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Sample records for ad patient brains

  1. Expression profiles of cytokines in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients, compared to the brains of non-demented patients with and without increasing AD pathology

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Kaori; Horio, Juri; Satoh, Haruhisa; Sue, Lucia; Beach, Thomas; Arita, Seizaburo; Tooyama, Ikuo; Konishi, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is involved in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology. Our major focus was to clarify whether neuroinflammation plays important roles in AD pathogenesis, particularly prior to the manifestation of overt dementia. We analyzed cytokine expression profiles of the brain, with focus on non-demented patients with increasing AD pathology, referred to as high pathology control (HPC) patients, who provide an intermediate subset between AD and normal control subjects, referred to as low pathology control (LPC) patients. With real-time PCR techniques, we found significant differences in interleukin (IL)-1β, 10, 13, 18, and 33, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α converting enzyme (TACE), and transforming growth factor (TGF)β1 mRNA expression ratios between HPC and AD patients, while no significant differences in the expression ratios of any cytokine tested here were observed between LPC and HPC patients. The cytokine mRNA expression ratios were determined as follows: first, cytokine mRNA levels were normalized to mRNA levels of a housekeeping gene, peptidyl-prolyl isomerase A (PPIA), which showed the most stable expression among ten housekeeping genes tested here; then, the normalized data of cytokine levels in the temporal cortex were divided by those in the cerebellum, which is resistant to AD pathology. Subsequently, the expression ratios of the temporal cortex to cerebellum were compared among LPC, HPC and AD patient groups. Our results indicate that cytokines are more mobilized and implicated in the later AD stage when a significant cognitive decline occurs and develops than in the developmental course of AD pathology prior to the manifestation of overt dementia. PMID:21368376

  2. Adding Chemotherapy to Radiation Improves Survival for Some Patients with Rare Brain Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Long-term results from two clinical trials confirm that certain patients with anaplastic oligodendrogliomas live substantially longer if they are treated with a combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy rather than radiatiation alone.

  3. Differential Impact of Whole-Brain Radiotherapy Added to Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Doo-Sik; Lee, Jung-Il; Im, Yong-Seok; Nam, Do-Hyun; Park, Kwan; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated whether the addition of whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) provided any therapeutic benefit according to recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-five patients with 1 to 10 metastases who underwent SRS between January 2002 and December 2007 were included in the study. Of those, 168 patients were treated with SRS alone and 77 patients received SRS followed by WBRT. Actuarial curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method regarding overall survival (OS), distant brain control (DC), and local brain control (LC) stratified by RPA class. Analyses for known prognostic variables were performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that control of the primary tumor, small number of brain metastases, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) > 70, and initial treatment modalities were significant predictors for survival. For RPA class 1, SRS plus WBRT was associated with a longer survival time compared with SRS alone (854 days vs. 426 days, p = 0.042). The SRS plus WBRT group also showed better LC rate than did the SRS-alone group (p = 0.021), although they did not show a better DC rate (p = 0.079). By contrast, for RPA class 2 or 3, no significant difference in OS, LC, or DC was found between the two groups. Conclusions: These results suggest that RPA classification should determine whether or not WBRT is added to SRS. WBRT may be recommended to be added to SRS for patients in whom long-term survival is expected on the basis of RPA classification.

  4. Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin and its Receptors in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) Brain Regions: Differential Findings in AD with and without Depression

    PubMed Central

    Dekens, Doortje W.; Naudé, Petrus J.W.; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Vermeiren, Yannick; Van Dam, Debby; Oude Voshaar, Richard C.; Eisel, Ulrich L.M.; De Deyn, Peter P.

    2016-01-01

    Co-existing depression worsens Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a newly identified (neuro)inflammatory mediator in the pathophysiologies of both AD and depression. This study aimed to compare NGAL levels in healthy controls, AD without depression (AD–D), and AD with co-existing depression (AD+D) patients. Protein levels of NGAL and its receptors, 24p3R and megalin, were assessed in nine brain regions from healthy controls (n = 19), AD–D (n = 19), and AD+D (n = 21) patients. NGAL levels in AD–D patients were significantly increased in brain regions commonly associated with AD. In the hippocampus, NGAL levels were even further increased in AD+D subjects. Unexpectedly, NGAL levels in the prefrontal cortex of AD+D patients were comparable to those in controls. Megalin levels were increased in BA11 and amygdala of AD+D patients, while no changes in 24p3R were detected. These findings indicate significant differences in neuroimmunological regulation between AD patients with and without co-existing depression. Considering its known effects, elevated NGAL levels might actively promote neuropathological processes in AD with and without depression. PMID:27716662

  5. Oligomeric Neuronal Protein Aggregates as Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    as Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael Sierks CONTRACTING...Oligomeric Neuronal Protein Aggregates as Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 12109023 5c

  6. Influence of Education on the Pattern of Cognitive Deterioration in Ad Patients: The Cognitive Reserve Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carret, N.L.; Auriacombe, S.; Letenneur, L.; Bergua, V.; Dartigues, J.F.; Fabrigoule, C.

    2005-01-01

    The cognitive reserve hypothesis proposes that a high educational level could delay the clinical expression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) although neuropathologic changes develop in the brain. Therefore, some studies have reported that when the clinical signs of the disease emerge, high-educated patients may decline more rapidly than low-educated…

  7. Brain and Plasma Molecular Characterization of the Pathogenic TBI-AD Interrelationship in Mouse Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0253 TITLE: Brain and Plasma Molecular Characterization of the Pathogenic TBI-AD Interrelationship in Mouse Models ... brain and plasma responses in mouse models of TBI, AD and other neurodegenerative conditions (Abdullah et al., 2014; Abdullah et al., 2013; Crawford...identify age/time-dependent expression of brain proteins and lipids in mouse models of AD (PSAPP and hTau) and of mTBI (single and repetitive mTBI in hTau

  8. Targeting modulates audiences' brain and behavioral responses to safe sex video ads.

    PubMed

    Wang, An-Li; Lowen, Steven B; Shi, Zhenhao; Bissey, Bryn; Metzger, David S; Langleben, Daniel D

    2016-10-01

    Video ads promoting condom use are a key component of media campaigns to stem the HIV epidemic. Recent neuroimaging studies in the context of smoking cessation, point to personal relevance as one of the key variables that determine the effectiveness of public health messages. While minority men who have sex with men (MSM) are at the highest risk of HIV infection, most safe-sex ads feature predominantly Caucasian actors in heterosexual scenarios. We compared brain respons of 45 African American MSM to safe sex ads that were matched (i.e. 'Targeted') to participants' sexual orientation and race, and 'Untargeted' ads that were un matched for these characteristics. Ad recall, perceived 'convincingness' and attitudes towards condom use were also assessed. We found that Targeted ads were better remembered than the Untargeted ads but perceived as equally convincing. Targeted ads engaged brain regions involved in self-referential processing and memory, including the amygdala, hippocampus, temporal and medial prefrontal cortices (MPFC) and the precuneus. Connectivity between MPFC and precuneus and middle temporal gyrus was stronger when viewing Targeted ads. Our results suggest that targeting may increase cognitive processing of safe sex ads and justify further prospective studies linking brain response to media public health interventions and clinical outcomes.

  9. Influence of education on the pattern of cognitive deterioration in AD patients: the cognitive reserve hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Le Carret, Nicolas; Auriacombe, Sophie; Letenneur, Luc; Bergua, Valérie; Dartigues, Jean-François; Fabrigoule, Colette

    2005-03-01

    The cognitive reserve hypothesis proposes that a high educational level could delay the clinical expression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) although neuropathologic changes develop in the brain. Therefore, some studies have reported that when the clinical signs of the disease emerge, high-educated patients may decline more rapidly than low-educated patients because the neuropathology is more advanced. However, these studies have only investigated the decline of global cognition or an isolated cognitive process. To study the differential deterioration pattern of several cognitive processes according to education, the performance of 20 AD patients with a high educational level and a low educational level were compared with the performance of 20 control subjects on a neuropsychological battery. The results showed that cognitive deterioration of AD patients is different according to education, although the global performance was similar in AD patients. The high-educated patients exhibited greater impairment of abstract thinking whereas the low-educated patients showed greater impairment of memory and attentional function. This confirms that some cognitive processes, such as abstract thinking, decline more rapidly in high-educated patients whereas others seem to evolve more slowly if compared to low-educated patients. In this latter case, high-educated patients may still benefit from cognitive reserve after the diagnosis of the dementia.

  10. Predicting conversion from MCI to AD with FDG-PET brain images at different prodromal stages.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Carlos; Morgado, Pedro M; Campos Costa, Durval; Silveira, Margarida

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD), while still at the stage known as mild cognitive impairment (MCI), is important for the development of new treatments. However, brain degeneration in MCI evolves with time and differs from patient to patient, making early diagnosis a very challenging task. Despite these difficulties, many machine learning techniques have already been used for the diagnosis of MCI and for predicting MCI to AD conversion, but the MCI group used in previous works is usually very heterogeneous containing subjects at different stages. The goal of this paper is to investigate how the disease stage impacts on the ability of machine learning methodologies to predict conversion. After identifying the converters and estimating the time of conversion (TC) (using neuropsychological test scores), we devised 5 subgroups of MCI converters (MCI-C) based on their temporal distance to the conversion instant (0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months before conversion). Next, we used the FDG-PET images of these subgroups and trained classifiers to distinguish between the MCI-C at different stages and stable non-converters (MCI-NC). Our results show that MCI to AD conversion can be predicted as early as 24 months prior to conversion and that the discriminative power of the machine learning methods decreases with the increasing temporal distance to the TC, as expected. These findings were consistent for all the tested classifiers. Our results also show that this decrease arises from a reduction in the information contained in the regions used for classification and by a decrease in the stability of the automatic selection procedure.

  11. MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and neuropsychological testing for neuronal connectivity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianhui; Ni, Hongyan; Zhu, Tong; Ekholm, Sven; Kavcic, Voyko

    2004-04-01

    We have used MR DTI to identify relevant brain structures involved in visuospatial processing, in an attempt to link perceptual and attentional impairments to WM changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Correlation of DTI measured parameters with results of several neuropsychological tests will be reported here. Several issues related to quantitation of DTI parameters in ROI analysis are addressed. In spite of only a small number of subjects were studied so far, we found not only that AD patients showed significant decrease of white matter (WM) integrity in corpus callosum (CC), most prominent at the posterior portion, but also found significant correlations between the DTI parameters and scores from several neuropsychological tests. Our preliminary results suggest that DTI help to improve the overall accuracy rate in distinguishing between early AD onset and age-related functional decline, and potentially may improve efficiency in differentiating between different types of dementia.

  12. PAK Inactivation Impairs Social Recognition in 3xTg-AD Mice without Increasing Brain Deposition of Tau and Aβ

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Dany; Dal-Pan, Alexandre; Tremblay, Cyntia; Bennett, David A.; Guitton, Matthieu J.; De Koninck, Yves; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    Defects in p21-activated kinase (PAK) are suspected to play a role in cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Dysfunction in PAK leads to cofilin activation, drebrin displacement from its actin-binding site, actin depolymerization/severing, and, ultimately, defects in spine dynamics and cognitive impairment in mice. To determine the role of PAK in AD, we first quantified PAK by immunoblotting in homogenates from the parietal neocortex of subjects with a clinical diagnosis of no cognitive impairment (n = 12), mild cognitive impairment (n = 12), or AD (n = 12). A loss of total PAK, detected in the cortex of AD patients (−39% versus controls), was correlated with cognitive impairment (r2 = 0.148, p = 0.027) and deposition of total and phosphorylated tau (r2 = 0.235 and r2 = 0.206, respectively), but not with Aβ42 (r2 = 0.056). Accordingly, we found a decrease of total PAK in the cortex of 12- and 20-month-old 3xTg-AD mice, an animal model of AD-like Aβ and tau neuropathologies. To determine whether PAK dysfunction aggravates AD phenotype, 3xTg-AD mice were crossed with dominant-negative PAK mice. PAK inactivation led to obliteration of social recognition in old 3xTg-AD mice, which was associated with a decrease in cortical drebrin (−25%), but without enhancement of Aβ/tau pathology or any clear electrophysiological signature. Overall, our data suggest that PAK decrease is a consequence of AD neuropathology and that therapeutic activation of PAK may exert symptomatic benefits on high brain function. PMID:23804095

  13. Study of amyloid-β peptide functional brain networks in AD, MCI and HC.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiehui; Duan, Huoqiang; Huang, Zheming; Yu, Zhihua

    2015-01-01

    One medical challenge in studying the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide mechanism for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is exploring the law of beta toxic oligomers' diffusion in human brains in vivo. One beneficial means of solving this problem is brain network analysis based on graph theory. In this study, the characteristics of Aβ functional brain networks of Healthy Control (HC), Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and AD groups were compared by applying graph theoretical analyses to Carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography (11C PiB-PET) data. 120 groups of PiB-PET images from the ADNI database were analyzed. The results showed that the small-world property of MCI and AD were lost as compared to HC. Furthermore, the local clustering of networks was higher in both MCI and AD as compared to HC, whereas the path length was similar among the three groups. The results also showed that there could be four potential Aβ toxic oligomer seeds: Frontal_Sup_Medial_L, Parietal_Inf_L, Frontal_Med_Orb_R, and Parietal_Inf_R. These four seeds are corresponding to Regions of Interests referred by physicians to clinically diagnose AD.

  14. Brain sterol dys-regulation in sporadic AD and MCI: Relationship to heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Hascalovici, Jacob R.; Vaya, Jacob; Khatib, Soliman; Holcroft, Christina A.; Zukor, Hillel; Song, Wei; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Bennett, David A.; Schipper, Hyman M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the impact of aging and Alzheimer disease (AD) on brain cholesterol (CH), CH precursors and oxysterol homeostasis. Altered CH metabolism and up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) are characteristic of AD-affected neural tissues. We recently determined that HO-1 over-expression suppresses total CH levels by augmenting liver X receptor-mediated CH efflux and enhances oxysterol formation in cultured astroglia. Lipids and proteins were extracted from post-mortem human frontal cortex derived from subjects with sporadic AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and no cognitive impairment (NCI; n=17 per group) enrolled in the Religious Orders Study, an ongoing clinical-pathologic study of aging and AD. ELISA was used to quantify human HO-1 protein expression from brain tissue and GC-MS to quantify total CH, CH precursors and relevant oxysterols. The relationships of sterol/oxysterol levels to HO-1 protein expression and clinical/demographic variables were determined by multivariable regression and non-parametric statistical analyses. Decreased CH, increased oxysterol and increased CH precursors concentrations in the cortex correlated significantly with HO-1 levels in MCI and AD, but not NCI. Specific oxysterols correlated with disease state, increasing neuropathological burden, neuropsychological impairment and age. A model featuring compensated and de-compensated states of altered sterol homeostasis in MCI and AD are presented based on the current data set and our earlier in vitro work. PMID:19522732

  15. Vascular risk and Aβ interact to reduce cortical thickness in AD vulnerable brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Bruce R.; Madison, Cindee M.; Wirth, Miranka; Marchant, Natalie L.; Kriger, Stephen; Mack, Wendy J.; Sanossian, Nerses; DeCarli, Charles; Chui, Helena C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Jagust, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to define whether vascular risk factors interact with β-amyloid (Aβ) in producing changes in brain structure that could underlie the increased risk of Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: Sixty-six cognitively normal and mildly impaired older individuals with a wide range of vascular risk factors were included in this study. The presence of Aβ was assessed using [11C]Pittsburgh compound B–PET imaging, and cortical thickness was measured using 3-tesla MRI. Vascular risk was measured with the Framingham Coronary Risk Profile Index. Results: Individuals with high levels of vascular risk factors have thinner frontotemporal cortex independent of Aβ. These frontotemporal regions are also affected in individuals with Aβ deposition, but the latter show additional thinning in parietal cortices. Aβ and vascular risk were found to interact in posterior (especially in parietal) brain regions, where Aβ has its greatest effect. In this way, the negative effect of Aβ in posterior regions is increased by the presence of vascular risk. Conclusion: Aβ and vascular risk interact to enhance cortical thinning in posterior brain regions that are particularly vulnerable to AD. These findings give insight concerning the mechanisms whereby vascular risk increases the likelihood of developing AD and supports the therapeutic intervention of controlling vascular risk for the prevention of AD. PMID:24907234

  16. Catecholamine-Based Treatment in AD Patients: Expectations and Delusions

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Alessandro; Olivola, Enrica; Liguori, Claudio; Hainsworth, Atticus H.; Saviozzi, Valentina; Angileri, Giacoma; D’Angelo, Vincenza; Galati, Salvatore; Pierantozzi, Mariangela

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the gap between excellence of diagnostics and efficacy of therapy is wide. Despite sophisticated imaging and biochemical markers, the efficacy of available therapeutic options is limited. Here we examine the possibility that assessment of endogenous catecholamine levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may fuel new therapeutic strategies. In reviewing the available literature, we consider the effects of levodopa, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and noradrenaline (NE) modulators, showing disparate results. We present a preliminary assessment of CSF concentrations of dopamine (DA) and NE, determined by HPLC, in a small dementia cohort of either Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or frontotemporal dementia patients, compared to control subjects. Our data reveal detectable levels of DA, NE in CSF, though we found no significant alterations in the dementia population as a whole. AD patients exhibit a small impairment of the DA axis and a larger increase of NE concentration, likely to represent a compensatory mechanism. While waiting for preventive strategies, a pragmatic approach to AD may re-evaluate catecholamine modulation, possibly stratified to dementia subtypes, as part of the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:25999852

  17. Alterations of brain activity in fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Sawaddiruk, Passakorn; Paiboonworachat, Sahattaya; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2017-04-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome, characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain with diffuse tenderness at multiple tender points. Despite intense investigations, the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia remains elusive. Evidence shows that it could be due to changes in either the peripheral or central nervous system (CNS). For the CNS changes, alterations in the high brain area of fibromyalgia patients have been investigated but the definite mechanisms are still unclear. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI) have been used to gather evidence regarding the changes of brain morphologies and activities in fibromyalgia patients. Nevertheless, due to few studies, limited knowledge for alterations in brain activities in fibromyalgia is currently available. In this review, the changes in brain activity in various brain areas obtained from reports in fibromyalgia patients are comprehensively summarized. Changes of the grey matter in multiple regions such as the superior temporal gyrus, posterior thalamus, amygdala, basal ganglia, cerebellum, cingulate cortex, SII, caudate and putamen from the MRI as well as the increase of brain activities in the cerebellum, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, thalamus, somatosensory cortex, insula in fMRI studies are presented and discussed. Moreover, evidence from pharmacological interventions offering benefits for fibromyalgia patients by reducing brain activity is presented. Because of limited knowledge regarding the roles of brain activity alterations in fibromyalgia, this summarized review will encourage more future studies to elucidate the underlying mechanisms involved in the brains of these patients.

  18. Neurophysiological predictors of long term response to AChE inhibitors in AD patients

    PubMed Central

    Di, L; Oliviero, A; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Marra, C; Ghirlanda, S; Ranieri, F; Gainotti, G; Tonali, P

    2005-01-01

    Background: In vivo evaluation of cholinergic circuits of the human brain has recently been introduced using a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol based on coupling peripheral nerve stimulation with motor cortex TMS (short latency afferent inhibition, SAI). SAI is reduced in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and drugs enhancing cholinergic transmission increase SAI. Methods: We evaluated whether SAI testing, together with SAI test-retest, after a single dose of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor rivastigmine, might be useful in predicting the response after 1 year treatment with rivastigmine in 16 AD patients. Results: Fourteen AD patients had pathologically reduced SAI. SAI was increased after administration of a single oral dose of rivastigmine in AD patients with abnormal baseline SAI, but individual responses to rivastigmine varied widely, with SAI change ranging from an increase in inhibition of ∼50% of test size to no change. Baseline SAI and the increase in SAI after a single dose of rivastigmine were correlated with response to long term treatment. A normal SAI in baseline conditions, or an abnormal SAI in baseline conditions that was not greatly increased by a single oral dose of rivastigmine, were invariably associated with poor response to long term treatment, while an abnormal SAI in baseline conditions in conjunction with a large increase in SAI after a single dose of rivastigmine was associated with good response to long term treatment in most of the patients. Conclusions: Evaluation of SAI may be useful for identifying AD patients likely to respond to treatment with AChE inhibitors. PMID:16024879

  19. Anesthesia for Patients with Traumatic Brain Injuries.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Bishwajit; Maung, Adrian A

    2016-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a wide spectrum of disease and disease severity. Because the primary brain injury occurs before the patient enters the health care system, medical interventions seek principally to prevent secondary injury. Anesthesia teams that provide care for patients with TBI both in and out of the operating room should be aware of the specific therapies and needs of this unique and complex patient population.

  20. Brain changes in Alzheimer's disease patients with implanted encapsulated cells releasing nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniel; Westman, Eric; Eyjolfsdottir, Helga; Almqvist, Per; Lind, Göran; Linderoth, Bengt; Seiger, Ake; Blennow, Kaj; Karami, Azadeh; Darreh-Shori, Taher; Wiberg, Maria; Simmons, Andrew; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Wahlberg, Lars; Eriksdotter, Maria

    2015-01-01

    New therapies with disease-modifying effects are urgently needed for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nerve growth factor (NGF) protein has demonstrated regenerative and neuroprotective effects on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in animal studies. In addition, AD patients treated with NGF have previously shown improved cognition, EEG activity, nicotinic binding, and glucose metabolism. However, no study to date has analyzed brain atrophy in patients treated with NGF producing cells. In this study we present MRI results of the first clinical trial in patients with AD using encapsulated NGF biodelivery to the basal forebrain. Six AD patients received the treatment during twelve months. Patients were grouped as responders and non-responders according to their twelve-months change in MMSE. Normative values were created from 131 AD patients from ADNI, selecting 36 age- and MMSE-matched patients for interpreting the longitudinal changes in MMSE and brain atrophy. Results at baseline indicated that responders showed better clinical status and less pathological levels of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ1-42. However, they showed more brain atrophy, and neuronal degeneration as evidenced by higher CSF levels of T-tau and neurofilaments. At follow-up, responders showed less brain shrinkage and better progression in the clinical variables and CSF biomarkers. Noteworthy, two responders showed less brain shrinkage than the normative ADNI group. These results together with previous evidence supports the idea that encapsulated biodelivery of NGF might have the potential to become a new treatment strategy for AD with both symptomatic and disease-modifying effects.

  1. Adding chemo after radiation treatment improves survival for adults with a type of brain tumor

    Cancer.gov

    Adults with low-grade gliomas, a form of brain tumor, who received chemotherapy following completion of radiation therapy lived longer than patients who received radiation therapy alone, according to long-term follow-up results from a NIH-supported random

  2. Classification of patients with MCI and AD from healthy controls using directed graph measures of resting-state fMRI.

    PubMed

    Khazaee, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Ata; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas

    2017-03-30

    Brain network alterations in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been the subject of much investigation, but the biological mechanisms underlying these alterations remain poorly understood. Here, we aim to identify the changes in brain networks in patients with AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and provide an accurate algorithm for classification of these patients from healthy control subjects (HC) by using a graph theoretical approach and advanced machine learning methods. Multivariate Granger causality analysis was performed on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data of 34 AD, 89 MCI, and 45 HC to calculate various directed graph measures. The graph measures were used as the original feature set for the machine learning algorithm. Filter and wrapper feature selection methods were applied to the original feature set to select an optimal subset of features. An accuracy of 93.3% was achieved for classification of AD, MCI, and HC using the optimal features and the naïve Bayes classifier. We also performed a hub node analysis and found that the number of hubs in HC, MCI, and AD were 12, 10, and 9, respectively, suggesting that patients with AD experience disturbance of critical communication areas in their brain network as AD progresses. The findings of this study provide insight into the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying MCI and AD. The proposed classification method highlights the potential of directed graph measures of rs-fMRI data for identification of the early stage of AD.

  3. Inhibitory effect of added adenosine diphosphate on palmitate oxidation in mitochondria from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, N.

    1986-05-01

    It is generally accepted that fatty acids are poor substrates for the oxidation in brain because plasma fatty acids do not traverse the blood-brain barrier. However, a regional difference in the barrier suggests that fatty acids are available for oxidation. Why most of fatty acids are not oxidized is not certain. For this reason, regulation of oxidation of (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate (pal) in rat brain has been studied in nonsynaptic mitochondria (mit) prepared by use of Ficoll/sucrose density gradient. The authors found two contrasting oxidations with respect to ATP concentration; Type A at 2 mM and Type B at 0.5 mM. The rate of Type A was 50% of the level of B. Type A was inhibited by high levels of L-carnitine (car) and Mg/sup 2 +/. Added ADP inhibited Type A, but stimulated B. Addition of carboxyatractyloside was stimulatory for Type A, but inhibitory for B. The rate of Type A showed a downward curvature with increasing protein concentration while that of B showed a linear relationship. Addition of NH/sub 4//sup +/ to Type A stimulated the rate and reduced the inhibitory effects of both added ADP and high levels of car. These results suggest that under the normal level of ATP, the carnitine-dependent transport of pal is inhibited (thereby resulting in the inhibition in pal oxidation) by the transport of ADP into mit mediated by the ATP-ADP translocase, but that the inhibition is not observed under the specified conditions or regions where ATP levels are low or ammonia levels are high.

  4. Integration and relative value of biomarkers for prediction of MCI to AD progression: spatial patterns of brain atrophy, cognitive scores, APOE genotype and CSF biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Da, Xiao; Toledo, Jon B; Zee, Jarcy; Wolk, David A; Xie, Sharon X; Ou, Yangming; Shacklett, Amanda; Parmpi, Paraskevi; Shaw, Leslie; Trojanowski, John Q; Davatzikos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the individual, as well as relative and joint value of indices obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns of brain atrophy (quantified by the SPARE-AD index), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, APOE genotype, and cognitive performance (ADAS-Cog) in progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD) within a variable follow-up period up to 6 years, using data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1). SPARE-AD was first established as a highly sensitive and specific MRI-marker of AD vs. cognitively normal (CN) subjects (AUC = 0.98). Baseline predictive values of all aforementioned indices were then compared using survival analysis on 381 MCI subjects. SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog were found to have similar predictive value, and their combination was significantly better than their individual performance. APOE genotype did not significantly improve prediction, although the combination of SPARE-AD, ADAS-Cog and APOE ε4 provided the highest hazard ratio estimates of 17.8 (last vs. first quartile). In a subset of 192 MCI patients who also had CSF biomarkers, the addition of Aβ1-42, t-tau, and p-tau181p to the previous model did not improve predictive value significantly over SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog combined. Importantly, in amyloid-negative patients with MCI, SPARE-AD had high predictive power of clinical progression. Our findings suggest that SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog in combination offer the highest predictive power of conversion from MCI to AD, which is improved, albeit not significantly, by APOE genotype. The finding that SPARE-AD in amyloid-negative MCI patients was predictive of clinical progression is not expected under the amyloid hypothesis and merits further investigation.

  5. Bosentan added to sildenafil therapy in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Vallerie; Channick, Richard N; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Lemarié, Jean-Christophe; Naeije, Robert; Packer, Milton; Souza, Rogério; Tapson, Victor F; Tolson, Jonathan; Al Hiti, Hikmet; Meyer, Gisela; Hoeper, Marius M

    2015-08-01

    The safety and efficacy of adding bosentan to sildenafil in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients was investigated.In this prospective, double-blind, event-driven trial, symptomatic PAH patients receiving stable sildenafil (≥20 mg three times daily) for ≥3 months were randomised (1:1) to placebo or bosentan (125 mg twice daily). The composite primary end-point was the time to the first morbidity/mortality event, defined as all-cause death, hospitalisation for PAH worsening or intravenous prostanoid initiation, atrial septostomy, lung transplant, or PAH worsening. Secondary/exploratory end-points included change in 6-min walk distance and World Health Organization functional class at 16 weeks, change in N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) over time, and all-cause death.Overall, 334 PAH patients were randomised to placebo (n=175) or bosentan (n=159). A primary end-point event occurred in 51.4% of patients randomised to placebo and 42.8% to bosentan (hazard ratio 0.83, 97.31% CI 0.58-1.19; p=0.2508). The mean between-treatment difference in 6-min walk distance at 16 weeks was +21.8 m (95% CI +5.9-37.8 m; p=0.0106). Except for NT-proBNP, no difference was observed for any other end-point. The safety profile of bosentan added to sildenafil was consistent with the known bosentan safety profile.In COMPASS-2, adding bosentan to stable sildenafil therapy was not superior to sildenafil monotherapy in delaying the time to the first morbidity/mortality event.

  6. Elevation of brain glucose and polyol-pathway intermediates with accompanying brain-copper deficiency in patients with Alzheimer’s disease: metabolic basis for dementia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingshu; Begley, Paul; Church, Stephanie J.; Patassini, Stefano; McHarg, Selina; Kureishy, Nina; Hollywood, Katherine A.; Waldvogel, Henry J.; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Shaoping; Lin, Wanchang; Herholz, Karl; Turner, Clinton; Synek, Beth J.; Curtis, Maurice A.; Rivers-Auty, Jack; Lawrence, Catherine B.; Kellett, Katherine A. B.; Hooper, Nigel M.; Vardy, Emma R. L. C.; Wu, Donghai; Unwin, Richard D.; Faull, Richard L. M.; Dowsey, Andrew W.; Cooper, Garth J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of brain-glucose uptake and brain-copper regulation occurs in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we sought to further elucidate the processes that cause neurodegeneration in AD by measuring levels of metabolites and metals in brain regions that undergo different degrees of damage. We employed mass spectrometry (MS) to measure metabolites and metals in seven post-mortem brain regions of nine AD patients and nine controls, and plasma-glucose and plasma-copper levels in an ante-mortem case-control study. Glucose, sorbitol and fructose were markedly elevated in all AD brain regions, whereas copper was correspondingly deficient throughout (all P < 0.0001). In the ante-mortem case-control study, by contrast, plasma-glucose and plasma-copper levels did not differ between patients and controls. There were pervasive defects in regulation of glucose and copper in AD brain but no evidence for corresponding systemic abnormalities in plasma. Elevation of brain glucose and deficient brain copper potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration in AD. PMID:27276998

  7. [Reflexes in brain-dead patients].

    PubMed

    Ulvik, A; Salvesen, R; Nielsen, E W

    1998-05-20

    We report on a patient who suffered an acute, extensive intracerebral haemorrhage, leading to symptoms of cerebral herniation within a few hours. The clinical diagnosis of brain death was made based on a neurological examination, and an apnoea test eight hours after the haemorrhage. A few hours later the diagnosis was changed, as several reflexes reappeared. After six days mechanical ventilation was withdrawn, as the brain damage was considered so serious as to render further therapy futile. It was considered unethical to sustain therapy for a possible organ donation at a later date. A review of relevant the literature, however, shows that brain-dead patients may exhibit such varying degrees of autonomic and spinal reflexes as to cause confusion, thus delaying the physician in making a diagnosis. Often, an opportunity for organ donation is lost. Based on this review, we believe that our patient was indeed brain dead when the first diagnosis was made, and that a cerebral angiography should have been performed. Because organ donation is an important issue, the diagnosis of brain death must be definitive.

  8. Distribution of lead in the brain tissues from DNTC patients using synchrotron radiation microbeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide-Ektessabi, Ari; Ota, Yukihide; Ishihara, Ryoko; Mizuno, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Tohru

    2005-12-01

    Diffuse neurofibrillary tangles with calcification (DNTC) is a form of dementia with certain characteristics. Its pathology is characterized by cerebrum atrophy, calcification on globus pallidus and dentate nucleus and diffuse neurofibrillary tangles without senile plaques. In the present study brain tissues were prepared from patients with patients DNTC, calcified and non-calcified Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The brain tissues were examined non-destructively by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation (SR) microbeams for trace metallic elements Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb. The XRF analysis showed that there were Pb concentrations in the calcified areas in the brain tissues with both DNTC and AD but there was none in those with non-calcified AD.

  9. Toward a brain-computer interface for Alzheimer's disease patients by combining classical conditioning and brain state classification.

    PubMed

    Liberati, Giulia; Dalboni da Rocha, Josué Luiz; van der Heiden, Linda; Raffone, Antonino; Birbaumer, Niels; Olivetti Belardinelli, Marta; Sitaram, Ranganatha

    2012-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) provide alternative methods for communicating and acting on the world, since messages or commands are conveyed from the brain to an external device without using the normal output pathways of peripheral nerves and muscles. Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients in the most advanced stages, who have lost the ability to communicate verbally, could benefit from a BCI that may allow them to convey basic thoughts (e.g., "yes" and "no") and emotions. There is currently no report of such research, mostly because the cognitive deficits in AD patients pose serious limitations to the use of traditional BCIs, which are normally based on instrumental learning and require users to self-regulate their brain activation. Recent studies suggest that not only self-regulated brain signals, but also involuntary signals, for instance related to emotional states, may provide useful information about the user, opening up the path for so-called "affective BCIs". These interfaces do not necessarily require users to actively perform a cognitive task, and may therefore be used with patients who are cognitively challenged. In the present hypothesis paper, we propose a paradigm shift from instrumental learning to classical conditioning, with the aim of discriminating "yes" and "no" thoughts after associating them to positive and negative emotional stimuli respectively. This would represent a first step in the development of a BCI that could be used by AD patients, lending a new direction not only for communication, but also for rehabilitation and diagnosis.

  10. Brain Morphometry using MRI in Schizophrenia Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abanshina, I.; Pirogov, Yu.; Kupriyanov, D.; Orlova, V.

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been the focus of intense neuroimaging research. Although its fundamental pathobiology remains elusive, neuroimaging studies provide evidence of abnormalities of cerebral structure and function in patients with schizophrenia. We used morphometry as a quantitative method for estimation of volume of brain structures. Seventy eight right-handed subjects aged 18-45 years were exposed to MRI-examination. Patients were divided into 3 groups: patients with schizophrenia, their relatives and healthy controls. The volumes of interested structures (caudate nucleus, putamen, ventricles, frontal and temporal lobe) were measured using T2-weighted MR-images. Correlations between structural differences and functional deficit were evaluated.

  11. Pre-treatment of rats with ad-hepcidin prevents iron-induced oxidative stress in the brain.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jing; Du, Fang; Qian, Zhong Ming; Luo, Qian Qian; Sheng, Yuan; Yung, Wing-Ho; Xu, Yan Xin; Ke, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Our recent investigation showed that hepcidin can reduce iron in the brain of iron-overloaded rat by down-regulating iron-transport proteins. It has also been demonstrated that iron is a major generator of reactive oxygen species. We therefore hypothesized that hepcidin could prevent iron accumulation and thus reduce iron-mediated oxidative stress in iron-overloaded rats. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of pre-treatment of rats with recombinant-hepcidin-adenovirus (ad-hepcidin) on the contents of iron, dichlorofluorescein and 8-isoprostane in the brain. Hepcidin expression was detected by real-time PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Iron contents were measured using Perl's staining as well as graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Dichlorofluorescein and 8-isoprostane were determined using a fluorescence spectrophotometer and an ELISA kit, respectively. We found that hepcidin contents in the cortex, hippocampus, striatum and substantia nigra of rats treated with ad-hepcidin are 3.50, 2.98, 2.93 and 4.07 fold of those of the control rats respectively. Also, we demonstrated that the increased iron as well as dichlorofluorescein and 8-isoprostane levels in all four brain regions, induced by injection of iron dextran, could be effectively prevented by pre-treatment of the rats with ad-hepcidin. We concluded that pre-treatment with ad-hepcidin could increase hepcidin expression and prevent the increase in iron and reduce reactive oxygen species in the brain of iron-overloaded rats.

  12. Alteration of mTOR signaling occurs early in the progression of Alzheimer disease (AD): analysis of brain from subjects with pre-clinical AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment and late-stage AD.

    PubMed

    Tramutola, Antonella; Triplett, Judy C; Di Domenico, Fabio; Niedowicz, Dana M; Murphy, Michael P; Coccia, Raffaella; Perluigi, Marzia; Butterfield, D Allan

    2015-06-01

    The clinical symptoms of Alzheimer disease (AD) include a gradual memory loss and subsequent dementia, and neuropathological deposition of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. At the molecular level, AD subjects present overt amyloid β (Aβ) production and tau hyperphosphorylation. Aβ species have been proposed to overactivate the phosphoinositide3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) axis, which plays a central role in proteostasis. The current study investigated the status of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in post-mortem tissue from the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) at three different stages of AD: late AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and pre-clinical AD (PCAD). Our findings suggest that the alteration of mTOR signaling and autophagy occurs at early stages of AD. We found a significant increase in Aβ (1-42) levels, associated with reduction in autophagy (Beclin-1 and LC-3) observed in PCAD, MCI, and AD subjects. Related to the autophagy impairment, we found a hyperactivation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in IPL of MCI and AD subjects, but not in PCAD, along with a significant decrease in phosphatase and tensin homolog. An increase in two mTOR downstream targets, p70S6K and 4EBP1, occurred in AD and MCI subjects. Both AD and MCI subjects showed increased, insulin receptor substrate 1, a candidate biomarker of brain insulin resistance, and GSK-3β, a kinase targeting tau phosphorylation. Nevertheless, tau phosphorylation was increased in the clinical groups. The results hint at a link between Aβ and the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis and provide further insights into the relationship between AD pathology and insulin resistance. In addition, we speculate that the alteration of mTOR signaling in the IPL of AD and MCI subjects, but not in PCAD, is due to the lack of substantial increase in oxidative stress. The figure represents the three different stages of Alzheimer Disease: Preclinical Alzheimer Disease (PCAD), Mild cognitive impairment (MCI

  13. Rosuvastatin reduces microglia in the brain of wild type and ApoE knockout mice on a high cholesterol diet; implications for prevention of stroke and AD.

    PubMed

    Famer, D; Wahlund, L-O; Crisby, M

    2010-11-12

    We have previously shown that a high cholesterol (HC) diet results in increases in microglia load and levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the brains of wild type (WT) and apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. In the present investigation, we analyzed whether treatment with rosuvastatin, an inhibitor of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, would prevent the increases in inflammatory microglia and IL-6 levels in the brain and plasma of WT and ApoE-/- mice. We report that a HC diet resulted in an increased microglia load in the brains of WT and ApoE-/- mice, in support of our previous study. Treatment with rosuvastatin significantly decreased the microglia load in the brains of WT and ApoE-/- mice on a HC diet. Rosuvastatin treatment resulted in lowered plasma IL-6 levels in WT mice on a HC diet. However, in the present study the number of IL-6 positive cells in the brain was not significantly affected by a HC diet. A recent clinical study has shown that rosuvastatin reduces risk of ischemic stroke in patients with high plasma levels of the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein by 50%. The results from our study show that rosuvastatin reduces inflammatory cells in the brain. This finding is essential for furthering the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and stroke.

  14. Using Individualized Brain Network for Analyzing Structural Covariance of the Cerebral Cortex in Alzheimer's Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jong; Shin, Jeong-Hyeon; Han, Cheol E; Kim, Hee Jin; Na, Duk L; Seo, Sang Won; Seong, Joon-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Cortical thinning patterns in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been widely reported through conventional regional analysis. In addition, the coordinated variance of cortical thickness in different brain regions has been investigated both at the individual and group network levels. In this study, we aim to investigate network architectural characteristics of a structural covariance network (SCN) in AD, and further to show that the structural covariance connectivity becomes disorganized across the brain regions in AD, while the normal control (NC) subjects maintain more clustered and consistent coordination in cortical atrophy variations. We generated SCNs directly from T1-weighted MR images of individual patients using surface-based cortical thickness data, with structural connectivity defined as similarity in cortical thickness within different brain regions. Individual SCNs were constructed using morphometric data from the Samsung Medical Center (SMC) dataset. The structural covariance connectivity showed higher clustering than randomly generated networks, as well as similar minimum path lengths, indicating that the SCNs are "small world." There were significant difference between NC and AD group in characteristic path lengths (z = -2.97, p < 0.01) and small-worldness values (z = 4.05, p < 0.01). Clustering coefficients in AD was smaller than that of NC but there was no significant difference (z = 1.81, not significant). We further observed that the AD patients had significantly disrupted structural connectivity. We also show that the coordinated variance of cortical thickness is distributed more randomly from one region to other regions in AD patients when compared to NC subjects. Our proposed SCN may provide surface-based measures for understanding interaction between two brain regions with co-atrophy of the cerebral cortex due to normal aging or AD. We applied our method to the AD Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) data to show consistency in results with the SMC

  15. Brain Monitoring in Critically Neurologically Impaired Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Salazar; Schwartzbauer, Gary; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of neurologic injury and the evolution of severe neurologic injury is limited in comatose or critically ill patients that lack a reliable neurologic examination. For common yet severe pathologies such as the comatose state after cardiac arrest, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), critical medical decisions are made on the basis of the neurologic injury. Decisions regarding active intensive care management, need for neurosurgical intervention, and withdrawal of care, depend on a reliable, high-quality assessment of the true state of neurologic injury, and have traditionally relied on limited assessments such as intracranial pressure monitoring and electroencephalogram. However, even within TBI there exists a spectrum of disease that is likely not captured by such limited monitoring and thus a more directed effort towards obtaining a more robust biophysical signature of the individual patient must be undertaken. In this review, multimodal monitoring including the most promising serum markers of neuronal injury, cerebral microdialysis, brain tissue oxygenation, and pressure reactivity index to access brain microenvironment will be discussed with their utility among specific pathologies that may help determine a more complete picture of the neurologic injury state for active intensive care management and long-term outcomes. Goal-directed therapy guided by a multi-modality approach appears to be superior to standard intracranial pressure (ICP) guided therapy and should be explored further across multiple pathologies. Future directions including the application of optogenetics to evaluate brain injury and recovery and even as an adjunct monitoring modality will also be discussed. PMID:28035993

  16. Dysfunctional whole brain networks in mild cognitive impairment patients: an fMRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenyu; Bai, Lijun; Dai, Ruwei; Zhong, Chongguang; Xue, Ting; You, Youbo; Tian, Jie

    2012-03-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) was recognized as the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent researches have shown that cognitive and memory decline in AD patients is coupled with losses of small-world attributes. However, few studies pay attention to the characteristics of the whole brain networks in MCI patients. In the present study, we investigated the topological properties of the whole brain networks utilizing graph theoretical approaches in 16 MCI patients, compared with 18 age-matched healthy subjects as a control. Both MCI patients and normal controls showed small-world architectures, with large clustering coefficients and short characteristic path lengths. We detected significantly longer characteristic path length in MCI patients compared with normal controls at the low sparsity. The longer characteristic path lengths in MCI indicated disrupted information processing among distant brain regions. Compared with normal controls, MCI patients showed decreased nodal centrality in the brain areas of the angular gyrus, heschl gyrus, hippocampus and superior parietal gyrus, while increased nodal centrality in the calcarine, inferior occipital gyrus and superior frontal gyrus. These changes in nodal centrality suggested a widespread rewiring in MCI patients, which may be an integrated reflection of reorganization of the brain networks accompanied with the cognitive decline. Our findings may be helpful for further understanding the pathological mechanisms of MCI.

  17. Fungal Enolase, β-Tubulin, and Chitin Are Detected in Brain Tissue from Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Pisa, Diana; Alonso, Ruth; Rábano, Alberto; Horst, Michael N; Carrasco, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings provide evidence that fungal structures can be detected in brain tissue from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients using rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against whole fungal cells. In the present work, we have developed and tested specific antibodies that recognize the fungal proteins, enolase and β-tubulin, and an antibody that recognizes the fungal polysaccharide chitin. Consistent with our previous studies, a number of rounded yeast-like and hyphal structures were detected using these antibodies in brain sections from AD patients. Some of these structures were intracellular and, strikingly, some were found to be located inside nuclei from neurons, whereas other fungal structures were detected extracellularly. Corporya amylacea from AD patients also contained enolase and β-tubulin as revealed by these selective antibodies, but were devoid of fungal chitin. Importantly, brain sections from control subjects were usually negative for staining with the three antibodies. However, a few fungal structures can be observed in some control individuals. Collectively, these findings indicate the presence of two fungal proteins, enolase and β-tubulin, and the polysaccharide chitin, in CNS tissue from AD patients. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis that AD is caused by disseminated fungal infection.

  18. Downregulation of the transcription factor scleraxis in brain of patients with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yeghiazaryan, K; Turhani-Schatzmann, D; Labudova, O; Schuller, E; Olson, E N; Cairns, N; Lubec, G

    1999-01-01

    Performing gene hunting in fetal Down Syndrome (DS) brain, we found a downregulated sequence with 100% homology to the basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor (TF) scleraxis (Scl). It was the aim of the study to evaluate Scl-mRNA steady state levels in adult DS brain with Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathological changes, brain of patients with AD, and controls in order to find out whether Scl-downregulation is linked to DS per se or simply to neurodegeneration, common to both disorders. Determination of Scl-mRNA steady state levels was carried out by a blotting method in frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital lobe and cerebellum. We found significantly decreased Scl-transcripts in brain of DS and AD, both, when normalized versus the house-keeping gene beta actin or total RNA. We demonstrate the significant decrease of Scl-mRNA steady state levels in the pathogenesis of DS and AD suggesting a tentative role for this transcription factor in the development of the neurodegenerative processes known to occur in both disorders. More specifically, the biological meaning of the downregulation of Scl may be the involvement in the pathogenesis of impaired neuronal plasticity and wiring observed in DS and AD, phenomena regulated by the concerted action of the many transcription factors expressed in human brain.

  19. Direct visualization of fungal infection in brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pisa, Diana; Alonso, Ruth; Juarranz, Angeles; Rábano, Alberto; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have reported the presence of fungal infections in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accordingly, fungal proteins and DNA were found in brain samples, demonstrating the existence of infection in the central nervous system. In the present work, we raised antibodies to specific fungal species and performed immunohistochemistry to directly visualize fungal components inside neurons from AD patients. Mice infected with Candida glabrata were initially used to assess whether yeast can be internalized in mammalian tissues. Using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against C. glabrata, rounded immunopositive cells could be detected in the cytoplasm of cells from liver, spleen, and brain samples in infected, but not uninfected, mice. Immunohistochemical analyses of tissue from the frontal cortex of AD patients revealed the presence of fungal material in a small percentage (~10%) of cells, suggesting the presence of infection. Importantly, this immunopositive material was absent in control samples. Confocal microscopy indicated that this fungal material had an intracellular localization. The specific morphology of this material varied between patients; in some instances, disseminated material was localized to the cytoplasm, whereas small punctate bodies were detected in other patients. Interestingly, fungal material could be revealed using different anti-fungal antibodies, suggesting multiple infections. In summary, fungal infection can only be observed using specific anti-fungal antibodies and only a small percentage of cells contain fungi. Our findings provide an explanation for the hitherto elusive detection of fungi in AD brains, and are consistent with the idea that fungal cells are internalized inside neurons.

  20. The Daily Life of Complicated Grief Patients--What Gets Missed, What Gets Added?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, Timothy H.; Houck, Patricia R.; Shear, M. Katherine

    2006-01-01

    Many patients with complicated grief suffer severe symptoms for several years after the loss, interfering with daily life. We sought to determine which elements of a patient's daily routine were likely to be missed or added. Sixty-four patients completed a diary each evening for 2 weeks. The diary asked whether each of 13 daily life activities…

  1. Aromatase Expression in the Hippocampus of AD Patients and 5xFAD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Prange-Kiel, Janine; Dudzinski, Danuta A.; Pröls, Felicitas; Glatzel, Markus; Matschke, Jakob; Rune, Gabriele M.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies show that 17β-estradiol (E2) protects against Alzheimer's disease (AD) induced neurodegeneration. The E2-synthesizing enzyme aromatase is expressed in healthy hippocampi, but although the hippocampus is severely affected in AD, little is known about the expression of hippocampal aromatase in AD. To better understand the role of hippocampal aromatase in AD, we studied its expression in postmortem material from patients with AD and in a mouse model for AD (5xFAD mice). In human hippocampi, aromatase-immunoreactivity was observed in the vast majority of principal neurons and signal quantification revealed higher expression of aromatase protein in AD patients compared to age- and sex-matched controls. The tissue-specific first exons of aromatase I.f, PII, I.3, and I.6 were detected in hippocampi of controls and AD patients by RT-PCR. In contrast, 3-month-old, female 5xFAD mice showed lower expression of aromatase mRNA and protein (measured by qRT-PCR and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry) than WT controls; no such differences were observed in male mice. Our findings stress the importance of hippocampal aromatase expression in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27298742

  2. Dynamical nonstationarity of resting EEGs in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD).

    PubMed

    Latchoumane, Charles-Francois V; Kim, In-Hye; Sohn, Hansem; Jeong, Jaeseung

    2013-01-01

    This study applied dynamical nonstationarity analysis (DNA) to the resting EEGs of patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD). We aimed to assess and characterize AD/HD using features based on the local and global duration of dynamical microstate. We hypothesized that AD/HD patients would have difficulties in maintaining stable cognitive states (e.g., attention deficit and impulsivity) and that they would thus exhibit EEGs with temporal dynamics distinct from normal controls, i.e., rapidly and frequently changing dynamics. To test this hypothesis, we recorded EEGs from 12 adolescent subjects with AD/HD and 11 age-matched healthy subjects in the resting state with eyes closed and eyes open. We found that AD/HD patients exhibited significantly faster changes in dynamics than controls in the right temporal region during the eyes closed condition, but slower changes in dynamics in the frontal region during the eyes open condition. AD/HD patients exhibited a disruption in the rate of change of dynamics in the frontotemporal region at rest, probably due to executive and attention processes. We suggest that the DNA using complementary local and global features based on the duration of dynamical microstates could be a useful tool for the clinical diagnosis of subjects with AD/HD.

  3. Intranasal insulin restores insulin signaling, increases synaptic proteins, and reduces Aβ level and microglia activation in the brains of 3xTg-AD mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanxing; Zhao, Yang; Dai, Chun-Ling; Liang, Zhihou; Run, Xiaoqin; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2014-11-01

    Decreased brain insulin signaling has been found recently in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Intranasal administration of insulin, which delivers the drug directly into the brain, improves memory and cognition in both animal studies and small clinical trials. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we treated 9-month-old 3xTg-AD mice, a commonly used mouse model of AD, with daily intranasal administration of insulin for seven days and then studied brain abnormalities of the mice biochemically and immunohistochemically. We found that intranasal insulin restored insulin signaling, increased the levels of synaptic proteins, and reduced Aβ40 level and microglia activation in the brains of 3xTg-AD mice. However, this treatment did not affect the levels of glucose transporters and O-GlcNAcylation or tau phosphorylation. Our findings provide a mechanistic insight into the beneficial effects of intranasal insulin treatment and support continuous clinical trials of intranasal insulin for the treatment of AD.

  4. [Tracheotomy in brain injured patients: which patients? Why? When? How?].

    PubMed

    Richard, I; Hamon, M-A; Ferrapie, A-L; Rome, J; Brunel, P; Mathé, J-F

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study is to determine, from the data available in the literature, the indications of tracheostomy in brain injured patients, the incidence and risk factors for complications and the follow-up required until decannulation. The incidence of tracheostomy is 10% in TBI and 50 to 70% in subpopulations with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) below 9. Early complications are not specific. The most frequent late complication is laryngotracheal stenosis, which occurs in 15% and is more frequently observed in the most severe patients with major hypertonia. It is likely that tracheostomy, if needed, should be performed early and the prognosis as to whether it will be required, can be made at the end of the first week. The follow-up of these patients includes surveillance of multiresistant colonisations and systematic performance of fibroscopy before decannulation. Cuffless, small diameters, soft tracheostomy tubes, are preferred on the long-term unless the risk of aspiration remains high.

  5. Mapping Functional Connectivity in Patients with Brain Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Guggisberg, Adrian G.; Honma, Susanne M.; Findlay, Anne M.; Dalal, Sarang S.; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although electrophysiological measures of functional connectivity between brain areas are widely used, the spatial distribution of functional interactions as well as the disturbance introduced by focal brain lesions remains poorly understood. Based on the rationale that damaged brain tissue can be expected to be disconnected from the physiological interactions among healthy areas, this study aimed to map the functionality of brain areas according to their connectivity with other areas. METHODS Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings of spontaneous cortical activity during resting state were obtained from 15 consecutive patients with focal brain lesions and from 14 healthy controls. Neural activity at each volume element (voxel) in the brain was estimated using an adaptive spatial filtering technique. For each brain voxel, the mean imaginary coherence of all its connections with other brain voxels was then caluculated as an index of functional connectivity, and the results compared across brain regions and between subjects. RESULTS The magnitude of the mean imaginary coherence of all voxels and subjects was greatest in the alpha frequency range corresponding to the human cortical idling rhythm. In healthy subjects, functionally critical brain areas such as the somatosensory and language cortices had the highest alpha coherence. When compared to healthy controls, all lesion patients had diffuse or scattered brain areas with decreased coherence. Patients with lesion-induced neurological deficits displayed decreased connectivity estimates in the corresponding brain area compared to intact contralateral regions. In tumor patients without preoperative neurological deficits, brain areas showing decreased coherence could be surgically resected without the occurrence of post-surgical deficits. CONCLUSION Resting state coherence measured with MEG is capable of mapping the functional connectivity of the brain, and can therefore offer valuable information for use in

  6. Ad cerebrum per scientia: Ira Hirsh, psychoacoustics, and new approaches to understanding the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauter, Judith

    2002-05-01

    As Research Director of CID, Ira emphasized the importance of combining information from biology with rigorous studies of behavior, such as psychophysics, to better understand how the brain and body accomplish the goals of everyday life. In line with this philosophy, my doctoral dissertation sought to explain brain functional asymmetries (studied with dichotic listening) in terms of the physical dimensions of a library of test sounds designed to represent a speech-music continuum. Results highlighted individual differences plus similarities in terms of patterns of relative ear advantages, suggesting an organizational basis for brain asymmetries depending on physical dimensions of stimulus and gesture with analogs in auditory, visual, somatosensory, and motor systems. My subsequent work has employed a number of noninvasive methods (OAEs, EPs, qEEG, PET, MRI) to explore the neurobiological bases of individual differences in general and functional asymmetries in particular. This research has led to (1) the AXS test battery for assessing the neurobiology of human sensory-motor function; (2) the handshaking model of brain function, describing dynamic relations along all three body/brain axes; (3) the four-domain EPIC model of functional asymmetries; and (4) the trimodal brain, a new model of individual differences based on psychoimmunoneuroendocrinology.

  7. Whole genome association study of brain-wide imaging phenotypes for identifying quantitative trait loci in MCI and AD: A study of the ADNI cohort.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Kim, Sungeun; Risacher, Shannon L; Nho, Kwangsik; Swaminathan, Shanker; West, John D; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Moore, Jason H; Sloan, Chantel D; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Dechairo, Bryan M; Potkin, Steven G; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Saykin, Andrew J

    2010-11-15

    A genome-wide, whole brain approach to investigate genetic effects on neuroimaging phenotypes for identifying quantitative trait loci is described. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 1.5 T MRI and genetic dataset was investigated using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and FreeSurfer parcellation followed by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). One hundred forty-two measures of grey matter (GM) density, volume, and cortical thickness were extracted from baseline scans. GWAS, using PLINK, were performed on each phenotype using quality-controlled genotype and scan data including 530,992 of 620,903 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 733 of 818 participants (175 AD, 354 amnestic mild cognitive impairment, MCI, and 204 healthy controls, HC). Hierarchical clustering and heat maps were used to analyze the GWAS results and associations are reported at two significance thresholds (p<10(-7) and p<10(-6)). As expected, SNPs in the APOE and TOMM40 genes were confirmed as markers strongly associated with multiple brain regions. Other top SNPs were proximal to the EPHA4, TP63 and NXPH1 genes. Detailed image analyses of rs6463843 (flanking NXPH1) revealed reduced global and regional GM density across diagnostic groups in TT relative to GG homozygotes. Interaction analysis indicated that AD patients homozygous for the T allele showed differential vulnerability to right hippocampal GM density loss. NXPH1 codes for a protein implicated in promotion of adhesion between dendrites and axons, a key factor in synaptic integrity, the loss of which is a hallmark of AD. A genome-wide, whole brain search strategy has the potential to reveal novel candidate genes and loci warranting further investigation and replication.

  8. Management of patients with brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Söderman, Michael; Andersson, Tommy; Karlsson, Bengt; Wallace, M Christopher; Edner, Göran

    2003-06-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain, which are probably genetically determined, are errors in the development of the vasculature that, together with the effects of blood flow, may lead to a focal arteriovenous shunt. Clinically, the adult patient may present with acute or chronic neurological symptoms-fixed or unstable-such as deficits, seizures or headache. Sometimes the lesion is an incidental finding. In about half of the patients, the revealing event is an intracranial haemorrhage. The prevalence of AVM in the western world is probably <0.01% and the detection rate is about one per 100,000 person-years. Most AVMs are revealed in patients 20-40 years of age. Therefore, the risk of developing neurological symptoms from an AVM, usually because of haemorrhage, increases with patient age. In the young adult population, AVMs are significant risk factors for hemorrhagic stroke. This risk increases with AVM volume and is higher in centrally located AVMs. Almost all patients with AVM are subjected to treatment, either by surgery, radiosurgery or embolisation, with the functional aim of reducing the risk of haemorrhage or to alleviate neurological symptoms with an acceptable treatment risk. Few neurocentres have physicians highly skilled in all treatment modalities. Therefore, the prescribed treatment may not be defined from an objective assessment of what is optimal for each individual patient, but rather from local expertise. In this context, more and better data about the natural history and the outcome of different treatments, as well as predictive models, would be valuable to help to optimise the management. Management strategies obviously differ according to local preferences, but results presented in the literature suggest the following strategy: (I) cortically located AVMs with a nidus volume <10 ml could be operated, with or without presurgical embolisation, unless there is a single feeder that can easily be catheterised and embolised for

  9. Differential hippocampal shapes in posterior cortical atrophy patients: A comparison with control and typical AD subjects

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Kate E.; Leung, Kelvin K.; Young, Jonathan; Pepple, Tracey; Lehmann, Manja; Zuluaga, Maria A.; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Schott, Jonathan M.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Crutch, Sebastian; Fox, Nick C.; Barnes, Josephine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by predominant visual deficits and parieto‐occipital atrophy, and is typically associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. In AD, assessment of hippocampal atrophy is widely used in diagnosis, research, and clinical trials; its utility in PCA remains unclear. Given the posterior emphasis of PCA, we hypothesized that hippocampal shape measures may give additional group differentiation information compared with whole‐hippocampal volume assessments. We investigated hippocampal volume and shape in subjects with PCA (n = 47), typical AD (n = 29), and controls (n = 48). Hippocampi were outlined on MRI scans and their 3D meshes were generated. We compared hippocampal volume and shape between disease groups. Mean adjusted hippocampal volumes were ∼8% smaller in PCA subjects (P < 0.001) and ∼22% smaller in tAD subject (P < 0.001) compared with controls. Significant inward deformations in the superior hippocampal tail were observed in PCA compared with controls even after adjustment for hippocampal volume. Inward deformations in large areas of the hippocampus were seen in tAD subjects compared with controls and PCA subjects, but only localized shape differences remained after adjusting for hippocampal volume. The shape differences observed, even allowing for volume differences, suggest that PCA and tAD are each associated with different patterns of hippocampal tissue loss that may contribute to the differential range and extent of episodic memory dysfunction in the two groups. Hum Brain Mapp 36:5123–5136, 2015. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26461053

  10. Stereotactic radiosurgery as therapy for melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma brain metastases: Impact of added surgical resection and whole-brain radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ganesh; Klimo, Paul; Thompson, Clinton J.; Samlowski, Wolfram; Wang, Michael; Watson, Gordon; Shrieve, Dennis; Jensen, Randy L. . E-mail: randy.jensen@hsc.utah.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Brain metastases of melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma have traditionally responded poorly to conventional treatments, including surgery and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Several studies have suggested a beneficial effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). We evaluated our institutional experience with systematic SRS in patients harboring these 'radioresistant' metastases. Methods and Materials: A total of 68 patients with brain metastases from melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma underwent SRS with or without WBRT or surgical resection. All patients had Karnofsky performance scores >70, and SRS was performed before the initiation of systemic therapy. The survival time was calculated from the diagnosis of brain metastases using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Statistical significance was calculated using the log-rank test. Factors influencing survival, including surgical resection, WBRT, gender, number of SRS sessions, and histologic type, were evaluated retrospectively using Cox univariate models. Results: The overall median survival was 427 days (14.2 months), which appears superior to the results obtained with conventional WBRT. The addition of neither surgery nor WBRT to SRS provided a statistically significant increase in survival. Conclusion: Our results suggest that patients undergoing SRS for up to five cerebral metastases from 'radioresistant' tumors (melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma) have survival rates comparable to those in other series of more selected patients. The addition of surgical resection or WBRT did not result in improved survival in our series.

  11. Decreased dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) concentrations in plasma of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients.

    PubMed

    Aldred, Sarah; Mecocci, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    DHEA is secreted by the adrenal cortex and is also a neurosteroid. Its sulfate (DHEAS) is the most abundant steroid in circulation. The levels of both are seen to decline in concentration with age. Evidence is available for altered levels of DHEA and DHEAS in AD but is limited to relatively few studies assessing small cohorts. This study assessed plasma DHEA and DHEAS levels in AD sufferers (n=72) and compared them to age-matched controls (n=72). Plasma DHEA concentrations were significantly lower in AD patients compared to control (4.24+/-0.4 ng/ml for AD; 3.38+/-0.3 ng/ml for control, p=0.027, Mann-Whitney 1-tailed) and DHEA levels were significantly correlated to DHEAS levels in both control and AD conditions (Spearman's rho correlation coefficient=0.635 in controls and 0.467 in AD, ppatients suffering from AD when compared to age-matched controls.

  12. How Placebos Change the Patient's Brain

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Fabrizio; Carlino, Elisa; Pollo, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    Although placebos have long been considered a nuisance in clinical research, today they represent an active and productive field of research and, because of the involvement of many mechanisms, the study of the placebo effect can actually be viewed as a melting pot of concepts and ideas for neuroscience. Indeed, there exists not a single but many placebo effects, with different mechanisms and in different systems, medical conditions, and therapeutic interventions. For example, brain mechanisms of expectation, anxiety, and reward are all involved, as well as a variety of learning phenomena, such as Pavlovian conditioning, cognitive, and social learning. There is also some experimental evidence of different genetic variants in placebo responsiveness. The most productive models to better understand the neurobiology of the placebo effect are pain and Parkinson's disease. In these medical conditions, the neural networks that are involved have been identified: that is, the opioidergic–cholecystokinergic–dopaminergic modulatory network in pain and part of the basal ganglia circuitry in Parkinson's disease. Important clinical implications emerge from these recent advances in placebo research. First, as the placebo effect is basically a psychosocial context effect, these data indicate that different social stimuli, such as words and rituals of the therapeutic act, may change the chemistry and circuitry of the patient's brain. Second, the mechanisms that are activated by placebos are the same as those activated by drugs, which suggests a cognitive/affective interference with drug action. Third, if prefrontal functioning is impaired, placebo responses are reduced or totally lacking, as occurs in dementia of the Alzheimer's type. PMID:20592717

  13. How placebos change the patient's brain.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Fabrizio; Carlino, Elisa; Pollo, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    Although placebos have long been considered a nuisance in clinical research, today they represent an active and productive field of research and, because of the involvement of many mechanisms, the study of the placebo effect can actually be viewed as a melting pot of concepts and ideas for neuroscience. Indeed, there exists not a single but many placebo effects, with different mechanisms and in different systems, medical conditions, and therapeutic interventions. For example, brain mechanisms of expectation, anxiety, and reward are all involved, as well as a variety of learning phenomena, such as Pavlovian conditioning, cognitive, and social learning. There is also some experimental evidence of different genetic variants in placebo responsiveness. The most productive models to better understand the neurobiology of the placebo effect are pain and Parkinson's disease. In these medical conditions, the neural networks that are involved have been identified: that is, the opioidergic-cholecystokinergic-dopaminergic modulatory network in pain and part of the basal ganglia circuitry in Parkinson's disease. Important clinical implications emerge from these recent advances in placebo research. First, as the placebo effect is basically a psychosocial context effect, these data indicate that different social stimuli, such as words and rituals of the therapeutic act, may change the chemistry and circuitry of the patient's brain. Second, the mechanisms that are activated by placebos are the same as those activated by drugs, which suggests a cognitive/affective interference with drug action. Third, if prefrontal functioning is impaired, placebo responses are reduced or totally lacking, as occurs in dementia of the Alzheimer's type.

