Science.gov

Sample records for ad patient performance

  1. Nurse Value-Added and Patient Outcomes in Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Yakusheva, Olga; Lindrooth, Richard; Weiss, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aims of the study were to (1) estimate the relative nurse effectiveness, or individual nurse value-added (NVA), to patients’ clinical condition change during hospitalization; (2) examine nurse characteristics contributing to NVA; and (3) estimate the contribution of value-added nursing care to patient outcomes. Data Sources/Study Setting Electronic data on 1,203 staff nurses matched with 7,318 adult medical–surgical patients discharged between July 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011 from an urban Magnet-designated, 854-bed teaching hospital. Study Design Retrospective observational longitudinal analysis using a covariate-adjustment value-added model with nurse fixed effects. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Data were extracted from the study hospital's electronic patient records and human resources databases. Principal Findings Nurse effects were jointly significant and explained 7.9 percent of variance in patient clinical condition change during hospitalization. NVA was positively associated with having a baccalaureate degree or higher (0.55, p = .04) and expertise level (0.66, p = .03). NVA contributed to patient outcomes of shorter length of stay and lower costs. Conclusions Nurses differ in their value-added to patient outcomes. The ability to measure individual nurse relative value-added opens the possibility for development of performance metrics, performance-based rankings, and merit-based salary schemes to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs. PMID:25256089

  2. The Incremental Diagnostic Performance of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Added to Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Patients with Intermediate-to-High Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Pei-Ying; Lee, Wen-Jeng; Cheng, Mei-Fang; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Wu, Yen-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Several studies have suggested that a combined approach of stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) can provide diagnostic results with excellent accuracy. We aimed to explore whether the addition of CCTA to stress MPI provides incremental diagnostic value in intermediate-to-high cardiovascular risk patients. Methods A total of 106 consecutive patients (93 male, 65 ± 10.4 years) underwent coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS), CCTA and 201Thallium stress MPI before coronary angiography was reviewed. Thirty-seven patients (34.9%) had a history of proven coronary artery disease (CAD) or revascularization procedures, and four had documented non-significant CAD (3.8%). The remaining patients consisted of 17 (16.0%) classified as intermediate, and 48 (45.3%) as the high-risk groups. Results Obstructive CAD was diagnosed by invasive coronary angiography in 88 patients with 161 vessels. The sensitivity and specificity in a patient-based analysis for obstructive CAD were 99% and 17% for CCTA, 80% and 50% for MPI and 91% and 67% for the combined method, respectively. The per-vessel diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 95% and 54% for CCTA, 59% and 75% for MPI and 84% and 76% for the combined method. There were significant differences (p < 0.05) when comparing the combined method with MPI or CCTA by areas under the curve in a patient- or vessel-based analysis. However, CACS of 400 or more could not further stratify the patients with obstructive CAD. Conclusions CCTA, not CACS, provided additional diagnostic values to stress MPI in patients with intermediate-to-high cardiovascular risk. PMID:27122945

  3. Functional communication with AD patients: a caregiver training program.

    PubMed

    Ripich, D N

    1994-01-01

    The loss of functional communication in Alzheimer disease (AD) results from the disproportionate breakdowns in the pragmatic and semantic areas of language in these patients. Communication breakdown is regularly listed among the top four stressors in measures of stress and burden of AD caregivers. A caregiver training program designed around seven specific communication strategies can be used to alter communication interactions. As a pilot program, the acronym FOCUSED organized the seven strategies for easy recall (Face-to-face, Orientation, Continuity, Unsticking, Structure, Exchanges, and Direct). Significant differences in both attitude toward AD patients, knowledge of AD, and knowledge of communication strategies were shown in comparisons of pre- and posttraining assessments. PMID:7999352

  4. Patient Internet services: creating the value-added paradigm.

    PubMed

    Molfenter, Todd; Johnson, Pauley; Gustafson, David H; DeVries, Kathy; Veeramani, Dharmaraj

    2002-01-01

    An analysis of consumer and organizational perspectives on web design suggests emerging webside functionality, growing patient needs for self-management skills, and mounting corporate accountability will transform web strategies and consumer expectations from the current general health information approach to a value-added paradigm, which is described with a list of eight guiding principles. PMID:12365305

  5. Catecholamine-Based Treatment in AD Patients: Expectations and Delusions

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Alessandro; Olivola, Enrica; Liguori, Claudio; Hainsworth, Atticus H.; Saviozzi, Valentina; Angileri, Giacoma; D’Angelo, Vincenza; Galati, Salvatore; Pierantozzi, Mariangela

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the gap between excellence of diagnostics and efficacy of therapy is wide. Despite sophisticated imaging and biochemical markers, the efficacy of available therapeutic options is limited. Here we examine the possibility that assessment of endogenous catecholamine levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may fuel new therapeutic strategies. In reviewing the available literature, we consider the effects of levodopa, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and noradrenaline (NE) modulators, showing disparate results. We present a preliminary assessment of CSF concentrations of dopamine (DA) and NE, determined by HPLC, in a small dementia cohort of either Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or frontotemporal dementia patients, compared to control subjects. Our data reveal detectable levels of DA, NE in CSF, though we found no significant alterations in the dementia population as a whole. AD patients exhibit a small impairment of the DA axis and a larger increase of NE concentration, likely to represent a compensatory mechanism. While waiting for preventive strategies, a pragmatic approach to AD may re-evaluate catecholamine modulation, possibly stratified to dementia subtypes, as part of the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:25999852

  6. ADS-Demo Fuel Rod Performance: Multivariate Statistical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, R.; Vettraino, F.; Luzzi, L.

    2004-07-01

    A forward step in the development of Accelerator Driven System (ADS) for the Pu, MA and LLFP transmutation, is the realisation of a 80 MWt ADS-demo (XADS) whose basic objective is the system feasibility demonstration. The XADS is forecasted to adopt the UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} mixed-oxides fuel already experimented in the sodium cooled fast reactors such as the french SPX-1. The present multivariate statistical analysis performed by using the Transuranus Code, was carried out for the Normal Operation at the so-called Enhanced Nominal Conditions (120% nominal reactor power), aimed at verifying that the fuel system complies with the stated design limits, i.e. centerline fuel temperature, cladding temperature and damage, during all the in-reactor lifetime. A statistical input set similar to SPX and PEC fuel case, was adopted. One most relevant assumption in the present calculations was a 30% AISI-316 cladding thickness corrosion at EOL. Relative influence of main fuel rod parameters on fuel centerline temperature was also evaluated. (authors)

  7. Does Ad Hoc Coronary Intervention Reduce Radiation Exposure? – Analysis of 568 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Truffa, Márcio A. M.; Alves, Gustavo M.P.; Bernardi, Fernando; Esteves Filho, Antonio; Ribeiro, Expedito; Galon, Micheli Z.; Spadaro, André; Kajita, Luiz J.; Arrieta, Raul; Lemos, Pedro A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Advantages and disadvantages of ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention have been described. However little is known about the radiation exposure of that procedure as compared with the staged intervention. Objective To compare the radiation dose of the ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention with that of the staged procedure Methods The dose-area product and total Kerma were measured, and the doses of the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were added. In addition, total fluoroscopic time and number of acquisitions were evaluated. Results A total of 568 consecutive patients were treated with ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention (n = 320) or staged percutaneous coronary intervention (n = 248). On admission, the ad hoc group had less hypertension (74.1% vs 81.9%; p = 0.035), dyslipidemia (57.8% vs. 67.7%; p = 0.02) and three-vessel disease (38.8% vs. 50.4%; p = 0.015). The ad hoc group was exposed to significantly lower radiation doses, even after baseline characteristic adjustment between both groups. The ad hoc group was exposed to a total dose-area product of 119.7 ± 70.7 Gycm2, while the staged group, to 139.2 ± 75.3 Gycm2 (p < 0.001). Conclusion Ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention reduced radiation exposure as compared with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures performed at two separate times. PMID:26351982

  8. Performance Improvement in Geographic Routing for Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kaiwartya, Omprakash; Kumar, Sushil; Lobiyal, D. K.; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Hassan, Ahmed Nazar

    2014-01-01

    Geographic routing is one of the most investigated themes by researchers for reliable and efficient dissemination of information in Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks (VANETs). Recently, different Geographic Distance Routing (GEDIR) protocols have been suggested in the literature. These protocols focus on reducing the forwarding region towards destination to select the Next Hop Vehicles (NHV). Most of these protocols suffer from the problem of elevated one-hop link disconnection, high end-to-end delay and low throughput even at normal vehicle speed in high vehicle density environment. This paper proposes a Geographic Distance Routing protocol based on Segment vehicle, Link quality and Degree of connectivity (SLD-GEDIR). The protocol selects a reliable NHV using the criteria segment vehicles, one-hop link quality and degree of connectivity. The proposed protocol has been simulated in NS-2 and its performance has been compared with the state-of-the-art protocols: P-GEDIR, J-GEDIR and V-GEDIR. The empirical results clearly reveal that SLD-GEDIR has lower link disconnection and end-to-end delay, and higher throughput as compared to the state-of-the-art protocols. It should be noted that the performance of the proposed protocol is preserved irrespective of vehicle density and speed. PMID:25429415

  9. Managing performance of DB2 Ad Hoc Reports

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, A.

    1994-02-01

    The DB2 financial reporting systems at Westinghouse Savannah River Company consists of 212 standardized reports that over 1034 users have accessed in 1993 to generate their reports. Each report has a range of selection criteria that the users can specify. Depending on the selection criteria, a report can access from a few rows to millions of rows of data. When this new DB2 system went into production in 1992, the CPU was at 100% utilization. From the beginning, ad hoc reports had a backlog of 4--5 days. Since DB2 was a new DBMS, most people blamed the poor report turn around times on DB2 as an inefficient DBMS and on a shortage of CPU cycles. Since we are unable to purchase a more powerful CPU, the only option left to us was to improve report turn around was system and application performance tuning. This document presents our efforts in these areas. Education of users in report submission was a starting point. And as to index tuning techniques that were applied, we created more friendly indexes, used clustering indexes, and used a reorganizing mechanism. A more efficient SQL was written which saved a lot of money.

  10. Can Value-Added Measures of Teacher Performance Be Trusted?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Reckase, Mark D.; Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate whether commonly used value-added estimation strategies produce accurate estimates of teacher effects under a variety of scenarios. We estimate teacher effects in simulated student achievement data sets that mimic plausible types of student grouping and teacher assignment scenarios. We find that no one method accurately captures…

  11. Radiographic Parameters in Adult Degenerative Scoliosis and Different Parameters Between Sagittal Balanced and Imbalanced ADS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Changwei; Yang, Mingyuan; Chen, Yuanyuan; Wei, Xianzhao; Ni, Haijian; Chen, Ziqiang; Li, Jingfeng; Bai, Yushu; Zhu, Xiaodong; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A retrospective study. To summarize and describe the radiographic parameters of adult degenerative scoliosis (ADS) and explore the radiological parameters which are significantly different in sagittal balanced and imbalanced ADS patients. ADS is the most common type of adult spinal deformity. However, no comprehensive description of radiographic parameters in ADS patients has been made, and few studies have been performed to explore which radiological parameters are significantly different between sagittal balanced and imbalanced ADS patients. Medical records of ADS patients in our outpatient clinic from January 2012 to January 2014 were reviewed. Demographic data including age and sex, and radiographic data including the coronal Cobb angle, location of apical vertebra/disc, convexity of the curve, degree of apical vertebra rotation, curve segments, thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), thoracolumbar kyphosis (TL), sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT), pelvic incidence (PI), sagittal vertical axis (SVA), and PI minus LL (PI − LL) were reviewed to make comprehensive description of radiographic parameters of ADS. Furthermore, patients were divided into 2 groups according to whether the patients’ sagittal plane was balanced: Group A (imbalanced, SVA > 5 cm) and Group B (balanced, SVA ≤ 5 cm). Demographic and radiological parameters were compared between these 2 groups. A total of 99 patients were included in this study (Group A = 33 and Group B = 66; female = 83 and male = 16; sex ratio = 5:1). The median of age were 67 years (range: 41–92 years). The median of coronal Cobb angle and length of curve was 23 (range: 10–75°) and 5 segments (range: 3–7), respectively. The most common location of apical vertebra was at L2 to L3 (81%) and the median of degree of apical vertebra rotation was 2° (range: 1–3). Our study also showed significant correlations between coronal Cobb angle and curve segments (r

  12. Evaluating Value-Added Methods of Estimating of Teacher Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Reckase, Mark D.; Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate indicators of educational effectiveness are needed to advance national policy goals of raising student achievement and closing social/cultural based achievement gaps. If constructed and used appropriately, such indicators for both program evaluation and the evaluation of teacher and school performance could have a transformative effect on…

  13. Battery Performance Modelling ad Simulation: a Neural Network Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottavianelli, Giuseppe; Donati, Alessandro

    2002-01-01

    This project has developed on the background of ongoing researches within the Control Technology Unit (TOS-OSC) of the Special Projects Division at the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) of the European Space Agency. The purpose of this research is to develop and validate an Artificial Neural Network tool (ANN) able to model, simulate and predict the Cluster II battery system's performance degradation. (Cluster II mission is made of four spacecraft flying in tetrahedral formation and aimed to observe and study the interaction between sun and earth by passing in and out of our planet's magnetic field). This prototype tool, named BAPER and developed with a commercial neural network toolbox, could be used to support short and medium term mission planning in order to improve and maximise the batteries lifetime, determining which are the future best charge/discharge cycles for the batteries given their present states, in view of a Cluster II mission extension. This study focuses on the five Silver-Cadmium batteries onboard of Tango, the fourth Cluster II satellite, but time restrains have allowed so far to perform an assessment only on the first battery. In their most basic form, ANNs are hyper-dimensional curve fits for non-linear data. With their remarkable ability to derive meaning from complicated or imprecise history data, ANN can be used to extract patterns and detect trends that are too complex to be noticed by either humans or other computer techniques. ANNs learn by example, and this is why they can be described as an inductive, or data-based models for the simulation of input/target mappings. A trained ANN can be thought of as an "expert" in the category of information it has been given to analyse, and this expert can then be used, as in this project, to provide projections given new situations of interest and answer "what if" questions. The most appropriate algorithm, in terms of training speed and memory storage requirements, is clearly the Levenberg

  14. Fiber-reinforced superalloy composites provide an added performance edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Mcdaniels, D. L.; Westfall, L. J.; Stephens, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Fiber reinforcements are being explored as a means to increasing the performance of superalloys past 980 C. Fiber-reinforced superalloys (FRS), particularly tungsten FRS (TFRS) are candidate materials for rocket-engine turbopump blades for advanced Shuttle engines and in airbreathing and other rocket engines. Refractory metal wires are the reinforcement of choice due to tolerance to fiber/matrix interactions. W alloy fibers have a maximum tensile strength of 2165 MPa at 1095 C and a 100 hr creep rupture strength at stresses up to 1400 MPa. A TFRS has the potential of a service temperature 110 C over the strongest superalloy. Manufacturing processes being evaluated to realize the FRS components are summarized, together with design features which will be introduced in turbine blades to take advantage of the FRS materials and to extend their surface life.

  15. Adding Doppler Ultrasonography to the Follow-Up of Patients with Vasospastic Disorder Improves Objectivity

    PubMed Central

    Karabacak, Kubilay; Kadan, Murat; Kaya, Erkan; Erol, Gokhan; Arslan, Gokhan; Celik, Murat; Doğanci, Suat; Demirkilic, Ufuk

    2015-01-01

    Background Assessing therapeutic efficacy and patient satisfaction objectively and quantitatively has always been a problem in patients with vasospastic disorders. We aimed to present the additive value of ultrasonographic assessment of peripheral arteries secondary to cold stimulation, as a test for treatment efficacy during follow-up. Material/Methods Arterial blood flow rates were measured from radial artery with Doppler USG in patients who presented to our department with vasospastic disorders. Ultrasonography was performed at the following intervals; before cold stimulation and at 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th minutes of cold stimulation. Patients were controlled by repeat cold stimulation test and Doppler US at the 2nd month of the treatment. Results were analyzed with SPSS for Mac 20.0 package program. Results We enrolled 46 patients in the study. All patients were male and mean age was 22.3±2.17 years. Most common symptoms were cyanosis and coldness. There were statistically significant differences between pre-treatment and post-treatment arterial blood flow rates at each measurement time point (p<0.001) except initial measurement (p>0.05). On post-treatment values, there were 10.04±0.78 cm/s increase in 5th minute, 6.25±1.39 cm/s in 10th minute, 6.43±2.13 cm/s in 15th minute, and 6.38±1.86 cm/s in 20th minute measurements. All increases at the 5 time points were statistically meaningful when compared to their pre-treatment corresponding time points (p<0.001). Conclusions Doppler flowmetry added to standard cold stimulation test for evaluating the patients with vasospastic disorders provides better and more objective results when compared to the patient-oriented subjective scoring systems. PMID:25639947

  16. Aromatase Expression in the Hippocampus of AD Patients and 5xFAD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Prange-Kiel, Janine; Dudzinski, Danuta A.; Pröls, Felicitas; Glatzel, Markus; Matschke, Jakob; Rune, Gabriele M.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies show that 17β-estradiol (E2) protects against Alzheimer's disease (AD) induced neurodegeneration. The E2-synthesizing enzyme aromatase is expressed in healthy hippocampi, but although the hippocampus is severely affected in AD, little is known about the expression of hippocampal aromatase in AD. To better understand the role of hippocampal aromatase in AD, we studied its expression in postmortem material from patients with AD and in a mouse model for AD (5xFAD mice). In human hippocampi, aromatase-immunoreactivity was observed in the vast majority of principal neurons and signal quantification revealed higher expression of aromatase protein in AD patients compared to age- and sex-matched controls. The tissue-specific first exons of aromatase I.f, PII, I.3, and I.6 were detected in hippocampi of controls and AD patients by RT-PCR. In contrast, 3-month-old, female 5xFAD mice showed lower expression of aromatase mRNA and protein (measured by qRT-PCR and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry) than WT controls; no such differences were observed in male mice. Our findings stress the importance of hippocampal aromatase expression in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27298742

  17. The bone-added osteotome sinus floor elevation technique: multicenter retrospective report of consecutively treated patients.

    PubMed

    Rosen, P S; Summers, R; Mellado, J R; Salkin, L M; Shanaman, R H; Marks, M H; Fugazzotto, P A

    1999-01-01

    A retrospective clinical evaluation of patients consecutively treated from multiple centers was performed. The treatment of these patients utilized the bone-added osteotome sinus floor elevation (BAOSFE) procedure with immediate implant fixation. The BAOSFE method employs a specific set of osteotome instruments to tent the sinus membrane with bone graft material placed through the osteotomy site. A total of 174 implants was placed in 101 patients. Implants were of both screw and cylinder shapes with machined, titanium plasma-sprayed, and hydroxyapatite surfaces from various manufacturers. The 9 participating clinicians used autografts, allografts, and xenografts alone or in various combinations, and the type of graft was selected by the individual clinicians. The choice of graft material did not appear to influence survival rates. Loading periods varied from 6 to 66 months. The survival rate was 96% or higher when pretreatment bone height was 5 mm or more and dropped to 85.7% when pretreatment bone height was 4 mm or less. The most important factor influencing implant survival with the BAOSFE was the preexisting bone height between the sinus floor and crest. This short-term retrospective investigation suggests that the BAOSFE can be a successful procedure with a wide variety of implant types and grafting procedures. PMID:10612923

  18. What Are Error Rates for Classifying Teacher and School Performance Using Value-Added Models?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.; Chiang, Hanley S.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses likely error rates for measuring teacher and school performance in the upper elementary grades using value-added models applied to student test score gain data. Using a realistic performance measurement system scheme based on hypothesis testing, the authors develop error rate formulas based on ordinary least squares and…

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and memory present distinct associations along the continuum from healthy subjects to AD patients.

    PubMed

    Rami, Lorena; Fortea, Juan; Bosch, Beatriz; Solé-Padullés, Cristina; Lladó, Albert; Iranzo, Alex; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Molinuevo, Jose Luis

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to study the association between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of amyloid-β (Aβ)(1-42), t-tau, and p-tau and cognitive performance along the Alzheimer's disease (AD) continuum from healthy subjects to AD patients and, specifically, among patients in the pre-dementia stage of the disease. A total of 101 subjects were studied: 19 healthy controls (CTR), 17 subjects with subjective memory complaints (SMC), 47 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 18 AD patients. Only memory performance significantly correlated with CSF levels of Aβ(1-42), t-tau, and p-tau along the AD continuum. Subgroup analyses revealed that in SMC patients Aβ(1-42) levels positively correlated with the total recall score of the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (FCRST) (r = 0.666; p < 0.005), Digit Span (r = 0.752; p < 0.005), and CERAD world list learning (r = 0.697; p < 0.005). In MCI patients, a significant inverse correlation was found between the word list recall score from the CERAD and t-tau (r = -0.483; p < 0.005) and p-tau levels (r = -0.495; p < 0.005), as well as between the total recall subtest score from the FCRST and both t-tau (r = -0.420; p < 0.005) and p-tau levels (r = -0.422; p < 0.005). No significant correlations were found between other aspects of cognition and CSF levels in CTR or AD patients. These results indicate that memory performance is related to Aβ(1-42) levels in SMC, while it is associated with tau in the prodromal stage of the disease. This suggests that in the continuum from healthy aging to AD, memory performance is first related with Aβ(1-42) levels and then with t-tau or p-tau, before becoming independent of biomarker levels in the dementia stage. PMID:21098971

  20. Measuring Value Added in Higher Education: A Proposed Methodology for Developing a Performance Indicator Based on the Economic Value Added to Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    The 2003 UK higher education White Paper suggested that the sector needed to re-examine the potential of the value added concept. This paper describes a possible methodology for developing a performance indicator based on the economic value added to graduates. The paper examines how an entry-quality-adjusted measure of a graduate's "expected"…

  1. 75 FR 48552 - Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Out Performance Requirements To Support Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... (ADS-B) Out Performance Requirements To Support Air Traffic Control (ATC) Service; OMB Approval of..., ``Automatic Dependent Surveillance- Broadcast (ADS-B) Out Performance Requirements To Support Air Traffic... rule, ``Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Out Performance Requirements To Support...

  2. A Robust Deep Model for Improved Classification of AD/MCI Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Tran, Loc; Thung, Kim-Han; Ji, Shuiwang; Shen, Dinggang; Li, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Accurate classification of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and its prodromal stage, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), plays a critical role in possibly preventing progression of memory impairment and improving quality of life for AD patients. Among many research tasks, it is of particular interest to identify noninvasive imaging biomarkers for AD diagnosis. In this paper, we present a robust deep learning system to identify different progression stages of AD patients based on MRI and PET scans. We utilized the dropout technique to improve classical deep learning by preventing its weight co-adaptation, which is a typical cause of over-fitting in deep learning. In addition, we incorporated stability selection, an adaptive learning factor, and a multi-task learning strategy into the deep learning framework. We applied the proposed method to the ADNI data set and conducted experiments for AD and MCI conversion diagnosis. Experimental results showed that the dropout technique is very effective in AD diagnosis, improving the classification accuracies by 5.9% on average as compared to the classical deep learning methods. PMID:25955998

  3. A Robust Deep Model for Improved Classification of AD/MCI Patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Tran, Loc; Thung, Kim-Han; Ji, Shuiwang; Shen, Dinggang; Li, Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Accurate classification of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its prodromal stage, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), plays a critical role in possibly preventing progression of memory impairment and improving quality of life for AD patients. Among many research tasks, it is of a particular interest to identify noninvasive imaging biomarkers for AD diagnosis. In this paper, we present a robust deep learning system to identify different progression stages of AD patients based on MRI and PET scans. We utilized the dropout technique to improve classical deep learning by preventing its weight coadaptation, which is a typical cause of overfitting in deep learning. In addition, we incorporated stability selection, an adaptive learning factor, and a multitask learning strategy into the deep learning framework. We applied the proposed method to the ADNI dataset, and conducted experiments for AD and MCI conversion diagnosis. Experimental results showed that the dropout technique is very effective in AD diagnosis, improving the classification accuracies by 5.9% on average as compared to the classical deep learning methods. PMID:25955998

  4. The effects of malicious nodes on performance of mobile ad hoc networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fanzhi; Shi, Xiyu; Jassim, Sabah; Adams, Christopher

    2006-05-01

    Wireless ad hoc networking offers convenient infrastructureless communication over the shared wireless channel. However, the nature of ad hoc networks makes them vulnerable to security attacks. Unlike their wired counterpart, infrastructureless ad hoc networks do not have a clear line of defense, their topology is dynamically changing, and every mobile node can receive messages from its neighbors and can be contacted by all other nodes in its neighborhood. This poses a great danger to network security if some nodes behave in a malicious manner. The immediate concern about the security in this type of networks is how to protect the network and the individual mobile nodes against malicious act of rogue nodes from within the network. This paper is concerned with security aspects of wireless ad hoc networks. We shall present results of simulation experiments on ad hoc network's performance in the presence of malicious nodes. We shall investigate two types of attacks and the consequences will be simulated and quantified in terms of loss of packets and other factors. The results show that network performance, in terms of successful packet delivery ratios, significantly deteriorates when malicious nodes act according to the defined misbehaving characteristics.

  5. An Evaluation of Empirical Bayes' Estimation of Value- Added Teacher Performance Measures. Working Paper #31. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Maxfield, Michelle; Reckase, Mark D.; Thompson, Paul; Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Empirical Bayes' (EB) estimation is a widely used procedure to calculate teacher value-added. It is primarily viewed as a way to make imprecise estimates more reliable. In this paper we review the theory of EB estimation and use simulated data to study its ability to properly rank teachers. We compare the performance of EB estimators with that of…

  6. The Effect of Summer on Value-Added Assessments of Teacher and School Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palardy, Gregory J.; Peng, Luyao

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of including the summer period on value-added assessments (VAA) of teacher and school performance at the early grades. The results indicate that 40-62% of the variance in VAA estimates originates from the summer period, depending on the outcome (i.e., reading or math achievement gains). Furthermore, when summer is…

  7. Influence of Education on the Pattern of Cognitive Deterioration in Ad Patients: The Cognitive Reserve Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carret, N.L.; Auriacombe, S.; Letenneur, L.; Bergua, V.; Dartigues, J.F.; Fabrigoule, C.

    2005-01-01

    The cognitive reserve hypothesis proposes that a high educational level could delay the clinical expression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) although neuropathologic changes develop in the brain. Therefore, some studies have reported that when the clinical signs of the disease emerge, high-educated patients may decline more rapidly than low-educated…

  8. Correlation of statin-increased platelet APP ratios and reduced blood lipids in AD patients.

    PubMed

    Baskin, F; Rosenberg, R N; Fang, X; Hynan, L S; Moore, C B; Weiner, M; Vega, G L

    2003-06-24

    Platelets, like neurons, contain 120- to 130- and 110-kd amyloid precursor proteins (APPs). Their ratio is reduced in AD, further reductions correlating with reduced Mini-Mental Status Examination scores [r(11) = 0.69, p < 0.05]. As statins alter APP processing, platelet APPs were analyzed in patients with AD given anticholesterol drugs for 6 weeks. APP ratios increased [t(37) = -3.888, p = 0.0004], proportionally with reduced cholesterol [r(36) = -0.45, p = 0.005]. Longer trials may reveal slowed cognitive loss, validating this index. PMID:12821755

  9. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor Treatment is Associated with Relatively Slow Cognitive Decline in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease and AD + DLB

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Peter T.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Abner, Erin L.; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Mendiondo, Marta S.; Cooper, Greg; Smith, Charles B.; Markesbery, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Dementia can be caused by different diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), or both (AD + DLB). University of Kentucky AD Center pathologically-diagnosed AD and AD + DLB cases were evaluated who had three or more longitudinal antemortem mental status examinations (n = 156). Patients with important concomitant pathology (n = 5) or patients that were profoundly demented at recruitment (intake MMSE < 20; n = 86) were excluded to strengthen our ability to test the association of specific clinical and pathological indices. Patients with pathologically-diagnosed AD + DLB (n = 25) lost cognitive capacity faster than patients with AD alone (n = 40). In both diseases, treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors was associated with a slower rate of cognitive decline. PMID:19158418

  10. Performance-based workload assessment: Allocation strategy and added task sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidulich, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    The preliminary results of a research program investigating the use of added tasks to evaluate mental workload are reviewed. The focus of the first studies was a reappraisal of the traditional secondary task logic that encouraged the use of low-priority instructions for the added task. It was believed that such low-priority tasks would encourage subjects to split their available resources among the two tasks. The primary task would be assigned all the resources it needed, and any remaining reserve capacity would be assigned to the secondary task. If the model were correct, this approach was expected to combine sensitivity to primary task difficulty with unintrusiveness to primary task performance. The first studies of the current project demonstrated that a high-priority added task, although intrusive, could be more sensitive than the traditional low-priority secondary task. These results suggested that a more appropriate model of the attentional effects associated with added task performance might be based on capacity switching, rather than the traditional optimal allocation model.

  11. Obesity is linked with lower brain volume in 700 AD and MCI patients

    PubMed Central

    Ho, April J.; Raji, Cyrus A.; Becker, James T.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Hibar, Derrek; Dinov, Ivo D.; Stein, Jason L.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is associated with lower brain volumes in cognitively normal elderly subjects, but no study has yet investigated the effects of obesity on brain structure in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To determine if higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with brain volume deficits in cognitively impaired elderly subjects, we analyzed brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 700 MCI or AD patients from two different cohorts: the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Cardiovascular Health Study-Cognition Study (CHS-CS). Tensor-based morphometry (TBM) was used to create 3-dimensional maps of regional tissue excess or deficits in subjects with MCI (ADNI, N=399; CHS, N=77) and AD (ADNI, N=188; CHS, N=36). In both AD and MCI groups, higher BMI was associated with brain volume deficits in frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes; the atrophic pattern was consistent in both ADNI and CHS populations. Cardiovascular risk factors, especially obesity, should be considered as influencing brain structure in those already afflicted by cognitive impairment and dementia. PMID:20570405

  12. Performance optimisation through EPT-WBC in mobile ad hoc networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ratish; Gupta, Roopam; Motwani, Mahesh

    2016-03-01

    Mobile ad hoc networks are self-organised, infrastructure-less networks in which each mobile host works as a router to provide connectivity within the network. Nodes out of reach to each other can communicate with the help of intermediate routers (nodes). Routing protocols are the rules which determine the way in which these routing activities are to be performed. In cluster-based architecture, some selected nodes (clusterheads) are identified to bear the extra burden of network activities like routing. Selection of clusterheads is a critical issue which significantly affects the performance of the network. This paper proposes an enhanced performance and trusted weight-based clustering approach in which a number of performance factors such as trust, load balancing, energy consumption, mobility and battery power are considered for the selection of clusterheads. Moreover, the performance of the proposed scheme is compared with other existing approaches to demonstrate the effectiveness of the work.

  13. A Research on Performance Measurement Based on Economic Valued-Added Comprehensive Scorecard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qin; Zhang, Xiaomei

    With the development of economic, the traditional performance mainly rely on financial indicators could not satisfy the need of work. In order to make the performance measurement taking the best services for business goals, this paper proposed Economic Valued-Added Comprehensive Scorecard based on research of shortages and advantages of EVA and BSC .We used Analytic Hierarchy Process to build matrix to solve the weighting of EVA Comprehensive Scorecard. At last we could find the most influence factors for enterprise value forming the weighting.

  14. Effect of added salt and increase in ionic strength on skim milk electroacidification performances.

    PubMed

    Bazinet, L; Ippersiel, D; Gendron, C; Mahdavi, B; Amiot, J; Lamarche, F

    2001-05-01

    Bipolar-memibrane electroacidification (BMEA) technology which uses the property of bipolar membranes to split water and the demineralization action of cation-exchange membranes (CEM), was tested for the production of acid casein. BMEA has numerous advantages in comparison with conventional isoelectric precipitation processes of proteins used in the dairy industry. BMEA uses electricity to generate the desired ionic species to acidify the treated solutions. The process can be precisely controlled, as electro-acidification rate is regulated by the effective current density in the cell. Water dissociation at the bipolar membrane interface is continuous and avoids local excess of acid. In-situ generation of dangerous chemicals (acids and bases) reduces the risks associated with the handling, transportation, use and elimination of these products. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of BMEA in different conditions of added ionic strength (p(added) = 0, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 M) and added salt (CaCl2, NaCl and KCl). The combination of KCl and p(added) = 0.5 M gave the best results with a 45% decrease in energy consumption. The increased energy efficiency was the result of a decrease in the anode/cathode voltage difference. This was due to an increase of conductivity, produced by addition of salt, necessary to compensate for the lack of sufficiently mobile ions in the skim milk. However, the addition of salts, irrespective of type or ionic strength, increased the required operation time. The protein profile of isolates were similar under all experimental conditions, except at 1.0 M-CaCl2. PMID:11504388

  15. A high performance, ad-hoc, fuzzy query processing system for relational databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansfield, William H., Jr.; Fleischman, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    Database queries involving imprecise or fuzzy predicates are currently an evolving area of academic and industrial research. Such queries place severe stress on the indexing and I/O subsystems of conventional database environments since they involve the search of large numbers of records. The Datacycle architecture and research prototype is a database environment that uses filtering technology to perform an efficient, exhaustive search of an entire database. It has recently been modified to include fuzzy predicates in its query processing. The approach obviates the need for complex index structures, provides unlimited query throughput, permits the use of ad-hoc fuzzy membership functions, and provides a deterministic response time largely independent of query complexity and load. This paper describes the Datacycle prototype implementation of fuzzy queries and some recent performance results.

  16. Implementation and performance evaluation of mobile ad hoc network for Emergency Telemedicine System in disaster areas.

    PubMed

    Kim, J C; Kim, D Y; Jung, S M; Lee, M H; Kim, K S; Lee, C K; Nah, J Y; Lee, S H; Kim, J H; Choi, W J; Yoo, S K

    2009-01-01

    So far we have developed Emergency Telemedicine System (ETS) which is a robust system using heterogeneous networks. In disaster areas, however, ETS cannot be used if the primary network channel is disabled due to damages on the network infrastructures. Thus we designed network management software for disaster communication network by combination of Mobile Ad hoc Network (MANET) and Wireless LAN (WLAN). This software maintains routes to a Backbone Gateway Node in dynamic network topologies. In this paper, we introduce the proposed disaster communication network with management software, and evaluate its performance using ETS between Medical Center and simulated disaster areas. We also present the results of network performance analysis which identifies the possibility of actual Telemedicine Service in disaster areas via MANET and mobile network (e.g. HSDPA, WiBro). PMID:19964544

  17. Ad-libitum drinking and performance during a 40-km cycling time trial in the heat.

    PubMed

    Berkulo, Meriam A R; Bol, Susan; Levels, Koen; Lamberts, Robert P; Daanen, Hein A M; Noakes, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if drinking ad-libitum can counteract potential negative effects of a hypohydrated start caused by fluid restriction during a 40-km time trial (TT) in the heat. Twelve trained males performed one 40-km cycling TT euhydrated (EU: no water during the TT) and two 40-km cycling TTs hypohydrated. During one hypohydrated trial no fluid was ingested (HYPO), during the other trial ad-libitum water ingestion was allowed (FLUID). Ambient temperature was 35.2 ± 0.2 °C, relative humidity 51 ± 3% and airflow 7 m·s(-1). Body mass (BM) was determined at the start of the test, and before and after the TT. During the TT, power output, heart rate (HR), gastrointestinal temperature, mean skin temperature, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), thermal sensation, thermal comfort and thirst sensation were measured. Prior to the start of the TT, BM was 1.2% lower in HYPO and FLUID compared to EU. During the TT, BM loss in FLUID was lower compared to EU and HYPO (1.0 ± 0.8%, 2.7 ± 0.2% and 2.6 ± 0.3%, respectively). Hydration status had no effect on power output (EU: 223 ± 32 W, HYPO: 217 ± 39 W, FLUID: 224 ± 35 W), HR, gastrointestinal temperature, mean skin temperature, RPE, thermal sensation and thermal comfort. Thirst sensation was higher in HYPO than in EU and FLUID. It was concluded that hypohydration did not adversely affect performance during a 40-km cycling TT in the heat. Therefore, whether or not participants consumed fluid during exercise did not influence their TT performance. PMID:25675355

  18. Exploring the Potential of Value-Added Performance Measures to Affect the Quality of the Teacher Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldhaber, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen a tremendous amount of research on the use of value-added modeling to assess individual teachers, and a significant number of states and districts are now using, or plan to use, value added as a component of a teacher's summative performance evaluation. In this article, I explore the various mechanisms through which the…

  19. Guardian ad litem, a potentially expensive invitation to either the mismanagement or management of patients with cognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F

    2010-01-01

    The children of a multiple sclerosis (MS) patient filed a guardian ad litem case to be brought against the patient. The basis for the petition was that the MS patient had a significant reduction is his mental competence. The children were not aware that hyperthermia could adversely affect the brain of MS patients. The patient's urologist recommended he have a suprapubic cystostomy done in a hospital. Passage of the two channel Foley catheter into his bladder immediately resolved his urinary tract infection, fever, and difficulty in communicating. Despite this dramatic improvement in his health from the urologic treatment, he was now faced with resolving his children's petition for a guardian ad litem that would allow them to control his estate including his residence and financial retirement assets. A judge supported this petition by requesting that the patient with MS pay for his children's attorney fees, 24 hour nursing home services that duplicated his own hired personal care assistants, the salary of the guardian ad litem, the attorney fees for the guardian ad litem, and payment for a psychological evaluation. The state law should be changed to require that the petitioner have adequate income to pay for his/her attorney as well as the salary of the guardian ad litem to prevent mismanagement of patients with cognitive disorders. In addition, the guardian ad litem should be an attorney or a registered nurse. The care of disabled individuals subjected to litigation should be coordinated by an attorney or registered nurse. PMID:21179591

  20. Improving lithium-ion battery performances by adding fly ash from coal combustion on cathode film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyartanti, Endah Retno; Jumari, Arif; Nur, Adrian; Purwanto, Agus

    2016-02-01

    A lithium battery is composed of anode, cathode and a separator. The performance of lithium battery is also influenced by the conductive material of cathode film. In this research, the use of fly ash from coal combustion as conductive enhancer for increasing the performances of lithium battery was investigated. Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) was used as the active material of cathode. The dry fly ash passed through 200 mesh screen, LiFePO4 and acethylene black (AB), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a binder and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent were mixed to form slurry. The slurry was then coated, dried and hot pressed to obtain the cathode film. The ratio of fly ash and AB were varied at the values of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5% while the other components were at constant. The anode film was casted with certain thickness and composition. The performance of battery lithium was examined by Eight Channel Battery Analyzer, the composition of the cathode film was examined by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), and the structure and morphology of the anode film was analyzed by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). The composition, structure and morphology of cathode film was only different when fly ash added was 4% of AB or more. The addition of 2% of AB on cathode film gave the best performance of 81.712 mAh/g on charging and 79.412 mAh/g on discharging.

  1. Greater medial temporal hypometabolism and lower cortical amyloid burden in ApoE4-positive AD patients

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Manja; Ghosh, Pia M.; Madison, Cindee; Karydas, Anna; Coppola, Giovanni; O’Neil, James P.; Huang, Yadong; Miller, Bruce L.; Jagust, William J.; Rabinovici, Gil D.

    2013-01-01

    Background ApoE4 has been associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), amyloid deposition and hypometabolism. ApoE4 is less prevalent in non-amnestic AD variants suggesting a direct effect on the clinical phenotype. However, the impact of ApoE4 on amyloid burden and glucose metabolism across different clinical AD syndromes is not well understood. We aimed to assess the relationship between amyloid deposition, glucose metabolism and ApoE4 genotype in a clinically heterogeneous population of AD patients. Methods Fifty-two patients with probable AD (NIA-AA) underwent [11C]Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET scans. All patients had positive PIB-PET scans. 23 were ApoE4+ (14 heterozygous, 9 homozygous) and 29 were ApoE4−. Groups consisted of language-variant AD, visual-variant AD, and AD patients with amnestic and dysexecutive deficits. 52 healthy controls were included for comparison. FDG and PIB uptake was compared between groups on a voxel-wise basis and in regions-of-interest. Results Whilst PIB patterns were diffuse in both patient groups, ApoE4− patients showed higher PIB uptake than ApoE4+ patients across the cortex. Higher PIB uptake in ApoE4− patients was particularly significant in right lateral frontotemporal regions. In contrast, similar patterns of hypometabolism relative to controls were found in both patient groups, mainly involving lateral temporoparietal cortex, precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex, and middle frontal gyrus. Comparing patient groups, ApoE4+ subjects showed greater hypometabolism in bilateral medial temporal and right lateral temporal regions, and ApoE4− patients showed greater hypometabolism in cortical areas including supplementary motor cortex and superior frontal gyrus. Conclusions ApoE4+ AD patients showed lower global amyloid burden and greater medial temporal hypometabolism compared to matched ApoE4− patients. These findings suggest that ApoE4 may increase susceptibility

  2. Performance Analysis of Ad Hoc Routing Protocols in City Scenario for VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sanjoy; Raw, Ram Shringar; Das, Indrani

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, performance analysis of Location Aided Routing (LAR), AODV and DSR protocol in city scenarios has been done. The mobility model considered is Manhattan model. This mobility model used to emulate the movement pattern of nodes i.e., vehicles on streets defined by maps. Our objective is to provide a comparative analysis among LAR, AODV and DSR protocol in city scenarios in Vehicular Ad hoc Networks. The simulation work has been conducted using the Glomosim 2.03 simulator. The results show that LAR1 protocol achieves maximum packet delivery ratio is 100% in the sparsely populated network. The delay is maximum in AODV 121.88 ms when the number of node is 10 in the network. The results show that LAR1 outperform DSR and AODV in term of packet delivery ratio and end to end delay.

  3. PARENT joint action: increasing the added value of patient registries in a cross-border setting.

    PubMed

    Meglič, Matic; Doupi, Persephone; Pristaš, Ivan; Skalkidis, Yannis; Zaletel, Metka; Orel, Andrej

    2013-01-01

    Patient registries are poorly interoperable and as a result data exchange or aggregation across organizations, regions and countries for secondary purposes (i.e. research and public health) is difficult to perform. PARENT Joint Action aims to provide EU Member States with a set of guidelines, recommendations and tools to support setting-up, management and governance of interoperable patient registries, thus helping EU Member States to drive down cost and interoperability risks of patient registries as well as improving secondary us-age of registry data in a cross-border setting. PMID:23920935

  4. Value-Added and Other Methods for Measuring School Performance: An Analysis of Performance Measurement Strategies in Teacher Incentive Fund Proposals. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In "Value-Added and Other Methods for Measuring School Performance: An Analysis of Performance Measurement Strategies in Teacher Incentive Fund Proposals"--a paper presented at the February 2008 National Center on Performance Incentives research to policy conference--Robert Meyer and Michael Christian examine select performance-pay plans used by…

  5. Typicality Mediates Performance during Category Verification in Both Ad-Hoc and Well-Defined Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Chaleece; Sebastian, Rajani; Kiran, Swathi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The typicality effect is present in neurologically intact populations for natural, ad-hoc, and well-defined categories. Although sparse, there is evidence of typicality effects in persons with chronic stroke aphasia for natural and ad-hoc categories. However, it is unknown exactly what influences the typicality effect in this…

  6. Performance evaluation of reactive and proactive routing protocol in IEEE 802.11 ad hoc network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamma, Salima; Cizeron, Eddy; Issaka, Hafiz; Guédon, Jean-Pierre

    2006-10-01

    Wireless technology based on the IEEE 802.11 standard is widely deployed. This technology is used to support multiple types of communication services (data, voice, image) with different QoS requirements. MANET (Mobile Adhoc NETwork) does not require a fixed infrastructure. Mobile nodes communicate through multihop paths. The wireless communication medium has variable and unpredictable characteristics. Furthermore, node mobility creates a continuously changing communication topology in which paths break and new one form dynamically. The routing table of each router in an adhoc network must be kept up-to-date. MANET uses Distance Vector or Link State algorithms which insure that the route to every host is always known. However, this approach must take into account the adhoc networks specific characteristics: dynamic topologies, limited bandwidth, energy constraints, limited physical security, ... Two main routing protocols categories are studied in this paper: proactive protocols (e.g. Optimised Link State Routing - OLSR) and reactive protocols (e.g. Ad hoc On Demand Distance Vector - AODV, Dynamic Source Routing - DSR). The proactive protocols are based on periodic exchanges that update the routing tables to all possible destinations, even if no traffic goes through. The reactive protocols are based on on-demand route discoveries that update routing tables only for the destination that has traffic going through. The present paper focuses on study and performance evaluation of these categories using NS2 simulations. We have considered qualitative and quantitative criteria. The first one concerns distributed operation, loop-freedom, security, sleep period operation. The second are used to assess performance of different routing protocols presented in this paper. We can list end-to-end data delay, jitter, packet delivery ratio, routing load, activity distribution. Comparative study will be presented with number of networking context consideration and the results show

  7. An MRI-Derived Definition of MCI-to-AD Conversion for Long-Term, Automatic Prognosis of MCI Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aksu, Yaman; Miller, David J.; Kesidis, George; Bigler, Don C.; Yang, Qing X.

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are of great current research interest. While there is no consensus on whether MCIs actually “convert” to AD, this concept is widely applied. Thus, the more important question is not whether MCIs convert, but what is the best such definition. We focus on automatic prognostication, nominally using only a baseline brain image, of whether an MCI will convert within a multi-year period following the initial clinical visit. This is not a traditional supervised learning problem since, in ADNI, there are no definitive labeled conversion examples. It is not unsupervised, either, since there are (labeled) ADs and Controls, as well as cognitive scores for MCIs. Prior works have defined MCI subclasses based on whether or not clinical scores significantly change from baseline. There are concerns with these definitions, however, since, e.g., most MCIs (and ADs) do not change from a baseline CDR = 0.5 at any subsequent visit in ADNI, even while physiological changes may be occurring. These works ignore rich phenotypical information in an MCI patient's brain scan and labeled AD and Control examples, in defining conversion. We propose an innovative definition, wherein an MCI is a converter if any of the patient's brain scans are classified “AD” by a Control-AD classifier. This definition bootstraps design of a second classifier, specifically trained to predict whether or not MCIs will convert. We thus predict whether an AD-Control classifier will predict that a patient has AD. Our results demonstrate that this definition leads not only to much higher prognostic accuracy than by-CDR conversion, but also to subpopulations more consistent with known AD biomarkers (including CSF markers). We also identify key prognostic brain region biomarkers. PMID:22022375

  8. Assessing the Potential of Using Value-Added Estimates of Teacher Job Performance for Making Tenure Decisions. Working Paper 31

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldhaber, Dan; Hansen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Reforming teacher tenure is an idea that appears to be gaining traction with the underlying assumption being that one can infer to a reasonable degree how well a teacher will perform over her career based on estimates of her early-career effectiveness. Here we explore the potential for using value-added models to estimate performance and inform…

  9. Effect of goserelin and leuprolide added to the semen on reproductive performance in rabbits - Short communication.

    PubMed

    Gogol, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of two synthetic GnRH analogues, goserelin and leuprolide, to induce ovulation in rabbit does using intravaginal administration. A total of 252 primiparous lactating does were randomly divided into five groups that, at the time of insemination, received the following treatments for ovulation induction: 1 µg of buserelin administered intramuscularly (control group), 5 µg of goserelin added to the semen dose (Group G5), 10 µg of goserelin added to the semen dose (Group G10), 5 µg of leuprolide added to the semen dose (Group L5), and 10 µg of leuprolide added to the semen dose (Group L10). The kindling rate was 80.5% in Group G10 and 75.0% in Group L10; these values are comparable to the kindling rate obtained in the control group (85.9%). The kindling rates in Groups G5 and L5 were significantly lower than in the control group (60.0%, 54.2% and 85.9%, respectively). The number of live-born rabbits was not significantly affected by the ovulation induction treatment. As regards the total number of rabbits born the only significant difference was observed between Groups G5 and L5. This study shows the possibility of inducing ovulation in rabbits by adding goserelin and leuprolide directly to the semen dose. PMID:26919148

  10. Small Delay and High Performance AD/DA Converters of Lease Circuit System for AM&FM Broadcast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takato, Kenji; Suzuki, Dai; Ishii, Takashi; Kobayashi, Masato; Yamada, Hirokazu; Amano, Shigeru

    Many AM&FM broadcasting stations in Japan are connected by the leased circuit system of NTT. Small delay and high performance AD/DA converter was developed for the system. The system was designed based on ITU-T J.41 Recommendation (384kbps), the transmission signal is 11bit-32 kHz where the Gain-frequency characteristics between 40Hz to 15kHz have to be quite flat. The ΔΣAD/DA converter LSIs for audio application in the market today realize very high performance. However the performance is not enough for the leased circuit system. We found that it is not possible to meet the delay and Gain-frequency requirements only by using ΔΣAD/DA converter LSI in normal operation, because 15kHz the highest frequency and 16kHz Nyquist frequency are too close, therefore there are aliasing around Nyquist frequency. In this paper, we designed AD/DA architecture having small delay (1msec) and sharp cut off LPF (100dB attenuation at 16kHz, and 1500dB/Oct from 15kHz to 16kHz) by operating ΔΣAD/DA converter LSIs over-sampling rate such as 128kHz and by adding custom LPF designed Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) filter. The IIR filter is a 16th order elliptic type and it is consist of eight biquad filters in series. We described how to evaluate the stability of IIR filter theoretically by calculating frequency response, Pole and Zero Layout and impulse response of each biquad filter, and experimentally by adding overflow detection circuit on each filters and input overlord signal.

  11. Conversion from MCI to AD in patients with the APOE ε4 genotype: Prediction by plasma HCY and serum BDNF.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Kong, Xiangjun; Cui, Yongjian; Wei, Yan; Zhang, Jinrong; Wei, Wei

    2016-07-28

    Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) is a transitional stage between normal aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Possession of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 genotype is a major predictor of progression to AD, particularly in patients with aMCI. However, the use of APOE genotyping in the diagnosis of aMCI that evolves into AD is limited due to its low sensitivity and specificity. In this study, we found that there was a notable increase in plasma homocysteine (HCY) and significant decrease in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in aMCI that converts to AD in patients with the APOE ε4 allele. Both plasma HCY and serum BDNF had higher positive predictive values and were more sensitive biomarkers of aMCI. Additionally, a testing strategy employing plasma HCY and serum BDNF revealed increases in sensitivity, specificity, and predictive ability compared with the use of either biomarker alone. The present study demonstrates that MCI that evolves into AD in patients with the APOE ε4 genotype may be predicted by plasma HCY and serum BDNF. PMID:27180036

  12. Vinasse added to the concentrate for fattening lambs: intake, animal performance, and carcass and meat characteristics.

    PubMed

    López-Campos, Ó; Bodas, R; Prieto, N; Frutos, P; Andrés, S; Giráldez, F J

    2011-04-01

    Twenty-four Merino lambs (mean BW 15.4 ± 0.13 kg, 6 to 7 wk old) were used to study the effects of the addition of 0 (control), 100 (V10), and 200 (V20) g of vinasse per kilgram of concentrate on intake, animal performance, biochemical blood profile, and carcass and meat characteristics. Lambs were assigned to 1 of 3 experimental diets and fed barley straw and the corresponding concentrate ad libitum. When the animals reached 25 kg of BW, a sample of blood was taken and the lambs were slaughtered. Feed intake, growth rate, biochemical blood profile, and carcass and meat characteristics were assessed. Lambs that received the concentrates with vinasse showed a reduced concentrate intake (linear contrast, P = 0.029) and ADG (linear contrast, P = 0.004) and an increased length of fattening period (linear contrast, P = 0.002) as well as feed:gain ratio (linear contrast P = 0.011). Vinasse enhanced ruminal pH (orthogonal contrast control vs. V10 + V20; P = 0.007). Plasma glucose concentrations declined in lambs fed vinasse (linear contrast, P = 0.003), whereas plasma urea concentration increased in animals fed vinasse (linear contrast, P = 0.036). The plasma concentrations of creatinine, triglycerides, and lactate and the enzyme profile studied (alkaline phosphate, alanine transaminase, glutamate oxal-acetate transaminase, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, and lactate dehydrogenase) were not modified in response to vinasse inclusion. Lambs in the vinasse groups had less Na(+) and nitrate and greater K(+) and nitrite plasma concentrations (linear contrasts, P < 0.05). None of the carcass characteristics studied was affected by vinasse (P > 0.10). Meat chemical composition and characteristics were unaffected (P > 0.10), but shear force was greater for lambs that received vinasse (orthogonal contrast, control vs. V10 + V20, P = 0.007). The addition of 100 or 200 g vinasse/kg of concentrate for fattening lambs reduced feed intake and growth rate and increased the feed:gain ratio

  13. Can Value-Added Measures of Teacher Performance Be Trusted? Working Paper #18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Reckase, Mark D.; Woolridge, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate whether commonly used value-added estimation strategies can produce accurate estimates of teacher effects. We estimate teacher effects in simulated student achievement data sets that mimic plausible types of student grouping and teacher assignment scenarios. No one method accurately captures true teacher effects in all scenarios,…

  14. An Evaluation of Empirical Bayes's Estimation of Value-Added Teacher Performance Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Maxfield, Michelle; Reckase, Mark D.; Thompson, Paul N.; Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Empirical Bayes's (EB) estimation has become a popular procedure used to calculate teacher value added, often as a way to make imprecise estimates more reliable. In this article, we review the theory of EB estimation and use simulated and real student achievement data to study the ability of EB estimators to properly rank teachers. We compare the…

  15. Effects of the antimicrobial peptide cecropin AD on performance and intestinal health in weaned piglets challenged with Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shudan; Zhang, Fengrui; Huang, Zhimin; Liu, Hong; Xie, Chunyuan; Zhang, Jiang; Thacker, Philip A; Qiao, Shiyan

    2012-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of the antimicrobial peptide cecropin on performance and intestinal health in piglets. Newly weaned barrows were randomly assigned to one of three treatments (n=8), including a corn-soybean basal diet or similar diets supplemented with antibiotics (100 mg/kg kitasamycin plus 800 mg/kg colistin sulfate) or 400 mg/kg cecropin AD. On day 13, all piglets were orally challenged with 10(9)CFU/mL of Escherichia coli K88. On day 19, all piglets were euthanized and sampled. Before challenge, piglets fed antibiotics had greater weight gain, feed efficiency, nitrogen and energy retention than the control (P<0.05). E. coli challenge decreased weight gain, feed intake and feed efficiency for the control piglets (P<0.05) but not for the antibiotic or cecropin AD treated piglets. The incidence of diarrhea post-challenge in the antibiotic and cecropin AD treatments decreased compared with the control piglets. The total viable counts of cecal E. coli were lower while the Lactobacilli counts were higher in the antibiotic and cecropin AD treatments compared with the control (P<0.05). Cecropin AD treatment decreased total aerobes while increasing total anaerobes in the ileum (P<0.05). A higher villus height to crypt depth ratio in the jejunum and ileum as well as a deeper crypt depth in the jejunum and higher villus height in the ileum were observed in piglets fed antibiotics or cecropin AD compared with control piglets (P<0.05). Piglets fed the control diet had lower levels of secretory IgA in their jejunum and lower serum IgA, IgG, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 compared with the other treatments (P<0.05). Overall, these data suggest that cecropin AD enhances pig performance through increasing immune status and nitrogen and energy retention as well as reducing intestinal pathogens in weaned piglets. PMID:22490448

  16. The Impact of Student Composition on Schools' Value-Added Performance: A Comparison of Seven Empirical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmermans, Anneke C.; Thomas, Sally M.

    2015-01-01

    In many countries, policy makers struggle with the development of value-added indicators of school performance for educational accountability purposes and in particular with the choice whether school context measured in the form of student composition variables should be included. This study investigates differences between 7 empirical studies…

  17. Assessing the Potential of Using Value-Added Estimates of Teacher Job Performance for Making Tenure Decisions. Brief 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldhaber, Dan; Hansen, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This research brief presents selected findings from work examining the stability of value-added model estimates of teacher effectiveness and their implication for tenure policies. Findings show year-to-year correlations in teacher effects are modest, but pre-tenure estimates of teacher job performance do predict estimated post-tenure performance…

  18. 14 CFR 91.227 - Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Out equipment performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Out equipment performance requirements. 91.227 Section 91.227 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES...

  19. Adding A Measure Of Patient Self-Management Capability To Risk Assessment Can Improve Prediction Of High Costs.

    PubMed

    Hibbard, Judith H; Greene, Jessica; Sacks, Rebecca; Overton, Valerie; Parrotta, Carmen D

    2016-03-01

    We explored whether supplementing a clinical risk score with a behavioral measure could improve targeting of the patients most in need of supports that reduce their risk of costly service utilization. Using data from a large health system that determines patient self-management capability using the Patient Activation Measure, we examined utilization of hospital and emergency department care by the 15 percent of patients with the highest clinical risk scores. After controlling for risk scores and placing patients within segments based on their level of activation in 2011, we found that the lower the activation level, the higher the utilization and cost of hospital services in each of the following three years. These findings demonstrate that adding a measure of patient self-management capability to a risk assessment can improve prediction of high care costs and inform actions to better meet patient needs. PMID:26953304

  20. Effects of adding MIN-AD to steam-flaked corn-based diets with or without wet corn distiller's grain plus solubles on performance by beef cattle during receiving and finishing phases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of wet corn distillers grain (WCDG) and MIN-AD (MIN-AD Inc., Amarillo, TX), a commercial source of calcium-magnesium carbonate, on cattle performance and carcass measurements were evaluated in a 42-d receiving phase (220 steers; initial BW = 279.3 kg) and a subsequent finishing phase (192 s...

  1. Differential hippocampal shapes in posterior cortical atrophy patients: A comparison with control and typical AD subjects

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Kate E.; Leung, Kelvin K.; Young, Jonathan; Pepple, Tracey; Lehmann, Manja; Zuluaga, Maria A.; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Schott, Jonathan M.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Crutch, Sebastian; Fox, Nick C.; Barnes, Josephine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by predominant visual deficits and parieto‐occipital atrophy, and is typically associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. In AD, assessment of hippocampal atrophy is widely used in diagnosis, research, and clinical trials; its utility in PCA remains unclear. Given the posterior emphasis of PCA, we hypothesized that hippocampal shape measures may give additional group differentiation information compared with whole‐hippocampal volume assessments. We investigated hippocampal volume and shape in subjects with PCA (n = 47), typical AD (n = 29), and controls (n = 48). Hippocampi were outlined on MRI scans and their 3D meshes were generated. We compared hippocampal volume and shape between disease groups. Mean adjusted hippocampal volumes were ∼8% smaller in PCA subjects (P < 0.001) and ∼22% smaller in tAD subject (P < 0.001) compared with controls. Significant inward deformations in the superior hippocampal tail were observed in PCA compared with controls even after adjustment for hippocampal volume. Inward deformations in large areas of the hippocampus were seen in tAD subjects compared with controls and PCA subjects, but only localized shape differences remained after adjusting for hippocampal volume. The shape differences observed, even allowing for volume differences, suggest that PCA and tAD are each associated with different patterns of hippocampal tissue loss that may contribute to the differential range and extent of episodic memory dysfunction in the two groups. Hum Brain Mapp 36:5123–5136, 2015. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26461053

  2. Added value of hepatobiliary phase gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI for diagnosing hepatocellular carcinoma in high-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Phongkitkarun, Sith; Limsamutpetch, Kuruwin; Tannaphai, Penampai; Jatchavala, Janjira

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the added value of hepatobiliary phase (HBP) gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluating hepatic nodules in high-risk patients. METHODS: The institutional review board approved this retrospective study and waived the requirement for informed consent. This study included 100 patients at high risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 105 hepatic nodules that were larger than 1 cm. A blind review of two MR image sets was performed in a random order: set 1, unenhanced (T1- and T2-weighted) and dynamic images; and set 2, unenhanced, dynamic 20-min and HBP images. The diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were compared for the two image sets. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on the MR characteristics utilized to diagnose HCC. RESULTS: A total of 105 hepatic nodules were identified in 100 patients. Fifty-nine nodules were confirmed to be HCC. The diameter of the 59 HCCs ranged from 1 to 12 cm (mean: 1.9 cm). The remaining 46 nodules were benign (28 were of hepatocyte origin, nine were hepatic cysts, seven were hemangiomas, one was chronic inflammation, and one was focal fat infiltration). The diagnostic accuracy significantly increased with the addition of HBP images, from 88.7% in set 1 to 95.5% in set 2 (P = 0.002). In set 1 vs set 2, the sensitivity and NPV increased from 79.7% to 93.2% and from 78.9% to 91.8%, respectively, whereas the specificity and PPV were not significantly different. The hypointensity on the HBP images was the most sensitive (93.2%), and typical arterial enhancement followed by washout was the most specific (97.8%). The multivariate analysis revealed that typical arterial enhancement followed by washout, hyperintensity on T2-weighted images, and hypointensity on HBP images were statistically significant MRI findings that could diagnose HCC (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The addition of HBP gadoxetic acid

  3. Safety and Efficacy of Adding Ribavirin to Interferon or Peginterferon in Treatment of Hepatitis C Infection in Patients With Thalassemia: A Systematic Review on Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Aminizadeh, Ehsan; Alavian, Seyed Moayyed; Akbari Sari, Ali; Ebrahimi Daryani, Nasser; Behnava, Bita

    2016-01-01

    Context Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver-morbidity and mortality among patients with thalassemia. Peginterferon plus ribavirin is currently the recommended therapy for hepatitis C infection in patients do not have thalassemia, but using ribavirin in patients with thalassemia is restricted due to its hemolytic effect. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of adding ribavirin to peginterferon or interferon, authors performed a systematic review on the available literatures. Evidence Acquisition Trials were identified through electronic database, manual searches of journals and bibliographies and approaching authors of trials. Randomized trials that enrolled patients with a diagnosis of thalassemia and chronic hepatitis C infection treated with interferon or peginterferon with or without ribavirin were included. Two investigators independently evaluated the trials for inclusion criteria, risk of bias and data extraction. The primary outcomes were sustained virological response (SVR), liver-related morbidity, mortality and adverse events. The odds ratios from each trial were calculated individually and in the subgroup analysis of trials. Data were analyzed with fixed-effect model. Results Three randomized clinical trials with 92 patients were included. All three trials had unclear risk of bias. Compared with peginterferon monotherapy, adding ribavirin to peginterferon had significant beneficial effect on sustained virological response (OR = 3.44, 95% CI: 1.18 - 10.06). There was no significant difference between combination therapy and monotherapy in the end of treatment achievement response. Other than about 30% increase in blood transfusion due to anemia that returned to normal level 2 - 3 months after treatment, there was no significant increase in side effects followed by adding ribavirin to pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN). Data were insufficient to determine the impact of genotype, viral load and age on the response to treatment

  4. Value-Added and Other Methods for Measuring School Performance. Working Paper 2008-17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Robert H.; Christian, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    One of the central challenges of designing and implementing a performance pay program is developing an approach for determining which schools, teachers, and administrators have performed well enough to have earned a bonus. The U.S. Department of Education's Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) program provides grantees substantial latitude to create…

  5. The effects of adding different whole-body vibration frequencies to preconditioning exercise on subsequent sprint performance.

    PubMed

    Rønnestad, Bent R; Ellefsen, Stian

    2011-12-01

    Rønnestad, BR and Ellefsen, S. The effects of adding different whole-body vibration frequencies to preconditioning exercise on subsequent sprint performance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3306-3310, 2011-The phenomenon postactivation potentiation can possibly be used to acutely improve sprint performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of adding whole-body vibration (WBV) to body-loaded half-squats, performed as preconditioning activity to the 40-m sprint test. Nine male amateur soccer players performed 1 familiarization session and 6 separate test sessions. Each session included a standardized warm-up followed by 1 of the after preconditioning exercises: 30-seconds of half-squats with WBV at either 50 or 30 Hz or half-squats without WBV. The 40-m sprint was performed 1 minute after the preconditioning exercise. For each subject, each of the 3 protocols was repeated twice on separate days in a randomized order. Mean values were used in the statistical analysis. Performing the preconditioning exercise with WBV at a frequency of 50 Hz resulted in a superior 40-m sprint performance compared to preconditioning exercise without WBV (5.48 ± 0.19 vs. 5.52 ± 0.21 seconds, respectively, p < 0.05). There was no difference between preconditioning exercise with WBV at a frequency of 30 Hz and the no-WBV condition. In conclusion, preconditioning exercise performed with WBV at 50 Hz seems to enhance 40-m sprint performance in recreationally trained soccer players. The present findings suggest that coaches can incorporate such exercise into the warm-up to improve sprint performance or the quality of the sprint training. PMID:22076085

  6. Health multi-terminology portal: a semantic added-value for patient safety.

    PubMed

    Grosjean, Julien; Merabti, Tayeb; Dahamna, Badisse; Kergourlay, Ivan; Thirion, Benoit; Soualmia, Lina F; Darmoni, Stefan J

    2011-01-01

    Since the mid-90s, several quality-controlled health gateways were developed. In France, CISMeF is the leading health gateway. It indexes Internet resources from the main institutions, using the MeSH thesaurus and the Dublin Core metadata element set. Since 2005, the CISMeF Information System (IS) includes 24 health terminologies, classifications and thesauri for indexing and information retrieval. This work aims at creating a Health Multi-Terminology Portal (HMTP) and connect it to the CISMeF Terminology Database mainly for searching concepts and terms among all the health controlled vocabularies available in French (or in English and translated in French) and browsing it dynamically. To integrate the terminologies in the CISMeF IS, three steps are necessary: (1) designing a meta-model into which each terminology can be integrated, (2) developing a process to include terminologies into the HMTP, (3) building and integrating existing and new inter-terminology mappings into the HMTP. A total of 24 terminologies are included in the HMTP, with 575,300 concepts, 852,000 synonyms, 222,800 definitions and 1,180,000 relations. Heightteen of these terminologies are not included yet in the UMLS among them, some from the World Health Organization. Since January 2010, HMTP is daily used by CISMeF librarians to index in multi-terminology mode. A health multiterminology portal is a valuable tool helping the indexing and the retrieval of resources from a quality-controlled patient safety gateway. It can also be very useful for teaching or performing audits in terminology management. PMID:21685618

  7. ADS-33C related handling qualities research performed using the NRC Bell 205 airborne simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. Murray; Baillie, Stewart W.

    1993-01-01

    Over 10 years ago a project was initiated by the U.S. Army AVSCOM to update the military helicopter flying qualities specification MIL-8501-A. While not yet complete, the project reached a major milestone in 1989 with the publication of an Airworthiness Design Standard, ADS-33C. The 8501 update project initially set out to identify critical gaps in the requisite data base and then proceeded to fill them using a variety of directed research studies. The magnitude of the task required that it become an international effort: appropriate research studies were conducted in Germany, the UK and Canada as well as in the USA. Canadian participation was supported by the Department of National Defence (DND) through the Chief of Research and Development. Both ground based and in-flight simulation were used to study the defined areas and the Canadian Bell 205-A1 variable stability helicopter was used extensively as one of the primary research tools available for this effort. This paper reviews the involvement of the Flight Research Laboratory of the National Research Council of Canada in the update project, it describes the various experiments conducted on the Airborne Simulator, it notes significant results obtained and describes ongoing research associated with the project.

  8. Value-added performance of processed cardboard and farm breeding compost by pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, L; Rouissi, T; Brar, S K; López-González, D; Ramirez, A A; Godbout, S

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to underline the huge potential in Canada of adding value to cardboard and compost as a renewable fuel with a low ecological footprint. The slow pyrolysis process of lined cardboard and compost blend was investigated. Thermal behavior was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectrometry (TGA-MS). The thermal profiles are presented in the form of TGA/DTG curves. With a constant heating rate of 10 °C/min, two parameters, temperature and time were varied. Cardboard decomposition occurred mostly between 203 °C and 436 °C, where 77% of the sample weight was decomposed. Compost blend decomposition occurred mostly between 209 °C and 373 °C, with 23% of weight. The principal gaseous products that evolved during the pyrolysis were H2O, CO and CO2. As a result, slow pyrolysis led to the formation of biochar. High yield of biochar from cardboard was found at 250 °C for a duration of 60 min (87.5%) while the biochar yield from the compost blend was maintained constant at about 31%. Finally, kinetic parameters and a statistical analysis for the pyrolysis process of the cardboard and compost samples have been investigated. Both materials showed a favorable thermochemical behavior. However, unlike cardboard, compost pyrolysis does not seem a promising process because of the low superior calorific and biochar values. PMID:25683201

  9. Informal, Incidental and Ad Hoc: The Information-Seeking and Learning Strategies of Health Care Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papen, Uta

    2012-01-01

    When people are ill, they want to know what is happening to them and how they can get better. Current health policies support patients' access to health information and encourage them to take part in decisions regarding their health. But little is known about how patients learn and the difficulties they may encounter in the process. This paper…

  10. Dental students' preferences and performance in crown design: conventional wax-added versus CAD.

    PubMed

    Douglas, R Duane; Hopp, Christa D; Augustin, Marcus A

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dental students' perceptions of traditional waxing vs. computer-aided crown design and to determine the effectiveness of either technique through comparative grading of the final products. On one of twoidentical tooth preparations, second-year students at one dental school fabricated a wax pattern for a full contour crown; on the second tooth preparation, the same students designed and fabricated an all-ceramic crown using computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) technology. Projects were graded for occlusion and anatomic form by three faculty members. On completion of the projects, 100 percent of the students (n=50) completed an eight-question, five-point Likert scalesurvey, designed to assess their perceptions of and learning associated with the two design techniques. The average grades for the crown design projects were 78.3 (CAD) and 79.1 (wax design). The mean numbers of occlusal contacts were 3.8 (CAD) and 2.9(wax design), which was significantly higher for CAD (p=0.02). The survey results indicated that students enjoyed designing afull contour crown using CAD as compared to using conventional wax techniques and spent less time designing the crown using CAD. From a learning perspective, students felt that they learned more about position and the size/strength of occlusal contacts using CAD. However, students recognized that CAD technology has limits in terms of representing anatomic contours and excursive occlusion compared to conventional wax techniques. The results suggest that crown design using CAD could be considered as an adjunct to conventional wax-added techniques in preclinical fixed prosthodontic curricula. PMID:25480282

  11. EFFECT OF MOBILITY ON PERFORMANCE OF WIRELESS AD-HOC NETWORK PROTOCOLS.

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C. L.; Drozda, M.; Marathe, M. V.; Marathe, A.

