. PMID:20197790

  15. Colorful brains: 14 years of display practice in functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Christen, Markus; Vitacco, Deborah A; Huber, Lara; Harboe, Julie; Fabrikant, Sara I; Brugger, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Neuroimaging results are typically graphically rendered and color-coded, which influences the process of knowledge generation within neuroscience as well as the public perception of brain research. Analyzing these issues requires empirical information on the display practice in neuroimaging. In our study we evaluated more than 9000 functional images (fMRI and PET) published between 1996 and 2009 with respect to the use of color, image structure, image production software and other factors that may determine the display practice. We demonstrate a variety of display styles despite a remarkable dominance of few image production sites and software systems, outline some tendencies of standardization, and identify shortcomings with respect to color scale explication in neuroimages. We discuss the importance of the finding for knowledge production in neuroimaging, and we make suggestions to improve the display practice in neuroimaging, especially on regimes of color coding. PMID:23403183

  16. A Review on the Bioinformatics Tools for Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    MAN, Mei Yen; ONG, Mei Sin; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; DERIS, Safaai; SULONG, Ghazali; YUNUS, Jasmy; CHE HARUN, Fauzan Khairi

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging is a new technique used to create images of the structure and function of the nervous system in the human brain. Currently, it is crucial in scientific fields. Neuroimaging data are becoming of more interest among the circle of neuroimaging experts. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a large amount of neuroimaging tools. This paper gives an overview of the tools that have been used to image the structure and function of the nervous system. This information can help developers, experts, and users gain insight and a better understanding of the neuroimaging tools available, enabling better decision making in choosing tools of particular research interest. Sources, links, and descriptions of the application of each tool are provided in this paper as well. Lastly, this paper presents the language implemented, system requirements, strengths, and weaknesses of the tools that have been widely used to image the structure and function of the nervous system. PMID:27006633

  17. Advances in neuroimaging research of schizophrenia in China

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Dengtang; XU, Yifeng; JIANG, Kaida

    2014-01-01

    Summary Since Hounsfield’s first report about X-ray computed tomography (CT) in 1972, there has been substantial progress in the application of neuroimaging techniques to study the structure, function, and biochemistry of the brain. This review provides a summary of recent research in structural and functional neuroimaging of schizophrenia in China and four tables describing all of the relevant studies from mainland China. The first research report using neuroimaging techniques in China dates back to 1983, a study that reported encephalatrophy in 30% of individuals with schizophrenia. Functional neuroimaging research in China emerged in the 1990s and has undergone rapid development since. Recently, structural and functional brain networks has become a hot topic among China’s neuroimaging researchers. PMID:25317005

  18. Integrated feature extraction and selection for neuroimage classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yong; Shen, Dinggang

    2009-02-01

    Feature extraction and selection are of great importance in neuroimage classification for identifying informative features and reducing feature dimensionality, which are generally implemented as two separate steps. This paper presents an integrated feature extraction and selection algorithm with two iterative steps: constrained subspace learning based feature extraction and support vector machine (SVM) based feature selection. The subspace learning based feature extraction focuses on the brain regions with higher possibility of being affected by the disease under study, while the possibility of brain regions being affected by disease is estimated by the SVM based feature selection, in conjunction with SVM classification. This algorithm can not only take into account the inter-correlation among different brain regions, but also overcome the limitation of traditional subspace learning based feature extraction methods. To achieve robust performance and optimal selection of parameters involved in feature extraction, selection, and classification, a bootstrapping strategy is used to generate multiple versions of training and testing sets for parameter optimization, according to the classification performance measured by the area under the ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve. The integrated feature extraction and selection method is applied to a structural MR image based Alzheimer's disease (AD) study with 98 non-demented and 100 demented subjects. Cross-validation results indicate that the proposed algorithm can improve performance of the traditional subspace learning based classification.

  19. The Virtual Brain Integrates Computational Modeling and Multimodal Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Schirner, Michael; McIntosh, Anthony R.; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Brain function is thought to emerge from the interactions among neuronal populations. Apart from traditional efforts to reproduce brain dynamics from the micro- to macroscopic scales, complementary approaches develop phenomenological models of lower complexity. Such macroscopic models typically generate only a few selected—ideally functionally relevant—aspects of the brain dynamics. Importantly, they often allow an understanding of the underlying mechanisms beyond computational reproduction. Adding detail to these models will widen their ability to reproduce a broader range of dynamic features of the brain. For instance, such models allow for the exploration of consequences of focal and distributed pathological changes in the system, enabling us to identify and develop approaches to counteract those unfavorable processes. Toward this end, The Virtual Brain (TVB) (www.thevirtualbrain.org), a neuroinformatics platform with a brain simulator that incorporates a range of neuronal models and dynamics at its core, has been developed. This integrated framework allows the model-based simulation, analysis, and inference of neurophysiological mechanisms over several brain scales that underlie the generation of macroscopic neuroimaging signals. In this article, we describe how TVB works, and we present the first proof of concept. PMID:23442172

  20. Diagnosis-Guided Method For Identifying Multi-Modality Neuroimaging Biomarkers Associated With Genetic Risk Factors In Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiaoke; Yan, Jingwen; Yao, Xiaohui; Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Zhang, Daoqiang; Shen, Li

    2015-01-01

    Many recent imaging genetic studies focus on detecting the associations between genetic markers such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and quantitative traits (QTs). Although there exist a large number of generalized multivariate regression analysis methods, few of them have used diagnosis information in subjects to enhance the analysis performance. In addition, few of models have investigated the identification of multi-modality phenotypic patterns associated with interesting genotype groups in traditional methods. To reveal disease-relevant imaging genetic associations, we propose a novel diagnosis-guided multi-modality (DGMM) framework to discover multi-modality imaging QTs that are associated with both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its top genetic risk factor (i.e., APOE SNP rs429358). The strength of our proposed method is that it explicitly models the priori diagnosis information among subjects in the objective function for selecting the disease-relevant and robust multi-modality QTs associated with the SNP. We evaluate our method on two modalities of imaging phenotypes, i.e., those extracted from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method not only achieves better performances under the metrics of root mean squared error and correlation coefficient but also can identify common informative regions of interests (ROIs) across multiple modalities to guide the disease-induced biological interpretation, compared with other reference methods. PMID:26776178

  1. DIAGNOSIS-GUIDED METHOD FOR IDENTIFYING MULTI-MODALITY NEUROIMAGING BIOMARKERS ASSOCIATED WITH GENETIC RISK FACTORS IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaoke; Yan, Jingwen; Yao, Xiaohui; Risacher, Shannon L; Saykin, Andrew J; Zhang, Daoqiang; Shen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Many recent imaging genetic studies focus on detecting the associations between genetic markers such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and quantitative traits (QTs). Although there exist a large number of generalized multivariate regression analysis methods, few of them have used diagnosis information in subjects to enhance the analysis performance. In addition, few of models have investigated the identification of multi-modality phenotypic patterns associated with interesting genotype groups in traditional methods. To reveal disease-relevant imaging genetic associations, we propose a novel diagnosis-guided multi-modality (DGMM) framework to discover multi-modality imaging QTs that are associated with both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its top genetic risk factor (i.e., APOE SNP rs429358). The strength of our proposed method is that it explicitly models the priori diagnosis information among subjects in the objective function for selecting the disease-relevant and robust multi-modality QTs associated with the SNP. We evaluate our method on two modalities of imaging phenotypes, i.e., those extracted from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method not only achieves better performances under the metrics of root mean squared error and correlation coefficient but also can identify common informative regions of interests (ROIs) across multiple modalities to guide the disease-induced biological interpretation, compared with other reference methods. PMID:26776178

  2. Systems Biology, Neuroimaging, Neuropsychology, Neuroconnectivity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, Erin D.

    2016-01-01

    The patient who sustains a traumatic brain injury (TBI) typically undergoes neuroimaging studies, usually in the form of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases the neuroimaging findings are clinically assessed with descriptive statements that provide qualitative information about the presence/absence of visually identifiable abnormalities; though little if any of the potential information in a scan is analyzed in any quantitative manner, except in research settings. Fortunately, major advances have been made, especially during the last decade, in regards to image quantification techniques, especially those that involve automated image analysis methods. This review argues that a systems biology approach to understanding quantitative neuroimaging findings in TBI provides an appropriate framework for better utilizing the information derived from quantitative neuroimaging and its relation with neuropsychological outcome. Different image analysis methods are reviewed in an attempt to integrate quantitative neuroimaging methods with neuropsychological outcome measures and to illustrate how different neuroimaging techniques tap different aspects of TBI-related neuropathology. Likewise, how different neuropathologies may relate to neuropsychological outcome is explored by examining how damage influences brain connectivity and neural networks. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic changes that occur following TBI and how best to capture those pathologies via different neuroimaging methods. However, traditional clinical neuropsychological techniques are not well suited for interpretation based on contemporary and advanced neuroimaging methods and network analyses. Significant improvements need to be made in the cognitive and behavioral assessment of the brain injured individual to better interface with advances in neuroimaging-based network analyses. By viewing both neuroimaging and neuropsychological processes within a systems biology

  3. Systems Biology, Neuroimaging, Neuropsychology, Neuroconnectivity and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Erin D

    2016-01-01

    The patient who sustains a traumatic brain injury (TBI) typically undergoes neuroimaging studies, usually in the form of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases the neuroimaging findings are clinically assessed with descriptive statements that provide qualitative information about the presence/absence of visually identifiable abnormalities; though little if any of the potential information in a scan is analyzed in any quantitative manner, except in research settings. Fortunately, major advances have been made, especially during the last decade, in regards to image quantification techniques, especially those that involve automated image analysis methods. This review argues that a systems biology approach to understanding quantitative neuroimaging findings in TBI provides an appropriate framework for better utilizing the information derived from quantitative neuroimaging and its relation with neuropsychological outcome. Different image analysis methods are reviewed in an attempt to integrate quantitative neuroimaging methods with neuropsychological outcome measures and to illustrate how different neuroimaging techniques tap different aspects of TBI-related neuropathology. Likewise, how different neuropathologies may relate to neuropsychological outcome is explored by examining how damage influences brain connectivity and neural networks. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic changes that occur following TBI and how best to capture those pathologies via different neuroimaging methods. However, traditional clinical neuropsychological techniques are not well suited for interpretation based on contemporary and advanced neuroimaging methods and network analyses. Significant improvements need to be made in the cognitive and behavioral assessment of the brain injured individual to better interface with advances in neuroimaging-based network analyses. By viewing both neuroimaging and neuropsychological processes within a systems biology

  4. Obesity is linked with lower brain volume in 700 AD and MCI patients

    PubMed Central

    Ho, April J.; Raji, Cyrus A.; Becker, James T.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Hibar, Derrek; Dinov, Ivo D.; Stein, Jason L.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is associated with lower brain volumes in cognitively normal elderly subjects, but no study has yet investigated the effects of obesity on brain structure in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To determine if higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with brain volume deficits in cognitively impaired elderly subjects, we analyzed brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 700 MCI or AD patients from two different cohorts: the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Cardiovascular Health Study-Cognition Study (CHS-CS). Tensor-based morphometry (TBM) was used to create 3-dimensional maps of regional tissue excess or deficits in subjects with MCI (ADNI, N=399; CHS, N=77) and AD (ADNI, N=188; CHS, N=36). In both AD and MCI groups, higher BMI was associated with brain volume deficits in frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes; the atrophic pattern was consistent in both ADNI and CHS populations. Cardiovascular risk factors, especially obesity, should be considered as influencing brain structure in those already afflicted by cognitive impairment and dementia. PMID:20570405

  5. Contribution of neuroimaging to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Román, Gustavo; Pascual, Belén

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to review, summarize and analyze recent findings relevant to the contribution of neuroimaging to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). Computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide accurate demonstration of the location and rate of progression of atrophic changes affecting the brain in AD and the different types of vascular lesions observed in mixed dementias and in pure VaD. Quantification of cortical thickness allows early diagnosis and rate of progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia. White matter involvement can also be quantified with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional methods including fMRI, functional connectivity, and MR spectroscopy (MRS). Isotope-based techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) allow measurement of regional cerebral glucose metabolism using (18)F-2-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). Cerebral blood flow can be measured using PET with H(2)(15)O or with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) with technetium ((99m)Tc-HMPAO) or, more recently, arterial spin label (ASL) imaging. There are isotope markers for amyloid-beta ((11)O-PIB, (18)F-florbetapir), tau ((18)FDDNP) and activated microglia ((11)C-PK11195). Neuroimaging markers are particularly useful at the early symptomatic and preclinical asymptomatic phases of AD, as well as serving as endpoints in clinical trials. PMID:23142262

  6. Brain glucose metabolism during hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes: insights from functional and metabolic neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Rooijackers, Hanne M M; Wiegers, Evita C; Tack, Cees J; van der Graaf, Marinette; de Galan, Bastiaan E

    2016-02-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most frequent complication of insulin therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes. Since the brain is reliant on circulating glucose as its main source of energy, hypoglycemia poses a threat for normal brain function. Paradoxically, although hypoglycemia commonly induces immediate decline in cognitive function, long-lasting changes in brain structure and cognitive function are uncommon in patients with type 1 diabetes. In fact, recurrent hypoglycemia initiates a process of habituation that suppresses hormonal responses to and impairs awareness of subsequent hypoglycemia, which has been attributed to adaptations in the brain. These observations sparked great scientific interest into the brain's handling of glucose during (recurrent) hypoglycemia. Various neuroimaging techniques have been employed to study brain (glucose) metabolism, including PET, fMRI, MRS and ASL. This review discusses what is currently known about cerebral metabolism during hypoglycemia, and how findings obtained by functional and metabolic neuroimaging techniques contributed to this knowledge. PMID:26521082

  7. Common Data Elements for Neuroimaging of Traumatic Brain Injury: Pediatric Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Holshouser, Barbara; Hunter, Jill V.; Tong, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract As part of the Traumatic Brain Injury Common Data Elements project, a large-scale effort to define common data elements across a variety of domains, including neuroimaging, special considerations for pediatric patients were introduced. This article is an extension of that initial work, in which pediatric-specific pathoanatomical entities, technical considerations, interpretation paradigms, and safety considerations were reviewed. The goal of this review was to outline differences and specific information relevant to optimal performance and proper interpretation of neuroimaging in pediatric patients with traumatic brain injury. The long-range goal of this project is to facilitate data sharing as well as to provide critical infrastructure for potential clinical trials in this major public health area. PMID:21671798

  8. Neuroimaging for drug addiction and related behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Parvaz, Muhammad A.; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Woicik, Patricia A.; Volkow, Nora D.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we highlight the role of neuroimaging techniques in studying the emotional and cognitive-behavioral components of the addiction syndrome by focusing on the neural substrates subserving them. The phenomenology of drug addiction can be characterized by a recurrent pattern of subjective experiences that includes drug intoxication, craving, bingeing, and withdrawal with the cycle culminating in a persistent preoccupation with obtaining, consuming, and recovering from the drug. In the past two decades, imaging studies of drug addiction have demonstrated deficits in brain circuits related to reward and impulsivity. The current review focuses on studies employing positron emission tomography (PET), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate these behaviors in drug-addicted human populations. We begin with a brief account of drug addiction followed by a technical account of each of these imaging modalities. We then discuss how these techniques have uniquely contributed to a deeper understanding of addictive behaviors. PMID:22117165

  9. The Human Connectome Project's neuroimaging approach.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Matthew F; Smith, Stephen M; Marcus, Daniel S; Andersson, Jesper L R; Auerbach, Edward J; Behrens, Timothy E J; Coalson, Timothy S; Harms, Michael P; Jenkinson, Mark; Moeller, Steen; Robinson, Emma C; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Xu, Junqian; Yacoub, Essa; Ugurbil, Kamil; Van Essen, David C

    2016-08-26

    Noninvasive human neuroimaging has yielded many discoveries about the brain. Numerous methodological advances have also occurred, though inertia has slowed their adoption. This paper presents an integrated approach to data acquisition, analysis and sharing that builds upon recent advances, particularly from the Human Connectome Project (HCP). The 'HCP-style' paradigm has seven core tenets: (i) collect multimodal imaging data from many subjects; (ii) acquire data at high spatial and temporal resolution; (iii) preprocess data to minimize distortions, blurring and temporal artifacts; (iv) represent data using the natural geometry of cortical and subcortical structures; (v) accurately align corresponding brain areas across subjects and studies; (vi) analyze data using neurobiologically accurate brain parcellations; and (vii) share published data via user-friendly databases. We illustrate the HCP-style paradigm using existing HCP data sets and provide guidance for future research. Widespread adoption of this paradigm should accelerate progress in understanding the brain in health and disease. PMID:27571196

  10. The experience of art: insights from neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The experience of art is a complex one. It emerges from the interaction of multiple cognitive and affective processes. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies are revealing the broadly distributed network of brain regions upon which it relies. This network can be divided into three functional components: (i) prefrontal, parietal, and temporal cortical regions support evaluative judgment, attentional processing, and memory retrieval; (ii) the reward circuit, including cortical, subcortical regions, and some of its regulators, is involved in the generation of pleasurable feelings and emotions, and the valuation and anticipation of reward; and (iii) attentional modulation of activity in low-, mid-, and high-level cortical sensory regions enhances the perceptual processing of certain features, relations, locations, or objects. Understanding how these regions act in concert to produce unique and moving art experiences and determining the impact of personal and cultural meaning and context on this network the biological foundation of the experience of art--remain future challenges. PMID:24041322

  11. Neuroimaging for drug addiction and related behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Parvaz M. A.; Parvaz, M.A.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik,P.A.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2011-10-01

    In this review, we highlight the role of neuroimaging techniques in studying the emotional and cognitive-behavioral components of the addiction syndrome by focusing on the neural substrates subserving them. The phenomenology of drug addiction can be characterized by a recurrent pattern of subjective experiences that includes drug intoxication, craving, bingeing, and withdrawal with the cycle culminating in a persistent preoccupation with obtaining, consuming, and recovering from the drug. In the past two decades, imaging studies of drug addiction have demonstrated deficits in brain circuits related to reward and impulsivity. The current review focuses on studies employing positron emission tomography (PET), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate these behaviors in drug-addicted human populations. We begin with a brief account of drug addiction followed by a technical account of each of these imaging modalities. We then discuss how these techniques have uniquely contributed to a deeper understanding of addictive behaviors.

  12. Neuroimaging of child abuse: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Heledd; Rubia, Katya

    2012-01-01

    Childhood maltreatment is a stressor that can lead to the development of behavior problems and affect brain structure and function. This review summarizes the current evidence for the effects of childhood maltreatment on behavior, cognition and the brain in adults and children. Neuropsychological studies suggest an association between child abuse and deficits in IQ, memory, working memory, attention, response inhibition and emotion discrimination. Structural neuroimaging studies provide evidence for deficits in brain volume, gray and white matter of several regions, most prominently the dorsolateral and ventromedial prefrontal cortex but also hippocampus, amygdala, and corpus callosum (CC). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies show evidence for deficits in structural interregional connectivity between these areas, suggesting neural network abnormalities. Functional imaging studies support this evidence by reporting atypical activation in the same brain regions during response inhibition, working memory, and emotion processing. There are, however, several limitations of the abuse research literature which are discussed, most prominently the lack of control for co-morbid psychiatric disorders, which make it difficult to disentangle which of the above effects are due to maltreatment, the associated psychiatric conditions or a combination or interaction between both. Overall, the better controlled studies that show a direct correlation between childhood abuse and brain measures suggest that the most prominent deficits associated with early childhood abuse are in the function and structure of lateral and ventromedial fronto-limbic brain areas and networks that mediate behavioral and affect control. Future, large scale multimodal neuroimaging studies in medication-naïve subjects, however, are needed that control for psychiatric co-morbidities in order to elucidate the structural and functional brain sequelae that are associated with early environmental adversity

  13. Identifying informative imaging biomarkers via tree structured sparse learning for AD diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Manhua; Zhang, Daoqiang; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-07-01

    Neuroimaging provides a powerful tool to characterize neurodegenerative progression and therapeutic efficacy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its prodromal stage-mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, since the disease pathology might cause different patterns of structural degeneration, which is not pre-known, it is still a challenging problem to identify the relevant imaging markers for facilitating disease interpretation and classification. Recently, sparse learning methods have been investigated in neuroimaging studies for selecting the relevant imaging biomarkers and have achieved very promising results on disease classification. However, in the standard sparse learning method, the spatial structure is often ignored, although it is important for identifying the informative biomarkers. In this paper, a sparse learning method with tree-structured regularization is proposed to capture patterns of pathological degeneration from fine to coarse scale, for helping identify the informative imaging biomarkers to guide the disease classification and interpretation. Specifically, we first develop a new tree construction method based on the hierarchical agglomerative clustering of voxel-wise imaging features in the whole brain, by taking into account their spatial adjacency, feature similarity and discriminability. In this way, the complexity of all possible multi-scale spatial configurations of imaging features can be reduced to a single tree of nested regions. Second, we impose the tree-structured regularization on the sparse learning to capture the imaging structures, and then use them for selecting the most relevant biomarkers. Finally, we train a support vector machine (SVM) classifier with the selected features to make the classification. We have evaluated our proposed method by using the baseline MR images of 830 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database, which includes 198 AD patients, 167 progressive MCI (pMCI), 236 stable MCI

  14. Neuroimaging for Pediatric Head Trauma: Do Patient and Hospital Characteristics Influence Who Gets Imaged?

    PubMed Central

    Mannix, Rebekah; Bourgeois, Florence T.; Schutzman, Sara A.; Bernstein, Ari; Lee, Lois K.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To identify patient, provider, and hospital characteristics associated with the use of neuroimaging in the evaluation of head trauma in children. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of children (≤19 years of age) with head injuries from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. NHAMCS collects data on approximately 25,000 visits annually to 600 randomly selected hospital emergency and outpatient departments. This study examined visits to U.S. emergency departments between 2002 and 2006. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze characteristics associated with neuroimaging in children with head injuries. Results: There were 50,835 pediatric visits in the 5 year sample, of which 1,256 (2.5%, 95% CI = 2.2% to 2.7%) were for head injury. Among these, 39% (95% CI = 34% to 43%) underwent evaluation with neuroimaging. In multivariable analyses, factors associated with neuroimaging included white race (odds ratio [OR] 1.5, 95% CI = 1.02 to 2.1), older age (OR 1.3, 95% CI = 1.1 to 1.5), presentation to a general hospital (vs. a pediatric hospital, OR 2.4, 95% CI = 1.1 to 5.3), more emergent triage status (OR 1.4, 95% CI = 1.1 to 1.8), admission or transfer (OR 2.7, 95% CI = 1.4 to 5.3), and treatment by an attending physician (OR 2.0, 95% CI = 1.1 to 3.7). The effect of race was mitigated at the pediatric hospitals compared to at the general hospitals (p < 0.001). Conclusions: In this study, patient race, age, and hospital-specific characteristics were associated with the frequency of neuroimaging in the evaluation of children with closed head injuries. Based on these results, focusing quality improvement initiatives on physicians at general hospitals may be an effective approach to decreasing rates of neuroimaging after pediatric head trauma. PMID:20653582

  15. Functional neuroimaging studies of post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Katherine C; Shin, Lisa M

    2011-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a significant problem that can affect individuals who have been exposed to a traumatic event or events, such as combat, violent crime or childhood abuse. Over the past several years, neuroimaging studies of PTSD have focused on elucidating the brain circuits that mediate this disorder. In this article, we will briefly introduce some of the methods used in functional neuroimaging studies of PTSD. We will then review functional neuroimaging studies that have reported significant findings in the amygdala, medial prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and insula. Finally, we will suggest future directions for research. PMID:21306214

  16. STGP: Spatio-temporal Gaussian process models for longitudinal neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Jung Won; Li, Yimei; Huang, Chao; Styner, Martin; Lin, Weili; Zhu, Hongtu

    2016-07-01

    Longitudinal neuroimaging data plays an important role in mapping the neural developmental profile of major neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and normal brain. The development of such developmental maps is critical for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of many brain-related diseases. The aim of this paper is to develop a spatio-temporal Gaussian process (STGP) framework to accurately delineate the developmental trajectories of brain structure and function, while achieving better prediction by explicitly incorporating the spatial and temporal features of longitudinal neuroimaging data. Our STGP integrates a functional principal component model (FPCA) and a partition parametric space-time covariance model to capture the medium-to-large and small-to-medium spatio-temporal dependence structures, respectively. We develop a three-stage efficient estimation procedure as well as a predictive method based on a kriging technique. Two key novelties of STGP are that it can efficiently use a small number of parameters to capture complex non-stationary and non-separable spatio-temporal dependence structures and that it can accurately predict spatio-temporal changes. We illustrate STGP using simulated data sets and two real data analyses including longitudinal positron emission tomography data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and longitudinal lateral ventricle surface data from a longitudinal study of early brain development. PMID:27103140

  17. Functional neuroimaging and schizophrenia: a view towards effective connectivity modeling and polygenic risk

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Rebecca; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    We review critical trends in imaging genetics as applied to schizophrenia research, and then discuss some future directions of the field. A plethora of imaging genetics studies have investigated the impact of genetic variation on brain function, since the paradigm of a neuroimaging intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia first emerged. It was initially posited that the effects of schizophrenia susceptibility genes would be more penetrant at the level of biologically based neuroimaging intermediate phenotypes than at the level of a complex and phenotypically heterogeneous psychiatric syndrome. The results of many studies support this assumption, most of which show single genetic variants to be associated with changes in activity of localized brain regions, as determined by select cognitive controlled tasks. From these basic studies, functional neuroimaging analysis of intermediate phenotypes has progressed to more complex and realistic models of brain dysfunction, incorporating models of functional and effective connectivity, including the modalities of psycho-physiological interaction, dynamic causal modeling, and graph theory metrics. The genetic association approaches applied to imaging genetics have also progressed to more sophisticated multivariate effects, including incorporation of two-way and three-way epistatic interactions, and most recently polygenic risk models. Imaging genetics is a unique and powerful strategy for understanding the neural mechanisms of genetic risk for complex CNS disorders at the human brain level. PMID:24174900

  18. Functional neuroimaging and schizophrenia: a view towards effective connectivity modeling and polygenic risk.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Rebecca; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2013-09-01

    We review critical trends in imaging genetics as applied to schizophrenia research, and then discuss some future directions of the field. A plethora of imaging genetics studies have investigated the impact of genetic variation on brain function, since the paradigm of a neuroimaging intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia first emerged. It was initially posited that the effects of schizophrenia susceptibility genes would be more penetrant at the level of biologically based neuroimaging intermediate phenotypes than at the level of a complex and phenotypically heterogeneous psychiatric syndrome. The results of many studies support this assumption, most of which show single genetic variants to be associated with changes in activity of localized brain regions, as determined by select cognitive controlled tasks. From these basic studies, functional neuroimaging analysis of intermediate phenotypes has progressed to more complex and realistic models of brain dysfunction, incorporating models of functional and effective connectivity, including the modalities of psycho-physiological interaction, dynamic causal modeling, and graph theory metrics. The genetic association approaches applied to imaging genetics have also progressed to more sophisticated multivariate effects, including incorporation of two-way and three-way epistatic interactions, and most recently polygenic risk models. Imaging genetics is a unique and powerful strategy for understanding the neural mechanisms of genetic risk for complex CNS disorders at the human brain level. PMID:24174900

  19. A review of neuroimaging findings in repetitive brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Koerte, Inga K; Lin, Alexander P; Willems, Anna; Muehlmann, Marc; Hufschmidt, Jakob; Coleman, Michael J; Green, Isobel; Liao, Huijun; Tate, David F; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Pasternak, Ofer; Bouix, Sylvain; Rathi, Yogesh; Bigler, Erin D; Stern, Robert A; Shenton, Martha E

    2015-05-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease confirmed at postmortem. Those at highest risk are professional athletes who participate in contact sports and military personnel who are exposed to repetitive blast events. All neuropathologically confirmed CTE cases, to date, have had a history of repetitive head impacts. This suggests that repetitive head impacts may be necessary for the initiation of the pathogenetic cascade that, in some cases, leads to CTE. Importantly, while all CTE appears to result from repetitive brain trauma, not all repetitive brain trauma results in CTE. Magnetic resonance imaging has great potential for understanding better the underlying mechanisms of repetitive brain trauma. In this review, we provide an overview of advanced imaging techniques currently used to investigate brain anomalies. We also provide an overview of neuroimaging findings in those exposed to repetitive head impacts in the acute/subacute and chronic phase of injury and in more neurodegenerative phases of injury, as well as in military personnel exposed to repetitive head impacts. Finally, we discuss future directions for research that will likely lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms separating those who recover from repetitive brain trauma vs. those who go on to develop CTE. PMID:25904047

  20. Role of Neuroimaging in the Presurgical Evaluation of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lüders, Hans

    2008-01-01

    A significant minority of patients with focal epilepsy are candidates for resective epilepsy surgery. Structural and functional neuroimaging plays an important role in the presurgical evaluation of theses patients. The most frequent etiologies of pharmacoresistant epilepsy in the adult population are mesial temporal sclerosis, malformations of cortical development, cavernous angiomas, and low-grade neoplasms. High-resolution multiplanar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with sequences providing T1 and T2 contrast is the initial imaging study of choice to detect these epileptogenic lesions. The epilepsy MRI protocol can be individually tailored when considering the patient's clinical and electrophysiological data. Metabolic imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) visualize metabolic alterations of the brain in the ictal and interictal states. These techniques may have localizing value in patients with a normal MRI scan. Functional MRI is helpful in non-invasively identifying areas of eloquent cortex. Developments in imaging technology and digital postprocessing may increase the yield for imaging studies to detect the epileptogenic lesion and to characterize its connectivity within the epileptic brain. PMID:19513318

  1. Neuroimaging in adult penetrating brain injury: a guide for radiographers

    SciTech Connect

    Temple, Nikki; Donald, Cortny; Skora, Amanda; Reed, Warren

    2015-06-15

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are a medical emergency, often resulting in complex damage and high mortality rates. Neuroimaging is essential to evaluate the location and extent of injuries, and to manage them accordingly. Currently, a myriad of imaging modalities are included in the diagnostic workup for adult PBI, including skull radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography, with each modality providing their own particular benefits. This literature review explores the current modalities available for investigating PBI and aims to assist in decision making for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging when presented with an adult PBI. Based on the current literature, the authors have developed an imaging pathway for adult penetrating brain injury that functions as both a learning tool and reference guide for radiographers and other health professionals. Currently, CT is recommended as the imaging modality of choice for the initial assessment of PBI patients, while MRI is important in the sub-acute setting where it aids prognosis prediction and rehabilitation planning, Additional follow-up imaging, such as angiography, should be dependent upon clinical findings.

  2. Neuroimaging in adult penetrating brain injury: a guide for radiographers.

    PubMed

    Temple, Nikki; Donald, Cortny; Skora, Amanda; Reed, Warren

    2015-06-01

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are a medical emergency, often resulting in complex damage and high mortality rates. Neuroimaging is essential to evaluate the location and extent of injuries, and to manage them accordingly. Currently, a myriad of imaging modalities are included in the diagnostic workup for adult PBI, including skull radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography, with each modality providing their own particular benefits. This literature review explores the current modalities available for investigating PBI and aims to assist in decision making for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging when presented with an adult PBI. Based on the current literature, the authors have developed an imaging pathway for adult penetrating brain injury that functions as both a learning tool and reference guide for radiographers and other health professionals. Currently, CT is recommended as the imaging modality of choice for the initial assessment of PBI patients, while MRI is important in the sub-acute setting where it aids prognosis prediction and rehabilitation planning, Additional follow-up imaging, such as angiography, should be dependent upon clinical findings. PMID:26229677

  3. Neuroimaging the temporal dynamics of human avoidance to sustained threat.

    PubMed

    Schlund, Michael W; Hudgins, Caleb D; Magee, Sandy; Dymond, Simon

    2013-11-15

    Many forms of human psychopathology are characterized by sustained negative emotional responses to threat and chronic behavioral avoidance, implicating avoidance as a potential transdiagnostic factor. Evidence from both nonhuman neurophysiological and human neuroimaging studies suggests a distributed frontal-limbic-striatal brain network supports avoidance. However, our understanding of the temporal dynamics of the network to sustained threat that prompts sustained avoidance is limited. To address this issue, 17 adults were given extensive training on a modified free-operant avoidance task in which button pressing avoided money loss during a sustained threat period. Subsequently, subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing the avoidance task. In our regions of interest, we observed phasic, rather than sustained, activation during sustained threat in dorsolateral and inferior frontal regions, anterior and dorsal cingulate, ventral striatum and regions associated with emotion, including the amygdala, insula, substantia nigra and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis complex. Moreover, trait levels of experiential avoidance were negatively correlated with insula, hippocampal and amygdala activation. These findings suggest knowledge that one can consistently avoid aversive outcomes is not associated with decreased threat-related responses and that individuals with greater experiential avoidance exhibit reduced reactivity to initial threat. Implications for understanding brain mechanisms supporting human avoidance and psychological theories of avoidance are discussed. PMID:24095880

  4. Functional Neuroimaging Abnormalities in Psychosis Spectrum Youth

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Daniel H.; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Calkins, Monica E.; Ruparel, Kosha; Elliott, Mark A.; Hopson, Ryan D.; Jackson, Chad; Prabhakaran, Karthik; Bilker, Warren B.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2015-01-01

    Importance The continuum view of the psychosis spectrum (PS) implies that in population-based samples, PS symptoms should be associated with neural abnormalities similar to those found in help-seeking clinical-risk individuals and in schizophrenia. Functional neuroimaging has not previously been applied in large population-based PS samples, and can help understand the neural architecture of psychosis more broadly, and identify brain phenotypes beyond symptomatology that are associated with the extended psychosis phenotype. Objective To examine the categorical and dimensional relationships of PS symptoms to prefrontal hypoactivation during working memory and to amygdala hyperactivation during threat emotion processing. Design The Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort (PNC) is a genotyped prospectively accrued population-based sample of nearly 10,000 youths, who received a structured psychiatric evaluation and a computerized neurocognitive battery. A subsample of 1,445 subjects underwent neuroimaging including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) tasks examined here. Setting The PNC is a collaboration between The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Participants Youths ages 11–22 years identified through structured interview as having psychosis-spectrum features (PS, n=260), and typically developing comparison subjects without significant psychopathology (TD, n=220). Main Outcomes and Measures Two fMRI paradigms were utilized, a fractal n-back working memory task probing executive system function, and an emotion identification task probing amygdala responses to threatening faces. Results In the n-back task, PS showed reduced activation in executive control circuitry, which correlated with cognitive deficits. During emotion identification, PS demonstrated elevated amygdala responses to threatening facial expressions, which correlated with positive symptom severity. Conclusions and Relevance The pattern of

  5. Efficient, Distributed and Interactive Neuroimaging Data Analysis Using the LONI Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Dinov, Ivo D; Van Horn, John D; Lozev, Kamen M; Magsipoc, Rico; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; Mackenzie-Graham, Allan; Eggert, Paul; Parker, Douglas S; Toga, Arthur W

    2009-01-01

    The LONI Pipeline is a graphical environment for construction, validation and execution of advanced neuroimaging data analysis protocols (Rex et al., 2003). It enables automated data format conversion, allows Grid utilization, facilitates data provenance, and provides a significant library of computational tools. There are two main advantages of the LONI Pipeline over other graphical analysis workflow architectures. It is built as a distributed Grid computing environment and permits efficient tool integration, protocol validation and broad resource distribution. To integrate existing data and computational tools within the LONI Pipeline environment, no modification of the resources themselves is required. The LONI Pipeline provides several types of process submissions based on the underlying server hardware infrastructure. Only workflow instructions and references to data, executable scripts and binary instructions are stored within the LONI Pipeline environment. This makes it portable, computationally efficient, distributed and independent of the individual binary processes involved in pipeline data-analysis workflows. We have expanded the LONI Pipeline (V.4.2) to include server-to-server (peer-to-peer) communication and a 3-tier failover infrastructure (Grid hardware, Sun Grid Engine/Distributed Resource Management Application API middleware, and the Pipeline server). Additionally, the LONI Pipeline provides three layers of background-server executions for all users/sites/systems. These new LONI Pipeline features facilitate resource-interoperability, decentralized computing, construction and validation of efficient and robust neuroimaging data-analysis workflows. Using brain imaging data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (Mueller et al., 2005), we demonstrate integration of disparate resources, graphical construction of complex neuroimaging analysis protocols and distributed parallel computing. The LONI Pipeline, its features, specifications

  6. Efficient, Distributed and Interactive Neuroimaging Data Analysis Using the LONI Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Van Horn, John D.; Lozev, Kamen M.; Magsipoc, Rico; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; MacKenzie-Graham, Allan; Eggert, Paul; Parker, Douglas S.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2009-01-01

    The LONI Pipeline is a graphical environment for construction, validation and execution of advanced neuroimaging data analysis protocols (Rex et al., 2003). It enables automated data format conversion, allows Grid utilization, facilitates data provenance, and provides a significant library of computational tools. There are two main advantages of the LONI Pipeline over other graphical analysis workflow architectures. It is built as a distributed Grid computing environment and permits efficient tool integration, protocol validation and broad resource distribution. To integrate existing data and computational tools within the LONI Pipeline environment, no modification of the resources themselves is required. The LONI Pipeline provides several types of process submissions based on the underlying server hardware infrastructure. Only workflow instructions and references to data, executable scripts and binary instructions are stored within the LONI Pipeline environment. This makes it portable, computationally efficient, distributed and independent of the individual binary processes involved in pipeline data-analysis workflows. We have expanded the LONI Pipeline (V.4.2) to include server-to-server (peer-to-peer) communication and a 3-tier failover infrastructure (Grid hardware, Sun Grid Engine/Distributed Resource Management Application API middleware, and the Pipeline server). Additionally, the LONI Pipeline provides three layers of background-server executions for all users/sites/systems. These new LONI Pipeline features facilitate resource-interoperability, decentralized computing, construction and validation of efficient and robust neuroimaging data-analysis workflows. Using brain imaging data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (Mueller et al., 2005), we demonstrate integration of disparate resources, graphical construction of complex neuroimaging analysis protocols and distributed parallel computing. The LONI Pipeline, its features, specifications

  7. The Evolution of Neuroimaging Research and Developmental Language Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Angela B.; Foundas, Anne L.; Leonard, Christiana M.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews current neuroimaging literature, including computer tomography, positron emission tomography, single photon emission spectroscopy, and magnetic resonance imaging, on individuals with developmental language disorders. The review suggests a complicated relationship between cortical morphometry and language development that is…

  8. Terminology development towards harmonizing multiple clinical neuroimaging research repositories

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jessica A.; Pasquerello, Danielle; Turner, Matthew D.; Keator, David B.; Alpert, Kathryn; King, Margaret; Landis, Drew; Calhoun, Vince D.; Potkin, Steven G.; Tallis, Marcelo; Ambite, Jose Luis; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Data sharing and mediation across disparate neuroimaging repositories requires extensive effort to ensure that the different domains of data types are referred to by commonly agreed upon terms. Within the SchizConnect project, which enables querying across decentralized databases of neuroimaging, clinical, and cognitive data from various studies of schizophrenia, we developed a model for each data domain, identified common usable terms that could be agreed upon across the repositories, and linked them to standard ontological terms where possible. We had the goal of facilitating both the current user experience in querying and future automated computations and reasoning regarding the data. We found that existing terminologies are incomplete for these purposes, even with the history of neuroimaging data sharing in the field; and we provide a model for efforts focused on querying multiple clinical neuroimaging repositories. PMID:26688838

  9. Auditory Neuroimaging with fMRI and PET

    PubMed Central

    Talavage, Thomas M.; Gonzalez-Castillo, Javier; Scott, Sophie K.

    2013-01-01

    For much of the past 30 years, investigations of auditory perception and language have been enhanced or even driven by the use of functional neuroimaging techniques that specialize in localization of central responses. Beginning with investigations using positron emission tomography (PET) and gradually shifting primarily to usage of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), auditory neuroimaging has greatly advanced our understanding of the organization and response properties of brain regions critical to the perception of and communication with the acoustic world in which we live. As the complexity of the questions being addressed has increased, the techniques, experiments and analyses applied have also become more nuanced and specialized. A brief review of the history of these investigations sets the stage for an overview and analysis of how these neuroimaging modalities are becoming ever more effective tools for understanding the auditory brain. We conclude with a brief discussion of open methodological issues as well as potential clinical applications for auditory neuroimaging. PMID:24076424

  10. [Neuroimaging findings in cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts].

    PubMed

    Herrera, Diego Alberto; Vargas, Sergio Alberto; Montoya, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts is a rare condition characterized by brain, retinal and bone anomalies, as well as a predisposition to gastrointestinal bleeding. There are few reported cases of this condition in adults, among whom the incidence is low. Neuroimaging findings are characteristic, with bilateral calcifications, leukoencephalopathy and intracranial cysts. The purpose of this article was to do a literature survey and illustrate two cases diagnosed with the aid of neuroimaging. PMID:24967922

  11. Neuroimaging findings in treatment-resistant schizophrenia: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Shinichiro; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Plitman, Eric; Fervaha, Gagan; Gerretsen, Philip; Caravaggio, Fernando; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent developments in neuroimaging have advanced understanding biological mechanisms underlying schizophrenia. However, neuroimaging correlates of treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS) and superior effects of clozapine on TRS remain unclear. Methods Systematic search was performed to identify neuroimaging characteristics unique to TRS and ultra-resistant schizophrenia (i.e. clozapine-resistant [URS]), and clozapine's efficacy in TRS using Embase, Medline, and PsychInfo. Search terms included (schizophreni*) and (resistan* OR refractory OR clozapine) and (ASL OR CT OR DTI OR FMRI OR MRI OR MRS OR NIRS OR PET OR SPECT). Results 25 neuroimaging studies have investigated TRS and effects of clozapine. Only 5 studies have compared TRS and non-TRS, collectively providing no replicated neuroimaging finding specific to TRS. Studies comparing TRS and healthy controls suggest hypometabolism in the prefrontal cortex, hypermetabolism in the basal ganglia, and structural anomalies in the corpus callosum contribute to TRS. Clozapine may increase prefrontal hypoactivation in TRS although this was not related to clinical improvement; in contrast, evidence has suggested a link between clozapine efficacy and decreased metabolism in the basal ganglia and thalamus. Conclusion Existing literature does not elucidate neuroimaging correlates specific to TRS or URS, which, if present, might also shed light on clozapine's efficacy in TRS. This said, leads from other lines of investigation, including the glutamatergic system can prove useful in guiding future neuroimaging studies focused on, in particular, the frontocortical-basal ganglia-thalamic circuits. Critical to the success of this work will be precise subtyping of study subjects based on treatment response/nonresponse and the use of multimodal neuroimaging. PMID:25684554

  12. Human Neuroimaging as a “Big Data” Science

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Toga, Arthur W.