  14. Does Ad Hoc Coronary Intervention Reduce Radiation Exposure? – Analysis of 568 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Truffa, Márcio A. M.; Alves, Gustavo M.P.; Bernardi, Fernando; Esteves Filho, Antonio; Ribeiro, Expedito; Galon, Micheli Z.; Spadaro, André; Kajita, Luiz J.; Arrieta, Raul; Lemos, Pedro A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Advantages and disadvantages of ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention have been described. However little is known about the radiation exposure of that procedure as compared with the staged intervention. Objective To compare the radiation dose of the ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention with that of the staged procedure Methods The dose-area product and total Kerma were measured, and the doses of the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were added. In addition, total fluoroscopic time and number of acquisitions were evaluated. Results A total of 568 consecutive patients were treated with ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention (n = 320) or staged percutaneous coronary intervention (n = 248). On admission, the ad hoc group had less hypertension (74.1% vs 81.9%; p = 0.035), dyslipidemia (57.8% vs. 67.7%; p = 0.02) and three-vessel disease (38.8% vs. 50.4%; p = 0.015). The ad hoc group was exposed to significantly lower radiation doses, even after baseline characteristic adjustment between both groups. The ad hoc group was exposed to a total dose-area product of 119.7 ± 70.7 Gycm2, while the staged group, to 139.2 ± 75.3 Gycm2 (p < 0.001). Conclusion Ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention reduced radiation exposure as compared with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures performed at two separate times. PMID:26351982

  15. Brain Metastasis in Patients With Adrenocortical Carcinoma: A Clinical Series

    PubMed Central

    Tageja, Nishant; Rosenberg, Avi; Mahalingam, Sowmya; Quezado, Martha; Velarde, Margarita; Edgerly, Maureen; Fojo, Tito

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a heterogeneous and rare disease. At presentation or at the time of a recurrence, the disease commonly spreads to the liver, lungs, lymph nodes, and bones. The brain has only rarely been reported as a site of metastases. Objective: The aims of this report were to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with ACC who developed brain metastasis and were evaluated at the National Cancer Institute. Methods: We describe the history and clinical presentation of six patients with ACC and metastatic disease in the brain. Images of the six patients and pathology slides were reviewed when available. Results: The median age at the time of the diagnosis of ACC was 42 years. The median time from the initial diagnosis until the presentation of brain metastasis was 43 months. As a group the patients had previously received multiples lines of chemotherapy (median of three), and they presented with one to three metastatic brain lesions. Four patients underwent metastasectomy, one had radiosurgery, and one had both modalities. Two patients are still alive, three died, between 2 and 14 months after the diagnosis of brain metastases, and one was lost to follow-up. Conclusion: Patients with advanced ACC can rarely present with metastasis to the brain, most often long after the initial diagnosis. Timely diagnosis of brain metastasis with appropriate intervention after discussion in a multidisciplinary meeting can improve the prognosis in this particular scenario. PMID:25412413

  16. The Effects of Acupuncture at Real or Sham Acupoints on the Intrinsic Brain Activity in Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Baohui; Min, Baoquan; Wang, Zhenchang; Zhou, Aihong; Li, Yong; Jia, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating neuroimaging studies in humans have shown that acupuncture can modulate a widely distributed brain network in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Acupuncture at different acupoints could exert different modulatory effects on the brain network. However, whether acupuncture at real or sham acupoints can produce different effects on the brain network in MCI or AD patients remains unclear. Using resting-state fMRI, we reported that acupuncture at Taixi (KI3) induced amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) change of different brain regions in MCI patients from those shown in the healthy controls. In MCI patients, acupuncture at KI3 increased or decreased ALFF in the different regions from those activated by acupuncture in the healthy controls. Acupuncture at the sham acupoint in MCI patients activated the different brain regions from those in healthy controls. Therefore, we concluded that acupuncture displays more significant effect on neuronal activities of the above brain regions in MCI patients than that in healthy controls. Acupuncture at KI3 exhibits different effects on the neuronal activities of the brain regions from acupuncture at sham acupoint, although the difference is only shown at several regions due to the close distance between the above points. PMID:26064166

  17. A Robust Deep Model for Improved Classification of AD/MCI Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Tran, Loc; Thung, Kim-Han; Ji, Shuiwang; Shen, Dinggang; Li, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Accurate classification of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and its prodromal stage, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), plays a critical role in possibly preventing progression of memory impairment and improving quality of life for AD patients. Among many research tasks, it is of particular interest to identify noninvasive imaging biomarkers for AD diagnosis. In this paper, we present a robust deep learning system to identify different progression stages of AD patients based on MRI and PET scans. We utilized the dropout technique to improve classical deep learning by preventing its weight co-adaptation, which is a typical cause of over-fitting in deep learning. In addition, we incorporated stability selection, an adaptive learning factor, and a multi-task learning strategy into the deep learning framework. We applied the proposed method to the ADNI data set and conducted experiments for AD and MCI conversion diagnosis. Experimental results showed that the dropout technique is very effective in AD diagnosis, improving the classification accuracies by 5.9% on average as compared to the classical deep learning methods. PMID:25955998

  18. Patient-centered care as value-added service by compounding pharmacists.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Timothy B; Fontane, Patrick E; Day, Jonathan R

    2013-01-01

    The term "value-added" is widely used to describe business and professional services that complement a product or service or that differentiate it from competing products and services. The objective of this study was to determine compounding pharmacists' self-perceptions of the value-added services they provide. A web-based survey method was used. Respondents' perceptions of their most important value-added service frequently fell into one of two categories: (1) enhanced pharmacist contribution to developing and implementing patient therapeutic plans and (2) providing customized medications of high pharmaceutical quality. The results were consistent with a hybrid community clinical practice model for compounding pharmacists wherein personalization of the professional relationship is the value-added characteristic.

  19. Brain Microdialysis Study of Meropenem in Two Patients with Acute Brain Injury▿

    PubMed Central

    Dahyot-Fizelier, Claire; Timofeev, Ivan; Marchand, Sandrine; Hutchinson, Peter; Debaene, Bertrand; Menon, David; Mimoz, Olivier; Gupta, Arun; Couet, William

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of unbound meropenem in the cerebral extracellular fluid (ECF) of two patients with acute brain injury were assessed by microdialysis. Brain ECF unbound-meropenem concentrations were lower than serum unbound-meropenem concentrations, with brain-to-serum area under the concentration-time curve ratios of 0.73 and 0.14. A pharmacokinetic model was developed to fit the experimental data adequately. PMID:20516279

  20. What happens in the leucotomised brain? A postmortem morphological study of brains from schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Pakkenberg, B

    1989-01-01

    Volume measurements were carried out on 19 brains from leucotomised schizophrenic patients and 20 age- and sex-matched controls using a stereological method. The volume of the total fixed brain, hemispheres, cortex, white matter, and central grey matter were all significantly reduced compared with controls. White matter and central grey structures were significantly reduced compared with a group of non-leucotomised schizophrenic brains. No difference was found in the size of the lesions in patients who improved compared with the patients who remained unchanged and the outcome was unrelated to lesional asymmetry. Morphometric measurements were correlated to a number of clinical parameters. PMID:2703834

  1. [Late-onset Neurodegenerative Diseases Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) and Alzheimer's Disease Secondary to TBI (AD-TBI)].

    PubMed

    Takahata, Keisuke; Tabuchi, Hajime; Mimura, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is associated with mild repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). This long-term and progressive symptom due to TBI was initially called punch-drunk syndrome or dementia pugilistica, since it was believed to be associated with boxing. However, serial neuropathological studies of mild repetitive TBI in the last decade have revealed that CTE occurs not only in boxers but also in a wider population including American football players, wrestlers, and military personnel. CTE has gained large public interest owing to dramatic cases involving retired professional athletes wherein serious behavioral problems and tragic incidents were reported. Unlike mild repetitive TBI, a single episode of severe TBI can cause another type of late-onset neuropsychiatric disease including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several epidemiological studies have shown that a single episode of severe TBI is one of the major risk factors of AD. Pathologically, both AD and CTE are characterized by abnormal accumulations of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. However, recent neuropathological studies revealed that CTE demonstrates a unique pattern of tau pathology in neurons and astrocytes, and accumulation of other misfolded proteins such as TDP-43. Currently, no reliable biomarkers of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI are available, and a definitive diagnosis can be made only via postmortem neuropathological examination. Development in neuroimaging techniques such as tau and amyloid positron emission tomography imaging might not only enable early diagnosis of CTE, but also contribute to the interventions for prevention of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in the living brain of patients with TBI.

  2. American brain tumor patients treated with BNCT in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Laramore, G.E.; Griffin, B.R.; Spence, A.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish and maintain a database for patients from the United States who have received BNCT in Japan for malignant gliomas of the brain. This database will serve as a resource for the DOE to aid in decisions relating to BNCT research in the United States, as well as assisting the design and implementation of clinical trials of BNCT for brain cancer patients in this country. The database will also serve as an information resource for patients with brain tumors and their families who are considering this form of therapy.

  3. Patients With Brain Tumors: Who Receives Postacute Occupational Therapy Services?

    PubMed

    Chan, Vincy; Xiong, Chen; Colantonio, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Data on the utilization of occupational therapy among patients with brain tumors have been limited to those with malignant tumors and small samples of patients outside North America in specialized palliative care settings. We built on this research by examining the characteristics of patients with brain tumors who received postacute occupational therapy services in Ontario, Canada, using health care administrative data. Between fiscal years 2004-2005 and 2008-2009, 3,199 patients with brain tumors received occupational therapy services in the home care setting after hospital discharge; 12.4% had benign brain tumors, 78.2% had malignant brain tumors, and 9.4% had unspecified brain tumors. However, patients with benign brain tumors were older (mean age=63.3 yr), and a higher percentage were female (65.2%). More than 90% of patients received in-home occupational therapy services. Additional research is needed to examine the significance of these differences and to identify factors that influence access to occupational therapy services in the home care setting.

  4. CAPACITY OF PATIENTS WITH BRAIN METASTASES TO MAKE TREATMENT DECISIONS

    PubMed Central

    Triebel, Kristen L.; Gerstenecker, Adam; Meneses, Karen; Fiveash, John B.; Meyers, Christina A.; Cutter, Gary; Marson, Daniel C.; Martin, Roy C.; Eakin, Amanda; Watts, Olivia; Nabors, Louis B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate medical decision-making capacity (MDC) in patients with brain metastasis. METHODS Participants were 41 adults with brain metastases with Karnofsky Performance Status scores ≥70 were recruited from an academic medical center and 41 demographically-matched controls recruited from the community. We evaluated MDC using the Capacity to Consent to Treatment Instrument (CCTI) and its four clinically relevant consent standards (expressing a treatment choice, appreciation, reasoning, and understanding). Capacity impairment ratings (no impairment, mild/moderate impairment, and severe impairment) on the consent standards were also assigned to each participant with brain metastasis using cutoff scores derived statistically from the performance of the control group. RESULTS The brain metastases patient group performed significantly below controls on consent standards of understanding and reasoning. Capacity compromise was defined as performance ≤1.5 standard deviations (SD) below the control group mean. Using this definition, approximately 60% of the participants with brain metastases demonstrated capacity compromise on at least one MDC standard. CONCLUSION When defining capacity compromise as performance ≤1.5 SD below the control group mean, over half of patients with brain metastases have reduced capacity to make treatment decisions. This impairment is demonstrated shortly after initial diagnosis of brain metastases and highlights the importance of routine clinical assessment of MDC following diagnosis of brain metastasis. These results also indicate a need for the development and investigation of interventions to support or improve MDC in this patient population. PMID:25613039

  5. Memory Function Before and After Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With and Without Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Welzel, Grit Fleckenstein, Katharina; Schaefer, Joerg; Hermann, Brigitte; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Mai, Sabine K.; Wenz, Frederik

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare the effect of prophylactic and therapeutic whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) on memory function in patients with and without brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with and without brain metastases (n = 44) were prospectively evaluated with serial cognitive testing, before RT (T0), after starting RT (T1), at the end of RT (T2), and 6-8 weeks (T3) after RT completion. Data were obtained from small-cell lung cancer patients treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation, patients with brain metastases treated with therapeutic cranial irradiation (TCI), and breast cancer patients treated with RT to the breast. Results: Before therapy, prophylactic cranial irradiation patients performed worse than TCI patients or than controls on most test scores. During and after WBRT, verbal memory function was influenced by pretreatment cognitive status (p < 0.001) and to a lesser extent by WBRT. Acute (T1) radiation effects on verbal memory function were only observed in TCI patients (p = 0.031). Subacute (T3) radiation effects on verbal memory function were observed in both TCI and prophylactic cranial irradiation patients (p = 0.006). These effects were more pronounced in patients with above-average performance at baseline. Visual memory and attention were not influenced by WBRT. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that WBRT causes cognitive dysfunction immediately after the beginning of RT in patients with brain metastases only. At 6-8 weeks after the end of WBRT, cognitive dysfunction was seen in patients with and without brain metastases. Because cognitive dysfunction after WBRT is restricted to verbal memory, patients should not avoid WBRT because of a fear of neurocognitive side effects.

  6. Clostridium glycolicum isolated from a patient with otogenic brain abscesses.

    PubMed

    Van Leer, C; Wensing, A M J; van Leeuwen, J P; Zandbergen, E G J; Swanink, C M A

    2009-02-01

    We describe a case of brain abscesses with gas formation following otitis media, for which the patient treated himself by placing clay in his ear. Several microorganisms, including Clostridium glycolicum, were cultured from material obtained from the patient. This is the first report of an infection in an immunocompetent patient associated with this microorganism.

  7. Solitary ring enhancing brain lesion in a patient with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Aldeen, Taha; Lunn, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis in immune competent patients usually causes asymptomatic infection or mild symptoms, while in immunocompromised and AIDS patients it can be a life threatening condition. We report a case of cerebral toxoplasmosis in a patient with AIDS and review the causes of brain ring enhancing lesions. PMID:22132018

  8. High-molecular weight Aβ oligomers and protofibrils are the predominant Aβ species in the native soluble protein fraction of the AD brain.

    PubMed

    Upadhaya, Ajeet Rijal; Lungrin, Irina; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Fändrich, Marcus; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf

    2012-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the aggregation and deposition of amyloid β protein (Aβ) in the brain. Soluble Aβ oligomers are thought to be toxic. To investigate the predominant species of Aβ protein that may play a role in AD pathogenesis, we performed biochemical analysis of AD and control brains. Sucrose buffer-soluble brain lysates were characterized in native form using blue native (BN)-PAGE and also in denatured form using SDS-PAGE followed by Western blot analysis. BN-PAGE analysis revealed a high-molecular weight smear (>1000 kD) of Aβ(42) -positive material in the AD brain, whereas low-molecular weight and monomeric Aβ species were not detected. SDS-PAGE analysis, on the other hand, allowed the detection of prominent Aβ monomer and dimer bands in AD cases but not in controls. Immunoelectron microscopy of immunoprecipitated oligomers and protofibrils/fibrils showed spherical and protofibrillar Aβ-positive material, thereby confirming the presence of high-molecular weight Aβ (hiMWAβ) aggregates in the AD brain. In vitro analysis of synthetic Aβ(40) - and Aβ(42) preparations revealed Aβ fibrils, protofibrils, and hiMWAβ oligomers that were detectable at the electron microscopic level and after BN-PAGE. Further, BN-PAGE analysis exhibited a monomer band and less prominent low-molecular weight Aβ (loMWAβ) oligomers. In contrast, SDS-PAGE showed large amounts of loMWAβ but no hiMWAβ(40) and strikingly reduced levels of hiMWAβ(42) . These results indicate that hiMWAβ aggregates, particularly Aβ(42) species, are most prevalent in the soluble fraction of the AD brain. Thus, soluble hiMWAβ aggregates may play an important role in the pathogenesis of AD either independently or as a reservoir for release of loMWAβ oligomers.

  9. Brain MRI volumetry in a single patient with mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ross, David E; Castelvecchi, Cody; Ochs, Alfred L

    2013-01-01

    This letter to the editor describes the case of a 42 year old man with mild traumatic brain injury and multiple neuropsychiatric symptoms which persisted for a few years after the injury. Initial CT scans and MRI scans of the brain showed no signs of atrophy. Brain volume was measured using NeuroQuant®, an FDA-approved, commercially available software method. Volumetric cross-sectional (one point in time) analysis also showed no atrophy. However, volumetric longitudinal (two points in time) analysis showed progressive atrophy in several brain regions. This case illustrated in a single patient the principle discovered in multiple previous group studies, namely that the longitudinal design is more powerful than the cross-sectional design for finding atrophy in patients with traumatic brain injury.

  10. Identification of N-terminally truncated pyroglutamate amyloid-β in cholesterol-enriched diet-fed rabbit and AD brain.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garmendia, Roxanna; Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Morales, Miguel Angel; Luna-Muñoz, José; Mena, Raul; Nava-Catorce, Miriam; Acero, Gonzalo; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Viramontes-Pintos, Amparo; Cribbs, David H; Gevorkian, Goar

    2014-01-01

    The main amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) variants detected in the human brain are Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42; however, a significant proportion of Aβ in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain also consists of N-terminal truncated/modified species. AβN3(pE), Aβ peptide bearing amino-terminal pyroglutamate at position 3, has been demonstrated to be a major N-truncated/modified constituent of intracellular, extracellular, and vascular Aβ deposits in AD and Down syndrome brain tissue. It has been previously demonstrated that rabbits fed a diet enriched in cholesterol and given water containing trace copper levels developed AD-like pathology including intraneuronal and extracellular Aβ accumulation, tau hyperphosphorylation, vascular inflammation, astrocytosis, microgliosis, reduced levels of acetylcholine, as well as learning deficits and thus, may be used as a non-transgenic animal model of sporadic AD. In the present study, we have demonstrated for the first time the presence of AβN3(pE) in blood vessels in cholesterol-enriched diet-fed rabbit brain. In addition, we detected AβN3(pE) immunoreactivity in all postmortem AD brain samples studied. We believe that our results are potentially important for evaluation of novel therapeutic molecules/strategies targeting Aβ peptides in a suitable non-transgenic animal model.

  11. Brain-computer interfaces for communication with nonresponsive patients.

    PubMed

    Naci, Lorina; Monti, Martin M; Cruse, Damian; Kübler, Andrea; Sorger, Bettina; Goebel, Rainer; Kotchoubey, Boris; Owen, Adrian M

    2012-09-01

    A substantial number of patients who survive severe brain injury progress to a nonresponsive state of wakeful unawareness, referred to as a vegetative state (VS). They appear to be awake, but show no signs of awareness of themselves, or of their environment in repeated clinical examinations. However, recent neuroimaging research demonstrates that some VS patients can respond to commands by willfully modulating their brain activity according to instruction. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) may allow such patients to circumvent the barriers imposed by their behavioral limitations and communicate with the outside world. However, although such devices would undoubtedly improve the quality of life for some patients and their families, developing BCI systems for behaviorally nonresponsive patients presents substantial technical and clinical challenges. Here we review the state of the art of BCI research across noninvasive neuroimaging technologies, and propose how such systems should be developed further to provide fully fledged communication systems for behaviorally nonresponsive populations.

  12. Alteration of spontaneous brain activity in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiaxing; Chen, Ji; Yu, Qian; Fan, Cunxiu; Zhang, Ran; Lin, Jianzhong; Yang, Tianhe; Fan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Airflow limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) results in a decrease in oxygen transport to the brain. The aim of the present study was to explore the alteration of spontaneous brain activity induced by hypoxia in patients with COPD. Patients and methods Twenty-five stable patients with COPD and 25 matching healthy volunteers were investigated. Amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) of blood oxygenation level-dependent signal at resting state in the brain was analyzed using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Results Whole-brain analysis using functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed significant decreases in ALFF in the bilateral posterior cingulate gyri and right lingual gyrus and an increase in ALFF in the left postcentral gyrus of patients with COPD. After controlling for SaO2, patients with COPD only showed an increase in ALFF in the left postcentral gyrus. Region of interest analysis showed a decrease in ALFF in the left precentral gyrus and an increase in ALFF in the left caudate nucleus of patients with COPD. In all subjects, ALFF in the bilateral posterior cingulate gyri and right lingual gyrus showed positive correlations with visual reproduction. Conclusion We demonstrated abnormal spontaneous brain activity of patients with COPD, which may have a pathophysiologic meaning. PMID:27555761

  13. Prooxidant-antioxidant balance in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ehsaei, Mohamadreza; Khajavi, Mehdi; Arjmand, Mohammad Hassan; Abuee, Mohammad Ali; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Hamidi Alamdari, Daryoush

    2015-03-01

    Brain trauma is an important cause of mortality and disability among young people worldwide. One of the mechanisms of post-traumatic secondary brain damage is related to free radical release and oxidative stress (OS). OS is the consequence of an imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidants in favor of pro-oxidants. This imbalance may lead to macromolecule damage including lipid peroxidation, protein crosslinking, DNA damage and changes in growth and function of cells in brain. Free radical release and subsequent lipid peroxidation are early events following neural tissues injury and are associated with hypo-perfusion, edema, and disruption of axonal guidance. In this study, we determined the prooxidant-antioxidant balance (PAB) in patients with brain injury, and its correlation with number of demographic and clinical parameters. Sera from 98 patients with traumatic brain and 100 healthy subjects were collected. The serum PAB was measured. Age, sex, GCS (Glasgow coma scale), mechanism of injury, brain lesions found on CT scan and lesions in other parts of the body, caused by trauma, were determined. A significantly higher PAB value was observed in the patient group (138.97 ± 15.9 HK unit) compared to the controls (60.82 ± 12.6 HK) (P = 0.001). In the patient group, there was no significant correlation of PAB with GCS, brain lesion characteristic, mechanism of injury, other accompanying traumatic injury, age and gender. When patients were classified into three groups according to GCS: group 1 (GCS>13, n = 28, PAB serum value = 138.51 ± 62.66 HK), group 2 (GCS between 8 and 12, n = 29, PAB serum value = 162.7 ± 50.6 HK) and group 3 (GCS <8, n = 41, PAB serum value = 155.56 ± 58.21 HK); there was no significant difference between groups. The serum PAB values were higher in patients with traumatic brain injury, although this was not associated with the extent of injury.

  14. Fungal Enolase, β-Tubulin, and Chitin Are Detected in Brain Tissue from Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pisa, Diana; Alonso, Ruth; Rábano, Alberto; Horst, Michael N.; Carrasco, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings provide evidence that fungal structures can be detected in brain tissue from Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients using rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against whole fungal cells. In the present work, we have developed and tested specific antibodies that recognize the fungal proteins, enolase and β-tubulin, and an antibody that recognizes the fungal polysaccharide chitin. Consistent with our previous studies, a number of rounded yeast-like and hyphal structures were detected using these antibodies in brain sections from AD patients. Some of these structures were intracellular and, strikingly, some were found to be located inside nuclei from neurons, whereas other fungal structures were detected extracellularly. Corporya amylacea from AD patients also contained enolase and β-tubulin as revealed by these selective antibodies, but were devoid of fungal chitin. Importantly, brain sections from control subjects were usually negative for staining with the three antibodies. However, a few fungal structures can be observed in some control individuals. Collectively, these findings indicate the presence of two fungal proteins, enolase and β-tubulin, and the polysaccharide chitin, in CNS tissue from AD patients. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis that AD is caused by disseminated fungal infection. PMID:27872620

  15. Enhanced taupathy and AD-like pathology in aged primate brains decades after infantile exposure to lead (Pb).

    PubMed

    Bihaqi, Syed Waseem; Zawia, Nasser H

    2013-12-01

    Late Onset Alzheimer Disease (LOAD) constitutes the majority of AD cases (∼90%). Amyloidosis and tau pathology, which are present in AD brains, appear to be sporadic in nature. We have previously shown that infantile lead (Pb) exposure is associated with a change in the expression and regulation of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its beta amyloid (Aβ) products in old age. Here we report that infantile Pb exposure elevated the mRNA and protein levels of tau as well as its transcriptional regulators namely specificity protein 1 and 3 (Sp1 and Sp3) in aged primates. These changes were also accompanied by an enhancement in site-specific tau phosphorylation as well as an increase in the mRNA and protein levels of cyclin dependent kinase 5 (cdk5). There was also a change in the protein ratio of p35/p25 with more Serine/Threonine phosphatase activity present in aged primates exposed to Pb as infants. These molecular alterations favored abundant tau phosphorylation and immunoreactivity in the frontal cortex of aged primates with prior Pb exposure. These findings provide more evidence that neurodegenerative diseases may be products of environmental influences that occur during the development.

  16. Regional brain glucose metabolism in patients with brain tumors before and after radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Lau, Y.H.

    1994-05-01

    This study was performed to measure regional glucose metabolism in nonaffected brain regions of patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors. Seven female and four male patients (mean age 51.5{plus_minus}14.0 years old) were compared with eleven age and sex matched normal subjects. None of the patients had hydrocephalus and/or increased intracranial pressure. Brain glucose metabolism was measured using FDG-PET scan. Five of the patients were reevaluated one week after receiving radiation treatment (RT) to the brain. Patients were on Decadron and/or Dilantin at the time of both scan. PET images were analyzed with a template of 115 nonoverlapping regions of interest and then grouped into eight gray matter regions on each hemisphere. Brain regions with tumors and edema shown in MR imaging were excluded. Z scores were used to compare individual patients` regional values with those of normal subjects. The number of regional values with Z scores of less than - 3.0 were considered abnormal and were quantified. The mean global glucose metabolic rate (mean of all regions) in nonaffected brain regions of patients was significantly lower than that of normal controls (32.1{plus_minus}9.0 versus 44.8{plus_minus}6.3 {mu}mol/100g/min, p<0.001). Analyses of individual subjects revealed that none of the controls and 8 of the 11 patients had at least one abnormal region. In these 8 patients the regions which were abnormal were most frequently localized in right (n=5) and left occipital (n=6) and right orbital frontal cortex (n=7) whereas the basal ganglia was not affected. Five of the patients who had repeated scans following RT showed decrements in tumor metabolism (41{plus_minus}20.5%) and a significant increase in whole brain metabolism (8.6{plus_minus}5.3%, p<0.001). The improvement in whole brain metabolism after RT suggests that the brain metabolic decrements in the patients were related to the presence of tumoral tissue and not just a medication effect.

  17. High Toxoplasma gondii Seropositivity among Brain Tumor Patients in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bong-Kwang; Song, Hyemi; Kim, Min-Jae; Cho, Jaeeun; Shin, Eun-Hee; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular protozoan that can modulate the environment of the infected host. An unfavorable environment modulated by T. gondii in the brain includes tumor microenvironment. Literature has suggested that T. gondii infection is associated with development of brain tumors. However, in Korea, epidemiological data regarding this correlation have been scarce. In this study, in order to investigate the relationship between T. gondii infection and brain tumor development, we investigated the seroprevalence of T. gondii among 93 confirmed brain tumor patients (various histological types, including meningioma and astrocytoma) in Korea using ELISA. The results revealed that T. gondii seropositivity among brain tumor patients (18.3%) was significantly (P<0.05) higher compared with that of healthy controls (8.6%). The seropositivity of brain tumor patients showed a significant age-tendency, i.e., higher in younger age group, compared with age-matched healthy controls (P<0.05). In conclusion, this study supports the close relationship between T. gondii infection and incidence of brain tumors. PMID:27180580

  18. Comparison of histological techniques to visualize iron in paraffin-embedded brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    van Duijn, Sara; Nabuurs, Rob J A; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Natté, Remco

    2013-11-01

    Better knowledge of the distribution of iron in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients may facilitate the development of an in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) marker for AD and may cast light on the role of this potentially toxic molecule in the pathogenesis of AD. Several histological iron staining techniques have been used in the past but they have not been systematically tested for sensitivity and specificity. This article compares three histochemical techniques and ferritin immunohistochemistry to visualize iron in paraffin-embedded human AD brain tissue. The specificity of the histochemical techniques was tested by staining sections after iron extraction. Iron was demonstrated in the white matter, in layers IV/V of the frontal neocortex, in iron containing plaques, and in microglia. In our hands, these structures were best visualized using the Meguro iron stain, a method that has not been described for iron staining in human brain or AD in particular. Ferritin immunohistochemistry stained microglia and iron containing plaques similar to the Meguro method but was less intense in myelin-associated iron. The Meguro method is most suitable for identifying iron-positive structures in paraffin-embedded human AD brain tissue.

  19. Triheptanoin improves brain energy metabolism in patients with Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Adanyeguh, Isaac Mawusi; Rinaldi, Daisy; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Caillet, Samantha; Valabregue, Romain; Durr, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Based on our previous work in Huntington disease (HD) showing improved energy metabolism in muscle by providing substrates to the Krebs cycle, we wished to obtain a proof-of-concept of the therapeutic benefit of triheptanoin using a functional biomarker of brain energy metabolism validated in HD. Methods: We performed an open-label study using 31P brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to measure the levels of phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) before (rest), during (activation), and after (recovery) a visual stimulus. We performed 31P brain MRS in 10 patients at an early stage of HD and 13 controls. Patients with HD were then treated for 1 month with triheptanoin after which they returned for follow-up including 31P brain MRS scan. Results: At baseline, we confirmed an increase in Pi/PCr ratio during brain activation in controls—reflecting increased adenosine triphosphate synthesis—followed by a return to baseline levels during recovery (p = 0.013). In patients with HD, we validated the existence of an abnormal brain energy profile as previously reported. After 1 month, this profile remained abnormal in patients with HD who did not receive treatment. Conversely, the MRS profile was improved in patients with HD treated with triheptanoin for 1 month with the restoration of an increased Pi/PCr ratio during visual stimulation (p = 0.005). Conclusion: This study suggests that triheptanoin is able to correct the bioenergetic profile in the brain of patients with HD at an early stage of the disease. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that, for patients with HD, treatment with triheptanoin for 1 month restores an increased MRS Pi/PCr ratio during visual stimulation. PMID:25568297

  20. Intrafacility transportation of patients with acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hsinfen

    2014-06-01

    Patients with acute brain injury (ABI) frequently require diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the areas located outside of the intensive care unit. Transports can be risky for critically ill patients with ABI. Secondary brain injury can occur during the transport from causes such as ischemia, hypotension, hypoxia, hypercapnia, and cerebral edema. Preparation and implementation of preventive procedures including pretransport assessment, monitoring during transport, and posttransport examination and documentation for transports of patients with ABI deem to be necessary. The purpose of this article is to review the typical risks associated with the transports of the patients with ABI out of the intensive care unit and to propose the strategies that can be used to minimize the risks of secondary brain injury.

  1. Shorter-Course Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases in Elderly Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Evers, Jasmin N.; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Lohynska, Radka; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Many patients with brain metastases receive whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. Using 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy in 2 weeks is the standard regimen in most centers. Regarding the extraordinarily poor survival prognosis of elderly patients with multiple brain metastases, a shorter WBRT regimen would be preferable. This study compared 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy in elderly patients ({>=}65 years). Methods and Materials: Data from 455 elderly patients who received WBRT alone for brain metastases were retrospectively analyzed. Survival and local (= intracerebral) control of 293 patients receiving 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy were compared with 162 patients receiving 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy. Eight additional potential prognostic factors were investigated including age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), primary tumor, number of brain metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to WBRT, extracerebral metastases, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Results: The 6-month overall survival rates were 29% after 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy and 21% after 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy (p = 0.020). The 6-month local control rates were 12% and 10%, respectively (p = 0.32). On multivariate analysis, improved overall survival was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), only one to three brain metastases (p = 0.029), no extracerebral metastasis (p = 0.012), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Improved local control was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), breast cancer (p = 0.029), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Shorter-course WBRT with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy was not inferior to 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with respect to overall survival or local control in elderly patients. 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy appears preferable for the majority of these patients.

  2. Value-added care: a paradigm shift in patient care delivery.

    PubMed

    Upenieks, Valda V; Akhavan, Jaleh; Kotlerman, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    Spiraling costs in health care have placed hospitals in a constant state of transition. As a result, nursing practice is now influenced by numerous factors and has remained in a continuous state of flux. Multiple changes within the last 2 decades in nurse/patient ratio and blend of front-line nurses are examples of this transition. To reframe the nursing practice into an economic equation that captures the cost, quality, and service, a paradigm shift in thinking is needed in order to assess work redesign. Nursing productivity must be evaluated in terms of value-added care, a vision that goes beyond direct care activities and includes team collaboration, physician rounding, increased RN-to-aide communication, and patient centeredness; all of which are crucial to the nurse's role and the patient's well-being. The science of appropriating staffing depends on assessment and implementation of systematic changes best illustrated through a "systems theory" framework. A throughput transformation is required to create process changes with input elements (number of front-line nurses) in order to increase time spent in value-added care and to decrease waste activities with an improvement in efficiency, quality, and service. The purpose of this pilot study was two-fold: (a) to gain an understanding of how much time RNs spent in value-added care, and (b) whether increasing the combined level of RNs and unlicensed assistive personnel increased the amount of time spent in value-added care compared to time spent in necessary tasks and waste.

  3. In Vivo Dosimetry Of Patients Submitted To Brain Spect Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Cortés, D.; Azorín, J.; Saucedo, V. M.

    2004-09-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a diagnosis technique which allows to visualize a three dimensional distribution of a radioactive material in the brain. This technique is used for evaluating the blood flux and the metabolic function of the diverse brain regions and is very useful to diagnostic several pathologies such as Alzheimer disease, tumors, epilepsy brain hemorrhages, etc. The radioactive tracer used is 99mTc-labeled hexamethylpropyleneamineoxime (99mTc-HMPAO). We present the results obtained from measurements performed in the chest, back and skull of patients submitted to brain SPECT studies during two hours using home-made LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE thermoluminescent dosimeters. Results obtained showed that the dose received by the patients during two hours are lower than 0.3 mGy.

  4. Brain perfusion asymmetry in patients with oral somatic delusions.

    PubMed

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Katagiri, Ayano; Watanabe, Motoko; Takenoshita, Miho; Sakuma, Tomomi; Sako, Emi; Sato, Yusuke; Toriihara, Akira; Uezato, Akihito; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Nishikawa, Toru; Motomura, Haruhiko; Toyofuku, Akira

    2013-06-01

    Oral cenesthopathy is a somatic delusion or hallucination involving the oral area and is categorized as a delusional disorder, somatic type. The pathophysiology of this intractable condition remains obscure. In this study, we clarified the pathophysiology of oral cenesthopathy by evaluating regional brain perfusion. We performed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using (99m)Tc-ethylcysteinate dimer in 16 subjects (cenesthopathy:control = 8:8). The SPECT images were visually assessed qualitatively, and quantitative analyses were also performed using a three-dimensional stereotactic region-of-interest template. The visual assessment revealed a right > left perfusion asymmetry in broad areas of the brain among the patients. The quantitative analysis confirmed that the regional cerebral blood flow values on the right side were significantly larger than those on the left side for most areas of the brain in the patients. A comparison of the R/(R + L) ratios in both groups confirmed the significant brain perfusion asymmetry between the two sides in the callosomarginal, precentral, and temporal regions in the patients. Qualitative evaluation of the SPECT images revealed right > left brain perfusion asymmetry in broad regions of the brain. Moreover, the quantitative analyses confirmed the perfusion asymmetry between the two sides in the frontal and temporal areas. Those may provide the key for elucidation of the pathophysiology of oral cenesthopathy.

  5. [Influence of antiplatelet drugs (AD) on the efectiveness of combined therapy in patients with small cell lung cancer. Part I. Influence of AD on the haemostatic system].

    PubMed

    Ochmański, Władysław

    2008-01-01

    In the last years, a sharp rise in the morbidity due to lung cancer is observed, especially in the male population. Despite the intensive, multidirectional development of oncology, early detection and effective treatment of lung cancer is still limited. Its detection is delayed because of the lack of characteristic early signs. Especially poor in prognosis are patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), who usually die in consequence of distant metastases. This may result due to coating of the surface of circulating neoplastic cells with thrombocytes and clots. Platelets aggregates on the surface of neoplastic cells may have a protective action in relation to cytostatic drugs. This is why neoplastic cells that persist through this phase, implant themselves into various organs giving rise to metastases. The aim of the 1st part of the paper was to evaluate the influence of antiplatelet drugs (AD) on the haemostatic system of patients with SCLC. There is data in literature indicating a ameliorating influence of AD on time of survival of patients with certain neoplasms. The study was performed in 87 male patients aged 35-73 years with SCLC, limited to half of the chest (limited disease). After 2 i.v. chemotherapy series in 3 week intervals (VAC scheme according Greco): --Adriamycin (ADR) 40 mg on 1sq.m of body surface; --Vincristin (VCR) 1 mg; on 1sq.m of body surface; --Cyclophosfamid (CTX) 1000 mg on 1sq.m of body surface; radiation was also applied--40 Gy during 20 days on the tumor and mediastinum. The described treatment was performed in 22 patients from controls (Group I). Patients from Group II (n = 22) received additionally Defibrotide, Group III (n = 22) Ticlide and Group IV (n = 21) Aspirin. To evaluate of the influence of AD on the haemostatic system--every 3 months during the consecutive 27 weeks, the following tests were performed: bleeding time, clotting time, platelet aggregation, platelets aggregation ratio, euglobulin clot lysis time (ECLT

  6. Linear measures of temporal lobe atrophy on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) but not visual rating of white matter changes can help discrimination of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD).

    PubMed

    Saka, Esen; Dogan, Ebru Apaydin; Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Senol, Utku; Balkan, Sevin

    2007-01-01

    Clinical discrimination of the early stages of AD and MCI is challenging. MRI indices which are simple enough to be applied by non-radiologists on hard copies would be of practical importance in the discrimination. We studied 45 consecutive patients (17 with MCI, 25 with AD, 3 with normal cognitive findings) with at least one white matter lesion (WML) on axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI sequences. WML load was evaluated by Fazekas' scoring system; temporal lobe atrophy by interuncal distance (IUD) measurement. WML pattern had no significant discriminative value of AD and MCI. No significant correlation between periventricular/subcortical WML scores and neuropsychological test results was observed. The mean IUD was significantly smaller in patients with MCI compared to those with AD. The cut-off value of IUD was 28.3 mm with receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis. Area under the curve was 0.925 (95% CI: 0.800-0.983). A significant negative correlation between IUD and the mini mental state examination (MMSE), verbal fluency, clock drawing, and Rey Auditory verbal learning test (AVLT) was noted. The results indicate that measurement of IUD is a clinically useful test in discrimination of AD and MCI patients with WML(s) on brain MRI. However, severity of these lesions is not useful for distinctions.

  7. Patient specific Parkinson's disease detection for adaptive deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ameer; Zamani, Majid; Bayford, Richard; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Continuous deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease (PD) patients results in side effects and shortening of the pacemaker battery life. This can be remedied using adaptive stimulation. To achieve adaptive DBS, patient customized PD detection is required due to the inconsistency associated with biomarkers across patients and time. This paper proposes the use of patient specific feature extraction together with adaptive support vector machine (SVM) classifiers to create a patient customized detector for PD. The patient specific feature extraction is obtained using the extrema of the ratio between the PD and non-PD spectra bands of each patient as features, while the adaptive SVM classifier adjusts its decision boundary until a suitable model is obtained. This yields individualised features and classifier pairs for each patient. Datasets containing local field potentials of PD patients were used to validate the method. Six of the nine patient datasets tested achieved a classification accuracy greater than 98%. The adaptive detector is suitable for realization on chip.

  8. Physician Expectations of Treatment Outcomes for Patients With Brain Metastases Referred for Whole Brain Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Chow, Edward; Tsao, May N.; Bradley, Nicole M.; Doyle, Meagan; Li, Kathy; Lam, Kelvin; Danjoux, Cyril

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Patients with advanced cancer are referred to our Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program for quick access to palliative radiotherapy. The primary objective of this prospective study was to determine the physician expectations of the treatment outcomes for patients with brain metastases referred for whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). The secondary objectives were to determine the factors influencing the expectations and to examine the accuracy of the physician-estimated patient survival. Methods and Materials: Patients were identified during a 17-month period. The referring physicians were sent a survey by facsimile to be completed and returned before the patient consultation. Information was sought on the patient's disease status, the physician's expectations of WBRT, the estimated patient survival and performance status, and physician demographic data. Results: A total of 137 surveys were sent out, and the overall response rate was 57.7%. The median patient age was 66 years (range, 35-87), 78.5% had multiple brain metastases, 42.3% had a controlled primary tumor, and 62.3% had extracranial disease. WBRT was thought to stabilize neurologic symptoms, improve quality of life, and allow for a Decadron (dexamethasone) taper by >=94.9% of the referring physicians; 87.0% thought WBRT would improve performance status; 77.9% thought it would improve neurologic symptoms; and 40.8% thought it would improve survival. The referring physicians estimated patient survival as a median of 6.0 months; however, the actual survival was a median of 2.5 months, for a median individual difference of 1.9 months (p < .0001). Conclusion: Physicians referring patients with brain metastases for consideration of WBRT are often overly optimistic when estimating the clinical benefit of the treatment and overestimate patient survival. These findings highlight the need for education and additional research in this field.

  9. The impact of chemo brain on the patient with a high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Michele R

    2010-01-01

    Health-related quality of life for patients with high-grade gliomas has always been poor. The multiple insults to the brain-tumor existence and surgical procedures, irradiation, the level of stress and anxiety suffered and the adjuvant medications--steroids and anti-convulsants, all combine to diminish their health-related quality of life. Prior to the development of chemotherapy agents capable of penetrating the blood brain barrier, prognosis was 6 to 18 months. Life expectancy was short and there was little time to address the health-related quality of life. The newer agents have served to extend life, but have added another condition to the existing poor health-related quality of life, i.e., chemo brain. Chemo brain affects all cognitive function. The patients have great difficulty processing information. They have reduced attentional and concentration capability and cannot learn new information. The overall impact on their lives renders them unemployable and places a great burden on their families and on society. This chapter provides an overview of the patient experience and the burden placed on their families and on society.

  10. Brain metastasis reirradiation in patients with advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhou; Sun, Bing; Shen, Ge; Cha, Lei; Meng, Xiangying; Wang, Junliang; Zhou, Zhenshan; Wu, Shikai

    2017-01-01

    The outcome of recurrent brain metastasis is dismal. This study aims to assess the clinical outcomes and toxicity of reirradiation as a salvage treatment for progressive brain metastasis in patients with advanced breast cancer. Between July 2005 and September 2014, the medical records of 56 patients with brain metastasis from breast cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Of these patients, 39 received whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) followed by stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) reirradiation (Group 1), and 17 received SRS followed by WBRT reirradiation (Group 2). Overall survival (OS) and brain progression-free survival rates/times were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Prognostic factors were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Change in neurologic function was also assessed. The median OS was 10.8 months (range, 1.3–56.8 months). In Group 1, the median PFS time (PFS-1) was 6.5 months and the OS time was 11.4 months. Multivariate analysis revealed that longer OS was significantly associated with a high Karnofsky performance score (KPS) (P = 0.004), controlled extracranial metastasis (P = 0.001) and a good response to reirradiation (P = 0.034). In Group 2, the median PFS time (PFS-2) after reirradiation was 8.5 months and the OS time was 10.8 months. Multivariate analysis revealed that longer OS was significantly associated with a high KPS (P = 0.018). The majority of the patients had improved or stable neurological function. Reirradiation is an effective and a safe treatment for patients with brain metastases from breast cancer. It might delay the progression of intracranial disease and improve neurological function. A suitable patient selection for reirradiation was suggested. PMID:27707842

  11. The imagined itch: Brain circuitry supporting nocebo-induced itch in atopic dermatitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Napadow, Vitaly; Li, Ang; Loggia, Marco; Kim, Jieun; Mawla, Ishtiaq; Desbordes, Gaelle; Schalock, Peter C; Lerner, Ethan A; Tran, Thanh N; Ring, Johannes; Rosen, Bruce R; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Pfab, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Background Psychological factors are known to significantly modulate itch in patients suffering from chronic itch. Itch is also highly susceptible to both placebo and nocebo (negative placebo) effects. Brain activity likely supports nocebo-induced itch, but is currently unknown. Methods We collected functional MRI (fMRI) data from atopic dermatitis (AD) patients, in a within-subject design, and contrast brain response to nocebo saline understood to be allergen versus open-label saline control. Exploratory analyses compared results to real allergen itch response and placebo responsiveness, evaluated in the same patients. Results Nocebo saline produced greater itch than open saline control (p<0.01). Compared to open saline, nocebo saline demonstrated greater fMRI response in caudate, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), and intraparietal sulcus (iPS) - brain regions important for cognitive executive and motivational processing. Exploratory analyses found that subjects with greater dlPFC and caudate activation to nocebo-induced itch also demonstrated greater dlPFC and caudate activation, respectively, for real allergen itch. Subjects reporting greater nocebo-induced itch also demonstrated greater placebo reduction of allergen-evoked itch, suggesting increased generalized modulation of itch perception. Conclusions Our study demonstrates the capacity of nocebo saline to mimic both the sensory and neural effects of real allergens and provides an insight to the brain mechanisms supporting nocebo-induced itch in AD, thus aiding our understanding of the role that expectations and other psychological factors play in modulating itch perception in chronic itch patients. PMID:26280659

  12. Cognitive rehabilitation in non-communicative brain-damaged patients.

    PubMed

    Trojano, Luigi; Moretta, Pasquale; Cozzolino, Autilia; Saltalamacchia, Annamaria; Estraneo, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Conscious patients with severe motor and speech disorders have great difficulty interacting with the environment and communicating with other people. Several augmentative communication devices are now available to exploit these patients' expressive potential, but their use often demands considerable cognitive effort. Non-communicative patients with severe brain lesions may have, in addition, specific cognitive deficits that hinder the efficient use of augmentative communication methods. Some neuropsychological batteries are now available for testing these patients. On the basis of such cognitive assessments, cognitive rehabilitation training can now be applied, but we underline that this training must be tailored to single patients in order to allow them to communicate autonomously and efficiently.

  13. Radiation-induced dementia in patients cured of brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelis, L.M.; Delattre, J.Y.; Posner, J.B.

    1989-06-01

    When a patient with cancer develops a brain metastasis, death is usually imminent, but aggressive treatment in some patients with limited or no systemic disease yields long-term survival. In such patients, delayed deleterious effects of therapy are particularly tragic. We report 12 patients who developed delayed complications of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) given as sole treatment (4 patients) or in combination with surgical resection (8 patients). Within 5 to 36 months (median, 14) all patients developed progressive dementia, ataxia, and urinary incontinence causing severe disability in all and leading to death in 7. No patient had tumor recurrence when neurologic symptoms began. Cortical atrophy and hypodense white matter were identified by CT in all. Contrast-enhancing lesions were seen in 3 patients; 2 of the lesions yielded radionecrosis on biopsy. Autopsies on 2 patients revealed diffuse chronic edema of the hemispheric white matter in the absence of tumor recurrence. Corticosteroids and ventriculoperitoneal shunt offered significant but incomplete improvement in some patients. The total dose of WBRT was only 2,500 to 3,900 cGy, but daily fractions of 300 to 600 cGy were employed. We believe that these fractionation schedules, several of which are used commonly, predispose to delayed neurologic toxicity, and that more protracted schedules should be employed for the safe and efficacious treatment of good-risk patients with brain metastases. The incidence of WBRT-induced dementia was only 1.9 to 5.1% in the 2 populations reviewed here; however, this underestimates the incidence because only severely affected patients could be identified from chart review.

  14. Functional MRI and intraoperative brain mapping to evaluate brain plasticity in patients with brain tumours and hemiparesis

    PubMed Central

    Roux, F; Boulanouar, K; Ibarrola, D; Tremoulet, M; Chollet, F; Berry, I

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To support the hypothesis about the potential compensatory role of ipsilateral corticofugal pathways when the contralateral pathways are impaired by brain tumours.
METHODS—Retrospective analysis was carried out on the results of functional MRI (fMRI) of a selected group of five paretic patients with Rolandic brain tumours who exhibited an abnormally high ipsilateral/contralateral ratio of activation—that is, movements of the paretic hand activated predominately the ipsilateral cortex. Brain activation was achieved with a flexion extension of the fingers. Statistical parametric activation was obtained using a t test and a threshold of p<0.001. These patients, candidates for tumour resection, also underwent cortical intraoperative stimulation that was correlated to the fMRI spatial data using three dimensional reconstructions of the brain. Three patients also had postoperative control fMRI.
RESULTS—The absence of fMRI activation of the primary sensorimotor cortex normally innervating the paretic hand for the threshold chosen, was correlated with completely negative cortical responses of the cortical hand area during the operation. The preoperative fMRI activation of these patients predominantly found in the ipsilateral frontal and primary sensorimotor cortices could be related to the residual ipsilateral hand function. Postoperatively, the fMRI activation returned to more classic patterns of activation, reflecting the consequences of therapy.
CONCLUSION—In paretic patients with brain tumours, ipsilateral control could be implicated in the residual hand function, when the normal primary pathways are impaired. The possibility that functional tissue still remains in the peritumorous sensorimotor cortex even when the preoperative fMRI and the cortical intraoperative stimulations are negative, should be taken into account when planning the tumour resection and during the operation.

 PMID:10990503

  15. Factors affecting the cerebral network in brain tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Heimans, Jan J; Reijneveld, Jaap C

    2012-06-01

    Brain functions, including cognitive functions, are frequently disturbed in brain tumor patients. These disturbances may result from the tumor itself, but also from the treatment directed against the tumor. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy all may affect cerebral functioning, both in a positive as well as in a negative way. Apart from the anti-tumor treatment, glioma patients often receive glucocorticoids and anti-epileptic drugs, which both also have influence on brain functioning. The effect of a brain tumor on cerebral functioning is often more global than should be expected on the basis of the local character of the disease, and this is thought to be a consequence of disturbance of the cerebral network as a whole. Any network, whether it be a neural, a social or an electronic network, can be described in parameters assessing the topological characteristics of that particular network. Repeated assessment of neural network characteristics in brain tumor patients during their disease course enables study of the dynamics of neural networks and provides more insight into the plasticity of the diseased brain. Functional MRI, electroencephalography and especially magnetoencephalography are used to measure brain function and the signals that are being registered with these techniques can be analyzed with respect to network characteristics such as "synchronization" and "clustering". Evidence accumulates that loss of optimal neural network architecture negatively impacts complex cerebral functioning and also decreases the threshold to develop epileptic seizures. Future research should be focused on both plasticity of neural networks and the factors that have impact on that plasticity as well as the possible role of assessment of neural network characteristics in the determination of cerebral function during the disease course.

  16. Brain Tumor Database, a free relational database for collection and analysis of brain tumor patient information.

    PubMed

    Bergamino, Maurizio; Hamilton, David J; Castelletti, Lara; Barletta, Laura; Castellan, Lucio

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we describe the development and utilization of a relational database designed to manage the clinical and radiological data of patients with brain tumors. The Brain Tumor Database was implemented using MySQL v.5.0, while the graphical user interface was created using PHP and HTML, thus making it easily accessible through a web browser. This web-based approach allows for multiple institutions to potentially access the database. The BT Database can record brain tumor patient information (e.g. clinical features, anatomical attributes, and radiological characteristics) and be used for clinical and research purposes. Analytic tools to automatically generate statistics and different plots are provided. The BT Database is a free and powerful user-friendly tool with a wide range of possible clinical and research applications in neurology and neurosurgery. The BT Database graphical user interface source code and manual are freely available at http://tumorsdatabase.altervista.org.

  17. Brain Metabolism Changes in Patients Infected with HTLV-1.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Manuel; Romanelli, Luiz C F; Rosa, Daniela V; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna B F; Nicolato, Rodrigo; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Brammer, Michael; de Miranda, Débora M

    2017-01-01

    The Human T-cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-1) is the causal agent of HTLV-associated myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HAM/TSP is the result of demyelination and cell death in the spinal cord and disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), mediated by a virus-induced inflammatory response. In this study, we applied Positron Emission Tomography with 18F-fluordeoxyglucose (18F-FDG PET) to evaluate brain metabolism in a group of 47 patients infected with HTLV-1, and 18 healthy controls. Patients were divided into three groups according to their neurological symptoms. A machine learning (ML) based Gaussian Processes classification algorithm (GPC) was applied to classify between patient groups and controls and also to organize the three patient groups, based on gray and white matter brain metabolism. We found that GPC was able to differentiate the HAM/TSP group from controls with 85% accuracy (p = 0.003) and the asymptomatic seropositive patients from controls with 85.7% accuracy (p = 0.001). The weight map suggests diffuse cortical hypometabolism in both patient groups when compared to controls. We also found that the GPC could separate the asymptomatic HTLV-1 patients from the HAM/TSP patients, but with a lower accuracy (72.7%, p = 0.026). The weight map suggests a diffuse pattern of lower metabolism in the asymptomatic group when compared to the HAM/TSP group. These results are compatible with distinctive patterns of glucose uptake into the brain of HTLV-1 patients, including those without neurological symptoms, which differentiate them from controls. Furthermore, our results might unveil surprising aspects of the pathophysiology of HAM/TSP and related diseases, as well as new therapeutic strategies.

  18. Brain Metabolism Changes in Patients Infected with HTLV-1

    PubMed Central

    Schütze, Manuel; Romanelli, Luiz C. F.; Rosa, Daniela V.; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna B. F.; Nicolato, Rodrigo; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Brammer, Michael; de Miranda, Débora M.

    2017-01-01

    The Human T-cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-1) is the causal agent of HTLV-associated myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HAM/TSP is the result of demyelination and cell death in the spinal cord and disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), mediated by a virus-induced inflammatory response. In this study, we applied Positron Emission Tomography with 18F-fluordeoxyglucose (18F-FDG PET) to evaluate brain metabolism in a group of 47 patients infected with HTLV-1, and 18 healthy controls. Patients were divided into three groups according to their neurological symptoms. A machine learning (ML) based Gaussian Processes classification algorithm (GPC) was applied to classify between patient groups and controls and also to organize the three patient groups, based on gray and white matter brain metabolism. We found that GPC was able to differentiate the HAM/TSP group from controls with 85% accuracy (p = 0.003) and the asymptomatic seropositive patients from controls with 85.7% accuracy (p = 0.001). The weight map suggests diffuse cortical hypometabolism in both patient groups when compared to controls. We also found that the GPC could separate the asymptomatic HTLV-1 patients from the HAM/TSP patients, but with a lower accuracy (72.7%, p = 0.026). The weight map suggests a diffuse pattern of lower metabolism in the asymptomatic group when compared to the HAM/TSP group. These results are compatible with distinctive patterns of glucose uptake into the brain of HTLV-1 patients, including those without neurological symptoms, which differentiate them from controls. Furthermore, our results might unveil surprising aspects of the pathophysiology of HAM/TSP and related diseases, as well as new therapeutic strategies. PMID:28293169

  19. Brain investigation and brain conceptualization

    PubMed Central

    Redolfi, Alberto; Bosco, Paolo; Manset, David; Frisoni, Giovanni B.

    Summary The brain of a patient with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) undergoes changes starting many years before the development of the first clinical symptoms. The recent availability of large prospective datasets makes it possible to create sophisticated brain models of healthy subjects and patients with AD, showing pathophysiological changes occurring over time. However, these models are still inadequate; representations are mainly single-scale and they do not account for the complexity and interdependence of brain changes. Brain changes in AD patients occur at different levels and for different reasons: at the molecular level, changes are due to amyloid deposition; at cellular level, to loss of neuron synapses, and at tissue level, to connectivity disruption. All cause extensive atrophy of the whole brain organ. Initiatives aiming to model the whole human brain have been launched in Europe and the US with the goal of reducing the burden of brain diseases. In this work, we describe a new approach to earlier diagnosis based on a multimodal and multiscale brain concept, built upon existing and well-characterized single modalities. PMID:24139654

  20. Apnea test in the determination of brain death in patients treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).

    PubMed

    Saucha, Wojciech; Sołek-Pastuszka, Joanna; Bohatyrewicz, Romuald; Knapik, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) is a well-established method of support in patients with severe respiratory and/or circulatory failure. Unfortunately, this invasive method of treatment is associated with a high risk of neurological complications including brain death. Proper diagnosis of brain death is crucial for the termination of futile medical care. Currently, the legal system in Poland does not provide an accepted protocol for apnea tests for patients on ECMO support. Veno-arterial ECMO is particularly problematic in this regard because it provides both gas exchange and circulatory support. CO₂ elimination by ECMO prevents hypercapnia, which is required to perform an apnea test. Several authors have described a safe apnea test procedure in patients on ECMO. Maximal reduction of the sweep gas flow to the oxygenator should maintain an acceptable haemoglobin oxygenation level and reduce elimination of carbon dioxide. Hypercapnia achieved via this method should allow an apnea test to be conducted in the typical manner. In the case of profound desaturation and an inadequate increase in the arterial CO₂ concentration, the sweep gas flow rate may be increased to obtain the desired oxygenation level, and exogenous carbon dioxide may be added to achieve a target carbon dioxide level. Incorporation of an apnea test for ECMO patients is planned in the next edition of the Polish guidelines on the determination of brain death.

  1. [Lung-brain interaction in the mechanically ventilated patient].

    PubMed

    López-Aguilar, J; Fernández-Gonzalo, M S; Turon, M; Quílez, M E; Gómez-Simón, V; Jódar, M M; Blanch, L

    2013-10-01

    Patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) admitted to the ICU present neuropsychological alterations, which in most cases extend beyond the acute phase and have an important adverse effect upon quality of life. The aim of this review is to deepen in the analysis of the complex interaction between lung and brain in critically ill patients subjected to mechanical ventilation. This update first describes the neuropsychological alterations occurring both during the acute phase of ICU stay and at discharge, followed by an analysis of lung-brain interactions during mechanical ventilation, and finally explores the etiology and mechanisms leading to the neurological disorders observed in these patients. The management of critical patients requires an integral approach focused on minimizing the deleterious effects over the short, middle or long term.

  2. Volumetric brain abnormalities in polysubstance use disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Noyan, Cemal Onur; Kose, Samet; Nurmedov, Serdar; Metin, Baris; Darcin, Aslı Enez; Dilbaz, Nesrin

    2016-01-01

    Aim Polysubstance users represent the largest group of patients seeking treatment at addiction and rehabilitation clinics in Turkey. There is little knowledge about the structural brain abnormalities seen in polysubstance users. This study was conducted to examine the structural brain differences between polysubstance use disorder patients and healthy control subjects using voxel-based morphometry. Methods Forty-six male polysubstance use disorder patients in the early abstinence period and 30 healthy male controls underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging scans. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed to examine gray matter (GM) abnormality differences. Results Polysubstance use disorder patients displayed significantly smaller GM volume in the thalamus, temporal pole, superior frontal gyrus, cerebellum, gyrus rectus, occipital lobe, anterior cingulate cortex, superior temporal gyrus, and postcentral gyrus. Conclusion A widespread and smaller GM volume has been found at different regions of the frontal, temporal, occipital, and parietal lobes, cerebellum, and anterior cingulate cortex in polysubstance users. PMID:27358566

  3. Hemispheric Visual Attentional Imbalance in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlovskaya, Marina; Groswasser, Zeev; Keren, Ofer; Mordvinov, Eugene; Hochstein, Shaul

    2007-01-01

    We find a spatially asymmetric allocation of attention in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) despite the lack of obvious asymmetry in neurological indicators. Identification performance was measured for simple spatial patterns presented briefly to a locus 5 degrees into the left or right hemifield, after precuing attention to the same…

  4. The Effect of Souvenaid on Functional Brain Network Organisation in Patients with Mild Alzheimer’s Disease: A Randomised Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    de Waal, Hanneke; Stam, Cornelis J.; Lansbergen, Marieke M.; Wieggers, Rico L.; Kamphuis, Patrick J. G. H.; Scheltens, Philip; Maestú, Fernando; van Straaten, Elisabeth C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Synaptic loss is a major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Disturbed organisation of large-scale functional brain networks in AD might reflect synaptic loss and disrupted neuronal communication. The medical food Souvenaid, containing the specific nutrient combination Fortasyn Connect, is designed to enhance synapse formation and function and has been shown to improve memory performance in patients with mild AD in two randomised controlled trials. Objective To explore the effect of Souvenaid compared to control product on brain activity-based networks, as a derivative of underlying synaptic function, in patients with mild AD. Design A 24-week randomised, controlled, double-blind, parallel-group, multi-country study. Participants 179 drug-naïve mild AD patients who participated in the Souvenir II study. Intervention Patients were randomised 1∶1 to receive Souvenaid or an iso-caloric control product once daily for 24 weeks. Outcome In a secondary analysis of the Souvenir II study, electroencephalography (EEG) brain networks were constructed and graph theory was used to quantify complex brain structure. Local brain network connectivity (normalised clustering coefficient gamma) and global network integration (normalised characteristic path length lambda) were compared between study groups, and related to memory performance. Results The network measures in the beta band were significantly different between groups: they decreased in the control group, but remained relatively unchanged in the active group. No consistent relationship was found between these network measures and memory performance. Conclusions The current results suggest that Souvenaid preserves the organisation of brain networks in patients with mild AD within 24 weeks, hypothetically counteracting the progressive network disruption over time in AD. The results strengthen the hypothesis that Souvenaid affects synaptic integrity and function. Secondly, we conclude that advanced EEG

  5. Biothermal Model of Patient and Automatic Control System of Brain Temperature for Brain Hypothermia Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakamatsu, Hidetoshi; Gaohua, Lu

    Various surface-cooling apparatus such as the cooling cap, muffler and blankets have been commonly used for the cooling of the brain to provide hypothermic neuro-protection for patients of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The present paper is aimed at the brain temperature regulation from the viewpoint of automatic system control, in order to help clinicians decide an optimal temperature of the cooling fluid provided for these three types of apparatus. At first, a biothermal model characterized by dynamic ambient temperatures is constructed for adult patient, especially on account of the clinical practice of hypothermia and anesthesia in the brain hypothermia treatment. Secondly, the model is represented by the state equation as a lumped parameter linear dynamic system. The biothermal model is justified from their various responses corresponding to clinical phenomena and treatment. Finally, the optimal regulator is tentatively designed to give clinicians some suggestions on the optimal temperature regulation of the patient’s brain. It suggests the patient’s brain temperature could be optimally controlled to follow-up the temperature process prescribed by the clinicians. This study benefits us a great clinical possibility for the automatic hypothermia treatment.

  6. Brain resting state is disrupted in chronic back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Balenzuela, Pablo; Fraiman, Daniel; Chialvo, Dante R.

    2010-01-01

    Recent brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that chronic back pain (CBP) alters brain dynamics beyond the feeling of pain. In particular, the response of the brain default mode network (DMN) during an attention task was found abnormal. In the present work similar alterations are demonstrated for spontaneous resting patterns of fMRI brain activity over a population of CBP patients (n=12, 29–67 years old, mean=51.2). Results show abnormal correlations of three out of four highly connected sites of the DMN with bilateral insular cortex and regions in the middle frontal gyrus (p<0.05), in comparison with a control group of healthy subjects (n=20, 21–60 years old, mean=38.4). The alterations were confirmed by the calculation of triggered averages, which demonstrated increased coactivation of the DMN and the former regions. These findings demonstrate that CBP disrupts normal activity in the DMN even during the brain resting state, highlighting the impact of enduring pain over brain structure and function. PMID:20800649

  7. Focally perfused succinate potentiates brain metabolism in head injury patients.

    PubMed

    Jalloh, Ibrahim; Helmy, Adel; Howe, Duncan J; Shannon, Richard J; Grice, Peter; Mason, Andrew; Gallagher, Clare N; Stovell, Matthew G; van der Heide, Susan; Murphy, Michael P; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Carpenter, T Adrian; Hutchinson, Peter J; Carpenter, Keri Lh

    2016-01-01

    Following traumatic brain injury, complex cerebral energy perturbations occur. Correlating with unfavourable outcome, high brain extracellular lactate/pyruvate ratio suggests hypoxic metabolism and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. We investigated whether focal administration of succinate, a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate interacting directly with the mitochondrial electron transport chain, could improve cerebral metabolism. Microdialysis perfused disodium 2,3-(13)C2 succinate (12 mmol/L) for 24 h into nine sedated traumatic brain injury patients' brains, with simultaneous microdialysate collection for ISCUS analysis of energy metabolism biomarkers (nine patients) and nuclear magnetic resonance of (13)C-labelled metabolites (six patients). Metabolites 2,3-(13)C2 malate and 2,3-(13)C2 glutamine indicated tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism, and 2,3-(13)C2 lactate suggested tricarboxylic acid cycle spinout of pyruvate (by malic enzyme or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate kinase), then lactate dehydrogenase-mediated conversion to lactate. Versus baseline, succinate perfusion significantly decreased lactate/pyruvate ratio (p = 0.015), mean difference -12%, due to increased pyruvate concentration (+17%); lactate changed little (-3%); concentrations decreased for glutamate (-43%) (p = 0.018) and glucose (-15%) (p = 0.038). Lower lactate/pyruvate ratio suggests better redox status: cytosolic NADH recycled to NAD(+) by mitochondrial shuttles (malate-aspartate and/or glycerol 3-phosphate), diminishing lactate dehydrogenase-mediated pyruvate-to-lactate conversion, and lowering glutamate. Glucose decrease suggests improved utilisation. Direct tricarboxylic acid cycle supplementation with 2,3-(13)C2 succinate improved human traumatic brain injury brain chemistry, indicated by biomarkers and (13)C-labelling patterns in metabolites.

  8. Brain function during cognitive flexibility and white matter integrity in alcohol-dependent patients, problematic drinkers and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jochem M; van Holst, Ruth J; van den Brink, Wim; Veltman, Dick J; Caan, Matthan W A; Goudriaan, Anna E

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive flexibility has been associated with prefrontal white matter (WM) integrity in healthy controls (HCs), showing that lower WM integrity is associated with worse performance. Although both cognitive flexibility and WM integrity have been found to be aberrant in alcohol-dependent (AD) patients, the relationship between the two has never been tested. In this study, we investigated the association between WM tract density and cognitive flexibility in patients with AD (n = 26) and HCs (n = 22). In order to assess the influence of AD severity, we also included a group of problematic drinkers (PrDs; n = 23) who did not meet the AD criteria. Behavioral responses and brain activity during a cognitive flexibility task were measured during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Probabilistic fiber tracking was performed between the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the basal ganglia; two crucial regions for task switching. Finally, the task-related functional connectivity between these areas was assessed. There were no significant group differences in the task performance. However, compared with HCs, AD patients and PrDs showed decreased WM integrity and increased prefrontal brain activation during task switching. Evidence is presented for a compensatory mechanism, involving recruitment of additional prefrontal resources in order to compensate for WM and neural function impairments in AD patients and PrDs. Although present in both alcohol groups, the PrDs were more successful in invoking this compensatory mechanism when compared to the AD patients. We propose that this may therefore serve as a protective factor, precluding transition from problematic drinking into alcohol dependence.

  9. Endogenous lipoid pneumonia in a cachectic patient after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji; Mu, Jiao; Lin, Wei; Dong, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous lipoid pneumonia (EnLP) is an uncommon non-life-threatening inflammatory lung disease that usually occurs in patients with conditions such as lung cancers, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and undifferentiated connective tissue disease. Here we report a case of EnLP in a paralytic and cachectic patient with bronchopneumonia after brain injury. A 40-year-old man experienced a severe brain injury in an automobile accident. He was treated for 1 month and his status plateaued. However, he became paralyzed and developed cachexia and ultimately died 145 days after the accident. Macroscopically, multifocal yellowish firm nodules were visible on scattered gross lesions throughout the lungs. Histologically, many foam cells had accumulated within the alveoli and alveolar walls accompanied by a surrounding interstitial infiltration of lymphocytes. The findings were in accordance with a diagnosis of EnLP. Bronchopneumonia was also noted. To our knowledge, there have been few reports of EnLP associated with bronchopneumonia and cachexia after brain injury. This uncommon pathogenesis should be well recognized by clinicians and forensic pathologists. The case reported here should prompt medical staff to increase the nutritional status and fight pulmonary infections in patients with brain injury to prevent the development of EnLP. PMID:26097618

  10. Endogenous lipoid pneumonia in a cachectic patient after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Mu, Jiao; Lin, Wei; Dong, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous lipoid pneumonia (EnLP) is an uncommon non-life-threatening inflammatory lung disease that usually occurs in patients with conditions such as lung cancers, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and undifferentiated connective tissue disease. Here we report a case of EnLP in a paralytic and cachectic patient with bronchopneumonia after brain injury. A 40-year-old man experienced a severe brain injury in an automobile accident. He was treated for 1 month and his status plateaued. However, he became paralyzed and developed cachexia and ultimately died 145 days after the accident. Macroscopically, multifocal yellowish firm nodules were visible on scattered gross lesions throughout the lungs. Histologically, many foam cells had accumulated within the alveoli and alveolar walls accompanied by a surrounding interstitial infiltration of lymphocytes. The findings were in accordance with a diagnosis of EnLP. Bronchopneumonia was also noted. To our knowledge, there have been few reports of EnLP associated with bronchopneumonia and cachexia after brain injury. This uncommon pathogenesis should be well recognized by clinicians and forensic pathologists. The case reported here should prompt medical staff to increase the nutritional status and fight pulmonary infections in patients with brain injury to prevent the development of EnLP.

  11. Factors affecting intellectual outcome in pediatric brain tumor patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ellenberg, L.; McComb, J.G.; Siegel, S.E.; Stowe, S.