    2001-01-01

    We empirically study the effect of mobility on the performance of protocols designed for wireless adhoc networks. An important ohjective is to study the interaction of the Routing and MAC layer protocols under different mobility parameters. We use three basic mobility models: grid mobility model, random waypoint model, and exponential correlated random model. The performance of protocols was measured in terms of (i) latency, (ii) throughput, (iii) number of packels received, (iv) long term fairness and (v) number of control packets at the MAC layer level. Three different commonly studied routing protocols were used: AODV, DSR and LAR1. Similarly three well known MAC protocols were used: MACA, 802.1 1 and CSMA. The inair1 conclusion of our study include the following: 1. 'I'he performance of the: network varies widely with varying mobility models, packet injection rates and speeds; and can ba in fact characterized as fair to poor depending on the specific situation. Nevertheless, in general, it appears that the combination of AODV and 802.1 I is far better than other combination of routing and MAC protocols. 2. MAC layer protocols interact with routing layer protocols. This concept which is formalized using statistics implies that in general it is not meaningful to speak about a MAC or a routing protocol in isolation. Such an interaction leads to trade-offs between the amount of control packets generated by each layer. More interestingly, the results wise the possibility of improving the performance of a particular MAC layer protocol by using a cleverly designed routing protocol or vice-versa. 3. Routing prolocols with distributed knowledge about routes are more suitable for networks with mobility. This is seen by comparing the performance of AODV with DSR or LAR scheme 1. In DSli and IAR scheme 1, information about a computed path is being stored in the route query control packct. 4. MAC layer protocols have varying performance with varying mobility models. It is

  12. Chartering and the Idea of Accountability Consequences: Adding Performance Value to Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manno, Bruno V.

    2004-01-01

    Accountability involves holding individuals and organizations responsible for agreed-upon promises to perform. This relationship between two or more parties includes formal structures that track results to determine if the parties who have entered into an agreement live up to that agreement. From the mid-1980s, states and districts in the U.S.…

  13. Adding Chemotherapy to Radiation Improves Survival for Some Patients with Rare Brain Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Long-term results from two clinical trials confirm that certain patients with anaplastic oligodendrogliomas live substantially longer if they are treated with a combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy rather than radiatiation alone.

  14. MHD generator performance comparisons between coal + ash firing. [Coal versus fuel oil with ashes added

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, S.; Enos, G.; Kessler, R.; Swallom, D.

    1983-08-01

    A two-stage slagging coal combustor developed by TRW Corporation, was successfully integrated with an MHD generator developed by the Avco Corporation, when the two companies cooperated in an operational demonstration of a coal fired MHD power train under the sponsorship of DOE. The experimental components, rated at a nominal 20 MW thermal input, are the engineering prototypes of 50 MW /SUB th/ hardware to be supplied by the contractors to the recently commissioned Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF), a federal MHD test site in Butte, Montana. A second series of tests was conducted in which the same channel and operating parameters were employed with an oil-fired ash-injected combustor (AIC) to provide performance comparisons. The only significant performance variation uncovered in the comparison tests was attributable to a non-optimum method and location for seed injection in the coal-fired combustor. The corrective measures are deemed to be relatively straightforward.

  15. Performance Evaluation of Mobile Ad Hoc Network Based Communications for Future Mobile Tele-Emergency System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswacheda, D. V.; Barukang, L.; Hamid, M. Y.; Arifianto, M. S.

    Sparked by awareness of the limitations to provide medical services in remote areas, researchers have perceived that developing telemedicine systems is inevitable. In most cases very remote areas and disaster struck areas lack telecommunication infrastructure. Telemedicine system operating in such areas must have advanced wireless technology supporting it in devastating situation, hence it is called as tele-emergency system. Our approach is on MANET combined with Mobile IP and MIPV6, is the basis of infrastructure for the mobile tele-emergency system. The tele-emergency system requires data, voice and video transmission in its network. In this investigation, evaluation is based on simulation of the various ITU-T standard CODECs of VoIP and video transmission over MANET using discrete event simulator NS-2. The results of simulation showed that ITU-T G723.1 worked well in the MANET environment than the other CODECs for VoIP in fixed and mobility tele-emergency environments. From the simulation of video CODEC performance evaluation, it was observed that H.263 performed to a great extent in random small scale environment and also in multiple video flow of 57.6kbps speed video transmission.

  16. Performance evaluation of adding ethanol production into an existing combined heat and power plant.

    PubMed

    Starfelt, F; Thorin, E; Dotzauer, E; Yan, J

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the configuration and performance of a polygeneration system are studied by modelling the integration of a lignocellulosic wood-to-ethanol process with an existing combined heat and power (CHP) plant. Data from actual plants are applied to validate the simulation models. The integrated polygeneration system reaches a total efficiency of 50%, meeting the heating load in the district heating system. Excess heat from the ethanol production plant supplies 7.9 MW to the district heating system, accounting for 17.5% of the heat supply at full heating load. The simulation results show that the production of ethanol from woody biomass is more efficient when integrated with a CHP plant compared to a stand-alone production plant. The total biomass consumption is reduced by 13.9% while producing the same amounts of heat, electricity and ethanol fuel as in the stand-alone configurations. The results showed that another feature of the integrated polygeneration system is the longer annual operating period compared to existing cogeneration. Thus, the renewable electricity production is increased by 2.7% per year. PMID:19758800

  17. Operation and performance of the FAST detector at the AD machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascagna, V.; Bolognini, D.; Corradini, M.; Leali, M.; Mozzanica, A.; Lodi Rizzini, E.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.; Venturelli, L.; Zurlo, N.

    2007-10-01

    The FAST (Fiber Antiproton Scintillating Tracker) detector has been installed at the Antiproton Decelerator at the CERN PS. Its goal is the measurement of the annihilation cross section of slow antiprotons (around 5 MeV) in gaseous targets in the ASACUSA experiment. FAST has to reconstruct the charged pions tracks to identify the annihilation vertices. The detector consists of 2 axial and 4 stereo layers of scintillating fibers. Each layer is built with 1 mm 50 cm long BCF-10 fibers readout by 64 channel multianode PMTs for a total of 2688 readout channels. The anode outputs, amplified and discriminated, are sampled with a 320 MHz clock inside a Cyclone II FPGA by Altera, in order to retrieve the time information of each hit. The readout system is designed to cope with a spilled beam which lasts 250 ns every minute. The expected number of events per spill was around 10. This paper will describe the operation and the performance of the FAST detector during the tests with cosmic rays (August 2006) and during the data taking on the beam (September 2006).

  18. Memory Test Performance on Analogous Verbal and Nonverbal Memory Tests in Patients with Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, Deanna; Miller, Justin B.; Leger, Gabriel C.; Banks, Sarah Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) typically have initial deficits in language or changes in personality, while the defining characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is memory impairment. Neuropsychological findings in the two diseases tend to differ, but can be confounded by verbal impairment in FTD impacting performance on memory tests in these patients. Methods Twenty-seven patients with FTD and 102 patients with AD underwent a neuropsychological assessment before diagnosis. By utilizing analogous versions of a verbal and nonverbal memory test, we demonstrated differences in these two modalities between AD and FTD. Discussion Better differentiation between AD and FTD is found in a nonverbal memory test, possibly because it eliminates the confounding variable of language deficits found in patients with FTD. These results highlight the importance of nonverbal learning tests with multiple learning trials in diagnostic testing. PMID:26933437

  19. Creatine co-ingestion with carbohydrate or cinnamon extract provides no added benefit to anaerobic performance.

    PubMed

    Islam, Hashim; Yorgason, Nick J; Hazell, Tom J

    2016-09-01

    The insulin response following carbohydrate ingestion enhances creatine transport into muscle. Cinnamon extract is promoted to have insulin-like effects, therefore this study examined if creatine co-ingestion with carbohydrates or cinnamon extract improved anaerobic capacity, muscular strength, and muscular endurance. Active young males (n = 25; 23.7 ± 2.5 y) were stratified into 3 groups: (1) creatine only (CRE); (2) creatine+ 70 g carbohydrate (CHO); or (3) creatine+ 500 mg cinnamon extract (CIN), based on anaerobic capacity (peak power·kg(-1)) and muscular strength at baseline. Three weeks of supplementation consisted of a 5 d loading phase (20 g/d) and a 16 d maintenance phase (5 g/d). Pre- and post-supplementation measures included a 30-s Wingate and a 30-s maximal running test (on a self-propelled treadmill) for anaerobic capacity. Muscular strength was measured as the one-repetition maximum 1-RM for chest, back, quadriceps, hamstrings, and leg press. Additional sets of the number of repetitions performed at 60% 1-RM until fatigue measured muscular endurance. All three groups significantly improved Wingate relative peak power (CRE: 15.4% P = .004; CHO: 14.6% P = .004; CIN: 15.7%, P = .003), and muscular strength for chest (CRE: 6.6% P < .001; CHO: 6.7% P < .001; CIN: 6.4% P < .001), back (CRE: 5.8% P < .001; CHO: 6.4% P < .001; CIN: 8.1% P < .001), and leg press (CRE: 11.7% P = .013; CHO: 10.0% P = .007; CIN: 17.3% P < .001). Only the CRE (10.4%, P = .021) and CIN (15.5%, P < .001) group improved total muscular endurance. No differences existed between groups post-supplementation. These findings demonstrate that three different methods of creatine ingestion lead to similar changes in anaerobic power, strength, and endurance. PMID:26313717

  20. The efficacy and safety of liraglutide added to metformin in patients with diabetes: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jianqiu; Meng, Xin; Guo, Yan; Wang, Lei; Zheng, Hongzhi; Liu, Yixuan; Wu, Bingshu; Wang, Difei

    2016-01-01

    Liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) receptor agonist, has showed favorable effects in the glycaemic control and weight reduction in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The meta-analysis was to compare the efficacy and safety of liraglutide added to metformin with other treatments in patients with T2DM. A systematic literature search on PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Cochrane library databases were performed. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of patients with T2DM who received the combination treatment of liraglutide and metformin. Pooled estimates were performed using a fixed-effects model or random-effects model. A total of nine RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Compared with control (placebo, sitagliptin, glimepiride, dulaglutide, insulin glargine, and NPH), liraglutide in combination with metformin resulted in significant reductions in HbA1c, bodyweight, FPG, and PPG, and similar reductions in SBP, and DBP. Moreover, liraglutide combined with metformin did not increase the risk of hypoglycemia, but induced a higher incidence of gastrointestinal disorders. In conclusion, this meta-analysis confirmed the use of liraglutide as add-on to metformin appeared to be effective and safe for patients with T2DM. However, considering the potential limitations in this study, more large-scale, well-conducted RCTs are needed to identify our findings. PMID:27600499

  1. The efficacy and safety of liraglutide added to metformin in patients with diabetes: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jianqiu; Meng, Xin; Guo, Yan; Wang, Lei; Zheng, Hongzhi; Liu, Yixuan; Wu, Bingshu; Wang, Difei

    2016-01-01

    Liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) receptor agonist, has showed favorable effects in the glycaemic control and weight reduction in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The meta-analysis was to compare the efficacy and safety of liraglutide added to metformin with other treatments in patients with T2DM. A systematic literature search on PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Cochrane library databases were performed. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of patients with T2DM who received the combination treatment of liraglutide and metformin. Pooled estimates were performed using a fixed-effects model or random-effects model. A total of nine RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Compared with control (placebo, sitagliptin, glimepiride, dulaglutide, insulin glargine, and NPH), liraglutide in combination with metformin resulted in significant reductions in HbA1c, bodyweight, FPG, and PPG, and similar reductions in SBP, and DBP. Moreover, liraglutide combined with metformin did not increase the risk of hypoglycemia, but induced a higher incidence of gastrointestinal disorders. In conclusion, this meta-analysis confirmed the use of liraglutide as add-on to metformin appeared to be effective and safe for patients with T2DM. However, considering the potential limitations in this study, more large-scale, well-conducted RCTs are needed to identify our findings. PMID:27600499

  2. New Mechanisms to Explain the Effects of Added Lactose Fines on the Dispersion Performance of Adhesive Mixtures for Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Grasmeijer, Floris; Lexmond, Anne J.; van den Noort, Maarten; Hagedoorn, Paul; Hickey, Anthony J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; de Boer, Anne H.

    2014-01-01

    Fine excipient particles or ‘fines’ have been shown to improve the dispersion performance of carrier-based formulations for dry powder inhalation. Mechanistic formulation studies have focussed mainly on explaining this positive effect. Previous studies have shown that higher drug contents may cause a decrease in dispersion performance, and there is no reason why this should not be true for fines with a similar shape, size and cohesiveness as drug particles. Therefore, the effects on drug detachment of ‘fine lactose fines’ (FLF, X50 = 1.95 µm) with a similar size and shape as micronised budesonide were studied and compared to those of ‘coarse lactose fines’ (CLF, X50 = 3.94 µm). Furthermore, interactions with the inhalation flow rate, the drug content and the mixing order were taken into account. The observed effects of FLF are comparable to drug content effects in that the detached drug fraction was decreased at low drug content and low flow rates but increased at higher flow rates. At high drug content the effects of added FLF were negligible. In contrast, CLF resulted in higher detached drug fractions at all flow rates and drug contents. The results from this study suggest that the effects of fines may be explained by two new mechanisms in addition to those previously proposed. Firstly, fines below a certain size may increase the effectiveness of press-on forces or cause the formation of strongly coherent fine particle networks on the carrier surface containing the drug particles. Secondly, when coarse enough, fines may prevent the formation of, or disrupt such fine particle networks, possibly through a lowering of their tensile strength. It is recommended that future mechanistic studies are based on the recognition that added fines may have any effect on dispersion performance, which is determined by the formulation and dispersion conditions. PMID:24489969

  3. Electrospun Ni-added SnO2-carbon nanofiber composite anode for high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongha; Lee, Daehee; Kim, Joosun; Moon, Jooho

    2012-10-24

    The SnO(2) anode is a promising anode for next-generation Li ion batteries because of its high theoretical capacity. However, it exhibits inherent capacity fading because of the large volume change and pulverization that occur during the charge/discharge cycles. The buffer matrix, such as electrospun carbon nanofibers (CNFs), can alleviate this problem to some extent, but SnO(2) particles are thermodynamically incompatible with the carbon matrix such that large Sn agglomerates form after carbonization upon melting of the Sn. Herein, we introduce well-dispersed nanosized SnO(2) attached to CNFs for high-performance anodes developed by Ni presence. The addition of Ni increases the stability of the SnO(2) such that the morphologies of the dispersed SnO(2) phase are modified as a function of the Ni composition. The optimal adding composition is determined to be Ni:Sn = 10:90 wt % in terms of the crystallite size and the distribution uniformity. A high capacity retention of 447.6 mA h g(-1) after 100 cycles can be obtained for 10 wt % Ni-added SnO(2)-CNFs, whereas Ni-free Sn/SnO(2)-CNFs have a capacity retention of 304.6 mA h g(-1). PMID:22999049

  4. [Enhanced Performance of Rolled Membrane Electrode Assembly by Adding Cation Exchange Resin to Anode in Microbial Fuel Cells].

    PubMed

    Mei, Zhuo; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with an anode-membrane-cathode structure ban reduce the distance between anode and cathode to improve the power of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Here in order to further promote the performance of MFCs, a novel MEA was constructed by rolling-press method without noble metal material, and the Ohmic resistance decreased to 3-5 Ω. The maximum power density was 446 mW x m(-2) when acetate was used as the substrate. Solid spheres (like polystyrene balls and glass microspheres) were added into anode to enhance the transportation of electrolyte to cathode, resulting in a 10% increase in power density by producing macropores on and in the anode during rolling process. Cation exchange resin was added to accelerate the transportation of proton through the anode so that the power density further increased to 543 mW x m(-2). Meanwhile, the stability of cell voltage and Coulomb efficiency of MFC were both enhanced after the addition of cation exchange resin. PMID:26911023

  5. Chromium allergy in consecutive patients in a country where ferrous sulfate has been added to cement since 1981.

    PubMed

    Zachariae, C O; Agner, T; Menné, T

    1996-08-01

    Cement eczema used to be a common occupational disease in Denmark. Since 1981, ferrous sulfate has been added to all cement produced in Denmark to reduce the amount of soluble hexavalent chromate to below 2 mg/kg (2 ppm). The aim of the study was to analyse a material of consecutive chromate-sensitive patients in an urban tertiary referral centre with respect to primary cause of sensitization, in a geographical area where the risk of chromate exposure from cement had been reduced. In the 6-year period January 1989 to December 1994, a total of 4511 patients were patch tested with the European standard series, including chromate. 79 patients, 31 male and 48 female, were diagnosed as chromate sensitive. Relevant chromate exposure was established in 34 of these 79 patients. Leather was the most frequent source of chromate sensitization (19 out of 34) (47%). Chromate sensitization from cement was considered likely in 10 out of 34 subjects. Of these, 7 had been sensitized before 1981, 2 had been sensitized by non-occupational exposure to cement, and only 1 had been sensitized from occupational cement exposure in the 6-year period. PMID:8917824

  6. Performance analysis of multi-radio routing protocol in cognitive radio ad hoc networks under different path failure rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che-Aron, Z.; Abdalla, A. H.; Abdullah, K.; Hassan, W. H.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, Cognitive Radio (CR) technology has largely attracted significant studies and research. Cognitive Radio Ad Hoc Network (CRAHN) is an emerging self-organized, multi-hop, wireless network which allows unlicensed users to opportunistically access available licensed spectrum bands for data communication under an intelligent and cautious manner. However, in CRAHNs, a lot of failures can easily occur during data transmission caused by PU (Primary User) activity, topology change, node fault, or link degradation. In this paper, an attempt has been made to evaluate the performance of the Multi-Radio Link-Quality Source Routing (MR-LQSR) protocol in CRAHNs under different path failure rate. In the MR-LQSR protocol, the Weighted Cumulative Expected Transmission Time (WCETT) is used as the routing metric. The simulations are carried out using the NS-2 simulator. The protocol performance is evaluated with respect to performance metrics like average throughput, packet loss, average end-to-end delay and average jitter. From the simulation results, it is observed that the number of path failures depends on the PUs number and mobility rate of SUs (Secondary Users). Moreover, the protocol performance is greatly affected when the path failure rate is high, leading to major service outages.

  7. A randomized controlled trial adding fluvastatin to peginterferon and ribavirin for naïve genotype 1 hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Bader, T; Hughes, L D; Fazili, J; Frost, B; Dunnam, M; Gonterman, A; Madhoun, M; Aston, C E

    2013-09-01

    Fluvastatin or simvastatin has demonstrable antiviral activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV) as monotherapy. The safety and efficacy of adding fluvastatin or simvastatin to peginterferon/ribavirin for 48 weeks was tested in HCV genotype 1 naïve-to-treatment veterans. Thirty-seven naïve-to-treatment genotype 1 HCV patients were randomized to either a control group (n = 20) to receive peginterferon alfa plus ribavirin or an experimental group (n = 18) to similarly receive peginterferon alfa plus ribavirin as well as fluvastatin 20 mg/day. In addition, seven patients who presented for HCV treatment already were on simvastatin and could not be withdrawn. These simvastatin users were not randomized but were entered into a concurrent prospective pilot arm. There were no unique safety issues with fluvastatin or simvastatin when these drugs were given with peginterferon/ribavirin for 48 weeks. Thirteen of 25 statin patients achieved sustained viral response (SVR), while 5 of 20 control patients achieved SVR. Analysis of SVR by intention-to-treat showed P = 0.078. In this phase 2 study, there were no safety issues with the addition of fluvastatin or simvastatin to peginterferon and ribavirin for 48 weeks. There was a trend towards improvement in SVR when fluvastatin or simvastatin was administered with peginterferon/ribavirin. The size of the groups did not reach the prestudy size thought needed to show significant difference (type II error). These results support the significant results of two other larger randomized controlled trials reported using the same dose of fluvastatin in naïve-to-treatment genotype 1 HCV patients. PMID:23910646

  8. Adding Chemoprophylaxis to Sequential Compression May Not Reduce the Risk of Venous Thromboembolism in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gagner, Michel; Selzer, Faith; Belle, Steve H.; Bessler, Marc; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Dakin, Gregory; Davis, Dan; Inabnet, William B.; Mitchell, James E.; Pomp, Alfons; Strain, Gladys; Pories, Walter J.; Wolfe, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation, the use of sequential compression devices on lower extremities peri-operatively, and early ambulation are thought to reduce venous thromboembolism (VTE) postoperatively and are recommended to reduce VTE risk. However, the evidence upon which this recommendation is based is not particularly strong. We demonstrate that even a large, multi-center cohort with carefully collected prospective data is inadequate to provide sufficient evidence to support, or refute, this recommendation. Methods The Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS) participants from 10 centers in the United States who underwent their first bariatric surgery between March, 2005 and December, 2007 comprise the study group. We examined the ability to address the question of whether anti-coagulation therapy, in addition to sequential compression, reduces the 30 day incidence of VTE or death sufficiently to recommend the use of prophylactic anticoagulation, a therapy that is not without risk. Results Of 4416 patients, 396 (9.0%) received sequential compression alone, while the others also received anticoagulation therapy. The incidence of VTE within 30 days of surgery was small (0.25% among those receiving sequential compression alone, 0.47% when anticoagulation therapy was added), and the 30 days incidence of death was also small (0.25% vs. 0.34%, p = 0.76, for sequential compression alone vs. sequential compression plus anticoagulation therapy). Estimates of the number of cases required to address the question of whether there is a difference in outcome related to VTE chemoprophylaxis, or whether the outcome rates are equivalent, range from 13,680 to at least 35,760 patients, depending upon whether superiority or equivalence is being analyzed. Conclusion Sufficient evidence from a clinical trial study to determine whether prophylactic anticoagulation added to compression devices further prevents VTEs is not available and such a trial is likely to be impractical

  9. Assessment of Bowel Wall Enhancement for the Diagnosis of Intestinal Ischemia in Patients with Small Bowel Obstruction: Value of Adding Unenhanced CT to Contrast-enhanced CT.

    PubMed

    Chuong, Anh Minh; Corno, Lucie; Beaussier, Hélène; Boulay-Coletta, Isabelle; Millet, Ingrid; Hodel, Jérôme; Taourel, Patrice; Chatellier, Gilles; Zins, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To determine whether adding unenhanced computed tomography (CT) to contrast material-enhanced CT improves the diagnostic performance of decreased bowel wall enhancement as a sign of ischemia complicating mechanical small bowel obstruction (SBO). Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, which waived the requirement for informed consent. Two gastrointestinal radiologists independently performed retrospective assessments of 164 unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT studies from 158 consecutive patients (mean age, 71.2 years) with mechanical SBO. The reference standard was the intraoperative and/or histologic diagnosis (in 80 cases) or results from clinical follow-up in patients who did not undergo surgery (84 cases). Decreased bowel wall enhancement was evaluated with contrast-enhanced images then and both unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images 1 month later. Diagnostic performance of decreased bowel wall enhancement and confidence in the diagnosis were compared between the two readings by using McNemar and Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Interobserver agreement was assessed by using κ statistics and compared with bootstrapping. Results Ischemia was diagnosed in 41 of 164 (25%) episodes of SBO. For both observers, adding unenhanced images improved decreased bowel wall enhancement sensitivity (observer 1: 46.3% [19 of 41] vs 65.8% [27 of 41], P = .02; observer 2: 56.1% [23 of 41] vs 63.4% [26 of 41], P = .45), Youden index (from 0.41 to 0.58 for observer 1 and from 0.42 to 0.61 for observer 2), and confidence score (P < .001 for both). Specificity significantly increased for observer 2 (84.5% [104 of 123] vs 94.3% [116 of 123], P = .002), and interobserver agreement significantly increased, from moderate (κ = 0.48) to excellent (κ = 0.89; P < .0001). Conclusion Adding unenhanced CT to contrast-enhanced CT improved the sensitivity, diagnostic confidence, and interobserver agreement of the diagnosis of ischemia

  10. Autoantibodies Profile in Matching CSF and Serum from AD and aMCI patients: Potential Pathogenic Role and Link to Oxidative Damage.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Fabio; Pupo, Gilda; Giraldo, Esther; Lloret, Ana; Badia, Mari-Carmen; Schinina, Maria Eugenia; Giorgi, Alessandra; Butterfield, D Allan; Vina, Jose; Perluigi, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the elderly and is characterized by progressive loss of memory and cognition. Amyloid-ß-peptide (Aß) forms senile plaques, which, together with hyperphosphorylated tau-based neurofibrillary tangles, are the hallmarks of AD neuropathology. Evidence support the involvement of immune system in AD progression and current concepts regarding its pathogenesis include the participation of inflammatory and autoimmune components in the neurodegenerative process. Pathologically, immune system components have been detected in the brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in serum of AD subjects and their trend of variation correlates with disease progression. However, patients with AD present significantly lower levels of antibody immunoreactivity against Aß in serum and CSF than healthy controls suggesting that a depletion of such patrolling system is involved in the deposition of toxic aggregates in AD. Within this frame, incomplete and often controversial results are reported about CNS immune/ autoimmune responses during AD, and a better comprehension of such processes is needed. Our research will aim to shed light on the nature and potential role of autoantibodies in CSF and serum from AD and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) patients compared to healthy subjects by using an immunoproteomics approach. Our method allows recognition of natural occurring antibodies by the identification of brain antigen targeted by human IgGs. Overall our data reveal that the alterations of autoantibodies profile both in CSF and serum follow disease staging and progression. However, we demonstrate a fair overlap between CSF and serum suggesting the existence of different immunogenic events. Interestingly, CSF autoantibodies recognized, among others, key players of energy metabolic pathway, including glycolysis and TCA cycle, found oxidatively modified in AD brain studies. These data suggest a potential casual sequence

  11. Enhanced performance of gas diffusion electrode for electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide to formate by adding polytetrafluoroethylene into catalyst layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinian; Dong, Heng; Yu, Han; Yu, Hongbing

    2015-04-01

    Gas diffusion electrode (GDE) with Nafion bonded catalyst layer (CL) for electrochemical reduction of CO2 to formate (ERCF) suffers from CO2 mass transfer limitation. In this work, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with contents of 5.9 wt%, 7.7 wt%, 11.1 wt% and 20 wt% are added into the CL of the GDE with Sn catalyst (P-SGDE) for ERCF. The morphologies and porous structures of the P-SGDEs are examined by scanning electron microscope and mercury intrusion measurement, respectively. The electrochemical performances of the P-SGDEs are investigated by linear sweep voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and constant potential electrolysis. The results show that the Faraday efficiency (86.75 ± 2.89%) and current density (21.67 ± 1.29 mA cm-2) for ERCF were improved by 25.4% and 25.8% respectively when the content of PTFE is 11.1 wt%, probably owing to the enhancement in the catalyst active surface area and CO2 diffusion. This Faraday efficiency is the highest one found for ERCF with Sn GDE under similar conductions.

  12. Effects of alginate and resistant starch on feeding patterns, behaviour and performance in ad libitum-fed growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Souza da Silva, C; Bosch, G; Bolhuis, J E; Stappers, L J N; van Hees, H M J; Gerrits, W J J; Kemp, B

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed the long-term effects of feeding diets containing either a gelling fibre (alginate (ALG)), or a fermentable fibre (resistant starch (RS)), or both, on feeding patterns, behaviour and growth performance of growing pigs fed ad libitum for 12 weeks. The experiment was set up as a 2×2 factorial arrangement: inclusion of ALG (yes or no) and inclusion of RS (yes or no) in the control diet, resulting in four dietary treatments, that is, ALG-RS- (control), ALG+RS-, ALG-RS+, and ALG+RS+. Both ALG and RS were exchanged for pregelatinized potato starch. A total of 240 pigs in 40 pens were used. From all visits to an electronic feeding station, feed intake and detailed feeding patterns were calculated. Apparent total tract digestibility of energy, dry matter (DM), and CP was determined in week 6. Pigs' postures and behaviours were scored from live observations in weeks 7 and 12. Dietary treatments did not affect final BW and average daily gain (ADG). ALG reduced energy and DM digestibility (P<0.01). Moreover, ALG increased average daily DM intake, and reduced backfat thickness and carcass gain : digestible energy (DE) intake (P<0.05). RS increased feed intake per meal, meal duration (P<0.05) and inter-meal intervals (P=0.05), and reduced the number of meals per day (P<0.01), but did not affect daily DM intake. Moreover, RS reduced energy, DM and CP digestibility (P<0.01). Average daily DE intake was reduced (P<0.05), and gain : DE intake tended to be increased (P=0.07), whereas carcass gain : DE intake was not affected by RS. In week 12, ALG+RS- increased standing and walking, aggressive, feeder-directed, and drinking behaviours compared with ALG+RS+ (ALG×RS interaction, P<0.05), with ALG-RS- and ALG-RS+ in between. No other ALG×RS interactions were found. In conclusion, pigs fed ALG compensated for the reduced dietary DE content by increasing their feed intake, achieving similar DE intake and ADG as control pigs. Backfat thickness and carcass efficiency

  13. A Phase I Clinical Trial of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD, a Novel Infectivity-Enhanced Bicistronic Adenovirus, in Patients with Recurrent Gynecologic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kenneth H.; Dmitriev, Igor; O’Malley, Janis P.; Wang, Minghui; Saddekni, Souheil; You, Zhiying; Preuss, Meredith A.; Harris, Raymond D.; Aurigemma, Rosemarie; Siegal, Gene P.; Zinn, Kurt R.; Curiel, David T.; Alvarez, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD is an infectivity-enhanced adenovirus expressing a therapeutic thymidine kinase suicide gene and a somatostatin receptor that allows for noninvasive gene transfer imaging. The purpose of this study was to identify the MTD, toxicities, clinical efficacy and biologic effects of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD in patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer. Experimental Design Eligible patients were treated intraperitoneally (IP) for 3 days with 1×109 to 1×1012 vp/dose of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD followed by intravenous ganciclovir for 14 days. Toxicity and clinical efficacy were assessed utilizing CTC Adverse Events grading and RECIST criteria. Imaging utilizing In-111 pentetreotide was obtained before and after treatment. Tissue samples were obtained to evaluate for gene transfer, generation of wild-type virus, viral shedding and antibody response. Results Twelve patients were treated in three cohorts. The most common vector-related clinical toxicities were grade 1–2 constitutional or pain symptoms, experienced most often in patients treated at the highest dose. MTD was not identified. Five patients demonstrated stable disease; all others experienced progressive disease. One patient with stable disease experienced complete resolution of disease and normalization of CA125 on further follow-up. Imaging detected increased In-111 pentetreotide retention in patients treated at the highest dose. Ancillary studies demonstrated presence of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD virus and HSV1-tk expression in ascites samples collected at various time points in most patients treated within the higher dose cohorts. Conclusions This study demonstrates the safety, potential efficacy, and possible gene transfer imaging capacity of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD in patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer. Further development of this novel gene therapeutic appears to be warranted. PMID:22510347

  14. Ondansetron and simvastatin added to treatment as usual in patients with schizophrenia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Negative symptoms and cognitive deficits are two partially-related features of schizophrenia which have a major negative impact on social function and objective quality of life. Standard drug treatments have little impact on either. There is some evidence that anti-inflammatory treatment may have beneficial effects in schizophrenia and major depression. Statins are cholesterol-lowering agents that have been found to be anti-inflammatory agents and are also known to decrease C-reactive protein (CRP). Ondansetron is a serotonin (5-HT3) receptor antagonist widely used to prevent nausea and vomiting in patients receiving chemotherapy for cancer. Small studies have suggested that ondansetron is effective as an adjunct drug in improving the symptoms of schizophrenia. Methods/design This is a two center, six-month, double-blind placebo controlled, factorial design study of ondansetron and/or simvastatin added to treatment as usual for patients suffering from schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, psychosis not otherwise specified or schizophreniform disorder. This will be a 2 × 2 design, with 54 patients in each cell, giving a total of 216 patients over three years. There will be a screening, a randomization and seven follow-up visits. Full clinical and neurocognitive assessments will be carried out at baseline (randomization), 14 weeks and at 26 weeks, while the positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS), pill count and side effects checklist will be carried out at every visit. Simvastatin will be started at 20 mg once daily (OD), this will be increased to 40 mg after four weeks. Ondansetron will be administered in an 8 mg dose. Discussion Anti-inflammatory treatments have been shown to have some beneficial effects in schizophrenia. Both simvastatin and ondansetron provide some evidence of a reduction in symptoms compared to treatment as usual. The aim of this study is to establish the degree of improvement in negative symptoms with the addition of

  15. Normal neurocognitive performance after extended practice in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wexler, B E; Hawkins, K A; Rounsaville, B; Anderson, M; Sernyak, M J; Green, M F

    1997-08-29

    This study evaluated new methods for improving the performance of patients with schizophrenia on specific neurocognitive tasks. Patients (n = 22) practiced sustained perceptual, memory and motor tasks 5 times/week for 10 weeks. Tasks were initially easy enough for patients to do well, but were made gradually more difficult over the 10 weeks. Patients received base pay and performance-based monetary supplements. No coaching or ongoing instruction was provided, and performance gains were assumed to depend upon implicit learning. High functioning healthy controls (n = 5) were given the same tasks at difficulty levels comparable to those achieved by patients after 10 weeks of practice. After 10 weeks of practice, 16 of the 22 patients performed as well or better than the best control on the perceptual and memory tasks, and 11 patients performed within the range of control subjects on the motor task. Half of the patients retested 6 months after training maintained supranormal performance, while the others showed marked performance declines. Patients with schizophrenia appear to have greater potential for neurocognitive improvement, and potentially for employment, than generally appreciated. PMID:9323348

  16. Improving the Performance of the Granulosis Virus of Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) by Adding the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with Sugar.

    PubMed

    Knight, Alan L; Basoalto, Esteban; Witzgall, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Studies were conducted with the codling moth granulosis virus (CpGV) to evaluate whether adding the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Meyen ex E. C. Hansen with brown cane sugar could improve larval control of Cydia pomonella (L.). Larval mortalities in dipped-apple bioassays with S. cerevisiae or sugar alone were not significantly different from the water control. The addition of S. cerevisiae but not sugar with CpGV significantly increased larval mortality compared with CpGV alone. The combination of S. cerevisiae and sugar with CpGV significantly increased larval mortality compared with CpGV plus either additive alone. The addition of S. cerevisiae improved the efficacy of CpGV similarly to the use of the yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrima (isolated from field-collected larvae). The proportion of uninjured fruit in field trials was significantly increased with the addition of S. cerevisiae and sugar to CpGV compared with CpGV alone only in year 1, and from the controls in both years. In comparison, larval mortality was significantly increased in both years with the addition of S. cerevisiae and sugar with CpGV compared with CpGV alone or from the controls. The numbers of overwintering larvae on trees was significantly reduced from the control following a seasonal program of CpGV plus S. cerevisiae and sugar. The addition of a microencapsulated formulation of pear ester did not improve the performance of CpGV or CpGV plus S. cerevisiae and sugar. These data suggest that yeasts can enhance the effectiveness of the biological control agent CpGV, in managing and maintaining codling moth at low densities. PMID:26313179

  17. The efficiency and safety of trastuzumab and lapatinib added to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in Her2-positive breast cancer patients: a randomized meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe-Ling; Shen, Yan-Wei; Li, Shu-Ting; Li, Chun-Li; Zhang, Ling-Xiao; Yang, Jiao; Lv, Meng; Lin, Ya-Yun; Wang, Xin; Yang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background The addition of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) therapies to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) during treatment of Her2-positive breast cancer has been proposed as an effective way to improve the prognosis. However, the treatment outcomes of adding trastuzumab, lapatinib, or both to NAC were not unequivocal in randomized clinical trials. Based on these data, a meta-analysis was performed. Objective The main objective was to evaluate the efficiency and safety of trastuzumab and lapatinib added to NAC for treatment of Her2-positive breast cancer. Methods ClinicalTrials.gov and PubMed were searched for randomized clinical trials that compared trastuzumab, lapatinib, or both, added to NAC. The main endpoint was a pathologically complete response (pCR) rate, in breast only or in breast and lymph nodes. The drug safety and the influence of hormone-receptor status, comparing the clinical response and the rate of breast conservation, were evaluated. Results A total of eight publications were included in the primary analysis, designed as two or three subgroups. The cumulative cases were 2,349 and the analyses of all the clinical trials showed that the pCR rate was significantly higher in the group receiving trastuzumab than that in the group with lapatinib, either in breast only (P=0.001) or in breast and lymph nodes (P=0.0001). Similar results could be seen in comparisons of the combination versus trastuzumab group. Further studies of subgroups divided into hormone receptor-positive or-negative patients showed that the addition of trastuzumab or dual Her2-targeted therapy significantly improved the pCR rate in patients who were hormone-insensitive. Regarding the toxic effects, we found more grade 3 and 4 toxic effects, such as diarrhea, skin disorder, and hepatic biochemical changes in the lapatinib and combination groups. No temporally significant differences were found when the clinical response and the rate of breast conservation in the groups

  18. Ad libitum Pasture Feeding in Late Pregnancy Does Not Improve the Performance of Twin-bearing Ewes and Their Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Corner-Thomas, R. A.; Back, P. J.; Kenyon, P. R.; Hickson, R. E.; Ridler, A. L.; Stafford, K. J.; Morris, S. T.

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of controlled ryegrass-white clover herbage availability from day 128 until day 142 of pregnancy in comparison to unrestricted availability, on the performance of twin-bearing ewes of varying body condition score (BCS; 2.0, 2.5, or 3.0) and their lambs. It was hypothesised that under conditions of controlled herbage availability, the performance of lambs born to ewes with a greater BCS would be greater than those born to ewes with a lower BCS. During the period that the nutritional regimens were imposed, the pre- and post-grazing herbage masses of the Control regimen (1,070±69 and 801±30 kg dry matter [DM]/ha) were lower than the ad libitum regimen (1,784±69 and 1,333±33 kg DM/ha; p<0.05). The average herbage masses during lactation were 1,410±31 kg DM/ha. Nutritional regimen had no effect on ewe live weight, BCS and back fat depth or on lamb live weight, indices of colostrum uptake, maximal heat production, total litter weight weaned or survival to weaning (p>0.05). The difference in ewe BCSs and back fats observed among body condition groups was maintained throughout pregnancy (p<0.05). At weaning, ewes from the BCS2.0 group had lower BCS and live weight (2.4±0.2, 74.3±2.6 kg) than both the BCS2.5 (2.6±0.2, 78.6±2.4 kg) and BCS3.0 ewes (2.7±0.2, 79.0±2.6 kg; p<0.05), which did not differ (p>0.05). Ewe BCS group had no effect on lamb live weight at birth or weaning or on maximal heat production (p>0.05). Serum gamma glutamyl transferase concentrations of lambs born to BCS3.0 ewes were higher within 36 hours of birth than lambs born to BCS2.0 ewes and BCS2.5 ewes (51.8±1.9 vs 46.5±1.9 and 45.6±1.9 IU/mL, respectively [p<0.05]). There was, however, no effect of ewe body condition on lamb plasma glucose concentration (p>0.05). Lamb survival was the only lamb parameter that showed an interaction between ewe nutritional regimen and ewe BCS whereby survival of lambs born to BCS2.5 and BCS3.0 ewes differed but only

  19. Effects of Adding Essential Oil to the Diet of Weaned Pigs on Performance, Nutrient Utilization, Immune Response and Intestinal Health

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pengfei; Piao, Xiangshu; Ru, Yingjun; Han, Xu; Xue, Lingfeng; Zhang, Hongyu

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of adding essential oils to the diet of weaned pigs on performance, nutrient utilization, immune response and intestinal health. A total of 96 weaning pigs (8.37±1.58 kg) were allotted to one of three dietary treatments. The treatments consisted of an unsupplemented basal diet (negative control, NC) or similar diets supplemented with 0.01% of an essential oil product which contained 18% thymol and cinnamaldehyde (EOD) as well as a diet supplemented with 0.19% of an antibiotic mixture which provided 150 ppm chlortetracycline, 80 ppm colistin sulfate and 50 ppm kitasamycin (positive control, PC). Each treatment was provided to eight pens of pigs with four pigs per pen. Over the entire 35 d experiment, ADG and fecal score were improved (p<0.05) for pigs fed the PC and EOD compared with the NC. Dry matter and crude protein digestibility as well as lymphocyte proliferation for pigs fed the PC and EOD diets were increased significantly compared with NC (p<0.05). IGF-I levels in plasma were significantly increased (p<0.05) in pigs fed the PC diet compared with pigs fed the NC diet. Interleukin-6 concentration was lower (p<0.05) and the tumor necrosis factor-α level was higher (p<0.05) in the plasma of pigs fed the EOD diet than the NC diet. Plasma total antioxidant capacity level increased (p<0.05) in pigs fed the EOD diet compared with pigs fed the NC. Villus height to crypt depth ratio in the jejunum was greater (p<0.05) in pigs fed the PC and EOD diets than the NC. The numbers of E. coli in the cecum, colon and rectum were reduced (p<0.05) in pigs fed the PC and EOD diets compared with the control. In the colon, the ratio of Lactobacilli to E. coli was increased (p<0.05) in pigs fed the EOD diet compared with NC diet. Total aerobe numbers in the rectum were decreased (p<0.05) in pigs fed the PC and EOD diets compared with the control. Collectively, these results indicate that blends of essential oils could be a

  20. Value Added?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UCLA IDEA, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Value added measures (VAM) uses changes in student test scores to determine how much "value" an individual teacher has "added" to student growth during the school year. Some policymakers, school districts, and educational advocates have applauded VAM as a straightforward measure of teacher effectiveness: the better a teacher, the better students…

  1. 75 FR 30159 - Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Out Performance Requirements To Support Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ..., published in the Federal Register on October 5, 2007 (72 FR 56947), Congress enacted the ``Century of... for ADS-B Out in the Federal Register on October 5, 2007 (72 FR 56947). The comment period for the... extended the comment period to March 3, 2008 (72 FR 64966, Nov. 19, 2007). The FAA received...

  2. Expecting and Achieving Gains in Student Performance: EVAAS Value-Added Report 2002-2004 for the Archdiocese of Indianapolis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Ronald W.; Shuey, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    The Archdiocese of Indianapolis has been using the Sander's value-added model to determine if they have had gains in student achievement in language arts, mathematics and reading. The article summarizes the method to make this determination and the results from three years of testing using the CTB McGraw-Hill Terre Nova test. The archdiocese has…

  3. Modelling Patterns of Improvement over Time: Value Added Trends in English Secondary School Performance across Ten Cohorts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Sally; Peng, Wen Jung; Gray, John

    2007-01-01

    This paper looks at underlying patterns of school effectiveness through analysing a GCSE examination data-set over a period of ten cohorts (1993-2002) in one very large English school district. Both value added and raw score approaches were explored by employing different statistical multilevel models to examine time trends of school and pupil…

  4. Improving the performance of the Granulosis virus of Codling moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricideae) by adding the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with sugar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies evaluated the effectiveness of adding Saccharomyces cerevisiae with brown cane sugar (sugar) to the codling moth granulosis virus, CpGV, to improve larval control of Cydia pomonella (L.), on apple. Neither the use of the yeast or sugar alone caused larval mortality greater than the water con...

  5. Effects of adding fibrous feedstuffs to the diet of young pigs on growth performance, intestinal cytokines, and circulating acute phase proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of adding fibrous feedstuffs on growth performance, intestinal cytokine expression, markers of inflammation, abundance of phosphorylated S6 kinase (S6K), and the expression of genes that control intestinal growth was evaluated in weanling pigs. Pigs (n = 120; 5.2 kg and 24 d of age) wer...

  6. Gene expression variance in hippocampal tissue of temporal lobe epilepsy patients corresponds to differential memory performance.

    PubMed

    Bungenberg, Julia; Surano, Natascha; Grote, Alexander; Surges, Rainer; Pernhorst, Katharina; Hofmann, Andrea; Schoch, Susanne; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Becker, Albert J

    2016-02-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a severe brain disorder affecting particularly young adults. TLE is frequently associated with memory deterioration and neuronal damage of the hippocampal formation. It thereby reveals striking parallels to neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). TLE patients differ with respect to their cognitive performance, but currently little is known about relevant molecular-genetic factors. Here, we correlated differential memory performance of pharmacoresistant TLE patients undergoing neurosurgery for seizure control with in-vitro findings of their hippocampal tissues. We analyzed mRNA transcripts and subsequently promoter variants specifically altered in brain tissue of individuals with 'very severe' memory impairment. TLE patients (n=79) were stratified according to preoperative memory impairment using an established four-tiered grading system ranging from 'average' to 'very severely'. Multimodal cluster analyses revealed molecules specifically associated with synaptic function and abundantly expressed in TLE patients with very impaired memory performance. In a subsequent promoter analysis, we found the single nucleotide polymorphism rs744373 C-allele to be associated with high mRNA levels of bridging integrator 1 (BIN1)/Amphiphysin 2, i.e. a major component of the endocytotic machinery and located in a crucial genetic AD risk locus. Using in vitro luciferase transfection assays, we found that BIN1 promoter activation is genotype dependent and strongly increased by reduced binding of the transcriptional repressor TGIF. Our data indicate that poor memory performance in patients with TLE strongly corresponds to distinctly altered neuronal transcript signatures, which - as demonstrated for BIN1 - can correlate with a particular allelic promoter variant. Our data suggest aberrant transcriptional signaling to significantly impact synaptic dynamics in TLE resulting in impaired memory performance and may serve as basis for

  7. Efficiency of Non-Contrast-Enhanced Liver Imaging Sequences Added to Initial Rectal MRI in Rectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Gene-hyuk; Kim, Kyung Ah; Hwang, Seong Su; Park, Soo Youn; Kim, Hyun A.; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Ji Woong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to estimate the value of addition of liver imaging to initial rectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of liver metastasis and evaluate imaging predictors of a high risk of liver metastasis on rectal MRI. Methods We enrolled 144 patients who from October 2010 to May 2013 underwent rectal MRI with T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) (b values = 50, 500, and 900 s/mm2) of the liver and abdominopelvic computed tomography (APCT) for the initial staging of rectal cancer. Two reviewers scored the possibility of liver metastasis on different sets of liver images (T2WI, DWI, and combined T2WI and DWI) and APCT and reached a conclusion by consensus for different analytic results. Imaging features from rectal MRI were also analyzed. The diagnostic performances of CT and an additional liver scan to detect liver metastasis were compared. Multivariate logistic regression to determine independent predictors of liver metastasis among rectal MRI features and tumor markers was performed. This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. Results All sets of liver images were more effective than APCT for detecting liver metastasis, and DWI was the most effective. Perivascular stranding and anal sphincter invasion were statistically significant for liver metastasis (p = 0.0077 and p = 0.0471), while extramural vascular invasion based on MRI (mrEMVI) was marginally significant (p = 0.0534). Conclusion The addition of non-contrast-enhanced liver imaging, particularly DWI, to initial rectal MRI in rectal cancer patients could facilitate detection of liver metastasis without APCT. Perivascular stranding, anal sphincter invasion, and mrEMVI detected on rectal MRI were important imaging predictors of liver metastasis. PMID:26348217

  8. Phase II study of methotrexate, vincristine, pegylated-asparaginase, and dexamethasone (MOpAD) in patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kadia, Tapan M.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Thomas, Deborah A.; O’Brien, Susan; Estrov, Zeev; Ravandi, Farhad; Jabbour, Elias; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Daver, Naval; Wang, Xuemei; Jain, Preetesh; Pierce, Sherry; Brandt, Mark; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cortes, Jorge; Borthakur, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Newer approaches are needed for the treatment of relapsed and refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Asparaginase-based regimens are active in the treatment of pediatric ALL and may be important in salvage therapy for adult patients. We conducted a pilot trial combining methotrexate, vincristine, PEGylated-asparaginase, and dexamethasone (MOpAD) in adults with relapsed or refractory ALL. We added tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) ALL and rituximab in patients with CD20 positive B-cell ALL. Among 37 patients treated (median age 42 years; median 2 prior therapies), the complete remission (CR) rate was 28% and an overall response rate (ORR) was 39%. The median CR duration was 4.3 months. Patients with Ph+ ALL had CR and ORR of 50% and 67%, respectively and the CR and ORR in patients with T-cell leukemia were 45% and 56%, respectively. The median survival in patients with CR/CRp was 10.4 versus 3.4 months in nonresponders (P =0.02). The most common grade 3 or 4 nonhematologic toxicities were elevations in bilirubin and transaminases, nausea, peripheral neuropathy, and hyperglycemia, which were managed with supportive care, dose adjustments, and interruptions. PMID:25368968

  9. Communication during haematological consultations; patients' preferences and professionals' performances.

    PubMed

    van Bruinessen, Inge R; van der Hout, Lotte E; van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn M; Gouw, Hans; Zijlstra, Josée M; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Many patients with haematological malignancies experience barriers in clinical communication. Reaching effective communication is of great importance as it has been linked to a range of improved patient outcomes such as satisfaction, compliance to treatment, perceived quality of life and physical and mental health. To get a better understanding how communication in haematological consultations can be improved, the current study focussed on patients' preferences and perceived performances regarding the communicative behaviour of their health care professional. Secondly, the mediation of an online communication tool for patients was analysed. Within a controlled pre- post-test design, 78 datasets of clinical consultations could be analysed. Patients considered both affective and instrumental communication aspects important. The affective communication behaviour of the health care professional met the patients' pre-visit preferences well. In the information exchange, more variability and discrepancies were found. Overall, the online intervention did not seem to influence the patients' perceived communication performance of their health care professional much. To further improve the communication during clinical consultations, health care professionals should inquire about patients' expectations, especially during the exchange of information and advices. At the same time, patients should be supported to express their preferences at the start of the consultation. The study was registered in the Netherlands Trial Register, number 3779. PMID:27091348

  10. Effects of ad libitum and restricted feeding on early production performance and body composition of Yorkshire pigs selected for reduced residual feed intake.

    PubMed

    Boddicker, N; Gabler, N K; Spurlock, M E; Nettleton, D; Dekkers, J C M

    2011-08-01

    Residual feed intake (RFI), defined as the difference between observed and expected feed intake based on growth and backfat, has been used to investigate genetic variation in feed efficiency in cattle, poultry and pigs. However, little is known about the biological basis of differences in RFI in pigs. To this end, the objective of this study was to evaluate the fifth generation of a line of pigs selected for reduced RFI against a randomly selected Control line for performance, carcass and chemical carcass composition and overall efficiency. Here, emphasis was on the early grower phase. A total of 100 barrows, 50 from each line, were paired by age and weight (22.6 ± 3.9 kg) and randomly assigned to one of four feeding treatments in 11 replicates: ad libitum (Ad), 75% of Ad (Ad75), 55% of Ad (Ad55) and weight stasis (WS), which involved weekly adjustments in intake to keep body weight (BW) constant for each pig. Pigs were individually penned (group housing was used for selection) and were on treatment for 6 weeks. Initial BW did not significantly differ between the lines (P > 0.17). Under Ad feeding, the low RFI pigs consumed 8% less feed compared with Control line pigs (P < 0.06), had less carcass fat (P < 0.05), but with no significant difference in growth rate (P > 0.85). Under restricted feeding, low RFI pigs under the Ad75 treatment had a greater rate of gain while consuming the same amount of feed as Control pigs. Despite the greater gain, no significant line differences in carcass composition or carcass traits were observed. For the WS treatment, low RFI pigs had similar BW (P > 0.37) with no significant difference in feed consumption (P > 0.32). Overall, selection for reduced RFI has decreased feed intake, with limited differences in growth rate but reduced carcass fat, as seen under Ad feeding. Collectively, results indicate that the effects of selection for low RFI are evident during the early grower stage, which allows for greater savings to the producer

  11. Adding Memantine to Rivastigmine Therapy in Patients With Mild-to-Moderate Alzheimer's Disease: Results of a 12-Week, Open-Label Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Riepe, Matthias W.; Adler, Georg; Ibach, Bernd; Weinkauf, Birgit; Gunay, Ibrahim; Tracik, Ferenc

    2006-01-01

    Objective: At present, inhibition of cholines-terase is the treatment of choice for subjects with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD). Memantine, a noncompetitive antagonist at N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, is currently used to treat subjects with moderate-to-severe AD. The goal of this multicenter, open-label pilot study was to investigate whether combination therapy with memantine added to rivastigmine is safe and beneficial in subjects with mild-to-moderate AD. Method: Patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer's type (N = 95), who were treated with rivastigmine (6–12 mg/day) for a maximum duration of 24 weeks prior to baseline, received memantine (5–20 mg/day) in combination with rivastigmine for 12 weeks. The primary efficacy variable was the change in the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) total score at the end of 12 weeks compared with baseline. The study was conducted between September 15, 2003, and May 27, 2004. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between baseline and week 12 for the ADAS-cog total score, showing a positive effect of combination therapy. Combination therapy did not evidence any unexpected safety concerns and was well-tolerated by most patients. Conclusion: Memantine in combination with rivastigmine appears to be safe and beneficial in patients with mild-to-moderate AD. Our results need to be confirmed in a large, long-term, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. PMID:17235381

  12. Maximizing cochlear implant patients' performance with advanced speech training procedures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qian-Jie; Galvin, John J

    2008-08-01

    Advances in implant technology and speech processing have provided great benefit to many cochlear implant patients. However, some patients receive little benefit from the latest technology, even after many years' experience with the device. Moreover, even the best cochlear implant performers have great difficulty understanding speech in background noise, and music perception and appreciation remain major challenges. Recent studies have shown that targeted auditory training can significantly improve cochlear implant patients' speech recognition performance. Such benefits are not only observed in poorly performing patients, but also in good performers under difficult listening conditions (e.g., speech noise, telephone speech, music, etc.). Targeted auditory training has also been shown to enhance performance gains provided by new implant devices and/or speech processing strategies. These studies suggest that cochlear implantation alone may not fully meet the needs of many patients, and that additional auditory rehabilitation may be needed to maximize the benefits of the implant device. Continuing research will aid in the development of efficient and effective training protocols and materials, thereby minimizing the costs (in terms of time, effort and resources) associated with auditory rehabilitation while maximizing the benefits of cochlear implantation for all recipients. PMID:18295992

  13. "Tu Que Te Mereces Un Principe, Un Dentista": The Use of Metaphors of Love, Desire, and Gender in Personal Ads on the Internet to Perform Heterosexuality. Creating and Supporting Ideologies of Heteronormativity and Sexuality in Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojas-Sosa, Deyanira

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates how heterosexuality is performed and achieved in everyday language use, specifically in personal ads from the Internet. Within personal ads, it focuses on the metaphors used by ad posters to articulate concepts of love, desire, gender and sexuality. The aim was to determine how the use of certain metaphors reflects ad…

  14. Adding Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsini, Larry L.; Hudack, Lawrence R.; Zekan, Donald L.

    1999-01-01

    The value-added statement (VAS), relatively unknown in the United States, is used in financial reports by many European companies. Saint Bonaventure University (New York) has adapted a VAS to make it appropriate for not-for-profit universities by identifying stakeholder groups (students, faculty, administrators/support personnel, creditors, the…

  15. Value-added Synthesis of Graphene: Recycling Industrial Carbon Waste into Electrodes for High-Performance Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Sik; Park, Chibeom; Xu, Wentao; Baek, Kangkyun; Bae, Sang-Hoon; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Kimoon; Choi, Hee Cheul; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a simple, scalable, transfer-free, ecologically sustainable, value-added method to convert inexpensive coal tar pitch to patterned graphene films directly on device substrates. The method, which does not require an additional transfer process, enables direct growth of graphene films on device substrates in large area. To demonstrate the practical applications of the graphene films, we used the patterned graphene grown on a dielectric substrate directly as electrodes of bottom-contact pentacene field-effect transistors (max. field effect mobility ~0.36 cm(2)·V(-1)·s(-1)), without using any physical transfer process. This use of a chemical waste product as a solid carbon source instead of commonly used explosive hydrocarbon gas sources for graphene synthesis has the dual benefits of converting the waste to a valuable product, and reducing pollution. PMID:26567845

  16. Value-added Synthesis of Graphene: Recycling Industrial Carbon Waste into Electrodes for High-Performance Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Sik; Park, Chibeom; Xu, Wentao; Baek, Kangkyun; Bae, Sang-Hoon; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Kimoon; Choi, Hee Cheul; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a simple, scalable, transfer-free, ecologically sustainable, value-added method to convert inexpensive coal tar pitch to patterned graphene films directly on device substrates. The method, which does not require an additional transfer process, enables direct growth of graphene films on device substrates in large area. To demonstrate the practical applications of the graphene films, we used the patterned graphene grown on a dielectric substrate directly as electrodes of bottom-contact pentacene field-effect transistors (max. field effect mobility ~0.36 cm2·V−1·s−1), without using any physical transfer process. This use of a chemical waste product as a solid carbon source instead of commonly used explosive hydrocarbon gas sources for graphene synthesis has the dual benefits of converting the waste to a valuable product, and reducing pollution. PMID:26567845

  17. Value-added Synthesis of Graphene: Recycling Industrial Carbon Waste into Electrodes for High-Performance Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Sik; Park, Chibeom; Xu, Wentao; Baek, Kangkyun; Bae, Sang-Hoon; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Kimoon; Choi, Hee Cheul; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a simple, scalable, transfer-free, ecologically sustainable, value-added method to convert inexpensive coal tar pitch to patterned graphene films directly on device substrates. The method, which does not require an additional transfer process, enables direct growth of graphene films on device substrates in large area. To demonstrate the practical applications of the graphene films, we used the patterned graphene grown on a dielectric substrate directly as electrodes of bottom-contact pentacene field-effect transistors (max. field effect mobility ~0.36 cm2·V-1·s-1), without using any physical transfer process. This use of a chemical waste product as a solid carbon source instead of commonly used explosive hydrocarbon gas sources for graphene synthesis has the dual benefits of converting the waste to a valuable product, and reducing pollution.

  18. Effects of feeding wheat straw or orchardgrass at ad libitum or restricted intake during the dry period on postpartum performance and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Litherland, N B; Weich, W D; Hansen, W P; Linn, J G

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of forage source [wheat straw (WS) or orchardgrass hay (OG)] and total amount of diet dry matter fed [ad libitum or restricted to 70% of predicted dry matter intake (DMI)] prepartum on postpartum performance. The study design was a 2×2 factorial design with 10 cows per treatment. Treatments were WS total mixed ration (TMR) ad libitum, OG TMR ad libitum, WS TMR restricted, and OG TMR restricted. The WS TMR (dry matter basis) contained 30% WS, 20.7% corn silage, 10.0% alfalfa hay, 18.2% ground corn, 16.8% soybean meal, and 4.3% molasses mineral mix (14.7% CP, 1.5 Mcal/kg of net energy for lactation, 37.0% neutral detergent fiber). The OG TMR contained 30% OG, 46.2% corn silage, 10.0% alfalfa hay, 9.5% soybean meal, and 4.3% molasses (14.2% CP, 1.5 Mcal/kg of net energy for lactation, 41.0% neutral detergent fiber). Cows received 1 lactation diet after calving (17.7% CP, 1.6 Mcal/kg of net energy for lactation, 27.3% neutral detergent fiber). Total diet DMI prepartum was higher for ad libitum than for restricted as designed, but forage source had no effect on DMI. Total tract apparent digestibilities of DM and NDF were greater for OG than for WS. Postpartum DMI expressed as a percentage of body weight for the first week of lactation was higher for ad libitum than for restricted diets. Postpartum DMI during the first 30 d of lactation was higher for OG than for WS, but no effect was observed for the amount fed prepartum. Milk yield during the first week of lactation was higher for OG than for WS; however, during the first 30 d, 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield and yield of milk fat were highest for OG TMR restricted and WS TMR ad libitum. Prepartum treatments had a limited effect on pre- and postpartum lipid metabolism; however, cows fed WS TMR ad libitum had the highest postpartum β-hydroxybutyrate. Eating behavior was observed by 10-min video scans of 24-h video surveillance for 5d pre- and postpartum

  19. Comparative Efficacy and Safety of Antidiabetic Drug Regimens Added to Metformin Monotherapy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sobieraj, Diana M.; White, C. Michael; Saulsberry, Whitney J.; Kohn, Christine G.; Doleh, Yunes; Zaccaro, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Introduction When first line therapy with metformin is insufficient for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), the optimal adjunctive therapy is unclear. We assessed the efficacy and safety of adjunctive antidiabetic agents in patients with inadequately controlled T2D on metformin alone. Materials and Methods A search of MEDLINE and CENTRAL, clinicaltrials.gov, regulatory websites was performed. We included randomized controlled trials of 3–12 months duration, evaluating Food and Drug Administration or European Union approved agents (noninsulin and long acting, once daily basal insulins) in patients experiencing inadequate glycemic control with metformin monotherapy (≥1500 mg daily or maximally tolerated dose for ≥4 weeks). Random-effects network meta-analyses were used to compare the weighted mean difference for changes from baseline in HbA1c, body weight (BW) and systolic blood pressure (SBP), and the risk of developing hypoglycemia, urinary (UTI) and genital tract infection (GTI). Results Sixty-two trials evaluating 25 agents were included. All agents significantly reduced HbA1c vs. placebo; albeit not to the same extent (range, 0.43% for miglitol to 1.29% for glibenclamide). Glargine, sulfonylureas (SUs) and nateglinide were associated with increased hypoglycemia risk vs. placebo (range, 4.00–11.67). Sodium glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs, miglitol and empagliflozin/linagliptin significantly reduced BW (range, 1.15–2.26kg) whereas SUs, thiazolindinediones, glargine and alogliptin/pioglitazone caused weight gain (range, 1.19–2.44kg). SGLT2 inhibitors, empagliflozin/linagliptin, liraglutide and sitagliptin decreased SBP (range, 1.88–5.43mmHg). No therapy increased UTI risk vs. placebo; however, SGLT2 inhibitors were associated with an increased risk of GTI (range, 2.16–8.03). Conclusions Adding different AHAs to metformin was associated with varying effects on HbA1c, BW, SBP, hypoglycemia, UTI and GTI

  20. Patients as experts: a collaborative performance support system.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    Performance support systems that provide decision support and encourage quality improvement historically focus on physicians as the expert to the exclusion of an active role for patients. This paper outlines an argument for the development of a collaborative expert system in the acute care setting that emphasizes a key role for patients. Patients are not just seekers of information; they remain capable of sharing and integrating their knowledge and expertise actively in an electronically-supported care process. Collaborative use of information technology emerges as a novel variation of consumer informatics. I will define specific domains of expertise for patients and place the proposed collaborative expert system within the framework of Wagner's view of idealized collaborative care for chronic illness. Basic architecture for a patient-inclusive system is proposed with additional detail provided for a patient-level interface targeting pediatric asthma. The benefits of the electronically-supported collaboration include the activation of patients in the information-sharing process, enhanced decision support, a patient-focused needs assessment, and improved communication and partnership between patients and providers. PMID:11825247

  1. Adding to the Education Debt: Depressive Symptoms Mediate the Association between Racial Discrimination and Academic Performance in African Americans.

    PubMed

    English, Devin; Lambert, Sharon F; Ialongo, Nicholas S

    2016-08-01

    Although the United States faces a seemingly intractable divide between white and African American academic performance, there remains a dearth of longitudinal research investigating factors that work to maintain this gap. The present study examined whether racial discrimination predicted the academic performance of African American students through its effect on depressive symptoms. Participants were a community sample of African American adolescents (N=495) attending urban public schools from grade 7 to grade 9 (Mage=12.5). Structural equation modeling revealed that experienced racial discrimination predicted increases in depressive symptoms 1year later, which, in turn, predicted decreases in academic performance the following year. These results suggest that racial discrimination continues to play a critical role in the academic performance of African American students and, as such, contributes to the maintenance of the race-based academic achievement gap in the United States. PMID:27425564

  2. Effect of heat treatment temperature on superconducting performance of B 4C added MgB 2/Nb conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljamaa, J.; Kario, A.; Dobročka, E.; Reissner, M.; Kulich, M.; Kováč, P.; Häßler, W.

    2012-02-01

    A previously observed enhancing effect of addition of 10 wt.% of B 4C on critical current density ( Jc) dependence on magnetic flux density ( B) in MgB 2 superconductors is examined here in more detail. Nb sheathed in situ MgB 2 monofilamentary Powder-in-Tube (PIT) samples are prepared with the 10 wt.% addition of boron carbide. The samples are heat treated at different temperatures, namely at 650, 700, 750, and 800 °C for 30 min. The phases and lattice parameters of the samples are studied using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The amount of B 4C does not decrease from the initial amount with increasing heat treatment temperature ( Tht) but instead increases. This indicates that some of the Mg from the precursor reacts with the Nb sheath. Magnetic Jc( B) characteristics are obtained at several temperatures in external B in a Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). The magnetic and transport Jc( B) results disagree with each other which can be explained by unsuitability of Nb as the sheath with higher Tht. From these results, also pinning force densities ( Fp) are calculated. No effect on pinning mechanism of B 4C added samples is observed by the heat treatment conditions. Resistance dependencies on temperature are also measured in a Physical Properties Measurement System (PPMS). Mg deficiency with high Tht is supported by these measurements.

  3. Immunization coverage among splenectomized patients: Results of an ad hoc survey in Puglia Region (South of Italy).

    PubMed

    Martino, Carmen; Gallone, Maria Serena; Quarto, Michele; Germinario, Cinzia; Tafuri, Silvio

    2016-05-01

    Patients with anatomic or functional asplenia have a 10-50 times higher risk than general population to develop Overwhelming Post-Splenectomy Infection. Evidences are unanimous in recommending splenectomised patients to receive meningococcal, antipneumococcal and Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccinations according to a specific timing. In Italy there are no current data on the immunisation coverage in these patients. This study aims to investigate immunisation coverage in patients undergoing elective or urgent splenectomy for 2012-2013 in the 3 Apulian hospitals. The patients discharged with the code ICD-9-CM 41.5 - "Total splenectomy" were enrolled. The administration of vaccines was verified through consultation of medical records, archives of general practitioners and vaccination offices. In the study period, 166 subjects underwent splenectomy and none of them received vaccinations during hospitalization. 25 splenectomised patients (15.1%) received at least one of the recommended vaccinations. 21 patients (12.6%) received vaccine against Streptococcus pneumonia, 13 (7.8%) meningococcal vaccine, 10 patients (6%) Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccine. The low vaccination coverage could be due both to poor perception of the risk of infection and to a lack of knowledge on vaccinations by surgeons. For this reason it is necessary to draw up and share operational protocols that establish the administration of vaccines. PMID:26890256

  4. Safety of pramlintide added to mealtime insulin in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes: a large observational study.

    PubMed

    Pencek, R; Roddy, T; Peters, Y; De Young, M B; Herrmann, K; Meller, L; Nguyen, H; Chen, S; Lutz, K

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this Phase 4, open-label, multicentre, observational study was to fulfil food and drug administration (FDA) postapproval requirement to evaluate in healthcare practices the risk of insulin-induced severe hypoglycaemia following initiation of pramlintide therapy in N = 1297 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with inadequate glycaemic control. The duration of the study was approximately 6 months. During the adjustment period (0-3 months), the incidence and event rate of patient-ascertained severe hypoglycaemia (PASH) were 4.8% and 0.33 events/patient-year in patients with T1DM and 2.8% and 0.19 events/patient-year in patients with T2DM. During the maintenance period (>3-6 months), the incidence and event rate of PASH declined in patients with T1DM or T2DM. This study confirms that in healthcare practices, the risk of insulin-induced severe hypoglycaemia following the initiation of pramlintide is low in patients with T1DM or T2DM. PMID:20518811

  5. DIS in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albacete, Javier L.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Taliotis, Anastasios

    2009-03-01

    We calculate the total cross section for the scattering of a quark-anti-quark dipole on a large nucleus at high energy for a strongly coupled N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory using AdS/CFT correspondence. We model the nucleus by a metric of a shock wave in AdS5. We then calculate the expectation value of the Wilson loop (the dipole) by finding the extrema of the Nambu-Goto action for an open string attached to the quark and antiquark lines of the loop in the background of an AdS5 shock wave. We find two physically meaningful extremal string configurations. For both solutions we obtain the forward scattering amplitude N for the quark dipole-nucleus scattering. We study the onset of unitarity with increasing center-of-mass energy and transverse size of the dipole: we observe that for both solutions the saturation scale Qs is independent of energy/Bjorken-x and depends on the atomic number of the nucleus as Qs˜A1/3. Finally we observe that while one of the solutions we found corresponds to the pomeron intercept of αP = 2 found earlier in the literature, when extended to higher energy or larger dipole sizes it violates the black disk limit. The other solution we found respects the black disk limit and yields the pomeron intercept of αP = 1.5. We thus conjecture that the right pomeron intercept in gauge theories at strong coupling may be αP = 1.5.

  6. Adding dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine for lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block for amputation of lower limb in high-risk patient-a case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Guang; Ding, Yan-Ling; Han, Ai-Ping; Hu, Chang-Qing; Hao, Shi; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Li, Yong-Wang; Liu, Hu; Han, Zhe; Guo, De-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The ischemia necrosis of limb frequently requires surgery of amputation. Lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block is an ideal intra-operative anesthetic and post-operative antalgic technique for patients of amputation, especially for high-risk patients who have severe cardio-cerebrovascular diseases. However, the duration of analgesia of peripheral nerve block is hardly sufficient to avoid the postoperative pain and the usage of opioids. In this case, a 79-year-old man, with multiple cerebral infarcts, congestive heart failure, atrial flutter and syncope, was treated with an above knee amputation because of ischemia necrosis of his left lower limb. Dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg was added to 0.33% ropivacaine for lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block in this case for intra-operative anesthesia and post-operative analgesia. The sensory function was blocked fully for surgery and the duration of analgesia maintained 26 hours with haemodynamic stability and moderate sedation. The patient did not complain pain and require any supplementary analgesics after surgery. This case showed that adding 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine for lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block may be a feasible and safe technique for high-risk patients for lower limb surgery of amputation. PMID:26550393

  7. Comparison of TIVA and Desflurane Added to a Subanaesthetic Dose of Propofol in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: Evaluation of Haemodynamic and Stress Hormone Changes.