    2013-01-01

    The maturation of in vivo neuroimaging has lead to incredible quantities of digital information about the human brain. While much is made of the data deluge in science, neuroimaging represents the leading edge of this onslaught of “big data”. A range of neuroimaging databasing approaches has streamlined the transmission, storage, and dissemination of data from such brain imaging studies. Yet few, if any, common solutions exist to support the science of neuroimaging. In this article, we discuss how modern neuroimaging research represents a mutifactorial and broad ranging data challenge, involving the growing size of the data being acquired; sociologial and logistical sharing issues; infrastructural challenges for multi-site, multi-datatype archiving; and the means by which to explore and mine these data. As neuroimaging advances further, e.g. aging, genetics, and age-related disease, new vision is needed to manage and process this information while marshalling of these resources into novel results. Thus, “big data” can become “big” brain science. PMID:24113873

  13. Neuroimaging supports central pathology in familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Hilz, Max J; Berlin, Dena; Yau, Po Lai; Javier, David; Sweat, Victoria; Bruehl, Hannah; Convit, Antonio

    2010-02-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a hereditary peripheral and central nervous system disorder with poorly defined central neuropathology. This prospective pilot study aimed to determine if MRI would provide objective parameters of central neuropathology. There were 14 study subjects, seven FD individuals (18.6 +/- 4.2 years, 3 female) and seven controls (19.1 +/- 5.8 years, 3 female). All subjects had standardized brain MRI evaluation including quantitative regional volume measurements, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for assessment of white matter (WM) microstructural integrity by calculation of fractional anisotropy (FA), and proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) to assess neuronal health. The FD patients had significantly decreased FA in optic radiation (p = 0.009) and middle cerebellar peduncle (p = 0.004). Voxel-wise analysis identified both GM and WM microstructural damage among FD subjects as there were nine clusters of WM FA reductions and 16 clusters of GM apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) elevations. Their WM proportion was significantly decreased (p = 0.003) as was the WM proportion in the frontal region (p = 0.007). (1)H MRS showed no significant abnormalities. The findings of WM abnormalities and decreased optic radiation and middle cerebellar peduncle FA in the FD study group, suggest compromised myelination and WM micro-structural integrity in FD brains. These neuroimaging results are consistent with clinical visual abnormalities and gait disturbance. Furthermore the frontal lobe atrophy is consistent with previously reported neuropsychological deficits. PMID:19705052

  14. Sleep Neuroimaging and Models of Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Behrens, Marion; Laufs, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Human deep sleep is characterized by reduced sensory activity, responsiveness to stimuli, and conscious awareness. Given its ubiquity and reversible nature, it represents an attractive paradigm to study the neural changes which accompany the loss of consciousness in humans. In particular, the deepest stages of sleep can serve as an empirical test for the predictions of theoretical models relating the phenomenology of consciousness with underlying neural activity. A relatively recent shift of attention from the analysis of evoked responses toward spontaneous (or “resting state”) activity has taken place in the neuroimaging community, together with the development of tools suitable to study distributed functional interactions. In this review we focus on recent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies of spontaneous activity during sleep and their relationship with theoretical models for human consciousness generation, considering the global workspace theory, the information integration theory, and the dynamical core hypothesis. We discuss the venues of research opened by these results, emphasizing the need to extend the analytic methodology in order to obtain a dynamical picture of how functional interactions change over time and how their evolution is modulated during different conscious states. Finally, we discuss the need to experimentally establish absent or reduced conscious content, even when studying the deepest sleep stages. PMID:23717291

  15. Challenges for Molecular Neuroimaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lelyveld, Victor S.; Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Jasanoff, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MRI)-based molecular imaging methods are beginning to have impact in neuroscience. A growing number of molecular imaging agents have been synthesized and tested in vitro, but so far relatively few have been validated in the brains of live animals. Here, we discuss key challenges associated with expanding the repertoire of successful molecular neuroimaging approaches. The difficulty of delivering agents past the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a particular obstacle to molecular imaging in the central nervous system. We review established and emerging techniques for trans-BBB delivery, including intracranial infusion, BBB disruption, and transporter-related methods. Improving the sensitivity with which MRI-based molecular agents can be detected is a second major challenge. Better sensitivity would in turn reduce the requirements for delivery and alleviate potential side effects. We discuss recent efforts to enhance relaxivity of conventional longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and transverse relaxation time (T2) MRI contrast agents, as well as strategies that involve amplifying molecular signals or reducing endogenous background influences. With ongoing refinement of imaging approaches and brain delivery methods, MRI-based techniques for molecular-level neuroscientific investigation will fall increasingly within reach. PMID:20808721

  16. Neuroimaging studies in people with gender incongruence.

    PubMed

    Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Guillamon, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The current review gives an overview of brain studies in transgender people. First, we describe studies into the aetiology of feelings of gender incongruence, primarily addressing the sexual differentiation hypothesis: does the brain of transgender individuals resemble that of their natal sex, or that of their experienced gender? Findings from neuroimaging studies focusing on brain structure suggest that the brain phenotypes of trans women (MtF) and trans men (FtM) differ in various ways from control men and women with feminine, masculine, demasculinized and defeminized features. The brain phenotypes of people with feelings of gender incongruence may help us to figure out whether sex differentiation of the brain is atypical in these individuals, and shed light on gender identity development. Task-related imaging studies may show whether brain activation and task performance in transgender people is sex-atypical. Second, we review studies that evaluate the effects of cross-sex hormone treatment on the brain. This type of research provides knowledge on how changes in sex hormone levels may affect brain structure and function. PMID:26766406

  17. Effect of CLU genetic variants on cerebrospinal fluid and neuroimaging markers in healthy, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease cohorts.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lin; Wang, Hui-Fu; Tan, Meng-Shan; Tan, Chen-Chen; Zhu, Xi-Chen; Miao, Dan; Yu, Wan-Jiang; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-01-01

    The Clusterin (CLU) gene, also known as apolipoprotein J (ApoJ), is currently the third most associated late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) risk gene. However, little was known about the possible effect of CLU genetic variants on AD pathology in brain. Here, we evaluated the interaction between 7 CLU SNPs (covering 95% of genetic variations) and the role of CLU in β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition, AD-related structure atrophy, abnormal glucose metabolism on neuroimaging and CSF markers to clarify the possible approach by that CLU impacts AD. Finally, four loci (rs11136000, rs1532278, rs2279590, rs7982) showed significant associations with the Aβ deposition at the baseline level while genotypes of rs9331888 (P = 0.042) increased Aβ deposition. Besides, rs9331888 was significantly associated with baseline volume of left hippocampus (P = 0.014). We then further validated the association with Aβ deposition in the AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), normal control (NC) sub-groups. The results in sub-groups confirmed the association between CLU genotypes and Aβ deposition further. Our findings revealed that CLU genotypes could probably modulate the cerebral the Aβ loads on imaging and volume of hippocampus. These findings raise the possibility that the biological effects of CLU may be relatively confined to neuroimaging trait and hence may offer clues to AD. PMID:27229352

  18. Polarised black holes in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Miguel S.; Greenspan, Lauren; Oliveira, Miguel; Penedones, João; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-06-01

    We consider solutions in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a negative cosmological constant that asymptote to global AdS 4 with conformal boundary {S}2× {{{R}}}t. At the sphere at infinity we turn on a space-dependent electrostatic potential, which does not destroy the asymptotic AdS behaviour. For simplicity we focus on the case of a dipolar electrostatic potential. We find two new geometries: (i) an AdS soliton that includes the full backreaction of the electric field on the AdS geometry; (ii) a polarised neutral black hole that is deformed by the electric field, accumulating opposite charges in each hemisphere. For both geometries we study boundary data such as the charge density and the stress tensor. For the black hole we also study the horizon charge density and area, and further verify a Smarr formula. Then we consider this system at finite temperature and compute the Gibbs free energy for both AdS soliton and black hole phases. The corresponding phase diagram generalizes the Hawking-Page phase transition. The AdS soliton dominates the low temperature phase and the black hole the high temperature phase, with a critical temperature that decreases as the external electric field increases. Finally, we consider the simple case of a free charged scalar field on {S}2× {{{R}}}t with conformal coupling. For a field in the SU(N ) adjoint representation we compare the phase diagram with the above gravitational system.

  19. Neuroimaging characteristics of dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Williams, Guy B; O'Brien, John T

    2014-01-01

    This review summarises the findings and applications from neuroimaging studies in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), highlighting key differences between DLB and other subtypes of dementia. We also discuss the increasingly important role of imaging biomarkers in differential diagnosis and outline promising areas for future research in DLB. DLB shares common clinical, neuropsychological and pathological features with Parkinson's disease dementia and other dementia subtypes, such as Alzheimer's disease. Despite the development of consensus diagnostic criteria, the sensitivity for differential diagnosis of DLB in clinical practice remains low and many DLB patients will be misdiagnosed. The importance of developing accurate imaging markers in dementia is highlighted by the potential for treatments targeting specific molecular abnormalities as well as the responsiveness to cholinesterase inhibitors and marked neuroleptic sensitivity of DLB. We review various brain imaging techniques that have been applied to investigate DLB, including the characteristic nigrostriatal degeneration in DLB using positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers. Dopamine transporter loss has proven to reliably differentiate DLB from other dementias and has been incorporated into the revised clinical diagnostic criteria for DLB. To date, this remains the 'gold standard' for diagnostic imaging of DLB. Regional cerebral blood flow, 18 F-fluorodeoxygluclose-PET and SPECT have also identified marked deficits in the occipital regions with relative sparing of the medial temporal lobe when compared to Alzheimer's disease. In addition, structural, diffusion, and functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques have shown alterations in structure, white matter integrity, and functional activity in DLB. We argue that the multimodal identification of DLB-specific biomarkers has the potential to improve ante-mortem diagnosis and contribute to our

  20. The human parental brain: In vivo neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Swain, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Interacting parenting thoughts and behaviors, supported by key brain circuits, critically shape human infants’ current and future behavior. Indeed, the parent–infant relationship provides infants with their first social environment, forming templates for what they can expect from others, how to interact with them and ultimately how they go on to themselves to be parents. This review concentrates on magnetic resonance imaging experiments of the human parent brain, which link brain physiology with parental thoughts and behaviors. After reviewing brain imaging techniques, certain social cognitive and affective concepts are reviewed, including empathy and trust—likely critical to parenting. Following that is a thorough study-by-study review of the state-of-the-art with respect to human neuroimaging studies of the parental brain—from parent brain responses to salient infant stimuli, including emotionally charged baby cries and brief visual stimuli to the latest structural brain studies. Taken together, this research suggests that networks of highly conserved hypothalamic–midbrain–limbic–paralimbic–cortical circuits act in concert to support parental brain responses to infants, including circuits for limbic emotion response and regulation. Thus, a model is presented in which infant stimuli activate sensory analysis brain regions, affect corticolimbic limbic circuits that regulate emotional response, motivation and reward related to their infant, ultimately organizing parenting impulses, thoughts and emotions into coordinated behaviors as a map for future studies. Finally, future directions towards integrated understanding of the brain basis of human parenting are outlined with profound implications for understanding and contributing to long term parent and infant mental health. PMID:21036196

  1. Analyzing neuroimaging data with subclasses: A shrinkage approach.

    PubMed

    Höhne, Johannes; Bartz, Daniel; Hebart, Martin N; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Among the numerous methods used to analyze neuroimaging data, Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) is commonly applied for binary classification problems. LDAs popularity derives from its simplicity and its competitive classification performance, which has been reported for various types of neuroimaging data. Yet the standard LDA approach proves less than optimal for binary classification problems when additional label information (i.e. subclass labels) is present. Subclass labels allow to model structure in the data, which can be used to facilitate the classification task. In this paper, we illustrate how neuroimaging data exhibit subclass labels that may contain valuable information. We also show that the standard LDA classifier is unable to exploit subclass labels. We introduce a novel method that allows subclass labels to be incorporated efficiently into the classifier. The novel method, which we call Relevance Subclass LDA (RSLDA), computes an individual classification hyperplane for each subclass. It is based on regularized estimators of the subclass mean and uses other subclasses as regularization targets. We demonstrate the applicability and performance of our method on data drawn from two different neuroimaging modalities: (I) EEG data from brain-computer interfacing with event-related potentials, and (II) fMRI data in response to different levels of visual motion. We show that RSLDA outperforms the standard LDA approach for both types of datasets. These findings illustrate the benefits of exploiting subclass structure in neuroimaging data. Finally, we show that our classifier also outputs regularization profiles, enabling researchers to interpret the subclass structure in a meaningful way. RSLDA therefore yields increased classification accuracy as well as a better interpretation of neuroimaging data. Since both results are highly favorable, we suggest to apply RSLDA for various classification problems within neuroimaging and beyond. PMID:26407815

  2. Increased CNV-Region deletions in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) subjects in the ADNI sample

    PubMed Central

    Guffanti, Guia; Torri, Federica; Rasmussen, Jerod; Clark, Andrew P.; Lakatos, Anita; Turner, Jessica A.; Fallon, James H.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Weiner, Michael; Vawter, Marquis P.; Knowles, James A.; Potkin, Steven G.; Macciardi, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the genome-wide distribution of CNVs in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) sample (146 with AD, 313 with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and 181 controls). Comparison of single CNVs between cases (MCI and AD) and controls shows overrepresentation of large heterozygous deletions in cases (p-value < 0.0001). The analysis of CNV-Regions identifies 44 copy number variable loci of heterozygous deletions, with more CNV-Regions among affected than controls (p = 0.005). Seven of the 44 CNV-Regions are nominally significant for association with cognitive impairment. We validated and confirmed our main findings with genome re-sequencing of selected patients and controls. The functional pathway analysis of the genes putatively affected by deletions of CNV-Regions reveals enrichment of genes implicated in axonal guidance, cell–cell adhesion, neuronal morphogenesis and differentiation. Our findings support the role of CNVs in AD, and suggest an association between large deletions and the development of cognitive impairment PMID:23583670

  3. Prognostic serum miRNA biomarkers associated with Alzheimer's disease shows concordance with neuropsychological and neuroimaging assessment.

    PubMed

    Cheng, L; Doecke, J D; Sharples, R A; Villemagne, V L; Fowler, C J; Rembach, A; Martins, R N; Rowe, C C; Macaulay, S L; Masters, C L; Hill, A F

    2015-10-01

    There is no consensus for a blood-based test for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Expression profiling of small non-coding RNA's, microRNA (miRNA), has revealed diagnostic potential in human diseases. Circulating miRNA are found in small vesicles known as exosomes within biological fluids such as human serum. The aim of this work was to determine a set of differential exosomal miRNA biomarkers between healthy and AD patients, which may aid in diagnosis. Using next-generation deep sequencing, we profiled exosomal miRNA from serum (N=49) collected from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Flagship Study (AIBL). Sequencing results were validated using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR; N=60), with predictions performed using the Random Forest method. Additional risk factors collected during the 4.5-year AIBL Study including clinical, medical and cognitive assessments, and amyloid neuroimaging with positron emission tomography were assessed. An AD-specific 16-miRNA signature was selected and adding established risk factors including age, sex and apolipoprotein ɛ4 (APOE ɛ4) allele status to the panel of deregulated miRNA resulted in a sensitivity and specificity of 87% and 77%, respectively, for predicting AD. Furthermore, amyloid neuroimaging information for those healthy control subjects incorrectly classified with AD-suggested progression in these participants towards AD. These data suggest that an exosomal miRNA signature may have potential to be developed as a suitable peripheral screening tool for AD. PMID:25349172

  4. Functional neuroimaging of traumatic brain injury: advances and clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Andrei; Van Horn, John Darrell

    2015-01-01

    Functional deficits due to traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have significant and enduring consequences upon patients’ life quality and expectancy. Although functional neuroimaging is essential for understanding TBI pathophysiology, an insufficient amount of effort has been dedicated to the task of translating functional neuroimaging findings into information with clinical utility. The purpose of this review is to summarize the use of functional neuroimaging techniques – especially functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and electroencephalography – for advancing current knowledge of TBI-related brain dysfunction and for improving the rehabilitation of TBI patients. We focus on seven core areas of functional deficits, namely consciousness, motor function, attention, memory, higher cognition, personality, and affect, and, for each of these, we summarize recent findings from neuroimaging studies which have provided substantial insight into brain function changes due to TBI. Recommendations are also provided to aid in setting the direction of future neuroimaging research and for understanding brain function changes after TBI. PMID:26396520

  5. Neuroimaging in mental health care: voices in translation

    PubMed Central

    Borgelt, Emily L.; Buchman, Daniel Z.; Illes, Judy

    2012-01-01

    Images of brain function, popularly called “neuroimages,” have become a mainstay of contemporary communication about neuroscience and mental health. Paralleling media coverage of neuroimaging research and the high visibility of clinics selling scans is pressure from sponsors to move basic research about brain function along the translational pathway. Indeed, neuroimaging may offer benefits to mental health care: early or tailored intervention, opportunities for education and planning, and access to resources afforded by objectification of disorder. However, risks of premature technology transfer, such as misinterpretation, misrepresentation, and increased stigmatization, could compromise patient care. The insights of stakeholder groups about neuroimaging for mental health care are a largely untapped resource of information and guidance for translational efforts. We argue that the insights of key stakeholders—including researchers, healthcare providers, patients, and families—have an essential role to play upstream in professional, critical, and ethical discourse surrounding neuroimaging in mental health. Here we integrate previously orthogonal lines of inquiry involving stakeholder research to describe the translational landscape as well as challenges on its horizon. PMID:23097640

  6. Neuroimaging, a new tool for investigating the effects of early diet on cognitive and brain development

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, Elizabeth B.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrition is crucial to the initial development of the central nervous system (CNS), and then to its maintenance, because both depend on dietary intake to supply the elements required to develop and fuel the system. Diet in early life is often seen in the context of “programming” where a stimulus occurring during a vulnerable period can have long-lasting or even lifetime effects on some aspect of the organism's structure or function. Nutrition was first shown to be a programming stimulus for growth, and then for cognitive behavior, in animal studies that were able to employ methods that allowed the demonstration of neural effects of early nutrition. Such research raised the question of whether nutrition could also programme cognition/brain structure in humans. Initial studies of cognitive effects were observational, usually conducted in developing countries where the presence of confounding factors made it difficult to interpret the role of nutrition in the cognitive deficits that were seen. Attributing causality to nutrition required randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and these, often in developed countries, started to appear around 30 years ago. Most demonstrated convincingly that early nutrition could affect subsequent cognition. Until the advent of neuroimaging techniques that allowed in vivo examination of the brain, however, we could determine very little about the neural effects of early diet in humans. The combination of well-designed trials with neuroimaging tools means that we are now able to pose and answer questions that would have seemed impossible only recently. This review discusses various neuroimaging methods that are suitable for use in nutrition studies, while pointing out some of the limitations that they may have. The existing literature is small, but examples of studies that have used these methods are presented. Finally, some considerations that have arisen from previous studies, as well as suggestions for future research, are discussed

  7. The child with a cephalocele: etiology, neuroimaging, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lage, J F; Poza, M; Sola, J; Soler, C L; Montalvo, C G; Domingo, R; Puche, A; Ramón, F H; Azorín, P; Lasso, R

    1996-09-01

    We report a series of 46 children who were treated for one of the diverse forms of cranium bifidum during a period of 22 years. The purpose of the survey was to investigate pathogenetic factors involved in the development of cranial dysraphism and to analyze clinical and pathological factors that influence the patients' outcome. We also investigated the existence of associated intracranial anomalies, in a systematic way, using modern methods of neuroimaging, and related the findings to the patients' final results. The lesions were classified as encephalocele (n = 15), cranial meningocele (n = 3), atretic cephalocele (n = 26), cranium bifidum occultum (n = 1), and exencephaly (n = 1). There was an excess of the atretic form of cephaloceles in our series, a fact that probably reflects geographical variations described for cephaloceles in general. The location of the lesions was occipital in 29 children, parietal in 16, and temporal and frontobasal in one case each. In seven cases there was parental consanguinity. A familial history of malformations of the central nervous system was encountered in eight instances. Associated systemic abnormalities were present in 23 patients, while central nervous system anomalies were found in 36 children. Cephalocele repair was undertaken on 35 occasions. There were no surgical fatalities in the series. The mean follow-up time was of 7 years. Overall mortality for the whole group was of 17/46 or 36%. Twenty of the 29 survivors had no neurological sequelae, but only 18 children exhibited a competitive intelligence level. A good outcome was found to correlate well with: an average head size at birth, a normal initial neurological condition, operability of the lesions, and an absence of disorders of the neuronal migration. Neurological outcome depended also on the occurrence or not of hydrocephalus, while the intelligence level was mainly related to the absence of cerebral tissue within the sac of the malformation. PMID:8906370

  8. Lorentzian AdS geometries, wormholes, and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Raul E.; Silva, Guillermo A.; Botta Cantcheff, Marcelo

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the structure of two-point functions for the quantum field theory dual to an asymptotically Lorentzian Anti de Sitter (AdS) wormhole. The bulk geometry is a solution of five-dimensional second-order Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity and causally connects two asymptotically AdS spacetimes. We revisit the Gubser-Klebanov-Polyakov-Witten prescription for computing two-point correlation functions for dual quantum field theories operators O in Lorentzian signature and we propose to express the bulk fields in terms of the independent boundary values {phi}{sub 0}{sup {+-}} at each of the two asymptotic AdS regions; along the way we exhibit how the ambiguity of normalizable modes in the bulk, related to initial and final states, show up in the computations. The independent boundary values are interpreted as sources for dual operators O{sup {+-}} and we argue that, apart from the possibility of entanglement, there exists a coupling between the degrees of freedom living at each boundary. The AdS{sub 1+1} geometry is also discussed in view of its similar boundary structure. Based on the analysis, we propose a very simple geometric criterion to distinguish coupling from entanglement effects among two sets of degrees of freedom associated with each of the disconnected parts of the boundary.

  9. Functional neuroimaging studies of the effects of psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Beauregard, Mario

    2014-03-01

    It has been long established that psychological interventions can markedly alter patients' thinking patterns, beliefs, attitudes, emotional states, and behaviors. Little was known about the neural mechanisms mediating such alterations before the advent of functional neuroimaging techniques. Since the turn of the new millenium, several functional neuroimaging studies have been conducted to tackle this important issue. Some of these studies have explored the neural impact of various forms of psychotherapy in individuals with major depressive disorder. Other neuroimaging studies have investigated the effects of psychological interventions for anxiety disorders. I review these studies in the present article, and discuss the putative neural mechanisms of change in psychotherapy. The findings of these studies suggest that mental and behavioral changes occurring during psychotherapeutic interventions can lead to a normalization of functional brain activity at a global level. PMID:24733972

  10. Functional neuroimaging studies of the effects of psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Beauregard, Mario

    2014-01-01

    It has been long established that psychological interventions can markedly alter patients' thinking patterns, beliefs, attitudes, emotional states, and behaviors. Little was known about the neural mechanisms mediating such alterations before the advent of functional neuroimaging techniques. Since the turn of the new millenium, several functional neuroimaging studies have been conducted to tackle this important issue. Some of these studies have explored the neural impact of various forms of psychotherapy in individuals with major depressive disorder. Other neuroimaging studies have investigated the effects of psychological interventions for anxiety disorders. I review these studies in the present article, and discuss the putative neural mechanisms of change in psychotherapy. The findings of these studies suggest that mental and behavioral changes occurring during psychotherapeutic interventions can lead to a normalization of functional brain activity at a global level. PMID:24733972

  11. Neuroimaging data sharing on the neuroinformatics database platform.

    PubMed

    Book, Gregory A; Stevens, Michael C; Assaf, Michal; Glahn, David C; Pearlson, Godfrey D

    2016-01-01

    We describe the Neuroinformatics Database (NiDB), an open-source database platform for archiving, analysis, and sharing of neuroimaging data. Data from the multi-site projects Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE), Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes parts one and two (B-SNIP1, B-SNIP2), and Monetary Incentive Delay task (MID) are available for download from the public instance of NiDB, with more projects sharing data as it becomes available. As demonstrated by making several large datasets available, NiDB is an extensible platform appropriately suited to archive and distribute shared neuroimaging data. PMID:25888923

  12. Neuroimaging the interaction of mind and metabolism in humans

    PubMed Central

    D’Agostino, Alexandra E.; Small, Dana M.

    2012-01-01

    Hormonal and metabolic signals interact with neural circuits orchestrating behavior to guide food intake. Neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enable the identification of where in the brain particular mental processes like desire, satiety and pleasure occur. Once these neural circuits are described it then becomes possible to determine how metabolic and hormonal signals can alter brain response to influence psychological states and decision-making processes to guide intake. Here, we provide an overview of the contributions of functional neuroimaging to the understanding of how subjective and neural responses to food and food cues interact with metabolic/hormonal factors. PMID:24024114

  13. 3D surface analysis and classification in neuroimaging segmentation.

    PubMed

    Zagar, Martin; Mlinarić, Hrvoje; Knezović, Josip

    2011-06-01

    This work emphasizes new algorithms for 3D edge and corner detection used in surface extraction and new concept of image segmentation in neuroimaging based on multidimensional shape analysis and classification. We propose using of NifTI standard for describing input data which enables interoperability and enhancement of existing computing tools used widely in neuroimaging research. In methods section we present our newly developed algorithm for 3D edge and corner detection, together with the algorithm for estimating local 3D shape. Surface of estimated shape is analyzed and segmented according to kernel shapes. PMID:21755723

  14. Neuroimaging of Semantic Processing in Schizophrenia: A Parametric Priming Approach

    PubMed Central

    Han, S. Duke; Wible, Cynthia G.

    2009-01-01

    The use of fMRI and other neuroimaging techniques in the study of cognitive language processes in psychiatric and non-psychiatric conditions has led at times to discrepant findings. Many issues complicate the study of language, especially in psychiatric populations. For example, the use of subtractive designs can produce misleading results. We propose and advocate for a semantic priming parametric approach to the study of semantic processing using fMRI methodology. Implications of this parametric approach are discussed in view of current functional neuroimaging research investigating the semantic processing disturbance of schizophrenia. PMID:19765623

  15. Smeared antibranes polarise in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautason, Fridrik Freyr; Truijen, Brecht; Van Riet, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    In the recent literature it has been questioned whether the local backreaction of antibranes in flux throats can induce a perturbative brane-flux decay. Most evidence for this can be gathered for D6 branes and D p branes smeared over 6 - p compact directions, in line with the absence of finite temperature solutions for these cases. The solutions in the literature have flat worldvolume geometries and non-compact transversal spaces. In this paper we consider what happens when the worldvolume is AdS and the transversal space is compact. We show that in these circumstances brane polarisation smoothens out the flux singularity, which is an indication that brane-flux decay is prevented. This is consistent with the fact that the cosmological constant would be less negative after brane-flux decay. Our results extend recent results on AdS7 solutions from D6 branes to AdS p+1 solutions from D p branes. We show that supersymmetry of the AdS solutions depend on p non-trivially.

  16. AdS orbifolds and Penrose limits

    SciTech Connect

    Alishahiha, Mohsen; Sheikh-Jabbari, Mohammad M.; Tatar, Radu

    2002-12-09

    In this paper we study the Penrose limit of AdS{sub 5} orbifolds. The orbifold can be either in the pure spatial directions or space and time directions. For the AdS{sub 5}/{Lambda} x S{sup 5} spatial orbifold we observe that after the Penrose limit we obtain the same result as the Penrose limit of AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5}/{Lambda}. We identify the corresponding BMN operators in terms of operators of the gauge theory on R x S{sup 3}/{Lambda}. The semi-classical description of rotating strings in these backgrounds have also been studied. For the spatial AdS orbifold we show that in the quadratic order the obtained action for the fluctuations is the same as that in S{sup 5} orbifold, however, the higher loop correction can distinguish between two cases.

  17. Pure Spinors in AdS and Lie Algebra Cohomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Andrei

    2014-10-01

    We show that the BRST cohomology of the massless sector of the Type IIB superstring on AdS5 × S 5 can be described as the relative cohomology of an infinite-dimensional Lie superalgebra. We explain how the vertex operators of ghost number 1, which correspond to conserved currents, are described in this language. We also give some algebraic description of the ghost number 2 vertices, which appears to be new. We use this algebraic description to clarify the structure of the zero mode sector of the ghost number two states in flat space, and initiate the study of the vertices of the higher ghost number.

  18. Testing for association with multiple traits in generalized estimation equations, with application to neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiwei; Xu, Zhiyuan; Shen, Xiaotong; Pan, Wei

    2014-08-01

    There is an increasing need to develop and apply powerful statistical tests to detect multiple traits-single locus associations, as arising from neuroimaging genetics and other studies. For example, in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), in addition to genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), thousands of neuroimaging and neuropsychological phenotypes as intermediate phenotypes for Alzheimer's disease, have been collected. Although some classic methods like MANOVA and newly proposed methods may be applied, they have their own limitations. For example, MANOVA cannot be applied to binary and other discrete traits. In addition, the relationships among these methods are not well understood. Importantly, since these tests are not data adaptive, depending on the unknown association patterns among multiple traits and between multiple traits and a locus, these tests may or may not be powerful. In this paper we propose a class of data-adaptive weights and the corresponding weighted tests in the general framework of generalized estimation equations (GEE). A highly adaptive test is proposed to select the most powerful one from this class of the weighted tests so that it can maintain high power across a wide range of situations. Our proposed tests are applicable to various types of traits with or without covariates. Importantly, we also analytically show relationships among some existing and our proposed tests, indicating that many existing tests are special cases of our proposed tests. Extensive simulation studies were conducted to compare and contrast the power properties of various existing and our new methods. Finally, we applied the methods to an ADNI dataset to illustrate the performance of the methods. We conclude with the recommendation for the use of the GEE-based Score test and our proposed adaptive test for their high and complementary performance. PMID:24704269

  19. Neuroimaging: A Window to the Neurological Foundations of Learning and Behavior in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, G. Reid, Ed.; Rumsey, Judith M., Ed.

    This book presents 11 papers on the use of neuroimaging technology in brain-related disorders. The text contains full-color neuroimaging scans and provides both theoretical and methodological explanations of the various neuroimaging techniques and their application to developmental disorders in children. The papers are grouped into three sections,…

  20. The Bilingual Brain as Revealed by Functional Neuroimaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abutalebi, Jubin; Cappa, Stefano F.; Perani, Daniela

    2001-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging of bilinguals and monolinguals used in conjunction with experimental cognitive tasks has been successful in establishing functional specialization as a principle of brain organization in humans. Consistent results show that attained proficiency and possibly language exposure are more important than age of acquisition as a…

  1. Uncovering the etiology of conversion disorder: insights from functional neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Ejareh dar, Maryam; Kanaan, Richard AA

    2016-01-01

    Conversion disorder (CD) is a syndrome of neurological symptoms arising without organic cause, arguably in response to emotional stress, but the exact neural substrates of these symptoms and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood with the hunt for a biological basis afoot for centuries. In the past 15 years, novel insights have been gained with the advent of functional neuroimaging studies in patients suffering from CDs in both motor and nonmotor domains. This review summarizes recent functional neuroimaging studies including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET) to see whether they bring us closer to understanding the etiology of CD. Convergent functional neuroimaging findings suggest alterations in brain circuits that could point to different mechanisms for manifesting functional neurological symptoms, in contrast with feigning or healthy controls. Abnormalities in emotion processing and in emotion-motor processing suggest a diathesis, while differential reactions to certain stressors implicate a specific response to trauma. No comprehensive theory emerges from these clues, and all results remain preliminary, but functional neuroimaging has at least given grounds for hope that a model for CD may soon be found. PMID:26834476

  2. Diagnostic and therapeutic utility of neuroimaging in depression: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Toby; Cleare, Anthony J; Herane, Andrés; Young, Allan H; Arnone, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of studies have used neuroimaging to further our understanding of how brain structure and function are altered in major depression. More recently, these techniques have begun to show promise for the diagnosis and treatment of depression, both as aids to conventional methods and as methods in their own right. In this review, we describe recent neuroimaging findings in the field that might aid diagnosis and improve treatment accuracy. Overall, major depression is associated with numerous structural and functional differences in neural systems involved in emotion processing and mood regulation. Furthermore, several studies have shown that the structure and function of these systems is changed by pharmacological and psychological treatments of the condition and that these changes in candidate brain regions might predict clinical response. More recently, “machine learning” methods have used neuroimaging data to categorize individual patients according to their diagnostic status and predict treatment response. Despite being mostly limited to group-level comparisons at present, with the introduction of new methods and more naturalistic studies, neuroimaging has the potential to become part of the clinical armamentarium and may improve diagnostic accuracy and inform treatment choice at the patient level. PMID:25187715

  3. Diagnostic and therapeutic utility of neuroimaging in depression: an overview.

    PubMed

    Wise, Toby; Cleare, Anthony J; Herane, Andrés; Young, Allan H; Arnone, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of studies have used neuroimaging to further our understanding of how brain structure and function are altered in major depression. More recently, these techniques have begun to show promise for the diagnosis and treatment of depression, both as aids to conventional methods and as methods in their own right. In this review, we describe recent neuroimaging findings in the field that might aid diagnosis and improve treatment accuracy. Overall, major depression is associated with numerous structural and functional differences in neural systems involved in emotion processing and mood regulation. Furthermore, several studies have shown that the structure and function of these systems is changed by pharmacological and psychological treatments of the condition and that these changes in candidate brain regions might predict clinical response. More recently, "machine learning" methods have used neuroimaging data to categorize individual patients according to their diagnostic status and predict treatment response. Despite being mostly limited to group-level comparisons at present, with the introduction of new methods and more naturalistic studies, neuroimaging has the potential to become part of the clinical armamentarium and may improve diagnostic accuracy and inform treatment choice at the patient level. PMID:25187715

  4. Epilogue: Neuroimaging with a View to Prediction and Prognosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Diane L.; Rothi, Leslie J. Gonzalez

    2001-01-01

    This epilogue discusses potentials in future clinical decision-making using the emerging functional neuroimaging technology, including identification of the mechanisms underlying cognitive functions and prediction of spared/impaired cognitive functions, those related to recovery of function and prediction of treatment candidacy; and those related…

  5. Neuroimaging Research with Children: Ethical Issues and Case Scenarios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coch, Donna

    2007-01-01

    There are few available resources for learning and teaching about ethical issues in neuroimaging research with children, who constitute a special and vulnerable population. Here, a brief review of ethical issues in developmental research, situated within the emerging field of neuroethics, highlights the increasingly interdisciplinary nature of…

  6. Neuroimaging of the Periaqueductal Gray: State of the Field

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Moulton, Eric A.; Barmettler, Gabi; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2011-01-01

    This review and meta-analysis aims at summarizing and integrating the human neuroimaging studies that report periaqueductal gray (PAG) involvement; 250 original manuscripts on human neuroimaging of the PAG were identified. A narrative review and meta-analysis using activation likelihood estimates is included. Behaviors covered include pain and pain modulation, anxiety, bladder and bowel function and autonomic regulation. Methods include structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, functional connectivity measures, diffusion weighted imaging and positron emission tomography. Human neuroimaging studies in healthy and clinical populations largely confirm the animal literature indicating that the PAG is involved in homeostatic regulation of salient functions such as pain, anxiety and autonomic function. Methodological concerns in the current literature, including resolution constraints, imaging artifacts and imprecise neuroanatomical labeling are discussed, and future directions are proposed. A general conclusion is that PAG neuroimaging is a field with enormous potential to translate animal data onto human behaviors, but with some growing pains that can and need to be addressed in order to add to our understanding of the neurobiology of this key region. PMID:22197740

  7. A Developmental Neuroimaging Investigation of the Change Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Laura A.; Hall, Julie M.; Skup, Martha; Jenkins, Sarah E.; Pine, Daniel S.; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    This neuroimaging study examines the development of cognitive flexibility using the Change task in a sample of youths and adults. The Change task requires subjects to inhibit a prepotent response and substitute an alternative response, and the task incorporates an algorithm that adjusts task difficulty in response to subject performance. Data from…

  8. Uncovering the etiology of conversion disorder: insights from functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Ejareh Dar, Maryam; Kanaan, Richard Aa

    2016-01-01

    Conversion disorder (CD) is a syndrome of neurological symptoms arising without organic cause, arguably in response to emotional stress, but the exact neural substrates of these symptoms and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood with the hunt for a biological basis afoot for centuries. In the past 15 years, novel insights have been gained with the advent of functional neuroimaging studies in patients suffering from CDs in both motor and nonmotor domains. This review summarizes recent functional neuroimaging studies including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET) to see whether they bring us closer to understanding the etiology of CD. Convergent functional neuroimaging findings suggest alterations in brain circuits that could point to different mechanisms for manifesting functional neurological symptoms, in contrast with feigning or healthy controls. Abnormalities in emotion processing and in emotion-motor processing suggest a diathesis, while differential reactions to certain stressors implicate a specific response to trauma. No comprehensive theory emerges from these clues, and all results remain preliminary, but functional neuroimaging has at least given grounds for hope that a model for CD may soon be found. PMID:26834476

  9. Neuroimaging of Aggressive and Violent Behaviour in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sterzer, Philipp; Stadler, Christina

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, a number of functional and structural neuroimaging studies have investigated the neural bases of aggressive and violent behaviour in children and adolescents. Most functional neuroimaging studies have persued the hypothesis that pathological aggression is a consequence of deficits in the neural circuits involved in emotion processing. There is converging evidence for abnormal neural responses to emotional stimuli in youths with a propensity towards aggressive behaviour. In addition, recent neuroimaging work has suggested that aggressive behaviour is also associated with abnormalities in neural processes that subserve both the inhibitory control of behaviour and the flexible adaptation of behaviour in accord with reinforcement information. Structural neuroimaging studies in children and adolescents with conduct problems are still scarce, but point to deficits in brain structures in volved in the processing of social information and in the regulation of social and goal-directed behaviour. The indisputable progress that this research field has made in recent years notwithstanding, the overall picture is still rather patchy and there are inconsistencies between studies that await clarification. Despite this, we attempt to provide an integrated view on the neural abnormalities that may contribute to various forms of juvenile aggression and violence, and discuss research strategies that may help to provide a more profound understanding of these important issues in the future. PMID:19862349

  10. Neuroimaging characteristics of patients with focal hand dystonia.

    PubMed

    Hinkley, Leighton B N; Webster, Rebecca L; Byl, Nancy N; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2009-01-01

    NARRATIVE REVIEW: Advances in structural and functional imaging have provided both scientists and clinicians with information about the neural mechanisms underlying focal hand dystonia (FHd), a motor disorder associated with aberrant posturing and patterns of muscle contraction specific to movements of the hand. Consistent with the hypothesis that FHd is the result of reorganization in cortical fields, studies in neuroimaging have confirmed alterations in the topography and response properties of somatosensory and motor areas of the brain. Noninvasive stimulation of these regions also demonstrates that FHd may be due to reductions in inhibition between competing sensory and motor representations. Compromises in neuroanatomical structure, such as white matter density and gray matter volume, have also been identified through neuroimaging methods. These advances in neuroimaging have provided clinicians with an expanded understanding of the changes in the brain that contribute to FHd. These findings should provide a foundation for the development of retraining paradigms focused on reversing overlapping sensory representations and interactions between brain regions in patients with FHd. Continued collaborations between health professionals who treat FHd and research scientists who examine the brain using neuroimaging tools are imperative for answering difficult questions about patients with specific movement disorders. PMID:19217255

  11. 25 years of neuroimaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Bradley R.; Welsh, Robert C.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disease for which a precise cause has not yet been identified. Standard CT or MRI evaluation does not demonstrate gross structural nervous system changes in ALS, so conventional neuroimaging techniques have provided little insight into the pathophysiology of this disease. Advanced neuroimaging techniques—such as structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy—allow evaluation of alterations of the nervous system in ALS. These alterations include focal loss of grey and white matter and reductions in white matter tract integrity, as well as changes in neural networks and in the chemistry, metabolism and receptor distribution in the brain. Given their potential for investigation of both brain structure and function, advanced neuroimaging methods offer important opportunities to improve diagnosis, guide prognosis, and direct future treatment strategies in ALS. In this article, we review the contributions made by various advanced neuroimaging techniques to our understanding of the impact of ALS on different brain regions, and the potential role of such measures in biomarker development. PMID:23917850

  12. How Is Pain Influenced by Cognition? Neuroimaging Weighs In

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Tor D.; Atlas, Lauren Y.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging can inform cognitive theories to the extent that particular patterns of brain activity are sensitively and specifically associated with particular types of cognitive processes. We illustrate the utility of neuroimaging data in one specific case: understanding cognitive influences on pain. We first argue that pain self-reports are often inadequate to fully characterize pain experience and the processes that underlie it. Then, we describe how neuroimaging measures have been used to corroborate the effects of psychological manipulations on pain by focusing on placebo treatments and demonstrating effects on the best available correlates of pain experience. In addition, using placebo analgesia as an example, we argue that brain evidence is useful for building psychological theories likely to yield valid and generalizable predictions, because biologically informed theories are grounded in the constraints inherent in the relevant physiological systems. Finally, we suggest that neuroimaging findings will become increasingly useful for constraining psychological inference as brain patterns diagnostic of particular types of mental events are identified and characterized. In our view, the relationships between biological findings and cognitive theory are empirically based and must develop through an iterative process of synthesis across studies, topics, and methods. PMID:24761154

  13. Functional neuroimaging of emotional learning and autonomic reactions.

    PubMed

    Peper, Martin; Herpers, Martin; Spreer, Joachim; Hennig, Jürgen; Zentner, Josef

    2006-06-01

    This article provides a selective overview of the functional neuroimaging literature with an emphasis on emotional activation processes. Emotions are fast and flexible response systems that provide basic tendencies for adaptive action. From the range of involved component functions, we first discuss selected automatic mechanisms that control basic adaptational changes. Second, we illustrate how neuroimaging work has contributed to the mapping of the network components associated with basic emotion families (fear, anger, disgust, happiness), and secondary dimensional concepts that organise the meaning space for subjective experience and verbal labels (emotional valence, activity/intensity, approach/withdrawal, etc.). Third, results and methodological difficulties are discussed in view of own neuroimaging experiments that investigated the component functions involved in emotional learning. The amygdala, prefrontal cortex, and striatum form a network of reciprocal connections that show topographically distinct patterns of activity as a correlate of up and down regulation processes during an emotional episode. Emotional modulations of other brain systems have attracted recent research interests. Emotional neuroimaging calls for more representative designs that highlight the modulatory influences of regulation strategies and socio-cultural factors responsible for inhibitory control and extinction. We conclude by emphasising the relevance of the temporal process dynamics of emotional activations that may provide improved prediction of individual differences in emotionality. PMID:16750614

  14. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum-Neuroimaging Evidence.

    PubMed

    Cerasa, Antonio; Quattrone, Aldo

    2016-06-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is the most common pathological tremor disorder in the world, and post-mortem evidence has shown that the cerebellum is the most consistent area of pathology in ET. In the last few years, advanced neuroimaging has tried to confirm this evidence. The aim of the present review is to discuss to what extent the evidence provided by this field of study may be generalised. We performed a systematic literature search combining the terms ET with the following keywords: MRI, VBM, MRS, DTI, fMRI, PET and SPECT. We summarised and discussed each study and placed the results in the context of existing knowledge regarding the cerebellar involvement in ET. A total of 51 neuroimaging studies met our search criteria, roughly divided into 19 structural and 32 functional studies. Despite clinical and methodological differences, both functional and structural imaging studies showed similar findings but without defining a clear topography of neurodegeneration. Indeed, the vast majority of studies found functional and structural abnormalities in several parts of the anterior and posterior cerebellar lobules, but it remains to be established to what degree these neural changes contribute to clinical symptoms of ET. Currently, advanced neuroimaging has confirmed the involvement of the cerebellum in pathophysiological processes of ET, although a high variability in results persists. For this reason, the translation of this knowledge into daily clinical practice is again partially limited, although new advanced multivariate neuroimaging approaches (machine-learning) are proving interesting changes of perspective. PMID:26626626

  15. Neuroimaging findings in late-onset schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Changtae; Lim, Hyun Kook; Lee, Chang Uk

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in late-onset mental disorders. Among them, geriatric schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are significant health care risks and major causes of disability. We discussed whether late-onset schizophrenia (LOS) and late-onset bipolar (LOB) disorder can be a separate entity from early-onset schizophrenia (EOS) and early-onset bipolar (EOB) disorder in a subset of late-life schizophrenia or late-life bipolar disorder through neuroimaging studies. A literature search for imaging studies of LOS or LOB was performed in the PubMed database. Search terms used were "(imaging OR MRI OR CT OR SPECT OR DTI OR PET OR fMRI) AND (schizophrenia or bipolar disorder) AND late onset." Articles that were published in English before October 2013 were included. There were a few neuroimaging studies assessing whether LOS and LOB had different disease-specific neural substrates compared with EOS and EOB. These researches mainly observed volumetric differences in specific brain regions, white matter hyperintensities, diffusion tensor imaging, or functional neuroimaging to explore the differences between LOS and LOB and EOS and EOB. The aim of this review was to highlight the neural substrates involved in LOS and LOB through neuroimaging studies. The exploration of neuroanatomical markers may be the key to the understanding of underlying neurobiology in LOS and LOB. PMID:24401535

  16. Neuroimaging of the periaqueductal gray: state of the field.

    PubMed

    Linnman, Clas; Moulton, Eric A; Barmettler, Gabi; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2012-03-01

    This review and meta-analysis aims at summarizing and integrating the human neuroimaging studies that report periaqueductal gray (PAG) involvement; 250 original manuscripts on human neuroimaging of the PAG were identified. A narrative review and meta-analysis using activation likelihood estimates is included. Behaviors covered include pain and pain modulation, anxiety, bladder and bowel function and autonomic regulation. Methods include structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, functional connectivity measures, diffusion weighted imaging and positron emission tomography. Human neuroimaging studies in healthy and clinical populations largely confirm the animal literature indicating that the PAG is involved in homeostatic regulation of salient functions such as pain, anxiety and autonomic function. Methodological concerns in the current literature, including resolution constraints, imaging artifacts and imprecise neuroanatomical labeling are discussed, and future directions are proposed. A general conclusion is that PAG neuroimaging is a field with enormous potential to translate animal data onto human behaviors, but with some growing pains that can and need to be addressed in order to add to our understanding of the neurobiology of this key region. PMID:22197740

  17. Serum Adiponectin Levels, Neuroimaging, and Cognition in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wennberg, Alexandra M. V.; Gustafson, Deborah; Hagen, Clinton E.; Roberts, Rosebud O.; Knopman, David; Jack, Clifford; Petersen, Ronald C.; Mielke, Michelle M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adiponectin, a protein involved in inflammatory pathways, may impact the development and progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Adiponectin levels have been associated with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD; however, its association with Alzheimer-associated neuroimaging and cognitive outcomes is unknown. OBJECTIVE Determine the cross-sectional association between plasma adiponectin and neuroimaging and cognitive outcomes in an older population-based sample. METHODS Multivariable adjusted regression models were used to investigate the association between plasma adiponectin and hippocampal volume (HVa), PiB-PET, FDG PET, cortical thickness, MCI diagnosis, and neuropsychological test performance. Analyses included 535 non-demented participants aged 70 and older enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. RESULTS Women had higher adiponectin than men (12,631 ng/mL vs. 8,908 ng/mL, P < .001). Among women, higher adiponectin was associated with smaller HVa (B=−0.595; 95% CI −1.19, −0.005), poorer performance in language (B−0.676; 95% CI −1.23, −0.121) and global cognition (B=−0.459; 95% CI −0.915, −0.002), and greater odds of a MCI diagnosis (OR=6.23; 95% CI 1.20, 32.43). In analyses stratified by sex and elevated amyloid (PiB-PET SUVR>1.4), among women with elevated amyloid, higher adiponectin was associated with smaller HVa (B=−0.723; 95% CI −1.43, −0.014), poorer performance in memory (B=−1.02; 95% CI −1.73, −0.312), language (B=−0.896; 95% CI −1.58, −0.212), and global (B=−0.650; 95% CI −1.18, −0.116) cognition, and greater odds of MCI (OR=19.34; 95% CI 2.72, 137.34). CONCLUSION Higher plasma adiponectin was associated with neuroimaging and cognitive outcomes among women. Longitudinal analyses are necessary to determine whether higher adiponectin predicts neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. PMID:27163809

  18. Cognitive Improvement after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Measured with Functional Neuroimaging during the Acute Period

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Glenn R.; Freeman, Kalev; Thomas, Alex; Shpaner, Marina; OKeefe, Michael; Watts, Richard; Naylor, Magdalena R.