    1987-11-01

    A prospective study utilizing repeated intellectual testing was undertaken in 73 children with brain tumors consecutively admitted to Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles over a 3-year period to determine the effect of tumor location, extent of surgical resection, hydrocephalus, age of the child, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy on cognitive outcome. Forty-three patients were followed for at least two sequential intellectual assessments and provide the data for this study. Children with hemispheric tumors had the most general cognitive impairment. The degree of tumor resection, adequately treated hydrocephalus, and chemotherapy had no bearing on intellectual outcome. Age of the child affected outcome mainly as it related to radiation. Whole brain radiation therapy was associated with cognitive decline. This was especially true in children below 7 years of age, who experienced a very significant loss of function after whole brain radiation therapy.

  12. Increased BMP6 levels in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients and APP transgenic mice are accompanied by impaired neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Crews, Leslie; Adame, Anthony; Patrick, Christina; Delaney, Alexandra; Pham, Emiley; Rockenstein, Edward; Hansen, Lawrence; Masliah, Eliezer

    2010-09-15

    During aging and in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), synaptic plasticity and neuronal integrity are disturbed. In addition to the alterations in plasticity in mature neurons, the neurodegenerative process in AD has been shown to be accompanied by alterations in neurogenesis. Members of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family of growth factors have been implicated as important regulators of neurogenesis and neuronal cell fate determination during development; however, their role in adult neurogenesis and in AD is less clear. We show here by qRT-PCR analysis that BMP6 mRNA levels were significantly increased in the hippocampus of human patients with AD and in APP transgenic mice compared to controls. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed that BMP6 protein levels were increased in human AD brains and APP transgenic mouse brains compared to controls and accumulated around hippocampal plaques. The increased levels of BMP6 were accompanied by defects in hippocampal neurogenesis in AD patients and APP transgenic mice. In support of a role for BMP6 in defective neurogenesis in AD, we show in an in vitro model of adult neurogenesis that treatment with amyloid-β(1-42) protein (Aβ) resulted in increased expression of BMP6, and that exposure to recombinant BMP6 resulted in reduced proliferation with no toxic effects. Together, these results suggest that Aβ-associated increases in BMP6 expression in AD may have deleterious effects on neurogenesis in the hippocampus, and therapeutic approaches could focus on normalization of BMP6 levels to protect against AD-related neurogenic deficits.

  13. Visuospatial attention deficit in patients with local brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Qing; Lan, Yue; Huang, Dong-Feng; Rao, De-Zhong; Pei, Zhong; Chen, Ling; Zeng, Jin-Sheng

    2010-03-31

    The disability of visuospatial attention can lead to poor volitional movement and functional recovery in patients with brain lesions. However, the accurate clinical method to assess visuospatial attention is limited. The frontoparietal network including the posterior parietal cortex and the frontal eye fields has been shown to involve in visuospatial attention. The Attention Network Test provided measures for three different components of visuospatial attention: alerting, orienting and executive control. This study was to probe the deficit and relationship of visuospatial attention using Attention Network Test paradigm in patients with frontoparietal network lesions. During this task, patients responded significantly slower on each cue condition and target type than controls, and showed deficits in the alerting and orienting networks. The efficiency of resolving conflict was decreased in patients with frontal lesions whereas this was increased in patients with parietal lesions. These findings suggest that the frontoparietal network is involved in the alerting and orienting attentional function and the executive function is possibly selectively associated with the frontal lobe. The Attention Network Test paradigm produces sensitive, valid and reliable subject estimates of visuospatial attention function in patients with brain lesions, and may be useful for clinical rehabilitation strategy selection for patients with the frontoparietal network lesions.

  14. Brain changes in diabetes mellitus patients with gastrointestinal symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Anne M; Søfteland, Eirik; Dimcevski, Georg; Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjær, Jens B; Krogh, Klaus; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. In various studies up to 30%-70% of patients present dysfunction and complications related to the gut. To date several clinical studies have demonstrated that autonomic nervous system neuropathy and generalized neuropathy of the central nervous system (CNS) may play a major role. This systematic review provides an overview of the neurodegenerative changes that occur as a consequence of diabetes with a focus on the CNS changes and gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction. Animal models where diabetes was induced experimentally support that the disease induces changes in CNS. Recent investigations with electroencephalography and functional brain imaging in patients with diabetes confirm these structural and functional brain changes. Encephalographic studies demonstrated that altered insular processing of sensory stimuli seems to be a key player in symptom generation. In fact one study indicated that the more GI symptoms the patients experienced, the deeper the insular electrical source was located. The electroencephalography was often used in combination with quantitative sensory testing mainly showing hyposensitivity to stimulation of GI organs. Imaging studies on patients with diabetes and GI symptoms mainly showed microstructural changes, especially in brain areas involved in visceral sensory processing. As the electrophysiological and imaging changes were associated with GI and autonomic symptoms they may represent a future therapeutic target for treating diabetics either pharmacologically or with neuromodulation. PMID:26839652

  15. Agnosias: recognition disorders in patients with brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Gainotti, Guido

    2012-06-01

    Two main varieties of recognition disorders are distinguished in neuropsychology: agnosias and semantic disorders. The term agnosias is generally used to denote recognition defects limited to a single perceptual modality (which is itself apparently intact), whereas the term semantic disorders is used to denote recognition defects involving all the sensory modalities in a roughly similar manner. Brain tumors can be one of the aetiologies underlying agnosias and semantic disorders. However, due to the heterogeneity and the rarity of recognition disorders, their investigation can be useful only to suggest or exclude the oncological nature of a brain lesion, but not to systematically monitor the clinical outcome in tumor patients. Furthermore, the relevance of recognition disorders as a hint toward a diagnosis of brain tumor varies according to the type of agnosia and of semantic disorder and the localization of the underlying brain pathology. The hypothesis that a variety of agnosia (or of semantic disorder) may be due to a neoplastic lesion can, therefore, be advanced if it is consistent with our knowledge about the usual localization and the growing patterns of different types of brain tumors.

  16. Disrupted Brain Functional Network Architecture in Chronic Tinnitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chen; Feng, Yuan; Xu, Jin-Jing; Mao, Cun-Nan; Xia, Wenqing; Ren, Jun; Yin, Xindao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have demonstrated the disruptions of multiple brain networks in tinnitus patients. Nonetheless, several studies found no differences in network processing between tinnitus patients and healthy controls (HCs). Its neural bases are poorly understood. To identify aberrant brain network architecture involved in chronic tinnitus, we compared the resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) patterns of tinnitus patients and HCs. Materials and Methods: Chronic tinnitus patients (n = 24) with normal hearing thresholds and age-, sex-, education- and hearing threshold-matched HCs (n = 22) participated in the current study and underwent the rs-fMRI scanning. We used degree centrality (DC) to investigate functional connectivity (FC) strength of the whole-brain network and Granger causality to analyze effective connectivity in order to explore directional aspects involved in tinnitus. Results: Compared to HCs, we found significantly increased network centrality in bilateral superior frontal gyrus (SFG). Unidirectionally, the left SFG revealed increased effective connectivity to the left middle orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), left posterior lobe of cerebellum (PLC), left postcentral gyrus, and right middle occipital gyrus (MOG) while the right SFG exhibited enhanced effective connectivity to the right supplementary motor area (SMA). In addition, the effective connectivity from the bilateral SFG to the OFC and SMA showed positive correlations with tinnitus distress. Conclusions: Rs-fMRI provides a new and novel method for identifying aberrant brain network architecture. Chronic tinnitus patients have disrupted FC strength and causal connectivity mostly in non-auditory regions, especially the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The current findings will provide a new perspective for understanding the neuropathophysiological mechanisms in chronic tinnitus. PMID:27458377

  17. BrainAGE in Mild Cognitive Impaired Patients: Predicting the Conversion to Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Gaser, Christian; Franke, Katja; Klöppel, Stefan; Koutsouleris, Nikolaos; Sauer, Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, shares many aspects of abnormal brain aging. We present a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based biomarker that predicts the individual progression of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to AD on the basis of pathological brain aging patterns. By employing kernel regression methods, the expression of normal brain-aging patterns forms the basis to estimate the brain age of a given new subject. If the estimated age is higher than the chronological age, a positive brain age gap estimation (BrainAGE) score indicates accelerated atrophy and is considered a risk factor for conversion to AD. Here, the BrainAGE framework was applied to predict the individual brain ages of 195 subjects with MCI at baseline, of which a total of 133 developed AD during 36 months of follow-up (corresponding to a pre-test probability of 68%). The ability of the BrainAGE framework to correctly identify MCI-converters was compared with the performance of commonly used cognitive scales, hippocampus volume, and state-of-the-art biomarkers derived from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). With accuracy rates of up to 81%, BrainAGE outperformed all cognitive scales and CSF biomarkers in predicting conversion of MCI to AD within 3 years of follow-up. Each additional year in the BrainAGE score was associated with a 10% greater risk of developing AD (hazard rate: 1.10 [CI: 1.07-1.13]). Furthermore, the post-test probability was increased to 90% when using baseline BrainAGE scores to predict conversion to AD. The presented framework allows an accurate prediction even with multicenter data. Its fast and fully automated nature facilitates the integration into the clinical workflow. It can be exploited as a tool for screening as well as for monitoring treatment options.

  18. BrainAGE in Mild Cognitive Impaired Patients: Predicting the Conversion to Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Klöppel, Stefan; Koutsouleris, Nikolaos; Sauer, Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, shares many aspects of abnormal brain aging. We present a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based biomarker that predicts the individual progression of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to AD on the basis of pathological brain aging patterns. By employing kernel regression methods, the expression of normal brain-aging patterns forms the basis to estimate the brain age of a given new subject. If the estimated age is higher than the chronological age, a positive brain age gap estimation (BrainAGE) score indicates accelerated atrophy and is considered a risk factor for conversion to AD. Here, the BrainAGE framework was applied to predict the individual brain ages of 195 subjects with MCI at baseline, of which a total of 133 developed AD during 36 months of follow-up (corresponding to a pre-test probability of 68%). The ability of the BrainAGE framework to correctly identify MCI-converters was compared with the performance of commonly used cognitive scales, hippocampus volume, and state-of-the-art biomarkers derived from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). With accuracy rates of up to 81%, BrainAGE outperformed all cognitive scales and CSF biomarkers in predicting conversion of MCI to AD within 3 years of follow-up. Each additional year in the BrainAGE score was associated with a 10% greater risk of developing AD (hazard rate: 1.10 [CI: 1.07–1.13]). Furthermore, the post-test probability was increased to 90% when using baseline BrainAGE scores to predict conversion to AD. The presented framework allows an accurate prediction even with multicenter data. Its fast and fully automated nature facilitates the integration into the clinical workflow. It can be exploited as a tool for screening as well as for monitoring treatment options. PMID:23826273

  19. Rationale for the use of upfront whole brain irradiation in patients with brain metastases from breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tallet, Agnes V; Azria, David; Le Rhun, Emilie; Barlesi, Fabrice; Carpentier, Antoine F; Gonçalves, Antony; Taillibert, Sophie; Dhermain, Frédéric; Spano, Jean-Philippe; Metellus, Philippe

    2014-05-08

    Breast cancer is the second most common cause of brain metastases and deserves particular attention in relation to current prolonged survival of patients with metastatic disease. Advances in both systemic therapies and brain local treatments (surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery) have led to a reappraisal of brain metastases management. With respect to this, the literature review presented here was conducted in an attempt to collect medical evidence-based data on the use of whole-brain radiotherapy for the treatment of brain metastases from breast cancer. In addition, this study discusses here the potential differences in outcomes between patients with brain metastases from breast cancer and those with brain metastases from other primary malignancies and the potential implications within a treatment strategy.

  20. Brain Gray Matter Deficits in Patients with Chronic Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Eun Yeon; Noh, Hyun Jin; Kim, Jeong-Sik; Koo, Dae Lim; Kim, Daeyoung; Hwang, Kyoung Jin; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Mi Rim; Hong, Seung Bong

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To investigate the structural changes in patients with chronic primary insomnia and the relationships with clinical features of insomnia. Design: Statistical parametric mapping 8-based voxel-based morphometry was used to identify differences in regional gray and white matter between patients with chronic primary insomnia and normal controls. Setting: University hospital. Patients and Participants: Twenty-seven patients and 27 age/sex-matched controls. Interventions: Regional differences were compared using two-sample t-tests with age, sex, and intracranial volume as covariates. Measurements and Results: The patients were a mean age of 52.3 y and had a mean history of insomnia of 7.6 y. Patients displayed cognitive deficits in attention, frontal/executive function, and nonverbal memory. Patients also displayed significantly reduced gray matter concentrations (GMCs) in dorsolateral prefrontal and pericentral cortices, superior temporal gyrus, and cerebellum and decreased gray matter volumes in medial frontal and middle temporal gyri compared with control patients with the cluster threshold ≥ 50 voxels at the level of uncorrected P < 0.001. Negative correlations were found between GMC of the prefrontal cortex and insomnia severity and the wakefulness after sleep onset, and between GMC of pericentral cortex and sleep latencies. None of the findings continued to be significant after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions: We found gray matter deficits in multiple brain regions including bilateral frontal lobes in patients with psychophysiologic insomnia. Gray matter deficit of the pericentral and lateral temporal areas may be associated with the difficulties in sleep initiation and maintenance. It is still unclear whether gray matter reductions are a preexisting abnormality or a consequence of insomnia. Citation: Joo EY; Noh HJ; Kim JS; Koo DL; Kim D; Hwang KJ; Kim JY; Kim ST; Kim MR; Hong SB. Brain gray matter deficits in patients with

  1. Brain metastasis: analysis of patients without known cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dhopesh, V.P.; Yagnik, P.M.

    1985-02-01

    A retrospective review of the charts of patients receiving radiation therapy for brain metastasis revealed that one third presented neurologic symptoms without prior diagnosis of cancer. Lung cancer was detected in two thirds of this group, and in one third, the primary site remained unknown. There was good clinical and CT correlation. CT scans with and without contrast injection were evaluated in the study. 6 references, 4 tables.

  2. Exenatide promotes cognitive enhancement and positive brain metabolic changes in PS1-KI mice but has no effects in 3xTg-AD animals

    PubMed Central

    Bomba, M; Ciavardelli, D; Silvestri, E; Canzoniero, L MT; Lattanzio, R; Chiappini, P; Piantelli, M; Di Ilio, C; Consoli, A; Sensi, S L

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor for cognitive dysfunction or dementia. Insulin resistance is often associated with T2DM and can induce defective insulin signaling in the central nervous system as well as increase the risk of cognitive impairment in the elderly. Glucagone like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone and, like GLP-1 analogs, stimulates insulin secretion and has been employed in the treatment of T2DM. GLP-1 and GLP-1 analogs also enhance synaptic plasticity and counteract cognitive deficits in mouse models of neuronal dysfunction and/or degeneration. In this study, we investigated the potential neuroprotective effects of long-term treatment with exenatide, a GLP-1 analog, in two animal models of neuronal dysfunction: the PS1-KI and 3xTg-AD mice. We found that exenatide promoted beneficial effects on short- and long-term memory performances in PS1-KI but not in 3xTg-AD animals. In PS1-KI mice, the drug increased brain lactate dehydrogenase activity leading to a net increase in lactate levels, while no effects were observed on mitochondrial respiration. On the contrary, exenatide had no effects on brain metabolism of 3xTg-AD mice. In summary, our data indicate that exenatide improves cognition in PS1-KI mice, an effect likely driven by increasing the brain anaerobic glycolysis rate. PMID:23640454

  3. Brain morphological alternation in chronic pain patients with neuropathic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sugimine, Satomi; Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Obata, Hideaki; Saito, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuropathic characteristics are highly involved in the development of chronic pain both physically and psychologically. However, little is known about the relationship between neuropathic characteristics and brain morphological alteration. Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanisms of chronic pain development by examining the above-mentioned relationships by voxel-based morphometry in patients with chronic pain. Methods First, we assessed neuropathic characteristics using the painDETECT Questionnaire in 12 chronic pain patients. Second, to assess the gray matter volume changes by voxel-based morphometry, we conducted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. We applied multiregression analysis of these two assessment methods. Results There were significant positive correlations between painDETECT Questionnaire scores and the gray matter volume in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex and right posterior cingulate cortex. Conclusions Our findings suggest that neuropathic characteristics strongly affect the brain regions related to modulation of pain in patients with chronic pain and, therefore, contribute to the severity of chronic pain. PMID:27284013

  4. Repetitive Traumatic Brain Injury in Patients From Kashan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fakharian, Esmaeil; Mohammadzadeh, Mahdi; Behdadmehr, Shirin; Sabri, Hamid Reza; Mirzadeh, Azadeh Sadat; Mohammadzadeh, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a worldwide problem, especially in countries with high incidence of road traffic accidents such as Iran. Patients with a single occurrence of TBI have been shown to be at increased risk to sustain future TBI. Objectives The aim of this study was to present the incidence and characteristics of repeated TBI (RTBI) in Iranian patients. Patients and Methods During one year, all admitted TBI patients with prior TBI history were enrolled into the study. In each patient, data such as age, gender, past medical history, injury cause, anatomic site of injury, TBI severity, clinical findings and CT scan findings were collected. Results RTBI comprised 2.5% of TBI cases (41 of 1629). The incidence of RTBI per 100,000 individuals per years was 9.7. The main cause of RTBI was road traffic accident (68.3%); 9.7 % of cases had preexisting seizure/epilepsy disorder; 36.6% of patients with RTBI had pervious ICU admission due to severe TBI. Ten patients had Glasgow coma scale (GCS) ≤ 13 (24.4%). Seizure was seen in seven patients (17.1%). Thirty-nine percent of patients with RTBI had associated injuries. Eleven patients had abnormal CT scan findings (26.9%). Conclusions Considering the high incidence of trauma in developing countries, RTBI may also be more common compared with that of developed countries. This mandates a newer approach to preventive strategies, particularly in those with a previous experience of head injury. PMID:28180123

  5. Graph Analysis of Functional Brain Networks in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    van der Horn, Harm J.; Liemburg, Edith J.; Scheenen, Myrthe E.; de Koning, Myrthe E.; Spikman, Jacoba M.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2017-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is one of the most common neurological disorders worldwide. Posttraumatic complaints are frequently reported, interfering with outcome. However, a consistent neural substrate has not yet been found. We used graph analysis to further unravel the complex interactions between functional brain networks, complaints, anxiety and depression in the sub-acute stage after mTBI. This study included 54 patients with uncomplicated mTBI and 20 matched healthy controls. Posttraumatic complaints, anxiety and depression were measured at two weeks post-injury. Patients were selected based on presence (n = 34) or absence (n = 20) of complaints. Resting-state fMRI scans were made approximately four weeks post-injury. High order independent component analysis resulted in 89 neural components that were included in subsequent graph analyses. No differences in graph measures were found between patients with mTBI and healthy controls. Regarding the two patient subgroups, degree, strength, local efficiency and eigenvector centrality of the bilateral posterior cingulate/precuneus and bilateral parahippocampal gyrus were higher, and eigenvector centrality of the frontal pole/ bilateral middle & superior frontal gyrus was lower in patients with complaints compared to patients without complaints. In patients with mTBI, higher degree, strength and eigenvector centrality of default mode network components were related to higher depression scores, and higher degree and eigenvector centrality of executive network components were related to lower depression scores. In patients without complaints, one extra module was found compared to patients with complaints and healthy controls, consisting of the cingulate areas. In conclusion, this research extends the knowledge of functional network connectivity after mTBI. Specifically, our results suggest that an imbalance in the function of the default mode- and executive network plays a central role in the interaction

  6. Activity of P-glycoprotein, a β-amyloid Transporter at the Blood-Brain Barrier, is Compromised in Patients with Mild Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Anand K.; Borson, Soo; Link, Jeanne M.; Domino, Karen; Eary, Janet F.; Ke, Ban; Richards, Todd L.; Mankoff, David A.; Minoshima, Satoshi; O’Sullivan, Finbarr; Eyal, Sara; Hsiao, Peng; Maravilla, Ken; Unadkat, Jashvant D.

    2015-01-01

    Animal and histopathological studies of human brain support a role for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in clearance of cerebral β-amyloid (Aβ) across the blood brain barrier (BBB). We tested the hypothesis that BBB P-gp activity is diminished in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by accounting for AD-related reduction in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Methods We compared P-gp activity in mild AD patients (n=9) and cognitively normal, age-matched controls (n=9) using positron emission tomography (PET) with a labeled P-gp substrate, [11C]-verapamil, and [15O]-water to measure rCBF. BBB P-gp activity was expressed as the [11C]-verapamil radioactivity extraction ratio (ER={[11C]-verapamil brain distributional clearance, K1}/rCBF). Results Compared to controls, BBB P-gp activity was significantly lower in the parietotemporal, frontal, posterior cingulate cortices and hippocampus of mild AD subjects. Conclusion BBB P-gp activity in brain regions affected by AD is reduced and is independent of rCBF. This study improves on prior work by eliminating the confounding effect that reduced rCBF has on assessment of BBB P-gp activity and suggests that impaired P-gp activity may contribute to cerebral Aβ accumulation in AD. P-gp induction/activation to increase cerebral Aβ clearance could constitute a novel preventive or therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:24842892

  7. Risk factors for ventilator-associated pneumonia: among trauma patients with and without brain injury.

    PubMed

    Gianakis, Anastasia; McNett, Molly; Belle, Josie; Moran, Cristina; Grimm, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) rates remain highest among trauma and brain injured patients; yet, no research compares VAP risk factors between the 2 groups. This retrospective, case-controlled study identified risk factors for VAP among critically ill trauma patients with and without brain injury. Data were abstracted on trauma patients with (cases) and without (controls) brain injury. Data gathered on n = 157 subjects. Trauma patients with brain injury had more emergent and field intubations. Age was strongest predictor of VAP in cases, and ventilator days predicted VAP in controls. Trauma patients with brain injury may be at higher risk for VAP.

  8. Optimizing sedation in patients with acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Mauro; Crippa, Ilaria Alice; Mehta, Sangeeta; Menon, David; Payen, Jean-Francois; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Citerio, Giuseppe

    2016-05-05

    Daily interruption of sedative therapy and limitation of deep sedation have been shown in several randomized trials to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay, and to improve the outcome of critically ill patients. However, patients with severe acute brain injury (ABI; including subjects with coma after traumatic brain injury, ischaemic/haemorrhagic stroke, cardiac arrest, status epilepticus) were excluded from these studies. Therefore, whether the new paradigm of minimal sedation can be translated to the neuro-ICU (NICU) is unclear. In patients with ABI, sedation has 'general' indications (control of anxiety, pain, discomfort, agitation, facilitation of mechanical ventilation) and 'neuro-specific' indications (reduction of cerebral metabolic demand, improved brain tolerance to ischaemia). Sedation also is an essential therapeutic component of intracranial pressure therapy, targeted temperature management and seizure control. Given the lack of large trials which have evaluated clinically relevant endpoints, sedative selection depends on the effect of each agent on cerebral and systemic haemodynamics. Titration and withdrawal of sedation in the NICU setting has to be balanced between the risk that interrupting sedation might exacerbate brain injury (e.g. intracranial pressure elevation) and the potential benefits of enhanced neurological function and reduced complications. In this review, we provide a concise summary of cerebral physiologic effects of sedatives and analgesics, the advantages/disadvantages of each agent, the comparative effects of standard sedatives (propofol and midazolam) and the emerging role of alternative drugs (ketamine). We suggest a pragmatic approach for the use of sedation-analgesia in the NICU, focusing on some practical aspects, including optimal titration and management of sedation withdrawal according to ABI severity.

  9. Brain-Computer Interfaces and communication in paralysis: extinction of goal directed thinking in completely paralysed patients?

    PubMed Central

    Kübler, A.; Birbaumer, N.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between physical impairment and brain-computer interface (BCI) performance. Method We present a meta-analysis of 29 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 6 with other severe neurological diseases in different stages of physical impairment who were trained with a BCI. In most cases voluntary regulation of slow cortical potentials has been used as input signal for BCI control. More recently sensorimotor rhythms and the P300 event-related brain potential were recorded. Results A strong correlation has been found between physical impairment and BCI performance, indicating that performance worsens as impairment increases. Seven patients were in the complete locked-in state (CLIS) with no communication possible. After removal of these patients from the analysis, the relationship between physical impairment and BCI performance disappeared. The lack of a relation between physical impairment and BCI performance was confirmed when adding BCI data of patients from other BCI research groups. Conclusions Basic communication (yes/no) was not restored in any of the CLIS patients with a BCI. Whether locked-in patients can transfer learned brain control to the CLIS remains an open empirical question. Significance Voluntary brain regulation for communication is possible in all stages of paralysis except the CLIS. PMID:18824406

  10. Cognitive rehabilitation in non-communicative brain-damaged patients

    PubMed Central

    Trojano, Luigi; Moretta, Pasquale; Cozzolino, Autilia; Saltalamacchia, Annamaria; Estraneo, Anna

    Summary Conscious patients with severe motor and speech disorders have great difficulty interacting with the environment and communicating with other people. Several augmentative communication devices are now available to exploit these patients’ expressive potential, but their use often demands considerable cognitive effort. Non-communicative patients with severe brain lesions may have, in addition, specific cognitive deficits that hinder the efficient use of augmentative communication methods. Some neuropsychological batteries are now available for testing these patients. On the basis of such cognitive assessments, cognitive rehabilitation training can now be applied, but we underline that this training must be tailored to single patients in order to allow them to communicate autonomously and efficiently. PMID:21693090

  11. Exercise for the diabetic brain: how physical training may help prevent dementia and Alzheimer's disease in T2DM patients.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Sebastian; Brixius, Klara; Brinkmann, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk of developing dementia/Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review, which is based on recent studies, presents a molecular framework that links the two diseases and explains how physical training could help counteract neurodegeneration in T2DM patients. Inflammatory, oxidative, and metabolic changes in T2DM patients cause cerebrovascular complications and can lead to blood-brain-barrier (BBB) breakdown. Peripherally increased pro-inflammatory molecules can then pass the BBB more easily and activate stress-activated pathways, thereby promoting key pathological features of dementia/AD such as brain insulin resistance, mitochondrial dysfunction, and accumulation of neurotoxic beta-amyloid (Aβ) oligomers, leading to synaptic loss, neuronal dysfunction, and cell death. Ceramides can also pass the BBB, induce pro-inflammatory reactions, and disturb brain insulin signaling. In a vicious circle, oxidative stress and the pro-inflammatory environment intensify, leading to further cognitive decline. Low testosterone levels might be a common risk factor in T2DM and AD. Regular physical exercise reinforces antioxidative capacity, reduces oxidative stress, and has anti-inflammatory effects. It improves endothelial function and might increase brain capillarization. Physical training can further counteract dyslipidemia and reduce increased ceramide levels. It might also improve Aβ clearance by up-regulating Aβ transporters and, in some cases, increase basal testosterone levels. In addition, regular physical activity can induce neurogenesis. Physical training should therefore be emphasized as a part of prevention programs developed for diabetic patients to minimize the risk of the onset of neurodegenerative diseases among this specific patient group.

  12. Evidence for brain glial activation in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Loggia, Marco L; Chonde, Daniel B; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Arabasz, Grae; Catana, Ciprian; Edwards, Robert R; Hill, Elena; Hsu, Shirley; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ji, Ru-Rong; Riley, Misha; Wasan, Ajay D; Zürcher, Nicole R; Albrecht, Daniel S; Vangel, Mark G; Rosen, Bruce R; Napadow, Vitaly; Hooker, Jacob M

    2015-03-01

    Although substantial evidence has established that microglia and astrocytes play a key role in the establishment and maintenance of persistent pain in animal models, the role of glial cells in human pain disorders remains unknown. Here, using the novel technology of integrated positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging and the recently developed radioligand (11)C-PBR28, we show increased brain levels of the translocator protein (TSPO), a marker of glial activation, in patients with chronic low back pain. As the Ala147Thr polymorphism in the TSPO gene affects binding affinity for (11)C-PBR28, nine patient-control pairs were identified from a larger sample of subjects screened and genotyped, and compared in a matched-pairs design, in which each patient was matched to a TSPO polymorphism-, age- and sex-matched control subject (seven Ala/Ala and two Ala/Thr, five males and four females in each group; median age difference: 1 year; age range: 29-63 for patients and 28-65 for controls). Standardized uptake values normalized to whole brain were significantly higher in patients than controls in multiple brain regions, including thalamus and the putative somatosensory representations of the lumbar spine and leg. The thalamic levels of TSPO were negatively correlated with clinical pain and circulating levels of the proinflammatory citokine interleukin-6, suggesting that TSPO expression exerts pain-protective/anti-inflammatory effects in humans, as predicted by animal studies. Given the putative role of activated glia in the establishment and or maintenance of persistent pain, the present findings offer clinical implications that may serve to guide future studies of the pathophysiology and management of a variety of persistent pain conditions.

  13. Brain White Matter Impairment in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Weimin; Chen, Qian; Chen, Xin; Wan, Lu; Qin, Wen; Qi, Zhigang; Li, Kuncheng

    2017-01-01

    It remains unknown whether spinal cord injury (SCI) could indirectly impair or reshape the white matter (WM) of human brain and whether these changes are correlated with injury severity, duration, or clinical performance. We choose tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to investigate the possible changes in whole-brain white matter integrity and their associations with clinical variables in fifteen patients with SCI. Compared with the healthy controls, the patients exhibited significant decreases in WM fractional anisotropy (FA) in the left angular gyrus (AG), right cerebellum (CB), left precentral gyrus (PreCG), left lateral occipital region (LOC), left superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), left supramarginal gyrus (SMG), and left postcentral gyrus (PostCG) (p < 0.01, TFCE corrected). No significant differences were found in all diffusion indices between the complete and incomplete SCI. However, significantly negative correlation was shown between the increased radial diffusivity (RD) of left AG and total motor scores (uncorrected p < 0.05). Our findings provide evidence that SCI can cause not only direct degeneration but also transneuronal degeneration of brain WM, and these changes may be irrespective of the injury severity. The affection of left AG on rehabilitation therapies need to be further researched in the future. PMID:28255458

  14. Tracheal decannulation protocol in patients affected by traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zanata, Isabel de Lima; Santos, Rosane Sampaio; Hirata, Gisela Carmona

    2014-04-01

    Introduction The frequency of tracheostomy in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) contrasts with the lack of objective criteria for its management. The study arose from the need for a protocol in the decision to remove the tracheal tube. Objective To evaluate the applicability of a protocol for tracheal decannulation. Methods A prospective study with 20 patients, ranging between 21 and 85 years of age (average 33.55), 4 of whom were women (20%) and 16 were men (80%). All patients had been diagnosed by a neurologist as having TBI, and the anatomical region of the lesion was known. Patients were evaluated following criteria for tracheal decannulation through a clinical evaluation protocol developed by the authors. Results Decannulation was performed in 12 (60%) patients. Fourteen (70%) had a score greater than 8 on the Glasgow Coma Scale and only 2 (14%) of these were not able to undergo decannulation. Twelve (60%) patients maintained the breathing pattern with occlusion of the tube and were successfully decannulated. Of the 20 patients evaluated, 11 (55%) showed no signs suggestive of tracheal aspiration, and of these, 9 (82%) began training on occlusion of the cannula. The protocol was relevant to establish the beginning of the decannulation process. The clinical assessment should focus on the patient's condition to achieve early tracheal decannulation. Conclusion This study allowed, with the protocol, to establish six criteria for tracheal decannulation: level of consciousness, respiration, tracheal secretion, phonation, swallowing, and coughing.

  15. Tracheal Decannulation Protocol in Patients Affected by Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zanata, Isabel de Lima; Santos, Rosane Sampaio; Hirata, Gisela Carmona

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The frequency of tracheostomy in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) contrasts with the lack of objective criteria for its management. The study arose from the need for a protocol in the decision to remove the tracheal tube. Objective To evaluate the applicability of a protocol for tracheal decannulation. Methods A prospective study with 20 patients, ranging between 21 and 85 years of age (average 33.55), 4 of whom were women (20%) and 16 were men (80%). All patients had been diagnosed by a neurologist as having TBI, and the anatomical region of the lesion was known. Patients were evaluated following criteria for tracheal decannulation through a clinical evaluation protocol developed by the authors. Results Decannulation was performed in 12 (60%) patients. Fourteen (70%) had a score greater than 8 on the Glasgow Coma Scale and only 2 (14%) of these were not able to undergo decannulation. Twelve (60%) patients maintained the breathing pattern with occlusion of the tube and were successfully decannulated. Of the 20 patients evaluated, 11 (55%) showed no signs suggestive of tracheal aspiration, and of these, 9 (82%) began training on occlusion of the cannula. The protocol was relevant to establish the beginning of the decannulation process. The clinical assessment should focus on the patient's condition to achieve early tracheal decannulation. Conclusion This study allowed, with the protocol, to establish six criteria for tracheal decannulation: level of consciousness, respiration, tracheal secretion, phonation, swallowing, and coughing. PMID:25992074

  16. Significant predictors of patients' uncertainty in primary brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Chien, Lung-Chang; Acquaye, Alvina A; Vera-Bolanos, Elizabeth; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2015-05-01

    Patients with primary brain tumors (PBT) face uncertainty related to prognosis, symptoms and treatment response and toxicity. Uncertainty is correlated to negative mood states and symptom severity and interference. This study identified predictors of uncertainty during different treatment stages (newly-diagnosed, on treatment, followed-up without active treatment). One hundred eighty six patients with PBT were accrued at various points in the illness trajectory. Data collection tools included: a clinical checklist/a demographic data sheet/the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale-Brain Tumor Form. The structured additive regression model was used to identify significant demographic and clinical predictors of illness-related uncertainty. Participants were primarily white (80 %) males (53 %). They ranged in age from 19-80 (mean = 44.2 ± 12.6). Thirty-two of the 186 patients were newly-diagnosed, 64 were on treatment at the time of clinical visit with MRI evaluation, 21 were without MRI, and 69 were not on active treatment. Three subscales (ambiguity/inconsistency; unpredictability-disease prognoses; unpredictability-symptoms and other triggers) were different amongst the treatment groups (P < .01). However, patients' uncertainty during active treatment was as high as in newly-diagnosed period. Other than treatment stages, change of employment status due to the illness was the most significant predictor of illness-related uncertainty. The illness trajectory of PBT remains ambiguous, complex, and unpredictable, leading to a high incidence of uncertainty. There was variation in the subscales of uncertainty depending on treatment status. Although patients who are newly diagnosed reported the highest scores on most of the subscales, patients on treatment felt more uncertain about unpredictability of symptoms than other groups. Due to the complexity and impact of the disease, associated symptoms, and interference with functional status, comprehensive assessment of patients

  17. Predictors of Hypopituitarism in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paula P B; Bhatnagar, Saurabha; Herman, Seth D; Zafonte, Ross; Klibanski, Anne; Miller, Karen K; Tritos, Nicholas A

    2015-11-15

    Hypopituitarism may often occur in association with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Identification of reliable predictors of pituitary dysfunction is of importance in order to establish a rational testing approach. We searched the records of patients with TBI, who underwent neuroendocrine evaluation in our institution between 2007 and 2013. One hundred sixty-six adults (70% men) with TBI (median age: 41.6 years; range: 18-76) were evaluated at a median interval of 40.4 months (0.2-430.4).Of these, 31% had ≥1 pituitary deficiency, including 29% of patients with mild TBI and 35% with moderate/severe TBI. Growth hormone deficiency was the most common deficiency (21%); when body mass index (BMI)-dependent cutpoints were used, this was reduced to 15%. Central hypoadrenalism occurred in10%, who were more likely to have suffered a motor vehicle accident (MVA, p = 0.04), experienced post-traumatic seizures (p = 0.04), demonstrated any intracranial hemorrhage (p = 0.05), petechial brain hemorrhages (p = 0.017), or focal cortical parenchymal contusions (p = 0.02). Central hypothyroidism occurred in 8% and central hypogonadism in 12%; the latter subgroup had higher BMI (p = 0.03), were less likely to be working after TBI (p = 0.002), and had lower Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scores (p = 0.03). Central diabetes insipidus (DI) occurred in 6%, who were more likely to have experienced MVA (p < 0.001) or sustained moderate/severe TBI (p < 0.001). Patients with MVA and those with post-traumatic seizures, intracranial hemorrhage, petechial brain hemorrhages, and/or focal cortical contusions are at particular risk for serious pituitary dysfunction, including adrenal insufficiency and DI, and should be referred for neuroendocrine testing. However, a substantial proportion of patients without these risk factors also developed hypopituitarism.

  18. β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is not found in the brains of patients with confirmed Alzheimer’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneely, Julie P.; Chevallier, Olivier P.; Graham, Stewart; Greer, Brett; Green, Brian D.; Elliott, Christopher T.

    2016-11-01

    Controversy surrounds the proposed hypothesis that exposure to β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) could play a role in various neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we present the results of the most comprehensive scientific study on BMAA detection ever undertaken on brain samples from patients pathologically confirmed to have suffered from AD, and those from healthy volunteers. Following the full validation of a highly accurate and sensitive mass spectrometric method, no trace of BMAA was detected in the diseased brain or in the control specimens. This contradicts the findings of other reports and calls into question the significance of this compound in neurodegenerative disease. We have attempted to explain the potential causes of misidentification of BMAA in these studies.

  19. β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is not found in the brains of patients with confirmed Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Meneely, Julie P; Chevallier, Olivier P; Graham, Stewart; Greer, Brett; Green, Brian D; Elliott, Christopher T

    2016-11-08

    Controversy surrounds the proposed hypothesis that exposure to β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) could play a role in various neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we present the results of the most comprehensive scientific study on BMAA detection ever undertaken on brain samples from patients pathologically confirmed to have suffered from AD, and those from healthy volunteers. Following the full validation of a highly accurate and sensitive mass spectrometric method, no trace of BMAA was detected in the diseased brain or in the control specimens. This contradicts the findings of other reports and calls into question the significance of this compound in neurodegenerative disease. We have attempted to explain the potential causes of misidentification of BMAA in these studies.

  20. β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is not found in the brains of patients with confirmed Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Meneely, Julie P.; Chevallier, Olivier P.; Graham, Stewart; Greer, Brett; Green, Brian D.; Elliott, Christopher T.

    2016-01-01

    Controversy surrounds the proposed hypothesis that exposure to β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) could play a role in various neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we present the results of the most comprehensive scientific study on BMAA detection ever undertaken on brain samples from patients pathologically confirmed to have suffered from AD, and those from healthy volunteers. Following the full validation of a highly accurate and sensitive mass spectrometric method, no trace of BMAA was detected in the diseased brain or in the control specimens. This contradicts the findings of other reports and calls into question the significance of this compound in neurodegenerative disease. We have attempted to explain the potential causes of misidentification of BMAA in these studies. PMID:27821863

  1. The evolution of brain surgery on awake patients.

    PubMed

    Surbeck, Werner; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Duffau, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    In the early days of modern neurological surgery, the inconveniences and potential dangers of general anesthesia by chloroform and ether using the so-called "open-drop technique" led to the quest for alternative methods of anesthesia. Besides preventing the feared side effects, the introduction of regional anesthesia revealed another decisive advantage over general anesthesia in neurosurgery: While intraoperative direct cortical stimulation under general anesthesia could only delineate the motor area (by evocation of contralateral muscular contraction), now, the awake patients were able to report sensations elicited by this method. These properties advanced regional anesthesia to the regimen of choice for cranial surgeries in the first half of the 20th century. While technical advances and new drugs led to a progressive return to general anesthesia for neurosurgical procedures, the use of regional anesthesia for epilepsy surgery has only decreased in recent decades. Meanwhile, awake craniotomies regained popularity in oncologically motivated surgeries, especially in craniotomies for diffuse low-grade gliomas. Intraoperative mapping of brain functions using electrical stimulation in awake patients enables not only for increased tumor removal while preserving the functional status of the patients but also opens a window to cognitive neuroscience. Observations during such interventions and their correlation with both pre - and postoperative neuropsychological examinations and functional neuroimaging is progressively leading to new insights into the complex functional anatomy of the human brain. Furthermore, it broadens our knowledge on cerebral network reorganization in the presence of disease-with implications for all disciplines of clinical neuroscience.

  2. Dissecting molecular mechanisms in the living brain of dementia patients.

    PubMed

    Barrio, Jorge R; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Petric, Andrej; Small, Gary W; Kepe, Vladimir

    2009-07-21

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms associated with the development of dementia is essential for designing successful interventions. Dementia, like cancer and cardiovascular disease, requires early detection to potentially arrest or prevent further disease progression. By the time a neurologist begins to manage clinical symptoms, the disease has often damaged the brain significantly. Because successful treatment is the logical goal, detecting the disease when brain damage is still limited is of the essence. The role of chemistry in this discovery process is critical. With the advent of molecular imaging, the understanding of molecular mechanisms in human neurodegenerative diseases has exploded. Traditionally, knowledge of enzyme and neurotransmitter function in humans has been extrapolated from animal studies, but now we can acquire data directly from both healthy and diseased human subjects. In this Account, we describe the use of molecular imaging probes to elucidate the biochemical and cellular bases of dementia (e.g., Alzheimer's disease) and the application of these discoveries to the design of successful therapeutic interventions. Molecular imaging permits observation and evaluation of the basic molecular mechanisms of disease progression in the living brains of patients. 2-Deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-d-glucose is used to assess the effect of Alzheimer's disease progression on neuronal circuits projecting from and to the temporal lobe (one of the earliest metabolic signs of the disease). Recently, we have developed imaging probes for detection of amyloid neuropathology (both tau and beta-amyloid peptide deposits) and neuronal losses. These probes allow us to visualize the development of pathology in the living brain of dementia patients and its consequences, such as losses of critical neurons associated with memory deficits and other neuropsychiatric impairments. Because inflammatory processes are tightly connected to the brain degenerative processes

  3. Dystrophic Serotonin Axons in Postmortem Brains from Young Autism Patients

    PubMed Central

    Azmitia, Efrain C.; Singh, Jorawer S.; Hou, Xiao P.; Wiegel, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Autism causes neuropathological changes in varied anatomical loci. A coherent neural mechanism to explain the spectrum of autistic symptomatology has not been proposed because most anatomical researchers focus on point-to-point functional neural systems (e.g. auditory, social networks) rather than considering global chemical neural systems. Serotonergic neurons have a global innervation pattern. Their cell bodies are found in the midbrain but they project their axons throughout the neural axis beginning in the fetal brain. This global system is implicated in autism by animal models and by biochemical, imaging, pharmacological, and genetics studies. However, no anatomical studies of the 5-HT innervation of autistic donors have been reported. Our review presents immunocytochemical evidence of an increase in 5-HT axons in post-mortem brain tissue from autism donors aged 2.8 to 29 years relative to controls. This increase is observed in the principle ascending fiber bundles of the medial and lateral forebrain bundles, and in the innervation density of the amygdala and the piriform, superior temporal, and parahippocampal cortices. In autistic donors eight years of age and up, several types of dystrophic 5-HT axons were seen in the termination fields. One class of these dystrophic axons, the thick heavily stained axons, was not seen in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. These findings provide morphological evidence for the involvement of serotonin neurons in the early etiology of autism, and suggest a diet therapy may be effective to blunt serotonin’s trophic actions during early brain development in children. PMID:21901837

  4. Increased brain uptake of targeted nanoparticles by adding an acid-cleavable linkage between transferrin and the nanoparticle core.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew J; Davis, Mark E

    2015-10-06

    Most therapeutic agents are excluded from entering the central nervous system by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Receptor mediated transcytosis (RMT) is a common mechanism used by proteins, including transferrin (Tf), to traverse the BBB. Here, we prepared Tf-containing, 80-nm gold nanoparticles with an acid-cleavable linkage between the Tf and the nanoparticle core to facilitate nanoparticle RMT across the BBB. These nanoparticles are designed to bind to Tf receptors (TfRs) with high avidity on the blood side of the BBB, but separate from their multidentate Tf-TfR interactions upon acidification during the transcytosis process to allow release of the nanoparticle into the brain. These targeted nanoparticles show increased ability to cross an in vitro model of the BBB and, most important, enter the brain parenchyma of mice in greater amounts in vivo after systemic administration compared with similar high-avidity nanoparticles containing noncleavable Tf. In addition, we investigated this design with nanoparticles containing high-affinity antibodies (Abs) to TfR. With the Abs, the addition of the acid-cleavable linkage provided no improvement to in vivo brain uptake for Ab-containing nanoparticles, and overall brain uptake was decreased for all Ab-containing nanoparticles compared with Tf-containing ones. These results are consistent with recent reports of high-affinity anti-TfR Abs trafficking to the lysosome within BBB endothelium. In contrast, high-avidity, Tf-containing nanoparticles with the acid-cleavable linkage avoid major endothelium retention by shedding surface Tf during their transcytosis.

  5. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yuan, X Q; Wade, C E

    1991-01-01

    This article provides an overview of hypothalamic and pituitary alterations in brain trauma, including the incidence of hypothalamic-pituitary damage, injury mechanisms, features of the hypothalamic-pituitary defects, and major hypothalamic-pituitary disturbances in brain trauma. While hypothalamic-pituitary lesions have been commonly described at postmortem examination, only a limited number of clinical cases of traumatic hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction have been reported, probably because head injury of sufficient severity to cause hypothalamic and pituitary damage usually leads to early death. With the improvement in rescue measures, an increasing number of severely head-injured patients with hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction will survive to be seen by clinicians. Patterns of endocrine abnormalities following brain trauma vary depending on whether the injury site is in the hypothalamus, the anterior or posterior pituitary, or the upper or lower portion of the pituitary stalk. Injury predominantly to the hypothalamus can produce dissociated ACTH-cortisol levels with no response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a limited or failed metopirone test, hypothyroxinemia with a preserved thyroid-stimulating hormone response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone, low gonadotropin levels with a normal response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone, a variable growth hormone (GH) level with a paradoxical rise in GH after glucose loading, hyperprolactinemia, the syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH), temporary or permanent diabetes insipidus (DI), disturbed glucose metabolism, and loss of body temperature control. Severe damage to the lower pituitary stalk or anterior lobe can cause low basal levels of all anterior pituitary hormones and eliminate responses to their releasing factors. Only a few cases showed typical features of hypothalamic or pituitary dysfunction. Most severe injuries are sufficient to damage both structures and produce a mixed endocrine picture

  6. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in patients with traumatic brain injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, X. Q.; Wade, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    This article provides an overview of hypothalamic and pituitary alterations in brain trauma, including the incidence of hypothalamic-pituitary damage, injury mechanisms, features of the hypothalamic-pituitary defects, and major hypothalamic-pituitary disturbances in brain trauma. While hypothalamic-pituitary lesions have been commonly described at postmortem examination, only a limited number of clinical cases of traumatic hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction have been reported, probably because head injury of sufficient severity to cause hypothalamic and pituitary damage usually leads to early death. With the improvement in rescue measures, an increasing number of severely head-injured patients with hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction will survive to be seen by clinicians. Patterns of endocrine abnormalities following brain trauma vary depending on whether the injury site is in the hypothalamus, the anterior or posterior pituitary, or the upper or lower portion of the pituitary stalk. Injury predominantly to the hypothalamus can produce dissociated ACTH-cortisol levels with no response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a limited or failed metopirone test, hypothyroxinemia with a preserved thyroid-stimulating hormone response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone, low gonadotropin levels with a normal response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone, a variable growth hormone (GH) level with a paradoxical rise in GH after glucose loading, hyperprolactinemia, the syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH), temporary or permanent diabetes insipidus (DI), disturbed glucose metabolism, and loss of body temperature control. Severe damage to the lower pituitary stalk or anterior lobe can cause low basal levels of all anterior pituitary hormones and eliminate responses to their releasing factors. Only a few cases showed typical features of hypothalamic or pituitary dysfunction. Most severe injuries are sufficient to damage both structures and produce a mixed endocrine picture

  7. Influence of Patient Age on Angioarchitecture of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Hetts, Steven W.; Cooke, Daniel L.; Nelson, Jeffrey; Gupta, Nalin; Fullerton, Heather; Amans, Matthew R.; Narvid, Jared A.; Moftakhar, Parham; McSwain, Hugh; Dowd, Christopher F.; Higashida, Randall T.; Halbach, Van V.; Lawton, Michael T.; Kim, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose To determine if clinical and angioarchitectural features of brain AVMs differ between children and adults. Materials and Methods A prospectively collected institutional database of all patients diagnosed with brain AVMs since 2001 was queried. Demographic, clinical, and angioarchitecture information was summarized and analyzed with univariable and multivariable models. Results Results often differed when age was treated as a continuous variable as opposed to dividing subjects into children (≤18 years; n=203) versus adults (>18 years; n=630). Children were more likely to present with AVM hemorrhage than adults (59% vs. 41%, p<0.001). Although AVMs with a larger nidus presented at younger ages (mean of 26.8 years for >6 cm compared to 37.1 years for <3 cm), this was not significantly different between children and adults (p=0.069). Exclusively deep venous drainage was more common in younger subjects both when age was treated continuously (p=0.04), or dichotomized (p<0.001). Venous ectasia was more common with increasing age (mean, 39.4 years with ectasia compared to 31.1 years without ectasia) and when adults were compared to children (52% vs. 35%, p<0.001). Patients with feeding artery aneurysms presented at later average age (44.1 years) than those without such aneurysms (31.6 years); this observation persisted when comparing children to adults (13% vs. 29%, p<0.001). Conclusion Although children with brain AVMs were more likely to come to clinical attention due to hemorrhage than adults, venous ectasia and feeding artery aneurysms were underrepresented in children, suggesting that these particular high risk features take time to develop. PMID:24627452

  8. Differential hippocampal shapes in posterior cortical atrophy patients: A comparison with control and typical AD subjects.

    PubMed

    Manning, Emily N; Macdonald, Kate E; Leung, Kelvin K; Young, Jonathan; Pepple, Tracey; Lehmann, Manja; Zuluaga, Maria A; Cardoso, M Jorge; Schott, Jonathan M; Ourselin, Sebastien; Crutch, Sebastian; Fox, Nick C; Barnes, Josephine

    2015-12-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by predominant visual deficits and parieto-occipital atrophy, and is typically associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. In AD, assessment of hippocampal atrophy is widely used in diagnosis, research, and clinical trials; its utility in PCA remains unclear. Given the posterior emphasis of PCA, we hypothesized that hippocampal shape measures may give additional group differentiation information compared with whole-hippocampal volume assessments. We investigated hippocampal volume and shape in subjects with PCA (n = 47), typical AD (n = 29), and controls (n = 48). Hippocampi were outlined on MRI scans and their 3D meshes were generated. We compared hippocampal volume and shape between disease groups. Mean adjusted hippocampal volumes were ∼ 8% smaller in PCA subjects (P < 0.001) and ∼ 22% smaller in tAD subject (P < 0.001) compared with controls. Significant inward deformations in the superior hippocampal tail were observed in PCA compared with controls even after adjustment for hippocampal volume. Inward deformations in large areas of the hippocampus were seen in tAD subjects compared with controls and PCA subjects, but only localized shape differences remained after adjusting for hippocampal volume. The shape differences observed, even allowing for volume differences, suggest that PCA and tAD are each associated with different patterns of hippocampal tissue loss that may contribute to the differential range and extent of episodic memory dysfunction in the two groups.

  9. Tetracyclic Truncated Analogue of the Marine Toxin Gambierol Modifies NMDA, Tau, and Amyloid β Expression in Mice Brains: Implications in AD Pathology.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Eva; Vieira, Andrés C; Rodriguez, Inés; Alvariño, Rebeca; Gegunde, Sandra; Fuwa, Haruhiko; Suga, Yuto; Sasaki, Makoto; Alfonso, Amparo; Cifuentes, José Manuel; Botana, Luis M

    2017-02-13

    Gambierol and its two, tetra- and heptacyclic, analogues have been previously proved as promising molecules for the modulation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmarks in primary cortical neurons of 3xTg-AD fetuses. In this work, the effect of the tetracyclic analogue of gambierol was tested in vivo in 3xTg-AD mice (10 months old) after 1 month of weekly treatment with 50 μg/kg. Adverse effects were not reported throughout the whole treatment period and no pathological signs were observed for the analyzed organs. The compound was found in brain samples after intraperitoneal injection. The tetracyclic analogue of gambierol elicited a decrease of amyloid β1-42 levels and a dose-dependent inhibition of β-secretase enzyme-1 activity. Moreover, this compound also reduced the phosphorylation of tau at the 181 and 159/163 residues with an increase of the inactive isoform of the glycogen synthase kinase-3β. In accordance with our in vitro neuronal model, this compound produced a reduction in the N2A subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. The combined effect of this compound on amyloid β1-42 and tau phosphorylation represents a multitarget therapeutic approach for AD which might be more effective for this multifactorial and complex neurodegenerative disease than the current treatments.

  10. Mapping neuroplastic potential in brain-damaged patients.

    PubMed

    Herbet, Guillaume; Maheu, Maxime; Costi, Emanuele; Lafargue, Gilles; Duffau, Hugues

    2016-03-01

    It is increasingly acknowledged that the brain is highly plastic. However, the anatomic factors governing the potential for neuroplasticity have hardly been investigated. To bridge this knowledge gap, we generated a probabilistic atlas of functional plasticity derived from both anatomic magnetic resonance imaging results and intraoperative mapping data on 231 patients having undergone surgery for diffuse, low-grade glioma. The atlas includes detailed level of confidence information and is supplemented with a series of comprehensive, connectivity-based cluster analyses. Our results show that cortical plasticity is generally high in the cortex (except in primary unimodal areas and in a small set of neural hubs) and rather low in connective tracts (especially associative and projection tracts). The atlas sheds new light on the topological organization of critical neural systems and may also be useful in predicting the likelihood of recovery (as a function of lesion topology) in various neuropathological conditions-a crucial factor in improving the care of brain-damaged patients.

  11. Increased brain iron deposition is a risk factor for brain atrophy in patients with haemodialysis: a combined study of quantitative susceptibility mapping and whole brain volume analysis.

    PubMed

    Chai, Chao; Zhang, Mengjie; Long, Miaomiao; Chu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Tong; Wang, Lijun; Guo, Yu; Yan, Shuo; Haacke, E Mark; Shen, Wen; Xia, Shuang

    2015-08-01

    To explore the correlation between increased brain iron deposition and brain atrophy in patients with haemodialysis and their correlation with clinical biomarkers and neuropsychological test. Forty two patients with haemodialysis and forty one age- and gender-matched healthy controls were recruited in this prospective study. 3D whole brain high resolution T1WI and susceptibility weighted imaging were scanned on a 3 T MRI system. The brain volume was analyzed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in patients and to compare with that of healthy controls. Quantitative susceptibility mapping was used to measure and compare the susceptibility of different structures between patients and healthy controls. Correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationship between the brain volume, iron deposition and neuropsychological scores. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to explore the effect of clinical biomarkers on the brain volumes in patients. Compared with healthy controls, patients with haemodialysis showed decreased volume of bilateral putamen and left insular lobe (All P < 0.05). Susceptibilities of bilateral caudate head, putamen, substantia nigra, red nucleus and dentate nucleus were significantly higher (All P < 0.05). The increased brain iron deposition is negatively correlated with the decreased volume of bilateral putamen (P < 0.01). Neuropsychological scores positively correlated with decreased volume of left insular lobe (P < 0.05). Dialysis duration was negatively associated with decreased volume of bilateral putamen (P < 0.05). Our study indicated increased brain iron deposition and dialysis duration was risk factors for brain atrophy in patients with haemodialysis. The decreased gray matter volume of the left insular lobe was correlated with neurocognitive impairment.

  12. Cognition in patients with newly diagnosed brain metastasis: profiles and implications.

    PubMed

    Gerstenecker, Adam; Nabors, Louis B; Meneses, Karen; Fiveash, John B; Marson, Daniel C; Cutter, Gary; Martin, Roy C; Meyers, Christina A; Triebel, Kristen L

    2014-10-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common symptom in patients with brain metastasis, and significant cognitive dysfunction is prevalent in a majority of patients who are still able to engage in basic self-care activities. In the current study, the neurocognitive performance of 32 patients with brain metastasis and 32 demographically-matched controls was examined using a battery of standardized neuropsychological tests, with the goal of comprehensively examining the cognitive functioning of newly diagnosed brain metastasis patients. The cognition of all patients was assessed within 1 week of beginning treatment for brain metastasis. Results indicated impairments in verbal memory, attention, executive functioning, and language in relation to healthy controls. Performance in relation to appropriate normative groups was also examined. Overall, cognitive deficits were prevalent and memory was the most common impairment. Given that cognitive dysfunction was present in this cohort of patients with largely minimal functional impairment, these results have implications for patients, caregivers and health care providers treating patients with brain metastasis.

  13. Generation of Bioactive Oxylipins from Exogenously Added Arachidonic, Eicosapentaenoic and Docosahexaenoic Acid in Primary Human Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Aukema, Harold M; Winter, Tanja; Ravandi, Amir; Dalvi, Siddhartha; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-05-01

    The human blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood and is formed in part by microvessel endothelial cells. The brain contains significant amounts of arachidonic acid (ARA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which potentially give rise to the generation of bioactive oxylipins. Oxylipins are oxygenated fatty acid metabolites that are involved in an assortment of biological functions regulating neurological health and disease. Since it is not known which oxylipins are generated by human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMECs), they were incubated for up to 30 min in the absence or presence of 0.1-mM ARA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or DHA bound to albumin (1:1 molar ratio), and the oxylipins generated were examined using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS). Of 135 oxylipins screened in the media, 63 were present at >0.1 ng/mL at baseline, and 95 were present after incubation with fatty acid. Oxylipins were rapidly generated and reached maximum levels by 2-5 min. While ARA, EPA and DHA each stimulated the production of oxylipins derived from these fatty acids themselves, ARA also stimulated the production of oxylipins from endogenous 18- and 20-carbon fatty acids, including α-linolenic acid. Oxylipins generated by the lipoxygenase pathway predominated both in resting and stimulated states. Oxylipins formed via the cytochrome P450 pathway were formed primarily from DHA and EPA, but not ARA. These data indicate that HBMECs are capable of generating a plethora of bioactive lipids that have the potential to modulate BBB endothelial cell function.

  14. Information sharing in the brain indexes consciousness in noncommunicative patients.

    PubMed

    King, Jean-Rémi; Sitt, Jacobo D; Faugeras, Frédéric; Rohaut, Benjamin; El Karoui, Imen; Cohen, Laurent; Naccache, Lionel; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2013-10-07

    Neuronal theories of conscious access tentatively relate conscious perception to the integration and global broadcasting of information across distant cortical and thalamic areas. Experiments contrasting visible and invisible stimuli support this view and suggest that global neuronal communication may be detectable using scalp electroencephalography (EEG). However, whether global information sharing across brain areas also provides a specific signature of conscious state in awake but noncommunicating patients remains an active topic of research. We designed a novel measure termed "weighted symbolic mutual information" (wSMI) and applied it to 181 high-density EEG recordings of awake patients recovering from coma and diagnosed in various states of consciousness. The results demonstrate that this measure of information sharing systematically increases with consciousness state, particularly across distant sites. This effect sharply distinguishes patients in vegetative state (VS), minimally conscious state (MCS), and conscious state (CS) and is observed regardless of etiology and delay since insult. The present findings support distributed theories of conscious processing and open up the possibility of an automatic detection of conscious states, which may be particularly important for the diagnosis of awake but noncommunicating patients.

  15. A derivative of the brain metabolite lanthionine ketimine improves cognition and diminishes pathology in the 3 × Tg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Kenneth; Gabbita, S Prasad; Venkova, Kalina; Hristov, Alexandar; Johnson, Ming F; Eslami, Pirooz; Harris-White, Marni E

    2013-10-01

    Lanthionine ketimine ([LK] 3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-thiazine-3,5-dicarboxylic acid) is the archetype for a family of naturally occurring brain sulfur amino acid metabolites, the physiologic function of which is unknown. Lanthionine ketimine and its synthetic derivatives have recently demonstrated neurotrophic, neuroprotective, and antineuroinflammatory properties in vitro through a proposed mechanism involving the microtubule-associated protein collapsin response mediator protein 2. Therefore, studies were undertaken to test the effects of a bioavailable LK ester in the 3 × Tg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer disease. Lanthionine ketimine ester treatment substantially diminished cognitive decline and brain amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide deposition and phospho-Tau accumulation in 3 × Tg-AD mice and also reduced the density of Iba1-positive microglia. Furthermore, LK ester treatment altered collapsin response mediator protein 2 phosphorylation. These findings suggest that LK may not be a metabolic waste but rather a purposeful neurochemical, the synthetic derivatives of which constitute a new class of experimental therapeutics for Alzheimer disease and related entities.

  16. Amyloid-β Precursor Protein Modulates the Sorting of Testican-1 and Contributes to Its Accumulation in Brain Tissue and Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Arlt, Sönke; Matschke, Jakob; Hartmann, Ursula; Puig, Berta; Ferrer, Isidre; Zürbig, Petra; Glatzel, Markus; Jahn, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation in sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) are unknown but both increased production or impaired clearance likely contribute to aggregation. To understand the potential roles of the extracellular matrix proteoglycan Testican-1 in the pathophysiology of AD, we used samples from AD patients and controls and an in vitro approach. Protein expression analysis showed increased levels of Testican-1 in frontal and temporal cortex of AD patients; histological analysis showed that Testican-1 accumulates and co-aggregates with Aβ plaques in the frontal, temporal and entorhinal cortices of AD patients. Proteomic analysis identified 10 fragments of Testican-1 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from AD patients. HEK293T cells expressing human wild type or mutant Aβ precursor protein (APP) were transfected with Testican-1. The co-expression of both proteins modified the sorting of Testican-1 into the endocytic pathway leading to its transient accumulation in Golgi, which seemed to affect APP processing, as indicated by reduced Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels in APP mutant cells. In conclusion, patient data reflect a clearance impairment that may favor Aβ accumulation in AD brains and our in vitro model supports the notion that the interaction between APP and Testican-1 may be a key step in the production and aggregation of Aβ species. PMID:27486134

  17. Radiation Dose to the Brain and Subsequent Risk of Developing Brain Tumors in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Interventional Neuroradiology Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Thierry-Chef; Simon, S. L.; Land, C. E.; Miller, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation dose to the brain and subsequent lifetime risk of diagnosis of radiation-related brain tumors were estimated for pediatric patients undergoing intracranial embolization. Average dose to the whole brain was calculated using dosimetric data from the Radiation Doses in Interventional Radiology Study for 49 pediatric patients who underwent neuroradiological procedures, and lifetime risk of developing radiation-related brain tumors was estimated using published algorithms based on A-bomb survivor data. The distribution of absorbed dose within the brain can vary significantly depending on field size and movement during procedures. Depending on the exposure conditions and age of the patient, organ-averaged brain dose was estimated to vary from 6 to 1600 mGy. The lifetime risk of brain tumor diagnosis was estimated to be increased over the normal background rates (57 cases per 10,000) by 3 to 40% depending on the dose received, age at exposure, and gender. While significant uncertainties are associated with these estimates, we have quantified the range of possible dose and propagated the uncertainty to derive a credible range of estimated lifetime risk for each subject. Collimation and limiting fluoroscopy time and dose rate are the most effective means to minimize dose and risk of future induction of radiation-related tumors. PMID:18959462

  18. Automatic segmentation of MR brain images in multiple sclerosis patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avula, Ramesh T. V.; Erickson, Bradley J.

    1996-04-01

    A totally automatic scheme for segmenting brain from extracranial tissues and to classify all intracranial voxels as CSF, gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), or abnormality such as multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions is presented in this paper. It is observed that in MR head images, if a tissue's intensity values are normalized, its relationship to the other tissues is essentially constant for a given type of image. Based on this approach, the subcutaneous fat surrounding the head is normalized to classify other tissues. Spatially registered 3 mm MR head image slices of T1 weighted, fast spin echo [dual echo T2 weighted and proton density (PD) weighted images] and fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences are used for segmentation. Subcutaneous fat surrounding the skull was identified based on intensity thresholding from T1 weighted images. A multiparametric space map was developed for CSF, GM and WM by normalizing each tissue with respect to the mean value of corresponding subcutaneous fat on each pulse sequence. To reduce the low frequency noise without blurring the fine morphological high frequency details an anisotropic diffusion filter was applied to all images before segmentation. An initial slice by slice classification was followed by morphological operations to delete any brides connecting extracranial segments. Finally 3-dimensional region growing of the segmented brain extracts GM, WM and pathology. The algorithm was tested on sequential scans of 10 patients with MS lesions. For well registered sequences, tissues and pathology have been accurately classified. This procedure does not require user input or image training data sets, and shows promise for automatic classification of brain and pathology.

  19. Anatomic brain disease in hemodialysis patients: a cross-sectional study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although dialysis patients are at high risk of stroke and have a high burden of cognitive impairment, there are few reports of anatomic brain findings in the hemodialysis population. Using magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, we compared the prevalence of brain abnormalities in hemodialysis pati...

  20. Biothermal Model of Patient for Brain Hypothermia Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakamatsu, Hidetoshi; Gaohua, Lu

    A biothermal model of patient is proposed and verified for the brain hypothermia treatment, since the conventionally applied biothermal models are inappropriate for their unprecedented application. The model is constructed on the basis of the clinical practice of the pertinent therapy and characterized by the mathematical relation with variable ambient temperatures, in consideration of the clinical treatments such as the vital cardiopulmonary regulation. It has geometrically clear representation of multi-segmental core-shell structure, database of physiological and physical parameters with a systemic state equation setting the initial temperature of each compartment. Its step response gives the time constant about 3 hours in agreement with clinical knowledge. As for the essential property of the model, the dynamic temperature of its face-core compartment is realized, which corresponds to the tympanic membrane temperature measured under the practical anesthesia. From the various simulations consistent with the phenomena of clinical practice, it is concluded that the proposed model is appropriate for the theoretical analysis and clinical application to the brain hypothermia treatment.

  1. Preliminary Results of Whole Brain Radiotherapy With Concurrent Trastuzumab for Treatment of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chargari, Cyrus; Idrissi, Hind Riahi; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Bollet, Marc A.; Dieras, Veronique; Campana, Francois; Cottu, Paul; Fourquet, Alain; Kirova, Youlia M.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the use of trastuzumab concurrently with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for patients with brain metastases from human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2001 and April 2007, 31 patients with brain metastases from human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive breast cancer were referred for WBRT with concurrent trastuzumab. At brain progression, the median age was 55 years (range, 38-73), and all patients had a performance status of 0-2. The patients received trastuzumab 2 mg/kg weekly (n = 17) or 6 mg/kg repeated every 21 days (n = 14). In 26 patients, concurrent WBRT delivered 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions. In 6 patients, other fractionations were chosen because of either poor performance status or patient convenience. Results: After WBRT, radiologic responses were observed in 23 patients (74.2%), including 6 (19.4%) with a complete radiologic response and 17 (54.8%) with a partial radiologic response. Clinical responses were observed in 27 patients (87.1%). The median survival time from the start of WBRT was 18 months (range, 2-65). The median interval to brain progression was 10.5 months (range, 2-27). No Grade 2 or greater acute toxicity was observed. Conclusion: The low toxicity of trastuzumab concurrently with WBRT should probably not justify delays. Although promising, these preliminary data warrant additional validation of trastuzumab as a potential radiosensitizer for WBRT in brain metastases from breast cancer in the setting of a clinical trial.