    PubMed

    Onk, Didem; Akarsu Ayazoğlu, Tülin; Onk, Oruç Alper; Aksüt, Mehmet; Günay, Murat; Turkmen, Kultigin; Özensoy, Aynur; Yazıcı Ersoy, Çiğdem; Çoban, Abdulkadir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Increased levels of stress hormones are associated with mortality in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Aim. To compare total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) and desflurane added to a subanaesthetic dose of propofol. Material and Methods. Fifty patients were enrolled in this study. Fentanyl (3-5 mcg/kg/h) was started in both groups. Patients were divided into two groups. The PD group (n = 25) received 1 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) desflurane anaesthesia in addition to propofol infusion (2-3 mg/kg/h), while P group (n = 25) received propofol infusion (5-6 mg/kg/h) only. Biochemical data, cortisol, and insulin levels were measured preoperatively (T0), after initiation of CPB but before cross-clamping the aorta (T1), after removal of the cross-clamp (T2), and at the 24th postoperative hour (T3). Results. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure levels were significantly higher in PD group than those in P group in T1 and T2 measurements (p ≤ 0.05). CK-MB showed a significant decrease in group P (p ≤ 0.05). When we compared both groups, cortisol levels were significantly higher in PD group than P group (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusion. Stress and haemodynamic responses were better controlled using TIVA than desflurane inhalation added to a subanaesthetic dose of propofol in patients undergoing CABG. PMID:27547757

  8. Comparison of TIVA and Desflurane Added to a Subanaesthetic Dose of Propofol in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: Evaluation of Haemodynamic and Stress Hormone Changes

    PubMed Central

    Akarsu Ayazoğlu, Tülin; Onk, Oruç Alper; Aksüt, Mehmet; Günay, Murat; Turkmen, Kultigin; Özensoy, Aynur; Yazıcı Ersoy, Çiğdem; Çoban, Abdulkadir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Increased levels of stress hormones are associated with mortality in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Aim. To compare total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) and desflurane added to a subanaesthetic dose of propofol. Material and Methods. Fifty patients were enrolled in this study. Fentanyl (3–5 mcg/kg/h) was started in both groups. Patients were divided into two groups. The PD group (n = 25) received 1 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) desflurane anaesthesia in addition to propofol infusion (2-3 mg/kg/h), while P group (n = 25) received propofol infusion (5-6 mg/kg/h) only. Biochemical data, cortisol, and insulin levels were measured preoperatively (T0), after initiation of CPB but before cross-clamping the aorta (T1), after removal of the cross-clamp (T2), and at the 24th postoperative hour (T3). Results. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure levels were significantly higher in PD group than those in P group in T1 and T2 measurements (p ≤ 0.05). CK-MB showed a significant decrease in group P (p ≤ 0.05). When we compared both groups, cortisol levels were significantly higher in PD group than P group (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusion. Stress and haemodynamic responses were better controlled using TIVA than desflurane inhalation added to a subanaesthetic dose of propofol in patients undergoing CABG. PMID:27547757

  9. Intraprostatic distribution and long-term follow-up after AdV-tk immunotherapy as neoadjuvant to surgery in patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Martínez, A; Manzanera, A G; Sukin, S W; Esteban-María, J; González-Guerrero, J F; Gomez-Guerra, L; Garza-Guajardo, R; Flores-Gutiérrez, J P; Elizondo Riojas, G; Delgado-Enciso, I; Ortiz-López, R; Aguilar, L K; Butler, E B; Barrera-Saldaña, H A; Aguilar-Cordova, E

    2013-11-01

    A phase I-II study to evaluate gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy in newly diagnosed prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy was conducted in Monterrey, Mexico. First, to investigate delivery of adenovirus to the prostate, fluorescently labeled vector was injected into fresh prostatectomy specimens and distribution was visually analyzed. The optimal volume and site instillation was then used for transrectal ultrasound guided intraprostatic injection in 10 patients with adenocarcinoma scheduled for radical prostatectomy. Each received two apical and two basal 0.5 ml injections of AdV-tk for a total of 1 × 10(11) vp followed by 14 days of prodrug. Nine patients continued to tumor resection: six high risk, one intermediate and two low risk. In vivo vector distribution was analyzed from the resected tissue of four patients. Patients were monitored for tumor progression and acute and long-term safety. For vector delivery, two apical and two basal injections of 0.5 ml led to optimal organ-wide distribution ex vivo and in vivo. Cytotoxicity was evidenced by transient rise in PSA and tumor histology. There were no significant adverse events deemed related to the treatment and no late toxicities after median follow-up of 11.3 years. All six high-risk patients had positive surgical margins and one had seminal vesicle involvement. Despite slow PSA rise post surgery in three of these patients, none developed metastases. The intermediate- and low-risk patients had complete resections and none have progressed. In conclusion, in vivo transrectal ultrasound guided instillation of an adenoviral vector into four sites in the prostate was practical as an outpatient procedure, well tolerated and led to distribution throughout the intraprostatic tumor mass. AdV-tk demonstrated no significant acute or late toxicities. Trends in PSA and disease progression conveyed the possibility of a sustained immune response against residual disease. PMID:24052127

  10. Intraprostatic distribution and long term follow-up after AdV-tk immunotherapy as neoadjuvant to surgery in patients with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Martínez, Augusto; Manzanera, Andrea G.; Sukin, Steven W.; Esteban-María, Jacinto; González-Guerrero, Juan Francisco; Gomez-Guerra, Lauro; Garza-Guajardo, Raquel; Flores-Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; Riojas, Guillermo Elizondo; Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Ortiz-López, Rocío; Aguilar, Laura K.; Butler, E. Brian; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A.; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo

    2013-01-01

    A phase I-II study to evaluate gene mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy in newly diagnosed prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy was conducted in Monterrey, Mexico. Methods To investigate delivery of adenovirus to the prostate, fluorescently labeled vector was injected into fresh prostatectomy specimens and distribution visually analyzed. The optimal volume and site instillation was then used for transrectal ultrasound guided intraprostatic injection in 10 patients with adenocarcinoma scheduled for radical prostatectomy. Each received 2-apical and 2-basal 0.5 ml injections of AdV-tk for a total of 1×1011 vp followed by 14 days of prodrug. Nine patients continued to tumor resection: 6 high-risk, 1 intermediate and 2 low-risk. In-vivo vector distribution was analyzed from resected tissue of four patients. Patients were monitored for tumor progression and acute and long-term safety. Results Two apical and two basal injections of 0.5ml led to optimal organ-wide distribution of an adenoviral vector ex-vivo and in-vivo. Cytotoxicity was evidenced by transient rise in PSA and tumor histology. There were no significant adverse events deemed related to the treatment and no late toxicities after median follow up of 11.3 years. All six high-risk patients had positive surgical margins and one had seminal vesicle involvement. Despite slow PSA rise post-surgery in 3 of these patients, none developed metastases. The intermediate and low-risk patients had complete resections and none have progressed. Conclusion In-vivo transrectal ultrasound guided instillation of an adenoviral vector into four sites in the prostate was practical as an outpatient procedure, well tolerated and led to distribution throughout the intraprostatic tumor mass. AdV-tk demonstrated no significant acute or late toxicities. Trends in PSA and disease progression conveyed the possibility of a sustained immune response against residual disease. PMID:24052127

  11. The effect of umeclidinium added to inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2-agonist in patients with symptomatic COPD: a randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana R; Riley, John H; Church, Alison; Zhu, Chang-Qing; Punekar, Yogesh S; Fahy, William A

    2016-01-01

    Benefits of triple therapy with a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA), added to inhaled corticosteroid (ICS)/long-acting β2-agonist (LABA), have been demonstrated. Limited data assessing the efficacy of the LAMA umeclidinium (UMEC) added to ICS/LABA are available. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of UMEC added to ICS/LABAs in patients with moderate-to-very-severe COPD. This is a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study. Patients were symptomatic (modified Medical Research Council Dyspnoea Scale score ⩾2), despite receiving ICS/LABA (fluticasone propionate/salmeterol (FP/SAL, branded) 500/50 mcg, budesonide/formoterol (BD/FOR, branded) 200/6 mcg or 400/12 mcg, or other ICS/LABAs) ⩾30 days before the run-in (7±2 days). Patients were randomised 1:1 to once-daily UMEC 62.5 mcg or placebo (PBO), added to twice-daily open-label ICS/LABA for 12 weeks. Primary end point was trough forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) at Day 85; secondary end point was weighted mean (WM) 0-6 h FEV1 at Day 84; other end points included COPD Assessment Test (CAT) score and Transition Dyspnoea Index (TDI) score. Adverse events (AEs) were investigated. In the UMEC+ICS/LABA and PBO+ICS/LABA groups, 119 and 117 patients were randomised, respectively. Patients received FP/SAL (40%), BD/FOR (43%) and other ICS/LABAs (17%). UMEC+ICS/LABA resulted in significant improvements in trough FEV1 (Day 85) and in WM 0-6 h FEV1 (Day 84) versus PBO+ICS/LABA (difference: 123 and 148 ml, respectively, both P<0.001). Change from baseline for UMEC+ICS/LABA versus PBO+ICS/LABA was significantly different for CAT score at Day 84 (-1.31, P<0.05), but not for TDI score (0.40, P=0.152). AE incidence was similar with UMEC+ICS/LABA (38%) and PBO+ICS/LABA (42%). UMEC+ICS/LABA improved lung function and CAT score in patients with symptomatic COPD versus PBO+ICS/LABA (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02257372). PMID:27334739

  12. The effect of umeclidinium added to inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2-agonist in patients with symptomatic COPD: a randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Ana R; Riley, John H; Church, Alison; Zhu, Chang-Qing; Punekar, Yogesh S; Fahy, William A

    2016-01-01

    Benefits of triple therapy with a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA), added to inhaled corticosteroid (ICS)/long-acting β2-agonist (LABA), have been demonstrated. Limited data assessing the efficacy of the LAMA umeclidinium (UMEC) added to ICS/LABA are available. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of UMEC added to ICS/LABAs in patients with moderate-to-very-severe COPD. This is a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study. Patients were symptomatic (modified Medical Research Council Dyspnoea Scale score ⩾2), despite receiving ICS/LABA (fluticasone propionate/salmeterol (FP/SAL, branded) 500/50 mcg, budesonide/formoterol (BD/FOR, branded) 200/6 mcg or 400/12 mcg, or other ICS/LABAs) ⩾30 days before the run-in (7±2 days). Patients were randomised 1:1 to once-daily UMEC 62.5 mcg or placebo (PBO), added to twice-daily open-label ICS/LABA for 12 weeks. Primary end point was trough forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) at Day 85; secondary end point was weighted mean (WM) 0–6 h FEV1 at Day 84; other end points included COPD Assessment Test (CAT) score and Transition Dyspnoea Index (TDI) score. Adverse events (AEs) were investigated. In the UMEC+ICS/LABA and PBO+ICS/LABA groups, 119 and 117 patients were randomised, respectively. Patients received FP/SAL (40%), BD/FOR (43%) and other ICS/LABAs (17%). UMEC+ICS/LABA resulted in significant improvements in trough FEV1 (Day 85) and in WM 0–6 h FEV1 (Day 84) versus PBO+ICS/LABA (difference: 123 and 148 ml, respectively, both P<0.001). Change from baseline for UMEC+ICS/LABA versus PBO+ICS/LABA was significantly different for CAT score at Day 84 (−1.31, P<0.05), but not for TDI score (0.40, P=0.152). AE incidence was similar with UMEC+ICS/LABA (38%) and PBO+ICS/LABA (42%). UMEC+ICS/LABA improved lung function and CAT score in patients with symptomatic COPD versus PBO+ICS/LABA (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02257372). PMID:27334739

  13. The effect of age on cognitive performance of frontal patients

    PubMed Central

    Cipolotti, Lisa; Healy, Colm; Chan, Edgar; MacPherson, Sarah E.; White, Mark; Woollett, Katherine; Turner, Martha; Robinson, Gail; Spanò, Barbara; Bozzali, Marco; Shallice, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Age is known to affect prefrontal brain structure and executive functioning in healthy older adults, patients with neurodegenerative conditions and TBI. Yet, no studies appear to have systematically investigated the effect of age on cognitive performance in patients with focal lesions. We investigated the effect of age on the cognitive performance of a large sample of tumour and stroke patients with focal unilateral, frontal (n=68), or non-frontal lesions (n=45) and healthy controls (n=52). We retrospectively reviewed their cross sectional cognitive and imaging data. In our frontal patients, age significantly predicted the magnitude of their impairment on two executive tests (Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, RAPM and the Stroop test) but not on nominal (Graded Naming Test, GNT) or perceptual (Incomplete Letters) task. In our non-frontal patients, age did not predict the magnitude of their impairment on the RAPM and GNT. Furthermore, the exacerbated executive impairment observed in our frontal patients manifested itself from middle age. We found that only age consistently predicted the exacerbated executive impairment. Lesions to specific frontal areas, or an increase in global brain atrophy or white matter abnormalities were not associated with this impairment. Our results are in line with the notion that the frontal cortex plays a critical role in aging to counteract cognitive and neuronal decline. We suggest that the combined effect of aging and frontal lesions impairs the frontal cortical systems by causing its computational power to fall below the threshold needed to complete executive tasks successfully. PMID:26102190

  14. The effect of age on cognitive performance of frontal patients.

    PubMed

    Cipolotti, Lisa; Healy, Colm; Chan, Edgar; MacPherson, Sarah E; White, Mark; Woollett, Katherine; Turner, Martha; Robinson, Gail; Spanò, Barbara; Bozzali, Marco; Shallice, Tim

    2015-08-01

    Age is known to affect prefrontal brain structure and executive functioning in healthy older adults, patients with neurodegenerative conditions and TBI. Yet, no studies appear to have systematically investigated the effect of age on cognitive performance in patients with focal lesions. We investigated the effect of age on the cognitive performance of a large sample of tumour and stroke patients with focal unilateral, frontal (n=68), or non-frontal lesions (n=45) and healthy controls (n=52). We retrospectively reviewed their cross sectional cognitive and imaging data. In our frontal patients, age significantly predicted the magnitude of their impairment on two executive tests (Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, RAPM and the Stroop test) but not on nominal (Graded Naming Test, GNT) or perceptual (Incomplete Letters) task. In our non-frontal patients, age did not predict the magnitude of their impairment on the RAPM and GNT. Furthermore, the exacerbated executive impairment observed in our frontal patients manifested itself from middle age. We found that only age consistently predicted the exacerbated executive impairment. Lesions to specific frontal areas, or an increase in global brain atrophy or white matter abnormalities were not associated with this impairment. Our results are in line with the notion that the frontal cortex plays a critical role in aging to counteract cognitive and neuronal decline. We suggest that the combined effect of aging and frontal lesions impairs the frontal cortical systems by causing its computational power to fall below the threshold needed to complete executive tasks successfully. PMID:26102190

  15. Improvement of proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance in low-humidity conditions by adding hygroscopic agarose powder to the catalyst layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Sanying; Liao, Shijun; Xiong, Ziang; Zou, Haobin; Dang, Dai; Zheng, Ruiping; Shu, Ting; Liang, Zhenxing; Li, Xiuhua; Li, Yingwei

    2015-01-01

    A high-performance membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with agarose added to the anodic catalyst layer (CL) was successfully prepared. The MEA exhibited excellent performance at low relative humidity (RH) in an air/hydrogen proton exchange membrane fuel cell. The effects of agarose content, RH, cell temperature, and back pressure on the low-humidity performance of this MEA were investigated. The results of water contact angles and water uptake measurements reveal that the hydrophilicity of the anode is significantly improved with the addition of agarose. With a low RH of 20% and a cell temperature of 60 °C, the optimal MEA (MEA-4), containing 4 wt.% agarose in the anode CL, achieves excellent low-humidity performance: the current density reaches 960 mA cm-2 at 0.6 V and 500 mA cm-2 at 0.7 V. After 10 h of continuous operation under the same conditions, the current density decreases just slightly, from 960 to 840 mA cm-2, whereas the current density of a blank MEA without added agarose degrades sharply.

  16. Reproductive Performance Of Heifers Offered Ad Libitum Or Restricted Access To Feed For A 140-D Period After Weaning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reproductive performance was evaluated in heifers born in 4 years that were randomly assigned to either control (fed to appetite; n = 268) or restricted (fed at 80 % of that consumed by controls adjusted to a common BW basis; n = 263) feeding during a 140-d postweaning trial, beginning about 2 mo af...

  17. Reproductive Performance of Heifers Offered Ad Libitum Or Restricted Access To Feed For A 140-D Period After Weaning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reproductive performance was evaluated in heifers born in 4 years that were randomly assigned to either control (fed to appetite; n = 268) or restricted (fed at 80 % of that consumed by controls adjusted to a common BW basis; n = 263) feeding during a 140-d postweaning trial, beginning about 2 mo af...

  18. Reproductive performance of heifers offered ad libitum or restricted access to feed for a 140-d period after weaning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reproductive performance was evaluated in composite heifers born over a 4-yr period that were randomly assigned to control (fed to appetite; n = 268) or restricted fed at 80 % of that consumed by controls adjusted to a common BW basis; n = 263) feeding for a 140-d period beginning about 2 mo after w...

  19. From the Snapshot to the Full Picture: Measuring School Performance with Value-Added. Education Outlook. No. 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2009-01-01

    The development of the horse and buggy was a necessary first step toward the development of the automobile; in fact, the first cars were built by putting engines on buggies. So it is with school accountability. The failure of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) to measure school performance is well known among researchers and, to some degree, among…

  20. Low-strength ultrasonication positively affects methanogenic granules toward higher AD performance: Implications from microbial community shift.

    PubMed

    Cho, Si-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Quince, Christopher; Im, Wan-Taek; Oh, Sae-Eun; Shin, Seung Gu

    2016-09-01

    To elucidate the enhanced methane yield from organic wastes, the effects of low-strength ultrasonication on the microbial community structures in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors were for the first time analyzed using pyrosequencing. Interestingly, a more even microbial community was observed in the ultrasonicated granules than in the control, which could compensate for the decreased richness and resulted in comparable (archaea) or even higher (bacteria) diversity. The ultrasonicated granules contained higher levels of δ-Proteobacteria, of which many are reportedly potential syntrophs, as well as methanogenic genera Methanosaeta, Methanotorris, and Methanococcus. The increased presence of syntrophic bacteria with their methanogenic partners was discussed with respect to hydrogen flux; their selective proliferation seems to be responsible for the enhanced anaerobic performance. This study is the first research shedding light on the novel function of low-strength ultrasound shifting the microbial structure towards better biogas production performance, and will facilitate application of low-strength ultrasound to other bioprocesses. PMID:27150761

  1. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeya Sharma, T.

    2014-01-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine’s performance within the range studied. PMID:26644918

  2. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture.

    PubMed

    Karthikeya Sharma, T

    2015-11-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine's performance within the range studied. PMID:26644918

  3. Improving the Performance of Two-Stage Gas Guns By Adding a Diaphragm in the Pump Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.; Miller, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    Herein, we study the technique of improving the gun performance by installing a diaphragm in the pump tube of the gun. A CFD study is carried out for the 0.28 in. gun in the Hypervelocity Free Flight Radiation (HFF RAD) range at the NASA Ames Research Center. The normal, full-length pump tube is studied as well as two pump tubes of reduced length (approximately 75% and approximately 33% of the normal length). Significant improvements in performance are calculated to be gained for the reduced length pump tubes upon the addition of the diaphragm. These improvements are identified as reductions in maximum pressures in the pump tube and at the projectile base of approximately 20%, while maintaining the projectile muzzle velocity or as increases in muzzle velocity of approximately 0.5 km/sec while not increasing the maximum pressures in the gun. Also, it is found that both guns with reduced pump tube length (with diaphragms) could maintain the performance of gun with the full length pump tube without diaphragms, whereas the guns with reduced pump tube lengths without diaphragms could not. A five-shot experimental investigation of the pump tube diaphragm technique is carried out for the gun with a pump tube length of 75% normal. The CFD predictions of increased muzzle velocity are borne out by the experimental data. Modest, but useful muzzle velocity increases (2.5 - 6%) are obtained upon the installation of a diaphragm, compared to a benchmark shot without a diaphragm.

  4. Impact of adding nitrate or increasing the lipid content of two contrasting diets on blood methaemoglobin and performance of two breeds of finishing beef steers.

    PubMed

    Duthie, C-A; Rooke, J A; Troy, S; Hyslop, J J; Ross, D W; Waterhouse, A; Roehe, R

    2016-05-01

    Adding nitrate to the diet or increasing the concentration of dietary lipid are effective strategies for reducing enteric methane emissions. This study investigated their effect on health and performance of finishing beef cattle. The experiment was a two×two×three factorial design comprising two breeds (CHX, crossbred Charolais; LU, Luing); two basal diets consisting of (g/kg dry matter (DM), forage to concentrate ratios) 520 : 480 (Mixed) or 84 : 916 (Concentrate); and three treatments: (i) control with rapeseed meal as the main protein source replaced with either (ii) calcium nitrate (18 g nitrate/kg diet DM) or (iii) rapeseed cake (RSC, increasing acid hydrolysed ether extract from 25 to 48 g/kg diet DM). Steers (n=84) were allocated to each of the six basal diet×treatments in equal numbers of each breed with feed offered ad libitum. Blood methaemoglobin (MetHb) concentrations (marker for nitrate poisoning) were monitored throughout the study in steers receiving nitrate. After dietary adaptation over 28 days, individual animal intake, performance and feed efficiency were recorded for a test period of 56 days. Blood MetHb concentrations were low and similar up to 14 g nitrate/kg diet DM but increased when nitrate increased to 18 g nitrate/kg diet DM (P0.05). Neither basal diet nor treatment affected carcass quality (P>0.05), but CHX steers achieved a greater killing out proportion (P<0.001) than LU steers. Thus, adding nitrate to the diet or increasing the level of dietary lipid through the use of cold-pressed RSC, did not adversely affect health or performance of finishing beef steers when used within the diets studied. PMID:26627142

  5. Continuum of care comes full circle. Adding hospice care allows a Denver system to better meet patient needs.

    PubMed

    Rockers, T H; Hoagland, B

    1994-09-01

    In November 1993 Hospice of Peace, a home hospice program in Denver, was reorganized under a new joint sponsorship of Provenant Health Partners and Catholic Charities and Community Services. Home hospice completes Provenant's continuum of healthcare. Based on the campus of Provenant Senior Life Center, Hospice of Peace employs multidisciplinary professionals who care for patients and their family care givers in their homes. Each hospice team works with a patient's physician and comes from a pool of primary care nurses, certified nurse assistants, social workers, counselors, pastoral care counselors, and specially trained volunteers and bereavement counselors. Respect for human life at all stages is the ethic behind the organizations' hospice efforts. Even at life's end, when aggressive medical treatment is no longer appropriate, healthcare professionals can enhance patients' quality of life and provide bereavement support to their loved ones. Just as Catholic healthcare addresses the spiritual component of healing, so it addresses the spiritual component of dying. PMID:10136079

  6. Hubble Space Telescope Star Tracker ad Two-Gyro Control Law Design, Implementation, and On-Orbit Performance. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanArsdall, John C.

    2005-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) normally requires three gyroscopes for three-axis rate control. The loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia on STS-107 resulted in the cancellation of a shuttle-based HST Servicing Mission 4. Therefore, HST must operate using the on-board hardware until an alternate means of servicing can be accomplished. The probability of gyro failure indicates that fewer than three gyros will be operable before any servicing mission can be performe& To mitigate this, and to extend the HST life expectancy, a rate estimation and control algorithm was developed that requires two gyros to measure rate about two axes, with the remaining axis rate estimated using one of three alternate sensors. Three-axis magnetometers (MSS) are used for coarse rate estimation during large maneuvers and during occultations of other sensors. Fixed-Head Star Trackers (FHSTs) are used for rate estimation during safe mode recovery and during transition to science operations. Fine rate estimation during science operations is performed using the Fine Guidance Sensors (FGSs). The FHST mode (T2G) relies on star vectors as measured by the FHSTs to estimate vehicle rate about the axis not measured by the gyros. Since the FHSTs were not designed to estimate body rate, this method involves a unique set of problems that had to be overcome in the final design, such as the effect of FHST break tracks and moving targets on rate estimation. The solutions to these problems, as well as a detailed description of the design and implementation of the rate estimation are presented Also included are the time domain and frequency domain analysis of the T2G control law. A high fidelity HST simulator (HSTSIM) was used to verify T2G performance prior to on-orbit use. Results of these simulations are also presented. Finally, analysis of actual T2G on-orbit test results is presented for design validation.

  7. Are You Ready Phase Two? Pricing Changes and Commercial Products Added to DOE High-Performance Windows Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mapes, Terry S.

    2011-05-01

    This article, for publication in Door and Window Manufacturer magazine, describes DOE's High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program, WVPP, and how PNNL, which manages the program for DOE, is assisting DOE in the transition to the next phase (Phase II), which begins in May. While the foundation of the program will remain relatively unchanged, PNNL is employing several new strategies to continue the momentum built during the program's first full year of implementation. The program helps buyers and manufacturers to develop a market for highly insulating windows and low-E storm windows at affordable prices and thereby overcome the principal barrier of cost.

  8. A comparison of hyperhydration versus ad libitum fluid intake strategies on measures of oxidative stress, thermoregulation, and performance.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Angela R; Turner, Mark C; Peart, Daniel J; Bray, James W; Taylor, Lee; McNaughton, Lars R; Siegler, Jason C

    2013-01-01

    Dehydration has been shown to augment cellular stress. Glycerol hyperhydration can delay dehydration, which may decrease the level of pre- and post-exercise oxidative stress. This study aimed to compare the effects of glycerol (G) or water (W) hyperhydration with no hyperhydration (C) on oxidative stress, thermoregulation, and cycle performance. Seven trained males consumed 1.2 g of glycerol·kg⁻¹ body mass (BM) in 26 ml·kg⁻¹ BM water or equal volume water to achieve hyperhydration followed by a 90 min time trial. Total glutathione increased post exercise (PE) in all trials (p < 0.01), while oxidized glutathione (p < 0.05) and protein carbonyl concentrations (p < 0.001) were increased PE for the C trial only. Mean body temperature and heart rate increased with exercise but were not different between interventions. Total distance covered and power outputs were not different between interventions. Fluid intake attenuated oxidative stress but did not enhance thermoregulation or performance. PMID:24067117

  9. DIS in AdS

    SciTech Connect

    Albacete, Javier L.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Taliotis, Anastasios

    2009-03-23

    We calculate the total cross section for the scattering of a quark-anti-quark dipole on a large nucleus at high energy for a strongly coupled N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory using AdS/CFT correspondence. We model the nucleus by a metric of a shock wave in AdS{sub 5}. We then calculate the expectation value of the Wilson loop (the dipole) by finding the extrema of the Nambu-Goto action for an open string attached to the quark and antiquark lines of the loop in the background of an AdS{sub 5} shock wave. We find two physically meaningful extremal string configurations. For both solutions we obtain the forward scattering amplitude N for the quark dipole-nucleus scattering. We study the onset of unitarity with increasing center-of-mass energy and transverse size of the dipole: we observe that for both solutions the saturation scale Q{sub s} is independent of energy/Bjorken-x and depends on the atomic number of the nucleus as Q{sub s}{approx}A{sup 1/3}. Finally we observe that while one of the solutions we found corresponds to the pomeron intercept of {alpha}{sub P} = 2 found earlier in the literature, when extended to higher energy or larger dipole sizes it violates the black disk limit. The other solution we found respects the black disk limit and yields the pomeron intercept of {alpha}{sub P} = 1.5. We thus conjecture that the right pomeron intercept in gauge theories at strong coupling may be {alpha}{sub P} = 1.5.

  10. Effectiveness of an intercultural module added to the treatment guidelines for Moroccan and Turkish patients with depressive and anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Since the sixties of the last century, many people from Morocco and Turkey have migrated into the Netherlands. In the last decade, Moroccan and Turkish patients have found their way to organizations for mental health care. However, they often drop out of treatment. Problems in the communication with therapists and different expectations regarding treatment seem to be causal factors for the early drop-out of therapy. In the Netherlands as in other countries courses have been developed for training cultural competence of therapists. Yet, up to now, the effectiveness of increased cultural competence of therapists in reducing drop-out of treatment has not been studied. Methods/Design A randomized clinical trial was started in January 2010. Moroccan and Turkish adult patients who are referred to our outpatient clinics for mood and anxiety disorders are randomly assigned to mental health workers who are trained in a cultural module and to those who are not. The therapists have been trained in the Cultural Formulation and in techniques bridging the (cultural) gap between them and their Moroccan and Turkish patients. The target number of participants is 150 patients, 75 for each group. Drop-out of treatment is the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures are no-show and patients' perspective of care. Discussion The study will give an answer to the question whether increasing cultural competence of therapists reduces drop-out of treatment in Moroccan and Turkish outpatients with depressive and anxiety disorders. Trial Registration The Dutch Cochrane Centre, NTR1989 PMID:21247455

  11. Prognosis and comparison of performances of composite CERCER and CERMET fuels dedicated to transmutation of TRU in an EFIT ADS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, V.; Uyttenhove, W.; Thetford, R.; Maschek, W.

    2011-07-01

    The neutronic and thermomechanical performances of two composite fuel systems: CERCER with (Pu,Np,Am,Cm)O 2-x fuel particles in ceramic MgO matrix and CERMET with metallic Mo matrix, selected for transmutation of minor actinides in the European Facility for Industrial Transmutation (EFIT), were analysed aiming at their optimisation. The ALEPH burnup code system, based on MNCPX and ORIGEN codes and JEFF3.1 nuclear data library, and the modern version of the fuel rod performance code TRAFIC were used for this analysis. Because experimental data on the properties of the mixed minor-actinide oxides are scarce, and the in-reactor behaviour of the T91 steel chosen as cladding, as well as of the corrosion protective layer, is still not well-known, a set of "best estimates" provided the properties used in the code. The obtained results indicate that both fuel candidates, CERCER and CERMET, can satisfy the fuel design and safety criteria of EFIT. The residence time for both types of fuel elements can reach about 5 years with the reactivity swing within ±1000 pcm, and about 22% of the loaded MA is transmuted during this period. However, the fuel centreline temperature in the hottest CERCER fuel rod is close to the temperature above which MgO matrix becomes chemically instable. Moreover, a weak PCMI can appear in about 3 years of operation. The CERMET fuel can provide larger safety margins: the fuel temperature is more than 1000 K below the permitted level of 2380 K and the pellet-cladding gap remains open until the end of operation.

  12. Bubbling AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, Dario; Morales, Jose F.

    2005-02-01

    In the light of the recent Lin, Lunin, Maldacena (LLM) results, we investigate 1/2-BPS geometries in minimal (and next to minimal) supergravity in D = 6 dimensions. In the case of minimal supergravity, solutions are given by fibrations of a two-torus T2 specified by two harmonic functions. For a rectangular torus the two functions are related by a non-linear equation with rare solutions: AdS3 × S3, the pp-wave and the multi-center string. ``Bubbling'', i.e. superpositions of droplets, is accommodated by allowing the complex structure of the T2 to vary over the base. The analysis is repeated in the presence of a tensor multiplet and similar conclusions are reached, with generic solutions describing D1D5 (or their dual fundamental string-momentum) systems. In this framework, the profile of the dual fundamental string-momentum system is identified with the boundaries of the droplets in a two-dimensional plane.

  13. Contextual predictability enhances reading performance in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Gerardo; Guinjoan, Salvador; Sapognikoff, Marcelo; Orozco, David; Agamennoni, Osvaldo

    2016-07-30

    In the present work we analyzed fixation duration in 40 healthy individuals and 18 patients with chronic, stable SZ during reading of regular sentences and proverbs. While they read, their eye movements were recorded. We used lineal mixed models to analyze fixation durations. The predictability of words N-1, N, and N+1 exerted a strong influence on controls and SZ patients. The influence of the predictabilities of preceding, current, and upcoming words on SZ was clearly reduced for proverbs in comparison to regular sentences. Both controls and SZ readers were able to use highly predictable fixated words for an easier reading. Our results suggest that SZ readers might compensate attentional and working memory deficiencies by using stored information of familiar texts for enhancing their reading performance. The predictabilities of words in proverbs serve as task-appropriate cues that are used by SZ readers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study using eyetracking for measuring how patients with SZ process well-defined words embedded in regular sentences and proverbs. Evaluation of the resulting changes in fixation durations might provide a useful tool for understanding how SZ patients could enhance their reading performance. PMID:27236087

  14. Positive impact of adding No.14v lymph node to D2 dissection on survival for distal gastric cancer patients after surgery with curative intent

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yuexiang; Wu, Liangliang; Wang, Xiaona; Ding, Xuewei; Liu, Hongmin; Li, Bin; Wang, Baogui; Pan, Yuan; Zhang, Rupeng; Liu, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Background D2 lymphadenectomy has been increasingly regarded as standard surgical procedure for advanced gastric cancer (GC), while the necessity of No.14v lymph node (14v) dissection for distal GC is still controversial. Methods A total of 920 distal GC patients receiving at least a D2 lymph node dissection in Department of Gastric Cancer, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital were enrolled in this study, of whom, 243 patients also had the 14v dissected. Other 677 patients without 14v dissection were used for comparison. Results Forty-five (18.5%) patients had 14v metastasis. There was no significant difference in 3-year overall survival (OS) rate between patients with and without 14v dissection. Following stratified analysis, in TNM stages I, II, IIIa and IV, 14v dissection did not affect 3-year OS; in contrast, patients with 14v dissection had a significant higher 3-year OS than those without in TNM stages IIIb and IIIc. In multivariate analysis, 14v dissection was found to be an independent prognostic factor for GC patients with TNM stage IIIb/IIIc disease [hazard ratio (HR), 1.568; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.186-2.072; P=0.002]. GC patients with 14v dissection had a significant lower locoregional, especially lymph node, recurrence rate than those without 14v dissection (11.7% vs. 21.1%, P=0.035). Conclusions Adding 14v to D2 lymphadenectomy may be associated with improved 3-year OS for distal GC staged TNM IIIb/IIIc. PMID:26752932

  15. Comparison of ketanserin and slow-release nifedipine added to the treatment of hypertensive patients uncontrolled by a thiazide diuretic plus beta-adrenoceptor blocker.

    PubMed

    Waller, P C; Solomon, S A; Ramsay, L E

    1987-11-01

    1. Ketanserin or slow-release nifedipine were added to the treatment of 24 patients with hypertension uncontrolled by a thiazide diuretic plus beta-adrenoceptor antagonist in an observer-blind, randomised parallel-group study of 6 months duration. 2. At 6 months the mean falls in supine blood pressure were for ketanserin (mean daily dose 77 mg) 7/5 mm Hg and for nifedipine (mean daily dose 62 mg) 27/10 mm Hg. The difference between the treatments was significant for systolic blood pressure (P less than 0.02) and mean arterial pressure (P less than 0.05). Six nifedipine-treated patients reached target blood pressure, compared with one patient with ketanserin (P less than 0.02). 3. One patient taking nifedipine, and none taking ketanserin withdrew because of side-effects. The tolerability of the two drugs was broadly similar. 4. Ketanserin treatment was associated with significant changes in supine pulse rate (-8 beats min-1, P less than 0.05) and corrected QT interval (+27 ms, P less than 0.05). Nifedipine treatment had no effect on these variables. The change in pulse rate was significantly different between the groups. 5. In patients treated with a diuretic and beta-adrenoceptor blocker who required additional treatment ketanserin was significantly inferior to nifedipine. PMID:2893636

  16. Neurocognitive performance in first-episode and chronic schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Steffen; Andresen, Burghard; Perro, Christian; Schickel, Marc; Krausz, Micheal; Naber, Dieter

    2002-02-01

    Previous research on neuropsychological disturbances in first-episode and chronic schizophrenic patients has provided mixed results which can be partially attributed to methodological inconsistencies. For the present study, 70 schizophrenic patients (40 with chronic and 30 with first-episode schizophrenia) were compared to 30 healthy controls on a large battery of neuropsychological tests. Special attention was paid to potential confounds such as differences in psychopathology, age and educational level between the schizophrenic sub-samples. Healthy controls performed better than both first-episode and chronic patients in almost all cognitive domains (P < 0.01), while the patient samples did not differ in any of the tasks. Results were confirmed in a second series of analyses in which patient subgroups were equated for sociodemographic background variables. The present results confirm recent data collected in longitudinal studies, thus, lending further support for a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. It is suggested that neuropsychological disturbances occur early in schizophrenia and do not worsen in the course beyond age-related decrement. Possible reasons why previous research has produced contradictory findings are discussed. PMID:12056580

  17. Glucose Variability and β- Cell Response by GLP-1 Analogue added-on CSII for Patients with Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Sheng-Hwu; Sun, Jui-Hung; Tsai, Jir-Shiong; Huang, Yu-Yao

    2015-01-01

    The effects of twice-daily GLP-1 analogue injections added on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (T2DM) were unknown. After optimization of blood glucose in the first 3 days by CSII during hospitalization, patients with poorly controlled T2DM were randomized to receive CSII combined with injections of exenatide or placebo for another 3 days. A total of 51 patients (30 in exenatide and 21 in placebo groups) with mean A1C 11% were studied. There was no difference in mean glucose but a significant higher standard deviation of plasma glucose (SDPG) was found in the exenatide group (50.51 ± 2.43 vs. 41.49 ± 3.00 mg/dl, p = 0.027). The improvement of incremental area under the curve (AUC) of glucose and insulinogenic index (Insulin0–peak/ Glucose0–peak) in 75 g oral glucose tolerance test was prominent in the exenatide group (p < 0.01). The adiponectin level was significantly increased with exenatide added on (0.39 ± 0.32 vs. −1.62 ± 0.97 μg/mL, in exenatide and placebo groups, respectively, p = 0.045). In conclusion, the add-on of GLP-1 analogue to CSII increased glucose variability and the β - cell response in patients with poorly controlled T2DM. PMID:26607841

  18. Adding Diet and Exercise Counseling to the Health Promotion Plan Alleviates Anthropometric and Metabolic Complications in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Morita-Suzuki, S.; Fujioka, Y.; Mitsuoka, H.; Tashiro, M.; Harada, M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of individual (IC) and group (GC) diet and exercise counseling in men with metabolic syndrome. Participants received exercise instruction and exercise load was monitored. IC participants received individual diet counseling sessions and general consultations at baseline and monthly. GC participants received a group diet counseling session at baseline and general consultations at baseline and monthly. In the IC group, body mass index (BMI) percent body fat, waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, and liver function levels were reduced significantly after 3 months, whereas in the GC group, waist circumference and levels of liver function were reduced. Exercise load was negatively correlated with change in BMI and waist circumference in the IC group, and positively correlated with changes in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in all subjects and in the GC group. Diet and exercise counseling, especially IC, may benefit patients with metabolic syndrome. PMID:23882148

  19. A double-blind placebo controlled trial of piracetam added to risperidone in patients with autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Akhondzadeh, Shahin; Tajdar, Hamid; Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Nouroozinejad, Gholam-Hossein; Shabstari, Omid L; Ghelichnia, Hossein-Ali

    2008-09-01

    It has been reported that autism is a hypoglutamatergic disorder. Therefore, it was of interest to assess the efficacy of piracetam, a positive modulator of AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors in autistic disorder. About 40 children between the ages three and 11 years (inclusive) with a DSM IV clinical diagnosis of autism and who were outpatients from a specialty clinic for children were recruited. The children presented with a chief complaint of severely disruptive symptoms related to autistic disorder. Patients were randomly allocated to piracetam + risperidone (Group A) or placebo + risperidone (Group B) for a 10-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The dose of risperidone was titrated up to 2 mg/day for children between 10 and 40 kg and 3 mg/day for children weighting above 40 kg. The dose of piracetam was titrated up to 800 mg/day. Patients were assessed at baseline and after 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 weeks of starting medication. The measure of the outcome was the Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Community (ABC-C) Rating Scale (total score). The ABC-C Rating Scale scores improved with piracetam. The difference between the two protocols was significant as indicated by the effect of group, the between subjects factor (F = 5.85, d.f. = 1, P = 0.02). The changes at the endpoint compared with baseline were: -11.90 +/- 3.79 (mean +/- SD) and -5.15 +/- 3.04 for group A and B respectively. A significant difference was observed on the change in scores in the ABC-C Rating Scale in week 10 compared with baseline in the two groups (t = 6.017, d.f. = 38, P < 0.0001). The results suggest that a combination of atypical antipsychotic medications and a glutamate agent such as piracetam, might have increase synergistic effects in the treatment of autism. PMID:17929164

  20. The moral aesthetics of simulated suffering in standardized patient performances.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Janelle S

    2011-06-01

    Standardized patient (SP) performances are staged clinical encounters between health-professional students and people who specialize in role-playing the part of patients. Such performances have in recent years become increasingly central to the teaching and assessment of clinical skills in U.S. medical schools. SP performances are valued for being both "real" (in that they involve interaction with a real person, unlike written examinations) and "not real" (in that the SP does not actually suffer from the condition portrayed, unlike an actual patient). This article considers how people involved in creating SP performances reconcile a moral commitment to avoid suffering (to keep it "not real"), with an aesthetic commitment to realistically portray it (to keep it "real"). The term "moral aesthetic" is proposed, to indicate a sensibility that combines ideas about what is morally right with ideas about what is aesthetically compelling. Drawing on ethnographic research among SPs and SP program staff and medical faculty who work closely with them, this article argues that their work of creating "realism" in simulated clinical encounters encompasses multiple different (and sometimes conflicting) understandings and practices of realism, informed by three different moral aesthetics: (1) a moral aesthetic of induction, in which an accurate portrayal with a well-documented provenance serves to introduce experientially distant forms of suffering; (2) a moral aesthetic of inoculation, in which the authenticity and emotional impact of a performance are meant to inoculate students against the impact of future encounters with suffering; (3) a moral aesthetic of presence, generating forms of voice and care that are born out of the embodied presence of suffering individuals in a clinical space. All are premised on the assumption that risk and suffering can be banished from SP performances. This article suggests, however, that SP performances necessarily raise the same difficult

  1. Egg quality and productive performance of laying hens fed different levels of skimmed milk powder added to a diet containing Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    Cesari, V; Mangiagalli, M G; Giardini, A; Galimberti, P; Carteri, S; Gallazzi, D; Toschi, I

    2014-05-01

    The current trial was carried out on a commercial poultry farm to study the effect of skim milk powder (SMP) added to a diet containing Lactobacillus acidophilus on performance and egg quality of laying hens from 20 to 49 wk of age. A total of 2,400 Hy-Line W-36 laying hens were housed in 600 unenriched cages (4 hens each) located over 4 tier levels. Animals were assigned to 1 of 3 experimental treatments (0, 3, and 4). The laying hens assigned to treatments 3 and 4 received a diet enriched respectively with 3 and 4% SMP, whereas the animals in treatment 0 were fed a diet without SMP. All diets, moreover, were supplemented with L. acidophilus D2/CSL. Hen performance was determined throughout the experimental period and egg quality was measured on 30 eggs per treatment every week. Results showed that productive performance in terms of egg production, egg weight, and feed conversion ratio was not influenced by SMP at 3 or 4% of the diet. Egg quality was significantly affected by SMP included at 3 or 4% of the diet. Eggs from treatments 3 and 4, in fact, displayed higher shell thickness than those from treatment 0 (P < 0.0001). Likewise, specific gravity, Haugh unit, and shell percentage were significantly affected by the addition of SMP. In conclusion, in our study, SMP added to a diet containing L. acidophilus had no significant effects on the productive parameters of hens during the laying period, whereas significant improvements were found in certain egg quality characteristics. PMID:24795312

  2. Postural performance of vestibular loss patients under increased postural threat.

    PubMed

    Young, Laurence R; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Dumitrescu, Michel; Magnan, Jacques; Borel, Liliane; Lacour, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The effects of increasing postural task difficulty on balance control was investigated in 9 compensated vestibular loss patients whose results were compared to 11 healthy adults. Subjects were tested in static (stable support) and dynamic (sinusoidal translation of the support) conditions, both at floor level and at height (62 cm above the floor), and with and without vision, to create an additional postural threat. Wavelet analysis of the center of foot pressure displacement and motion analysis of the body segments were used to evaluate the postural performance. Evaluation questionnaires were used to examine the compensation level of the patients (DHI test), their general anxiety level (SAST), fear of height (subjective scale), and workload (NASA TLX test). (Vestibular loss patients rely more on vision and spend more energy maintaining balance than controls, but they use the same postural strategy as normals in both static and dynamic conditions.) Questionnaire data all showed differences in behavior and perceptions between the controls and the patients. However, at height and without vision, a whole body strategy leading to rigid posture replaces the head stabilization strategy found for standing at floor level. The effects of height on postural control can be attributable to an increase in postural threat and attention changes resulting from modifications in perception. PMID:23000612

  3. [Rapid screening and quantitative detection of 11 illegally added antidiabetics in health care products by ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole/electrostatic field orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Du, Yanshan; Li, Qiang; Wu, Chunmin; Zhang, Yan

    2015-04-01

    A method for rapid screening and quantification of 11 antidiabetics (nateglinide, pioglitazone hydrochloride, gliquidone, gliclazide, glipizide, glibenclamide, metformin hydrochloride, repaglinide, phenformin hydrochloride, rosiglitazone hydrochloride, glimepiride) illegally added in health care products by ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-quadrupole/ electrostatic field orbitrap mass spectrometry was established. The samples were extracted with methanol, and separated on an Agilent Poroshell 120 SB-C18 column (100 mm x 4.6 mm, 2.7 µm) with acetonitrile-10 mmol/L ammonium acetate solution as mobile phases by gradient elution. The positive mode was used in the MS detection. The resolution of the precursor mass was 70,000, while the resolution of the product mass was 17,500. The results indicated that the linearity of all the 11 antidiabetics ranged from 0.005 mg/L to 0.5 mg/L with the correlation coefficients greater than 0.99. The limits of detection were confirmed by spiked samples, and were between 2.7 and 5.1 µg/kg for the 11 antidiabetics. The recoveries were in the range of 87.3% to 98.3%, with the relative standard deviations in the range of 2.18%-5.21%. This method is accurate, simple and rapid, and can be used in rapid screening and quantitative analysis of the 11 illegally added antidiabetics in health care products. PMID:26292406

  4. [Rapid screening and confirmation of illegally added anti- impotence preparations in health care products by high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Hu, Tingting; Qu, Xiaoyu; Kang, Mingqin; Song, Qinglian; Yang, Lu; Zhao, Yunhui; Zhang, Daihui

    2015-08-01

    A method was established for rapid screening and quantifying 11 illegally added anti-impotence preparations (yohimbine, acetildenafil, nor-acetildenafil, homosildenafil, hydroxy-homosildenafil, sildenafil, vardenafil, thioaildenafil, tadalafil, pseudovardenafil, dapoxetine) in health care products by high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry. The samples were extracted with methanol and analyzed by positive mode in the MS detection. The results showed that the limits of detection were 25.0 ng/mLexcept for nor-acetildenafil (5.0 ng/mL), the linear ranges were 5.0-200.0 ng/mL except for nor-acetildenafil (25.0-500.0 ng/mL) with the correlation coefficients not less than 0.999 0. The recoveries were in the range of 82.0%-105.9% with the relative standard deviations of 4.7%-16.5%. This method is accurate, simple and rapid, and can be used in rapid screening and quantitative analysis of the 11 illegally added anti-impotence in health care products. PMID:26749869

  5. Performance indicators--a quest to improve patient care.

    PubMed

    Morris, Clare; Pritchard, Barbara

    Nurses working in the field of tissue viability constantly strive to improve pressure ulcer prevention and management in their clinical areas, knowing that pressure ulcers cause pain and suffering to patients while costing the NHS millions of pounds to treat. The aim of this initiative was for the tissue viability team to develop an audit tool based on recently devised performance indicators. The purpose of the audit was to provide the mechanism for reviewing the quality of everyday care. The tool utilizes the 'traffic light' system to categorize the results. The initiative has improved clinical outcomes for patients and increased the awareness, education, knowledge and confidence of nurses in pressure ulcer prevention and management across a combined primary and secondary care Trust. PMID:18073696

  6. FRAGMATIC: A randomised phase III clinical trial investigating the effect of fragmin® added to standard therapy in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs when blood clots in the leg, pelvic or other deep vein (deep vein thrombosis) with or without transport of the thrombus into the pulmonary arterial circulation (pulmonary embolus). VTE is common in patients with cancer and is increased by surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and disease progression. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is routinely used to treat VTE and some evidence suggests that LMWH may also have an anticancer effect, by reduction in the incidence of metastases. The FRAGMATIC trial will assess the effect of adding dalteparin (FRAGMIN), a type of LMWH, to standard treatment for patients with lung cancer. Methods/Design The study design is a randomised multicentre phase III trial comparing standard treatment and standard treatment plus daily LMWH for 24 weeks in patients with lung cancer. Patients eligible for this study must have histopathological or cytological diagnosis of primary bronchial carcinoma (small cell or non-small cell) within 6 weeks of randomisation, be 18 or older, and must be willing and able to self-administer 5000 IU dalteparin by daily subcutaneous injection or have it administered to themselves or by a carer for 24 weeks. A total of 2200 patients will be recruited from all over the UK over a 3 year period and followed up for a minimum of 1 year after randomisation. Patients will be randomised to one of the two treatment groups in a 1:1 ratio, standard treatment or standard treatment plus dalteparin. The primary outcome measure of the trial is overall survival. The secondary outcome measures include venous thrombotic event (VTE) free survival, serious adverse events (SAEs), metastasis-free survival, toxicity, quality of life (QoL), levels of breathlessness, anxiety and depression, cost effectiveness and cost utility. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN80812769 PMID:19807917

  7. [Neuropsychological performance and demographic characteristics in alcoholic patients in treatment].

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Rigoni, Maisa; Quarti Irigaray, Tatiana; Feliz Duarte de Moraes, João; Ferrão, Ygor; da Silva Oliveira, Margareth

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the cognitive performance of alcoholics (AG) and participants from the general population (CG) without alcohol dependence. The sample consisted of 141 men, aged 18 and 59. Divided into two groups, 101 alcoholic patients without comorbidities, hospitalized for drug abuse treatment, and 40 healthy individuals from the general population, matched for age and socioeconomic status. The instruments assessed the sociodemographics data and economic classification, alcohol dependence, psychiatric comorbidities, cognitive performance, executive functions, memory and perception. The results showed that the AG group presented severe dependence on alcohol and 92.1% indicated having a family with problems associated with alcohol for only 41.5 % of the CG. At the moment of the evaluation, 59.4 % of the participants of the AG group were abstinent between 8 and 15 days, and the in CG, 43.9%, were more than 60 days alcohol free. The neuropsychological performance verified that there was a decline in cognitive functions in alcoholics’ participants, whereas the AG suggests psychomotor retardation. Thus, it can be inferred that alcohol greatly affects cognitive functions of people who depend on this substance. In addition, there was a greater number of family stories with prevalence of symptoms of anxiety and depression and nicotine addiction in alcoholic patients compared with the general population. PMID:25314037

  8. Clinical team leaders provide added heft in driving improvements, moving the ED culture toward a patient-centered approach.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    Anticipating a more competitive marketplace when the Accountable Care Act is fully implemented next year, ED administrators at Truman Medical Center Lakewood in Kansas City, MO, have taken steps to re-engineer outdated practices and infuse the department with a patient-focused culture. To get staff on board, the ED director appointed several clinical team leaders (CTL) from the nursing staff. Infused with a combination of managerial and administrative responsibilities, the CTLs have reinforced a flurry of new practices and policies on a 24/7 basis, and key metrics are on the rise. The CTLs were created through the re-allocation of existing full-time positions within the ED. There was no need to take on additional staff, although the ED director solicited staff input when deciding which of the staff nurses were best suited for the CTL positions. Since the CTL positions were created in 2011, the ED has implemented immediate bedding, bedside triage, hourly rounding, bedside shift reports, and a number of other improvements. The ED's left-without-being-seen rate has been more than halved, from 10% to 4.6%, and the arrival-to-leave time has been slashed by more than 100 minutes, even while volume is on the increase. PMID:23776993

  9. What Value "Value Added"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Two quantitative measures of school performance are currently used, the average points score (APS) at Key Stage 2 and value-added (VA), which measures the rate of academic improvement between Key Stage 1 and 2. These figures are used by parents and the Office for Standards in Education to make judgements and comparisons. However, simple…

  10. Budgetary Impact of Adding Riociguat to a US Health Plan for the Treatment of Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension or Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Burudpakdee, Chakkarin; Shah, Anshul; Joish, Vijay N.; Divers, Christine H.; Yaldo, Avin

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) are chronic, debilitating, and life-threatening conditions. Riociguat is the first and only pharmacotherapy approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of PAH and for CTEPH in patients who are either inoperable or have persistent pulmonary hypertension after surgery. Objective To estimate the budgetary impact of adding riociguat to a US health plan's formulary for the treatment of patients with PAH or CTEPH using a budget impact analytic model. Methods A customizable, Microsoft Excel–based decision analytic tool was developed to estimate the impact of riociguat on per-member per-month (PMPM) and per-member per-year (PMPY) bases in Medicare and non-Medicare health plans. The economic impact was calculated based on 1 million insured lives, published prevalence estimates of PAH and CTEPH, pharmacotherapy-eligible patients with PAH or CTEPH, administration costs, and monitoring costs related to pharmacotherapy. The drug costs were based on wholesale acquisition costs, and the medical costs were derived from Truven Health MarketScan claims data and the Medicare 2013 Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Fee Schedule and Physician Fee Schedule. The market share for approved treatments was based on a tracking study of physicians treating patients with PAH or CTEPH. A sensitivity analysis was used to test the model's robustness. Results In a hypothetical plan population of 1 million members, the model estimated that 7 patients with PAH and 2 patients with CTEPH would be suitable for pharmacotherapy. Overall, 3 patients (1 with PAH and 2 with CTEPH) were receiving riociguat in a health plan consisting of patients with commercial and with Medicare insurance coverage. The incremental PMPY and PMPM costs for providing insurance coverage for riociguat were $0.27 and $0.02, respectively, for non-Medicare and Medicare health plans. Sensitivity analyses

  11. Relationship of body mass index with efficacy of exenatide twice daily added to insulin glargine in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wolffenbuttel, B H R; Van Gaal, L; Durán-Garcia, S; Han, J

    2016-08-01

    This post hoc analysis assessed the evidence behind common reimbursement practices by evaluating the relationship of body mass index (BMI) ranges (<30, 30-35 and >35 kg/m(2) ) with treatment effects of exenatide twice daily among patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients received exenatide twice daily added to insulin glargine in two 30-week studies (exenatide twice daily vs insulin lispro, n = 627; exenatide twice daily vs placebo, n = 259). No association of baseline BMI with changes in efficacy variables was observed. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) reductions were significant (p < 0.0001) and similar across BMI range groups in the lispro-comparator study and greater for exenatide versus placebo in the placebo-controlled study. Significant weight loss occurred with exenatide across BMI range groups (p < 0.0001), while weight increased with both comparators. Achievement of HbA1c <7.0% (<53 mmol/mol) without weight gain was greater for exenatide versus comparators. Systolic blood pressure decreased across BMI range groups with exenatide in the lispro-comparator study (p < 0.0001); changes in lipids were not clinically meaningful. Minor hypoglycaemia was less frequent for exenatide versus insulin lispro. These findings suggest that BMI alone should not limit clinical decision-making or patient access to medication. PMID:27027802

  12. Noninvasive measurement of cardiac performance in recovery from exercise in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jonathan N; Gujja, Pradeep; Neelagaru, Suresh; Hsu, Leon; Burkhoff, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between cardiac performance during recovery and the severity of heart failure, as determined by clinical and cardiopulmonary exercise test responses. METHODS: As part of a retrospective cohort study, 46 heart failure patients and 13 normal subjects underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing while cardiac output was measured using a noninvasive device. Cardiac output in recovery was expressed as the slope of a single exponential relationship between cardiac output and time; the recovery-time constant was assessed in relation to indices of cardiac function, along with clinical, functional, and cardiopulmonary exercise responses. RESULTS: The recovery time constant was delayed in patients with heart failure compared with normal subjects (296.7±238 vs. 110.1±27 seconds, p <0.01), and the slope of the decline of cardiac output in recovery was steeper in normal subjects compared with heart failure patients (p<0.001). The slope of the decline in cardiac output recovery was inversely related to peak VO2 (r = -0.72, p<0.001) and directly related to the VE/VCO2 slope (r = 0.57, p<0.001). Heart failure patients with abnormal recovery time constants had lower peak VO2, lower VO2 at the ventilatory threshold, lower peak cardiac output, and a heightened VE/VCO2 slope during exercise. CONCLUSIONS: Impaired cardiac output recovery kinetics can identify heart failure patients with more severe disease, lower exercise capacity, and inefficient ventilation. Estimating cardiac output in recovery from exercise may provide added insight into the cardiovascular status of patients with heart failure. PMID:21655761

  13. Guidance for laboratories performing molecular pathology for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Cree, Ian A; Deans, Zandra; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Normanno, Nicola; Edsjö, Anders; Rouleau, Etienne; Solé, Francesc; Thunnissen, Erik; Timens, Wim; Schuuring, Ed; Dequeker, Elisabeth; Murray, Samuel; Dietel, Manfred; Groenen, Patricia; Van Krieken, J Han

    2014-01-01

    Molecular testing is becoming an important part of the diagnosis of any patient with cancer. The challenge to laboratories is to meet this need, using reliable methods and processes to ensure that patients receive a timely and accurate report on which their treatment will be based. The aim of this paper is to provide minimum requirements for the management of molecular pathology laboratories. This general guidance should be augmented by the specific guidance available for different tumour types and tests. Preanalytical considerations are important, and careful consideration of the way in which specimens are obtained and reach the laboratory is necessary. Sample receipt and handling follow standard operating procedures, but some alterations may be necessary if molecular testing is to be performed, for instance to control tissue fixation. DNA and RNA extraction can be standardised and should be checked for quality and quantity of output on a regular basis. The choice of analytical method(s) depends on clinical requirements, desired turnaround time, and expertise available. Internal quality control, regular internal audit of the whole testing process, laboratory accreditation, and continual participation in external quality assessment schemes are prerequisites for delivery of a reliable service. A molecular pathology report should accurately convey the information the clinician needs to treat the patient with sufficient information to allow for correct interpretation of the result. Molecular pathology is developing rapidly, and further detailed evidence-based recommendations are required for many of the topics covered here. PMID:25012948

  14. Parallel implementation of inverse adding-doubling and Monte Carlo multi-layered programs for high performance computing systems with shared and distributed memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugunov, Svyatoslav; Li, Changying

    2015-09-01

    Parallel implementation of two numerical tools popular in optical studies of biological materials-Inverse Adding-Doubling (IAD) program and Monte Carlo Multi-Layered (MCML) program-was developed and tested in this study. The implementation was based on Message Passing Interface (MPI) and standard C-language. Parallel versions of IAD and MCML programs were compared to their sequential counterparts in validation and performance tests. Additionally, the portability of the programs was tested using a local high performance computing (HPC) cluster, Penguin-On-Demand HPC cluster, and Amazon EC2 cluster. Parallel IAD was tested with up to 150 parallel cores using 1223 input datasets. It demonstrated linear scalability and the speedup was proportional to the number of parallel cores (up to 150x). Parallel MCML was tested with up to 1001 parallel cores using problem sizes of 104-109 photon packets. It demonstrated classical performance curves featuring communication overhead and performance saturation point. Optimal performance curve was derived for parallel MCML as a function of problem size. Typical speedup achieved for parallel MCML (up to 326x) demonstrated linear increase with problem size. Precision of MCML results was estimated in a series of tests - problem size of 106 photon packets was found optimal for calculations of total optical response and 108 photon packets for spatially-resolved results. The presented parallel versions of MCML and IAD programs are portable on multiple computing platforms. The parallel programs could significantly speed up the simulation for scientists and be utilized to their full potential in computing systems that are readily available without additional costs.

  15. Adding of Sitagliptin on Insulin Therapy Effectively and Safely Reduces a Hemoglobin A1c Level and Glucose Fluctuation in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tajiri, Yuji; Kawano, Seiko; Hirao, Saori; Oshige, Tamami; Iwata, Shinpei; Ono, Yasuhiro; Inada, Chizuko; Akashi, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Hideki; Tojikubo, Masayuki; Yamada, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Aims. Efficacy and safety of DPP-4 inhibitor, sitagliptin, add-on therapy to insulin were investigated in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. Subjects and Methods. Two hundred and sixteen patients (126 men, 65 ± 12 years old, BMI 24.9 ± 4.5, means ± S.D.) who had been treated by insulin alone or insulin combined with other oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) were recruited, and sitagliptin was added for 3 months. Results. HbA1c was significantly decreased after 3 months of add-on therapy as a whole (8.56 ± 1.50% to 7.88 ± 1.25%, P < 0.0001). Body weight did not change and insulin dosage was significantly (P < 0.0001) decreased for 3 months. Furthermore, day-to-day glucose variability was significantly reduced (18.3 ± 9.1 to 16.1 ± 8.1%, P < 0.05). In stepwise multiple regression analysis on ΔHbA1c as an outcome variable, the higher baseline HbA1c value and a preserved CPR were selected as significant predictive variables. Fifteen patients complained of mild hypoglycemia without any assistance during 3 months of sitagliptin add-on, while no severe hypoglycemic episode was reported. Conclusions. Add-on of sitagliptin to ongoing insulin therapy effectively reduced either HbA1c level or glucose fluctuation and could be a practical and well-tolerated alternative to treat Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes who had been inadequately controlled by insulin with or without other OHAs.

  16. [Determination of twelve chemical drugs illegally added in herbal tea by ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with modified QuEChERS].

    PubMed

    Song, Ningning; Zhang, Keming; Liu, Xianghong; Sang, Tong; Sun, Yu; Teng, Nanyan

    2015-10-01

    An ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method with modified QuEChERS procedure for sample preparation was developed for the simultaneous determination of 12 chemical drugs (chlorpheniramine, piroxicam, α-asarone etc) illegally added in herbal tea. The samples were extracted with acetonitrile, purified with QuEChERS procedure and filtrated by 0.22 μm microporous filters. The separation was carried on an XBridge BEH C18 column (100 mm x 2.1 mm, 3.5 μm) by a gradient elution using acetonitrile/0.1% (v/v) formic acid aqueous solution as mobile phases. The analytes were detected by tandem mass spectrometry with positive electrospray ionization (ESI+) in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, and quantified by external standard calibration method. The correlation coefficients of the standard calibration curves for the 12 analytes were all above 0.997. The limits of detection ranged from 0.1 μg/L to 2.1 μg/L, and the limits of quantification ranged from 0.4 g/L to 8.0 μg/L. The average recoveries of the 12 analytes spiked at three levels in blank samples ranged from 62.7% to 95.2% with the RSDs from 1.3% to 10.8%. The samples bought from markets were screened, and some of the samples showed positive for these analytes. The method developed is easy to operate, sensitive, and with good purification effect. It can be applied to the rapid determination of the 12 chemical drugs illegally added in herbal tea. PMID:26930958

  17. Influence of controlled encoding and retrieval facilitation on memory performance in patients with different profiles of mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Perri, Roberta; Monaco, Marco; Fadda, Lucia; Serra, Laura; Marra, Camillo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bruni, Amalia C; Curcio, Sabrina; Bozzali, M; Carlesimo, Giovanni A

    2015-01-01

    Memory tests able to differentiate encoding and retrieval processes from the memoranda storing ones should be used to differentiate patients in a very early phase of AD. In fact, individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can be characterized by two different memory profiles: a pure amnestic one (with poor learning and retrieval and poor improvement when encoding is assisted and retrieval is facilitated) and a dysexecutive one (with inefficient encoding and/or poor retrieval strategies and improvement with assisted encoding and retrieval). The amnestic profile characterizes subjects affected by medio-temporal atrophy typical of AD. In this study, a Grober-Buschke memory procedure was used to evaluate normal controls and MCI patients with different cognitive profiles: pure amnestic (aMCIsd), amnestic plus other cognitive impairments (aMCImd) and non-amnestic (naMCI). An index of sensitivity of cueing (ISC) measured the advantage passing from free to cued recall. Results showed that both strategic and consolidation abilities were impaired in the aMCIsd and aMCImd groups and were preserved in the naMCI group. aMCImd, however, compensated the memory deficit with assisted encoding and retrieval, but aMCIsd performed very poorly. When MCI subjects were defined according to the ISC value, subjects with poor ISC were primarily in the aMCIsd group and, to a lesser extent, in the aMCImd group and the naMCI group. Finally, patients with a poor ISC showed cerebral atrophy documented in the precocious phase of AD and the retrosplenial cerebral areas seemed to be the most useful areas for identifying patients in the early phase of AD. PMID:25670528

  18. Immunological data from cancer patients treated with Ad5/3-E2F-Δ24-GMCSF suggests utility for tumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, Otto; Parviainen, Suvi; Juhila, Juuso; Turkki, Riku; Linder, Nina; Lundin, Johan; Kankainen, Matti; Ristimäki, Ari; Koski, Anniina; Liikanen, Ilkka; Oksanen, Minna; Nettelbeck, Dirk M.; Kairemo, Kalevi; Partanen, Kaarina; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses that selectively replicate in tumor cells can be used for treatment of cancer. Accumulating data suggests that virus induced oncolysis can enhance anti-tumor immunity and break immune tolerance. To capitalize on the immunogenic nature of oncolysis, we generated a quadruple modified oncolytic adenovirus expressing granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF). Ad5/3-E2F-Δ24-GMCSF (CGTG-602) was engineered to contain a tumor specific E2F1 promoter driving an E1 gene deleted at the retinoblastoma protein binding site (“Δ24”). The fiber features a knob from serotype 3 for enhanced gene delivery to tumor cells. The virus was tested preclinically in vitro and in vivo and then 13 patients with solid tumors refractory to standard therapies were treated. Treatments were well tolerated and frequent tumor- and adenovirus-specific T-cell immune responses were seen. Overall, with regard to tumor marker or radiological responses, signs of antitumor efficacy were seen in 9/12 evaluable patients (75%). The radiological disease control rate with positron emission tomography was 83% while the response rate (including minor responses) was 50%. Tumor biopsies indicated accumulation of immunological cells, especially T-cells, to tumors after treatment. RNA expression analyses of tumors indicated immunological activation and metabolic changes secondary to virus replication. PMID:25714011

  19. Effect of added zinc in diets with ractopamine hydrochloride on growth performance, carcass characteristics, and ileal mucosal inflammation mRNA expression of finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Paulk, C B; Burnett, D D; Tokach, M D; Nelssen, J L; Dritz, S S; DeRouchey, J M; Goodband, R D; Hill, G M; Haydon, K D; Gonzalez, J M

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of increasing the dietary Zn content on growth performance, carcass characteristics, plasma Zn, and ileal mucosal inflammation mRNA expression of finishing pigs fed diets containing ractopamine HCl (RAC; Elanco Animal Health, Greenfield, IN). In Exp. 1, 312 pigs (327 × 1050; PIC, Hendersonville, TN; 94 kg BW) were used in a 27-d study. There were 2 pigs per pen and 26 pens per treatment. Treatments included a corn-soybean meal diet (control; 0.66% standardized ileal digestible [SID] Lys); a diet (0.92% SID Lys) with 10 mg/kg RAC; and the RAC diet plus 50, 100, or 150 mg Zn/kg from ZnO or 50 mg Zn/kg from a Zn AA complex (ZnAA; Availa-Zn; Zinpro, Eden Prairie, MN). All diets also contained 83 mg Zn/kg from ZnSO4 in the trace mineral premix. Pigs fed the RAC diet without added Zn had increased (P < 0.05) ADG, G:F, HCW, carcass yield, and loin weight compared with pigs fed the control diet. Increasing Zn from ZnO in diets containing RAC tended to increase (linear, P = 0.067) G:F and loin weight (quadratic, P = 0.064). Pigs fed diets with 50 mg Zn/kg from ZnAA tended to have increased (P = 0.057) ADG compared with pigs fed the RAC diet. In Exp. 2, 320 pigs (327 × 1050; PIC; 98 kg BW) were used in a 35-d study. There were 2 pigs per pen and 20 pens per treatment. Treatments included a control diet (0.66% SID Lys); a diet (0.92% SID Lys) with 10 mg/kg RAC; or the RAC diet plus 75, 150, and 225 mg Zn/kg from ZnO or ZnAA. All diets also contained 55 mg Zn/kg from ZnSO4 from the trace mineral premix. Pigs fed the RAC diet had increased (P < 0.05) ADG, G:F, HCW, loin depth, percentage lean, and liver weight compared with pigs fed the control diet. No Zn level or source effects or level × source interactions were observed for growth performance. A Zn level × source interaction (quadratic, P = 0.007) was observed in liver Zn concentrations. This resulted from liver Zn concentrations plateauing at 150 mg Zn/kg when Zn

  20. Acquisition, calibration, and performance of airborne high-resolution ADS40 SH52 sensor data for monitoring the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, P. A.; Cagney, L. E.; Kohl, K. A.; Gushue, T. M.; Fritzinger, C.; Bennett, G. E.; Hamill, J. F.; Melis, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    Periodically, the Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center of the U.S. Geological Survey collects and interprets high-resolution (20-cm), airborne multispectral imagery and digital surface models (DSMs) to monitor the effects of Glen Canyon Dam operations on natural and cultural resources of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. We previously employed the first generation of the ADS40 in 2000 and the Zeiss-Imaging Digital Mapping Camera (DMC) in 2005. Data from both sensors displayed band-image misregistration owing to multiple sensor optics and image smearing along abrupt scarps due to errors in image rectification software, both of which increased post-processing time, cost, and errors from image classification. Also, the near-infrared gain on the early, 8-bit ADS40 was not properly set and its signal was saturated for the more chlorophyll-rich vegetation, which limited our vegetation mapping. Both sensors had stereo panchromatic capability for generating a DSM. The ADS40 performed to specifications; the DMC failed. In 2009, we employed the new ADS40 SH52 to acquire 11-bit multispectral data with a single lens (20-cm positional accuracy), as well as stereo panchromatic data that provided a 1-m cell DSM (40-cm root-mean-square vertical error at one sigma). Analyses of the multispectral data showed near-perfect registration of its four band images at our 20-cm resolution, a linear response to ground reflectance, and a large dynamic range and good sensitivity (except for the blue band). Data were acquired over a 10-day period for the 450-km-long river corridor in which acquisition time and atmospheric conditions varied considerably during inclement weather. We received 266 orthorectified flightlines for the corridor, choosing to calibrate and mosaic the data ourselves to ensure a flawless mosaic with consistent, realistic spectral information. A linear least-squares cross-calibration of overlapping flightlines for the corridor showed that the dominate factors in

  1. Adherence to and appropriateness of anti-osteoporotic treatments in patients aged 50 and over in the Valencia Region (Spain). The ESOSVAL-AD Study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background A study to evaluate the adherence to and appropriateness of anti-osteoporotic treatments in a cohort of men and women aged 50 and over participating in the ESOSVAL-R study. Methods/Design Design: An observational, longitudinal, prospective cohort study; Study subjects: Men and women aged 50 and over living in the Valencia Region (Spain) who initiated treatment between June 15, 2009, and June 15, 2011, in primary healthcare centers with electronic medical records; Data sources: The main data source will be electronic medical records. Measurement of results: Degree of compliance with and persistence of anti-osteoporotic treatments, and the proportion of patients with appropriate anti-osteoporotic treatment in accordance with the most relevant and high impact recommendations with clearly defined treatment algorithms in Spain (the Spanish National Health System guide (2010), the General Practitioners' Society (2007) and the General Directorate for Pharmacy and Medical Products of Madrid (2007)), and with the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF, 2010), and the International Osteoporosis Foundation guidelines (IOF, 2008); Analysis: 1.) Descriptive analysis of patients undergoing treatment and the treatments prescribed; 2.) Descriptive analysis of compliance with and persistence of anti-osteoporotic treatments; 3.) Analysis of factors associated with compliance with and persistence of treatments by Cox proportional hazard regression models, 4.) Descriptive analysis of appropriateness of treatment; 5.) Analysis of factors associated with the appropriateness of treatment by multilevel models (4 levels: patient, doctor, Basic Healthcare Zone/Primary Healthcare Center, and Health Area variables). Discussion ESOSVAL-AD will provide information regarding adherence to osteoporosis treatments and the factors associated with a higher or lower adherence (including the appropriateness of the treatment) in the Spanish context. A better understanding of this

  2. Constructing a Patient Education System: A Performance Technology Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edith E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the patient education system described here was to distribute patient education material to and within medical practices managed by a small medical practice management company. The belief was that patient education opportunities improved health care outcomes and increased patient participation in health care decisions and compliance…

  3. Adding point of care ultrasound to assess volume status in heart failure patients in a nurse-led outpatient clinic. A randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Gundersen, Guri Holmen; Norekval, Tone M; Haug, Hilde Haugberg; Skjetne, Kyrre; Kleinau, Jens Olaf; Graven, Torbjorn; Dalen, Havard

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Medical history, physical examination and laboratory testing are not optimal for the assessment of volume status in heart failure (HF) patients. We aimed to study the clinical influence of focused ultrasound of the pleural cavities and inferior vena cava (IVC) performed by specialised nurses to assess volume status in HF patients at an outpatient clinic. Methods HF outpatients were prospectively included and underwent laboratory testing, history recording and clinical examination by two nurses with and without an ultrasound examination of the pleural cavities and IVC using a pocket-size imaging device, in random order. Each nurse worked in a team with a cardiologist. The influence of the different diagnostic tests on diuretic dosing was assessed descriptively and in linear regression analyses. Results Sixty-two patients were included and 119 examinations were performed. Mean±SD age was 74±12 years, EF was 34±14%, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) value was 3761±3072 ng/L. Dosing of diuretics differed between the teams in 31 out of 119 consultations. Weight change and volume status assessed clinically with and without ultrasound predicted dose adjustment of diuretics at follow-up (p<0.05). Change of oedema, NT-proBNP, creatinine, and symptoms did not (p≥0.10). In adjusted analyses, only volume status based on ultrasound predicted dose adjustments of diuretics at first visit and follow-up (all ultrasound p≤0.01, all other p≥0.2). Conclusions Ultrasound examinations of the pleural cavities and IVC by nurses may improve diagnostics and patient care in HF patients at an outpatient clinic, but more studies are needed to determine whether these examinations have an impact on clinical outcomes. Trial registration number NCT01794715. PMID:26438785

  4. Factors Affecting Exercise Test Performance in Patients After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kotarska, Katarzyna; Wunsch, Ewa; Jodko, Lukasz; Raszeja-Wyszomirska, Joanna; Bania, Izabela; Lawniczak, Malgorzata; Bogdanos, Dimitrios; Kornacewicz-Jach, Zdzislawa; Milkiewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant recipients. In addition, low physical activity is a risk factor for cardiac and cerebrovascular complications. Objectives This study examined potential relationships between physical activity, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and an exercise test in liver-graft recipients. Patients and Methods A total of 107 participants (62 men/45 women) who had received a liver transplantation (LT) at least 6 months previously were evaluated. Physical activity was assessed using three different questionnaires, while HRQoL was assessed using the medical outcomes study short form (SF)-36 questionnaire, and health behaviors were evaluated using the health behavior inventory (HBI). The exercise test was performed in a standard manner. Results Seven participants (6.5%) had a positive exercise test, and these individuals were older than those who had a negative exercise test (P = 0.04). A significant association between a negative exercise test and a higher level of physical activity was shown by the Seven-day physical activity recall questionnaire. In addition, HRQoL was improved in various domains of the SF-36 in participants who had a negative exercise test. No correlations between physical activity, the exercise test and healthy behaviors, as assessed via the HBI were observed. Conclusions Exercise test performance was affected by lower quality of life and lower physical activity after LT. With the exception of hypertension, well known factors that affect the risk of coronary artery disease had no effect on the exercise test results. PMID:27226801

  5. Polarised black holes in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Miguel S.; Greenspan, Lauren; Oliveira, Miguel; Penedones, João; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-06-01

    We consider solutions in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a negative cosmological constant that asymptote to global AdS 4 with conformal boundary {S}2× {{{R}}}t. At the sphere at infinity we turn on a space-dependent electrostatic potential, which does not destroy the asymptotic AdS behaviour. For simplicity we focus on the case of a dipolar electrostatic potential. We find two new geometries: (i) an AdS soliton that includes the full backreaction of the electric field on the AdS geometry; (ii) a polarised neutral black hole that is deformed by the electric field, accumulating opposite charges in each hemisphere. For both geometries we study boundary data such as the charge density and the stress tensor. For the black hole we also study the horizon charge density and area, and further verify a Smarr formula. Then we consider this system at finite temperature and compute the Gibbs free energy for both AdS soliton and black hole phases. The corresponding phase diagram generalizes the Hawking-Page phase transition. The AdS soliton dominates the low temperature phase and the black hole the high temperature phase, with a critical temperature that decreases as the external electric field increases. Finally, we consider the simple case of a free charged scalar field on {S}2× {{{R}}}t with conformal coupling. For a field in the SU(N ) adjoint representation we compare the phase diagram with the above gravitational system.