    2015-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) have been largely limited to patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms, utilizing images obtained months to years after the actual head trauma. We sought to distinguish acute and delayed effects of mild traumatic brain injury on working memory functional brain activation patterns < 72 hours after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and again one-week later. We hypothesized that clinical and fMRI measures of working memory would be abnormal in symptomatic mTBI patients assessed < 72 hours after injury, with most patients showing clinical recovery (i.e., improvement in these measures) within 1 week after the initial assessment. We also hypothesized that increased memory workload at 1 week following injury would expose different cortical activation patterns in mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms, compared to those with full clinical recovery. We performed a prospective, cohort study of working memory in emergency department patients with isolated head injury and clinical diagnosis of concussion, compared to control subjects (both uninjured volunteers and emergency department patients with extremity injuries and no head trauma). The primary outcome of cognitive recovery was defined as resolution of reported cognitive impairment and quantified by scoring the subject’s reported cognitive post-concussive symptoms at 1 week. Secondary outcomes included additional post-concussive symptoms and neurocognitive testing results. We enrolled 46 subjects: 27 with mild TBI and 19 controls. The time of initial neuroimaging was 48 (+22 S.D.) hours after injury (time 1). At follow up (8.7, + 1.2 S.D., days after injury, time 2), 18 of mTBI subjects (64%) reported moderate to complete cognitive recovery, 8 of whom fully recovered between initial and follow-up imaging. fMRI changes from time 1 to time 2 showed an increase in posterior cingulate activation in the mTBI subjects compared to

  19. Cognitive Improvement after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Measured with Functional Neuroimaging during the Acute Period.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Glenn R; Freeman, Kalev; Thomas, Alex; Shpaner, Marina; OKeefe, Michael; Watts, Richard; Naylor, Magdalena R

    2015-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) have been largely limited to patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms, utilizing images obtained months to years after the actual head trauma. We sought to distinguish acute and delayed effects of mild traumatic brain injury on working memory functional brain activation patterns < 72 hours after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and again one-week later. We hypothesized that clinical and fMRI measures of working memory would be abnormal in symptomatic mTBI patients assessed < 72 hours after injury, with most patients showing clinical recovery (i.e., improvement in these measures) within 1 week after the initial assessment. We also hypothesized that increased memory workload at 1 week following injury would expose different cortical activation patterns in mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms, compared to those with full clinical recovery. We performed a prospective, cohort study of working memory in emergency department patients with isolated head injury and clinical diagnosis of concussion, compared to control subjects (both uninjured volunteers and emergency department patients with extremity injuries and no head trauma). The primary outcome of cognitive recovery was defined as resolution of reported cognitive impairment and quantified by scoring the subject's reported cognitive post-concussive symptoms at 1 week. Secondary outcomes included additional post-concussive symptoms and neurocognitive testing results. We enrolled 46 subjects: 27 with mild TBI and 19 controls. The time of initial neuroimaging was 48 (+22 S.D.) hours after injury (time 1). At follow up (8.7, + 1.2 S.D., days after injury, time 2), 18 of mTBI subjects (64%) reported moderate to complete cognitive recovery, 8 of whom fully recovered between initial and follow-up imaging. fMRI changes from time 1 to time 2 showed an increase in posterior cingulate activation in the mTBI subjects compared to

  20. Identifying Treatment Response of Sertraline in a Teenager with Selective Mutism using Electrophysiological Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Eugene, Andy R.; Masiak, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Background Selective Mutism is described as the inability to verbally express oneself in anxiety provoking social situations and may result in awkward social interactions in school-aged children. In this case-report we present the baseline electrophysiological neuroimaging results and after treatment with Sertraline for 6-weeks. Methods A 20-channel EEG event-related potential recording was acquired during an internal voice task at baseline prior to the initiation of 50mg of Sertraline and then repeated 6-weeks after treatment with Sertraline. EEG signals were processed for movement, eye-blink, and muscle artifacts and ERP signal averaging was completed. ERPs were analyzed using Standard Low Resolution Brain Electromagnetic Tomography (sLORETA). Results At baseline, Sertraline increased the neuronal activation in the middle temporal gyrus and the anterior cingulate gyrus from baseline in the patient following 6-weeks of treatment. Conclusion Our findings suggest that electrophysiological neuroimaging may provide a creative approach for personalizing medicine by providing insight to the pharmacodynamics of antidepressants. PMID:27468379

  1. A transformation similarity constraint for groupwise nonlinear registration in longitudinal neuroimaging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Greg M.; Gutman, Boris A.; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Thompson, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease and other brain disorders often show a similar spatial distribution of volume change throughout the brain over time, but this information is not yet used in registration algorithms to refine the quantification of change. Here, we develop a mathematical basis to incorporate that prior information into a longitudinal structural neuroimaging study. We modify the canonical minimization problem for non-linear registration to include a term that couples a collection of registrations together to enforce group similarity. More specifically, throughout the computation we maintain a group-level representation of the transformations and constrain updates to individual transformations to be similar to this representation. The derivations necessary to produce the Euler-Lagrange equations for the coupling term are presented and a gradient descent algorithm based on the formulation was implemented. We demonstrate using 57 longitudinal image pairs from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) that longitudinal registration with such a groupwise coupling prior is more robust to noise in estimating change, suggesting such change maps may have several important applications.

  2. Sharing privacy-sensitive access to neuroimaging and genetics data: a review and preliminary validation

    PubMed Central

    Sarwate, Anand D.; Plis, Sergey M.; Turner, Jessica A.; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2014-01-01

    The growth of data sharing initiatives for neuroimaging and genomics represents an exciting opportunity to confront the “small N” problem that plagues contemporary neuroimaging studies while further understanding the role genetic markers play in the function of the brain. When it is possible, open data sharing provides the most benefits. However, some data cannot be shared at all due to privacy concerns and/or risk of re-identification. Sharing other data sets is hampered by the proliferation of complex data use agreements (DUAs) which preclude truly automated data mining. These DUAs arise because of concerns about the privacy and confidentiality for subjects; though many do permit direct access to data, they often require a cumbersome approval process that can take months. An alternative approach is to only share data derivatives such as statistical summaries—the challenges here are to reformulate computational methods to quantify the privacy risks associated with sharing the results of those computations. For example, a derived map of gray matter is often as identifiable as a fingerprint. Thus alternative approaches to accessing data are needed. This paper reviews the relevant literature on differential privacy, a framework for measuring and tracking privacy loss in these settings, and demonstrates the feasibility of using this framework to calculate statistics on data distributed at many sites while still providing privacy. PMID:24778614

  3. Auditory-limbic interactions in chronic tinnitus: Challenges for neuroimaging research.

    PubMed

    Leaver, Amber M; Seydell-Greenwald, Anna; Rauschecker, Josef P

    2016-04-01

    Tinnitus is a widespread auditory disorder affecting approximately 10-15% of the population, often with debilitating consequences. Although tinnitus commonly begins with damage to the auditory system due to loud-noise exposure, aging, or other etiologies, the exact neurophysiological basis of chronic tinnitus remains unknown. Many researchers point to a central auditory origin of tinnitus; however, a growing body of evidence also implicates other brain regions, including the limbic system. Correspondingly, we and others have proposed models of tinnitus in which the limbic and auditory systems both play critical roles and interact with one another. Specifically, we argue that damage to the auditory system generates an initial tinnitus signal, consistent with previous research. In our model, this "transient" tinnitus is suppressed when a limbic frontostriatal network, comprised of ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum, successfully modulates thalamocortical transmission in the auditory system. Thus, in chronic tinnitus, limbic-system damage and resulting inefficiency of auditory-limbic interactions prevents proper compensation of the tinnitus signal. Neuroimaging studies utilizing connectivity methods like resting-state fMRI and diffusion MRI continue to uncover tinnitus-related anomalies throughout auditory, limbic, and other brain systems. However, directly assessing interactions between these brain regions and networks has proved to be more challenging. Here, we review existing empirical support for models of tinnitus stressing a critical role for involvement of "non-auditory" structures in tinnitus pathophysiology, and discuss the possible impact of newly refined connectivity techniques from neuroimaging on tinnitus research. PMID:26299843

  4. Neuroimaging schizophrenia: a picture is worth a thousand words, but is it saying anything important?

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Anthony O; Buckley, Peter F; Hanna, Mona

    2013-03-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by neurostructural and neurofunctional aberrations that have now been demonstrated through neuroimaging research. The article reviews recent studies that have attempted to use neuroimaging to understand the relation between neurological abnormalities and aspects of the phenomenology of schizophrenia. Neuroimaging studies show that neurostructural and neurofunctional abnormalities are present in people with schizophrenia and their close relatives and may represent putative endophenotypes. Neuroimaging phenotypes predict the emergence of psychosis in individuals classified as high-risk. Neuroimaging studies have linked structural and functional abnormalities to symptoms; and progressive structural changes to clinical course and functional outcome. Neuroimaging has successfully indexed the neurotoxic and neuroprotective effects of schizophrenia treatments. Pictures can inform about aspects of the phenomenology of schizophrenia including etiology, onset, symptoms, clinical course, and treatment effects but this assertion is tempered by the scientific and practical limitations of neuroimaging. PMID:23397252

  5. Neuroimaging in Central Nervous System Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Vossough, Arastoo; Hajmomenian, Mehrdad; Assadsangabi, Reza; Mohan, Suyash

    2016-08-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare aggressive high-grade type of extranodal lymphoma. PCNSL can have a variable imaging appearance and can mimic other brain disorders such as encephalitis, demyelination, and stroke. In addition to PCNSL, the CNS can be secondarily involved by systemic lymphoma. Computed tomography and conventional MRI are the initial imaging modalities to evaluate these lesions. Recently, however, advanced MRI techniques are more often used in an effort to narrow the differential diagnosis and potentially inform diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. PMID:27443998

  6. The AdS particle [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subir

    2005-09-01

    In this Letter we have considered a relativistic Nambu-Goto model for a particle in AdS metric. With appropriate gauge choice to fix the reparameterization invariance, we recover the previously discussed [S. Ghosh, P. Pal, Phys. Lett. B 618 (2005) 243, arxiv:hep-th/0502192] "exotic oscillator". The Snyder algebra and subsequently the κ-Minkowski spacetime are also derived. Lastly we comment on the impossibility of constructing a non-commutative spacetime in the context of open string where only a curved target space is introduced.

  7. Per aspirin ad astra...

    PubMed

    Hartung, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Taking the 110th anniversary of marketing of aspirin as starting point, the almost scary toxicological profile of aspirin is contrasted with its actual use experience. The author concludes that we are lucky that, in 1899, there was no regulatory toxicology. Adding, for the purpose of this article, a fourth R to the Three Rs, i.e. Realism, three reality-checks are carried out. The first one comes to the conclusion that the tools of toxicology are hardly adequate for the challenges ahead. The second one concludes that, specifically, the implementation of the EU REACH system is not feasible with these tools, mainly with regard to throughput. The third one challenges the belief that classical alternative methods, i.e. replacing animal test-based tools one by one, is actually leading to a new toxicology - it appears to change only patches of the patchwork, but not to overcome any inherent limitations other than ethical ones. The perspective lies in the Toxicology for the 21st Century initiatives, which aim to create a new approach from the scratch, by an evidence-based toxicology and a global "Human Toxicology Programme". PMID:20105011

  8. Mechanisms underlying sporadic cerebral small vessel disease: insights from neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, JM; Smith, C; Dichgans, M

    2013-01-01

    The term “cerebral small vessel disease” (SVD) describes a range of neuroimaging, pathological and associated clinical features. The latter range from none, to discrete focal neurological symptoms (stroke), to insidious global neurological dysfunction and dementia. The public health burden is considerable. The pathogenesis is largely unknown. Although associated with vascular risk factors, and generally considered to result from an intrinsic cerebral arteriolar occlusive disease, the pathological processes leading to the arteriolar disease, how these result in brain disease, how SVD lesions contribute to neurological or cognitive symptoms and the relationship to risk factors, have been the subject of much speculation. Pathology often reflects end-stage disease making determination of the earliest stages difficult. Neuroimaging provides considerable insights: the small vessels are not easily seen themselves, but the effects of their malfunction on the brain can be tracked on detailed brain imaging. We review the growing evidence for the most likely mechanisms. PMID:23602162

  9. Volumetric neuroimage analysis extensions for the MIPAV software package.

    PubMed

    Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L; Yassa, Michael A; Gandler, William; McAuliffe, Matthew J; Bassett, Susan S; Pham, Dzung L

    2007-09-15

    We describe a new collection of publicly available software tools for performing quantitative neuroimage analysis. The tools perform semi-automatic brain extraction, tissue classification, Talairach alignment, and atlas-based measurements within a user-friendly graphical environment. They are implemented as plug-ins for MIPAV, a freely available medical image processing software package from the National Institutes of Health. Because the plug-ins and MIPAV are implemented in Java, both can be utilized on nearly any operating system platform. In addition to the software plug-ins, we have also released a digital version of the Talairach atlas that can be used to perform regional volumetric analyses. Several studies are conducted applying the new tools to simulated and real neuroimaging data sets. PMID:17604116

  10. Neuroimaging the Effectiveness of Substance Use Disorder Treatments.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Elizabeth A; Wiers, Corinde E; Lindgren, Elsa; Miller, Gregg; Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack

    2016-09-01

    Neuroimaging techniques to measure the function and biochemistry of the human brain such as positron emission tomography (PET), proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), are powerful tools for assessing neurobiological mechanisms underlying the response to treatments in substance use disorders. Here, we review the neuroimaging literature on pharmacological and behavioral treatment in substance use disorder. We focus on neural effects of medications that reduce craving (e.g., naltrexone, bupropion hydrochloride, baclofen, methadone, varenicline) and that improve cognitive control (e.g., modafinil, N-acetylcysteine), of behavioral treatments for substance use disorders (e.g., cognitive bias modification training, virtual reality, motivational interventions) and neuromodulatory interventions such as neurofeedback and transcranial magnetic stimulation. A consistent finding for the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions identifies the improvement of executive control networks and the dampening of limbic activation, highlighting their values as targets for therapeutic interventions in substance use disorders. PMID:27184387

  11. Structural Neuroimaging Findings in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Erin D; Abildskov, Tracy J; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi J; Black, Garrett; Christensen, Zachary P; Huff, Trevor; Wood, Dawn-Marie G; Hesselink, John R; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Max, Jeffrey E

    2016-09-01

    Common neuroimaging findings in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), including sport-related concussion (SRC), are reviewed based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Common abnormalities radiologically identified on the day of injury, typically a computed tomographic scan, are in the form of contusions, small subarachnoid or intraparenchymal hemorrhages as well as subdural and epidural collections, edema, and skull fractures. Common follow-up neuroimaging findings with MRI include white matter hyperintensities, hypointense signal abnormalities that reflect prior hemorrhage, focal encephalomalacia, presence of atrophy and/or dilated Virchow-Robins perivascular space. The MRI findings from a large pediatric mTBI study show low frequency of positive MRI findings at 6 months postinjury. The review concludes with an examination of some of the advanced MRI-based image analysis methods that can be performed in the patient who has sustained an mTBI. PMID:27482782

  12. Pain perception and hypnosis: findings from recent functional neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Del Casale, Antonio; Ferracuti, Stefano; Rapinesi, Chiara; Serata, Daniele; Caltagirone, Saverio Simone; Savoja, Valeria; Piacentino, Daria; Callovini, Gemma; Manfredi, Giovanni; Sani, Gabriele; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Hypnosis modulates pain perception and tolerance by affecting cortical and subcortical activity in brain regions involved in these processes. By reviewing functional neuroimaging studies focusing on pain perception under hypnosis, the authors aimed to identify brain activation-deactivation patterns occurring in hypnosis-modulated pain conditions. Different changes in brain functionality occurred throughout all components of the pain network and other brain areas. The anterior cingulate cortex appears to be central in modulating pain circuitry activity under hypnosis. Most studies also showed that the neural functions of the prefrontal, insular, and somatosensory cortices are consistently modified during hypnosis-modulated pain conditions. Functional neuroimaging studies support the clinical use of hypnosis in the management of pain conditions. PMID:25719519

  13. SchizConnect: Virtual Data Integration in Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Ambite, Jose Luis; Tallis, Marcelo; Alpert, Kathryn; Keator, David B.; King, Margaret; Landis, Drew; Konstantinidis, George; Calhoun, Vince D.; Potkin, Steven G.; Turner, Jessica A.; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    In many scientific domains, including neuroimaging studies, there is a need to obtain increasingly larger cohorts to achieve the desired statistical power for discovery. However, the economics of imaging studies make it unlikely that any single study or consortia can achieve the desired sample sizes. What is needed is an architecture that can easily incorporate additional studies as they become available. We present such architecture based on a virtual data integration approach, where data remains at the original sources, and is retrieved and harmonized in response to user queries. This is in contrast to approaches that move the data to a central warehouse. We implemented our approach in the SchizConnect system that integrates data from three neuroimaging consortia on Schizophrenia: FBIRN's Human Imaging Database (HID), MRN's Collaborative Imaging and Neuroinformatics System (COINS), and the NUSDAST project at XNAT Central. A portal providing harmonized access to these sources is publicly deployed at schizconnect.org. PMID:26688837

  14. Genetic imaging consortium for addiction medicine: From neuroimaging to genes.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Scott; Kan, Kees-Jan; Chaarani, Bader; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Batalla, Albert; Brooks, Samantha; Cousijn, Janna; Dagher, Alain; de Ruiter, Michiel; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W; Goldstein, Rita Z; Goudriaan, Anna E; Heitzeg, Mary M; Hutchison, Kent; Li, Chiang-Shan R; London, Edythe D; Lorenzetti, Valentina; Luijten, Maartje; Martin-Santos, Rocio; Morales, Angelica M; Paulus, Martin P; Paus, Tomas; Pearlson, Godfrey; Schluter, Renée; Momenan, Reza; Schmaal, Lianne; Schumann, Gunter; Sinha, Rajita; Sjoerds, Zsuzsika; Stein, Dan J; Stein, Elliot A; Solowij, Nadia; Tapert, Susan; Uhlmann, Anne; Veltman, Dick; van Holst, Ruth; Walter, Henrik; Wright, Margaret J; Yucel, Murat; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah; Hibar, Derrek P; Jahanshad, Neda; Thompson, Paul M; Glahn, David C; Garavan, Hugh; Conrod, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Since the sample size of a typical neuroimaging study lacks sufficient statistical power to explore unknown genomic associations with brain phenotypes, several international genetic imaging consortia have been organized in recent years to pool data across sites. The challenges and achievements of these consortia are considered here with the goal of leveraging these resources to study addiction. The authors of this review have joined together to form an Addiction working group within the framework of the ENIGMA project, a meta-analytic approach to multisite genetic imaging data. Collectively, the Addiction working group possesses neuroimaging and genomic data obtained from over 10,000 subjects. The deadline for contributing data to the first round of analyses occurred at the beginning of May 2015. The studies performed on this data should significantly impact our understanding of the genetic and neurobiological basis of addiction. PMID:26822360

  15. Neuroimaging in Animal Seizure Models with 18FDG-PET

    PubMed Central

    Mirrione, Martine M.; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2011-01-01

    Small animal neuroimaging has become increasingly available to researchers, expanding the breadth of questions studied with these methods. Applying these noninvasive techniques to the open questions underlying epileptogenesis is no exception. A major advantage of small animal neuroimaging is its translational appeal. Studies can be well controlled and manipulated, examining the living brain in the animal before, during, and after the disease onset or disease treatment. The results can also be compared to data collected on human patients. Over the past decade, we and others have explored metabolic patterns in animal models of epilepsy to gain insight into the circuitry underlying development of the disease. In this paper, we provide technical details on how metabolic imaging that uses 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) is performed and explain the strengths and limitations of these studies. We will also highlight recent advances toward understanding epileptogenesis through small animal imaging. PMID:22937232

  16. Probing crunching AdS cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. Prem; Vaganov, Vladislav

    2016-02-01

    Holographic gravity duals of deformations of CFTs formulated on de Sitter spacetime contain FRW geometries behind a horizon, with cosmological big crunch singularities. Using a specific analytically tractable solution within a particular single scalar truncation of {N}=8 supergravity on AdS4, we first probe such crunching cosmologies with spacelike radial geodesics that compute spatially antipodal correlators of large dimension boundary operators. At late times, the geodesics lie on the FRW slice of maximal expansion behind the horizon. The late time two-point functions factorise, and when transformed to the Einstein static universe, they exhibit a temporal non-analyticity determined by the maximal value of the scale factor ã max. Radial geodesics connecting antipodal points necessarily have de Sitter energy Ɛ ≲ ã max, while geodesics with Ɛ > ã max terminate at the crunch, the two categories of geodesics being separated by the maximal expansion slice. The spacelike crunch singularity is curved "outward" in the Penrose diagram for the deformed AdS backgrounds, and thus geodesic limits of the antipodal correlators do not directly probe the crunch. Beyond the geodesic limit, we point out that the scalar wave equation, analytically continued into the FRW patch, has a potential which is singular at the crunch along with complex WKB turning points in the vicinity of the FRW crunch. We then argue that the frequency space Green's function has a branch point determined by ã max which corresponds to the lowest quasinormal frequency.

  17. Will neuroimaging ever be used to diagnose pediatric bipolar disorder?

    PubMed

    Chang, Kiki; Adleman, Nancy; Wagner, Christopher; Barnea-Goraly, Naama; Garrett, Amy

    2006-01-01

    There is a great need for discovery of biological markers that could be used diagnostically for pediatric onset disorders, particularly those with potentially confusing phenomenology such as pediatric-onset bipolar disorder (BD). Obtaining these markers would help overcome current subjective diagnostic techniques of relying on parent and child interview and symptomatic history. Brain imaging may be the most logical choice for a diagnostic tool, and certain neurobiological abnormalities have already been found in pediatric BD. However, much work remains to be done before neuroimaging can be used reliably to diagnose this disorder, and because of the nature of BD and the limitations of imaging technology and technique, neuroimaging will likely at most be only a diagnostic aide in the near future. In this paper we discuss the characteristics of pediatric BD that complicate the use of biological markers as diagnostic tools, how neuroimaging techniques have been used to study pediatric BD so far, and the limitations and potential of such techniques for future diagnostic use. PMID:17064431

  18. Pain in multiple sclerosis: A systematic review of neuroimaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Seixas, D.; Foley, P.; Palace, J.; Lima, D.; Ramos, I.; Tracey, I.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction While pain in multiple sclerosis (MS) is common, in many cases the precise mechanisms are unclear. Neuroimaging studies could have a valuable role in investigating the aetiology of pain syndromes. The aim of this review was to synthesise and appraise the current literature on neuroimaging studies of pain syndromes in MS. Methods We systematically searched PubMed and Scopus from their inception dates to the 2nd of April 2013. Studies were selected by predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Methodological quality was appraised. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted. Results We identified 38 studies of variable methodology and quality. All studies but one used conventional structural magnetic resonance imaging, and the majority reported a positive association between location of demyelinating lesions and specific neuropathic pain syndromes. Most investigated headache and facial pain, with more common pain syndromes such as limb pain being relatively understudied. We identified a number of methodological concerns, which along with variable study design and reporting limit our ability to synthesise data. Higher quality studies were however less likely to report positive associations of lesion distribution to pain syndromes. Conclusions Further high quality hypothesis-driven neuroimaging studies of pain syndromes in MS are required to clarify pain mechanisms, particularly for the commonest pain syndromes. PMID:25161898

  19. Abnormal Neuroimaging in a Case of Infant Botulism

    PubMed Central

    Good, Ryan J.; Messacar, Kevin; Stence, Nicholas V.; Press, Craig A.; Carpenter, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first case of abnormal neuroimaging in a case of infant botulism. The clinical findings of the patient with constipation, bulbar weakness, and descending, symmetric motor weakness are consistent with the classic findings of infant botulism. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), however, revealed restricted diffusion in the brain and enhancement of the cervical nerve roots. Traditionally, normal neuroimaging was used to help differentiate infant botulism from other causes of weakness in infants. Abnormal neuroimaging is seen in other causes of weakness in an infant including metabolic disorders and hypoxic–ischemic injury, but these diagnoses did not fit the clinical findings in this case. The explanation for the MRI abnormalities in the brain and cervical nerve roots is unclear as botulinum toxin acts at presynaptic nerve terminals and does not cross the blood–brain barrier. Possible explanations for the findings include inflammation from the botulinum toxin at the synapse, alterations in sensory signaling and retrograde transport of the botulinum toxin. The patient was treated with human botulism immune globulin and had rapid recovery in weakness. A stool sample from the patient was positive for Type A Clostridium botulinum toxin eventually confirming the diagnosis of infant botulism. The findings in this case support use of human botulism immune globulin when the clinical findings are consistent with infant botulism despite the presence of MRI abnormalities in the brain and cervical nerve roots. PMID:26697417

  20. Pre- and Postnatal Neuroimaging of Congenital Cerebellar Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-02-01

    The human cerebellum has a protracted development that makes it vulnerable to a broad spectrum of developmental disorders including malformations and disruptions. Starting from 19 to 20 weeks of gestation, prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reliably study the developing cerebellum. Pre- and postnatal neuroimaging plays a key role in the diagnostic work-up of congenital cerebellar abnormalities. Diagnostic criteria for cerebellar malformations and disruptions are based mostly on neuroimaging findings. The diagnosis of a Dandy-Walker malformation is based on the presence of hypoplasia, elevation, and counterclockwise upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis and cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, which extends posteriorly filling out the posterior fossa. For the diagnosis of Joubert syndrome, the presence of the molar tooth sign (thickened, elongated, and horizontally orientated superior cerebellar peduncles and an abnormally deep interpeduncular fossa) is needed. The diagnostic criteria of rhombencephalosynapsis include a complete or partial absence of the cerebellar vermis and continuity of the cerebellar hemispheres across the midline. Unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia is defined by the complete aplasia or hypoplasia of one cerebellar hemisphere. Familiarity with these diagnostic criteria as well as the broad spectrum of additional neuroimaging findings is important for a correct pre- and postnatal diagnosis. A correct diagnosis is essential for management, prognosis, and counseling of the affected children and their family. PMID:26166429

  1. Robust regression for large-scale neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Virgile; Da Mota, Benoit; Loth, Eva; Varoquaux, Gaël; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Brühl, Rüdiger; Butzek, Brigitte; Conrod, Patricia; Flor, Herta; Garavan, Hugh; Lemaitre, Hervé; Mann, Karl; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomas; Schad, Daniel J; Schümann, Gunter; Frouin, Vincent; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Thirion, Bertrand

    2015-05-01

    Multi-subject datasets used in neuroimaging group studies have a complex structure, as they exhibit non-stationary statistical properties across regions and display various artifacts. While studies with small sample sizes can rarely be shown to deviate from standard hypotheses (such as the normality of the residuals) due to the poor sensitivity of normality tests with low degrees of freedom, large-scale studies (e.g. >100 subjects) exhibit more obvious deviations from these hypotheses and call for more refined models for statistical inference. Here, we demonstrate the benefits of robust regression as a tool for analyzing large neuroimaging cohorts. First, we use an analytic test based on robust parameter estimates; based on simulations, this procedure is shown to provide an accurate statistical control without resorting to permutations. Second, we show that robust regression yields more detections than standard algorithms using as an example an imaging genetics study with 392 subjects. Third, we show that robust regression can avoid false positives in a large-scale analysis of brain-behavior relationships with over 1500 subjects. Finally we embed robust regression in the Randomized Parcellation Based Inference (RPBI) method and demonstrate that this combination further improves the sensitivity of tests carried out across the whole brain. Altogether, our results show that robust procedures provide important advantages in large-scale neuroimaging group studies. PMID:25731989

  2. The neuroimaging research process from the participants' perspective.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Richard; Peel, Elizabeth; Shaw, Rachel L; Senior, Carl

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate participants' experiences of taking part in research conducted using fMRI or MEG procedures. Forty-four participants completed a questionnaire after taking part in either fMRI or MEG experiments; the questionnaire asked about experiences of and attitudes toward fMRI/MEG. Ten follow-up interviews were conducted to enable an in-depth analysis of these attitudes and experiences. The findings were generally positive: all participants thought fMRI and MEG were safe procedures, 93% would recommend participating in neuroimaging research to their friends and family, and participants were positive about participating in future neuroimaging research. However, some negative issues were identified. Some participants reported feeling nervous prior to scanning procedures, several participants reported side-effects after taking part, a number of participants were upset at being in a confined space and some participants did not feel confident about exiting the scanner in an emergency. Several recommendations for researchers are made, including a virtual tour of the scanning equipment during the consenting process in order to better prepare potential participants for the scanning experience and to minimize the potential psychological discomfort sometimes experienced in neuroimaging research. PMID:16806548

  3. Neuroimaging correlates of aggression in schizophrenia: an update

    PubMed Central

    Hoptman, Matthew J.; Antonius, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Aggression in schizophrenia is associated with poor treatment outcomes, hospital admissions, and stigmatization of patients. As such it represents an important public health issue. This article reviews recent neuroimaging studies of aggression in schizophrenia, focusing on PET/single photon emission computed tomography and MRI methods. Recent findings The neuroimaging literature on aggression in schizophrenia is in a period of development. This is attributable in part to the heterogeneous nature and basis of that aggression. Radiological methods have consistently shown reduced activity in frontal and temporal regions. MRI brain volumetric studies have been less consistent, with some studies finding increased volumes of inferior frontal structures, and others finding reduced volumes in aggressive individuals with schizophrenia. Functional MRI studies have also had inconsistent results, with most finding reduced activity in inferior frontal and temporal regions, but some also finding increased activity in other regions. Some studies have made a distinction between types of aggression in schizophrenia in the context of antisocial traits, and this appears to be useful in understanding the neuroimaging literature. Summary Frontal and temporal abnormalities appear to be a consistent feature of aggression in schizophrenia, but their precise nature likely differs because of the heterogeneous nature of that behavior. PMID:21178624

  4. Neuroimaging Insights into the Pathophysiology of Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Desseilles, Martin; Dang-Vu, Thanh; Schabus, Manuel; Sterpenich, Virginie; Maquet, Pierre; Schwartz, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    Neuroimaging methods can be used to investigate whether sleep disorders are associated with specific changes in brain structure or regional activity. However, it is still unclear how these new data might improve our understanding of the pathophysiology underlying adult sleep disorders. Here we review functional brain imaging findings in major intrinsic sleep disorders (i.e., idiopathic insomnia, narcolepsy, and obstructive sleep apnea) and in abnormal motor behavior during sleep (i.e., periodic limb movement disorder and REM sleep behavior disorder). The studies reviewed include neuroanatomical assessments (voxel-based morphometry, magnetic resonance spectroscopy), metabolic/functional investigations (positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging), and ligand marker measurements. Based on the current state of the research, we suggest that brain imaging is a useful approach to assess the structural and functional correlates of sleep impairments as well as better understand the cerebral consequences of various therapeutic approaches. Modern neuroimaging techniques therefore provide a valuable tool to gain insight into possible pathophysiological mechanisms of sleep disorders in adult humans. Citation: Desseilles M; Dang-Vu TD; Schabus M; Sterpenich V; Maquet P; Schwartz S. Neuroimaging insights into the pathophysiology of sleep disorders. SLEEP 2008;31(6):777–794. PMID:18548822

  5. Genetic Studies of Quantitative MCI and AD Phenotypes in ADNI: Progress, Opportunities, and Plans

    PubMed Central

    Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Yao, Xiaohui; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Risacher, Shannon L.; Ramanan, Vijay K.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Faber, Kelly M.; Sarwar, Nadeem; Munsie, Leanne M.; Hu, Xiaolan; Soares, Holly D.; Potkin, Steven G.; Thompson, Paul M.; Kauwe, John S.K.; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Green, Robert C.; Toga, Arthur W.; Weiner, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Genetic data from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has been crucial in advancing the understanding of AD pathophysiology. Here we provide an update on sample collection, scientific progress and opportunities, conceptual issues, and future plans. METHODS Lymphoblastoid cell lines and DNA and RNA samples from blood have been collected and banked, and data and biosamples have been widely disseminated. To date, APOE genotyping, genome-wide association study (GWAS), and whole exome and whole genome sequencing (WES, WGS) data have been obtained and disseminated. RESULTS ADNI genetic data have been downloaded thousands of times and over 300 publications have resulted, including reports of large scale GWAS by consortia to which ADNI contributed. Many of the first applications of quantitative endophenotype association studies employed ADNI data, including some of the earliest GWAS and pathway-based studies of biospecimen and imaging biomarkers, as well as memory and other clinical/cognitive variables. Other contributions include some of the first WES and WGS data sets and reports in healthy controls, MCI, and AD. DISCUSSION Numerous genetic susceptibility and protective markers for AD and disease biomarkers have been identified and replicated using ADNI data, and have heavily implicated immune, mitochondrial, cell cycle/fate, and other biological processes. Early sequencing studies suggest that rare and structural variants are likely to account for significant additional phenotypic variation. Longitudinal analyses of transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, and epigenomic changes will also further elucidate dynamic processes underlying preclinical and prodromal stages of disease. Integration of this unique collection of multi-omics data within a systems biology framework will help to separate truly informative markers of early disease mechanisms and potential novel therapeutic targets from the vast background of less relevant biological

  6. Effect of CLU genetic variants on cerebrospinal fluid and neuroimaging markers in healthy, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lin; Wang, Hui-Fu; Tan, Meng-Shan; Tan, Chen-Chen; Zhu, Xi-Chen; Miao, Dan; Yu, Wan-Jiang; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai; Weiner, Michael W.; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Silbert, Lisa; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Morris, John C.; Carroll, Maria; Creech, Mary L.; Franklin, Erin; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Love, Marissa Natelson; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Shah, Raj C.; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D’Agostino, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Borges-Neto, Salvador; Wong, Terence Z.; Coleman, Edward; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Brooks, William M.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Brosch, Jared R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Varma, Pradeep; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Finger, Elizabeth; Pasternack, Stephen; Rachisky, Irina; Trost, Dick; Kertesz, Andrew; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristine; Weintraub, Sandra; Bonakdarpour, Borna; Kerwin, Diana; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Fatica, Parianne; Fletcher, Evan; Maillard, Pauline; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Carmichael, Owen; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T -Y; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Burke, Anna; Trncic, Nadira; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Flashman, Laura A.; Seltzer, Marc; Hynes, Mary L.; Santulli, Robert B.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Gordineer, Leslie; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Perry, David; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Lin, Michael; Ravdin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Raj, Balebail Ashok; Fargher, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    The Clusterin (CLU) gene, also known as apolipoprotein J (ApoJ), is currently the third most associated late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) risk gene. However, little was known about the possible effect of CLU genetic variants on AD pathology in brain. Here, we evaluated the interaction between 7 CLU SNPs (covering 95% of genetic variations) and the role of CLU in β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition, AD-related structure atrophy, abnormal glucose metabolism on neuroimaging and CSF markers to clarify the possible approach by that CLU impacts AD. Finally, four loci (rs11136000, rs1532278, rs2279590, rs7982) showed significant associations with the Aβ deposition at the baseline level while genotypes of rs9331888 (P = 0.042) increased Aβ deposition. Besides, rs9331888 was significantly associated with baseline volume of left hippocampus (P = 0.014). We then further validated the association with Aβ deposition in the AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), normal control (NC) sub-groups. The results in sub-groups confirmed the association between CLU genotypes and Aβ deposition further. Our findings revealed that CLU genotypes could probably modulate the cerebral the Aβ loads on imaging and volume of hippocampus. These findings raise the possibility that the biological effects of CLU may be relatively confined to neuroimaging trait and hence may offer clues to AD. PMID:27229352

  7. Bayesian Generalized Low Rank Regression Models for Neuroimaging Phenotypes and Genetic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongtu; Khondker, Zakaria; Lu, Zhaohua; Ibrahim, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a Bayesian generalized low rank regression model (GLRR) for the analysis of both high-dimensional responses and covariates. This development is motivated by performing searches for associations between genetic variants and brain imaging phenotypes. GLRR integrates a low rank matrix to approximate the high-dimensional regression coefficient matrix of GLRR and a dynamic factor model to model the high-dimensional covariance matrix of brain imaging phenotypes. Local hypothesis testing is developed to identify significant covariates on high-dimensional responses. Posterior computation proceeds via an efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. A simulation study is performed to evaluate the finite sample performance of GLRR and its comparison with several competing approaches. We apply GLRR to investigate the impact of 1,071 SNPs on top 40 genes reported by AlzGene database on the volumes of 93 regions of interest (ROI) obtained from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). PMID:25349462

  8. Effects of Marijuana Use on Brain Structure and Function: Neuroimaging Findings from a Neurodevelopmental Perspective.

    PubMed

    Brumback, T; Castro, N; Jacobus, J; Tapert, S

    2016-01-01

    Marijuana, behind only tobacco and alcohol, is the most popular recreational drug in America with prevalence rates of use rising over the past decade. A wide range of research has highlighted neurocognitive deficits associated with marijuana use, particularly when initiated during childhood or adolescence. Neuroimaging, describing alterations to brain structure and function, has begun to provide a picture of possible mechanisms associated with the deleterious effects of marijuana use. This chapter provides a neurodevelopmental framework from which recent data on brain structural and functional abnormalities associated with marijuana use is reviewed. Based on the current data, we provide aims for future studies to more clearly delineate the effects of marijuana on the developing brain and to define underlying mechanisms of the potential long-term negative consequences of marijuana use. PMID:27503447

  9. Dysfunction of the prefrontal cortex in addiction: neuroimaging findings and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Rita Z.; Volkow, Nora D.

    2012-01-01

    The loss of control over drug intake that occurs in addiction was initially believed to result from disruption of subcortical reward circuits. However, imaging studies in addictive behaviours have identified a key involvement of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) both through its regulation of limbic reward regions and its involvement in higher-order executive function (for example, self-control, salience attribution and awareness). This Review focuses on functional neuroimaging studies conducted in the past decade that have expanded our understanding of the involvement of the PFC in drug addiction. Disruption of the PFC in addiction underlies not only compulsive drug taking but also accounts for the disadvantageous behaviours that are associated with addiction and the erosion of free will. PMID:22011681

  10. Islands of stability and recurrence times in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Stephen R.; Maillard, Antoine; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.

    2015-10-01

    We study the stability of anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime to spherically symmetric perturbations of a real scalar field in general relativity. Further, we work within the context of the "two time framework" (TTF) approximation, which describes the leading nonlinear effects for small amplitude perturbations, and is therefore suitable for studying the weakly turbulent instability of AdS—including both collapsing and noncollapsing solutions. We have previously identified a class of quasiperiodic (QP) solutions to the TTF equations, and in this paper we analyze their stability. We show that there exist several families of QP solutions that are stable to linear order, and we argue that these solutions represent islands of stability in TTF. We extract the eigenmodes of small oscillations about QP solutions, and we use them to predict approximate recurrence times for generic noncollapsing initial data in the full (non-TTF) system. Alternatively, when sufficient energy is driven to high-frequency modes, as occurs for initial data far from a QP solution, the TTF description breaks down as an approximation to the full system. Depending on the higher order dynamics of the full system, this often signals an imminent collapse to a black hole.

  11. AdS3: the NHEK generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Heurtier, Lucien; Puhm, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    It was argued in [1] that the five-dimensional near-horizon extremal Kerr (NHEK) geometry can be embedded in String Theory as the infrared region of an infinite family of non-supersymmetric geometries that have D1, D5, momentum and KK monopole charges. We show that there exists a method to embed these geometries into asymptotically- {AdS}_3× {S}^3/{{Z}}_N solutions, and hence to obtain infinite families of flows whose infrared is NHEK. This indicates that the CFT dual to the NHEK geometry is the IR fixed point of a Renormalization Group flow from a known local UV CFT and opens the door to its explicit construction.

  12. Shadows, currents, and AdS fields

    SciTech Connect

    Metsaev, R. R.

    2008-11-15

    Conformal totally symmetric arbitrary spin currents and shadow fields in flat space-time of dimension greater than or equal to four are studied. A gauge invariant formulation for such currents and shadow fields is developed. Gauge symmetries are realized by involving the Stueckelberg fields. A realization of global conformal boost symmetries is obtained. Gauge invariant differential constraints for currents and shadow fields are obtained. AdS/CFT correspondence for currents and shadow fields and the respective normalizable and non-normalizable solutions of massless totally symmetric arbitrary spin AdS fields are studied. The bulk fields are considered in a modified de Donder gauge that leads to decoupled equations of motion. We demonstrate that leftover on shell gauge symmetries of bulk fields correspond to gauge symmetries of boundary currents and shadow fields, while the modified de Donder gauge conditions for bulk fields correspond to differential constraints for boundary conformal currents and shadow fields. Breaking conformal symmetries, we find interrelations between the gauge invariant formulation of the currents and shadow fields, and the gauge invariant formulation of massive fields.

  13. Clinical and neuroimaging differences between posterior cortical atrophy and typical amnestic Alzheimer's disease patients at an early disease stage.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guoping; Wang, Jianqin; Feng, Zhan; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Yafei; He, Fangping; Chen, Zhongqin; Zhao, Kui; Luo, Benyan

    2016-01-01

    To identify clinical and neuroimaging characteristics between posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) and typical amnestic Alzheimer's disease (tAD) patients at an early disease stage, 16 PCA and 13 age-matched tAD patients were enrolled. Compared with tAD patients, PCA patients showed higher mean recognition and recall test scores, and lower mean calculation, spatial attention, shape discrimination, and writing test scores. Mean right hippocampal volume was larger in PCA patients compared with tAD patients, while cortical gray matter (GM) volume of bilateral parietal and occipital lobes was smaller in PCA patients. Further, when compared with tAD patients, significant hypometabolism was observed in bilateral parietal and occipital lobes, particularly the right occipitotemporal junction in PCA patients. Additionally, there were significant positive correlations in recognition and recall scores with hippocampal volumes. In PCA patients, calculation and visuospatial ability scores are positively associated with GM volume of parietal and occipital lobes. And only spatial attention and shape discrimination scores are positively associated with regional glucose metabolism of parietal and occipital lobes. Therefore, PCA patients display better recognition and recall scores, which are associated with larger hippocampal volumes and poorer performance in visual spatial tasks because of marked GM atrophy and hypometabolism of parietal and occipital lobes. PMID:27377199

  14. The impact of PICALM genetic variations on reserve capacity of posterior cingulate in AD continuum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Hui-Fu; Tan, Lin; Tan, Meng-Shan; Tan, Chen-Chen; Zhu, Xi-Chen; Miao, Dan; Yu, Wan-Jiang; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositolbinding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM) gene is one novel genetic player associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), based on recent genome wide association studies (GWAS). However, how it affects AD occurrence is still unknown. Brain reserve hypothesis highlights the tolerant capacities of brain as a passive means to fight against neurodegenerations. Here, we took the baseline volume and/or thickness of LOAD-associated brain regions as proxies of brain reserve capacities and investigated whether PICALM genetic variations can influence the baseline reserve capacities and the longitudinal atrophy rate of these specific regions using data from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. In mixed population, we found that brain region significantly affected by PICALM genetic variations was majorly restricted to posterior cingulate. In sub-population analysis, we found that one PICALM variation (C allele of rs642949) was associated with larger baseline thickness of posterior cingulate in health. We found seven variations in health and two variations (rs543293 and rs592297) in individuals with mild cognitive impairment were associated with slower atrophy rate of posterior cingulate. Our study provided preliminary evidences supporting that PICALM variations render protections by facilitating reserve capacities of posterior cingulate in non-demented elderly. PMID:27117083

  15. The impact of PICALM genetic variations on reserve capacity of posterior cingulate in AD continuum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Hui-Fu; Tan, Lin; Tan, Meng-Shan; Tan, Chen-Chen; Zhu, Xi-Chen; Miao, Dan; Yu, Wan-Jiang; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai; Weiner, Michael W.; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Silbert, Lisa; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Morris, John C.; Carroll, Maria; Creech, Mary L.; Franklin, Erin; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Natelson Love, Marissa; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Shah, Raj C.; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D’Agostino, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Borges-Neto, Salvador; Wong, Terence Z.; Coleman, Edward; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Brooks, William M.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Brosch, Jared R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Varma, Pradeep; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging-Yuek; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Finger, Elizabeth; Pasternack, Stephen; Rachisky, Irina; Trost, Dick; Kertesz, Andrew; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristine; Weintraub, Sandra; Bonakdarpour, Borna; Kerwin, Diana; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Villena, Teresa; Scott Turner, Raymond; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Lynn Johnson, Patricia; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Fatica, Parianne; Fletcher, Evan; Maillard, Pauline; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Carmichael, Owen; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Burke, Anna; Trncic, Nadira; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Flashman, Laura A.; Seltzer, Marc; Hynes, Mary L.; Santulli, Robert B.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Gordineer, Leslie; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Perry, David; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Lin, Michael; Ravdin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Ashok Raj, Balebail; Fargher, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositolbinding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM) gene is one novel genetic player associated with late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD), based on recent genome wide association studies (GWAS). However, how it affects AD occurrence is still unknown. Brain reserve hypothesis highlights the tolerant capacities of brain as a passive means to fight against neurodegenerations. Here, we took the baseline volume and/or thickness of LOAD-associated brain regions as proxies of brain reserve capacities and investigated whether PICALM genetic variations can influence the baseline reserve capacities and the longitudinal atrophy rate of these specific regions using data from Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. In mixed population, we found that brain region significantly affected by PICALM genetic variations was majorly restricted to posterior cingulate. In sub-population analysis, we found that one PICALM variation (C allele of rs642949) was associated with larger baseline thickness of posterior cingulate in health. We found seven variations in health and two variations (rs543293 and rs592297) in individuals with mild cognitive impairment were associated with slower atrophy rate of posterior cingulate. Our study provided preliminary evidences supporting that PICALM variations render protections by facilitating reserve capacities of posterior cingulate in non-demented elderly. PMID:27117083

  16. Can structural neuroimaging be used to define phenotypes and course of schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Kerns, John G; Lauriello, John

    2012-09-01

    This article examines whether structural neuroimaging measures have been found to predict outcome in schizophrenia and whether changes in neuroimaging measures have been found to correlate with poor outcome in the disorder. Overall, there is little compelling evidence that structural neuroimaging measures in either first-episode or chronic patients predict future outcome. Progressive brain changes might reflect a neuroimaging phenotype associated with a worse course of the disorder. At the same time, there are many fruitful avenues that future research could take in an attempt to better predict future outcome or to identify specific imaging phenotypes associated with outcome. PMID:22929870

  17. High-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; Eggert, Paul; Hobel, Sam; Vespa, Paul; Woo Moon, Seok; Van Horn, John D.; Franco, Joseph; Toga, Arthur W.

