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Sample records for ad transgenic mouse

  1. A non-transgenic mouse model (icv-STZ mouse) of Alzheimer's disease: similarities to and differences from the transgenic model (3xTg-AD mouse).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanxing; Liang, Zhihou; Blanchard, Julie; Dai, Chun-Ling; Sun, Shenggang; Lee, Moon H; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be divided into sporadic AD (SAD) and familial AD (FAD). Most AD cases are sporadic and result from multiple etiologic factors, including environmental, genetic, and metabolic factors, whereas FAD is caused by mutations in the presenilins or amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) genes. A commonly used animal model for AD is the 3xTg-AD transgenic mouse model, which harbors mutated presenilin 1, APP, and tau genes and thus represents a model of FAD. There is an unmet need in the field to characterize animal models representing different AD mechanisms, so that potential drugs for SAD can be evaluated preclinically in these animal models. A mouse model generated by intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of streptozocin (STZ), the icv-STZ mouse, shows many aspects of SAD. In this study, we compared the non-cognitive and cognitive behaviors as well as biochemical and immunohistochemical alterations between the icv-STZ mouse and the 3xTg-AD mouse. We found that both mouse models showed increased exploratory activity as well as impaired learning and spatial memory. Both models also demonstrated neuroinflammation, altered synaptic proteins and insulin/IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1) signaling, and increased hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain. The most prominent brain abnormality in the icv-STZ mouse was neuroinflammation, and in the 3xTg-AD mouse it was elevation of hyperphosphorylated tau. These observations demonstrate the behavioral and neuropathological similarities and differences between the icv-STZ mouse and the 3xTg-AD mouse models and will help guide future studies using these two mouse models for the development of AD drugs.

  2. Nobiletin, a citrus flavonoid, improves cognitive impairment and reduces soluble Aβ levels in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (3XTg-AD).

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Akira; Aoyama, Yuki; Shin, Eun-Joo; Nam, Yunsung; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Nagai, Taku; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia among the elderly, is characterized by the progressive decline of cognitive function. Increasing evidence indicates that the production and accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ), particularly soluble Aβ oligomers, is central to the pathogenesis of AD. Our recent studies have demonstrated that nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavone from citrus peels, ameliorates learning and memory impairment in olfactory-bulbectomized mice, amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice, NMDA receptor antagonist-treated mice, and senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8. Here, we present evidence that this natural compound improves cognitive impairment and reduces soluble Aβ levels in a triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3XTg-AD) that progressively develops amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and cognitive impairments. Treatment with nobiletin (30 mg/kg) for 3 months reversed the impairment of short-term memory and recognition memory in 3XTg-AD mice. Our ELISA analysis also showed that nobiletin reduced the levels of soluble Aβ1-40 in the brain of 3XTg-AD mice. Furthermore, nobiletin reduced ROS levels in the hippocampus of 3XTg-AD as well as wild-type mice. These results suggest that this natural compound has potential to become a novel drug for the treatment and prevention of AD.

  3. Deficits in odor-guided behaviors in the transgenic 3xTg-AD female mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Coronas-Sámano, G; Portillo, W; Beltrán Campos, V; Medina-Aguirre, G I; Paredes, R G; Diaz-Cintra, S

    2014-07-14

    Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) is characterized by a number of alterations including those in cognition and olfaction. An early symptom of AD is decreased olfactory ability, which may affect odor-guided behaviors. To test this possibility we evaluated alterations in sexual incentive motivation, sexual olfactory preference, sexual olfactory discrimination, nursing-relevant olfactory preference and olfactory discrimination in female mice. We tested 3xTg-AD (a triple transgenic model, which is a "knock in" of PS1M146V, APPSwe, and tauP300L) and wild type (WT) female mice when receptive (estrous) and non-receptive (anestrous). Subjects were divided into three groups of different ages: (1) 4-5 months, (2) 10-11 months, and (3) 16-18 months. In the sexual incentive motivation task, the receptive 3xTg-AD females showed no preference for a sexually active male at any age studied, in contrast to the WT females. In the sexual olfactory preference test, the receptive WT females were able to identify sexually active male secretions at all ages, but the oldest (16-18 months old) 3xTg-AD females could not. In addition, the oldest 3xTg-AD females showed no preference for nursing-relevant odors in dam secretions and were unable to discriminate between cinnamon and strawberry odors, indicating olfactory alterations. Thus, the present study suggests that the olfactory deficits in this mouse model are associated with changes in sexual incentive motivation and discrimination of food-related odors.

  4. Whole body exposure to 2.4 GHz WIFI signals: effects on cognitive impairment in adult triple transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (3xTg-AD).