  6. Does adding noradrenaline reuptake inhibition to selective serotonin reuptake inhibition improve efficacy in patients with depression? A systematic review of meta-analyses and large randomised pragmatic trials.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Andrew J; Lenox-Smith, Alan J

    2013-08-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are recommended as first-line pharmacological treatment for depression and are the most commonly prescribed class of antidepressants. However, there is substantial evidence that noradrenaline has a role in the pathogenesis and treatment of depression. This review aims to examine the evidence of including noradrenaline reuptake inhibition with serotonin reuptake inhibition with respect to increasing efficacy in the treatment of depression. Evidence from meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and randomised pragmatic trials was found in support of greater efficacy of the serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), venlafaxine and duloxetine, in moderate to severe depression compared to SSRIs but no evidence was found for superiority of milnacipran. There is sufficient current evidence that demonstrates an increase in efficacy, when noradrenaline reuptake is added to serotonin (5-HT) reuptake, to suggest that patients with severe depression or those who have failed to reach remission with a SSRI may benefit from treatment with a SNRI. However, as these conclusions are drawn from the evidence derived from meta-analyses and pragmatic trials, large adequately powered RCTs using optimal dosing regimens and clinically relevant outcome measures in severe depression and SSRI treatment failures are still required to confirm these findings. PMID:23832963

  7. Performance of phalangeal quantitative ultrasound parameters in the evaluation of reduced bone mineral density assessed by DX in patients with 21 hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Ezequiel M; Sewaybricker, Leticia E; Baptista, Fatima; Silva, Analiza M; Carvalho, Wellington R G; Santos, Allan O; de Mello, Maricilda P; Lemos-Marini, Sofia H V; Guerra, Gil

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the performance of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters of proximal phalanges in the evaluation of reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21 OHD). Seventy patients with 21 OHD (41 females and 29 males), aged between 6-27 y were assessed. The QUS measurements, amplitude-dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS), bone transmission time (BTT), and ultrasound bone profile index (UBPI) were obtained using the BMD Sonic device (IGEA, Carpi, Italy) on the last four proximal phalanges in the non-dominant hand. BMD was determined by dual energy X-ray (DXA) across the total body and lumbar spine (LS). Total body and LS BMD were positively correlated to UBPI, BTT and AD-SoS (correlation coefficients ranged from 0.59-0.72, p < 0.001). In contrast, when comparing patients with normal and low (Z-score < -2) BMD, no differences were found in the QUS parameters. Furthermore, UBPI, BTT and AD-SoS measurements were not effective for diagnosing patients with reduced BMD by receiver operator characteristic curve parameters. Although the AD-SoS, BTT and UBPI showed significant correlations with the data obtained by DXA, they were not effective for diagnosing reduced bone mass in patients with 21 OHD. PMID:24726797

  8. Simeprevir added to peginterferon and ribavirin lessens time with fatigue, depressive symptoms and functional limitations in patients with chronic hepatitis C compared with peginterferon and ribavirin: results from 1161 patients in the QUEST-1, QUEST-2 and PROMISE studies.

    PubMed

    Scott, J; Gilles, L; Fu, M; Brohan, E; Panter, C; Arbuckle, R; Jessner, W; Beumont, M

    2015-08-01

    The value of adding simeprevir (SMV) vs placebo (PBO) to peginterferon and ribavirin (PR) for treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection was examined using patient-reported outcomes (PROs); further, concordance of PROs with virology endpoints and adverse events (AEs) was explored. Patients (n = 768 SMV/PR, n = 393 PBO/PR) rated fatigue (FSS), depressive symptoms (CES-D) and functional impairment (WPAI: Hepatitis C Productivity, Daily Activity and Absenteeism) at baseline and throughout treatment in three randomised, double-blind trials comparing the addition of SMV or PBO during initial 12 weeks of PR. PR was administered for 48 weeks (PBO group) and 24/48 weeks (SMV group) using a response-guided therapy (RGT) approach. Mean PRO scores (except Absenteeism) worsened from baseline to Week 4 to the same extent in both groups but reverted after Week 24 for SMV/PR and only after Week 48 for PBO/PR. Accordingly, there was a significantly lower area under the curve (baseline-Week 60, AUC60 ) and fewer weeks with clinically important worsening of scores in the SMV/PR group at any time point. Incidences of patients with fatigue and anaemia AEs were similar in both groups, but FSS scores showed that clinically important increases in fatigue lasted a mean of 6.9 weeks longer with PBO/PR (P < 0.001). PRO score subgroup analysis indicated better outcomes for patients who met the criteria for RGT or achieved sustained virological response 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12); differences in mean PRO scores associated with fibrosis level were only observed with PBO/PR. Greater efficacy of SMV/PR enabled reduced treatment duration and reduced time with PR-related AEs without adding to AE severity. PMID:25487355

  9. Examination of standardized patient performance: Accuracy and consistency of six standardized patients over time

    PubMed Central

    Erby, Lori A.H.; Roter, Debra L.; Biesecker, Barbara B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the accuracy and consistency of standardized patient (SP) performance in the context of routine genetic counseling, focusing on elements beyond scripted case items including general communication style and affective demeanor. Methods One hundred seventy-seven genetic counselors were randomly assigned to counsel one of six SPs. Videotapes and transcripts of the sessions were analyzed to assess consistency of performance across four dimensions. Results Accuracy of script item presentation was high; 91% and 89% in the prenatal and cancer cases. However, there were statistically significant differences among SPs in the accuracy of presentation, general communication style, and some aspects of affective presentation. All SPs were rated as presenting with similarly high levels of realism. SP performance over time was generally consistent, with some small but statistically significant differences. Conclusion and practice implications These findings demonstrate that well-trained SPs can not only perform the factual elements of a case with high degrees of accuracy and realism; but they can also maintain sufficient levels of uniformity in general communication style and affective demeanor over time to support their use in even the demanding context of genetic counseling. Results indicate a need for an additional focus in training on consistency between different SPs. PMID:21094590

  10. Efficacy of Biofeedback and Cognitive-behavioural Therapy in Psoriatic PatientsA Single-blind, Randomized and Controlled Study with Added Narrow-band Ultraviolet B Therapy.

    PubMed

    Piaserico, Stefano; Marinello, Elena; Dessi, Andrea; Linder, Michael Dennis; Coccarielli, Debora; Peserico, Andrea

    2016-08-23

    Increasing data suggests that there is a connection between stress and the appearance of psoriasis symptoms. We therefore performed a clinical trial enrolling 40 participants who were randomly allocated to either an 8-week cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) (treatment group) plus narrow-band UVB phototherapy or to an 8-week course of only narrow-band UVB phototherapy (control group). We evaluated the clinical severity of psoriasis (PASI), General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-12, Skindex-29 and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) at baseline and by the end of the study. Sixty-five percent of patients in the treatment group achieved PASI75 compared with 15% of standard UVB patients (p = 0.007). GHQ-12 cases were reduced from 45% to 10% in the treatment group and from 30% to 20% in the control group (p = 0.05). The Skindex-29 emotional domain showed a significant improvement in the CBT/biofeedback group compared with control patients (-2.8 points, p = 0.04). This study shows that an adjunctive 8-week intervention with CBT combined with biofeedback increases the beneficial effect of UVB therapy in the overall management of psoriasis, reduces the clinical severity of psoriasis, improving quality of life and decreases the number of minor psychiatric disorders. PMID:27283367

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Umeclidinium Added to Fluticasone Propionate/Salmeterol in Patients with COPD: Results of Two Randomized, Double-Blind Studies

    PubMed Central

    Siler, Thomas M.; Kerwin, Edward; Singletary, Karen; Brooks, Jean; Church, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Combinations of drugs with distinct and complementary mechanisms of action may offer improved efficacy in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In two 12-week, double-blind, parallel-group studies, patients with COPD were randomized 1:1:1 to once-daily umeclidinium (UMEC; 62.5 μg and 125 μg) 
or placebo (PBO), added to twice-daily fluticasone propionate/salmeterol (FP/SAL; 250/50 μg). In both studies, the primary efficacy measure was trough forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) at Day 85. Secondary endpoints were weighted-mean (WM) FEV1 over 0–6 hours post-dose (Day 84) and rescue albuterol use. Health-related quality of life outcomes (St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire [SGRQ] and COPD assessment test [CAT]) were also examined. Safety was assessed throughout. Both UMEC+FP/SAL doses provided statistically significant improvements in trough FEV1 (Day 85: 0.127–0.148 L) versus PBO+FP/SAL. Similarly, both UMEC+FP/SAL doses provided statistically-significant improvements in 0–6 hours post-dose WM FEV1 versus PBO+FP/SAL (Day 84: 0.144–0.165 L). Rescue use over Weeks 1–12 decreased with UMEC+FP/SAL in both studies versus PBO+FP/SAL (Study 1, 0.3 puffs/day [both doses]; Study 2, 0.5 puffs/day [UMEC 125+FP/SAL]). Decreases from baseline in CAT score were generally larger for both doses of UMEC+FP/SAL versus PBO+FP/SAL (except for Day 84 Study 2). In Study 1, no differences in SGRQ score were observed between UMEC+FP/SAL and PBO+FP/SAL; however, in Study 2, statistically significant improvements were observed with UMEC 62.5+FP/SAL (Day 28) and UMEC 125+FP/SAL (Days 28 and 84) versus PBO+FP/SAL. The incidence of on-treatment adverse events across all treatment groups was 37–41% in Study 1 and 36–38% in Study 2. Overall, these data indicate that the combination of UMEC+FP/SAL can provide additional benefits over FP/SAL alone in patients with COPD. PMID:26417965

  12. Vehicle surge detection and pathway discrimination by pedestrians who are blind: Effect of adding an alert sound to hybrid electric vehicles on performance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Shik; Emerson, Robert Wall; Naghshineh, Koorosh; Pliskow, Jay; Myers, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effect of adding an artificially generated alert sound to a quiet vehicle on its detectability and localizability with 15 visually impaired adults. When starting from a stationary position, the hybrid electric vehicle with an alert sound was significantly more quickly and reliably detected than either the identical vehicle without such added sound or the comparable internal combustion engine vehicle. However, no significant difference was found between the vehicles in respect to how accurately the participants could discriminate the path of a given vehicle (straight vs. right turn). These results suggest that adding an artificial sound to a hybrid electric vehicle may help reduce delay in street crossing initiation by a blind pedestrian, but the benefit of such alert sound may not be obvious in determining whether the vehicle in his near parallel lane proceeds straight through the intersection or turns right in front of him. PMID:22707841

  13. Vehicle surge detection and pathway discrimination by pedestrians who are blind: Effect of adding an alert sound to hybrid electric vehicles on performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Shik; Emerson, Robert Wall; Naghshineh, Koorosh; Pliskow, Jay; Myers, Kyle

    2012-05-01

    This study examined the effect of adding an artificially generated alert sound to a quiet vehicle on its detectability and localizability with 15 visually impaired adults. When starting from a stationary position, the hybrid electric vehicle with an alert sound was significantly more quickly and reliably detected than either the identical vehicle without such added sound or the comparable internal combustion engine vehicle. However, no significant difference was found between the vehicles in respect to how accurately the participants could discriminate the path of a given vehicle (straight vs. right turn). These results suggest that adding an artificial sound to a hybrid electric vehicle may help reduce delay in street crossing initiation by a blind pedestrian, but the benefit of such alert sound may not be obvious in determining whether the vehicle in his near parallel lane proceeds straight through the intersection or turns right in front of him. PMID:22707841

  14. Assessment of feeding performance in patients with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Sule; Basar, Pinar; Gisel, Erika G

    2004-12-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy (CP) frequently manifest oral-ingestive problems ranging from mild to severe. Drooling, rejection of solid foods, choking, coughing and spillage during eating may contribute to these problems. The aim of this study was to assess functional feeding skills of patients with CP, aged 4-25 years. They were assessed with the Modified Functional Feeding Assessment Scale (FFAm). Mothers had expressed concern regarding drooling and reluctance in accepting solid foods. None of the mothers thought that there was a major problem with adequate ingestion. However, the study revealed that patients had disabilities in spoon feeding, biting, chewing, cup drinking, straw drinking, swallowing and clearing. PMID:15572999

  15. Efficacy and safety of adding an agent to bevacizumab/taxane regimens for the first-line treatment of Her2-negative patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: results from seven randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqun; Liu, Xiangdong; Qiao, Tiankui; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Sujuan

    2016-01-01

    Background The combined therapy of bevacizumab (BEV) with taxane (paclitaxel or docetaxel) has shown an improvement on progression-free survival (PFS) and objective remission in Her2-negative patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer (LR/MBC). However, there was no benefit in overall survival (OS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adding an agent to the BEV/taxane regimens for the treatment of Her2-negative patients with LR/MBC in a first-line setting. Materials and methods We searched PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, EBSCO, and the Cochrane Library databases for eligible trials. A meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.0 freeware package. We calculated the hazard ratio (HR) for PFS and OS. The odds ratio (OR) was used to calculate objective response rate (ORR) and grade 3/4 drug-related adverse events. The heterogeneity of study outcomes was calculated by the χ2 test or I2 statistics. Results A total of 1,124 patients from seven randomized controlled trials were analyzed. Our meta-analysis showed that the ORR was significantly improved in the BEV/taxane-based triplet group when compared with the BEV/taxane-based doublet group (OR =1.31, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03–1.67, P=0.03). A subset analysis showed that a similar result was achieved in the triplet group in which a cytotoxic agent was added (OR =1.46, 95% CI: 1.09–1.95, P=0.01). However, the PFS and OS had no statistically significant differences between the two groups (HR =0.87, 95% CI: 0.68–1.13, P=0.31; HR =0.98, 95% CI: 0.82–1.16, P=0.78, respectively). Regarding safety, thromboembolic events, fatigue, and diarrhea (all $grade 3) were more frequently observed in the BEV/taxane-based triplet group (OR =3.8, 95% CI: 1.86–7.79, P=0.0003; OR =1.55, 95% CI: 1.05–2.27, P=0.03; OR =2.1, 95% CI: 1.29–3.41, P=0.003, respectively). Other toxic effects had no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion Our

  16. Effects of adding saturated fat to diets with sorghum-based distiller's dried grains with solubles on growth performance and carcass characteristics in finishing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 112 barrows (avg BW of 72 kg) was used in a 65-day growth assay to determine the effects of adding a source of saturated fat (beef tallow) into diets with sorghum-based distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS). The pigs were sorted by ancestry and blocked by BW with seven pigs/pen an...

  17. Smeared antibranes polarise in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautason, Fridrik Freyr; Truijen, Brecht; Van Riet, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    In the recent literature it has been questioned whether the local backreaction of antibranes in flux throats can induce a perturbative brane-flux decay. Most evidence for this can be gathered for D6 branes and D p branes smeared over 6 - p compact directions, in line with the absence of finite temperature solutions for these cases. The solutions in the literature have flat worldvolume geometries and non-compact transversal spaces. In this paper we consider what happens when the worldvolume is AdS and the transversal space is compact. We show that in these circumstances brane polarisation smoothens out the flux singularity, which is an indication that brane-flux decay is prevented. This is consistent with the fact that the cosmological constant would be less negative after brane-flux decay. Our results extend recent results on AdS7 solutions from D6 branes to AdS p+1 solutions from D p branes. We show that supersymmetry of the AdS solutions depend on p non-trivially.

  18. AdS orbifolds and Penrose limits

    SciTech Connect

    Alishahiha, Mohsen; Sheikh-Jabbari, Mohammad M.; Tatar, Radu

    2002-12-09

    In this paper we study the Penrose limit of AdS{sub 5} orbifolds. The orbifold can be either in the pure spatial directions or space and time directions. For the AdS{sub 5}/{Lambda} x S{sup 5} spatial orbifold we observe that after the Penrose limit we obtain the same result as the Penrose limit of AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5}/{Lambda}. We identify the corresponding BMN operators in terms of operators of the gauge theory on R x S{sup 3}/{Lambda}. The semi-classical description of rotating strings in these backgrounds have also been studied. For the spatial AdS orbifold we show that in the quadratic order the obtained action for the fluctuations is the same as that in S{sup 5} orbifold, however, the higher loop correction can distinguish between two cases.

  19. Attributing patients to accountable care organizations: performance year approach aligns stakeholders' interests.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Valerie A; McClurg, Asha Belle; Smith, Jeremy; Fisher, Elliott S; Bynum, Julie P W

    2013-03-01

    The accountable care organization (ACO) model of health care delivery is rapidly being implemented under government and private-sector initiatives. The model requires that each ACO have a defined patient population for which the ACO will be held accountable for both total cost of care and quality performance. However, there is no empirical evidence about the best way to define how patients are assigned to these groups of doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers. We examined the two major methods of defining, or attributing, patient populations to ACOs: the prospective method and the performance year method. The prospective method uses data from one year to assign patients to an ACO for the following performance year. The performance year method assigns patients to an ACO at the end of the performance year based on the population served during the performance year. We used Medicare fee-for-service claims data from 2008 and 2009 to simulate a set of ACOs to compare the two methods. Although both methods have benefits and drawbacks, we found that attributing patients using the performance year method yielded greater overlap of attributed patients and patients treated during the performance year and resulted in a higher proportion of care concentrated within an accountable care organization. Together, these results suggest that performance year attribution may more fully and accurately reflect an ACO's patient population and may better position an ACO to achieve shared savings. PMID:23459739

  20. Neuropsychological test performance of patients with Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Wollmann, Tone; Barroso, Jose; Monton, Fernando; Nieto, Antonieta

    2002-08-01

    Although recognized as one of the most common hereditary diseases of the nervous system, the neuropsychological deficits in Friedreich's ataxia (FA) have rarely been studied. A protocol was constructed to assess the major cognitive areas in patients with FA and pair-matched normal controls. Motor difficulties, dysarthria and fatigability were taken into account. Neuropsychological assessment showed decreased motor and mental reaction times, reduced verbal span, deficits in letter fluency, impaired acquisition and consolidation of verbal information, proactive interference effect, and alterations in complex visuoperceptual and visuoconstructive abilities, in comparison with the control group. Magnetic resonance images showing cerebellar atrophy in the majority of patients suggest that cerebellar degeneration and the interruption of afferent and efferent cerebellar connections could be related to the cognitive deficits shown by our patients. PMID:12187450

  1. Psychological Adjustment and Neuropsychological Performance in Diabetic Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skenazy, Judy A.; Bigler, Erin D.

    1985-01-01

    Compared diabetic (N=39) with nondiabetic chronic illness patients (N=20) and healthy controls (N=24). The chronic illness and the diabetic groups had significant elevations on the Hypochondriasis, Depression, and Hysteria scales of the Feschingbauer Abbreviated MMPI. For diabetics, results demonstrated a negligible effect of poor adjustment on…

  2. Antisaccade performance in Korsakoff patients reveals deficits in oculomotor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Reichenbach, Roderick C L; Wester, Arie J; Nijboer, Tanja C W

    2012-01-01

    Oculomotor inhibition reflects the ability to suppress an unwanted eye movement. The goal of the present study was to assess oculomotor inhibition in patients with Korsakoff's syndrome (KS). To this end, an antisaccade task was employed in which an eye movement towards an onset stimulus has to be inhibited, and a voluntary saccade has to be executed in the opposite direction. Compared to the results of a matched control group, patients showed a higher percentage of intrusive saccades, made more antisaccade errors, and showed longer latencies on prosaccade trials. These results clearly show that oculomotor inhibition is impaired in KS. Part of these deficits in oculomotor inhibition may be explained by neuronal atrophy in the frontal areas, which is generally associated with KS. PMID:22712532

  3. Patient Positioning Based on a Radioactive Tracer Implanted in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer: A Performance and Safety Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Kruijf, Willy J.M. de; Verstraete, Jan; Neustadter, David; Corn, Benjamin W.; Hol, Sandra; Venselaar, Jack L.M.; Davits, Rob J.; Wijsman, Bart P.; Van den Bergh, Laura; Budiharto, Tom; Oyen, Raymond; Haustermans, Karin; Poortmans, Philip M.P.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance and safety of a radiation therapy positioning system (RealEye) based on tracking a radioactive marker (Tracer) implanted in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a single-arm multi-institutional trial in 20 patients. The iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir)-containing Tracer was implanted in the patient together with 4 standard gold seed fiducials. Patient prostate-related symptoms were evaluated with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Computed tomography (CT) was performed for treatment planning, during treatment, and after treatment to evaluate the migration stability of the Tracer. At 5 treatment sessions, cone beam CT was performed to test the positioning accuracy of the RealEye. Results: The Tracer was successfully implanted in all patients. No device or procedure-related adverse events occurred. Changes in IPSS scores were limited. The difference between the mean change in Tracer-fiducial distance and the mean change in fiducial-fiducial distance was -0.39 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] upper boundary, -0.22 mm). The adjusted mean difference between Tracer position according to RealEye and the Tracer position on the CBCT for all patients was 1.34 mm (95% CI upper boundary, 1.41 mm). Conclusions: Implantation of the Tracer is feasible and safe. Migration stability of the Tracer is good. Prostate patients can be positioned and monitored accurately by using RealEye.

  4. Poor performance status is associated with early death in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    de Vallière, S; Barker, R D

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether poor performance status at the start of anti-tuberculous (anti-TB) treatment is associated with early death in patients admitted to hospital with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). During 3 months in 2001, all adult patients admitted to eight hospitals in Limpopo Province, South Africa, and diagnosed with PTB were eligible for inclusion. At initiation of anti-TB treatment, a performance status between 0 and 4 was estimated for each patient using a modified version of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scoring system. Hospital records and local TB registers were reviewed to identify patients who had died during the first 2 months of treatment. In addition, it was ascertained whether a death notification had been received by the provincial administration. Fifty-three of 295 (18%) patients died within 2 months. Mortality increased from 6% in patients with the best performance status to 51% in patients with the poorest performance status. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that the hazard ratio for dying was significantly higher for patients with a performance status of 3 or 4. Poor performance status shows a strong association with early death in patients with PTB and has the potential to be a useful clinical, epidemiological and research tool. PMID:16313934

  5. Hourly rounding is key contributor to patient-centered care at high-performing hospitals.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    According to new findings, hospitals with the highest HCAHPS scores suggest that hourly rounding on patients is one of the best ways to elevate the patient experience. In a survey of top-performing hospitals, 83% reported they employed the practice of regular nurse rounding on patients, and 62% employed leadership rounding. When rounding on patients, experts suggest nurses should always consider pain, the plan of care, and duration, or "PPD". PMID:26447259

  6. Adding value to your work.

    PubMed

    Chambers, D W

    1998-01-01

    Dentists and many staff enjoy characteristics of work associated with high levels of satisfaction and performance. Although value can be added to oral health care professionals' jobs through enlargement, enrichment, rotations, and autonomous work groups, there are limits to these techniques. Controlling work performance by means of rewards is risky. Probably the most effective means of adding value to jobs is through the Quality of Work Life approach, concentrating on job design and placement to make work meaningful and autonomous and to provide feedback. PMID:9697373

  7. Compliance on neuropsychological performance validity testing in patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Anthony C

    2016-03-01

    Complaints of cognitive dysfunction are common in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD), and they are often accompanied by deficits on neuropsychological testing. Prior studies of BPD, however, did not evaluate compliance on neuropsychological performance validity testing, which could partially account for cognitive deficits observed in patients. The aims of the current study were to evaluate the frequency at which patients with BPD show less than adequate compliance on performance validity testing, and whether patients showing less compliance perform lower on standardized neuropsychological measures. Fifty outpatients with BPD completed the Victoria Symptom Validity Test, a 2-alternative, forced-choice recognition test as part of a larger neuropsychological test battery for research on cognitive functioning in BPD. As a group, patients with BPD made more errors and had longer response latencies on seemingly difficult items as compared to healthy individuals. Based on established guidelines for interpretation of performances on the Victoria Symptom Validity Test, 2% of the sample was classified as probably not compliant, 10% questionably compliant, and 88% compliant. Patients with questionably or probably not compliant performances had lower estimated premorbid intellectual functioning and displayed poorer response control on neuropsychological testing than compliant patients. These findings highlight the value of incorporating performance validity testing in neuropsychological studies of patients with BPD and suggest that prior research on the disorder should be interpreted with caution because the results may not be based on valid performances. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26121384

  8. Systemically treated breast cancer patients and controls: an evaluation of the presence of noncredible performance.

    PubMed

    Wefel, Jeffrey S; Kornet, Rozemarijn L; Schagen, Sanne B

    2014-04-01

    This study sought to define the frequency of noncredible performance in breast cancer patients before, during and after completion of systemic treatment, as well as predictors of noncredible performance. We examined six datasets investigating the cognitive effects of chemotherapy and/or endocrine therapy. Embedded performance validity test (PVT) measures were identified and used to evaluate the datasets. One dataset included a standalone PVT. Possible noncredible performance was operationally defined as performance below criterion on three or more PVT indices. This was undertaken as cancer patients have been observed clinically to fail PVTs both in the context of external gain and independent of such motivators. A total of 534 breast cancer patients and 214 healthy controls were included in the analysis. Percentages of patients performing below cutoff on one or more PVT varied from 0% to 21.2%. Only 1 patient met the criterion of noncredible performance. Calculation of post-test probabilities indicated a more than 90% chance to detect noncredible performance. There is no evidence to suggest noncredible performance in breast cancer patients and healthy controls who choose to participate in research studies examining cognitive function. Thus, the observational data showing that non-central nervous system (CNS) cancer and therapies not targeting the CNS can have untoward effects on cognitive function are unlikely to be due to noncredible performance. PMID:24607070

  9. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adherence and Depression (CBT-AD) in Patients With Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Safren, Steven A.; Gonzalez, Jeffrey S.; Wexler, Deborah J.; Psaros, Christina; Delahanty, Linda M.; Blashill, Aaron J.; Margolina, Aleksandra I.; Cagliero, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test cognitive behavioral therapy for adherence and depression (CBT-AD) in type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that CBT-AD would improve adherence; depression; and, secondarily, hemoglobin A1c (A1C). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Eighty-seven adults with unipolar depression and uncontrolled type 2 diabetes received enhanced treatment as usual (ETAU), including medication adherence, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG), and lifestyle counseling; a provider letter documented psychiatric diagnoses. Those randomized to the intervention arm also received 9–11 sessions of CBT-AD. RESULTS Immediately after acute treatment (4 months), adjusting for baseline, CBT-AD had 20.7 percentage points greater oral medication adherence on electronic pill cap (95% CI −31.14 to −10.22, P = 0.000); 30.2 percentage points greater SMBG adherence through glucometer downloads (95% CI −42.95 to −17.37, P = 0.000); 6.44 points lower depression scores on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (95% CI 2.33–10.56, P = 0.002); 0.74 points lower on the Clinical Global Impression (95% CI 0.16–1.32, P = 0.01); and 0.72 units lower A1C (95% CI 0.29–1.15, P = 0.001) relative to ETAU. Analyses of 4-, 8-, and 12-month follow-up time points indicated that CBT-AD maintained 24.3 percentage points higher medication adherence (95% CI −38.2 to −10.3, P = 0.001); 16.9 percentage points greater SMBG adherence (95% CI −33.3 to −0.5, P = 0.043); and 0.63 units lower A1C (95% CI 0.06–1.2, P = 0.03) after acute treatment ended. For depression, there was some evidence of continued improvement posttreatment, but no between-group differences. CONCLUSIONS CBT-AD is an effective intervention for adherence, depression, and glycemic control, with enduring and clinically meaningful benefits for diabetes self-management and glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes and depression. PMID:24170758

  10. The AdS particle [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subir

    2005-09-01

    In this Letter we have considered a relativistic Nambu-Goto model for a particle in AdS metric. With appropriate gauge choice to fix the reparameterization invariance, we recover the previously discussed [S. Ghosh, P. Pal, Phys. Lett. B 618 (2005) 243, arxiv:hep-th/0502192] "exotic oscillator". The Snyder algebra and subsequently the κ-Minkowski spacetime are also derived. Lastly we comment on the impossibility of constructing a non-commutative spacetime in the context of open string where only a curved target space is introduced.

  11. Next-Generation A/D Sampler ADS3000+ for VLBI2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Masanori; Koyama, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    A high-speed A/D sampler, called ADS3000+, has been developed in 2008, which can sample one analog signal up to 4 Gbps to versatile Linux PC. After A/D conversion, the ADS3000+ can perform digital signal processing such as real-time DBBC (Digital Base Band Conversion) and FIR filtering such as simple CW RFI filtering using the installed FPGAs. A 4 Gsps fringe test with the ADS3000+ has been successfully performed. The ADS3000+ will not exclusively be used for VLBI but will also be employed in other applications.

  12. Probing crunching AdS cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. Prem; Vaganov, Vladislav

    2016-02-01

    Holographic gravity duals of deformations of CFTs formulated on de Sitter spacetime contain FRW geometries behind a horizon, with cosmological big crunch singularities. Using a specific analytically tractable solution within a particular single scalar truncation of {N}=8 supergravity on AdS4, we first probe such crunching cosmologies with spacelike radial geodesics that compute spatially antipodal correlators of large dimension boundary operators. At late times, the geodesics lie on the FRW slice of maximal expansion behind the horizon. The late time two-point functions factorise, and when transformed to the Einstein static universe, they exhibit a temporal non-analyticity determined by the maximal value of the scale factor ã max. Radial geodesics connecting antipodal points necessarily have de Sitter energy Ɛ ≲ ã max, while geodesics with Ɛ > ã max terminate at the crunch, the two categories of geodesics being separated by the maximal expansion slice. The spacelike crunch singularity is curved "outward" in the Penrose diagram for the deformed AdS backgrounds, and thus geodesic limits of the antipodal correlators do not directly probe the crunch. Beyond the geodesic limit, we point out that the scalar wave equation, analytically continued into the FRW patch, has a potential which is singular at the crunch along with complex WKB turning points in the vicinity of the FRW crunch. We then argue that the frequency space Green's function has a branch point determined by ã max which corresponds to the lowest quasinormal frequency.

  13. Findings and Preliminary Recommendations from the Michigan State and Indiana University Research Study of Value-Added Models to Evaluate Teacher Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.

    2013-01-01

    The push for accountability in public schooling has extended to the measurement of teacher performance, accelerated by federal efforts through Race to the Top. Currently, a large number of states and districts across the country are computing measures of teacher performance based on the standardized test scores of their students and using them in…

  14. LWR (Light Water Reactor) power plant simulations using the AD10 and AD100 systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Chien, C.J.; Jang, J.Y.; Lin, H.C.; Mallen, A.N.; Wang, S.J.; Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Lung-Tan; Tawian Power Co., Taipei; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY; Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Lung-Tan )

    1989-01-01

    Boiling (BWR) and Pressurized (PWR) Water Reactor Power Plants are being simulated at BNL with the AD10 and AD100 Peripheral Processor Systems. The AD10 system has been used for BWR simulations since 1984 for safety analyses, emergency training and optimization studies. BWR simulation capabilities have been implemented recently on the AD100 system and PWR simulation capabilities are currently being developed under the auspices of international cooperation. Modeling and simulation methods are presented with emphasis on the simulation of the Nuclear Steam Supply System. Results are presented for BWR simulation and performance characteristics are compared of the AD10 and AD100 systems. It will be shown that the AD100 simulates two times faster than two AD10 processors operating in parallel and that the computing capacity of one AD100 (with FMU processor) is twice as large as that of two AD10 processors. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Category fluency performance in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: The influence of affective categories.

    PubMed

    Rossell, Susan L

    2006-02-28

    Semantic fluency (SF) and phonological fluency (PF) were examined in large groups of schizophrenia patients, bipolar patients and controls. As well as standard SF categories (animals and food), fluency to two affective categories, happy and fear was measured, i.e. participants were asked to produce as many words as they could that resulted in or are associated with fear or happiness. Schizophrenia patients showed SF and PF deficits. Bipolar patients showed PF deficits. Thus, PF is argued to be a good cognitive marker in both disorders. Severity of delusions was related to SF performance in all patients. The patient groups showed different patterns on the affective categories compared to controls: the bipolar patients were better and produced more words, especially to the happiness category, and the schizophrenia patients were impaired and produced less words. The results suggest an interesting interaction between psychotic illnesses, fluency and emotion. PMID:16376054

  16. Similar patient-reported outcomes and performance after total knee arthroplasty with or without patellar resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Ali, Abdulemir; Lindstrand, Anders; Nilsdotter, Anna; Sundberg, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Knee pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is not uncommon. Patellar retention in TKA is one cause of postoperative knee pain, and may lead to secondary addition of a patellar component. Patellar resurfacing in TKA is controversial. Its use ranges from 2% to 90% worldwide. In this randomized study, we compared the outcome after patellar resurfacing and after no resurfacing. Patients and methods - We performed a prospective, randomized study of 74 patients with primary osteoarthritis who underwent a Triathlon CR TKA. The patients were randomized to either patellar resurfacing or no resurfacing. They filled out the VAS pain score and KOOS questionnaires preoperatively, and VAS pain, KOOS, and patient satisfaction 3, 12, and 72 months postoperatively. Physical performance tests were performed preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Results - We found similar scores for VAS pain, patient satisfaction, and KOOS 5 subscales at 3, 12, and 72 months postoperatively in the 2 groups. Physical performance tests 3 months postoperatively were also similar in the 2 groups. No secondary resurfacing was performed in the group with no resurfacing during the first 72 months Interpretation - Patellar resurfacing in primary Triathlon CR TKA is of no advantage regarding pain, physical performance, KOOS 5 subscales, or patient satisfaction compared to no resurfacing. None of the patients were reoperated with secondary addition of a patellar component within 6 years. According to these results, routine patellar resurfacing in primary Triathlon TKA appears to be unnecessary. PMID:27212102

  17. Similar patient-reported outcomes and performance after total knee arthroplasty with or without patellar resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdulemir; Lindstrand, Anders; Nilsdotter, Anna; Sundberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Knee pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is not uncommon. Patellar retention in TKA is one cause of postoperative knee pain, and may lead to secondary addition of a patellar component. Patellar resurfacing in TKA is controversial. Its use ranges from 2% to 90% worldwide. In this randomized study, we compared the outcome after patellar resurfacing and after no resurfacing. Patients and methods We performed a prospective, randomized study of 74 patients with primary osteoarthritis who underwent a Triathlon CR TKA. The patients were randomized to either patellar resurfacing or no resurfacing. They filled out the VAS pain score and KOOS questionnaires preoperatively, and VAS pain, KOOS, and patient satisfaction 3, 12, and 72 months postoperatively. Physical performance tests were performed preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Results We found similar scores for VAS pain, patient satisfaction, and KOOS 5 subscales at 3, 12, and 72 months postoperatively in the 2 groups. Physical performance tests 3 months postoperatively were also similar in the 2 groups. No secondary resurfacing was performed in the group with no resurfacing during the first 72 months Interpretation Patellar resurfacing in primary Triathlon CR TKA is of no advantage regarding pain, physical performance, KOOS 5 subscales, or patient satisfaction compared to no resurfacing. None of the patients were reoperated with secondary addition of a patellar component within 6 years. According to these results, routine patellar resurfacing in primary Triathlon TKA appears to be unnecessary. PMID:27212102

  18. Switching Lopinavir/Ritonavir to Atazanavir/Ritonavir vs Adding Atorvastatin in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Second-Line Antiretroviral Therapy With Hypercholesterolemia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Wangpatharawanit, Phanthaboon; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek

    2016-09-15

    A randomized controlled trial was conducted among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving lopinavir/ritonavir-based regimens with hypercholesterolemia. Reduction of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein was significantly greater in patients who were randomized to the addition of atorvastatin compared with those who were switched from lopinavir/ritonavir to atazanavir/ritonavir. PMID:27402817

  19. Physical performance, pain, pain behavior and subjective disability in patients with subacute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Lindström, I; Ohlund, C; Nachemson, A

    1995-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the physical performance, pain, pain behavior and disability in patients with subacute low back pain (LBP). The patients were blue-collar workers and had been sick-listed for 8 weeks due to subacute low back pain. A total of 103 patients were randomized, 51 of them to the intervention group and the other to a control group. Recordings of physical performance and complaints of LBP were done before and after treatment in the intervention group. The proportion of patients with no complaints of LBP was significantly greater in the intervention group than in the control group at the one-year follow-up. The patients who intra-individually improved their physical performance also intra-individually decreased their complaints of LBP. The intra-individual improvements were suggested to be important for the individual return to work. PMID:8602477

  20. Effect of Adding McKenzie Syndrome, Centralization, Directional Preference, and Psychosocial Classification Variables to a Risk-Adjusted Model Predicting Functional Status Outcomes for Patients With Lumbar Impairments.

    PubMed

    Werneke, Mark W; Edmond, Susan; Deutscher, Daniel; Ward, Jason; Grigsby, David; Young, Michelle; McGill, Troy; McClenahan, Brian; Weinberg, Jon; Davidow, Amy L

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort. Background Patient-classification subgroupings may be important prognostic factors explaining outcomes. Objectives To determine effects of adding classification variables (McKenzie syndrome and pain patterns, including centralization and directional preference; Symptom Checklist Back Pain Prediction Model [SCL BPPM]; and the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire subscales of work and physical activity) to a baseline risk-adjusted model predicting functional status (FS) outcomes. Methods Consecutive patients completed a battery of questionnaires that gathered information on 11 risk-adjustment variables. Physical therapists trained in Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy methods classified each patient by McKenzie syndromes and pain pattern. Functional status was assessed at discharge by patient-reported outcomes. Only patients with complete data were included. Risk of selection bias was assessed. Prediction of discharge FS was assessed using linear stepwise regression models, allowing 13 variables to enter the model. Significant variables were retained in subsequent models. Model power (R(2)) and beta coefficients for model variables were estimated. Results Two thousand sixty-six patients with lumbar impairments were evaluated. Of those, 994 (48%), 10 (<1%), and 601 (29%) were excluded due to incomplete psychosocial data, McKenzie classification data, and missing FS at discharge, respectively. The final sample for analyses was 723 (35%). Overall R(2) for the baseline prediction FS model was 0.40. Adding classification variables to the baseline model did not result in significant increases in R(2). McKenzie syndrome or pain pattern explained 2.8% and 3.0% of the variance, respectively. When pain pattern and SCL BPPM were added simultaneously, overall model R(2) increased to 0.44. Although none of these increases in R(2) were significant, some classification variables were stronger predictors compared with some other variables included in

  1. Added value of next generation gene panel analysis for patients with elevated methylmalonic acid and no clinical diagnosis following functional studies of vitamin B12 metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pupavac, Mihaela; Tian, Xia; Chu, Jordan; Wang, Guoli; Feng, Yanming; Chen, Stella; Fenter, Remington; Zhang, Victor W; Wang, Jing; Watkins, David; Wong, Lee-Jun; Rosenblatt, David S

    2016-03-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) based gene panel testing is increasingly available as a molecular diagnostic approach for inborn errors of metabolism. Over the past 40 years patients have been referred to the Vitamin B12 Clinical Research Laboratory at McGill University for diagnosis of inborn errors of cobalamin metabolism by functional studies in cultured fibroblasts. DNA samples from patients in which no diagnosis was made by these studies were tested by a NGS gene panel to determine whether any molecular diagnoses could be made. 131 DNA samples from patients with elevated methylmalonic acid and no diagnosis following functional studies of cobalamin metabolism were analyzed using the 24 gene extended cobalamin metabolism NGS based panel developed by Baylor Miraca Genetics Laboratories. Gene panel testing identified two or more variants in a single gene in 16/131 patients. Eight patients had pathogenic findings, one had a finding of uncertain significance, and seven had benign findings. Of the patients with pathogenic findings, five had mutations in ACSF3, two in SUCLG1 and one in TCN2. Thus, the NGS gene panel allowed for the presumptive diagnosis of 8 additional patients for which a diagnosis was not made by the functional assays. PMID:26827111

  2. Case report: Is verbal cognitive performance in bilingual neuropsychiatric patients test-language dependent?

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Mabel; Kratochvilova, Zuzana; Kuniss, Renata; Vorackova, Veronika; Dorazilova, Aneta; Fajnerova, Iveta

    2015-12-01

    Bilingualism (BL) is increasing around the world. Although BL has been shown to have a broad impact-both positive and negative-on language and cognitive functioning, cognitive models and standards are mainly based on monolinguals. If we take cognitive performance of monolinguals as a standard, then the performance of bilinguals might not be accurately estimated. The assessment of cognitive functions is an important part of both the diagnostic process and further treatment in neurological and neuropsychiatric patients. In order to identify the presence or absence of cognitive deficit in bilingual patients, it will be important to determine the positive and/or negative impact of BL properties on measured cognitive performance. However, research of the impact of BL on cognitive performance in neuropsychiatric patients is limited. This article aims to compare the influence of the language (dominant-L1, second-L2) used for assessment of verbal cognitive performance in two cases of bilingual neuropsychiatric patients (English/Czech). Despite the fact that the two cases have different diagnoses, similarities in working memory and verbal learning profiles for L1 and L2 were present in both patients. We expected L1 to have higher performance in all measures when compared with L2. This assumption was partially confirmed. As expected, verbal working memory performance was better when assessed in L1. In contrast, verbal learning showed the same or better performance in L2 when compared with L1. Verbal fluency and immediate recall results were comparable in both languages. In conclusion, the language of administration partially influenced verbal performance of bilingual patients. Whether the language itself influenced low performance in a given language or it was a result of a deficit requires further research. According to our results, we suggest that an assessment in both languages needs to be a component of reasonable cognitive assessment of bilingual patients. PMID:26663627

  3. Time-on-task decrements in "steer clear" performance of patients with sleep apnea and narcolepsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Findley, L. J.; Suratt, P. M.; Dinges, D. F.

    1999-01-01

    Loss of attention with time-on-task reflects the increasing instability of the waking state during performance in experimentally induced sleepiness. To determine whether patients with disorders of excessive sleepiness also displayed time-on-task decrements indicative of wake state instability, visual sustained attention performance on "Steer Clear," a computerized simple RT driving simulation task, was compared among 31 patients with untreated sleep apnea, 16 patients with narcolepsy, and 14 healthy control subjects. Vigilance decrement functions were generated by analyzing the number of collisions in each of six four-minute periods of Steer Clear task performance in a mixed-model analysis of variance and linear regression equations. As expected, patients had more Steer Clear collisions than control subjects (p=0.006). However, the inter-subject variability in errors among the narcoleptic patients was four-fold that of the apnea patients, and 100-fold that of the controls volunteers; the variance in errors among untreated apnea patients was 27-times that of controls. The results of transformed collision data revealed main effects for group (p=0.006), time-on-task (p=0.001), and a significant interaction (p=0.022). Control subjects showed no clear evidence of increasing collision errors with time-on-task (adjusted R2=0.22), while apnea patients showed a trend toward vigilance decrement (adjusted R2=0.42, p=0.097), and narcolepsy patients evidenced a robust linear vigilance decrement (adjusted R2=0.87, p=0.004). The association of disorders of excessive somnolence with escalating time-on-task decrements makes it imperative that when assessment of neurobehavioral performance is conducted in patients, it involves task durations and analyses that will evaluate the underlying vulnerability of potentially sleepy patients to decrements over time in tasks that require sustained attention and timely responses, both of which are key components in safe driving performance.

  4. The added value of hybrid ventilation/perfusion SPECT/CT in patients with stable COPD or apparently healthy smokers. Cancer-suspected CT findings in the lungs are common when hybrid imaging is used.

    PubMed

    Jögi, Jonas; Markstad, Hanna; Tufvesson, Ellen; Bjermer, Leif; Bajc, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Ventilation/perfusion (V/P) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is recognized as a diagnostic method with potential beyond the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. V/P SPECT identifies functional impairment in diseases such as heart failure (HF), pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The development of hybrid SPECT/computed tomography (CT) systems, combining functional with morphological imaging through the addition of low-dose CT (LDCT), may be useful in COPD, as these patients are prone to lung cancer and other comorbidities. The aim of this study was to investigate the added value of LDCT among healthy smokers and patients with stable COPD, when examined with V/P SPECT/CT hybrid imaging. Sixty-nine subjects, 55 with COPD (GOLD I-IV) and 14 apparently healthy smokers, were examined with V/P SPECT and LDCT hybrid imaging. Spirometry was used to verify COPD grade. Only one apparently healthy smoker and three COPD patients had a normal or nearly normal V/P SPECT. All other patients showed various degrees of airway obstruction, even when spirometry was normal. The same interpretation was reached on both modalities in 39% of the patients. LDCT made V/P SPECT interpretation more certain in 9% of the patients and, in 52%, LDCT provided additional diagnoses. LDCT better characterized the type of emphysema in 12 patients. In 19 cases, tumor-suspected changes were reported. Three of these 19 patients (ie, 4.3% of all subjects) were in the end confirmed to have lung cancer. The majority of LDCT findings were not regarded as clinically significant. V/P SPECT identified perfusion patterns consistent with decompensated left ventricular HF in 14 COPD patients. In 16 patients (23%), perfusion defects were observed. HF and perfusion defects were not recognized with LDCT. In COPD patients and long-time smokers, hybrid imaging had added value compared to V/P SPECT alone, by identifying patients with lung malignancy and more clearly identifying

  5. The role of surgeon-performed ultrasound in patients with possible cardiac wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Rozycki, G S; Feliciano, D V; Schmidt, J A; Cushman, J G; Sisley, A C; Ingram, W; Ansley, J D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors evaluate surgeon-performed ultrasound in determining the need for operation in patients with possible cardiac wounds. BACKGROUND DATA: Ultrasound quickly is becoming part of the surgeon's diagnostic armamentarium; however, its role for the patient with penetrating injury is less well-defined. Although accurate for the detection of hemopericardium, the lack of immediate availability of the cardiologist to perform the test may delay the diagnosis, adversely affecting patient outcome. To be an effective diagnostic test in trauma centers, ultrasound must be immediately available in the resuscitation area and performed and interpreted by surgeons. METHODS: Surgeons performed pericardial ultrasound examinations on patients with penetrating truncal wounds but no immediate indication for operation. The subcostal view detected hemopericardium, and patients with positive examinations underwent immediate operation by the same surgeon. Vital signs, base deficit, time from examination to operation, operative findings, treatment, and outcome were recorded. RESULTS: During 13 months, 247 patients had surgeon-performed ultrasound. There were 236 true-negative and 10 true-positive results, and no false-negative or false-positive results; however, the pericardial region could not be visualized in one patient. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 100%; mean examination time was 0.8 minute (246 patients). Of the ten true-positive examinations, three were hypotensive. The mean time (8 patients) from ultrasound to operation was 12.1 minutes; all survived. Operative findings (site of cardiac wounds) were: left ventricle (4), right ventricle (3), right atrium (2), right atrium/superior vena cava (1), and right atrium/inferior vena cava (1). CONCLUSIONS: Surgeon-performed ultrasound is a rapid and accurate technique for diagnosing hemopericardium. Delay times from admission to operating room are minimized when the surgeon performs the ultrasound examination

  6. AdS3: the NHEK generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Heurtier, Lucien; Puhm, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    It was argued in [1] that the five-dimensional near-horizon extremal Kerr (NHEK) geometry can be embedded in String Theory as the infrared region of an infinite family of non-supersymmetric geometries that have D1, D5, momentum and KK monopole charges. We show that there exists a method to embed these geometries into asymptotically- {AdS}_3× {S}^3/{{Z}}_N solutions, and hence to obtain infinite families of flows whose infrared is NHEK. This indicates that the CFT dual to the NHEK geometry is the IR fixed point of a Renormalization Group flow from a known local UV CFT and opens the door to its explicit construction.

  7. Frequency of and risk factors for poor cognitive performance in hemodialysis patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are few detailed data on cognition in patients undergoing dialysis. We evaluated the frequency of and risk factors for poor cognitive performance using detailed neurocognitive testing. In this cross-sectional cohort study, 314 hemodialysis patients from 6 Boston-area hemodialysis units underwe...

  8. Impaired Driving Performance Associated with Effect of Time Duration in Patients with Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Perrier, Joy; Bertran, Françoise; Marie, Sullivan; Couque, Colette; Bulla, Jan; Denise, Pierre; Bocca, Marie-Laure

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate driving performance and psychomotor vigilance in patients with primary insomnia. Design: After 1 night of polysomnography, participants performed a 1-h simulated monotonous driving task and a psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). Self-ratings of sleepiness, mood, and driving performance were completed. Setting: This study was conducted at the CHU of Caen Sleep Unit and the University of Caen. Participants: Twenty-one primary insomnia patients and 16 good sleepers. Interventions: Not applicable. Measurements and Results: Results revealed a larger standard deviation of lateral position (P = 0.023) and more lane crossings (P = 0.03) in insomnia patients than in good sleepers. Analyses of effect of time on task performance showed that the impairment in patients occurred after 20 min of driving, which was not the case for good sleepers. No difference between groups was found for the PVT, neither for the mean reaction time (RT) (P = 0.43) nor the number of lapses (P = 0.21) and the mean slowest 10% 1/RT (P = 0.81). Patients rated their sleepiness level higher (P = 0.06) and their alertness level lower (P = 0.007) than did good sleepers (P = 0.007). The self-evaluation of the driving performance was not different between groups (P = 0.15). Conclusions: These findings revealed that primary insomnia is associated with a performance decrement during a simulated monotonous driving task. We also showed that patients are able to drive safely only for a short time. It appears advisable for clinicians to warn patients about their impaired driving performance that could lead to an increased risk of driving accidents. Citation: Perrier J, Bertran F, Marie S, Couque C, Bulla J, Denise P, Bocca ML. Impaired driving performance associated with effect of time duration in patients with primary insomnia. SLEEP 2014;37(9):1565-1573. PMID:25142564

  9. Shadows, currents, and AdS fields

    SciTech Connect

    Metsaev, R. R.

    2008-11-15

    Conformal totally symmetric arbitrary spin currents and shadow fields in flat space-time of dimension greater than or equal to four are studied. A gauge invariant formulation for such currents and shadow fields is developed. Gauge symmetries are realized by involving the Stueckelberg fields. A realization of global conformal boost symmetries is obtained. Gauge invariant differential constraints for currents and shadow fields are obtained. AdS/CFT correspondence for currents and shadow fields and the respective normalizable and non-normalizable solutions of massless totally symmetric arbitrary spin AdS fields are studied. The bulk fields are considered in a modified de Donder gauge that leads to decoupled equations of motion. We demonstrate that leftover on shell gauge symmetries of bulk fields correspond to gauge symmetries of boundary currents and shadow fields, while the modified de Donder gauge conditions for bulk fields correspond to differential constraints for boundary conformal currents and shadow fields. Breaking conformal symmetries, we find interrelations between the gauge invariant formulation of the currents and shadow fields, and the gauge invariant formulation of massive fields.

  10. Myocardial performance and perfusion during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease caused by Kawasaki disease

    SciTech Connect

    Paridon, S.M.; Ross, R.D.; Kuhns, L.R.; Pinsky, W.W. )

    1990-01-01

    For a study of the natural history of coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease and their effect on myocardial blood flow reserve with exercise, five such patients underwent exercise testing on a bicycle. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute ventilation, and electrocardiograms were monitored continuously. Thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed for all patients. One patient stopped exercise before exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve but had no evidence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities. Four patients terminated exercise because of exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve; one had normal cardiovascular reserve and thallium scintiscans, but the remaining patients had diminished cardiovascular reserve. Thallium scintigrams showed myocardial ischemia in two and infarction in one. No patient had exercise-induced electrocardiographic changes. These results indicate that patients with residual coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease frequently have reduced cardiovascular reserve during exercise. The addition of thallium scintigraphy and metabolic measurements to exercise testing improved the detection of exercise-induced abnormalities of myocardial perfusion.

  11. Functional Status Assessment of Patients With COPD: A Systematic Review of Performance-Based Measures and Patient-Reported Measures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Li, Honghe; Ding, Ning; Wang, Ningning; Wen, Deliang

    2016-05-01

    Presently, there is no recommendation on how to assess functional status of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. This study aimed to summarize and systematically evaluate these measures.Studies on measures of COPD patients' functional status published before the end of January 2015 were included using a search filters in PubMed and Web of Science, screening reference lists of all included studies, and cross-checking against some relevant reviews. After title, abstract, and main text screening, the remaining was appraised using the Consensus-based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) 4-point checklist. All measures from these studies were rated according to best-evidence synthesis and the best-rated measures were selected.A total of 6447 records were found and 102 studies were reviewed, suggesting 44 performance-based measures and 14 patient-reported measures. The majority of the studies focused on internal consistency, reliability, and hypothesis testing, but only 21% of them employed good or excellent methodology. Their common weaknesses include lack of checks for unidimensionality, inadequate sample sizes, no prior hypotheses, and improper methods. On average, patient-reported measures perform better than performance-based measures. The best-rated patient-reported measures are functional performance inventory (FPI), functional performance inventory short form (FPI-SF), living with COPD questionnaire (LCOPD), COPD activity rating scale (CARS), University of Cincinnati dyspnea questionnaire (UCDQ), shortness of breath with daily activities (SOBDA), and short-form pulmonary functional status scale (PFSS-11), and the best-rated performance-based measures are exercise testing: 6-minute walk test (6MWT), endurance treadmill test, and usual 4-meter gait speed (usual 4MGS).Further research is needed to evaluate the reliability and validity of performance-based measures since present studies failed to provide convincing

  12. Effect of polyethylene glycol 4000 supplementation on the performance of indigenous Pedi goats fed different levels of Acacia nilotica leaf meal and ad libitum Buffalo grass hay.

    PubMed

    Motubatse, M R; Ng'ambi, J W; Norris, D; Malatje, M M

    2008-04-01

    In a first of two experiments, twenty yearling male Pedi goats weighing 21.3 +/- 0.5 kg live weight were used in a 37-day study in a 2 (levels of PEG 4000) x 2 (levels ofAcacia) Factorial arrangement in a Completely Randomised Design to determine the effect of the level of Acacia nilotica leaf meal supplementation plus 23 g polyethylene glycol 4000 on diet intake and digestibility, and growth rate of Pedi goats fed ad libitum Buffalo grass hay. Acacia nilotica leaf meal contained high amounts of total phenolics (2.04% DM) and low amounts of condensed tannins; both extracted (0.37% DM) and unextracted (1.83% DM). Supplementation with PEG 4000 increased (P < 0.05) crude protein intake as the level of Acacia nilotica leaf meal increased from 80 to 120 g. Similarly, treatment with PEG 4000 improved (P < 0.05) DM, OM and CP digestibilities when compared to 80 g Acacia nilotica leaf meal. Supplementation with PEG 4000 resulted in an increase (P < 0.05) in blood urea concentrations. Polyethylene glycol 4000 has the potential to improve the feeding value of A. nilotica leaf meal and can, therefore, be used in the feeding systems for ruminant animals. The second experiment determined the effect of A. nilotica leaf meal supplementation on in vitro digestibility of the diets similar to the actual ratios of the first experiment. Level of A. nilotica leaf meal supplementation plus 23 g PEG 4000 supplementation improved (P < 0.05) in vitro DM, OM and CP digestibilities where 120 g A. nilotica leaf meal was supplemented. Similarly, 23 g PEG 4000 supplementation also improved (P < 0.05) in vitro CP digestibility where 80 g A. nilotica leaf meal was supplemented. In vivo DM and OM digestibilities were best predicted from in vitro DM and OM digestibilities while in vivo CP was explained by in vitro OM and CP digestibilities. It is, therefore, concluded that in vitro DM and OM digestibilities have good capacity to predict in vivo DM and OM digestibilities while OM and CP

  13. Detection and quantification of new psychoactive substances (NPSs) within the evolved "legal high" product, NRG-2, using high performance liquid chromatography-amperometric detection (HPLC-AD).

    PubMed

    Zuway, Khaled Y; Smith, Jamie P; Foster, Christopher W; Kapur, Nikil; Banks, Craig E; Sutcliffe, Oliver B

    2015-09-21

    The global increase in the production and abuse of cathinone-derived New Psychoactive Substances (NPSs) has developed the requirement for rapid, selective and sensitive protocols for their separation and detection. Electrochemical sensing of these compounds has been demonstrated to be an effective method for the in-field detection of these substances, either in their pure form or in the presence of common adulterants, however, the technique is limited in its ability to discriminate between structurally related cathinone-derivatives (for example: (±)-4′-methylmethcathinone (4-MMC, 2a) and (±)-4′-methyl-N-ethylmethcathinone (4-MEC, 2b) when they are both present in a mixture. In this paper we demonstrate, for the first time, the combination of HPLC-UV with amperometric detection (HPLC-AD) for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of 4-MMC and 4-MEC using either a commercially available impinging jet (LC-FC-A) or custom-made iCell channel (LC-FC-B) flow-cell system incorporating embedded graphite screen-printed macroelectrodes. The protocol offers a cost-effective, reproducible and reliable sensor platform for the simultaneous HPLC-UV and amperometric detection of the target analytes. The two systems have similar limits of detection, in terms of amperometric detection [LC-FC-A: 14.66 μg mL(-1) (2a) and 9.35 μg mL(-1) (2b); LC-FC-B: 57.92 μg mL(-1) (2a) and 26.91 μg mL(-1) (2b)], to the previously reported oxidative electrochemical protocol [39.8 μg mL(-1) (2a) and 84.2 μg mL(-1) (2b)], for two synthetic cathinones, prevalent on the recreational drugs market. Though not as sensitive as standard HPLC-UV detection, both flow cells show a good agreement, between the quantitative electroanalytical data, thereby making them suitable for the detection and quantification of 4-MMC and 4-MEC, either in their pure form or within complex mixtures. Additionally, the simultaneous HPLC-UV and amperometric detection protocol detailed herein shows a marked improvement

  14. A novel solar bi-ejector refrigeration system and the performance of the added injector with different structures and operation parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Fei; Shen, Shengqiang

    2009-12-15

    A novel solar bi-ejector refrigeration system was investigated, whose difference compared to the traditional system is that the circulation pump is replaced by a thermal injector. The new system works more stably and needs less maintenance work than the old one, and the whole system can more fully utilize the solar energy. The mathematical models for calculating the performance of the injector and the whole solar refrigeration system were established. The pressure rise performance of injector under different structure and operation parameters and the performance of solar bi-ejector refrigeration system were studied with R123. The results show that the discharged pressure of injector is affected by structure dimensions of injector and operation conditions. With increasing generation temperature, the entrainment ratio of ejector becomes better while that of injector becomes worse and the overall thermal efficiency of the solar bi-ejector refrigeration system first increases and then decreases with an optimum value of 0.132 at generation temperature of 105 C, condensation temperature of 35 C and evaporation temperature of 10 C. (author)

  15. Rifaximin Improves Driving Simulator Performance in a Randomized Trial of Patients with Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S; Heuman, Douglas M; Wade, James B; Gibson, Douglas P; Saeian, Kia; Wegelin, Jacob A; Hafeezullah, Muhammad; Bell, Debulon E; Sterling, Richard K; Stravitz, R. Todd; Fuchs, Michael; Luketic, Velimir; Sanyal, Arun J

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Patients with cirrhosis and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) have driving difficulties but the effects of therapy on driving performance have not been assessed. We evaluated whether performance on a driving simulator improves in patients with MHE following treatment with rifaximin. Methods Patients with MHE who were current drivers were randomly assigned to placebo or rifaximin groups and followed for 8 weeks (n=42). Patients underwent driving simulation (driving and navigation tasks) at the start (baseline) and end of the study. We evaluated patients’ cognitive abilities, quality-of-life (using the Sickness Impact Profile [SIP]), serum levels of ammonia, levels of inflammatory cytokines, and MELD scores. The primary outcome was percent who improved in driving performance, calculated by: total driving errors=speeding + illegal turns + collisions. Results Over the 8-week study period, patients given rifaximin made significantly greater improvements than those given placebo in avoiding total driving errors (76% vs. 31%, P=0.013), speeding (81% vs. 33%, P=0.005), and illegal turns (62% vs. 19%, P=0.01). Of patients given rifaximin, 91% improved their cognitive performance, compared with 61% of patients given placebo (P=0.01); they also made improvements in the psycho-social dimension of the SIP, compared with the placebo group (P=0.04). Adherence to the assigned drug averaged 92%. Neither group had changes in ammonia levels or MELD scores, but patients in the rifaximin group had increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10. Conclusions Patients with MHE significantly improve driving simulator performance following treatment with rifaximin, compared with placebo. PMID:20849805

  16. IMPACT OF SB4 TANK 40 DECANT AND ARP/MCU ADDITIONS WITH/WITHOUT ADDED CAUSTIC ON DWPF CPC PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D; David Best, D; Frances Williams, F

    2008-04-18

    cases. Relatively insignificant rheological changes were noted other than the previously established thinning from higher acid additions. SRAT and SME processing at 130% acid stoichiometry with and without ARP/MCU additions were very similar. MCU nitric acid content, however, shifted the normal acid addition prior to boiling toward more formic acid and less nitric acid than without MCU. SRNL found no technical issues processing the proposed Tank 40 decant (with or without added NaOH) from the standpoint of the impact on the DWPF SRAT and SME cycles subject to the inherent uncertainties in modeling the ARP noble metal concentrations. The noble metals in the ARP were set to the same weight percents in the total solids that they were measured at in the SB4 waste, which was considered likely to be bounding on the actual noble metal content of the ARP transfer to DWPF. Assumptions for formate loss and nitrite to nitrate conversion can be left at the current levels.

  17. Short-term memory binding is impaired in AD but not in non-AD dementias.

    PubMed

    Della Sala, Sergio; Parra, Mario A; Fabi, Katia; Luzzi, Simona; Abrahams, Sharon

    2012-04-01

    Binding is a cognitive function responsible for integrating features within complex stimuli (e.g., shape-colour conjunctions) or events within complex memories (e.g., face-name associations). This function operates both in short-term memory (STM) and in long-term memory (LTM) and is severely affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, forming conjunctions in STM is the only binding function which is not affected by healthy ageing or chronic depression. Whether this specificity holds true across other non-AD dementias is as yet unknown. The present study investigated STM conjunctive binding in a sample of AD patients and patients with other non-AD dementias using a task which has proved sensitive to the effects of AD. The STM task assesses the free recall of objects, colours, and the bindings of objects and colours. Patients with AD, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, lewy body dementia and dementia associated with Parkinson's disease showed memory, visuo-spatial, executive and attentional deficits on standard neuropsychological assessment. However, only AD patients showed STM binding deficits. This deficit was observed even when memory for single features was at a similar level across patient groups. Regression and discriminant analyses confirmed that the STM binding task accounted for the largest proportion of variance between AD and non-AD groups and held the greatest classification power to identify patients with AD. STM conjunctive binding places little demands on executive functions and appears to be subserved by components of the memory network which are targeted by AD, but not by non-AD dementias. PMID:22289292

  18. Better Overall Survival for Breast Cancer Patients by Adding Breast Ultrasound to Follow-Up Examinations for Early Detection of Locoregional Recurrence-A Survival Impact Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wan-Chen; Wei, Hung-Kuang; Hung, Chen-Fang; Kwang-Jane Lin, Christopher; Hung-Chun Cheng, Skye; Chen, Chii-Ming; Wang, Yong Alison

    2016-09-01

    We retrospectively reviewed patient records to evaluate the effectiveness of our 15 y of ultrasound (US) surveillance of recurrent breast disease in comparison with mammography (MM) and clinical examination. From 4796 stage 0-III breast cancer patients who had received surgical treatment, we identified locoregional recurrence (LRR) in 161 patients. The mean age of the 161 patients was 48 y (27-82 y), and the mean follow-up interval was 77.2 mo (11-167 mo). The methods of LRR detection, sites of LRR and overall survival (OS) were examined. Multivariate Cox survival analysis showed significantly better survival in groups detected by US (hazard ratio = 0.6, p = 0.042). The 10-y LRR OS by detection types for US (n = 69), clinical examination (n = 78) and MM (n = 8) were 58.5%, 33.1% and 100%, respectively (p = 0.0004). US was seen with better OS associated with the effective early detection of non-palpable LRR breast cancer, which is mostly not detectable on MM. PMID:27184247

  19. Is there an added clinical value of "true"whole body(18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with malignant melanoma?

    PubMed

    Tan, Julie C; Chatterton, Barry E

    2012-01-01

    Accurate and reliable staging of disease extent in patients with malignant MM is essential to ensure appropriate treatment planning. The detection of recurrent or residual malignancy after primary treatment is important to allow for early intervention and to optimise patient survival. 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET or PET computed tomography (PET/CT) is indicated for surveillance of malignant MM due to its high sensitivity and specificity for soft-tissue or nodal recurrences and metastases. It has been claimed that including lower extremities and skull in addition to 'eyes to thigh' images in PET/CT evaluation of metastatic MM routinely is warranted. We have studied retrospectively the reports of whole-body PET/CT scans in all patients with MM scanned in our Department from April 2005 to December 2010. All PET abnormalities in the brain/scalp and lower extremities were tabulated by location and whether they were 'expected' or 'unexpected'. Findings were correlated with pathology, other imaging studies, and clinical follow-up. In this study, 398 PET/CT examinations in 361 patients with MM were included. Results showed that twelve of the 398 (3%) scans had brain/scalp abnormalities, with only 4 (1.0%) showing unexpected abnormalities. Twenty nine of the 398 (7.2%) scans showed lower extremity abnormalities, with only 5 (1.2%) showing unexpected abnormalities. In no case was an isolated unexpected malignant lesion identified in the brain/scalp or lower extremities. In conclusion, whole body PET/CT scan showed about 1% unexpected primary or metastatic MM lesions involving the head or lower extremities, which seldom offered significant additional clinical benefit and were unlikely to change clinical management. No clinically significant change in staging would have occurred. Routine 'eyes to thighs' images were adequate for this subset of patients. PMID:23106051

  20. Pemetrexed clinical studies in performance status 2 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ZINNER, RALPH; GRUL, CARLA VISSEREN; SPIGEL, DAVID R.; OBASAJU, COLEMAN

    2016-01-01

    Because poor performance status (PS) is an independent prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), PS scores are widely used by oncologists to make treatment decisions. Advanced NSCLC patients with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group PS of 2 have poor prognoses and are frequently excluded from clinical trials. This article reviews the efficacy and safety of pemetrexed in this patient group. We identified English-language literature (through March 2015) involving completed and ongoing studies through searches of PubMed, meeting abstracts, ClinicalTrials.gov and the European Clinical Trials Register; search terms included ‘pemetrexed,’ ‘NSCLC’ and ‘PS2’. Only studies reporting ≥1 subset analysis of PS2 patients receiving pemetrexed were chosen. Our search identified a total of ten pemetrexed studies in PS2 patients. Eight studies included only chemonaive patients, one study included both chemonaive patients and patients with one prior chemotherapy regimen and one study included only patients with one prior regimen. In subset analyses in these studies, PS2 patients had worse outcomes than PS0-1 patients regardless of treatment. In a phase 3 study, chemonaive advanced NSCLC patients with PS2 receiving pemetrexed-carboplatin versus pemetrexed experienced improved overall survival [hazard ratio (HR)=0.62; P=0.001], progression-free survival (HR=0.46; P<0.001) and response (P=0.032). This review confirms the poorer outcomes in PS2 vs. PS0-1 patients. Although it is not an approved combination therapy, in clinical studies, PS2 patients treated with pemetrexed plus carboplatin as first-line therapy had improved response rates and survival. Additional research on PS2 patients is needed. PMID:26530033

  1. Development of a Performance-Based Measure of Executive Functions in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chiu, En-Chi; Lee, Shu-Chun; Kuo, Chian-Jue; Lung, For-Wey; Hsueh, I-Ping; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2015-01-01

    A performance-based measure for assessing executive functions (EF) is useful to understand patients' real life performance of EF. This study aimed to develop a performance-based measure of executive functions (PEF) based on the Lezak model and to examine psychometric properties (i.e., unidimensionality and reliability) of the PEF using Rasch analysis in patients with schizophrenia. We developed the PEF in three phases: (1) designing the preliminary version of PEF; (2) consultation with experts, cognitive interviews with patients, and pilot tests on patients to revise the preliminary PEF; (3) establishment of the final version of the PEF and examination of unidimensionality and Rasch reliability. Two hundred patients were assessed using the revised PEF. After deleting items which did not satisfy the Rasch model's expectations, the final version of the PEF contained 1 practice item and 13 test items for assessing the four domains of EF (i.e., volition, planning, purposive action, and effective performance). For unidimensional and multidimensional Rasch analyses, the 4 domains showed good reliability (i.e., 0.77-0.85 and 0.87-0.90, respectively). Our results showed that the PEF had satisfactory unidimensionality and Rasch reliability. Therefore, clinicians and researchers could use the PEF to assess the four domains of EF in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26561862

  2. Critical gravity on AdS2 spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myung, Yun Soo; Kim, Yong-Wan; Park, Young-Jai

    2011-09-01

    We study the critical gravity in two-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS2) spacetimes, which was obtained from the cosmological topologically massive gravity (TMGΛ) in three dimensions by using the Kaluza-Klein dimensional reduction. We perform the perturbation analysis around AdS2, which may correspond to the near-horizon geometry of the extremal Banados, Teitelboim, and Zanelli (BTZ) black hole obtained from the TMGΛ with identification upon uplifting three dimensions. A massive propagating scalar mode δF satisfies the second-order differential equation away from the critical point of K=l, whose solution is given by the Bessel functions. On the other hand, δF satisfies the fourth-order equation at the critical point. We exactly solve the fourth-order equation, and compare it with the log gravity in two dimensions. Consequently, the critical gravity in two dimensions could not be described by a massless scalar δFml and its logarithmic partner δFlog⁡4th.