    2014-01-01

    Many contemporary neuroscientific investigations face significant challenges in terms of data management, computational processing, data mining, and results interpretation. These four pillars define the core infrastructure necessary to plan, organize, orchestrate, validate, and disseminate novel scientific methods, computational resources, and translational healthcare findings. Data management includes protocols for data acquisition, archival, query, transfer, retrieval, and aggregation. Computational processing involves the necessary software, hardware, and networking infrastructure required to handle large amounts of heterogeneous neuroimaging, genetics, clinical, and phenotypic data and meta-data. Data mining refers to the process of automatically extracting data features, characteristics and associations, which are not readily visible by human exploration of the raw dataset. Result interpretation includes scientific visualization, community validation of findings and reproducible findings. In this manuscript we describe the novel high-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure available at the Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics (INI) and the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging (LONI) at University of Southern California (USC). INI and LONI include ultra-high-field and standard-field MRI brain scanners along with an imaging-genetics database for storing the complete provenance of the raw and derived data and meta-data. In addition, the institute provides a large number of software tools for image and shape analysis, mathematical modeling, genomic sequence processing, and scientific visualization. A unique feature of this architecture is the Pipeline environment, which integrates the data management, processing, transfer, and visualization. Through its client-server architecture, the Pipeline environment provides a graphical user interface for designing, executing, monitoring validating, and disseminating of complex protocols that utilize

  18. High-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Dinov, Ivo D; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; Eggert, Paul; Hobel, Sam; Vespa, Paul; Woo Moon, Seok; Van Horn, John D; Franco, Joseph; Toga, Arthur W

    2014-01-01

    Many contemporary neuroscientific investigations face significant challenges in terms of data management, computational processing, data mining, and results interpretation. These four pillars define the core infrastructure necessary to plan, organize, orchestrate, validate, and disseminate novel scientific methods, computational resources, and translational healthcare findings. Data management includes protocols for data acquisition, archival, query, transfer, retrieval, and aggregation. Computational processing involves the necessary software, hardware, and networking infrastructure required to handle large amounts of heterogeneous neuroimaging, genetics, clinical, and phenotypic data and meta-data. Data mining refers to the process of automatically extracting data features, characteristics and associations, which are not readily visible by human exploration of the raw dataset. Result interpretation includes scientific visualization, community validation of findings and reproducible findings. In this manuscript we describe the novel high-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure available at the Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics (INI) and the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging (LONI) at University of Southern California (USC). INI and LONI include ultra-high-field and standard-field MRI brain scanners along with an imaging-genetics database for storing the complete provenance of the raw and derived data and meta-data. In addition, the institute provides a large number of software tools for image and shape analysis, mathematical modeling, genomic sequence processing, and scientific visualization. A unique feature of this architecture is the Pipeline environment, which integrates the data management, processing, transfer, and visualization. Through its client-server architecture, the Pipeline environment provides a graphical user interface for designing, executing, monitoring validating, and disseminating of complex protocols that utilize

  19. Neuroimaging and Neurodevelopmental Outcome in Extremely Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Patrick D.; Bulas, Dorothy; Slovis, Thomas L.; Finer, Neil N.; Wrage, Lisa A.; Das, Abhik; Tyson, Jon E.; Stevenson, David K.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Walsh, Michele C.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Yoder, Bradley A.; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Faix, Roger G.; Rich, Wade; Newman, Nancy S.; Cheng, Helen; Heyne, Roy J.; Vohr, Betty R.; Acarregui, Michael J.; Vaucher, Yvonne E.; Pappas, Athina; Peralta-Carcelen, Myriam; Wilson-Costello, Deanne E.; Evans, Patricia W.; Goldstein, Ricki F.; Myers, Gary J.; Poindexter, Brenda B.; McGowan, Elisabeth C.; Adams-Chapman, Ira; Fuller, Janell; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extremely preterm infants are at risk for neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI). Early cranial ultrasound (CUS) is usual practice, but near-term brain MRI has been reported to better predict outcomes. We prospectively evaluated MRI white matter abnormality (WMA) and cerebellar lesions, and serial CUS adverse findings as predictors of outcomes at 18 to 22 months’ corrected age. METHODS: Early and late CUS, and brain MRI were read by masked central readers, in a large cohort (n = 480) of infants <28 weeks’ gestation surviving to near term in the Neonatal Research Network. Outcomes included NDI or death after neuroimaging, and significant gross motor impairment or death, with NDI defined as cognitive composite score <70, significant gross motor impairment, and severe hearing or visual impairment. Multivariable models evaluated the relative predictive value of neuroimaging while controlling for other factors. RESULTS: Of 480 infants, 15 died and 20 were lost. Increasing severity of WMA and significant cerebellar lesions on MRI were associated with adverse outcomes. Cerebellar lesions were rarely identified by CUS. In full multivariable models, both late CUS and MRI, but not early CUS, remained independently associated with NDI or death (MRI cerebellar lesions: odds ratio, 3.0 [95% confidence interval: 1.3–6.8]; late CUS: odds ratio, 9.8 [95% confidence interval: 2.8–35]), and significant gross motor impairment or death. In models that did not include late CUS, MRI moderate-severe WMA was independently associated with adverse outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Both late CUS and near-term MRI abnormalities were associated with outcomes, independent of early CUS and other factors, underscoring the relative prognostic value of near-term neuroimaging. PMID:25554820

  20. Multiple brain atlas database and atlas-based neuroimaging system.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, W L; Fang, A; Nguyen, B T; Raphel, J K; Jagannathan, L; Raghavan, R; Bryan, R N; Miller, G A

    1997-01-01

    For the purpose of developing multiple, complementary, fully labeled electronic brain atlases and an atlas-based neuroimaging system for analysis, quantification, and real-time manipulation of cerebral structures in two and three dimensions, we have digitized, enhanced, segmented, and labeled the following print brain atlases: Co-Planar Stereotaxic Atlas of the Human Brain by Talairach and Tournoux, Atlas for Stereotaxy of the Human Brain by Schaltenbrand and Wahren, Referentially Oriented Cerebral MRI Anatomy by Talairach and Tournoux, and Atlas of the Cerebral Sulci by Ono, Kubik, and Abernathey. Three-dimensional extensions of these atlases have been developed as well. All two- and three-dimensional atlases are mutually preregistered and may be interactively registered with an actual patient's data. An atlas-based neuroimaging system has been developed that provides support for reformatting, registration, visualization, navigation, image processing, and quantification of clinical data. The anatomical index contains about 1,000 structures and over 400 sulcal patterns. Several new applications of the brain atlas database also have been developed, supported by various technologies such as virtual reality, the Internet, and electronic publishing. Fusion of information from multiple atlases assists the user in comprehensively understanding brain structures and identifying and quantifying anatomical regions in clinical data. The multiple brain atlas database and atlas-based neuroimaging system have substantial potential impact in stereotactic neurosurgery and radiotherapy by assisting in visualization and real-time manipulation in three dimensions of anatomical structures, in quantitative neuroradiology by allowing interactive analysis of clinical data, in three-dimensional neuroeducation, and in brain function studies. PMID:9148878

  1. NPAS3 variants in schizophrenia: a neuroimaging study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This research is a one-site neuroimaging component of a two-site genetic study involving patients with schizophrenia at early and later stages of illness. Studies support a role for the neuronal Per-Arnt-Sim 3 (NPAS3) gene in processes that are essential for normal brain development. Specific NPAS3 variants have been observed at an increased frequency in schizophrenia. In humans, NPAS3 protein was detected in the hippocampus from the first trimester of gestation. In addition, NPAS3 protein levels were reduced in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of some patients with schizophrenia. Npas3 knockout mice display behavioural, neuroanatomical and structural changes with associated severe reductions in neural precursor cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. This study will evaluate the hypothesis that the severe reductions in neural precursor cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus will be present to some degree in patients carrying schizophrenia-associated NPAS3 variants and less so in other patients. Methods/Design Patients enrolled in the larger genetic study (n = 150) will be invited to participate in this neuroimaging arm. The genetic data will be used to ensure a sample size of 45 participants in each genetic subgroup of patients (with and without NPAS3 variants). In addition, we will recruit 60 healthy controls for acquisition of normative data. The following neuroimaging measures will be acquired from the medial temporal region: a) an index of the microcellular environment; b) a macro-structural volumetric measure of the hippocampus; and c) concentration levels of N-acetylaspartate, a marker of neuronal health. Discussion This study will help to establish the contribution of the NPAS3 gene and its variants to brain tissue abnormalities in schizophrenia. Given the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder and the large variation in outcomes, the identification of biological subgroups may in future support tailoring of treatment

  2. Random forests on Hadoop for genome-wide association studies of multivariate neuroimaging phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Motivation Multivariate quantitative traits arise naturally in recent neuroimaging genetics studies, in which both structural and functional variability of the human brain is measured non-invasively through techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There is growing interest in detecting genetic variants associated with such multivariate traits, especially in genome-wide studies. Random forests (RFs) classifiers, which are ensembles of decision trees, are amongst the best performing machine learning algorithms and have been successfully employed for the prioritisation of genetic variants in case-control studies. RFs can also be applied to produce gene rankings in association studies with multivariate quantitative traits, and to estimate genetic similarities measures that are predictive of the trait. However, in studies involving hundreds of thousands of SNPs and high-dimensional traits, a very large ensemble of trees must be inferred from the data in order to obtain reliable rankings, which makes the application of these algorithms computationally prohibitive. Results We have developed a parallel version of the RF algorithm for regression and genetic similarity learning tasks in large-scale population genetic association studies involving multivariate traits, called PaRFR (Parallel Random Forest Regression). Our implementation takes advantage of the MapReduce programming model and is deployed on Hadoop, an open-source software framework that supports data-intensive distributed applications. Notable speed-ups are obtained by introducing a distance-based criterion for node splitting in the tree estimation process. PaRFR has been applied to a genome-wide association study on Alzheimer's disease (AD) in which the quantitative trait consists of a high-dimensional neuroimaging phenotype describing longitudinal changes in the human brain structure. PaRFR provides a ranking of SNPs associated to this trait, and produces pair-wise measures of genetic proximity

  3. Accelerating Neuroimage Registration through Parallel Computation of Similarity Metric

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yun-gang; Liu, Ping; Shi, Lin; Luo, Yishan; Yi, Lei; Li, Ang; Qin, Jing; Heng, Pheng-Ann; Wang, Defeng

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimage registration is crucial for brain morphometric analysis and treatment efficacy evaluation. However, existing advanced registration algorithms such as FLIRT and ANTs are not efficient enough for clinical use. In this paper, a GPU implementation of FLIRT with the correlation ratio (CR) as the similarity metric and a GPU accelerated correlation coefficient (CC) calculation for the symmetric diffeomorphic registration of ANTs have been developed. The comparison with their corresponding original tools shows that our accelerated algorithms can greatly outperform the original algorithm in terms of computational efficiency. This paper demonstrates the great potential of applying these registration tools in clinical applications. PMID:26352412

  4. Multimodal Neuroimaging-Informed Clinical Applications in Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Rafael; Kopell, Brian H; Sprooten, Emma; Goodman, Wayne K; Frangou, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging data acquisition and analysis hold the promise to enhance the ability to make diagnostic and prognostic predictions and perform treatment planning in neuropsychiatric disorders. Prior research using a variety of types of neuroimaging techniques has confirmed that neuropsychiatric disorders are associated with dysfunction in anatomical and functional brain circuits. We first discuss current challenges associated with the identification of reliable neuroimaging markers for diagnosis and prognosis in mood disorders and for neurosurgical treatment planning for deep brain stimulation (DBS). We then present data on the use of neuroimaging for the diagnosis and prognosis of mood disorders and for DBS treatment planning. We demonstrate how multivariate analyses of functional activation and connectivity parameters can be used to differentiate patients with bipolar disorder from those with major depressive disorder and non-affective psychosis. We also present data on connectivity parameters that mediate acute treatment response in affective and non-affective psychosis. We then focus on precision mapping of functional connectivity in native space. We describe the benefits of integrating anatomical fiber reconstruction with brain functional parameters and cortical surface measures to derive anatomically informed connectivity metrics within the morphological context of each individual brain. We discuss how this approach may be particularly promising in psychiatry, given the clinical and etiological heterogeneity of the disorders, and particularly in treatment response prediction and planning. Precision mapping of connectivity is essential for DBS. In DBS, treatment electrodes are inserted into positions near key gray matter nodes within the circuits considered relevant to disease expression. However, targeting white matter tracts that underpin connectivity within these circuits may increase treatment efficacy and tolerability therefore relevant

  5. Presurgical multimodality neuroimaging analysis for complex partial seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Stephen T. C.; Hoo, Kent S., Jr.; Knowlton, Robert C.; Laxer, Kenneth D.; Hawkins, Randall A.; Rowley, Howard A.; Weiner, Michael W.

    1998-07-01

    Surgical treatment of patients suffering from complex partial seizures requires the localization of the epileptogenic zone for surgical resection. Currently, clinicians utilize electroencephalography (EEG), psychological tests, and various neuroimaging modalities together to determine the location of this zone. We investigate the use of positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in the presurgical workup and analysis of patients with complex partial seizures. The results of imaging studies of 25 patients are compared for lateralization accuracy and relative concordance.

  6. Neuroimaging of schizophrenia: structural abnormalities and pathophysiological implications

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Peter F

    2005-01-01

    Schizophrenia, once considered a psychological malady devoid of any organic brain substrate, has been the focus of intense neuroimaging research. Findings reveal mild but generalized tissue loss as well as more selective focal loss. It is unclear whether these abnormalities reflect neurodevelopmental or neurodegenerative processes, or some combination of each; current evidence favors a preponderance of neurodevelopmental abnormalities. The pattern of brain abnormalities is also influenced by environmental and genetic risk factors, as well as by the course (and possibly even treatment) of this illness. These findings are described in this article. PMID:18568069

  7. Multimodal Neuroimaging-Informed Clinical Applications in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    O’Halloran, Rafael; Kopell, Brian H.; Sprooten, Emma; Goodman, Wayne K.; Frangou, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging data acquisition and analysis hold the promise to enhance the ability to make diagnostic and prognostic predictions and perform treatment planning in neuropsychiatric disorders. Prior research using a variety of types of neuroimaging techniques has confirmed that neuropsychiatric disorders are associated with dysfunction in anatomical and functional brain circuits. We first discuss current challenges associated with the identification of reliable neuroimaging markers for diagnosis and prognosis in mood disorders and for neurosurgical treatment planning for deep brain stimulation (DBS). We then present data on the use of neuroimaging for the diagnosis and prognosis of mood disorders and for DBS treatment planning. We demonstrate how multivariate analyses of functional activation and connectivity parameters can be used to differentiate patients with bipolar disorder from those with major depressive disorder and non-affective psychosis. We also present data on connectivity parameters that mediate acute treatment response in affective and non-affective psychosis. We then focus on precision mapping of functional connectivity in native space. We describe the benefits of integrating anatomical fiber reconstruction with brain functional parameters and cortical surface measures to derive anatomically informed connectivity metrics within the morphological context of each individual brain. We discuss how this approach may be particularly promising in psychiatry, given the clinical and etiological heterogeneity of the disorders, and particularly in treatment response prediction and planning. Precision mapping of connectivity is essential for DBS. In DBS, treatment electrodes are inserted into positions near key gray matter nodes within the circuits considered relevant to disease expression. However, targeting white matter tracts that underpin connectivity within these circuits may increase treatment efficacy and tolerability therefore relevant

  8. Sporadic Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Pathophysiology, Neuroimaging Features, and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Boulouis, Gregoire; Charidimou, Andreas; Greenberg, Steven M

    2016-06-01

    Sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a small vessel disorder defined pathologically by progressive amyloid deposition in the walls of cortical and leptomeningeal vessels resulting from disruption of a complex balance between production, circulation, and clearance of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the brain. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a major cause of lobar symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, transient focal neurologic episodes, and a key contributor to vascular cognitive impairment. The mechanisms and consequences of amyloid-β deposition at the pathological level and its neuroimaging manifestations, clinical consequences, and implications for patient care are addressed in this review. PMID:27214698

  9. Neuroimaging the brain-gut axis in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Kristen R; Sherwin, LeeAnne B; Walitt, Brian; Melkus, Gail D’Eramo; Henderson, Wendy A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To summarize and synthesize current literature on neuroimaging the brain-gut axis in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: A database search for relevant literature was conducted using PubMed, Scopus and Embase in February 2015. Date filters were applied from the year 2009 and onward, and studies were limited to those written in the English language and those performed upon human subjects. The initial search yielded 797 articles, out of which 38 were pulled for full text review and 27 were included for study analysis. Investigations were reviewed to determine study design, methodology and results, and data points were placed in tabular format to facilitate analysis of study findings across disparate investigations. RESULTS: Analysis of study data resulted in the abstraction of four key themes: Neurohormonal differences, anatomic measurements of brain structure and connectivity, differences in functional responsiveness of the brain during rectal distention, and confounding/correlating patient factors. Studies in this review noted alterations of glutamate in the left hippocampus (HIPP), commonalities across IBS subjects in terms of brain oscillation patterns, cortical thickness/gray matter volume differences, and neuroanatomical regions with increased activation in patients with IBS: Anterior cingulate cortex, mid cingulate cortex, amygdala, anterior insula, posterior insula and prefrontal cortex. A striking finding among interventions was the substantial influence that patient variables (e.g., sex, psychological and disease related factors) had upon the identification of neuroanatomical differences in structure and connectivity. CONCLUSION: The field of neuroimaging can provide insight into underlying physiological differences that distinguish patients with IBS from a healthy population. PMID:27158548

  10. ADS pilot program Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauson, J.; Heuser, J.

    1981-01-01

    The Applications Data Service (ADS) is a system based on an electronic data communications network which will permit scientists to share the data stored in data bases at universities and at government and private installations. It is designed to allow users to readily locate and access high quality, timely data from multiple sources. The ADS Pilot program objectives and the current plans for accomplishing those objectives are described.

  11. Neuroimaging characteristics of ruptured aneurysm as predictors of outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: pooled analyses of the SAHIT cohort.

    PubMed

    Jaja, Blessing N R; Lingsma, Hester; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Schweizer, Tom A; Thorpe, Kevin E; Macdonald, R Loch

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Neuroimaging characteristics of ruptured aneurysms are important to guide treatment selection, and they have been studied for their value as outcome predictors following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Despite multiple studies, the prognostic value of aneurysm diameter, location, and extravasated SAH clot on computed tomography scan remains debatable. The authors aimed to more precisely ascertain the relation of these factors to outcome. METHODS The data sets of studies included in the Subarachnoid Hemorrhage International Trialists (SAHIT) repository were analyzed including data on ruptured aneurysm location and diameter (7 studies, n = 9125) and on subarachnoid clot graded on the Fisher scale (8 studies; n = 9452) for the relation to outcome on the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) at 3 months. Prognostic strength was quantified by fitting proportional odds logistic regression models. Univariable odds ratios (ORs) were pooled across studies using random effects models. Multivariable analyses were adjusted for fixed effect of study, age, neurological status on admission, other neuroimaging factors, and treatment modality. The neuroimaging predictors were assessed for their added incremental predictive value measured as partial R(2). RESULTS Spline plots indicated outcomes were worse at extremes of aneurysm size, i.e., less than 4 or greater than 9 mm. In between, aneurysm size had no effect on outcome (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.98-1.09 for 9 mm vs 4 mm, i.e., 75th vs 25th percentile), except in those who were treated conservatively (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.02-1.35). Compared with anterior cerebral artery aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms tended to result in slightly poorer outcome in patients who underwent endovascular coil embolization (OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.82-1.57) or surgical clipping (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.10-1.57); the relation was statistically significant only in the latter. Fisher CT subarachnoid clot burden was related to outcome in a gradient manner. Each

  12. Behavioral, computational, and neuroimaging studies of acquired apraxia of speech

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Kirrie J.; Tourville, Jason A.; Robin, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    A critical examination of speech motor control depends on an in-depth understanding of network connectivity associated with Brodmann areas 44 and 45 and surrounding cortices. Damage to these areas has been associated with two conditions—the speech motor programming disorder apraxia of speech (AOS) and the linguistic/grammatical disorder of Broca’s aphasia. Here we focus on AOS, which is most commonly associated with damage to posterior Broca’s area (BA) and adjacent cortex. We provide an overview of our own studies into the nature of AOS, including behavioral and neuroimaging methods, to explore components of the speech motor network that are associated with normal and disordered speech motor programming in AOS. Behavioral, neuroimaging, and computational modeling studies are indicating that AOS is associated with impairment in learning feedforward models and/or implementing feedback mechanisms and with the functional contribution of BA6. While functional connectivity methods are not yet routinely applied to the study of AOS, we highlight the need for focusing on the functional impact of localized lesions throughout the speech network, as well as larger scale comparative studies to distinguish the unique behavioral and neurological signature of AOS. By coupling these methods with neural network models, we have a powerful set of tools to improve our understanding of the neural mechanisms that underlie AOS, and speech production generally. PMID:25404911

  13. New frontiers in neuroimaging applications to inborn errors of metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Prust, Morgan J.; Gropman, Andrea L.; Hauser, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Most inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) are associated with potential for injury to the developing central nervous system resulting in chronic encephalopathy, though the etiopathophysiology of neurological injury have not been fully established in many disorders. Shared mechanisms can be envisioned such as oxidative injury due to over-activation of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptors with subsequent glutamatergic damage, but other causes such as energy depletion or inflammation are possible. Neuroimaging has emerged as a powerful clinical and research tool for studying the brain in a noninvasive manner. Several platforms exist to study neural networks underlying cognitive processes, white matter/myelin microstructure, and cerebral metabolism in vivo. The scope and limitations of these methods will be discussed in the context of valuable information they provide in the study and management of selected inborn errors of metabolism. This review is not meant to be an exhaustive coverage of diagnostic findings on MRI in multiple IEMs, but rather to illustrate how neuroimaging modalities beyond T1 and T2 images, can add depth to an understanding of the underlying brain changes evoked by the selected IEMs. Emphasis will be placed on techniques that are available in the clinical setting. Though technically complex, many of these modalities have moved – or soon will – to the clinical arena. PMID:21778100

  14. Neuroimaging of Mobility in Aging: A Targeted Review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Noah; Mahoney, Jeannette R.; Izzetoglu, Meltem; Blumen, Helena M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The relationship between mobility and cognition in aging is well established, but the relationship between mobility and the structure and function of the aging brain is relatively unknown. This, in part, is attributed to the technological limitations of most neuroimaging procedures, which require the individual to be immobile or in a supine position. Herein, we provide a targeted review of neuroimaging studies of mobility in aging to promote (i) a better understanding of this relationship, (ii) future research in this area, and (iii) development of applications for improving mobility. Methods. A systematic search of peer-reviewed studies was performed using PubMed. Search terms included (i) aging, older adults, or elderly; (ii) gait, walking, balance, or mobility; and (iii) magnetic resonance imaging, voxel-based morphometry, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, diffusion tensor imaging, positron emission tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, event-related potential, and functional near-infrared spectroscopy. Results. Poor mobility outcomes were reliably associated with reduced gray and white matter volume. Fewer studies examined the relationship between changes in task-related brain activation and mobility performance. Extant findings, however, showed that activation patterns in the cerebellum, basal ganglia, parietal and frontal cortices were related to mobility. Increased involvement of the prefrontal cortex was evident in both imagined walking conditions and conditions where the cognitive demands of locomotion were increased. Conclusions. Cortical control of gait in aging is bilateral, widespread, and dependent on the integrity of both gray and white matter. PMID:24739495

  15. Understanding face perception by means of prosopagnosia and neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Rossion, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the human neuro-anatomy of face recognition is a long-standing goal of Cognitive Neuroscience. Studies of patients with face recognition impairment following brain damage (i.e., acquired prosopagnosia) have revealed the specificity of face recognition, the importance and nature of holistic/configural perception of individual faces, and the distribution of this function in the ventral occipito-temporal (VOT) cortex, with a right hemispheric dominance. Yet, neuroimaging studies in this field have essentially focused on a single face-selective area of the VOT and underestimated the right hemisphere superiority. Findings in these studies have also been taken as supporting a hierarchical view of face perception, according to which a face is decomposed into parts in early face-selective areas, these parts being subsequently integrated into a whole representation in higher-order areas. This review takes a historical and current perspective on the study of acquired prosopagnosia and neuroimaging that challenges this latter view. It argues for a combination of these methods, an approach suggesting a coarse-to-fine emergence of the holistic face percept in a non-hierarchical network of cortical face-selective areas. PMID:24896206

  16. Neuroimaging in the Diagnostic Evaluation of Eye Pain.

    PubMed

    Szatmáry, Gabriella

    2016-09-01

    Ocular or eye pain is a frequent complaint encountered not only by eye care providers but neurologists. Isolated eye pain is non-specific and non-localizing; therefore, it poses significant differential diagnostic problems. A wide range of neurologic and ophthalmic disorders may cause pain in, around, or behind the eye. These include ocular and orbital diseases and primary and secondary headaches. In patients presenting with an isolated and chronic eye pain, neuroimaging is usually normal. However, at the beginning of a disease process or in low-grade disease, the eye may appear "quiet," misleading a provider lacking familiarity with underlying disorders and high index of clinical suspicion. Delayed diagnosis of some neuro-ophthalmic causes of eye pain could result in significant neurologic and ophthalmic morbidity, conceivably even mortality. This article reviews some recent advances in imaging of the eye, the orbit, and the brain, as well as research in which neuroimaging has advanced the discovery of the underlying pathophysiology and the complex differential diagnosis of eye pain. PMID:27474094

  17. Neuroimaging in moderate MDMA use: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mueller, F; Lenz, C; Steiner, M; Dolder, P C; Walter, M; Lang, U E; Liechti, M E; Borgwardt, S

    2016-03-01

    MDMA ("ecstasy") is widely used as a recreational drug, although there has been some debate about its neurotoxic effects in humans. However, most studies have investigated subjects with heavy use patterns, and the effects of transient MDMA use are unclear. In this review, we therefore focus on subjects with moderate use patterns, in order to assess the evidence for harmful effects. We searched for studies applying neuroimaging techniques in man. Studies were included if they provided at least one group with an average of <50 lifetime episodes of ecstasy use or an average lifetime consumption of <100 ecstasy tablets. All studies published before July 2015 were included. Of the 250 studies identified in the database search, 19 were included. There is no convincing evidence that moderate MDMA use is associated with structural or functional brain alterations in neuroimaging measures. The lack of significant results was associated with high methodological heterogeneity in terms of dosages and co-consumption of other drugs, low quality of studies and small sample sizes. PMID:26746590

  18. The use of neuroimaging in the diagnosis of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Seth D; Shaw, Dennis W W; Ishak, Gisele; Gropman, Andrea L; Saneto, Russell P

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA impacting mitochondrial function result in disease manifestations ranging from early death to abnormalities in all major organ systems and to symptoms that can be largely confined to muscle fatigue. The definitive diagnosis of a mitochondrial disorder can be difficult to establish. When the constellation of symptoms is suggestive of mitochondrial disease, neuroimaging features may be diagnostic and suggestive, can help direct further workup, and can help to further characterize the underlying brain abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging changes may be nonspecific, such as atrophy (both general and involving specific structures, such as cerebellum), more suggestive of particular disorders such as focal and often bilateral lesions confined to deep brain nuclei, or clearly characteristic of a given disorder such as stroke-like lesions that do not respect vascular boundaries in mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode (MELAS). White matter hyperintensities with or without associated gray matter involvement may also be observed. Across patients and discrete disease subtypes (e.g., MELAS, Leigh syndrome, etc.), patterns of these features are helpful for diagnosis. However, it is also true that marked variability in expression occurs in all mitochondrial disease subtypes, illustrative of the complexity of the disease process. The present review summarizes the role of neuroimaging in the diagnosis and characterization of patients with suspected mitochondrial disease. PMID:20818727

  19. Visualization of group inference data in functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Gläscher, Jan

    2009-01-01

    While thresholded statistical parametric maps can convey an accurate account for the location and spatial extent of an effect in functional neuroimaging studies, their use is somewhat limited for characterizing more complex experimental effects, such as interactions in a factorial design. The resulting necessity for plotting the underlying data has long been recognized. Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) is a widely used software package for analyzing functional neuroimaging data that offers a variety of options for visualizing data from first level analyses. However, nowadays, the thrust of the statistical inference lies at the second level thus allowing for population inference. Unfortunately, the options for visualizing data from second level analyses are quite sparse. rfxplot is a new toolbox designed to alleviate this problem by providing a comprehensive array of options for plotting data from within second level analyses in SPM. These include graphs of average effect sizes (across subjects), averaged fitted responses and event-related blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) time courses. All data are retrieved from the underlying first level analyses and voxel selection can be tailored to the maximum effect in each subject within a defined search volume. All plot configurations can be easily configured via a graphical user-interface as well as non-interactively via a script. The large variety of plot options renders rfxplot suitable both for data exploration as well as producing high-quality figures for publications. PMID:19140033

  20. Neuroimaging correlates of pharmacological and psychological treatments for specific phobia.

    PubMed

    Linares, Ila M; Chags, Marcos H N; Machado-de-Sousa, João P; Crippa, José A S; Hallak, Jaime E C

    2014-01-01

    Specific phobia is an anxiety disorder characterized by irrational fear and avoidance of specific things or situations, interfering significantly with the patients' daily life. Treatment for the disorder consists of both pharmacological and psychological approaches, mainly cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Neuroimaging techniques have been used in an attempt to improve our understanding of the neurobiology of SP and of the effects of treatment options available. This review describes the design and results of eight articles investigating the neuroimaging correlates of pharmacological and psychological treatments for SP. The studies show that CBT is effective in SP, leading to a reduction of anxiety symptoms that is accompanied by functional alterations in the brain. The results of pharmacological interventions for SP are less uniform, but suggest that the partial agonist of the NMDA (N-methyl D-aspartate) receptor DCS (D-cycloserine) can be used in combination with psychotherapy techniques for the achievement of quicker treatment response and that DCS modulates the function of structures implicated in the neurobiology of SP. Further research should explore the augmentation of CBT treatment with DCS in controlled trials. PMID:24923351

  1. Neuroimaging of amblyopia and binocular vision: a review

    PubMed Central

    Joly, Olivier; Frankó, Edit

    2014-01-01

    Amblyopia is a cerebral visual impairment considered to derive from abnormal visual experience (e.g., strabismus, anisometropia). Amblyopia, first considered as a monocular disorder, is now often seen as a primarily binocular disorder resulting in more and more studies examining the binocular deficits in the patients. The neural mechanisms of amblyopia are not completely understood even though they have been investigated with electrophysiological recordings in animal models and more recently with neuroimaging techniques in humans. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the brain regions that underlie the visual deficits associated with amblyopia with a focus on binocular vision using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The first studies focused on abnormal responses in the primary and secondary visual areas whereas recent evidence shows that there are also deficits at higher levels of the visual pathways within the parieto-occipital and temporal cortices. These higher level areas are part of the cortical network involved in 3D vision from binocular cues. Therefore, reduced responses in these areas could be related to the impaired binocular vision in amblyopic patients. Promising new binocular treatments might at least partially correct the activation in these areas. Future neuroimaging experiments could help to characterize the brain response changes associated with these treatments and help devise them. PMID:25147511

  2. A multi-subject, multi-modal human neuroimaging dataset

    PubMed Central

    Wakeman, Daniel G; Henson, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    We describe data acquired with multiple functional and structural neuroimaging modalities on the same nineteen healthy volunteers. The functional data include Electroencephalography (EEG), Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data, recorded while the volunteers performed multiple runs of hundreds of trials of a simple perceptual task on pictures of familiar, unfamiliar and scrambled faces during two visits to the laboratory. The structural data include T1-weighted MPRAGE, Multi-Echo FLASH and Diffusion-weighted MR sequences. Though only from a small sample of volunteers, these data can be used to develop methods for integrating multiple modalities from multiple runs on multiple participants, with the aim of increasing the spatial and temporal resolution above that of any one modality alone. They can also be used to integrate measures of functional and structural connectivity, and as a benchmark dataset to compare results across the many neuroimaging analysis packages. The data are freely available from https://openfmri.org/. PMID:25977808

  3. Structural Neuroimaging Markers of Cognitive Decline in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hanganu, Alexandru; Monchi, Oury

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is a major challenge since it has been established that 25 to 40% of patients will develop cognitive impairment early in the disease. Furthermore, it has been reported that up to 80% of Parkinsonian patients will eventually develop dementia. Thus, it is important to improve the diagnosing procedures in order to detect cognitive impairment at early stages of development and to delay as much as possible the developing of dementia. One major challenge is that patients with mild cognitive impairment exhibit measurable cognitive deficits according to recently established criteria, yet those deficits are not severe enough to interfere with daily living, hence being avoided by patients, and might be overseen by clinicians. Recent advances in neuroimaging brain analysis allowed the establishment of several anatomical markers that have the potential to be considered for early detection of cognitive impairment in Parkinsonian patients. This review aims to outline the neuroimaging possibilities in diagnosing cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease and to take into consideration the near-future possibilities of their implementation into clinical practice. PMID:27190672

  4. Neuroimaging studies of alexithymia: physical, affective, and social perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Alexithymia refers to difficulty in identifying and expressing one’s emotions, and it is related to disturbed emotional regulation. It was originally proposed as a personality trait that plays a central role in psychosomatic diseases. This review of neuroimaging studies on alexithymia suggests that alexithymia is associated with reduced neural responses to emotional stimuli from the external environment, as well as with reduced activity during imagery, in the limbic and paralimbic areas (i.e., amygdala, insula, anterior/posterior cingulate cortex). In contrast, alexithymia is also known to be associated with enhanced neural activity in somatosensory and sensorimotor regions, including the insula. Moreover, neural activity in the medial, prefrontal, and insula cortex was lowered when people with alexithymia were involved in social tasks. Because most neuroimaging studies have been based on sampling by self-reported questionnaires, the contrasted features of neural activities in response to internal and external emotional stimuli need to be elucidated. The social and emotional responses of people with alexithymia are discussed and recommendations for future research are presented. PMID:23537323

  5. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in schizophrenia: the contribution of neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhong-de; Wang, R; Prakash, Ravi; Chaudhury, S; Dayananda, G

    2012-01-01

    At the most basic level, the Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation(TMS) is a neuro-scientific tool that exerts its action by influencing the neo-cortical functions. However, in-spite of so many well-evidenced roles of TMS in neuropsychiatric conditions, its exact mechanism of action remains to be known. More intriguing are its therapeutic effects in Schizophrenia at the Cerebral-level. In this review, we adopt a neuro-imaging approach for this exploration. We review the present literature for the studies in Schizophrenia which have used a combination of rTMS with 1) Electroenchephalogram (EEG) 2)The functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and the 3) Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/ Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography. The TMS-EEG combination provides direct effects of TMS on the electro- magnetic field (EMF) of brain. The TMS-fMRI/PET/SPECT combinations are very effective in exploring the functional connectivity in brains of Schizophrenia patients as well as in performing rTMS guided neuro-navigation. Our review suggests that TMS combined with other neuroimaging modalities are needed for a better clarification of its neural actions. PMID:23409741

  6. Very poor outcome schizophrenia: Clinical and neuroimaging aspects

    PubMed Central

    Mitelman, Serge A.; Buchsbaum, Monte S.

    2009-01-01

    In spite of significant advances in treatment of patients with schizophrenia and continued efforts towards their deinstitutionalization, a considerable group of patients remain chronically hospitalized or otherwise dependent on others for basic necessities of life. It has been proposed that these patients belong to a distinct etiopathological subgroup, termed Kraepelinian, whose course of illness may be progressive and resistant to treatment. Indeed, longitudinal studies appear to show that elderly Kraepelinian patients follow a course of rapid cognitive and functional deterioration, commensurate with a dementing process, and that their poor functional status is closely correlated with the cognitive deterioration. Recent neuroimaging studies described a pattern of posteriorization of grey and white matter deficits with poor outcome in schizophrenia, and produced a constellation of findings implicating primary processing of visual and auditory information as central to the impaired functional status in this patient group. These studies are summarized in detail in this review and future directions for neuroimaging assessment of very poor outcome patients with schizophrenia are suggested. PMID:17671868

  7. Behavioral, computational, and neuroimaging studies of acquired apraxia of speech.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kirrie J; Tourville, Jason A; Robin, Donald A

    2014-01-01

    A critical examination of speech motor control depends on an in-depth understanding of network connectivity associated with Brodmann areas 44 and 45 and surrounding cortices. Damage to these areas has been associated with two conditions-the speech motor programming disorder apraxia of speech (AOS) and the linguistic/grammatical disorder of Broca's aphasia. Here we focus on AOS, which is most commonly associated with damage to posterior Broca's area (BA) and adjacent cortex. We provide an overview of our own studies into the nature of AOS, including behavioral and neuroimaging methods, to explore components of the speech motor network that are associated with normal and disordered speech motor programming in AOS. Behavioral, neuroimaging, and computational modeling studies are indicating that AOS is associated with impairment in learning feedforward models and/or implementing feedback mechanisms and with the functional contribution of BA6. While functional connectivity methods are not yet routinely applied to the study of AOS, we highlight the need for focusing on the functional impact of localized lesions throughout the speech network, as well as larger scale comparative studies to distinguish the unique behavioral and neurological signature of AOS. By coupling these methods with neural network models, we have a powerful set of tools to improve our understanding of the neural mechanisms that underlie AOS, and speech production generally. PMID:25404911

  8. Neuroimaging Studies of Speech: An Overview of Techniques and Methodological Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiez, Julie A.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of how functional neuroimaging has been applied to the study of speech production first reviews neuroimaging methods and limitations, then describes two approaches to study of the relevant speech areas: comparison across different language production tasks and comparison of effects of different stimuli within a single task. Examples…

  9. Functional neuroimaging in obesity and the potential for development of novel treatments.

    PubMed

    Schlögl, Haiko; Horstmann, Annette; Villringer, Arno; Stumvoll, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Recently, exciting progress has been made in understanding the role of the CNS in controlling eating behaviour and in the development of overeating. Regions and networks of the human brain involved in eating behaviour and appetite control have been identified with neuroimaging techniques such as functional MRI, PET, electroencephalography, and magnetoencephalography. Hormones that regulate our drive to eat (eg, leptin, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide-1) can affect brain function. Defects in central hunger signalling are present in many pathologies. On the basis of an understanding of brain mechanisms that lead to overeating, powerful neuroimaging protocols could be a future clinical approach to allow individually tailored treatment options for patients with obesity. The aim of our Review is to provide an overview of neuroimaging approaches for obesity (ie, neuroimaging study design, questions which can be answered by neuroimaging, and limitations of neuroimaging techniques), examine current models of central nervous processes regulating eating behaviour, summarise and review important neuroimaging studies investigating therapeutic approaches to treat obesity or to control eating behaviour, and to provide a perspective on how neuroimaging might lead to new therapeutic approaches to obesity. PMID:26838265

  10. The Status of the Quality Control in Acupuncture-Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ke; Jing, Miaomiao; Liu, Xiaoyan; Gao, Feifei; Liang, Fanrong; Zeng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Using neuroimaging techniques to explore the central mechanism of acupuncture gains increasing attention, but the quality control of acupuncture-neuroimaging study remains to be improved. We searched the PubMed Database during 1995 to 2014. The original English articles with neuroimaging scan performed on human beings were included. The data involved quality control including the author, sample size, characteristics of the participant, neuroimaging technology, and acupuncture intervention were extracted and analyzed. The rigorous inclusion and exclusion criteria are important guaranty for the participants' homogeneity. The standard operation process of acupuncture and the stricter requirement for acupuncturist play significant role in quality control. More attention should be paid to the quality control in future studies to improve the reproducibility and reliability of the acupuncture-neuroimaging studies. PMID:27242911

  11. Neuroimaging and the school-based assessment of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jantz, Paul B; Bigler, Erin D

    2014-01-01

    Advanced neuroimaging contributes to a greater understanding of brain pathology following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and has the ability to guide neurorehabilitation decisions. When integrated with the school-based psychoeducational assessment of a child with a TBI, neuroimaging can provide a different perspective when interpreting educational and behavioral variables relevant to school-based neurorehabilitation. School psychologists conducting traditional psychoeducational assessments of children with TBI seldom obtain and integrate neuroimaging, despite its availability. This article presents contextual information on the medical assessment of TBI, major types of neuroimaging, and networks of the brain. A case study illustrates the value of incorporating neuroimaging into the standard school-based psychoeducational evaluations of children with traumatic brain injury. PMID:24473251

  12. The Utility of Neuroimaging Studies for Informing Educational Practice and Policy in Reading Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Black, Jessica M.; Myers, Chelsea A.; Hoeft, Fumiko

    2015-01-01

    Educational neuroscience is an emerging scientific field that brings together researchers from neuroscience, psychology, and education to explore the neurocognitive processes underlying educational practice and theory. In this brief article, we take reading disorder (RD, also known as developmental dyslexia) as an example, and explore trends in neuroimaging research, which may have future implications for educational practice and policy. Specifically, we present two examples that have been central to research efforts in our laboratory: (a) utilizing multimodal neuroimaging to optimize criteria to diagnose RD, and (b) identifying neuroimaging markers that predict future academic outcomes. Such research is faced with important challenges, and rigorous validation is necessary before any claims of the widespread practical utility of neuroimaging can be made. Nevertheless, we contend that neuroimaging studies offer opportunities for providing critical information that could lead to advancing theory of reading and RD. This could in turn lead to better diagnostic criteria and more accurate and earlier identification of RD. PMID:25732015

  13. Seeing responsibility: can neuroimaging teach us anything about moral and legal responsibility?

    PubMed

    Wasserman, David; Johnston, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    As imaging technologies help us understand the structure and function of the brain, providing insight into human capabilities as basic as vision and as complex as memory, and human conditions as impairing as depression and as fraught as psychopathy, some have asked whether they can also help us understand human agency. Specifically, could neuroimaging lead us to reassess the socially significant practice of assigning and taking responsibility? While responsibility itself is not a psychological process open to investigation through neuroimaging, decision-making is. Over the past decade, different researchers and scholars have sought to use neuroimaging (or the results of neuroimaging studies) to investigate what is going on in the brain when we make decisions. The results of this research raise the question whether neuroscience-especially now that it includes neuroimaging-can and should alter our understandings of responsibility and our related practice of holding people responsible. It is this question that we investigate here. PMID:24634084

  14. Towards structured sharing of raw and derived neuroimaging data across existing resources.

    PubMed

    Keator, D B; Helmer, K; Steffener, J; Turner, J A; Van Erp, T G M; Gadde, S; Ashish, N; Burns, G A; Nichols, B N

    2013-11-15

    Data sharing efforts increasingly contribute to the acceleration of scientific discovery. Neuroimaging data is accumulating in distributed domain-specific databases and there is currently no integrated access mechanism nor an accepted format for the critically important meta-data that is necessary for making use of the combined, available neuroimaging data. In this manuscript, we present work from the Derived Data Working Group, an open-access group sponsored by the Biomedical Informatics Research Network (BIRN) and the International Neuroimaging Coordinating Facility (INCF) focused on practical tools for distributed access to neuroimaging data. The working group develops models and tools facilitating the structured interchange of neuroimaging meta-data and is making progress towards a unified set of tools for such data and meta-data exchange. We report on the key components required for integrated access to raw and derived neuroimaging data as well as associated meta-data and provenance across neuroimaging resources. The components include (1) a structured terminology that provides semantic context to data, (2) a formal data model for neuroimaging with robust tracking of data provenance, (3) a web service-based application programming interface (API) that provides a consistent mechanism to access and query the data model, and (4) a provenance library that can be used for the extraction of provenance data by image analysts and imaging software developers. We believe that the framework and set of tools outlined in this manuscript have great potential for solving many of the issues the neuroimaging community faces when sharing raw and derived neuroimaging data across the various existing database systems for the purpose of accelerating scientific discovery. PMID:23727024

  15. Towards structured sharing of raw and derived neuroimaging data across existing resources

    PubMed Central

    Keator, D.B.; Helmer, K.; Steffener, J.; Turner, J.A.; Van Erp, T.G.M.; Gadde, S.; Ashish, N.; Burns, G.A.; Nichols, B.N.