    PubMed

    Banaceur, Sana; Banasr, Sihem; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2013-03-01

    The present investigation aimed at evaluating the effects of long-term exposure to WIFI type radiofrequency (RF) signals (2.40 GHz), two hours per day during one month at a Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of 1.60 W/kg. The effects of RF exposure were studied on wildtype mice and triple transgenic mice (3xTg-AD) destined to develop Alzheimer's-like cognitive impairment. Mice were divided into four groups: two sham groups (WT, TG; n=7) and two exposed groups (WTS, TGS; n=7). The cognitive interference task used in this study was designed from an analogous human cognitive interference task including the Flex field activity system test, the two-compartment box test and the Barnes maze test. Our data demonstrate for the first time that RF improves cognitive behavior of 3xTg-AD mice. We conclude that RF exposure may represent an effective memory-enhancing approach in Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Fibrillar Amyloid-β Accumulation Triggers an Inflammatory Mechanism Leading to Hyperphosphorylation of the Carboxyl-Terminal End of Tau Polypeptide in the Hippocampal Formation of the 3×Tg-AD Transgenic Mouse.

    PubMed

    Ontiveros-Torres, Miguel Ángel; Labra-Barrios, María Luisa; Díaz-Cintra, Sofía; Aguilar-Vázquez, Azucena Ruth; Moreno-Campuzano, Samadhi; Flores-Rodríguez, Paola; Luna-Herrera, Claudia; Mena, Raúl; Perry, George; Florán-Garduño, Benjamín; Luna-Muñoz, José; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro

    2016-03-22

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative and irreversible disorder whose progressiveness is dependent on age. It is histopathologically characterized by the massive accumulation of insoluble forms of tau and amyloid-β (Aβ) asneurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques, respectively. Many studies have documented that these two polypeptides suffer several posttranslational modifications employing postmortem tissue sections from brains of patients with AD. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the posttranslational modifications of key players in this disease, including Aβ and tau, several transgenic mouse models have been developed. One of these models is the 3×Tg-AD transgenic mouse, carrying three transgenes encoding APPSWE, S1M146V, and TauP301L proteins. To further characterize this transgenicmouse, we determined the accumulation of fibrillar Aβ as a function of age in relation to the hyperphosphorylation patterns of TauP301L at both its N- and C-terminus in the hippocampal formation by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Moreover, we searched for the expression of activated protein kinases and mediators of inflammation by western blot of wholeprotein extracts from hippocampal tissue sections since 3 to 28 months as well. Our results indicate that the presence of fibrillar Aβ deposits correlates with a significant activation of astrocytes and microglia in subiculum and CA1 regions of hippocampus. Accordingly, we also observed a significant increase in the expression of TNF-α associated to neuritic plaques and glial cells. Importantly, there is an overexpression of the stress activated protein kinases SAPK/JNK and Cdk-5 in pyramidal neurons, which might phosphorylate several residues at the C-terminus of TauP301L. Therefore, the accumulation of Aβ oligomers results in an inflammatory environment that upregulates kinases involved in hyperphosphorylation of TauP301L polypeptide.

  6. Transgenic mouse offspring generated by ROSI.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Pedro; Pérez-Cerezales, Serafín; Laguna, Ricardo; Fernández-Gonzalez, Raúl; Sanjuanbenito, Belén Pintado; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The production of transgenic animals is an important tool for experimental and applied biology. Over the years, many approaches for the production of transgenic animals have been tried, including pronuclear microinjection, sperm-mediated gene transfer, transfection of male germ cells, somatic cell nuclear transfer and the use of lentiviral vectors. In the present study, we developed a new transgene delivery approach, and we report for the first time the production of transgenic animals by co-injection of DNA and round spermatid nuclei into non-fertilized mouse oocytes (ROSI). The transgene used was a construct containing the human CMV immediate early promoter and the enhanced GFP gene. With this procedure, 12% of the live offspring we obtained carried the transgene. This efficiency of transgenic production by ROSI was similar to the efficiency by pronuclear injection or intracytoplasmic injection of male gamete nuclei (ICSI). However, ICSI required fewer embryos to produce the same number of transgenic animals. The expression of Egfp mRNA and fluorescence of EGFP were found in the majority of the organs examined in 4 transgenic lines generated by ROSI. Tissue morphology and transgene expression were not distinguishable between transgenic animals produced by ROSI or pronuclear injection. Furthermore, our results are of particular interest because they indicate that the transgene incorporation mediated by intracytoplasmic injection of male gamete nuclei is not an exclusive property of mature sperm cell nuclei with compact chromatin but it can be accomplished with immature sperm cell nuclei with decondensed chromatin as well. The present study also provides alternative procedures for transgene delivery into embryos or reconstituted oocytes.