  3. The Safety and Immunological Effects of rAd5-EBV-LMP2 Vaccine in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients: A Phase I Clinical Trial and Two-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Si, Yongfeng; Deng, Zhuoxia; Lan, Guiping; Du, Haijun; Wang, Yongli; Si, Jinyuan; Wei, Jiazhang; Weng, Jingjin; Qin, Yangda; Huang, Bo; Yang, Yong; Qin, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded latent membrane protein 2 (LMP2) promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) progression. Previously, we reported that the dendritic cells (DCs) transfected with EBV-LMP2 recombinant serotype 5 adenoviruses (rAd5) induced anti-tumor effect by eliciting cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs)-mediated immune response in vitro and the adenoviral vaccine of EBV-LMP2 (rAd5-EBV-LMP2) stimulated antigen-specific cellular immunity in mice. However, the safety and immunological effect of rAd5-EBV-LMP2 vaccine in human still remained unknown. Here we conducted a single-center, non-randomized, open-label, single-arm phase I clinical trial to clarify this unsolved issue. A total of 24 patients with regional advanced NPC were sequentially enrolled into three dose level groups (2×10(9), 2×10(10), 2×10(11) vp). The rAd5-EBV-LMP2 vaccines were intramuscularly injected for four times within 28 d (D0, D7, D14, D28). Blood samples were harvested immediately before every vaccination, one week and one month after the last vaccination (D0, D7, D14, D28, D35, D58). All the vaccine inoculation-related toxicities presented as grade I/II adverse events. The most frequent systemic adverse reactions were fatigue (33.0%, 8/24), myalgia (29.2%, 7/24) and cough (29.2%, 7/24), while the most common regional adverse reaction was tenderness in the inoculation site (54.2%, 13/24). In addition, proportion of CD(3+)CD(4+) cells in peripheral blood was significantly increased in the high dose group (2×10(11) vp). The rAd5-EBV-LMP2 vaccine was generally well-tolerated and the high dose (2×10(11) vp) is recommended to be adopted in phase II studies. The long-term outcome of rAd5-EBV-LMP2 vaccine inoculation is required to be determined in following placebo-controlled trials. PMID:27477649

  4. Acute hemodynamic effects of single-dose sildenafil when added to established bosentan therapy in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: results of the COMPASS-1 study.

    PubMed

    Gruenig, Ekkehard; Michelakis, Evangelos; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Meyer, F Joachim; Doelberg, Martin; Bach, Doris; Dingemanse, Jasper; Galiè, Nazzareno

    2009-11-01

    This study investigated the acute pharmacodynamic effects of sildenafil in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and concomitant bosentan treatment, in view of a mutual pharmacokinetic interaction between the 2 drugs. This prospective, open-label, noncomparative, multicenter, phase II study enrolled 45 patients (>or=18 years) with stable PAH (idiopathic, familial, or related to corrected congenital systemic-to-pulmonary shunts, drugs, or toxins) and on bosentan treatment for at least 3 months. Patients underwent right heart catheterization to evaluate the acute hemodynamic effects of (a) inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) and (b) a single oral dose of sildenafil (25 mg). Mean pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) decreased from baseline following iNO (-15%; 95% confidence limits: -21%, -8%; P = .0001). A statistically significant decrease from baseline in mean PVR was also observed 60 minutes following sildenafil administration (-15%; 95% confidence limits: -21%, -10%; P < .0001). The reduction in PVR following sildenafil was comparable to that resulting from iNO. There were no unexpected safety findings. The pharmacodynamic effect suggests that addition of sildenafil to bosentan treatment can elicit additional hemodynamic benefits. These data represent a rationale for long-term combination studies with the 2 compounds. PMID:19755415

  5. Effects of Task-Oriented Training as an Added Treatment to Electromyogram-Triggered Neuromuscular Stimulation on Upper Extremity Function in Chronic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Ho; Park, Ji-Hyuk; Jung, Min-Ye; Yoo, Eun-Young

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of electromyogram-triggered neuromuscular stimulation (EMG-stim) combined with task-oriented training (TOT) on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients. Twenty chronic stroke patients were randomly assigned to either the intervention (n = 10) or control (n = 10) group. The intervention group conducted TOT with EMG-stim on the wrist and finger extensor of the affected arm for 30 minutes per day, 5 days per week, for 4 weeks. The control group was provided EMG-stim for 20 minutes per day for the same duration. The intervention group exhibited significant improvement relative to the control group in muscle activation, motor recovery (Fugl-Meyer assessment) and dexterity (Box and Block Test) (p < 0.05). Significant differences in hand function between the groups were detected in the writing of short sentences and in stacking checkers (p < 0.05). It is concluded that EMG-stim in combination with TOT may be better than EMG-stim alone for the treatment of arm paresis in stroke patients. Further research with a larger sample is recommended to examine neurologic changes or cerebral cortex reorganization. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26876527

  6. The Effect of Adding Magnesium Sulfate to Lidocaine Compared with Paracetamol in Prevention of Acute Pain in Hand Surgery Patients Under Intravenous Regional Anesthesia (IVRA)

    PubMed Central

    Mirkheshti, Alireza; Aryani, Mohammad Reza; Shojaei, Poujia; Dabbagh, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This study was done to compare the analgesic effects of “magnesium plus lidocaine”, “paracetamol plus lidocaine”, and “placebo plus lidocaine” on block characteristics for intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA) in patients undergoing upper extremity orthopedic surgery. Methods: In a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial, 90 patients were selected and entered randomly into three study groups after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Time to start of the sensory and motor block were measured separately and also the duration of these two block types were measured. Post-op pain assessment was measured using a numeric rating scale. Venous samples were checked and compared regarding blood gas and pH measurements. Results: The time from drug injection to sensory block onset was the shortest in the magnesium plus lidocaine group; the time from drug injection to the time of motor block onset was the shortest in the lidocaine plus magnesium group; the duration of the motor block was the longest in the lidocaine plus magnesium group. Discussion: Addition of magnesium lidocaine in patients undergoing upper extremity orthopedic operations using IVRA decreases significantly the time gap between drug administration and the start of the block; also, this drug combination increases the IVRA block length, while paracetamol does not have such a significant effect. PMID:23024850

  7. Analysis and performance of various classification criteria sets in a Colombian cohort of patients with spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Molano, Wilson; Landewé, Robert B M; Londoño, John; Romero-Sanchez, Consuelo; Valle-Oñate, Rafael; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of classification criteria sets (Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS), European Spondylarthropathy Study Group (ESSG), and Amor) for spondyloarthritis (SpA) in a clinical practice cohort in Colombia and provide insight into how rheumatologists follow the diagnostic path in patients suspected of SpA. Patients with a rheumatologist's diagnosis of SpA were retrospectively classified according to three criteria sets. Classification rate was defined as the proportion of patients fulfilling a particular criterion. Characteristics of patients fulfilling and not fulfilling each criterion were compared. The ASAS criteria classified 81 % of all patients (n = 581) as having either axial SpA (44 %) or peripheral SpA (37 %), whereas a lower proportion met ESSG criteria (74 %) and Amor criteria (53 %). There was a high degree of overlap among the different criteria, and 42 % of the patients met all three criteria. Patients fulfilling all three criteria sets were older (36 vs. 30 years), had more SpA features (3 vs. 1 features), and more frequently had a current or past history of back pain (77 vs. 43 %), inflammatory back pain (47 vs. 13 %), enthesitis (67 vs. 26 %), and buttock pain (37 vs. 13 %) vs. those not fulfilling any criteria. HLA-B27, radiographs, and MRI-SI were performed in 77, 59, and 24 % of the patients, respectively. The ASAS criteria classified more patients as having SpA in this Colombian cohort when the rheumatologist's diagnosis is used as an external standard. Although physicians do not perform HLA-B27 or imaging in all patients, they do require these tests if the clinical symptoms fall short of confirming SpA and suspicion remains. PMID:26791876

  8. On the practice of ignoring center-patient interactions in evaluating hospital performance.

    PubMed

    Varewyck, Machteld; Vansteelandt, Stijn; Eriksson, Marie; Goetghebeur, Els

    2016-01-30

    We evaluate the performance of medical centers based on a continuous or binary patient outcome (e.g., 30-day mortality). Common practice adjusts for differences in patient mix through outcome regression models, which include patient-specific baseline covariates (e.g., age and disease stage) besides center effects. Because a large number of centers may need to be evaluated, the typical model postulates that the effect of a center on outcome is constant over patient characteristics. This may be violated, for example, when some centers are specialized in children or geriatric patients. Including interactions between certain patient characteristics and the many fixed center effects in the model increases the risk for overfitting, however, and could imply a loss of power for detecting centers with deviating mortality. Therefore, we assess how the common practice of ignoring such interactions impacts the bias and precision of directly and indirectly standardized risks. The reassuring conclusion is that the common practice of working with the main effects of a center has minor impact on hospital evaluation, unless some centers actually perform substantially better on a specific group of patients and there is strong confounding through the corresponding patient characteristic. The bias is then driven by an interplay of the relative center size, the overlap between covariate distributions, and the magnitude of the interaction effect. Interestingly, the bias on indirectly standardized risks is smaller than on directly standardized risks. We illustrate our findings by simulation and in an analysis of 30-day mortality on Riksstroke. PMID:26303843

  9. Adding Sarcosine to Antipsychotic Treatment in Patients with Stable Schizophrenia Changes the Concentrations of Neuronal and Glial Metabolites in the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Strzelecki, Dominik; Podgórski, Michał; Kałużyńska, Olga; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Kotlicka-Antczak, Magdalena; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka; Grzelak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The glutamatergic system is a key point in pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Sarcosine (N-methylglycine) is an exogenous amino acid that acts as a glycine transporter inhibitor. It modulates glutamatergic transmission by increasing glycine concentration around NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptors. In patients with schizophrenia, the function of the glutamatergic system in the prefrontal cortex is impaired, which may promote negative and cognitive symptoms. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy is a non-invasive imaging method enabling the evaluation of brain metabolite concentration, which can be applied to assess pharmacologically induced changes. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of a six-month course of sarcosine therapy on the concentration of metabolites (NAA, N-acetylaspartate; Glx, complex of glutamate, glutamine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA); mI, myo-inositol; Cr, creatine; Cho, choline) in the left dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in patients with stable schizophrenia. Fifty patients with schizophrenia, treated with constant antipsychotics doses, in stable clinical condition were randomly assigned to administration of sarcosine (25 patients) or placebo (25 patients) for six months. Metabolite concentrations in DLPFC were assessed with 1.5 Tesla 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Clinical symptoms were evaluated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). The first spectroscopy revealed no differences in metabolite concentrations between groups. After six months, NAA/Cho, mI/Cr and mI/Cho ratios in the left DLPFC were significantly higher in the sarcosine than the placebo group. In the sarcosine group, NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho, mI/Cr, mI/Cho ratios also significantly increased compared to baseline values. In the placebo group, only the NAA/Cr ratio increased. The addition of sarcosine to antipsychotic therapy for six months increased markers of neurons viability (NAA) and neurogilal activity (mI) with simultaneous improvement

  10. Adding Sarcosine to Antipsychotic Treatment in Patients with Stable Schizophrenia Changes the Concentrations of Neuronal and Glial Metabolites in the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Strzelecki, Dominik; Podgórski, Michał; Kałużyńska, Olga; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Kotlicka-Antczak, Magdalena; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka; Grzelak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The glutamatergic system is a key point in pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Sarcosine (N-methylglycine) is an exogenous amino acid that acts as a glycine transporter inhibitor. It modulates glutamatergic transmission by increasing glycine concentration around NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptors. In patients with schizophrenia, the function of the glutamatergic system in the prefrontal cortex is impaired, which may promote negative and cognitive symptoms. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR) spectroscopy is a non-invasive imaging method enabling the evaluation of brain metabolite concentration, which can be applied to assess pharmacologically induced changes. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of a six-month course of sarcosine therapy on the concentration of metabolites (NAA, N-acetylaspartate; Glx, complex of glutamate, glutamine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA); mI, myo-inositol; Cr, creatine; Cho, choline) in the left dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in patients with stable schizophrenia. Fifty patients with schizophrenia, treated with constant antipsychotics doses, in stable clinical condition were randomly assigned to administration of sarcosine (25 patients) or placebo (25 patients) for six months. Metabolite concentrations in DLPFC were assessed with 1.5 Tesla ¹H-NMR spectroscopy. Clinical symptoms were evaluated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). The first spectroscopy revealed no differences in metabolite concentrations between groups. After six months, NAA/Cho, mI/Cr and mI/Cho ratios in the left DLPFC were significantly higher in the sarcosine than the placebo group. In the sarcosine group, NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho, mI/Cr, mI/Cho ratios also significantly increased compared to baseline values. In the placebo group, only the NAA/Cr ratio increased. The addition of sarcosine to antipsychotic therapy for six months increased markers of neurons viability (NAA) and neurogilal activity (mI) with simultaneous improvement

  11. ADS pilot program Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauson, J.; Heuser, J.

    1981-01-01

    The Applications Data Service (ADS) is a system based on an electronic data communications network which will permit scientists to share the data stored in data bases at universities and at government and private installations. It is designed to allow users to readily locate and access high quality, timely data from multiple sources. The ADS Pilot program objectives and the current plans for accomplishing those objectives are described.

  12. Visual search performance of patients with vision impairment: Effect of JPEG image enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Gang; Satgunam, PremNandhini; Peli, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To measure natural image search performance in patients with central vision impairment. To evaluate the performance effect for a JPEG based image enhancement technique using the visual search task. Method 150 JPEG images were presented on a touch screen monitor in either an enhanced or original version to 19 patients (visual acuity 0.4 to 1.2 logMAR, 6/15 to 6/90, 20/50 to 20/300) and 7 normally sighted controls (visual acuity −0.12 to 0.1 logMAR, 6/4.5 to 6/7.5, 20/15 to 20/25). Each image fell into one of three categories: faces, indoors, and collections. The enhancement was realized by moderately boosting a mid-range spatial frequency band in the discrete cosine transform (DCT) coefficients of the image luminance component. Participants pointed to an object in a picture that matched a given target displayed at the upper-left corner of the monitor. Search performance was quantified by the percentage of correct responses, the median search time of correct responses, and an “integrated performance” measure – the area under the curve of cumulative correct response rate over search time. Results Patients were able to perform the search tasks but their performance was substantially worse than the controls. Search performances for the 3 image categories were significantly different (p≤0.001) for all the participants, with searching for faces being the most difficult. When search time and correct response were analyzed separately, the effect of enhancement led to increase in one measure but decrease in another for many patients. Using the integrated performance, it was found that search performance declined with decrease in acuity (p=0.005). An improvement with enhancement was found mainly for the patients whose acuity ranged from 0.4 to 0.8 logMAR (6/15 to 6/38, 20/50 to 20/125). Enhancement conferred a small but significant improvement in integrated performance for indoor and collection images (p=0.025) in the patients. Conclusion Search performance

  13. PERFORM: A System for Monitoring, Assessment and Management of Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tzallas, Alexandros T.; Tsipouras, Markos G.; Rigas, Georgios; Tsalikakis, Dimitrios G.; Karvounis, Evaggelos C.; Chondrogiorgi, Maria; Psomadellis, Fotis; Cancela, Jorge; Pastorino, Matteo; Waldmeyer, María Teresa Arredondo; Konitsiotis, Spiros; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the PERFORM system for the continuous remote monitoring and management of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. The PERFORM system is an intelligent closed-loop system that seamlessly integrates a wide range of wearable sensors constantly monitoring several motor signals of the PD patients. Data acquired are pre-processed by advanced knowledge processing methods, integrated by fusion algorithms to allow health professionals to remotely monitor the overall status of the patients, adjust medication schedules and personalize treatment. The information collected by the sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes) is processed by several classifiers. As a result, it is possible to evaluate and quantify the PD motor symptoms related to end of dose deterioration (tremor, bradykinesia, freezing of gait (FoG)) as well as those related to over-dose concentration (Levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID)). Based on this information, together with information derived from tests performed with a virtual reality glove and information about the medication and food intake, a patient specific profile can be built. In addition, the patient specific profile with his evaluation during the last week and last month, is compared to understand whether his status is stable, improving or worsening. Based on that, the system analyses whether a medication change is needed—always under medical supervision—and in this case, information about the medication change proposal is sent to the patient. The performance of the system has been evaluated in real life conditions, the accuracy and acceptability of the system by the PD patients and healthcare professionals has been tested, and a comparison with the standard routine clinical evaluation done by the PD patients' physician has been carried out. The PERFORM system is used by the PD patients and in a simple and safe non-invasive way for long-term record of their motor status, thus offering to the clinician a precise, long-term and

  14. PERFORM: a system for monitoring, assessment and management of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tzallas, Alexandros T; Tsipouras, Markos G; Rigas, Georgios; Tsalikakis, Dimitrios G; Karvounis, Evaggelos C; Chondrogiorgi, Maria; Psomadellis, Fotis; Cancela, Jorge; Pastorino, Matteo; Waldmeyer, María Teresa Arredondo; Konitsiotis, Spiros; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the PERFORM system for the continuous remote monitoring and management of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. The PERFORM system is an intelligent closed-loop system that seamlessly integrates a wide range of wearable sensors constantly monitoring several motor signals of the PD patients. Data acquired are pre-processed by advanced knowledge processing methods, integrated by fusion algorithms to allow health professionals to remotely monitor the overall status of the patients, adjust medication schedules and personalize treatment. The information collected by the sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes) is processed by several classifiers. As a result, it is possible to evaluate and quantify the PD motor symptoms related to end of dose deterioration (tremor, bradykinesia, freezing of gait (FoG)) as well as those related to over-dose concentration (Levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID)). Based on this information, together with information derived from tests performed with a virtual reality glove and information about the medication and food intake, a patient specific profile can be built. In addition, the patient specific profile with his evaluation during the last week and last month, is compared to understand whether his status is stable, improving or worsening. Based on that, the system analyses whether a medication change is needed--always under medical supervision--and in this case, information about the medication change proposal is sent to the patient. The performance of the system has been evaluated in real life conditions, the accuracy and acceptability of the system by the PD patients and healthcare professionals has been tested, and a comparison with the standard routine clinical evaluation done by the PD patients' physician has been carried out. The PERFORM system is used by the PD patients and in a simple and safe non-invasive way for long-term record of their motor status, thus offering to the clinician a precise, long-term and

  15. Regioisomeric and enantiomeric analyses of 24 designer cathinones and phenethylamines using ultra high performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis with added cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Lurie, Ira S

    2015-09-01

    DESIGNER: phenethylamines (PEAs) and cathinones have been encountered worldwide. Complete characterization of these substances can be challenging due to their chirality and variably substituted phenyl rings. In this study, 24 PEAs and cathinones were analyzed by ultra high performance liquid chromatography with photo diode array detection (UHPLC-PDA) on a variety of stationary phases, and by capillary electrophoresis on a dynamically coated capillary with PDA detection (CE-PDA). In the UHPLC-PDA study, a BEH Phenyl column resolved 18 of the 24 regioisomers in 8min, with good discrimination of the PEAs. In contrast, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) on a dynamically coated capillary partially or baseline resolved only 10 of the 24 regioisomers, but with improved discrimination of mono-substituted cathinones. A second series of CE-PDA experiments using 80mM (2-hydroxypropyl)-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) in the run buffer resolved all 24 regioisomers and all but two sets of enantiomers within 18min. Five illicit samples were successfully analyzed using the described methods. PMID:26232847

  16. Performance tests of Mn-added aluminum heat pipe with micro-sized inner fins and thermal fluid for cooling electronic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. R.; Choi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Aluminum-5 wt % manganese alloy heat pipe with a nano-fluid of n-butanol and 0.2 wt % carbon nano-tubes was prepared by deep-drawing, and its mechanical and corrosion properties were determined to improve thermal conductivity performance. The heat pipe was designed to have micro-sized inner fins working at temperature higher than 200°C and simultaneously retaining a similar thermal conductivity to that of pure aluminum. The heat pipe formed by aluminum-5 wt % manganese alloys had improved mechanical properties such as 38% micro-hardness, 45.8% yield strength, and 53.5 wt % ultimate tensile strength due to grain size refinement and work hardening effects. The corrosion rate of the aluminum alloy in artificial sea water at room temperature decreased from 0.110 mpy to 0.102 mpy. The nano-fluid of n-butanol and 0.2 wt % carbon nano-tubes improved the thermal conductivity of the heat-pipe by about 250%.

  17. Performance evaluation of a Wireless Body Area sensor network for remote patient monitoring.

    PubMed

    Khan, Jamil Y; Yuce, Mehmet R; Karami, Farbood

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, interests in the application of Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN) have grown considerably. A WBAN can be used to develop a patient monitoring system which offers flexibility and mobility to patients. Use of a WBAN will also allow the flexibility of setting up a remote monitoring system via either the internet or an intranet. For such medical systems it is very important that a WBAN can collect and transmit data reliably, and in a timely manner to the monitoring entity. In this paper we examine the performance of an IEEE802.15.4/Zigbee MAC based WBAN operating in different patient monitoring environment. We study the performance of a remote patient monitoring system using an OPNET based simulation model. PMID:19162897

  18. Efficacy of adding the kinesio taping method to guideline-endorsed conventional physiotherapy in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic nonspecific low back pain is a significant health condition with high prevalence worldwide and it is associated with enormous costs to society. Clinical practice guidelines show that many interventions are available to treat patients with chronic low back pain, but the vast majority of these interventions have a modest effect in reducing pain and disability. An intervention that has been widespread in recent years is the use of elastic bandages called Kinesio Taping. Although Kinesio Taping has been used extensively in clinical practice, current evidence does not support the use of this intervention; however these conclusions are based on a small number of underpowered studies. Therefore, questions remain about the effectiveness of the Kinesio Taping method as an additional treatment to interventions, such as conventional physiotherapy, that have already been recommended by the current clinical practice guidelines in robust and high-quality randomised controlled trials. We aim to determine the effectiveness of the addition of the use of Kinesio Taping in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain who receive guideline-endorsed conventional physiotherapy. Methods/design One hundred and forty-eight patients will be randomly allocated to receive either conventional physiotherapy, which consists of a combination of manual therapy techniques, general exercises, and specific stabilisation exercises (Guideline-Endorsed Conventional Physiotherapy Group) or to receive conventional physiotherapy with the addition of Kinesio Taping to the lumbar spine (Conventional Physiotherapy plus Kinesio Taping Group) over a period of 5 weeks (10 sessions of treatment). Clinical outcomes (pain intensity, disability and global perceived effect) will be collected at baseline and at 5 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after randomisation. We will also collect satisfaction with care and adverse effects after treatment. Data will be collected by a blinded assessor. All

  19. The analysis of drawing from memory performance in brain-damaged patients.

    PubMed

    Leek, E C; Rapp, B C; Turnbull, O H

    2000-01-01

    The drawing from memory task is frequently used in cognitive neuropsychology to investigate visual processing impairments. However, in surprising contrast to most other neuropsychological tests, the analyses of results on this task are most often based solely on qualitative judgements about the normality of a patient's performance. In most case reports, these judgements are not made with reference to normative data and are not made by individuals who are impartial with respect to the study (that is, using a blind rating procedure). There are several grounds for arguing that such analyses are inadequate. First, seemingly abnormal drawings made by a patient may well be within the range of performance shown by control subjects. Second, judgments that are not based on a blind rating procedure are likely to be influenced by knowledge about the patient's performance on other tasks. We describe an alternative assessment procedure that addresses both of these concerns. PMID:10857715

  20. Assessing Predictive Performance of Published Population Pharmacokinetic Models of Intravenous Tobramycin in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Celeste; Staatz, Christine E; Unwin, Sean; Hennig, Stefanie

    2016-06-01

    Several population pharmacokinetic models describe the dose-exposure relationship of tobramycin in pediatric patients. Before the implementation of these models in clinical practice for dosage adjustment, their predictive performance should be externally evaluated. This study tested the predictive performance of all published population pharmacokinetic models of tobramycin developed for pediatric patients with an independent patient cohort. A literature search was conducted to identify suitable models for testing. Demographic and pharmacokinetic data were collected retrospectively from the medical records of pediatric patients who had received intravenous tobramycin. Tobramycin exposure was predicted from each model. Predictive performance was assessed by visual comparison of predictions to observations, by calculation of bias and imprecision, and through the use of simulation-based diagnostics. Eight population pharmacokinetic models were identified. A total of 269 concentration-time points from 41 pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis were collected for external evaluation. Three models consistently performed best in all evaluations and had mean errors ranging from -0.4 to 1.8 mg/liter, relative mean errors ranging from 4.9 to 29.4%, and root mean square errors ranging from 47.8 to 66.9%. Simulation-based diagnostics supported these findings. Models that allowed a two-compartment disposition generally had better predictive performance than those that used a one-compartment disposition model. Several published models of the pharmacokinetics of tobramycin showed reasonable low levels of bias, although all models seemed to have some problems with imprecision. This suggests that knowledge of typical pharmacokinetic behavior and patient covariate values alone without feedback concentration measurements from individual patients is not sufficient to make precise predictions. PMID:27001806

  1. EEG Analysis of the Effects of Therapeutic Cooling on the Cognitive Performance of Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Leslie D.; Montgomery, Richard W.; Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Luna, Bernadette; Lee, Hank C.; Kliss, Mark; Webbon, Bruce; Mead, Susan C. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project was to determine whether a controlled period of head and torso cooling would enhance the cognitive performance of multiple sclerosis patients. Nineteen MS patients (11 men and 8 women) participated in the study. Control data were taken from nineteen healthy volunteers (12 men and 7 women). All but six of nineteen MS patients tested improved their cognitive performance, as measured by their scores on the Rao test battery. A second objective was to gain insight into the neurological effects of cooling. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) stimulated by a reversing checkerboard pattern were recorded before and after cooling. We found that cooling selectively benefited the cognitive performance of those MS patients whose pre-cooling VEPs were abnormally shaped (which is an indication of visual pathway impairment due to demyelinization). Moreover, for female MS patients, the degree of cognitive performance improvement following cooling was correlated with a change in the shape of their VEPs toward a more normal shape following cooling.

  2. Quantitative Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography Metrics are Associated with Cognitive Performance Among HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Jared; Paul, Robert H.; Coop, Kathryn; Zhang, Song; Zhou, Wenjin; Laidlaw, David H.; Taylor, Lynn E.; Flanigan, Timothy; Navia, Bradford; Cohen, Ronald; Tashima, Karen

    2010-01-01

    There have been many studies examining HIV-infection-related alterations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diffusion metrics. However, examining scalar diffusion metrics ignores the orientation aspect of diffusion imaging, which can be captured with tractography. We examined five different tractography metrics obtained from global tractography maps (global tractography FA, average tube length, normalized number of streamtubes, normalized weighted streamtube length, and normalized total number of tubes generated) for differences between HIV positive and negative patients and the association between the metrics and clinical variables of disease severity. We also examined the relationship between these metrics and cognitive performance across a wide range of cognitive domains for the HIV positive and negative patient groups separately. The results demonstrated a significant difference between the groups for global tractography FA (t=2.13, p= 0.04), but not for any of the other tractography metrics examined (p-value range=0.39 to 0.95). There were also several significant associations between the tractography metrics and cognitive performance (i.e., tapping rates, switching 1 and 2, verbal interference, mazes; r≥0.42) for HIV infected patients. In particular, associations were noted between tractography metrics, speed of processing, fine motor control/speed, and executive function for the HIV-infected patients. These findings suggest that tractography metrics capture clinically relevant information regarding cognitive performance among HIV infected patients and suggests the importance of subtle white matter changes in examining cognitive performance. PMID:20503115

  3. Evaluation of Exercise Tolerance in Dialysis Patients Performing Tai Chi Training: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Bulińska, Katarzyna; Kusztal, Mariusz; Kowalska, Joanna; Rogowski, Łukasz; Zembroń-Łacny, Agnieszka; Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Ochmann, Bartosz; Pawlaczyk, Weronika; Woźniewski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have poor physical performance and exercise capacity due to frequent dialysis treatments. Tai Chi exercises can be very useful in the area of rehabilitation of people with ESRD. Objectives. The aim of the study was to assess exercise capacity in ESRD patients participating in 6-month Tai Chi training. Patients and Methods. Twenty dialysis patients from Wroclaw took part in the training; at the end of the project, 14 patients remained (age 69.2 ± 8.6 years). A 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and spiroergometry were performed at the beginning and after 6 months of training. Results. After 6 months of Tai Chi, significant improvements were recorded in mean distance in the 6MWT (387.89 versus 436.36 m), rate of perceived exertion (7.4 versus 4.7), and spiroergometry (8.71 versus 10.08 min). Conclusions. In the ESRD patients taking part in Tai Chi training, a definite improvement in exercise tolerance was recorded after the 6-month training. Tai Chi exercises conducted on days without dialysis can be an effective and interesting form of rehabilitation for patients, offering them a chance for a better quality of life and fewer falls and hospitalisations that are the result of it. PMID:27547228

  4. Enhanced cardiac perception predicts impaired performance in the Iowa Gambling Task in patients with panic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wölk, Julian; Sütterlin, Stefan; Koch, Stefan; Vögele, Claus; Schulz, Stefan M

    2014-01-01

    Objective Somatic marker theory predicts that somatic cues serve intuitive decision making; however, cardiovascular symptoms are threat cues for patients with panic disorder (PD). Therefore, enhanced cardiac perception may aid intuitive decision making only in healthy individuals, but impair intuitive decision making in PD patients. Methods PD patients and age-and sex-matched volunteers without a psychiatric diagnosis (n = 17, respectively) completed the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) as a measure of intuitive decision making. Interindividual differences in cardiac perception were assessed with a common mental-tracking task. Results In line with our hypothesis, we found a pattern of opposing associations (Fisher's Z = 1.78, P = 0.04) of high cardiac perception with improved IGT-performance in matched control-participants (r = 0.36, n = 14) but impaired IGT-performance in PD patients (r = −0.38, n = 13). Conclusion Interoceptive skills, typically assumed to aid intuitive decision making, can have the opposite effect in PD patients who experience interoceptive cues as threatening, and tend to avoid them. This may explain why PD patients frequently have problems with decision making in everyday life. Screening of cardiac perception may help identifying patients who benefit from specifically tailored interventions. PMID:24683516

  5. Blood pressure control in treated hypertensive patients: clinical performance of general practitioners.

    PubMed Central

    Frijling, B D; Spies, T H; Lobo, C M; Hulscher, M E; van Drenth, B B; Braspenning, J C; Prins, A; van der Wouden, J C; Grol, R P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The blood pressure of many treated hypertensive patients remains above recommended target levels. This discrepancy may be related to general practitioners' (GPs') actions. AIM: To assess clinical performance of GPs in blood pressure control in treated hypertensive patients and to explore the influence of patient and GP characteristics on clinical performance. DESIGN OF STUDY: Cross-sectional study conducted on 195 GPs with invitations to participate made via bulletins and by letter. SETTING: One hundred and thirty-two practices in the southern half of The Netherlands from November 1996 to April 1997. METHOD: Performance criteria were selected from Dutch national hypertension guidelines for general practice. GPs completed self-report forms immediately after follow-up visits of hypertensive patients treated with antihypertensive medication. RESULTS: The GPs recorded 3526 follow-up visits. In 63% of these consultations the diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was 90 mmHg or above. The median performance rates of the GPs were less than 51% for most of the recommended actions, even at a DBP of > or = 100 mmHg. Performance of non-pharmacological actions increased gradually with increasing DBP; prescribing an increase in antihypertensive medication and making a follow-up appointment scheduled within six weeks rose steeply at a DBP of > or = 100 mmHg. Patient and GP characteristics contributed little to clinical performance. Action performance rates varied considerably between GPs. CONCLUSION: GPs seem to target their actions at a DBP of below 100 mmHg, whereas guidelines recommend targeting at a DBP of below 90 mmHg. PMID:11271892

  6. Adding Papillomacular Bundle Measurements to Standard Optical Coherence Tomography Does Not Increase Sensitivity to Detect Prior Optic Neuritis in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Laible, Mona; Jarius, Sven; Schmidt-Bacher, Annette; Platten, Michael; Haas, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To improve the detection of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning in multiple sclerosis (MS), a special peripapillary ring scanning algorithm (N-site RNFL, N-RNFL) was developed for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). In contrast to the standard protocol (ST-RNFL) scanning starts nasally, not temporally, and provides an additional sector of analysis, the papillomacular bundle (PMB). We aimed to ascertain whether the temporal RNFL differs between the two techniques, whether N-RNFL is more sensitive than ST-RNFL to detect previous optic neuritis (ON), and whether analyzing the PMB adds additional sensitivity. Furthermore, we investigated whether RNFL is associated with disease severity and/or disease duration. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional case-control study of 38 patients with MS, of whom 24 had a history of ON, and 40 healthy controls (HC). Subjects with ON within the previous 6 months were excluded. Records included clinical characteristics, visual evoked potentials (VEP), and SD-OCT in both techniques. Results In a total of 73 evaluable MS eyes, temporal N-RNFL was abnormal in 17.8%, temporal ST-RNFL in 19.2%, and the PMB-RNFL in 21.9%. In ON eyes, the sensitivity of temporal N-RNFL and ST-RNFL did not differ significantly (37.0%/33.3%, p = 0.556). The sensitivity of VEP was 85.2%. RNFL thickness was associated with disease severity in all eyes, with and without a history of ON, and with disease duration. Conclusion The two OCT techniques detected previous ON with similar sensitivity, but the sensitivity of VEPs was superior to that of both N-RNFL and ST-RNFL. Our results indicate that the widely used ST-RNFL technique is appropriate for peripapillary RNFL measurements in MS patients. PMID:27171375

  7. Technical and patient performance using a virtual reality-integrated telerehabilitation system: preliminary finding.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Judith E; Lewis, Jeffrey A; Burdea, Grigore

    2007-03-01

    Telerehabilitation is the provision of rehabilitation services at a distance by a therapist at a remote location. Integration with virtual reality (VR) is a relatively new addition to this field. This paper describes the technical and patient performance of a telerehabilitation application the remote console (ReCon) that is integrated with a VR system. The VR system consists of the Rutgers Ankle prototype robot, a local PC which is connected with a remote PC connected over the Internet. Six individuals in the chronic phase poststroke participated in a four week training program. They used the robot to interact with two VR simulations, while the therapist was in the same room during the first three weeks or in another room during the fourth week. Technical and patient performance was assessed in the transition from the third to the fourth week of training. Technical performance of the system was assessed based on bandwidth and lag of message transmission, which were found to be suitable for clinic-to-clinic communication. Patient performance (in terms of accuracy of ankle movement, exercise duration and training efficiency, mechanical power of the ankle, and number of repetitions) did not decrease during telerehabilitation in the fourth week. These preliminary findings over a short telerehabilitation intervention support the feasibility of remote monitoring of VR-based telerehabilitation without adverse effects on patient performance. PMID:17436873

  8. [Effects of an optimized exercise therapy on physical performance of patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Rhodius, U; Posselt, S; Posselt, H G; Hofstetter, R; Leyk, D

    2002-09-01

    Regular exercise training can increase the physical performance of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, training is often hampered by negative factors such as infections, lack of time, etc. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a 3-week-training-program performed under favourable conditions on physical performance and lung function of CF-patients: 17 patients daily trained at least 2,5 h under suspicious conditions at a sport hotel in Israel (Eilat). During the entire 3 weeks a comprehensive care was applied to the patients including intensive physical therapy and nutrition adapted to the individual demands. Testings of lung function and cycle ergometry ramp tests were performed a week before and after the training program. Additional control measurements were taken 7 months post training. After the 3-week-training vital capacity and FEV1 were increased by 7 % and 6 % (p > 0.05). The results of the cycle ergometry showed bigger and significant improvements in the maximal values of power (12 % - 20 %), oxygen uptake and ventilation. This findings were also valid for the submaximal exercise range indicated by a slower heart rate slope and a lower aerobic-anaerobic threshold. The present results suggest, that relatively large increases in physical performance can be obtained by short, but intensive exercise training including a comprehensive care. PMID:12215912

  9. The impact of different aetiologies on the cognitive performance of frontal patients

    PubMed Central

    Cipolotti, Lisa; Healy, Colm; Chan, Edgar; Bolsover, Fay; Lecce, Francesca; White, Mark; Spanò, Barbara; Shallice, Tim; Bozzali, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychological group study methodology is considered one of the primary methods to further understanding of the organisation of frontal ‘executive’ functions. Typically, patients with frontal lesions caused by stroke or tumours have been grouped together to obtain sufficient power. However, it has been debated whether it is methodologically appropriate to group together patients with neurological lesions of different aetiologies. Despite this debate, very few studies have directly compared the performance of patients with different neurological aetiologies on neuropsychological measures. The few that did included patients with both anterior and posterior lesions. We present the first comprehensive retrospective comparison of the impact of lesions of different aetiologies on neuropsychological performance in a large number of patients whose lesion solely affects the frontal cortex. We investigated patients who had a cerebrovascular accident (CVA), high (HGT) or low grade (LGT) tumour, or meningioma, all at the post-operative stage. The same frontal ‘executive’ (Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, Stroop Colour-Word Test, Letter Fluency-S; Trail Making Test Part B) and nominal (Graded Naming Test) tasks were compared. Patients' performance was compared across aetiologies controlling for age and NART IQ scores. Assessments of focal frontal lesion location, lesion volume, global brain atrophy and non-specific white matter (WM) changes were undertaken and compared across the four aetiology. We found no significant difference in performance between the four aetiology subgroups on the ‘frontal’ executive and nominal tasks. However, we found strong effects of premorbid IQ on all cognitive tasks and robust effects of age only on the frontal tasks. We also compared specific aetiology subgroups directly, as previously reported in the literature. Overall we found no significant differences in the performance of CVA and tumour patients, or LGT and HGT

  10. Health System Performance for the High-Need Patient: A Look at Access to Care and Patient Care Experiences.

    PubMed

    Salzberg, Claudia A; Hayes, Susan L; McCarthy, Douglas; Radley, David C; Abrams, Melina K; Shah, Tanya; Anderson, Gerard F

    2016-08-01

    Issue: Achieving a high-performing health system will require improving outcomes and reducing costs for high-need, high-cost patients--those who use the most health care services and account for a disproportionately large share of health care spending. Goal: To compare the health care experiences of adults with high needs--those with three or more chronic diseases and a functional limitation in the ability to care for themselves or perform routine daily tasks--to all adults and to those with multiple chronic diseases but no functional limitations. Methods: Analysis of data from the 2009--2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Key findings: High-need adults were more likely to report having an unmet medical need and less likely to report having good patient-provider communication. High-need adults reported roughly similar ease of obtaining specialist referrals as other adults and greater likelihood of having a medical home. While adults with private health insurance reported the fewest unmet needs overall, privately insured high-need adults reported the greatest difficulties having their needs met. Conclusion: The health care system needs to work better for the highest-need, most-complex patients. This study's findings highlight the importance of tailoring interventions to address their needs. PMID:27571600

  11. Exercise performance in young patients with complete atrioventricular block: the relevance of synchronous atrioventricular pacing.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Corcia, M Cecilia; Remy, Lorraine Saint; Marchandise, Sebastien; Moniotte, Stephane

    2016-08-01

    At present, there are many pacing strategies for young patients with complete atrioventricular block. The most frequent policy is to attempt placing a dual-chamber system when possible; however, there is a group of patients that is functioning with a non-synchronous ventricular pacing, raising the question of the ideal timing to upgrade their systems. We investigated the exercise performance of a group of children and young adults with complete atrioventricular block and dual-chamber pacemakers in both single- and dual-chamber pacing modalities. A total of 15 patients performed maximal exercise stress testing after programming the VVIR or DDD modes with 2 hours of interval in a double-blind study protocol. Compared with VVIR pacing, DDD pacing resulted in increase in the peak VO2, longer test duration, major increase in the heart rate achieved during peak exercise, decreased systemic non-invasive arterial blood pressure measured at maximal exercise, higher maximal workload, prolongation of the anaerobic threshold timing, and better self-rated performance perception in all the patients. Synchronous atrioventricular pacing contributes to an increase in both the exercise performance and the performance perception in 100% of the patients. This difference contributes to create a sense of "fitness" with repercussions in the overall health, self-esteem, and life quality, as well as encourages youngster to practice sports. Our experience tends to favour upgrading patients' systems to dual-chamber systems before reaching the adolescent years, even if the centre policy is to prolong as long as possible the epicardial site in order to avoid long years of right ventricular pacing. PMID:26796814

  12. Gait characteristics in patients with major depression performing cognitive and motor tasks while walking.

    PubMed

    Radovanović, Saša; Jovičić, Milica; Marić, Nadja P; Kostić, Vladimir

    2014-06-30

    Depressed patients demonstrate alterations in motor and cognitive functioning that can affect their adjustments to the variations in everyday life environment. The objective was to explore gait parameters and variability of patients with major depressive disorder in dual task walking situations. Eight patients and 20 healthy controls performed motor, mental and combined motor+mental tasks while walking. Calculated parameters were cycle time, stride length, swing time, double support time and their coefficients of variation (CV). Patients demonstrated greater gait variability (swing time CV) than controls during baseline walk (t(26)=2.64, p<0.05) and motor dual task (t(26)=3.68, p<0.05). Moreover, the transition from mental to combined task decreased stride length (M=126.48±15.35 and M=121.19±13.55, p<0.001) and increased double support time (M=0.266±0.072 and M=0.287±0.076, p<0.01) only in controls. Also, gait variability increased in controls during the combined task, while remaining the same or decreasing in patients. Tasks that required greater cognitive involvement affected gait variability in patients more than controls, but only up to a certain level, after which patients׳ stability appeared unaffected by the increase of cognitive demand. This could be explained by a tendency of patients to neglect complex cognitive tasks while walking in order to preserve stability and prevent possible falls. PMID:24613201

  13. The forecaster's added value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, M.; Milelli, M.

    2009-09-01

    skill scores of two competitive forecast. It is important to underline that the conclusions refer to the analysis of the Piemonte operational alert system, so they cannot be directly taken as universally true. But we think that some of the main lessons that can be derived from this study could be useful for the meteorological community. In details, the main conclusions are the following: - despite the overall improvement in global scale and the fact that the resolution of the limited area models has increased considerably over recent years, the QPF produced by the meteorological models involved in this study has not improved enough to allow its direct use, that is, the subjective HQPF continues to offer the best performance; - in the forecast process, the step where humans have the largest added value with respect to mathematical models, is the communication. In fact the human characterisation and communication of the forecast uncertainty to end users cannot be replaced by any computer code; - eventually, although there is no novelty in this study, we would like to show that the correct application of appropriated statistical techniques permits a better definition and quantification of the errors and, mostly important, allows a correct (unbiased) communication between forecasters and decision makers.

  14. Fatigue, Sleep, Pain, Mood and Performance Status in Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Elizabeth Ann; Goodwin, Julia A.; Coon, Sharon K.; Richards, Kathy; Enderlin, Carol; Kennedy, Robert; Stewart, Carol B.; McNatt, Paula; Lockhart, Kim; Anaissie, Elias J.; Barlogie, Bart

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer-related fatigue and insomnia are common distressing symptoms and may affect mood and performance status. Objective to describe fatigue, sleep, pain, mood and performance status and the relationships among these variables in 187 patients newly diagnosed with multiple myeloma (MM) and conduct an analysis using the correlates of fatigue. Interventions/Methods Data were from baseline measures from the study, using the Profile of Mood States (POMS) and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Fatigue to assess fatigue, the Actigraph to measure sleep, the Wong/Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale to assess pain, the POMS to assess mood, and the 6-minute walk test along with a back/leg/chest dynamometer to test muscle strength to assess performance status. Data analysis consisted of descriptive statistics, Pearson and Spearman rho correlations and multiple regression using fatigue as the dependent variable. All p values were two-sided, and those with < .05 considered significant. Results Patients newly diagnosed with MM presented with fatigue, pain, sleep and mood disturbances, and diminished functional performance. The regression model, which included all of these variables along with age, gender and stage of disease, was statistically significant with a large measure of effect. Mood was a significant individual contributor to the model. Conclusions Among patients with MM, fatigue, pain, sleep, mood and functional performance are interrelated. Implications for Practice Interventions are needed to decrease fatigue and pain and to improve sleep, mood and functional performance. PMID:21522061

  15. A noninflammatory immune response in aged DNA Aβ42-immunized mice supports its safety for possible use as immunotherapy in AD patients.

    PubMed

    Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Rosenberg, Roger N

    2015-03-01

    Aging in the immune system results in tendency to proinflammatory responses. Intradermal DNA immunization showed Th2 polarized noninflammatory immune responses. We tested here 18-month-old mice which were immunized with Aβ42 peptide, DNA Aβ42 trimer, or 2 different prime boost protocols identical to previous experiments. High Aβ42 antibody levels were found in aged mice which had received peptide immunizations (900 μg/mL plasma), and in mice which had received peptide prime and DNA boost immunizations (500 μg/mL), compared with antibodies in DNA Aβ42 immunized mice with 50 μg/mL. Although we found T-cell proliferation and inflammatory cytokines in mice which had received peptide or prime boost immunization, these were not found in DNA-immunized mice. The results are concordant with proinflammatory responses because of immunosenescence and contraindicate the use of Aβ42 peptide immunizations or prime boost immunization protocols for the use in elderly Alzheimer's disease patients. DNA Aβ42 immunization only on the other hand does lead to effective levels of antibodies without inflammatory cytokine or T-cell responses in the aged animal model tested. PMID:25725942

  16. Depressed left ventricular performance. Response to volume infusion in patients with sepsis and septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, F.P.; Parker, M.M.; Natanson, C.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Parrillo, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    Volume infusion, to increase preload and to enhance ventricular performance, is accepted as initial management of septic shock. Recent evidence has demonstrated depressed myocardial function in human septic shock. We analyzed left ventricular performance during volume infusion using serial data from simultaneously obtained pulmonary artery catheter hemodynamic measurements and radionuclide cineangiography. Critically ill control subjects (n = 14), patients with sepsis but without shock (n = 21), and patients with septic shock (n = 21) had prevolume infusion hemodynamic measurements determined and received statistically similar volumes of fluid resulting in similar increases in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. There was a strong trend (p = 0.004) toward less of a change in left ventricular stroke work index (LVSWI) after volume infusion in patients with sepsis and septic shock compared with control subjects. The LVSWI response after volume infusion was significantly less in patients with septic shock when compared with critically ill control subjects (p less than 0.05). These data demonstrate significantly altered ventricular performance, as measured by LVSWI, in response to volume infusion in patients with septic shock.

  17. Exercise left ventricular performance in patients with chest pain, ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiograms, and angiographically normal coronary arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, H.J.; Sands, M.J.; Davies, R.A.; Wackers, F.J.; Alexander, J.; Lachman, A.S.; Williams, B.W.; Zaret, B.L.

    1981-02-01

    Left ventricular performance was evaluated using first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography in 31 patients with chest pain, an ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiogram, and angiographically normal coronary arteries at rest and during maximal upright bicycle exercise. /sup 201/Tl imaging was done in all patients after treadmill exercise and in selected patients after ergonovine provocation. Resting left ventricular performance was normal in all patients. An abnormal ejection fraction response to exercise was detected in 12 of 31 patients. Regional dysfunction was present during exercise in four patients, all of whom also had abnormal global responses. Three of these 12 patients and two additional patients had exercise-induced /sup 201/Tl perfusion defects. In all nine patients who underwent ergonovine testing, there was no suggestion of coronary arterial spasm. Thus, left ventricular dysfunction during exercise, in the presence of normal resting performance, was found in a substantial number of patients with chest pain, an ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiogram, and normal coronary arteries.

  18. Assessing early performance in the patient-doctor relationship in dental education.

    PubMed

    Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Maramaldi, Peter; Kinnunen, Taru H; Spinell, Diane; Nelson, Linda Pollak

    2012-02-01

    In addition to current admissions criteria, the assessment of qualities related to humanistic medicine may help predict clinical and academic performance in dental education. The objective of this feasibility study was to develop and assess the reliability of a coding scheme to quantify and rate qualitative formative narratives describing individual student performance in a medical interview course that utilizes principles of humanistic medicine. A mixed method, using focus groups and individual interviews, was used to develop a coding strategy. Three coders retrospectively rated 209 formative narratives evaluating first-year students at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine to determine high and low performance in this course. Interrater reliability was tested. The focus groups yielded the use of superlatives to identify high performance, with their absence indicating low performance. This study found a high level of calibration among independent coders (Cronbach's alpha 0.75). Twenty-four (11.5 percent) of the narrative evaluations were coded as "high performers" and seven (3.3 percent) as "low performers." The results demonstrate the feasibility of quantifying narrative evaluations to determine high and low performance in a patient-centered course for dental students. It may be that humanistic qualities taught in a patient-centered medical interview course are more significant competencies than previously thought. PMID:22319080

  19. Effects of aerobic exercise on cognitive performance and individual psychopathology in depressive and schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Oertel-Knöchel, Viola; Mehler, Pia; Thiel, Christian; Steinbrecher, Kristina; Malchow, Berend; Tesky, Valentina; Ademmer, Karin; Prvulovic, David; Banzer, Winfried; Zopf, Yurdagül; Schmitt, Andrea; Hänsel, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Cognitive deficits are core symptoms in patients with schizophrenia (SZ) and major depressive disorder (MDD), but specific and approved treatments for cognitive deterioration are scarce. Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that aerobic exercise may help to reduce psychopathological symptoms and support cognitive performance, but this has not yet been systematically investigated. In the current study, we examined the effects of aerobic training on cognitive performance and symptom severity in psychiatric inpatients. To our knowledge, to date, no studies have been published that directly compare the effects of exercise across disease groups in order to acquire a better understanding of disease-specific versus general or overlapping effects of physical training intervention. Two disease groups (n=22 MDD patients, n=29 SZ patients) that were matched for age, gender, duration of disease and years of education received cognitive training combined either with aerobic physical exercise or with mental relaxation training. The interventions included 12 sessions (3 times a week) over a time period of 4 weeks, lasting each for 75 min (30 min of cognitive training+45 min of cardio training/mental relaxation training). Cognitive parameters and psychopathology scores of all participants were tested in pre- and post-testing sessions and were then compared with a waiting control group. In the total group of patients, the results indicate an increase in cognitive performance in the domains visual learning, working memory and speed of processing, a decrease in state anxiety and an increase in subjective quality of life between pre- and post-testing. The effects in SZ patients compared with MDD patients were stronger for cognitive performance, whereas there were stronger effects in MDD patients compared with SZ patients in individual psychopathology values. MDD patients showed a significant reduction in depressive symptoms and state anxiety values after the intervention period

  20. Internal Medicine House Officers' Performance as Assessed by Experts and Standardized Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Judith G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Three chronically ill patients were trained to evaluate the performance of 31 second-year internal medicine house officers based upon: a checklist for the medical data elicited during the medical interview; the process of the interview; and the physical examination technique. (Author/MLW)

  1. Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleep Quality, Cognition, and Driving Performance in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S; Thacker, Leroy R; Leszczyszyn, David; Taylor, Samuel A; Heuman, Douglas M; Raman, Shekar; Sterling, Richard K; Siddiqui, Muhammad S; Stravitz, R Todd; Sanyal, Arun J; Puri, Puneet; Luketic, Velimir; Matherly, Scott; Fuchs, Michael; White, Melanie B; Noble, Nicole A; Unser, Ariel B; Wade, James B

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims: In patients with cirrhosis, sleep disturbances are assumed to result from hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The effects of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on cognition, sleep parameters, or driving in patients with cirrhosis are unclear. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional, prospective study of 118 subjects. Subjects were assigned to 1 of 4 groups: those with OSA and cirrhosis (without HE or ascites, n=34), those with only cirrhosis (n=30), those with only OSA only (n=29), and those without OSA or cirrhosis (controls, n=25). None of OSA patients were receiving continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Subjects underwent cognitive testing (paper–pencil tests for psychomotor speed and attention, as well as executive function tests), sleep assessment (daytime sleepiness and night-time sleep quality) and a monotonous driving simulation (worsening lane deviations over time indicate poor performance). We also tested patients with OSA, with cirrhosis (n=10) and without cirrhosis (n=7), before and after CPAP therapy. Results: Daytime sleepiness and sleep quality were worse in subjects in the OSA groups (with or without cirrhosis) than subjects with cirrhosis alone or controls. Of subjects with only OSA, 36% had impaired psychomotor speed and attention, compared to >60% of subjects in both cirrhosis groups. In contrast, executive function was uniformly worse in subjects with OSA, with or without cirrhosis, than groups without OSA. Simulator performance (lane deviations) worsened over time in both OSA groups. CPAP therapy significantly increased executive function and sleep quality, and reduced simulator lane deviations and sleepiness, in subjects with and without cirrhosis. After CPAP therapy, performance on the paper–pencil test performance improved significantly only in subjects with OSA without cirrhosis. Conclusion: OSA should be considered in evaluating sleep impairment in patients with cirrhosis. In patients with cirrhosis and OSA

  2. The level of association between functional performance status measures and patient-reported outcomes in cancer patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Andreotti, Charissa F.; Roberts, Kailey E.; Saracino, Rebecca M.; Hernandez, Marisol; Basch, Ethan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The process of assessing patient symptoms and functionality using patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and functional performance status (FPS) is an essential aspect of patient-centered oncology research and care. However, PRO and FPS measures are often employed separately or inconsistently combined. Thus, the purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the level of association between PRO and FPS measures to determine their differential or combined utility. Methods A systematic search was conducted using five databases (1966 to February 2014) to identify studies that described an association between PRO and FPS. Studies were excluded if they were non-cancer specific, did not include adults aged 18 or older, or were review articles. Publications were selected for review by consensus among two authors, with a third author arbitrating as needed. Results A total of 18 studies met inclusion criteria. FPS was primarily assessed by clinicians using the ECOG Performance Status or Karnofsky Performance Status measures. PROs were captured using a variety of measures, with numerous domains assessed (e.g., pain, fatigue, and general health status). Concordance between PROs and FPS measures was widely variable, falling in the low to moderate range (0.09–0.72). Conclusions Despite consistency in the method of capture of PROs or FPS, domain capture varied considerably across reviewed studies. Irrespective of the method of capturing PROs or FPS, the quantified level of association between these two areas was moderate at best, providing evidence that FPS and PRO assessments offer unique information to assist clinicians in their decision-making. PMID:26314706

  3. Influence of Patient and Hospital Characteristics on the Performance of Direct Reconstruction after Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hartrampf, J.; Ansmann, L.; Wesselmann, S.; Beckmann, M. W.; Pfaff, H.; Kowalski, C.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: International studies have shown that the performance of a direct (or immediate) reconstruction (DR) after mastectomy is associated with patient (e.g., socio-economic status, insurance status, age) and hospital (number of cases, teaching status) characteristics. The present article addresses the question if such relationships also exist in Germany. Material and Methods: The results of a nationwide questionnaire to the patients of certified breast cancer centres were coupled with the clinical features of the patients and the characteristics of the hospital. Predictors for receiving a DR (vs. delayed or no reconstruction) were estimated by means of a logistic multilevel model for a sample of 1165 patients from 105 certified locations. Results: Substantial differences between the treating hospitals were found (intraclass correlation coefficient null model: 0.195) which can in part be explained by the total model (total model: 0.169). Patients with the following features are more likely to receive a DR: younger age, private health insurance, secondary school leaving certificate (vs. primary school leaving certificate), lower stage and acquisition of more information about reconstruction. ASA and partnership status are not statistically significantly related with DR. DR is more likely to be performed in hospitals with higher caseload of patients with primary breast cancer. Teaching status, operations per surgeon and urbanity of the location are not related to receiving a DR. Conclusions: Non-clinical features of the patients and the primary case number are associated with the performance of a DR, this poses questions concerning reasons and the equality of health care. PMID:25568467

  4. Innovations Without Added Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cereghino, Edward

    1974-01-01

    There is no question that we are in a tight money market, and schools are among the first institutions to feel the squeeze. Therefore, when a plan is offered that provides for innovations without added costs, its something worth noting. (Editor)

  5. Bilateral subthalamic stimulation impairs cognitive–motor performance in Parkinson's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Hallahan, Katie; Vitek, Megan; Bamzai, Rashi; Vitek, Jerrold L.

    2008-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical procedure that has been shown effective in improving the cardinal motor signs of advanced Parkinson's disease, however, declines in cognitive function have been associated with bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS. Despite the fact that most activities of daily living clearly have motor and cognitive components performed simultaneously, postoperative assessments of cognitive and motor function occur, in general, in isolation of one another. The primary aim of this study was to determine the effects of unilateral and bilateral STN DBS on upper extremity motor function and cognitive performance under single- and dual-task conditions in advanced Parkinson's disease patients. Data were collected from eight advanced Parkinson's disease patients between the ages of 48 and 70 years (mean 56.5) who had bilaterally placed STN stimulators. Stimulation parameters for DBS devices were optimized clinically and were stable for at least 6 months prior to study participation. Data were collected while patients were Off anti-parkinsonian medications under three stimulation conditions: Off stimulation, unilateral DBS and bilateral DBS. In each stimulation condition patients performed a cognitive (n-back task) and motor (force tracking) task under single- and dual-task conditions. During dual-task conditions, patients performed the n-back and force-maintenance task simultaneously. Under relatively simple dual-task conditions there were no differences in cognitive or motor performance under unilateral and bilateral stimulation. As dual-task complexity increased, cognitive and motor performance was significantly worse with bilateral compared with unilateral stimulation. In the most complex dual-task condition (i.e. 2-back + force tracking), bilateral stimulation resulted in a level of motor performance that was similar to the Off stimulation condition. Significant declines in cognitive and motor function under modest dual-task conditions

  6. Distinguishing familiarity-based from source-based memory performance in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Anthony P.; Goff, Donald C.; Duff, Margaret; Roffman, Joshua L.; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    Background There is substantial current interest in the cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia, particularly those in the realm of memory. Yet the exact nature of these deficits remains a matter of some debate. This study sought to examine performance on two distinct aspects of memory performance: familiarity-based and source-based memory processes. Methods Eighteen medicated outpatients with schizophrenia and eighteen healthy adult control subjects performed an external source memory task. Key measures included the ability to distinguish old (previously experienced) items from new items, the ability to correctly identify the source (male voice or female voice) of previously experienced items, and the reaction time associated with these responses. Results Patients with schizophrenia showed an impaired ability to distinguish old from new items, but intact performance in correctly identifying the source of items recognized as old. Whereas control subjects showed a rapid response to items deemed unfamiliar, particularly in rejecting novel items, these responses were slowed in patients with schizophrenia. This was not attributable to a generalized diminution in processing speed, as reaction times to correctly recognized old items (regardless of source accuracy) did not differ between the two groups. Conclusions Patients with schizophrenia demonstrated impaired familiarity-based and intact source-based memory performance. In addition, the reaction time for novelty detection, an important component of familiarity-based memory, was significantly delayed in patients compared to controls, while the response times for source-based decisions were completely overlapping. Considered together, these findings suggest a deficit in the familiarity-based aspect of episodic memory in at least some patients with schizophrenia. PMID:17629463

  7. Introducing ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Henneken, E.; Grant, C. S.; Kurtz, M. J.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Thompson, D. M.; Bohlen, E.; Murray, S. S.

    2011-05-01

    ADS Labs is a platform that ADS is introducing in order to test and receive feedback from the community on new technologies and prototype services. Currently, ADS Labs features a new interface for abstract searches, faceted filtering of results, visualization of co-authorship networks, article-level recommendations, and a full-text search service. The streamlined abstract search interface provides a simple, one-box search with options for ranking results based on a paper relevancy, freshness, number of citations, and downloads. In addition, it provides advanced rankings based on collaborative filtering techniques. The faceted filtering interface allows users to narrow search results based on a particular property or set of properties ("facets"), allowing users to manage large lists and explore the relationship between them. For any set or sub-set of records, the co-authorship network can be visualized in an interactive way, offering a view of the distribution of contributors and their inter-relationships. This provides an immediate way to detect groups and collaborations involved in a particular research field. For a majority of papers in Astronomy, our new interface will provide a list of related articles of potential interest. The recommendations are based on a number of factors, including text similarity, citations, and co-readership information. The new full-text search interface allows users to find all instances of particular words or phrases in the body of the articles in our full-text archive. This includes all of the scanned literature in ADS as well as a select portion of the current astronomical literature, including ApJ, ApJS, AJ, MNRAS, PASP, A&A, and soon additional content from Springer journals. Fulltext search results include a list of the matching papers as well as a list of "snippets" of text highlighting the context in which the search terms were found. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  8. Evolution of the Karnosky Performance Status throughout life in glioblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Sacko, Adama; Hou, Miao-Miao; Temgoua, Michael; Alkhafaji, Ali; Marantidou, Athina; Belin, Catherine; Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Ursu, Renata; Doridam, Jennifer; Coman, Irène; Levy-Piedbois, Christine; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2015-05-01

    Functional independence in glioblastoma (GBM) patients is a key factor in measuring the quality of life. Progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) have been largely described. However, the evolution over time of the performance status during the patients' life remains understudied. We thus studied the time to loss of functional independence as assessed by a Karnosky Performance Status (KPS) below 70 % in GBM patients. We analysed all GBM patients treated in our institution between 2008 and 2013 and meeting the following criteria: age >18 years, supratentorial location, post-surgical KPS ≥ 70 %, initially treated with concomitant radiotherapy (RT) and Temozolomide. Within the 84 patients studied, the median PFS was 9 months and the median OS was 18.7 months. The median survival time with functional independence (KPS ≥ 70 %) was 14.5 months. On average, the patients spent 73 % of their lifespan with a KPS ≥ 70 %. Surgical resection and low steroid dosage were statistically associated with increased survival time with KPS ≥ 70 % (p = 0.015 and p = 0.03, respectively). Sixty-two (62) patients received one or several lines of chemotherapy at recurrence. Under treatment with Bevacizumab (42 Bev-based regimens), radiological responses were seen in 35 % and improvement in KPS occurred in 24 % whereas no response and rare improvement of KPS (3 %) were seen with other type of chemotherapy (97 non Bev-based regimens). In GBM patients, median survival with KPS ≥ 70 % largely exceeds PFS. Surgical resection and low steroids dosage at RT-onset appeared as good prognosis factors for survival with functional independence. PMID:25700836

  9. Lithium might be associated with better decision-making performance in euthymic bipolar patients.

    PubMed

    Adida, Marc; Jollant, Fabrice; Clark, Luke; Guillaume, Sebastien; Goodwin, Guy M; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Courtet, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Bipolar disorder is associated with impaired decision-making. Little is known about how treatment, especially lithium, influences decision-making abilities in bipolar patients when euthymic. We aimed at testing for an association between lithium medication and decision-making performance in remitted bipolar patients. Decision-making was measured using the Iowa Gambling Task in 3 groups of subjects: 34 and 56 euthymic outpatients with bipolar disorder, treated with lithium (monotherapy and lithium combined with anticonvulsant or antipsychotic) and without lithium (anticonvulsant, antipsychotic and combination treatment), respectively, and 152 matched healthy controls. Performance was compared between the 3 groups. In the 90 euthymic patients, the relationship between different sociodemographic and clinical variables and decision-making was assessed by stepwise multivariate regression analysis. Euthymic patients with lithium (p=0.007) and healthy controls (p=0.001) selected significantly more cards from the safe decks than euthymic patients without lithium, with no significant difference between euthymic patients with lithium and healthy controls (p=0.9). In the 90 euthymic patients, the stepwise linear multivariate regression revealed that decision-making was significantly predicted (p<0.001) by lithium dose, level of education and no family history of bipolar disorder (all p≤0.01). Because medication was not randomized, it was not possible to discriminate the effect of different medications. Lithium medication might be associated with better decision-making in remitted bipolar patients. A randomized trial is required to test for the hypothesis that lithium, but not other mood stabilizers, may specifically improve decision-making abilities in bipolar disorder. PMID:25840740

  10. Pay for Performance: Are Hospitals Becoming More Efficient in Improving Their Patient Experience?

    PubMed

    Stanowski, Anthony Charles; Simpson, Kit; White, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) changed the way hospitals interact with patients when it implemented a pay-for-performance (P4P) system. Under this system, a financial reward or penalty is based in part on measures of patient experience. The program seeks to reward healthcare providers who expand their focus from solely delivering a highly technical set of services that improves the patient's health to creating an atmosphere that makes hospitalization more humane and respectful of patients' values and preferences. Refocusing priorities requires capital investment in more "patient-friendly" facilities or funding staff training programs. This study seeks to determine whether a relationship exists between inpatient costs and the score for "overall rating of hospital" (ORH) on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) hospital version survey. Second, if a relationship exists, the study examines how that relationship changed during the time of CMS' implementation of its P4P program. The study's findings suggest that higher-cost hospitals have higher levels of positive patient experiences, after controlling for other variables. Importantly, the research findings indicate that hospitals are becoming more efficient in delivering care associated with higher levels of patient experience, coinciding with implementation of the P4P program. PMID:26364350

  11. Improving health worker performance: The patient-perspective from a PBF program in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Lannes, Laurence

    2015-08-01

    The effect of performance-based financing (PBF) on patients' perception of primary health care services in developing countries in not well documented. Data from a randomized impact evaluation in Rwanda conducted between 2006 and 2008 in 157 primary level facilities is used to explore patients' satisfaction with clinical and non-clinical services and quantify the contribution of individual and facility characteristics to satisfaction including PBF. Improvements in productivity, availability and competences of the health workforce following the implementation of PBF have a positive effect on patients' satisfaction with clinical services even if patients' satisfaction is not tied to a reward. The positive effect of PBF on non-clinical dimensions of satisfaction also suggests that PBF incentivizes providers to raise patients' satisfaction with non-clinical services if it is associated with future financial gains. It is recommended that low and middle income countries build on the experience from high income countries to better listen to patients' voice in general and include an assessment of patients' satisfaction in incentive mechanisms as a way to increase the benefits of the strategy. PMID:26026400

  12. Prospective memory performance of patients with Parkinson's disease depends on shifting aptitude: evidence from cognitive rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Costa, Alberto; Peppe, Antonella; Serafini, Francesca; Zabberoni, Silvia; Barban, Francesco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of cognitive training aimed at improving shifting ability on Parkinson's disease (PD) patients' performance of prospective memory (PM) tasks. Using a double-blind protocol, 17 PD patients were randomly assigned to two experimental arms. In the first arm (n=9) shifting training was administered, and in the second (placebo) arm (n=8), language and respiratory exercises. Both treatments consisted of 12 sessions executed over 4 weeks. PM and shifting measures (i.e., Trail Making Test and Alternate Fluency Test) were administered at T0 (before treatment) and T1 (immediately after treatment). A mixed analysis of variance was applied to the data. To evaluate the effects of treatment, the key effect was the interaction between Group (experimental vs. placebo) and Time of Assessment (T0 vs. T1). This interaction was significant for the accuracy indices of the PM procedure (p<.05) and for the performance parameters of the shifting tasks (p ≤.05). Tukey's HSD tests showed that in all cases passing from T0 to T1 performance significantly improved in the experimental group (in all cases p ≤.02) but remained unchanged in the placebo group (all p consistently>.10). The performance change passing from T0 to T1 on the Alternate Fluency test and the PM procedure was significantly correlated (p<.05). Results show that the cognitive training significantly improved PD patients' event-based PM performance and suggest that their poor PM functioning might be related to reduced shifting abilities. PMID:24967725

  13. The correlation between occupational performance and well-being in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Gang-Seok; Chang, Moonyoung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to evaluate the occupational performance of stroke patients and their environment by occupational self-assessment and to investigate the relationship between occupational performance and well-being. [Subjects and Methods] This study enrolled ninety-two stroke patients who were receiving occupational therapy at a general hospital, a rehabilitation hospital, or a community welfare center in the cities of Busan and Gimhae, Republic of Korea. Occupational performance and well-being were investigated with Occupational Self-Assessment Version 2.2 and the Personal Well-being Index-Adult. [Results] Analysis of the correlation between occupational performance as assessed by the “Myself” and “My Environment” sections of Occupational Self-Assessment Version 2.2 and well-being revealed moderate positive correlation for both sections. [Conclusion] The relationship between occupational performance and well-being was identified. Further studies are needed to reveal whether improvement of occupational performance could affect well-being in various dimensions. PMID:27390400

  14. Reduced prefrontal activation during performance of the Iowa Gambling Task in patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yasuki; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Hirosawa, Tetsu; Hino, Shoryoku; Nagasawa, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Takanori; Munesue, Toshio; Minabe, Yoshio

    2015-07-30

    The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) is a complex decision-making task in which monetary wins and losses guide the development of strategies. The objective of this study was to evaluate hemodynamic responses of patients with bipolar disorder (BD) during performance of the IGT using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Participants comprised 13 patients and 15 healthy control subjects who were matched for age, sex, handedness, and intelligence quotient. Relative changes in oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb and deoxy-Hb) levels in the frontal region were measured using a 46-channel NIRS system. All subjects were evaluated using NIRS during a verbal fluency task (VFT) and the IGT. During performance of the IGT, BD patients showed significantly decreased oxy-Hb levels in the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and left prefrontal cortex (PFC) compared with normal control subjects. However, during the VFT, patients with BD showed no significant changes in oxy-Hb levels compared with control subjects. Changes in oxy-Hb levels in the bilateral OFC and the PFC during the IGT were negatively correlated with total scores on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D). Although the IGT was useful for differentiating patients with BP from control subjects, no significant differences in autonomic activity were observed. PMID:25978934

  15. Initial Clinical Experience Performing Patient Treatment Verification With an Electronic Portal Imaging Device Transit Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Sean L.; Polvorosa, Cynthia; Cheng, Simon; Deutsch, Israel; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate a 2-dimensional transit dosimetry algorithm's performance on a patient population and to analyze the issues that would arise in a widespread clinical adoption of transit electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients were enrolled on the protocol; 9 completed and were analyzed. Pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient-specific quality assurance was performed using a stringent local 3%, 3-mm γ criterion to verify that the planned fluence had been appropriately transferred to and delivered by the linear accelerator. Transit dosimetric EPID images were then acquired during treatment and compared offline with predicted transit images using a global 5%, 3-mm γ criterion. Results: There were 288 transit images analyzed. The overall γ pass rate was 89.1% ± 9.8% (average ± 1 SD). For the subset of images for which the linear accelerator couch did not interfere with the measurement, the γ pass rate was 95.7% ± 2.4%. A case study is presented in which the transit dosimetry algorithm was able to identify that a lung patient's bilateral pleural effusion had resolved in the time between the planning CT scan and the treatment. Conclusions: The EPID transit dosimetry algorithm under consideration, previously described and verified in a phantom study, is feasible for use in treatment delivery verification for real patients. Two-dimensional EPID transit dosimetry can play an important role in indicating when a treatment delivery is inconsistent with the original plan.