    2013-01-01

    Data sharing efforts increasingly contribute to the acceleration of scientific discovery. Neuroimaging data is accumulating in distributed domain-specific databases and there is currently no integrated access mechanism nor an accepted format for the critically important meta-data that is necessary for making use of the combined, available neuroimaging data. In this manuscript, we present work from the Derived Data Working Group, an open-access group sponsored by the Biomedical Informatics Research Network (BIRN) and the International Neuroimaging Coordinating Facility (INCF) focused on practical tools for distributed access to neuroimaging data. The working group develops models and tools facilitating the structured interchange of neuroimaging meta-data and is making progress towards a unified set of tools for such data and meta-data exchange. We report on the key components required for integrated access to raw and derived neuroimaging data as well as associated meta-data and provenance across neuroimaging resources. The components include (1) a structured terminology that provides semantic context to data, (2) a formal data model for neuroimaging with robust tracking of data provenance, (3) a web service-based application programming interface (API) that provides a consistent mechanism to access and query the data model, and (4) a provenance library that can be used for the extraction of provenance data by image analysts and imaging software developers. We believe that the framework and set of tools outlined in this manuscript have great potential for solving many of the issues the neuroimaging community faces when sharing raw and derived neuroimaging data across the various existing database systems for the purpose of accelerating scientific discovery. PMID:23727024

  16. Innovations Without Added Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cereghino, Edward

    1974-01-01

    There is no question that we are in a tight money market, and schools are among the first institutions to feel the squeeze. Therefore, when a plan is offered that provides for innovations without added costs, its something worth noting. (Editor)

  17. What Value "Value Added"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Two quantitative measures of school performance are currently used, the average points score (APS) at Key Stage 2 and value-added (VA), which measures the rate of academic improvement between Key Stage 1 and 2. These figures are used by parents and the Office for Standards in Education to make judgements and comparisons. However, simple…

  18. Introducing ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Henneken, E.; Grant, C. S.; Kurtz, M. J.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Thompson, D. M.; Bohlen, E.; Murray, S. S.

    2011-05-01

    ADS Labs is a platform that ADS is introducing in order to test and receive feedback from the community on new technologies and prototype services. Currently, ADS Labs features a new interface for abstract searches, faceted filtering of results, visualization of co-authorship networks, article-level recommendations, and a full-text search service. The streamlined abstract search interface provides a simple, one-box search with options for ranking results based on a paper relevancy, freshness, number of citations, and downloads. In addition, it provides advanced rankings based on collaborative filtering techniques. The faceted filtering interface allows users to narrow search results based on a particular property or set of properties ("facets"), allowing users to manage large lists and explore the relationship between them. For any set or sub-set of records, the co-authorship network can be visualized in an interactive way, offering a view of the distribution of contributors and their inter-relationships. This provides an immediate way to detect groups and collaborations involved in a particular research field. For a majority of papers in Astronomy, our new interface will provide a list of related articles of potential interest. The recommendations are based on a number of factors, including text similarity, citations, and co-readership information. The new full-text search interface allows users to find all instances of particular words or phrases in the body of the articles in our full-text archive. This includes all of the scanned literature in ADS as well as a select portion of the current astronomical literature, including ApJ, ApJS, AJ, MNRAS, PASP, A&A, and soon additional content from Springer journals. Fulltext search results include a list of the matching papers as well as a list of "snippets" of text highlighting the context in which the search terms were found. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  19. The down syndrome biomarker initiative (DSBI) pilot: proof of concept for deep phenotyping of Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers in down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Michael S.; Wishnek, Hannah; Brewer, James B.; Donohue, Michael C.; Ness, Seth; Mobley, William C.; Aisen, Paul S.; Rissman, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    To gain further knowledge on the preclinical phase of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), we sought to characterize cognitive performance, neuroimaging and plasma-based AD biomarkers in a cohort of non-demented adults with down syndrome (DS). The goal of the down syndrome biomarker Initiative (DSBI) pilot is to test feasibility of this approach for future multicenter studies. We enrolled 12 non-demented participants with DS between the ages of 30–60 years old. Participants underwent extensive cognitive testing, volumetric MRI, amyloid positron emission tomography (PET; 18F-florbetapir), fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose) and retinal amyloid imaging. In addition, plasma beta-amyloid (Aβ) species were measured and Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotyping was performed. Results from our multimodal analysis suggest greater hippocampal atrophy with amyloid load. Additionally, we identified an inverse relationship between amyloid load and regional glucose metabolism. Cognitive and functional measures did not correlate with amyloid load in DS but did correlate with regional FDG PET measures. Biomarkers of AD can be readily studied in adults with DS as in other preclinical AD populations. Importantly, all subjects in this feasibility study were able to complete all test procedures. The data indicate that a large, multicenter longitudinal study is feasible to better understand the trajectories of AD biomarkers in this enriched population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02141971. PMID:26441570

  20. MTA index: a simple 2D-method for assessing atrophy of the medial temporal lobe using clinically available neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Menéndez-González, Manuel; López-Muñiz, Alfonso; Vega, José A.; Salas-Pacheco, José M.; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Despite a strong correlation to severity of AD pathology, the measurement of medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) is not being widely used in daily clinical practice as a criterion in the diagnosis of prodromal and probable AD. This is mainly because the methods available to date are sophisticated and difficult to implement for routine use in most hospitals—volumetric methods—or lack objectivity—visual rating scales. In this pilot study we aim to describe a new, simple and objective method for measuring the rate of MTA in relation to the global atrophy using clinically available neuroimaging and describe the rationale behind this method. Description: This method consists of calculating a ratio with the area of 3 regions traced manually on one single coronal MRI slide at the level of the interpeduncular fossa: (1) the medial temporal lobe (MTL) region (A); (2) the parenchima within the medial temporal region, that includes the hippocampus and the parahippocampal gyrus—the fimbria taenia and plexus choroideus are excluded—(B); and (3) the body of the ipsilateral lateral ventricle (C). Therefrom we can compute the ratio “Medial Temporal Atrophy index” at both sides as follows: MTAi = (A − B)× 10/C. Conclusions: The MTAi is a simple 2D-method for measuring the relative extent of atrophy in the MTL in relation to the global brain atrophy. This method can be useful for a more accurate diagnosis of AD in routine clinical practice. Further studies are needed to assess the usefulness of MTAi in the diagnosis of early AD, in tracking the progression of AD and in the differential diagnosis of AD with other dementias. PMID:24715861

  1. Neoplastic cauda equina syndrome: a neuroimaging-based review.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Shelby J; Katzman, Gregory L; Roos, Raymond P; Mehta, Amar S; Ali, Saad

    2016-02-01

    Cauda equina syndrome refers to dysfunction of the cauda equina, the collection of ventral and dorsal lumbar, sacral and coccygeal nerve roots that surround the filum terminale. This most commonly occurs as a result of compression by a herniated lumbosacral disc. However, the syndrome may also complicate metastatic cancer or a primary neoplasm within or infiltrating the spinal canal. An accurate and timely diagnosis is critical to avoid irreversible loss of neurological function. The clinician and radiologist must therefore be aware of the many possible causes to guide timely management. Here we review the diverse neoplastic causes affecting the cauda equina nerve roots from a neuroimaging-based perspective. We divide them by location into intramedullary neoplasms at the conus (such as astrocytoma), intradural-extramedullary neoplasms (such as schwannoma and leptomeningeal metastases) and extradural neoplasms (such as spinal metastases from systemic neoplasms). We also discuss the clinical features associated with cauda equina tumours, with special focus on cauda equina syndrome. PMID:26442520

  2. Neuroimaging studies of striatum in cognition part II: Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hanganu, Alexandru; Provost, Jean-Sebastien; Monchi, Oury

    2015-01-01

    In recent years a gradual shift in the definition of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been established, from a classical akinetic-rigid movement disorder to a multi-system neurodegenerative disease. While the pathophysiology of PD is complex and goes much beyond the nigro-striatal degeneration, the striatum has been shown to be responsible for many cognitive functions. Patients with PD develop impairments in multiple cognitive domains and the PD model is probably the most extensively studied regarding striatum dysfunction and its influence on cognition. Up to 40% of PD patients present cognitive impairment even in the early stages of disease development. Thus, understanding the key patterns of striatum and connecting regions' influence on cognition will help develop more specific approaches to alleviate cognitive impairment and slow down its decline. This review focuses on the contribution of neuroimaging studies in understanding how striatum impairment affects cognition in PD. PMID:26500512

  3. Neuroimaging biomarkers for Parkinson disease: facts and fantasy.

    PubMed

    Perlmutter, Joel S; Norris, Scott A

    2014-12-01

    In this grand rounds, we focus on development, validation, and application of neuroimaging biomarkers for Parkinson disease (PD). We cover whether such biomarkers can be used to identify presymptomatic individuals (probably yes), provide a measure of PD severity (in a limited fashion, but frequently done poorly), investigate pathophysiology of parkinsonian disorders (yes, if done carefully), play a role in differential diagnosis of parkinsonism (not well), and investigate pathology underlying cognitive impairment (yes, in conjunction with postmortem data). Along the way, we clarify several issues about definitions of biomarkers and surrogate endpoints. The goal of this lecture is to provide a basis for interpreting current literature and newly proposed clinical tools in PD. In the end, one should be able to critically distinguish fact from fantasy. PMID:25363872

  4. Preclinical PET Neuroimaging of [11C]Bexarotene.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, Benjamin H; Placzek, Michael S; Krishnan, Hema S; Pekošak, Aleksandra; Collier, Thomas Lee; Wang, Changning; Liang, Steven H; Burstein, Ethan S; Hooker, Jacob M; Vasdev, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Activation of retinoid X receptors (RXRs) has been proposed as a therapeutic mechanism for the treatment of neurodegeneration, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. We previously reported radiolabeling of a Food and Drug Administration-approved RXR agonist, bexarotene, by copper-mediated [(11)C]CO2 fixation and preliminary positron emission tomography (PET) neuroimaging that demonstrated brain permeability in nonhuman primate with regional binding distribution consistent with RXRs. In this study, the brain uptake and saturability of [(11)C]bexarotene were studied in rats and nonhuman primates by PET imaging under baseline and greater target occupancy conditions. [(11)C]Bexarotene displays a high proportion of nonsaturable uptake in the brain and is unsuitable for RXR occupancy measurements in the central nervous system. PMID:27553293

  5. Motivating forces of human actions. Neuroimaging reward and social interaction.

    PubMed

    Walter, Henrik; Abler, Birgit; Ciaramidaro, Angela; Erk, Susanne

    2005-11-15

    In neuroeconomics, reward and social interaction are central concepts to understand what motivates human behaviour. Both concepts are investigated in humans using neuroimaging methods. In this paper, we provide an overview about these results and discuss their relevance for economic behaviour. For reward it has been shown that a system exists in humans that is involved in predicting rewards and thus guides behaviour, involving a circuit including the striatum, the orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala. Recent studies on social interaction revealed a mentalizing system representing the mental states of others. A central part of this system is the medial prefrontal cortex, in particular the anterior paracingulate cortex. The reward as well as the mentalizing system is engaged in economic decision-making. We will discuss implications of this study for neuromarketing as well as general implications of these results that may help to provide deeper insights into the motivating forces of human behaviour. PMID:16216683

  6. Structural neuroimaging in schizophrenia from methods to insights to treatments

    PubMed Central

    Shenton, Martha E.; Whitford, Thomas J.; Kubicki, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Historically, Kraepelin speculated that dementia praecox resulted from damage to the cerebral cortex, most notably the frontal and temporal cortices. It is only recently, however, that tools have been available to test this hypothesis. Now, more than a century later, we know that schizophrenia is a brain disorder. This knowledge comes from critical advances in imaging technology- including computerized axial tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and diffusion imaging - all of which provide an unprecedented view of neuroanatomical structures, in vivo. Here, we review evidence for structural neuroimaging abnormalities, beginning with evidence for focal brain abnormalities, primarily in gray matter, and proceeding to the quest to identify abnormalities in brain systems and circuits by focusing on damage to white matter connections in the brain. We then review future prospects that need to be explored and pursued in order to translate our current knowledge into an understanding of the neurobiology of schizophrenia, which can then be translated into novel treatments. PMID:20954428

  7. Antidepressant-related sexual dysfunction - perspectives from neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Graf, Heiko; Walter, Martin; Metzger, Coraline D; Abler, Birgit

    2014-06-01

    Sexual dysfunction is not only a common symptom in major depression but also a frequent side-effect of antidepressant medication, mainly of the selective serotonin reuptake-inhibitors (SSRI) that are often prescribed as a first line treatment option. Despite of the increasing incidence and prescription rates, neuronal mechanisms underlying SSRI-related sexual dysfunction are poorly understood and investigations on this topic are scarce. Neuroimaging techniques, mainly functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), provide a feasible approach to investigate these mechanisms since SSRI-related sexual dysfunction is most likely related to central nervous processes. This review summarizes the recent literature regarding the basic clinical findings and imaging correlates of antidepressant-related sexual dysfunction linking brain regions and networks potentially involved to phases and subcomponents of sexual processing and antidepressant action. In particular, fMRI studies on SSRI antidepressants including paroxetine and SNRIs including bupropion are highlighted. PMID:24333547

  8. Atlas generated generalized ROIs for use in functional neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Thurfjell, L. . Dept. of Neuroradiology and Clinical Neurophysiology); Bohm, C. . Dept. of Physics)

    1994-08-01

    The interpretation of functional neuroimaging data can, in many cases, be facilitated by comparison with simulated data corresponding to the measuring situation. A computerized brain atlas is used to provide information regarding the spatial extent of the object being imaged. This knowledge combined with information about the resolution of the imaging device expressed as point spread functions is used to calculate a simulated image of the object. The simulated image can be regarded as a generalized region of interest (ROI) containing information of the object as viewed by the specific instrument. Generalized ROIs are used to automatically determine boundaries or ordinary ROIs and to provide recovery coefficients to compensate for partial volume effects. Simulations can also be used to generate three-dimensional data sets where different activity levels have been assigned to different anatomical structures. These methods are presented in this paper and some experimental results are shown.

  9. Clinical Neuroimaging Using Arterial Spin-Labeled Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Ronald L.; Detre, John A.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY The two most common methods for measuring perfusion with MRI are based on dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and arterial spin labeling (ASL). Although clinical experience to date is much more extensive with DSC perfusion MRI, ASL methods offer several advantages. The primary advantages are that completely noninvasive absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements are possible with relative insensitivity to permeability, and that multiple repeated measurements can be obtained to evaluate one or more interventions or to perform perfusion-based functional MRI. ASL perfusion and perfusion-based fMRI methods have been applied in many clinical settings, including acute and chronic cerebrovascular disease, CNS neoplasms, epilepsy, aging and development, neurodegenerative disorders, and neuropsychiatric diseases. Recent technical advances have improved the sensitivity of ASL perfusion MRI, and increasing use is expected in the coming years. This review focuses on ASL perfusion MRI and applications in clinical neuroimaging. PMID:17599701

  10. Neurobehavioral, neurologic, and neuroimaging characteristics of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Glass, Leila; Ware, Ashley L; Mattson, Sarah N

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy can have deleterious consequences for the fetus, including changes in central nervous system development leading to permanent neurologic alterations and cognitive and behavioral deficits. Individuals affected by prenatal alcohol exposure, including those with and without fetal alcohol syndrome, are identified under the umbrella of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). While studies of humans and animal models confirm that even low to moderate levels of exposure can have detrimental effects, critical doses of such exposure have yet to be specified and the most clinically significant and consistent consequences occur following heavy exposure. These consequences are pervasive, devastating, and can result in long-term dysfunction. This chapter summarizes the neurobehavioral, neurologic, and neuroimaging characteristics of FASD, focusing primarily on clinical research of individuals with histories of heavy prenatal alcohol exposure, although studies of lower levels of exposure, particularly prospective, longitudinal studies, will be discussed where relevant. PMID:25307589

  11. Causal interpretation rules for encoding and decoding models in neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Weichwald, Sebastian; Meyer, Timm; Özdenizci, Ozan; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Ball, Tonio; Grosse-Wentrup, Moritz

    2015-04-15

    Causal terminology is often introduced in the interpretation of encoding and decoding models trained on neuroimaging data. In this article, we investigate which causal statements are warranted and which ones are not supported by empirical evidence. We argue that the distinction between encoding and decoding models is not sufficient for this purpose: relevant features in encoding and decoding models carry a different meaning in stimulus- and in response-based experimental paradigms.We show that only encoding models in the stimulus-based setting support unambiguous causal interpretations. By combining encoding and decoding models trained on the same data, however, we obtain insights into causal relations beyond those that are implied by each individual model type. We illustrate the empirical relevance of our theoretical findings on EEG data recorded during a visuo-motor learning task. PMID:25623501

  12. Structural neuroimaging in schizophrenia: from methods to insights to treatments.

    PubMed

    Shenton, Martha E; Whitford, Thomas J; Kubicki, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Historically, Kraepelin speculated that dementia praecox resulted from damage to the cerebral cortex, most notably the frontal and temporal cortices. It is only recently, however, that tools have been available to test this hypothesis. Now, more than a century later, we know that schizophrenia is a brain disorder. This knowledge comes from critical advances in imaging technology--including computerized axial tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and diffusion imaging--all of which provide an unprecedented view of neuroanatomical structures, in vivo. Here, we review evidence for structural neuroimaging abnormalities, beginning with evidence for focal brain abnormalities, primarily in gray matter, and proceeding to the quest to identify abnormalities in brain systems and circuits by focusing on damage to white matter connections in the brain. We then review future prospects that need to be explored and pursued in order to translate our current knowledge into an understanding of the neurobiology of schizophrenia, which can then be translated into novel treatments. PMID:20954428

  13. Neuroimaging studies in schizophrenia: an overview of research from Asia.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2012-10-01

    Neuroimaging studies in schizophrenia help clarify the neural substrates underlying the pathogenesis of this neuropsychiatric disorder. Contemporary brain imaging in schizophrenia is predominated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based research approaches. This review focuses on the various imaging studies from India and their relevance to the understanding of brain abnormalities in schizophrenia. The existing studies are predominantly comprised of structural MRI reports involving region-of-interest and voxel-based morphometry approaches, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and single-photon emission computed tomography/positron emission tomography (SPECT/PET) studies. Most of these studies are significant in that they have evaluated antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients--a relatively difficult population to obtain in contemporary research. Findings of these studies offer robust support to the existence of significant brain abnormalities at very early stages of the disorder. In addition, theoretically relevant relationships between these brain abnormalities and developmental aberrations suggest possible neurodevelopmental basis for these brain deficits. PMID:23057977

  14. Ethical concepts and future challenges of neuroimaging: an Islamic perspective.

    PubMed

    Al-Delaimy, Wael K

    2012-09-01

    Neuroscience is advancing at a rapid pace, with new technologies and approaches that are creating ethical challenges not easily addressed by current ethical frameworks and guidelines. One fascinating technology is neuroimaging, especially functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Although still in its infancy, fMRI is breaking new ground in neuroscience, potentially offering increased understanding of brain function. Different populations and faith traditions will likely have different reactions to these new technologies and the ethical challenges they bring with them. Muslims are approximately one-fifth of world population and they have a specific and highly regulated ethical and moral code, which helps them deal with scientific advances and decision making processes in an Islamically ethical manner. From this ethical perspective, in light of the relevant tenets of Islam, neuroimaging poses various challenges. The privacy of spirituality and the thought process, the requirement to put community interest before individual interest, and emphasis on conscious confession in legal situations are Islamic concepts that can pose a challenge for the use of something intrusive such as an fMRI. Muslim moral concepts such as There shall be no harm inflicted or reciprocated in Islam and Necessities overrule prohibitions are some of the criteria that might appropriately be used to guide advancing neuroscience. Neuroscientists should be particularly prudent and well prepared in implementing neuroscience advances that are breaking new scientific and ethical ground. Neuroscientists should also be prepared to assist in setting the ethical frameworks in place in advance of what might be perceived as runaway applications of technology. PMID:22865482

  15. Sensitivity of the neuroimaging techniques in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Dzevdet; Sinanović, Osman

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the sensitivity and effectiveness of neuroimaging techniques in 190 patients with acute ischemic stroke. The first computed tomography (CT) scan for all patients was performed within the first 12 hours of the stroke symptoms onset. For each patient, between the third and fifth day of the hospitalization, at least one more neuroimaging procedure (CT and/or magnetic resonance imaging--MRI, and/or diffusion weighted imaging--DWI) was done. The CT scan in the first 12 hours of the stroke onset was positive in 32% of the patients; the highest number of the positive findings was in the patients with total anterior circulation infarct (52%). After 48 hours of the stroke onset second CT was positive in 85% (75/89), MRI in 93.5% (115/123), and DWI in 98.8% (79/80) patients. MRI was significantly more sensitive than CT in detection of ischemic lesion (88% vs. 72%, P=0.01), particularly in the patients with lacunar infarcts (75% vs. 50%, P=0.005). In detection of ischemic stroke 48 hours of the stroke onset the slightly higher number of strokes were detected on DWI in comparison with MRI (98.6% vs. 88.7%). According to our results, within the first 12 hours after the stroke onset, CT is reliable only for detection of considerable number of cortical ischemic strokes of the anterior cerebral circulation. After 48 hours from the stroke onset CT, MRI and DWI show high sensitivity in the detection of ischemic lesion of all clinical stroke subtypes. MRI is more sensitive in comparison with CT in detection of ischemic lesion, while DWI does not show dominance in comparison with MRI in identification of ischemic stroke after 48 hours of the symptoms onset. PMID:15628251

  16. Functional Neuroimaging Insights into the Physiology of Human Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Schabus, Manuel; Desseilles, Martin; Sterpenich, Virginie; Bonjean, Maxime; Maquet, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Functional brain imaging has been used in humans to noninvasively investigate the neural mechanisms underlying the generation of sleep stages. On the one hand, REM sleep has been associated with the activation of the pons, thalamus, limbic areas, and temporo-occipital cortices, and the deactivation of prefrontal areas, in line with theories of REM sleep generation and dreaming properties. On the other hand, during non-REM (NREM) sleep, decreases in brain activity have been consistently found in the brainstem, thalamus, and in several cortical areas including the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), in agreement with a homeostatic need for brain energy recovery. Benefiting from a better temporal resolution, more recent studies have characterized the brain activations related to phasic events within specific sleep stages. In particular, they have demonstrated that NREM sleep oscillations (spindles and slow waves) are indeed associated with increases in brain activity in specific subcortical and cortical areas involved in the generation or modulation of these waves. These data highlight that, even during NREM sleep, brain activity is increased, yet regionally specific and transient. Besides refining the understanding of sleep mechanisms, functional brain imaging has also advanced the description of the functional properties of sleep. For instance, it has been shown that the sleeping brain is still able to process external information and even detect the pertinence of its content. The relationship between sleep and memory has also been refined using neuroimaging, demonstrating post-learning reactivation during sleep, as well as the reorganization of memory representation on the systems level, sometimes with long-lasting effects on subsequent memory performance. Further imaging studies should focus on clarifying the role of specific sleep patterns for the processing of external stimuli, as well as the consolidation of freshly encoded information during sleep. Citation: Dang

  17. Methods for identifying subject-specific abnormalities in neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Andrew R; Bedrick, Edward J; Ling, Josef M; Toulouse, Trent; Dodd, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Algorithms that are capable of capturing subject-specific abnormalities (SSA) in neuroimaging data have long been an area of focus for diverse neuropsychiatric conditions such as multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia, and traumatic brain injury. Several algorithms have been proposed that define SSA in patients (i.e., comparison group) relative to image intensity levels derived from healthy controls (HC) (i.e., reference group) based on extreme values. However, the assumptions underlying these approaches have not always been fully validated, and may be dependent on the statistical distributions of the transformed data. The current study evaluated variations of two commonly used techniques ("pothole" method and standardization with an independent reference group) for identifying SSA using simulated data (derived from normal, t and chi-square distributions) and fractional anisotropy maps derived from 50 HC. Results indicated substantial group-wise bias in the estimation of extreme data points using the pothole method, with the degree of bias being inversely related to sample size. Statistical theory was utilized to develop a distribution-corrected z-score (DisCo-Z) threshold, with additional simulations demonstrating elimination of the bias and a more consistent estimation of extremes based on expected distributional properties. Data from previously published studies examining SSA in mild traumatic brain injury were then re-analyzed using the DisCo-Z method, with results confirming the evidence of group-wise bias. We conclude that the benefits of identifying SSA in neuropsychiatric research are substantial, but that proposed SSA approaches require careful implementation under the different distributional properties that characterize neuroimaging data. PMID:24931496

  18. Neural correlates of the LSD experience revealed by multimodal neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh; Roseman, Leor; Kaelen, Mendel; Droog, Wouter; Murphy, Kevin; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Schenberg, Eduardo E; Nest, Timothy; Orban, Csaba; Leech, Robert; Williams, Luke T; Williams, Tim M; Bolstridge, Mark; Sessa, Ben; McGonigle, John; Sereno, Martin I; Nichols, David; Hellyer, Peter J; Hobden, Peter; Evans, John; Singh, Krish D; Wise, Richard G; Curran, H Valerie; Feilding, Amanda; Nutt, David J

    2016-04-26

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is the prototypical psychedelic drug, but its effects on the human brain have never been studied before with modern neuroimaging. Here, three complementary neuroimaging techniques: arterial spin labeling (ASL), blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) measures, and magnetoencephalography (MEG), implemented during resting state conditions, revealed marked changes in brain activity after LSD that correlated strongly with its characteristic psychological effects. Increased visual cortex cerebral blood flow (CBF), decreased visual cortex alpha power, and a greatly expanded primary visual cortex (V1) functional connectivity profile correlated strongly with ratings of visual hallucinations, implying that intrinsic brain activity exerts greater influence on visual processing in the psychedelic state, thereby defining its hallucinatory quality. LSD's marked effects on the visual cortex did not significantly correlate with the drug's other characteristic effects on consciousness, however. Rather, decreased connectivity between the parahippocampus and retrosplenial cortex (RSC) correlated strongly with ratings of "ego-dissolution" and "altered meaning," implying the importance of this particular circuit for the maintenance of "self" or "ego" and its processing of "meaning." Strong relationships were also found between the different imaging metrics, enabling firmer inferences to be made about their functional significance. This uniquely comprehensive examination of the LSD state represents an important advance in scientific research with psychedelic drugs at a time of growing interest in their scientific and therapeutic value. The present results contribute important new insights into the characteristic hallucinatory and consciousness-altering properties of psychedelics that inform on how they can model certain pathological states and potentially treat others. PMID:27071089

  19. Neural correlates of the LSD experience revealed by multimodal neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Carhart-Harris, Robin L.; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh; Roseman, Leor; Kaelen, Mendel; Droog, Wouter; Murphy, Kevin; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Schenberg, Eduardo E.; Nest, Timothy; Orban, Csaba; Leech, Robert; Williams, Luke T.; Williams, Tim M.; Bolstridge, Mark; Sessa, Ben; McGonigle, John; Sereno, Martin I.; Nichols, David; Hobden, Peter; Evans, John; Singh, Krish D.; Wise, Richard G.; Curran, H. Valerie; Feilding, Amanda; Nutt, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is the prototypical psychedelic drug, but its effects on the human brain have never been studied before with modern neuroimaging. Here, three complementary neuroimaging techniques: arterial spin labeling (ASL), blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) measures, and magnetoencephalography (MEG), implemented during resting state conditions, revealed marked changes in brain activity after LSD that correlated strongly with its characteristic psychological effects. Increased visual cortex cerebral blood flow (CBF), decreased visual cortex alpha power, and a greatly expanded primary visual cortex (V1) functional connectivity profile correlated strongly with ratings of visual hallucinations, implying that intrinsic brain activity exerts greater influence on visual processing in the psychedelic state, thereby defining its hallucinatory quality. LSD’s marked effects on the visual cortex did not significantly correlate with the drug’s other characteristic effects on consciousness, however. Rather, decreased connectivity between the parahippocampus and retrosplenial cortex (RSC) correlated strongly with ratings of “ego-dissolution” and “altered meaning,” implying the importance of this particular circuit for the maintenance of “self” or “ego” and its processing of “meaning.” Strong relationships were also found between the different imaging metrics, enabling firmer inferences to be made about their functional significance. This uniquely comprehensive examination of the LSD state represents an important advance in scientific research with psychedelic drugs at a time of growing interest in their scientific and therapeutic value. The present results contribute important new insights into the characteristic hallucinatory and consciousness-altering properties of psychedelics that inform on how they can model certain pathological states and potentially treat others. PMID:27071089

  20. What can functional neuroimaging tell the experimental psychologist?

    PubMed

    Henson, Richard

    2005-02-01

    I argue here that functional neuroimaging data--which I restrict to the haemodynamic techniques of fMRI and PET--can inform psychological theorizing, provided one assumes a "systematic" function-structure mapping in the brain. In this case, imaging data simply comprise another dependent variable, along with behavioural data, that can be used to test competing theories. In particular, I distinguish two types of inference: function-to-structure deduction and structure-to-function induction. With the former inference, a qualitatively different pattern of activity over the brain under two experimental conditions implies at least one different function associated with changes in the independent variable. With the second type of inference, activity of the same brain region(s) under two conditions implies a common function, possibly not predicted a priori. I illustrate these inferences with imaging studies of recognition memory, short-term memory, and repetition priming. I then consider in greater detail what is meant by a "systematic" function-structure mapping and argue that, particularly for structure-to-function induction, this entails a one-to-one mapping between functional and structural units, although the structural unit may be a network of interacting regions and care must be taken over the appropriate level of functional/structural abstraction. Nonetheless, the assumption of a systematic function-structure mapping is a "working hypothesis" that, in common with other scientific fields, cannot be proved on independent grounds and is probably best evaluated by the success of the enterprise as a whole. I also consider statistical issues such as the definition of a qualitative difference and methodological issues such as the relationship between imaging and behavioural data. I finish by reviewing various objections to neuroimaging, including neophrenology, functionalism, and equipotentiality, and by observing some criticisms of current practice in the imaging

  1. Two Virasoro symmetries in stringy warped AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Guica, Monica; Rodriguez, Maria J.

    2014-12-01

    We study three-dimensional consistent truncations of type IIB supergravity which admit warped AdS3 solutions. These theories contain subsectors that have no bulk dynamics. We show that the symplectic form for these theories, when restricted to the non-dynamical subsectors, equals the symplectic form for pure Einstein gravity in AdS3. Consequently, for each consistent choice of boundary conditions in AdS3, we can define a consistent phase space in warped AdS3 with identical conserved charges. This way, we easily obtain a Virasoro × Virasoro asymptotic symmetry algebra in warped AdS3; two different types of Virasoro × Kač-Moody symmetries are also consistent alternatives.

  2. The brain following transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: the perspective from neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui Juan; Zheng, Gang; Wichmann, Julian L; Schoepf, U Joseph; Lu, Guang Ming; Zhang, Long Jiang

    2015-12-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication after implantation of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Neuroimaging offers a variety of techniques for non-invasive evaluation of alterations in metabolism, as well as structural and functional changes of the brain in patients after TIPS implantation. In this article, we review the epidemiology and pathophysiology of post-TIPS HE. The potential of neuroimaging including positron emission tomography and multimodality magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the pathophysiology of post-TIPS HE is presented. We also give a perspective on the role of neuroimaging in this field. PMID:26404041

  3. [What happens in the brain of my patients? Neuroimaging and neurogenetics as ethical challenges in medicine].

    PubMed

    Synofzik, M

    2007-12-01

    Precise diagnosis of many neurological or psychiatric diseases has for long been one of the main problems in medicine. New diagnostic procedures like neuroimaging or neurogenetics seem now able to change thi situation but evoke new ethical questions. How should we cope with the fact that we may be able to diagnose and even predict diseases like schizophrenia or Alzheimer's Disease? How should we deal with incidental findings in neuroimaging? Can and should we use neuroimaging or neurogenetic procedures to detect certain behavioral dispositions? A new interdisciplinary research programme, called "neuroethics", can provide an ethical orientation for such questions. PMID:18050032

  4. Ethical issues in neuroimaging health research: an IPA study with research participants.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Rachel L; Senior, Carl; Peel, Elizabeth; Cooke, Richard; Donnelly, Louise S

    2008-11-01

    Neuroimaging is increasingly used to understand conditions like stroke and epilepsy. However, there is growing recognition that neuroimaging can raise ethical issues. We used interpretative phenomenological analysis to analyse interview data pre-and post-scan to explore these ethical issues. Findings show participants can become anxious prior to scanning and the protocol for managing incidental findings is unclear. Participants lacked a frame of reference to contextualize their expectations and often drew on medical narratives. Recommendations to reduce anxiety include dialogue between researcher and participant to clarify understanding during consent and the use of a ;virtual tour' of the neuroimaging experience. PMID:18987078

  5. Leading Change, Adding Value.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nick

    2016-09-12

    Essential facts Leading Change, Adding Value is NHS England's new nursing and midwifery framework. It is designed to build on Compassion in Practice (CiP), which was published 3 years ago and set out the 6Cs: compassion, care, commitment, courage, competence and communication. CiP established the values at the heart of nursing and midwifery, while the new framework sets out how staff can help transform the health and care sectors to meet the aims of the NHS England's Five Year Forward View. PMID:27615573

  6. The neuroimaging of Leigh syndrome: case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bonfante, Eliana; Koenig, Mary Kay; Adejumo, Rahmat B; Perinjelil, Vinu; Riascos, Roy F

    2016-04-01

    Leigh syndrome by definition is (1) a neurodegenerative disease with variable symptoms, (2) caused by mitochondrial dysfunction from a hereditary genetic defect and (3) accompanied by bilateral central nervous system lesions. A genetic etiology is confirmed in approximately 50% of patients, with more than 60 identified mutations in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Here we review the clinical features and imaging studies of Leigh syndrome and describe the neuroimaging findings in a cohort of 17 children with genetically confirmed Leigh syndrome. MR findings include lesions in the brainstem in 9 children (53%), basal ganglia in 13 (76%), thalami in 4 (24%) and dentate nuclei in 2 (12%), and global atrophy in 2 (12%). The brainstem lesions were most frequent in the midbrain and medulla oblongata. With follow-up an increased number of lesions from baseline was observed in 7 of 13 children, evolution of the initial lesion was seen in 6, and complete regression of the lesions was seen in 3. No cerebral white matter lesions were found in any of the 17 children. In concordance with the literature, we found that Leigh syndrome follows a similar pattern of bilateral, symmetrical basal ganglia or brainstem changes. Lesions in Leigh syndrome evolve over time and a lack of visible lesions does not exclude the diagnosis. Reversibility of lesions is seen in some patients, making the continued search for treatment and prevention a priority for clinicians and researchers. PMID:26739140

  7. Predictors of Abnormal Neuroimaging of the Brain in Children With Epilepsy Aged 1 Month to 2 Years: Useful Clues in a Resource-Limited Setting.

    PubMed

    Sanmaneechai, Oranee; Danchaivijitr, Nasuda; Likasitwattanakul, Surachai

    2015-10-01

    Neuroimaging should be performed on infants with seizure. However, there are economic limitations in performing neuroimaging in a resource-limited setting. The younger the age, the higher the risk of having abnormal neuroimaging. The aim was to determine frequency and predictors of abnormal neuroimaging in children with epilepsy aged 1 month to 2 years. History, physical examination, electroencephalogram (EEG), and neuroimaging were reviewed. Thirty-seven of 49 (76%) had neuroimaging studies; 19 computed tomography (CT), 14 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and 4 had both. Abnormal neuroimaging was found in 19 (51%). Predictors of abnormal neuroimages are developmental delay, abnormal head circumference, and abnormal neurologic examination. Eight children (21%) had lesions on neuroimaging studies that altered or influenced management. Of 8 patients with normal examination and EEG, 1 had a brain tumor and another had arteriovenous malformation. Neuroimaging should be considered as an essential aid in the evaluation of infants with epilepsy, even in a resource-limited setting. PMID:25792429

  8. The functional neuroimaging correlates of psychogenic versus organic dystonia.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Anette E; Mehta, Arpan R; Bhatia, Kailash P; Brown, Richard J; Frackowiak, Richard S J; Trimble, Michael R; Ward, Nicholas S; Rowe, James B

    2013-03-01

    The neurobiological basis of psychogenic movement disorders remains poorly understood and the management of these conditions difficult. Functional neuroimaging studies have provided some insight into the pathophysiology of disorders implicating particularly the prefrontal cortex, but there are no studies on psychogenic dystonia, and comparisons with findings in organic counterparts are rare. To understand the pathophysiology of these disorders better, we compared the similarities and differences in functional neuroimaging of patients with psychogenic dystonia and genetically determined dystonia, and tested hypotheses on the role of the prefrontal cortex in functional neurological disorders. Patients with psychogenic (n = 6) or organic (n = 5, DYT1 gene mutation positive) dystonia of the right leg, and matched healthy control subjects (n = 6) underwent positron emission tomography of regional cerebral blood flow. Participants were studied during rest, during fixed posturing of the right leg and during paced ankle movements. Continuous surface electromyography and footplate manometry monitored task performance. Averaging regional cerebral blood flow across all tasks, the organic dystonia group showed abnormal increases in the primary motor cortex and thalamus compared with controls, with decreases in the cerebellum. In contrast, the psychogenic dystonia group showed the opposite pattern, with abnormally increased blood flow in the cerebellum and basal ganglia, with decreases in the primary motor cortex. Comparing organic dystonia with psychogenic dystonia revealed significantly greater regional blood flow in the primary motor cortex, whereas psychogenic dystonia was associated with significantly greater blood flow in the cerebellum and basal ganglia (all P < 0.05, family-wise whole-brain corrected). Group × task interactions were also examined. During movement, compared with rest, there was abnormal activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex that was

  9. How can neuroimaging facilitate the diagnosis and stratification of patients with psychosis?

    PubMed Central

    Kempton, Matthew J.; McGuire, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of patients with psychosis are associated with improved outcome in terms of future functioning, symptoms and treatment response. Identifying neuroimaging biomarkers for illness onset and treatment response would lead to immediate clinical benefits. In this review we discuss if neuroimaging may be utilised to diagnose patients with psychosis, predict those who will develop the illness in those at high risk, and stratify patients. State-of-the-art developments in the field are critically examined including multicentre studies, longitudinal designs, multimodal imaging and machine learning as well as some of the challenges in utilising future neuroimaging biomarkers in clinical trials. As many of these developments are already being applied in neuroimaging studies of Alzheimer׳s disease, we discuss what lessons have been learned from this field and how they may be applied to research in psychosis. PMID:25092428

  10. Neuroimaging Studies of Normal Brain Development and Their Relevance for Understanding Childhood Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Rachel; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    Neuroimaging findings which identify normal brain development trajectories are presented. Results show that early brain development begins with the neural tube formation and ends with myelintation. How disturbances in brain development patterns are related to childhood psychiatric disorders is examined.

  11. Dirac operator on fuzzy AdS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, Hossein; Imaanpur, Ali

    2003-03-01

    In this article we construct the chirality and Dirac operators on noncommutative AdS2. We also derive the discrete spectrum of the Dirac operator which is important in the study of the spectral triple associated to AdS2. It is shown that the degeneracy of the spectrum present in the commutative AdS2 is lifted in the noncommutative case. The way we construct the chirality operator is suggestive of how to introduce the projector operators of the corresponding projective modules on this space.

  12. An xp model on AdS2 spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Vilaplana, Javier; Sierra, Germán

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we formulate the xp model on the AdS2 spacetime. We find that the spectrum of the Hamiltonian has positive and negative eigenvalues, whose absolute values are given by a harmonic oscillator spectrum, which in turn coincides with that of a massive Dirac fermion in AdS2. We extend this result to generic xp models which are shown to be equivalent to a massive Dirac fermion on spacetimes whose metric depend of the xp Hamiltonian. Finally, we construct the generators of the isometry group SO(2,1) of the AdS2 spacetime, and discuss the relation with conformal quantum mechanics.

  13. [Relevance of neuroimaging findings for diagnoses and treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Konrad, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is associated with a marked loss of brain volumes during the acute stage of the disease. Due to the advances in neuroimaging methods during the last years our understanding of the consequences of starvation and the etiology of eating disorders has increased considerably, however, still the clinical relevance of these findings is limited. Thus, some future perspectives of neuroimaging findings for diagnoses and treatment of anorexia nervosa are summarized in the current review. PMID:25594269

  14. Responsible Reporting: Neuroimaging News in the Age of Responsible Research and Innovation.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Irja Marije; Kupper, Frank; Arentshorst, Marlous; Broerse, Jacqueline

    2016-08-01

    Besides offering opportunities in both clinical and non-clinical domains, the application of novel neuroimaging technologies raises pressing dilemmas. 'Responsible Research and Innovation' (RRI) aims to stimulate research and innovation activities that take ethical and social considerations into account from the outset. We previously identified that Dutch neuroscientists interpret "responsible innovation" as educating the public on neuroimaging technologies via the popular press. Their aim is to mitigate (neuro)hype, an aim shared with the wider emerging RRI community. Here, we present results of a media-analysis undertaken to establish whether the body of articles in the Dutch popular press presents balanced conversations on neuroimaging research to the public. We found that reporting was mostly positive and framed in terms of (healthcare) progress. There was rarely a balance between technology opportunities and limitations, and even fewer articles addressed societal or ethical aspects of neuroimaging research. Furthermore, neuroimaging metaphors seem to favour oversimplification. Current reporting is therefore more likely to enable hype than to mitigate it. How can neuroscientists, given their self-ascribed social responsibility, address this conundrum? We make a case for a collective and shared responsibility among neuroscientists, journalists and other stakeholders, including funders, committed to responsible reporting on neuroimaging research. PMID:26208573

  15. Heads in the Cloud: A Primer on Neuroimaging Applications of High Performance Computing

    PubMed Central

    Shatil, Anwar S.; Younas, Sohail; Pourreza, Hossein; Figley, Chase R.