  7. Immunotherapeutic approaches for Alzheimer's disease in transgenic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Thomas; Boutajangout, Allal

    2010-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a member of a category of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the conformational change of a normal protein into a pathological conformer with a high beta-sheet content that renders it resistant to degradation and neurotoxic. In the case of AD the normal soluble amyloid beta (sAbeta) peptide is converted into oligomeric/fibrillar Abeta. The oligomeric forms of Abeta are thought to be the most toxic, while fibrillar Abeta becomes deposited as amyloid plaques and congophilic angiopathy, which both serve as neuropathological markers of the disease. In addition, the accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau as soluble toxic oligomers and as neurofibrillary tangles is an essential part of the pathology. Many therapeutic interventions are under investigation to prevent and treat AD. The testing of these diverse approaches to ameliorate AD pathology has been made possible by the existence of numerous transgenic mouse models which each mirror different aspects of AD pathology. Perhaps the most exciting of these approaches is immunomodulation. Vaccination is currently being tried for a range of age associated CNS disorders with great success being reported in many transgenic mouse models. However, there is a discrepancy between these results and current human clinical trials which highlights the limitations of current models and also uncertainties in our understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of AD. No current AD Tg mouse model exactly reflects all aspects of the human disease. Since the underlying etiology of sporadic AD is unknown, the process of creating better Tg models is in constant evolution. This is an essential goal since it will be necessary to develop therapeutic approaches which will be highly effective in humans.

  8. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  9. A Transgenic Mouse Model of Poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Koike, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice (tg mice) that express the human poliovirus receptor (PVR), CD155, are susceptible to poliovirus and develop a neurological disease that resembles human poliomyelitis. Assessment of the neurovirulence levels of poliovirus strains, including mutant viruses produced by reverse genetics, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, and vaccine candidates, is useful for basic research of poliovirus pathogenicity, the surveillance of circulating polioviruses, and the quality control of oral live poliovirus vaccines, and does not require the use of monkeys. Furthermore, PVR-tg mice are useful for studying poliovirus tissue tropism and host immune responses. PVR-tg mice can be bred with mice deficient in the genes involved in viral pathogenicity. This report describes the methods used to analyze the pathogenicity and immune responses of poliovirus using the PVR-tg mouse model.

  10. Age-dependent phenotypic characteristics of a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Susanna; Feldon, Joram; Yee, Benjamin K

    2008-08-01

    The triple-transgenic mouse line (3 x Tg-AD) harboring PS1M146V, APPSwe, and taup301L transgenes represents the only transgenic model for Alzheimer's disease (AD) to date capturing both beta-amyloid and tau neuropathology. The present study provides an extensive behavioral characterization of the 3 x Tg-AD mouse line, evaluating the emergence of noncognitive and cognitive AD-like symptoms at two ages corresponding to the early (6-7 months) and advanced (12-13 months) stages of AD-pathology. Enhanced responsiveness to aversive stimulation was detected in mutant mice at both ages: the 3 x Tg-AD genotype enhanced acoustic startle response and facilitated performance in the cued-version of the water maze. These noncognitive phenotypes were accompanied by hyperactivity and reduced locomotor habituation in the open field at the older age. Signs of cognitive aberrations were also detected at both ages, but they were limited to associative learning. The present study suggests that this popular transgenic mouse model of AD has clear phenotypes beyond the cognitive domain, and their potential relationship to the cognitive phenotypes should be further explored.

  11. Variegated transgene expression in mouse mammary gland is determined by the transgene integration locus.

    PubMed Central

    Dobie, K W; Lee, M; Fantes, J A; Graham, E; Clark, A J; Springbett, A; Lathe, R; McClenaghan, M

    1996-01-01

    Mice carrying an ovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) transgene secrete BLG protein into their milk. To explore transgene expression stability, we studied expression levels in three BLG transgenic mouse lines. Unexpectedly, two lines exhibited variable levels of transgene expression. Copy number within lines appeared to be stable and there was no evidence of transgene rearrangement. In the most variable line, BLG production levels were stable within individual mice in two successive lactations. Backcrossing demonstrated that genetic background did not contribute significantly to variable expression. Tissue in situ hybridization revealed mosaicism of transgene expression within individual mammary glands from the two variable lines; in low expressors, discrete patches of cells expressing the transgene were observed. Transgene protein concentrations in milk reflected the proportion of epithelial cells expressing BLG mRNA. Furthermore, chromosomal in situ hybridization revealed that transgene arrays in both lines are situated close to the centromere. We propose that mosaicism of transgene expression is a consequence of the chromosomal location and/or the nature of the primary transgene integration event. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8692874