  16. Type 1 Diabetes Modifies Brain Activation in Young Patients While Performing Visuospatial Working Memory Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo-Moreno, Geisa B.; González-Garrido, Andrés A.; Gudayol-Ferré, Esteban; Guàrdia-Olmos, Joan

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the effects of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) on cognitive functions. T1D onset usually occurs during childhood, so it is possible that the brain could be affected during neurodevelopment. We selected young patients of normal intelligence with T1D onset during neurodevelopment, no complications from diabetes, and adequate glycemic control. The purpose of this study was to compare the neural BOLD activation pattern in a group of patients with T1D versus healthy control subjects while performing a visuospatial working memory task. Sixteen patients and 16 matched healthy control subjects participated. There was no significant statistical difference in behavioral performance between the groups, but, in accordance with our hypothesis, results showed distinct brain activation patterns. Control subjects presented the expected activations related to the task, whereas the patients had greater activation in the prefrontal inferior cortex, basal ganglia, posterior cerebellum, and substantia nigra. These different patterns could be due to compensation mechanisms that allow them to maintain a behavioral performance similar to that of control subjects. PMID:26266268

  17. Performance of the Existing Classification Criteria for Gout in Thai Patients Presenting With Acute Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jatuworapruk, Kanon; Lhakum, Panomkorn; Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Kasitanon, Nuntana; Wangkaew, Suparaporn; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, there are 5 existing classification criteria for gout: the Rome, New York, American Rheumatism Association (ARA), Mexico, and Netherlands criteria. This study was carried out to determine the performance of these classification criteria in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis. All consecutive patients presenting with acute arthritis and being consulted at the Rheumatology Unit, Chiang Mai University Hospital from January 2013 to May 2015 were invited to join the study. Gout was defined by the presence of monosodium urate crystals in the synovial fluid or tissue examined by experienced rheumatologists. The 5 existing gout classification criteria were performed and evaluated in all of the patients, who were divided in subgroups of early disease (≤2 years), established disease (>2 years), and those without tophus. There were 136 gout and 97 nongout patients. Sensitivity and specificity across all criteria ranged from 75.7% to 97.1% and 68.0% to 84.5%, respectively. Overall, the Mexico criteria had the highest sensitivity (97.1%), and the ARA survey criteria the highest specificity (84.5%), whereas the Mexico criteria performed well in early disease with sensitivity and specificity of 97.1% and 81.7%, respectively. All 5 criteria showed high sensitivity (from 76.4% to 99.1%) but low specificity (from 30.8% to 65.4%) in established disease. In patients without tophus, the sensitivity and specificity ranged from 64.1% to 95.7% and 68.8% to 85.4%, respectively. The ARA survey criteria across all groups showed consistently high specificity for gout. The 5 existing classification criteria for gout had limited sensitivity and specificity in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis. The ARA survey criteria are the most suitable for diagnosing gout in Thai people when crystal identification is not available. PMID:26844519

  18. Cystatin C and Creatinine-based eGFR equation performance depends on patient characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Meeusen, Jeffrey W.; Rule, Andrew D.; Voskoboev, Nikolay; Baumann, Nikola A.; Lieske, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guideline recommends use of a cystatin C-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to confirm creatinine-based eGFR between 45–59 mL/min/1.73m2. Prior studies have demonstrated that comorbidities such as solid-organ transplant strongly influence the relationship between measured GFR, creatinine and cystatin C. Our objective was to evaluate the performance of cystatin C based eGFR equations compared to creatinine-based eGFR and measured GFR across different clinical presentations. Methods The performance of the CKD-EPI 2009 creatinine-based estimated GFR equation (eGFRCr) and the newer CKD-EPI 2012 cystatin C-based equations (eGFRCys and eGFRCr-Cys) were compared with measured GFR (iothalamate renal clearance) across defined patient populations. Patients (n = 1,652) were categorized as transplant recipients (n=568 kidney; n=319 other organ [non-kidney]), known chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients (n=618), or potential kidney donors (n=147). Results eGFRCr-Cys showed the most consistent performance across different clinical populations. Among potential kidney donors without CKD (stage 2 or higher; eGFR >60mL/min/1.73m2), eGFRCys and eGFRCr-Cys demonstrated significantly less bias than eGFRCr, however, all three equations substantially underestimated GFR when eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2. Among transplant recipients with CKD stage 3B or lower (eGFR <45mL/min/1.73m2), eGFRCys was significantly more biased than eGFRCr. No clear differences among eGFR bias between equations were observed among known CKD patients regardless of eGFR range, or in any patient group with a GFR between 45–59 mL/min/1.73m2. Conclusions The performance of eGFR equations depends on patient characteristics readily apparent upon presentation. Among the three CKD-EPI equations, eGFRCr-Cys performed most consistently across the studied patient populations. PMID:26240296

  19. Performance comparison between static and dynamic cardiac CT on perfusion quantitation and patient classification tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac CT acquisitions for perfusion assessment can be performed in a dynamic or static mode. In this simulation study, we evaluate the relative classification and quantification performance of these modes for assessing myocardial blood flow (MBF). In the dynamic method, a series of low dose cardiac CT acquisitions yields data on contrast bolus dynamics over time; these data are fit with a model to give a quantitative MBF estimate. In the static method, a single CT acquisition is obtained, and the relative CT numbers in the myocardium are used to infer perfusion states. The static method does not directly yield a quantitative estimate of MBF, but these estimates can be roughly approximated by introducing assumed linear relationships between CT number and MBF, consistent with the ways such images are typically visually interpreted. Data obtained by either method may be used for a variety of clinical tasks, including 1) stratifying patients into differing categories of ischemia and 2) using the quantitative MBF estimate directly to evaluate ischemic disease severity. Through simulations, we evaluate the performance on each of these tasks. The dynamic method has very low bias in MBF estimates, making it particularly suitable for quantitative estimation. At matched radiation dose levels, ROC analysis demonstrated that the static method, with its high bias but generally lower variance, has superior performance in stratifying patients, especially for larger patients.

  20. Identification of tasks performed by stroke patients using a mobility assistive device.

    PubMed

    Hester, Todd; Sherrill, Delsey M; Hamel, Mathieu; Perreault, Karine; Boissy, Patrick; Bonato, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Many stroke patients are prescribed canes or other mobility assistive devices. Once taken home, these mobility assistive devices are often abandoned or misused. A means for assessing the use of the cane in the home and community settings is required to assist clinicians in the prescription of these devices. In this study, we propose the use of wearable sensors to identify tasks performed by stroke patients with a mobility assistive device. Subjects performed ten tasks with a three-axis accelerometer attached to their ankle and a neural network was trained to identify the task being performed. Results from 15 stroke patients indicated that these motor tasks can be reliably identified with a median sensitivity of 90 % at a median specificity of 95%. These results indicate that it is possible to use a single module with a three-axis accelerometer attached to the ankle to reliably identify motor tasks associated with the use of a cane. Therefore, we envision that the methodology presented in this paper could be used to evaluate the use of a cane in the context of the task being performed. PMID:17946896

  1. Performance predictors of brain-computer interfaces in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geronimo, A.; Simmons, Z.; Schiff, S. J.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may benefit from brain-computer interfaces (BCI), but the utility of such devices likely will have to account for the functional, cognitive, and behavioral heterogeneity of this neurodegenerative disorder. Approach. In this study, a heterogeneous group of patients with ALS participated in a study on BCI based on the P300 event related potential and motor-imagery. Results. The presence of cognitive impairment in these patients significantly reduced the quality of the control signals required to use these communication systems, subsequently impairing performance, regardless of progression of physical symptoms. Loss in performance among the cognitively impaired was accompanied by a decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio of task-relevant EEG band power. There was also evidence that behavioral dysfunction negatively affects P300 speller performance. Finally, older participants achieved better performance on the P300 system than the motor-imagery system, indicating a preference of BCI paradigm with age. Significance. These findings highlight the importance of considering the heterogeneity of disease when designing BCI augmentative and alternative communication devices for clinical applications.

  2. Autoimmune Manifestations in the 3xTg-AD Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marchese, Monica; Cowan, David; Head, Elizabeth; Ma, Donglai; Karimi, Khalil; Ashthorpe, Vanessa; Kapadia, Minesh; Zhao, Hui; Davis, Paulina; Sakic, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Background Immune system activation is frequently reported in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unknown whether this is a cause, a consequence, or an epiphenomenon of brain degeneration. Objective The present study examines whether immunological abnormalities occur in a well-established murine AD model and if so, how they relate temporally to behavioral deficits and neuropathology. Methods A broad battery of tests was employed to assess behavioral performance and autoimmune/inflammatory markers in 3xTg-AD (AD) mice and wild type controls from 1.5 to 12 months of age. Results Aged AD mice displayed severe manifestations of systemic autoimmune/inflammatory disease, as evidenced by splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, elevated serum levels of anti-nuclear/anti-dsDNA antibodies, low hematocrit, and increased number of double-negative T splenocytes. However, anxiety-related behavior and altered spleen function were evident as early as 2 months of age, thus preceding typical AD-like brain pathology. Moreover, AD mice showed altered olfaction and impaired “cognitive” flexibility in the first 6 months of life, suggesting mild cognitive impairment-like manifestations before general learning/memory impairments emerged at an older age. Interestingly, all of these features were present in 3xTg-AD mice prior to significant amyloid-β or tau pathology. Conclusion The results indicate that behavioral deficits in AD mice develop in parallel with systemic autoimmune/inflammatory disease. These changes antedate AD-like neuropathology, thus supporting a causal link between autoimmunity and aberrant behavior. Consequently, 3xTg-AD mice may be a useful model in elucidating the role of immune system in the etiology of AD. PMID:24150111

  3. Realizing "value-added" metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Lipscomb, Pete; Allgair, John; Patel, Dilip; Caldwell, Mark; Solecky, Eric; Archie, Chas; Morningstar, Jennifer; Rice, Bryan J.; Singh, Bhanwar; Cain, Jason; Emami, Iraj; Banke, Bill, Jr.; Herrera, Alfredo; Ukraintsev, Vladamir; Schlessinger, Jerry; Ritchison, Jeff

    2007-03-01

    The conventional premise that metrology is a "non-value-added necessary evil" is a misleading and dangerous assertion, which must be viewed as obsolete thinking. Many metrology applications are key enablers to traditionally labeled "value-added" processing steps in lithography and etch, such that they can be considered integral parts of the processes. Various key trends in modern, state-of-the-art processing such as optical proximity correction (OPC), design for manufacturability (DFM), and advanced process control (APC) are based, at their hearts, on the assumption of fine-tuned metrology, in terms of uncertainty and accuracy. These trends are vehicles where metrology thus has large opportunities to create value through the engineering of tight and targetable process distributions. Such distributions make possible predictability in speed-sorts and in other parameters, which results in high-end product. Additionally, significant reliance has also been placed on defect metrology to predict, improve, and reduce yield variability. The necessary quality metrology is strongly influenced by not only the choice of equipment, but also the quality application of these tools in a production environment. The ultimate value added by metrology is a result of quality tools run by a quality metrology team using quality practices. This paper will explore the relationships among present and future trends and challenges in metrology, including equipment, key applications, and metrology deployment in the manufacturing flow. Of key importance are metrology personnel, with their expertise, practices, and metrics in achieving and maintaining the required level of metrology performance, including where precision, matching, and accuracy fit into these considerations. The value of metrology will be demonstrated to have shifted to "key enabler of large revenues," debunking the out-of-date premise that metrology is "non-value-added." Examples used will be from critical dimension (CD

  4. Back to the future: Patient experience and the link to quality, safety, and financial performance.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Bonnie S; Hagins, Mitch; King, John A; Picciano, Gino; McCafferty, Maureen M; Nelson, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Improving patient experience has emerged as an important healthcare policy priority across Canada. Tools and systems for monitoring patient experience metrics are becoming increasingly refined and standardized, and the trend toward greater accountability for improvements that are sustainable and affordable is well underway. For many healthcare professionals, this represents a renewed focus on core patient needs and priorities, following decades during which structural and technological changes have dominated healthcare agendas. Improving patient experience in our contemporary healthcare environment presents major challenges-and opportunities-for Canadian health leaders. The experience of Studer Group partner organizations in Canada is relevant and instructive in this context. These organizations have adopted a model known as Evidence-Based Leadership (EBL) that enables and supports the alignment of all activities and behaviours toward specific organizational goals, including measurable patient experience improvements. This article reviews case studies of organizations that have adopted EBL. These organizations are demonstrating rapid progress in patient experience indicators while simultaneously making gains in critical areas such as clinical outcomes, safety, physician and staff engagement, and financial performance. Emerging evidence concerning the factors and processes that underlie these improvements is also discussed. PMID:26487727

  5. Olfactory performance segregates effects of anhedonia and anxiety on social function in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, Kristina; Walsh-Messinger, Julie; Stanford, Arielle; Vaez-Azizi, Leila; Antonius, Daniel; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill; Goetz, Deborah; Goetz, Raymond R.; Malaspina, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Background Social dysfunction is common among individuals with schizophrenia. While often attributed to anhedonia, social dysfunction could also result from unrecognized anxiety. We examined the contributions of anhedonia and anxiety to social function using olfactory function to examine whether the domains had separate underpinnings. Methods We assessed anhedonia, anxiety and social function as well as olfactory function in well-characterized patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and healthy controls. Results We included 56 patients and 37 controls in our study. Patients exhibited significantly higher levels of anhedonia and anxiety than controls, and the domains were highly correlated in patients. The combination of anhedonia and anxiety more strongly predicted social dysfunction than either measure alone. Smell identification was differentially related to the symptoms, with better performance predicting less anhedonia but more social fear in male patients. Limitations The use of self-report measures precludes differentiation between recollected or recounted experience. Aside from smell identification and odour threshold, additional measures of olfaction may be considered for future studies. Conclusion Anhedonia and anxiety were strongly correlated and both negatively impacted social function. The olfactory biomarker results support the conclusion that these domains are separate. Social function in patients with schizophrenia may improve with interventions for anxiety, even in the presence of marked negative symptoms. PMID:26107162

  6. Using Eye Tracking to Assess Reading Performance in Patients with Glaucoma: A Within-Person Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nicholas D.; Glen, Fiona C.; Mönter, Vera M.; Crabb, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Reading is often cited as a demanding task for patients with glaucomatous visual field (VF) loss, yet reading speed varies widely between patients and does not appear to be predicted by standard visual function measures. This within-person study aimed to investigate reading duration and eye movements when reading short passages of text in a patient's worse eye (most VF damage) when compared to their better eye (least VF damage). Reading duration and saccade rate were significantly different on average in the worse eye when compared to the better eye (P < 0.001) in 14 patients with glaucoma that had median (interquartile range) between-eye difference in mean deviation (MD; a standard clinical measure for VF loss) of 9.8 (8.3 to 14.8) dB; differences were not related to the size of the difference in MD between eyes. Patients with a more pronounced effect of longer reading duration on their worse eye made a larger proportion of “regressions” (backward saccades) and “unknown” EMs (not adhering to expected reading patterns) when reading with the worse eye when compared to the better eye. A between-eye study in patients with asymmetric disease, coupled with eye tracking, provides a useful experimental design for exploring reading performance in glaucoma. PMID:24883203

  7. Temporal lobe volume predicts Wada memory test performance in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Kan; Gong, Yunhua; Modur, Pradeep N; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Agostini, Mark; Gupta, Puneet; McColl, Roderick; Hays, Ryan; Van Ness, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The Wada test is widely used in the presurgical evaluation of potential temporal lobectomy patients to predict postoperative memory function. Expected asymmetry (EA), defined as Wada memory lateralized to the nonsurgical hemisphere, or a higher score after injection of the surgical hemisphere would be considered favorable in terms of postoperative memory outcome. However, in some cases, nonlateralized memory (NM) results, with no appreciable asymmetry, may occur because of impaired scores after both injections, often leading to denial of surgery. The reason for such nonlateralized Wada memory in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) remains unclear. Given that quantitative morphometric magnetic resonance imaging studies in TLE patients have shown bilateral regional atrophy in temporal and extratemporal structures, we hypothesized that the volume loss in contralateral temporal structures could contribute to nonlateralized Wada memory performance. To investigate this, we examined the relationship between the volume changes of temporal structures and Wada memory scores in patients with intractable TLE with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) using an age- and gender-matched control group. Memory was considered nonlateralized if the absolute difference in the total correct recall scores between ipsilateral and contralateral injections was <11%. Among 21 patients, Wada memory was lateralized in 15 and nonlateralized in 6 patients, with all the nonlateralized scores being observed in left TLE. The recall scores after ipsilateral injection were significantly lower in patients with an NM profile than an EA profile (23 ± 14% vs. 59 ± 18% correct recall, p ≤ 0.001). However, the recall scores after contralateral injection were low but similar between the two groups (25 ± 17% vs. 25 ± 15% correct recall, p=0.97). Compared to controls, all the patients showed greater volume loss in the temporal regions. However, patients with a NM profile showed

  8. Two Virasoro symmetries in stringy warped AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Guica, Monica; Rodriguez, Maria J.

    2014-12-01

    We study three-dimensional consistent truncations of type IIB supergravity which admit warped AdS3 solutions. These theories contain subsectors that have no bulk dynamics. We show that the symplectic form for these theories, when restricted to the non-dynamical subsectors, equals the symplectic form for pure Einstein gravity in AdS3. Consequently, for each consistent choice of boundary conditions in AdS3, we can define a consistent phase space in warped AdS3 with identical conserved charges. This way, we easily obtain a Virasoro × Virasoro asymptotic symmetry algebra in warped AdS3; two different types of Virasoro × Kač-Moody symmetries are also consistent alternatives.

  9. Inspiratory muscle performance relative to the anaerobic threshold in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Wanke, T; Formanek, D; Lahrmann, H; Merkle, M; Rauscher, H; Zwick, H

    1993-09-01

    Rehabilitation programmes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) require exercise training above the anaerobic threshold. However, not all COPD patients develop metabolic acidosis during exercise. The hypothesis of this study was that non-exercise variables, characterizing the mechanical load on the inspiratory muscles during breathing at rest, can be used to reliably predict which patients with COPD are not able to develop metabolic acidosis during exercise. Thirty participants with COPD performed a symptom-limited cycle ergometer test. The oesophageal pressure/time index (PTIoes: the product of pressure magnitude and duration), the mean rate of pressure development during inspiration (Poes/TI), and the mean airway resistance (Raw)/maximal oesophageal pressure (Poesmax) ratio served as indices for the mechanical load on the inspiratory muscles. The oxygen uptake (VO2) at which plasma standard bicarbonate was seen to decrease from its baseline value was taken as the anaerboic threshold (AT). Mean Raw was significantly higher in those patients in whom the AT could not be detected. No other lung function parameters measured at rest allowed the accurate selection of those patients who did or did not develop exercise metabolic acidosis. On the other hand, Raw/Poesmax, PTIoes and Poes/TI were significantly different in the two patient groups. Additionally, whereas in the patient group with identifiable AT exercise hyperpnoea produced a non-linear increase of Poes/TI with respect to PTIoes above the AT, in the patient group without identifiable AT there was a linear relationship between Poes/TI and PTIoes throughout exercise. We conclude that the determination of inspiratory muscle load indices at rest may be useful in pulmonary rehabilitation programmes, for identifying those patients with COPD who do not develop exercise induced metabolic acidosis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8224135

  10. Complications of percutaneous vertebroplasty: An analysis of 1100 procedures performed in 616 patients.

    PubMed

    Saracen, Agnieszka; Kotwica, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is a minimally invasive procedure widely used for the treatment of pain due to vertebral fractures of different origins-osteoporotic, traumatic, or neoplastic. PVP is minimally invasive, but the complications are not rare; however, they are in most cases not significant clinically. The most frequent is cement leakage, which can occur onto veins, paravertebral soft tissue, into the intervertebral disk, or to the spinal canal, affecting foraminal area or epidural space. We analyzed results of treatment and complications of vertebroplasty performed with the use of polimethylomethylacrylate cement (PMMA) on 1100 vertebrae, with a special regard to the severity of complication and eventual clinical manifestation. One thousand one hundred PVP were analyzed, performed in 616 patients. There were 468 (76%) women and 148 men (24%), 24 to 94-year old, mean age 68 years. From 1100 procedures, 794 treated osteporotic and 137 fractures due to malignant disease, 69 PVP were made in traumatic fractures. One hundred patients had painful vertebral hemangiomas. Seven hundred twenty-six (66%) lesions were in thoracic, and 374 (34%) in lumbar area. Results of treatment were assessed using 10 cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) 12 hours after surgery, 7 days, 30 days, and then each 6 months, up to 3 years. Before surgery all patients had significant pain 7 to 10 in VAS scale, mean 8.9 cm. Twelve  hours after surgery 602 (97.7%) reported significant relief of pain, with mean VAS of 2,3 cm. Local complications occurred in 50% of osteoporotic, 34% of neoplastic, 16% of traumatic fractures, and 2% of vertebral hemangiomas. The most common was PMMA leakage into surrounding tissues-20%; paravertebral vein embolism-13%; intradiscal leakage-8%; and PMMA leakage into the spinal canal-0.8%. Results of treatment did not differ between patients with and without any complications. From 104 patients who had chest X-ray or CT study performed after surgery

  11. Evidence for improved cardiac performance after beta-blockade in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Reale, A; Nigri, A; Gioffrè, P A

    1976-01-01

    The study was undertaken to investigate the acute haemodynamic effects of bunitrolol (0-2-hydroxy-3-(tert.butylamino)-propoxy)-bity. Right and left heart catheterization was performed in eleven patients with documented coronary artery disease. After bunitrolol (10 mg i.v.), there was a statistically significant decrease in left ventricular and aortic systolic pressures left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, aortic diastolic and mean pressures, pressure-rate product and compliance index (delta P/delta V). Left ventricular dp/dt, left ventricular dp/dt over isovolumic pressure, systemic resistance and heart rate tended to decrease, stroke volume and left ventricular stroke work index tended to increase, without statistical significance. Cardiac index showed individual variations, the mean values for the group being unchanged. Correlation of left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and left ventricular stroke work index showed a shift toward improved ventricular function curve in most cases, deterioration in no instance. Supine exercise was performed in ten patients. Angina occurred in nine patients; in five only before and in four before and after beta-blockade. Post-drug exercise heart rate, pressure-rate product and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure were significantly lower, the latter also in the four patients who still presented exercise angina. It is concluded that certain beta-blockers can improve cardiac performance at rest and during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease. This is explainable on the basis of a more favourable balance between oxygen supply and demand, together with a less marked negative inotropic effect due to the partial agonist activity of the agent used in the study. PMID:18374

  12. Working memory in ALS patients: preserved performance but marked changes in underlying neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Zaehle, Tino; Becke, Andreas; Naue, Nicole; Machts, Judith; Abdulla, Susanne; Petri, Susanne; Kollewe, Katja; Dengler, Reinhard; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Vielhaber, Stefan; Müller, Notger G

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease which affects the motor system but also other frontal brain regions. In this study we investigated changes in functional neuronal networks including posterior brain regions that are not directly affected by the neurodegenerative process. To this end, we analyzed the contralateral delay activity (CDA), an ERP component considered an online marker of memory storage in posterior cortex, while 23 ALS patients and their controls performed a delayed-matching-to-sample working memory (WM) task. The task required encoding of stimuli in the cued hemifield whilst ignoring stimuli in the other hemifield. Despite their unimpaired behavioral performance patients displayed several changes in the neuronal markers of the memory processes. Their CDA amplitude was smaller; it showed less load-dependent modulation and lacked the reduction observed when controls performed the same task three months later. The smaller CDA in the patients could be attributed to more ipsilateral cortical activity which may indicate that ALS patients unnecessarily processed the irrelevant stimuli as well. The latter is presumably related to deterioration of the frontal cortex in the patient group which was indicated by slight deficits in tests of their executive functions that increased over time. The frontal pathology presumably affected their top-down control of memory storage in remote regions in the posterior brain. In sum, the present results demonstrate functional changes in neuronal networks, i.e. neuroplasticity, in ALS that go well beyond the known structural changes. They also show that at least in WM tasks, in which strategic top-down control demands are relatively low, the frontal deficit can be compensated for by intact low level processes in posterior brain regions. PMID:23951274

  13. Working Memory in ALS Patients: Preserved Performance but Marked Changes in Underlying Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zaehle, Tino; Becke, Andreas; Naue, Nicole; Machts, Judith; Abdulla, Susanne; Petri, Susanne; Kollewe, Katja; Dengler, Reinhard; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Vielhaber, Stefan; Müller, Notger G.

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease which affects the motor system but also other frontal brain regions. In this study we investigated changes in functional neuronal networks including posterior brain regions that are not directly affected by the neurodegenerative process. To this end, we analyzed the contralateral delay activity (CDA), an ERP component considered an online marker of memory storage in posterior cortex, while 23 ALS patients and their controls performed a delayed-matching-to-sample working memory (WM) task. The task required encoding of stimuli in the cued hemifield whilst ignoring stimuli in the other hemifield. Despite their unimpaired behavioral performance patients displayed several changes in the neuronal markers of the memory processes. Their CDA amplitude was smaller; it showed less load-dependent modulation and lacked the reduction observed when controls performed the same task three months later. The smaller CDA in the patients could be attributed to more ipsilateral cortical activity which may indicate that ALS patients unnecessarily processed the irrelevant stimuli as well. The latter is presumably related to deterioration of the frontal cortex in the patient group which was indicated by slight deficits in tests of their executive functions that increased over time. The frontal pathology presumably affected their top-down control of memory storage in remote regions in the posterior brain. In sum, the present results demonstrate functional changes in neuronal networks, i.e. neuroplasticity, in ALS that go well beyond the known structural changes. They also show that at least in WM tasks, in which strategic top-down control demands are relatively low, the frontal deficit can be compensated for by intact low level processes in posterior brain regions. PMID:23951274

  14. Body composition and exercise performance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Schols, A M; Mostert, R; Soeters, P B; Wouters, E F

    1991-01-01

    To investigate whether a compromised nutritional state may limit exercise performance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease we studied 54 such patients (FEV1 less than 50% and arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) greater than 7.3 kPa) whose clinical condition was stable and who were admitted to a pulmonary rehabilitation centre. Fat free mass was assessed anthropometrically (from skinfold measurements at four sites) and by bioelectrical impedance; creatinine height index and arm muscle circumference were also assessed. The mean (SD) distance walked in 12 minutes was 845 (178) m. No association was established between the distance walked and spirometric measures. A good correlation was found between the distance walked and fat free mass in the whole group (r = 0.73 for impedance measurements and 0.65 for skinfold thickness) and in a subgroup of 23 lean patients (body weight less than 90% of ideal weight; r = 0.66 for impedance measurements and 0.46 for skinfold thickness). Body weight correlated with the distance walked only in the whole group (r = 0.61). On stepwise regression analysis fat free mass measured by bioelectrical impedance, maximal inspiratory mouth pressure, and PaO2 accounted for 60% of the variation in the distance walked in 12 minutes. We conclude that fat free mass, independently of airflow obstruction, is an important determinant of exercise performance in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:1750015

  15. Effects of adding aqueous extract of Tribulus terrestris to diet on productive performance, egg quality characteristics, and blood biochemical parameters of laying hens reared under low ambient temperature (6.8 ± 3 °C).

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mohsen; Torki, Mehran

    2016-06-01

    A study was conducted using 144 laying hens to evaluate the effects of adding aqueous extract of Tribulus terrestris to diets on productive performance, egg quality traits, and some blood parameters of laying hens reared under cold stress condition (6.8 ± 3 °C). The birds were randomly assigned to each of four dietary treatments (C, T1, T2, and T3) with six replicate cages of six birds. Diet inclusion of aqueous extract of T. terrestris at the rate of 10, 20, and 30 ml/Lit offered to groups T1, T2, and T3, respectively, while group C served as the control diet with no addition. Feed intake (FI), feed conversion ratio (FCR), egg weight (EW), egg production (EP), and egg mass (EM) were evaluated during the 42-day trial period. The EP and EM increased, whereas FCR decreased (P < 0.001) in the hens fed the extract-included diet as compared to those fed the basal diet. The serum content of cholesterol decreased and the thickness of egg shell increased in the hens fed the T2 and T3 diet compared to those fed the basal diet. Overall from the results of the present experiment, it can be concluded that diet supplementation with aqueous extract of T. terrestris has beneficial effects on productive performance of laying hens reared under cold stress condition. PMID:26471188

  16. Effects of adding aqueous extract of Tribulus terrestris to diet on productive performance, egg quality characteristics, and blood biochemical parameters of laying hens reared under low ambient temperature (6.8 ± 3 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Mohsen; Torki, Mehran

    2015-10-01

    A study was conducted using 144 laying hens to evaluate the effects of adding aqueous extract of Tribulus terrestris to diets on productive performance, egg quality traits, and some blood parameters of laying hens reared under cold stress condition (6.8 ± 3 °C). The birds were randomly assigned to each of four dietary treatments (C, T1, T2, and T3) with six replicate cages of six birds. Diet inclusion of aqueous extract of T. terrestris at the rate of 10, 20, and 30 ml/Lit offered to groups T1, T2, and T3, respectively, while group C served as the control diet with no addition. Feed intake (FI), feed conversion ratio (FCR), egg weight (EW), egg production (EP), and egg mass (EM) were evaluated during the 42-day trial period. The EP and EM increased, whereas FCR decreased (P < 0.001) in the hens fed the extract-included diet as compared to those fed the basal diet. The serum content of cholesterol decreased and the thickness of egg shell increased in the hens fed the T2 and T3 diet compared to those fed the basal diet. Overall from the results of the present experiment, it can be concluded that diet supplementation with aqueous extract of T. terrestris has beneficial effects on productive performance of laying hens reared under cold stress condition.

  17. Effects of adding aqueous extract of Tribulus terrestris to diet on productive performance, egg quality characteristics, and blood biochemical parameters of laying hens reared under low ambient temperature (6.8 ± 3 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Mohsen; Torki, Mehran

    2016-06-01

    A study was conducted using 144 laying hens to evaluate the effects of adding aqueous extract of Tribulus terrestris to diets on productive performance, egg quality traits, and some blood parameters of laying hens reared under cold stress condition (6.8 ± 3 °C). The birds were randomly assigned to each of four dietary treatments (C, T1, T2, and T3) with six replicate cages of six birds. Diet inclusion of aqueous extract of T. terrestris at the rate of 10, 20, and 30 ml/Lit offered to groups T1, T2, and T3, respectively, while group C served as the control diet with no addition. Feed intake (FI), feed conversion ratio (FCR), egg weight (EW), egg production (EP), and egg mass (EM) were evaluated during the 42-day trial period. The EP and EM increased, whereas FCR decreased ( P < 0.001) in the hens fed the extract-included diet as compared to those fed the basal diet. The serum content of cholesterol decreased and the thickness of egg shell increased in the hens fed the T2 and T3 diet compared to those fed the basal diet. Overall from the results of the present experiment, it can be concluded that diet supplementation with aqueous extract of T. terrestris has beneficial effects on productive performance of laying hens reared under cold stress condition.

  18. Early detection of AD using cortical thickness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spjuth, M.; Gravesen, F.; Eskildsen, S. F.; Østergaard, L. R.

    2007-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that causes cortical atrophy and impaired cognitive functions. The diagnosis is difficult to make and is often made over a longer period of time using a combination of neuropsychological tests, and structural and functional imaging. Due to the impact of early intervention the challenge of distinguishing early AD from normal ageing has received increasing attention. This study uses cortical thickness measurements to characterize the atrophy in nine mild AD patients (mean MMSE-score 23.3 (std: 2.6)) compared to five healthy middle-aged subjects. A fully automated method based on deformable models is used for delineation of the inner and outer boundaries of the cerebral cortex from Magnetic Resonance Images. This allows observer independent high-resolution quantification of the cortical thickness. The cortex analysis facilitates detection of alterations throughout the entire cortical mantle. To perform inter-subject thickness comparison in which the spatial information is retained, a feature-based registration algorithm is developed which uses local cortical curvature, normal vector, and a distance measure. A comparison of the two study groups reveals that the lateral side of the hemispheres shows diffuse thinner areas in the mild AD group but especially the medial side shows a pronounced thinner area which can be explained by early limbic changes in AD. For classification principal component analysis is applied to reduce the high number of thickness measurements (>200,000) into fewer features. All mild AD and healthy middle-aged subjects are classified correctly (sensitivity and specificity 100%).

  19. Effect of practice on performance of a skilled motor task in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Soliveri, P; Brown, R G; Jahanshahi, M; Marsden, C D

    1992-06-01

    Parkinson's disease leads to a breakdown in the execution of highly practised, skilled movements such as walking and handwriting. The improved execution of skilled movements with practice can be understood as a process of schema learning, the determining of the relevant parameters of the specific movement. The ability of patients with Parkinson's disease and age matched normal control subjects to improve their performance, with practice, on a skilled motor task, doing up buttons, was assessed. The task was assessed on its own and with simultaneous foot tapping. Both groups showed an initial improvement in the task on its own and deterioration in performance when buttoning with foot tapping. The amount of interference, however, decreased with practice, particularly in the patients with a 2 Hz tapping rate. The results suggest that patients with Parkinson's disease are capable of schema learning but require more practice than control subjects to achieve comparable levels of performance. This may be a reflection of the fundamental motor dysfunction of the disease rather than a specific learning deficit. PMID:1619411

  20. Patient-reported outcomes are superior in patients with Type 2 diabetes treated with liraglutide as compared with exenatide, when added to metformin, sulphonylurea or both: results from a randomized, open-label study

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, W E; Christiansen, J S; Hammer, M; Zychma, M J; Buse, J B

    2011-01-01

    Aims The Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes 6 trial was an open-label trial comparing liraglutide with exenatide as an ‘add-on’ to metformin and/or sulphonylurea. Methods Patients with Type 2 diabetes were randomized to liraglutide 1.8 mg once daily or exenatide 10 μg twice daily for 26 weeks. This was followed by a 14-week extension phase, in which all patients received liraglutide 1.8 mg once daily. Results Patient-reported outcomes were measured in 379 patients using Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire status (DTSQs) and DTSQ change (DTSQc). The change in overall treatment satisfaction (DTSQs score) from baseline at week 26 with liraglutide was 4.71 and with exentaide was 1.66 [difference between groups 3.04 (95% CI 1.73–4.35), P < 0.0001]. Five of the six items on the DTSQs improved significantly more with liraglutide than with exenatide (differences: current treatment 0.37, P = 0.0093; convenience 0.68, P < 0.0001; flexibility 0.57, P = 0.0002; recommend 0.49, P = 0.0003; continue 0.66, P = 0.0001). Patients perceived a greater reduction in hypoglycaemia at week 26 with liraglutide than with exenatide [difference in DTSQc score 0.48 (0.08–0.89), P = 0.0193] and a greater reduction in perceived hyperglycaemia [difference 0.74 (0.31–1.17), P = 0.0007]. During the extension phase, when all patients received liraglutide, DTSQs scores remained stable in patients who continued on liraglutide and increased significantly (P = 0.0026) in those switching from exenatide. Conclusions These results demonstrate significant improvements in patients’ treatment satisfaction with liraglutide compared with exenatide. PMID:21388442

  1. Evaluating therapist adherence in motivational interviewing by comparing performance with standardized and real patients

    PubMed Central

    Imel, Zac E.; Baldwin, Scott A.; Baer, John; Hartzler, Bryan; Dunn, Christopher; Rosengren, David; Atkins, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The goal of measuring therapist adherence is to determine if a therapist can perform a given treatment. Yet the evaluation of therapist behaviors in most clinical trials is limited. Typically, randomized trials have few therapists and minimize therapist variability through training and supervision. Furthermore, therapist adherence is confounded with uncontrolled differences in patients across therapists. Consequently, the extent to which adherence measures capture differences in actual therapist adherence versus other sources of variance is unclear. Method We estimated intra-class correlations (ICCs) for therapist adherence in sessions with real and standardized patients (RPs and SPs), using ratings from a motivational interviewing (MI) dissemination trial (Baer et al., 2009) in which 189 therapists recorded 826 sessions with both patient types. We also examined the correlations of therapist adherence between SP and RP sessions, and the reliability of therapist level adherence scores with generalizability coefficients (GCs). Results ICC’s for therapist adherence were generally large (average ICC for SPs = 0.44, RPs = 0.40), meaning that a given therapist’s adherence scores were quite similar across their sessions. Both ICCs and GCs were larger for SP sessions as compared to RPs on global measures of MI adherence, such as Empathy and MI Spirit. Correlations between therapist adherence with real and standardized patients were moderate to large on three of five adherence measures. Conclusion Differences in therapist-level adherence ratings were substantial, and standardized patients have promise as tools to evaluate therapist behavior. PMID:24588405

  2. Leading Change, Adding Value.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nick

    2016-09-12

    Essential facts Leading Change, Adding Value is NHS England's new nursing and midwifery framework. It is designed to build on Compassion in Practice (CiP), which was published 3 years ago and set out the 6Cs: compassion, care, commitment, courage, competence and communication. CiP established the values at the heart of nursing and midwifery, while the new framework sets out how staff can help transform the health and care sectors to meet the aims of the NHS England's Five Year Forward View. PMID:27615573

  3. Hierarchy of Dysfunction Related to Dressing Performance in Stroke Patients: A Path Analysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Takaaki; Nagayama, Hirofumi; Sato, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Yamane, Kazuhiro; Otsuki, Koji; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Tozato, Fusae

    2016-01-01

    Previous reports indicated that various dysfunctions caused by stroke affect the level of independence in dressing. These dysfunctions can be hierarchical, and these effects on dressing performance can be complicated in stroke patients. However, there are no published reports focusing on the hierarchical structure of the relationships between the activities of daily living and balance function, motor and sensory functions of the affected lower limb, strength of the abdominal muscles and knee extension on the unaffected side, and visuospatial deficits. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the hierarchical and causal relationships between dressing performance and these dysfunctions in stroke patients. This retrospective study included 104 first-time stroke patients. The causal relationship between the dressing performance and age, time post stroke, balance function, motor and sensory functions of the affected lower limb, strength of the abdominal muscles and knee extension on the unaffected side, and visuospatial deficits were examined using path analysis. A hypothetical path model was created based on previous studies, and the goodness of fit between the data and model were verified. A modified path model was created that achieved an almost perfect fit to the data. Balance function and abdominal muscle strength have direct effects on dressing performance, with standardized direct effect estimates of 0.78 and 0.15, respectively. Age, motor and sensory functions of the affected lower limb, and strength of abdominal muscle and knee extension on the unaffected side have indirect effects on dressing by influencing balance function. Our results suggest that dressing performance depends strongly on balance function, and it is mainly influenced by the motor function of the affected lower limb. PMID:26954499

  4. Spatiotemporal and Kinematic Parameters Relating to Oriented Gait and Turn Performance in Patients with Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bonnyaud, Céline; Pradon, Didier; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Bensmail, Djamel; Roche, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Background The timed up and go test (TUG) is a functional test which is increasingly used to evaluate patients with stroke. The outcome measured is usually global TUG performance-time. Assessment of spatiotemporal and kinematic parameters during the Oriented gait and Turn sub-tasks of the TUG would provide a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying patients’ performance and therefore may help to guide rehabilitation. The aim of this study was thus to determine the spatiotemporal and kinematic parameters which were most related to the walking and turning sub-tasks of TUG performance in stroke patients. Methods 29 stroke patients carried out the TUG test which was recorded using an optoelectronic system in two conditions: spontaneous and standardized condition (standardized foot position and instructed to turn towards the paretic side). They also underwent a clinical assessment. Stepwise regression was used to determine the parameters most related to Oriented gait and Turn sub-tasks. Relationships between explanatory parameters of Oriented gait and Turn performance and clinical scales were evaluated using Spearman correlations. Results Step length and cadence explained 82% to 95% of the variance for the walking sub-tasks in both conditions. Percentage single support phase and contralateral swing phase (depending on the condition) respectively explained 27% and 56% of the variance during the turning sub-task in the spontaneous and standardized conditions. Discussion and Conclusion Step length, cadence, percentage of paretic single support phase and non-paretic swing phase, as well as dynamic stability were the main parameters related to TUG performance and they should be targeted in rehabilitation. PMID:26091555

  5. A guide to gauging ad effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Cashill, J

    1987-09-01

    Techniques that have proven successful in private industry can help hospital executives increase their accountability for advertising expenditures. Among these techniques are: The random telephone survey, which can be used to measure whether the hospital's awareness level among the public has increased as the result of a particular ad; The focus group, which assists the hospital in evaluating how it is perceived in relation to other hospitals in its market; The pretest, to determine which ads to eliminate from a campaign and which ones to refine; Educational seminars and direct-response ads; Reliable baseline data on patients and services for use in comparing figures before and after an ad has been used. Above all, careful planning is required to enable the marketing staff to determine what it wishes to accomplish through advertising and to set measurable goals that reflect its expectations for each component of a campaign. PMID:10283482

  6. Dirac operator on fuzzy AdS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, Hossein; Imaanpur, Ali

    2003-03-01

    In this article we construct the chirality and Dirac operators on noncommutative AdS2. We also derive the discrete spectrum of the Dirac operator which is important in the study of the spectral triple associated to AdS2. It is shown that the degeneracy of the spectrum present in the commutative AdS2 is lifted in the noncommutative case. The way we construct the chirality operator is suggestive of how to introduce the projector operators of the corresponding projective modules on this space.

  7. An xp model on AdS2 spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Vilaplana, Javier; Sierra, Germán

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we formulate the xp model on the AdS2 spacetime. We find that the spectrum of the Hamiltonian has positive and negative eigenvalues, whose absolute values are given by a harmonic oscillator spectrum, which in turn coincides with that of a massive Dirac fermion in AdS2. We extend this result to generic xp models which are shown to be equivalent to a massive Dirac fermion on spacetimes whose metric depend of the xp Hamiltonian. Finally, we construct the generators of the isometry group SO(2,1) of the AdS2 spacetime, and discuss the relation with conformal quantum mechanics.

  8. Adding liraglutide to the backbone therapy of biguanide in patients with coronary artery disease and newly diagnosed type-2 diabetes (the AddHope2 study): a randomised controlled study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Anholm, Christian; Kumarathurai, Preman; Klit, Malene S; Kristiansen, Ole P; Nielsen, Olav W; Ladelund, Steen; Madsbad, Sten; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Haugaard, Steen B

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) more than doubles the risk of death compared with otherwise matched glucose tolerant patients. The biguanide metformin is the drug of choice in treatment of T2DM and has shown to ameliorate cardiovascular morbidity in patients with T2DM and myocardial infarction (MI). The incretin hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) improves β-cell function, insulin sensitivity and causes weight loss and has been suggested to have beneficial effects on cardiac function. The GLP-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA), liraglutide, is currently used for treatment of T2DM but its potential effect on cardiac function has not been investigated in detail. We hypothesised that liraglutide added to metformin backbone therapy in patients with CAD and newly diagnosed T2DM will improve β-cell function and left ventricular systolic function during dobutamine stress. Methods and analyses 40 patients with CAD and newly diagnosed T2DM will receive the intervention liraglutide+metformin and placebo+metformin in this investigator-initiated, double blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, cross-over 12 plus 12 weeks intervention study with a 2-week washout period. The primary cardiovascular end point is changes in left ventricular ejection fraction during stress echocardiography. The primary endocrine end point is β-cell function evaluated during a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. Secondary end points include heart rate variability, diurnal blood pressure, glucagon suppression and inflammatory response (urine, blood and adipose tissue). Ethics and dissemination This study is approved by the Danish Medicines Agency, the Danish Dataprotection Agency and the Regional Committee on Biomedical Research Ethics of the Capital Region of Denmark. The trial will be carried out under the guidance from the GCP unit at Copenhagen University Hospital of Bispebjerg and in accordance with

  9. Accuracy of Nurse-Performed Lung Ultrasound in Patients With Acute Dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    Mumoli, Nicola; Vitale, Josè; Giorgi-Pierfranceschi, Matteo; Cresci, Alessandra; Cei, Marco; Basile, Valentina; Brondi, Barbara; Russo, Elisa; Giuntini, Lucia; Masi, Lorenzo; Cocciolo, Massimo; Dentali, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In clinical practice lung ultrasound (LUS) is becoming an easy and reliable noninvasive tool for the evaluation of dyspnea. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of nurse-performed LUS, in particular, in the diagnosis of acute cardiogenic pulmonary congestion. We prospectively evaluated all the consecutive patients admitted for dyspnea in our Medicine Department between April and July 2014. At admission, serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and LUS was performed by trained nurses blinded to clinical and laboratory data. The accuracy of nurse-performed LUS alone and combined with BNP for the diagnosis of acute cardiogenic dyspnea was calculated. Two hundred twenty-six patients (41.6% men, mean age 78.7 ± 12.7 years) were included in the study. Nurse-performed LUS alone had a sensitivity of 95.3% (95% CI: 92.6–98.1%), a specificity of 88.2% (95% CI: 84.0–92.4%), a positive predictive value of 87.9% (95% CI: 83.7–92.2%) and a negative predictive value of 95.5% (95% CI: 92.7–98.2%). The combination of nurse-performed LUS with BNP level (cut-off 400 pg/mL) resulted in a higher sensitivity (98.9%, 95% CI: 97.4–100%), negative predictive value (98.8%, 95% CI: 97.2–100%), and corresponding negative likelihood ratio (0.01, 95% CI: 0.0, 0.07). Nurse-performed LUS had a good accuracy in the diagnosis of acute cardiogenic dyspnea. Use of this technique in combination with BNP seems to be useful in ruling out cardiogenic dyspnea. Other studies are warranted to confirm our preliminary findings and to establish the role of this tool in other settings. PMID:26945396

  10. Accuracy of Nurse-Performed Lung Ultrasound in Patients With Acute Dyspnea: A Prospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Mumoli, Nicola; Vitale, Josè; Giorgi-Pierfranceschi, Matteo; Cresci, Alessandra; Cei, Marco; Basile, Valentina; Brondi, Barbara; Russo, Elisa; Giuntini, Lucia; Masi, Lorenzo; Cocciolo, Massimo; Dentali, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    In clinical practice lung ultrasound (LUS) is becoming an easy and reliable noninvasive tool for the evaluation of dyspnea. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of nurse-performed LUS, in particular, in the diagnosis of acute cardiogenic pulmonary congestion. We prospectively evaluated all the consecutive patients admitted for dyspnea in our Medicine Department between April and July 2014. At admission, serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and LUS was performed by trained nurses blinded to clinical and laboratory data. The accuracy of nurse-performed LUS alone and combined with BNP for the diagnosis of acute cardiogenic dyspnea was calculated. Two hundred twenty-six patients (41.6% men, mean age 78.7 ± 12.7 years) were included in the study. Nurse-performed LUS alone had a sensitivity of 95.3% (95% CI: 92.6-98.1%), a specificity of 88.2% (95% CI: 84.0-92.4%), a positive predictive value of 87.9% (95% CI: 83.7-92.2%) and a negative predictive value of 95.5% (95% CI: 92.7-98.2%). The combination of nurse-performed LUS with BNP level (cut-off 400 pg/mL) resulted in a higher sensitivity (98.9%, 95% CI: 97.4-100%), negative predictive value (98.8%, 95% CI: 97.2-100%), and corresponding negative likelihood ratio (0.01, 95% CI: 0.0, 0.07). Nurse-performed LUS had a good accuracy in the diagnosis of acute cardiogenic dyspnea. Use of this technique in combination with BNP seems to be useful in ruling out cardiogenic dyspnea. Other studies are warranted to confirm our preliminary findings and to establish the role of this tool in other settings. PMID:26945396

  11. Altered Small-World Brain Networks in Schizophrenia Patients during Working Memory Performance

    PubMed Central

    He, Hao; Sui, Jing; Yu, Qingbao; Turner, Jessica A.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Sponheim, Scott R.; Manoach, Dara S.; Clark, Vincent P.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2012-01-01

    Impairment of working memory (WM) performance in schizophrenia patients (SZ) is well-established. Compared to healthy controls (HC), SZ patients show aberrant blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activations and disrupted functional connectivity during WM performance. In this study, we examined the small-world network metrics computed from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data collected as 35 HC and 35 SZ performed a Sternberg Item Recognition Paradigm (SIRP) at three WM load levels. Functional connectivity networks were built by calculating the partial correlation on preprocessed time courses of BOLD signal between task-related brain regions of interest (ROIs) defined by group independent component analysis (ICA). The networks were then thresholded within the small-world regime, resulting in undirected binarized small-world networks at different working memory loads. Our results showed: 1) at the medium WM load level, the networks in SZ showed a lower clustering coefficient and less local efficiency compared with HC; 2) in SZ, most network measures altered significantly as the WM load level increased from low to medium and from medium to high, while the network metrics were relatively stable in HC at different WM loads; and 3) the altered structure at medium WM load in SZ was related to their performance during the task, with longer reaction time related to lower clustering coefficient and lower local efficiency. These findings suggest brain connectivity in patients with SZ was more diffuse and less strongly linked locally in functional network at intermediate level of WM when compared to HC. SZ show distinctly inefficient and variable network structures in response to WM load increase, comparing to stable highly clustered network topologies in HC. PMID:22701611

  12. Assessment of Myocardial Performance Index and Aortic Elasticity in Patients With Beta-Thalassemia Major

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Cem; Basaran, Ozcan; Altun, Ibrahim; Akin, Fatih; Topal, Yasar; Topal, Hatice; Biteker, Murat; Azik, Mehmet Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to assess myocardial performance index (MPI) and arterial elasticity indices in asymptomatic patients with beta-thalassemia major without known heart disease and to determine relationship between these indices and parameters indicating iron load of body. Methods The study included 55 asymptomatic beta-thalassemia patients (median age: 20 years (10 - 48 years)) without known history of heart disease and 40 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. MPI and arterial elasticity indices were determined by using standard two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography. Data were analyzed by SPSS for Windows version 20.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results Left ventricular mass index (83.917 (50.62 - 144) and 68.37 (41.9 - 113.3)) and MPI (0.464 (0.33 - 0.68) and 0.431 (0.31 - 0.51)) were significantly higher in patients with beta-thalassemia when compared to control group (P < 0.001 and P = 0.006). Aortic elasticity indices were significantly higher while aortic strain and distensibility values were significantly lower in patients with beta-thalassemia compared to controls (all P values < 0.001). Positive correlations were detected between aortic stiffness index and platelet (r = 0.235; P = 0.019) and ferritin values (r = 0.328; P = 0.008). Presence of thalassemia (β = -0.729; P = 0.041) and higher platelet value (β = 0.235; P = 0.019) were significant determinants for increased aortic stiffness in linear regression analysis. Conclusion Arterial elasticity indices and MPI are impaired in patients with beta-thalassemia major and these parameters may be used to predict cardiovascular complications in asymptomatic patients with beta-thalassemia major. PMID:26346439

  13. Serum uric acid and subsequent cognitive performance in patients with pre-existing cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Molshatzki, Noa; Weinstein, Galit; Streifler, Jonathan Y; Goldbourt, Uri; Tanne, David

    2015-01-01

    High serum uric acid (UA) levels are associated with numerous vascular risk factors, and vascular disease, that predispose patients to cognitive impairment, yet UA is also a major natural antioxidant and higher levels have been linked to slower progression of several neurodegenerative disease. In-order to test the association between UA and subsequent cognitive performance among patients that carry a high vascular burden, UA levels were determined by calorimetric enzymatic tests in a sub-cohort of patients with chronic cardiovascular disease who previously participating in a secondary prevention trial. After an average of 9.8±1.7 years, we assessed cognitive performance (Neurotrax Computerized Cognitive Battery) as well as cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) and common carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Among 446 men (mean age 62.3±6.4 yrs) mean UA levels were 5.8±1.1 mg/dL. Adjusted linear regression models revealed that low UA levels (bottom quintile) were associated with poorer cognitive performance. Adjusted differences between the bottom quintile and grouped top UA quintiles were (B coefficient±SE) -4.23±1.28 for global cognitive scores (p = 0.001), -4.69±1.81 for memory scores (p = 0.010), -3.32±1.43 for executive scores (p = 0.020) and -3.43±1.97 for visual spatial scores (p = 0.082). Significant difference was also found for attention scores (p = 0.015). Additional adjustment for impaired CVR and high common carotid IMT slightly attenuated the relationship. Stronger UA effect on cognitive performance was found for older (age>65) patients with significant age interaction for global cognitive score (p = 0.016) and for executive (p = 0.018) and attention domains (p<0.001). In conclusion, we demonstrate that low UA levels in patients with preexisting cardiovascular disease are associated with poorer cognitive function a decade later. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of age

  14. Neuropsychological performance and affective temperaments in Euthymic patients with bipolar disorder type II.

    PubMed

    Romero, Ester; Holtzman, Jessica N; Tannenhaus, Lucila; Monchablon, Romina; Rago, Carlo Mario; Lolich, Maria; Vázquez, Gustavo H

    2016-04-30

    Affective temperament has been suggested as a potential mediator of the effect between genetic predisposition and neurocognitive functioning. As such, this report seeks to assess the extent of the correlation between affective temperament and cognitive function in a group of bipolar II subjects. 46 bipolar II outpatients [mean age 41.4 years (SD 18.2); female 58.9%] and 46 healthy controls [mean age 35.1 years (SD 18); female 56.5%] were evaluated with regard to their demographic and clinical characteristics, affective temperament, and neurocognitive performance. Crude bivariate correlation analyses and multiple linear regression models were constructed between five affective temperament subscales and eight neurocognitive domains. Significant correlations were identified in bipolar patients between hyperthymic temperament and verbal memory and premorbid IQ; cyclothymic temperament and attention; and irritable temperament, attention, and verbal fluency. In adjusting for potential confounders of the relationship between temperament and cognitive function, the strongest mediating factors among the euthymic bipolar patients were found to be residual manic and depressive symptoms. It is therefore concluded that affective temperaments may partially influence the neurocognitive performance of both healthy controls and euthymic patients with bipolar disorder type II in several specific domains. PMID:27086230

  15. Activity performance problems of patients with cardiac diseases and their impact on quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Duruturk, Neslihan; Tonga, Eda; Karatas, Metin; Doganozu, Ersin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To describe the functional consequences of patients with cardiac diseases and analyze associations between activity limitations and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy subjects (mean age: 60.1±12.0 years) were being treated by Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Cardiology Departments were included in the study. Activity limitations and participation restrictions as perceived by the individual were measured by the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). The Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living (NEADL) Scale was used to describe limitations in daily living activities. To detect the impact of activity limitations on quality of life the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) was used. [Results] The subjects described 46 different types of problematic activities. The five most identified problems were walking (45.7%), climbing up the stairs (41.4%), bathing (30%), dressing (28.6%) and outings (27.1%). The associations between COPM performance score with all subgroups of NEADL and NHP; total, energy, physical abilities subgroups, were statistically significant. [Conclusion] Our results showed that patients with cardiac diseases reported problems with a wide range of activities, and that also quality of life may be affected by activities of daily living. COPM can be provided as a patient-focused outcome measure, and it may be a useful tool for identifying those problems. PMID:26311919

  16. Analysis of Trunk Rolling Performances by Mattress Mobility Detection System in Poststroke Patients: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Shang-Lin; Lin, Chia-Huei; Lin, Chueh-Ho; Lu, Liang-Hsuan; Chang, Shin-Tsu; Sung, Wen-Hsu; Wei, Shun-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation of kinematic variables with quality of trunk control in poststroke patients. Methods. This cross-sectional study included stroke subjects with mild to moderate motor deficit corresponding to Brunnstrom stages 3-4. Trunk functional performance was measured using bed mobility monitor system. All tasks were repeated ten times for both directions in each subject. Outcome measurements included the movement time and displacement of center of pressure (CoP) from supine to side lying and returning. Results. The results revealed that a significant longer turning time was observed when turning from the paretic side toward the nonparetic side compared to the other direction, with an estimated mean difference of 0.427 sec (P = 0.005). We found a significant difference in the time of rolling back to supine position between two directions. The displacement of CoP in rolling back from side lying on the nonparetic side was smaller than that from the paretic side with an estimated mean difference of -0.797 cm (P = 0.023). Conclusions. The impaired trunk mobility was associated with increased movement time and decreased displacement of CoP in poststroke patients. Trunk rolling performance has potential in assessment of stroke patients. PMID:27042672

  17. Analysis of Trunk Rolling Performances by Mattress Mobility Detection System in Poststroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Shang-Lin; Lin, Chia-Huei; Lin, Chueh-Ho; Lu, Liang-Hsuan; Chang, Shin-Tsu; Sung, Wen-Hsu; Wei, Shun-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation of kinematic variables with quality of trunk control in poststroke patients. Methods. This cross-sectional study included stroke subjects with mild to moderate motor deficit corresponding to Brunnstrom stages 3-4. Trunk functional performance was measured using bed mobility monitor system. All tasks were repeated ten times for both directions in each subject. Outcome measurements included the movement time and displacement of center of pressure (CoP) from supine to side lying and returning. Results. The results revealed that a significant longer turning time was observed when turning from the paretic side toward the nonparetic side compared to the other direction, with an estimated mean difference of 0.427 sec (P = 0.005). We found a significant difference in the time of rolling back to supine position between two directions. The displacement of CoP in rolling back from side lying on the nonparetic side was smaller than that from the paretic side with an estimated mean difference of −0.797 cm (P = 0.023). Conclusions. The impaired trunk mobility was associated with increased movement time and decreased displacement of CoP in poststroke patients. Trunk rolling performance has potential in assessment of stroke patients. PMID:27042672

  18. Internal qualification and credentialing of radiation oncology physicists to perform patient special procedures.

    PubMed

    Mills, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    In the arena of radiation oncology special procedures, medical physicists are often the focus professionals for implementation and administration of advanced and complex technologies. One of the most vexing and challenging aspects of managing complexity concerns the ongoing internal qualification and credentialing of radiation oncology physicists to perform patient special procedures. To demonstrate ongoing qualification, a physicist must: (a) document initial training and successful completion of competencies to implement and perform this procedure, (b) demonstrate familiarity with all aspects of the commissioning and quality assurance process, (c) demonstrate continuing education respecting this procedure, (d) demonstrate the peer-reviewed completion of a minimum number of patient special procedures during a specified time span, and (e) demonstrate satisfactory overall progress toward maintenance of specialty board certification. In many respects, this information complement is similar to that required by an accredited residency program in therapy physics. In this investigation, we report on the design of a management tool to qualify staff radiation oncology physicists to deliver patient procedures. PMID:24427742

  19. Activity performance problems of patients with cardiac diseases and their impact on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Duruturk, Neslihan; Tonga, Eda; Karatas, Metin; Doganozu, Ersin

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] To describe the functional consequences of patients with cardiac diseases and analyze associations between activity limitations and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy subjects (mean age: 60.1±12.0 years) were being treated by Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Cardiology Departments were included in the study. Activity limitations and participation restrictions as perceived by the individual were measured by the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). The Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living (NEADL) Scale was used to describe limitations in daily living activities. To detect the impact of activity limitations on quality of life the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) was used. [Results] The subjects described 46 different types of problematic activities. The five most identified problems were walking (45.7%), climbing up the stairs (41.4%), bathing (30%), dressing (28.6%) and outings (27.1%). The associations between COPM performance score with all subgroups of NEADL and NHP; total, energy, physical abilities subgroups, were statistically significant. [Conclusion] Our results showed that patients with cardiac diseases reported problems with a wide range of activities, and that also quality of life may be affected by activities of daily living. COPM can be provided as a patient-focused outcome measure, and it may be a useful tool for identifying those problems. PMID:26311919

  20. ADS Development in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    Accelerator driven nuclear transmutation system has been pursued to have a clue to the solution of high-level radioactive waste management. The concept consists of super conducting linac, sub-critical reactor and the beam window. Reference model is set up to 800MW thermal power by using 1.5GeV proton beams with considerations multi-factors such as core criticality. Materials damage is simulated by high-energy particle transport codes and so on. Recent achievement on irradiation materials experiment is stated and the differences are pointed out if core burn-up is considered or not. Heat balance in tank-type ADS indicates the temperature conditions of steam generator, the beam widow and cladding materials. Lead-bismuth eutectics demonstration has been conducted. Corrosion depth rate was shown by experiments.

  1. Supersymmetric warped AdS in extended topologically massive supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deger, N. S.; Kaya, A.; Samtleben, H.; Sezgin, E.

    2014-07-01

    We determine the most general form of off-shell N=(1,1) supergravity field configurations in three dimensions by requiring that at least one off-shell Killing spinor exists. We then impose the field equations of the topologically massive off-shell supergravity and find a class of solutions whose properties crucially depend on the norm of the auxiliary vector field. These are spacelike-squashed and timelike-stretched AdS3 for the spacelike and timelike norms, respectively. At the transition point where the norm vanishes, the solution is null warped AdS3. This occurs when the coefficient of the Lorentz-Chern-Simons term is related to the AdS radius by μℓ=2. We find that the spacelike-squashed AdS3 can be modded out by a suitable discrete subgroup of the isometry group, yielding an extremal black hole solution which avoids closed timelike curves.

  2. Performance monitoring and empathy during active and observational learning in patients with major depression.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Patrizia; Norra, Christine; Juckel, Georg; Suchan, Boris; Bellebaum, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Previous literature established a link between major depressive disorder (MDD) and altered reward processing as well as between empathy and (observational) reward learning. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of MDD on the electrophysiological correlates - the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P300 - of active and observational reward processing and to relate them to trait cognitive and affective empathy. Eighteen patients with MDD and 16 healthy controls performed an active and an observational probabilistic reward-learning task while event- related potentials were recorded. Also, participants were assessed with regard to self-reported cognitive and affective trait empathy. Relative to healthy controls, patients with MDD showed overall impaired learning and attenuated FRN amplitudes, irrespective of feedback valence and learning type (active vs. observational), but comparable P300 amplitudes. In the patient group, but not in controls, higher trait perspective taking scores were significantly correlated with reduced FRN amplitudes. The pattern of results suggests impaired prediction error processing and a negative effect of higher trait empathy on feedback-based learning in patients with MDD. PMID:26057196

  3. Case report of an intracarotid amobarbital procedure performed for a deaf patient.

    PubMed

    Wolff, A B; Sass, K J; Keidan, J

    1994-02-01

    The intracarotid amobarbital procedure (IAP) was conducted with a profoundly deaf young man prior to right anteromedial temporal lobectomy for pharmacologically refractory partial complex seizures. The IAP required considerable modification in order to take into account the use of varying sign language methods and related issues. Visual memory, American Sign Language, signed English, and finger-spelling functioning were all assessed. The patient manifested left hemisphere dominance for all these abilities, performing well under right hemisphere anesthesia. In contrast, no ability to function on these tasks was detectable when the left hemisphere was anesthetized. This demonstrates that an intact left temporal lobe and related structures are sufficient to support sign language functioning. The development of a deaf adaptation of the IAP is of methodological significance, as the IAP is thereby rendered accessible for deaf patients. PMID:8150885

  4. Analysis of cognitive performance in schizophrenia patients and healthy individuals with unsupervised clustering models.

    PubMed

    Silver, Henry; Shmoish, Michael

    2008-05-30

    Currently, assignment of cognitive test results to particular cognitive domains is guided by theoretical considerations and expert judgments which may vary. More objective means of classification may advance understanding of the relationships between test performance and the cognitive functions probed. We examined whether "atheoretical" analyses of cognitive test data can help identify potential hidden structures in cognitive performance. Novel data-mining methods which "let the data talk" without a priori theoretically bound constraints were used to analyze neuropsychological test results of 75 schizophrenia patients and 57 healthy individuals. The analyses were performed on the combined sample to maximize the "atheoretical" approach and allow it to reveal different structures of cognition in patients and controls. Analyses used unsupervised clustering methods, including hierarchical clustering, self-organizing maps (SOM), k-means and supermagnetic clustering (SPC). The model revealed two major clusters containing accuracy and reaction time measures respectively. The sensitivity (75% versus 52%) and specificity (95% versus 77% ) of these clusters for diagnosing schizophrenia differed. Downstream branching was influenced by stimulus domain. Predictions arising from this "atheoretical" model are supported by evidence from published studies. This preliminary study suggests that appropriate application of data-mining methods may contribute to investigation of cognitive functions. PMID:18440074

  5. An Australian mixed methods pilot study exploring students performing patient risk screening.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Simone J; Golder, Janet; Cant, Robyn P; Davidson, Zoe E

    2016-06-01

    Clinical placement shortages and rising costs have created demand to provide low-resource, high value student learning opportunities. Malnutrition screening provides a vehicle for achieving this. A mixed methods explanatory sequential intervention study investigated time costs, and students' perceptions of preparedness after performing routine patient screening tasks, as well as students' overall views on their feelings of confidence and preparedness when commencing their first clinical placements. Pre-clinical student dietitians commencing initial placements participated (n=58), with 16 of these forming a subgroup who performed malnutrition screening tasks while the others attended usual placement orientation. The time saved when students undertook screening tasks usually assigned to nurses was substantial. Questionnaires revealed that student perceived confidence increased in the screening group when compared with controls. Focus group themes included "anxiety and confidence," "learning in the clinical learning environment," "communication skill development," and "the pre-placement screening experience." Students performing routine patient-screening tasks prior to initial clinical placement has potential cost savings for healthcare organizations and was perceived to be valuable for learning. PMID:26685779

  6. A memory and organizational aid improves AD research consent capacity: Results of a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rubright, Jonathan; Sankar, Pamela; Casarett, David J; Gur, Ruben; Xie, Sharon X; Karlawish, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Objectives AD patients' early and progressive cognitive impairments hinder their capacity to provide informed consent. Unfortunately, the limited research on techniques to improve capacity has shown mixed results. Therefore, we tested whether a memory and organizational aid improves AD patient performance on measures of capacity and competency to give informed consent. Design, Setting, and Participants AD patients randomly assigned to standard consent, or standard plus a memory and organizational aid. Intervention Memory and organizational aid summarized at a 6th grade reading level the content of information mandated under the Common Rule's informed consent disclosure requirements. Measurements Three psychiatrists without access to patient data independently reviewed MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Clinical Research (MacCAT-CR) interview transcripts to judge whether the patient was capable of providing informed consent. The agreement of at least two of three experts defined a participant as capable of providing informed consent. Secondary outcomes are MacCAT-CR measures of understanding, appreciation and reasoning, and comparison to cognitively normal older adult norms. Results AD intervention and control groups were similar in terms of age, education, and cognitive status. The intervention group was more likely to be judged competent than control group and had higher scores on MacCAT-CR measure of understanding. The intervention had no effect on measures of appreciation or reasoning. Conclusions A consent process that addresses an AD patients' deficits in memory and attention can improve capacity to give informed consent for early phase AD research. The results also validate the MacCAT-CR as an instrument to measure capacity, especially the understanding subscale. PMID:20808101

  7. The accuracy and performance of the A&D TM 2421, a new ambulatory blood pressure monitoring device based on the cuff-oscillometric method and the Korotkoff sound technique.