  2. Early alterations in blood and brain RANTES and MCP-1 expression and the effect of exercise frequency in the 3xTg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Morgan; Jones, Terry E; Lu, Qun; Bareiss, Sonja K

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to protect against cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression, however the dose of exercise required to protect against AD is unknown. Recent studies show that the pathological processes leading to AD cause characteristic alterations in blood and brain inflammatory proteins that are associated with the progression of AD, suggesting that these markers could be used to diagnosis and monitor disease progression. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of exercise frequency on AD blood chemokine profiles, and correlate these findings with chemokine brain expression changes in the triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mouse model. Three month old 3xTg-AD mice were subjected to 12 weeks of moderate intensity wheel running at a frequency of either 1×/week or 3×/week. Blood and cortical tissue were analyzed for expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and regulated and normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES). Alterations in blood RANTES and MCP-1 expression were evident at 3 and 6 month old animals compared to WT animals. Three times per week exercise but not 1×/week exercise was effective at reversing serum and brain RANTES and MCP-1 expression to the levels of WT controls, revealing a dose dependent response to exercise. Analysis of these chemokines showed a strong negative correlation between blood and brain expression of RANTES. The results indicate that alterations in serum and brain inflammatory chemokines are evident as early signs of Alzheimer's disease pathology and that higher frequency exercise was necessary to restore blood and brain inflammatory expression levels in this AD mouse model.

  3. [Factors significant for cerebral circulacion in patients with supratentorial brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Sboev, A Yu; Dolgih, V T; Larkin, V I

    2013-01-01

    Using the Doppler ultrasonography method the condition of brain blood circulation of 90 patients with supratentorial brain tumors (gliomas--43, meningiomas--34, metastasis--9) during pre-surgical period was studied. The factors changing brain blood circulation at patients with with supratentorial brain tumors were brain displacement, increase of intracranial pressure, histologic structure and the first symptoms duration of illness. Localization (for an exception of an occipital lobe) and the size of a tumor directly didn't render influence on blood circulation parameters.

  4. [Brain hemorrhage in a patient with Kawasaki disease].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco Antonio; Rivas-Larrauri, Francisco; Alcántara-Salinas, Adriana; Hernández-Bautista, Victor; Rodríguez-Lozano, Ana Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, self-limiting vasculitis of unknown origin, characterized by fever, palms and soles edema, cervical lymphadenopathy, strawberry tongue, and non-exudative conjunctivitis. It is a multisystemic vasculitis that affects predominantly infants and young children. The most feared complication is the development of coronary aneurysms that occurs up to 25% of untreated patients; however there are reports of extra coronary involvement. Herein we present the case of a 2 year-old girl who had a severe symptomatology and persistent fever despite intravenous gammaglobulin. Two years later she presented right hemiparesia and headache, with data from CAT and MRI suggestive of brain mass and deviation of the midline, secondary to left frontoparietal haemorrhage that was treated with a craniotomy. She was discharged on prednisone, ASA and rehabilitation.

  5. Brain activation induced by psychological stress in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Castro, M N; Villarreal, M F; Bolotinsky, N; Papávero, E; Goldschmidt, M G; Costanzo, E Y; Drucaroff, L; Wainsztein, A; de Achával, D; Pahissa, J; Bär, K-J; Nemeroff, C B; Guinjoan, S M

    2015-10-01

    Environmental influences are critical for the expression of genes putatively related to the behavioral and cognitive phenotypes of schizophrenia. Among such factors, psychosocial stress has been proposed to play a major role in the expression of symptoms. However, it is unsettled how stress interacts with pathophysiological pathways to produce the disease. We studied 21 patients with schizophrenia and 21 healthy controls aged 18 to 50years with 3T-fMRI, in which a period of 6min of resting state acquisition was followed by a block design, with three blocks of 1-min control-task, 1-min stress-task and 1-min rest after-task. Self-report of stress and PANSS were measured. Limbic structures were activated in schizophrenia patients by simple tasks and remained active during, and shortly after stress. In controls, stress-related brain activation was more time-focused, and restricted to the stressful task itself. Negative symptom severity was inversely related to activation of anterior cingulum and orbitofrontal cortex. Results might represent the neurobiological aspect of hyper-reactivity to normal stressful situations previously described in schizophrenia, thus providing evidence on the involvement of limbic areas in the response to stress in schizophrenia. Patients present a pattern of persistent limbic activation probably contributing to hypervigilance and subsequent psychotic thought distortions.

  6. Baseline brain perfusion and brain structure in patients with major depression: a multimodal magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Vasic, Nenad; Wolf, Nadine D.; Grön, Georg; Sosic-Vasic, Zrinka; Connemann, Bernhard J.; Sambataro, Fabio; von Strombeck, Anna; Lang, Dirk; Otte, Stefanie; Dudek, Manuela; Wolf, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Abnormal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and grey matter volume have been frequently reported in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). However, it is unclear to what extent structural and functional change co-occurs in patients with MDD and whether markers of neural activity, such as rCBF, can be predicted by structural change. Methods Using MRI, we investigated resting-state rCBF and brain structure in patients with MDD and healthy controls between July 2008 and January 2013. We acquired perfusion images obtained with continuous arterial spin labelling, used voxel-based morphometry to assess grey matter volume and integrated biological parametric mapping analyses to investigate the impact of brain atrophy on rCBF. Results We included 43 patients and 29 controls in our study. Frontotemporal grey matter volume was reduced in patients compared with controls. In patients, rCBF was reduced in the anterior cingulate and bilateral parahippocampal areas and increased in frontoparietal and striatal regions. These abnormalities were confirmed by analyses with brain volume as a covariate. In patients with MDD there were significant negative correlations between the extent of depressive symptoms and bilateral parahippocampal rCBF. We found a positive correlation between depressive symptoms and rCBF for right middle frontal cortical blood flow. Limitations Medication use in patients has to be considered as a limitation of our study. Conclusion Our data suggest that while changes of cerebral blood flow and brain volume co-occur in patients with MDD, structural change is not sufficient to explain altered neural activity in patients at rest. Abnormal brain structure and function in patients with MDD appear to reflect distinct levels of neuropathology. PMID:26125119

  7. Neurocognitive Function of Patients with Brain Metastasis Who Received Either Whole Brain Radiotherapy Plus Stereotactic Radiosurgery or Radiosurgery Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Hidefumi . E-mail: hao@radi.med.hokudai.ac.jp; Tago, Masao; Kato, Norio; Toyoda, Tatsuya; Kenjyo, Masahiro; Hirota, Saeko; Shioura, Hiroki; Inomata, Taisuke; Kunieda, Etsuo; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Kobashi, Gen; Shirato, Hiroki

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To determine how the omission of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) affects the neurocognitive function of patients with one to four brain metastases who have been treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: In a prospective randomized trial between WBRT+SRS and SRS alone for patients with one to four brain metastases, we assessed the neurocognitive function using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Of the 132 enrolled patients, MMSE scores were available for 110. Results: In the baseline MMSE analyses, statistically significant differences were observed for total tumor volume, extent of tumor edema, age, and Karnofsky performance status. Of the 92 patients who underwent the follow-up MMSE, 39 had a baseline MMSE score of {<=}27 (17 in the WBRT+SRS group and 22 in the SRS-alone group). Improvements of {>=}3 points in the MMSEs of 9 WBRT+SRS patients and 11 SRS-alone patients (p = 0.85) were observed. Of the 82 patients with a baseline MMSE score of {>=}27 or whose baseline MMSE score was {<=}26 but had improved to {>=}27 after the initial brain treatment, the 12-, 24-, and 36-month actuarial free rate of the 3-point drop in the MMSE was 76.1%, 68.5%, and 14.7% in the WBRT+SRS group and 59.3%, 51.9%, and 51.9% in the SRS-alone group, respectively. The average duration until deterioration was 16.5 months in the WBRT+SRS group and 7.6 months in the SRS-alone group (p = 0.05). Conclusion: The results of the present study have revealed that, for most brain metastatic patients, control of the brain tumor is the most important factor for stabilizing neurocognitive function. However, the long-term adverse effects of WBRT on neurocognitive function might not be negligible.

  8. [Meningitis and brain abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius in a patient infected with HIV-1].

    PubMed

    Vallalta Morales, M; Solaz Moreno, E; Lacruz Rodrigo, J; Salavert Lletí, M; Silla Burdalo, G; Pérez-Bellés, C

    2005-06-01

    Streptococcus milleri group have been recognized as an important pathogens for abscess formation in various organs. Streptococci other than Streptococcus pneumoniae are a rare cause of bacterial meningitis in adults and can be associated with the presence of an undiagnosed brain abscess. Brain abscess is a focal collection within the brain parenchyma which can arise as a complication of a variety of infections. The most common etiologic organisms in clinical series have been microaerophilic streptococci and anaerobic bacteria. Although intracranial mass lesions that occur as a result of infection have commonly been reported in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, brain abscess due to the common bacterial pathogens are rarely described in HIV infected patients and Toxoplasma gondii is the organism most frequently isolated from stereotactic brain biopsy in these patients. We report a patient with both HIV-1 infection and streptococcal meningitis secondary to brain abscess caused by S. intermedius.

  9. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for mapping of whole brain activity patterns associated with the intake of snack food in ad libitum fed rats.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Tobias; Kreitz, Silke; Gaffling, Simone; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Hess, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Non-homeostatic hyperphagia, which is a major contributor to obesity-related hyperalimentation, is associated with the diet's molecular composition influencing, for example, the energy content. Thus, specific food items such as snack food may induce food intake independent from the state of satiety. To elucidate mechanisms how snack food may induce non-homeostatic food intake, it was tested if manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) was suitable for mapping the whole brain activity related to standard and snack food intake under normal behavioral situation. Application of the MnCl2 solution by osmotic pumps ensured that food intake was not significantly affected by the treatment. After z-score normalization and a non-affine three-dimensional registration to a rat brain atlas, significantly different grey values of 80 predefined brain structures were recorded in ad libitum fed rats after the intake of potato chips compared to standard chow at the group level. Ten of these areas had previously been connected to food intake, in particular to hyperphagia (e.g., dorsomedial hypothalamus or the anterior paraventricular thalamic nucleus) or to the satiety system (e.g., arcuate hypothalamic nucleus or solitary tract); 27 areas were related to reward/addiction including the core and shell of the nucleus accumbens, the ventral pallidum and the ventral striatum (caudate and putamen). Eleven areas associated to sleep displayed significantly reduced Mn2+ -accumulation and six areas related to locomotor activity showed significantly increased Mn2+ -accumulation after the intake of potato chips. The latter changes were associated with an observed significantly higher locomotor activity. Osmotic pump-assisted MEMRI proved to be a promising technique for functional mapping of whole brain activity patterns associated to nutritional intake under normal behavior.

  10. Resveratrol decreases the insoluble Aβ1-42 level in hippocampus and protects the integrity of the blood-brain barrier in AD rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H F; Li, N; Wang, Q; Cheng, X J; Li, X M; Liu, T T

    2015-12-03

    Our previous studies demonstrated resveratrol (Res) administration protected Alzheimer's disease (AD) rats from developing memory decline by anti-oxidation. Beta-amyloid peptide 1-42 (Aβ1-42) is not only the primary protein component of senile plaques in AD but also is believed to play an important part in its pathology. Increasing evidence has shown neuroinflammation and the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is closely related to the pathogenesis of AD. The aim of the present study is to further elucidate whether Res prevents AD rats from inflammation induced by Aβ1-42 and protects the integrity of BBB. Rats were divided into six groups: (1) ovariectomized (OVX)+D-galactose (D-gal) 100mg/kg group (OVX+D-gal); (2-4) OVX, D-gal and Res 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg treated groups; and (5) OVX, D-gal and estradiol valerate 0.8 mg/kg treated group (ET); (6) Sham control group. 12 weeks later, Res 40 and 80 mg/kg treatment exhibited a significant decrease of Aβ1-42 compared with the OVX+D-gal rats of hippocampus, which was accompanied by decreased expression of advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE), matrix metalloprotein-9 (MMP-9), nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) and the increase of Claudin-5. These results suggest that Res is useful not only in protecting OVX+D-gal rats from neuroinflammation mediated by Aβ1-42 by decreasing the expression of NF-κB but also the integrity of BBB by increasing Claudin-5 and decreasing RAGE, MMP-9.

  11. F18 EF5 PET/CT Imaging in Patients with Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    with Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lilie Lin, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Pennsylvania...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 01 July 2012 to 30 June 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE F18 EF5 PET/CT Imaging in Patients with Brain Metastases from Breast 5a...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The aim of this study is to estimate the degree of residual hypoxia after whole brain radiation therapy in patients

  12. High-dose fractionated radiation therapy for select patients with brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Pezner, R.D.; Lipsett, J.A.; Archambeau, J.O.; Fine, R.M.; Moss, W.T.

    1981-08-01

    Four patients with metastases to the brain were treated by high-dose fractionated radiation therapy. In all four cases, a complete response and prolonged disease-free survival could be documented. Unlike the standard therapy for such patients (i.e., craniotomy and postoperative irradiation), high-dose fractionated radiation therapy carries no operative risk and can encompass multiple brain metastases and metastases in deep or critical intracranial sites. The risk of radiotherapy side effects in the brain is discussed.

  13. Abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging in two patients with Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maya, Idit; Vinkler, Chana; Konen, Osnat; Kornreich, Liora; Steinberg, Tamar; Yeshaya, Josepha; Latarowski, Victoria; Shohat, Mordechai; Lev, Dorit; Baris, Hagit N

    2014-08-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable contiguous gene syndrome ascribed to an interstitial deletion in chromosome 17p11.2. Seventy percent of SMS patients have a common deletion interval spanning 3.5 megabases (Mb). Clinical features of SMS include characteristic mild dysmorphic features, ocular anomalies, short stature, brachydactyly, and hypotonia. SMS patients have a unique neurobehavioral phenotype that includes intellectual disability, self-injurious behavior and severe sleep disturbance. Little has been reported in the medical literature about anatomical brain anomalies in patients with SMS. Here we describe two patients with SMS caused by the common deletion in 17p11.2 diagnosed using chromosomal microarray (CMA). Both patients had a typical clinical presentation and abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. One patient had subependymal periventricular gray matter heterotopia, and the second had a thin corpus callosum, a thin brain stem and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. This report discusses the possible abnormal MRI images in SMS and reviews the literature on brain malformations in SMS. Finally, although structural brain malformations in SMS patients are not a common feature, we suggest baseline routine brain imaging in patients with SMS in particular, and in patients with chromosomal microdeletion/microduplication syndromes in general. Structural brain malformations in these patients may affect the decision-making process regarding their management.

  14. Impaired blood-brain/spinal cord barrier in ALS patients.

    PubMed

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Hernandez-Ontiveros, Diana G; Rodrigues, Maria C O; Haller, Edward; Frisina-Deyo, Aric; Mirtyl, Santhia; Sallot, Sebastian; Saporta, Samuel; Borlongan, Cesario V; Sanberg, Paul R

    2012-08-21

    Vascular pathology, including blood-brain/spinal cord barrier (BBB/BSCB) alterations, has recently been recognized as a key factor possibly aggravating motor neuron damage, identifying a neurovascular disease signature for ALS. However, BBB/BSCB competence in sporadic ALS (SALS) is still undetermined. In this study, BBB/BSCB integrity in postmortem gray and white matter of medulla and spinal cord tissue from SALS patients and controls was investigated. Major findings include (1) endothelial cell damage and pericyte degeneration, (2) severe intra- and extracellular edema, (3) reduced CD31 and CD105 expressions in endothelium, (4) significant accumulation of perivascular collagen IV, and fibrin deposits (5) significantly increased microvascular density in lumbar spinal cord, (6) IgG microvascular leakage, (7) reduced tight junction and adhesion protein expressions. Microvascular barrier abnormalities determined in gray and white matter of the medulla, cervical, and lumbar spinal cord of SALS patients are novel findings. Pervasive barrier damage discovered in ALS may have implications for disease pathogenesis and progression, as well as for uncovering novel therapeutic targets.

  15. Regional volumes in brain stem and cerebellum are associated with postural impairments in young brain-injured patients.

    PubMed

    Drijkoningen, David; Leunissen, Inge; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Hoogkamer, Wouter; Sunaert, Stefan; Duysens, Jacques; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2015-12-01

    Many patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) suffer from postural control impairments that can profoundly affect daily life. The cerebellum and brain stem are crucial for the neural control of posture and have been shown to be vulnerable to primary and secondary structural consequences of TBI. The aim of this study was to investigate whether morphometric differences in the brain stem and cerebellum can account for impairments in static and dynamic postural control in TBI. TBI patients (n = 18) and healthy controls (n = 30) completed three challenging postural control tasks on the EquiTest® system (Neurocom). Infratentorial grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volumes were analyzed with cerebellum-optimized voxel-based morphometry using the spatially unbiased infratentorial toolbox. Volume loss in TBI patients was revealed in global cerebellar GM, global infratentorial WM, middle cerebellar peduncles, pons and midbrain. In the TBI group and across both groups, lower postural control performance was associated with reduced GM volume in the vermal/paravermal regions of lobules I-IV, V and VI. Moreover, across all participants, worse postural control performance was associated with lower WM volume in the pons, medulla, midbrain, superior and middle cerebellar peduncles and cerebellum. This is the first study in TBI patients to demonstrate an association between postural impairments and reduced volume in specific infratentorial brain areas. Volumetric measures of the brain stem and cerebellum may be valuable prognostic markers of the chronic neural pathology, which complicates rehabilitation of postural control in TBI.

  16. The effect of galantamine added to clozapine on cognition of five patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bora, Emre; Veznedaroğlu, Baybars; Kayahan, Bülent

    2005-01-01

    Although clozapine may be beneficial for the treatment of cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia, it may also impair some cognitive skills as a result of its anticholinergic activity. In this case series, the impact of galantamine administration on 5 patients with schizophrenia who had been treated with clozapine are reported. Neuropsychological assessment was administered before and after 8 weeks of 16 mg/d galantamine treatment. In this case series, galantamine was well tolerated by all of the patients. Three of the patients were much improved in sustained attention tasks. Most of the patients were also improved in psychomotor speed and selective attention tasks. Two patients with low pretreatment memory scores seemed to also be improved. Our results suggest that the possible role of galantamine as a cognitive enhancer in schizophrenia should be investigated in controlled trials.

  17. ECG changes of cardiac origin in elderly patients with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Hashemian, Amir Masoud; Ahmadi, Koorosh; Taherinia, Ali; Sharifi, Mohamad Davood; Ramezani, Javad; Jazayeri, Seyed Behzad; Saadat, Soheil; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Simultaneous electrocardiographic (ECG) changes are seen in hemorrhagic brain events even in the absence of associated myocardial infarction (MI). This study was designed to assess the role of ECG changes to predict true MI in patients with hemorrhagic brain trauma. Methods: Data of 153 patients with traumatic brain injury and concomitant ECG changes were recorded. Enzyme study was performed for the patients, and a cardiologist confirmed the diagnosis of MI. Results: Overall, 83 females and 70 males older than 50 years of age were enrolled in the study. The most common type of hemorrhagic brain event was subarachnoid hemorrhage, and the most common ECG change was an inverted T wave. MI was confirmed in 15 (9.8%) patients. Patients with intracranial hemorrhage had significantly (p= 0.023) higher rates of associated MI than other types of brain hemorrhages. ST segment elevation was found to have a positive predictive value of 71.4% in males and 25% in females in terms of diagnosing a true MI associated with hemorrhagic brain events. Conclusion: Although simultaneous cardiac changes are seen after sympathetic over- activity in brain hemorrhages, regular ECG screening of elder patients with traumatic brain injury is suggested, particularly in patients with intracranial hemorrhages. PMID:26913269

  18. Feasibility of Neoadjuvant Ad-REIC Gene Therapy in Patients with High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Kumon, Hiromi; Sasaki, Katsumi; Ariyoshi, Yuichi; Sadahira, Takuya; Araki, Motoo; Ebara, Shin; Yanai, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo

    2015-12-01

    In a phase I/IIa study of in situ gene therapy using an adenovirus vector carrying the human REIC/Dkk-3 gene (Ad-REIC), we assessed the inhibitory effects of cancer recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP), in patients with high risk localized prostate cancer (PCa). After completing the therapeutic interventions with initially planned three escalating doses of 1.0 × 10(10) , 1.0 × 10(11) , and 1.0 × 10(12) viral particles (VP) in 1.0-1.2 mL (n = 3, 3, and 6), an additional higher dose of 3.0 × 10(12) VP in 3.6 mL (n = 6) was further studied. Patients with recurrence probability of 35% or more within 5 years after RP as calculated by Kattan's nomogram, were enrolled. They received two ultrasound-guided intratumoral injections at 2-week intervals, followed by RP 6 weeks after the second injection. Based on the findings of MRI and biopsy mapping, as a rule, one track injection to the most prominent cancer area was given to initial 12 patients and 3 track injections to multiple cancer areas in additional 6 patients. As compared to the former group, biochemical recurrence-free survival of the latter showed a significantly favorable outcome. Neoadjuvant Ad-REIC, mediating simultaneous induction of cancer selective apoptosis and augmentation of antitumor immunity, is a feasible approach in preventing cancer recurrence after RP. (199).

  19. Characterisation of element profile changes induced by long-term dietary supplementation of zinc in the brain and cerebellum of 3xTg-AD mice by alternated cool and normal plasma ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Ciavardelli, Domenico; Consalvo, Ada; Caldaralo, Valentina; Di Vacri, Maria Laura; Nisi, Stefano; Corona, Carlo; Frazzini, Valerio; Sacchetta, Paolo; Urbani, Andrea; Di Ilio, Carmine; Sensi, Stefano L

    2012-12-01

    Metal dyshomeostasis plays a crucial role in promoting several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), a condition that has been linked to deregulation of brain levels of Al, Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn. Thus, quantitative multi-element profiling of brain tissues from AD models can be of great value in assessing the pathogenic role of metals as well as the value of therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring metal homeostasis in the brain. In this study, we employed low resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to evaluate levels of ultra-trace, trace, and major elements in brains and cerebella of 3xTg-AD mice, a well characterized transgenic (Tg) AD model. This method is based on alternated cool and hot plasma ICP-MS. The essay fulfilled analytical requirements for the quantification of 14 elements in the Central Nervous System (CNS) of our Tg model. Quantification of Li, Al, Cr, and Co, a procedure that requires a pre-concentration step, was validated by high resolution ICP-MS. Changes in element profiles occurring in 3xTg-AD mice were compared to the ones observed in wild type (WT) mice. We also investigated variations in element profiles in 3xTg-AD mice receiving a long-term (17 months) dietary supplementation of Zn. Our data indicate that, compared to WT animals, 3xTg-AD mice displayed signs of altered brain metal homeostasis. We also found that long-term Zn administration promoted decreased brain levels of some metals (K, Ca, and Fe) and restored levels of Al, Cr, and Co to values found in WT mice.

  20. Human anti-Aβ IgGs target conformational epitopes on synthetic dimer assemblies and the AD brain-derived peptide.

    PubMed

    Welzel, Alfred T; Williams, Angela D; McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P; Acero, Luis; Weber, Alfred; Blinder, Veronika; Mably, Alex; Bunk, Sebastian; Hermann, Corinna; Farrell, Michael A; Ehrlich, Hartmut J; Schwarz, Hans P; Walsh, Dominic M; Solomon, Alan; O'Nuallain, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Soluble non-fibrillar assemblies of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and aggregated tau protein are the proximate synaptotoxic species associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Anti-Aβ immunotherapy is a promising and advanced therapeutic strategy, but the precise Aβ species to target is not yet known. Previously, we and others have shown that natural human IgGs (NAbs) target diverse Aβ conformers and have therapeutic potential. We now demonstrate that these antibodies bound with nM avidity to conformational epitopes on plate-immobilized synthetic Aβ dimer assemblies, including synaptotoxic protofibrils, and targeted these conformers in solution. Importantly, NAbs also recognized Aβ extracted from the water-soluble phase of human AD brain, including species that migrated on denaturing PAGE as SDS-stable dimers. The critical reliance on Aβ's conformational state for NAb binding, and not a linear sequence epitope, was confirmed by the antibody's nM reactivity with plate-immobilized protofibrills, and weak uM binding to synthetic Aβ monomers and peptide fragments. The antibody's lack of reactivity against a linear sequence epitope was confirmed by our ability to isolate anti-Aβ NAbs from intravenous immunoglobulin using affinity matrices, immunoglobulin light chain fibrils and Cibacron blue, which had no sequence similarity with the peptide. These findings suggest that further investigations on the molecular basis and the therapeutic/diagnostic potential of anti-Aβ NAbs are warranted.

  1. Human Anti-Aβ IgGs Target Conformational Epitopes on Synthetic Dimer Assemblies and the AD Brain-Derived Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Welzel, Alfred T.; Williams, Angela D.; McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Acero, Luis; Weber, Alfred; Blinder, Veronika; Mably, Alex; Bunk, Sebastian; Hermann, Corinna; Farrell, Michael A.; Ehrlich, Hartmut J.; Schwarz, Hans P.; Walsh, Dominic M.; Solomon, Alan; O’Nuallain, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Soluble non-fibrillar assemblies of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and aggregated tau protein are the proximate synaptotoxic species associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Anti-Aβ immunotherapy is a promising and advanced therapeutic strategy, but the precise Aβ species to target is not yet known. Previously, we and others have shown that natural human IgGs (NAbs) target diverse Aβ conformers and have therapeutic potential. We now demonstrate that these antibodies bound with nM avidity to conformational epitopes on plate-immobilized synthetic Aβ dimer assemblies, including synaptotoxic protofibrils, and targeted these conformers in solution. Importantly, NAbs also recognized Aβ extracted from the water-soluble phase of human AD brain, including species that migrated on denaturing PAGE as SDS-stable dimers. The critical reliance on Aβ’s conformational state for NAb binding, and not a linear sequence epitope, was confirmed by the antibody’s nM reactivity with plate-immobilized protofibrills, and weak uM binding to synthetic Aβ monomers and peptide fragments. The antibody’s lack of reactivity against a linear sequence epitope was confirmed by our ability to isolate anti-Aβ NAbs from intravenous immunoglobulin using affinity matrices, immunoglobulin light chain fibrils and Cibacron blue, which had no sequence similarity with the peptide. These findings suggest that further investigations on the molecular basis and the therapeutic/diagnostic potential of anti-Aβ NAbs are warranted. PMID:23209707

  2. Reduction of nausea and vomiting from epidural opioids by adding droperidol to the infusate in home-bound patients.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A

    1995-10-01

    In 184 adult patients with severe nonmalignant low back pain from postlaminectomy syndrome, temporary lumbar epidural catheters were infused with either 0.25% bupivacaine 92 mL, fentanyl 600 micrograms, and droperidol 5 mg (Group A), or 0.25% bupivacaine 92 mL, fentanyl 600 micrograms, and NaCl 0.9% 2 mL (Group B). Infusion rates ranged from 0.5 to 2 mL per hour, with an option for turning the infusion off when the patient had no pain and turning it on when the pain returned. Infusions were continued from 2 to 55 days, during which time the patient was at home. In Group A, only two patients had nausea without emesis, while in Group B, nausea occurred in 18 patients (P < 0.04) and four vomited (P < 0.05). The number of patients with headache, pruritus, somnolence, and/or numbness was minimal and without statistically significant group differences. During treatments, pain levels were 2 or less on a 10-cm visual analogue scale. Added to the epidural infusate, droperidol appears to significantly reduce nausea and vomiting in ambulatory patients receiving fentanyl and bupivacaine in extended epidural infusions. The possibility that droperidol potentiates analgesic effects could not be evaluated.

  3. Incidence of Brain Atrophy and Decline in Mini-Mental State Examination Score After Whole-Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Brain Metastases: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shibamoto, Yuta Baba, Fumiya; Oda, Kyota; Hayashi, Shinya; Kokubo, Masaki; Ishihara, Shun-Ichi; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Masahiko

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of brain atrophy and dementia after whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in patients with brain metastases not undergoing surgery. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients underwent WBRT to 40 Gy in 20 fractions with or without a 10-Gy boost. Brain magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were performed before and soon after radiotherapy, every 3 months for 18 months, and every 6 months thereafter. Brain atrophy was evaluated by change in cerebrospinal fluid-cranial ratio (CCR), and the atrophy index was defined as postradiation CCR divided by preradiation CCR. Results: Of 101 patients (median age, 62 years) entering the study, 92 completed WBRT, and 45, 25, and 10 patients were assessable at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Mean atrophy index was 1.24 {+-} 0.39 (SD) at 6 months and 1.32 {+-} 0.40 at 12 months, and 18% and 28% of the patients had an increase in the atrophy index by 30% or greater, respectively. No apparent decrease in mean MMSE score was observed after WBRT. Individually, MMSE scores decreased by four or more points in 11% at 6 months, 12% at 12 months, and 0% at 18 months. However, about half the decrease in MMSE scores was associated with a decrease in performance status caused by systemic disease progression. Conclusions: Brain atrophy developed in up to 30% of patients, but it was not necessarily accompanied by MMSE score decrease. Dementia after WBRT unaccompanied by tumor recurrence was infrequent.

  4. Cognitive profiles of neurofibromatosis type 1 patients with minor brain malformations.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Maria T; Walsh, Karin S; Kardel, Peter G; Kutteruf, Rachel E; Bhatt, Rujuta R; Bouton, Tara C; Vezina, Louis-Gilbert; Packer, Roger J

    2012-04-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a genetic condition associated with increased risk of abnormal brain development. The relationship between a specific type of brain malformation and a distinct cognitive sign/deficiency remains unknown. This study investigated the frequency of brain malformations in children with neurofibromatosis type 1, and the impact of those brain malformations on cognitive performance. A retrospective examination was performed of cranial magnetic resonance imaging and clinical records in 604 neurofibromatosis type 1 patients. Eighteen patients with brain malformations and intellectual evaluations were available and compared to a subset of neurofibromatosis type 1 patients (n = 20) without brain malformations. The most common brain malformations included hypothalamic hamartomas and Chiari I malformation. More complex migration disorders were also observed. Comparisons of cognitive profiles between groups revealed differences in patients with hamartomas compared with those manifesting Chiari I malformations or control subjects. As a group, those with hamartomas demonstrated below-average global intellect, whereas patients with Chiari I or no malformations performed in the average range. Disorders in cell organization, expressed as brain malformations (hamartomas or more complex defects), may comprise part of the expression of organizational and developmental defects in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 and possibly other rat sarcoma gene-mitogen activated protein kinase pathway disorders.

  5. Increased BMP6 levels in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients and APP transgenic mice are accompanied by impaired neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Leslie; Adame, Anthony; Patrick, Christina; DeLaney, Alexandra; Pham, Emiley; Rockenstein, Edward; Hansen, Lawrence; Masliah, Eliezer

    2010-01-01

    During aging and in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), synaptic plasticity and neuronal integrity are disturbed. In addition to the alterations in plasticity in mature neurons, the neurodegenerative process in AD has been shown to be accompanied by alterations in neurogenesis. Members of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family of growth factors have been implicated as important regulators of neurogenesis and neuronal cell fate determination during development, however their role in adult neurogenesis and in AD is less clear. We show here by qRT-PCR analysis that BMP6 mRNA levels were significantly increased in the hippocampus of human patients with AD and in APP transgenic mice compared to controls. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed that BMP6 protein levels were increased in human AD brains and APP transgenic mouse brains compared to controls and accumulated around hippocampal plaques. The increased levels of BMP6 were accompanied by defects in hippocampal neurogenesis in AD patients and APP transgenic mice. In support of a role for BMP6 in defective neurogenesis in AD, we show in an in vitro model of adult neurogenesis that treatment with amyloid-β1–42 protein (Aβ) resulted in increased expression of BMP6, and that exposure to recombinant BMP6 resulted in reduced proliferation with no toxic effects. Taken together, these results suggest that Aβ-associated increases in BMP6 expression in AD may have deleterious effects on neurogenesis in the hippocampus, and therapeutic approaches could focus on normalization of BMP6 levels to protect against AD-related neurogenic deficits. PMID:20844121

  6. Care interaction adding challenges to old patients' well-being during surgical hospital treatment.

    PubMed

    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Høybye, Mette Terp

    2015-01-01

    Today, hospitals offer surgical treatment within a short hospital admission. This brief interaction may challenge the well-being of old patients. The aim of this study was to explore how the well-being of old hospitalized patients was affected by the interaction with staff during a fast-track surgical treatment and hospital admission for colon cancer. We used an ethnographic methodology with field observations and unstructured interviews focusing on one patient at a time (n=9) during a full day; the hours ranging from 7:45 a.m. to 8 p.m. Participants were between 74 and 85 years of age and of both sexes. The study was reported to the Danish Data Protection Agency with reference number (2007-58-0010). The encounter between old patients and the staff was a main theme in our findings elucidating a number of care challenges. The identified care challenges illustrated "well-being as a matter of different perspectives," "vulnerability in contrast to well-being," and "staff mix influencing the care encounter." The experience of well-being in old cancer patients during hospital admission was absent or challenged when staff did not acknowledge their individual vulnerability and needs.

  7. Customizing Deep Brain Stimulation to the Patient Using Computational Models

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Cameron C.; Frankenmolle, Anneke; Wu, Jennifer; Noecker, Angela M.; Alberts, Jay L.

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral subthalamic (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is effective in improving the cardinal motor signs of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD); however declines in cognitive function have been associated with this procedure. The aim of this study was to assess cognitive-motor performance of 10 PD patients implanted with STN DBS systems during either clinically determined stimulation settings or settings derived from a computational model. Cicerone DBS software was used to define the model parameters such that current spread to non-motor areas of the STN was minimized. Clinically determined and model defined parameters were equally effective in improving motor scores on the traditional clinical rating scale (UPDRS-III). Under modest dual-task conditions, cognitive-motor performance was worse with clinically determined compared to model derived parameters. In addition, the model parameters provided a 33% reduction in power consumption. These results indicate that the cognitivemotor declines associated with bilateral STN can be mitigated, without compromising motor benefits, utilizing stimulation parameters that minimize current spread into non-motor regions of the STN. PMID:19965023

  8. The calculating hemispheres: studies of a split-brain patient.

    PubMed

    Funnell, Margaret G; Colvin, Mary K; Gazzaniga, Michael S

    2007-06-11

    The purpose of the study was to investigate simple calculation in the two cerebral hemispheres of a split-brain patient. In a series of four experiments, the left hemisphere was superior to the right in simple calculation, confirming the previously reported left hemisphere specialization for calculation. In two different recognition paradigms, right hemisphere performance was at chance for all arithmetic operations, with the exception of subtraction in a two-alternative forced choice paradigm (performance was at chance when the lure differed from the correct answer by a magnitude of 1 but above chance when the magnitude difference was 4). In a recall paradigm, the right hemisphere performed above chance for both addition and subtraction, but performed at chance levels for multiplication and division. The error patterns in that experiment suggested that for subtraction and addition, the right hemisphere does have some capacity for approximating the solution even when it is unable to generate the exact solution. Furthermore, right hemisphere accuracy in addition and subtraction was higher for problems with small operands than with large operands. An additional experiment assessed approximate and exact addition in the two hemispheres for problems with small and large operands. The left hemisphere was equally accurate in both tasks but the right hemisphere was more accurate in approximate addition than in exact addition. In exact addition, right hemisphere accuracy was higher for problems with small operands than large, but the opposite pattern was found for approximate addition.

  9. Structural changes in Alzheimer's disease brain microvessels.

    PubMed

    Christov, Alexander; Ottman, J; Hamdheydari, L; Grammas, Paula

    2008-08-01

    Brain microvascular alterations are thought to contribute to the development of stroke and dementia. Structural changes in capillaries of elderly patients correlate positively with advanced age and dementia. The objective of this study is to use laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy to compare structural (collagen content) and functional (apoptosis) parameters in brain tissues and isolated vessels of AD patients to age-matched controls. Our results show significantly higher fluorescent labeling for apoptosis in AD vessels compared to controls. Also, there is significantly higher autofluorescence (reflecting levels of collagen and other proteins that autofluoresce) in AD brain and vessels compared to controls. Western blot analysis of collagen subtypes shows elevated type I and type III and reduced type IV levels in AD vessels. These data demonstrate that changes in the amount and type of collagen occur in AD brain and suggest that cerebral vessel injury is part of AD pathology.

  10. F18 EF5 PET/CT Imaging in Patients with Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Pennsylvania, where more patients are offered gamma knife radiotherapy upfront rather than whole brain radiotherapy which has impacted our accrual rates...to follow. Furthermore, patients with better performance status often receive upfront gamma knife radiotherapy instead. These patients were...four weeks post treatment. Additionally, opening up the protocol enrollment to include patients receiving gamma knife radiotherapy was done

  11. Empagliflozin added to metformin and sulfonylurea therapy in patients with sub-optimally controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Andrew J; Frías, Juan P

    2015-04-01

    The combination of metformin and a sulfonylurea is commonly used in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Many patients on this combination therapy do not achieve or maintain glycemic targets and require the addition of a third antihyperglycemic agent. Among the options are the sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, a recently developed class of medications that effectively improve glycemic control and are associated with reduction in body weight and blood pressure. This article evaluates a 24-week, randomized, placebo-controlled study of the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin, added to metformin plus sulfonylurea regimens. Empagliflozin led to significant reductions in glycated hemoglobin and fasting plasma glucose, as well as body weight and systolic blood pressure. Adverse events typically recorded with SGLT2 inhibitors were observed; notably, genital infections occurred in more patients on empagliflozin than placebo. Overall, empagliflozin was well tolerated. These results indicate that SGLT2 inhibitors can be successfully added to metformin plus sulfonylurea regimens. SGLT2 inhibitors are not the only therapeutic option in this clinical situation; however, based on the secondary effects observed in this and other studies, they appear to be of particular value for patients who are obese or overweight.

  12. Relationship Between Neurocognitive Function and Quality of Life After Whole-Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Brain Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Bentzen, Soren M.; Li Jialiang; Renschler, Markus; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between neurocognitive function (NCF) and quality of life (QOL) in patients with brain metastases after whole-brain radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 208 patients from the whole-brain radiotherapy arm of a Phase III trial (PCI-P120-9801), who underwent regular NCF and QOL (ADL [activities of daily living] and FACT-Br [Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain-specific]) testing, were analyzed. Spearman's rank correlation was calculated between NCF and QOL, using each patient's own data, at each time point. To test the hypothesis that NCF declines before QOL changes, the predictive effect of NCF from previous visits on QOL was studied with a linear mixed-effects model. Neurocognitive function or QOL deterioration was defined relative to each patient's own baseline. Lead or lag time, defined as NCF deterioration before or after the date of QOL decline, respectively, was computed. Results: At baseline, all NCF tests showed statistically significant correlations with ADL, which became stronger at 4 months. A similar observation was made with FACT-Br. Neurocognitive function scores from previous visits predicted ADL (p < 0.05 for seven of eight tests) or FACT-Br. Scores on all eight NCF tests deteriorated before ADL decline (net lead time 9-153 days); and scores on six of eight NCF tests deteriorated before FACT-Br (net lead time 9-82 days). Conclusions: Neurocognitive function and QOL are correlated. Neurocognitive function scores from previous visits are predictive of QOL. Neurocognitive function deterioration precedes QOL decline. The sequential association between NCF and QOL decline suggests that delaying NCF deterioration is a worthwhile treatment goal in brain metastases patients.

  13. A Comprehensive Support Program: Effect on Depression in Spouse-Caregivers of AD Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittelman, Mary S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a psychosocial intervention program that treats the primary caregiver and family members of the Alzheimer's patient over the entire course of the disease. In the first year after intake, the control group became increasingly more depressed, whereas the treatment group remained stable. By the eighth month, treated caregivers were…

  14. Brain lesion-pattern analysis in patients with olfactory dysfunctions following head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lötsch, Jörn; Ultsch, Alfred; Eckhardt, Maren; Huart, Caroline; Rombaux, Philippe; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The presence of cerebral lesions in patients with neurosensory alterations provides a unique window into brain function. Using a fuzzy logic based combination of morphological information about 27 olfactory-eloquent brain regions acquired with four different brain imaging techniques, patterns of brain damage were analyzed in 127 patients who displayed anosmia, i.e., complete loss of the sense of smell (n = 81), or other and mechanistically still incompletely understood olfactory dysfunctions including parosmia, i.e., distorted perceptions of olfactory stimuli (n = 50), or phantosmia, i.e., olfactory hallucinations (n = 22). A higher prevalence of parosmia, and as a tendency also phantosmia, was observed in subjects with medium overall brain damage. Further analysis showed a lower frequency of lesions in the right temporal lobe in patients with parosmia than in patients without parosmia. This negative direction of the differences was unique for parosmia. In anosmia, and also in phantosmia, lesions were more frequent in patients displaying the respective symptoms than in those without these dysfunctions. In anosmic patients, lesions in the right olfactory bulb region were much more frequent than in patients with preserved sense of smell, whereas a higher frequency of carriers of lesions in the left frontal lobe was observed for phantosmia. We conclude that anosmia, and phantosmia, are the result of lost function in relevant brain areas whereas parosmia is more complex, requiring damaged and intact brain regions at the same time. PMID:26937377

  15. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui-yan; Li, Qiang; Chen, Xi-ping; Tao, Lu-yang

    2015-01-01

    Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocognition with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, respectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most significant positive correlations were found between mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most significant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positively associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental findings suggest that mismatch negativity might efficiently reflect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. PMID:26170824

  16. Adding Ultrasound to the Evaluation of Patients with Pathologic Nipple Discharge to Diagnose Additional Breast Cancers: Preliminary Data.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Haesung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Park, Byeong-Woo; Kim, Min Jung

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the malignancy yield of ultrasound Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classification and the diagnostic value of adding ultrasound to diagnosis of breast cancer in patients with pathologic nipple discharge. Of 267 patients with pathologic nipple discharge seen from February 2003 to March 2011, 198 with histopathologic confirmation and follow-up data were included. Ultrasound images and mammograms were analyzed according to BI-RADS. The malignancy rate for each BI-RADS category and the difference in diagnostic performance resulting from the addition of ultrasound to mammography were calculated. Of the 198 enrolled patients, 34 were diagnosed with a malignancy. The malignancy rates obtained with the addition of ultrasound to mammography were 0.0% (0 of 27) for category 1, 5.9% (1/17) for category 2, 9.4% (5/53) for category 3, 21.5% (20/93) for category 4 and 100% (8/8) for category 5. The malignancy rates for mammography alone were 7.7%-9.0% for categories 1-3, 68.5% (13/19) for category 4 and 100.0% (5/5) for category 5. Adding US to mammography did not significantly increase sensitivity compared with mammography alone. Other diagnostic performance markers such as specificity and positive predictive value were not improved. Among patients for whom mammograms were available, ultrasound detected 5 breast cancers (26.3%) in addition to the 19 breast cancers found by positive mammography. Although it did not increase overall diagnostic performance in patients with pathologic nipple discharge, addition of ultrasound to mammography did detect an additional 26.3% of malignant lesions.

  17. Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation vs Best Medical Therapy for Patients With Advanced Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Frances M.; Follett, Kenneth; Stern, Matthew; Hur, Kwan; Harris, Crystal; Marks, William J.; Rothlind, Johannes; Sagher, Oren; Reda, Domenic; Moy, Claudia S.; Pahwa, Rajesh; Burchiel, Kim; Hogarth, Penelope; Lai, Eugene C.; Duda, John E.; Holloway, Kathryn; Samii, Ali; Horn, Stacy; Bronstein, Jeff; Stoner, Gatana; Heemskerk, Jill; Huang, Grant D.

    2010-01-01

    Context Deep brain stimulation is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson disease (PD), although there are few randomized trials comparing treatments, and most studies exclude older patients. Objective To compare 6-month outcomes for patients with PD who received deep brain stimulation or best medical therapy. Design, Setting, and Patients Randomized controlled trial of patients who received either deep brain stimulation or best medical therapy, stratified by study site and patient age (<70 years vs ≥70 years) at 7 Veterans Affairs and 6 university hospitals between May 2002 and October 2005. A total of 255 patients with PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage ≥2 while not taking medications) were enrolled; 25% were aged 70 years or older. The final 6-month follow-up visit occurred in May 2006. Intervention Bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (n=60) or globus pallidus (n=61). Patients receiving best medical therapy (n=134) were actively managed by movement disorder neurologists. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was time spent in the “on” state (good motor control with unimpeded motor function) without troubling dyskinesia, using motor diaries. Other outcomes included motor function, quality of life, neurocognitive function, and adverse events. Results Patients who received deep brain stimulation gained a mean of 4.6 h/d of on time without troubling dyskinesia compared with 0 h/d for patients who received best medical therapy (between group mean difference, 4.5 h/d [95% CI, 3.7-5.4 h/d]; P<.001). Motor function improved significantly (P<.001) with deep brain stimulation vs best medical therapy, such that 71% of deep brain stimulation patients and 32% of best medical therapy patients experienced clinically meaningful motor function improvements (≥5 points). Compared with the best medical therapy group, the deep brain stimulation group experienced significant improvements in the summary measure of quality of life and on 7 of 8 PD

  18. CT brain findings in a patient with elevated brain cesium levels.

    PubMed

    Khangure, Simon R; Williams, Eric S; Welman, Christopher J

    2013-12-01

    We describe the CT findings in the brain of a woman with pathologically proven elevated levels of blood and tissue cesium. The 42-year-old woman had been receiving cesium chloride as a non-mainstream treatment for metastatic breast carcinoma. She presented to hospital following a seizure, and died 48 hours after admission. A brain CT performed on hospital admission showed a diffuse increase in attenuation of brain parenchyma. Autopsy revealed elevated levels of cesium in blood and solid organs including the brain. We hypothesize that the imaging findings are attributable to the abnormally elevated level of brain cesium at the time of the CT scan. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of this imaging finding.

  19. Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-03-21

    Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Malignant Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Noninfiltrating Astrocytoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Meningioma; Brain Metastases; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Pineal Parenchymal Tumor; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Infiltrating Astrocytoma; Mixed Gliomas; Stage IV Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  20. High-resolution whole-brain DCE-MRI using constrained reconstruction: Prospective clinical evaluation in brain tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yi; Lebel, R. Marc; Zhu, Yinghua; Lingala, Sajan Goud; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Law, Meng; Nayak, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To clinically evaluate a highly accelerated T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI technique that provides high spatial resolution and whole-brain coverage via undersampling and constrained reconstruction with multiple sparsity constraints. Methods: Conventional (rate-2 SENSE) and experimental DCE-MRI (rate-30) scans were performed 20 minutes apart in 15 brain tumor patients. The conventional clinical DCE-MRI had voxel dimensions 0.9 × 1.3 × 7.0 mm3, FOV 22 × 22 × 4.2 cm3, and the experimental DCE-MRI had voxel dimensions 0.9 × 0.9 × 1.9 mm3, and broader coverage 22 × 22 × 19 cm3. Temporal resolution was 5 s for both protocols. Time-resolved images and blood–brain barrier permeability maps were qualitatively evaluated by two radiologists. Results: The experimental DCE-MRI scans showed no loss of qualitative information in any of the cases, while achieving substantially higher spatial resolution and whole-brain spatial coverage. Average qualitative scores (from 0 to 3) were 2.1 for the experimental scans and 1.1 for the conventional clinical scans. Conclusions: The proposed DCE-MRI approach provides clinically superior image quality with higher spatial resolution and coverage than currently available approaches. These advantages may allow comprehensive permeability mapping in the brain, which is especially valuable in the setting of large lesions or multiple lesions spread throughout the brain. PMID:27147313

  1. The Effect of Hemoglobin Levels on Mortality in Pediatric Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Yee, Kevin F; Walker, Andrew M; Gilfoyle, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Objective. There is increasing evidence of adverse outcomes associated with blood transfusions for adult traumatic brain injury patients. However, current evidence suggests that pediatric traumatic brain injury patients may respond to blood transfusions differently on a vascular level. This study examined the influence of blood transfusions and anemia on the outcome of pediatric traumatic brain injury patients. Design. A retrospective cohort analysis of severe pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients was undertaken to investigate the association between blood transfusions and anemia on patient outcomes. Measurements and Main Results. One hundred and twenty patients with severe traumatic brain injury were identified and included in the analysis. The median Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was 6 and the mean hemoglobin (Hgb) on admission was 115.8 g/L. Forty-three percent of patients (43%) received at least one blood transfusion and the mean hemoglobin before transfusion was 80.1 g/L. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that anemia and the administration of packed red blood cells were not associated with adverse outcomes. Factors that were significantly associated with mortality were presence of abusive head trauma, increasing PRISM score, and low GCS after admission. Conclusion. In this single centre retrospective cohort study, there was no association found between anemia, blood transfusions, and hospital mortality in a pediatric traumatic brain injury patient population.

  2. Systems biology of human epilepsy applied to patients with brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Sandeep; Shah, Aashit K; Barkmeier, Daniel T; Loeb, Jeffrey A

    2013-12-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of recurrent seizures that can be associated with a wide variety of acquired and developmental brain lesions. Current medications for patients with epilepsy can suppress seizures; they do not cure or modify the underlying disease process. On the other hand, surgical removal of focal brain regions that produce seizures can be curative. This surgical procedure can be more precise with the placement of intracranial recording electrodes to identify brain regions that generate seizure activity as well as those that are critical for normal brain function. The detail that goes into these surgeries includes extensive neuroimaging, electrophysiology, and clinical data. Combined with precisely localized tissues removed, these data provide an unparalleled opportunity to learn about the interrelationships of many "systems" in the human brain not possible in just about any other human brain disorder. Herein, we describe a systems biology approach developed to study patients who undergo brain surgery for epilepsy and how we have begun to apply these methods to patients whose seizures are associated with brain tumors. A central goal of this clinical and translational research program is to improve our understanding of epilepsy and brain tumors and to improve diagnosis and treatment outcomes of both.

  3. Insights into brain metastasis in patients with ALK+ lung cancer: is the brain truly a sanctuary?

    PubMed

    Toyokawa, Gouji; Seto, Takashi; Takenoyama, Mitsuhiro; Ichinose, Yukito

    2015-12-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been identified to exert a potent transforming activity through its rearrangement in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and patients (pts) with ALK rearrangement can be treated more successfully with ALK inhibitors, such as crizotinib, alectinib, and ceritinib, than with chemotherapy. Despite the excellent efficacy of ALK inhibitors, resistance to these drugs is inevitably encountered in most ALK-rearranged pts. Cases of resistance are subtyped into three groups, i.e., systemic, oligo, and central nervous system (CNS) types, with the CNS being used to be considered a sanctuary. With regard to the management of CNS lesions in pts with ALK+ NSCLC, a growing body of evidence has gradually demonstrated the intracranial (IC) efficacy of ALK inhibitor (ALKi) in ALK+ NSCLC pts with brain metastases (BMs). Although the efficacy of crizotinib for the CNS lesions remains controversial, a recent retrospective investigation of ALK+ pts with BM enrolled in PROFILE 1005 and PROFILE 1007 demonstrated that crizotinib is associated with a high disease control rate for BM. However, BM comprises the most common site of progressive disease in pts with or without baseline BMs, which is a serious problem for crizotinib. Furthermore, alectinib can be used to achieve strong and long-lasting inhibitory effects on BM. In addition to alectinib, the IC efficacy of other next-generation ALK inhibitors, such as ceritinib, AP26113 and PF-06463922, has been demonstrated. In this article, we review the latest evidence regarding the BM and IC efficacy of ALK inhibitors in pts with ALK+ NSCLC.

  4. Use of Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound for Diagnosis of Brain Death in Patients with Severe Cerebral Injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuequn; Liu, Shangwei; Xun, Fangfang; Liu, Zhan; Huang, Xiuying

    2016-06-06

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate the use of transcranial Doppler (TCD) for diagnosis of brain death in patients with severe cerebral injury. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective study enrolled 42 patients based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. All patients were divided into either the brain death group or the survival group according to prognosis. Blood flow of the brain was examined by TCD and analyzed for spectrum changes. The average blood flow velocity (Vm), pulse index (PI), and diastolic blood flow in reverse (RDF) were recorded and compared. RESULTS The data demonstrated that the average speed of bilateral middle cerebral artery blood flow in the brain death group was significantly reduced (P<0.05). However, the PI of the brain death group increased significantly. Moreover, RDF spectrum and nail-like sharp peak spectrum of the brain death group was higher than in the survival group. CONCLUSIONS Due to its simplicity, high repeatability, and specificity, TCD combined with other methods is highly valuable for diagnosis of brain death in patients with severe brain injury.

  5. Blood-brain barrier permeability of gefitinib in patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer before and during whole brain radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Wei, Wei-dong; Liang, Jian-zhong; Xu, Fei; Dinglin, Xiao-xiao; Ma, Shu-xiang; Chen, Li-kun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To explore the ability of gefitinib to penetrate blood brain barrier (BBB) during whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Patients and Methods Enrolled in this study were eligible patients who were diagnosed with BM from NSCLC. Gefitinib was given at 250 mg/day for 30 days, then concurrently with WBRT (40 Gy/20 F/4 w), followed by maintenance. Serial CSF and blood samples were collected on 30 day after gefitinib administration, and at the time of 10, 20, 30 and 40 Gy following WBRT. CSF and plasma samples of 13 patients without BM who were treated with gefitinib were collected as control. CSF and plasma gefitinib levels were measured by LC-MS/MS. Results Fifteen BM patients completed gefitinib plus WBRT. The CSF-to-plasma ratio of gefitinib in patients with BM was higher than that in patients without BM (1.34% vs. 0.36%, P < 0.001). The CSF-to-plasma ratio of gefitinib increased with the increased dose of WBRT and reached the peak (1.87 ± 0.72%) at 30 Gy, which was significantly higher than that 1.34 ± 0.49% at 0 Gy (P = 0.01). The median time to progression of brain lesions and the median overall survival were 7.07 and 15.4 months, respectively. Conclusion The BBB permeability of gefitinib increased in accordance with escalated dose of WBRT. PMID:25788260

  6. Segmentation and quantification for Alzheimer's disease (AD): a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Tianhu; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Zhuge, Ying; Moonis, Gul; Clark, Christopher

    2003-05-01

    Alzheimer's is a progressive brain disease and is clinically characterized by cognitive symptoms that, in combination with behavioral disturbances, significantly interfere with activities of daily living. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility of developing volumetric measures of the structural damage and atrophy of brain derived from multiprotocol MR imaging. Our approach first applies intensity inhomogeneity correction and intensity standardization to PD and T2 weighted MR images to create base images for quantitative image analysis. Then, vectorial scale-based fuzzy connectedness segmentation (VSFCS) and morphological operations are applied to the base images to extract masks of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), grey matter (GM), and white matter (WM), and further to create a clean and accurate intracranial (IC) mask. After separating CSF from brain parenchyma (BP), VSFCS is applied to BP (PD and T2) images to generate pure GM and WM masks, and then subtracting these pure from the BP mask to detect AD lesions. This method was applied to a set of conventional PD and T2 weighted MR images that were obtained from 5 patients with probable AD and 5 healthy normal control subjects. The segmented images of individual brain tissue regions (CSF, GM, WM, and AD lesion) are consistent with a Neuroradiologist's examination. The quantitative analysis shows that patients with AD have more atrophy. The mean value of the volume of brain parenchyma of patients with AD is about 10% less than that of healthy controls.

  7. Functional brain imaging in 14 patients with dissociative amnesia reveals right inferolateral prefrontal hypometabolism.

    PubMed

    Brand, Matthias; Eggers, Carsten; Reinhold, Nadine; Fujiwara, Esther; Kessler, Josef; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Markowitsch, Hans J

    2009-10-30

    Dissociative amnesia is a condition usually characterized by severely impaired retrograde memory functioning in the absence of structural brain damage. Recent case studies nevertheless found functional brain changes in patients suffering from autobiographical-episodic memory loss in the cause of dissociative amnesia. Functional changes were demonstrated in both resting state and memory retrieval conditions. In addition, some but not all cases also showed other neuropsychological impairments beyond retrograde memory deficits. However, there is no group study available that examined potential functional brain abnormalities and accompanying neuropsychological deteriorations in larger samples of patients with dissociative retrograde amnesia. We report functional imaging and neuropsychological data acquired in 14 patients with dissociative amnesia following stressful or traumatic events. All patients suffered from autobiographical memory loss. In addition, approximately half of the patients had deficits in anterograde memory and executive functioning. Accompanying functional brain changes were measured by [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Regional glucose utilization of the patients was compared with that of 19 healthy subjects, matched for age and gender. We found significantly decreased glucose utilization in the right inferolateral prefrontal cortex in the patients. Hypometabolism in this brain region, known to be involved in retrieval of autobiographical memories and self-referential processing, may be a functional brain correlate of dissociative amnesia.

  8. Brain Scans Let 'Locked-In' ALS Patients Communicate

    MedlinePlus

    ... suffered strokes, not just those with ALS. The study was published online Jan. 31 in the journal PLOS Biology . SOURCES: Marie-Christine Nizzi, Ph.D., psychology instructor, Mind, Brain and Behavior Initiative, Harvard University, and associate ...

  9. Dosimetric Impact of Intrafractional Patient Motion in Pediatric Brain Tumor Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, Chris Trussell, John; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the dosimetric consequences of intrafractional patient motion on the clinical target volume (CTV), spinal cord, and optic nerves for non-sedated pediatric brain tumor patients. The patients were immobilized for treatment using a customized thermoplastic full-face mask and bite-block attached to an array of reflectors. The array was optically tracked by infra-red cameras at a frequency of 10 Hz. Patients were localized based on skin/mask marks and weekly films were taken to ensure proper setup. Before each noncoplanar field was delivered, the deviation from baseline of the array was recorded. The systematic error (SE) and random error (RE) were calculated. Direct simulation of the intrafractional motion was used to quantify the dosimetric changes to the targets and critical structures. Nine patients utilizing the optical tracking system were evaluated. The patient cohort had a mean of 31 {+-} 1.5 treatment fractions; motion data were acquired for a mean of 26 {+-} 6.2 fractions. The mean age was 15.6 {+-} 4.1 years. The SE and RE were 0.4 and 1.1 mm in the posterior-anterior, 0.5 and 1.0 mm in left-right, and 0.6 and 1.3 mm in superior-inferior directions, respectively. The dosimetric effects of the motion on the CTV were negligible; however, the dose to the critical structures was increased. Patient motion during treatment does affect the dose to critical structures, therefore, planning risk volumes are needed to properly assess the dose to normal tissues. Because the motion did not affect the dose to the CTV, the 3-mm PTV margin used is sufficient to account for intrafractional motion, given the patient is properly localized at the start of treatment.

  10. Yoga Therapy in Treating Patients With Malignant Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-17

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  11. Solitary supratentorial Listeria monocytogenes brain abscess in an immunocompromised patient

    PubMed Central

    Onofrio, Anthony R.; Martinez, Lauren C.; Opatowsky, Michael J.; Spak, Cedric W.; Layton, Kennith F.

    2015-01-01

    We describe an 81-year-old man receiving azacitidine monotherapy for myelodysplastic syndrome who was improving from Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia after receiving antibiotic therapy during an earlier hospital admission. Shortly after discharge he developed new-onset seizure activity, with brain imaging on subsequent admissions demonstrating a posterior right frontal lobe mass. Specimen cultures after resection of the mass revealed this to be a cerebral abscess related to L. monocytogenes. Brain abscesses related to this organism are rare. PMID:26130881

  12. Mirror Asymmetry of Category and Letter Fluency in Traumatic Brain Injury and Alzheimer's Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capitani, Erminio; Rosci, Chiara; Saetti, Maria Cristina; Laiacona, Marcella

    2009-01-01

    In this study we contrasted the Category fluency and Letter fluency performance of 198 normal subjects, 57 Alzheimer's patients and 57 patients affected by traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim was to check whether, besides the prevalence of Category fluency deficit often reported among Alzheimer's patients, the TBI group presented the opposite…

  13. Gamma-Knife radiosurgery in the management of melanoma patients with brain metastases: A series of 106 patients without whole-brain radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudy-Marqueste, Caroline . E-mail: marqueste@wanadoo.fr; Regis, Jean-Marie; Muracciole, Xavier; Laurans, Renaud; Richard, Marie-Aleth; Bonerandi, Jean-Jacques; Grob, Jean-Jacques

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To assess retrospectively a strategy that uses Gamma-Knife radiosurgery (GKR) in the management of patients with brain metastases (BMs) of malignant melanoma (MM). Methods: GKR without whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) was performed for patients with Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) of 60 or above who harbored 1 to 4 BMs of 30 mm or less and was repeated as often as needed. Survival was assessed in the whole population, whereas local-control rates were assessed for patients with follow-up longer than 3 months. Results: A total of 221 BMs were treated in 106 patients; 61.3% had a single BM. Median survival from the time of GKR was 5.09 months. Control rate of treated BMs was 83.7%, with 14% of complete response (14 BMs), 42% of partial response (41 BMs), and 43% of stabilization (43 BMs). In multivariate analysis, survival prognosis factors retained were KPS greater than 80, cortical or subcortical location, and Score Index for Radiosurgery (SIR) greater than 6. On the basis of KPS, BM location, and age, a score called MM-GKR, predictive of survival in our population, was defined. Conclusion: Gamma-Knife radiosurgery provides a surgery-like ability to obtain control of a solitary BM and could be consider as an alternative treatment to the combination of GKR+WBRT as a palliative strategy. MM-GKR classification is more adapted to MM patients than are SIR, RPA and Brain Score for Brain Metastasis.

  14. Impact of Adding a Decision Aid to Patient Education in Adults with Asthma: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Légaré, France; Moisan, Jocelyne; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Background Not providing adequate patient education interventions to asthma patients remains a major care gap. To help asthma patients and caregivers discuss inhaled controller medication use, our team has previously developed a decision aid (DA). We sought to assess whether adding this DA to education interventions improved knowledge, decisional conflict, and asthma control among adults with asthma. Methods A parallel clinical trial (NCT02516449). We recruited adults with asthma, aged 18 to 65 years, prescribed inhaled controller medication to optimize asthma control. Educators randomly allocated participants either to the education + DA or to the education group. At baseline and two-month follow-up, we measured asthma knowledge (primary outcome) with a validated self-administered questionnaire (score –37 to +37). Secondary outcomes included decisional conflict and asthma control. Blinded assessors collected data. Between the two time points, the within- and between-group changes were estimated by generalized linear mixed models. Results Fifty-one participants (response rate: 53%; age: 44 ± 13 years; women: n = 32) were randomized either to the education + DA group (n = 26) or to the education group (n = 25), and included in statistical analyses. Between baseline and follow-up, mean [95% CI] knowledge scores increased from 21.5 [19.9–23.2] to 25.1 [23.1–27.0] in the education + DA group (P = 0.0002) and from 24.0 [22.3–25.7] to 26.0 [24.0–28.0] in the education group (P = 0.0298). In both of the groups, decisional conflict and asthma control improved. There were no differences between groups. Conclusions Education improved knowledge, decisional conflict, and asthma control whether the DA was added or not. PMID:28107540

  15. The Effects of smoking status and smoking history on patients with brain metastases from lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shenker, Rachel F; McTyre, Emory R; Ruiz, Jimmy; Weaver, Kathryn E; Cramer, Christina; Alphonse-Sullivan, Natalie K; Farris, Michael; Petty, William J; Bonomi, Marcelo R; Watabe, Kounosuke; Laxton, Adrian W; Tatter, Stephen B; Warren, Graham W; Chan, Michael D

    2017-04-12

    There is limited data on the effects of smoking on lung cancer patients with brain metastases. This single institution retrospective study of patients with brain metastases from lung cancer who received stereotactic radiosurgery assessed whether smoking history is associated with overall survival, local control, rate of new brain metastases (brain metastasis velocity), and likelihood of neurologic death after brain metastases. Patients were stratified by adenocarcinoma versus nonadenocarcinoma histologies. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed for survival endpoints. Competing risk analysis was performed for neurologic death analysis to account for risk of nonneurologic death. Separate linear regression and multivariate analyses were performed to estimate the brain metastasis velocity. Of 366 patients included in the analysis, the median age was 63, 54% were male and, 60% were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma. Current smoking was reported by 37% and 91% had a smoking history. Current smoking status and pack-year history of smoking had no effect on overall survival. There was a trend for an increased risk of neurologic death in nonadenocarcinoma patients who continued to smoke (14%, 35%, and 46% at 6/12/24 months) compared with patients who did not smoke (12%, 23%, and 30%, P = 0.053). Cumulative pack years smoking was associated with an increase in neurologic death for nonadenocarcinoma patients (HR = 1.01, CI: 1.00-1.02, P = 0.046). Increased pack-year history increased brain metastasis velocity in multivariate analysis for overall patients (P = 0.026). Current smokers with nonadenocarcinoma lung cancers had a trend toward greater neurologic death than nonsmokers. Cumulative pack years smoking is associated with a greater brain metastasis velocity.