  12. Novel Transgenic Mouse Model for Testing the Effect of Circulating IGF-I on Mammary Stem/Progenitor Cell Number and Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0628 TITLE: Novel Transgenic Mouse Model for Testing ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Novel Transgenic Mouse Model for Testing the Effect of Circulating IGF-I on Mammary Stem/Progenitor Cell...tumorigenesis. We found no difference in time to tumor formation in ErbB2 vs. TTR-IGF-I/ErbB2 transgenic mice . Our conclusion is either that ErbB2

  13. Chimeric elk/mouse prion proteins in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Oehler, Abby; Johnson, Natrina L; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2013-02-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer and elk is a highly communicable neurodegenerative disorder caused by prions. Investigations of CWD are hampered by slow bioassays in transgenic (Tg) mice. Towards the development of Tg mice that will be more susceptible to CWD prions, we created a series of chimeric elk/mouse transgenes that encode the N terminus of elk PrP (ElkPrP) up to residue Y168 and the C terminus of mouse PrP (MoPrP) beyond residue 169 (mouse numbering), designated Elk3M(SNIVVK). Between codons 169 and 219, six residues distinguish ElkPrP from MoPrP: N169S, T173N, V183I, I202V, I214V and R219K. Using chimeric elk/mouse PrP constructs, we generated 12 Tg mouse lines and determined incubation times after intracerebral inoculation with the mouse-passaged RML scrapie or Elk1P CWD prions. Unexpectedly, one Tg mouse line expressing Elk3M(SNIVVK) exhibited incubation times of <70 days when inoculated with RML prions; a second line had incubation times of <90 days. In contrast, mice expressing full-length ElkPrP had incubation periods of >250 days for RML prions. Tg(Elk3M,SNIVVK) mice were less susceptible to CWD prions than Tg(ElkPrP) mice. Changing three C-terminal mouse residues (202, 214 and 219) to those of elk doubled the incubation time for mouse RML prions and rendered the mice resistant to Elk1P CWD prions. Mutating an additional two residues from mouse to elk at codons 169 and 173 increased the incubation times for mouse prions to >300 days, but made the mice susceptible to CWD prions. Our findings highlight the role of C-terminal residues in PrP that control the susceptibility and replication of prions.

  14. Chimeric elk/mouse prion proteins in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Oehler, Abby; Johnson, Natrina L.; DeArmond, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer and elk is a highly communicable neurodegenerative disorder caused by prions. Investigations of CWD are hampered by slow bioassays in transgenic (Tg) mice. Towards the development of Tg mice that will be more susceptible to CWD prions, we created a series of chimeric elk/mouse transgenes that encode the N terminus of elk PrP (ElkPrP) up to residue Y168 and the C terminus of mouse PrP (MoPrP) beyond residue 169 (mouse numbering), designated Elk3M(SNIVVK). Between codons 169 and 219, six residues distinguish ElkPrP from MoPrP: N169S, T173N, V183I, I202V, I214V and R219K. Using chimeric elk/mouse PrP constructs, we generated 12 Tg mouse lines and determined incubation times after intracerebral inoculation with the mouse-passaged RML scrapie or Elk1P CWD prions. Unexpectedly, one Tg mouse line expressing Elk3M(SNIVVK) exhibited incubation times of <70 days when inoculated with RML prions; a second line had incubation times of <90 days. In contrast, mice expressing full-length ElkPrP had incubation periods of >250 days for RML prions. Tg(Elk3M,SNIVVK) mice were less susceptible to CWD prions than Tg(ElkPrP) mice. Changing three C-terminal mouse residues (202, 214 and 219) to those of elk doubled the incubation time for mouse RML prions and rendered the mice resistant to Elk1P CWD prions. Mutating an additional two residues from mouse to elk at codons 169 and 173 increased the incubation times for mouse prions to >300 days, but made the mice susceptible to CWD prions. Our findings highlight the role of C-terminal residues in PrP that control the susceptibility and replication of prions. PMID:23100369

  15. Generation of transgenic mouse model using PTTG as an oncogene.

    PubMed

    Kakar, Sham S; Kakar, Cohin

    2015-01-01

    The close physiological similarity between the mouse and human has provided tools to understanding the biological function of particular genes in vivo by introduction or deletion of a gene of interest. Using a mouse as a model has provided a wealth of resources, knowledge, and technology, helping scientists to understand the biological functions, translocation, trafficking, and interaction of a candidate gene with other intracellular molecules, transcriptional regulation, posttranslational modification, and discovery of novel signaling pathways for a particular gene. Most importantly, the generation of the mouse model for a specific human disease has provided a powerful tool to understand the etiology of a disease and discovery of novel therapeutics. This chapter describes in detail the step-by-step generation of the transgenic mouse model, which can be helpful in guiding new investigators in developing successful models. For practical purposes, we will describe the generation of a mouse model using pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) as the candidate gene of interest.