    PubMed

    Imai, Y; Sasaki, S; Minami, N; Munakata, M; Hashimoto, J; Sakuma, H; Sakuma, M; Watanabe, N; Imai, K; Sekino, H

    1992-10-01

    The accuracy and performance of the A&D TM 2421, a new ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring device using both the cuff-oscillometric method (O) and the Korotkoff sound method (K) were evaluated. The device was tested for accuracy under static and dynamic conditions by simultaneous comparison with two observers using a standard mercury column sphygmomanometer (standard method) and by the objective recording method (ORM). The performance of the device was also evaluated under ordinary ambulatory conditions. The mean differences in BP of standard method from K-method were -1.2 +/- 4.7 mm Hg systole and 1.3 +/- 4.7 mm Hg diastole (n = 323, mean +/- SD) and those of standard method from O-method were -0.4 +/- 5.3 mm Hg systole and 1.4 +/- 5.1 mm Hg diastole (n = 323). The agreement between each of the two methods of the device and the standard method was within 10 mm Hg for more than 90% of both systolic and diastolic readings. During bicycle exercise, the mean differences in BP of standard method from K-method were -3.4 +/- 4.8 mm Hg systole and 1.8 +/- 5.2 mm Hg diastole (n = 71) and those of standard method from O-method were -1.1 +/- 7.3 mm Hg systole and 1.7 +/- 7.8 mm Hg diastole (n = 67). There was a greater scatter in the individual comparisons of the device and the standard method during exercise, especially in diastolic BP. The relation between the device and ORM was almost similar to that between the device and the standard method.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1418835

  8. Efficacy and tolerability of adding coenzyme A 400 U/d capsule to stable statin therapy for the treatment of patients with mixed dyslipidemia: an 8-week, multicenter, double-Blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with mixed hyperlipidemia usually are in need of combination therapy to achieve low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglyceride (TG) target values for reduction of cardiovascular risk. This study investigated the efficacy and safety of adding a new hypolipidemic agent, coenzyme A (CoA) to stable statin therapy in patients with mixed hyperlipidemia. Methods In this multi-center, 8-week, double-blind study, adults who had received ≥8 weeks of stable statin therapy and had hypertriglyceridemia (TG level at 2.3-6.5 mmol/L) were randomized to receive CoA 400 U/d or placebo plus stable dosage of statin. Efficacy was assessed by the changes in the levels and patterns of lipoproteins. Tolerability was assessed by the incidence and severity of adverse events (AEs). Results A total of 304 patients with mixed hyperlipidemia were randomized to receive CoA 400 U/d plus statin or placebo plus statin (n = 152, each group). After treatment for 8 weeks, the mean percent change in TG was significantly greater with CoA plus statin compared with placebo plus statin (-25.9% vs -4.9%, respectively; p = 0.0003). CoA plus statin was associated with significant reductions in TC (-9.1% vs -3.1%; p = 0.0033), LDL-C (-9.9% vs 0.1%; p = 0.003), and non- high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-13.5% vs -5.7%; p = 0.0039). There was no significant difference in the frequency of AEs between groups. No serious AEs were considered treatment related. Conclusions In these adult patients with persistent hypertriglyceridemia, CoA plus statin therapy improved TG and other lipoprotein parameters to a greater extent than statin alone and has no obviously adverse effect. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01928342. PMID:24382338

  9. Effect of novel patient interaction on students’ performance of pregnancy options counseling

    PubMed Central

    Shaddeau, Angela; Nimz, Abigail; Sheeder, Jeanelle; Tocce, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Background Although options counseling is a fundamental skill for medical providers, previous research has identified gaps in medical school reproductive health education. Purpose To determine if a 1-h novel patient interaction (NPI) improves student performance when caring for a standardized patient with an unintended pregnancy. Methods From September 2012 to June 2013 we randomized third-year medical students at the University of Colorado School of Medicine to the standard curriculum plus an NPI, or the standard curriculum only. The NPI consisted of a 1-h small-group session with a patient who discussed her experiences with options counseling and her decision to terminate her pregnancy. Students completed an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) at the rotation's end, which included options counseling. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants achieving ‘excellence’ on the OSCE checklist. ‘Excellence’ was defined as a score ≥90%. Examinations were flagged as ‘unsatisfactory encounters’ if core competencies were not addressed. OSCE standardized patients and evaluators were blinded to group assignment. Results In total, 135 students were eligible and randomized: 75 to NPI; 60 to control. During the OSCE, few students achieved ‘excellence’ (24% NPI vs. 28% control, p=0.57). There were no differences between scores for components of options counseling. More students in the control group ‘appeared somewhat uncomfortable’ delivering the pregnancy test results (5% NPI vs. 18% control, p=0.006). More than half (54%) of the intervention group and 67% of controls had ‘unsatisfactory encounters’ (p=0.16), almost exclusively due to omission of adoption. Most students addressed abortion (96% NPI vs. 92% control, p=0.29). Conclusions A 1-h NPI does not improve medical students’ performance of pregnancy options counseling and the option of adoption is routinely omitted. Adoption is clearly an area that needs greater attention

  10. Measurement of global functional performance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using rheumatology function tests

    PubMed Central

    Escalante, Agustín; Haas, Roy W; del Rincón, Inmaculada

    2004-01-01

    Outcome assessment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) includes measurement of physical function. We derived a scale to quantify global physical function in RA, using three performance-based rheumatology function tests (RFTs). We measured grip strength, walking velocity, and shirt button speed in consecutive RA patients attending scheduled appointments at six rheumatology clinics, repeating these measurements after a median interval of 1 year. We extracted the underlying latent variable using principal component factor analysis. We used the Bayesian information criterion to assess the global physical function scale's cross-sectional fit to criterion standards. The criteria were joint tenderness, swelling, and deformity, pain, physical disability, current work status, and vital status at 6 years after study enrolment. We computed Guyatt's responsiveness statistic for improvement according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) definition. Baseline functional performance data were available for 777 patients, and follow-up data were available for 681. Mean ± standard deviation for each RFT at baseline were: grip strength, 14 ± 10 kg; walking velocity, 194 ± 82 ft/min; and shirt button speed, 7.1 ± 3.8 buttons/min. Grip strength and walking velocity departed significantly from normality. The three RFTs loaded strongly on a single factor that explained ≥70% of their combined variance. We rescaled the factor to vary from 0 to 100. Its mean ± standard deviation was 41 ± 20, with a normal distribution. The new global scale had a stronger fit than the primary RFT to most of the criterion standards. It correlated more strongly with physical disability at follow-up and was more responsive to improvement defined according to the ACR20 and ACR50 definitions. We conclude that a performance-based physical function scale extracted from three RFTs has acceptable distributional and measurement properties and is responsive to clinically meaningful change. It

  11. Effect of L-carnitine on exercise performance in patients with mitochondrial myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, A.C.; Bravo, D.M.; Nápolis, L.M.; Mello, M.T.; Oliveira, A.S.B.; Neder, J.A.; Nery, L.E.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise intolerance due to impaired oxidative metabolism is a prominent symptom in patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM), but it is still uncertain whether L-carnitine supplementation is beneficial for patients with MM. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of L-carnitine on exercise performance in MM. Twelve MM subjects (mean age±SD=35.4±10.8 years) with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) were first compared to 10 healthy controls (mean age±SD=29±7.8 years) before they were randomly assigned to receive L-carnitine supplementation (3 g/daily) or placebo in a double-blind crossover design. Clinical status, body composition, respiratory function tests, peripheral muscle strength (isokinetic and isometric torque) and cardiopulmonary exercise tests (incremental to peak exercise and at 70% of maximal), constant work rate (CWR) exercise test, to the limit of tolerance [Tlim]) were assessed after 2 months of L-carnitine/placebo administration. Patients with MM presented with lower mean height, total body weight, fat-free mass, and peripheral muscle strength compared to controls in the pre-test evaluation. After L-carnitine supplementation, the patients with MM significantly improved their Tlim (14±1.9 vs 11±1.4 min) and oxygen consumption (V˙O2) at CWR exercise, both at isotime (1151±115 vs 1049±104 mL/min) and at Tlim (1223±114 vs 1060±108 mL/min). These results indicate that L-carnitine supplementation may improve aerobic capacity and exercise tolerance during high-intensity CWRs in MM patients with CPEO. PMID:25714882

  12. Cognitive Behavioral Performance of Untreated Depressed Patients with Mild Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mi; Zhong, Ning; Lu, Shengfu; Wang, Gang; Feng, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the working memory performance of 18 patients experiencing their first onset of mild depression without treatment and 18 healthy matched controls. The results demonstrated that working memory impairment in patients with mild depression occurred when memorizing the position of a picture but not when memorizing the pictures themselves. There was no significant difference between the two groups in the emotional impact on the working memory, indicating that the attenuation of spatial working memory was not affected by negative emotion; however, cognitive control selectively affected spatial working memory. In addition, the accuracy of spatial working memory in the depressed patients was not significantly reduced, but the reaction time was significantly extended compared with the healthy controls. This finding indicated that there was no damage to memory encoding and function maintenance in the patients but rather only impaired memory retrieval, suggesting that the extent of damage to the working memory system and cognitive control abilities was associated with the corresponding depressive symptoms. The development of mild to severe depressive symptoms may be accompanied by spatial working memory damage from the impaired memory retrieval function extending to memory encoding and memory retention impairments. In addition, the impaired cognitive control began with an inadequate capacity to automatically process internal negative emotions and further extended to impairment of the ability to regulate and suppress external emotions. The results of the mood-congruent study showed that the memory of patients with mild symptoms of depression was associated with a mood-congruent memory effect, demonstrating that mood-congruent memory was a typical feature of depression, regardless of the severity of depression. This study provided important information for understanding the development of cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26730597

  13. A programmable and implantable pumping system for systemic chemotherapy: a performance analysis in 52 patients.

    PubMed

    Vogelzang, N J; Ruane, M; Ratain, M J; Dhowlatshahi, K; Chodak, G W

    1987-12-01

    We have prospectively evaluated the performance of the implanted battery-powered Medtronic (Minneapolis) SynchroMed infusion system. Between July 1984 and July 1986, fifty-three SynchroMed pumps were implanted in 52 patients for phase I and II trials of low-dose continuous-infusion doxorubicin (N = 35) or vinblastine (N = 17). The median duration of pump function was 145 days (mean, 180; range, 20 to 787 +) and the systems infused drugs for 61% (range, 32% to 100%) of their patient implant time. During 10,045 patient days (27.5 years) of implantation, there have been no failures of the pump mechanism and pump accuracy was excellent (2.2% error rate in 256 analyzed refills). The median cost of the hospitalization for implantation was +17,140 in 14 analyzed cases. Complications requiring a second surgical procedure occurred with 13 systems (24%). Two of the complications were related to localized cutaneous hypersensitivity to vinblastine, four were directly related to system complications, and seven were secondary to implant procedure problems. Seven patients (13%) requested removal of the device after tumor progression occurred. Based on this experience, the company has made improvements in certain aspects of system design and has implemented a comprehensive user training program to minimize procedure-related problems. The Medtronic SynchroMed is an accurate and sophisticated system that allows infusion of low-dose doxorubicin and of vinblastine for prolonged periods. Extravasation of these vesicant agents must be carefully prevented. The financial cost of this implanted system may limit its use to patients with an expected survival of 5 months or longer. PMID:3316517

  14. Cognitive Behavioral Performance of Untreated Depressed Patients with Mild Depressive Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Zhong, Ning; Lu, Shengfu; Wang, Gang; Feng, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the working memory performance of 18 patients experiencing their first onset of mild depression without treatment and 18 healthy matched controls. The results demonstrated that working memory impairment in patients with mild depression occurred when memorizing the position of a picture but not when memorizing the pictures themselves. There was no significant difference between the two groups in the emotional impact on the working memory, indicating that the attenuation of spatial working memory was not affected by negative emotion; however, cognitive control selectively affected spatial working memory. In addition, the accuracy of spatial working memory in the depressed patients was not significantly reduced, but the reaction time was significantly extended compared with the healthy controls. This finding indicated that there was no damage to memory encoding and function maintenance in the patients but rather only impaired memory retrieval, suggesting that the extent of damage to the working memory system and cognitive control abilities was associated with the corresponding depressive symptoms. The development of mild to severe depressive symptoms may be accompanied by spatial working memory damage from the impaired memory retrieval function extending to memory encoding and memory retention impairments. In addition, the impaired cognitive control began with an inadequate capacity to automatically process internal negative emotions and further extended to impairment of the ability to regulate and suppress external emotions. The results of the mood-congruent study showed that the memory of patients with mild symptoms of depression was associated with a mood-congruent memory effect, demonstrating that mood-congruent memory was a typical feature of depression, regardless of the severity of depression. This study provided important information for understanding the development of cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26730597

  15. Evaluation of standardized teaching plans for hospitalized pediatric patients: a performance improvement project.

    PubMed

    Blagojevic, Joanne; Stephens, Sigrid

    2008-01-01

    Discharge teaching in a pediatric hospital setting is difficult because the situation involves multiple learners, time constraints, and differing skill levels of nurse teachers. Shortened length of stay forces nurses to complete patient education efficiently. Unstructured education can lead to failed learning, as evidenced by readmissions and postdischarge feedback. A performance improvement project was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of standardized teaching plans for diabetes mellitus and infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Preliminary data indicated a passing score of at least 90% on posttests by all learners, suggesting that standardized teaching plans may help nurses complete prescribed discharge teaching. PMID:18507236

  16. Analysis of motor function in 6-month-old male and female 3xTg-AD mice.

    PubMed

    Stover, Kurt R; Campbell, Mackenzie A; Van Winssen, Christine M; Brown, Richard E

    2015-03-15

    The 3xTg-AD mouse has high validity as a model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) because it develops both amyloid beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Human patients with AD typically develop motor deficits, which worsen as the disease progresses, but 3xTg-AD mice have been reported to show enhanced motor abilities. We investigated the motor behaviour phenotype of male and female 3xTg-AD and B6129SF2 wildtype mice on a battery of motor behaviours at 6 months of age. Compared to wildtype mice, the 3xTg-AD mice had enhanced motor performance on the Rotarod, but worse performance on the grid suspension task. In gait analysis 3xTg-AD mice had a longer stride length and made more foot slips on the balance beam than wildtype mice. There was no overall difference in voluntary wheel-running activity between genotypes, but there was a disruption in circadian activity rhythm in 3xTg-AD mice. In some motor tasks, such as the Rotarod and balance beam, females appeared to perform better than males, but this sex differences was accounted for by differences in body weight. Our results indicate that while the 3xTg-AD mice show enhanced performance on the Rotarod, they have poorer performance on other motor behaviour tasks, indicating that their motor behaviour phenotype is more complex than previously reported. The presence of the P301L transgene may explain the enhancement of Rotarod performance but the poorer performance on other motor behaviour tasks may be due to other transgenes. PMID:25486177

  17. Value Added in English Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Andrew; McCormack, Tanya; Evans, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Value-added indicators are now a central part of school accountability in England, and value-added information is routinely used in school improvement at both the national and the local levels. This article describes the value-added models that are being used in the academic year 2007-8 by schools, parents, school inspectors, and other…

  18. Per aspirin ad astra...

    PubMed

    Hartung, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Taking the 110th anniversary of marketing of aspirin as starting point, the almost scary toxicological profile of aspirin is contrasted with its actual use experience. The author concludes that we are lucky that, in 1899, there was no regulatory toxicology. Adding, for the purpose of this article, a fourth R to the Three Rs, i.e. Realism, three reality-checks are carried out. The first one comes to the conclusion that the tools of toxicology are hardly adequate for the challenges ahead. The second one concludes that, specifically, the implementation of the EU REACH system is not feasible with these tools, mainly with regard to throughput. The third one challenges the belief that classical alternative methods, i.e. replacing animal test-based tools one by one, is actually leading to a new toxicology - it appears to change only patches of the patchwork, but not to overcome any inherent limitations other than ethical ones. The perspective lies in the Toxicology for the 21st Century initiatives, which aim to create a new approach from the scratch, by an evidence-based toxicology and a global "Human Toxicology Programme". PMID:20105011

  19. Comparison of Prefrontal Atrophy and Episodic Memory Performance in Dysexecutive Alzheimer's Disease and Behavioral-Variant Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Stephanie; Bertoux, Maxime; Savage, Greg; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier; Hornberger, Michael

    2016-02-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) sometimes presents with prominent executive dysfunction and associated prefrontal cortex atrophy. The impact of such executive deficits on episodic memory performance as well as their neural correlates in AD, however, remains unclear. The aim of the current study was to investigate episodic memory and brain atrophy in AD patients with relatively spared executive functioning (SEF-AD; n = 12) and AD patients with relatively impaired executive functioning (IEF-AD; n = 23). We also compared the AD subgroups with a group of behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia patients (bvFTD; n = 22), who typically exhibit significant executive deficits, and age-matched healthy controls (n = 38). On cognitive testing, the three patient groups showed comparable memory profiles on standard episodic memory tests, with significant impairment relative to controls. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed extensive prefrontal and medial temporal lobe atrophy in IEF-AD and bvFTD, whereas this was limited to the middle frontal gyrus and hippocampus in SEF-AD. Moreover, the additional prefrontal atrophy in IEF-AD and bvFTD correlated with memory performance, whereas this was not the case for SEF-AD. These findings indicate that IEF-AD patients show prefrontal atrophy in regions similar to bvFTD, and suggest that this contributes to episodic memory performance. This has implications for the differential diagnosis of bvFTD and subtypes of AD. PMID:26923025

  20. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of naltrexone in plasma of hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kambia, K; Bah, S; Dine, T; Azar, R; Odou, P; Gressier, B; Luyckx, M; Brunet, C; Ballester, L; Cazin, M; Cazin, J C

    2000-05-01

    A simple, sensitive, selective and reliable reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with UV detection is described for the determination of naltrexone in plasma samples. Naltrexone and the internal standard, naloxone, were isolated from plasma either with a liquid-liquid extraction method using ethyl acetate or with a solid-phase extraction method using Sep-Pack C18 cartridge before chromatography. The extracts were dried under a stream of nitrogen and the samples were reconstituted in the mobile phase, then 20 microL were injected on a Waters Symmetry C18 column (5 microm particle size, 4.6 x 150 mm). The mobile phase consisted of 0.06% triethylamine (pH 2.8)-acetonitrile (92:8, v/v) pumped at 1 mL/min. The peak-area ratio versus plasma concentration was linear over the range of 10-500 ng/mL and the detection limit was less than 8 ng/mL. Quantification was by ultra-violet detection at 204 nm. The present method was applied to the determination of the plasma concentration of naltrexone in dialyzed patients. Patients (n = 8) with severe generalized pruritus received 50 mg of naltrexone orally per day for 2 weeks. The variability in the therapeutic response in treated patients required plasma concentration investigations of this opioid antagonist. PMID:10850617

  1. Performance in multiple domains of social cognition in parents of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Marie-Audrey; Plana, India; Jackson, Philip L; Godmaire-Duhaime, Florence; Bédard Lacroix, Jacinthe; Achim, Amélie M

    2014-12-15

    Social cognition refers to a set of cognitive abilities that allow us to perceive and interpret social stimuli. Social cognition is affected in schizophrenia and impairments have also been documented in unaffected relatives, suggesting that social cognition may be related to a genetic vulnerability to the disease. This study aims to investigate potential impairments in four domains of social cognition (mentalizing, emotion recognition, social knowledge and empathy) in the same group of relatives in order to gather a more complete picture of social cognition difficulties in this population. The Batterie Intégrée de Cognition Sociale (BICS) (mentalizing, emotion recognition, and social knowledge) and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) (empathy) were administered to 31 parents of patients with a psychotic disorder and 38 healthy controls. Parents of patients performed significantly worse than controls on the mentalizing test but significantly better on the social knowledge test. No significant between-group differences were observed for emotion recognition and empathy. This study is the first to evaluate four social cognition domains in this population. The results precise which social cognition processes may be impaired or preserved in unaffected relatives of patients and lead us to propose an hypothesis about a mechanism that could underlie the mentalizing difficulties observed in this population. PMID:25216560

  2. [Neuroprogression and cognition in Bipolar Disorders: A systematic review of cognitive performance in euthymic patients].

    PubMed

    Lolich, María; Holtzman, Jessica N; Rago, Carlo M; Vázquez, Gustavo H

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, investigators have begun to consider the possibility of explaining the physiopathology of bipolar disorder from a neuroprogressive perspective. The evidence that supports the feasibility of such an approach is varied, and arises from neuroimaging studies, batteries of neurocognitive evaluations, and tests to identify the specific biomarkers of the disorder. The present article seeks to perform a review of the research that investigates the cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder. A bibliographic revision was performed of articles published between 1990 and 2015. Levels of cognitive performance were explored in both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. The compiled studies signal the presence of altered cognitive function, even during periods of euthymia. However, there are contradictory results as to whether bipolar disorder presents a degenerative course. New lines of investigation suggest that only a percentage of individuals with bipolar disorder are affected in a progressive manner. It is of paramount importance to perform new longitudinal studies in high-risk populations, so as to validate or refute a neuroprogressive model of cognitive deficits in patients with bipolar disorder. PMID:26672503

  3. Nurses versus physicians' knowledge, attitude, and performance on care for the family members of dying patients

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahimohammad, Abdolghani; Firouzkouhi, Mohammadreza; Amrollahimishvan, Fatemeh; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Nurses and physicians must be competent enough to provide care for the clients. As a lack of knowledge and a poor attitude result in a low performance of delivering care, this study aimed to explore the nurses versus physicians’ knowledge, attitude, and performance on care for the family members of dying patients (FMDPs). Methods: This descriptive study was conducted at the educational hospitals in Isfahan, Iran. The samples were 110 nurses and 110 physicians. The data were collected through a convenience sampling method and using a valid and reliable questionnaire. Results: The average knowledge, attitude, and performance on care for the FMDPs were not significantly different between nurses and physicians (p>0.05). The majority of nurses (55.4%) and physician (63.6%) were at a moderate and a fair level of knowledge of care for the FMDPs. Most of the nurses (81%) and physicians (87.3%) had a positive attitude towards caring the FMDPs. Most of the nurses (70%) and physicians (86.3%) had a moderate and fair performance. Conclusion: Having enough knowledge and skills, and a positive attitude are necessary for caring the FMDPs. Nurses’ and physicians' competencies must be improved through continuing educational programs and holding international and national conferences with a focus on the palliative care. PMID:26838571

  4. Success rates and prognosis of heart valvuloplasty and valve replacement performed for elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weichao; He, Fei; Shi, Gongning

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the success rates and prognosis of heart valvuloplasty and valve replacement for elderly patients, and to provide clinical evidence. Methods: A total of 1240 patients who received heart valve surgeries in our hospital from June 2004 to October 2014 were selected and retrospectively analyzed. They were divided into two groups based on age (60), and those older than 60 (Group B) suffered from rheumatic valvular heart disease and nonrheumatic valvular heart disease including degenerative valve disease. Mitral valve replacement (MVR), tricuspid valve replacement (TVR), aortic valve replacement (AVR), double valve replacement (DVR), mitral valvuloplasty (MVP) and tricuspid valvuloplasty (TVP) were performed by using bioprosthetic and mechanical valves. Before surgery, coronary angiography, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), left atrial thrombectomy, left atrial wall folding and radiofrequency ablation were conducted. For the patients younger than 60 (Group A) who had congenital heart disease, rheumatic valvular heart disease and valvular heart disease, MVR, AVR, DVR, MVP, TVP and closed cuspid commissurotomy were performed with bioprosthetic and mechanical valves. The two groups were then monitored. Results: The mortality rates of Group A and Group B were 2.7% (16 cases) and 3.1% (20 cases) respectively. They died mainly of malignant ventricular arrhythmias, multiple organ failure, left ventricular rupture, low cardiac output syndrome, acute renal failure, respiratory failure, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, mechanical valve failure and cerebrovascular accident. The two groups had significantly different application rates of bioprosthetic valve, times of auxiliary ventilation and hospitalization stay lengths (P<0.05), but left ventricular ejection fractions, left ventricular end-diastolic diameters (LVEDDs), mortality rates as well as times of aortic cross-clamping and cardiopulmonary bypass were similar (P>0.05). LVEDD, complicated coronary

  5. Technical performance of a commercial laser surface scanning system for patient setup correction in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moser, Torsten; Fleischhacker, Sarah; Schubert, Kai; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele; Karger, Christian P

    2011-10-01

    In conformal radiotherapy, careful setup of the patient and setup verification prior to irradiation is essential. The technical performance of a commercial 3D-surface imaging system (Galaxy, LAP Laser, Lüneburg, Germany) for patient setup correction was evaluated. The system reconstructs a 3D-surface model by scanning the patient with a laser line while a camera records its reflections. This surface model is then compared with a reference model and a setup correction with 6 degrees of freedom is derived. The calibration stability of the system was investigated using the daily check phantom of the manufacturer. The accuracy and reproducibility of the system were investigated with an anthropomorphic phantom by performing 1D- and 3D-shifts with and without breathing of the phantom, respectively. In addition, measurements in a healthy volunteer were performed. With a few exceptions, the day-by-day variations of the calibration were <0.5mm in LAT and LNG direction and <1.5mm in VRT direction, respectively. Besides day-by-day variations, also baseline-shifts of up to 3mm were observed. The lowest observed accuracy of the system in detecting pre-defined shifts of the rigid phantom was found in lateral direction. Here, mean deviations of -0.15 ± 0.46 mm for 1D-shifts and -0.12 ± 0.26 mm for 3D-shifts were found. For the ventilated phantom, the lowest observed accuracy was found in vertical direction with mean deviations of 1.16 ± 0.6mm for 1D-shifts and -0.45 ± 0.57 mm for 3D-shifts. In a healthy volunteer, the accuracy was lowest in longitudinal direction with 1.7 ± 1.5mm. The overall technical accuracy of the surface imaging system can be considered to be acceptable for application in fractionated radiotherapy. For special radiotherapy techniques such as SBRT, an increased accuracy might be necessary. To define the clinical role of the system, patient studies for different target locations are required. PMID:21055989

  6. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Performed by Residents: A Retrospective Study on 569 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Stefano; Zetti, Giorgio; Cortese, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed by residents. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 569 elective laparoscopic cholecystectomies. Results. Duration of surgery was 84 ± 39 min for residents versus  66 ± 47 min for staff surgeons, P < 0.001. Rate of conversion was 3.2% for residents versus 2.7% for staff surgeons, P = 0.7. There was no difference in the rates of intraoperative and postoperative complications for residents (1.2% and 3.2%) versus staff surgeons (1.5% and 3.1%), P = 0.7 and P = 0.9. Postoperative hospital stay was 3.3 ± 1.8 days for residents versus  3.4 ± 3.2 days for staff surgeons, P = 0.6. One death in patients operated by residents (1/246) and one in patients operated by staff surgeons (1/323) were found, P = 0.8. No difference in the time to return to normal daily activities between residents (11.3 ± 4.2 days) and staff surgeons (10.8 ± 5.6 days) was found, P = 0.2. Shorter duration of surgery when operating the senior residents (75 ± 31 minutes) than the junior residents (87 ± 27 minutes), P = 0.003. Conclusion. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed by residents is a safe procedure with results comparable to those of staff surgeons. PMID:25379566

  7. Citalopram for agitation in Alzheimer’s disease (CitAD): design and methods

    PubMed Central

    Drye, Lea T.; Ismail, Zahinoor; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Weintraub, Daniel; Marano, Christopher; Pelton, Gregory; Frangakis, Constantine; Rabins, Peter V.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Meinert, Curtis L.; Devanand, D.P.; Yesavage, Jerome; Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Schneider, Lon S.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Agitation is one of the most common neuropsychiatric symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and is associated with serious adverse consequences for patients and caregivers. Evidence-supported treatment options for agitation are limited. The citalopram for agitation in Alzheimer’s disease (CitAD) study was designed to evaluate the potential of citalopram to ameliorate these symptoms. Methods CitAD is a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled multicenter clinical trial with two parallel treatment groups assigned in a 1:1 ratio and randomization stratified by clinical center. The study has eight recruiting clinical centers, a chair’s office and a coordinating center located in university settings in the United States and Canada. 200 people having probable Alzheimer’s disease with clinically significant agitation and without major depression are being recruited. Patients are randomized to receive citalopram (target dose of 30 mg/day) or matching placebo. Caregivers of patients in both treatment groups receive a structured psychosocial therapy. Agitation will be compared between treatment groups using the NeuroBehavioral Rating Scale and the AD Cooperative Study- Clinical Global Impression of Change which are the primary outcomes. Functional performance, cognition, caregiver distress and rates of adverse and serious adverse events will also be measured. Conclusion The authors believe the design elements in CitAD are important features to be included in trials assessing the safety and efficacy of psychotropic medications for clinically significant agitation in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:22301195

  8. Contrasting diagnosis performance of forced oscillation and spirometry in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and respiratory symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Alvaro Camilo Dias; Barbosa, Wellington Ribeiro; Lopes, Agnaldo José; da Rocha Castelar Pinheiro, Geraldo; de Melo, Pedro Lopes

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis is directly responsible for 10% to 20% of all mortality. The best way to improve the prognosis is early detection and treatment. The forced oscillation technique is easy to perform and offers a detailed exam, which may be helpful in the early detection of respiratory changes. This study was undertaken to (1) evaluate the clinical potential of the forced oscillation technique in the detection of early respiratory alterations in rheumatoid arthritis patients with respiratory complaints and (2) to compare the sensitivity of forced oscillation technique and spirometric parameters. METHODS: A total of 40 individuals were analyzed: 20 healthy and 20 with rheumatoid arthritis (90% with respiratory complaints). The clinical usefulness of the parameters was evaluated by investigating the sensibility, the specificity and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01641705. RESULTS: The early adverse respiratory effects of rheumatoid arthritis were adequately detected by the forced oscillation technique parameters, and a high accuracy for clinical use was obtained (AUC>0.9, Se = 80%, Sp = 95%). The use of spirometric parameters did not obtain an appropriate accuracy for clinical use. The diagnostic performance of the forced oscillation technique parameters was significantly higher than that of spirometry. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study provide substantial evidence that the forced oscillation technique can contribute to the easy identification of initial respiratory abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis patients that are not detectable by spirometric exams. Therefore, we believe that the forced oscillation technique can be used as a complementary exam that may help to improve the treatment of breathing disorders in rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:23018292

  9. Supergravity at the boundary of AdS supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsel, Aaron J.; Compère, Geoffrey

    2009-04-01

    We give a general analysis of AdS boundary conditions for spin-3/2 Rarita-Schwinger fields and investigate boundary conditions preserving supersymmetry for a graviton multiplet in AdS4. Linear Rarita-Schwinger fields in AdSd are shown to admit mixed Dirichlet-Neumann boundary conditions when their mass is in the range 0≤|m|<1/2lAdS. We also demonstrate that mixed boundary conditions are allowed for larger masses when the inner product is “renormalized” accordingly with the action. We then use the results obtained for |m|=1/lAdS to explore supersymmetric boundary conditions for N=1 AdS4 supergravity in which the metric and Rarita-Schwinger fields are fluctuating at the boundary. We classify boundary conditions that preserve boundary supersymmetry or superconformal symmetry. Under the AdS/CFT dictionary, Neumann boundary conditions in d=4 supergravity correspond to gauging the superconformal group of the three-dimensional CFT describing M2-branes, while N=1 supersymmetric mixed boundary conditions couple the CFT to N=1 superconformal topologically massive gravity.

  10. Dietary nitrate supplementation improves exercise performance and decreases blood pressure in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Berry, Michael J; Justus, Nicholas W; Hauser, Jordan I; Case, Ashlee H; Helms, Christine C; Basu, Swati; Rogers, Zachary; Lewis, Marc T; Miller, Gary D

    2015-08-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO3(-)) supplementation via beetroot juice has been shown to increase the exercise capacity of younger and older adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acute NO3(-) ingestion on the submaximal constant work rate exercise capacity of COPD patients. Fifteen patients were assigned in a randomized, single-blind, crossover design to receive one of two treatments (beetroot juice then placebo or placebo then beetroot juice). Submaximal constant work rate exercise time at 75% of the patient's maximal work capacity was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included plasma NO3(-) and nitrite (NO2(-)) levels, blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen consumption (VO2), dynamic hyperinflation, dyspnea and leg discomfort. Relative to placebo, beetroot ingestion increased plasma NO3(-) by 938% and NO2(-) by 379%. Median (+interquartile range) exercise time was significantly longer (p = 0.031) following the ingestion of beetroot versus placebo (375.0 + 257.0 vs. 346.2 + 148.0 s, respectively). Compared with placebo, beetroot ingestion significantly reduced iso-time (p = 0.001) and end exercise (p = 0.008) diastolic blood pressures by 6.4 and 5.6 mmHg, respectively. Resting systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced (p = 0.019) by 8.2 mmHg for the beetroot versus the placebo trial. No other variables were significantly different between the beetroot and placebo trials. These results indicate that acute dietary NO3(-) supplementation can elevate plasma NO3(-) and NO2(-) concentrations, improve exercise performance, and reduce blood pressure in COPD patients. PMID:25445634

  11. Biased wrist and finger coordination in Parkinsonian patients during performance of graphical tasks.

    PubMed

    Dounskaia, Natalia; Van Gemmert, Arend W A; Leis, Berta C; Stelmach, George E

    2009-10-01

    Handwriting impairments in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been associated with micrographia, i.e. diminished letter size. However, dyscoordination of the wrist and fingers may also contribute to handwriting deterioration in PD. To investigate this hypothesis, right-handed PD patients and controls were tested in performance of three types of cyclic wrist and finger movements: drawing of two lines and a circle. The line drawing was performed with either simultaneous flexion and extension of the wrist and fingers (equivalent pattern resulting in a right-tilted line) or with wrist flexion/extension accompanied with finger extension/flexion (nonequivalent pattern resulting in a left-tilted line). Circle drawing required a specific phase difference between wrist and finger motions. Movements were performed with an inkless pen on a digitizer-tablet at two frequency levels. Consistent deformations of the circle into right-tilted ovals and lower variability in equivalent compared with nonequivalent lines revealed preference to produce right-tilted shapes. This preference became more apparent with increased movement speed and it was amplified in PD patients. Analysis revealed that the circle deformation emerged mainly due to reduction in relative phase, while wrist and finger amplitudes remained unchanged. The results suggest that PD causes deficit characterized by strong tendency to produce certain coordination patterns between wrist and finger motions. This deficit may significantly contribute to handwriting impairments in PD by reducing the dexterity in the production of the variety of shapes of the cursive letters. Furthermore, the deficiency revealed in wrist and finger coordination may represent a more general deficit affecting control of various multi-joint movements in PD. PMID:19410590

  12. A Portable Platform for Evaluation of Visual Performance in Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Peter N.; Boer, Erwin R.; Gracitelli, Carolina P. B.; Abe, Ricardo Y.; Diniz-Filho, Alberto; Marvasti, Amir H.; Medeiros, Felipe A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To propose a new tablet-enabled test for evaluation of visual performance in glaucoma, the PERformance CEntered Portable Test (PERCEPT), and to evaluate its ability to predict history of falls and motor vehicle crashes. Design Cross-sectional study. Methods The study involved 71 patients with glaucomatous visual field defects on standard automated perimetry (SAP) and 59 control subjects. The PERCEPT was based on the concept of increasing visual task difficulty to improve detection of central visual field losses in glaucoma patients. Subjects had to perform a foveal 8-alternative-forced-choice orientation discrimination task, while detecting a simultaneously presented peripheral stimulus within a limited presentation time. Subjects also underwent testing with the Useful Field of View (UFOV) divided attention test. The ability to predict history of motor vehicle crashes and falls was investigated by odds ratios and incident-rate ratios, respectively. Results When adjusted for age, only the PERCEPT processing speed parameter showed significantly larger values in glaucoma compared to controls (difference: 243ms; P<0.001). PERCEPT results had a stronger association with history of motor vehicle crashes and falls than UFOV. Each 1 standard deviation increase in PERCEPT processing speed was associated with an odds ratio of 2.69 (P = 0.003) for predicting history of motor vehicle crashes and with an incident-rate ratio of 1.95 (P = 0.003) for predicting history of falls. Conclusion A portable platform for testing visual function was able to detect functional deficits in glaucoma, and its results were significantly associated with history of involvement in motor vehicle crashes and history of falls. PMID:26445501

  13. Asymptotically AdS spacetimes with a timelike Kasner singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Exact solutions to Einstein's equations for holographic models are presented and studied. The IR geometry has a timelike cousin of the Kasner singularity, which is the less generic case of the BKL (Belinski-Khalatnikov-Lifshitz) singularity, and the UV is asymptotically AdS. This solution describes a holographic RG flow between them. The solution's appearance is an interpolation between the planar AdS black hole and the AdS soliton. The causality constraint is always satisfied. The entanglement entropy and Wilson loops are discussed. The boundary condition for the current-current correlation function and the Laplacian in the IR is examined. There is no infalling wave in the IR, but instead, there is a normalizable solution in the IR. In a special case, a hyperscaling-violating geometry is obtained after a dimensional reduction.

  14. All AdS7 solutions of type II supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apruzzi, Fabio; Fazzi, Marco; Rosa, Dario; Tomasiello, Alessandro

    2014-04-01

    In M-theory, the only AdS7 supersymmetric solutions are AdS7 × S 4 and its orbifolds. In this paper, we find and classify new supersymmetric solutions of the type AdS7 × M 3 in type II supergravity. While in IIB none exist, in IIA with Romans mass (which does not lift to M-theory) there are many new ones. We use a pure spinor approach reminiscent of generalized complex geometry. Without the need for any Ansatz, the system determines uniquely the form of the metric and fluxes, up to solving a system of ODEs. Namely, the metric on M 3 is that of an S 2 fibered over an interval; this is consistent with the Sp(1) R-symmetry of the holographically dual (1,0) theory. By including D8 brane sources, one can numerically obtain regular solutions, where topologically M 3 ≅ S 3.

  15. Worldsheet scattering in AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundin, Per; Wulff, Linus

    2013-07-01

    We confront the recently proposed exact S-matrices for AdS 3/ CFT 2 with direct worldsheet calculations. Utilizing the BMN and Near Flat Space (NFS) expansions for strings on AdS 3 × S 3 × S 3 × S 1 and AdS 3 × S 3 × T 4 we compute both tree-level and one-loop scattering amplitudes. Up to some minor issues we find nice agreement in the tree-level sector. At the one-loop level however we find that certain non-zero tree-level processes, which are not visible in the exact solution, contribute, via the optical theorem, and give an apparent mismatch for certain amplitudes. Furthermore we find that a proposed one-loop modification of the dressing phase correctly reproduces the worldsheet calculation while the standard Hernandez-Lopez phase does not. We also compute several massless to massless processes.

  16. Detailed ultraviolet asymptotics for AdS scalar field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evnin, Oleg; Jai-akson, Puttarak

    2016-04-01

    We present a range of methods suitable for accurate evaluation of the leading asymptotics for integrals of products of Jacobi polynomials in limits when the degrees of some or all polynomials inside the integral become large. The structures in question have recently emerged in the context of effective descriptions of small amplitude perturbations in anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime. The limit of high degree polynomials corresponds in this situation to effective interactions involving extreme short-wavelength modes, whose dynamics is crucial for the turbulent instabilities that determine the ultimate fate of small AdS perturbations. We explicitly apply the relevant asymptotic techniques to the case of a self-interacting probe scalar field in AdS and extract a detailed form of the leading large degree behavior, including closed form analytic expressions for the numerical coefficients appearing in the asymptotics.

  17. New massive gravity and AdS(4) counterterms.

    PubMed

    Jatkar, Dileep P; Sinha, Aninda

    2011-04-29

    We show that the recently proposed Dirac-Born-Infeld extension of new massive gravity emerges naturally as a counterterm in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter space (AdS(4)). The resulting on-shell Euclidean action is independent of the cutoff at zero temperature. We also find that the same choice of counterterm gives the usual area law for the AdS(4) Schwarzschild black hole entropy in a cutoff-independent manner. The parameter values of the resulting counterterm action correspond to a c=0 theory in the context of the duality between AdS(3) gravity and two-dimensional conformal field theory. We rewrite this theory in terms of the gauge field that is used to recast 3D gravity as a Chern-Simons theory. PMID:21635026

  18. Tele-Operated Echography and Remote Guidance for Performing Tele-Echography on Geographically Isolated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Arbeille, Philippe; Zuj, Kathryn; Saccomandi, Arnaud; Andre, Elise; De La Porte, Cedric; Georgescu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of three tele-echography systems for routine use in isolated medical centers. Methods: Three systems were used for deep (abdomen, pelvis, fetal) and superficial (muscle, thyroid, carotid artery) examinations: (a) a robotic arm (RA) holding an echographic probe; (b) an echograph with a motorized probe (MP); and (c) remote guidance (RG) where the patient site operator performed the examination assisted by an expert via videoconference. All systems were tested in the same medical center located 60 km away from the university hospital. Results: A total of 340 remote echography examinations were performed (41% RA and MP, 59% RG). MP and RA allowed full control of the probe orientation by the expert, and provided diagnoses in 97% of cases. The use of RG was sufficient for superficial vessel examinations and provided diagnoses in 98% of cases but was not suited for deep or superficial organs. Assessment of superficial organs was best accomplished using the MP. Discussion: Both teleoperated systems provided control of the probe orientation by the expert necessary for obtaining appropriate views of deep organs but the MP was much more ergonomic and easier to use than the RA. RG was appropriate for superficial vessels while the MP was better for superficial volumic organs. PMID:27304972

  19. Detective quantum efficiency: a standard test to ensure optimal detector performance and low patient exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, Terenz R.; Nano, Tomi F.; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2016-03-01

    The detective quantum efficiency (DQE), expressed as a function of spatial frequency, describes the ability of an x-ray detector to produce high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) images. While regulatory and scientific communities have used the DQE as a primary metric for optimizing detector design, the DQE is rarely used by end users to ensure high system performance is maintained. Of concern is that image quality varies across different systems for the same exposures with no current measures available to describe system performance. Therefore, here we conducted an initial DQE measurement survey of clinical x-ray systems using a DQE-testing instrument to identify their range of performance. Following laboratory validation, experiments revealed that the DQE of five different systems under the same exposure level (8.0 μGy) ranged from 0.36 to 0.75 at low spatial frequencies, and 0.02 to 0.4 at high spatial frequencies (3.5 cycles/mm). Furthermore, the DQE dropped substantially with decreasing detector exposure by a factor of up to 1.5x in the lowest spatial frequency, and a factor of 10x at 3.5 cycles/mm due to the effect of detector readout noise. It is concluded that DQE specifications in purchasing decisions, combined with periodic DQE testing, are important factors to ensure patients receive the health benefits of high-quality images for low x-ray exposures.

  20. Phases of global AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Pallab; Krishnan, Chethan; Subramanian, P. N. Bala

    2016-06-01

    We study the phases of gravity coupled to a charged scalar and gauge field in an asymptotically Anti-de Sitter spacetime ( AdS 4) in the grand canonical ensemble. For the conformally coupled scalar, an intricate phase diagram is charted out between the four relevant solutions: global AdS, boson star, Reissner-Nordstrom black hole and the hairy black hole. The nature of the phase diagram undergoes qualitative changes as the charge of the scalar is changed, which we discuss. We also discuss the new features that arise in the extremal limit.

  1. Short-Term Memory Performances during Sustained Wakefulness in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greneche, Jerome; Krieger, Jean; Bertrand, Frederic; Erhardt, Christine; Maumy, Myriam; Tassi, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Both working and immediate memories were assessed every 4 h by specific short-term memory tasks over sustained wakefulness in 12 patients with obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and 10 healthy controls. Results indicated that OSAHS patients exhibited lower working memory performances than controls on both backward digit span and…

  2. A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Three Drug Regimens on Cognitive Performance of Patients with Parkinson's disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emsaki, Golit; Asgari, Karim; Molavi, Hossein; Chitsaz, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the effectiveness of 3 drug regimen on cognitive performance of PD patients was compared. 12 patients who had been using pramipexole, levodopa and amantadine for at least 1 month entered the study and compared with those 12 who had been using trihexiphenidyle, levodopa and amantadine. There was also a control group…

  3. Objective instrumental memory and performance tests for evaluation of patients with brain damage: a search for a behavioral diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Harness, B Z; Bental, E; Carmon, A

    1976-03-01

    Cognition and performance of patients with localized and diffuse brain damage was evaluated through the application of objective perceptual testing. A series of visual perceptual and verbal tests, memory tests, as well as reaction time tasks were administered to the patients by logic programming equipment. In order to avoid a bias due to communicative disorders, all responses were motor, and achievement was scored in terms of correct identification and latencies of response. Previously established norms based on a large sample of non-brain-damaged hospitalized patients served to standardize the performance of the brain-damaged patient since preliminary results showed that age and educational level constitute an important variable affecting performance of the control group. The achievement of brain-damaged patients, corrected for these factors, was impaired significantly in all tests with respect to both recognition and speed of performance. Lateralized effects of brain damage were not significantly demonstrated. However, when the performance was analyzed with respect to the locus of visual input, it was found that patients with right hemispheric lesions showed impairment mainly on perception of figurative material, and that this deficit was more apparent in the left visual field. Conversely, patients with left hemispheric lesions tended to show impairment on perception of visually presented verbal material when the input was delivered to the right visual field. PMID:931718

  4. Cognitive performance following lacunar stroke in Spanish-speaking patients: Results from the SPS3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Jacova, Claudia; Pearce, Lesly A.; Roldan, Ana M.; Arauz, Antonio; Tapia, Jorge; Costello, Raymond; McClure, Leslie A.; Hart, Robert G.; Benavente, Oscar R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment is frequent in lacunar stroke patients. The prevalence and pattern of among Spanish-speaking patients (SSP) are unknown and have not been compared across regions or to English-speaking patients (ESP). Aims To characterize cognitive impairment in SSP and compare to ESP. Methods The baseline neuropsychological test (NPT) performance and the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), defined as a z score ≤ −1.5 on memory and/or non-memory tests, were evaluated in SSP in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) trial. Results Out of 3020 participants, 1,177 were SSP residing in Latin America (n=693), the US (n=121) and Spain (n=363). Low education (0-8 years) was frequent in SSP (49-57%). Latin American SSP had frequent post-stroke upper extremity motor impairment (83%). Compared to ESP, all SSP groups had smaller memory deficits and larger non-memory/motor deficits, with Latin American SSP showing the largest deficits (median z-score 0.6 to −1.3 for non-memory tests; ≥ −5.0 grooved pegboard; −0.4 to −0.7 memory tests). The prevalence of MCI was high and comparable to ESP in the US and Latin American SSP but not Spanish group: ESP=47%, Latin American SSP=51%, US SSP=40%, Spanish SSP=29%, with >50% characterized as non-amnestic in SSP groups. Older age (OR per 10-y =1.52, CI=1.35-1.71), lower education (OR 0-4-y=1.23, CI=0.90-1.67), being a Latin American resident (OR=1.31, CI=0.87-1.98), and post-stroke disability (OR Barthel Index<95=1.89, CI-1.43-2.50) were independently associated with MCI. Conclusions Mild cognitive impairment in SPS3 Spanish-speaking patients with recent lacunar stroke is highly prevalent but has a different pattern to that observed in English-speaking patients. A combination of socio-demographics, stroke biology, and stroke care may account for these differences. PMID:25973704

  5. Abnormal degree centrality in Alzheimer's disease patients with depression: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhongwei; Liu, Xiaozheng; Hou, Hongtao; Wei, Fuquan; Liu, Jian; Chen, Xingli

    2016-06-15

    Depression is common in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and occurs in AD patients with a prevalence of up to 40%. It reduces cognitive function and increases the burden on caregivers. Currently, there are very few medications that are useful for treating depression in AD patients. Therefore, understanding the brain abnormalities in AD patients with depression (D-AD) is crucial for developing effective interventions. The aim of this study was to investigate the intrinsic dysconnectivity pattern of whole-brain functional networks at the voxel level in D-AD patients based on degree centrality (DC) as measured by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI). Our study included 32 AD patients. All patients were evaluated using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and further divided into two groups: 15 D-AD patients and 17 non-depressed AD (nD-AD) patients. R-fMRI datasets were acquired from these D-AD and nD-AD patients. First, we performed a DC analysis to identify voxels that showed altered whole brain functional connectivity (FC) with other voxels. We then further investigated FC using the abnormal DC regions to examine in more detail the connectivity patterns of the identified DC changes. D-AD patients had lower DC values in the right middle frontal, precentral, and postcentral gyrus than nD-AD patients. Seed-based analysis revealed decreased connectivity between the precentral and postcentral gyrus to the supplementary motor area and middle cingulum. FC also decreased in the right middle frontal, precentral, and postcentral gyrus. Thus, AD patients with depression fit a 'network dysfunction model' distinct from major depressive disorder and AD. PMID:27079332

  6. Modafinil Improves Real Driving Performance in Patients with Hypersomnia: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Crossover Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Pierre; Chaufton, Cyril; Taillard, Jacques; Capelli, Aurore; Coste, Olivier; Léger, Damien; Moore, Nicholas; Sagaspe, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: Patients with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) are at high risk for driving accidents, and physicians are concerned by the effect of alerting drugs on driving skills of sleepy patients. No study has up to now investigated the effect of modafinil (a reference drug to treat EDS in patients with hypersomnia) on on-road driving performance of patients suffering from central hypersomnia. The objective is to evaluate in patients with central hypersomnia the effect of a wake-promoting drug on real driving performance and to assess the relationship between objective sleepiness and driving performance. Design and Participants: Randomized, crossover, double-blind placebo-controlled trial conducted among 13 patients with narcolepsy and 14 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia. Patients were randomly assigned to receive modafinil (400 mg) or placebo for 5 days prior to the driving test. Each condition was separated by at least 3 weeks of washout. Measurements: Mean number of Inappropriate Line Crossings, Standard Deviation of Lateral Position of the vehicle and mean sleep latency in the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test were assessed. Results: Modafinil reduced the mean number of Inappropriate Line Crossings and Standard Deviation of Lateral Position of the vehicle compared to placebo (F(1,25) = 4.88, P < 0.05 and F(1,25) = 3.87, P = 0.06 tendency). Mean sleep latency at the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test significantly correlated with the mean number of Inappropriate Line Crossings (r = -0.41, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Modafinil improves driving performance in patients with narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia. The Maintenance of Wakefulness Test is a suitable clinical tool to assess fitness to drive in this population. Citation: Philip P; Chaufton C; Taillard J; Capelli A; Coste O; Léger D; Moore N; Sagaspe P. Modafinil improves real driving performance in patients with hypersomnia: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover clinical trial. SLEEP

  7. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Improves Walking Performance in Patients With Intermittent Claudication.

    PubMed

    Seenan, Chris; McSwiggan, Steve; Roche, Patricia A; Tan, Chee-Wee; Mercer, Tom; Belch, Jill J F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 2 types of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on walking distance and measures of pain in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and intermittent claudication (IC). In a phase 2a study, 40 participants with PAD and IC completed a graded treadmill test on 2 separate testing occasions. Active TENS was applied to the lower limb on the first occasion; and placebo TENS, on the second. The participants were divided into 2 experimental groups. One group received high-frequency TENS; and the other, low-frequency TENS. Measures taken were initial claudication distance, functional claudication distance, and absolute claudication distance. The McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) vocabulary was completed at the end of the intervention, and the MPQ-Pain Rating Index score was calculated. Four participants were excluded from the final analysis because of noncompletion of the experimental procedure. Median walking distance increased with high-frequency TENS for all measures (P < .05, Wilcoxon signed rank test, all measures). Only absolute claudication distance increased significantly with low-frequency TENS compared with placebo (median, 179-228; Ws = 39; z = 2.025; P = .043; r = 0.48). No difference was observed between reported median MPQ-Pain Rating Index scores: 21.5 with placebo TENS and 21.5 with active TENS (P = .41). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied to the lower limb of the patients with PAD and IC was associated with increased walking distance on a treadmill but not with any reduction in pain. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may be a useful adjunctive intervention to help increase walking performance in patients with IC. PMID:27299758

  8. Neutrophil functions and clinical performance after total fasting in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Udén, A M; Trang, L; Venizelos, N; Palmblad, J

    1983-01-01

    The effects of fasting for 7 days were investigated in 13 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in comparison with a control regimen in a cross-over trial. The effects of fasting on clinical performance and blood neutrophil functions were studied. During fasting, with a mean weight loss of 5.1 kg, clinical inflammation in the joints and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) decreased. During the control period the joints either remained unchanged or deteriorated, and no change was observed in the body weight or the ESR. The locomotion of neutrophils under agarose, induced by a reference serum, decreased during the fasting period (p less than 0.001), but no change in their locomotion was induced by an Escherichia coli bacterial factor. During the control period, however, the locomotion induced by either stimulant was significantly decreased. Generation of migration-stimulating factors from the patients' plasma declined 3 days after the end of fasting (p less than 0.001). The adherence of the neutrophils to nylon fibres was unchanged during both periods. The bactericidal capacity improved during fasting, both in comparison with the initial value (p less than 0.005) and with the values from the control period (p less than 0.001). An association was found between improvement in inflammatory activity of the joints and enhancement of neutrophil bactericidal capacity. Fasting appears to improve the clinical status of patients with RA. This could partly be due to the observed changes in the functions of the neutrophils, since the latter contribute to the inflammatory joint reactions. PMID:6338840

  9. Safety of performing fiberoptic bronchoscopy in critically ill hypoxemic patients with acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Cracco, Christophe; Fartoukh, Muriel; Prodanovic, Hélène; Azoulay, Elie; Chenivesse, Cécile; Lorut, Christine; Beduneau, Gaëtan; Bui, Hoang Nam; Taille, Camille; Brochard, Laurent; Demoule, Alexandre; Maitre, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Background Safety of fibreoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) in nonintubated critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure have not been extensively evaluated. We aimed to measure the incidence of intubation and need to increase ventilatory support following FOB and to identify predictive factors of this event. Methods A prospective multicenter observational study was carried out in 8 French adult intensive care units. 169 FOB performed in patients with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio equal or less than 300 were analyzed. Our main end point was intubation rate. The secondary end point was rate of increased ventilatory support defined as greater than a 50% increase in oxygen requirement, the need to start non invasive-positive pressure ventilation (NI-PPV) or increase NI-PPV support. Results Within 24 hours, an increase in ventilatory support was required following 59 (35%) bronchoscopies, of which 25 (15%) led to endotracheal intubation. The existence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR:5.2 [1.6–17.8], p=0.007) or immunosuppression (OR : 5.4 [1.7–17.2], p=0.004) were significantly associated with the need for intubation in multivariable analysis. None of the baseline physiological parameters including the PaO2/FiO2 ratio was associated with intubation. Conclusion Bronchoscopy is often followed by an increase in ventilatory support in hypoxemic critically ill patients, but less frequently by the need for intubation. COPD, immunosuppression are associated with a need for invasive ventilation in the following 24 hours. PMID:23070123

  10. TU-C-BRE-09: Performance Comparisons of Patient Specific IMRT QA Methodologies Using ROC Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, E; Balter, P; Stingo, F; Followill, D; Kry, S; Jones, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ability of a selection of patient-specific QA methods to accurately classify IMRT plans as acceptable or unacceptable based on a multiple ion chamber (MIC) phantom. Methods: Twenty-four IMRT plans were selected (20 previously failed the institutional QA), and were measured on a MIC phantom to assess their dosimetric acceptability. These same plans were then measured using film (Kodak EDR2) and ion chamber (Wellhofer cc04), ArcCheck (Sun Nuclear), and MapCheck (Sun Nuclear) (delivered AP field-by-field, AP composite, and with original gantry angles). All gamma analyses were performed at 2%/2mm, 3%/3mm, and 5%/3mm. By using the MIC results as a gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity were calculated across a range of cut-off thresholds (% pixels passing for gamma analysis, and % dose difference for ion chamber), and were used to form ROC curves. Area under the curve (AUC) was used as a metric to quantify the performance of the various QA methods. Results: Grouping device’s AUC’s revealed two statistically significant different groups: ion chamber (AUC of 0.94), AP composite MapCheck (AUC of 0.85), ArcCheck (AUC of 0.84), and film (AUC of 0.82) were in the better performing group, while original gantry angles and AP field-by-field MapCheck (AUC of 0.65 and 0.66, respectively) matched less well with the gold standard results. Optimal cut-offs were also assessed using the ROC curves. We found that while often 90% of pixels passing is used as a criteria, the differing sensitivities of QA methods can lead to device and methodology-based optimal cutoff thresholds. Conclusion: While many methods exist to perform the same task of patient-specific IMRT QA, they utilize different strategies. This work has shown that there are inconsistencies in these methodologies in terms of their sensitivity and specificity to dosimetric acceptability. This work was supported by Public Health Service grants CA010953, CA081647, and CA21661 awarded by the

  11. Characterization of cognitive and motor performance during dual-tasking in healthy older adults and patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wild, Lucia Bartmann; de Lima, Daiane Borba; Balardin, Joana Bisol; Rizzi, Luana; Giacobbo, Bruno Lima; Oliveira, Henrique Bianchi; de Lima Argimon, Irani Iracema; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre; Rieder, Carlos R M; Bromberg, Elke

    2013-02-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of dual-tasking on cognitive performance and gait parameters in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) without dementia. The impact of cognitive task complexity on cognition and walking was also examined. Eighteen patients with PD (ages 53-88, 10 women; Hoehn and Yahr stage I-II) and 18 older adults (ages 61-84; 10 women) completed two neuropsychological measures of executive function/attention (the Stroop Test and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test). Cognitive performance and gait parameters related to functional mobility of stride were measured under single (cognitive task only) and dual-task (cognitive task during walking) conditions with different levels of difficulty and different types of stimuli. In addition, dual-task cognitive costs were calculated. Although cognitive performance showed no significant difference between controls and PD patients during single or dual-tasking conditions, only the patients had a decrease in cognitive performance during walking. Gait parameters of patients differed significantly from controls at single and dual-task conditions, indicating that patients gave priority to gait while cognitive performance suffered. Dual-task cognitive costs of patients increased with task complexity, reaching significantly higher values then controls in the arithmetic task, which was correlated with scores on executive function/attention (Stroop Color-Word Page). Baseline motor functioning and task executive/attentional load affect the performance of cognitive tasks of PD patients while walking. These findings provide insight into the functional strategies used by PD patients in the initial phases of the disease to manage dual-task interference. PMID:23052601

  12. Comparing the performance of English mental health providers in achieving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Moran, Valerie; Jacobs, Rowena

    2015-09-01

    Evidence on provider payment systems that incorporate patient outcomes is limited for mental health care. In England, funding for mental health care services is changing to a prospective payment system with a future objective of linking some part of provider payment to outcomes. This research examines performance of mental health providers offering hospital and community services, in order to investigate if some are delivering better outcomes. Outcomes are measured using the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) - a clinician-rated routine outcome measure (CROM) mandated for national use. We use data from the Mental Health Minimum Data Set (MHMDS) - a dataset on specialist mental health care with national coverage - for the years 2011/12 and 2012/13 with a final estimation sample of 305,960 observations with follow-up HoNOS scores. A hierarchical ordered probit model is used and outcomes are risk adjusted with independent variables reflecting demographic, need, severity and social indicators. A hierarchical linear model is also estimated with the follow-up total HoNOS score as the dependent variable and the baseline total HoNOS score included as a risk-adjuster. Provider performance is captured by a random effect that is quantified using Empirical Bayes methods. We find that worse outcomes are associated with severity and better outcomes with older age and social support. After adjusting outcomes for various risk factors, variations in performance are still evident across providers. This suggests that if the intention to link some element of provider payment to outcomes becomes a reality, some providers may gain financially whilst others may lose. The paper contributes to the limited literature on risk adjustment of outcomes and performance assessment of providers in mental health in the context of prospective activity-based payment systems. PMID:26218853

  13. RETROSPECTIVE ESTIMATION OF PATIENT DOSE-AREA PRODUCT IN THORACIC SPINE TOMOSYNTHESIS PERFORMED USING VOLUMERAD.

    PubMed

    Båth, Magnus; Söderman, Christina; Svalkvist, Angelica

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a recently developed method of retrospectively estimating the patient dose-area product (DAP) of a chest tomosynthesis examination, performed using VolumeRAD, in thoracic spine tomosynthesis and to determine the necessary field-size correction factor. Digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data for the projection radiographs acquired during a thoracic spine tomosynthesis examination were retrieved directly from the modality for 17 patients. Using the previously developed method, an estimated DAP for the tomosynthesis examination was determined from DICOM data in the scout image. By comparing the estimated DAP with the actual DAP registered for the projection radiographs, a field-size correction factor was determined. The field-size correction factor for thoracic spine tomosynthesis was determined to 0.92. Applying this factor to the DAP estimated retrospectively, the maximum difference between the estimated DAP and the actual DAP was <3 %. In conclusion, the previously developed method of retrospectively estimating the DAP in chest tomosynthesis can be applied to thoracic spine tomosynthesis. PMID:26590395

  14. Treadmill performance and cardiac function in selected patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKirnan, M.D.; Sullivan, M.; Jensen, D.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1984-02-01

    To investigate the cardiac determinants of treadmill performance in patients able to exercise to volitional fatigue, 88 patients with coronary heart disease free of angina pectoris were tested. The exercise tests included supine bicycle radionuclide ventriculography, thallium scintigraphy and treadmill testing with expired gas analysis. The number of abnormal Q wave locations, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output, exercise-induced ST segment depression and thallium scar and ischemia scores were the cardiac variables considered. Rest and exercise ejection fractions were highly correlated to thallium scar score (r . -0.72 to -0.75, p less than 0.001), but not to maximal oxygen consumption (r . 0.19 to 0.25, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the variability in predicting treadmill time or estimated maximal oxygen consumption was explained by treadmill test-induced change in heart rate (39%), thallium ischemia score (12%) and cardiac output at rest (4%). The change in heart rate induced by the treadmill test explained only 27% of the variability in measured maximal oxygen consumption. Myocardial damage predicted ejection fraction at rest and the ability to increase heart rate with treadmill exercise appeared as an essential component of exercise capacity. Exercise capacity was only minimally affected by asymptomatic ischemia and was relatively independent of ventricular function.

  15. Mystery cloud of AD 536

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The possible cause of the densest and most persistent dry fog on record, which was observed in Europe and the Middle East during AD 536 and 537, is discussed. The fog's long duration toward the south and the high sulfuric acid signal detected in Greenland in ice cores dated around AD 540 support the theory that the fog was due to the explosion of the Rabaul volcano, the occurrence of which has been dated at about AD 540 by the radiocarbon method.

  16. AdS Branes from Partial Breaking of Superconformal Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, E.A.

    2005-10-01

    It is shown how the static-gauge world-volume superfield actions of diverse superbranes on the AdS{sub d+1} superbackgrounds can be systematically derived from nonlinear realizations of the appropriate AdS supersymmetries. The latter are treated as superconformal symmetries of flat Minkowski superspaces of the bosonic dimension d. Examples include the N = 1 AdS{sub 4} supermembrane, which is associated with the 1/2 partial breaking of the OSp(1|4) supersymmetry down to the N = 1, d = 3 Poincare supersymmetry, and the T-duality related L3-brane on AdS{sub 5} and scalar 3-brane on AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 1}, which are associated with two different patterns of 1/2 breaking of the SU(2, 2|1) supersymmetry. Another (closely related) topic is the AdS/CFT equivalence transformation. It maps the world-volume actions of the codimension-one AdS{sub d+1} (super)branes onto the actions of the appropriate Minkowski (super)conformal field theories in the dimension d.

  17. Emotional Working Memory in Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Satler, Corina; Tomaz, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have assessed whether emotional content affects processes supporting working memory in Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Methods We assessed 22 AD patients and 40 elderly controls (EC) with a delayed matching and non-matching to sample task (DMST/DNMST), and a spatial-delayed recognition span task (SRST; unique/varied) using emotional stimuli. Results AD patients showed decreased performance on both tasks compared with EC. With regard to the valence of the stimuli, we did not observe significant performance differences between groups in the DMST/DNMST. However, both groups remembered a larger number of negative than positive or neutral pictures on unique SRST. Conclusion The results suggest that AD patients show a relative preservation of working memory for emotional information, particularly for negative stimuli. PMID:22163239

  18. Effect of added dietary threonine on growth performance, health, immunity and gastrointestinal function of weaning pigs with differing genetic susceptibility to Escherichia coli infection and challenged with E. coli K88ac.

    PubMed

    Trevisi, P; Corrent, E; Mazzoni, M; Messori, S; Priori, D; Gherpelli, Y; Simongiovanni, A; Bosi, P

    2015-06-01

    Threonine (Thr) is important for mucin and immunoglobulin production. We studied the effect of added dietary Thr on growth performance, health, immunity and gastrointestinal function of weaning pigs with differing genetic susceptibility to E. coli K88ac (ETEC) infection and challenged with ETEC. Forty-eight 24-day-old weaned pigs were divided into two groups by their ETEC susceptibility using mucin 4 (MUC4) gene as a marker (2 MUC4(-/-) , not-susceptible, and 2 MUC4(+/+) , susceptible, pigs per litter). Within genotype, pigs were fed two different diets: 8.5 (LThr) or 9.0 (HThr) g Thr/kg. Pigs were orally challenged on day 7 after weaning and slaughtered on day 12 or 13 after weaning. Before ETEC challenge, HThr pigs ate more (p < 0.05). The diet did not affect post-challenge growth, but HThr tended to increase post-challenge feed efficiency (p = 0.087) and overall growth (p = 0.087) and feed efficiency (p = 0.055). Before challenge, HThr pigs excreted less E. coli (p < 0.05), while after challenge, diet did not affect the number of days with diarrhoea and ETEC excretion. MUC4(+/+) pigs responded to the challenge with more diarrhoea, ETEC excretion and anti-K88 IgA in blood and jejunal secretion (p < 0.001). HThr pigs had a higher increase of anti-K88 IgA values in jejunal secretion (p = 0.089) and in blood (p = 0.089, in MUC4(+/+) pigs only). Thr did not affect total IgA and IgM values, morphometry of jejunum, goblet cells count in colon, total mucin from jejunum and colon, but varied jejunal goblet cells counts (p < 0.05). In the first two post-weaning weeks, 8.5 g Thr/kg diet may be not sufficient to optimize initial feed intake, overall feed efficiency and intestinal IgA secretion and to control the gut microbiota in the first post-weaning week, irrespective of the pig genetic susceptibility to ETEC infection. PMID:24965751

  19. AdS5 backgrounds with 24 supersymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, S.; Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.

    2016-06-01

    We prove a non-existence theorem for smooth AdS 5 solutions with connected, compact without boundary internal space that preserve strictly 24 supersymmetries. In particular, we show that D = 11 supergravity does not admit such solutions, and that all such solutions of IIB supergravity are locally isometric to the AdS 5 × S 5 maximally supersymmetric background. Furthermore, we prove that (massive) IIA supergravity also does not admit such solutions, provided that the homogeneity conjecture for massive IIA supergravity is valid. In the context of AdS/CFT these results imply that if gravitational duals for strictly mathcal{N}=3 superconformal theories in 4-dimensions exist, they are either singular or their internal spaces are not compact.

  20. Entanglement temperature and perturbed AdS3 geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, G. C.; Caravan, B.

    2016-06-01

    Generalizing the first law of thermodynamics, the increase in entropy density δ S (x ) of a conformal field theory (CFT) is proportional to the increase in energy density, δ E (x ) , of a subsystem divided by a spatially dependent entanglement temperature, TE(x ) , a fixed parameter determined by the geometry of the subsystem, crossing over to thermodynamic temperature at high temperatures. In this paper we derive a generalization of the thermodynamic Clausius relation, showing that deformations of the CFT by marginal operators are associated with spatial temperature variations, δ TE(x ) , and spatial energy correlations play the role of specific heat. Using AdS/CFT duality we develop a relationship between a perturbation in the local entanglement temperature of the CFT and the perturbation of the bulk AdS metric. In two dimensions, we demonstrate a method through which direct diagonalizations of the boundary quantum theory may be used to construct geometric perturbations of AdS3 .

  1. Pressure-Flow Experimental Performance of New Intravascular Blood Pump Designs for Fontan Patients.

    PubMed

    Chopski, Steven G; Fox, Carson S; Riddle, Michelle L; McKenna, Kelli L; Patel, Jay P; Rozolis, John T; Throckmorton, Amy L

    2016-03-01

    An intravascular axial flow pump is being developed as a mechanical cavopulmonary assist device for adolescent and adult patients with dysfunctional Fontan physiology. Coupling computational modeling with experimental evaluation of prototypic designs, this study examined the hydraulic performance of 11 impeller prototypes with blade stagger or twist angles varying from 100 to 600 degrees. A refined range of twisted blade angles between 300 and 400 degrees with 20-degree increments was then selected, and four additional geometries were constructed and hydraulically evaluated. The prototypes met performance expectations and produced 3-31 mm Hg for flow rates of 1-5 L/min for 6000-8000 rpm. A regression analysis was completed with all characteristic coefficients contributing significantly (P < 0.0001). This analysis revealed that the impeller with 400 degrees of blade twist outperformed the other designs. The findings of the numerical model for 300-degree twisted case and the experimental results deviated within approximately 20%. In an effort to simplify the impeller geometry, this work advanced the design of this intravascular cavopulmonary assist device closer to preclinical animal testing. PMID:26333131

  2. Standardized patient and standardized interdisciplinary team meeting: validation of a new performance-based assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Misuzu; Nagoshi, Michael; Oshiro-Wong, Celeste; Tin, Maung; Wen, Aida; Masaki, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    The interdisciplinary team (IDT) approach is critical in the care of elderly adults. Performance-based tools to assess IDT skills have not been well validated. A novel assessment tool, the standardized patient (SP) and standardized interdisciplinary team meeting (SIDTM), consisting of two stations, was developed. First, trainees evaluate a SP hospitalized after a fall. Second, trainees play the role of the physician in a standardized IDT meeting with a standardized registered nurse (SRN) and standardized medical social worker (SMSW) for discharge planning. The SP-SIDTM was administered to 52 fourth-year medical students (MS4s) and six geriatric medicine fellows (GMFs) in 2011/12. The SP, SRN, and SMSW scored trainee performance on dichotomous checklists of clinical tasks and Likert scales of communication skills, which were compared according to level of training using t-tests. Trainees rated the SP-SIDTM experience as moderately difficult, length of time about right, and believability moderate to high. Reliability was high for both cases (Cronbach α = 0.73-0.87). Interobserver correlation between SRN and SMSW checklist scores (correlation coefficient (r) = 0.82, P < .001) and total scores (r = 0.69, P < .001) were high. The overall score on the SP-SIDTM case was significantly higher for GMF (75) than for MS4 (65, P = .002). These observations support the validity of this novel assessment tool. PMID:24383978

  3. Performance.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2006-01-01

    High performance is difficult to maintain because it is dynamic and not well understood. Based on a synthesis of many sources, a model is proposed where performance is a function of the balance between capacity and challenge. Too much challenge produces coping (or a crash); excess capacity results in boredom. Over time, peak performance drifts toward boredom. Performance can be managed by adjusting our level of ability, our effort, the opportunity to perform, and the challenge we agree to take on. Coping, substandard but acceptable performance, is common among professionals and its long-term side effects can be debilitating. A crash occurs when coping mechanisms fail. PMID:17020177

  4. Lorentzian AdS geometries, wormholes, and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Raul E.; Silva, Guillermo A.; Botta Cantcheff, Marcelo

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the structure of two-point functions for the quantum field theory dual to an asymptotically Lorentzian Anti de Sitter (AdS) wormhole. The bulk geometry is a solution of five-dimensional second-order Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity and causally connects two asymptotically AdS spacetimes. We revisit the Gubser-Klebanov-Polyakov-Witten prescription for computing two-point correlation functions for dual quantum field theories operators O in Lorentzian signature and we propose to express the bulk fields in terms of the independent boundary values {phi}{sub 0}{sup {+-}} at each of the two asymptotic AdS regions; along the way we exhibit how the ambiguity of normalizable modes in the bulk, related to initial and final states, show up in the computations. The independent boundary values are interpreted as sources for dual operators O{sup {+-}} and we argue that, apart from the possibility of entanglement, there exists a coupling between the degrees of freedom living at each boundary. The AdS{sub 1+1} geometry is also discussed in view of its similar boundary structure. Based on the analysis, we propose a very simple geometric criterion to distinguish coupling from entanglement effects among two sets of degrees of freedom associated with each of the disconnected parts of the boundary.

  5. Self-dual warped AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Ning, Bo

    2010-12-01

    We study a new class of solutions of three-dimensional topological massive gravity. These solutions can be taken as nonextremal black holes, with their extremal counterparts being discrete quotients of spacelike warped AdS3 along the U(1)L isometry. We study the thermodynamics of these black holes and show that the first law is satisfied. We also show that for consistent boundary conditions, the asymptotic symmetry generators form only one copy of the Virasoro algebra with central charge cL=(4νℓ)/(G(ν2+3)), with which the Cardy formula reproduces the black hole entropy. We compute the real-time correlators of scalar perturbations and find a perfect match with the dual conformal field theory (CFT) predictions. Our study provides a novel example of warped AdS/CFT correspondence: the self-dual warped AdS3 black hole is dual to a CFT with nonvanishing left central charge. Moreover, our investigation suggests that the quantum topological massive gravity asymptotic to the same spacelike warped AdS3 in different consistent ways may be dual to different two-dimensional CFTs.