    2015-01-01

    With larger data sets and more sophisticated analyses, it is becoming increasingly common for neuroimaging researchers to push (or exceed) the limitations of standalone computer workstations. Nonetheless, although high-performance computing platforms such as clusters, grids and clouds are already in routine use by a small handful of neuroimaging researchers to increase their storage and/or computational power, the adoption of such resources by the broader neuroimaging community remains relatively uncommon. Therefore, the goal of the current manuscript is to: 1) inform prospective users about the similarities and differences between computing clusters, grids and clouds; 2) highlight their main advantages; 3) discuss when it may (and may not) be advisable to use them; 4) review some of their potential problems and barriers to access; and finally 5) give a few practical suggestions for how interested new users can start analyzing their neuroimaging data using cloud resources. Although the aim of cloud computing is to hide most of the complexity of the infrastructure management from end-users, we recognize that this can still be an intimidating area for cognitive neuroscientists, psychologists, neurologists, radiologists, and other neuroimaging researchers lacking a strong computational background. Therefore, with this in mind, we have aimed to provide a basic introduction to cloud computing in general (including some of the basic terminology, computer architectures, infrastructure and service models, etc.), a practical overview of the benefits and drawbacks, and a specific focus on how cloud resources can be used for various neuroimaging applications. PMID:27279746

  16. Neurochemistry of schizophrenia: the contribution of neuroimaging postmortem pathology and neurochemistry in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dean, B

    2012-01-01

    The advent of molecular neuroimaging has greatly impacted on understanding the neurochemical changes occurring in the CNS from subjects with psychiatric disorders, especially schizophrenia. This review focuses on the outcomes from studies using positron emission tomography and single photon emission computer tomography that have measure levels of neurotransmitter receptors and transporters in the CNS from subjects with schizophrenia. One outcome from such studies is the confirmation of a number of findings using postmortem tissue, but in the case of neuroimaging, using drug na�ve and drug free subjects. These findings add weight to the argument that findings from postmortem studies are not an artifact of tissue processing or a simple drug effect. However, there are some important unique findings from studies using neuroimaging studies. These include evidence to suggest that in schizophrenia there are alterations in dopamine synthesis and release, which are not accompanied by an appropriate down-regulation of dopamine D2 receptors. There are also data that would support the notion that decreased levels of serotonin 2A receptors may be an early marker of the onset of schizophrenia. Whilst there is a clear need for on-going development of neuroimaging ligands to expand the number of targets that can be studied and to increase cohort sizes in neuroimaging studies to give power to the analyses of the resulting data, current studies show that existing neuroimaging studies have already extended our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:23279177

  17. On the role of general system theory for functional neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Klaas Enno

    2004-01-01

    One of the most important goals of neuroscience is to establish precise structure–function relationships in the brain. Since the 19th century, a major scientific endeavour has been to associate structurally distinct cortical regions with specific cognitive functions. This was traditionally accomplished by correlating microstructurally defined areas with lesion sites found in patients with specific neuropsychological symptoms. Modern neuroimaging techniques with high spatial resolution have promised an alternative approach, enabling non-invasive measurements of regionally specific changes of brain activity that are correlated with certain components of a cognitive process. Reviewing classic approaches towards brain structure–function relationships that are based on correlational approaches, this article argues that these approaches are not sufficient to provide an understanding of the operational principles of a dynamic system such as the brain but must be complemented by models based on general system theory. These models reflect the connectional structure of the system under investigation and emphasize context-dependent couplings between the system elements in terms of effective connectivity. The usefulness of system models whose parameters are fitted to measured functional imaging data for testing hypotheses about structure–function relationships in the brain and their potential for clinical applications is demonstrated by several empirical examples. PMID:15610393

  18. Clinical and Neuroimaging Findings of Sydenham’s Chorea

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Arzu; Yakut, Ayten; Yimenicioglu, Sevgi; Bora Carman, Kursat; Saylısoy, Suzan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Sydenham’s chorea (SC) is thought to be an autoimmune disorder. MRI is generally used to exclude other causes of chorea. There are no typically defined MRI features of SC. In this study we aimed to determine clinical and neuroimaging findings of SC. Methods: In this study 17 patients with acute SC were retrospectively evaluated. Sydenham’s chorea was diagnosed according to the 1992 revision of the Jones criteria. The other causes of chorea were excluded. Cranial MRI was performed in all patients during the acute phase of SC. Walking, speech and swallowing disorders, muscle weakness, behavioral disorders, treatment, symptom recovery time and recurrence were evaluated. Findings : The patients’ mean age was 11.2 years. Behavioral changes, muscle weakness and dysphagia occurred in 70%, 64% and 23% of the patients, respectively. Nonspecific signal hyperintensities were observed in the white matter, brain stem and caudate nucleus in 47% of patients. Two patients who had chorea paralytica were treated successfully with a high dose of intravenous methylprednisolone. Conclusion: Nonspecific hyperintense white matter abnormalities may be due to the inflammatory process associated with a longer duration of clinical signs. To explain the MRI findings and the pathogenesis of SC, comprehensive studies are needed. PMID:25562024

  19. Spatially Varying Coefficient Model for Neuroimaging Data with Jump Discontinuities

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongtu; Fan, Jianqing; Kong, Linglong

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by recent work on studying massive imaging data in various neuroimaging studies, we propose a novel spatially varying coefficient model (SVCM) to capture the varying association between imaging measures in a three-dimensional (3D) volume (or 2D surface) with a set of covariates. Two stylized features of neuorimaging data are the presence of multiple piecewise smooth regions with unknown edges and jumps and substantial spatial correlations. To specifically account for these two features, SVCM includes a measurement model with multiple varying coefficient functions, a jumping surface model for each varying coefficient function, and a functional principal component model. We develop a three-stage estimation procedure to simultaneously estimate the varying coefficient functions and the spatial correlations. The estimation procedure includes a fast multiscale adaptive estimation and testing procedure to independently estimate each varying coefficient function, while preserving its edges among different piecewise-smooth regions. We systematically investigate the asymptotic properties (e.g., consistency and asymptotic normality) of the multiscale adaptive parameter estimates. We also establish the uniform convergence rate of the estimated spatial covariance function and its associated eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. Our Monte Carlo simulation and real data analysis have confirmed the excellent performance of SVCM. PMID:25435598

  20. Panic and the brainstem: clues from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Perna, Giampaolo; Guerriero, Giuseppe; Brambilla, Paolo; Caldirola, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    One of the most influential theories has conceived unexpected panic attack (PA) as a primal defensive reaction to threat within the internal milieu of the body. This theory is based on findings suggesting the involvement of dysfunctional respiratory regulation and/or abnormally sensitive central neural network of carbon dioxide (CO2)/hydrogen ion (H+) chemoreception in PA. Thus, unexpected PA may be related to phylogenetically older brain structures, including the brainstem areas, which process basic functions related to the organism's internal milieu. The brainstem represents a crucial area for homeostatic regulation, including chemoreception and cardio-respiratory control. In addition, the midbrain dorsal periaqueductal gray may be involved in the unconditioned defense reactions to proximal threats, including internal physical stimuli. Our aim was to specifically consider the potential involvement of the brainstem in panic disorder (PD) by a comprehensive review of the available neuroimaging studies. Available data are limited and potentially affected by several limitations. However, preliminary evidence of a role of the brainstem in PD can be found and, secondly, the brainstem serotonergic system seems to be involved in panic modulation with indications of both altered serotonergic receptors and 5-HT transporter bindings. In conclusion, our review suggests that the brainstem may be involved in psychopathology of PD and supports the relevant role of subcortical serotonergic system in panic pathogenesis. PMID:24923341

  1. Developing High-Density Diffuse Optical Tomography for Neuroimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Brian Richard

    Clinicians who care for brain-injured patients and premature infants desire a bedside monitor of brain function. A decade ago, there was hope that optical imaging would be able to fill this role, as it combined fMRI's ability to construct cortical maps with EEG's portable, cap-based systems. However, early optical systems had poor imaging performance, and the momentum for the technique slowed. In our lab, we develop diffuse optical tomography (DOT), which is a more advanced method of performing optical imaging. My research has been to pioneer the in vivo use of DOT for advanced neuroimaging by (1) quantifying the advantages of DOT through both in silico simulation and in vivo performance metrics, (2) restoring confidence in the technique with the first retinotopic mapping of the visual cortex (a benchmark for fMRI and PET), and (3) creating concepts and methods for the clinical translation of DOT. Hospitalized patients are unable to perform complicated neurological tasks, which has motivated us to develop the first DOT methods for resting-state brain mapping with functional connectivity. Finally, in collaboration with neonatologists, I have extended these methods with proof-of-principle imaging of brain-injured premature infants. This work establishes DOT's improvements in imaging performance and readies it for multiple clinical and research roles.

  2. Hemimegalencephaly: Clinical, EEG, neuroimaging, and IMP-SPECT correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Konkol, R.J.; Maister, B.H.; Wells, R.G.; Sty, J.R. )

    1990-11-01

    Iofetamine-single photon emission computed tomography (IMP-SPECT) was performed on 2 girls (5 1/2 and 6 years of age) with histories of intractable seizures, developmental delay, and unilateral hemiparesis secondary to hemimegalencephaly. Electroencephalography (EEG) revealed frequent focal discharges in 1 patient, while a nearly continuous burst suppression pattern over the malformed hemisphere was recorded in the other. IMP-SPECT demonstrated a good correlation with neuroimaging studies. In spite of the different EEG patterns, which had been proposed to predict contrasting clinical outcomes, both IMP-SPECT scans disclosed a similar decrease in tracer uptake in the malformed hemisphere. These results are consistent with the pattern of decreased tracer uptake found in other interictal studies of focal seizures without cerebral malformations. In view of recent recommendations for hemispherectomy in these patients, we suggest that the IMP-SPECT scan be used to compliment EEG as a method to define the extent of abnormality which may be more relevant to long-term prognosis than EEG alone.

  3. When encoding yields remembering: insights from event-related neuroimaging.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, A D; Koutstaal, W; Schacter, D L

    1999-01-01

    To understand human memory, it is important to determine why some experiences are remembered whereas others are forgotten. Until recently, insights into the neural bases of human memory encoding, the processes by which information is transformed into an enduring memory trace, have primarily been derived from neuropsychological studies of humans with select brain lesions. The advent of functional neuroimaging methods, such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), has provided a new opportunity to gain additional understanding of how the brain supports memory formation. Importantly, the recent development of event-related fMRI methods now allows for examination of trial-by-trial differences in neural activity during encoding and of the consequences of these differences for later remembering. In this review, we consider the contributions of PET and fMRI studies to the understanding of memory encoding, placing a particular emphasis on recent event-related fMRI studies of the Dm effect: that is, differences in neural activity during encoding that are related to differences in subsequent memory. We then turn our attention to the rich literature on the Dm effect that has emerged from studies using event-related potentials (ERPs). It is hoped that the integration of findings from ERP studies, which offer higher temporal resolution, with those from event-related fMRI studies, which offer higher spatial resolution, will shed new light on when and why encoding yields subsequent remembering. PMID:10466153

  4. Functional neuroimaging of acute oculomotor deficits in concussed athletes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brian; Zhang, Kai; Hallett, Mark; Slobounov, Semyon

    2015-09-01

    In the pursuit to better understand the neural underpinnings of oculomotor deficits following concussion we performed a battery of oculomotor tests while performing simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Based on the increasing evidence that concussion can disrupt multiple brain functional networks, including the oculomotor control networks, a series of classic saccadic and smooth pursuit tasks were implemented. Nine concussed athletes were tested within seven days of injury along with nine age and sex matched healthy normal volunteers. Both behavioral and fMRI data revealed differential results between the concussed and normal volunteer groups. Concussed subjects displayed longer latency time in the saccadic tasks, worse position errors, and fewer numbers of self-paced saccades compared to normal volunteer subjects. Furthermore, the concussed group showed recruitment of additional brain regions and larger activation sites as evidenced by fMRI. As a potential diagnostic and management tool for concussion, oculomotor testing shows promise, and here we try to understand the reasons for this disrupted performance with the aide of advanced neuroimaging tools. PMID:25179246

  5. Neuroimaging studies on recognition of personally familiar people.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Motoaki

    2014-01-01

    From an evolutionary viewpoint, readiness to engage in appropriate behavior toward a recognized person seems to be inherent in the human brain. In support of this hypothesis, functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated activation in regions relevant to relationship-appropriate behavior during the recognition of personally familiar (PF) people. Recognition of friends and colleagues activates regions involved in real-time communication, including the regions for inference about the other's mental state, autobiographical memory retrieval, and self-referential processes. Recognition of people related by romantic love, maternal love, and lost love induces activation in regions involved in motivational, reward, and affective processes, reflecting behavioral readiness for mating, caretaking, and yearning, respectively. The involvement of motor-associated cortices during recognition of a personal enemy may reflect readiness for attack or defense. Self-recognition in a body-related modality uniquely activates sensory and motor association cortices reflecting the sensorimotor origin of the bodily self-concept, with social cognitive processes being suppressed or context dependent. Issues and future directions are also discussed. PMID:24389212

  6. A cognitive neurobiological account of deception: evidence from functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Sean A; Hunter, Mike D; Farrow, Tom F D; Green, Russell D; Leung, David H; Hughes, Catherine J; Ganesan, Venkatasubramanian

    2004-01-01

    An organism may use misinformation, knowingly (through deception) or unknowingly (as in the case of camouflage), to gain advantage in a competitive environment. From an evolutionary perspective, greater tactical deception occurs among primates closer to humans, with larger neocortices. In humans, the onset of deceptive behaviours in childhood exhibits a developmental trajectory, which may be regarded as 'normal' in the majority and deficient among a minority with certain neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g. autism). In the human adult, deception and lying exhibit features consistent with their use of 'higher' or 'executive' brain systems. Accurate detection of deception in humans may be of particular importance in forensic practice, while an understanding of its cognitive neurobiology may have implications for models of 'theory of mind' and social cognition, and societal notions of responsibility, guilt and mitigation. In recent years, functional neuroimaging techniques (especially functional magnetic resonance imaging) have been used to study deception. Though few in number, and using very different experimental protocols, studies published in the peer-reviewed literature exhibit certain consistencies. Attempted deception is associated with activation of executive brain regions (particularly prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices), while truthful responding has not been shown to be associated with any areas of increased activation (relative to deception). Hence, truthful responding may comprise a relative 'baseline' in human cognition and communication. The subject who lies may necessarily engage 'higher' brain centres, consistent with a purpose or intention (to deceive). While the principle of executive control during deception remains plausible, its precise anatomy awaits elucidation. PMID:15590616

  7. Age of Onset of Schizophrenia: Perspectives From Structural Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gogtay, Nitin; Vyas, Nora S.; Testa, Renee; Wood, Stephen J.; Pantelis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    Many of the major neuropsychiatric illnesses, including schizophrenia, have a typical age of onset in late adolescence. Late adolescence may reflect a critical period in brain development making it particularly vulnerable for the onset of psychopathology. Neuroimaging studies that focus on this age range may provide unique insights into the onset and course of psychosis. In this review, we examine the evidence from 2 unique longitudinal cohorts that span the ages from early childhood through young adulthood; a study of childhood-onset schizophrenia where patients and siblings are followed from ages 6 through to their early twenties, and an ultra-high risk study where subjects (mean age of 19 years) are studied before and after the onset of psychosis. From the available evidence, we make an argument that subtle, regionally specific, and genetically influenced alterations during developmental age windows influence the course of psychosis and the resultant brain phenotype. The importance of examining trajectories of development and the need for future combined approaches, using multimodal imaging together with molecular studies is discussed. PMID:21505117

  8. Bootstrap Enhanced Penalized Regression for Variable Selection with Neuroimaging Data.

    PubMed

    Abram, Samantha V; Helwig, Nathaniel E; Moodie, Craig A; DeYoung, Colin G; MacDonald, Angus W; Waller, Niels G

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in fMRI research highlight the use of multivariate methods for examining whole-brain connectivity. Complementary data-driven methods are needed for determining the subset of predictors related to individual differences. Although commonly used for this purpose, ordinary least squares (OLS) regression may not be ideal due to multi-collinearity and over-fitting issues. Penalized regression is a promising and underutilized alternative to OLS regression. In this paper, we propose a nonparametric bootstrap quantile (QNT) approach for variable selection with neuroimaging data. We use real and simulated data, as well as annotated R code, to demonstrate the benefits of our proposed method. Our results illustrate the practical potential of our proposed bootstrap QNT approach. Our real data example demonstrates how our method can be used to relate individual differences in neural network connectivity with an externalizing personality measure. Also, our simulation results reveal that the QNT method is effective under a variety of data conditions. Penalized regression yields more stable estimates and sparser models than OLS regression in situations with large numbers of highly correlated neural predictors. Our results demonstrate that penalized regression is a promising method for examining associations between neural predictors and clinically relevant traits or behaviors. These findings have important implications for the growing field of functional connectivity research, where multivariate methods produce numerous, highly correlated brain networks. PMID:27516732

  9. Applying neuroimaging to detect neuroanatomical dysconnectivity in psychosis.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, S; Cannon, D M; Perlini, C; Brambilla, P; McDonald, C

    2015-08-01

    This editorial discusses the application of a novel brain imaging analysis technique in the assessment of neuroanatomical dysconnectivity in psychotic illnesses. There has long been a clinical interest in psychosis as a disconnection syndrome. In recent years graph theory metrics have been applied to functional and structural imaging datasets to derive measures of brain connectivity, which represent the efficiency of brain networks. These metrics can be derived from structural neuroimaging datasets acquired using diffusion imaging whereby cortical structures are parcellated into nodes and white matter tracts represent edges connecting these nodes. Furthermore neuroanatomical measures of connectivity may be decoupled from measures of physiological connectivity as assessed using functional imaging, underpinning the need for multi-modal imaging approaches to probe brain networks. Studies to date have reported a number of structural brain connectivity abnormalities associated with schizophrenia that carry potential as illness biomarkers. Structural connectivity abnormalities have also been reported in well patients with bipolar disorder and in unaffected relatives of patients with schizophrenia. Such connectivity metrics may represent clinically relevant biomarkers in studies employing a longitudinal design of illness course in psychosis. PMID:25672250

  10. Bootstrap Enhanced Penalized Regression for Variable Selection with Neuroimaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Abram, Samantha V.; Helwig, Nathaniel E.; Moodie, Craig A.; DeYoung, Colin G.; MacDonald, Angus W.; Waller, Niels G.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in fMRI research highlight the use of multivariate methods for examining whole-brain connectivity. Complementary data-driven methods are needed for determining the subset of predictors related to individual differences. Although commonly used for this purpose, ordinary least squares (OLS) regression may not be ideal due to multi-collinearity and over-fitting issues. Penalized regression is a promising and underutilized alternative to OLS regression. In this paper, we propose a nonparametric bootstrap quantile (QNT) approach for variable selection with neuroimaging data. We use real and simulated data, as well as annotated R code, to demonstrate the benefits of our proposed method. Our results illustrate the practical potential of our proposed bootstrap QNT approach. Our real data example demonstrates how our method can be used to relate individual differences in neural network connectivity with an externalizing personality measure. Also, our simulation results reveal that the QNT method is effective under a variety of data conditions. Penalized regression yields more stable estimates and sparser models than OLS regression in situations with large numbers of highly correlated neural predictors. Our results demonstrate that penalized regression is a promising method for examining associations between neural predictors and clinically relevant traits or behaviors. These findings have important implications for the growing field of functional connectivity research, where multivariate methods produce numerous, highly correlated brain networks. PMID:27516732

  11. Neuroimaging in basal ganglia disorders: perspectives for transcranial ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Becker, G; Berg, D

    2001-01-01

    Transcranial sonography is a new diagnostic tool, allowing not only the evaluation of cerebral arteries but also the two-dimensional display of the brain parenchyma. In this review we will summarize basics of the application, the ultrasound anatomy of the brain and sonographic findings in some movement disorders. While in normal adults basal ganglia nuclei are hypoechogenic, they are hyperechogenic in certain basal ganglia disorders. In Parkinson's disease, for example, the substantia nigra can be depicted as a distinctly echogenic area. An elevated echogenicity of the lentiform nuclei was noticed in patients with primary adult-onset dystonia. In both disorders the altered echogenicity may arise from higher heavy metal tissue content (i.e. iron in Parkinson's disease and copper in primary dystonia). Our findings converge to the hypothesis that transcranial ultrasound sensitively detects pathological metal accumulation not identified by other neuroimaging techniques (CT and MRI) and therefore provides new insights in the diagnosis of basal ganglia disorders. The implications of these findings for the understanding of the pathogenesis and its usefulness for the early diagnosis of movement disorders are outlined. PMID:11215589

  12. A Functional Approach to Deconvolve Dynamic Neuroimaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ci-Ren; Aston, John A. D.; Wang, Jane-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging technique which can be used to investigate chemical changes in human biological processes such as cancer development or neurochemical reactions. Most dynamic PET scans are currently analyzed based on the assumption that linear first-order kinetics can be used to adequately describe the system under observation. However, there has recently been strong evidence that this is not the case. To provide an analysis of PET data which is free from this compartmental assumption, we propose a nonparametric deconvolution and analysis model for dynamic PET data based on functional principal component analysis. This yields flexibility in the possible deconvolved functions while still performing well when a linear compartmental model setup is the true data generating mechanism. As the deconvolution needs to be performed on only a relative small number of basis functions rather than voxel by voxel in the entire three-dimensional volume, the methodology is both robust to typical brain imaging noise levels while also being computationally efficient. The new methodology is investigated through simulations in both one-dimensional functions and 2D images and also applied to a neuroimaging study whose goal is the quantification of opioid receptor concentration in the brain. PMID:27226673

  13. Neuroimaging and neurocognitive correlates of aggression and violence in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2012-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with major mental disorders such as schizophrenia are more likely to have engaged in violent behavior than mentally healthy members of the same communities. Although aggressive acts can have numerous causes, research about the underlying neurobiology of violence and aggression in schizophrenia can lead to a better understanding of the heterogeneous nature of that behavior and can assist in developing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent literature and discuss some of the neurobiological correlates of aggression and violence. The focus will be on schizophrenia, and the results of neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies that have directly investigated brain functioning and/or structure in aggressive and violent samples will be discussed as well as other domains that might predispose to aggression and violence such as deficits in responding to the emotional expressions of others, impulsivity, and psychopathological symptoms. Finally gender differences regarding aggression and violence are discussed. In this context several methodological and conceptional issues that limited the comparison of these studies will be addressed. PMID:24278673

  14. Choroid plexus calcification: clinical, neuroimaging and histopathological correlations in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, Ileana; Udriştoiu, I; Marinescu, D

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is recognized as a psychiatric disorder that causes the most pronounced disturbances of cognition and social integration. In the etiopathogenesis of the disease, genetic, neurobiological and vascular factors are involved. Functional integrity of the brain can be correlated with the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the dysfunction of this barrier is an indicator that suggests neurodevelopmental abnormalities, injuries of various etiologies and dysfunctions within the small vessels of the brain that disrupt the calcium homeostasis. Neuroimaging shows that in patients with poor evolution, cognitive dysfunction and therapeutic resistance, the presence of choroid plexus calcification associated with hippocampal, frontal, temporoparietal and cerebellar atrophies. Antipsychotics with high capacity to block D2 dopamine receptors (haloperidol model) can aggravate apoptotic mechanisms of the brain areas involved in cognition and disrupts the functional integrity of the BBB due to decreased of choroid plexus blood flow because of the narrowing of cerebral small vessels. Choroid plexus calcification may be a predictive indicator of poor evolution or of a neurodegenerative type. PMID:23771083

  15. Neuroimaging and Neurocognitive Correlates of Aggression and Violence in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Elisabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with major mental disorders such as schizophrenia are more likely to have engaged in violent behavior than mentally healthy members of the same communities. Although aggressive acts can have numerous causes, research about the underlying neurobiology of violence and aggression in schizophrenia can lead to a better understanding of the heterogeneous nature of that behavior and can assist in developing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent literature and discuss some of the neurobiological correlates of aggression and violence. The focus will be on schizophrenia, and the results of neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies that have directly investigated brain functioning and/or structure in aggressive and violent samples will be discussed as well as other domains that might predispose to aggression and violence such as deficits in responding to the emotional expressions of others, impulsivity, and psychopathological symptoms. Finally gender differences regarding aggression and violence are discussed. In this context several methodological and conceptional issues that limited the comparison of these studies will be addressed. PMID:24278673

  16. Age of onset of schizophrenia: perspectives from structural neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Gogtay, Nitin; Vyas, Nora S; Testa, Renee; Wood, Stephen J; Pantelis, Christos

    2011-05-01

    Many of the major neuropsychiatric illnesses, including schizophrenia, have a typical age of onset in late adolescence. Late adolescence may reflect a critical period in brain development making it particularly vulnerable for the onset of psychopathology. Neuroimaging studies that focus on this age range may provide unique insights into the onset and course of psychosis. In this review, we examine the evidence from 2 unique longitudinal cohorts that span the ages from early childhood through young adulthood; a study of childhood-onset schizophrenia where patients and siblings are followed from ages 6 through to their early twenties, and an ultra-high risk study where subjects (mean age of 19 years) are studied before and after the onset of psychosis. From the available evidence, we make an argument that subtle, regionally specific, and genetically influenced alterations during developmental age windows influence the course of psychosis and the resultant brain phenotype. The importance of examining trajectories of development and the need for future combined approaches, using multimodal imaging together with molecular studies is discussed. PMID:21505117

  17. The glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia: neuroimaging and drug development.

    PubMed

    Egerton, Alice; Stone, James M

    2012-06-01

    Over the last 50 years, evidence for central involvement of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia has accumulated. Recent advances in neuroimaging technology now allow several components of glutamatergic neurotransmission to be assessed in the living human brain. Positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission tomography (SPET) in combination with select radiotracers allows visualization of glutamatergic receptors in vivo, and magnetic resonance (MR) - based techniques allow mapping of the effects of glutamatergic agents on regional brain activation, and the measurement of regional glutamate concentrations. These imaging studies have provided evidence for regional glutamatergic abnormalities in psychosis, and are beginning to describe both the evolution of these abnormalities over the course of the illness and their response to therapeutic intervention. In parallel, advances in small animal imaging and the development of animal models have provided a platform to explore the neuropathological consequences of glutamatergic abnormality, and the potential antipsychotic efficacy of novel compounds. The molecular diversity of the glutamatergic system has driven the design of several compounds targeting aspects of glutamatergic transmission, and clinical trials have yielded encouraging results. Here, we review the contribution of imaging studies to date in understanding glutamatergic abnormalities in psychosis, and discuss the potential of new glutamatergic compounds for treatment of the disorder. PMID:22283750

  18. Neurocognition and neuroimaging of persistent negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hovington, Cindy L; Lepage, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Negative symptoms have been a conundrum to researchers and clinicians alike since having first been identified by Bleuler and Kraepelin. The term 'negative symptoms' has been scrutinized with regards to what it encompasses. Negative symptomatology has been categorized into distinct subdomains, including primary symptoms, secondary symptoms, deficit syndrome and, more recently, persistent negative symptoms (PNS). Although there have been some theories put forward with regards to negative symptoms, there are still discordant findings regarding PNS. Thus, this article aimed to review the structural, functional and cognitive correlates of PNS in an attempt to better understand these specific negative symptoms in schizophrenia. According to the reviewed literature, deficit syndrome appears to have similar neurocognitive and structural deficits as PNS; however, some minor distinctions may suggest that PNS are a separate subtype of negative symptoms. White matter decrements in the frontal lobe and gray matter reductions in the temporal lobe may be related more specifically to PNS. Furthermore, unlike deficit syndrome, structural abnormalities in the frontal and temporal lobe also appear to be related to PNS in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. Cognitive domains, such as memory, are impaired and appear to be predominantly related to PNS. Hence, PNS do appear to have neuroimaging and neurocognitive correlates and warrant further research. PMID:22243045

  19. The Human Amygdala and Pain: Evidence from Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Laura; Moulton, Eric A.; Linnman, Clas; Carpino, Elizabeth; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2014-01-01

    The amygdala, a small deep brain structure involved in behavioral processing through interactions with other brain regions, has garnered increased attention in recent years in relation to pain processing. As pain is a multidimensional experience that encompasses physical sensation, affect, and cognition, the amygdala is well suited to play a part in this process. Multiple neuroimaging studies of pain in humans have reported activation in the amygdala. Here we summarize these studies by performing a coordinate-based meta-analysis within experimentally induced and clinical pain studies using an activation likelihood estimate analysis. The results are presented in relation to locations of peak activation within and outside of amygdala subregions. The majority of studies identified coordinates consistent with human amygdala cytoarchitecture indicating reproducibility in neuroanatomical labeling across labs, analysis methods, and imaging modalities. Differences were noted between healthy and clinical pain studies: in clinical pain studies, peak activation was located in the laterobasal region, suggestive of the cognitive-affective overlay present among individuals suffering from chronic pain; while the less understood superficial region of the amygdala was prominent among experimental pain studies. Taken together, these findings suggest several important directions for further research exploring the amygdala’s role in pain processing. PMID:23097300

  20. The human amygdala and pain: evidence from neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Simons, Laura E; Moulton, Eric A; Linnman, Clas; Carpino, Elizabeth; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2014-02-01

    The amygdala, a small deep brain structure involved in behavioral processing through interactions with other brain regions, has garnered increased attention in recent years in relation to pain processing. As pain is a multidimensional experience that encompasses physical sensation, affect, and cognition, the amygdala is well suited to play a part in this process. Multiple neuroimaging studies of pain in humans have reported activation in the amygdala. Here, we summarize these studies by performing a coordinate-based meta-analysis within experimentally induced and clinical pain studies using an activation likelihood estimate analysis. The results are presented in relation to locations of peak activation within and outside of amygdala subregions. The majority of studies identified coordinates consistent with human amygdala cytoarchitecture indicating reproducibility in neuroanatomical labeling across labs, analysis methods, and imaging modalities. Differences were noted between healthy and clinical pain studies: in clinical pain studies, peak activation was located in the laterobasal region, suggestive of the cognitive-affective overlay present among individuals suffering from chronic pain; while the less understood superficial region of the amygdala was prominent among experimental pain studies. Taken together, these findings suggest several important directions for further research exploring the amygdala's role in pain processing. PMID:23097300

  1. Behavioral endophenotypes of drug addiction: Etiological insights from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Jupp, Bianca; Dalley, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in the elucidation of neurobehavioral endophenotypes associated with drug addiction made possible by the translational neuroimaging techniques magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Increasingly, these non-invasive imaging approaches have been the catalyst for advancing our understanding of the etiology of drug addiction as a brain disorder involving complex interactions between pre-disposing behavioral traits, environmental influences and neural perturbations arising from the chronic abuse of licit and illicit drugs. In this article we discuss the causal role of trait markers associated with impulsivity and novelty-/sensation-seeking in speeding the development of compulsive drug administration and in facilitating relapse. We also discuss the striking convergence of imaging findings from these behavioural traits and addiction in rats, monkeys and humans with a focus on biomarkers of dopamine neurotransmission, and highlight areas where further research is needed to disambiguate underlying causal mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'NIDA 40th Anniversary Issue'. PMID:23756169

  2. Understanding the minds of others: A neuroimaging meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Molenberghs, Pascal; Johnson, Halle; Henry, Julie D; Mattingley, Jason B

    2016-06-01

    Theory of mind (ToM) is an important skill that refers broadly to the capacity to understand the mental states of others. A large number of neuroimaging studies have focused on identifying the functional brain regions involved in ToM, but many important questions remain with respect to the neural networks implicated in specific types of ToM tasks. In the present study, we conducted a series of activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analyses on 144 datasets (involving 3150 participants) to address these questions. The ALE results revealed common regions shared across all ToM tasks and broader task parameters, but also some important dissociations. In terms of commonalities, consistent activation was identified in the medial prefrontal cortex and bilateral temporoparietal junction. On the other hand, ALE contrast analyses on our dataset, as well as meta-analytic connectivity modelling (MACM) analyses on the BrainMap database, indicated that different types of ToM tasks reliably elicit activity in unique brain areas. Our findings provide the most accurate picture to date of the neural networks that underpin ToM function. PMID:27073047

  3. Searching for disease-modifying drugs in AD: can we combine neuropsychological tools with biological markers?

    PubMed

    Caraci, Filippo; Castellano, Sabrina; Salomone, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo; Bosco, Paolo; Di Nuovo, Santo

    2014-02-01

    Drug discovery efforts in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been directed in the last ten years to develop "disease-modifying drugs" able to exert neuroprotective effects in an early phase of AD pathogenesis. Unfortunately several candidate disease-modifying drugs have failed in Phase III clinical trials conducted in mild to moderate AD for different methodological difficulties, such as the time course of treatment in relation to development of disease as well as the appropriate use of validated biological and neuropsychological markers. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has been considered a precursor of AD. Much effort is now directed to identify the most appropriate and sensitive markers which can predict the progression from MCI to AD, such as neuroimaging markers (e.g. hippocampal atrophy and amyloid positron emission tomography imaging), cerebrospinal fluid markers (i.e. association of elevated tau with low levels of amyloid β -peptide(1-42) and neuropsychological markers (i.e. episodic memory deficits and executive dysfunction). Recent studies demonstrate that the combination of these different biomarkers significantly increases the chance to predict the conversion into AD within 24 months. These biomarkers will be essential in the future to analyze clinical efficacy of disease-modifying drugs in MCI patients at high risk to develop AD. In the present review we analyze recent evidence on the combination of neuropsychological and biological markers in AD as a new tool to track disease progression in early AD as well as the response to disease-modifying drugs. PMID:24040795

  4. ADS Development in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    Accelerator driven nuclear transmutation system has been pursued to have a clue to the solution of high-level radioactive waste management. The concept consists of super conducting linac, sub-critical reactor and the beam window. Reference model is set up to 800MW thermal power by using 1.5GeV proton beams with considerations multi-factors such as core criticality. Materials damage is simulated by high-energy particle transport codes and so on. Recent achievement on irradiation materials experiment is stated and the differences are pointed out if core burn-up is considered or not. Heat balance in tank-type ADS indicates the temperature conditions of steam generator, the beam widow and cladding materials. Lead-bismuth eutectics demonstration has been conducted. Corrosion depth rate was shown by experiments.

  5. Developing Neuroimaging Phenotypes of the Default Mode Network in PTSD: Integrating the Resting State, Working Memory, and Structural Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Noah S.; Carpenter, S. Louisa; Sweet, Lawrence H.

    2014-01-01

    Complementary structural and functional neuroimaging techniques used to examine the Default Mode Network (DMN) could potentially improve assessments of psychiatric illness severity and provide added validity to the clinical diagnostic process. Recent neuroimaging research suggests that DMN processes may be disrupted in a number of stress-related psychiatric illnesses, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although specific DMN functions remain under investigation, it is generally thought to be involved in introspection and self-processing. In healthy individuals it exhibits greatest activity during periods of rest, with less activity, observed as deactivation, during cognitive tasks, e.g., working memory. This network consists of the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus, lateral parietal cortices and medial temporal regions. Multiple functional and structural imaging approaches have been developed to study the DMN. These have unprecedented potential to further the understanding of the function and dysfunction of this network. Functional approaches, such as the evaluation of resting state connectivity and task-induced deactivation, have excellent potential to identify targeted neurocognitive and neuroaffective (functional) diagnostic markers and may indicate illness severity and prognosis with increased accuracy or specificity. Structural approaches, such as evaluation of morphometry and connectivity, may provide unique markers of etiology and long-term outcomes. Combined, functional and structural methods provide strong multimodal, complementary and synergistic approaches to develop valid DMN-based imaging phenotypes in stress-related psychiatric conditions. This protocol aims to integrate these methods to investigate DMN structure and function in PTSD, relating findings to illness severity and relevant clinical factors. PMID:25046537

  6. Supersymmetric warped AdS in extended topologically massive supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deger, N. S.; Kaya, A.; Samtleben, H.; Sezgin, E.

    2014-07-01

    We determine the most general form of off-shell N=(1,1) supergravity field configurations in three dimensions by requiring that at least one off-shell Killing spinor exists. We then impose the field equations of the topologically massive off-shell supergravity and find a class of solutions whose properties crucially depend on the norm of the auxiliary vector field. These are spacelike-squashed and timelike-stretched AdS3 for the spacelike and timelike norms, respectively. At the transition point where the norm vanishes, the solution is null warped AdS3. This occurs when the coefficient of the Lorentz-Chern-Simons term is related to the AdS radius by μℓ=2. We find that the spacelike-squashed AdS3 can be modded out by a suitable discrete subgroup of the isometry group, yielding an extremal black hole solution which avoids closed timelike curves.

  7. Neuroimaging and Neuromodulation: Complementary Approaches for Identifying the Neuronal Correlates of Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Langguth, Berthold; Schecklmann, Martin; Lehner, Astrid; Landgrebe, Michael; Poeppl, Timm Benjamin; Kreuzer, Peter Michal; Schlee, Winfried; Weisz, Nathan; Vanneste, Sven; De Ridder, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    An inherent limitation of functional imaging studies is their correlational approach. More information about critical contributions of specific brain regions can be gained by focal transient perturbation of neural activity in specific regions with non-invasive focal brain stimulation methods. Functional imaging studies have revealed that tinnitus is related to alterations in neuronal activity of central auditory pathways. Modulation of neuronal activity in auditory cortical areas by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can reduce tinnitus loudness and, if applied repeatedly, exerts therapeutic effects, confirming the relevance of auditory cortex activation for tinnitus generation and persistence. Measurements of oscillatory brain activity before and after rTMS demonstrate that the same stimulation protocol has different effects on brain activity in different patients, presumably related to interindividual differences in baseline activity in the clinically heterogeneous study cohort. In addition to alterations in auditory pathways, imaging techniques also indicate the involvement of non-auditory brain areas, such as the fronto-parietal “awareness” network and the non-tinnitus-specific distress network consisting of the anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, and amygdale. Involvement of the hippocampus and the parahippocampal region putatively reflects the relevance of memory mechanisms in the persistence of the phantom percept and the associated distress. Preliminary studies targeting the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and the parietal cortex with rTMS and with transcranial direct current stimulation confirm the relevance of the mentioned non-auditory networks. Available data indicate the important value added by brain stimulation as a complementary approach to neuroimaging for identifying the neuronal correlates of the various clinical aspects of tinnitus. PMID:22509155

  8. Overcoming the effects of false positives and threshold bias in graph theoretical analyses of neuroimaging data

    PubMed Central

    Drakesmith, M.; Caeyenberghs, K.; Dutt, A.; Lewis, G.; David, A.S.; Jones, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graph theory (GT) is a powerful framework for quantifying topological features of neuroimaging-derived functional and structural networks. However, false positive (FP) connections arise frequently and influence the inferred topology of networks. Thresholding is often used to overcome this problem, but an appropriate threshold often relies on a priori assumptions, which will alter inferred network topologies. Four common network metrics (global efficiency, mean clustering coefficient, mean betweenness and smallworldness) were tested using a model tractography dataset. It was found that all four network metrics were significantly affected even by just one FP. Results also show that thresholding effectively dampens the impact of FPs, but at the expense of adding significant bias to network metrics. In a larger number (n = 248) of tractography datasets, statistics were computed across random group permutations for a range of thresholds, revealing that statistics for network metrics varied significantly more than for non-network metrics (i.e., number of streamlines and number of edges). Varying degrees of network atrophy were introduced artificially to half the datasets, to test sensitivity to genuine group differences. For some network metrics, this atrophy was detected as significant (p < 0.05, determined using permutation testing) only across a limited range of thresholds. We propose a multi-threshold permutation correction (MTPC) method, based on the cluster-enhanced permutation correction approach, to identify sustained significant effects across clusters of thresholds. This approach minimises requirements to determine a single threshold a priori. We demonstrate improved sensitivity of MTPC-corrected metrics to genuine group effects compared to an existing approach and demonstrate the use of MTPC on a previously published network analysis of tractography data derived from a clinical population. In conclusion, we show that there are large biases and instability

  9. Multivariate and univariate neuroimaging biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Habeck, Christian; Foster, Norman L.; Perneczky, Robert; Kurz, Alexander; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Koeppe, Robert A.; Drzezga, Alexander; Stern, Yaakov

    2008-01-01

    We performed univariate and multivariate discriminant analysis of FDG-PET scans to evaluate their ability to identify Alzheimer’s disease (AD). FDG-PET scans came from two sources: 17 AD patients and 33 healthy elderly controls were scanned at the University of Michigan; 102 early AD patients and 20 healthy elderly controls were scanned at the Technical University of Munich, Germany. We selected a derivation sample of 20 AD patients and 20 healthy controls matched on age with the remainder divided into 5 replication samples. The sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic AD-markers and threshold criteria from the derivation sample were determined in the replication samples. Although both univariate and multivariate analyses produced markers with high classification accuracy in the derivation sample, the multivariate marker’s diagnostic performance in the replication samples was superior. Further, supplementary analysis showed its performance to be unaffected by the loss of key regions. Multivariate measures of AD utilize the covariance structure of imaging data and provide complementary, clinically relevant information that may be superior to univariate measures. PMID:18343688

  10. Immunity factor contributes to altered brain functional networks in individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease: Neuroimaging-genetic evidence.

    PubMed

    Bai, Feng; Shi, Yongmei; Yuan, Yonggui; Xie, Chunming; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-08-01

    Clusterin (CLU) is recognized as a secreted protein that is related to the processes of inflammation and immunity in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The effects of the risk variant of the C allele at the rs11136000 locus of the CLU gene are associated with variations in the brain structure and function. However, the relationship of the CLU-C allele to architectural disruptions in resting-state networks in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) subjects (i.e., individuals with elevated risk of AD) remains relatively unknown. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and an imaging genetic approach, this study investigated whether individual brain functional networks, i.e., the default mode network (DMN) and the task-positive network, were modulated by the CLU-C allele (rs11136000) in 50 elderly participants, including 26 aMCI subjects and 24 healthy controls. CLU-by-aMCI interactions were associated with the information-bridging regions between resting-state networks rather than with the DMN itself, especially in cortical midline regions. Interestingly, the complex communications between resting-state networks were enhanced in aMCI subjects with the CLU rs11136000 CC genotype and were modulated by the degree of memory impairment, suggesting a reconstructed balance of the resting-state networks in these individuals with an elevated risk of AD. The neuroimaging-genetic evidence indicates that immunity factors may contribute to alterations in brain functional networks in aMCI. These findings add to the evidence that the CLU gene may represent a potential therapeutic target for slowing disease progression in AD. PMID:26899953

  11. Value Added in English Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Andrew; McCormack, Tanya; Evans, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Value-added indicators are now a central part of school accountability in England, and value-added information is routinely used in school improvement at both the national and the local levels. This article describes the value-added models that are being used in the academic year 2007-8 by schools, parents, school inspectors, and other…

  12. [Functional Neuroimaging Pilot Study of Borderline Personality Disorder in Adolescents].

    PubMed

    LeBoeuf, Amélie; Guilé, Jean-Marc; Labelle, Réal; Luck, David

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is being increasingly recognized by clinicians working with adolescents, and the reliability and validity of the diagnosis have been established in the adolescent population. Adolescence is known to be a period of high risk for BPD development as most patients identify the onset of their symptoms to be in the adolescent period. As with other mental health disorders, personality disorder, are thought to result from the interaction between biological and environmental factors. Functional neuroimaging studies are reporting an increasing amount of data on abnormal neuronal functions in BPD adult patients. However, no functional neuroimaging studies have been conducted in adolescents with BPD.Objectives This pilot project aims to evaluate the feasibility of a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study coupled with clinical and psychological measures in adolescent girls with a diagnosis of BPD. It also aims to identify neuronal regions of interest (ROI) for the study of BPD in adolescent girls.Method Six female adolescents meeting DSM-IV criteria for BPD and 6 female adolescents without psychiatric disorder were recruited. Both groups were evaluated for BPD symptoms, depressive symptoms, impulsivity, affective lability, and other potential psychiatric comorbidities. We used fMRI to compare patterns of regional brain activation between these two groups as they viewed 20 positive, 20 negative and 20 neutral emotion-inducing pictures, which were presented in random order.Results Participants were recruited over a period of 22 months. The protocol was well tolerated by participants. Mean age of the BPD group and control group was 15.8 ± 0.9 years-old and 15.5 ± 1.2 years-old respectively. Psychiatric comorbidity and use of medication was common among participants in the BPD group. This group showed higher impulsivity and affective lability scores. For the fMRI task, BPD patients demonstrated greater differences in activation

  13. Structural neuroimaging of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.

    PubMed

    Scheltens, P H

    2001-06-01

    This paper reviews the use of imaging techniques to aid in the clinical diagnosis of dementia. Two approaches are distinguished. One is the exclusionary approach in which imaging is used to rule out diseases that would mimic or cause dementia; based on the literature, this approach yields very little, if any, information that was not identified clinically. The more positive approach uses imaging as a diagnostic tool to identify changes specific for causes of dementia; any assessment of medial temporal lobe atrophy on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) will result in a reasonably high positive likelihood ratio distinguishing AD patients from non-demented individuals, but fails to distinguish AD patients from patients with other dementias. For a diagnosis of vascular dementia imaging is necessary, although not all vascular changes fulfill requirements of being relevant to dementia. Potentially of more importance, given the higher prevalence of AD, is the identification of concomitant vascular changes in AD that may be amenable to therapy, and may be used to identify subgroups. Structural and functional MRI techniques have great potential in identifying patients at risk for AD, which will allow for a very early treatment with drugs that slow or even halt progression. PMID:11442302

  14. Neuroimaging Findings in Cryptogenic Stroke Patients with and without PFO

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, David E.; Ruthazer, Robin; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Donovan, Jennifer S.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Griffith, John; Homma, Shunichi; Jaigobin, Cheryl; Mas, Jean-Louis; Mattle, Heinrich P.; Michel, Patrik; Mono, Marie-Luise; Nedeltchev, Krassen; Papetti, Federica; Serena, Joaquín; Weimar, Christian; Kent, David M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patent foramen ovale (PFO) and cryptogenic stroke (CS) are commonly associated but some PFOs are incidental. Specific radiological findings associated with PFO may be more likely to indicate a PFO-related etiology. We examined whether specific radiological findings are associated with PFO among subjects with CS and known PFO status. METHODS We analyzed the Risk of Paradoxical Embolism (RoPE) database of subjects with CS and known PFO status, for associations between PFO and: 1) index stroke seen on imaging, 2) index stroke size, 3) index stroke location, 4) multiple index strokes, and 5) prior stroke on baseline imaging. We also compared imaging with purported “high risk” echocardiographic features. RESULTS Subjects (n=2680) were significantly more likely to have a PFO if their index stroke was large (OR 1.36, p=0.0025), seen on index imaging (OR 1.53, p=0.003), and superficially located (OR 1.54, p<0.0001). A prior stroke on baseline imaging was associated with not having a PFO (OR 0.66, p<0.0001). Finding multiple index strokes was unrelated to PFO status (OR 1.21, p=0.161). No echocardiographic variables were related to PFO status. CONCLUSIONS This is the largest study to report the radiological characteristics of patients with CS and known PFO status. Strokes that were large, radiologically apparent, superficially located, or unassociated with prior radiological infarcts were more likely to be PFO associated than were unapparent, smaller, or deep strokes, and those accompanied by chronic infarcts. There was no association between PFO and multiple acute strokes nor between specific echocardiographic PFO features with neuroimaging findings. PMID:23339957

  15. Multiple Sclerosis in Malaysia: Demographics, Clinical Features, and Neuroimaging Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, S.; Rose, N.; Masita, A.; Dhaliwal, J. S.; Puvanarajah, S. D.; Rafia, M. H.; Muda, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an uncommon disease in multiracial Malaysia. Diagnosing patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases has been greatly aided by the evolution in diagnostic criterion, the identification of new biomarkers, and improved accessibility to neuroimaging in the country. Objectives. To investigate the spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia. Methods. Retrospective analysis with longitudinal follow-up of patients referred to a single tertiary medical center with neurology services in Malaysia. Results. Out of 245 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease, 104 patients had multiple sclerosis. Female to male ratio was 5 : 1. Mean age at onset was 28.6 ± 9.9 years. The Malays were the predominant racial group affected followed by the Chinese, Indians, and other indigenous groups. Subgroup analysis revealed more Chinese having neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders rather than multiple sclerosis. Positive family history was reported in 5%. Optic neuritis and myelitis were the commonest presentations at onset of disease, and relapsing remitting course was the commonest disease pattern observed. Oligoclonal band positivity was 57.6%. At disease onset, 61.5% and 66.4% fulfilled the 2005 and 2010 McDonald's criteria for dissemination in space. Mean cord lesion length was 1.86 ± 1.65 vertebral segments in the relapsing remitting group as opposed to 6.25 ± 5.18 vertebral segments in patients with neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders. Conclusion. The spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia has changed over the years. Further advancement in diagnostic criteria will no doubt continue to contribute to the evolution of this disease here. PMID:24455266

  16. DeID - a data sharing tool for neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuebo; Wang, James; Wang, Anlin; Meng, Qingping; Prescott, Christian; Tsu, Loretta; Eckert, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Funding institutions and researchers increasingly expect that data will be shared to increase scientific integrity and provide other scientists with the opportunity to use the data with novel methods that may advance understanding in a particular field of study. In practice, sharing human subject data can be complicated because data must be de-identified prior to sharing. Moreover, integrating varied data types collected in a study can be challenging and time consuming. For example, sharing data from structural imaging studies of a complex disorder requires the integration of imaging, demographic and/or behavioral data in a way that no subject identifiers are included in the de-identified dataset and with new subject labels or identification values that cannot be tracked back to the original ones. We have developed a Java program that users can use to remove identifying information in neuroimaging datasets, while still maintaining the association among different data types from the same subject for further studies. This software provides a series of user interaction wizards to allow users to select data variables to be de-identified, implements functions for auditing and validation of de-identified data, and enables the user to share the de-identified data in a single compressed package through various communication protocols, such as FTPS and SFTP. DeID runs with Windows, Linux, and Mac operating systems and its open architecture allows it to be easily adapted to support a broader array of data types, with the goal of facilitating data sharing. DeID can be obtained at http://www.nitrc.org/projects/deid. PMID:26441500

  17. Multiple sclerosis in malaysia: demographics, clinical features, and neuroimaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, S; Rose, N; Masita, A; Dhaliwal, J S; Puvanarajah, S D; Rafia, M H; Muda, S

    2013-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an uncommon disease in multiracial Malaysia. Diagnosing patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases has been greatly aided by the evolution in diagnostic criterion, the identification of new biomarkers, and improved accessibility to neuroimaging in the country. Objectives. To investigate the spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia. Methods. Retrospective analysis with longitudinal follow-up of patients referred to a single tertiary medical center with neurology services in Malaysia. Results. Out of 245 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease, 104 patients had multiple sclerosis. Female to male ratio was 5 : 1. Mean age at onset was 28.6 ± 9.9 years. The Malays were the predominant racial group affected followed by the Chinese, Indians, and other indigenous groups. Subgroup analysis revealed more Chinese having neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders rather than multiple sclerosis. Positive family history was reported in 5%. Optic neuritis and myelitis were the commonest presentations at onset of disease, and relapsing remitting course was the commonest disease pattern observed. Oligoclonal band positivity was 57.6%. At disease onset, 61.5% and 66.4% fulfilled the 2005 and 2010 McDonald's criteria for dissemination in space. Mean cord lesion length was 1.86 ± 1.65 vertebral segments in the relapsing remitting group as opposed to 6.25 ± 5.18 vertebral segments in patients with neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders. Conclusion. The spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia has changed over the years. Further advancement in diagnostic criteria will no doubt continue to contribute to the evolution of this disease here. PMID:24455266

  18. Neuroimaging with magnetoencephalography: A dynamic view of brain pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Tony W; Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Proskovec, Amy L; McDermott, Timothy J

    2016-09-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a noninvasive, silent, and totally passive neurophysiological imaging method with excellent temporal resolution (∼1 ms) and good spatial precision (∼3-5 mm). In a typical experiment, MEG data are acquired as healthy controls or patients with neurologic or psychiatric disorders perform a specific cognitive task, or receive sensory stimulation. The resulting data are generally analyzed using standard electrophysiological methods, coupled with advanced image reconstruction algorithms. To date, the total number of MEG instruments and associated users is significantly smaller than comparable human neuroimaging techniques, although this is likely to change in the near future with advances in the technology. Despite this small base, MEG research has made a significant impact on several areas of translational neuroscience, largely through its unique capacity to quantify the oscillatory dynamics of activated brain circuits in humans. This review focuses on the clinical areas where MEG imaging has arguably had the greatest impact in regard to the identification of aberrant neural dynamics at the regional and network level, monitoring of disease progression, determining how efficacious pharmacologic and behavioral interventions modulate neural systems, and the development of neural markers of disease. Specifically, this review covers recent advances in understanding the abnormal neural oscillatory dynamics that underlie Parkinson's disease, autism spectrum disorders, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorders, cerebral palsy, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, cognitive aging, and post-traumatic stress disorder. MEG imaging has had a major impact on how clinical neuroscientists understand the brain basis of these disorders, and its translational influence is rapidly expanding with new discoveries and applications emerging continuously. PMID:26874219

  19. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Comasco, Erika; Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2014-01-01

    The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. The present review summarizes the findings of thirty-five studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri- and postmenopausal women treated with estrogen, or estrogen-progestagen replacement therapy. Seven studies using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist intervention as a model of hormonal withdrawal are also included. Cognitive paradigms are employed by the majority of studies evaluating the effect of unopposed estrogen or estrogen-progestagen treatment on peri- and postmenopausal women's brain. In randomized-controlled trials, estrogen treatment enhances activation of fronto-cingulate regions during cognitive functioning, though in many cases no difference in cognitive performance was present. Progestagens seems to counteract the effects of estrogens. Findings on cognitive functioning during acute ovarian hormone withdrawal suggest a decrease in activation of the left inferior frontal gyrus, thus essentially corroborating the findings in postmenopausal women. Studies of the cholinergic and serotonergic systems indicate these systems as biological mediators of hormonal influences on the brain. More, hormonal replacement appears to increase cerebral blood flow in several cortical regions. On the other hand, studies on emotion processing in postmenopausal women are lacking. These results call for well-powered randomized-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal

  20. Nipype: A Flexible, Lightweight and Extensible Neuroimaging Data Processing Framework in Python

    PubMed Central

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof; Burns, Christopher D.; Madison, Cindee; Clark, Dav; Halchenko, Yaroslav O.; Waskom, Michael L.; Ghosh, Satrajit S.