  16. Self-Reported Cognitive Outcomes in Patients With Brain Metastases Before and After Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Ansa Maer; Scherwath, Angela; Ernst, Gundula; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Bremer, Michael; Steinmann, Diana

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Patients with brain metastases may experience treatment-related cognitive deficits. In this study, we prospectively assessed the self-reported cognitive abilities of patients with brain metastases from any solid primary cancer before and after irradiation of the brain. Methods and Materials: The treatment group (TG) consisted of adult patients (n=50) with brain metastases who received whole or partial irradiation of the brain without having received prior radiation therapy (RT). The control group (CG) consisted of breast cancer patients (n=27) without cranial involvement who were treated with adjuvant RT. Patients were recruited between May 2008 and December 2010. Self-reported cognitive abilities were acquired before RT and 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after irradiation. The information regarding the neurocognitive status was collected by use of the German questionnaires for self-perceived deficits in attention (FEDA) and subjectively experienced everyday memory performance (FEAG). Results: The baseline data showed a high proportion of self-perceived neurocognitive deficits in both groups. A comparison between the TG and the CG regarding the course of self-reported outcomes after RT showed significant between-group differences for the FEDA scales 2 and 3: fatigue and retardation of daily living activities (P=.002) and decrease in motivation (P=.032) with an increase of attention deficits in the TG, but not in the CG. There was a trend towards significance in FEDA scale 1: distractibility and retardation of mental processes (P=.059) between the TG and the CG. The FEAG assessment presented no significant differences. An additional subgroup analysis within the TG was carried out. FEDA scale 3 showed significant differences in the time-related progress between patients with whole-brain RT and those receiving hypofractionated stereotactic RT (P=.025), with less decrease in motivation in the latter group. Conclusion: Self-reported attention declined in

  17. Cerebral extracellular lactate increase is predominantly nonischemic in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Nathalie; Suys, Tamarah; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Bouzat, Pierre; Messerer, Mahmoud; Bloch, Jocelyne; Levivier, Marc; Magistretti, Pierre J; Meuli, Reto; Oddo, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that endogenous lactate is an important substrate for neurons. This study aimed to examine cerebral lactate metabolism and its relationship with brain perfusion in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). A prospective cohort of 24 patients with severe TBI monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD) and brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) was studied. Brain lactate metabolism was assessed by quantification of elevated CMD lactate samples (>4 mmol/L); these were matched to CMD pyruvate and PbtO2 values and dichotomized as glycolytic (CMD pyruvate >119 μmol/L vs. low pyruvate) and hypoxic (PbtO2 <20 mm Hg vs. nonhypoxic). Using perfusion computed tomography (CT), brain perfusion was categorized as oligemic, normal, or hyperemic, and was compared with CMD and PbtO2 data. Samples with elevated CMD lactate were frequently observed (41±8%), and we found that brain lactate elevations were predominantly associated with glycolysis and normal PbtO2 (73±8%) rather than brain hypoxia (14±6%). Furthermore, glycolytic lactate was always associated with normal or hyperemic brain perfusion, whereas all episodes with hypoxic lactate were associated with diffuse oligemia. Our findings suggest predominant nonischemic cerebral extracellular lactate release after TBI and support the concept that lactate may be used as an energy substrate by the injured human brain. PMID:23963367

  18. Health multi-terminology portal: a semantic added-value for patient safety.

    PubMed

    Grosjean, Julien; Merabti, Tayeb; Dahamna, Badisse; Kergourlay, Ivan; Thirion, Benoit; Soualmia, Lina F; Darmoni, Stefan J

    2011-01-01

    Since the mid-90s, several quality-controlled health gateways were developed. In France, CISMeF is the leading health gateway. It indexes Internet resources from the main institutions, using the MeSH thesaurus and the Dublin Core metadata element set. Since 2005, the CISMeF Information System (IS) includes 24 health terminologies, classifications and thesauri for indexing and information retrieval. This work aims at creating a Health Multi-Terminology Portal (HMTP) and connect it to the CISMeF Terminology Database mainly for searching concepts and terms among all the health controlled vocabularies available in French (or in English and translated in French) and browsing it dynamically. To integrate the terminologies in the CISMeF IS, three steps are necessary: (1) designing a meta-model into which each terminology can be integrated, (2) developing a process to include terminologies into the HMTP, (3) building and integrating existing and new inter-terminology mappings into the HMTP. A total of 24 terminologies are included in the HMTP, with 575,300 concepts, 852,000 synonyms, 222,800 definitions and 1,180,000 relations. Heightteen of these terminologies are not included yet in the UMLS among them, some from the World Health Organization. Since January 2010, HMTP is daily used by CISMeF librarians to index in multi-terminology mode. A health multiterminology portal is a valuable tool helping the indexing and the retrieval of resources from a quality-controlled patient safety gateway. It can also be very useful for teaching or performing audits in terminology management.

  19. Comparison of embedded and added motor imagery training in patients after stroke: results of a randomised controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Motor imagery (MI) when combined with physiotherapy can offer functional benefits after stroke. Two MI integration strategies exist: added and embedded MI. Both approaches were compared when learning a complex motor task (MT): 'Going down, laying on the floor, and getting up again'. Methods Outpatients after first stroke participated in a single-blinded, randomised controlled trial with MI embedded into physiotherapy (EG1), MI added to physiotherapy (EG2), and a control group (CG). All groups participated in six physiotherapy sessions. Primary study outcome was time (sec) to perform the motor task at pre and post-intervention. Secondary outcomes: level of help needed, stages of MT-completion, independence, balance, fear of falling (FOF), MI ability. Data were collected four times: twice during one week baseline phase (BL, T0), following the two week intervention (T1), after a two week follow-up (FU). Analysis of variance was performed. Results Thirty nine outpatients were included (12 females, age: 63.4 ± 10 years; time since stroke: 3.5 ± 2 years; 29 with an ischemic event). All were able to complete the motor task using the standardised 7-step procedure and reduced FOF at T0, T1, and FU. Times to perform the MT at baseline were 44.2 ± 22s, 64.6 ± 50s, and 118.3 ± 93s for EG1 (N = 13), EG2 (N = 12), and CG (N = 14). All groups showed significant improvement in time to complete the MT (p < 0.001) and degree of help needed to perform the task: minimal assistance to supervision (CG) and independent performance (EG1+2). No between group differences were found. Only EG1 demonstrated changes in MI ability over time with the visual indicator increasing from T0 to T1 and decreasing from T1 to FU. The kinaesthetic indicator increased from T1 to FU. Patients indicated to value the MI training and continued using MI for other difficult-to-perform tasks. Conclusions Embedded or added MI training combined with physiotherapy seem to be feasible and benefi

  20. Detection of AIDS Virus in Macrophages in Brain Tissue from AIDS Patients with Encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Scott; Gendelman, Howard E.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Canto, Mauro C.; Pezeshkpour, Gholam H.; Yungbluth, Margaret; Janotta, Frank; Aksamit, Allen; Martin, Malcolm A.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    1986-09-01

    One of the common neurological complications in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a subacute encephalopathy with progressive dementia. By using the techniques of cocultivation for virus isolation, in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy, the identity of an important cell type that supports replication of the AIDS retrovirus in brain tissue was determined in two affected individuals. These cells were mononucleated and multinucleated macrophages that actively synthesized viral RNA and produced progeny virions in the brains of the patients. Infected brain macrophages may serve as a reservoir for virus and as a vehicle for viral dissemination in the infected host.

  1. Cognition in patients with newly diagnosed brain metastasis: profiles and implications

    PubMed Central

    Gerstenecker, Adam; Nabors, Louis B.; Meneses, Karen; Fiveash, John B.; Marson, Daniel C.; Cutter, Gary; Martin, Roy C.; Meyers, Christina A.; Triebel, Kristen L.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common symptom in patients with brain metastasis, and significant cognitive dysfunction is prevalent in a majority of patients who are still able to engage in basic self-care activities. In the current study, the neurocognitive performance of 32 patients with brain metastasis and 32 demographically-matched controls was examined using a battery of standardized neuropsychological tests, with the goal of comprehensively examining the cognitive functioning of newly diagnosed brain metastasis patients. The cognition of all patients was assessed within 1 week of beginning treatment for brain metastasis. Results indicated impairments in verbal memory, attention, executive functioning, and language in relation to healthy controls. Performance in relation to appropriate normative groups was also examined. Overall, cognitive deficits were prevalent and memory was the most common impairment. Given that cognitive dysfunction was present in this cohort of patients with largely minimal functional impairment, these results have implications for patients, caregivers and health care providers treating patients with brain metastasis. PMID:25035099

  2. Netrin-1 Expression Is an Independent Prognostic Factor for Poor Patient Survival in Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Harter, Patrick N.; Zinke, Jenny; Scholz, Alexander; Tichy, Julia; Zachskorn, Cornelia; Kvasnicka, Hans M.; Goeppert, Benjamin; Delloye-Bourgeois, Céline; Hattingen, Elke; Senft, Christian; Steinbach, Joachim P.; Plate, Karl H.; Mehlen, Patrick; Schulte, Dorothea; Mittelbronn, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The multifunctional molecule netrin-1 is upregulated in various malignancies and has recently been presented as a major general player in tumorigenesis leading to tumor progression and maintenance in various animal models. However, there is still a lack of clinico-epidemiological data related to netrin-1 expression. Therefore, the aim of our study was to elucidate the association of netrin-1 expression and patient survival in brain metastases since those constitute one of the most limiting factors for patient prognosis. We investigated 104 brain metastases cases for netrin-1 expression using in-situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry with regard to clinical parameters such as patient survival and MRI data. Our data show that netrin-1 is strongly upregulated in most cancer subtypes. Univariate analyses revealed netrin-1 expression as a significant factor associated with poor patient survival in the total cohort of brain metastasis patients and in sub-entities such as non-small cell lung carcinomas. Interestingly, many cancer samples showed a strong nuclear netrin-1 signal which was recently linked to a truncated netrin-1 variant that enhances tumor growth. Nuclear netrin-1 expression was associated with poor patient survival in univariate as well as in multivariate analyses. Our data indicate both total and nuclear netrin-1 expression as prognostic factors in brain metastases patients in contrast to other prognostic markers in oncology such as patient age, number of brain metastases or Ki67 proliferation index. Therefore, nuclear netrin-1 expression constitutes one of the first reported molecular biomarkers for patient survival in brain metastases. Furthermore, netrin-1 may constitute a promising target for future anti-cancer treatment approaches in brain metastases. PMID:24647424

  3. Cranial findings and iatrogenesis from craniosacral manipulation in patients with traumatic brain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Greenman, P E; McPartland, J M

    1995-03-01

    Craniosacral findings were recorded for all patients with traumatic brain injury entering an outpatient rehabilitation program between 1978 and 1992. The average cranial rhythmic impulse was low in all 55 patients (average, 7.2 c/min). At least one cranial strain pattern was exhibited by 95%, and 87% had one or more bony motion restrictions. Sacral findings were similar to those in patients with low back pain. Although craniosacral manipulation has been found empirically useful in patients with traumatic brain injury, three cases of iatrogenesis occurred. The incidence rate is low (5%), but the practitioner must be prepared to deal with the possibility of adverse reactions.

  4. Prognostic Significance of Hyperglycemia in Patients with Brain Tumors: a Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongwei; Liu, Zhixiong; Jiang, Bing; Ding, Xiping; Huo, Lei; Wan, Xin; Liu, Jinfang; Xia, Zhenyun

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia has been associated with poor outcomes of patients with various diseases. There were several studies published to assess the association between hyperglycemia and prognosis of patients with brain tumors, but no consistent conclusion was available. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of available studies to evaluate the prognostic role of hyperglycemia in brain tumors. Several common databases were searched for eligible studies on the association between hyperglycemia and survival of patients with brain tumors. Two investigators used a set of predefined inclusion criteria to assess eligible studies independently. The pooled hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used to assess the prognostic role of hyperglycemia. Finally, seven studies with a total of 2168 patients with brain tumors were included into the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of total seven studies showed that hyperglycemia was significantly associated with shorter overall survival of brain tumors (HR = 2.04, 95% CI 1.51-2.76, P < 0.001). Meta-analysis of studies focusing on hyperglycemia showed that hyperglycemia was still significantly associated with shorter overall survival of brain tumors (HR = 1.82, 95% CI 1.29-2.59, P = 0.001). Meta-analysis of three studies on diabetes showed that diabetes was significantly associated with shorter overall survival of brain tumors (HR = 2.09, 95% CI 1.22-3.57, P = 0.007). Meta-regression analysis showed that there was no obvious difference in the roles of between hyperglycemia caused by glucocorticoids and hyperglycemia from diabetes (P = 0.25). Thus, hyperglycemia has an obvious prognostic significance in patients with brain tumors, and hyperglycemia is significantly associated with shorter overall survival of brain tumors.

  5. Concentration of Donepezil in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of AD Patients: Evaluation of Dosage Sufficiency in Standard Treatment Strategy.

    PubMed

    Valis, Martin; Masopust, Jiri; Vysata, Oldrich; Hort, Jakub; Dolezal, Rafael; Tomek, Jiri; Misik, Jan; Kuca, Kamil; Karasova, Jana Zdarova

    2017-01-01

    Although some studies have described the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of donepezil in the peripheral compartment, studies focused on drug transport across the blood-brain barrier are still very rare. To our knowledge, the fluctuation in the cerebrospinal fluid concentration of donepezil after administration of the drug has not been described in the literature so far. We recruited 16 patients regularly taking a standard therapeutic dose of donepezil (10 mg per day). All patients (Caucasian race) were treated for at least three months with a stable dose of 10 mg per day prior to sample collection. Patients were divided into two groups depending on the time of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid sampling: 12 h (n = 9; 4 M/5F aged 78.68 ± 7.35 years) and 24 h (n = 7; 3 M/4F aged 77.14 ± 5.87 years) after donepezil administration. The cerebrospinal fluid sample was collected by standard lumbar puncture technique using a single-use traumatic needle. The samples were analysed on an Agilent 1260 Series liquid chromatograph comprising a degasser, a quaternary pump, a light-tight autosampler unit set, a thermostated column compartment, and a UV/VIS detector. Agilent ChemStation software, the statistical software Prism4, version 5.0 (GraphPad Software, USA), and IBM(®) SPSS(®) Statistics were used for the analysis of the results. The difference in plasma concentration of donepezil after 12 h (mean ± SEM; 39.99 ± 5.90 ng/ml) and after 24 h (29.38 ± 1.71 ng/ml) was nonsignificant. In contrast, the donepezil concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid was significantly higher in the 24-h interval (7.54 ± 0.55 ng/ml) compared with the 12-h interval (5.19 ± 0.83 ng/ml, which is ~70 % based on mean cerebrospinal fluid values). Based on these data, it is plausible to predict that donepezil might produce a stronger AChE inhibition in the brain at 24 h compared with 12 h following the administration. This information may help physicians

  6. Prognostic Factors for Survival in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Recurrent Brain Metastases After Prior Whole Brain Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, Jorge A.; Sneed, Penny K.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Ma, Lijun; Denduluri, Sandeep; Nakamura, Jean L.; Barani, Igor J.; McDermott, Michael W.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prognostic factors for survival after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for new, progressive, or recurrent brain metastases (BM) after prior whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: Patients treated between 1991 and 2007 with Gamma Knife SRS for BM after prior WBRT were retrospectively reviewed. Potential prognostic factors were analyzed overall and by primary site using univariate and stepwise multivariate analyses and recursive partitioning analysis, including age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), primary tumor control, extracranial metastases, number of BM treated, total SRS target volume, and interval from WBRT to SRS. Results: A total of 310 patients were analyzed, including 90 breast, 113 non-small-cell lung, 31 small-cell lung, 42 melanoma, and 34 miscellaneous patients. The median age was 56, KPS 80, number of BM treated 3, and interval from WBRT to SRS 8.1 months; 76% had controlled primary tumor and 60% had extracranial metastases. The median survival was 8.4 months overall and 12.0 vs. 7.9 months for single vs. multiple BM treated (p = 0.001). There was no relationship between number of BM and survival after excluding single-BM patients. On multivariate analysis, favorable prognostic factors included age <50, smaller total target volume, and longer interval from WBRT to SRS in breast cancer patients; smaller number of BM, KPS >60, and controlled primary in non-small-cell lung cancer patients; and smaller total target volume in melanoma patients. Conclusions: Among patients treated with salvage SRS for BM after prior WBRT, prognostic factors appeared to vary by primary site. Although survival time was significantly longer for patients with a single BM, the median survival time of 7.9 months for patients with multiple BM seems sufficiently long for salvage SRS to appear to be worthwhile, and no evidence was found to support the use of a cutoff for number of BM appropriate for salvage SRS.

  7. Lewy Bodies Contain Altered α-Synuclein in Brains of Many Familial Alzheimer’s Disease Patients with Mutations in Presenilin and Amyloid Precursor Protein Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lippa, Carol F.; Fujiwara, Hideo; Mann, David M.A.; Giasson, Benoit; Baba, Minami; Schmidt, Marie L.; Nee, Linda E.; O’Connell, Brendan; Pollen, Dan A.; St. George-Hyslop, Peter; Ghetti, Bernardino; Nochlin, David; Bird, Thomas D.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Trojanowski, John Q.

    1998-01-01

    Missense mutations in the α-synuclein gene cause familial Parkinson’s disease (PD), and α-synuclein is a major component of Lewy bodies (LBs) in sporadic PD, dementia with LBs (DLB), and the LB variant of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To determine whether α-synuclein is a component of LBs in familial AD (FAD) patients with known mutations in presenilin (n = 65) or amyloid precursor protein (n = 9) genes, studies were conducted with antibodies to α-, β-, and γ-synuclein. LBs were detected with α- but not β- or γ-synuclein antibodies in 22% of FAD brains, and α-synuclein-positive LBs were most numerous in amygdala where some LBs co-localized with tau-positive neurofibrillary tangles. As 12 (63%) of 19 FAD amygdala samples contained α-synuclein-positive LBs, these inclusions may be more common in FAD brains than previously reported. Furthermore, α-synuclein antibodies decorated LB filaments by immunoelectron microscopy, and Western blots revealed that the solubility of α-synuclein was reduced compared with control brains. The presence of α-synuclein-positive LBs was not associated with any specific FAD mutation. These studies suggest that insoluble α-synuclein aggregates into filaments that form LBs in many FAD patients, and we speculate that these inclusions may compromise the function and/or viability of affected neurons in the FAD brain. PMID:9811326

  8. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the modern management of patients with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Hany; Das, Sunit; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an established non-invasive ablative therapy for brain metastases. Early clinical trials with SRS proved that tumor control rates are superior to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. As a result, WBRT plus SRS was widely adopted for patients with a limited number of brain metastases (“limited number” customarily means 1-4). Subsequent trials focused on answering whether WBRT upfront was necessary at all. Based on current randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses comparing SRS alone to SRS plus WBRT, adjuvant WBRT results in better intracranial control; however, at the expense of neurocognitive functioning and quality of life. These adverse effects of WBRT may also negatively impact on survival in younger patients. Based on the results of these studies, treatment has shifted to SRS alone in patients with a limited number of metastases. Additionally, RCTs are evaluating the role of SRS alone in patients with >4 brain metastases. New developments in SRS include fractionated SRS for large tumors and the integration of SRS with targeted systemic therapies that cross the blood brain barrier and/or stimulate an immune response. We present in this review the current high level evidence and rationale supporting SRS as the standard of care for patients with limited brain metastases, and emerging applications of SRS. PMID:26848525

  9. Assessment and Predicting Factors of Repeated Brain Computed Tomography in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients for Risk-Stratified Care Management: A 5-Year Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Sumritpradit, Preeda; Setthalikhit, Thitipong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective. To determine the value of repeated brain CT in TBI cases for risk-stratified care management (RSCM) and to identify predicting factors which will change the neurosurgical management after repeated brain CTs. Methods. A 5-year retrospective study from January 2009 to August 2013 was conducted. The primary outcome was the value of repeated brain CT in TBI cases. The secondary outcome is to identify predicting factors which will change the neurosurgical management after repeated brain CTs. Results. There were 145 consecutive patients with TBI and repeated brain CT after initial abnormal brain CT. Forty-two percent of all cases (N = 61) revealed the progression of intracranial hemorrhage after repeated brain CT. In all 145 consecutive patients, 67.6% of cases (N = 98) were categorized as mild TBI. For mild head injury, 8.2% of cases (N = 8) had undergone neurosurgical management after repeated brain CT. Only 1 from 74 mild TBI patients with repeated brain CT had neurosurgical intervention. Clopidogrel and midline shift more than 2 mm on initial brain CT were significant predicting factors to indicate the neurosurgical management in mild TBI cases. Conclusion. Routine repeated brain CT for RSCM had no clinical benefit in mild TBI cases. PMID:27703812

  10. Active music therapy in the rehabilitation of severe brain injured patients during coma recovery.

    PubMed

    Formisano, R; Vinicola, V; Penta, F; Matteis, M; Brunelli, S; Weckel, J W

    2001-01-01

    Active improvised music therapy may offer an adjuvant from of treatment in the early rehabilitation of severe brain-injured patients. Active music therapy consists of musical improvisation between patient and therapist by singing or by playing different musical instruments, according to the vital functions, the neurological conditions and the motor abilities of the patients. We studied 34 severe brain-injured patients with a mean coma duration of 52 days +/- 37.21 and a mean interval from coma onset to the beginning of rehabilitation of 154 days on average. Our preliminary results show a significant improvement of the collaboration of the severe brain-injured patients and a reduction of undesired behaviours such as inertia (reduced psychomotor initiative) or psychomotor agitation.

  11. Armored brain in patients with hydrocephalus after shunt surgery: review of the literatures.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mahmoud M

    2012-01-01

    Armored brain or chronic calcified subdural hematoma is a rare complication of cerebrospinal fluid diversion with few cases reported in the literature. Seventeen patients with this pathology have been published. A complete review of the literatures regarding this topic has been collected and discussed. The author also presents a 12- year old boy with triventricular hydrocephalus who had undergone ventriculoperitoneal medium pressure shunt system since birth. The patient presented to our clinic with a 2-year history of seizures. The patient was conscious and without neurological deficits on examination. Computed tomography of the brain showed bilateral high density mass with surface calcification. X ray skull and MRI confirmed the calcified subdural hematoma bilaterally. We preferred conservative treatment and the patient continued his antiepileptic treatment. At one year follow up, the patient had the same neurological state. The case highlights the importance of frequent follow up CT brain after shunt surgery.

  12. New Breast Cancer Recursive Partitioning Analysis Prognostic Index in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Niwinska, Anna; Murawska, Magdalena

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to present a new breast cancer recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) prognostic index for patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases as a guide in clinical decision making. Methods and Materials: A prospectively collected group of 441 consecutive patients with breast cancer and brain metastases treated between the years 2003 and 2009 was assessed. Prognostic factors significant for univariate analysis were included into RPA. Results: Three prognostic classes of a new breast cancer RPA prognostic index were selected. The median survival of patients within prognostic Classes I, II, and III was 29, 9, and 2.4 months, respectively (p < 0.0001). Class I included patients with one or two brain metastases, without extracranial disease or with controlled extracranial disease, and with Karnofsky performance status (KPS) of 100. Class III included patients with multiple brain metastases with KPS of {<=}60. Class II included all other cases. Conclusions: The breast cancer RPA prognostic index is an easy and valuable tool for use in clinical practice. It can select patients who require aggressive treatment and those in whom whole-brain radiotherapy or symptomatic therapy is the most reasonable option. An individual approach is required for patients from prognostic Class II.

  13. Irinotecan and Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Brain Metastases From Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-03-15

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Cognitive/Functional Effects; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Poor Performance Status; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  14. Contralateral and ipsilateral disorders of visual attention in patients with unilateral brain damage.

    PubMed Central

    Gainotti, G; Giustolisi, L; Nocentini, U

    1990-01-01

    To explain the prevalence of unilateral spatial neglect in patients with right brain damage, Heilman et al have suggested that the attentional neurons of the right parietal lobe might have bilateral receptive fields, whereas the homologous cells of the left hemisphere would have strictly contralateral receptive fields. One implication of this theory is that patients with right brain damage should show a prevalence of disorders of visual attention not only in the half space contralateral to the damaged hemisphere, but also in the ipsilateral one. To check this theory, 50 control subjects, 102 right and 125 left brain-damaged patients were given a drawing completion task in which patients were requested to complete the missing parts of a star, a cube and a house. Omissions of lines lying on the sides of the models contralateral and ipsilateral to the damaged hemisphere were taken separately into account. Results did not confirm the hypothesis, since right brain-damaged patients failed to complete the contralateral sides of the models much more frequently than patients with left brain injury, but no difference was found between the two hemispheric groups when ipsilateral disorders of visual attention were taken into account. Furthermore, no correlation was found between omissions of lines lying on the sides of the models contralateral and ipsilateral to the damaged hemisphere. This finding suggests that contralateral and ipsilateral disorders of visual attention are not due to the same mechanism in right brain-damaged patients. The alternative hypothesis viewing ipsilateral disorders as resulting from a widespread lowering of general attention (and only contralateral neglect reflecting a specific disorder of visual attention) was supported by results obtained on a verbal memory test, used to evaluate the general cognitive and attention level of the patients. Patients with clear-cut ipislateral inattention obtained very low scores on this test, whereas patients with

  15. Contralateral and ipsilateral disorders of visual attention in patients with unilateral brain damage.

    PubMed

    Gainotti, G; Giustolisi, L; Nocentini, U

    1990-05-01

    To explain the prevalence of unilateral spatial neglect in patients with right brain damage, Heilman et al have suggested that the attentional neurons of the right parietal lobe might have bilateral receptive fields, whereas the homologous cells of the left hemisphere would have strictly contralateral receptive fields. One implication of this theory is that patients with right brain damage should show a prevalence of disorders of visual attention not only in the half space contralateral to the damaged hemisphere, but also in the ipsilateral one. To check this theory, 50 control subjects, 102 right and 125 left brain-damaged patients were given a drawing completion task in which patients were requested to complete the missing parts of a star, a cube and a house. Omissions of lines lying on the sides of the models contralateral and ipsilateral to the damaged hemisphere were taken separately into account. Results did not confirm the hypothesis, since right brain-damaged patients failed to complete the contralateral sides of the models much more frequently than patients with left brain injury, but no difference was found between the two hemispheric groups when ipsilateral disorders of visual attention were taken into account. Furthermore, no correlation was found between omissions of lines lying on the sides of the models contralateral and ipsilateral to the damaged hemisphere. This finding suggests that contralateral and ipsilateral disorders of visual attention are not due to the same mechanism in right brain-damaged patients. The alternative hypothesis viewing ipsilateral disorders as resulting from a widespread lowering of general attention (and only contralateral neglect reflecting a specific disorder of visual attention) was supported by results obtained on a verbal memory test, used to evaluate the general cognitive and attention level of the patients. Patients with clear-cut ipislateral inattention obtained very low scores on this test, whereas patients with

  16. Predictive factors of early distant brain failure after gamma knife radiosurgery alone in patients with brain metastases of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Na, Young Cheol; Jung, Hyun Ho; Kim, Hye Ryun; Cho, Byoung Chul; Chang, Jin Woo; Park, Yong Gou; Chang, Won Seok

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the predictive factors for early distant brain failure in patients with brain metastases of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who were treated with gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) without previous whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) or surgery. We retrospectively reviewed clinical and imaging data of 459 patients with brain metastases of NSCLC who underwent GKRS from June 2008 to December 2013. The primary end-point was early distant brain failure, defined as the detection of newly developed metastatic lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 3 months after GKRS. Factors such as tumor pathology subtype, concurrent systemic chemotherapy, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status, use of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), systemic disease status, presence of a metastatic lesion only in delayed MRI, and volume and number of metastases were analyzed. There were no statistically significant differences with respect to pathologic subtype, concurrent systemic chemotherapy, EGFR mutation, and early distant brain failure. Patients treated with EGFR-TKIs (p = 0.004), with a stable systemic disease status (p = 0.028) and 3 or fewer brain lesions (p = 0.000) experienced a significantly lower incidence of early distant brain failure. This study suggests that GKRS alone could be considered for patients treated with EGFR-TKIs who have a stable systemic disease status and 3 or fewer brain lesions. WBRT should be considered for other patients.

  17. Hairy AdS solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru; Choque, David

    2016-11-01

    We construct exact hairy AdS soliton solutions in Einstein-dilaton gravity theory. We examine their thermodynamic properties and discuss the role of these solutions for the existence of first order phase transitions for hairy black holes. The negative energy density associated to hairy AdS solitons can be interpreted as the Casimir energy that is generated in the dual filed theory when the fermions are antiperiodic on the compact coordinate.

  18. Hyperbaric oxygen can induce neuroplasticity and improve cognitive functions of patients suffering from anoxic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Hadanny, A.; Golan, H.; Fishlev, G.; Bechor, Y.; Volkov, O.; Suzin, G.; Ben-Jacob, E.; Efrati, S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Cognitive impairment may occur in 42–50% of cardiac arrest survivors. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO2) has recently been shown to have neurotherapeutic effects in patients suffering from chronic cognitive impairments (CCI) consequent to stroke and mild traumatic brain injury. The objective of this study was to assess the neurotherapeutic effect of HBO2 in patients suffering from CCI due to cardiac arrest. Methods: Retrospective analysis of patients with CCI caused by cardiac arrest, treated with 60 daily sessions of HBO2. Evaluation included objective computerized cognitive tests (NeuroTrax), Activity of Daily Living (ADL) and Quality of life questionnaires. The results of these tests were compared with changes in brain activity as assessed by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain imaging. Results: The study included 11 cases of CCI patients. Patients were treated with HBO2, 0.5–7.5 years (mean 2.6 ± 0.6 years) after the cardiac arrest. HBO2 was found to induce modest, but statistically significant improvement in memory, attention and executive function (mean scores) of 12% , 20% and 24% respectively. The clinical improvements were found to be well correlated with increased brain activity in relevant brain areas as assessed by computerized analysis of the SPECT imaging. Conclusions: Although further research is needed, the results demonstrate the beneficial effects of HBO2 on CCI in patients after cardiac arrest, even months to years after the acute event. PMID:26409406

  19. Elderly depression diagnostic of diabetic patients by brain tissue pulsatility imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachemi, Mélouka Elkateb; Remeniéras, Jean-pierre; Desmidt, Thomas; Camus, Vincent; Tranquart, François

    2010-01-01

    Pulsatile motion of brain parenchyma results from cardiac and breathing cycles and consists in a rapid displacement in systole, with slow diastolic recovery. Based on the vascular depression concept and recent studies where a correlation was found between cerebral haemodynamics and depression in the elderly, we emitted the hypothesis that tissue brain motion due to perfusion is correlated to elderly depression associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Tissue Pulsatlity Imaging (TPI) is a new ultrasound technique developed firstly at the University of Washington to assess the brain tissue motion. We used TPI technique to measure the brain displacement of two groups of elderly patients with diabetes as a vascular risk factor. The first group is composed of 11 depressed diabetic patients. The second group is composed of 12 diabetic patients without depressive symptoms. Transcranial acquisitions were performed with a 1.8 MHz ultrasound phased array probe through the right temporal bone window. The acquisition of six cardiac cycles was realized on each patient with a frame rate of 23 frames/s. Displacements estimation was performed by off-line analysis. A significant decrease in brain pulsatility was observed in the group of depressed patients compared to the group of non depressed patients. Mean displacement magnitude was about 44±7 μm in the first group and 68±13 μm in the second group.

  20. Linagliptin added to sulphonylurea in uncontrolled type 2 diabetes patients with moderate-to-severe renal impairment.

    PubMed

    McGill, Janet B; Barnett, Anthony H; Lewin, Andrew J; Patel, Sanjay; Neubacher, Dietmar; von Eynatten, Maximilian; Woerle, Hans-Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-lowering treatment options are limited for uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with advanced stages of renal impairment (RI). This retrospective analysis evaluated glycaemic efficacy and tolerability of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor linagliptin added to sulphonylurea. Three randomized phase 3 studies (n = 619) including T2DM subjects with moderate or severe RI [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) < 60 mL/min/1.73 m²] were analysed; only sulphonylurea-treated subjects who received additional linagliptin (n = 58) or placebo (n = 33) were evaluated. Linagliptin provided meaningful placebo-adjusted HbA1c reductions of -0.68% (95% confidence interval: -1.19, -0.17), -1.08% (-2.02, -0.14) and -0.62% (-1.25, 0.01) after 24, 18 and 12 weeks, respectively. There was a similar incidence of overall adverse events (linagliptin: 79.3%, placebo: 75.8%) and hypoglycaemia (linagliptin: 37.9%, placebo: 39.4%). Severe hypoglycaemia was more common with placebo (linagliptin: 1.7%, placebo: 6.1%). These data suggest that linagliptin is a safe and effective glucose-lowering treatment in T2DM patients with moderate-to-severe RI for whom sulphonylurea treatment is no longer sufficient.

  1. Prolonged duodenal paralysis after PEG placement in a patient with traumatic brain injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mammi, P; Zaccaria, B; Dazzi, F; Saccavini, M

    2011-03-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) has recently become a usual procedure for patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness after brain injuries. Despite a high rate of success and a very low procedure-related mortality, morbidity associated to PEG placement reaches 9.4% in a recent large meta-analysis. This case report describes an uncommon complication of PEG placement in a patient with vegetative state after traumatic brain injury: the development of prolonged duodenal paralysis. This patient was treated by placement of a transient jejunostomy until recovery of duodenal functional activity, to permit adequate nutrition. This procedure-related complication is previously unreported in scientific literature.

  2. [Cognitive functions and personality traits in patients with brain tumors: the role of lesion localization].

    PubMed

    Razumnikova, O M; Perfil'ev, A M; Stupak, V V

    2014-01-01

    Personality traits and cognitive functions were studied depending on a tumor localization in the brain in 21 neurosurgical patients and the results were compared with a control group. In patients with brain damage, mostly affected were personality traits associated with emotion regulation and social interaction (neuroticism, psychoticism and social conformity). Increases in psychoticism and decreases in neuroticism were more expressed in patients with a left-hemisphere localization of tumors. The tumor-induced decrease in cognitive abilities was more presented in performing figurative tasks and less in verbal ones. Verbal functions were more decreased in the group with frontal localization of tumor compared to that with parietal localization.

  3. [Clinical application of the plasma substitutes in patients with postoperative complications after surgeries for brain meningioma].

    PubMed

    Kvasha, M S; Iarotskiĭ, R Iu; Ivashenko, V I; Gavrish, R V; Dmitrieva, N Iu; Ivanovich, I N; Pushkareva, T M

    2011-04-01

    The issues on optimization of the restoration treatment of patients, suffering the brain meningioma, were discussed, basing on analysis of 498 observations. Tactics of the patients management in noncomplicated, complicated and severe course of postoperative period is adduced. The indices of survival and lethality, peculiarities of the infusion therapy were analyzed. The role of plasm-restituting preparations was demonstrated in complicated course of postoperative period. Rational complex approach to the restoration measures and intensive therapy conduction promotes the treatment efficacy raising, the patients fair quality of life securing in the brain meningioma in postoperative period.

  4. Perturbation and Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Acoustic Phonatory Signal in Parkinsonian Patients Receiving Deep Brain Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Victoria S.; Zhou, Xiao Ping; Rahn, Douglas A., III; Wang, Emily Q.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen PD patients who received deep brain stimulation (DBS), 10 non-surgical (control) PD patients, and 11 non-pathologic age- and gender-matched subjects performed sustained vowel phonations. The following acoustic measures were obtained on the sustained vowel phonations: correlation dimension (D[subscript 2]), percent jitter, percent shimmer,…

  5. Propranolol in the treatment of assaultive patients with organic brain disease.

    PubMed

    Greendyke, R M; Schuster, D B; Wooton, J A

    1984-10-01

    Propranolol in doses up to 520 mg/day was administered to eight patients with organic brain disease characterized by violent and assaultive behavior refractory to conventional treatment. Improvement was demonstrated in the seven patients able to tolerate adequate drug dosages. Hypotension, bradycardia, and interactions with other medications constituted complications.

  6. Response of brain metastasis from lung cancer patients to an oral nutraceutical product containing silibinin

    PubMed Central

    Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Sais, Elia; Cañete, Noemí; Marruecos, Jordi; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Izquierdo, Angel; Porta, Rut; Haro, Manel; Brunet, Joan; Pedraza, Salvador; Menendez, Javier A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite multimodal treatment approaches, the prognosis of brain metastases (BM) from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains poor. Untreated patients with BM have a median survival of about 1 month, with almost all patients dying from neurological causes. We herein present the first report describing the response of BM from NSCLC patients to an oral nutraceutical product containing silibinin, a flavonoid extracted from the seeds of the milk thistle. We present evidence of how the use of the silibinin-based nutraceutical Legasil® resulted in significant clinical and radiological improvement of BM from NSCLC patients with poor performance status that progressed after whole brain radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The suppressive effects of silibinin on progressive BM, which involved a marked reduction of the peritumoral brain edema, occurred without affecting the primary lung tumor outgrowth in NSCLC patients. Because BM patients have an impaired survival prognosis and are in need for an immediate tumor control, the combination of brain radiotherapy with silibinin-based nutraceuticals might not only alleviate BM edema but also prove local control and time for either classical chemotherapeutics with immunostimulatory effects or new immunotherapeutic agents such as checkpoint blockers to reveal their full therapeutic potential in NSCLC BM patients. New studies aimed to illuminate the mechanistic aspects underlying the regulatory effects of silibinin on the cellular and molecular pathobiology of BM might expedite the entry of new formulations of silibinin into clinical testing for progressive BM from lung cancer patients. PMID:26959886

  7. Response of brain metastasis from lung cancer patients to an oral nutraceutical product containing silibinin.

    PubMed

    Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Sais, Elia; Cañete, Noemí; Marruecos, Jordi; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Izquierdo, Angel; Porta, Rut; Haro, Manel; Brunet, Joan; Pedraza, Salvador; Menendez, Javier A

    2016-05-31

    Despite multimodal treatment approaches, the prognosis of brain metastases (BM) from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains poor. Untreated patients with BM have a median survival of about 1 month, with almost all patients dying from neurological causes. We herein present the first report describing the response of BM from NSCLC patients to an oral nutraceutical product containing silibinin, a flavonoid extracted from the seeds of the milk thistle. We present evidence of how the use of the silibinin-based nutraceutical Legasil® resulted in significant clinical and radiological improvement of BM from NSCLC patients with poor performance status that progressed after whole brain radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The suppressive effects of silibinin on progressive BM, which involved a marked reduction of the peritumoral brain edema, occurred without affecting the primary lung tumor outgrowth in NSCLC patients. Because BM patients have an impaired survival prognosis and are in need for an immediate tumor control, the combination of brain radiotherapy with silibinin-based nutraceuticals might not only alleviate BM edema but also prove local control and time for either classical chemotherapeutics with immunostimulatory effects or new immunotherapeutic agents such as checkpoint blockers to reveal their full therapeutic potential in NSCLC BM patients. New studies aimed to illuminate the mechanistic aspects underlying the regulatory effects of silibinin on the cellular and molecular pathobiology of BM might expedite the entry of new formulations of silibinin into clinical testing for progressive BM from lung cancer patients.

  8. Brain metastasis from pheochromocytoma in a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A.

    PubMed

    Gentile, S; Rainero, I; Savi, L; Rivoiro, C; Pinessi, L

    2001-12-01

    Neurological involvement in multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndrome is uncommon. Notalgia paresthetica (pruritus localized in an area between D2 and D6 dermatomes) is the neurological symptom more frequently described in patients with MEN 2A. The authors report the unusual case of a MEN 2A patient with a brain metastasis from a pheochromocytoma.

  9. The creation of protection and hope in patients with malignant brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Salander, P; Bergenheim, T; Henriksson, R

    1996-04-01

    The malignant brain tumour disease condenses much of the anguish of cancer diseases. The brain is a vital and delicate organ, and the prognosis is generally unfavourable. The patient is exposed and has to rely on cognitive manoeuvres to manage the mental stress. The purpose of this study was to generate new insights into how the patient constructs a new sense of reality when confronted with the malignant brain tumour diagnosis. Within grounded theory methodology, 30 patients with malignant gliomas were interviewed twice, in direct connection with diagnosis, surgery and radiotherapy. In addition, their partners were interviewed, and quantitative instruments (SMMSE, RDCQ) were used as additional references for assessing the patients cognitively and emotionally. Eleven patients were excluded from the final analysis because of cognitive impairment of personality change. Most of the patients were aware of the fact that the brain tumour exposed them to grave danger, but they were also able to use various cognitive manoeuvres to create protection and hope. This process originated from different sources: the body; helpful relations; cognitive schemata; and the handling of information. The importance of the body to raise hope is emphasized. In the discussion we consider this process as an expression of how the patient brings together reality and hope, thus creating her/his own illusion. These findings are also related to adjacent psychoanalytic theory, proposing a theoretical reference with clinical implications when discussing "What to tell cancer patients."

  10. Cognitive Impairment and Whole Brain Diffusion in Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica after Acute Relapse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Diane; Wu, Qizhu; Chen, Xiuying; Zhao, Daidi; Gong, Qiyong; Zhou, Hongyu

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study investigated cognitive impairments and their correlations with fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) without visible lesions on conventional brain MRI during acute relapse. Twenty one patients with NMO and 21 normal control subjects received several cognitive…

  11. Time Perception in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Study Comparing Different Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mioni, G.; Mattalia, G.; Stablum, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated time perception in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Fifteen TBI patients and 15 matched healthy controls participated in the study. Participants were tested with durations above and below 1s on three different temporal tasks that involved time reproduction, production, and discrimination tasks. Data…

  12. Attenuation of brain grey matter volume in brachial plexus injury patients.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yechen; Liu, Hanqiu; Hua, Xuyun; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong; Shen, Yundong

    2016-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury (BPI) causes functional changes in the brain, but the structural changes resulting from BPI remain unknown. In this study, we compared grey matter volume between nine BPI patients and ten healthy controls by means of voxel-based morphometry. This was the first study of cortical morphology in BPI. We found that brain regions including the cerebellum, anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral inferior, medial, superior frontal lobe, and bilateral insula had less grey matter in BPI patients. Most of the affected brain regions of BPI patients are closely related to motor function. We speculate that the loss of grey matter in multiple regions might be the neural basis of the difficulties in the motor rehabilitation of BPI patients. The mapping result might provide new target regions for interventions of motor rehabilitation.

  13. Non-invasive EEG-based brain-computer interfaces in patients with disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Mikołajewska, Emilia; Mikołajewski, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of consciousness (DoCs) are chronic conditions resulting usually from severe neurological deficits. The limitations of the existing diagnosis systems and methodologies cause a need for additional tools for relevant patients with DoCs assessment, including brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Recent progress in BCIs' clinical applications may offer important breakthroughs in the diagnosis and therapy of patients with DoCs. Thus the clinical significance of BCI applications in the diagnosis of patients with DoCs is hard to overestimate. One of them may be brain-computer interfaces. The aim of this study is to evaluate possibility of non-invasive EEG-based brain-computer interfaces in diagnosis of patients with DOCs in post-acute and long-term care institutions.

  14. Diagnostic Challenge of Diffusion Tensor Imaging in a Patient With Hemiplegia After Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A 51-year-old man showed hemiplegia on his right side after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). On initial brain computed tomography (CT) scan, an acute subdural hemorrhage in the right cerebral convexity and severe degrees of midline shifting and subfalcine herniation to the left side were evident. On follow-up brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), there were multiple microhemorrhages in the left parietal and occipital subcortical regions. To explain the occurrence of right hemiplegia after brain damage which dominantly on the right side of brain, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to reconstruct the corticospinal tract (CST), which showed nearly complete injury on the left CST. We also performed motor-evoked potentials, and stimulation of left motor cortex evoked no response on both sides of upper extremity. We report a case of patient with hemiplegia after TBI and elucidation of the case by DTI rather than CT and MRI. PMID:28289648

  15. Diagnostic Challenge of Diffusion Tensor Imaging in a Patient With Hemiplegia After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye Eun; Suh, Hoon Chang; Kang, Si Hyun; Seo, Kyung Mook; Kim, Don-Kyu; Shin, Hae-Won

    2017-02-01

    A 51-year-old man showed hemiplegia on his right side after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). On initial brain computed tomography (CT) scan, an acute subdural hemorrhage in the right cerebral convexity and severe degrees of midline shifting and subfalcine herniation to the left side were evident. On follow-up brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), there were multiple microhemorrhages in the left parietal and occipital subcortical regions. To explain the occurrence of right hemiplegia after brain damage which dominantly on the right side of brain, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to reconstruct the corticospinal tract (CST), which showed nearly complete injury on the left CST. We also performed motor-evoked potentials, and stimulation of left motor cortex evoked no response on both sides of upper extremity. We report a case of patient with hemiplegia after TBI and elucidation of the case by DTI rather than CT and MRI.

  16. Erlotinib Versus Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases in Patients With EGFR-Mutant Lung Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Naamit K.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Rimner, Andreas; Shi, Weiji; Riely, Gregory J.; Beal, Kathryn; Yu, Helena A.; Chan, Timothy A.; Zhang, Zhigang; Wu, Abraham J.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Radiation therapy (RT) is the principal modality in the treatment of patients with brain metastases (BM). However, given the activity of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the central nervous system, it is uncertain whether upfront brain RT is necessary for patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma with BM. Methods and Materials: Patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma and newly diagnosed BM were identified. Results: 222 patients were identified. Exclusion criteria included prior erlotinib use, presence of a de novo erlotinib resistance mutation, or incomplete data. Of the remaining 110 patients, 63 were treated with erlotinib, 32 with whole brain RT (WBRT), and 15 with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The median overall survival (OS) for the whole cohort was 33 months. There was no significant difference in OS between the WBRT and erlotinib groups (median, 35 vs 26 months; P=.62), whereas patients treated with SRS had a longer OS than did those in the erlotinib group (median, 64 months; P=.004). The median time to intracranial progression was 17 months. There was a longer time to intracranial progression in patients who received WBRT than in those who received erlotinib upfront (median, 24 vs 16 months, P=.04). Patients in the erlotinib or SRS group were more likely to experience intracranial failure as a component of first failure, whereas WBRT patients were more likely to experience failure outside the brain (P=.004). Conclusions: The survival of patients with EGFR-mutant adenocarcinoma with BM is notably long, whether they receive upfront erlotinib or brain RT. We observed longer intracranial control with WBRT, even though the WBRT patients had a higher burden of intracranial disease. Despite the equivalent survival between the WBRT and erlotinib group, this study underscores the role of WBRT in producing durable intracranial control in comparison with a targeted biologic agent with known central nervous system activity.

  17. Single arc volumetric modulated arc therapy for complex brain gliomas: is there an advantage as compared to intensity modulated radiotherapy or by adding a partial arc?

    PubMed

    Davidson, M T M; Masucci, G L; Follwell, M; Blake, S J; Xu, W; Moseley, D J; Sanghera, P; Wong, C S; Perry, J; Tsao, M; Sahgal, A

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) offers advantages over intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for complex brain gliomas and evaluate the role of an additional partial arc. Twelve patients with glioma involving critical organs at risk (OAR) were selected [six low grade brainstem glioma (BG) and six glioblastoma (GB) cases]. BGs were prescribed 54 Gy/30 fractions (frx), and GB treated to 50 Gy/30 frx to a lower dose PTV (PTV50) with a simultaneous integrated boost delivering a total dose of 60 Gy/30 frx to a higher dose PTV (PTV60). VMAT was planned with a single arc (VMAT1) and with an additional coplanar partial arc spanning 90° (VMAT2). We observed VMATI improving the PTV equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for BG cases (p=0.027), improving the V95 for the PTV50 in GB cases (p=0.026) and resulting in more conformal GB plans (p=0.008) as compare to IMRT. However, for the GB PTV60, IMRT achieved favorable V95 over VMAT1 and VMAT2 (0.0046 and 0.008, respectively). The GB total integral dose (ID) was significantly lower with VMAT1 and VMAT2 (p=0.049 and p=0.006, respectively). Both VMAT1 and VMAT2 reduced the ID, however, only at the 5 Gy threshold for BG cases (p=0.011 and 0.005, respectively). VMAT achieved a lower spinal cord maximum dose and EUD for BG cases and higher optic nerve doses, otherwise no significant differences were observed. VMAT1 yielded the fastest treatment times and least MU. We conclude that VMAT offers faster treatment delivery for complex brain tumors while maintaining similar dosimetric qualities to IMRT. Selective dosimetric advantages in terms of spinal cord sparing and lowering the ID are observed favoring the use of an additional coplanar partial arc.

  18. Outcomes of low-molecular-weight heparin treatment for venous thromboembolism in patients with primary and metastatic brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Chai-Adisaksopha, Chatree; Linkins, Lori-Ann; ALKindi, Said Y; Cheah, Matthew; Crowther, Mark A; Iorio, Alfonso

    2017-02-28

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is one of the most common complications in patients with brain tumours. There is limited data available in the literature on VTE treatment in these patients. We conducted a matched retrospective cohort study of patients with primary or metastatic brain cancer who were diagnosed with cancer-associated VTE. Patients were selected after a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients who were diagnosed with cancer-associated VTE between January 2010 and January 2014 at the Juravinski Thrombosis Clinic, Hamilton, Canada. Controls were age- and gender-matched patients with cancer-associated VTE from the same cohort, but without known brain tumours. A total of 364 patients with cancer-associated VTE were included (182 with primary or metastatic brain tumours and 182 controls). The median follow-up duration was 6.7 (interquartile range 2.5-15.8) months. The incidence rate of recurrent VTE was 11.0 per 100 patient-years (95 % CI; 6.7-17.9) in patients with brain tumours and 13.5 per 100 patient-years (95 % CI; 9.3-19.7) in non-brain tumour group. The incidence of major bleeding was 8.6 per 100 (95 % CI; 4.8-14.7) patient-years in patients with brain tumours versus 5.0 per 100 patient-years (95 % CI; 2.8-9.2) in controls. Rate of intracranial bleeding was higher in brain tumour patients (4.4 % vs 0 %, p-value=0.004). In summary, rates of recurrent VTE and major bleeding were not significantly different in patients with cancer-associated VTE in the setting of primary or metastatic brain tumours compared those without known brain tumours. However, greater numbers of intracranial bleeds were observed in patients with brain tumours.

  19. Analysis of complement and plasma cells in the brain of patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Hernandez, E.; Horvath, J.; Shiloh-Malawsky, Y.; Sangha, N.; Martinez-Lage, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Most patients with anti-NMDA receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis have intrathecal synthesis of antibodies, which cause a decrease of cell surface and synaptic NMDAR. Antibodies are immunoglobulin G (IgG)1 and IgG3 subtypes and can potentially activate complement. We examined whether complement immunoreactivity and antibody-secreting cells (plasma cells/plasmablasts) are present in the brain of these patients. Methods: Cultured rat hippocampal neurons were used in an immunocytochemical assay to test whether patients' antibodies can fix complement. Using the same reagents (antibodies to C9neo, C5b-9, C3), complement immunoreactivity was determined in the brain of 5 patients, the teratoma of 21 patients, and appropriate control tissues. A set of markers for B (CD20), T (CD3, CD4, CD8) and antibody-secreting cells (plasma cells/plasmablasts, CD138) were used to examine the brain inflammatory infiltrates. Results: Patients' antibodies were able to bind complement in vitro, but deposits of complement were not detected in patients' brain. Parallel experiments with teratomas showed that in contrast to the brain, the neural tissue of the tumors contained complement. Analysis of the inflammatory infiltrates in brain samples from autopsy or biopsy performed 3–4 weeks after symptom presentation demonstrated numerous antibody-secreting cells (CD138+) in perivascular, interstitial, and Virchow-Robin spaces, and B and T cells predominantly located in perivascular regions. Conclusions: Complement-mediated mechanisms do not appear to play a substantial pathogenic role in anti-NMDAR encephalitis. In contrast, there are copious infiltrates of antibody-secreting cells (plasma cells/plasmablasts) in the CNS of these patients. The demonstration of these cells provides an explanation for the intrathecal synthesis of antibodies and has implications for treatment. PMID:21795662

  20. Invited review--neuroimaging response assessment criteria for brain tumors in veterinary patients.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, John H; Garcia, Paulo A; Daniel, Gregory B; Bourland, John Daniel; Debinski, Waldemar; Dervisis, Nikolaos; Klahn, Shawna

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of therapeutic response using cross-sectional imaging techniques, particularly gadolinium-enhanced MRI, is an integral part of the clinical management of brain tumors in veterinary patients. Spontaneous canine brain tumors are increasingly recognized and utilized as a translational model for the study of human brain tumors. However, no standardized neuroimaging response assessment criteria have been formulated for use in veterinary clinical trials. Previous studies have found that the pathophysiologic features inherent to brain tumors and the surrounding brain complicate the use of the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) assessment system. Objectives of this review are to describe strengths and limitations of published imaging-based brain tumor response criteria and propose a system for use in veterinary patients. The widely used human Macdonald and response assessment in neuro-oncology (RANO) criteria are reviewed and described as to how they can be applied to veterinary brain tumors. Discussion points will include current challenges associated with the interpretation of brain tumor therapeutic responses such as imaging pseudophenomena and treatment-induced necrosis, and how advancements in perfusion imaging, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown promise in differentiating tumor progression from therapy-induced changes. Finally, although objective endpoints such as MR imaging and survival estimates will likely continue to comprise the foundations for outcome measures in veterinary brain tumor clinical trials, we propose that in order to provide a more relevant therapeutic response metric for veterinary patients, composite response systems should be formulated and validated that combine imaging and clinical assessment criteria.

  1. Concordance of Brain and Core Temperature in Comatose Patients After Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Coppler, Patrick J; Marill, Keith A; Okonkwo, David O; Shutter, Lori A; Dezfulian, Cameron; Rittenberger, Jon C; Callaway, Clifton W; Elmer, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    Comatose patients after cardiac arrest should receive active targeted temperature management (TTM), with a goal core temperature of 32-36°C for at least 24 hours. Small variations in brain temperature may confer or mitigate a substantial degree of neuroprotection, which may be lost at temperatures near 37°C. The purpose of this study was to define the relationship between brain and core temperature after cardiac arrest through direct, simultaneous measurement of both. We placed intracranial monitors in a series of consecutive patients hospitalized for cardiac arrest at a single tertiary care facility within 12 hours of return of spontaneous circulation to guide postcardiac arrest care. We compared the absolute difference between brain and core (esophageal or rectal) temperature measurements every hour for the duration of intracranial monitoring and tested for a lag between brain and core temperature using the average square difference method. Overall, 11 patients underwent simultaneous brain and core temperature monitoring for a total of 906 hours of data (Median 95; IQR: 15-118 hours per subject). On average, brain temperature was 0.34C° (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.31-0.37) higher than core temperature. In 7% of observations, brain temperature exceeded the measured core temperature ≥1°C. Brain temperature lagged behind core temperature by 0.45 hours (95% CI = -0.27-1.27 hours). Brain temperature averages 0.34°C higher than core temperature after cardiac arrest, and is more than 1°C higher than core temperature 7% of the time. This phenomenon must be considered when carrying out TTM to a goal core temperature of <36°C.

  2. INVITED REVIEW – NEUROIMAGING RESPONSE ASSESSMENT CRITERIA FOR BRAIN TUMORS IN VETERINARY PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Rossmeisl, John H.; Garcia, Paulo A.; Daniel, Gregory B.; Bourland, John Daniel; Debinski, Waldemar; Dervisis, Nikolaos; Klahn, Shawna

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of therapeutic response using cross-sectional imaging techniques, particularly gadolinium-enhanced MRI, is an integral part of the clinical management of brain tumors in veterinary patients. Spontaneous canine brain tumors are increasingly recognized and utilized as a translational model for the study of human brain tumors. However, no standardized neuroimaging response assessment criteria have been formulated for use in veterinary clinical trials. Previous studies have found that the pathophysiologic features inherent to brain tumors and the surrounding brain complicate the use of the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) assessment system. Objectives of this review are to describe strengths and limitations of published imaging-based brain tumor response criteria and propose a system for use in veterinary patients. The widely used human Macdonald and Response Assessment in Neuro-oncology (RANO) criteria are reviewed and described as to how they can be applied to veterinary brain tumors. Discussion points will include current challenges associated with the interpretation of brain tumor therapeutic responses such as imaging pseudophenomena and treatment-induced necrosis, and how advancements in perfusion imaging, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown promise in differentiating tumor progression from therapy-induced changes. Finally, although objective endpoints such as MR-imaging and survival estimates will likely continue to comprise the foundations for outcome measures in veterinary brain tumor clinical trials, we propose that in order to provide a more relevant therapeutic response metric for veterinary patients, composite response systems should be formulated and validated that combine imaging and clinical assessment criteria. PMID:24219161

  3. Brain Ischemia in Patients with Intracranial Hemorrhage: Pathophysiological Reasoning for Aggressive Diagnostic Management

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, Daniel; Arkuszewski, Michal; Rudzinski, Wojciech; Melhem, Elias R.; Krejza, Jaroslaw

    2013-01-01

    Summary Patients with intracranial hemorrhage have to be managed aggressively to avoid or minimize secondary brain damage due to ischemia, which contributes to high morbidity and mortality. The risk of brain ischemia, however, is not the same in every patient. The risk of complications associated with an aggressive prophylactic therapy in patients with a low risk of brain ischemia can outweigh the benefits of therapy. Accurate and timely identification of patients at highest risk is a diagnostic challenge. Despite the availability of many diagnostic tools, stroke is common in this population, mostly because the pathogenesis of stroke is frequently multifactorial whereas diagnosticians tend to focus on one or two risk factors. The pathophysiological mechanisms of brain ischemia in patients with intracranial hemorrhage are not yet fully elucidated and there are several important areas of ongoing research. Therefore, this review describes physiological and pathophysiological aspects associated with the development of brain ischemia such as the mechanism of oxygen and carbon dioxide effects on the cerebrovascular system, neurovascular coupling and respiratory and cardiovascular factors influencing cerebral hemodynamics. Consequently, we review investigations of cerebral blood flow disturbances relevant to various hemodynamic states associated with high intracranial pressure, cerebral embolism, and cerebral vasospasm along with current treatment options. PMID:24355179

  4. Changes of the directional brain networks related with brain plasticity in patients with long-term unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G-Y; Yang, M; Liu, B; Huang, Z-C; Li, J; Chen, J-Y; Chen, H; Zhang, P-P; Liu, L-J; Wang, J; Teng, G-J

    2016-01-28

    Previous studies often report that early auditory deprivation or congenital deafness contributes to cross-modal reorganization in the auditory-deprived cortex, and this cross-modal reorganization limits clinical benefit from cochlear prosthetics. However, there are inconsistencies among study results on cortical reorganization in those subjects with long-term unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL). It is also unclear whether there exists a similar cross-modal plasticity of the auditory cortex for acquired monaural deafness and early or congenital deafness. To address this issue, we constructed the directional brain functional networks based on entropy connectivity of resting-state functional MRI and researched changes of the networks. Thirty-four long-term USNHL individuals and seventeen normally hearing individuals participated in the test, and all USNHL patients had acquired deafness. We found that certain brain regions of the sensorimotor and visual networks presented enhanced synchronous output entropy connectivity with the left primary auditory cortex in the left long-term USNHL individuals as compared with normally hearing individuals. Especially, the left USNHL showed more significant changes of entropy connectivity than the right USNHL. No significant plastic changes were observed in the right USNHL. Our results indicate that the left primary auditory cortex (non-auditory-deprived cortex) in patients with left USNHL has been reorganized by visual and sensorimotor modalities through cross-modal plasticity. Furthermore, the cross-modal reorganization also alters the directional brain functional networks. The auditory deprivation from the left or right side generates different influences on the human brain.

  5. Right posterior brain-damaged patients are poor at assessing the age of a face.

    PubMed

    De Renzi, E; Bonacini, M G; Faglioni, P

    1989-01-01

    The ability to order unknown faces by age was investigated in right and left brain-damaged patients, divided into posterior and non-posterior groups on the basis of CT scan findings. A face recognition test and a figure ground discrimination test were also given. All three tests were affected by brain damage, but their sensitivity to the locus and side of lesion varied. While no hemispheric difference was found on the figure ground discrimination test, the face age test significantly discriminated patients with right posterior injury from any other brain-damaged group. The face recognition test occupied an intermediate position, with right posterior patients significantly impaired in comparison with right non-posterior patients and marginally impaired with respect to left posterior patients. Aphasia did not affect the performance of left brain-damaged patients on any of the tests. The findings are interpreted as evidence that damage of the right posterior hemisphere areas disrupts the structural encoding of visual information. Four prosopagnosic patients were also tested. Only those showing signs of apperceptive agnosia failed on the face age test.

  6. Excessive sleep need following traumatic brain injury: a case-control study of 36 patients.

    PubMed

    Sommerauer, Michael; Valko, Philipp O; Werth, Esther; Baumann, Christian R

    2013-12-01

    Increased sleep need following traumatic brain injury, referred to in this study as post-traumatic pleiosomnia, is common, but so far its clinical impact and therapeutic implications have not been characterized. We present a case-control study of 36 patients with post-traumatic pleiosomnia, defined by an increased sleep need of at least 2 h per 24 h after traumatic brain injury, compared to 36 controls. We assessed detailed history, sleep-activity patterns with sleep logs and actigraphy, nocturnal sleep with polysomnography and daytime sleep propensity with multiple sleep latency tests. Actigraphy recordings revealed that traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients had longer estimated sleep durations than controls (10.8 h per 24 h, compared to 7.3 h). When using sleep logs, TBI patients underestimated their sleep need. During nocturnal sleep, patients had higher amounts of slow-wave sleep than controls (20 versus 13.8%). Multiple sleep latency tests revealed excessive daytime sleepiness in 15 patients (42%), and 10 of them had signs of chronic sleep deprivation. We conclude that post-traumatic pleiosomnia may be even more frequent than reported previously, because affected patients often underestimate their actual sleep need. Furthermore, these patients exhibit an increase in slow-wave sleep which may reflect recovery mechanisms, intrinsic consequences of diffuse brain damage or relative sleep deprivation.

  7. Positron Emission Tomography Reveals Abnormal Topological Organization in Functional Brain Network in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiangzhe; Zhang, Yanjun; Feng, Hongbo; Jiang, Donglang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated alterations in the topological organization of structural brain networks in diabetes mellitus (DM). However, the DM-related changes in the topological properties in functional brain networks are unexplored so far. We therefore used fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data to construct functional brain networks of 73 DM patients and 91 sex- and age-matched normal controls (NCs), followed by a graph theoretical analysis. We found that both DM patients and NCs had a small-world topology in functional brain network. In comparison to the NC group, the DM group was found to have significantly lower small-world index, lower normalized clustering coefficients and higher normalized characteristic path length. Moreover, for diabetic patients, the nodal centrality was significantly reduced in the right rectus, the right cuneus, the left middle occipital gyrus, and the left postcentral gyrus, and it was significantly increased in the orbitofrontal region of the left middle frontal gyrus, the left olfactory region, and the right paracentral lobule. Our results demonstrated that the diabetic brain was associated with disrupted topological organization in the functional PET network, thus providing functional evidence for the abnormalities of brain networks in DM. PMID:27303259

  8. Small-World Brain Network and Dynamic Functional Distribution in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yongqiang; Zhou, Xia; Wang, Haibao; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhu, Xiaoqun; Xu, Liyan; Zhang, Chao; Sun, Zhongwu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the topological properties of the functional connectivity and their relationships with cognition impairment in subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (SVCI) patients, resting-state fMRI and graph theory approaches were employed in 23 SVCI patients and 20 healthy controls. Functional connectivity between 90 brain regions was estimated using bivariate correlation analysis and thresholded to construct a set of undirected graphs. Moreover, all of them were subjected to a battery of cognitive assessment, and the correlations between graph metrics and cognitive performance were further analyzed. Our results are as follows: functional brain networks of both SVCI patients and controls showed small-world attributes over a range of thresholds(0.15≤sparsity≤0.40). However, global topological organization of the functional brain networks in SVCI was significantly disrupted, as indicated by reduced global and local efficiency, clustering coefficients and increased characteristic path lengths relative to normal subjects. The decreased activity areas in SVCI predominantly targeted in the frontal-temporal lobes, while subcortical regions showed increased topological properties, which are suspected to compensate for the inefficiency of the functional network. We also demonstrated that altered brain network properties in SVCI are closely correlated with general cognitive and praxis dysfunction. The disruption of whole-brain topological organization of the functional connectome provides insight into the functional changes in the human brain in SVCI. PMID:26132397

  9. Monitoring the Brain-Stem State Through the Assessment of the Baroreceptor-Heart Rate Reflex in Critically Brain-Injured Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    death . We estimated during impending brain death in 11 comatose patients hospitalized in ICU 1) spontaneous variability of systolic and diastolic...and baroreflex effectiveness index (BEI) by the sequence technique. Brain death was associated with significant spectral changes, including a...generalized reduction in PI spectra and a decrease of the 0,1 Hz power in SBP and DBP spectra, BRS and BEI, close to normal values just before brain death , dropped

  10. Added Sugars

    MedlinePlus

    ... need sugar to function properly. Added sugars contribute zero nutrients but many added calories that can lead to extra pounds or even obesity, thereby reducing heart health. If you think of your daily calorie needs as a budget, you want to “spend” ...

  11. Value Added?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UCLA IDEA, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Value added measures (VAM) uses changes in student test scores to determine how much "value" an individual teacher has "added" to student growth during the school year. Some policymakers, school districts, and educational advocates have applauded VAM as a straightforward measure of teacher effectiveness: the better a teacher,…

  12. The added value of C-reactive protein measurement in diagnosing pneumonia in primary care: a meta-analysis of individual patient data

    PubMed Central

    Minnaard, Margaretha C.; de Groot, Joris A.H.; Hopstaken, Rogier M.; Schierenberg, Alwin; de Wit, Niek J.; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Broekhuizen, Berna D.L.; van Vugt, Saskia F.; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Graffelman, Aleida W.; Melbye, Hasse; Rainer, Timothy H.; Steurer, Johann; Holm, Anette; Gonzales, Ralph; Dinant, Geert-Jan; van de Pol, Alma C.; Verheij, Theo J.M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is increasingly being included in the diagnostic work-up for community-acquired pneumonia in primary care. Its added diagnostic value beyond signs and symptoms, however, remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis of individual patient data to quantify the added value of CRP measurement. METHODS: We included studies of the diagnostic accuracy of CRP in adult outpatients with suspected lower respiratory tract infection. We contacted authors of eligible studies for inclusion of data and for additional data as needed. The value of adding CRP measurement to a basic signs-and-symptoms prediction model was assessed. Outcome measures were improvement in discrimination between patients with and without pneumonia in primary care and improvement in risk classification, both within the individual studies and across studies. RESULTS: Authors of 8 eligible studies (n = 5308) provided their data sets. In all of the data sets, discrimination between patients with and without pneumonia improved after CRP measurement was added to the prediction model (extended model), with a mean improvement in the area under the curve of 0.075 (range 0.02–0.18). In a hypothetical cohort of 1000 patients, the proportion of patients without pneumonia correctly classified at low risk increased from 28% to 36% in the extended model, and the proportion with pneumonia correctly classified at high risk increased from 63% to 70%. The number of patients with pneumonia classified at low risk did not change (n = 4). Overall, the proportion of patients assigned to the intermediate-risk category decreased from 56% to 51%. INTERPRETATION: Adding CRP measurement to the diagnostic work-up for suspected pneumonia in primary care improved the discrimination and risk classification of patients. However, it still left a substantial group of patients classified at intermediate risk, in which clinical decision-making remains challenging. PMID:27647618

  13. Use of Transcranial Doppler in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Daniel; Cravens, George; Poche, Gerard; Gandhi, Raj; Tellez, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Severe traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are associated with a high rate of mortality and disability. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) sonography permits a noninvasive measurement of cerebral blood flow. The purpose of this study is to determine the usefulness of TCD in patients with severe TBI. TCD was performed, from April 2008 to April 2013, on 255 patients with severe TBI, defined as a Glasgow Coma Scale score of ≤8 on admission. TCD was performed on hospital days 1, 2, 3, and 7. Hypoperfusion was defined by having two out of three of the following: 1) mean velocity (Vm) of the middle cerebral artery <35 cm/sec, 2) diastolic velocity (Vd) of the middle cerebral artery <20 cm/sec, or 3) pulsatility index (PI) of >1.4. Vasospasm was defined by the following: Vm of the middle cerebral artery >120 cm/sec and/or a Lindegaard index (LI) >3. One hundred fourteen (45%) had normal measurements. Of these, 92 (80.7%) had a good outcome, 6 (5.3%) had moderate disability, and 16 (14%) died, 4 from brain death. Seventy-two patients (28%) had hypoperfusion and 71 (98.6%) died, 65 from brain death, and 1 patient survived with moderate disability. Sixty-nine patients (27%) had vasospasm, 31 (44.9%) had a good outcome, 16 (23.2%) had severe disability, and 22 (31.9%) died, 13 from brain death. The vasospasm was detected on hospital day 1 in 8 patients, on day 2 in 23 patients, on day 3 in 22 patients, and on day 7 in 16 patients. Patients with normal measurements can be expected to survive. Patients with hypoperfusion have a poor prognosis. Patients with vasospasm have a high incidence of mortality and severe disability. TCD is useful in determining early prognosis.