  6. The patient work system: an analysis of self-care performance barriers among elderly heart failure patients and their informal caregivers.

    PubMed

    Holden, Richard J; Schubert, Christiane C; Mickelson, Robin S

    2015-03-01

    Human factors and ergonomics approaches have been successfully applied to study and improve the work performance of healthcare professionals. However, there has been relatively little work in "patient-engaged human factors," or the application of human factors to the health-related work of patients and other nonprofessionals. This study applied a foundational human factors tool, the systems model, to investigate the barriers to self-care performance among chronically ill elderly patients and their informal (family) caregivers. A Patient Work System model was developed to guide the collection and analysis of interviews, surveys, and observations of patients with heart failure (n = 30) and their informal caregivers (n = 14). Iterative analyses revealed the nature and prevalence of self-care barriers across components of the Patient Work System. Person-related barriers were common and stemmed from patients' biomedical conditions, limitations, knowledge deficits, preferences, and perceptions as well as the characteristics of informal caregivers and healthcare professionals. Task barriers were also highly prevalent and included task difficulty, timing, complexity, ambiguity, conflict, and undesirable consequences. Tool barriers were related to both availability and access of tools and technologies and their design, usability, and impact. Context barriers were found across three domains-physical-spatial, social-cultural, and organizational-and multiple "spaces" such as "at home," "on the go," and "in the community." Barriers often stemmed not from single factors but from the interaction of several work system components. Study findings suggest the need to further explore multiple actors, contexts, and interactions in the patient work system during research and intervention design, as well as the need to develop new models and measures for studying patient and family work. PMID:25479983

  7. Design, development, and performance of an adapter for simulation of ocular melanoma patients in supine position for proton beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daftari, I.; Phillips, T. L.

    2003-06-01

    A patient assembly adapter system for ocular melanoma patient simulation was developed and its performance evaluated. The aim for the construction of the apparatus was to simulate the patients in supine position using a commercial x-ray simulator. The apparatus consists of a base plate, head immobilization holder, patient assembly system that includes fixation light and collimator system. The reproducibility of the repeated fixation was initially tested with a head phantom. Simulation and verification films were studied for seven consecutive patients treated with proton beam therapy. Patient's simulation was performed in a supine position using a dental fixation bite block and a thermoplastic head mask immobilization device with a patient adapter system. Two orthogonal x rays were used to obtain the x, y, and z coordinates of sutured tantalum rings for treatment planning with the EYEPLAN software. The verification films were obtained in treatment position with the fixation light along the central axis of the eye. The results indicate good agreement within 0.5 mm deviations. The results of this investigation showed that the same planning accuracy could be achieved by performing simulation using the adapter described above with a patient in the supine position as that obtained by performing simulation with the patient in the seated, treatment position. The adapter can also be attached to the head of the chair for simulating in the seated position using a fixed x-ray unit. This has three advantages: (1) this will save radiation therapists time; (2) it eliminates the need for arranging access to the treatment room, thus avoiding potential conflicts in treatment room usage; and (3) it allows the use of a commercial simulator.

  8. Physical performance in kidney transplanted patients: a study on desert trekking.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, G; Colombo, D; Graziani, E; Franceschelli, N; Roi, G S; Totti, V; Nanni Costa, A; Stefoni, S

    2011-01-01

    Physical performance of kidney transplanted patients in challenging environments, such as deserts, has been poorly studied. Six kidney transplanted (T: 5 males, 1 female; 45±6 yrs) and 8 control (C: 5 males, 3 females; 49±13 yrs) subjects participated in a 5-day desert trek. Blood pressure, hydration status (Height2/Rz by bioimpedance), heart rate, energy expenditure (by SenseWear Pro Armband) and walking velocities were recorded during each daily trekking stage (GPS-assisted wearable devices). Systo-diastolic blood pressure did not differ between C (119/77±12/8 mmHg) and T (121/77±10/6 mmHg) groups throughout the study. The hydration status was stable from day 1 (Ht2/Rz: 64±13 cm2/Ohm in T and 59±12 cm2/Ohm in C subjects) to day 5 (66±11 cm2/Ohm in T and 61±13 cm2/Ohm in C subjects) in both groups. Two patients on steroid treatment showed a relative hyperhydration. Mean heart rate did not differ between T (135±10 bpm) and C (136±5 bpm) subjects throughout the study, although a reduction from day 1 to day 5 was observed in T subjects only (p<0.05 vs C group). No differences were found between T and C group in walking velocity (1.7±0.6 km/h in T and 1.7±0.5 km/h in C group); mean intensity of physical activity was 3.4±0.5 METs in T and 3.3±0.6 METs in C group during each trekking stage. Negligible differences were observed in cardiovascular, metabolic and hydration status adaptations to desert trekking between selected T and C individuals. T subjects with creatinine clearance > 55 ml/min showed acceptable physical performance and acclimatization to desert environment, suggesting a good long-term outcome of transplantation. PMID:22023766

  9. Patient punctuality and clinic performance: observations from an academic-based private practice pain centre: a prospective quality improvement study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kayode A; Chambers, Chester G; Dada, Maqbool; McLeod, Julia C; Ulatowski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an intervention to alter patient unpunctuality. The major hypothesis was that the intervention will change the distribution of patient unpunctuality by decreasing patient tardiness and increasing patient earliness. Design Prospective Quality Improvement. Setting Specialty Pain Clinic in suburban Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Participants The patient population ranged in age from 18 to 93 years. All patients presenting to the clinic during the study period were included in the study. The average monthly volume was 86.2 (SD=13) patients. A total of 1500 patient visits were included in this study. Interventions We tracked appointment times and patient arrival times at an ambulatory pain clinic. An intervention was made in which patients were informed that tardy patients would not be seen and would be rescheduled. This policy was enforced over a 12-month period. Primary and secondary outcome measures The distribution of patient unpunctuality was developed preintervention and at 12 months after implementation. Distribution parameters were used as inputs to a discrete event simulation to determine effects of the change in patient unpunctuality on clinic delay. Results Data regarding patient unpunctuality were gathered by direct observation before and after implementation of the intervention. The mean unpunctuality changed from −20.5 min (110 observations, SD=1.7) preintervention to −23.2 (169, 1.2) at 1 month after the intervention, −23.8 min (69, 1.8) at 6 months and −25.0 min (71, 1.2) after 1 year. The unpunctuality 12 months after initiation of the intervention was significantly different from that prior to the intervention (p<0.05). Conclusions Physicians and staff are able to alter patient arrival patterns to reduce patient unpunctuality. Reducing tardiness improves some measures of clinic performance, but may not always improve waiting times. Accommodating early arriving patients

  10. Warped AdS3/dipole-CFT duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    String theory contains solutions with {{SL}}( {{2},{R}} ){{R}} × {{U}}{( {1} )_L} -invariant warped AdS3 (WAdS3) factors arising as continuous deformations of ordinary AdS3 factors. We propose that some of these are holographically dual to the IR limits of nonlocal dipole-deformed 2D D-brane gauge theories, referred to as "dipole CFTs". Neither the bulk nor boundary theories are currently well-understood, and consequences of the proposed duality for both sides is investigated. The bulk entropy-area law suggests that dipole CFTs have (at large N) a high-energy density of states which does not depend on the deformation parameter. Putting the boundary theory on a spatial circle leads to closed timelike curves in the bulk, suggesting a relation of the latter to dipole-type nonlocality.

  11. New boundary conditions for AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Song, Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    New chiral boundary conditions are found for quantum gravity with matter on AdS3. The associated asymptotic symmetry group is generated by a single right-moving U(1) Kac-Moody-Virasoro algebra with {c_R}={3ℓ}/2G . The Kac-Moody zero mode generates global left-moving translations and equals, for a BTZ black hole, the sum of the total mass and spin. The level is positive about the global vacuum and negative in the black hole sector, corresponding to ergosphere formation. Realizations arising in Chern-Simons gravity and string theory are analyzed. The new boundary conditions are shown to naturally arise for warped AdS3 in the limit that the warp parameter is taken to zero.

  12. Observing quantum gravity in asymptotically AdS space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanov, Slava

    2015-12-01

    The question is studied of whether an observer can discover quantum gravity in the semiclassical regime. It is shown that it is indeed possible to probe a certain quantum gravity effect by employing an appropriately designed detector. The effect is related to the possibility of having topologically inequivalent geometries in the path-integral approach at the same time. A conformal field theory (CFT) state which is expected to describe the eternal anti-de Sitter (AdS) black hole in the large-N limit is discussed. It is argued under certain assumptions that the black hole boundary should be merely a patch of the entire AdS boundary. This leads then to a conclusion that that CFT state is the ordinary CFT vacuum restricted to that patch. If existent, the bulk CFT operators can behave as the ordinary semiclassical quantum field theory in the large-N limit in the weak sense.

  13. Semiclassical Virasoro blocks from AdS3 gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijano, Eliot; Kraus, Per; Perlmutter, Eric; Snively, River

    2015-12-01

    We present a unified framework for the holographic computation of Virasoro conformal blocks at large central charge. In particular, we provide bulk constructions that correctly reproduce all semiclassical Virasoro blocks that are known explicitly from conformal field theory computations. The results revolve around the use of geodesic Witten diagrams, recently introduced in [1], evaluated in locally AdS3 geometries generated by backreaction of heavy operators. We also provide an alternative computation of the heavy-light semiclassical block — in which two external operators become parametrically heavy — as a certain scattering process involving higher spin gauge fields in AdS3; this approach highlights the chiral nature of Virasoro blocks. These techniques may be systematically extended to compute corrections to these blocks and to interpolate amongst the different semiclassical regimes.

  14. Comparison of speech performance in labial and lingual orthodontic patients: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Ambesh Kumar; Rozario, Joe E.; Ganeshkar, Sanjay V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The intensity and duration of speech difficulty inherently associated with lingual therapy is a significant issue of concern in orthodontics. This study was designed to evaluate and to compare the duration of changes in speech between labial and lingual orthodontics. Materials and Methods: A prospective longitudinal clinical study was designed to assess speech of 24 patients undergoing labial or lingual orthodontic treatment. An objective spectrographic evaluation of/s/sound was done using software PRAAT version 5.0.47, a semiobjective auditive evaluation of articulation was done by four speech pathologists and a subjective assessment of speech was done by four laypersons. The tests were performed before (T1), within 24 h (T2), after 1 week (T3) and after 1 month (T4) of the start of therapy. The Mann-Whitney U-test for independent samples was used to assess the significance difference between the labial and lingual appliances. A speech alteration with P < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: The objective method showed a significant difference to be present between the two groups for the/s/sound in the middle position (P < 0.001) at T3. The semiobjective assessment showed worst speech performance in the lingual group to be present at T3 for vowels and blends (P < 0.01) and at T3 and T4 for alveolar and palatal consonants (P < 0.01). The subjective assessment also showed a significant difference between the two groups at T3 (P < 0.01) and T4 (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Both appliance systems caused a comparable speech difficulty immediately after bonding (T2). Although the speech recovered within a week in the labial group (T3), the lingual group continued to experience discomfort even after a month (T4). PMID:25540661

  15. Alday-Maldacena Duality and AdS Plateau Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.

    A short summary of approximate approach to the study of minimal surfaces in AdS, based on solving Nambu-Goto equations iteratively. Today, after partial denunciation of the BDS conjecture, this looks like the only constructive approach to understanding the ways of its possible modification and thus to saving the Alday-Maldacena duality. Numerous open technical problems are explicitly formulated throughout the text.

  16. Categorical spatial memory in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer dementia: positional versus object-location recall.

    PubMed

    Kessels, Roy P C; Rijken, Stefan; Joosten-Weyn Banningh, Liesbeth W A; Van Schuylenborgh-VAN Es, Nelleke; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M

    2010-01-01

    Memory for object locations, as part of spatial memory function, has rarely been studied in patients with Alzheimer dementia (AD), while studies in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients are lacking altogether. The present study examined categorical spatial memory function using the Location Learning Test (LLT) in MCI patients (n = 30), AD patients (n = 30), and healthy controls (n = 40). Two scoring methods were compared, aimed at disentangling positional recall (location irrespective of object identity) and object-location binding. The results showed that AD patients performed worse than the MCI patients on the LLT, both on recall of positional information and on recall of the locations of different objects. In addition, both measures could validly discriminate between AD and MCI patients. These findings are in agreement with the notion that visual cued-recall tests may have better diagnostic value than traditional (verbal) free-recall tests in the assessment of patients with suspected MCI or AD. PMID:19883520

  17. Poor performance in smooth pursuit and antisaccadic eye-movement tasks in healthy siblings of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Karoumi, B; Saoud, M; d'Amato, T; Rosenfeld, F; Denise, P; Gutknecht, C; Gaveau, V; Beaulieu, F E; Daléry, J; Rochet, T

    2001-04-15

    This study examines the area of eye movement dysfunctions as an indicator of vulnerability to schizophrenia. Eye movement performance was investigated with three different paradigms: Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements (SPEM); Visually Guided Saccades (VGS); and Antisaccades (AS) in 21 clinically stable patients with schizophrenia, 21 of their healthy, biological full siblings and 21 healthy control subjects. The three groups did not differ on VGS performance, whereas both patients and their siblings showed lower SPEM gain, an increased catch-up Saccades (CUS) rate, reduced AS accuracy and an increased number of AS errors in comparison to control subjects. In addition, patients with schizophrenia exhibited increased AS latency. Among the patients with schizophrenia, eye movement abnormalities did not correlate with age, gender, clinical state or duration of illness. These data suggest that abnormalities of SPEM and AS may represent neurobiological markers of the vulnerability to schizophrenia in individuals at high genetic risk for the disease. PMID:11311924

  18. On information loss in AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Li, Daliang; Wang, Junpu

    2016-05-01

    We discuss information loss from black hole physics in AdS3, focusing on two sharp signatures infecting CFT2 correlators at large central charge c: `forbidden singularities' arising from Euclidean-time periodicity due to the effective Hawking temperature, and late-time exponential decay in the Lorentzian region. We study an infinite class of examples where forbidden singularities can be resolved by non-perturbative effects at finite c, and we show that the resolution has certain universal features that also apply in the general case. Analytically continuing to the Lorentzian regime, we find that the non-perturbative effects that resolve forbidden singularities qualitatively change the behavior of correlators at times t ˜ S BH , the black hole entropy. This may resolve the exponential decay of correlators at late times in black hole backgrounds. By Borel resumming the 1 /c expansion of exact examples, we explicitly identify `information-restoring' effects from heavy states that should correspond to classical solutions in AdS3. Our results suggest a line of inquiry towards a more precise formulation of the gravitational path integral in AdS3.

  19. Supersymmetric giant graviton solutions in AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Gautam; Raju, Suvrat; Smedbäck, Mikael

    2008-02-01

    We parametrize all classical probe brane configurations that preserve four supersymmetries in (a) the extremal D1-D5 geometry, (b) the extremal D1-D5-P geometry, (c) the smooth D1-D5 solutions proposed by Lunin and Mathur, and (d) global AdS3×S3×T4/K3. These configurations consist of D1 branes, D5 branes, and bound states of D5 and D1 branes with the property that a particular Killing vector is tangent to the brane world volume at each point. We show that the supersymmetric sector of the D5-brane world volume theory may be analyzed in an effective 1+1 dimensional framework that places it on the same footing as D1 branes. In global AdS and the corresponding Lunin-Mathur solution, the solutions we describe are “bound” to the center of AdS for generic parameters and cannot escape to infinity. We show that these probes only exist on the submanifold of moduli space where the background BNS field and theta angle vanish. We quantize these probes in the near-horizon region of the extremal D1-D5 geometry and obtain the theory of long strings discussed by Seiberg and Witten.

  20. Role of Frontotemporal Fiber Tract Integrity in Task-Switching Performance of Healthy Controls and Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kucukboyaci, N. Erkut; Girard, H.M.; Hagler, D.J.; Kuperman, J.; Tecoma, E.S.; Iragui, V.J.; Halgren, E.; McDonald, C.R.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the relationships among frontotemporal fiber tract compromise and task-switching performance in healthy controls and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We performed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) on 30 controls and 32 patients with TLE (15 left TLE). Fractional anisotropy (FA) was calculated for four fiber tracts [uncinate fasciculus (UncF), arcuate fasciculus (ArcF), dorsal cingulum (CING), and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF)]. Participants completed the Trail Making Test-B (TMT-B) and Verbal Fluency Category Switching (VFCS) test. Multivariate analyses of variances (MANOVAs) were performed to investigate group differences in fiber FA and set-shifting performances. Canonical correlations were used to examine the overall patterns of structural-cognitive relationships and were followed by within-group bivariate correlations. We found a significant canonical correlation between fiber FA and task-switching performance. In controls, TMT-B correlated with left IFOF, whereas VFCS correlated with FA of left ArcF and left UncF. These correlations were not significant in patients with TLE. We report significant correlations between frontotemporal fiber tract integrity and set-shifting performance in healthy controls that appear to be absent or attenuated in patients with TLE. These findings suggest a breakdown of typical structure-function relationships in TLE that may reflect aberrant developmental or degenerative processes. PMID:22014246

  1. The patient work system: An analysis of self-care performance barriers among elderly heart failure patients and their informal caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Richard J.; Schubert, Christiane C.; Mickelson, Robin S.

    2014-01-01

    Human factors and ergonomics approaches have been successfully applied to study and improve the work performance of healthcare professionals. However, there has been relatively little work in “patient-engaged human factors,” or the application of human factors to the health-related work of patients and other nonprofessionals. This study applied a foundational human factors tool, the systems model, to investigate the barriers to self-care performance among chronically ill elderly patients and their informal (family) caregivers. A Patient Work System model was developed to guide the collection and analysis of interviews, surveys, and observations of patients with heart failure (n=30) and their informal caregivers (n=14). Iterative analyses revealed the nature and prevalence of self-care barriers across components of the Patient Work System. Person-related barriers were common and stemmed from patients’ biomedical conditions, limitations, knowledge deficits, preferences, and perceptions as well as the characteristics of informal caregivers and healthcare professionals. Task barriers were also highly prevalent and included task difficulty, timing, complexity, ambiguity, conflict, and undesirable consequences. Tool barriers were related to both availability and access of tools and technologies and their design, usability, and impact. Context barriers were found across three domains—physical-spatial, social-cultural, and organizational—and multiple “spaces” such as “at home,” “on the go,” and “in the community.” Barriers often stemmed not from single factors but from the interaction of several work system components. Study findings suggest the need to further explore multiple actors, context, and interactions in the patient work system during research and intervention design, as well as the need to develop new models and measures for studying patient and family work. PMID:25479983

  2. Autism Disorder (AD): An Updated Review for Paediatric Dentists

    PubMed Central

    J., Udhya; M.M, Varadharaja; J., Parthiban; Srinivasan, Ila

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been an explosion of interest in Autism Disorder (AD). Knowledge and awareness on the condition has grown exponentially at all levels among the general public, parents, health professionals, the research community and more recently, at parliamentary level. The world has begun to recognize the scope of this problem and act internationally and locally to improve the lives of the growing number of individuals and families affected by this devastating disorder. This article reviews the dental literature since 1969 and it summarizes characteristics of patients with AD, oral health status and dental management of patients with AD. PMID:24701555

  3. Patient-Rated Alliance as a Measure of Therapist Performance in Two Clinical Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Zac E.; Hubbard, Rebecca A.; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Simon, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The ability to form a strong therapeutic alliance is considered a foundational skill across psychotherapies. Patient-rated measures of the alliance are now being used to make judgments about a therapist's tendency to build alliances with their patients. However, whether a patient-rated alliance measure provides a useful index of a…

  4. Authoring experience: the significance and performance of storytelling in Socratic dialogue with rehabilitating cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Knox, Jeanette Bresson Ladegaard; Svendsen, Mette Nordahl

    2015-08-01

    This article examines the storytelling aspect in philosophizing with rehabilitating cancer patients in small Socratic dialogue groups (SDG). Recounting an experience to illustrate a philosophical question chosen by the participants is the traditional point of departure for the dialogical exchange. However, narrating is much more than a beginning point or the skeletal framework of events and it deserves more scholarly attention than hitherto given. Storytelling pervades the whole Socratic process and impacts the conceptual analysis in a SDG. In this article we show how the narrative aspect became a rich resource for the compassionate bond between participants and how their stories cultivated the abstract reflection in the group. In addition, the aim of the article is to reveal the different layers in the performance of storytelling, or of authoring experience. By picking, poking and dissecting an experience through a collaborative effort, most participants had their initial experience existentially refined and the chosen concept of which the experience served as an illustration transformed into a moral compass to be used in self-orientation post cancer. PMID:25894237

  5. Application of near-infrared spectroscopy to the evaluation of exercise performance and limitations in patients with heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Donna

    1997-01-01

    Exercise performance in patients with heart failure is limited primarily due to a reduction in cardiac output. This results in skeletal muscle hypo-perfusion. Near infrared spectroscopy provides a simple noninvasive method for assessing skeletal muscle oxygenation during exercise. In this paper we review the application of this technique to patients with heart failure and describe excessive limb and respiratory muscle oxygenation as compared to normal subjects. The potential of this technology for monitoring clinical improvement and therapeutic efficacy also is discussed.

  6. Obstacle Avoidance, Visual Detection Performance, and Eye-Scanning Behavior of Glaucoma Patients in a Driving Simulator: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Prado Vega, Rocío; van Leeuwen, Peter M.; Rendón Vélez, Elizabeth; Lemij, Hans G.; de Winter, Joost C. F.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate differences in driving performance, visual detection performance, and eye-scanning behavior between glaucoma patients and control participants without glaucoma. Glaucoma patients (n = 23) and control participants (n = 12) completed four 5-min driving sessions in a simulator. The participants were instructed to maintain the car in the right lane of a two-lane highway while their speed was automatically maintained at 100 km/h. Additional tasks per session were: Session 1: none, Session 2: verbalization of projected letters, Session 3: avoidance of static obstacles, and Session 4: combined letter verbalization and avoidance of static obstacles. Eye-scanning behavior was recorded with an eye-tracker. Results showed no statistically significant differences between patients and control participants for lane keeping, obstacle avoidance, and eye-scanning behavior. Steering activity, number of missed letters, and letter reaction time were significantly higher for glaucoma patients than for control participants. In conclusion, glaucoma patients were able to avoid objects and maintain a nominal lane keeping performance, but applied more steering input than control participants, and were more likely than control participants to miss peripherally projected stimuli. The eye-tracking results suggest that glaucoma patients did not use extra visual search to compensate for their visual field loss. Limitations of the study, such as small sample size, are discussed. PMID:24146975

  7. Connective tissue anomalies in patients with spontaneous cervical artery dissection

    PubMed Central

    Giossi, Alessia; Ritelli, Marco; Costa, Paolo; Morotti, Andrea; Poli, Loris; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Volonghi, Irene; Chiarelli, Nicola; Gamba, Massimo; Bovi, Paolo; Tomelleri, Giampaolo; Carletti, Monica; Checcarelli, Nicoletta; Meneghetti, Giorgio; Morra, Michele; Chinaglia, Mauro; De Giuli, Valeria; Colombi, Marina; Padovani, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of connective tissue abnormalities in patients with spontaneous cervical artery dissections (sCeAD). Methods: We systematically assessed clinically detectable signs of connective tissue aberration in a series of consecutive patients with sCeAD and of age- and sex-matched patients with ischemic stroke unrelated to CeAD (non-CeAD IS) by a standard examination protocol including 68 items, and performed extensive molecular investigation for hereditary connective tissue disorders in all patients with sCeAD. Results: The study group included 84 patients with sCeAD (mean age, 44.5 ± 7.8 years; 66.7% men) and 84 patients with non-CeAD IS. None of the patients with sCeAD met clinical or molecular diagnostic criteria for established hereditary connective tissue disorder. Connective tissue abnormalities were detected more frequently in the group of patients with sCeAD than in the group of those with non-CeAD IS (mean number of pathologic findings, 4.5 ± 3.5 vs 1.9 ± 2.3; p < 0.001). Eighty-one patients (96.4%) in the sCeAD group had at least one detectable sign compared with 55 patients (66.7%) in the group with non-CeAD IS (p < 0.001). Skeletal, ocular, and skin abnormalities, as well as craniofacial dysmorphisms, were the clinical signs more strongly associated with sCeAD. Signs suggesting connective tissue abnormality were also more frequently represented in patients with sCeAD than in patients with traumatic CeAD (28.6%, p < 0.001; mean number of pathologic findings, 1.7 ± 3.7, p = 0.045). Conclusions: Connective tissue abnormalities are frequent in patients with sCeAD. This reinforces the hypothesis that systemic aberrations of the connective tissue might be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:25355826

  8. Relationship Between Metabolic Syndrome and Clinical Features, and Its Personal-Social Performance in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Saatcioglu, Omer; Kalkan, Murat; Fistikci, Nurhan; Erek, Sakire; Kilic, Kasim Candas

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolic syndrome (MS) criteria and also to investigate the effects of MS on medical treatment, clinical course and personal and social performance in patients with schizophrenia. One hundred-sixteen patients with schizophrenia were included in the study. Measurements of MS were calculated in all patients. Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms, Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms, Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia, Personal and Social Performance Scale (PSP) were applied. The frequency of MS according to IDF criteria was 42.2 % among the patients. There was no significant difference between patients with and without MS in terms of age. The ratios of MS were 62.5 % for the group taking typical and atypical antipsychotics together and 35.7 % for the group taking two or more atypical antipsychotics together. The duration of disorder in patients with MS was higher than those without MS. Furthermore there was no significant difference between the schizophrenic patients with and without MS, in terms of PSP scores. Our findings showed that the duration of illness, high scores of BMI, use of clozapine or concurrent use of typical and atypical antipsychotics, depressive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia were significant risk factors for the development of MS. PMID:26174109

  9. Bending AdS waves with new massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayón-Beato, Eloy; Giribet, Gaston; Hassaïne, Mokhtar

    2009-05-01

    We study AdS-waves in the three-dimensional new theory of massive gravity recently proposed by Bergshoeff, Hohm, and Townsend. The general configuration of this type is derived and shown to exhibit different branches, with different asymptotic behaviors. In particular, for the special fine tuning m2 = ±1/(2l2), solutions with logarithmic fall-off arise, while in the range m2 > -1/(2l2), spacetimes with Schrödinger isometry group are admitted as solutions. Spacetimes that are asymptotically AdS3, both for the Brown-Henneaux and for the weakened boundary conditions, are also identified. The metric function that characterizes the profile of the AdS-wave behaves as a massive excitation on the spacetime, with an effective mass given by meff2 = m2-1/(2l2). For the critical value m2 = -1/(2l2), the value of the effective mass precisely saturates the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound for the AdS3 space where the wave is propagating on. The analogies with the AdS-wave solutions of topologically massive gravity are also discussed. Besides, we consider the coupling of both massive deformations to Einstein gravity and find the exact configurations for the complete theory, discussing all the different branches exhaustively. One of the effects of introducing the Chern-Simons gravitational term is that of breaking the degeneracy in the effective mass of the generic modes of pure New Massive Gravity, producing a fine structure due to parity violation. Another effect is that the zoo of exact logarithmic specimens becomes considerably enlarged.

  10. LBT-AdOpt control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fini, Luca; Puglisi, Alfio; Riccardi, Armando

    2004-09-01

    The LBT-AdOpt subsystem is a complex machine which includes several software controlled parts. It is essentially divided into two parts: a real-time loop which implements the actual adaptive optics control loop, from the wavefront sensor to the deformable secondary mirror, and a supervisor which performs a number of coordination and diagnostics tasks. The coordination and diagnostics task are essential for the proper operation of the system both as an aid for the preparation of observations and because only a continuous monitoring of dynamic system parameters can guarantee optimal performances and system safety during the operation. In the paper we describe the overall software architecture of the LBT-AdOpt supervisor and we discuss the functionalities required for a proper operation.

  11. ADS/CFT and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U. /SLAC

    2007-02-21

    The AdS/CFT correspondence between string theory in AdS space and conformal .eld theories in physical spacetime leads to an analytic, semi-classical model for strongly-coupled QCD which has scale invariance and dimensional counting at short distances and color confinement at large distances. Although QCD is not conformally invariant, one can nevertheless use the mathematical representation of the conformal group in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space to construct a first approximation to the theory. The AdS/CFT correspondence also provides insights into the inherently non-perturbative aspects of QCD, such as the orbital and radial spectra of hadrons and the form of hadronic wavefunctions. In particular, we show that there is an exact correspondence between the fifth-dimensional coordinate of AdS space z and a specific impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron in ordinary space-time. This connection allows one to compute the analytic form of the frame-independent light-front wavefunctions, the fundamental entities which encode hadron properties and allow the computation of decay constants, form factors, and other exclusive scattering amplitudes. New relativistic lightfront equations in ordinary space-time are found which reproduce the results obtained using the 5-dimensional theory. The effective light-front equations possess remarkable algebraic structures and integrability properties. Since they are complete and orthonormal, the AdS/CFT model wavefunctions can also be used as a basis for the diagonalization of the full light-front QCD Hamiltonian, thus systematically improving the AdS/CFT approximation.

  12. Cognitive performance-altering effects of electronic medical records: An application of the human factors paradigm for patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    According to the human factors paradigm for patient safety, health care work systems and innovations such as electronic medical records do not have direct effects on patient safety. Instead, their effects are contingent on how the clinical work system, whether computerized or not, shapes health care providers' performance of cognitive work processes. An application of the human factors paradigm to interview data from two hospitals in the Midwest United States yielded numerous examples of the performance-altering effects of electronic medical records, electronic clinical documentation, and computerized provider order entry. Findings describe both improvements and decrements in the ease and quality of cognitive performance, both for interviewed clinicians and for their colleagues and patients. Changes in cognitive performance appear to have desirable and undesirable implications for patient safety as well as for quality of care and other important outcomes. Cognitive performance can also be traced to interactions between work system elements, including new technology, allowing for the discovery of problems with “fit” to be addressed through design interventions. PMID:21479125

  13. Ultraviolet asymptotics and singular dynamics of AdS perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Vanhoof, Joris

    2015-10-01

    Important insights into the dynamics of spherically symmetric AdS-scalar field perturbations can be obtained by considering a simplified time-averaged theory accurately describing perturbations of amplitude ɛ on time-scales of order 1/ ɛ 2. The coefficients of the time-averaged equations are complicated expressions in terms of the AdS scalar field mode functions, which are in turn related to the Jacobi polynomials. We analyze the behavior of these coefficients for high frequency modes. The resulting asymptotics can be useful for understanding the properties of the finite-time singularity in solutions of the time-averaged theory recently reported in the literature. We highlight, in particular, the gauge dependence of this asymptotics, with respect to the two most commonly used gauges. The harsher growth of the coefficients at large frequencies in higher-dimensional AdS suggests strengthening of turbulent instabilities in higher dimensions. In the course of our derivations, we arrive at recursive relations for the coefficients of the time-averaged theory that are likely to be useful for evaluating them more efficiently in numerical simulations.

  14. Performance of the forward-view echoendoscope for pancreaticobiliary examination in patients with status post-upper gastrointestinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fusaroli, Pietro; Serrani, Marta; Lisotti, Andrea; D’Ercole, Maria Cristina; Ceroni, Liza; Caletti, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Failures of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) imaging of the head of the pancreas (HOP) and the common bile duct (CBD) have been reported in up to 50% of patients with status postsurgery (e.g., Billroth II and Roux-en-Y). This is attributable to inability to intubate the afferent limb or the duodenum. Recently, a forward-view (FV) echoendoscope has become available. The frontal endoscopic and ultrasound field of view theoretically allow easier manipulation throughout the gastrointestinal tract compared to the traditional echoendoscopes. The aim of our study was to evaluate the safety and performance of the FV echoendoscope for the investigation of the biliary tree and the pancreas, including fine-needle aspiration (FNA), in patients with surgically altered upper gastrointestinal anatomy. Patients and Methods: This was a retrospective evaluation of a prospectively maintained database. All EUS procedures were performed at our institution by one experienced endosonographer from March to September 2009 under conscious sedation. The FV echoendoscope was used for all procedures. Results: Twenty-five (25) out of 37 presented status post-Billroth II and 12 out of 37 with status post-Roux-en-Y surgery. Overall, HOP and CBD were adequately visualized in 28 out of 37 (75.7%). All the failures occurred in the Roux-en-Y patients. EUS-FNA was successfully performed in 16 patients. No adverse events were observed. Conclusions: The FV echoendoscope proved to be safe and effective in reaching the periampullary area in patients with previous Billroth II, allowing complete exploration of the HOP and the CBD and performance of EUS-FNA. However, FV EUS was unsuccessful in the majority of patients with Roux-en-Y, which still remains a challenging condition. PMID:26643703

  15. Knowledge and Performance about Nursing Ethic Codes from Nurses' and Patients' Perspective in Tabriz Teaching Hospitals, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohajjel-Aghdam, Alireza; Hassankhani, Hadi; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Khameneh, Saied; Moghaddam, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nursing profession requires knowledge of ethics to guide performance. The nature of this profession necessitates ethical care more than routine care. Today, worldwide definition of professional ethic code has been done based on human and ethical issues in the communication between nurse and patient. To improve all dimensions of nursing, we need to respect ethic codes. The aim of this study is to assess knowledge and performance about nursing ethic codes from nurses' and patients' perspective. Methods: A descriptive study Conducted upon 345 nurses and 500 inpatients in six teaching hospitals of Tabriz, 2012. To investigate nurses' knowledge and performance, data were collected by using structured questionnaires. Statistical analysis was done using descriptive and analytic statistics, independent t-test and ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient, in SPSS13. Results: Most of the nurses were female, married, educated at BS degree and 86.4% of them were aware of Ethic codes also 91.9% of nurses and 41.8% of patients represented nurses respect ethic codes. Nurses' and patients' perspective about ethic codes differed significantly. Significant relationship was found between nurses' knowledge of ethic codes and job satisfaction and complaint of ethical performance. Conclusion: According to the results, consideration to teaching ethic codes in nursing curriculum for student and continuous education for staff is proposed, on the other hand recognizing failures of the health system, optimizing nursing care, attempt to inform patients about Nursing ethic codes, promote patient rights and achieve patient satisfaction can minimize the differences between the two perspectives. PMID:25276730

  16. Superradiance and instability of small rotating charged AdS black holes in all dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Alikram N.

    2016-02-01

    Rotating small AdS black holes exhibit the superradiant instability to low-frequency scalar perturbations, which is amenable to a complete analytic description in four dimensions. In this paper, we extend this description to all higher dimensions, focusing on slowly rotating charged AdS black holes with a single angular momentum. We divide the spacetime of these black holes into the near-horizon and far regions and find solutions to the scalar wave equation in each of these regions. Next, we perform the matching of these solutions in the overlap between the regions, by employing the idea that the orbital quantum number ℓ can be thought of as an approximate integer. Thus, we obtain the complete low-frequency solution that allows us to calculate the complex frequency spectrum of quasinormal modes, whose imaginary part is determined by a small damping parameter. Finally, we find a remarkably instructive expression for the damping parameter, which appears to be a complex quantity in general. We show that the real part of the damping parameter can be used to give a universal analytic description of the superradiant instability for slowly rotating charged AdS black holes in all spacetime dimensions.

  17. Effects of cortisol on hippocampal subfields volumes and memory performance in healthy control subjects and patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Travis, Scott G; Coupland, Nicholas J; Hegadoren, K; Silverstone, Peter H; Huang, Yushan; Carter, Rawle; Fujiwara, Esther; Seres, Peter; Malykhin, Nikolai V

    2016-09-01

    Overactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in major depressive disorder (MDD) is among the most consistently replicated biological findings in psychiatry. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have consistently demonstrated that hippocampal (HC) volume is decreased in patients with MDD. The improved spatial resolution of high field strength MRI has recently enabled measurements of HC subfield volumes in vivo. The main goal of the present study was to examine the relationship between cortisol concentrations over a day and HC subfield volumes in patients with MDD compared to healthy controls and to investigate whether diurnal cortisol measures are related to memory performance. Fourteen MDD patients with moderate or severe episodes were recruited, together with 14 healthy controls. Imaging was performed using a 4.7T whole-body imaging system. HC subfields and subregions were segmented manually using previously defined protocol. Memory performance was assessed using the Wechsler Memory Scale IV. The salivary cortisol levels were measured over the course of one day. We found that cortisol awakening response to 8h (CAR-8h) was higher in MDD patients compared to controls and that this increase in CAR-8h in MDD patients correlated negatively with left total Cornu Ammonis (CA)1-3 and left HC head volume. In healthy controls mean cortisol levels were negatively associated with right total CA1-3, right HC head, and right total HC volume. In addition, in healthy controls higher CAR-8h was related to worse performance on the immediate content memory. These results provide the first in vivo evidence of the negative associations between cortisol level, CA1-3 HC subfield volume and memory performance in patients with MDD and healthy controls. PMID:27162154

  18. Patients' Perceptions on the Performance of a Local Health System to Eliminate Leprosy, Paraná State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pieri, Flávia Meneguetti; Touso, Michelle Mosna; Rodrigues, Ludmila Barbosa Bandeira; Yamamura, Mellina; Pinto, Ione Carvalho; Dessunti, Elma Mathias; Crispim, Juliane de Almeida; Ramos, Antônio Carlos Vieira; Arroyo, Luiz Henrique; Neto, Marcelino Santos; Garcia, Maria Concebida da Cunha; Popolin, Marcela Paschoal; Silveira, Tatiane Ramos dos Santos; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Background In Brazil, leprosy has been listed among the health priorities since 2006, in a plan known as the “Pact for life” (Pacto pela Vida). It is the sole country on the American continent that has not reached the global goal of disease elimination. Local health systems face many challenges to achieve this global goal. The study aimed to investigate how patients perceive the local health system's performance to eliminate leprosy and whether these perceptions differ in terms of the patients' income. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross-sectional study was conducted in Londrina, State of Paraná, Brazil. Interviews were performed with the leprosy patients. The local health system was assessed through a structured and adapted tool, considering the domains judged as good quality of health care. The authors used univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses. One hundred and nineteen patients were recruited for the study, 50.4% (60) of them were male, 54.0% (64) were between 42 and 65 years old and 66.3% (79) had finished elementary school. The results showed that patients used the Primary Health Care service near their place of residence but did not receive the leprosy diagnosis there. Important advances of this health system were verified for the elimination of leprosy, verifying protocols for good care delivery to the leprosy patients, but these services did not develop collective health actions and did not engage the patients' family members and community. Conclusions/Significance The patients' difficulty was observed to have access to the diagnosis and treatment at health services near their homes. Leprosy care is provided at the specialized level, where the patients strongly bond with the teams. The care process is individual, with limited perspectives of integration among the health services for the purpose of case management and social mobilization of the community to the leprosy problem. PMID:25412349

  19. Exogenous Variables and Value-Added Assessments: A Fatal Flaw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There has been rapid growth in value-added assessment of teachers to meet the widely supported policy goal of identifying the most effective and the most ineffective teachers in a school system. The former group is to be rewarded while the latter group is to be helped or fired for their poor performance. But, value-added approaches to…

  20. Value-Added Results for Public Virtual Schools in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Richard; Rice, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present value-added calculation methods that were applied to determine whether online schools performed at the same or different levels relative to standardized testing. This study includes information on how we approached our value added model development and the results for 32 online public high schools in…

  1. How Does Value-Added Data Affect Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Jennifer L.; Pallas, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Teacher evaluation systems can have high stakes for individual teachers, and it's important to ask how new evaluation models--including value-added measures--serve teachers as they strive to improve their practice. The authors interviewed teachers at a high-performing New York City school about their reactions to their value-added scores and…

  2. New Features in ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Murray, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) has been working hard on updating its services and interfaces to better support our community's research needs. ADS Labs is a new interface built on the old tried-and-true ADS Abstract Databases, so all of ADS's content is available through it. In this presentation we highlight the new features that have been developed in ADS Labs over the last year: new recommendations, metrics, a citation tool and enhanced fulltext search. ADS Labs has long been providing article-level recommendations based on keyword similarity, co-readership and co-citation analysis of its corpus. We have now introduced personal recommendations, which provide a list of articles to be considered based on a individual user's readership history. A new metrics interface provides a summary of the basic impact indicators for a list of records. These include the total and normalized number of papers, citations, reads, and downloads. Also included are some of the popular indices such as the h, g and i10 index. The citation helper tool allows one to submit a set of records and obtain a list of top 10 papers which cite and/or are cited by papers in the original list (but which are not in it). The process closely resembles the network approach of establishing "friends of friends" via an analysis of the citation network. The full-text search service now covers more than 2.5 million documents, including all the major astronomy journals, as well as physics journals published by Springer, Elsevier, the American Physical Society, the American Geophysical Union, and all of the arXiv eprints. The full-text search interface interface allows users and librarians to dig deep and find words or phrases in the body of the indexed articles. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  3. Changes of Motivational Variables in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis in an Exercise Intervention: Associations between Physical Performance and Motivational Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Geertz, Wiebke; Dechow, Anna-Sophie; Patra, Stefan; Heesen, Christoph; Gold, Stefan M.; Schulz, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study examines the effects of a standardized fitness training on motivational factors such as the intention to be physically active, self-efficacy, perceived barriers, counterstrategies, and exercise specific social support in patients with progressive Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and the relation of these factors to physical performance. Methods. Moderately disabled patients with secondary or primary progressive MS (Expanded Disability Status Scale of 4–6) were randomized to a training group or a waitlist control group. Patients completed on average 20 sessions of training tailored to their individual fitness at baseline over a course of 8–12 weeks. Motivational variables (stage of change according to the transtheoretical model (TTM), self-efficacy, perceived barriers, counterstrategies, and exercise specific social support) were assessed via questionnaires at baseline and follow-up. Results. Forty patients completed the trial. We found significant effects on stages of change (p = .016) and self-efficacy (p = .014) and a trend in counterstrategies (p = .08). Significant correlations between change of physical performance during the exercise training and change in the TTM, perceived barriers, and counterstrategies were detected. Conclusion. This study indicates that tailored individual endurance training could stabilize self-efficacy and increase exercise motivation in patients with progressive MS. Motivational variables were related to the physical performance. PMID:26246692

  4. The AdS central charge in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troost, Jan

    2011-11-01

    We evaluate the vacuum expectation value of the central charge operator in string theory in an AdS3 vacuum. Our calculation provides a rare non-zero one-point function on a spherical worldsheet. The evaluation involves the regularization both of a worldsheet ultraviolet divergence (associated to the infinite volume of the conformal Killing group), and a space-time infrared divergence (corresponding to the infinite volume of space-time). The two divergences conspire to give a finite result, which is the classical general relativity value for the central charge, corrected in bosonic string theory by an infinite series of tree level higher derivative terms.

  5. Small black holes in global AdS spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokela, Niko; Pönni, Arttu; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-04-01

    We study the properties of two-point functions and quasinormal modes in a strongly coupled field theory holographically dual to a small black hole in global anti-de Sitter spacetime. Our results are seen to smoothly interpolate between known limits corresponding to large black holes and thermal AdS space, demonstrating that the Son-Starinets prescription works even when there is no black hole in the spacetime. Omitting issues related to the internal space, the results can be given a field theory interpretation in terms of the microcanonical ensemble, which provides access to energy densities forbidden in the canonical description.

  6. Entanglement entropy and duality in AdS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakas, Ioannis; Pastras, Georgios

    2015-07-01

    Small variations of the entanglement entropy δS and the expectation value of the modular Hamiltonian δE are computed holographically for circular entangling curves in the boundary of AdS4, using gravitational perturbations with general boundary conditions in spherical coordinates. Agreement with the first law of thermodynamics, δS = δE, requires that the line element of the entangling curve remains constant. In this context, we also find a manifestation of electric-magnetic duality for the entanglement entropy and the corresponding modular Hamiltonian, following from the holographic energy-momentum/Cotton tensor duality.

  7. Fake gaps in AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belin, Alexandre; Castro, Alejandra; Hung, Ling-Yan

    2015-11-01

    We discuss properties of interpolating geometries in three dimensional gravity in the presence of a chiral anomaly. This anomaly, which introduces an unbalance between left and right central charges, is protected under RG flows. For this simple reason it is impossible to gap a system with such an anomaly. Our goal is to discuss how holography captures this basic and robust feature. We demonstrate the absence of a mass gap by analysing the linearized spectrum and holographic entanglement entropy of these backgrounds in the context of AdS3/CFT2.

  8. Pure Spinors in AdS and Lie Algebra Cohomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Andrei

    2014-10-01

    We show that the BRST cohomology of the massless sector of the Type IIB superstring on AdS5 × S 5 can be described as the relative cohomology of an infinite-dimensional Lie superalgebra. We explain how the vertex operators of ghost number 1, which correspond to conserved currents, are described in this language. We also give some algebraic description of the ghost number 2 vertices, which appears to be new. We use this algebraic description to clarify the structure of the zero mode sector of the ghost number two states in flat space, and initiate the study of the vertices of the higher ghost number.

  9. Internal structure of charged AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Srijit; Sarkar, Sudipta; Virmani, Amitabh

    2016-06-01

    When an electrically charged black hole is perturbed, its inner horizon becomes a singularity, often referred to as the Poisson-Israel mass inflation singularity. Ori constructed a model of this phenomenon for asymptotically flat black holes, in which the metric can be determined explicitly in the mass inflation region. In this paper we implement the Ori model for charged AdS black holes. We find that the mass function inflates faster than the flat space case as the inner horizon is approached. Nevertheless, the mass inflation singularity is still a weak singularity: Although spacetime curvature becomes infinite, tidal distortions remain finite on physical objects attempting to cross it.

  10. The influence of central neuropathic pain in paraplegic patients on performance of a motor imagery based Brain Computer Interface☆

    PubMed Central

    Vuckovic, A.; Hasan, M.A.; Osuagwu, B.; Fraser, M.; Allan, D.B.; Conway, B.A.; Nasseroleslami, B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to test how the presence of central neuropathic pain (CNP) influences the performance of a motor imagery based Brain Computer Interface (BCI). Methods In this electroencephalography (EEG) based study, we tested BCI classification accuracy and analysed event related desynchronisation (ERD) in 3 groups of volunteers during imagined movements of their arms and legs. The groups comprised of nine able-bodied people, ten paraplegic patients with CNP (lower abdomen and legs) and nine paraplegic patients without CNP. We tested two types of classifiers: a 3 channel bipolar montage and classifiers based on common spatial patterns (CSPs), with varying number of channels and CSPs. Results Paraplegic patients with CNP achieved higher classification accuracy and had stronger ERD than paraplegic patients with no pain for all classifier configurations. Highest 2-class classification accuracy was achieved for CSP classifier covering wider cortical area: 82 ± 7% for patients with CNP, 82 ± 4% for able-bodied and 78 ± 5% for patients with no pain. Conclusion Presence of CNP improves BCI classification accuracy due to stronger and more distinct ERD. Significance Results of the study show that CNP is an important confounding factor influencing the performance of motor imagery based BCI based on ERD. PMID:25698307

  11. The effects of high frequency subthalamic stimulation on balance performance and fear of falling in patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Maria H; Fransson, Per-Anders; Jarnlo, Gun-Britt; Magnusson, Måns; Rehncrona, Stig

    2009-01-01

    Background Balance impairment is one of the most distressing symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) even with pharmacological treatment (levodopa). A complementary treatment is high frequency stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Whether STN stimulation improves postural control is under debate. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of STN stimulation alone on balance performance as assessed with clinical performance tests, subjective ratings of fear of falling and posturography. Methods Ten patients (median age 66, range 59–69 years) with bilateral STN stimulation for a minimum of one year, had their anti-PD medications withdrawn overnight. Assessments were done both with the STN stimulation turned OFF and ON (start randomized). In both test conditions, the following were assessed: motor symptoms (descriptive purposes), clinical performance tests, fear of falling ratings, and posturography with and without vibratory proprioceptive disturbance. Results STN stimulation alone significantly (p = 0.002) increased the scores of the Berg balance scale, and the median increase was 6 points. The results of all timed performance tests, except for sharpened Romberg, were significantly (p ≤ 0.016) improved. The patients rated their fear of falling as less severe, and the total score of the Falls-Efficacy Scale(S) increased (p = 0.002) in median with 54 points. All patients completed posturography when the STN stimulation was turned ON, but three patients were unable to do so when it was turned OFF. The seven patients with complete data showed no statistical significant difference (p values ≥ 0.109) in torque variance values when comparing the two test situations. This applied both during quiet stance and during the periods with vibratory stimulation, and it was irrespective of visual input and sway direction. Conclusion In this sample, STN stimulation alone significantly improved the results of the clinical performance tests that mimic activities in

  12. Assisting Patients with Disabilities to Actively Perform Occupational Activities Using Battery-Free Wireless Mice to Control Environmental Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Wang, Shu-Hui; Chang, Man-Ling; Kung, Ssu-Yun

    2012-01-01

    The latest studies have adopted software technology to turn the battery-free wireless mouse into a high performance object location detector using a newly developed object location detection program (OLDP). This study extended OLDP functionality to assess whether two patients recovering from cerebral vascular accidents would be able to actively…

  13. Linking Rhetorical Sensitivity with the Ability of an Athletic Training Student to Successfully Perform a Patient Medical Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertoncino, Thomas K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which the self-reported rhetorical sensitivity of a sample of athletic training students is positively related to successfully performing a patient medical interview. Particularly, the study focused on if athletic training students' reported communication behaviors is related to their…

  14. The kidney disease quality of life cognitive function subscale and cognitive performance maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Cognitive impairment is common but often undiagnosed in patients with end-stage renal disease, in part reflecting limited validated and easily administered tools to assess cognitive function in dialysis patients. Accordingly, we assessed the utility of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life ...

  15. Preclinical safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution studies with Ad35K++ protein: a novel rituximab cotherapeutic

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Saydaminova, Kamola; Wang, Hongjie; Gough, Michael; Baldessari, Audrey; Cattaneo, Roberto; Lee, Frank; Wang, Chung-Huei Katherine; Jang, Haishan; Astier, Anne; Gopal, Ajay; Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a mouse/human chimeric monoclonal antibody targeted toward CD20. It is efficient as first-line therapy of CD20-positive B-cell malignancies. However, a large fraction of treated patients relapse with rituximab-resistant disease. So far, only modest progress has been made in treatment options for rituximab refractory patients. One of the mechanisms for rituximab resistance involves the upregulation of CD46, which is a key cell surface protein that blocks the activation of complement. We have recently developed a technology that depletes CD46 from the cell surface and thereby sensitizes tumor cells to complement-dependent cytotoxicity. This technology is based on a small recombinant protein, Ad35K++ that binds with high affinity to CD46. In preliminary studies using a 6 × histidinyl tagged protein, we had demonstrated that intravenous Ad35K++ injection in combination with rituximab was safe and increased rituximab-mediated killing of CD20-positive target cells in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs). The presence of the tag, while allowing for easy purification by Ni-NTA chromatography, has the potential to increase the immunogenicity of the recombinant protein. For clinical application, we therefore developed an Ad35K++ protein without His-tag. In the present study, we performed preclinical studies in two animal species (mice and NHPs) with this protein demonstrating its safety and efficacy. These studies estimated the Ad35K++ dose range and treatment regimen to be used in patients. Furthermore, we showed that intravenous Ad35K++ injection triggers the shedding of the CD46 extracellular domain in xenograft mouse tumor models and in macaques. Shed serum CD46 can be measured in the serum and can potentially be used as a pharmacodynamic marker for monitoring Ad35K++ activity in patient undergoing treatment with this agent. These studies create the basis for an investigational new drug application for the use of Ad35K++ in combination with rituximab in the

  16. Preclinical safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution studies with Ad35K++ protein: a novel rituximab cotherapeutic.

    PubMed

    Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Saydaminova, Kamola; Wang, Hongjie; Gough, Michael; Baldessari, Audrey; Cattaneo, Roberto; Lee, Frank; Wang, Chung-Huei Katherine; Jang, Haishan; Astier, Anne; Gopal, Ajay; Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a mouse/human chimeric monoclonal antibody targeted toward CD20. It is efficient as first-line therapy of CD20-positive B-cell malignancies. However, a large fraction of treated patients relapse with rituximab-resistant disease. So far, only modest progress has been made in treatment options for rituximab refractory patients. One of the mechanisms for rituximab resistance involves the upregulation of CD46, which is a key cell surface protein that blocks the activation of complement. We have recently developed a technology that depletes CD46 from the cell surface and thereby sensitizes tumor cells to complement-dependent cytotoxicity. This technology is based on a small recombinant protein, Ad35K++ that binds with high affinity to CD46. In preliminary studies using a 6 × histidinyl tagged protein, we had demonstrated that intravenous Ad35K++ injection in combination with rituximab was safe and increased rituximab-mediated killing of CD20-positive target cells in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs). The presence of the tag, while allowing for easy purification by Ni-NTA chromatography, has the potential to increase the immunogenicity of the recombinant protein. For clinical application, we therefore developed an Ad35K++ protein without His-tag. In the present study, we performed preclinical studies in two animal species (mice and NHPs) with this protein demonstrating its safety and efficacy. These studies estimated the Ad35K++ dose range and treatment regimen to be used in patients. Furthermore, we showed that intravenous Ad35K++ injection triggers the shedding of the CD46 extracellular domain in xenograft mouse tumor models and in macaques. Shed serum CD46 can be measured in the serum and can potentially be used as a pharmacodynamic marker for monitoring Ad35K++ activity in patient undergoing treatment with this agent. These studies create the basis for an investigational new drug application for the use of Ad35K++ in combination with rituximab in the

  17. Introducing ADS 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Luker, J.; Chyla, R.; Murray, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    In the spring of 1993, the Smithsonian/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) first launched its bibliographic search system. It was known then as the ADS Abstract Service, a component of the larger Astrophysics Data System effort which had developed an interoperable data system now seen as a precursor of the Virtual Observatory. As a result of the massive technological and sociological changes in the field of scholarly communication, the ADS is now completing the most ambitious technological upgrade in its twenty-year history. Code-named ADS 2.0, the new system features: an IT platform built on web and digital library standards; a new, extensible, industrial strength search engine; a public API with various access control capabilities; a set of applications supporting search, export, visualization, analysis; a collaborative, open source development model; and enhanced indexing of content which includes the full-text of astronomy and physics publications. The changes in the ADS platform affect all aspects of the system and its operations, including: the process through which data and metadata are harvested, curated and indexed; the interface and paradigm used for searching the database; and the follow-up analysis capabilities available to the users. This poster describes the choices behind the technical overhaul of the system, the technology stack used, and the opportunities which the upgrade is providing us with, namely gains in productivity and enhancements in our system capabilities.

  18. The Performance of Vibration Controlled Transient Elastography in a US Cohort of Patients with Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tapper, Elliot B.; Challies, Tracy; Nasser, Imad; Afdhal, Nezam H.; Lai, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) who have advanced fibrosis is crucial. Vibration Controlled Elastography (VCTE) is an alternative to biopsy; though published experience with VCTE in a U.S. population is limited. Methods We performed a prospective cohort of 164 biopsy-proven NAFLD patients evaluated with VCTE using an M probe and NAFLD Fibrosis Score (NFS) at baseline and a repeat VCTE at 6 months. Reliable liver stiffness measurements (LSM) were defined as 10 valid measurements and interquartile range (IQR) < 30% of the median. Results 120 (73.2%) patients had reliable LSM. The median LSM for patients with and without F3–F4 (advanced) fibrosis were 6.6 kPA (5.3 – 8.9) and 14.4 kPA (12.1 – 24.3), respectively. The optimal LSM cutoff for advanced fibrosis was 9.9 kPa (sensitivity 95%, specificity 77%). Additionally, 100% of patients with LSM < 7.9 kPa did not have advanced fibrosis. A risk stratification strategy based on VCTE avoids the need for biopsy in at least the 74 (45.1%) patients correctly classified as low risk for advanced fibrosis. The area under the receiver operating curve (AUROC) of 0.93 (95% CI: 0.86–0.96). For the detection of F3-F4 fibrosis in patients with reliable VCTE, the AUROC of VCTE is superior to that of NFS (0.77), p=0.01. Patients who achieved a ≥5% weight loss at 6 month follow-up experienced improved LSM (p = 0.009), independent of changes in aminotransferase levels. Conclusion Reliable VCTE results can rule out advanced fibrosis and avoid the need for biopsy in at least 45% of US patients with NAFLD. However, 1 in 4 patients have uninterpretable studies using the M probe. PMID:26977758

  19. Combination analysis of neuropsychological tests and structural MRI measures in differentiating AD, MCI and control groups--the AddNeuroMed study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yawu; Paajanen, Teemu; Zhang, Yi; Westman, Eric; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Simmons, Andrew; Tunnard, Catherine; Sobow, Tomasz; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Muehlboeck, Sebastian; Evans, Alan; Spenger, Christian; Lovestone, Simon; Soininen, Hilkka

    2011-07-01

    To study the ability of neuropsychological tests, manual MRI hippocampal volume measures, regional volume and cortical thickness measures to identify subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy age-matched controls. Neuropsychological tests, manual hippocampal volume, automated regional volume and regional cortical thickness measures were performed in 120 AD patients, 120 MCI subjects, and 111 controls. The regional cortical thickness and volumes in MCI subjects were significantly decreased in limbic/paralimbic areas and temporal lobe compared to controls. Atrophy was much more extensive in the AD patients compared to MCI subjects and controls. The combination of neuropsychological tests and volumes revealed the highest accuracy (82% AD vs. MCI; 94% AD vs. control; 83% MCI vs. control). Adding regional cortical thicknesses into the discriminate analysis did not improve accuracy. We conclude that regional cortical thickness and volume measures provide a panoramic view of brain atrophy in AD and MCI subjects. A combination of neuropsychological tests and regional volumes are important when discriminating AD from healthy controls and MCI. PMID:19683363

  20. Conserved charges in timelike warped AdS3 spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnay, L.; Fernández-Melgarejo, J. J.; Giribet, G.; Goya, A.; Lavia, E.

    2015-06-01

    We consider the timelike version of warped anti-de Sitter space (WAdS), which corresponds to the three-dimensional section of the Gödel solution of four-dimensional cosmological Einstein equations. This geometry presents closed timelike curves (CTCs), which are inherited from its four-dimensional embedding. In three dimensions, this type of solution can be supported without matter provided the graviton acquires mass. Here, among the different ways to consistently give mass to the graviton in three dimensions, we consider the parity-even model known as new massive gravity (NMG). In the bulk of timelike WAdS3 space, we introduce defects that, from the three-dimensional point of view, represent spinning massive particlelike objects. For this type of source, we investigate the definition of quasilocal gravitational energy as seen from infinity, far beyond the region where the CTCs appear. We also consider the covariant formalism applied to NMG to compute the mass and the angular momentum of spinning particlelike defects and compare the result with the one obtained by means of the quasilocal stress tensor. We apply these methods to special limits in which the WAdS3 solutions coincide with locally AdS3 and locally AdS2×R spaces. Finally, we make some comments about the asymptotic symmetry algebra of asymptotically WAdS3 spaces in NMG.

  1. Primordial fluctuations from complex AdS saddle points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertog, Thomas; van der Woerd, Ellen

    2016-02-01

    One proposal for dS/CFT is that the Hartle-Hawking (HH) wave function in the large volume limit is equal to the partition function of a Euclidean CFT deformed by various operators. All saddle points defining the semiclassical HH wave function in cosmology have a representation in which their interior geometry is part of a Euclidean AdS domain wall with complex matter fields. We compute the wave functions of scalar and tensor perturbations around homogeneous isotropic complex saddle points, turning on single scalar field matter only. We compare their predictions for the spectra of CMB perturbations with those of a different dS/CFT proposal based on the analytic continuation of inflationary universes to real asymptotically AdS domain walls. We find the predictions of both bulk calculations agree to first order in the slow roll parameters, but there is a difference at higher order which, we argue, is a signature of the HH state of the fluctuations.

  2. Suspected non-AD pathology in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Wisse, Laura E M; Butala, Nirali; Das, Sandhitsu R; Davatzikos, Christos; Dickerson, Bradford C; Vaishnavi, Sanjeev N; Yushkevich, Paul A; Wolk, David A

    2015-12-01

    We aim to better characterize mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients with suspected non-Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology (SNAP) based on their longitudinal outcome, cognition, biofluid, and neuroimaging profile. MCI participants (n = 361) from ADNI-GO/2 were designated "amyloid positive" with abnormal amyloid-beta 42 levels (AMY+) and "neurodegeneration positive" (NEU+) with abnormal hippocampal volume or hypometabolism using fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. SNAP was compared with the other MCI groups and with AMY- controls. AMY-NEU+/SNAP, 16.6%, were older than the NEU- groups but not AMY- controls. They had a lower conversion rate to AD after 24 months than AMY+NEU+ MCI participants. SNAP-MCI participants had similar amyloid-beta 42 levels, florbetapir and tau levels, but larger white matter hyperintensity volumes than AMY- controls and AMY-NEU- MCI participants. SNAP participants performed worse on all memory domains and on other cognitive domains, than AMY-NEU- participants but less so than AMY+NEU+ participants. Subthreshold levels of cerebral amyloidosis are unlikely to play a role in SNAP-MCI, but pathologies involving the hippocampus and cerebrovascular disease may underlie the neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment in this group. PMID:26422359

  3. Performance of Verbal Fluency as an Endophenotype in Patients with Familial versus Sporadic Schizophrenia and Their Parents.

    PubMed

    Liang, Sugai; Deng, Wei; Wang, Qiang; Ma, Xiaohong; Li, Mingli; Brown, Matthew R G; Hu, Xun; Li, Xinmin; Greenshaw, Andrew J; Li, Tao

    2016-01-01

    What's the neurocognitive deficit as an endophenotype to familial schizophrenia? Here, we investigate the neurocognitive endophenotype in first-episode patients with familial schizophrenia (FS) and sporadic schizophrenia (SS), and their parents. 98 FS patients and their 105 parents; 190 SS patients and their 207 parents; 195 controls matched with patients, and 190 controls matched with the patients' parents, were assessed with the short version of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised in China (WAIS-RC), the immediate and delayed logical memory tests from the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised in China (WMS-RC), the Verbal Fluency Test (VFT), the Trail Making Test Parts A and B-Modified (TMA, TMB-M), and the Modified Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST-M). The results showed that with age, gender, and education as covariates, after controlling for false discovery rates, the FS group and their parent group performed worse than the SS group and their parent group on VFT. No significant differences were found for other neurocognitive tests between the FS and SS patient groups, and their respective parent groups. Our findings suggest the patients with familial and sporadic schizophrenia and their respective parent groups may have a different genetic predisposition in relation to a cognitive endophenotype. PMID:27581658

  4. Influence of coagulation factor x on in vitro and in vivo gene delivery by adenovirus (Ad) 5, Ad35, and chimeric Ad5/Ad35 vectors.

    PubMed

    Greig, Jenny A; Buckley, Suzanne Mk; Waddington, Simon N; Parker, Alan L; Bhella, David; Pink, Rebecca; Rahim, Ahad A; Morita, Takashi; Nicklin, Stuart A; McVey, John H; Baker, Andrew H

    2009-10-01

    The binding of coagulation factor X (FX) to the hexon of adenovirus (Ad) 5 is pivotal for hepatocyte transduction. However, vectors based on Ad35, a subspecies B Ad, are in development for cancer gene therapy, as Ad35 utilizes CD46 (which is upregulated in many cancers) for transduction. We investigated whether interaction of Ad35 with FX influenced vector tropism using Ad5, Ad35, and Ad5/Ad35 chimeras: Ad5/fiber(f)35, Ad5/penton(p)35/f35, and Ad35/f5. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) revealed that Ad35 and Ad35/f5 bound FX with approximately tenfold lower affinities than Ad5 hexon-containing viruses, and electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) demonstrated a direct Ad35 hexon:FX interaction. The presence of physiological levels of FX significantly inhibited transduction of vectors containing Ad35 fibers (Ad5/f35, Ad5/p35/f35, and Ad35) in CD46-positive cells. Vectors were intravenously administered to CD46 transgenic mice in the presence and absence of FX-binding protein (X-bp), resulting in reduced liver accumulation for all vectors. Moreover, Ad5/f35 and Ad5/p35/f35 efficiently accumulated in the lung, whereas Ad5 demonstrated poor lung targeting. Additionally, X-bp significantly reduced lung genome accumulation for Ad5/f35 and Ad5/p35/f35, whereas Ad35 was significantly enhanced. In summary, vectors based on the full Ad35 serotype will be useful vectors for selective gene transfer via CD46 due to a weaker FX interaction compared to Ad5. PMID:19603000

  5. Antagonistic molecular interactions of photosynthetic pigments with molecular disease targets: a new approach to treat AD and ALS.

    PubMed

    Krishnaraj, R Navanietha; Kumari, S S Sreeja; Mukhopadhyay, Sudit Sekhar

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are progressive neurodegenerative diseases that affect the neurons in the brain and the spinal cord. Neuroinflamation and apoptosis are key players in the progressive damage of the neurons in AD and ALS. Currently, there is no drug to offer complete cure for both these diseases. Riluzole is the only available drug that can prolong the life time of the ALS patients for nearly 3 months. Molecules that offer good HIT to the molecular targets of ALS will help to treat AD and ALS patients. P53 kinase receptor (4AT3), EphA4 (3CKH) and histone deacetylase (3SFF) are the promising disease targets of AD and ALS. This paper discusses on a new approach to combat neurodegenerative diseases using photosynthetic pigments. The docking studies were performed with the Autodock Vina algorithm to predict the binding of the natural pigments such as β carotene, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, phycoerythrin and phycocyanin on these targets. The β carotene, phycoerythrin and phycocyanin had higher binding energies indicating the antagonistic activity to the disease targets. These pigments serve as a potential therapeutic molecule to treat neuroinflammation and apoptosis in the AD and ALS patients. PMID:26053508

  6. [Influence of mnemonic, semantic, and conceptual factors on the performance of aphasic patients in the Token Test (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Naumann, E; Kelter, S; Cohen, R

    1980-01-01

    Three experimental modifications of the Token Test were presented to 40 aphasics with predominantly expressive disturbances and 40 control patients with diffuse brain damage. On each token a human figure was drawn (a man, woman, boy, or girl); the size, color, and form of the token were given in the instructions, or the depicted figure was given as the target either in addition to or instead of the size and form. The mere fact that a figure was depicted on the tokens did not affect the performance of the patients. However, when the figures were mentioned in the instructions, the aphasics' performance improved significantly, although it never reached the level of the controls. An analysis of the error types suggested that the poor performance of the aphasics in the Token Test is at least in part due to difficulties identifying complex stimuli when the features are separately named in the instructions. PMID:7425822

  7. Art as an Evolutionary Adaptation: Inspiration from the Visible Supernovae of AD 1054 and AD 3054

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbally, C. J.; Rappaport, M. B.

    2016-01-01

    The authors, an astronomer/priest and an anthropologist/biologist, describe their use of the dramatic arts at the INSAP VIII meeting in their performance of two short skits on the sighting of a supernova in AD 1054 (creating the beautiful Crab Nebula) and a future “Rho Cas” stellar explosion in the constellation Cassiopeia, in AD 3054. They speculate on the emergence of science, religion, and art as bona fide adaptations, responding to natural selection, which served early hominins well in their struggle for existence. They draw parallels to the continued functions of science, religion, and art in modern society.

  8. ADS: The Next Generation Search Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, A.; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Chyla, R.; Luker, J.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D. M.; Holachek, A.; Dave, R.; Murray, S. S.

    2015-04-01

    Four years after the last LISA meeting, the NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) finds itself in the middle of major changes to the infrastructure and contents of its database. In this paper we highlight a number of features of great importance to librarians and discuss the additional functionality that we are currently developing. Our citation coverage has doubled since 2010 and now consists of over 10 million citations. We are normalizing the affiliation information in our records and we have started collecting and linking funding sources with papers in our system. At the same time, we are undergoing major technology changes in the ADS platform. We have rolled out and are now enhancing a new high-performance search engine capable of performing full-text as well as metadata searches using an intuitive query language. We are currently able to index acknowledgments, affiliations, citations, and funding sources. While this effort is still ongoing, some of its benefits are already available through the ADS Labs user interface and API at http://adslabs.org/adsabs/.

  9. A study protocol for performance evaluation of a new academic intensive care unit facility: impact on patient care

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Mauricio; Zygun, David A; Harrison, Alexandra; Stelfox, Henry T

    2013-01-01

    Background Healthcare facility construction is increasing because of population demand and the need to replace ageing infrastructure. Research suggests that there may be a relationship between healthcare environment and patient care. To date, most evaluations of new healthcare facilities are derived from techniques used in other industries and focus on physical, financial and architectural performance. However, few studies have evaluated the impact of healthcare facility design on processes and outcomes of patient care. Study aims The primary objective of this study was to investigate the impact of relocation to a new intensive care unit (ICU) facility on clinical performance measures. This study also proposes to develop and test a framework for facility performance evaluation using accepted ICU design guidelines and Donabedian's model for healthcare quality. Methods and analysis We will utilise a mixed-methods, observational, retrospective, controlled, before-and-after design to take advantage of the quasiexperimental conditions created with the construction of a new ICU facility in Calgary, Canada. For the qualitative substudy, we will conduct individual interviews with end-users to understand their impressions and experiences with the new environment and perform thematic analysis. For the quantitative substudy, we will compare process of care indicators and patient outcomes for the 12-month period before and after relocation to the new facility. Two other local ICU facilities that did not undergo structural change during the study period will serve as controls. We will triangulate qualitative and quantitative results utilising a novel framework. Ethics and dissemination The results of this study will contribute in understanding the impact of new ICU facilities on clinical performance measures centred on patients, their families and healthcare providers. The framework will complement existing building performance evaluation techniques and help healthcare

  10. Predicting 30-Day Readmissions: Performance of the LACE Index Compared with a Regression Model among General Medicine Patients in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Low, Lian Leng; Lee, Kheng Hock; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng; Wang, Sijia; Tan, Shu Yun; Thumboo, Julian; Liu, Nan

    2015-01-01

    The LACE index (length of stay, acuity of admission, Charlson comorbidity index, CCI, and number of emergency department visits in preceding 6 months) derived in Canada is simple and may have clinical utility in Singapore to predict readmission risk. We compared the performance of the LACE index with a derived model in identifying 30-day readmissions from a population of general medicine patients in Singapore. Additional variables include patient demographics, comorbidities, clinical and laboratory variables during the index admission, and prior healthcare utilization in the preceding year. 5,862 patients were analysed and 572 patients (9.8%) were readmitted in the 30 days following discharge. Age, CCI, count of surgical procedures during index admission, white cell count, serum albumin, and number of emergency department visits in previous 6 months were significantly associated with 30-day readmission risk. The final logistic regression model had fair discriminative ability c-statistic of 0.650 while the LACE index achieved c-statistic of 0.628 in predicting 30-day readmissions. Our derived model has the advantage of being available early in the admission to identify patients at high risk of readmission for interventions. Additional factors predicting readmission risk and machine learning techniques should be considered to improve model performance. PMID:26682212

  11. Predicting 30-Day Readmissions: Performance of the LACE Index Compared with a Regression Model among General Medicine Patients in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lian Leng; Lee, Kheng Hock; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng; Wang, Sijia; Tan, Shu Yun