    2011-01-01

    Current neuroimaging software offer users an incredible opportunity to analyze their data in different ways, with different underlying assumptions. Several sophisticated software packages (e.g., AFNI, BrainVoyager, FSL, FreeSurfer, Nipy, R, SPM) are used to process and analyze large and often diverse (highly multi-dimensional) data. However, this heterogeneous collection of specialized applications creates several issues that hinder replicable, efficient, and optimal use of neuroimaging analysis approaches: (1) No uniform access to neuroimaging analysis software and usage information; (2) No framework for comparative algorithm development and dissemination; (3) Personnel turnover in laboratories often limits methodological continuity and training new personnel takes time; (4) Neuroimaging software packages do not address computational efficiency; and (5) Methods sections in journal articles are inadequate for reproducing results. To address these issues, we present Nipype (Neuroimaging in Python: Pipelines and Interfaces; http://nipy.org/nipype), an open-source, community-developed, software package, and scriptable library. Nipype solves the issues by providing Interfaces to existing neuroimaging software with uniform usage semantics and by facilitating interaction between these packages using Workflows. Nipype provides an environment that encourages interactive exploration of algorithms, eases the design of Workflows within and between packages, allows rapid comparative development of algorithms and reduces the learning curve necessary to use different packages. Nipype supports both local and remote execution on multi-core machines and clusters, without additional scripting. Nipype is Berkeley Software Distribution licensed, allowing anyone unrestricted usage. An open, community-driven development philosophy allows the software to quickly adapt and address the varied needs of the evolving neuroimaging community, especially in the context of increasing demand for

  1. Clinical and neuroimaging differences between posterior cortical atrophy and typical amnestic Alzheimer’s disease patients at an early disease stage

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guoping; Wang, Jianqin; Feng, Zhan; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Yafei; He, Fangping; Chen, Zhongqin; Zhao, Kui; Luo, Benyan

    2016-01-01

    To identify clinical and neuroimaging characteristics between posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) and typical amnestic Alzheimer’s disease (tAD) patients at an early disease stage, 16 PCA and 13 age-matched tAD patients were enrolled. Compared with tAD patients, PCA patients showed higher mean recognition and recall test scores, and lower mean calculation, spatial attention, shape discrimination, and writing test scores. Mean right hippocampal volume was larger in PCA patients compared with tAD patients, while cortical gray matter (GM) volume of bilateral parietal and occipital lobes was smaller in PCA patients. Further, when compared with tAD patients, significant hypometabolism was observed in bilateral parietal and occipital lobes, particularly the right occipitotemporal junction in PCA patients. Additionally, there were significant positive correlations in recognition and recall scores with hippocampal volumes. In PCA patients, calculation and visuospatial ability scores are positively associated with GM volume of parietal and occipital lobes. And only spatial attention and shape discrimination scores are positively associated with regional glucose metabolism of parietal and occipital lobes. Therefore, PCA patients display better recognition and recall scores, which are associated with larger hippocampal volumes and poorer performance in visual spatial tasks because of marked GM atrophy and hypometabolism of parietal and occipital lobes. PMID:27377199

  2. Supergravity at the boundary of AdS supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsel, Aaron J.; Compère, Geoffrey

    2009-04-01

    We give a general analysis of AdS boundary conditions for spin-3/2 Rarita-Schwinger fields and investigate boundary conditions preserving supersymmetry for a graviton multiplet in AdS4. Linear Rarita-Schwinger fields in AdSd are shown to admit mixed Dirichlet-Neumann boundary conditions when their mass is in the range 0≤|m|<1/2lAdS. We also demonstrate that mixed boundary conditions are allowed for larger masses when the inner product is “renormalized” accordingly with the action. We then use the results obtained for |m|=1/lAdS to explore supersymmetric boundary conditions for N=1 AdS4 supergravity in which the metric and Rarita-Schwinger fields are fluctuating at the boundary. We classify boundary conditions that preserve boundary supersymmetry or superconformal symmetry. Under the AdS/CFT dictionary, Neumann boundary conditions in d=4 supergravity correspond to gauging the superconformal group of the three-dimensional CFT describing M2-branes, while N=1 supersymmetric mixed boundary conditions couple the CFT to N=1 superconformal topologically massive gravity.

  3. Asymptotically AdS spacetimes with a timelike Kasner singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Exact solutions to Einstein's equations for holographic models are presented and studied. The IR geometry has a timelike cousin of the Kasner singularity, which is the less generic case of the BKL (Belinski-Khalatnikov-Lifshitz) singularity, and the UV is asymptotically AdS. This solution describes a holographic RG flow between them. The solution's appearance is an interpolation between the planar AdS black hole and the AdS soliton. The causality constraint is always satisfied. The entanglement entropy and Wilson loops are discussed. The boundary condition for the current-current correlation function and the Laplacian in the IR is examined. There is no infalling wave in the IR, but instead, there is a normalizable solution in the IR. In a special case, a hyperscaling-violating geometry is obtained after a dimensional reduction.

  4. All AdS7 solutions of type II supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apruzzi, Fabio; Fazzi, Marco; Rosa, Dario; Tomasiello, Alessandro

    2014-04-01

    In M-theory, the only AdS7 supersymmetric solutions are AdS7 × S 4 and its orbifolds. In this paper, we find and classify new supersymmetric solutions of the type AdS7 × M 3 in type II supergravity. While in IIB none exist, in IIA with Romans mass (which does not lift to M-theory) there are many new ones. We use a pure spinor approach reminiscent of generalized complex geometry. Without the need for any Ansatz, the system determines uniquely the form of the metric and fluxes, up to solving a system of ODEs. Namely, the metric on M 3 is that of an S 2 fibered over an interval; this is consistent with the Sp(1) R-symmetry of the holographically dual (1,0) theory. By including D8 brane sources, one can numerically obtain regular solutions, where topologically M 3 ≅ S 3.

  5. Worldsheet scattering in AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundin, Per; Wulff, Linus

    2013-07-01

    We confront the recently proposed exact S-matrices for AdS 3/ CFT 2 with direct worldsheet calculations. Utilizing the BMN and Near Flat Space (NFS) expansions for strings on AdS 3 × S 3 × S 3 × S 1 and AdS 3 × S 3 × T 4 we compute both tree-level and one-loop scattering amplitudes. Up to some minor issues we find nice agreement in the tree-level sector. At the one-loop level however we find that certain non-zero tree-level processes, which are not visible in the exact solution, contribute, via the optical theorem, and give an apparent mismatch for certain amplitudes. Furthermore we find that a proposed one-loop modification of the dressing phase correctly reproduces the worldsheet calculation while the standard Hernandez-Lopez phase does not. We also compute several massless to massless processes.

  6. Detailed ultraviolet asymptotics for AdS scalar field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evnin, Oleg; Jai-akson, Puttarak

    2016-04-01

    We present a range of methods suitable for accurate evaluation of the leading asymptotics for integrals of products of Jacobi polynomials in limits when the degrees of some or all polynomials inside the integral become large. The structures in question have recently emerged in the context of effective descriptions of small amplitude perturbations in anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime. The limit of high degree polynomials corresponds in this situation to effective interactions involving extreme short-wavelength modes, whose dynamics is crucial for the turbulent instabilities that determine the ultimate fate of small AdS perturbations. We explicitly apply the relevant asymptotic techniques to the case of a self-interacting probe scalar field in AdS and extract a detailed form of the leading large degree behavior, including closed form analytic expressions for the numerical coefficients appearing in the asymptotics.

  7. New massive gravity and AdS(4) counterterms.

    PubMed

    Jatkar, Dileep P; Sinha, Aninda

    2011-04-29

    We show that the recently proposed Dirac-Born-Infeld extension of new massive gravity emerges naturally as a counterterm in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter space (AdS(4)). The resulting on-shell Euclidean action is independent of the cutoff at zero temperature. We also find that the same choice of counterterm gives the usual area law for the AdS(4) Schwarzschild black hole entropy in a cutoff-independent manner. The parameter values of the resulting counterterm action correspond to a c=0 theory in the context of the duality between AdS(3) gravity and two-dimensional conformal field theory. We rewrite this theory in terms of the gauge field that is used to recast 3D gravity as a Chern-Simons theory. PMID:21635026

  8. Integration of a neuroimaging processing pipeline into a pan-canadian computing grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie-Courchesne, S.; Rioux, P.; Chouinard-Decorte, F.; Sherif, T.; Rousseau, M.-E.; Das, S.; Adalat, R.; Doyon, J.; Craddock, C.; Margulies, D.; Chu, C.; Lyttelton, O.; Evans, A. C.; Bellec, P.

    2012-02-01

    The ethos of the neuroimaging field is quickly moving towards the open sharing of resources, including both imaging databases and processing tools. As a neuroimaging database represents a large volume of datasets and as neuroimaging processing pipelines are composed of heterogeneous, computationally intensive tools, such open sharing raises specific computational challenges. This motivates the design of novel dedicated computing infrastructures. This paper describes an interface between PSOM, a code-oriented pipeline development framework, and CBRAIN, a web-oriented platform for grid computing. This interface was used to integrate a PSOM-compliant pipeline for preprocessing of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging into CBRAIN. We further tested the capacity of our infrastructure to handle a real large-scale project. A neuroimaging database including close to 1000 subjects was preprocessed using our interface and publicly released to help the participants of the ADHD-200 international competition. This successful experiment demonstrated that our integrated grid-computing platform is a powerful solution for high-throughput pipeline analysis in the field of neuroimaging.

  9. Neurobiological narratives: experiences of mood disorder through the lens of neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Buchman, Daniel Z; Borgelt, Emily L; Whiteley, Louise; Illes, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Many scientists, healthcare providers, policymakers and patients are awaiting in anticipation the application of biomedical technologies such as functional neuroimaging for the prediction, diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders. The potential efficacy of such applications is controversial, and functional neuroimaging is not yet routinely used in psychiatric clinics. However, commercial ventures and enthusiastic reporting indicate a pressing need to engage with the social and ethical issues raised by clinical translation. There has been little investigation of how individuals living with mental illness view functional neuroimaging, or of the potential psychological impacts of its clinical use. We conducted 12 semi-structured interviews with adults diagnosed with major depression or bipolar disorder, probing their experiences with mental health care and their perspectives on the prospect of receiving neuroimaging for prediction, diagnosis and planning treatment. The participants discussed the potential role of neuroimages in (i) mitigating stigma; (ii) supporting morally loaded explanations of mental illness due to an imbalance of brain chemistry; (iii) legitimising psychiatric symptoms, which may have previously been de-legitimised since they lacked objective representation, through objective representations of disorder; and (iv) reifying DSM-IV-TR disorder categories and links to identity. We discuss these anticipated outcomes in the context of participant lived experience and attitudes to biologisation of mental illness, and argue for bringing these voices into upstream ethics discussion. PMID:22554090

  10. ABrIL - Advanced Brain Imaging Lab : a cloud based computation environment for cooperative neuroimaging projects.

    PubMed

    Neves Tafula, Sérgio M; Moreira da Silva, Nádia; Rozanski, Verena E; Silva Cunha, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience is an increasingly multidisciplinary and highly cooperative field where neuroimaging plays an important role. Neuroimaging rapid evolution is demanding for a growing number of computing resources and skills that need to be put in place at every lab. Typically each group tries to setup their own servers and workstations to support their neuroimaging needs, having to learn from Operating System management to specific neuroscience software tools details before any results can be obtained from each setup. This setup and learning process is replicated in every lab, even if a strong collaboration among several groups is going on. In this paper we present a new cloud service model - Brain Imaging Application as a Service (BiAaaS) - and one of its implementation - Advanced Brain Imaging Lab (ABrIL) - in the form of an ubiquitous virtual desktop remote infrastructure that offers a set of neuroimaging computational services in an interactive neuroscientist-friendly graphical user interface (GUI). This remote desktop has been used for several multi-institution cooperative projects with different neuroscience objectives that already achieved important results, such as the contribution to a high impact paper published in the January issue of the Neuroimage journal. The ABrIL system has shown its applicability in several neuroscience projects with a relatively low-cost, promoting truly collaborative actions and speeding up project results and their clinical applicability. PMID:25570014

  11. Relationships between cognitive performance, neuroimaging, and vascular disease: the DHS-Mind Study

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Fang-Chi; Raffield, Laura M.; Hugenschmidt, Christina E.; Cox, Amanda; Xu, Jianzhao; Carr, J. Jeffery; Freedman, Barry I.; Maldjian, Joseph A.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus increases risk for cognitive decline and dementia; elevated burdens of vascular disease are hypothesized to contribute to this risk. These relationships were examined in the Diabetes Heart Study-Mind using a battery of cognitive tests, neuroimaging measures, and subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) burden assessed by coronary artery calcified plaque (CAC). We hypothesized that CAC would attenuate the association between neuroimaging measures and cognition performance. Methods Associations were examined using marginal models in this family-based cohort of 572 European Americans from 263 families. All models were adjusted for age, gender, education, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension, with some neuroimaging measures additionally adjusted for intracranial volume. Results Higher total brain volume (TBV) was associated with better performance on the Digit Symbol Substitution Task (DSST) and Semantic Fluency (both p≤7.0 x 10−4). Higher gray matter volume (GMV) was associated with better performance on the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination and Semantic Fluency (both p≤9.0 x 10−4). Adjusting for CAC caused minimal changes to the results. Conclusions Relationships exist between neuroimaging measures and cognitive performance in a type 2 diabetes-enriched European American cohort. Associations were minimally attenuated after adjusting for subclinical CVD. Additional work is needed to understand how subclinical CVD burden interacts with other factors and impacts relationships between neuroimaging and cognitive testing measures. PMID:26185004

  12. Reading the Freudian theory of sexual drives from a functional neuroimaging perspective

    PubMed Central

    Stoléru, Serge

    2014-01-01

    One of the essential tasks of neuropsychoanalysis is to investigate the neural correlates of sexual drives. Here, we consider the four defining characteristics of sexual drives as delineated by Freud: their pressure, aim, object, and source. We systematically examine the relations between these characteristics and the four-component neurophenomenological model that we have proposed based on functional neuroimaging studies, which comprises a cognitive, a motivational, an emotional and an autonomic/neuroendocrine component. Functional neuroimaging studies of sexual arousal (SA) have thrown a new light on the four fundamental characteristics of sexual drives by identifying their potential neural correlates. While these studies are essentially consistent with the Freudian model of drives, the main difference emerging between the functional neuroimaging perspective on sexual drives and the Freudian theory relates to the source of drives. From a functional neuroimaging perspective, sources of sexual drives, conceived by psychoanalysis as processes of excitation occurring in a peripheral organ, do not seem, at least in adult subjects, to be an essential part of the determinants of SA. It is rather the central processing of visual or genital stimuli that gives to these stimuli their sexually arousing and sexually pleasurable character. Finally, based on functional neuroimaging results, some possible improvements to the psychoanalytic theory of sexual drives are suggested. PMID:24672467

  13. Phases of global AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Pallab; Krishnan, Chethan; Subramanian, P. N. Bala

    2016-06-01

    We study the phases of gravity coupled to a charged scalar and gauge field in an asymptotically Anti-de Sitter spacetime ( AdS 4) in the grand canonical ensemble. For the conformally coupled scalar, an intricate phase diagram is charted out between the four relevant solutions: global AdS, boson star, Reissner-Nordstrom black hole and the hairy black hole. The nature of the phase diagram undergoes qualitative changes as the charge of the scalar is changed, which we discuss. We also discuss the new features that arise in the extremal limit.

  14. The Road Ahead to Cure Alzheimer’s Disease: Development of Biological Markers and Neuroimaging Methods for Prevention Trials Across all Stages and Target Populations

    PubMed Central

    Cavedo, E.; Lista, S.; Khachaturian, Z.; Aisen, P.; Amouyel, P.; Herholz, K.; Jack, C.R.; Sperling, R.; Cummings, J.; Blennow, K.; O’Bryant, S.; Frisoni, G.B.; Khachaturian, A.; Kivipelto, M.; Klunk, W.; Broich, K.; Andrieu, S.; de Schotten, M. Thiebaut; Mangin, J.-F.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Johnson, K.; Teipel, S.; Drzezga, A.; Bokde, A.; Colliot, O.; Bakardjian, H.; Zetterberg, H.; Dubois, B.; Vellas, B.; Schneider, L.S.; Hampel, H.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a slowly progressing non-linear dynamic brain disease in which pathophysiological abnormalities, detectable in vivo by biological markers, precede overt clinical symptoms by many years to decades. Use of these biomarkers for the detection of early and preclinical AD has become of central importance following publication of two international expert working group’s revised criteria for the diagnosis of AD dementia, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to AD, prodromal AD and preclinical AD. As a consequence of matured research evidence six AD biomarkers are sufficiently validated and partly qualified to be incorporated into operationalized clinical diagnostic criteria and use in primary and secondary prevention trials. These biomarkers fall into two molecular categories: biomarkers of amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposition and plaque formation as well as of tau-protein related hyperphosphorylation and neurodegeneration. Three of the six gold-standard (“core feasible) biomarkers are neuroimaging measures and three are cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analytes. CSF Aβ1-42 (Aβ1-42), also expressed as Aβ1-42 : Aβ1-40 ratio, T-tau, and P-tau Thr181 & Thr231 proteins have proven diagnostic accuracy and risk enhancement in prodromal MCI and AD dementia. Conversely, having all three biomarkers in the normal range rules out AD. Intermediate conditions require further patient follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at increasing field strength and resolution allows detecting the evolution of distinct types of structural and functional abnormality pattern throughout early to late AD stages. Anatomical or volumetric MRI is the most widely used technique and provides local and global measures of atrophy. The revised diagnostic criteria for “prodromal AD” and “mild cognitive impairment due to AD” include hippocampal atrophy (as the fourth validated biomarker), which is considered an indicator of regional neuronal injury. Advanced image analysis

  15. Evaluation of multi-modal, multi-site neuroimaging measures in Huntington's disease: Baseline results from the PADDINGTON study☆

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Nicola Z.; Cole, James H.; Farmer, Ruth E.; Rees, Elin M.; Crawford, Helen E.; Malone, Ian B.; Roos, Raymund A.C.; Sprengelmeyer, Reiner; Durr, Alexandra; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Scahill, Rachael I.; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Frost, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Background Macro- and micro-structural neuroimaging measures provide valuable information on the pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD) and are proposed as biomarkers. Despite theoretical advantages of microstructural measures in terms of sensitivity to pathology, there is little evidence directly comparing the two. Methods 40 controls and 61 early HD subjects underwent 3 T MRI (T1- and diffusion-weighted), as part of the PADDINGTON study. Macrostructural volumetrics were obtained for the whole brain, caudate, putamen, corpus callosum (CC) and ventricles. Microstructural diffusion metrics of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean-, radial- and axial-diffusivity (MD, RD, AD) were computed for white matter (WM), CC, caudate and putamen. Group differences were examined adjusting for age, gender and site. A formal comparison of effect sizes determined which modality and metrics provided a statistically significant advantage over others. Results Macrostructural measures showed decreased regional and global volume in HD (p < 0.001); except the ventricles which were enlarged (p < 0.01). In HD, FA was increased in the deep grey-matter structures (p < 0.001), and decreased in the WM (CC, p = 0.035; WM, p = 0.053); diffusivity metrics (MD, RD, AD) were increased for all brain regions (p < 0.001). The largest effect sizes were for putamen volume, caudate volume and putamen diffusivity (AD, RD and MD); each was significantly larger than those for all other metrics (p < 0.05). Conclusion The highest performing macro- and micro-structural metrics had similar sensitivity to HD pathology quantified via effect sizes. Region-of-interest may be more important than imaging modality, with deep grey-matter regions outperforming the CC and global measures, for both volume and diffusivity. FA appears to be relatively insensitive to disease effects. PMID:24179770

  16. [Late-onset Neurodegenerative Diseases Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) and Alzheimer's Disease Secondary to TBI (AD-TBI)].

    PubMed

    Takahata, Keisuke; Tabuchi, Hajime; Mimura, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is associated with mild repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). This long-term and progressive symptom due to TBI was initially called punch-drunk syndrome or dementia pugilistica, since it was believed to be associated with boxing. However, serial neuropathological studies of mild repetitive TBI in the last decade have revealed that CTE occurs not only in boxers but also in a wider population including American football players, wrestlers, and military personnel. CTE has gained large public interest owing to dramatic cases involving retired professional athletes wherein serious behavioral problems and tragic incidents were reported. Unlike mild repetitive TBI, a single episode of severe TBI can cause another type of late-onset neuropsychiatric disease including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several epidemiological studies have shown that a single episode of severe TBI is one of the major risk factors of AD. Pathologically, both AD and CTE are characterized by abnormal accumulations of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. However, recent neuropathological studies revealed that CTE demonstrates a unique pattern of tau pathology in neurons and astrocytes, and accumulation of other misfolded proteins such as TDP-43. Currently, no reliable biomarkers of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI are available, and a definitive diagnosis can be made only via postmortem neuropathological examination. Development in neuroimaging techniques such as tau and amyloid positron emission tomography imaging might not only enable early diagnosis of CTE, but also contribute to the interventions for prevention of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in the living brain of patients with TBI. PMID:27395469

  17. Multiple tasks and neuroimaging modalities increase the likelihood of detecting covert awareness in patients with disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Raechelle M; Fernández-Espejo, Davinia; Gonzalez-Lara, Laura E; Kwan, Benjamin Y; Lee, Donald H; Owen, Adrian M; Cruse, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Minimal or inconsistent behavioral responses to command make it challenging to accurately diagnose the level of awareness of a patient with a Disorder of consciousness (DOC). By identifying markers of mental imagery being covertly performed to command, functional neuroimaging (fMRI), electroencephalography (EEG) has shown that some of these patients are aware despite their lack of behavioral responsiveness. We report the findings of behavioral, fMRI, and EEG approaches to detecting command-following in a group of patients with DOC. From an initial sample of 14 patients, complete data across all tasks was obtained in six cases. Behavioral evaluations were performed with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised. Both fMRI and EEG evaluations involved the completion of previously validated mental imagery tasks-i.e., motor imagery (EEG and fMRI) and spatial navigation imagery (fMRI). One patient exhibited statistically significant evidence of motor imagery in both the fMRI and EEG tasks, despite being unable to follow commands behaviorally. Two behaviorally non-responsive patients produced appropriate activation during the spatial navigation fMRI task. However, neither of these patients successfully completed the motor imagery tasks, likely due to specific motor area damage in at least one of these cases. A further patient demonstrated command following only in the EEG motor imagery task, and two patients did not demonstrate command following in any of the behavioral, EEG, or fMRI assessments. Due to the heterogeneity of etiology and pathology in this group, DOC patients vary in terms of their suitability for some forms of neuroimaging, the preservation of specific neural structures, and the cognitive resources that may be available to them. Assessments of a range of cognitive abilities supported by spatially-distinct brain regions and indexed by multiple neural signatures are therefore required in order to accurately characterize a patient's level of residual cognition and

  18. Neuroimaging studies of the striatum in cognition Part I: healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean-Sebastien; Hanganu, Alexandru; Monchi, Oury

    2015-01-01

    The striatum has traditionally mainly been associated with playing a key role in the modulation of motor functions. Indeed, lesion studies in animals and studies of some neurological conditions in humans have brought further evidence to this idea. However, better methods of investigation have raised concerns about this notion, and it was proposed that the striatum could also be involved in different types of functions including cognitive ones. Although the notion was originally a matter of debate, it is now well-accepted that the caudate nucleus contributes to cognition, while the putamen could be involved in motor functions, and to some extent in cognitive functions as well. With the arrival of modern neuroimaging techniques in the early 1990, knowledge supporting the cognitive aspect of the striatum has greatly increased, and a substantial number of scientific papers were published studying the role of the striatum in healthy individuals. For the first time, it was possible to assess the contribution of specific areas of the brain during the execution of a cognitive task. Neuroanatomical studies have described functional loops involving the striatum and the prefrontal cortex suggesting a specific interaction between these two structures. This review examines the data up to date and provides strong evidence for a specific contribution of the fronto-striatal regions in different cognitive processes, such as set-shifting, self-initiated responses, rule learning, action-contingency, and planning. Finally, a new two-level functional model involving the prefrontal cortex and the dorsal striatum is proposed suggesting an essential role of the dorsal striatum in selecting between competing potential responses or actions, and in resolving a high level of ambiguity. PMID:26500513

  19. The forecaster's added value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, M.; Milelli, M.

    2009-09-01

    skill scores of two competitive forecast. It is important to underline that the conclusions refer to the analysis of the Piemonte operational alert system, so they cannot be directly taken as universally true. But we think that some of the main lessons that can be derived from this study could be useful for the meteorological community. In details, the main conclusions are the following: - despite the overall improvement in global scale and the fact that the resolution of the limited area models has increased considerably over recent years, the QPF produced by the meteorological models involved in this study has not improved enough to allow its direct use, that is, the subjective HQPF continues to offer the best performance; - in the forecast process, the step where humans have the largest added value with respect to mathematical models, is the communication. In fact the human characterisation and communication of the forecast uncertainty to end users cannot be replaced by any computer code; - eventually, although there is no novelty in this study, we would like to show that the correct application of appropriated statistical techniques permits a better definition and quantification of the errors and, mostly important, allows a correct (unbiased) communication between forecasters and decision makers.

  20. Vulnerability of Welders to Manganese Exposure – A Neuroimaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Zaiyang, Long; Yue-Ming, Jiang; Xiang-Rong, Li; William, Fadel; Jun, Xu; Chien-Lin, Yeh; Li-Ling, Long; Hai-Lan, Luo; Jaroslaw, Harezlak; James B, Murdoch; Wei, Zheng; Ulrike, Dydak

    2014-01-01

    Increased manganese (Mn) exposure is known to cause cognitive, psychiatric and motor deficits. Mn exposure occurs in different occupational settings, where the airborne Mn level and the size of respirable particulates may vary considerably. Recently the importance of the role of the cerebral cortex in Mn toxicity has been highlighted, especially in Mn-induced neuropsychological effects. In this study we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate brain Mn accumulation using T1 signal intensity indices and to examine changes in brain iron content using T2* contrast, as well as magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to measure exposure-induced metabolite changes non-invasively in cortical and deep brain regions in Mn-exposed welders, Mn-exposed smelter workers and control factory workers with no measurable exposure to Mn. MRS data as well as T1 signal intensity indices and T2* values were acquired from the frontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus. Smelters were exposed to higher air Mn levels and had a longer duration of exposure, which was reflected in higher Mn levels in erythrocytes and urine than in welders. Nonetheless, welders had more significant metabolic differences compared to controls than did the smelter workers, especially in the frontal cortex. T1 hyperintensities in the globus pallidus were observed in both Mn-exposed groups, but only welders showed significantly higher thalamic and hippocampal T1 hyperintensities, as well as significantly reduced T2* values in the frontal cortex. Our results indicate that (1) the cerebral cortex, in particular the frontal cortex, is clearly involved in Mn neurotoxic effects and (2) in spite of the lower air Mn levels and shorter duration of exposure, welders exhibit more extensive neuroimaging changes compared to controls than smelters, including measurable deposition of Mn in more brain areas. These results indicate that the type of exposure (particulate sizes, dust versus fume) and

  1. Vulnerability of welders to manganese exposure--a neuroimaging study.

    PubMed

    Long, Zaiyang; Jiang, Yue-Ming; Li, Xiang-Rong; Fadel, William; Xu, Jun; Yeh, Chien-Lin; Long, Li-Ling; Luo, Hai-Lan; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Murdoch, James B; Zheng, Wei; Dydak, Ulrike

    2014-12-01

    Increased manganese (Mn) exposure is known to cause cognitive, psychiatric and motor deficits. Mn exposure occurs in different occupational settings, where the airborne Mn level and the size of respirable particulates may vary considerably. Recently the importance of the role of the cerebral cortex in Mn toxicity has been highlighted, especially in Mn-induced neuropsychological effects. In this study we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate brain Mn accumulation using T1 signal intensity indices and to examine changes in brain iron content using T2* contrast, as well as magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to measure exposure-induced metabolite changes non-invasively in cortical and deep brain regions in Mn-exposed welders, Mn-exposed smelter workers and control factory workers with no measurable exposure to Mn. MRS data as well as T1 signal intensity indices and T2* values were acquired from the frontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus. Smelters were exposed to higher air Mn levels and had a longer duration of exposure, which was reflected in higher Mn levels in erythrocytes and urine than in welders. Nonetheless, welders had more significant metabolic differences compared to controls than did the smelter workers, especially in the frontal cortex. T1 hyperintensities in the globus pallidus were observed in both Mn-exposed groups, but only welders showed significantly higher thalamic and hippocampal T1 hyperintensities, as well as significantly reduced T2* values in the frontal cortex. Our results indicate that (1) the cerebral cortex, in particular the frontal cortex, is clearly involved in Mn neurotoxic effects and (2) in spite of the lower air Mn levels and shorter duration of exposure, welders exhibit more extensive neuroimaging changes compared to controls than smelters, including measurable deposition of Mn in more brain areas. These results indicate that the type of exposure (particulate sizes, dust versus fume) and

  2. Detecting Neuroimaging Biomarkers for Psychiatric Disorders: Sample Size Matters.

    PubMed

    Schnack, Hugo G; Kahn, René S

    2016-01-01

    In a recent review, it was suggested that much larger cohorts are needed to prove the diagnostic value of neuroimaging biomarkers in psychiatry. While within a sample, an increase of diagnostic accuracy of schizophrenia (SZ) with number of subjects (N) has been shown, the relationship between N and accuracy is completely different between studies. Using data from a recent meta-analysis of machine learning (ML) in imaging SZ, we found that while low-N studies can reach 90% and higher accuracy, above N/2 = 50 the maximum accuracy achieved steadily drops to below 70% for N/2 > 150. We investigate the role N plays in the wide variability in accuracy results in SZ studies (63-97%). We hypothesize that the underlying cause of the decrease in accuracy with increasing N is sample heterogeneity. While smaller studies more easily include a homogeneous group of subjects (strict inclusion criteria are easily met; subjects live close to study site), larger studies inevitably need to relax the criteria/recruit from large geographic areas. A SZ prediction model based on a heterogeneous group of patients with presumably a heterogeneous pattern of structural or functional brain changes will not be able to capture the whole variety of changes, thus being limited to patterns shared by most patients. In addition to heterogeneity (sample size), we investigate other factors influencing accuracy and introduce a ML effect size. We derive a simple model of how the different factors, such as sample heterogeneity and study setup determine this ML effect size, and explain the variation in prediction accuracies found from the literature, both in cross-validation and independent sample testing. From this, we argue that smaller-N studies may reach high prediction accuracy at the cost of lower generalizability to other samples. Higher-N studies, on the other hand, will have more generalization power, but at the cost of lower accuracy. In conclusion, when comparing results from different

  3. Dissociable Genetic Contributions to Error Processing: A Multimodal Neuroimaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Agam, Yigal; Vangel, Mark; Roffman, Joshua L.; Gallagher, Patience J.; Chaponis, Jonathan; Haddad, Stephen; Goff, Donald C.; Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Wilhelm, Sabine; Smoller, Jordan W.; Manoach, Dara S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroimaging studies reliably identify two markers of error commission: the error-related negativity (ERN), an event-related potential, and functional MRI activation of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC). While theorized to reflect the same neural process, recent evidence suggests that the ERN arises from the posterior cingulate cortex not the dACC. Here, we tested the hypothesis that these two error markers also have different genetic mediation. Methods We measured both error markers in a sample of 92 comprised of healthy individuals and those with diagnoses of schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder or autism spectrum disorder. Participants performed the same task during functional MRI and simultaneously acquired magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography. We examined the mediation of the error markers by two single nucleotide polymorphisms: dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) C-521T (rs1800955), which has been associated with the ERN and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T (rs1801133), which has been associated with error-related dACC activation. We then compared the effects of each polymorphism on the two error markers modeled as a bivariate response. Results We replicated our previous report of a posterior cingulate source of the ERN in healthy participants in the schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorder groups. The effect of genotype on error markers did not differ significantly by diagnostic group. DRD4 C-521T allele load had a significant linear effect on ERN amplitude, but not on dACC activation, and this difference was significant. MTHFR C677T allele load had a significant linear effect on dACC activation but not ERN amplitude, but the difference in effects on the two error markers was not significant. Conclusions DRD4 C-521T, but not MTHFR C677T, had a significant differential effect on two canonical error markers. Together with the anatomical dissociation between the ERN and error-related dACC activation

  4. Detecting Neuroimaging Biomarkers for Psychiatric Disorders: Sample Size Matters

    PubMed Central

    Schnack, Hugo G.; Kahn, René S.

    2016-01-01

    In a recent review, it was suggested that much larger cohorts are needed to prove the diagnostic value of neuroimaging biomarkers in psychiatry. While within a sample, an increase of diagnostic accuracy of schizophrenia (SZ) with number of subjects (N) has been shown, the relationship between N and accuracy is completely different between studies. Using data from a recent meta-analysis of machine learning (ML) in imaging SZ, we found that while low-N studies can reach 90% and higher accuracy, above N/2 = 50 the maximum accuracy achieved steadily drops to below 70% for N/2 > 150. We investigate the role N plays in the wide variability in accuracy results in SZ studies (63–97%). We hypothesize that the underlying cause of the decrease in accuracy with increasing N is sample heterogeneity. While smaller studies more easily include a homogeneous group of subjects (strict inclusion criteria are easily met; subjects live close to study site), larger studies inevitably need to relax the criteria/recruit from large geographic areas. A SZ prediction model based on a heterogeneous group of patients with presumably a heterogeneous pattern of structural or functional brain changes will not be able to capture the whole variety of changes, thus being limited to patterns shared by most patients. In addition to heterogeneity (sample size), we investigate other factors influencing accuracy and introduce a ML effect size. We derive a simple model of how the different factors, such as sample heterogeneity and study setup determine this ML effect size, and explain the variation in prediction accuracies found from the literature, both in cross-validation and independent sample testing. From this, we argue that smaller-N studies may reach high prediction accuracy at the cost of lower generalizability to other samples. Higher-N studies, on the other hand, will have more generalization power, but at the cost of lower accuracy. In conclusion, when comparing results from different

  5. Multi-Parametric Neuroimaging Reproducibility: A 3T Resource Study

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Bennett A.; Huang, Alan J.; Gifford, Aliya; Vikram, Deepti S.; Lim, Issel Anne L.; Farrell, Jonathan A.D.; Bogovic, John A.; Hua, Jun; Chen, Min; Jarso, Samson; Smith, Seth A.; Joel, Suresh; Mori, Susumu; Pekar, James J.; Barker, Peter B.; Prince, Jerry L.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2010-01-01

    richness of the joint distribution of intensities across imaging methods can be best assessed within the context of a particular analysis approach as opposed to a summary table. As such, all imaging data and analysis routines have been made publicly and freely available. This effort provides the neuroimaging community with a resource for optimization of algorithms that exploit the diversity of modern MRI modalities. Additionally, it establishes a baseline for continuing development and optimization of multi-parametric imaging protocols. PMID:21094686

  6. Mystery cloud of AD 536

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The possible cause of the densest and most persistent dry fog on record, which was observed in Europe and the Middle East during AD 536 and 537, is discussed. The fog's long duration toward the south and the high sulfuric acid signal detected in Greenland in ice cores dated around AD 540 support the theory that the fog was due to the explosion of the Rabaul volcano, the occurrence of which has been dated at about AD 540 by the radiocarbon method.

  7. Verb generation in patients with focal frontal lesions: A neuropsychological test of neuroimaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.; Swick, Diane; Farah, Martha J.; D’Esposito, Mark; Kan, Irene P.; Knight, Robert T.

    1998-01-01

    What are the neural bases of semantic memory? Traditional beliefs that the temporal lobes subserve the retrieval of semantic knowledge, arising from lesion studies, have been recently called into question by functional neuroimaging studies finding correlations between semantic retrieval and activity in left prefrontal cortex. Has neuroimaging taught us something new about the neural bases of cognition that older methods could not reveal or has it merely identified brain activity that is correlated with but not causally related to the process of semantic retrieval? We examined the ability of patients with focal frontal lesions to perform a task commonly used in neuroimaging experiments, the generation of semantically appropriate action words for concrete nouns, and found evidence of the necessity of the left inferior frontal gyrus for certain components of the verb generation task. Notably, these components did not include semantic retrieval per se. PMID:9861060

  8. Mind-Body Practices and the Adolescent Brain: Clinical Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anup; Newberg, Andrew B

    2016-01-01

    Background Mind-Body practices constitute a large and diverse group of practices that can substantially affect neurophysiology in both healthy individuals and those with various psychiatric disorders. In spite of the growing literature on the clinical and physiological effects of mind-body practices, very little is known about their impact on central nervous system (CNS) structure and function in adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Method This overview highlights findings in a select group of mind-body practices including yoga postures, yoga breathing techniques and meditation practices. Results Mind-body practices offer novel therapeutic approaches for adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Findings from these studies provide insights into the design and implementation of neuroimaging studies for adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Conclusions Clinical neuroimaging studies will be critical in understanding how different practices affect disease pathogenesis and symptomatology in adolescents. Neuroimaging of mind-body practices on adolescents with psychiatric disorders will certainly be an open and exciting area of investigation. PMID:27347478

  9. Functional neuroimaging: a brief overview and feasibility for use in chiropractic research

    PubMed Central

    Lystad, Reidar P; Pollard, Henry

    2009-01-01

    There is a need to further our understanding of the neurophysiological effects of chiropractic spinal manipulation on brain activity as it pertains to both musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal complaints. This paper aims to provide a basic overview of the most commonly utilised techniques in the neurosciences for functional imaging the brain (positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computerised tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, and magnetoencephalography), and discuss their applicability in future chiropractic research. Functional neuroimaging modalities are used in a wide range of different research and clinical settings, and are powerful tools in the investigation of neuronal activity in the human brain. There are many potential applications for functional neuroimaging in future chiropractic research, but there are some feasibility issues, mainly pertaining to access and funding. We strongly encourage the use of functional neuroimaging in future investigations of the effects of chiropractic spinal manipulation on brain function. PMID:19421353

  10. The BrainMap strategy for standardization, sharing, and meta-analysis of neuroimaging data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuroimaging researchers have developed rigorous community data and metadata standards that encourage meta-analysis as a method for establishing robust and meaningful convergence of knowledge of human brain structure and function. Capitalizing on these standards, the BrainMap project offers databases, software applications, and other associated tools for supporting and promoting quantitative coordinate-based meta-analysis of the structural and functional neuroimaging literature. Findings In this report, we describe recent technical updates to the project and provide an educational description for performing meta-analyses in the BrainMap environment. Conclusions The BrainMap project will continue to evolve in response to the meta-analytic needs of biomedical researchers in the structural and functional neuroimaging communities. Future work on the BrainMap project regarding software and hardware advances are also discussed. PMID:21906305

  11. Functional and clinical insights from neuroimaging studies in childhood-onset schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez, Anna E; Sastry, Nevin V; Gogtay, Nitin

    2015-08-01

    Childhood-onset schizophrenia is a rare pediatric onset psychiatric disorder continuous with and typically more severe than its adult counterpart. Neuroimaging research conducted on this population has revealed similarly severe neural abnormalities. When taken as a whole, neuroimaging research in this population shows generally decreased cortical gray matter coupled with white matter connectivity abnormalities, suggesting an anatomical basis for deficits in executive function. Subcortical abnormalities are pronounced in limbic structures, where volumetric deficits are likely related to social skill deficits, and cerebellar deficits that have been correlated to cognitive abnormalities. Structures relevant to motor processing also show a significant alteration, with volumetric increase in basal ganglia structures likely due to antipsychotic administration. Neuroimaging of this disorder shows an important clinical image of exaggerated cortical loss, altered white matter connectivity, and differences in structural development of subcortical areas during the course of development and provides important background to the disease state. PMID:26234702

  12. Suspected non-AD pathology in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Wisse, Laura E M; Butala, Nirali; Das, Sandhitsu R; Davatzikos, Christos; Dickerson, Bradford C; Vaishnavi, Sanjeev N; Yushkevich, Paul A; Wolk, David A

    2015-12-01

    We aim to better characterize mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients with suspected non-Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology (SNAP) based on their longitudinal outcome, cognition, biofluid, and neuroimaging profile. MCI participants (n = 361) from ADNI-GO/2 were designated "amyloid positive" with abnormal amyloid-beta 42 levels (AMY+) and "neurodegeneration positive" (NEU+) with abnormal hippocampal volume or hypometabolism using fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. SNAP was compared with the other MCI groups and with AMY- controls. AMY-NEU+/SNAP, 16.6%, were older than the NEU- groups but not AMY- controls. They had a lower conversion rate to AD after 24 months than AMY+NEU+ MCI participants. SNAP-MCI participants had similar amyloid-beta 42 levels, florbetapir and tau levels, but larger white matter hyperintensity volumes than AMY- controls and AMY-NEU- MCI participants. SNAP participants performed worse on all memory domains and on other cognitive domains, than AMY-NEU- participants but less so than AMY+NEU+ participants. Subthreshold levels of cerebral amyloidosis are unlikely to play a role in SNAP-MCI, but pathologies involving the hippocampus and cerebrovascular disease may underlie the neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment in this group. PMID:26422359

  13. AdS Branes from Partial Breaking of Superconformal Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, E.A.

    2005-10-01

    It is shown how the static-gauge world-volume superfield actions of diverse superbranes on the AdS{sub d+1} superbackgrounds can be systematically derived from nonlinear realizations of the appropriate AdS supersymmetries. The latter are treated as superconformal symmetries of flat Minkowski superspaces of the bosonic dimension d. Examples include the N = 1 AdS{sub 4} supermembrane, which is associated with the 1/2 partial breaking of the OSp(1|4) supersymmetry down to the N = 1, d = 3 Poincare supersymmetry, and the T-duality related L3-brane on AdS{sub 5} and scalar 3-brane on AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 1}, which are associated with two different patterns of 1/2 breaking of the SU(2, 2|1) supersymmetry. Another (closely related) topic is the AdS/CFT equivalence transformation. It maps the world-volume actions of the codimension-one AdS{sub d+1} (super)branes onto the actions of the appropriate Minkowski (super)conformal field theories in the dimension d.