  14. Metacontrol of Hemispheric Function in Human Split-Brain Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Jerre; Trevarthen, Colwyn

    1976-01-01

    Four commissurotomy patients were tested for ability to match tachistoscopically presented stimuli with pictures in free vision, according to either structural appearance or functional/conceptual category. (Editor)

  15. Toxic epidermal necrolysis in a patient receiving concurrent phenytoin and whole brain and thoracic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Imtiaz; Biswas, Ahitagni; Krishnamurthy, Sapna; Julka, Pramod K

    2014-11-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a severe drug induced type IV hypersensitivity syndrome that can be caused by anticonvulsant drugs, especially the aromatic anticonvulsants such as phenytoin. Most patients with brain metastasis receive whole brain radiotherapy along with anti-edema measures and anticonvulsants either as prophylactic or for symptom control; phenytoin being the most commonly used drug. In a subset of patients, cranial irradiation may act as a precipitating factor along with anticonvulsants for the development of TEN. We report a 54-year-old patient with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer treated with palliative whole brain and mediastinal radiotherapy with concurrent phenytoin-developing TEN, which started within the radiation portals with subsequent generalization. Though a rare, but serious complication, avoidance of the use of phenytoin concurrent with radiotherapy, replacing phenytoin with newer anticonvulsants, early recognition, aggressive management and awareness of this possible complication has been implied upon in this report.

  16. Primary brain calcification in patients undergoing treatment with the biphosphanate alendronate.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, J R M; Oliveira, M F

    2016-03-15

    Brain calcification might be associated with various metabolic, infectious or vascular conditions. Clinically, brain calcification can include symptoms such as migraine, parkinsonism, psychosis or dementia. The term Primary Brain Calcification was recently used for those patients without an obvious cause (formerly idiopathic) while Primary Familial Brain Calcifications was left for the cases with autosomal dominant inheritance. Recent studies found mutations in four genes (SLC20A2, PDGFRB, PDGFB and XPR1). However, these gene represent only 60% of all familial cases suggesting other genes remain to be elucidated. Studies evaluating treatments for such a devastating disease are scattered, usually appearing as single case reports. In the present study, we describe a case series of 7 patients treated with Alendronate, a widely prescribed biphosphanate. We observed good tolerance and evidence of improvements and stability by some patients. No side effects were reported and no specific symptoms related to medication. Younger patients and one individual continuing a prescription (prior to study commencement) appeared to respond more positively with some referred improvements in symptoms. Biphosphanates may represent an excellent prospect for the treatment of brain calcifications due to their being well tolerated and easily available. Conversely, prospective and controlled studies should promptly address weaknesses found in the present analysis.

  17. Brain uptake of iomazenil in cirrhotic patients: a single photon emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Kapczinski, F; Quevedo, J; Curran, H V; Fleminger, S; Toone, B; Cluckie, A; Lader, M

    1999-01-01

    Brain uptake of 123I-iomazenil was studied in seven cirrhotic patients and eight normal controls using single photon emission computerized tomography. The highest concentration of the ligand was found in the occipital cortex, which corresponds to the brain region with the highest concentration of benzodiazepine receptors. The peak uptake was delayed in patients across all brain regions. The uptake in occipital cortex was higher in low albumin cirrhotics. Patients with low albumin also presented a more delayed peak uptake in occipital cortex and a higher volume of distribution of iomazenil in plasma, compared to patients with normal albumin levels and controls. The changes in brain uptake (delayed peak uptake and increased maximal uptake in occipital cortex) appears to reflect changes in the pharmacokinetics of the ligand, particularly in cirrhotics with low levels of plasma albumin. The curve of brain uptake of the tracer was modelled into a two compartments equation, which seems to provide a practical and reliable method to calculate the slopes of acquisition and decay, time to peak and maximal acquisition.

  18. Microstructural Abnormalities Were Found in Brain Gray Matter from Patients with Chronic Myofascial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Peng; Qin, Bangyong; Song, Ganjun; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Song; Yu, Jin; Wu, Jianjiang; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Tijiang; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yu, Tian; Zheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain, presented as myofascial trigger points (MTrPs)-related pain, is a common, chronic disease involving skeletal muscle, but its underlying mechanisms have been poorly understood. Previous studies have revealed that chronic pain can induce microstructural abnormalities in the cerebral gray matter. However, it remains unclear whether the brain gray matters of patients with chronic MTrPs-related pain undergo alteration. In this study, we employed the Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI) technique, which is particularly sensitive to brain microstructural perturbation, to monitor the MTrPs-related microstructural alterations in brain gray matter of patients with chronic pain. Our results revealed that, in comparison with the healthy controls, patients with chronic myofascial pain exhibited microstructural abnormalities in the cerebral gray matter and these lesions were mainly distributed in the limbic system and the brain areas involved in the pain matrix. In addition, we showed that microstructural abnormalities in the right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) had a significant negative correlation with the course of disease and pain intensity. The results of this study demonstrated for the first time that there are microstructural abnormalities in the brain gray matter of patients with MTrPs-related chronic pain. Our findings may provide new insights into the future development of appropriate therapeutic strategies to this disease. PMID:28066193

  19. Imaging of Cerebral Blood Flow in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in the Neurointensive Care

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Elham; Engquist, Henrik; Enblad, Per

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI). A great challenge for the treatment of TBI patients in the neurointensive care unit (NICU) is to detect early signs of ischemia in order to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. Today, several imaging techniques are available to monitor cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the injured brain such as positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography, xenon computed tomography (Xenon-CT), perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and CT perfusion scan. An ideal imaging technique would enable continuous non-invasive measurement of blood flow and metabolism across the whole brain. Unfortunately, no current imaging method meets all these criteria. These techniques offer snapshots of the CBF. MRI may also provide some information about the metabolic state of the brain. PET provides images with high resolution and quantitative measurements of CBF and metabolism; however, it is a complex and costly method limited to few TBI centers. All of these methods except mobile Xenon-CT require transfer of TBI patients to the radiological department. Mobile Xenon-CT emerges as a feasible technique to monitor CBF in the NICU, with lower risk of adverse effects. Promising results have been demonstrated with Xenon-CT in predicting outcome in TBI patients. This review covers available imaging methods used to monitor CBF in patients with severe TBI. PMID:25071702

  20. Expression of defective measles virus genes in brain tissues of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    SciTech Connect

    Baczko, K.; Liebert, U.G.; Billeter, M.; Cattaneo, R.; Budka, H.; Ter Meulen, V.

    1986-08-01

    The persistence of measles virus in selected areas of the brains of four patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) was characterized by immunohistological and biochemical techniques. The five measles virus structural proteins were never simultaneously detectable in any of the bran sections. Nucleocapsid proteins and phosphoproteins were found in every diseased brain area, whereas hemagglutinin protein was detected in two cases, fusion protein was detected in three cases, and matrix protein was detected in only one case. Also, it could be shown that the amounts of measles virus RNA in the brains differed from patient to patient and in the different regions investigated. In all patients, plus-strand RNAs specific for these five viral genes could be detected. However, the amounts of fusion and hemagglutinin mRNAs were low compared with the amounts in lytically infected cells. The presence of particular measles virus RNAs in SSPE-infected brains did not always correlate with mRNA activity. In in vitro translations, the matrix protein was produced in only one case, and the hemagglutinin protein was produced in none. These results indicate that measles virus persistence in SSPE is correlated with different defects of several genes which probably prevent assembly of viral particles in SSPE-infected brain tissue.

  1. Brain motor system function in a patient with complete spinal cord injury following extensive brain-computer interface training.

    PubMed

    Enzinger, Christian; Ropele, Stefan; Fazekas, Franz; Loitfelder, Marisa; Gorani, Faton; Seifert, Thomas; Reiter, Gudrun; Neuper, Christa; Pfurtscheller, Gert; Müller-Putz, Gernot

    2008-09-01

    Although several features of brain motor function appear to be preserved even in chronic complete SCI, previous functional MRI (fMRI) studies have also identified significant derangements such as a strongly reduced volume of activation, a poor modulation of function and abnormal activation patterns. It might be speculated that extensive motor imagery training may serve to prevent such abnormalities. We here report on a unique patient with a complete traumatic SCI below C5 who learned to elicit electroencephalographic signals beta-bursts in the midline region upon imagination of foot movements. This enabled him to use a neuroprosthesis and to "walk from thought" in a virtual environment via a brain-computer interface (BCI). We here used fMRI at 3T during imagined hand and foot movements to investigate the effects of motor imagery via persistent BCI training over 8 years on brain motor function and compared these findings to a group of five untrained healthy age-matched volunteers during executed and imagined movements. We observed robust primary sensorimotor cortex (SMC) activity in expected somatotopy in the tetraplegic patient upon movement imagination while such activation was absent in healthy untrained controls. Sensorimotor network activation with motor imagery in the patient (including SMC contralateral to and the cerebellum ipsilateral to the imagined side of movement as well as supplementary motor areas) was very similar to the pattern observed with actual movement in the controls. We interpret our findings as evidence that BCI training as a conduit of motor imagery training may assist in maintaining access to SMC in largely preserved somatopy despite complete deafferentation.

  2. Pre- and postoperative neurocognitive deficits in brain tumor patients assessed by a computer based screening test.

    PubMed

    Hoffermann, Markus; Bruckmann, Lukas; Mahdy Ali, Kariem; Zaar, Karla; Avian, Alexander; von Campe, Gord

    2017-02-01

    Neurocognitive assessment becomes increasingly important in neuro-oncology. The presence and degree of neurocognitive deficits in patients with brain tumors appear to be important not only as outcome measures but also in treatment planning and as possible prognostic markers for tumor-progression. Common screening methods for neurocognitive deficits are often insufficient in uncovering subtle changes or harbor the risk of being observer-dependent and time-consuming. We present data of brain tumor patients screened by a computer-based neurocognitive assessment tool before and after surgery. 196 patients with tumor resections were tested at our institution using the NeuroCog Fx® software 2days before and 3-4months after surgery. Additionally to the test results, patient-related information, such as age, sex, handedness, level of education, pre- and postoperative neurological status, KPS, location and histopathological diagnosis were recorded. These prospectively collected results were correlated in the here presented retrospective study. The majority of patients with malignant gliomas, metastases and meningiomas showed significant deficits in various neurocognitive domains, most of them improved or did not decline in their postoperative neurocognitive performances. Interestingly, there was no significant correlation of neurocognitive deficits and brain tumor location. In future, standardized neuropsychological assessment should become an essential part of the management and care of patients with brain tumors to provide a more personalized and tailored treatment. Further studies will improve the understanding of the influence of various treatment modalities on neuro-cognition.

  3. [Prevention of brain infarction in patients with atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Toshiyasu; Yasaka, Masahiro

    2007-01-01

    The patients with cardioembolic stroke sometimes suffer from severe neurological deficit and from recurrent strokes. Since atrial fibrillation, especially non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is associated with over half of the cardioembolic strokes, the prevention of cardioembolic stroke in patients with NVAF is important. There have been some reports about how to prevent stroke. They have indicated that the best medication for preventing from stroke was anticoagulation by warfarin. Therefore, the guidelines recommended the patients with NVAF to take warfarin. In case with the older patients under 70 years, prothrombin international normalized ratio (PT-INR) should be kept from 2.0 to 3.0. On the other hand, if the patients with NVAF are over 70 years, PT-INR has to be controlled from 1.6 to 2.6. Before extraction of a tooth, anticoagulation should not be call off.

  4. Impaired peri-nidal cerebrovascular reserve in seizure patients with brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Fierstra, Jorn; Conklin, John; Krings, Timo; Slessarev, Marat; Han, Jay S; Fisher, Joseph A; Terbrugge, Karel; Wallace, M Christopher; Tymianski, Michael; Mikulis, David J

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are a common presentation in patients with newly diagnosed brain arteriovenous malformations, but the pathophysiological mechanisms causing the seizures remain poorly understood. We used magnetic resonance imaging-based quantitative cerebrovascular reactivity mapping and conventional angiography to determine whether seizure-prone patients with brain arteriovenous malformations exhibit impaired cerebrovascular reserve or morphological angiographic features predictive of seizures. Twenty consecutive patients with untreated brain arteriovenous malformations were recruited (10 with and 10 without epileptic seizures) along with 12 age-matched healthy controls. Blood oxygen level-dependent MRI was performed while applying iso-oxic step changes in end-tidal partial pressure of CO(2) to obtain quantitative cerebrovascular reactivity measurements. The brain arteriovenous malformation morphology was evaluated by angiography, to determine to what extent limitations of arterial blood supply or the presence of restricted venous outflow and tissue congestion correlated with seizure susceptibility. Only patients with seizures exhibited impaired peri-nidal cerebrovascular reactivity by magnetic resonance imaging (0.11 ± 0.10 versus 0.25 ± 0.07, respectively; P < 0.001) and venous drainage patterns suggestive of tissue congestion on angiography. However, cerebrovascular reactivity changes were not of a magnitude suggestive of arterial steal, and were probably compatible with venous congestion in aetiology. Our findings demonstrate a strong association between impaired peri-nidal cerebrovascular reserve and epileptic seizure presentation in patients with brain arteriovenous malformation. The impaired cerebrovascular reserve may be associated with venous congestion. Quantitative measurements of cerebrovascular reactivity using blood oxygen level-dependent MRI appear to correlate with seizure susceptibility in patients with brain arteriovenous malformation.

  5. [Fractal characteristics of the functional state of the brain in patients with anxious phobic disorders].

    PubMed

    Dik, O E; Sviatogor, I A; Ishinova, V A; Nozdrachev, A D

    2012-01-01

    The task of estimation of the functional state of the human brain during psychotherapeutic treatment of psychogenic pain in patients with anxious phobic disorders is examined. For solving the task the methods of spectral and multifractal analyses of EEG fragments are applied during the perception of psychogenic pain and its removal by the psychorelaxation technique. Contrary to power spectra singularity spectra allow to distinguish EEGs quanitatively in the examined functional states of the human brain. The pain suppression in patients with anxious phobic disorders during psychorelaxation is accompanied by changing the width of the singularity spectrum and approximation of this multifractal partameter to the value corresponding to a healthy subject.

  6. Brain metastasis in two patients with stage IA papillary serous carcinoma of the uterus

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhulu, Deepa M.; Khulpateea, Neekianund; Meritz, Keith; Xu, Yiquing

    2015-01-01

    We report two cases of brain metastasis in patients initially diagnosed with extremely early stage UPSC after extensive staging surgery. They did not receive either adjuvant chemotherapy or adjuvant pelvic or vaginal cuff radiation. At the same time that these patients were diagnosed with systemic metastasis, they both had a local “drop” metastasis in the vulva or the vaginal cuff. After the initial response to palliative chemotherapy, they both developed brain metastasis. The pattern of recurrence with the lack of adjuvant treatment underscores the urgent need in further evaluation of the potential benefits of adjuvant treatment, including chemotherapy and possibly in combination with radiation in this highly aggressive disease. PMID:26425708

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid indices of blood-brain barrier permeability following adrenal-brain transplantation in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ahlskog, J E; Tyce, G M; Kelly, P J; van Heerden, J A; Stoddard, S L; Carmichael, S W

    1989-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum or plasma concentrations of albumin, IgG and carbidopa were measured before and after adrenal-brain transplantation in patients with Parkinson's disease to indirectly assess blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity. Previous studies in animals have suggested that the BBB is compromised by cerebral transplantation. CSF and plasma levodopa was also measured to permit comparison with the carbidopa values, recognizing that levodopa readily crosses the BBB via facilitated transport. Our patients underwent adrenal-brain transplantation in accordance with the method of Madrazo et al. (I. Madrazo, R. Drucker-Colin, V. Diaz, J. Martinez-Mata, C. Torres, and J. J. Becerril, 1987, N. Engl. J. Med. 316: 831-834) in which adrenal medullary pieces are implanted in the head of the caudate nucleus, in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid. All patients were maintained on oral carbidopa/levodopa therapy after surgery. CSF albumin/serum albumin and CSF IgG/serum IgG ratios were initially elevated above the preoperative baseline 6 weeks after the surgery; however, these values returned to the preoperative baseline by 6 months following the operation in six of seven patients. This suggested that the BBB was sufficiently intact to exclude these larger protein molecules from the CSF of these six patients. On the other hand, exogenously administered carbidopa, which normally is largely excluded from the cerebrospinal fluid by the BBB, was modestly increased in the CSF in four of the five patients in which it was measured. This suggests that the transplant BBB might be partially patent to small molecules for at least 6 months after the surgery. Whether increased passage of carbidopa into CSF and perhaps the transplant is of clinical significance has yet to be determined. Median CSF levodopa did not increase after surgery, probably because a limited defect in the BBB would be likely to be overshadowed by the effects of facilitated transport. CT scans performed

  8. Linac stereotactic radiosurgery: An effective and safe treatment for elderly patients with brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Georges . E-mail: noel@ipno.in2p3.fr; Bollet, Marc A.; Noel, Sophie; Feuvret, Loic; Boisserie, Gilbert; Tep, Bernadette; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Baillet, Francois; Ambroise Valery, Charles; Cornu, Philippe; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of radiosurgery for brain metastases in patients 65 years or older. Patients and Methods: Between January 1994 and January 2003, 117 patients (47 women, 70 men), median age 71 years (range, 65-86 years), received radiosurgery for 227 metastases. Sixty-one patients (55%) presented symptoms in relation to the brain metastases. Thirty-eight patients (32%) received whole-brain radiotherapy. Median metastasis diameter and volume were 21 mm (range, 0.5-75 mm) and 1.7 cc (range, 0.02-71 cc), respectively. Results: Median follow-up was 7 months (range, 1-45 months), 9.5 months for alive patients (range, 1-45 months). Median minimum and maximum doses were 14.5 Gy (6.5 Gy, 19.5 Gy), and 20.4 Gy (13.2 Gy, 41.9 Gy), respectively. Median survival was 8 months from the date of radiosurgery. Overall survival rates at 6 and 24 months were 58% {+-} 5% and 13% {+-} 4%, respectively. According to multivariate analysis, a low Karnofsky performance status was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival (p = 0.003; odds ratio [OR] = 0.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.14-0.56). Median brain disease-free survival was 10 months. Brain disease-free survival rates at 6 and 24 months were 67% {+-} 6% and 40% {+-} 7%, respectively. According to multivariate analysis, a radiosensitive lesion was an independent favorable factor (p = 0.038; OR = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.18-0.95); more than two metastases and a low Karnofsky performance status were independent unfavorable factors for brain disease-free survival (p = 0.046; OR = 2.15; 95% CI, 1.01-4.58 and p = 0.003; OR = 30.4; 95% CI, 3.1-296, respectively). Local control rates were 98% {+-} 2% and 91% {+-} 8.5% at 6 and 24 months. Out of the 61 patients presenting symptoms before radiosurgery, complete symptomatic response was achieved in 12 patients (20%), partial improvement in 25 (41%), stabilization in 7 (11%), and worsening in 4 (6%) related to a progression of the irradiated metastasis

  9. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenqing; Wang, Aihui; Yu, Limin; Han, Xuesong; Jiang, Guiyun; Weng, Changshui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia. PMID:25337108

  10. The clinical significance of brain microbleeds in patients with Alzheimer's disease: Preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jae-Hyeok; Im, Dong-Gyu; Lee, Seung-Hyeon; Ahn, Jin-Young

    2016-01-01

    Background: Microbleeds (MBs) are observed frequently in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and suggested to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology, but their clinical significance remains unclear. Materials and Methods: The study recruited 100 patients with AD who were diagnosed at the memory clinic in Seoul Medical Center in 2014. For each patient, baseline characteristics, neuropsychological tests, cerebrovascular risk factors, medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTLA), and severity of small vessel disease (SVD) according to the existence of MBs were evaluated. Results: The prevalence of MBs in patients with AD was 33%. The percentage of male gender, the severity of SVD and MTLA were significantly increased in MB(+) group. The MB(+) group showed more severe MTLA and SVD than MB(−) group. Conclusions: These results suggested that MBs might reflect the burden of amyloid and ischemic vascular pathology. PMID:27994360

  11. Metronidazole and hydroxymetronidazole central nervous system distribution: 1. microdialysis assessment of brain extracellular fluid concentrations in patients with acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Frasca, Denis; Dahyot-Fizelier, Claire; Adier, Christophe; Mimoz, Olivier; Debaene, Bertrand; Couet, William; Marchand, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of metronidazole in the central nervous system has only been described based on cerebrospinal fluid data. However, extracellular fluid (ECF) concentrations may better predict its antimicrobial effect and/or side effects. We sought to explore by microdialysis brain ECF metronidazole distribution in patients with acute brain injury. Four brain-injured patients monitored by cerebral microdialysis received 500 mg of metronidazole over 0.5 h every 8 h. Brain dialysates and blood samples were collected at steady state over 8 h. Probe recoveries were evaluated by in vivo retrodialysis in each patient for metronidazole. Metronidazole and OH-metronidazole were assayed by high-pressure liquid chromatography, and a noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. Probe recovery was equal to 78.8% ± 1.3% for metronidazole in patients. Unbound brain metronidazole concentration-time curves were delayed compared to unbound plasma concentration-time curves but with a mean metronidazole unbound brain/plasma AUC0-τ ratio equal to 102% ± 19% (ranging from 87 to 124%). The unbound plasma concentration-time profiles for OH-metronidazole were flat, with mean average steady-state concentrations equal to 4.0 ± 0.7 μg ml(-1). This microdialysis study describes the steady-state brain distribution of metronidazole in patients and confirms its extensive distribution.

  12. Safety of a dedicated brain MRI protocol in patients with a vagus nerve stimulator.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Jeroen C; Melis, Gerrit I; Gebbink, Tineke A; de Kort, Gérard A P; Leijten, Frans S S

    2014-11-01

    Although implanted metallic devices constitute a relative contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning, the safety of brain imaging in a patient with a vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) is classified as "conditional," provided that specific manufacturer guidelines are followed when a transmit and receive head coil is used at 1.5 or 3.0 Tesla. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of performing brain MRI scans in patients with the VNS. From September 2009 until November 2011, 101 scans were requested in 73 patients with the VNS in The Netherlands. Patients were scanned according to the manufacturer's guidelines. No patient reported any side effect, discomfort, or pain during or after the MRI scan. In one patient, a lead break was detected based on device diagnostics after the MRI-scan. However, because no system diagnostics had been performed prior to MR scanning in this patient, it is unclear whether MR scanning was responsible for the lead break. The indication for most scans was epilepsy related. Twenty-six scans (26%) were part of a (new) presurgical evaluation and could probably better have been performed prior to VNS implantation. Performing brain MRI scans in patients with an implanted VNS is safe when a modified MRI protocol is followed.

  13. Predicting the post-treatment recovery of patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Zaigham Faraz; Krempl, Georg; Spiliopoulou, Myra; Peña, Jose M; Paul, Nuria; Maestu, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Predicting the evolution of individuals is a rather new mining task with applications in medicine. Medical researchers are interested in the progression of a disease and/or how do patients evolve or recover when they are subjected to some treatment. In this study, we investigate the problem of patients' evolution on the basis of medical tests before and after treatment after brain trauma: we want to understand to what extend a patient can become similar to a healthy participant. We face two challenges. First, we have less information on healthy participants than on the patients. Second, the values of the medical tests for patients, even after treatment started, remain well-separated from those of healthy people; this is typical for neurodegenerative diseases, but also for further brain impairments. Our approach encompasses methods for modelling patient evolution and for predicting the health improvement of different patients' subpopulations, i.e. prediction of label if they recovered or not. We test our approach on a cohort of patients treated after brain trauma and a corresponding cohort of controls.

  14. Cognitive Impairment and Brain Imaging Characteristics of Patients with Congenital Cataracts, Facial Dysmorphism, Neuropathy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chamova, Teodora; Zlatareva, Dora; Raycheva, Margarita; Bichev, Stoyan; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Tournev, Ivailo

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, neuropathy (CCFDN) syndrome is a complex autosomal recessive multisystem disorder. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the degree of cognitive impairment in a cohort of 22 CCFDN patients and its correlation with patients' age, motor disability, ataxia, and neuroimaging changes. Twenty-two patients with genetically confirmed diagnosis of CCFDN underwent a detailed neurological examination. Verbal and nonverbal intelligence, memory, executive functions, and verbal fluency wеre assessed in all the patients aged 4 to 47 years. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 20 affected patients. Eighteen affected were classified as having mild intellectual deficit, whereas 4 had borderline intelligence. In all psychometric tests, evaluating different cognitive domains, CCFDN patients had statistically significant lower scores when compared to the healthy control group. All cognitive domains seemed equally affected. The main abnormalities on brain MRI found in 19/20 patients included diffuse cerebral atrophy, enlargement of the lateral ventricles, and focal lesions in the subcortical white matter, different in number and size, consistent with demyelination more pronounced in the older CCFDN patients. The correlation analysis of the structural brain changes and the cognitive impairment found a statistically significant correlation only between the impairment of short-term verbal memory and the MRI changes.

  15. Methods and results of local treatment of brain metastases in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pluta, Elżbieta; Walasek, Tomasz; Blecharz, Paweł; Jakubowicz, Jerzy; Mituś, Jerzy W.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents methods and results of surgical treatment and radiation therapy of brain metastases in breast cancer patients (brain metastases from breast cancer BMF-BC). Based on the literature data, it was shown that patients with single BMF-BC, aged less than 65 years, with Karnofsky score (KPS) of 70 or more and with cured or controlled extracranial disease are the best candidates to surgical treatment. Irrespective of the extracranial disease control status, there are indications for surgery in patients with symptomatic mass effect (tumour diameter larger than 3 cm) and patients with obstructive hydrocephalus from their BMF-BC. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has some advantages over surgery, with similar effectiveness: it may be used in the treatment of lesions inaccessible to surgery, the number of lesion is not a limiting factor if each lesion is small (< 3) and adequate doses can be delivered, it is not contraindicated in patients with active extracranial disease, it does not interfere with ongoing systemic treatment, and it does not require general anaesthesia or hospitalisation. A disadvantage of SRS, as compared to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT), in patients with BMF-BC is the possibility of subsequent development of new lesion in the non-irradiated field. Thus the majority of the BMF-BC patients are not good candidates to surgery or SRS; WBRT alone or combined with a systemic treatment still plays a major role in the treatment of these patients. PMID:28239278

  16. Readiness to change and brain damage in patients with chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Le Berre, Anne-Pascale; Rauchs, Géraldine; La Joie, Renaud; Segobin, Shailendra; Mézenge, Florence; Boudehent, Céline; Vabret, François; Viader, Fausto; Eustache, Francis; Pitel, Anne-Lise; Beaunieux, Hélène

    2013-09-30

    High motivation to change is a crucial triggering factor to patients' engagement in clinical treatment. This study investigates whether the low readiness to change observed in some alcoholic inpatients at treatment entry could, at least partially, be linked with macrostructural gray matter abnormalities in critical brain regions. Participants comprised 31 alcoholic patients and 27 controls, who underwent 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging. The Readiness to Change Questionnaire, designed to assess three stages of motivation to change (precontemplation, contemplation and action stages), was completed by all patients, who were then divided into "Action" (i.e., patients in action stage) and "PreAction" (i.e., patients in precontemplation or in contemplation stage) subgroups. The PreAction subgroup, but not the Action subgroup, had gray matter volume deficits compared with controls. Unlike the patients in the Action subgroup, the PreAction patients had gray matter abnormalities in the cerebellum (Crus I), fusiform gyri and frontal cortex. The low level of motivation to modify drinking behavior observed in some alcoholic patients at treatment entry may be related to macrostructural brain abnormalities in regions subtending cognitive, emotional and social abilities. These brain volume deficits may result in impairment of critical abilities such as decision making, executive functions and social cognition skills. Those abilities may be needed to resolve ambivalence toward alcohol addiction and to apply "processes of change", which are essential for activating the desire to change problematic behavior.

  17. [Brain abscess due to Fusobacterium necrophorum in a patient with convulsion and no signs of meningitis].

    PubMed

    Shimohata, Mitsuteru; Naruse, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Watanabe, Yumiko; Koyama, Miyako; Ito, Yasushi; Tanaka, Hajime

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report brain abscess due to Fusobacterium necrophorum (F. necrophorum) in a 78-year-old healthy man. He developed convulsion and did not have any signs of meningitis. Although the brain magnetic resonance imaging findings of the left occipital lobe were typical of a brain abscess, his cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed only slight pleocytosis and mild increase in protein levels. Thus, it was difficult to rule out the possibility of metastatic brain tumor; the patient's condition was provisionally diagnosed as symptomatic epilepsy secondary to brain abscess. His convulsion disappeared soon after administration of antiepileptic, antibacterial, and steroid agents. A craniotomy was performed to evacuate the abscess, and F. necrophorum was identified by culturing the abscess contents. After the operation, he was treated with appropriate antibacterial agents, which resulted in resolution of the brain abscess. Although Fusobacterium species are gram-negative anaerobic bacilli commensal of the human oropharynx, we need to recognize that Fusobacterium species can be a primary pathogen causing brain abscesses and may leave residual neurological sequelae without early appropriate treatment.

  18. Blood-brain barrier impairment in MPS III patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of a specific enzyme leading to heparan sulfate (HS) accumulation within cells and to eventual progressive cerebral and systemic organ abnormalities. Different enzyme deficiencies comprise the MPS III subcategories (A, B, C, D). Since neuropathological manifestations are common to all MPS III types, determining blood-brain barrier (BBB) condition may be critical to understand potential additional disease mechanisms. Methods We investigated BBB integrity in various brain structures of post-mortem tissues from an eleven year old Caucasian female with MPS III A and from a twenty four year old Caucasian female with MPS III D. Control tissues were obtained post-mortem from three Caucasians without neurological deficits: a twelve year old male, a twenty four year old female, and a twenty seven year old female. BBB capillary ultrastructure (electron microscopy) and capillary functional integrity (IgG leakage, tight junction proteins, and lysosomal accumulation within endothelium) were examined. Results Compromised BBB integrity was found in both MPS III cases. Major study findings were: (1) capillary endothelial and pericyte cell damage; (2) mucopolysaccharide bodies in a majority of endothelial cells and pericytes rupturing cell membranes; (3) severe extracellular edema; (4) IgG microvascular leakage and reductions of occludin and claudin-5 with variations between MPS III types; (5) extensive lysosomal accumulation in capillary endothelium. Conclusions These new findings of BBB structural and functional impairment, although from only two cases, MPS III A and III D, may have implications for disease pathogenesis and should be considered in treatment development for MPS III. PMID:24225396

  19. Affection of Fundamental Brain Activity By Using Sounds For Patients With Prosodic Disorders: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Emiko; Katagiri, Yoshitada; Seki, Keiko; Kawamata, Toshio

    2011-06-01

    We present a neural model of the production of modulated speech streams in the brain, referred to as prosody, which indicates the limbic structure essential for producing prosody both linguistically and emotionally. This model suggests that activating the fundamental brain including monoamine neurons at the basal ganglia will potentially contribute to helping patients with prosodic disorders coming from functional defects of the fundamental brain to overcome their speech problem. To establish effective clinical treatment for such prosodic disorders, we examine how sounds affect the fundamental activity by using electroencephalographic measurements. Throughout examinations with various melodious sounds, we found that some melodies with lilting rhythms successfully give rise to the fast alpha rhythms at the electroencephalogram which reflect the fundamental brain activity without any negative feelings.

  20. Structural Brain Changes Related to Disease Duration in Patients with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    von Leupoldt, Andreas; Brassen, Stefanie; Baumann, Hans Jörg; Klose, Hans; Büchel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Dyspnea is the impairing, cardinal symptom patients with asthma repeatedly experience over the course of the disease. However, its accurate perception is also crucial for timely initiation of treatment. Reduced perception of dyspnea is associated with negative treatment outcome, but the underlying brain mechanisms of perceived dyspnea in patients with asthma remain poorly understood. We examined whether increasing disease duration in fourteen patients with mild-to-moderate asthma is related to structural brain changes in the insular cortex and brainstem periaqueductal grey (PAG). In addition, the association between structural brain changes and perceived dyspnea were studied. By using magnetic resonance imaging in combination with voxel-based morphometry, gray matter volumes of the insular cortex and the PAG were analysed and correlated with asthma duration and perceived affective unpleasantness of resistive load induced dyspnea. Whereas no associations were observed for the insular cortex, longer duration of asthma was associated with increased gray matter volume in the PAG. Moreover, increased PAG gray matter volume was related to reduced ratings of dyspnea unpleasantness. Our results demonstrate that increasing disease duration is associated with increased gray matter volume in the brainstem PAG in patients with mild-to-moderate asthma. This structural brain change might contribute to the reduced perception of dyspnea in some patients with asthma and negatively impact the treatment outcome. PMID:21886820

  1. Altered brain connectivity in patients with schizophrenia is consistent across cognitive contexts

    PubMed Central

    Orban, Pierre; Desseilles, Martin; Mendrek, Adrianna; Bourque, Josiane; Bellec, Pierre; Stip, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia has been defined as a dysconnection syndrome characterized by aberrant functional brain connectivity. Using task-based fMRI, we assessed to what extent the nature of the cognitive context may further modulate abnormal functional brain connectivity. Methods We analyzed data matched for motion in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls who performed 3 different tasks. Tasks 1 and 2 both involved emotional processing and only slighlty differed (incidental encoding v. memory recognition), whereas task 3 was a much different mental rotation task. We conducted a connectome-wide general linear model analysis aimed at identifying context-dependent and independent functional brain connectivity alterations in patients with schizophrenia. Results After matching for motion, we included 30 patients with schizophrenia and 30 healthy controls in our study. Abnormal connectivity in patients with schizophrenia followed similar patterns regardless of the degree of similarity between cognitive tasks. Decreased connectivity was most notable in the medial prefrontal cortex, the anterior and posterior cingulate, the temporal lobe, the lobule IX of the cerebellum and the premotor cortex. Limitations A more circumscribed yet significant context-dependent effect might be detected with larger sample sizes or cognitive domains other than emotional and visuomotor processing. Conclusion The context-independence of functional brain dysconnectivity in patients with schizophrenia provides a good justification for pooling data from multiple experiments in order to identify connectivity biomarkers of this mental illness. PMID:27091719

  2. Concise review: Patient-derived olfactory stem cells: new models for brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2012-11-01

    Traditional models of brain diseases have had limited success in driving candidate drugs into successful clinical translation. This has resulted in large international pharmaceutical companies moving out of neuroscience research. Cells are not brains, obviously, but new patient-derived stem models have the potential to elucidate cell biological aspects of brain diseases that are not present in worm, fly, or rodent models, the work horses of disease investigations and drug discovery. Neural stem cells are present in the olfactory mucosa, the organ of smell in the nose. Patient-derived olfactory mucosa has demonstrated disease-associated differences in a variety of brain diseases and recently olfactory mucosa stem cells have been generated from patients with schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and familial dysautonomia. By comparison with cells from healthy controls, patient-derived olfactory mucosa stem cells show disease-specific alterations in gene expression and cell functions including: a shorter cell cycle and faster proliferation in schizophrenia, oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease, and altered cell migration in familial dysautonomia. Olfactory stem cell cultures thus reveal patient-control differences, even in complex genetic diseases such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease, indicating that multiple genes of small effect can converge on shared cell signaling pathways to present as a disease-specific cellular phenotype. Olfactory mucosa stem cells can be maintained in homogeneous cultures that allow robust and repeatable multiwell assays suitable for screening libraries of drug candidate molecules.

  3. A high-definition fiber tracking report for patients with traumatic brain injury and their doctors.

    PubMed

    Chmura, Jon; Presson, Nora; Benso, Steven; Puccio, Ava M; Fissel, Katherine; Hachey, Rebecca; Braun, Emily; Okonkwo, David O; Schneider, Walter

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a tablet-based application, the High-Definition Fiber Tracking Report App, to enable clinicians and patients in research studies to see and understand damage from Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) by viewing 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional images of their brain, with a focus on white matter tracts with quantitative metrics. The goal is to visualize white matter fiber tract injury like bone fractures; that is, to make the "invisible wounds of TBI" understandable for patients. Using mobile computing technology (iPad), imaging data for individual patients can be downloaded remotely within hours of a magnetic resonance imaging brain scan. Clinicians and patients can view the data in the form of images of each tract, rotating animations of the tracts, 3-dimensional models, and graphics. A growing number of tracts can be examined for asymmetry, gaps in streamline coverage, reduced arborization (branching), streamline volume, and standard quantitative metrics (e.g., Fractional Anisotropy (FA)). Novice users can learn to effectively navigate and interact with the application (explain the figures and graphs representing normal and injured brain tracts) within 15 minutes of simple orientation with high accuracy (96%). The architecture supports extensive graphics, configurable reports, provides an easy-to-use, attractive interface with a smooth user experience, and allows for securely serving cases from a database. Patients and clinicians have described the application as providing dramatic benefits in understanding their TBI and improving their lives.

  4. Review article: anesthetic management of patients undergoing deep brain stimulator insertion.

    PubMed

    Venkatraghavan, Lashmi; Luciano, Michelle; Manninen, Pirjo

    2010-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation is used for the treatment of patients with neurologic disorders who have an alteration of function, such as movement disorders and other chronic illnesses. The insertion of the deep brain stimulator (DBS) is a minimally invasive procedure that includes the placement of electrodes into deep brain structures for microelectrode recordings and intraoperative clinical testing and connection of the DBS to an implanted pacemaker. The anesthetic technique varies depending on the traditions and requirements of each institution performing these procedures and has included monitored anesthesia with local anesthesia, conscious sedation, and general anesthesia. The challenges and demands for the anesthesiologist in the care of these patients relate to the specific concerns of the patients with functional neurologic disorders, the effects of anesthetic drugs on microelectrode recordings, and the requirements of the surgical procedure, which often include an awake and cooperative patient. The purpose of this review is to familiarize anesthesiologists with deep brain stimulation by discussing the mechanism, the effects of anesthetic drugs, and the surgical procedure of DBS insertion, and the perioperative assessment, preparation, intraoperative anesthetic management, and complications in patients with functional neurologic disorders.

  5. Functional Brain Dysfunction in Patients with Benign Childhood Epilepsy as Revealed by Graph Theory.

    PubMed

    Adebimpe, Azeez; Aarabi, Ardalan; Bourel-Ponchel, Emilie; Mahmoudzadeh, Mahdi; Wallois, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that brain networks are altered in epileptic subjects. In this study, we investigated the functional connectivity and brain network properties of benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes using graph theory. Benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes is the most common form of idiopathic epilepsy in young children under the age of 16 years. High-density EEG data were recorded from patients and controls in resting state with eyes closed. Data were preprocessed and spike and spike-free segments were selected for analysis. Phase locking value was calculated for all paired combinations of channels and for five frequency bands (δ, θ, α, β1 and β2). We computed the degree and small-world parameters--clustering coefficient (C) and path length (L)--and compared the two patient conditions to controls. A higher degree at epileptic zones during interictal epileptic spikes (IES) was observed in all frequency bands. Both patient conditions reduced connection at the occipital and right frontal regions close to the epileptic zone in the α band. The "small-world" features (high C and short L) were deviated in patients compared to controls. A changed from an ordered network in the δ band to a more randomly organized network in the α band was observed in patients compared to healthy controls. These findings show that the benign epileptic brain network is disrupted not only at the epileptic zone, but also in other brain regions especially frontal regions.

  6. Cognitive Predictors of Reasoning through Treatment Decisions in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Gerstenecker, Adam; Duff, Kevin; Meneses, Karen; Fiveash, John B; Nabors, Louis B; Triebel, Kristen L

    2015-07-01

    To examine the association between reasoning through medical treatment decisions and cognition in a sample of patients with brain metastasis. The association between reasoning and cognition was examined using data from 41 patients with diagnosed brain metastasis. All diagnoses were made by a board-certified radiation oncologist and were verified histologically. In total, 41 demographically matched, cognitively healthy controls were also included to aid in classifying patients with brain metastasis according to reasoning status (i.e., intact or impaired). Results indicate that measures of episodic memory and processing speed were associated with reasoning. Using these two predictors, actuarial equations were constructed that can be used to help screen for impaired reasoning ability in patients' with brain metastasis. The equations presented in this study have clinical significance as they can be used to help identify patients at risk for possessing a diminished ability to reason through medical treatment decisions and, thus, are in need of a more comprehensive evaluation of their medical decision-making capacity.

  7. Evidence for fungal infection in cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ruth; Pisa, Diana; Marina, Ana Isabel; Morato, Esperanza; Rábano, Alberto; Rodal, Izaskun; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Among neurogenerative diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal illness characterized by a progressive motor neuron dysfunction in the motor cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. ALS is the most common form of motor neuron disease; yet, to date, the exact etiology of ALS remains unknown. In the present work, we have explored the possibility of fungal infection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in brain tissue from ALS patients. Fungal antigens, as well as DNA from several fungi, were detected in CSF from ALS patients. Additionally, examination of brain sections from the frontal cortex of ALS patients revealed the existence of immunopositive fungal antigens comprising punctate bodies in the cytoplasm of some neurons. Fungal DNA was also detected in brain tissue using PCR analysis, uncovering the presence of several fungal species. Finally, proteomic analyses of brain tissue demonstrated the occurrence of several fungal peptides. Collectively, our observations provide compelling evidence of fungal infection in the ALS patients analyzed, suggesting that this infection may play a part in the etiology of the disease or may constitute a risk factor for these patients.

  8. Evidence for Fungal Infection in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Brain Tissue from Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Ruth; Pisa, Diana; Marina, Ana Isabel; Morato, Esperanza; Rábano, Alberto; Rodal, Izaskun; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Among neurogenerative diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal illness characterized by a progressive motor neuron dysfunction in the motor cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. ALS is the most common form of motor neuron disease; yet, to date, the exact etiology of ALS remains unknown. In the present work, we have explored the possibility of fungal infection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in brain tissue from ALS patients. Fungal antigens, as well as DNA from several fungi, were detected in CSF from ALS patients. Additionally, examination of brain sections from the frontal cortex of ALS patients revealed the existence of immunopositive fungal antigens comprising punctate bodies in the cytoplasm of some neurons. Fungal DNA was also detected in brain tissue using PCR analysis, uncovering the presence of several fungal species. Finally, proteomic analyses of brain tissue demonstrated the occurrence of several fungal peptides. Collectively, our observations provide compelling evidence of fungal infection in the ALS patients analyzed, suggesting that this infection may play a part in the etiology of the disease or may constitute a risk factor for these patients. PMID:25892962

  9. Melanoma brain metastasis globally reconfigures chemokine and cytokine profiles in patient cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Lok, Edwin; Chung, Amy S; Swanson, Kenneth D; Wong, Eric T

    2014-04-01

    The aggressiveness of melanoma is believed to be correlated with tumor-stroma-associated immune cells. Cytokines and chemokines act to recruit and then modulate the activities of these cells, ultimately affecting disease progression. Because melanoma frequently metastasizes to the brain, we asked whether global differences in immunokine profiles could be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of melanoma patients and reveal aspects of tumor biology that correlate with patient outcomes. We therefore measured the levels of 12 cytokines and 12 chemokines in melanoma patient CSF and the resulting data were analyzed to develop unsupervised hierarchical clustergrams and heat maps. Unexpectedly, the overall profiles of immunokines found in these samples showed a generalized reconfiguration of their expression in melanoma patient CSF, resulting in the segregation of individuals with melanoma brain metastasis from nondisease controls. Chemokine CCL22 and cytokines IL1α, IL4, and IL5 were reduced in most samples, whereas a subset including CXCL10, CCL4, CCL17, and IL8 showed increased expression. Further, analysis of clusters identified within the melanoma patient set comparing patient outcome suggests that suppression of IL1α, IL4, IL5, and CCL22, with concomitant elevation of CXCL10, CCL4, and CCL17, may correlate with more aggressive development of brain metastasis. These results suggest that global immunokine suppression in the host, together with a selective increase in specific chemokines, constitute a predominant immunomodulatory feature of melanoma brain metastasis. These alterations likely drive the course of this disease in the brain and variations in the immune profiles of individual patients may predict outcomes.

  10. Assessing Region of Interest Schemes for the Corticospinal Tract in Patients With Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Chen; Liu, Xin; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Kun; Min, Zhigang; Wang, Maode; Li, Wenfei; Guo, Liping; Lin, Pan; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) techniques are widely used for identifying the corticospinal tract (CST) white matter pathways as part of presurgical planning. However, mass effects in patients with brain tumors tend to cause anatomical distortions and compensatory functional reorganization of the cortex, which may lead to inaccurate mapping of white matter tracts. To overcome these problems, we compared different region-of-interest (ROI) selection schemes to track CST fibers in patients with brain tumors. Our study investigated the CSTs of 16 patients with intracranial tumors. The patients were classified into 3 subgroups according to the spatial relationships of the lesion and the primary motor cortex (PMC)/internal capsule. Specifically, we investigated the key factors that cause distorted tractography in patients with tumors. We compared 3 CST tractography methods that used different ROI selection schemes. The results indicate that CST fiber tracking methods based only on anatomical ROIs could possibly lead to distortions near the PMC region and may be unable to effectively localize the PMC. In contrast, the dual ROI method, which uses ROIs that have been selected from both blood oxygen level-dependent functional MRI (BOLD-fMRI) activation and anatomical landmarks, enabled the tracking of fibers to the motor cortex. The results demonstrate that the dual ROI method can localize the entire CST fiber pathway and can accurately describe the spatial relationships of CST fibers relative to the tumor. These results illustrate the reliability of using fMRI-guided DTT in patients with tumors. The combination of fMRI and anatomical information enhances the identification of tracts of interest in brains with anatomical deformations, which provides neurosurgeons with a more accurate approach for visualizing and localizing white matter fiber tracts in patients with brain tumors. This approach enhances surgical performance and

  11. Type and occurrence of serious complications in patients after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sivak, S; Nosal, V; Bittsansky, M; Dluha, J; Dobrota, D; Kurca, E

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major public health and socio-economic problem, and 70-90% of all TBIs are classified as mild. Mild TBIs and concussions are mostly considered to be non-serious conditions with symptoms subsiding within a few days or weeks. However in 10-15% of patients, the symptoms persist one year after concussion and mostly include headache, fatigue, irritability, and cognitive problems (e.g. memory, concentration). These persisting symptoms negatively influence patient daily activities as postconcussion syndrome (PCS). Second-impact syndrome (SIS) is a very rare but usually fatal condition and occurs when repeated brain injuries lead to a catastrophic diffuse brain swelling. There is no scientific evidence on the incidence and risk of SIS. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive degenerative disease of the brain found in patients with a history of repetitive brain trauma. CTE presents with behavioural, cognitive, and motor symptoms. The literature to date lacks prospective epidemiological studies of the incidence of CTE. In recent medical literature, there is a description of 110 athletes with postmortem diagnosis of CTE (Tab. 1, Ref. 37).

  12. Clinical outcomes in patients with brain metastases from breast cancer treated with single-session radiosurgery or whole brain radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mix, Michael; Elmarzouky, Rania; O'Connor, Tracey; Plunkett, Robert; Prasad, Dheerendra

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is used to treat brain metastases from breast cancer (BMB) as the sole treatment or in conjunction with tumor resection and/or whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). This study evaluates outcomes in BMB based on treatment techniques and tumor biological features. METHODS The authors reviewed all patients treated with BMB between 2004 and 2014. Patients were identified from a prospectively collected radiosurgery database and institutional tumor registry; 214 patients were identified. Data were collected from aforementioned sources and supplemented with chart review where needed. Independent radiological review was performed for all available brain imaging in those treated with GKRS. Survival analyses are reported using Kaplan-Meier estimates. RESULTS During the 10-year study period, 214 patients with BMB were treated; 23% underwent GKRS alone, 46% underwent a combination of GKRS and WBRT, and 31% underwent WBRT alone. Median survival after diagnosis of BMB in those treated with GKRS alone was 21 months, and in those who received WBRT alone it was 3 months. In those treated with GKRS plus WBRT, no significant difference in median survival was observed between those receiving WBRT upfront or in a salvage setting following GKRS (19 months vs 14 months, p = 0.63). The median survival of patients with total metastatic tumor volume of ≤ 7 cm(3) versus > 7 cm(3) was 20 months vs 7 months (p < 0.001). Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her-2) positively impacted survival after diagnosis of BMB (19 months vs 12 months, p = 0.03). Estrogen receptor status did not influence survival after diagnosis of BMB. No difference was observed in survival after diagnosis of BMB based on receptor status in those who received WBRT alone. CONCLUSIONS In this single-institution series of BMB, the addition of WBRT to GKRS did not significantly influence survival, nor did the number of lesions treated with GKRS. Survival after the diagnosis of BMB

  13. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Patients With Brain Metastases From Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, Rodney E.; Olson, Adam C.; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay; Lundsford, L. Dade; Flickinger, John C.

    2011-11-01

    Background: Patients with small-cell lung cancer have a high likelihood of developing brain metastases. Many of these patients will have prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) or eventually undergo whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Despite these treatments, a large number of these patients will have progression of their intracranial disease and require additional local therapy. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an important treatment option for such patients. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 44 patients with brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer treated with gamma knife SRS. Multivariate analysis was used to determine significant prognostic factors influencing survival. Results: The median follow-up from SRS in this patient population was 9 months (1-49 months). The median overall survival (OS) was 9 months after SRS. Karnofsky performance status (KPS) and combined treatment involving WBRT and SRS within 4 weeks were the two factors identified as being significant predictors of increased OS (p = 0.033 and 0.040, respectively). When comparing all patients, patients treated with a combined approach had a median OS of 14 months compared to 6 months if SRS was delivered alone. We also compared the OS times from the first definitive radiation: WBRT, WBRT and SRS if combined therapy was used, and SRS if the patient never received WBRT. The median survival for those groups was 12, 14, and 13 months, respectively, p = 0.19. Seventy percent of patients had follow-up magnetic resonance imaging available for review. Actuarial local control at 6 months and 12 months was 90% and 86%, respectively. Only 1 patient (2.2%) had symptomatic intracranial swelling related to treatment, which responded to a short course of steroids. New brain metastases outside of the treated area developed in 61% of patients at a median time of 7 months; 81% of these patients had received previous WBRT. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery for small-cell lung carcinoma

  14. Further validation of the Motivation for Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation Questionnaire (MOT-Q) in patients with acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Boosman, Hileen; van Heugten, Caroline M; Winkens, Ieke; Smeets, Sanne M J; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A

    2016-01-01

    The Motivation for Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation Questionnaire (MOT-Q) evaluates motivation for rehabilitation in four subscales: Interest in rehabilitation, Lack of anger, Lack of denial, and Reliance on professional help. The objective of this study was to further validate the MOT-Q in 122 inpatients and 92 outpatients with acquired brain injury (ABI). The main measures were motivation for rehabilitation (MOT-Q), self-awareness (Patient Competency Rating Scale), and treatment motivation (Visual Analogue Scale). The MOT-Q showed adequate feasibility in terms of few items with missing responses and few undecided responses. We found no floor or ceiling effects, and significant item-total MOT-Q correlations for 29 of 31 items. Internal consistency was good for the MOT-Q total and acceptable to good for the subscales. The MOT-Q scores were significantly intercorrelated except for the subscales Lack of denial and Reliance on professional help in the inpatient group. The MOT-Q total and subscales were significantly associated with treatment motivation. The Lack of denial subscale showed no significant association with treatment motivation and no to moderate significant associations with self-awareness. In conclusion, the overall MOT-Q is a valid instrument to assess motivation for rehabilitation in patients with ABI. Further research is needed to examine the validity of the subscales.

  15. Driving safety after brain damage: follow-up of twenty-two patients with matched controls.

    PubMed

    Katz, R T; Golden, R S; Butter, J; Tepper, D; Rothke, S; Holmes, J; Sahgal, V

    1990-02-01

    Driving after brain damage is a vital issue, considering the large number of patients who suffer from cerebrovascular and traumatic encephalopathy. The ability to operate a motor vehicle is an integral part of independence for most adults and so should be preserved whenever possible. The physician may estimate a patient's ability to drive safely based on his own examination, the evaluation of a neuropsychologist, and a comprehensive driving evaluation--testing, driving simulation, behind-the-wheel observation--with a driving specialist. This study sought to evaluate the ability of brain-damaged individuals to operate a motor vehicle safely at follow-up. These patients had been evaluated (by a physician, a neuropsychologist, and a driving specialist) and were judged able to operate a motor vehicle safely after their cognitive insult. Twenty-two brain-damaged patients who were evaluated at our institution were successfully followed up to five years (mean interval of 2.67 years). Patients were interviewed by telephone. Their driving safely was compared with a control group consisting of a close friend or spouse of each patient. Statistical analysis revealed no difference between patient and control groups in the type of driving, the incidence of speeding tickets, near accidents, and accidents, and the cost of vehicle damage when accidents occurred. The patient group was further divided into those who had, and those who had not experienced driving difficulties so that initial neuropsychologic testing could be compared. No significant differences were noted in any aspect of the neuropsychologic test battery. We conclude that selected brain-damaged patients who have passed a comprehensive driving assessment as outlined were as fit to drive as were their normal matched controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Prognostic value of brain natriuretic peptide in patients with heart failure and reserved left ventricular systolic function.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hui; Wang, Xin; Ling, Yi; Shi, Yijun; Shi, Haiming

    2014-06-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is used as a prognostic biomarker for patients with heart failure (HF) in clinical practice, however, the correlation between BNP levels and the prognosis of HF in patients with reserved left ventricular systolic function (RLVSF) is not clear. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the added value of BNP in the prognosis of HF patients with RLVSF. Inpatients with cardiovascular disease (mean age, 65.7 years; male, 790; female, 625) admitted to the Division of Cardiology at Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University (Shanghai, China) between June 2006 and December 2009 underwent follow-up examinations. Plasma BNP levels were analyzed and measurements of the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were performed by echocardiography. Evaluations of the patients with HF were performed according to the New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification system. The duration of the follow-up period ranged between 21 and 63 months (average duration, 35.8 months) and key events included cardiovascular mortality, readmission due to cardiovascular disease or mortality due to other reasons. Survival times decreased with increasing BNP levels in all the follow-up patients (Spearman's ρ, -0.1877; P<0.0001). Among the 1,415 patients, 1,312 underwent echocardiographic detection. A total of 395 patients with NYHA classes II-IV and a LVEF ≥45% were selected. The incidence of compound endpoint events was significantly higher in the patients that had BNP levels of >100 pg/ml when compared with the patients that had BNP levels of ≤100 pg/ml (37.07 vs. 23.93%; relative risk, 1.55); consequently the survival times were significantly reduced (P=0.0039). A negative correlation was identified between the BNP levels and the survival times in these patients (Spearman's ρ, -0.1738; P=0.0005). These results indicated that the levels of BNP may be used to predict the prognosis of patients with cardiovascular disease. The prognoses of patients with

  17. Analysis of mobile phone use among young patients with brain tumors in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasuto; Kojimahara, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Naohito

    2017-03-24

    The purpose of this study was to clarify ownership and usage of mobile phones among young patients with brain tumors in Japan. The subjects of this study were patients with brain tumors diagnosed between 2006 and 2010 who were between the ages of 6 and 18 years. The target population for the analysis was 82 patients. Patients were divided into two groups: 16 patients who were mobile phone owners 1 year before diagnosis, and 66 patients who did not own mobile phones (non-owners). Using data on the mobile phone ownership rate obtained from three general-population surveys, we calculated the expected number of mobile phone owners. The three age-adjusted standardized ownership ratios were 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.56-1.22), 0.51 (95% CI: 0.24-1.04), and 0.75 (95% CI: 0.42-1.32). The mobile phone ownership prevalence among the young Japanese patients with brain tumors in the current study does not differ from available estimates for the general population of corresponding age. However, since the use of mobile phones among children is increasing annually, investigations into the health effects of mobile phone use among children should continue. Bioelectromagnetics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Hyperhomocysteinemia as a new risk factor for brain shrinkage in patients with alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Bleich, S; Bandelow, B; Javaheripour, K; Müller, A; Degner, D; Wilhelm, J; Havemann-Reinecke, U; Sperling, W; Rüther, E; Kornhuber, J

    2003-01-02

    Chronic alcohol consumption can induce brain atrophy, whereby the exact mechanism of brain damage in alcoholics remains unknown. There is evidence that chronic alcoholism is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia. Homocysteine is an excitatory amino acid which markedly enhances the vulnerability of neuronal cells to excitotoxic and oxidative injury in vitro and in vivo. The present volumetric magnetic resonance imaging study included 52 chronic alcoholics and 30 non-drinking healthy controls. Patients were active drinkers and had an established diagnosis of alcohol dependence. We investigated the influence of different variables on the hippocampal volume of patients suffering from chronic alcoholism. We observed that pathological raised levels of plasma homocysteine showed the most significant correlation to hippocampal volume reduction (P<0.001, multiple regression analysis). Raised plasma levels of homocysteine are associated with hippocampal (brain) atrophy in alcoholism.

  19. Abnormal brain activation during movement observation in patients with conversion paralysis.

    PubMed

    Burgmer, Markus; Konrad, Carsten; Jansen, Andreas; Kugel, Harald; Sommer, Jens; Heindel, Walter; Ringelstein, Erich B; Heuft, Gereon; Knecht, Stefan

    2006-02-15

    Dissociative paralysis in conversion disorders has variably been attributed to a lack of movement initiation or an inhibition of movement. While psychodynamic theory suggests altered movement conceptualization, brain activation associated with observation and replication of movements has so far not been assessed neurobiologically. Here, we measured brain activation by functional magnetic resonance imaging during observation and subsequent imitative execution of movements in four patients with dissociative hand paralysis. Compared to healthy controls conversion disorder patients showed decreased activation of cortical hand areas during movement observation. This effect was specific to the side of their dissociative paralysis. No brain activation compatible with movement inhibition was observed. These findings indicate that in dissociative paralysis, there is not only derangement of movement initiation but already of movement conceptualization. This raises the possibility that strategies targeted at reestablishing appropriate movement conceptualization may contribute to the therapy of dissociative paralysis.

  20. Microdialysis in the human brain: extracellular measurements in the thalamus of parkinsonian patients.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, B A; Linderoth, B; Karlsson, H; Ungerstedt, U

    1990-01-01

    Microdialysis in the human brain has been performed for the first time during thalamotomy intended to relieve tremor in patients with Parkinson's disease. The aim was to test the reliability of the microdialysis technique for biochemical characterization of a target area in the human brain during a routine operation. Microdialysis probes were introduced through the same trajectory as the lesioning electrode thus causing no additional damage to the brain. Dopamine, DOPAC, HVA, 5-HIAA, hypoxanthine, inosine, guanosine, adenosine, GABA, taurine, aspartate and glutamate were measured in the perfusate from the target region - the Vim nucleus. The results show initial high levels that reach baseline levels after 10-20 minutes. Surprisingly, consistent and reproducible levels were found, the only exception being one patient on 1-DOPA therapy who had elevated DA and metabolite levels.

  1. Man versus machine: comparison of radiologists' interpretations and NeuroQuant® volumetric analyses of brain MRIs in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ross, David E; Ochs, Alfred L; Seabaugh, Jan M; Shrader, Carole R

    2013-01-01

    NeuroQuant® is a recently developed, FDA-approved software program for measuring brain MRI volume in clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to compare NeuroQuant with the radiologist's traditional approach, based on visual inspection, in 20 outpatients with mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). Each MRI was analyzed with NeuroQuant, and the resulting volumetric analyses were compared with the attending radiologist's interpretation. The radiologist's traditional approach found atrophy in 10.0% of patients; NeuroQuant found atrophy in 50.0% of patients. NeuroQuant was more sensitive for detecting brain atrophy than the traditional radiologist's approach.

  2. Abnormal functional global and local brain connectivity in female patients with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Daniel; Borchardt, Viola; Lord, Anton R.; Boehm, Ilka; Ritschel, Franziska; Zwipp, Johannes; Clas, Sabine; King, Joseph A.; Wolff-Stephan, Silvia; Roessner, Veit; Walter, Martin; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous resting-state functional connectivity studies in patients with anorexia nervosa used independent component analysis or seed-based connectivity analysis to probe specific brain networks. Instead, modelling the entire brain as a complex network allows determination of graph-theoretical metrics, which describe global and local properties of how brain networks are organized and how they interact. Methods To determine differences in network properties between female patients with acute anorexia nervosa and pairwise matched healthy controls, we used resting-state fMRI and computed well-established global and local graph metrics across a range of network densities. Results Our analyses included 35 patients and 35 controls. We found that the global functional network structure in patients with anorexia nervosa is characterized by increases in both characteristic path length (longer average routes between nodes) and assortativity (more nodes with a similar connectedness link together). Accordingly, we found locally decreased connectivity strength and increased path length in the posterior insula and thalamus. Limitations The present results may be limited to the methods applied during preprocessing and network construction. Conclusion We demonstrated anorexia nervosa–related changes in the network configuration for, to our knowledge, the first time using resting-state fMRI and graph-theoretical measures. Our findings revealed an altered global brain network architecture accompanied by local degradations indicating wide-scale disturbance in information flow across brain networks in patients with acute anorexia nervosa. Reduced local network efficiency in the thalamus and posterior insula may reflect a mechanism that helps explain the impaired integration of visuospatial and homeostatic signals in patients with this disorder, which is thought to be linked to abnormal representations of body size and hunger. PMID:26252451

  3. Sepsis in intensive care unit patients with traumatic brain injury: factors associated with higher mortality

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, Luis Carlos Maia; da Silva, Redson Ruy

    2014-01-01

    Objective Patients with traumatic brain injury are particularly susceptible to sepsis, which may exacerbate the systemic inflammatory response and lead to organ dysfunction. The influence of clinical variables on the mortality of intensive care unit patients with traumatic brain injury and sepsis was investigated. Methods The present investigation was a retrospective study involving 175 patients with traumatic brain injury who were treated in a period of 1 year at a reference hospital for trauma and who had sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock. Demographic and clinical data were obtained, and the SOFA score was calculated at the time sepsis was found and after 72 hours. Results There was a predominance of young men with severe traumatic brain injury, multiple head injuries, sepsis with a pulmonary focus, prolonged hospital stay, and high mortality (37.7%). Circulatory and respiratory failure had a high incidence, but renal and coagulation failure were less frequent, and liver failure was not observed. After logistic regression, the presence of septic shock and respiratory failure 72 hours after the sepsis diagnosis was associated with higher mortality, with an odds ratio of 7.56 (95%CI=2.04-27.31, p=0.0024) and 6.62 (95%CI=1.93-22.78, p=0.0027), respectively. In addition, there was a higher mortality among patients who had no organ failure on D1 but who developed the condition after 72 hours of sepsis and in those patients who already had organ failure at the time sepsis was diagnosed and remained in this condition after 72 hours. Conclusion Septic shock and progressive organ (particularly respiratory) dysfunction increases the mortality of patients with traumatic brain injury and sepsis. PMID:25028949

  4. Long-term heart rate fluctuations in postoperative and brain-dead patients.

    PubMed

    Tamura, T; Maekawa, T; Nakajima, K; Sadamitsu, D; Tateishi, A

    1998-11-01

    Long-term heart rate fluctuations in postoperative and brain-dead patients were investigated. Heart rates were monitored continuously, and the data were stored, edited, and interpolated to allow for data lost during calibration and disconnection of the sensors for various treatments. Heart rate power spectra were calculated using the fast Fourier transform method. The power spectra of the patients who recovered showed that the heart rate fluctuated and produced a 1/f relationship, termed 1/f fluctuations, whereas those of patients who died in the intensive care unit (ICU) consisted of white-noise-like signals. The power spectra in brain-dead patients showed a 1/f relationship under steady-state conditions, while the power density and variation of the frequency distribution were lower than those in a normal subject. Therefore, 1/f fluctuations appear to be universal and occur independent of the central nervous system.

  5. Features of Neurotoxicity on Brain CT of Acutely Intoxicated Unconscious Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sanei Taheri, Morteza; Noori, Maryam; Nahvi, Vahideh; Moharamzad, Yashar

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging is a valuable device in clinical management of poisoned patients presenting to emergency units in a comatose state. Some toxic agents have adverse effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Non-contrast computed tomography (CT) of the brain, as an available diagnostic method with a high resolution, can provide useful information about structural disturbances of unconscious patients with suspected drug or chemical intoxication. The authors would describe various presentations of toxic substances detected on the brain CT scans of ten patients with acute intoxication. While non-specific, CT findings of low-attenuation lesions in the basal ganglia, infarctions in young patients, or diffuse edema should raise suspicion for poisoning or overdose. PMID:21270943

  6. Reaching a Moveable Visual Target: Dissociations in Brain Tumour Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buiatti, Tania; Skrap, Miran; Shallice, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Damage to the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) can lead to Optic Ataxia (OA), in which patients misreach to peripheral targets. Recent research suggested that the PPC might be involved not only in simple reaching tasks toward peripheral targets, but also in changing the hand movement trajectory in real time if the target moves. The present study…

  7. Brain biochemistry in autopsied patients with essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Shill, Holly A; Adler, Charles H; Beach, Thomas G; Lue, Lih-Fen; Caviness, John N; Sabbagh, Marwan N; Sue, Lucia I; Walker, Douglas G

    2012-01-01

    The pathology of essential tremor is increasingly being studied; however, there are limited studies of biochemical changes in this condition. We studied several candidate biochemical/anatomical systems in the brain stem, striatum, and cerebellum of 23 essential tremor subjects who came to autopsy, comparing them with a control population. Striatal tyrosine hydroxylase, a marker of dopaminergic neurons, was 91.7 ± 113.2 versus 96.4 ± 102.7 ng/mg (not significant) in cases and controls, respectively. Locus coeruleus dopamine beta-hydroxylase, a marker of noradrenergic neurons, was not significantly different between the essential tremor and control groups. Parvalbumin, a marker of GABAergic neurons, was 199.3 ± 42.0 versus 251.4 ± 74.8 ng/mg (P = .025) in the pons in the region of the locus coeruleus of essential tremor subjects versus controls, whereas there was no difference in cerebellar parvalbumin. These results are supportive of a possible role for reduced GABAergic function in the locus coeruleus in essential tremor. The hypothesis that essential tremor represents early Parkinson's disease was not supported, as striatal dopaminergic markers were not reduced compared with control subjects.