  16. Transgenic Rescue of the LARGEmyd Mouse: A LARGE Therapeutic Window?

    PubMed Central

    Hildyard, J. C. W.; Lacey, E.; Booler, H.; Hopkinson, M.; Wells, D. J.; Brown, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    LARGE is a glycosyltransferase involved in glycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG). Absence of this protein in the LARGEmyd mouse results in α-DG hypoglycosylation, and is associated with central nervous system abnormalities and progressive muscular dystrophy. Up-regulation of LARGE has previously been proposed as a therapy for the secondary dystroglycanopathies: overexpression in cells compensates for defects in multiple dystroglycanopathy genes. Counterintuitively, LARGE overexpression in an FKRP-deficient mouse exacerbates pathology, suggesting that modulation of α-DG glycosylation requires further investigation. Here we demonstrate that transgenic expression of human LARGE (LARGE-LV5) in the LARGEmyd mouse restores α-DG glycosylation (with marked hyperglycosylation in muscle) and that this corrects both the muscle pathology and brain architecture. By quantitative analyses of LARGE transcripts we also here show that levels of transgenic and endogenous LARGE in the brains of transgenic animals are comparable, but that the transgene is markedly overexpressed in heart and particularly skeletal muscle (20–100 fold over endogenous). Our data suggest LARGE overexpression may only be deleterious under a forced regenerative context, such as that resulting from a reduction in FKRP: in the absence of such a defect we show that systemic expression of LARGE can indeed act therapeutically, and that even dramatic LARGE overexpression is well-tolerated in heart and skeletal muscle. Moreover, correction of LARGEmyd brain pathology with only moderate, near-physiological LARGE expression suggests a generous therapeutic window. PMID:27467128

  17. Transgenic mouse model for the fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kooy, R.F.; Reyniers, E.; De Boulle, K.

    1996-08-09

    Transgenic fragile X knockout mice have been constructed to provide an animal model to study the physiologic function of the fragile X gene (FMR1) and to gain more insight into the clinical phenotype caused by the absence of the fragile X protein. Initial experiments suggested that the knockout mice show macroorchidism and cognitive and behavioral deficits, abnormalities comparable to those of human fragile X patients. In the present study, we have extended our experiments, and conclude that the Fmr1 knockout mouse is a reliable transgenic model to study the fragile X syndrome. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. [Enhancement of artemisinin biosynthesis in transgenic Artemisia annua L. by overexpressed HDR and ADS genes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Xiong; Long, Shi-Ping; Zeng, Li-Xia; Xiang, Li-En; Lin, Zhi; Chen, Min; Liao, Zhi-Hua

    2014-09-01

    Artemisnin is a novel sesquiterpene lactone with an internal peroxide bridge structure, which is extracted from traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua L. (Qinghao). Recommended by World Health Organization, artemisinin is the first-line drug in the treatment of encephalic and chloroquine-resistant malaria. In the present study, transgenic A. annua plants were developed by overexpressing the key enzymes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of artemisinin. Based on Agrobacterium-mediated transformation methods, transgenic plants of A. annua with overexpression of both HDR and ADS were obtained through hygromycin screening. The genomic PCR analysis confirmed six transgenic lines in which both HDR and ADS were integrated into genome. The gene expression analysis given by real-time quantitative PCR showed that all the transgenic lines had higher expression levels of HDR and ADS than the non-transgenic control (except ah3 in which the expression level of ADS showed no significant difference compared with control); and the HPLC analysis of artemisinin demonstrated that transgenic A. annua plants produced artemisinin at significantly higher level than non-transgenic plants. Especially, the highest content of artemisinin was found in transgenic line ah70, in which the artemisinin content was 3.48 times compared with that in non-transgenic lines. In summary, overexpression of HDR and ADS facilitated artemisinin biosynthesis and this method could be applied to develop transgenic plants of A. annua with higher yield of artemisinin.

  19. Proteomic profiling of brain cortex tissues in a Tau transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Seong-Hun; Jung, In-Soo; Han, Gi-Yeon; Kim, Nam-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A transgenic mouse model expressing NSE-htau23 was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D-gel electrophoresis to analyze the cortex proteins of transgenic mice was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentially expressed spots in different stages of AD were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GSTP1 and CAII were downregulated with the progression of AD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SCRN1 and ATP6VE1 were up regulated and down regulated differentially. -- Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves regionalized neuronal death, synaptic loss, and an accumulation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular senile plaques. Although there have been numerous studies on tau proteins and AD in various stages of neurodegenerative disease pathology, the relationship between tau and AD is not yet fully understood. A transgenic mouse model expressing neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-controlled human wild-type tau (NSE-htau23), which displays some of the typical Alzheimer-associated pathological features, was used to analyze the brain proteome associated with tau tangle deposition. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was performed to compare the cortex proteins of transgenic mice (6- and 12-month-old) with those of control mice. Differentially expressed spots in different stages of AD were identified with ESI-Q-TOF (electrospray ionization quadruple time-of-flight) mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Among the identified proteins, glutathione S-transferase P 1 (GSTP1) and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) were down-regulated with the progression of AD, and secerin-1 (SCRN1) and V-type proton ATPase subunit E 1 (ATP6VE1) were up-regulated only in the early stages, and down-regulated in the later stages of AD. The proteins, which were further confirmed by RT-PCR at the mRNA level and with western blotting at the protein level, are expected to be good candidates as drug targets for AD. The study