  14. AdS5 backgrounds with 24 supersymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, S.; Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.

    2016-06-01

    We prove a non-existence theorem for smooth AdS 5 solutions with connected, compact without boundary internal space that preserve strictly 24 supersymmetries. In particular, we show that D = 11 supergravity does not admit such solutions, and that all such solutions of IIB supergravity are locally isometric to the AdS 5 × S 5 maximally supersymmetric background. Furthermore, we prove that (massive) IIA supergravity also does not admit such solutions, provided that the homogeneity conjecture for massive IIA supergravity is valid. In the context of AdS/CFT these results imply that if gravitational duals for strictly mathcal{N}=3 superconformal theories in 4-dimensions exist, they are either singular or their internal spaces are not compact.

  15. Entanglement temperature and perturbed AdS3 geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, G. C.; Caravan, B.

    2016-06-01

    Generalizing the first law of thermodynamics, the increase in entropy density δ S (x ) of a conformal field theory (CFT) is proportional to the increase in energy density, δ E (x ) , of a subsystem divided by a spatially dependent entanglement temperature, TE(x ) , a fixed parameter determined by the geometry of the subsystem, crossing over to thermodynamic temperature at high temperatures. In this paper we derive a generalization of the thermodynamic Clausius relation, showing that deformations of the CFT by marginal operators are associated with spatial temperature variations, δ TE(x ) , and spatial energy correlations play the role of specific heat. Using AdS/CFT duality we develop a relationship between a perturbation in the local entanglement temperature of the CFT and the perturbation of the bulk AdS metric. In two dimensions, we demonstrate a method through which direct diagonalizations of the boundary quantum theory may be used to construct geometric perturbations of AdS3 .

  16. Gene X Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: Evidence from Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Etain, Bruno; Houenou, Josselin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Schizophrenia (SZ) and Bipolar disorder (BD) are considered as severe multifactorial diseases, stemming from genetic and environmental influences. Growing evidence supports gene x environment (GxE) interactions in these disorders and neuroimaging studies can help us to understand how those factors mechanistically interact. No reviews synthesized the existing data of neuroimaging studies in these issues. Methods: We conduct a systematic review on the neuroimaging studies exploring GxE interactions relative to SZ or BD in PubMed. Results: First results of the influence of genetic and environmental risks on brain structures came from monozygotic twin pairs concordant and discordant for SZ or BD. Few structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) studies have explored the GxE interactions. No other imaging methods were found. Two main GxE interactions on brain volumes have arisen. First, an interaction between genetic liability to SZ and obstetric complications on gray matter, cerebrospinal fluid, and hippocampal volumes. Second, cannabis use and genetic liability interaction effects on cortical thickness and white matter volumes. Conclusion: Combining GxE interactions and neuroimaging domains is a promising approach. Genetic risk and environmental exposures such as cannabis or obstetrical complications seem to interact leading to specific neuroimaging cerebral alterations in SZ. They are suggestive of GxE interactions that confer phenotypic abnormalities in SZ and possibly BD. We need further, larger neuroimaging studies of GxE interactions for which we may propose a framework focusing on GxE interactions data already known to have a clinical effect such as infections, early stress, urbanicity, and substance abuse. PMID:24133464

  17. Prenatal Cerebellar Disruptions: Neuroimaging Spectrum of Findings in Correlation with Likely Mechanisms and Etiologies of Injury.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that the cerebellum is susceptible to prenatal infections and hemorrhages and that congenital morphologic anomalies of the cerebellum may be caused by disruptive (acquired) causes. Starting from the neuroimaging pattern, this report describes a spectrum of prenatal cerebellar disruptions including cerebellar agenesis, unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia, cerebellar cleft, global cerebellar hypoplasia, and vanishing cerebellum in Chiari type II malformation. The neuroimaging findings, possible causative disruptive events, and clinical features of each disruption are discussed. Recognition of cerebellar disruptions and their differentiation from cerebellar malformations is important in terms of diagnosis, prognosis, and genetic counselling. PMID:27423799

  18. Inferring mental states from neuroimaging data: From reverse inference to large-scale decoding

    PubMed Central

    Poldrack, Russell A.

    2011-01-01

    A common goal of neuroimaging research is to use imaging data to identify the mental processes that are engaged when a subject performs a mental task. The use of reasoning from activation to mental functions, known as “reverse inference”, has been previously criticized on the basis that it does not take into account how selectively the area is activated by the mental process in question. In this Perspective, I outline the critique of informal reverse inference, and describe a number of new developments that provide the ability to more formally test the predictive power of neuroimaging data. PMID:22153367

  19. Neuroimaging auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia: from neuroanatomy to neurochemistry and beyond.

    PubMed

    Allen, Paul; Modinos, Gemma; Hubl, Daniela; Shields, Gregory; Cachia, Arnaud; Jardri, Renaud; Thomas, Pierre; Woodward, Todd; Shotbolt, Paul; Plaze, Marion; Hoffman, Ralph

    2012-06-01

    Despite more than 2 decades of neuroimaging investigations, there is currently insufficient evidence to fully understand the neurobiological substrate of auditory hallucinations (AH). However, some progress has been made with imaging studies in patients with AH consistently reporting altered structure and function in speech and language, sensory, and nonsensory regions. This report provides an update of neuroimaging studies of AH with a particular emphasis on more recent anatomical, physiological, and neurochemical imaging studies. Specifically, we provide (1) a review of findings in schizophrenia and nonschizophrenia voice hearers, (2) a discussion regarding key issues that have interfered with progress, and (3) practical recommendations for future studies. PMID:22535906

  20. Neuroimaging Auditory Hallucinations in Schizophrenia: From Neuroanatomy to Neurochemistry and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Paul; Modinos, Gemma; Hubl, Daniela; Shields, Gregory; Cachia, Arnaud; Jardri, Renaud; Thomas, Pierre; Woodward, Todd; Shotbolt, Paul; Plaze, Marion; Hoffman, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Despite more than 2 decades of neuroimaging investigations, there is currently insufficient evidence to fully understand the neurobiological substrate of auditory hallucinations (AH). However, some progress has been made with imaging studies in patients with AH consistently reporting altered structure and function in speech and language, sensory, and nonsensory regions. This report provides an update of neuroimaging studies of AH with a particular emphasis on more recent anatomical, physiological, and neurochemical imaging studies. Specifically, we provide (1) a review of findings in schizophrenia and nonschizophrenia voice hearers, (2) a discussion regarding key issues that have interfered with progress, and (3) practical recommendations for future studies. PMID:22535906

  1. Predictors of diagnostic neuroimaging delays among adults presenting with symptoms suggestive of acute stroke in Ontario: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Kapral, Moira K.; Li, Shudong; Fang, Jiming; Moody, Alan R.; Krahn, Murray; Laupacis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many studies have examined the timeliness of thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke, but less is known about door-to-imaging time. We conducted a prospective cohort study to assess the timing of neuroimaging among patients with suspected acute stroke in the province of Ontario, Canada, and to examine factors associated with delays in neuroimaging. Methods: We included all patients 18 years and older with suspected acute stroke seen at hospitals with neuroimaging capacity within the Ontario Stroke Registry between Apr. 1, 2010, and Mar. 31, 2011. We used a hierarchical, multivariable Cox proportional hazards model to evaluate the association between patient and hospital factors and the likelihood of receiving timely neuroimaging (≤ 25 min) after arrival in the emergency department. Results: A total of 13 250 patients presented to an emergency department with stroke-like symptoms during the study period. Of the 3984 who arrived within 4 hours after symptom onset, 1087 (27.3%) had timely neuroimaging. The factors independently associated with an increased likelihood of timely neuroimaging were less time from symptom onset to presentation, more severe stroke, male sex, no history of stroke or transient ischemic attack, arrival to hospital from a setting other than home and presentation to a designated stroke centre or an urban hospital. Interpretation: A minority of patients with stroke-like symptoms who presented within the 4-hour thrombolytic treatment window received timely neuroimaging. Neuroimaging delays were influenced by various patient and hospital factors, some of which are modifiable. PMID:27398382

  2. Current Practice in the Referral of Individuals with Suspected Dementia for Neuroimaging by General Practitioners in Ireland and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Ciblis, Aurelia S.; Butler, Marie-Louise; Quinn, Catherine; Clare, Linda; Bokde, Arun L. W.; Mullins, Paul G.; McNulty, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives While early diagnosis of dementia is important, the question arises whether general practitioners (GPs) should engage in direct referrals. The current study investigated current referral practices for neuroimaging in dementia, access to imaging modalities and investigated related GP training in Ireland and North Wales. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to GPs in the programme regions which included approximately two thirds of all GPs in the Republic of Ireland and all general practitioners in North Wales. A total of 2,093 questionnaires were issued. Results 48.6% of Irish respondents and 24.3% of Welsh respondents directly referred patients with suspected dementia for neuroimaging. Irish GPs reported greater direct access to neuroimaging than their Welsh counterparts. A very small percentage of Irish and Welsh GPs (4.7% and 10% respectively) had received training in neuroimaging and the majority who referred patients for neuroimaging were not aware of any dementia-specific protocols for referrals (93.1% and 95% respectively). Conclusions The benefits of direct GP access to neuroimaging investigations for dementia have yet to be established. Our findings suggest that current GP speciality training in Ireland and Wales is deficient in dementia-specific and neuroimaging training with the concern being that inadequate training will lead to inadequate referrals. Further training would complement guidelines and provide a greater understanding of the role and appropriateness of neuroimaging techniques in the diagnosis of dementia. PMID:27007435

  3. Self-dual warped AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Ning, Bo

    2010-12-01

    We study a new class of solutions of three-dimensional topological massive gravity. These solutions can be taken as nonextremal black holes, with their extremal counterparts being discrete quotients of spacelike warped AdS3 along the U(1)L isometry. We study the thermodynamics of these black holes and show that the first law is satisfied. We also show that for consistent boundary conditions, the asymptotic symmetry generators form only one copy of the Virasoro algebra with central charge cL=(4νℓ)/(G(ν2+3)), with which the Cardy formula reproduces the black hole entropy. We compute the real-time correlators of scalar perturbations and find a perfect match with the dual conformal field theory (CFT) predictions. Our study provides a novel example of warped AdS/CFT correspondence: the self-dual warped AdS3 black hole is dual to a CFT with nonvanishing left central charge. Moreover, our investigation suggests that the quantum topological massive gravity asymptotic to the same spacelike warped AdS3 in different consistent ways may be dual to different two-dimensional CFTs.

  4. Warped AdS3/dipole-CFT duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    String theory contains solutions with {{SL}}( {{2},{R}} ){{R}} × {{U}}{( {1} )_L} -invariant warped AdS3 (WAdS3) factors arising as continuous deformations of ordinary AdS3 factors. We propose that some of these are holographically dual to the IR limits of nonlocal dipole-deformed 2D D-brane gauge theories, referred to as "dipole CFTs". Neither the bulk nor boundary theories are currently well-understood, and consequences of the proposed duality for both sides is investigated. The bulk entropy-area law suggests that dipole CFTs have (at large N) a high-energy density of states which does not depend on the deformation parameter. Putting the boundary theory on a spatial circle leads to closed timelike curves in the bulk, suggesting a relation of the latter to dipole-type nonlocality.

  5. New boundary conditions for AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Song, Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    New chiral boundary conditions are found for quantum gravity with matter on AdS3. The associated asymptotic symmetry group is generated by a single right-moving U(1) Kac-Moody-Virasoro algebra with {c_R}={3ℓ}/2G . The Kac-Moody zero mode generates global left-moving translations and equals, for a BTZ black hole, the sum of the total mass and spin. The level is positive about the global vacuum and negative in the black hole sector, corresponding to ergosphere formation. Realizations arising in Chern-Simons gravity and string theory are analyzed. The new boundary conditions are shown to naturally arise for warped AdS3 in the limit that the warp parameter is taken to zero.

  6. Observing quantum gravity in asymptotically AdS space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanov, Slava

    2015-12-01

    The question is studied of whether an observer can discover quantum gravity in the semiclassical regime. It is shown that it is indeed possible to probe a certain quantum gravity effect by employing an appropriately designed detector. The effect is related to the possibility of having topologically inequivalent geometries in the path-integral approach at the same time. A conformal field theory (CFT) state which is expected to describe the eternal anti-de Sitter (AdS) black hole in the large-N limit is discussed. It is argued under certain assumptions that the black hole boundary should be merely a patch of the entire AdS boundary. This leads then to a conclusion that that CFT state is the ordinary CFT vacuum restricted to that patch. If existent, the bulk CFT operators can behave as the ordinary semiclassical quantum field theory in the large-N limit in the weak sense.

  7. Semiclassical Virasoro blocks from AdS3 gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijano, Eliot; Kraus, Per; Perlmutter, Eric; Snively, River

    2015-12-01

    We present a unified framework for the holographic computation of Virasoro conformal blocks at large central charge. In particular, we provide bulk constructions that correctly reproduce all semiclassical Virasoro blocks that are known explicitly from conformal field theory computations. The results revolve around the use of geodesic Witten diagrams, recently introduced in [1], evaluated in locally AdS3 geometries generated by backreaction of heavy operators. We also provide an alternative computation of the heavy-light semiclassical block — in which two external operators become parametrically heavy — as a certain scattering process involving higher spin gauge fields in AdS3; this approach highlights the chiral nature of Virasoro blocks. These techniques may be systematically extended to compute corrections to these blocks and to interpolate amongst the different semiclassical regimes.

  8. Joint Coupled-Feature Representation and Coupled Boosting for AD Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yinghuan; Suk, Heung-Il; Gao, Yang; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great interest in computer-aided Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) diagnosis. Previous learning based methods defined the diagnosis process as a classification task and directly used the low-level features extracted from neuroimaging data without considering relations among them. However, from a neuroscience point of view, it’s well known that a human brain is a complex system that multiple brain regions are anatomically connected and functionally interact with each other. Therefore, it is natural to hypothesize that the low-level features extracted from neuroimaging data are related to each other in some ways. To this end, in this paper, we first devise a coupled feature representation by utilizing intra-coupled and inter-coupled interaction relationship. Regarding multi-modal data fusion, we propose a novel coupled boosting algorithm that analyzes the pairwise coupled-diversity correlation between modalities. Specifically, we formulate a new weight updating function, which considers both incorrectly and inconsistently classified samples. In our experiments on the ADNI dataset, the proposed method presented the best performance with accuracies of 94.7% and 80.1% for AD vs. Normal Control (NC) and MCI vs. NC classifications, respectively, outperforming the competing methods and the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26167107

  9. Alday-Maldacena Duality and AdS Plateau Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.

    A short summary of approximate approach to the study of minimal surfaces in AdS, based on solving Nambu-Goto equations iteratively. Today, after partial denunciation of the BDS conjecture, this looks like the only constructive approach to understanding the ways of its possible modification and thus to saving the Alday-Maldacena duality. Numerous open technical problems are explicitly formulated throughout the text.

  10. On information loss in AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Li, Daliang; Wang, Junpu

    2016-05-01

    We discuss information loss from black hole physics in AdS3, focusing on two sharp signatures infecting CFT2 correlators at large central charge c: `forbidden singularities' arising from Euclidean-time periodicity due to the effective Hawking temperature, and late-time exponential decay in the Lorentzian region. We study an infinite class of examples where forbidden singularities can be resolved by non-perturbative effects at finite c, and we show that the resolution has certain universal features that also apply in the general case. Analytically continuing to the Lorentzian regime, we find that the non-perturbative effects that resolve forbidden singularities qualitatively change the behavior of correlators at times t ˜ S BH , the black hole entropy. This may resolve the exponential decay of correlators at late times in black hole backgrounds. By Borel resumming the 1 /c expansion of exact examples, we explicitly identify `information-restoring' effects from heavy states that should correspond to classical solutions in AdS3. Our results suggest a line of inquiry towards a more precise formulation of the gravitational path integral in AdS3.

  11. Supersymmetric giant graviton solutions in AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Gautam; Raju, Suvrat; Smedbäck, Mikael

    2008-02-01

    We parametrize all classical probe brane configurations that preserve four supersymmetries in (a) the extremal D1-D5 geometry, (b) the extremal D1-D5-P geometry, (c) the smooth D1-D5 solutions proposed by Lunin and Mathur, and (d) global AdS3×S3×T4/K3. These configurations consist of D1 branes, D5 branes, and bound states of D5 and D1 branes with the property that a particular Killing vector is tangent to the brane world volume at each point. We show that the supersymmetric sector of the D5-brane world volume theory may be analyzed in an effective 1+1 dimensional framework that places it on the same footing as D1 branes. In global AdS and the corresponding Lunin-Mathur solution, the solutions we describe are “bound” to the center of AdS for generic parameters and cannot escape to infinity. We show that these probes only exist on the submanifold of moduli space where the background BNS field and theta angle vanish. We quantize these probes in the near-horizon region of the extremal D1-D5 geometry and obtain the theory of long strings discussed by Seiberg and Witten.

  12. Neuroimaging in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: Current and Future Predictors of Functional Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suskauer, Stacy J.; Huisman, Thierry A. G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Although neuroimaging has long played a role in the acute management of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI), until recently, its use as a tool for understanding and predicting long-term brain-behavior relationships after TBI has been limited by the relatively poor sensitivity of routine clinical imaging for detecting diffuse axonal injury…

  13. Systematic Review of Structural and Functional Neuroimaging Findings in Children and Adults with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, Kathryn A.; Detre, John A.; Schultz, Robert T.; Herrington, John D.; Davatzikos, Christos; Doshi, Jimit J.; Erus, Guray; Liu, Hua-Shan; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Furth, Susan L.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary CKD has been linked with cognitive deficits and affective disorders in multiple studies. Analysis of structural and functional neuroimaging in adults and children with kidney disease may provide additional important insights into the pathobiology of this relationship. This paper comprehensively reviews neuroimaging studies in both children and adults. Major databases (PsychLit, MEDLINE, WorldCat, ArticleFirst, PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE) were searched using consistent search terms, and studies published between 1975 and 2012 were included if their samples focused on CKD as the primary disease process. Exclusion criteria included case reports, chapters, and review articles. This systematic process yielded 43 studies for inclusion (30 in adults, 13 in children). Findings from this review identified several clear trends: (1) presence of cerebral atrophy and cerebral density changes in patients with CKD; (2) cerebral vascular disease, including deep white matter hyperintensities, white matter lesions, cerebral microbleeds, silent cerebral infarction, and cortical infarction, in patients with CKD; and (3) similarities in regional cerebral blood flow between patients with CKD and those with affective disorders. These findings document the importance of neuroimaging procedures in understanding the effect of CKD on brain structure, function, and associated behaviors. Results provide a developmental linkage between childhood and adulthood, with respect to the effect of CKD on brain functioning across the lifespan, with strong implications for a cerebrovascular mechanism contributing to this developmental linkage. Use of neuroimaging methods to corroborate manifest neuropsychological deficits or perhaps to indicate preventive actions may prove useful to individuals with CKD. PMID:23723341

  14. Identifying Predictors, Moderators, and Mediators of Antidepressant Response in Major Depressive Disorder: Neuroimaging Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Mary L.; Chase, Henry W.; Sheline, Yvette I.; Etkin, Amit; Almeida, Jorge R.C.; Deckersbach, Thilo; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite significant advances in neuroscience and treatment development, no widely accepted biomarkers are available to inform diagnostics or identify preferred treatments for individuals with major depressive disorder. Method In this critical review, the authors examine the extent to which multimodal neuroimaging techniques can identify biomarkers reflecting key pathophysiologic processes in depression and whether such biomarkers may act as predictors, moderators, and mediators of treatment response that might facilitate development of personalized treatments based on a better understanding of these processes. Results The authors first highlight the most consistent findings from neuroimaging studies using different techniques in depression, including structural and functional abnormalities in two parallel neural circuits: serotonergically modulated implicit emotion regulation circuitry, centered on the amygdala and different regions in the medial prefrontal cortex; and dopaminergically modulated reward neural circuitry, centered on the ventral striatum and medial prefrontal cortex. They then describe key findings from the relatively small number of studies indicating that specific measures of regional function and, to a lesser extent, structure in these neural circuits predict treatment response in depression. Conclusions Limitations of existing studies include small sample sizes, use of only one neuroimaging modality, and a focus on identifying predictors rather than moderators and mediators of differential treatment response. By addressing these limitations and, most importantly, capitalizing on the benefits of multimodal neuroimaging, future studies can yield moderators and mediators of treatment response in depression to facilitate significant improvements in shorter- and longer-term clinical and functional outcomes. PMID:25640931

  15. Systematic review of structural and functional neuroimaging findings in children and adults with CKD.

    PubMed

    Moodalbail, Divya G; Reiser, Kathryn A; Detre, John A; Schultz, Robert T; Herrington, John D; Davatzikos, Christos; Doshi, Jimit J; Erus, Guray; Liu, Hua-Shan; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Furth, Susan L; Hooper, Stephen R

    2013-08-01

    CKD has been linked with cognitive deficits and affective disorders in multiple studies. Analysis of structural and functional neuroimaging in adults and children with kidney disease may provide additional important insights into the pathobiology of this relationship. This paper comprehensively reviews neuroimaging studies in both children and adults. Major databases (PsychLit, MEDLINE, WorldCat, ArticleFirst, PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE) were searched using consistent search terms, and studies published between 1975 and 2012 were included if their samples focused on CKD as the primary disease process. Exclusion criteria included case reports, chapters, and review articles. This systematic process yielded 43 studies for inclusion (30 in adults, 13 in children). Findings from this review identified several clear trends: (1) presence of cerebral atrophy and cerebral density changes in patients with CKD; (2) cerebral vascular disease, including deep white matter hyperintensities, white matter lesions, cerebral microbleeds, silent cerebral infarction, and cortical infarction, in patients with CKD; and (3) similarities in regional cerebral blood flow between patients with CKD and those with affective disorders. These findings document the importance of neuroimaging procedures in understanding the effect of CKD on brain structure, function, and associated behaviors. Results provide a developmental linkage between childhood and adulthood, with respect to the effect of CKD on brain functioning across the lifespan, with strong implications for a cerebrovascular mechanism contributing to this developmental linkage. Use of neuroimaging methods to corroborate manifest neuropsychological deficits or perhaps to indicate preventive actions may prove useful to individuals with CKD. PMID:23723341

  16. Localization of function in anterior cingulate cortex: from psychosurgery to functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Gasquoine, Philip Gerard

    2013-03-01

    Early localizationists linked anterior cingulate cortex (ACC: Brodmann's area 24 and adjacent regions) with emotional behavior, paving the way for bilateral cingulotomy psychosurgery in severe, treatment resistant, cases of obsessive-compulsive disorder, chronic pain, depression, and substance abuse. Neuropsychological follow-up of such cases demonstrated executive function impairment. Abnormal neuroimaged activity in ACC has been found in many psychiatric conditions, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, chronic pain, substance abuse, and schizophrenia. With healthy participants, increased neuroimaged activity in ACC has been linked with challenging executive function tasks, homeostatically incongruous physical states, and the encoding of the pleasant/averseness of stimuli. There is disagreement on the cortical substrate subsumed by the term ACC, the existence of functionally distinct ACC subregions (e.g., dorsal: cognitive vs. ventral: emotion), and the interpretation of functional neuroimaging studies. Synthesis of neuropsychological and functional neuroimaging studies suggests ACC contributes to behavior by modifying responses especially in reaction to challenging cognitive and physical states that require additional effortful cognitive control. This is accomplished by monitoring the emotional salience of stimuli, exerting control over the autonomic nervous system, and modulating cognitive activity. PMID:23313645

  17. Integrating Functional Neuroimaging and Human Operant Research: Brain Activation Correlated with Presentation of Discriminative Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlund, Michael W.; Cataldo, Michael F.

    2005-01-01

    Results of numerous human imaging studies and nonhuman neurophysiological studies on "reward" highlight a role for frontal, striatal, and thalamic regions in operant learning. By integrating operant and functional neuroimaging methodologies, the present investigation examined brain activation to two types of discriminative stimuli correlated with…

  18. Emerging neuroimaging contribution to the diagnosis and management of the ring chromosome 20 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vaudano, Anna Elisabetta; Ruggieri, Andrea; Vignoli, Aglaia; Canevini, Maria Paola; Meletti, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Ring chromosome 20 [r(20)] syndrome is an underdiagnosed chromosomal anomaly characterized by severe epilepsy, behavioral problems, and mild-to-moderate cognitive deficits. Since the cognitive and behavioral decline follows seizure onset, this syndrome has been proposed as an epileptic encephalopathy (EE). The recent overwhelming development of advanced neuroimaging techniques has opened a new era in the investigation of the brain networks subserving the EEs. In particular, functional neuroimaging tools are well suited to show alterations related to epileptiform discharges at the network level and to build hypotheses about the mechanisms underlying the cognitive disruption observed in these conditions. This paper reviews the brain circuits and their disruption as revealed by functional neuroimaging studies in patients with [r(20)] syndrome. It discusses the clinical consequences of the neuroimaging findings on the management of patients with [r(20)] syndrome, including their impact to an earlier diagnosis of this disorder. Based on the available lines of evidences, [r(20)] syndrome is characterized by interictal and ictal dysfunctions within basal ganglia-prefrontal lobe networks and by long-lasting effects of the peculiar theta-delta rhythm, which represents an EEG marker of the syndrome on integrated brain networks that subserve cognitive functions. PMID:25843339

  19. Offering to Share: How to Put Heads Together in Autism Neuroimaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belmonte, Matthew K.; Mazziotta, John C.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Evans, Alan C.; Courchesne, Eric; Dager, Stephen R.; Bookheimer, Susan Y.; Aylward, Elizabeth H.; Amaral, David G.; Cantor, Rita M.; Chugani, Diane C.; Dale, Anders M.; Davatzikos, Christos; Gerig, Guido; Herbert, Martha R.; Lainhart, Janet E.; Murphy, Declan G.; Piven, Joseph; Reiss, Allan L.; Schultz, Robert T.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Levi-Pearl, Susan; Lajonchere, Clara; Colamarino, Sophia A.

    2008-01-01

    Data sharing in autism neuroimaging presents scientific, technical, and social obstacles. We outline the desiderata for a data-sharing scheme that combines imaging with other measures of phenotype and with genetics, defines requirements for comparability of derived data and recommendations for raw data, outlines a core protocol including…

  20. Brief Report: Neuroimaging in Autism: The State of the Science 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipek, Pauline A.

    1996-01-01

    This review of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in autism addresses three questions: (1) what structural anomalies of the brain have been identified by MRI? (2) why are these collective findings inconclusive? and (3) where should neuroimaging research go from here? It is noted that the vast majority of MRI scans in autism are clinically…

  1. Digging Deeper Using Neuroimaging Tools Reveals Important Clues to Early-Onset Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumra, Sanjiv

    2008-01-01

    The article describes the use of structural neuroimaging to understand the psychopathology of childhood-onset schizophrenia. Results showed an increase in lateral volumes, reduced total and regional volumes of gray matter in the cortex and increased basal ganglia volumes as in adult-onset schizophrenia in comparison with healthy subjects.

  2. Adolescent Schizophrenia: A Methodologic Review of the Current Neuroimaging and Neuropsychologic Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findling, Robert L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the methodology in articles that have reported structural neuroimaging or neuropsychological data in adolescent patients with schizophrenia. Identification of methodological issues led to the finding that, at present, no conclusions can be made regarding the presence or absence of neuropsychologic dysfunction or structural…

  3. What Is Self-Specific? Theoretical Investigation and Critical Review of Neuroimaging Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legrand, Dorothee; Ruby, Perrine

    2009-01-01

    The authors propose a paradigm shift in the investigation of the self. Synthesizing neuroimaging results from studies investigating the self, the authors first demonstrate that self-relatedness evaluation involves a wide cerebral network, labeled E-network, comprising the medial prefrontal cortex, precuneus, temporoparietal junction, and temporal…

  4. Integrating Genetic, Psychopharmacological and Neuroimaging Studies: A Converging Methods Approach to Understanding the Neurobiology of ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durston, Sarah; Konrad, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to illustrate how combining multiple approaches can inform us about the neurobiology of ADHD. Converging evidence from genetic, psychopharmacological and functional neuroimaging studies has implicated dopaminergic fronto-striatal circuitry in ADHD. However, while the observation of converging evidence from multiple vantage points…

  5. Integrating Functional Brain Neuroimaging and Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience in Child Psychiatry Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavuluri, Mani N.; Sweeney, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The use of cognitive neuroscience and functional brain neuroimaging to understand brain dysfunction in pediatric psychiatric disorders is discussed. Results show that bipolar youths demonstrate impairment in affective and cognitive neural systems and in these two circuits' interface. Implications for the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric…

  6. In Vivo Characterization of Traumatic Brain Injury Neuropathology with Structural and Functional Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    LEVINE, BRIAN; FUJIWARA, ESTHER; O’CONNOR, CHARLENE; RICHARD, NADINE; KOVACEVIC, NATASA; MANDIC, MARINA; RESTAGNO, ADRIANA; EASDON, CRAIG; ROBERTSON, IAN H.; GRAHAM, SIMON J.; CHEUNG, GORDON; GAO, FUQIANG; SCHWARTZ, MICHAEL L.; BLACK, SANDRA E.

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative neuroimaging is increasingly used to study the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on brain structure and function. This paper reviews quantitative structural and functional neuroimaging studies of patients with TBI, with an emphasis on the effects of diffuse axonal injury (DAI), the primary neuropathology in TBI. Quantitative structural neuroimaging has evolved from simple planometric measurements through targeted region-of-interest analyses to whole-brain analysis of quantified tissue compartments. Recent studies converge to indicate widespread volume loss of both gray and white matter in patients with moderate-to-severe TBI. These changes can be documented even when patients with focal lesions are excluded. Broadly speaking, performance on standard neuropsychological tests of speeded information processing are related to these changes, but demonstration of specific brain-behavior relationships requires more refined experimental behavioral measures. The functional consequences of these structural changes can be imaged with activation functional neuroimaging. Although this line of research is at an early stage, results indicate that TBI causes a more widely dispersed activation in frontal and posterior cortices. Further progress in analysis of the consequences of TBI on neural structure and function will require control of variability in neuropathology and behavior. PMID:17020478

  7. Fluent Versus Nonfluent Primary Progressive Aphasia: A Comparison of Clinical and Functional Neuroimaging Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.G.; Charuvastra, A.; Miller, B.L.; Shapira, J.S.; Mendez, M.F.

    2005-01-01

    To better characterize fluent and nonfluent variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA). Although investigators have recognized both fluent and nonfluent patients with PPA (Mesulam, 2001), the clinical and neuroimaging features of these variants have not been fully defined. We present clinical and neuropsychological data on 47 PPA patients…

  8. Integrative Bayesian analysis of neuroimaging-genetic data with application to cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Azadeh, Shabnam; Hobbs, Brian P; Ma, Liangsuo; Nielsen, David A; Moeller, F Gerard; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran

    2016-01-15

    Neuroimaging and genetic studies provide distinct and complementary information about the structural and biological aspects of a disease. Integrating the two sources of data facilitates the investigation of the links between genetic variability and brain mechanisms among different individuals for various medical disorders. This article presents a general statistical framework for integrative Bayesian analysis of neuroimaging-genetic (iBANG) data, which is motivated by a neuroimaging-genetic study in cocaine dependence. Statistical inference necessitated the integration of spatially dependent voxel-level measurements with various patient-level genetic and demographic characteristics under an appropriate probability model to account for the multiple inherent sources of variation. Our framework uses Bayesian model averaging to integrate genetic information into the analysis of voxel-wise neuroimaging data, accounting for spatial correlations in the voxels. Using multiplicity controls based on the false discovery rate, we delineate voxels associated with genetic and demographic features that may impact diffusion as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA) obtained from DTI images. We demonstrate the benefits of accounting for model uncertainties in both model fit and prediction. Our results suggest that cocaine consumption is associated with FA reduction in most white matter regions of interest in the brain. Additionally, gene polymorphisms associated with GABAergic, serotonergic and dopaminergic neurotransmitters and receptors were associated with FA. PMID:26484829

  9. Bending AdS waves with new massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayón-Beato, Eloy; Giribet, Gaston; Hassaïne, Mokhtar

    2009-05-01

    We study AdS-waves in the three-dimensional new theory of massive gravity recently proposed by Bergshoeff, Hohm, and Townsend. The general configuration of this type is derived and shown to exhibit different branches, with different asymptotic behaviors. In particular, for the special fine tuning m2 = ±1/(2l2), solutions with logarithmic fall-off arise, while in the range m2 > -1/(2l2), spacetimes with Schrödinger isometry group are admitted as solutions. Spacetimes that are asymptotically AdS3, both for the Brown-Henneaux and for the weakened boundary conditions, are also identified. The metric function that characterizes the profile of the AdS-wave behaves as a massive excitation on the spacetime, with an effective mass given by meff2 = m2-1/(2l2). For the critical value m2 = -1/(2l2), the value of the effective mass precisely saturates the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound for the AdS3 space where the wave is propagating on. The analogies with the AdS-wave solutions of topologically massive gravity are also discussed. Besides, we consider the coupling of both massive deformations to Einstein gravity and find the exact configurations for the complete theory, discussing all the different branches exhaustively. One of the effects of introducing the Chern-Simons gravitational term is that of breaking the degeneracy in the effective mass of the generic modes of pure New Massive Gravity, producing a fine structure due to parity violation. Another effect is that the zoo of exact logarithmic specimens becomes considerably enlarged.

  10. Pain as a fact and heuristic: how pain neuroimaging illuminates moral dimensions of law.

    PubMed

    Pustilnik, Amanda C

    2012-05-01

    In legal domains ranging from tort to torture, pain and its degree do important definitional work by delimiting boundaries of lawfulness and of entitlements. Yet, for all the work done by pain as a term in legal texts and practice, it has a confounding lack of external verifiability. Now, neuroimaging is rendering pain and myriad other subjective states at least partly ascertainable. This emerging ability to ascertain and quantify subjective states is prompting a "hedonic" or a "subjectivist" turn in legal scholarship, which has sparked a vigorous debate as to whether the quantification of subjective states might affect legal theory and practice. Subjectivists contend that much values-talk in law has been a necessary but poor substitute for quantitative determinations of subjective states--determinations that will be possible in the law's "experiential future." This Article argues the converse: that pain discourse in law frequently is a heuristic for values. Drawing on interviews and laboratory visits with neuroimaging researchers, this Article shows current and in-principle limitations of pain quantification through neuroimaging. It then presents case studies on torture-murder, torture, the death penalty, and abortion to show the largely heuristic role of pain discourse in law. Introducing the theory of "embodied morality," the Article describes how moral conceptions of rights and duties are informed by human physicality and constrained by the limits of empathic identification. Pain neuroimaging helps reveal this dual factual and heuristic nature of pain in the law, and thus itself points to the translational work required for neuroimaging to influence, much less transform, legal practice and doctrine. PMID:22754972

  11. Role of neuroimaging in multidisciplinary approach towards Non-Alzheimer's dementia.

    PubMed

    Patro, Satya Narayana; Glikstein, Rafael; Hanagandi, Prasad; Chakraborty, Santanu

    2015-10-01

    Dementia is defined as chronic deterioration of intellectual function and cognitive skills significant enough to interfere with the ability to perform daily activities. Recent advances in the treatment of dementia have renewed interest in the use of various neuroimaging techniques that can assist in the diagnosis and differentiation of various subtypes. Neuroimaging and computational techniques have helped the radiological community to monitor disease progression of various neurodegenerative conditions presenting with dementia, such as Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal lobe dementia (FTLD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multisystem atrophy-cerebellar variant (MSA-C), and their response to newer therapies. Prompt identification of treatable or reversible forms of dementia, such as tumours, subdural haemorrhage and intracranial dAVF, is crucial for the effective management of these conditions. It is also prudent to recognize the imaging spectrum of metabolic, infective and autoimmune diseases with rapidly progressing dementia, such as methanol toxicity, central pontine myelinolysis (CPM), delayed post hypoxic leukoencephalopathy (DPHL), HIV, Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), Sjogren's syndrome, multiple sclerosis (MS), radiation necrosis and Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS), which are difficult to treat and often require palliative care. This pictorial review emphasizes various non-Alzheimer's dementia entities and discusses their imaging highlights. Teaching Points • Non Alzheimer's dementia constitutes a broad spectrum of conditions. • Neuroimaging plays an important role in differentiating treatable from irreversible dementia. • Neuroimaging is often non-specific in early stages of neurodegenerative conditions with dementia. • Neuroimaging plays an important role in the multimodal approach towards management of dementia. PMID:26206249

  12. ADS/CFT and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U. /SLAC

    2007-02-21

    The AdS/CFT correspondence between string theory in AdS space and conformal .eld theories in physical spacetime leads to an analytic, semi-classical model for strongly-coupled QCD which has scale invariance and dimensional counting at short distances and color confinement at large distances. Although QCD is not conformally invariant, one can nevertheless use the mathematical representation of the conformal group in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space to construct a first approximation to the theory. The AdS/CFT correspondence also provides insights into the inherently non-perturbative aspects of QCD, such as the orbital and radial spectra of hadrons and the form of hadronic wavefunctions. In particular, we show that there is an exact correspondence between the fifth-dimensional coordinate of AdS space z and a specific impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron in ordinary space-time. This connection allows one to compute the analytic form of the frame-independent light-front wavefunctions, the fundamental entities which encode hadron properties and allow the computation of decay constants, form factors, and other exclusive scattering amplitudes. New relativistic lightfront equations in ordinary space-time are found which reproduce the results obtained using the 5-dimensional theory. The effective light-front equations possess remarkable algebraic structures and integrability properties. Since they are complete and orthonormal, the AdS/CFT model wavefunctions can also be used as a basis for the diagonalization of the full light-front QCD Hamiltonian, thus systematically improving the AdS/CFT approximation.

  13. Ultraviolet asymptotics and singular dynamics of AdS perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Vanhoof, Joris

    2015-10-01

    Important insights into the dynamics of spherically symmetric AdS-scalar field perturbations can be obtained by considering a simplified time-averaged theory accurately describing perturbations of amplitude ɛ on time-scales of order 1/ ɛ 2. The coefficients of the time-averaged equations are complicated expressions in terms of the AdS scalar field mode functions, which are in turn related to the Jacobi polynomials. We analyze the behavior of these coefficients for high frequency modes. The resulting asymptotics can be useful for understanding the properties of the finite-time singularity in solutions of the time-averaged theory recently reported in the literature. We highlight, in particular, the gauge dependence of this asymptotics, with respect to the two most commonly used gauges. The harsher growth of the coefficients at large frequencies in higher-dimensional AdS suggests strengthening of turbulent instabilities in higher dimensions. In the course of our derivations, we arrive at recursive relations for the coefficients of the time-averaged theory that are likely to be useful for evaluating them more efficiently in numerical simulations.

  14. Research Initiatives

    Cancer.gov

    This page provides detailed information about currently funded RFA initiatives both led by DCCPS, and those led by other NIH Institutes and Centers (I/Cs) that include DCCPS as a partner. Each initiative includes a table of funded grants and a map that shows the location of funded institutions.

  15. New Features in ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Murray, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) has been working hard on updating its services and interfaces to better support our community's research needs. ADS Labs is a new interface built on the old tried-and-true ADS Abstract Databases, so all of ADS's content is available through it. In this presentation we highlight the new features that have been developed in ADS Labs over the last year: new recommendations, metrics, a citation tool and enhanced fulltext search. ADS Labs has long been providing article-level recommendations based on keyword similarity, co-readership and co-citation analysis of its corpus. We have now introduced personal recommendations, which provide a list of articles to be considered based on a individual user's readership history. A new metrics interface provides a summary of the basic impact indicators for a list of records. These include the total and normalized number of papers, citations, reads, and downloads. Also included are some of the popular indices such as the h, g and i10 index. The citation helper tool allows one to submit a set of records and obtain a list of top 10 papers which cite and/or are cited by papers in the original list (but which are not in it). The process closely resembles the network approach of establishing "friends of friends" via an analysis of the citation network. The full-text search service now covers more than 2.5 million documents, including all the major astronomy journals, as well as physics journals published by Springer, Elsevier, the American Physical Society, the American Geophysical Union, and all of the arXiv eprints. The full-text search interface interface allows users and librarians to dig deep and find words or phrases in the body of the indexed articles. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  16. The AdS central charge in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troost, Jan

    2011-11-01

    We evaluate the vacuum expectation value of the central charge operator in string theory in an AdS3 vacuum. Our calculation provides a rare non-zero one-point function on a spherical worldsheet. The evaluation involves the regularization both of a worldsheet ultraviolet divergence (associated to the infinite volume of the conformal Killing group), and a space-time infrared divergence (corresponding to the infinite volume of space-time). The two divergences conspire to give a finite result, which is the classical general relativity value for the central charge, corrected in bosonic string theory by an infinite series of tree level higher derivative terms.

  17. Small black holes in global AdS spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokela, Niko; Pönni, Arttu; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-04-01

    We study the properties of two-point functions and quasinormal modes in a strongly coupled field theory holographically dual to a small black hole in global anti-de Sitter spacetime. Our results are seen to smoothly interpolate between known limits corresponding to large black holes and thermal AdS space, demonstrating that the Son-Starinets prescription works even when there is no black hole in the spacetime. Omitting issues related to the internal space, the results can be given a field theory interpretation in terms of the microcanonical ensemble, which provides access to energy densities forbidden in the canonical description.

  18. Entanglement entropy and duality in AdS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakas, Ioannis; Pastras, Georgios

    2015-07-01

    Small variations of the entanglement entropy δS and the expectation value of the modular Hamiltonian δE are computed holographically for circular entangling curves in the boundary of AdS4, using gravitational perturbations with general boundary conditions in spherical coordinates. Agreement with the first law of thermodynamics, δS = δE, requires that the line element of the entangling curve remains constant. In this context, we also find a manifestation of electric-magnetic duality for the entanglement entropy and the corresponding modular Hamiltonian, following from the holographic energy-momentum/Cotton tensor duality.

  19. Fake gaps in AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belin, Alexandre; Castro, Alejandra; Hung, Ling-Yan

    2015-11-01

    We discuss properties of interpolating geometries in three dimensional gravity in the presence of a chiral anomaly. This anomaly, which introduces an unbalance between left and right central charges, is protected under RG flows. For this simple reason it is impossible to gap a system with such an anomaly. Our goal is to discuss how holography captures this basic and robust feature. We demonstrate the absence of a mass gap by analysing the linearized spectrum and holographic entanglement entropy of these backgrounds in the context of AdS3/CFT2.

  20. Internal structure of charged AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Srijit; Sarkar, Sudipta; Virmani, Amitabh

    2016-06-01

    When an electrically charged black hole is perturbed, its inner horizon becomes a singularity, often referred to as the Poisson-Israel mass inflation singularity. Ori constructed a model of this phenomenon for asymptotically flat black holes, in which the metric can be determined explicitly in the mass inflation region. In this paper we implement the Ori model for charged AdS black holes. We find that the mass function inflates faster than the flat space case as the inner horizon is approached. Nevertheless, the mass inflation singularity is still a weak singularity: Although spacetime curvature becomes infinite, tidal distortions remain finite on physical objects attempting to cross it.