  8. Differential disruption of simple drawing movements in patients with unilateral brain lesion.

    PubMed

    Qin, Z; Lufei, H Q; Su, M F; Wang, Y X

    1991-11-01

    In examining the ability of patients with unilateral brain lesion to copy simple drawings of a house and a human face, 18 apoplectic patients confirmed by CT scanning were studied. We found that their drawing of a house was inferior to that of a face in 19 tests (90.5%) of 17 patients (94.4%). Marked differences existed in nearly 90% of these tests. No difference was found between the right-hemisphere and left-hemisphere group, except that more patients of the right-hemisphere group showed contralateral neglect, but in the house drawings only.

  9. Weight and body mass index in Parkinson's disease patients after deep brain stimulation surgery.

    PubMed

    Tuite, Paul J; Maxwell, Robert E; Ikramuddin, Sayeed; Kotz, Catherine M; Kotzd, Catherine M; Billington, Charles J; Billingtond, Charles J; Laseski, Maggie A; Thielen, Scott D

    2005-06-01

    A retrospective chart review characterizing changes in 17 male and 10 female Parkinson's disease (PD) patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery indicated that 6 mo before surgery, patients lost a mean of 5.1 lbs, whereas in the 6 mo after surgery, subjects gained a mean of 10.1 lbs; 22% gained more than 14 lbs. In 10 patients followed an additional 6 mo, weight gain continued. This weight gain may be associated with decreased energy expenditure due to subsidence of chronic tremor. The magnitude of gain underscores the need for proactive management of body weight in PD patients undergoing DBS.

  10. Diazepam prophylaxis of contrast media-induced seizures during computed tomography of patients with brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Pagani, J.J.; Hayman, L.A.; Bigelow, R.H.; Libshitz, H.I.; Lepke, R.A.; Wallace, S.

    1983-04-01

    The effect of 5 mg of intravenous diazepam (Valium) on contrast media-associated seizer incidence was studied in a randomized controlled trial involving 284 patients with known or suspected brain metastases undergoing cerebral computed tomography. Of these patients, 188 were found to have brain metastases, and it is estimated that for this subgroup prophylactic diazepam reduces the risk of contrast-assocated seizure by a factor of 0.26. Seizures occurred in three of 96 patients with metastases on diazepam and in 14 of 92 patients with metastases but without diazepam. Factors related to increased risk of contrast media-associated seizures are: (1) prior seizure history due to brain metatases and/or prior contrast, (2) progressive cerebral metastases, and (3) prior or concurrent brain antineoplastic therapy. Factors not related to an increased risk of these seizures are: (1) contrast media dosage, chemical composition, or osmolarity, (2) computed tomographic appearance of metastases, and (3) type of primary malignancy. Concomitant therapeutic levels of diphenylhydantoin (Dilantin) do not protect completely against contrast media-associated seizures. Pathophysiology of contrast media-associated seizures is discussed in view of the risk factors determined by this study.

  11. Immune response to Bacteroides ureolyticus in a patient with brain abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Lalitha, M K; Mathai, K V; Koshi, G

    1983-01-01

    A high titer (1:256) of agglutinating antibodies against Bacteroides ureolyticus was demonstrated in a 35-year-old woman with brain abscess, using a microagglutination test. Tests done with B. ureolyticus and heterologous sera as well as with heterologous strains and the patient's serum were negative. Circulating antibody to B. ureolyticus has not been reported previously. PMID:6619293

  12. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Quantification of GABAA Receptors in the Brain of Fragile X Patients.

    PubMed

    D'Hulst, Charlotte; Heulens, Inge; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Goffin, Karolien; Koole, Michel; Porke, Kathleen; Van De Velde, Marc; Rooms, Liesbeth; Van Paesschen, Wim; Van Esch, Hilde; Van Laere, Koen; Kooy, R Frank

    2015-01-01

    Over the last several years, evidence has accumulated that the GABAA receptor is compromised in animal models for fragile X syndrome (FXS), a common hereditary form of intellectual disability. In mouse and fly models, agonists of the GABAA receptor were able to rescue specific consequences of the fragile X mutation. Here, we imaged and quantified GABAA receptors in vivo in brain of fragile X patients using Positron Emission Topography (PET) and [11C]flumazenil, a known high-affinity and specific ligand for the benzodiazepine site of GABAA receptors. We measured regional GABAA receptor availability in 10 fragile X patients and 10 control subjects. We found a significant reduction of on average 10% in GABAA receptor binding potential throughout the brain in fragile X patients. In the thalamus, the brain region showing the largest difference, the GABAA receptor availability was even reduced with 17%. This is one of the first reports of a PET study of human fragile X brain and directly demonstrates that the GABAA receptor availability is reduced in fragile X patients. The study reinforces previous hypotheses that the GABAA receptor is a potential target for rational pharmacological treatment of fragile X syndrome.

  13. EEG Delta Band as a Marker of Brain Damage in Aphasic Patients after Recovery of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spironelli, Chiara; Angrilli, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    In this study spectral delta percentage was used to assess both brain dysfunction/inhibition and functional linguistic impairment during different phases of word processing. To this aim, EEG delta amplitude was measured in 17 chronic non-fluent aphasic patients while engaged in three linguistic tasks: Orthographic, Phonological and Semantic.…

  14. Evoked Potentials and Neuropsychological Tests Validate Positron Emission Topography (PET) Brain Metabolism in Cognitively Impaired Patients

    PubMed Central

    Braverman, Eric R.; Blum, Kenneth; Damle, Uma J.; Kerner, Mallory; Dushaj, Kristina; Oscar-Berman, Marlene

    2013-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Topography (PET) brain hypometabolism (HM) correlates with diminished cognitive capacity and risk of developing dementia. However, because clinical utility of PET is limited by cost, we sought to determine whether a less costly electrophysiological measure, the P300 evoked potential, in combination with neuropsychological test performance, would validate PET HM in neuropsychiatric patients. We found that patients with amnestic and non-amnestic cognitive impairment and HM (n = 43) evidenced significantly reduced P300 amplitudes, delayed latencies, and neuropsychological deficits, compared to patients with normal brain metabolism (NM; n = 187). Data from patients with missing cognitive test scores (n = 57) were removed from the final sample, and logistic regression modeling was performed on the modified sample (n = 173, p = .000004). The logistic regression modeling, based on P300 and neuropsychological measures, was used to validate membership in the HM vs. NM groups. It showed classification validation in 13/25 HM subjects (52.0%) and in 125/148 NM subjects (84.5%), correlating with total classification accuracy of 79.8%. In this paper, abnormal P300 evoked potentials coupled with cognitive test impairment validates brain metabolism and mild/moderate cognitive impairment (MCI). To this end, we cautiously propose incorporating electrophysiological and neuropsychological assessments as cost-effective brain metabolism and MCI indicators in primary care. Final interpretation of these results must await required additional studies confirming these interesting results. PMID:23526928

  15. Cognitive Predictors of Reasoning Through Treatment Decisions in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gerstenecker, Adam; Duff, Kevin; Meneses, Karen; Fiveash, John B.; Nabors, Louis B.; Triebel, Kristen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between reasoning through medical treatment decisions and cognition in a sample of patients with brain metastasis. Methods The association between reasoning and cognition was examined using data from 41 patients with diagnosed brain metastasis. All diagnoses were made by a board-certified radiation oncologist and were verified histologically. In total, 41 demographically-matched, cognitively healthy controls were also included to aid in classifying patients with brain metastasis according to reasoning status (i.e., intact or impaired). Results Results indicate that measures of episodic memory and processing speed were associated with reasoning. Using these two predictors, actuarial equations were constructed that can be used to help screen for impaired reasoning ability in patients’ with brain metastasis. Conclusions The equations presented in this study have clinical significance as they can be used to help identify patients at risk for possessing a diminished ability to reason through medical treatment decisions and, thus, are in need of a more comprehensive evaluation of their medical decision-making capacity. PMID:26149751

  16. Brain responses to acupuncture stimulation in the prosthetic hand of an amputee patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Seon; Jung, Won-Mo; Lee, Ye-Seul; Wallraven, Christian; Chae, Younbyoung

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the brain responses to acupuncture in an upper limb amputee patient. A 62-year-old male had previously undergone a lower left arm amputation following an electrical accident. Using functional MRI, we investigated brain responses to acupuncture stimulation in the aforementioned amputee under three conditions: (a) intact hand, (b) prosthetic hand (used by the patient), and (c) fake fabric hand. The patient described greater de qi sensation when he received acupuncture stimulation in his prosthetic hand compared to a fake hand, with both stimulations performed in a similar manner. We found enhanced brain activation in the insula and sensorimotor cortex in response to acupuncture stimulation in the amputee's prosthetic hand, while there was only minimal activation in the visual cortex in response to acupuncture stimulation in a fake hand. The enhanced brain responses to acupuncture stimulation of the patient's prosthetic hand might be derived from cortical reorganisation, as he has been using his prosthetic hand for over 40 years. Our findings suggest the possible use of acupuncture stimulation in a prosthetic hand as an enhanced sensory feedback mechanism, which may represent a new treatment approach for phantom limb pain.

  17. Map-following skills in left and right brain-damaged patients with and without hemineglect.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Liana; Ranieri, Giulia; Boccia, Maddalena; Piccardi, Laura; Nemmi, Federico; Guariglia, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Map-following tasks require a "semantic interpretation" of the map, which could be affected by left brain damage, and "superimposition of the map upon the space," which could be compromised by right lesions and particularly by the presence of hemineglect. Participants followed a pathway depicted on a map of a real environment. The pathway included four left and four right turns. A legend explained the meaning of each symbol that appeared on the map. Our results showed no deficits in left brain-damaged patients, but poor performance in right brain-damaged patients affected by hemineglect. This deficit can be ascribed to their impaired egocentric frame of reference, but we cannot exclude a prevalent role of the right hemisphere in their use of the allocentric information on the map despite the presence of hemineglect. Indeed, three right brain-damaged patients without hemineglect showed a specific deficit in performing the task. We discuss the results in light of the possible impairment of the parietomedial temporal pathway, which supports spatial navigation and could be responsible for the patients' deficit.

  18. Neuro-oncology: Under-recognized mental incapacity in brain tumour patients.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Many patients with brain tumours possess inadequate mental capacity to provide informed consent, but this situation often goes undetected because clinicians do not routinely conduct formal cognitive assessments. This oversight should be recognized and rectified to enable optimum ethical and medical care of these vulnerable individuals.

  19. Diminished supraspinal pain modulation in patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shivshil; Yang, Eric; Canlas, Bryan; Kadokana, Mawj; Heald, Jason; Davani, Ariea; Song, David; Lin, Lisa; Polston, Greg; Tsai, Alice; Lee, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic pain conditions are highly prevalent in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Supraspinal diffuse axonal injury is known to dissociate brain functional connectivity in these patients. The effect of this dissociated state on supraspinal pain network is largely unknown. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study was conducted to compare the supraspinal pain network in patients with mild traumatic brain injury to the gender and age-matched healthy controls with the hypothesis that the functional connectivities of the medial prefrontal cortices, a supraspinal pain modulatory region to other pain-related sensory discriminatory and affective regions in the mild traumatic brain injury subjects are significantly reduced in comparison to healthy controls. Results The mild traumatic brain injury group (N = 15) demonstrated significantly (P < 0.01, cluster threshold > 150 voxels) less activities in the thalamus, pons, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and medial prefrontal cortices than the healthy control group (N = 15). Granger Causality Analyses (GCA) indicated while the left medial prefrontal cortices of the healthy control group cast a noticeable degree of outward (to affect) causality inference to multiple pain processing related regions, this outward inference pattern was not observed in the mild traumatic brain injury group. On the other hand, only patients’ bilateral anterior cingulate cortex received multiple inward (to be affected) causality inferences from regions including the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices and the inferior parietal lobe. Resting state functional connectivity analyses indicated that the medial prefrontal cortices of the mild traumatic brain injury group demonstrated a significantly (P < 0.01, F = 3.6, cluster size > 150 voxels) higher degree of functional connectivity to the inferior parietal lobe, premotor and secondary somatosensory cortex

  20. Radiotherapy and death from cerebrovascular disease in patients with primary brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Aizer, Ayal A; Du, Rose; Wen, Patrick Y; Arvold, Nils D

    2015-09-01

    Radiotherapy is often used in the management of primary brain tumors, but late cerebrovascular risks remain incompletely characterized. We examined the relationship between radiotherapy and the risk of death from cerebrovascular disease (CVD) in this population. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program to identify 19,565 patients of any age diagnosed with a primary brain tumor between 1983-2002. Multivariable competing risks analysis and an interaction model were used to determine whether receipt of radiotherapy was associated with an increased risk of CVD-specific death, adjusting for tumor proximity to central arterial circulations of the brain. The median follow up in surviving patients was 12.75 years. Baseline characteristics were similar in patients who did and did not receive radiotherapy. Ten-year CVD-specific mortality in patients with tumors near central arterial circulations who did and did not receive radiotherapy were 0.64 % (95 % CI 0.42-0.93 %) versus 0.16 % (95 % CI 0.055-0.40 %), p = 0.01. After adjustment for demographic, tumor-related, and treatment-related covariates, patients with tumors near central arterial circulations were significantly more likely to experience CVD-specific mortality after radiotherapy (HR 2.81; 95 % CI 1.25-6.31; p = 0.01); no association was observed among patients with more distant tumors (HR 0.77; 95 % CI 0.50-1.16; p = 0.21). The interaction model showed that tumor location was a key predictor of the risk of radiotherapy-associated, CVD-specific mortality (p-interaction = 0.004). Patients receiving radiotherapy for tumors near but not distant from the central vasculature of the brain are at increased risk for death secondary to CVD, which should be considered when counseling patients.

  1. Human Serum Metabolites Associate With Severity and Patient Outcomes in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Orešič, Matej; Posti, Jussi P; Kamstrup-Nielsen, Maja H; Takala, Riikka S K; Lingsma, Hester F; Mattila, Ismo; Jäntti, Sirkku; Katila, Ari J; Carpenter, Keri L H; Ala-Seppälä, Henna; Kyllönen, Anna; Maanpää, Henna-Riikka; Tallus, Jussi; Coles, Jonathan P; Heino, Iiro; Frantzén, Janek; Hutchinson, Peter J; Menon, David K; Tenovuo, Olli; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide, especially in children and young adults. TBI is an example of a medical condition where there are still major lacks in diagnostics and outcome prediction. Here we apply comprehensive metabolic profiling of serum samples from TBI patients and controls in two independent cohorts. The discovery study included 144 TBI patients, with the samples taken at the time of hospitalization. The patients were diagnosed as severe (sTBI; n=22), moderate (moTBI; n=14) or mild TBI (mTBI; n=108) according to Glasgow Coma Scale. The control group (n=28) comprised of acute orthopedic non-brain injuries. The validation study included sTBI (n=23), moTBI (n=7), mTBI (n=37) patients and controls (n=27). We show that two medium-chain fatty acids (decanoic and octanoic acids) and sugar derivatives including 2,3-bisphosphoglyceric acid are strongly associated with severity of TBI, and most of them are also detected at high concentrations in brain microdialysates of TBI patients. Based on metabolite concentrations from TBI patients at the time of hospitalization, an algorithm was developed that accurately predicted the patient outcomes (AUC=0.84 in validation cohort). Addition of the metabolites to the established clinical model (CRASH), comprising clinical and computed tomography data, significantly improved prediction of patient outcomes. The identified 'TBI metabotype' in serum, that may be indicative of disrupted blood-brain barrier, of protective physiological response and altered metabolism due to head trauma, offers a new avenue for the development of diagnostic and prognostic markers of broad spectrum of TBIs.

  2. Salvage Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases: Prognostic Factors to Consider in Patient Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Goldie; Zadeh, Gelareh; Gingras-Hill, Geneviève; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Laperriere, Normand J.; Bernstein, Mark; Jiang, Haiyan; Ménard, Cynthia; Chung, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is offered to patients for recurrent brain metastases after prior brain radiation therapy (RT), but few studies have evaluated the efficacy of salvage SRS or factors to consider in selecting patients for this treatment. This study reports overall survival (OS), intracranial progression-free survival (PFS), and local control (LC) after salvage SRS, and factors associated with outcomes. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of patients treated from 2009 to 2011 with salvage SRS after prior brain RT for brain metastases. Survival from salvage SRS and from initial brain metastases diagnosis (IBMD) was calculated. Univariate and multivariable (MVA) analyses included age, performance status, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, extracranial disease control, and time from initial RT to salvage SRS. Results: There were 106 patients included in the analysis with a median age of 56.9 years (range 32.5-82 years). A median of 2 metastases were treated per patient (range, 1-12) with a median dose of 21 Gy (range, 12-24) prescribed to the 50% isodose. With a median follow-up of 10.5 months (range, 0.1-68.2), LC was 82.8%, 60.1%, and 46.8% at 6 months, 1 year, and 3 years, respectively. Median PFS was 6.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.9-7.6). Median OS was 11.7 months (95% CI = 8.1-13) from salvage SRS, and 22.1 months from IBMD (95% CI = 18.4-26.8). On MVA, age (P=.01; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.04; 95% CI = 1.01-1.07), extracranial disease control (P=.004; HR = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.27-0.78), and interval from initial RT to salvage SRS of at least 265 days (P=.001; HR = 2.46; 95% CI = 1.47-4.09) were predictive of OS. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that patients can have durable local control and survival after salvage SRS for recurrent brain metastases. In particular, younger patients with controlled extracranial disease and a durable response to initial brain RT are likely to benefit from salvage SRS.

  3. Ipilimumab and craniotomy in patients with melanoma and brain metastases: a case series.

    PubMed

    Jones, Pamela S; Cahill, Daniel P; Brastianos, Priscilla K; Flaherty, Keith T; Curry, William T

    2015-03-01

    OBJECT In patients with large or symptomatic brain lesions from metastatic melanoma, the value of resection of metastases to facilitate administration of systemic ipilimumab therapy has not yet been described. The authors undertook this study to investigate whether craniotomy creates the opportunity for patients to receive and benefit from ipilimumab who would otherwise succumb to brain metastasis prior to the onset of regression. METHODS All patients with metastatic melanoma who received ipilimumab and underwent craniotomy for metastasis resection between 2008 and 2014 at the Massachusetts General Hospital were identified through retrospective chart review. The final analysis included cases involving patients who underwent craniotomy within 3 months prior to initiation of therapy or up to 6 months after cessation of ipilimumab administration. RESULTS Twelve patients met the inclusion criteria based on timing of therapy (median age 59.2). The median number of metastases at the time of craniotomy was 2. The median number of ipilimumab doses received was 4. Eleven of 12 courses of ipilimumab were stopped for disease progression, and 1 was stopped for treatment-induced colitis. Eight of 12 patients had improvement in their performance status following craniotomy. Of the 6 patients requiring corticosteroids prior to craniotomy, 3 tolerated corticosteroid dose reduction after surgery. Ten of 12 patients had died by the time of data collection, with 1 patient lost to follow-up. The median survival after the start of ipilimumab treatment was 7 months. CONCLUSIONS In this series, patients who underwent resection of brain metastases in temporal proximity to receiving ipilimumab had qualitatively improved performance status following surgery in most cases. Surgery facilitated corticosteroid reduction in select patients. Larger analyses are required to better understand possible synergies between craniotomy for melanoma metastases and ipilimumab treatment.

  4. Amplified Brain Processing of Dentoalveolar Pressure Stimulus in Persistent Dentoalveolar Pain Disorder Patients

    PubMed Central

    Moana-Filho, Estephan J.; Bereiter, David A.; Nixdorf, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims (1) To determine the brain regions activated by dentoalveolar pressure stimulation in persistent dentoalveolar pain disorder (PDAP) patients, and (2) to compare these activation patterns to those seen in pain-free control subjects. Methods A total of 13 PDAP patients and 13 matched controls completed the study. Clinical pain characteristics and psychosocial data were collected. Dentoalveolar mechanical pain thresholds were determined with a custom-made device over the painful area for patients and were used as the stimulation level during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquisition. Control subjects received two stimulation levels over matched locations during fMRI scanning: one determined (as above) that evoked equally subjective pain ratings matching those of patients (subjective-pain match) and another nonpainful stimulation level matching the average stimulus intensity provided to patients (stimulus-intensity match). Clinical and psychosocial data were analyzed using independent samples t tests, Mann-Whitney U test, and Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient. fMRI data were analyzed using validated neuroimaging software and tested using a general linear model. Results PDAP patients had greater anxiety (P < .0001) and depression scores (P = .001), more jaw function impairment (P < .0001), and greater social impact (P < .0001) than controls. No significant differences were found for brain activation spatial extent (PDAP × Controls subjective pain: P = .48; PDAP × Controls stimulus intensity: P = .12). Brain activations were significantly increased for PDAP patients compared to control subjects when matched to stimulus intensity in several regions related to the sensory-discriminative and cognitive components of pain perception, including the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices, inferior parietal lobule, insula, premotor cortex, prefrontal cortex, and thalamus. When matched to subjective pain ratings, increased brain

  5. Delayed regaining of gait ability in a patient with brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Little is known about delay in regaining gait ability at a chronic stage after brain injury. In this study, we report on a single patient who regained the gait ability during 2 months of intensive rehabilitation starting 2 years after a brain injury. Methods and results: A 40-year-old male patient diagnosed with viral encephalitis underwent comprehensive rehabilitation until 2 years after onset. However, he could not even sit independently and presented with severe physical deconditioning and severe ataxia. To understand his neurological state, 4 neural tracts related to gait function were reconstructed, and based on the state of these neural tracts, we decided that the patient had the neurological potential to walk independently. Therefore, we assumed that the main reasons for gait inability in this patient were severe physical deconditioning and truncal ataxia. Consequently, the patient underwent the following intensive rehabilitative therapy: administration of drugs for control of ataxia (topiramate, clonazepam, and propranolol) and movement therapy for physical conditioning and gait training. As a result, after 2 months of rehabilitation, he was able to walk independently on an even floor, with improvement of severe physical deconditioning and truncal ataxia. Conclusion: We described the rehabilitation program in a single patient who regained the gait ability during 2 months of intensive rehabilitation starting 2 years after a brain injury. PMID:27661035

  6. Language-specific dysgraphia in Korean patients with right brain stroke: influence of unilateral spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Min-Wook; Park, Kyoung Ha; Lee, Jae Woo

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between Korean language-specific dysgraphia and unilateral spatial neglect in 31 right brain stroke patients. All patients were tested for writing errors in spontaneous writing, dictation, and copying tests. The dysgraphia was classified into visuospatial omission, visuospatial destruction, syllabic tilting, stroke omission, stroke addition, and stroke tilting. Twenty-three (77.4%) of the 31 patients made dysgraphia and 18 (58.1%) demonstrated unilateral spatial neglect. The visuospatial omission was the most common dysgraphia followed by stroke addition and omission errors. The highest number of errors was made in the copying and the least was in the spontaneous writing test. Patients with unilateral spatial neglect made a significantly higher number of dysgraphia in the copying test than those without. We identified specific dysgraphia features such as a right side space omission and a vertical stroke addition in Korean right brain stroke patients. In conclusion, unilateral spatial neglect influences copy writing system of Korean language in patients with right brain stroke.

  7. Radial bisection of words and lines in right-brain-damaged patients with spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Veronelli, Laura; Arduino, Lisa S; Girelli, Luisa; Vallar, Giuseppe

    2015-11-27

    The bisection of lines positioned radially (with the two ends of the line close and far, with respect to the participant's body) has been less investigated than that of lines placed horizontally (with their two ends left and right, with respect to the body's midsagittal plane). In horizontal bisection, patients with left neglect typically show a rightward bias for both lines and words, greater with longer stimuli. As for radial bisection, available data indicate that neurologically unimpaired participants make a distal error, while results from right-brain-damaged patients with left spatial neglect are contradictory. We investigated the bisection of radially oriented words, with the prediction that, during bisection, linguistic material would be recoded to its canonical left-to-right format in reading, with the performance of neglect patients being similar to that for horizontal words. Thirteen right-brain-damaged patients (seven with left spatial neglect) and fourteen healthy controls were asked to manually bisect 40 radial and 40 horizontal words (5-10 letters), and 80 lines, 40 radial and 40 horizontal, of comparable length. Right-brain-damaged patients with spatial neglect exhibited a proximal bias in the bisection of short radial words, with the proximal part corresponding to the final right part of horizontally oriented words. This proximal error was not found in patients without neglect and healthy controls. For bisection, short radial words may be recoded to the canonical orthographic horizontal format, unveiling the impact of left neglect on radially oriented stimuli.

  8. Reduced Regional Brain Cortical Thickness in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Yadav, Santosh K.; Palomares, Jose A.; Park, Bumhee; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Ogren, Jennifer A.; Macey, Paul M.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Harper, Ronald M.; Woo, Mary A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Autonomic, cognitive, and neuropsychologic deficits appear in heart failure (HF) subjects, and these compromised functions depend on cerebral cortex integrity in addition to that of subcortical and brainstem sites. Impaired autoregulation, low cardiac output, sleep-disordered-breathing, hypertension, and diabetic conditions in HF offer considerable potential to affect cortical areas by loss of neurons and glia, which would be expressed as reduced cortical thicknesses. However, except for gross descriptions of cortical volume loss/injury, regional cortical thickness integrity in HF is unknown. Our goal was to assess regional cortical thicknesses across the brain in HF, compared to control subjects. Methods and Results We examined localized cortical thicknesses in 35 HF and 61 control subjects with high-resolution T1-weighted images (3.0-Tesla MRI) using FreeSurfer software, and assessed group differences with analysis-of-covariance (covariates; age, gender; p<0.05; FDR). Significantly-reduced cortical thicknesses appeared in HF over controls in multiple areas, including the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes, more markedly on the left side, within areas that control autonomic, cognitive, affective, language, and visual functions. Conclusion Heart failure subjects show reduced regional cortical thicknesses in sites that control autonomic, cognitive, affective, language, and visual functions that are deficient in the condition. The findings suggest chronic tissue alterations, with regional changes reflecting loss of neurons and glia, and presumably are related to earlier-described axonal changes. The pathological mechanisms contributing to reduced cortical thicknesses likely include hypoxia/ischemia, accompanying impaired cerebral perfusion from reduced cardiac output and sleep-disordered-breathing and other comorbidities in HF. PMID:25962164

  9. Modular Organization of Brain Resting State Networks in Chronic Back Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Balenzuela, Pablo; Chernomoretz, Ariel; Fraiman, Daniel; Cifre, Ignacio; Sitges, Carol; Montoya, Pedro; Chialvo, Dante R.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on functional magnetic resonance imaging large-scale brain networks under resting conditions demonstrated its potential to evaluate the integrity of brain function under normal and pathological conditions. A similar approach is used in this work to study a group of chronic back pain patients and healthy controls to determine the impact of long enduring pain over brain dynamics. Correlation networks were constructed from the mutual partial correlations of brain activity's time series selected from ninety regions using a well validated brain parcellation atlas. The study of the resulting networks revealed an organization of up to six communities with similar modularity in both groups, but with important differences in the membership of key communities of frontal and temporal regions. The bulk of these findings were confirmed by a surprisingly naive analysis based on the pairwise correlations of the strongest and weakest correlated healthy regions. Beside confirming the brain effects of long enduring pain, these results provide a framework to study the effect of other chronic conditions over cortical function. PMID:21206760

  10. PIXE analysis of low concentration aluminum in brain tissues of an Alzheimer's disease patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, R.; Hanaichi, T.; Takeuchi, T.; Ektessabi, A. M.

    1999-06-01

    An excess accumulation and presence of metal ions may significantly alter a brain cell's normal functions. There have been increasing efforts in recent years to measure and quantify the density and distribution of excessive accumulations of constituent elements (such as Fe, Zn, Cu, and Ca) in the brain, as well as the presence and distribution of contaminating elements (such as Al). This is particularly important in cases of neuropathological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and ALS. The aim of this paper was to measure the Al present in the temporal cortex of the brain of an Alzheimer's disease patient. The specimens were taken from an unfixed autopsy brain which has been preserved for a period of 4 years in the deep freezer at -80 °C. Proton Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy was used for the measurement of Al concentration in this brain tissue. A tandem accelerator with 2 MeV of energy was also used. In order to increase the sensitivity of the signals in the low energy region of the spectra, the absorbers were removed. The results show that the peak height depends on the measurement site. However, in certain cases an extremely high concentration of Al was observed in the PIXE spectra, with an intensity higher than those in the other major elements of the brain's matrix element. Samples from tissues affected by the same disease were analyzed using the EDX analyzer. The results are quantitatively in very good agreement with those of the PIXE analysis.

  11. PIXE analysis of low concentration aluminum in brain tissues of an Alzheimer's disease patient

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, R.; Takeuchi, T.; Hanaichi, T.; Ektessabi, A. M.

    1999-06-10

    An excess accumulation and presence of metal ions may significantly alter a brain cell's normal functions. There have been increasing efforts in recent years to measure and quantify the density and distribution of excessive accumulations of constituent elements (such as Fe, Zn, Cu, and Ca) in the brain, as well as the presence and distribution of contaminating elements (such as Al). This is particularly important in cases of neuropathological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and ALS. The aim of this paper was to measure the Al present in the temporal cortex of the brain of an Alzheimer's disease patient. The specimens were taken from an unfixed autopsy brain which has been preserved for a period of 4 years in the deep freezer at -80 degree sign C. Proton Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy was used for the measurement of Al concentration in this brain tissue. A tandem accelerator with 2 MeV of energy was also used. In order to increase the sensitivity of the signals in the low energy region of the spectra, the absorbers were removed. The results show that the peak height depends on the measurement site. However, in certain cases an extremely high concentration of Al was observed in the PIXE spectra, with an intensity higher than those in the other major elements of the brain's matrix element. Samples from tissues affected by the same disease were analyzed using the EDX analyzer. The results are quantitatively in very good agreement with those of the PIXE analysis.

  12. Brain Injury in Autonomic, Emotional, and Cognitive Regulatory Areas in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Mary A.; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Harper, Ronald M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is accompanied by autonomic, emotional, and cognitive deficits, indicating brain alterations. Reduced gray matter volume and isolated white matter infarcts occur in HF, but the extent of damage is unclear. Using magnetic resonance T2 relaxometry, we evaluated the extent of injury across the entire brain in HF. Methods and Results Proton-density and T2-weighted images were acquired from 13 HF (age 54.6 ± 8.3 years; 69% male, LVEF 0.28 ± 0.07) and 49 controls (50.6 ± 7.3 years, 59% male). Whole brain maps of T2 relaxation times were compared at each voxel between groups using analysis of covariance (covariates: age and gender). Higher T2 relaxation values, indicating injured brain areas (p < 0.005), emerged in sites that control autonomic, analgesic, emotional, and cognitive functions (hypothalamus, raphé magnus, cerebellar cortex, deep nuclei and vermis; temporal, parietal, prefrontal, occipital, insular, cingulate, and ventral frontal cortices; corpus callosum; anterior thalamus; caudate nuclei; anterior fornix and hippocampus). No brain areas showed higher T2 values in control vs. HF subjects. Conclusions Brain structural injury emerged in areas involved in autonomic, pain, mood, language, and cognitive function in HF patients. Comorbid conditions accompanying HF may result from neural injury associated with the syndrome. PMID:19327623

  13. Review of language organisation in bilingual patients: what can we learn from direct brain mapping?

    PubMed

    Giussani, C; Roux, F-E; Lubrano, V; Gaini, S M; Bello, L

    2007-11-01

    Although the majority of people worldwide are bilingual, the brain representation of language in bilingual persons is still a matter of debate. Since the beginning of the studies conducted on bilinguals, most authors denied that learning a new language requires a new semantic processing or the involvement of new cortical areas. In this paper, we review neurosurgical studies using direct electrocortical or subcortical stimulation techniques for brain mapping in bilingual subjects and compare this data with that obtained from other brain mapping methods. The authors focused on the most controversial issue whether multiple languages are represented in common or distinct cerebral areas. Seven direct brain mapping studies from different teams focused on bilingualism and multilingualism. All these studies showed that even if cerebral representation of language in multilingual patients could be grossly located in the same cortical region, it was possible to individualise distinct language-specific areas by direct cortical stimulation in the dominant frontal and temporo-parietal regions. Task- and language-specific sites were also described, demonstrating an important specialisation of some cortical areas. Using subcortical stimulation, some authors were able to find specific white matter tracts for different languages. Finally, all authors recommend in bilingual patients who need brain mapping for neurosurgical purpose to test all languages in which the subjects are fluent.

  14. Detecting awareness in patients with disorders of consciousness using a hybrid brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jiahui; Xie, Qiuyou; He, Yanbin; Wang, Fei; Di, Haibo; Laureys, Steven; Yu, Ronghao; Li, Yuanqing

    2014-10-01

    Objective. The bedside detection of potential awareness in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) currently relies only on behavioral observations and tests; however, the misdiagnosis rates in this patient group are historically relatively high. In this study, we proposed a visual hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI) combining P300 and steady-state evoked potential (SSVEP) responses to detect awareness in severely brain injured patients. Approach. Four healthy subjects, seven DOC patients who were in a vegetative state (VS, n = 4) or minimally conscious state (MCS, n = 3), and one locked-in syndrome (LIS) patient attempted a command-following experiment. In each experimental trial, two photos were presented to each patient; one was the patient's own photo, and the other photo was unfamiliar. The patients were instructed to focus on their own or the unfamiliar photos. The BCI system determined which photo the patient focused on with both P300 and SSVEP detections. Main results. Four healthy subjects, one of the 4 VS, one of the 3 MCS, and the LIS patient were able to selectively attend to their own or the unfamiliar photos (classification accuracy, 66-100%). Two additional patients (one VS and one MCS) failed to attend the unfamiliar photo (50-52%) but achieved significant accuracies for their own photo (64-68%). All other patients failed to show any significant response to commands (46-55%). Significance. Through the hybrid BCI system, command following was detected in four healthy subjects, two of 7 DOC patients, and one LIS patient. We suggest that the hybrid BCI system could be used as a supportive bedside tool to detect awareness in patients with DOC.

  15. A Quantitative Analysis of Brain Soluble Tau and the Tau Secretion Factor.

    PubMed

    Han, Pengcheng; Serrano, Geidy; Beach, Thomas G; Caselli, Richard J; Yin, Junxiang; Zhuang, Ningning; Shi, Jiong

    2017-01-09

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) represent products of insoluble tau protein in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau level is a biomarker in AD diagnosis. The soluble portion of tau protein in brain parenchyma is presumably the source for CSF tau but this has not previously been quantified. We measured CSF tau and soluble brain tau at autopsy in temporal and frontal brain tissue samples from 7 cognitive normal, 12 mild cognitively impaired, and 19 AD subjects. Based on the measured brain soluble tau, we calculated the whole brain tau load and estimated tau secretion factor. Our results suggest that the increase in NFT in AD is likely attributable to post-translational processes; the increase in CSF tau in AD patients is due to an accelerated carrier-based secretion. Moreover, cognitive dysfunction assessed by final Mini-Mental State Examination scores correlated with the secretion factor but not with the soluble tau.

  16. Effects of Long-Term Treatment on Brain Volume in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hosung; Joo, Eun Yeon; Suh, Sooyeon; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Sung Tae; Hong, Seung Bong

    2015-01-01

    We assessed structural brain damage in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) patients (21 males) and the effects of long-term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment (18.2 ± 12.4 months; 8-44 months) on brain structures and investigated the relationship between severity of OSA and effects of treatment. Using deformation-based morphometry to measure local volume changes, we identified widespread neocortical and cerebellar atrophy in untreated patients compared to controls (59 males; Cohen's D = 0.6; FDR < 0.05). Analysis of longitudinally scanned magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans both before and after treatment showed increased brain volume following treatment (FDR < 0.05). Volume increase was correlated with longer treatment in the cortical areas that largely overlapped with the initial atrophy. The areas overlying the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the cerebellar dentate nucleus displayed a volume increase after treatment. Patients with very severe OSA (AHI > 64) presented with prefrontal atrophy and displayed an additional volume increase in this area following treatment. Higher impairment of working memory in patients prior to treatment correlated with prefrontal volume increase after treatment. The large overlap between the initial brain damage and the extent of recovery after treatment suggests partial recovery of non-permanent structural damage. Volume increases in the dentate gyrus and the dentate nucleus possibly likely indicate compensatory neurogenesis in response to diminishing oxidative stress. Such changes in other brain structures may explain gliosis, dendritic volume increase, or inflammation. This study provides neuroimaging evidence that revealed the positive effects of long-term CPAP treatment in patients with OSA. PMID:26503297

  17. Uncommon case of brain metastasis in a patient with a history of heavy smoking.

    PubMed

    Scharl, M; Bode, B; Rushing, E; Knuth, A; Rordorf, T

    2014-10-01

    Primary sarcomas of the aorta are extremely uncommon. Depending on histomorphology and immunohistochemical pattern, intimal sarcomas can show angiosarcomatous differentiation. Here, we describe the case of a 60-year-old woman with a primary intimal sarcoma of the aortic arch and signs of cerebral metastatic disease as the initial manifestation. After the patient experienced the onset of severe headaches, ataxia, and left-sided weakness, magnetic resonance imaging showed several brain lesions. Histologic assessment of a brain biopsy specimen revealed a malignant tumour composed of large pleomorphic cells that were positive for pancytokeratin and CD10. Radiation to the brain did not significantly improve the patient's symptoms, and cranial computed tomography (ct) imaging revealed several metastases, indicating lack of response. Because of the patient's smoking history, the presence of central nervous system and skeletal metastases on combined positron-emission tomography and ct imaging, and the focal pan-cytokeratin positivity of the tumour, carcinoma of the lung was favoured as the primary tumour. Despite chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide, the patient's neurologic symptoms and general condition deteriorated rapidly, and she died within a few days. At autopsy, an undifferentiated intimal sarcoma of the aortic arch was diagnosed. The primary tumour in the aorta consisted of large pleomorphic cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of the aortic tumour and brain metastases demonstrated diffuse positivity for vimentin and p53 and focal S-100 staining. In summary, we report a challenging case of advanced intimal sarcoma of the aortic arch with brain and bone metastases at initial presentation. Our report demonstrates the difficulties in diagnosing and treating this disease, and the need for multicentre studies to accrue more patients for investigations of optimal therapy.

  18. Structural brain alterations in patients with lumbar disc herniation: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Luchtmann, Michael; Steinecke, Yvonne; Baecke, Sebastian; Lützkendorf, Ralf; Bernarding, Johannes; Kohl, Jana; Jöllenbeck, Boris; Tempelmann, Claus; Ragert, Patrick; Firsching, Raimund

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is one of the most common health complaints in industrial nations. For example, chronic low back pain (cLBP) disables millions of people across the world and generates a tremendous economic burden. While previous studies provided evidence of widespread functional as well as structural brain alterations in chronic pain, little is known about cortical changes in patients suffering from lumbar disc herniation. We investigated morphometric alterations of the gray and white matter of the brain in patients suffering from LDH. The volumes of the gray and white matter of 12 LDH patients were determined in a prospective study and compared to the volumes of healthy controls to distinguish local differences. High-resolution MRI brain images of all participants were performed using a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate local differences in gray and white matter volume between patients suffering from LDH and healthy controls. LDH patients showed significantly reduced gray matter volume in the right anterolateral prefrontal cortex, the right temporal lobe, the left premotor cortex, the right caudate nucleus, and the right cerebellum as compared to healthy controls. Increased gray matter volume, however, was found in the right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, the left precuneal cortex, the left fusiform gyrus, and the right brainstem. Additionally, small subcortical decreases of the white matter were found adjacent to the left prefrontal cortex, the right premotor cortex and in the anterior limb of the left internal capsule. We conclude that the lumbar disk herniation can lead to specific local alterations of the gray and white matter in the human brain. The investigation of LDH-induced brain alterations could provide further insight into the underlying nature of the chronification processes and could possibly identify prognostic factors that may improve the conservative as well as the operative treatment of the LDH.

  19. Three-dimensional brain metabolic imaging in patients with toxic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Callender, T.J.; Duhon, D.; Ristovv, M. ); Morrow, L. ); Subramanian, K. )

    1993-02-01

    Thirty-three workers, ages 24 to 63, developed clinical toxic encephalopathy after exposure to neurotoxins and were studied by SPECT brain scans. Five were exposed to pesticides, 13 were acutely exposed to mixtures of solvents, 8 were chronically exposed to mixtures of hazardous wastes that contained organic solvents, 2 were acutely exposed to phosgene and other toxins, and 5 had exposures to hydrogen sulfide. Twenty-nine had neuropsychological testing and all had a medical history and physical. Of the workers who had a clinical diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy, 31 (93.9%) had abnormal SPECT brain scans with the most frequent areas of abnormality being temporal lobes (67.7%), frontal lobes (61.3%), basal ganglia (45.2%), thalamus (29.0%), parietal lobes (12.9%), motorstrip (9.68%), cerebral hemisphere (6.45%), occipital lobes (3.23%), and caudate nucleus (3.23%). Twenty-three out of 29 (79.3%) neuropsychological evaluations were abnormal. Other modalities when performed included the following percentages of abnormals: NCV, 33.3%; CPT sensory nerve testing, 91.3%, vestibular function testing, 71.4%; olfactory testing, 89.2%; sleep EEG analysis, 85.7%; EEG, 8.33%; CT, 7.14%; and MRI brain scans, 28.6%. The complex of symptoms seen in toxic encephalopathy implies dysfunction involving several CNS regions. This series of patients adds to the previous experience of brain metabolic imaging and demonstrates that certain areas of the brain are typically affected despite differences in toxin structure, that these lesions can be globally defined by SPECT/PET brain scans, that these lesions correlate well with clinical and neuropsychological testing, and that such testing is a useful adjunct to previous methods. EEG and structural brain imaging such as CT and MRI are observed to have poor sensitivity in this type of patient. 32 refs., 5 tabs.

  20. Structural and Functional Brain Correlates of Cognitive Impairment in Euthymic Patients with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goikolea, José M.; Bonnin, Caterina M.; Sarró, Salvador; Segura, Barbara; Amann, Benedikt L.; Monté, Gemma C.; Moro, Noemi; Fernandez-Corcuera, Paloma; Maristany, Teresa; Salvador, Raymond; Vieta, Eduard; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; McKenna, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cognitive impairment in the euthymic phase is a well-established finding in bipolar disorder. However, its brain structural and/or functional correlates are uncertain. Methods Thirty-three euthymic bipolar patients with preserved memory and executive function and 28 euthymic bipolar patients with significant memory and/or executive impairment, as defined using two test batteries, the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test (RBMT) and the Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS), plus 28 healthy controls underwent structural MRI using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Twenty-seven of the cognitively preserved patients, 23 of the cognitively impaired patients and 28 controls also underwent fMRI during performance of the n-back working memory task. Results No clusters of grey or white matter volume difference were found between the two patient groups. During n-back performance, the cognitively impaired patients showed hypoactivation compared to the cognitively preserved patients in a circumscribed region in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Both patient groups showed failure of de-activation in the medial frontal cortex compared to the healthy controls. Conclusions Cognitive impairment in euthymic bipolar patients appears from this study to be unrelated to structural brain abnormality, but there was some evidence for an association with altered prefrontal function. PMID:27448153

  1. Different Brain Regions are Infected with Fungi in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Pisa, Diana; Alonso, Ruth; Rábano, Alberto; Rodal, Izaskun; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-10-15

    The possibility that Alzheimer's disease (AD) has a microbial aetiology has been proposed by several researchers. Here, we provide evidence that tissue from the central nervous system (CNS) of AD patients contain fungal cells and hyphae. Fungal material can be detected both intra- and extracellularly using specific antibodies against several fungi. Different brain regions including external frontal cortex, cerebellar hemisphere, entorhinal cortex/hippocampus and choroid plexus contain fungal material, which is absent in brain tissue from control individuals. Analysis of brain sections from ten additional AD patients reveals that all are infected with fungi. Fungal infection is also observed in blood vessels, which may explain the vascular pathology frequently detected in AD patients. Sequencing of fungal DNA extracted from frozen CNS samples identifies several fungal species. Collectively, our findings provide compelling evidence for the existence of fungal infection in the CNS from AD patients, but not in control individuals.

  2. Peptic ulcer disease and other complications in patients receiving dexamethasone palliation for brain metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Penzner, R.D.; Lipsett, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of 106 patients who received radiation therapy for brain metastasis. Dexamethasone therapy was instituted in 97 patients. Peptic ulcer disease developed in 5 of 89 patients (5.6 percent) who received a dosage of at least 12 mg a day, but did not occur in patients who received a lower dose or in those who did not receive steroids. The interval between institution of dexamethasone therapy and the development of peptic ulcer disease ranged from three to nine weeks. Two patients had perforated ulcers, one of whom required surgical resection. Peptic ulcer disease contributed to the general deterioration and death of three of the five patients. Overall, in 14 of the 89 patients (15.7 percent) a complication of steroid therapy developed in the form of peptic ulcer disease, steroid myopathy or diabetes mellitus (or a combination of these).

  3. [Application of nootropic agents in complex treatment of patients with concussion of the brain].

    PubMed

    Tkachev, A V

    2007-01-01

    65 patients with a mild craniocereberal trauma have been observed. Medical examination included among general clinical methods the following methods: KT (MRT) of the brain, oculist examination including the observation of eye fundus. For objectification of a patient' complaints the authors used orientation and Galvestona's amnesia tests, feeling scale (psychological test), the table to determine the level of memory. Tests have been carried out on the first, tenth and thirty day of the treatment. Patients of the first group received in a complex treatment -pramistar, patients of the second group - piracetam. Patients of both groups noted considerable improvement during a complex treatment (disappearance of headache, dizziness and nausea) and at the same time patients receiving pramistar had better restoration of orientation and feeling. Pramistar was also more effective in patients with amnesia.

  4. Five-year survivors of brain metastases: A single-institution report of 32 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Samuel T.; Barnett, Gene H.; Liu, Stephanie W.; Reuther, Alwyn M.; Toms, Steven A.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Videtic, Gregory; Suh, John H. . E-mail: suhj@ccf.org

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: To report on 32 patients who survived {>=}5 years from brain metastases treated at a single institution. Methods and Materials: The records of 1288 patients diagnosed with brain metastases between 1973 and 1999 were reviewed. Patients were treated with whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT), surgery, and/or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Thirty-two (2.5%) {>=}5-year survivors were identified. Factors contributing to long-term survival were identified. Results: Median survival was 9.3 years for {>=}5-year survivors. Seven of these patients lived {>=}10 years. Female gender was the only patient characteristic that correlated with better survival (p = 0.0369). When these patients were compared with <5-year survivors, age <65 years (p = 0.0044), control of the primary at diagnosis (p = 0.0052), no systemic disease (p = 0.0012), recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 1 (p = 0.0002 with Class 2; p = 0.0022 with Class 3), and single brain metastasis (p = 0.0018) were associated with long-term survival in the univariate logistic regression model. In the multivariate model, RPA Class 1 compared with Class 2 (OR = 0.39, p = 0.0196), surgery (OR = 0.16, p < 0.0001), and SRS (OR = 0.41, p = 0.0188) were associated with long-term survival. Conclusions: For patients with good prognostic factors such as young age, good RPA characteristics and single metastasis, treatment with surgery or SRS offers the best chance for long-term survival.

  5. Line and word bisection in right-brain-damaged patients with left spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Veronelli, Laura; Vallar, Giuseppe; Marinelli, Chiara V; Primativo, Silvia; Arduino, Lisa S

    2014-01-01

    Right-brain-damaged patients with left unilateral spatial neglect typically set the mid-point of horizontal lines to the right of the objective center. By contrast, healthy participants exhibit a reversed bias (pseudoneglect). The same effect has been described also when bisecting orthographic strings. In particular, for this latter kind of stimulus, some recent studies have shown that visuo-perceptual characteristics, like stimulus length, may contribute to both the magnitude and the direction bias of the bisection performance (Arduino et al. in Neuropsychologia 48:2140-2146, 2010). Furthermore, word stress was shown to modulate reading performances in both healthy participants, and patients with left spatial neglect and neglect dyslexia (Cubelli and Beschin in Brain Lang 95:319-326, 2005; Rusconi et al. in Neuropsychology 18:135-140, 2004). In Experiment I, 22 right-brain-damaged patients (11 with left visuo-spatial neglect) and 11 matched neurologically unimpaired control participants were asked to set the subjective mid-point of word letter strings, and of lines of comparable length. Most patients exhibited an overall disproportionate rightward bias, sensitive to stimulus length, and similar for words and lines. Importantly, in individual patients, biases differed according to stimulus type (words vs. lines), indicating that at least partly different mechanisms may be involved. In Experiment II, the putative effects on the bisection bias of ortho-phonological information (i.e., word stress endings), arising from the non-neglected right hand side of the stimulus were investigated. The orthographic cue induced a rightward shift of the perceived mid-point in both patients and controls, with short words stressed on the antepenultimate final sequence inducing a smaller rightward deviation with respect to short words stressed on the penultimate final sequence. In conclusion, partly different mechanisms, including both visuo-spatial and lexical factors, may support

  6. Identifying minimal hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic patients by measuring spontaneous brain activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua-Jun; Zhang, Ling; Jiang, Long-Feng; Chen, Qiu-Feng; Li, Jun; Shi, Hai-Bin

    2016-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is associated with aberrant regional intrinsic brain activity in cirrhotic patients. However, few studies have investigated whether altered intrinsic brain activity can be used as a biomarker of MHE among cirrhotic patients. In this study, 36 cirrhotic patients (with MHE, n = 16; without MHE [NHE], n = 20) underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Spontaneous brain activity was measured by examining the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in the fMRI signal. MHE was diagnosed based on the Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES). A two-sample t-test was used to determine the regions of interest (ROIs) in which ALFF differed significantly between the two groups; then, ALFF values within ROIs were selected as classification features. A linear discriminative analysis was used to differentiate MHE patients from NHE patients. The leave-one-out cross-validation method was used to estimate the performance of the classifier. The classification analysis was 80.6 % accurate (81.3 % sensitivity and 80.0 % specificity) in terms of distinguishing between the two groups. Six ROIs were identified as the most discriminative features, including the bilateral medial frontal cortex/anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus, left precentral and postcentral gyrus, right lingual gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, and inferior/superior parietal lobule. The ALFF values within ROIs were correlated with PHES in cirrhotic patients. Our findings suggest that altered regional brain spontaneous activity is a useful biomarker for MHE detection among cirrhotic patients.

  7. Analysis of Time-Dependent Brain Network on Active and MI Tasks for Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee; Lee, Seong-Whan; Kwon, Gyu Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers have analyzed brain activities by investigating brain networks. However, there is a lack of the research on the temporal characteristics of the brain network during a stroke by EEG and the comparative studies between motor execution and imagery, which became known to have similar motor functions and pathways. In this study, we proposed the possibility of temporal characteristics on the brain networks of a stroke. We analyzed the temporal properties of the brain networks for nine chronic stroke patients by the active and motor imagery tasks by EEG. High beta band has a specific role in the brain network during motor tasks. In the high beta band, for the active task, there were significant characteristics of centrality and small-worldness on bilateral primary motor cortices at the initial motor execution. The degree centrality significantly increased on the contralateral primary motor cortex, and local efficiency increased on the ipsilateral primary motor cortex. These results indicate that the ipsilateral primary motor cortex constructed a powerful subnetwork by influencing the linked channels as compensatory effect, although the contralateral primary motor cortex organized an inefficient network by using the connected channels due to lesions. For the MI task, degree centrality and local efficiency significantly decreased on the somatosensory area at the initial motor imagery. Then, there were significant correlations between the properties of brain networks and motor function on the contralateral primary motor cortex and somatosensory area for each motor execution/imagery task. Our results represented that the active and MI tasks have different mechanisms of motor acts. Based on these results, we indicated the possibility of customized rehabilitation according to different motor tasks. We expect these results to help in the construction of the customized rehabilitation system depending on motor tasks by understanding temporal functional

  8. The effect of brain tumour laterality on anxiety levels among neurosurgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Mainio, A; Hakko, H; Niemela, A; Tuurinkoski, T; Koivukangas, J; Rasanen, P

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the level of anxiety in patients with a primary brain tumour and to analyse the effect of tumour laterality and histology on the level of anxiety. Recurrent measurements were assessed preoperatively, three months, and one year after operation. Methods: The study population consisted of 101 patients with a primary brain tumour from unselected and homogeneous population in northern Finland. The patients were studied preoperatively with CT or MRI to determine the location of the tumour. The histology of the tumour was defined according to WHO classification. The level of anxiety was obtained by Crown-Crisp Experiential Index (CCEI) scale. Results: The patients with a tumour in the right hemisphere had statistically significantly higher mean anxiety scores compared to the patients with a tumour in the left hemisphere before surgery of the tumour. By three months and by one year after surgical resection of the tumour, the level of anxiety declined in patients with a tumour in the right hemisphere. A corresponding decline was not found in patients with a tumour in the left hemisphere. According to laterality by tumour histology, the level of anxiety decreased significantly in male and female patients with a glioma in the right hemisphere, but a corresponding decline was not significant in the female patients with a meningioma in the right hemisphere. Decreased level of anxiety was not found in patients with gliomas or meningiomas in the left hemisphere by follow up measurements. Conclusions: Primary brain tumour in right hemisphere is associated with anxiety symptoms. The laterality of anxiety seems to reflect the differentiation of the two hemispheres. The level of anxiety declined after operation of right tumour, approaching that of the general population. The effect of right hemisphere gliomas on anxiety symptoms deserves special attention in future research. PMID:12933936

  9. Adding Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsini, Larry L.; Hudack, Lawrence R.; Zekan, Donald L.

    1999-01-01

    The value-added statement (VAS), relatively unknown in the United States, is used in financial reports by many European companies. Saint Bonaventure University (New York) has adapted a VAS to make it appropriate for not-for-profit universities by identifying stakeholder groups (students, faculty, administrators/support personnel, creditors, the…

  10. Testing Brain Overgrowth and Synaptic Models of Autism Using NPCs and Neurons from Patient-Derived iPS Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0415 TITLE: Testing Brain Overgrowth and Synaptic Models of Autism Using NPCs and Neurons from...REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 15 Sept 2013 – 14 Sept 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Testing Brain Overgrowth and Synaptic Models of Autism Using...STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASD

  11. [Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury].

    PubMed

    Silva, Vinícius Trindade Gomes da; Iglesio, Ricardo; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Siqueira, Mario Gilberto; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: O risco de trombose venosa profunda encontra-se aumentado em doentes vítimas de traumatismo cranioencefálico, mas a profilaxia da trombose venosa profunda se confronta com o possível risco de piora de lesões hemorrágicas relacionados ao traumatismo cranioencefálico. Neste artigo apresentamos uma revisão crítica do tema e propomos um protocolo de profilaxia para estes doentes.Material e Métodos: Foi realizada uma pesquisa na base de dados Medline/PubMed, Cochrane, e Scielo de janeiro de 1998 a janeiro de 2014 com a expressão de busca âÄúdeep venous thrombosis and prophylaxis and traumatic brain injuryâÄù. Foram encontrados 44 artigos usando os termos MeSH definidos. Destes foram selecionados 23 artigos, usando como critérios: publicação em inglês ou português, fase aguda do traumatismo cranioencefálico moderado e grave, profilaxia mecânica não invasiva ou química.Resultados: O traumatismo cranioencefálico é um fator de risco para trombose venosa profunda e tromboembolismo pulmonar. A chance de trombose venosa profunda é 2,59 vezes maior em doentes com traumatismo cranioencefálico. A prevalência de trombose venosa profunda e embolia pulmonar em doentes que sofreram traumatismo cranioencefálico é de 20%, podendo atingir 30% dos doentes em alguns estudos.Discussão e Conclusão: As diversas formas de traumatismo de forma isolada constituem fator de risco para trombose venosa profunda e tromboembolismo pulmonar. Ensaios clínicos são necessários para estabelecer a eficácia da profilaxia e o melhor momento de iniciar medicação para trombose venosa profunda em doentes com traumatismo craniencefálico.

  12. Incidental findings on brain MRI of cognitively normal first-degree descendants of patients with Alzheimer's disease: a cross-sectional analysis from the ALFA (Alzheimer and Families) project

    PubMed Central

    Brugulat-Serrat, Anna; Rojas, Santiago; Bargalló, Nuria; Conesa, Gerardo; Minguillón, Carolina; Fauria, Karine; Gramunt, Nina; Molinuevo, José Luis; Gispert, Juan Domingo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To describe the prevalence of brain MRI incidental findings (IF) in a cohort of cognitively normal first-degree descendants of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Design Cross-sectional observational study. Setting All scans were obtained with a 3.0 T scanner. Scans were evaluated by a single neuroradiologist and IF recorded and categorised. The presence of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) was determined with the Fazekas scale and reported as relevant if ≥2. Participants 575 participants (45–75 years) underwent high-resolution structural brain MRI. Participants were cognitively normal and scored over the respective cut-off values in all the following neuropsychological tests: Mini-Mental State Examination (≥26), Memory Impairment Screen (≥6), Time Orientation Subtest of the Barcelona Test II (≥68), verbal semantic fluency (naming animals ≥12). Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) had to be 0. Results 155 participants (27.0%) presented with at least one IF. Relevant WMH were present in 7.8% of the participants, and vascular abnormalities, cyst and brain volume loss in 10.7%, 3.1% and 6.9% of the study volunteers, respectively. Neoplastic brain findings were found in 2.4% of participants and within these, meningiomas were the most common (1.7%) and more frequently found in women. A positive correlation between increasing age and the presence of IF was found. Additionally, brain atrophy greater than that expected by age was significantly more prevalent in participants without a parental history of AD. Conclusions Brain MRIs of healthy middle-aged participants show a relatively high prevalence of IF even when study participants have been screened for subtle cognitive alterations. Most of our participants are first-degree descendants of patients with AD, and therefore these results are of special relevance for novel imaging studies in the context of AD prevention in cognitively healthy middle-aged participants. Trial registration number NCT

  13. [Effects of Shenwu capsule on learning-memory ability and cholinergic function of brain in AD-like rat model induced by chronic infusion of sodium azide by minipump].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Ru-Yi; Li, Ya-Li; Zhang, Li; Ye, Cui-Fei; Li, Lin

    2013-05-01

    Because of the proposed importance of mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase (COX) decrease in Alzheimer's disease (AD) , the protective effect of Shenwu capsule on mitochondrial deficiency model rats and its pharmacological mechanism were investigated in present study. Rats were administered with azide at 1 mg . kg-1 . h-1 subcutaneously via an Alzet minipump for 30 days. Tweny-four hours after the operation, the rats were administered intragastrically by Shenwu capsule with the dose of 0. 45, 0. 9 and 1. 8 g . kg-1 . d-1 for one month. Then learning-memory ability was determined by the watermaze test and passive avoidance tests. The activity of choline-acetyl-transfertase(ChAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in hippocampus and cortex of rats were measured by radiochemical method and hydroxylamine colorimetry separately. M-cholinergic receptor binding ability (M-binding) was assayed by radio binding. Chronic infusion of sodium azide via minipump induced learning-memory deficiency of rats. Both ChAT activity and M-binding decreased in hippocampus and cortex of model rats, however, the activity of AChE increased in hippocampus and was not affected at the cortex. As the result, the cholinergic function of the brain decreased in model rats. Shenwu capsule significantly improved learning and memory ability and the mechanism may be related with the improved cholinergic function in model brain: ChAT activity and M-binding significantly increased in Shenwu treated groups compared with model group; and the increased activity of AChE in hippocampus returned to normal. Mitochondria, especially mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase, may play the key role in the early event of AD. Chronic, partial in vivo inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase in rats provides a suitable model mimicking several aspects of AD. Shenwu capsule indicate effectiveness in AD-like mitochondrial deficiency model rats, so it would be applied in the treatment of AD.

  14. Ataxia in patients with brain infarcts and hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Louis R

    2012-01-01

    Gait and limb incoordination and ataxia are most often found in patients with brainstem and cerebellar infarcts and hemorrhages. Lesions involving the thalamus and the deep portions of the cerebral hemispheres also may cause ataxia accompanied by weakness and sensory symptoms. Patients who have lesions in the lateral medulla and inferior cerebellum often topple, lean, or veer when attempting to sit, stand, or walk. They list to the side or abruptly veer when walking. The affected limbs are often hypotonic. In pontine lesions, ataxia is accompanied by weakness and pyramidal tract signs as part of an ataxic hemiparesis syndrome. In lesions affecting the superior cerebellum and the brachium conjunctivum, limb dysmetria and overshoot and dysarthria predominate and gait ataxia is absent or slight and transient. Infarcts affecting the thalamus can cause gait instability and astasia with ataxia. Lateral thalamic lesions are characterized by hemisensory symptoms, extrapyramidal limb postures and dysfunction, and gait ataxia. Lesions that affect the posterior limb of the internal capsule and its afferent and efferent projections may also cause an ataxic hemiparesis syndrome, often with accompanying hemisensory abnormalities.

  15. Rehabilitation of executive functioning in patients with frontal lobe brain damage with goal management training.

    PubMed

    Levine, Brian; Schweizer, Tom A; O'Connor, Charlene; Turner, Gary; Gillingham, Susan; Stuss, Donald T; Manly, Tom; Robertson, Ian H

    2011-01-01

    Executive functioning deficits due to brain disease affecting frontal lobe functions cause significant real-life disability, yet solid evidence in support of executive functioning interventions is lacking. Goal Management Training (GMT), an executive functioning intervention that draws upon theories concerning goal processing and sustained attention, has received empirical support in studies of patients with traumatic brain injury, normal aging, and case studies. GMT promotes a mindful approach to complex real-life tasks that pose problems for patients with executive functioning deficits, with a main goal of periodically stopping ongoing behavior to monitor and adjust goals. In this controlled trial, an expanded version of GMT was compared to an alternative intervention, Brain Health Workshop that was matched to GMT on non-specific characteristics that can affect intervention outcome. Participants included 19 individuals in the chronic phase of recovery from brain disease (predominantly stroke) affecting frontal lobe function. Outcome data indicated specific effects of GMT on the Sustained Attention to Response Task as well as the Tower Test, a visuospatial problem-solving measure that reflected far transfer of training effects. There were no significant effects on self-report questionnaires, likely owing to the complexity of these measures in this heterogeneous patient sample. Overall, these data support the efficacy of GMT in the rehabilitation of executive functioning deficits.