  20. Increased expression of miRNA-146a in Alzheimer’s disease transgenic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.Y.; Cui, J.G.; Hill, J.M.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Zhao, Y.; Lukiw, W.J.

    2017-01-01

    A mouse and human brain-enriched micro-RNA-146a (miRNA-146a) is known to be important in modulating the innate immune response and inflammatory signaling in certain immunological and brain cell types. In this study we examined miRNA-146a levels in early-, moderate- and late-stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neocortex and hippocampus, in several human primary brain and retinal cell lines, and in 5 different transgenic mouse models of AD including Tg2576, TgCRND8, PSAPP, 3xTg-AD and 5xFAD. Inducible expression of miRNA-146a was found to be significantly up-regulated in a primary co-culture of human neuronal–glial (HNG) cells stressed using interleukin1-beta (IL-1β), and this up-regulation was quenched using specific NF-κB inhibitors including curcumin. Expression of miRNA-146a correlated with senile plaque density and synaptic pathology in Tg2576 and in 5xFAD transgenic mouse models used in the study of this common neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:20934487

  1. An Antidepressant Decreases CSF Aβ Production in Healthy Individuals and in Transgenic AD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sheline, Yvette I.; West, Tim; Yarasheski, Kevin; Swarm, Robert; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Fisher, Jonathan R.; Ficker, Whitney D.; Yan, Ping; Xiong, Chengjie; Frederiksen, Christine; Grzelak, Monica V.; Chott, Robert; Bateman, Randall J.; Morris, John C.; Mintun, Mark A.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Cirrito, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin signaling suppresses generation of amyloid-β (Aβ) in vitro and in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We show that in an aged transgenic AD mouse model (APP/PS1 plaque-bearing mice), the antidepressant citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), decreased Aβ in brain interstitial fluid (ISF) in a dose-dependent manner. Growth of individual amyloid plaques was assessed in plaque-bearing mice that were chronically administered citalopram. Citalopram arrested the growth of pre-existing plaques and reduced the appearance of new plaques by 78%. In healthy human volunteers, citalopram’s effects on Aβ production and Aβ concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured prospectively using stable-isotope labeling kinetics (SILK), with CSF sampling during acute dosing of citalopram. Aβ production in CSF was slowed by 37% in the citalopram group compared to placebo. This change was associated with a 38% decrease in total CSF Aβ concentrations in the drug-treated group. The ability to safely decrease Aβ concentrations is potentially important as a preventive strategy for AD. This study demonstrates key target engagement for future AD prevention trials. PMID:24828079

  2. Chronic Microdose Lithium Treatment Prevented Memory Loss and Neurohistopathological Changes in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Marielza Andrade; Schöwe, Natalia Mendes; Monteiro-Silva, Karla Cristina; Baraldi-Tornisielo, Ticiana; Souza, Suzzanna Ingryd Gonçalves; Balthazar, Janaina; Albuquerque, Marilia Silva; Caetano, Ariadiny Lima; Viel, Tania Araujo; Buck, Hudson Sousa

    2015-01-01

    The use of lithium is well established in bipolar disorders and the benefits are being demonstrated in neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, our group showed that treatment with microdose lithium stabilized the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. In order to verify the lithium microdose potential in preventing the disease development, the aim of this work was to verify the effects of chronic treatment with microdose lithium given before and after the appearance of symptoms in a mouse model of a disease similar to AD. Transgenic mice (Cg-Tg(PDGFB-APPSwInd)20Lms/2J) and their non-transgenic litter mate genetic controls were treated with lithium carbonate (0.25mg/Kg/day in drinking water) for 16 or 8 months starting at two and ten months of age, respectively [corrected]. Similar groups were treated with water. At the end of treatments, both lithium treated transgenic groups and non-transgenic mice showed no memory disruption, different from what was observed in the water treated transgenic group. Transgenic mice treated with lithium since two months of age showed decreased number of senile plaques, no neuronal loss in cortex and hippocampus and increased BDNF density in cortex, when compared to non-treated transgenic mice. It is suitable to conclude that these data support the use of microdose lithium in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, once the neurohistopathological characteristics of the disease were modified and the memory of transgenic animals was maintained.

  3. Chronic Microdose Lithium Treatment Prevented Memory Loss and Neurohistopathological Changes in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro-Silva, Karla Cristina; Baraldi-Tornisielo, Ticiana; Souza, Suzzanna Ingryd Gonçalves; Balthazar, Janaina; Albuquerque, Marilia Silva; Caetano, Ariadiny Lima; Viel, Tania Araujo; Buck, Hudson Sousa

    2015-01-01

    The use of lithium is well established in bipolar disorders and the benefits are being demonstrated in neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, our group showed that treatment with microdose lithium stabilized the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. In order to verify the lithium microdose potential in preventing the disease development, the aim of this work was to verify the effects of chronic treatment with microdose lithium given before and after the appearance of symptoms in a mouse model of a disease similar to AD. Transgenic mice (Cg-Tg(PDGFB-APPSwInd)20Lms/2J) and their non-transgenic litter mate genetic controls were treated with lithium carbonate (1.2 mg/Kg/day in drinking water) for 16 or 8 months starting at two and ten months of age, respectively. Similar groups were treated with water. At the end of treatments, both lithium treated transgenic groups and non-transgenic mice showed no memory disruption, different from what was observed in the water treated transgenic group. Transgenic mice treated with lithium since two months of age showed decreased number of senile plaques, no neuronal loss in cortex and hippocampus and increased BDNF density in cortex, when compared to non-treated transgenic mice. It is suitable to conclude that these data support the use of microdose lithium in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, once the neurohistopathological characteristics of the disease were modified and the memory of transgenic animals was maintained. PMID:26605788

  4. Genetic suppression of transgenic APP rescues Hypersynchronous network activity in a mouse model of Alzeimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Born, Heather A; Kim, Ji-Yoen; Savjani, Ricky R; Das, Pritam; Dabaghian, Yuri A; Guo, Qinxi; Yoo, Jong W; Schuler, Dorothy R; Cirrito, John R; Zheng, Hui; Golde, Todd E; Noebels, Jeffrey L; Jankowsky, Joanna L

    2014-03-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with an elevated risk for seizures that may be fundamentally connected to cognitive dysfunction. Supporting this link, many mouse models for AD exhibit abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG) activity in addition to the expected neuropathology and cognitive deficits. Here, we used a controllable transgenic system to investigate how network changes develop and are maintained in a model characterized by amyloid β (Aβ) overproduction and progressive amyloid pathology. EEG recordings in tet-off mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein (APP) from birth display frequent sharp wave discharges (SWDs). Unexpectedly, we found that withholding APP overexpression until adulthood substantially delayed the appearance of epileptiform activity. Together, these findings suggest that juvenile APP overexpression altered cortical development to favor synchronized firing. Regardless of the age at which EEG abnormalities appeared, the phenotype was dependent on continued APP overexpression and abated over several weeks once transgene expression was suppressed. Abnormal EEG discharges were independent of plaque load and could be extinguished without altering deposited amyloid. Selective reduction of Aβ with a γ-secretase inhibitor has no effect on the frequency of SWDs, indicating that another APP fragment or the full-length protein was likely responsible for maintaining EEG abnormalities. Moreover, transgene suppression normalized the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory innervation in the cortex, whereas secretase inhibition did not. Our results suggest that APP overexpression, and not Aβ overproduction, is responsible for EEG abnormalities in our transgenic mice and can be rescued independently of pathology.

  5. Case Study: Polycystic Livers in a Transgenic Mouse Line

    SciTech Connect

    Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Artwohl, James E.; Ward, Christopher J.; Diekwisch, Thomas G. H.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2014-04-01

    Three mice (2 male, 1 female; age, 5 to 16 mo) from a mouse line transgenic for keratin 14 (K14)-driven LacZ expression and on an outbred Crl:CD1(ICR) background, were identified as having distended abdomens and livers that were diffusely enlarged by numerous cysts (diameter, 0.1 to 2.0 cm). Histopathology revealed hepatic cysts lined by biliary type epithelium and mild chronic inflammation, and confirmed the absence of parasites. Among 21 related mice, 5 additional affected mice were identified via laparotomy. Breeding of these 5 mice (after 5 mo of age) did not result in any offspring; the K14 mice with olycystic livers failed to reproduce. Affected male mice had degenerative testicular lesions, and their sperm was immotile. Nonpolycystic K14 control male mice bred well, had no testicular lesions, and had appropriate sperm motility. Genetic analysis did not identify an association of this phenotype with the transgene or insertion site.