  16. Multiple Brain Abscesses in an Immunocompetent Patient With Factor V Leiden Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Saeed Zubair; Pervin, Najwa; Manthri, Sukesh; Bhattarai, Mukul

    2016-01-01

    Multiple brain abscesses in an immunocompetent patient is a challenging clinical problem in the medical world despite advances in imaging techniques, laboratory diagnostics, surgical interventions, and antimicrobial treatment. It is a clinical entity that typically tends to occur in the presence of known predisposing factors. Clinicians seek to determine the potential risk factors responsible for the development of brain abscess because it is very crucial for management of this life-threatening condition. At times, like in our case, there are clinical situations where it is difficult to reveal any traditional risk factors. We report a case of multiple brain abscesses in a 51-year-old female with a past medical history significant only for factor V Leiden mutation, and deep vein thrombosis on chronic anticoagulation. She underwent thorough evaluation but no predisposing factors were found. Based on our extensive literature review, this is the index case of multiple brain abscesses in a patient with history of factor V Leiden mutation and the absence of any conventional risk factors. We also postulate a possible mechanism of infection in such patients. PMID:28203573

  17. Management strategies for neoplastic and vascular brain lesions presenting during pregnancy: A series of 29 patients

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Celestino Esteves; Lynch, Jose Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Background: The occurrence of a brain tumor or intracranial vascular lesion during pregnancy is a rare event, but when it happens, it jeopardizes the lives of both the mother and infant. It also creates challenges of a neurosurgical, obstetric, and ethical nature. A multidisciplinary approach should be used for their care. Methods: Between 1986 and 2015, 12 pregnant women diagnosed with brain tumors and 17 women with intracranial vascular lesion underwent treatment at the Neurosurgery Department of the Servidores do Estado Hospital and Rede D’Or/São Luis. The Neurosurgery Department teamed up with Obstetrics Anesthesiology Departments in establishing the procedures. The patients’ records, surgical descriptions, imaging studies, and histopathological material were reviewed. Results: Among 12 patients presenting with brain tumors, there were neither operative mortality nor fetal deaths. Among the vascular lesions, aneurysm rupture was responsible for bleeding in 6 instances. Arteriovenous malformation was diagnosed in 7 patients. In this subgroup, the maternal and fetal mortality rates were 11.7% and 23.7%, respectively. Conclusions: We can assert that the association between a brain tumor and vascular lesions with pregnancy is a very unusual event, which jeopardizes both the lives of the mother and infant. It remains incompletely characterized due to the rare nature of these potentially devastating events. Knowing the exact mechanism responsible for the interaction of pregnancy and with these lesions will improve the treatment of these patients. PMID:28303207

  18. Subclassification of Recursive Partitioning Analysis Class II Patients With Brain Metastases Treated Radiosurgically

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Sato, Yasunori; Serizawa, Toru; Kawabe, Takuya; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Nagano, Osamu; Barfod, Bierta E.; Ono, Junichi; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Urakawa, Yoichi

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Although the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class is generally used for predicting survival periods of patients with brain metastases (METs), the majority of such patients are Class II and clinical factors vary quite widely within this category. This prompted us to divide RPA Class II patients into three subclasses. Methods and Materials: This was a two-institution, institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study using two databases: the Mito series (2,000 consecutive patients, comprising 787 women and 1,213 men; mean age, 65 years [range, 19-96 years]) and the Chiba series (1,753 patients, comprising 673 female and 1,080 male patients; mean age, 65 years [range, 7-94 years]). Both patient series underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery alone, without whole-brain radiotherapy, for brain METs during the same 10-year period, July 1998 through June 2008. The Cox proportional hazard model with a step-wise selection procedure was used for multivariate analysis. Results: In the Mito series, four factors were identified as favoring longer survival: Karnofsky Performance Status (90% to 100% vs. 70% to 80%), tumor numbers (solitary vs. multiple), primary tumor status (controlled vs. not controlled), and non-brain METs (no vs. yes). This new index is the sum of scores (0 and 1) of these four factors: RPA Class II-a, score of 0 or 1; RPA Class II-b, score of 2; and RPA Class II-c, score of 3 or 4. Next, using the Chiba series, we tested whether our index is valid for a different patient group. This new system showed highly statistically significant differences among subclasses in both the Mito series and the Chiba series (p < 0.001 for all subclasses). In addition, this new index was confirmed to be applicable to Class II patients with four major primary tumor sites, that is, lung, breast, alimentary tract, and urogenital organs. Conclusions: Our new grading system should be considered when designing future clinical trials involving brain MET

  19. Mitochondrial DNA Rearrangement Spectrum in Brain Tissue of Alzheimer’s Disease: Analysis of 13 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yucai; Liu, Changsheng; Parker, William Davis; Chen, Hongyi; Beach, Thomas G.; Liu, Xinhua; Serrano, Geidy E.; Lu, Yanfen; Huang, Jianjun; Yang, Kunfang; Wang, Chunmei

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction may play a central role in the pathologic process of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but there is still a scarcity of data that directly links the pathology of AD with the alteration of mitochondrial DNA. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive assessment of mtDNA rearrangement events in AD brain tissue. Patients and Methods Postmortem frozen human brain cerebral cortex samples were obtained from the Banner Sun Health Research Institute Brain and Body Donation Program, Sun City, AZ. Mitochondria were isolated and direct sequence by using MiSeq®, and analyzed by relative software. Results Three types of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements have been seen in post mortem human brain tissue from patients with AD and age matched control. These observed rearrangements include a deletion, F-type rearrangement, and R-type rearrangement. We detected a high level of mtDNA rearrangement in brain tissue from cognitively normal subjects, as well as the patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The rate of rearrangements was calculated by dividing the number of positive rearrangements by the coverage depth. The rearrangement rate was significantly higher in AD brain tissue than in control brain tissue (17.9%versus 6.7%; p = 0.0052). Of specific types of rearrangement, deletions were markedly increased in AD (9.2% versus 2.3%; p = 0.0005). Conclusions Our data showed that failure of mitochondrial DNA in AD brain might be important etiology of AD pathology. PMID:27299301

  20. Regional brain structural abnormality in ischemic stroke patients: a voxel-based morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping; Zhou, Yu-mei; Zeng, Fang; Li, Zheng-jie; Luo, Lu; Li, Yong-xin; Fan, Wei; Qiu, Li-hua; Qin, Wei; Chen, Lin; Bai, Lin; Nie, Juan; Zhang, San; Xiong, Yan; Bai, Yu; Yin, Can-xin; Liang, Fan-rong

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study used regional homogeneity analysis and found that activity in some brain areas of patients with ischemic stroke changed significantly. In the current study, we examined structural changes in these brain regions by taking structural magnetic resonance imaging scans of 11 ischemic stroke patients and 15 healthy participants, and analyzing the data using voxel-based morphometry. Compared with healthy participants, patients exhibited higher gray matter density in the left inferior occipital gyrus and right anterior white matter tract. In contrast, gray matter density in the right cerebellum, left precentral gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus was less in ischemic stroke patients. The changes of gray matter density in the middle frontal gyrus were negatively associated with the clinical rating scales of the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (r = –0.609, P = 0.047) and the left middle temporal gyrus was negatively correlated with the clinical rating scales of the nervous functional deficiency scale (r = –0.737, P = 0.010). Our findings can objectively identify the functional abnormality in some brain regions of ischemic stroke patients. PMID:27857744

  1. The association of DNA methylation and brain volume in healthy individuals and schizophrenia patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyu; Julnes, Peter Siyahhan; Chen, Jiayu; Ehrlich, Stefan; Walton, Esther; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2015-01-01

    Both methylation and brain volume patterns hold important biological information for the development and prognosis of schizophrenia (SZ). A combined study to probe the association between them provides a new perspective to understanding SZ. Genomic methylation of peripheral blood and regional brain volumes derived from magnate resonance imaging were analyzed using parallel independent component analyses in this study. Nine methylation components and five brain volumetric components were extracted for 94 SZ patients and 106 healthy controls. After controlling for age, sex, race, and substance use, a component comprised primarily of bilateral cerebellar volumes was significantly correlated to a methylation component from 14 CpG sites in 13 genes. Both patients and healthy controls demonstrated similar associations, but patients had significantly smaller cerebellar volumes and dysmethylation in the associated epigenetic component compared to controls. The 13 genes are enriched in cellular growth and proliferation with some genes involved in neuronal growth and cerebellum development (GATA4, ADRA1D, EPHA3, and KCNK10), and these genes are prominently associated with neurological and psychological disorders. Such findings suggest that the methylation pattern of the genes coding for cellular growth may influence the cerebellar development through regulating gene expression, and the alteration in the methylation of these genes in SZ patients may contribute to the cerebellar volume reduction observed in patients. PMID:26381449

  2. Noninvasive Imaging of the High Frequency Brain Activity in Focal Epilepsy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yunfeng; Worrell, Gregory A.; Zhang, Huishi Clara; Yang, Lin; Brinkmann, Benjamin; Nelson, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    High frequency (HF) activity represents a potential biomarker of the epileptogenic zone in epilepsy patients, the removal of which is considered to be crucial for seizure-free surgical outcome. We proposed a high frequency source imaging (HFSI) approach to noninvasively image the brain sources of scalp recorded high frequency EEG activity. Both computer simulation and clinical patient data analysis were performed to investigate the feasibility of using the HFSI approach to image the sources of HF activity from noninvasive scalp EEG recordings. The HF activity was identified from high-density scalp recordings after high-pass filtering the EEG data and the EEG segments with HF activity were concatenated together to form repetitive HF activity. Independent component analysis was utilized to extract the components corresponding to the HF activity. Noninvasive EEG source imaging using realistic geometric boundary element head modeling was then applied to image the sources of the pathological HF brain activity. Five medically intractable focal epilepsy patients were studied and the estimated sources were found to be concordant with the surgical resection or intracranial recordings of the patients. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, that source imaging from the scalp HF activity could help to localize the seizure onset zone (SOZ) and provide a novel noninvasive way of studying the epileptic brain in humans. This study also indicates the potential application of studying HF activity in the pre-surgical planning of medically intractable epilepsy patients. PMID:24845275

  3. Cognitive Predictors of Understanding Treatment Decisions in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gerstenecker, Adam; Meneses, Karen; Duff, Kevin; Fiveash, John B.; Marson, Daniel C.; Triebel, Kristen L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical decision-making capacity is a higher-order functional skill that refers to a patient’s ability to make informed, sound decisions related to care and treatment. In a medical context, understanding is the most cognitively demanding consent standard and refers to a patient’s ability to comprehend information to the extent that informed decisions can be made. Methods The association between reasoning and cognition was examined using data from 41 patients with diagnosed brain metastasis. All diagnoses were made by a board-certified radiation oncologist and were verified histologically. In total, 41 demographically-matched, cognitively healthy controls were also included to aid in classifying patients with brain metastasis according to reasoning status (i.e., intact or impaired). Results Results indicate that measures of simple attention, verbal fluency, verbal memory, processing speed, and executive functioning were all associated with understanding, and that verbal memory and phonemic fluency were the primary cognitive predictors. Using these two primary predictors, equations can be constructed to predict the ability to understand treatment decisions in patients with brain metastasis. Conclusions Although preliminary, these data demonstrate how cognitive measures can estimate understanding as it relates to medical decision-making capacities in these patients. Clinically, these findings suggest that poor verbal memory and expressive language function could serve as “red flags” for reduced consent capacity in this patient population, and, thus, signal that a more comprehensive medical decision-making capacity evaluation is warranted. PMID:25735262

  4. Neurocognitive functioning and genetic variation in patients with primary brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wefel, Jeffrey S.; Noll, Kyle R.; Scheurer, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Impairment of neurocognitive functioning is a common consequence of cerebral neoplasms and treatment, though considerable heterogeneity exists in the pattern and severity of problems across individuals and tumor types. While the influence of numerous clinical and patient characteristics have been documented, relatively little research has been devoted to understanding the influence of genetic variation upon neurocognitive outcomes in patients with brain tumors. This review highlights preliminary evidence associating genes from diverse pathways with risk of adverse neurocognitive outcomes in brain tumor patients, including genes specific to neuronal function and those involved in more systemic cellular regulation. Related literature involving other disease populations is also briefly surveyed, pointing to additional candidate genes. Methodological considerations are also discussed and the need for future research integrating novel investigative techniques is emphasized. PMID:26972863

  5. Multiple Brain Abscesses Due to Aspergillus Fumigatus in a Patient With Liver Cirrhosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hung-Jen; Liu, Wei-Lun; Chang, Tsung Chain; Li, Ming-Chi; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wu, Chi-Jung; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Invasive cerebral aspergillosis always developed in immunocompromised host. Early diagnosis may save life in this critical condition; however, it is difficult to reach. Herein, we presented an unusual case of invasive cerebral aspergillosis in a cirrhotic patient. A 47-year-old man presented with progressive deterioration of consciousness for three days. The patient had a history of alcoholic liver cirrhosis, Child-Pugh class C. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain showed multi-focal parenchymal lesions, which was consistent with multiple brain abscesses. The diagnosis of invasive cerebral aspergillosis was made by molecular based laboratory methods including Aspergillus galactomannan antigen assay and oligonucleotide array. Despite treatment with the antifungal agent, Amphotericin B, the patient died at the ninth day of hospitalization. Our findings suggest that liver cirrhosis can be one of risk factors of invasive cerebral aspergillosis, and support the diagnosing usefulness of MRI, Aspergillus galactomannan antigen assay, and oligonucleotide array.

  6. Comparison of doses received by the hippocampus in patients treated with single isocenter– vs multiple isocenter–based stereotactic radiation therapy to the brain for multiple brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Algan, Ozer Giem, Jared; Young, Julie; Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Hossain, Sabbir

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the doses received by the hippocampus and normal brain tissue during a course of stereotactic radiation therapy using a single isocenter (SI)–based or multiple isocenter (MI)–based treatment planning in patients with less than 4 brain metastases. In total, 10 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating 2-3 brain metastases were included in this retrospective study, and 2 sets of stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans (SI vs MI) were generated. The hippocampus was contoured on SPGR sequences, and doses received by the hippocampus and the brain were calculated and compared between the 2 treatment techniques. A total of 23 lesions in 10 patients were evaluated. The median tumor volume, the right hippocampus volume, and the left hippocampus volume were 3.15, 3.24, and 2.63 mL, respectively. In comparing the 2 treatment plans, there was no difference in the planning target volume (PTV) coverage except in the tail for the dose-volume histogram (DVH) curve. The only statistically significant dosimetric parameter was the V{sub 100}. All of the other measured dosimetric parameters including the V{sub 95}, V{sub 99}, and D{sub 100} were not significantly different between the 2 treatment planning techniques. None of the dosimetric parameters evaluated for the hippocampus revealed any statistically significant difference between the MI and SI plans. The total brain doses were slightly higher in the SI plans, especially in the lower dose region, although this difference was not statistically different. The use of SI-based treatment plan resulted in a 35% reduction in beam-on time. The use of SI treatments for patients with up to 3 brain metastases produces similar PTV coverage and similar normal tissue doses to the hippocampus and the brain when compared with MI plans. SI treatment planning should be considered in patients with multiple brain metastases undergoing stereotactic treatment.

  7. WAIS-III and WMS-III profiles of mildly to severely brain-injured patients.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D C; Ledbetter, M F; Cohen, N J; Marmor, D; Tulsky, D S

    2000-01-01

    Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III; The Psychological Corporation, 1997) scores of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI, n = 23) to moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (M-S TBI, n = 22) were compared to those of 45 matched normal control patients. WAIS-III results revealed that IQ and index scores of MTBI patients did not significantly differ from those of controls, whereas M-S TBI patients received significantly lower mean scores on all measures. All M-S TBI patients' WMS-III index scores also revealed significantly lower scores in comparison to those of control participants, with the exception of Delayed Auditory Recognition. MTBI patients showed significantly lower mean index scores compared to normal controls on measures of immediate and delayed auditory memory, immediate memory, visual delayed memory, and general memory. Eta-squared analyses revealed that WMS-III visual indexes and WAIS-III processing speed showed particularly large effect sizes. These results suggest that symptomatic MTBI patients obtain some low WMS-III test scores comparable to those of more severely injured patients.

  8. Brain (18)F-FDG PET Metabolic Abnormalities in Patients with Long-Lasting Macrophagic Myofascitis.

    PubMed

    Van Der Gucht, Axel; Aoun Sebaiti, Mehdi; Guedj, Eric; Aouizerate, Jessie; Yara, Sabrina; Gherardi, Romain K; Evangelista, Eva; Chalaye, Julia; Cottereau, Anne-Ségolène; Verger, Antoine; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine; Abulizi, Mukedaisi; Itti, Emmanuel; Authier, François-Jérôme

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize brain metabolic abnormalities in patients with macrophagic myofascitis (MMF) and the relationship with cognitive dysfunction through the use of PET with (18)F-FDG. Methods:(18)F-FDG PET brain imaging and a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests were performed in 100 consecutive MMF patients (age [mean ± SD], 45.9 ± 12 y; 74% women). Images were analyzed with statistical parametric mapping (SPM12). Through the use of analysis of covariance, all (18)F-FDG PET brain images of MMF patients were compared with those of a reference population of 44 healthy subjects similar in age (45.4 ± 16 y; P = 0.87) and sex (73% women; P = 0.88). The neuropsychological assessment identified 4 categories of patients: those with no significant cognitive impairment (n = 42), those with frontal subcortical (FSC) dysfunction (n = 29), those with Papez circuit dysfunction (n = 22), and those with callosal disconnection (n = 7). Results: In comparison with healthy subjects, the whole population of patients with MMF exhibited a spatial pattern of cerebral glucose hypometabolism (P < 0.001) involving the occipital lobes, temporal lobes, limbic system, cerebellum, and frontoparietal cortices, as shown by analysis of covariance. The subgroup of patients with FSC dysfunction exhibited a larger extent of involved areas (35,223 voxels vs. 13,680 voxels in the subgroup with Papez circuit dysfunction and 5,453 voxels in patients without cognitive impairment). Nonsignificant results were obtained for the last subgroup because of its small population size. Conclusion: Our study identified a peculiar spatial pattern of cerebral glucose hypometabolism that was most marked in MMF patients with FSC dysfunction. Further studies are needed to determine whether this pattern could represent a diagnostic biomarker of MMF in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and cognitive dysfunction.

  9. Exogenous lactate infusion improved neurocognitive function of patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Bisri, Tatang; Utomo, Billy A.; Fuadi, Iwan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many studies showed a better recovery of cognitive function after administration of exogenous lactate during moderate-severe traumatic brain injury. However, the study evaluating lactate effect on mild traumatic brain injury is still limited. Aims: To evaluate the effect of exogenous lactate on cognitive function in mild traumatic brain injury patients. Settings and Design: Prospective, single blind, randomized controlled study on 60 mild traumatic brain injury patients who were undergoing neurosurgery. Materials and Methods: Subjects were randomly assigned into hyperosmolar sodium lactate (HSL) group or hyperosmolar sodium chloride (HSS) group. Patients in each group received either intravenous infusion of HSL or NaCl 3% at 1.5 ml/KgBW within 15 min before neurosurgery. During the surgery, patients in both groups received maintenance infusion of NaCl 0.9% at 1.5 ml/KgBW/hour. Statistical Analysis: Cognitive function, as assessed by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score at 24 h, 30 and 90 days post-surgery, was analyzed by Anova repeated measures test. Results: The MMSE score improvement was significantly better in HSL group than HSS group (P < 0.001). In HSL group the MMSE score improved from 16.00 (13.75-18.00) at baseline to 21.00 (18.75-22.00); 25.00 (23.75-26.00); 28.00 (27.00-29.00) at 24 h, 30, 90 days post-surgery, respectively. In contrast, in HSS group the MMSE score almost unchanged at 24 h and only slightly increased at 30 and 90 days post-surgery. Conclusions: Hyperosmolar sodium lactate infusion during mild traumatic brain injury improved cognitive function better than sodium chloride 3%. PMID:27057222

  10. Outcome After Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases in Patients With Low Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) Scores

    SciTech Connect

    Chernov, Mikhail F. |. E-mail: m_chernov@yahoo.com; Nakaya, Kotaro; Izawa, Masahiro; Usuba, Yuki; Kato, Koichi; Hori, Tomokatsu; Hayashi, Motohiro |; Muragaki, Yoshihiro |; Iseki, Hiroshi ||; Takakura, Kintomo ||

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: The objective of this retrospective study was evaluation of the outcome after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with intracranial metastases and poor performance status. Methods and Materials: Forty consecutive patients with metastatic brain tumors and Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) scores {<=}50 (mean, 43 {+-} 8; median, 40) treated with SRS were analyzed. Poor performance status was caused by presence of intracranial metastases in 28 cases (70%) and resulted from uncontrolled extracerebral disease in 12 (30%). Results: Survival after SRS varied from 3 days to 11.5 months (mean, 3.8 {+-} 2.9 months; median, 3.3 months). Survival probability constituted 0.50 {+-} 0.07 at 3 months and 0.20 {+-} 0.05 at 6 months posttreatment. Cause of low KPS score (p = 0.0173) and presence of distant metastases beside the brain (p = 0.0308) showed statistically significant associations with overall survival in multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Median survival was 6.0 months if low KPS score was caused by cerebral disease and distant metastases in regions beyond the brain were absent, 3.3 months if low KPS score was caused by cerebral disease and distant metastases in regions beyond the brain were present, and 1.0 month if poor performance status resulted from extracerebral disease. Conclusions: Identification of the cause of low KPS score (cerebral vs. extracerebral) in patients with metastatic brain tumor(s) may be important for prediction of the outcome after radiosurgical treatment. If poor patient performance status without surgical indications is caused by intracranial tumor(s), SRS may be a reasonable treatment option.

  11. Venous Thromboembolism in Patients Undergoing Craniotomy for Brain Tumors: A U.S. Nationwide Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cote, David J; Dubois, Heloise M; Karhade, Aditya V; Smith, Timothy R

    2016-11-01

    Background Patients who undergo craniotomy for brain tumor have an increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). Using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) registry, patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumor from 2006 and 2014 were analyzed to identify risk factors for postoperative VTE. Methods The study population, identified by Current Procedural Terminology codes, included all NSQIP-reported patients who underwent a craniotomy for brain tumor resection. Results There were 629 instances of VTE among 19,409 craniotomies for brain tumor (3.2%) recorded in NSQIP. Occurrence of VTE was associated with other postoperative complications on univariate analysis, including pneumonia, respiratory failure, stroke, and sepsis (all p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, independent predictors of VTE included age 46 to 57 years (odds ratio [OR], 1.432; p = 0.006), 57 to 66 years (OR, 1.550; p = 0.001), or over 66 years (OR, 2.493; p < 0.001), body mass index (BMI) over 32.1 kg/m(2) (OR, 1.835; p < 0.001), functional dependence (OR, 1.657; p < 0.001), ventilator dependence (OR, 2.516; p < 0.001), steroid use (OR, 1.661; p < 0.001), prior sepsis (OR, 1.845; p < 0.001), and total operative time 183 to 271 minutes (OR, 1.462; p = 0.032) and longer than 271 minutes (OR, 1.945; p < 0.001). Conclusions VTE occurs in approximately 3% of patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumor resection. Independent predictors for developing VTE include older age, higher BMI, recent steroid use, and total operative time.

  12. Deep brain stimulation suppresses pallidal low frequency activity in patients with phasic dystonic movements.

    PubMed

    Barow, Ewgenia; Neumann, Wolf-Julian; Brücke, Christof; Huebl, Julius; Horn, Andreas; Brown, Peter; Krauss, Joachim K; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Kühn, Andrea A

    2014-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus internus alleviates involuntary movements in patients with dystonia. However, the mechanism is still not entirely understood. One hypothesis is that deep brain stimulation suppresses abnormally enhanced synchronized oscillatory activity within the motor cortico-basal ganglia network. Here, we explore deep brain stimulation-induced modulation of pathological low frequency (4-12 Hz) pallidal activity that has been described in local field potential recordings in patients with dystonia. Therefore, local field potentials were recorded from 16 hemispheres in 12 patients undergoing deep brain stimulation for severe dystonia using a specially designed amplifier allowing simultaneous high frequency stimulation at therapeutic parameter settings and local field potential recordings. For coherence analysis electroencephalographic activity (EEG) over motor areas and electromyographic activity (EMG) from affected neck muscles were recorded before and immediately after cessation of high frequency stimulation. High frequency stimulation led to a significant reduction of mean power in the 4-12 Hz band by 24.8 ± 7.0% in patients with predominantly phasic dystonia. A significant decrease of coherence between cortical EEG and pallidal local field potential activity in the 4-12 Hz range was revealed for the time period of 30 s after switching off high frequency stimulation. Coherence between EMG activity and pallidal activity was mainly found in patients with phasic dystonic movements where it was suppressed after high frequency stimulation. Our findings suggest that high frequency stimulation may suppress pathologically enhanced low frequency activity in patients with phasic dystonia. These dystonic features are the quickest to respond to high frequency stimulation and may thus directly relate to modulation of pathological basal ganglia activity, whereas improvement in tonic features may depend on long-term plastic changes within the

  13. Clinical impact of RehaCom software for cognitive rehabilitation of patients with acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Elízabeth; Bringas, María Luisa; Salazar, Sonia; Rodríguez, Daymí; García, María Eugenia; Torres, Maydané

    2012-10-01

    We describe the clinical impact of the RehaCom computerized cognitive training program instituted in the International Neurological Restoration Center for rehabilitation of brain injury patients. Fifty patients admitted from 2008 through 2010 were trained over 60 sessions. Attention and memory functions were assessed with a pre- and post-treatment design, using the Mini-Mental State Examination, Wechsler Memory Scale and Trail Making Test (Parts A and B). Negative effects were assessed, including mental fatigue, headache and eye irritation. The program's clinical usefulness was confirmed, with 100% of patients showing improved performance in trained functions.

  14. Cognitive Rehabilitation in Patients with Gliomas and Other Brain Tumors: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, G.; Pambuku, A.; Della Puppa, A.; Bellu, L.; D'Avella, D.; Zagonel, V.

    2016-01-01

    Disease prognosis is very poor in patients with brain tumors. Cognitive deficits due to disease or due to its treatment have an important weight on the quality of life of patients and caregivers. Studies often take into account quality of life as a fundamental element in the management of disease and interventions have been developed for cognitive rehabilitation of neuropsychological deficits with the aim of improving the quality of life and daily-life autonomy of patients. In this literature review, we will consider the published studies of cognitive rehabilitation over the past 20 years. PMID:27493954

  15. Patient Perspectives on Deep Brain Stimulation Clinical Research in Early Stage Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Heusinkveld, Lauren; Hacker, Mallory; Turchan, Maxim; Bollig, Madelyn; Tamargo, Christina; Fisher, William; McLaughlin, Lauren; Martig, Adria; Charles, David

    2017-01-01

    The FDA has approved a multicenter, double-blind, Phase III, pivotal trial testing deep brain stimulation (DBS) in 280 people with very early stage Parkinson's disease (PD; IDE#G050016). In partnership with The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research, we conducted a survey to investigate motivating factors, barriers, and gender differences among potentially eligible patients for participation in a trial testing DBS in early PD compared to standard medical treatment. The majority of survey respondents (72%) indicated they would consider learning more about participating. Early PD patients are therefore likely to consider enrolling in trials of invasive therapies that may slow symptom progression and help future patients.

  16. Characterization of T2 hyperintensity lesions in patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caban, Jesus J.; Green, Savannah A.; Riedy, Gerard

    2013-03-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) is often an invisible injury that is poorly understood and its sequelae can be difficult to diagnose. Recent neuroimaging studies on patients diagnosed with mild TBI (mTBI) have demonstrated an increase in hyperintense brain lesions on T2-weighted MR images. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of the multi-modal and morphological properties of T2 hyperintensity lesions among service members diagnosed with mTBI. A total of 790 punctuate T2 hyperintensity lesions from 89 mTBI subjects were analyzed and used to characterize the lesions based on different quantitative measurements. Morphological analysis shows that on average, T2 hyperintensity lesions have volumes of 23mm3 (+/-24.75), a roundness measure of 0.83 (+/-0.08) and an elongation of 7.90 (+/-2.49). The frontal lobe lesions demonstrated significantly more elongated lesions when compared to other areas of the brain.

  17. Brain Death in Pediatric Patients in Japan: Diagnosis and Unresolved Issues

    PubMed Central

    ARAKI, Takashi; YOKOTA, Hiroyuki; FUSE, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Brain death (BD) is a physiological state defined as complete and irreversible loss of brain function. Organ transplantation from a patient with BD is controversial in Japan because there are two classifications of BD: legal BD in which the organs can be donated and general BD in which the organs cannot be donated. The significance of BD in the terminal phase remains in the realm of scientific debate. As indicated by the increasing number of organ transplants from brain-dead donors, certain clinical diagnosis for determining BD in adults is becoming established. However, regardless of whether or not organ transplantation is involved, there are many unresolved issues regarding BD in children. Here, we will discuss the historical background of BD determination in children, pediatric emergencies and BD, and unresolved issues related to pediatric BD. PMID:26548741

  18. Clinical application of event related potentials in patients with brain tumours and traumatic head injuries.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, H M; Nau, H E; Zerbin, D; Lanczos, L; Lodemann, E; Engelmeier, M P; Grote, W

    1986-01-01

    Event related potential recording and psychometric evaluation of cognitive impairment were carried out on 21 patients with brain tumours, 21 patients with severe head injuries and 24 controls. The tumour and trauma patients who met the psychometric inclusion criteria for dementia, but not the non-demented patients, had significantly longer N2 and P3 latencies than the controls. In assessing individual patients P3 latency correctly differentiated between demented and non-demented patients in 81% of cases (for N2 latency 77%). Particularly P3 latency may provide a practical and objective measure of mental impairment in neurosurgical disorders producing dementia. Marked asymmetry in N2 and P3 amplitudes between hemispheres was observed in a number of cases. No significant relationship was found between diminution of N2 and P3 components and side of lesion.

  19. Executive dysfunction in chronic brain-injured patients: assessment in outpatient rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Boelen, Danielle H E; Spikman, Jacoba M; Rietveld, Antonius C M; Fasotti, Luciano

    2009-10-01

    In this study 81 chronic brain-injured patients referred for outpatient rehabilitation, who complained of executive impairments in daily life situations and were observed by proxies and therapists to have such problems, were assessed using various tests and questionnaires of executive functioning, such as the BADS and the DEX Questionnaire. The main purpose was to examine the sensitivity of these instruments in this particular group of patients. The tests and the DEX were also administered to healthy controls to investigate which of the instruments discriminate optimally between patients and controls. The results indicate that the tests as well as the questionnaires were sensitive to the executive problems of the patients. There were no significant differences between DEX ratings of patients, proxies and therapists. This suggests that patients who were eligible for outpatient rehabilitation showed relatively intact awareness into their executive problems. A specific combination of three "open-ended" tests and the DEX contributed significantly to the prediction of group membership.

  20. Brain MRI, apoliprotein E genotype, and plasma homocysteine in American Indian Alzheimer disease patients and Indian controls.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Myron F; de la Plata, Carlos Marquez; Fields, B A Julie; Womack, Kyle B; Rosenberg, Roger N; Gong, Yun-Hua; Qu, Bao-Xi; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Hynan, Linda S

    2009-02-01

    We obtained brain MRIs, plasma homocysteine levels and apolipoprotein E genotyping for 11 American Indian Alzheimer disease (AD) subjects and 10 Indian controls. We calculated white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHV), whole brain volume (WBV), and ratio of white matter hyperintensity volume to whole brain volume (WMHV/WBV). There were no significant differences between AD subjects and controls in gender, history of hypertension, diabetes, or history of high cholesterol, but hypertension and diabetes were more common among AD subjects. There was no difference between AD and control groups in age (range for all subjects was 61-89 years), % Indian heritage, waist size or body mass index. Median Indian heritage was 50% or greater in both groups. Range of education was 5-13 years in the AD group and 12-16 years in controls. Median plasma homocysteine concentration was higher in AD subjects (11 micromol/L vs. 9.8 micromol/L), but did not achieve statistical significance. Significantly more AD subjects had apolipoprotein Eepsilon4 alleles than did controls (63% vs.10%). Neuroimaging findings were not significantly different between the 2 groups, but AD subjects had greater WMHV (median 15.64 vs. 5.52 cc) and greater WMHV/WBV ratio (median 1.63 vs. 0.65 %) and a far greater range of WMHV. In combined AD subjects and controls, WBV correlated with BMI and age. WMHV and WMHV/WBV correlated inversely with MMSE scores (p = 0.001, 0.002, respectively). In addition, WMHV correlated positively with % Indian heritage (p = 0.047).

  1. Decreased functional connectivity density in pain-related brain regions of female migraine patients without aura.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qing; Xu, Fei; Jiang, Cui; Chen, Zhifeng; Chen, Huafu; Liao, Huaqiang; Zhao, Ling

    2016-02-01

    Migraine is one of the most prevalent neurological disorders which is suggested to be associated with dysfunctions of the central nervous system. The purpose of the present study was to detect the altered functional connectivity architecture in the large-scale network of the whole brain in migraine without aura (MWoA). Meanwhile, the brain functional hubs which are targeted by MWoA could be identified. A new voxel-based method named functional connectivity density (FCD) mapping was applied to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data of 55 female MWoA patients and 44 age-matched female healthy controls (HC). Comparing to HC, MWoA patients showed abnormal short-range FCD values in bilateral hippocampus, bilateral insula, right amygdale, right anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral putamen, bilateral caudate nucleus and the prefrontal cortex. The results suggested decreased intraregional connectivity of these pain-related brain regions in female MWoA. In addition, short-range FCD values in left prefrontal cortex, putamen and caudate nucleus were significantly negatively correlated with duration of disease in MWoA group, implying the repeated migraine attacks over time may consistently affect the resting-state functional connectivity architecture of these brain hubs. Our findings revealed the dysfunction of brain hubs in female MWoA, and suggested the left prefrontal cortex, putamen and caudate nucleus served as sensitive neuroimaging markers for reflecting the disease duration of female MWoA. This may provide us new insights into the changes in the organization of the large-scale brain network in MWoA.

  2. Delayed Effects of Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Germ Cell Tumor Patients With Central Nervous System Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Danielle M. Einhorn, Lawrence H.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Central nervous system (CNS) metastases are uncommon in patients with germ cell tumors, with an incidence of 2-3%. CNS metastases have been managed with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and concomitant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Our previous study did not observe serious CNS toxicity (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 1991;22:17-22). We now report on 5 patients who developed delayed significant CNS toxicity. Patients and Methods: We observed 5 patients with delayed CNS toxicity. The initial diagnosis was between 1981 and 2003. All patients had poor-risk disease according to the International Germ Cell Consensus Collaborative Group criteria. Of the 5 patients, 3 had CNS metastases at diagnosis and 2 developed relapses with CNS metastases. These 5 patients underwent WBRT to 4,000-5,000 cGy in 18-28 fractions concurrently with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Results: All 5 patients developed delayed symptoms consistent with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The symptoms included seizures, hemiparesis, cranial neuropathy, headaches, blindness, dementia, and ataxia. The median time from WBRT to CNS symptoms was 72 months (range, 9-228). Head imaging revealed multiple abnormalities consistent with gliosis and diffuse cerebral atrophy. Of the 5 patients, 3 had progressive and 2 stable symptoms. Treatment with surgery and/or steroids had modest benefit. The progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy resulted in significant debility in all 5 patients, resulting in death (3 patients), loss of work, steroid-induced morbidity, and recurrent hospitalizations. Conclusion: Whole brain radiotherapy is not innocuous in young patients with germ cell tumors and can cause late CNS toxicity.

  3. Disrupted brain anatomical connectivity in medication-naïve patients with first-episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruibin; Wei, Qinling; Kang, Zhuang; Zalesky, Andrew; Li, Meng; Xu, Yong; Li, Leijun; Wang, Junjing; Zheng, Liangrong; Wang, Bin; Zhao, Jingping; Zhang, Jinbei; Huang, Ruiwang

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies suggested that the topological properties of brain anatomical networks may be aberrant in schizophrenia (SCZ), and most of them focused on the chronic and antipsychotic-medicated SCZ patients which may introduce various confounding factors due to antipsychotic medication and duration of illness. To avoid those potential confounders, a desirable approach is to select medication-naïve, first-episode schizophrenia (FE-SCZ) patients. In this study, we acquired diffusion tensor imaging datasets from 30 FE-SCZ patients and 34 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Taking a distinct gray matter region as a node, inter-regional connectivity as edge and the corresponding streamline counts as edge weight, we constructed whole-brain anatomical networks for both groups, calculated their topological parameters using graph theory, and compared their between-group differences using nonparametric permutation tests. In addition, network-based statistic method was utilized to identify inter-regional connections which were impaired in the FE-SCZ patients. We detected only significantly decreased inter-regional connections in the FE-SCZ patients compared to the controls. These connections were primarily located in the frontal, parietal, occipital, and subcortical regions. Although small-worldness was conserved in the FE-SCZ patients, we found that the network strength and global efficiency as well as the degree were significantly decreased, and shortest path length was significantly increased in the FE-SCZ patients compared to the controls. Most of the regions that showed significantly decreased nodal parameters belonged to the top-down control, sensorimotor, basal ganglia, and limbic-visual system systems. Correlation analysis indicated that the nodal efficiency in the sensorimotor system was negatively correlated with the severity of psychosis symptoms in the FE-SCZ patients. Our results suggest that the network organization is changed in the early stages of the

  4. The combined monitoring of brain stem auditory evoked potentials and intracranial pressure in coma. A study of 57 patients.

    PubMed Central

    García-Larrea, L; Artru, F; Bertrand, O; Pernier, J; Mauguière, F

    1992-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) was carried out in 57 comatose patients for periods ranging from 5 hours to 13 days. In 53 cases intracranial pressure (ICP) was also simultaneously monitored. The study of relative changes of evoked potentials over time proved more relevant to prognosis than the mere consideration of "statistical normality" of waveforms; thus progressive degradation of the BAEPs was associated with a bad outcome even if the responses remained within normal limits. Contrary to previous reports, a normal BAEP obtained during the second week of coma did not necessarily indicate a good vital outcome; it could, however, do so in cases with a low probability of secondary insults. The simultaneous study of BAEPs and ICP showed that apparently significant (greater than 40 mm Hg) acute rises in ICP were not always followed by BAEP changes. The stability of BAEP's despite "significant" ICP rises was associated in our patients with a high probability of survival, while prolongation of central latency of BAEPs in response to ICP modifications was almost invariably followed by brain death. Continuous monitoring of brainstem responses provided a useful physiological counterpart to physical parameters such as ICP. Serial recording of cortical EPs should be added to BAEP monitoring to permit the early detection of rostrocaudal deterioration. Images PMID:1402970

  5. Parkinson's disease progression at 30 years: a study of subthalamic deep brain-stimulated patients.

    PubMed

    Merola, Aristide; Zibetti, Maurizio; Angrisano, Serena; Rizzi, Laura; Ricchi, Valeria; Artusi, Carlo A; Lanotte, Michele; Rizzone, Mario G; Lopiano, Leonardo

    2011-07-01

    Clinical findings in Parkinson's disease suggest that most patients progressively develop disabling non-levodopa-responsive symptoms during the course of the disease. Nevertheless, several heterogeneous factors, such as clinical phenotype, age at onset and genetic aspects may influence the long-term clinical picture. In order to investigate the main features of long-term Parkinson's disease progression, we studied a cohort of 19 subjects treated with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation after >20 years of disease, reporting clinical and neuropsychological data up to a mean of 30 years from disease onset. This group of patients was characterized by an early onset of disease, with a mean age of 38.63 years at Parkinson's disease onset, which was significantly lower than in the other long-term subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation follow-up cohorts reported in the literature. All subjects were regularly evaluated by a complete Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, a battery of neuropsychological tests and a clinical interview, intended to assess the rate of non-levodopa-responsive symptom progression. Clinical data were available for all patients at presurgical baseline and at 1, 3 and 5 years from the subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation surgical procedure, while follow-up data after >7 years were additionally reported in a subgroup of 14 patients. The clinical and neuropsychological performance progressively worsened during the course of follow-up; 64% of patients gradually developed falls, 86% dysphagia, 57% urinary incontinence and 43% dementia. A progressive worsening of motor symptoms was observed both in 'medication-ON' condition and in 'stimulation-ON' condition, with a parallel reduction in the synergistic effect of 'medication-ON/stimulation-ON' condition. Neuropsychological data also showed a gradual decline in the performances of all main cognitive domains, with an initial involvement of executive functions, followed by the impairment

  6. Methylphenidate on Cognitive Improvement in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chi-Hsien; Huang, Chia-Chen; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Lin, Gong-Hong; Hou, Wen-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Although methylphenidate has been used as a neurostimulant to treat patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, its therapeutic role in the psychomotor or cognitive recovery of patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in both intensive care and rehabilitation settings has not been adequately explored. To address this issue, this meta-analysis searched the available electronic databases using the key words “methylphenidate”, “brain injuries”, “head injuries”, and “traumatic brain injury”. Analysis of the ten double-blind RCTs demonstrated significant benefit in using methylphenidate for enhancing vigilance-associated attention (i.e., selective, sustained, and divided attention) in patients with TBIs (standardized mean difference: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.10 to 0.79), especially in sustained attention (standardized mean difference: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.22 to 1.10). However, no significant positive impact was noted on the facilitation of memory or processing speed. More studies on the efficacy and safety of methylphenidate for the cognitive improvement of patients with TBIs are warranted. PMID:26951094

  7. Detection of Protein Aggregates in Brain and Cerebrospinal Fluid Derived from Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    David, Monique Antoinette; Tayebi, Mourad

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the properties of soluble oligomer species of amyloidogenic proteins, derived from different proteins with little sequence homology, have indicated that they share a common structure and may share similar pathogenic mechanisms. Amyloid β, tau protein, as well as amyloid precursor protein normally associated with Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease were found in lesions and plaques of multiple sclerosis patients. The objective of the study is to investigate whether brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples derived from multiple sclerosis patients demonstrate the presence of soluble oligomers normally associated with protein-misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. We have used anti-oligomer monoclonal antibodies to immunodetect soluble oligomers in CSF and brain tissues derived from multiple sclerosis patients. In this report, we describe the presence of soluble oligomers in the brain tissue and cerebral spinal fluid of multiple sclerosis patients detected with our monoclonal anti-oligomer antibodies with Western blot and Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (sELISA). These results might suggest that protein aggregation plays a role in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis although further and more refined studies are needed to confirm the role of soluble aggregates in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25520699

  8. Abnormal whole-brain functional connectivity in patients with primary insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Dong, Mengshi; Yin, Yi; Hua, Kelei; Fu, Shishun; Jiang, Guihua

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of the mechanism of insomnia could provide the basis for improved understanding and treatment of insomnia. The aim of this study is to investigate the abnormal functional connectivity throughout the entire brain of insomnia patients, and analyze the global distribution of these abnormalities. Whole brains of 50 patients with insomnia and 40 healthy controls were divided into 116 regions and abnormal connectivities were identified by comparing the Pearson’s correlation coefficients of each pair using general linear model analyses with covariates of age, sex, and duration of education. In patients with insomnia, regions that relate to wakefulness, emotion, worry/rumination, saliency/attention, and sensory-motor showed increased positive connectivity with each other; however, regions that often restrain each other, such as regions in salience network with regions in default mode network, showed decreased positive connectivity. Correlation analysis indicated that some increased positive functional connectivity was associated with the Self-Rating Depression Scale, Insomnia Severity Index, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores. According to our findings, increased and decreased positive connectivities suggest function strengthening and function disinhibition, respectively, which offers a parsimonious explanation for the hyperarousal hypothesis in the level of the whole-brain functional connectivity in patients with insomnia. PMID:28243094

  9. Increased Intracranial Pressure during Hemodialysis in a Patient with Anoxic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Damholt, Mette B.; Strange, Ditte G.; Kelsen, Jesper; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Møller, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS) is a serious neurological complication of hemodialysis, and patients with acute brain injury are at increased risk. We report a case of DDS leading to intracranial hypertension in a patient with anoxic brain injury and discuss the subsequent dialysis strategy. A 13-year-old girl was admitted after prolonged resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an inferior vena cava aneurysm and multiple pulmonary emboli as the likely cause. An intracranial pressure (ICP) monitor was inserted, and, on day 3, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) was initiated due to acute kidney injury, during which the patient developed severe intracranial hypertension. CT of the brain showed diffuse cerebral edema. CRRT was discontinued, sedation was increased, and hypertonic saline was administered, upon which ICP normalized. Due to persistent hyperkalemia and overhydration, ultrafiltration and intermittent hemodialysis were performed separately on day 4 with a small dialyzer, low blood and dialysate flow, and high dialysate sodium content. During subsequent treatments, isolated ultrafiltration was well tolerated, whereas hemodialysis was associated with increased ICP necessitating frequent pauses or early cessation of dialysis. In patients at risk of DDS, hemodialysis should be performed with utmost care and continuous monitoring of ICP should be considered.

  10. Clinical Factors Asssociated with Treatment Outcomes following Whole-brain Irradiation in Patients with Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    DZIGGEL, LIESA; E. SCHILD, STEVEN; VENINGA, THEO; BAJROVIC, AMIRA; RADES, DIRK

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim: Patients with prostate cancer represent a small minority of cancer patients presenting with metastases to the brain. This study investigated the role of whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in this rare group. Patients and Methods: Eighteen such patients were included. Clinical factors including fractionation program of WBI, age at WBI, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), number of metastases to the brain, involvement of extracerebral metastatic sites, time from prostate cancer diagnosis to WBI and recursive-partitioning-analysis (RPA) class were investigated regarding local (intracerebral) control and survival. Results: On multivariate evaluation, longer time from prostate cancer diagnosis to WBI showed a trend towards improved local control (hazard ratio 2.77, p=0.098). Better KPS (hazard ratio 5.64, p=0.021) and longer time from prostate cancer diagnosis to WBI (hazard ratio 5.64, p=0.013) were significantly associated with better survival. Conclusion: Two independent predictors of survival were identified and should be considered when designing for personalized treatment regimens and clinical trials. PMID:28064217

  11. Abnormal whole-brain functional connectivity in patients with primary insomnia.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Dong, Mengshi; Yin, Yi; Hua, Kelei; Fu, Shishun; Jiang, Guihua

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of the mechanism of insomnia could provide the basis for improved understanding and treatment of insomnia. The aim of this study is to investigate the abnormal functional connectivity throughout the entire brain of insomnia patients, and analyze the global distribution of these abnormalities. Whole brains of 50 patients with insomnia and 40 healthy controls were divided into 116 regions and abnormal connectivities were identified by comparing the Pearson's correlation coefficients of each pair using general linear model analyses with covariates of age, sex, and duration of education. In patients with insomnia, regions that relate to wakefulness, emotion, worry/rumination, saliency/attention, and sensory-motor showed increased positive connectivity with each other; however, regions that often restrain each other, such as regions in salience network with regions in default mode network, showed decreased positive connectivity. Correlation analysis indicated that some increased positive functional connectivity was associated with the Self-Rating Depression Scale, Insomnia Severity Index, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores. According to our findings, increased and decreased positive connectivities suggest function strengthening and function disinhibition, respectively, which offers a parsimonious explanation for the hyperarousal hypothesis in the level of the whole-brain functional connectivity in patients with insomnia.

  12. Conscious and unconscious processing of facial expressions: evidence from two split-brain patients.

    PubMed

    Prete, Giulia; D'Ascenzo, Stefania; Laeng, Bruno; Fabri, Mara; Foschi, Nicoletta; Tommasi, Luca

    2015-03-01

    We investigated how the brain's hemispheres process explicit and implicit facial expressions in two 'split-brain' patients (one with a complete and one with a partial anterior resection). Photographs of faces expressing positive, negative or neutral emotions were shown either centrally or bilaterally. The task consisted in judging the friendliness of each person in the photographs. Half of the photograph stimuli were 'hybrid faces', that is an amalgamation of filtered images which contained emotional information only in the low range of spatial frequency, blended to a neutral expression of the same individual in the rest of the spatial frequencies. The other half of the images contained unfiltered faces. With the hybrid faces the patients and a matched control group were more influenced in their social judgements by the emotional expression of the face shown in the left visual field (LVF). When the expressions were shown explicitly, that is without filtering, the control group and the partially callosotomized patient based their judgement on the face shown in the LVF, whereas the complete split-brain patient based his ratings mainly on the face presented in the right visual field. We conclude that the processing of implicit emotions does not require the integrity of callosal fibres and can take place within subcortical routes lateralized in the right hemisphere.

  13. [Rehabilitation of post stroke patients using a bioengineering system "brain-computer interface + exoskeleton"].

    PubMed

    Kotov, S V; Turbina, L G; Bobrov, P D; Frolov, A A; Pavlova, O G; Kurganskaia, M E; Biriukova, E V

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the possibility of using a bioengineering system, which includes an electroencephalograph and a personal computer with a software for synchronous data transmission, recognition and classification of EEG signals, development of directions for intended actions in real time in the combination with the hand exoskeleton (the bioengineering system "brain-computer interface + exoskeleton"), in motor rehabilitation of post stroke patients with paresis of the upper extremity. Material and methods. Brain-computer interface is a promising field of neurorehabilitation. Rehabilitation treatment, including 8-10 sessions, was conducted in 5 patients with paresis of the upper extremity. All patients had large MRI lesions in cortical/subcortical areas. Results. Positive changes in neurological status measured with the NIHSS, a significant increase in the volume and power of movements in the paretic hand, improvement of coordination and slight decrease in the level of spasticity were found after the treatment. There was an increase in daily activities measured with the Barthel index, mostly due to the improvement of fine motor skills. The level of disability assessed by the modified Rankin scale was changed significantly. Conclusion. The use of "brain-computer interface + exoskeleton" in the rehabilitation of post stroke patients with hand paresis provided positive results that would need to be verified in further studies.

  14. Expressive aphasia caused by Streptococcus intermedius brain abscess in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Khaja, Misbahuddin; Adler, Darryl; Lominadze, George

    2017-01-01

    Background Brain abscess is an uncommon but life-threatening infection. It involves a focal, intracerebral infection that begins in a localized area of cerebritis and develops into a collection of pus, surrounded by a well-vascularized capsule. Brain abscess still poses a significant problem in developing countries but rarely in developed countries. Predisposing factors vary in different parts of the world. With the introduction of antibiotics and imaging studies, the mortality rate has decreased between 5% and 15%. If left untreated it may lead to serious neurologic sequelae. The temporal lobe abscess can be caused by conditions like sinusitis, otitis media, dental infections, and mastoiditis if left untreated or partially treated. Additionally, in neurosurgical procedures like craniotomy, the external ventricular drain can get infected, leading to abscess formation. Case presentation We present the case study of an elderly female patient who presented with expressive aphasia caused by brain abscess, secondary to Streptococcus intermedius infection. The 72-year-old female with a medical history of hypertension came to hospital for evaluation with word-finding difficulty, an expressive aphasia that began a few days prior to presentation. Computed tomography of the head showed a left temporal lobe mass-like lesion, with surrounding vasogenic edema. The patient was empirically started on courses of antibiotics. The next day, she was subjected to magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, which showed a left temporal lobe septated rim-enhancing mass lesion, with bright restricted diffusion and diffuse surrounding vasogenic edema consistent with abscess. The patient was also seen by the neurosurgery department and underwent stereotactic, left temporal craniotomy, with drainage, and resection of abscess. Tissue culture grew S. intermedius sensitive to ampicillin sulbactam. Subsequently her expressive aphasia improved. Conclusion Brain abscess has a high mortality, however

  15. The Change in Nutritional Status in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Retrospective Descriptive Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masha'al, Dina A.

    There is a high prevalence in malnutrition among traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to the hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism which develop post injury. Traumatic brain injury patients are different, even among themselves, in their energy requirements and response to nutritional therapy. This implies that there are other factors that affect the energy intake of these patients and enhance the incidence of malnutrition. This dissertation study examines the nutritional status of TBI patients upon admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and during their hospital stay to describe baseline status, detect changes in nutritional status over 7 days, and identify the factors affecting the adequacy of energy intake and the change in nutritional status as a consequence. Anthropometric measurements, biomedical measurements, measures of severity of illness, daily health status, level of brain injury severity, and other data were collected from the medical records of 50 patients, who were ≥ 18 years old, mechanically ventilated in the first 24 hours of ICU admission, and had a Glasgow Coma Scale score between 3-12. These data were used to examine the previous relationships. Although there was no statistically significant change found in body mass index and weight, there was a significant change detected in other nutritional markers, including hemoglobin, albumin, and total lymphocyte levels over the 7 days of ICU and hospital stay. No significant relationship was found between the adequacy of energy intake and total prescribed energy, severity of illness, level of brain injury severity, daily health status, patient age, intracranial pressure, or time of feeding initiation. Findings may be used to develop and test interventions to improve nutritional status during the acute phase of TBI. This will lay a foundation for health care providers, including nurses, to establish standards for practice and nutrition protocols to assure optimal nutrition assessment and intervention in a

  16. Quantification of F-18 FDG PET images in temporal lobe epilepsy patients using probabilistic brain atlas.

    PubMed

    Kang, K W; Lee, D S; Cho, J H; Lee, J S; Yeo, J S; Lee, S K; Chung, J K; Lee, M C

    2001-07-01

    A probabilistic atlas of the human brain (Statistical Probabilistic Anatomical Maps: SPAM) was developed by the international consortium for brain mapping (ICBM). It is a good frame for calculating volume of interest (VOI) in many fields of brain images. After calculating the counts in VOI using the product of probability of SPAM images and counts in FDG images, asymmetric indices (AI) were calculated and used for finding epileptogenic zones in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). FDG PET images from 18 surgically confirmed mTLE patients and 22 age-matched controls were spatially normalized to the average brain MRI template of ICBM. Counts from normalized PET images were multiplied with the probability of 12 VOIs from SPAM images in both temporal lobes. Finally AI were calculated on each pair of VOIs, and compared with visual assessment. If AI of mTLE patients were not within 2.9 standard deviation from those of normal control group (P < 0.008; Bonferroni correction for P < 0.05), epileptogenic zones were considered to be found successfully. The counts of VOIs in the normal control group were symmetric (AI < 4.3%, paired t test P > 0.05) except for those of the inferior temporal gyrus (P < 0.001). By AIs in six pairs of VOIs, PET in mTLE had deficit on one side (P < 0.05). Lateralization was correct in only 14/18 of patients by AI, but 17/18 were consistent with visual inspection. In three patients with normal AI, PET images were symmetric on visual inspection. The asymmetric indices obtained by taking the product of the statistical probability anatomical map and FDG PET, correlated well with visual assessment in mTLE patients. SPAM is useful for the quantification of VOIs in functional images.

  17. Alterations in Brain Structure and Functional Connectivity in Alcohol Dependent Patients and Possible Association with Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yue; Ma, Mengying; Ma, Yi; Dong, Yuru; Niu, Yajuan; Jiang, Yin; Wang, Hong; Wang, Zhiyan; Wu, Liuzhen; Sun, Hongqiang; Cui, Cailian

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have documented that heightened impulsivity likely contributes to the development and maintenance of alcohol use disorders. However, there is still a lack of studies that comprehensively detected the brain changes associated with abnormal impulsivity in alcohol addicts. This study was designed to investigate the alterations in brain structure and functional connectivity associated with abnormal impulsivity in alcohol dependent patients. Methods Brain structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging data as well as impulsive behavior data were collected from 20 alcohol dependent patients and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls respectively. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate the differences of grey matter volume, and tract-based spatial statistics was used to detect abnormal white matter regions between alcohol dependent patients and healthy controls. The alterations in resting-state functional connectivity in alcohol dependent patients were examined using selected brain areas with gray matter deficits as seed regions. Results Compared with healthy controls, alcohol dependent patients had significantly reduced gray matter volume in the mesocorticolimbic system including the dorsal posterior cingulate cortex, the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, the medial prefrontal cortex, the orbitofrontal cortex and the putamen, decreased fractional anisotropy in the regions connecting the damaged grey matter areas driven by higher radial diffusivity value in the same areas and decreased resting-state functional connectivity within the reward network. Moreover, the gray matter volume of the left medial prefrontal cortex exhibited negative correlations with various impulse indices. Conclusions These findings suggest that chronic alcohol dependence could cause a complex neural changes linked to abnormal impulsivity. PMID:27575491

  18. Predictive value of early brain atrophy on response in patients treated with interferon β

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Miralles, Francisco Carlos; Vidal-Jordana, Angela; Río, Jordi; Auger, Cristina; Pareto, Deborah; Tintoré, Mar; Rovira, Alex; Montalban, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between brain volume loss during the first year of interferon treatment and clinical outcome at 4 years. Methods: Patients with multiple sclerosis initiating interferon β were clinically evaluated every 6 months for the presence of relapses and assessment of global disability using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). MRI scans were performed at baseline and after 12 months, and the percentage of brain volume change (PBVC), brain parenchymal volume change (BPVc%), gray matter volume change (GMVc%), and white matter volume change (WMVc%) were estimated. Patients were divided based on the cutoff values for predicting confirmed EDSS worsening obtained by receiver operating characteristic analysis for all atrophy measurements. Survival curves and Cox proportional hazards regression to predict disability worsening at last observation were applied, adjusting for demographic, clinical, and radiologic variables. Results: Larger PBVC and WMVc% decreases were observed in patients with disability worsening at 4 years of follow-up, whereas no differences were found in BPVc% or GMVc%. Cutoff points were obtained for PBVC (−0.86%; sensitivity 65.5%, specificity 71.4%) and WMVc% (−2.49%; sensitivity 85.3%, specificity 43.8%). Patients with decreases of PBVC and WMVc% below cutoff values were more prone to develop disability worsening (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] 3.875, p = 0.005; HR 4.246, p = 0.004, respectively). PBVC (HR 4.751, p = 0.008) and the interaction of new T2 lesions with WMVc% (HR 1.086, p = 0.005) were found to be independent predictors of disability worsening in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions: At the patient level, whole-brain and white matter volume changes in the first year of interferon β therapy are predictive of subsequent clinical evolution under treatment. PMID:26185778

  19. Neuroimaging the brain-gut axis in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Kristen R; Sherwin, LeeAnne B; Walitt, Brian; Melkus, Gail D’Eramo; Henderson, Wendy A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To summarize and synthesize current literature on neuroimaging the brain-gut axis in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: A database search for relevant literature was conducted using PubMed, Scopus and Embase in February 2015. Date filters were applied from the year 2009 and onward, and studies were limited to those written in the English language and those performed upon human subjects. The initial search yielded 797 articles, out of which 38 were pulled for full text review and 27 were included for study analysis. Investigations were reviewed to determine study design, methodology and results, and data points were placed in tabular format to facilitate analysis of study findings across disparate investigations. RESULTS: Analysis of study data resulted in the abstraction of four key themes: Neurohormonal differences, anatomic measurements of brain structure and connectivity, differences in functional responsiveness of the brain during rectal distention, and confounding/correlating patient factors. Studies in this review noted alterations of glutamate in the left hippocampus (HIPP), commonalities across IBS subjects in terms of brain oscillation patterns, cortical thickness/gray matter volume differences, and neuroanatomical regions with increased activation in patients with IBS: Anterior cingulate cortex, mid cingulate cortex, amygdala, anterior insula, posterior insula and prefrontal cortex. A striking finding among interventions was the substantial influence that patient variables (e.g., sex, psychological and disease related factors) had upon the identification of neuroanatomical differences in structure and connectivity. CONCLUSION: The field of neuroimaging can provide insight into underlying physiological differences that distinguish patients with IBS from a healthy population. PMID:27158548

  20. Preliminary evidence of reduced brain network activation in patients with post-traumatic migraine following concussion.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Anthony P; Reches, Amit; Elbin, R J; Dickman, Dalia; Laufer, Ilan; Geva, Amir B; Shacham, Galit; DeWolf, Ryan; Collins, Michael W

    2016-06-01

    Post-traumatic migraine (PTM) (i.e., headache, nausea, light and/or noise sensitivity) is an emerging risk factor for prolonged recovery following concussion. Concussions and migraine share similar pathophysiology characterized by specific ionic imbalances in the brain. Given these similarities, patients with PTM following concussion may exhibit distinct electrophysiological patterns, although researchers have yet to examine the electrophysiological brain activation in patients with PTM following concussion. A novel approach that may help differentiate brain activation in patients with and without PTM is brain network activation (BNA) analysis. BNA involves an algorithmic analysis applied to multichannel EEG-ERP data that provides a network map of cortical activity and quantitative data during specific tasks. A prospective, repeated measures design was used to evaluate BNA (during Go/NoGo task), EEG-ERP, cognitive performance, and concussion related symptoms at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks post-injury intervals among athletes with a medically diagnosed concussion with PTM (n = 15) and without (NO-PTM) (n = 22); and age, sex, and concussion history matched controls without concussion (CONTROL) (n = 20). Participants with PTM had significantly reduced BNA compared to NO-PTM and CONTROLS for Go and NoGo components at 3 weeks and for NoGo component at 4 weeks post-injury. The PTM group also demonstrated a more prominent deviation of network activity compared to the other two groups over a longer period of time. The composite BNA algorithm may be a more sensitive measure of electrophysiological change in the brain that can augment established cognitive assessment tools for detecting impairment in individuals with PTM.

  1. Surface-Based Parameters of Brain Imaging in Male Patients with Alcohol Use Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sungjin; Lee, Sang-Gu; Lee, Jeonghwan; Shin, Chul-Jin; Son, Jeong-Woo; Ju, Gawon; Lee, Sang-Ick

    2016-01-01

    Objective The structural alteration of brain shown in patients with alcohol use disorder (AUD) can originate from both alcohol effects and genetic or developmental processes. We compared surface-based parameters of patients with AUD with healthy controls to prove the applicability of surface-based morphometry with head size correction and to determine the areas that were sensitive to brain alteration related to AUD. Methods Twenty-six abstinent male patients with AUD (alcohol group, mean abstinence=13.2 months) and twenty-eight age-matched healthy participants (control group) were recruited from an inpatient mental hospital and community. All participants underwent a 3T MRI scan. Surface-based parameters were determined by using FreeSurfer. Results Every surface-based parameter of the alcohol group was lower than the corresponding control group parameter. There were large group differences in the whole brain, grey and white matter volume, and the differences were more prominent after head size correction. Significant group differences were shown in cortical thicknesses in entire brain regions, especially in parietal, temporal and frontal areas. There were no significant group differences in surface areas, but group difference trends in surface areas of the frontal and parietal cortices were shown after head size correction. Conclusion Most of the surface-based parameters in alcohol group were altered because of incomplete recovery from chronic alcohol exposure and possibly genetic or developmental factors underlying the risk of AUD. Surface-based morphometry with controlling for head size is useful in comparing the volumetric parameters and the surface area to a lesser extent in alcohol-related brain alteration. PMID:27757129

  2. Abnormal resting-state brain activities in patients with first-episode obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Qihui; Yang, Lei; Song, Xueqin; Chu, Congying; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Lifang; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiang; Cheng, Jingliang; Li, Youhui

    2017-01-01

    Objective This paper attempts to explore the brain activity of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and its correlation with the disease at resting duration in patients with first-episode OCD, providing a forceful imaging basis for clinic diagnosis and pathogenesis of OCD. Methods Twenty-six patients with first-episode OCD and 25 healthy controls (HC group; matched for age, sex, and education level) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning at resting state. Statistical parametric mapping 8, data processing assistant for resting-state fMRI analysis toolkit, and resting state fMRI data analysis toolkit packages were used to process the fMRI data on Matlab 2012a platform, and the difference of regional homogeneity (ReHo) values between the OCD group and HC group was detected with independent two-sample t-test. With age as a concomitant variable, the Pearson correlation analysis was adopted to study the correlation between the disease duration and ReHo value of whole brain. Results Compared with HC group, the ReHo values in OCD group were decreased in brain regions, including left thalamus, right thalamus, right paracentral lobule, right postcentral gyrus, and the ReHo value was increased in the left angular gyrus region. There was a negative correlation between disease duration and ReHo value in the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Conclusion OCD is a multifactorial disease generally caused by abnormal activities of many brain regions at resting state. Worse brain activity of the OFC is related to the OCD duration, which provides a new insight to the pathogenesis of OCD. PMID:28243104

  3. Altered expressions of apoptotic factors and synaptic markers in postmortem brain from bipolar disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Wook; Rapoport, Stanley I; Rao, Jagadeesh S

    2009-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a progressive psychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent changes of mood, and is associated with cognitive decline. There is evidence of excitotoxicity, neuroinflammation, upregulated arachidonic acid (AA) cascade signaling and brain atrophy in BD patients. These observations suggest that BD pathology may be associated with apoptosis as well as with disturbed synaptic function. To test this hypothesis, we measured mRNA and protein levels of the pro-apoptotic (Bax, BAD, Caspase-9 and Caspase-3) and anti-apoptotic factors (BDNF and Bcl-2), and of pre- and post-synaptic markers (synaptophysin and drebrin), in postmortem brain from 10 BD patients and 10 age-matched controls. Consistent with the hypothesis, BD brains showed significant increases in protein and mRNA levels of the pro-apoptotic factors and significant decreases of levels of the anti-apoptotic factors and the synaptic markers, synaptophysin and drebrin. These differences may contribute to brain atrophy and progressive cognitive changes in BD. PMID:19945534

  4. Evidence for ongoing brain injury in human immunodeficiency virus–positive patients treated with antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, VA; Meyerhoff, DJ; Studholme, C; Kornak, J; Rothlind, J; Lampiris, H; Neuhaus, J; Grant, RM; Chao, LL; Truran, D; Weiner, MW

    2009-01-01

    Treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART) has greatly reduced the incidence of dementia. The goal of this longitudinal study was to determine if there are ongoing macrostructural brain changes in human immunodeficiency virus–positive (HIV+) individuals treated with ART. To quantify brain structure, three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed at baseline and again after 24 months in 39 HIV+ patients on ART and 30 HIV− controls. Longitudinal changes in brain volume were measured using tissue segmentation within regions of interest and deformation morphometry. Measured by tissue segmentation, HIV+ patients on ART had significantly (all P < .05) greater rates of white matter volume loss than HIV− control individuals. Compared with controls, the subgroup of HIV+ individuals on ART with viral suppression also had significantly greater rates of white matter volume loss. Deformation morphometry confirmed these results with more specific spatial localization. Deformation morphometry also detected greater rates of gray matter and white matter loss in the subgroup of HIV+ individuals with detectable viral loads. These results provide evidence of ongoing brain volume loss in HIV+ individuals on stable ART, possibly suggesting ongoing cerebral injury. The presence of continuing injury raises the possibility that HIV+ individuals—even in the presence of viral suppression in the periphery—are at greater risk for future cognitive impairments and dementia and possibly faster cognitive decline. Therefore, HIV+ individuals on ART should be monitored for cognitive decline, and treatments that reduce ongoing neurological injury should be considered. PMID:19499454

  5. Coarse electrocorticographic decoding of ipsilateral reach in patients with brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Hotson, Guy; Fifer, Matthew S; Acharya, Soumyadipta; Benz, Heather L; Anderson, William S; Thakor, Nitish V; Crone, Nathan E

    2014-01-01

    In patients with unilateral upper limb paralysis from strokes and other brain lesions, strategies for functional recovery may eventually include brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) using control signals from residual sensorimotor systems in the damaged hemisphere. When voluntary movements of the contralateral limb are not possible due to brain pathology, initial training of such a BMI may require use of the unaffected ipsilateral limb. We conducted an offline investigation of the feasibility of decoding ipsilateral upper limb movements from electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings in three patients with different lesions of sensorimotor systems associated with upper limb control. We found that the first principal component (PC) of unconstrained, naturalistic reaching movements of the upper limb could be decoded from ipsilateral ECoG using a linear model. ECoG signal features yielding the best decoding accuracy were different across subjects. Performance saturated with very few input features. Decoding performances of 0.77, 0.73, and 0.66 (median Pearson's r between the predicted and actual first PC of movement using nine signal features) were achieved in the three subjects. The performance achieved here with small numbers of electrodes and computationally simple decoding algorithms suggests that it may be possible to control a BMI using ECoG recorded from damaged sensorimotor brain systems.

  6. Neural stem cells improve neuronal survival in cultured postmortem brain tissue from aged and Alzheimer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, L; Sluiter, A A; Guo, Ho-fu; Balesar, R A; Swaab, D F; Zhou, Jiang-Ning; Verwer, R W H

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Neurodegenerative diseases are progressive and incurable and are becoming ever more prevalent. To study whether neural stem cell can reactivate or rescue functions of impaired neurons in the human aging and neurodegenerating brain, we co-cultured postmortem slices from Alzheimer patients and control participants with rat embryonic day 14 (E14) neural stem cells. Viability staining based on the exclusion of ethidium bromide by intact plasma membranes showed that there were strikingly more viable cells and fewer dead cells in slices co-cultured with neural stem cells than in untreated slices. The presence of Alzheimer pathology in the brain slices did not influence this effect, although the slices from Alzheimer patients, in general, contained fewer viable cells. Co-culturing with rat E14 fibroblasts did not improve the viability of neurons in the human brain slices. Since the human slices and neural stem cells were separated by a membrane during co-culturing our data show for the first time that neural stem cells release diffusible factors that may improve the survival of aged and degenerating neurons in human brains. PMID:18088384

  7. Cost-effectiveness of extended-release niacin/laropiprant added to a stable simvastatin dose in secondary prevention patients not at cholesterol goal in Germany.

    PubMed

    Michailov, Galin V; Davies, Glenn M; Krobot, Karl J

    2012-06-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) remains the leading cause of death in Germany despite statin use to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels; improving lipids beyond LDL-C may further reduce cardiovascular risk. A fixed-dose combination of extended-release niacin (ERN) with laropiprant (LRPT) provides comprehensive lipid management. We adapted a decision-analytic model to evaluate the economic value (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio [ICER] in terms of costs per life-years gained [LYG]) of ERN/LRPT 2 g over a lifetime in secondary prevention patients in a German setting. Two scenarios were modelled: (1) ERN/LRPT 2 g added to simvastatin 40 mg in patients not at LDL-C goal with simvastatin 40 mg; (2) adding ERN/LRPT 2 g compared with titration to simvastatin 40 mg in patients not at LDL-C goal with simvastatin 20 mg. In both scenarios, adding ERN/LRPT was cost-effective relative to simvastatin monotherapy at a commonly accepted threshold of €30,000 per LYG; ICERs for ERN/LRPT were €13,331 per LYG in scenario 1 and €17,684 per LYG in scenario 2. Subgroup analyses showed that ERN/LRPT was cost-effective in patients with or without diabetes, patients aged ≤ 65 or >65 years and patients with low baseline high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels; ICERs ranged from €10,342 to €15,579 in scenario 1, and from €14,081 to €20,462 in scenario 2. In conclusion, comprehensive lipid management with ERN/LRPT 2 g is cost-effective in secondary prevention patients in Germany who have not achieved LDL-C goal with simvastatin monotherapy.

  8. Incidental parenchymal magnetic resonance imaging findings in the brains of patients with neurofibromatosis type 2☆

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Wendy S.; Heier, Linda A.; Rodriguez, Fausto; Bergner, Amanda; Yohay, Kaleb

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Whereas T2 hyperintensities known as NF-associated bright spots are well described in patients with neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1), there is a paucity of data on incidental findings in patients with neurofibromatosis type II (NF-2). We aim to characterize unexplained imaging findings in the brains of patients with NF-2. Materials and methods This study is retrospective, HIPAA-compliant and approved by the institutional review board. 34 patients with NF-2 underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between January 2000 and December 2012. T2 and T1-weighted imaging characteristics, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) characteristics, and enhancement patterns were analyzed by visual inspection. Clinical information at time of imaging was available for all patients. Neuropathologic data was available for one patient. Results We found unexplained T2 hyperintensit