  6. Epithelial cell differentiation in normal and transgenic mouse intestinal isografts

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Transgenes consisting of segments of the rat liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) gene's 5' non-transcribed domain linked to the human growth hormone (hGH) gene (minus its regulatory elements) have provided useful tools for analyzing the mechanisms that regulate cellular and spatial differentiation of the continuously renewing gut epithelium. We have removed the jejunum from normal and transgenic fetal mice before or coincident with, cytodifferentiation of its epithelium. These segments were implanted into the subcutaneous tissues of young adult CBY/B6 nude mouse hosts to determine whether the bipolar, migration- dependent differentiation pathways of gut epithelial cells can be established and maintained in the absence of its normal luminal environment. Immunocytochemical analysis of isografts harvested 4-6 wk after implantation revealed that activation of the intact endogenous mouse L-FABP gene (fabpl) in differentiating enterocytes is perfectly recapitulated as these cells are translocated along the crypt-to-villus axis. Similarly, Paneth and goblet cells appear to appropriately differentiate as they migrate to the crypt base and villus tip, respectively. The enteroendocrine cell subpopulations present in intact 4-6-wk-old jejunum are represented in these isografts. Their precise spatial distribution along the crypt-to-villus axis mimics that seen in the intact gut. A number of complex interrelationships between enteroendocrine subpopulations are also recapitulated. In both "intact" and isografted jejunum, nucleotides -596 to +21 of the rat L-FABP gene were sufficient to direct efficient expression of the hGH reporter to enterocytes although precocious expression of the transgene occurred in cells located in the upper crypt, before their translocation to the villus base. Inappropriate expression of hGH occurred in a high percentage (greater than 80%) of secretin, gastrin, cholecystokinin, and gastric inhibitory peptide producing enteroendocrine cells present

  7. Fully human antibodies from transgenic mouse and phage display platforms.

    PubMed

    Lonberg, Nils

    2008-08-01

    Over the past two decades, technologies have emerged for generating monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) derived from human immunoglobulin gene sequences. These fully human MAbs provide an alternative to re-engineered, or de-immunized, rodent MAbs as a source of low immunogenicity therapeutic antibodies. There are now two marketed fully human therapeutic MAbs, adalimumab and panitumumab, and several dozen more in various stages of human clinical testing. Most of the drugs, including adalimumab and panitumumab, were generated using either phage display or transgenic mouse platforms. The reported clinical experience with fully human MAbs demonstrates that these two platforms are, and should continue to be, a significant source of active and well tolerated experimental therapeutics. While this body of reported clinical data does not yet provide a clear distinction between the platforms, the available descriptions of the drug discovery processes used to identify the clinical candidates highlight one difference. It appears that lead optimization is more commonly applied to phage display derived leads than transgenic mouse derived leads.

  8. Sodium selenate regulates the brain ionome in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lin; Zhu, Hua-Zhang; Wang, Bing-Tao; Zhao, Qiong-Hui; Du, Xiu-Bo; Zheng, Yi; Jiang, Liang; Ni, Jia-Zuan; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that imbalance of mineral metabolism may play an important role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression. It was recently reported that selenium could reverse memory deficits in AD mouse model. We carried out multi-time-point ionome analysis to investigate the interactions among 15 elements in the brain by using a triple-transgenic mouse model of AD with/without high-dose sodium selenate supplementation. Except selenium, the majority of significantly changed elements showed a reduced level after 6-month selenate supplementation, especially iron whose levels were completely reversed to normal state at almost all examined time points. We then built the elemental correlation network for each time point. Significant and specific elemental correlations and correlation changes were identified, implying a highly complex and dynamic crosstalk between selenium and other elements during long-term supplementation with selenate. Finally, we measured the activities of two important anti-oxidative selenoenzymes, glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase, and found that they were remarkably increased in the cerebrum of selenate-treated mice, suggesting that selenoenzyme-mediated protection against oxidative stress might also be involved in the therapeutic effect of selenate in AD. Overall, this study should contribute to our understanding of the mechanism related to the potential use of selenate in AD treatment. PMID:28008954

  9. Three-dimensional analysis of abnormal ultrastructural alteration in mitochondria of hippocampus of APP/PSEN1 transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ki Ju; Kim, Mi Jeong; Je, A Reum; Jun, Sangmi; Lee, Chulhyun; Lee, Eunji; Jo, Mijung; Huh, Yang Hoon; Kweon, Hee-Seok

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The deterioration of subcellular organelles, including the mitochondria, is another major ultrastructural characteristic of AD pathogenesis, in addition to amyloid plaque deposition. However, the three-dimensional (3-D) study of mitochondrial structural alteration in AD remains poorly understood. Therefore, ultrastructural analysis, 3-D electron tomography, and immunogold electron microscopy were performed in the present study to clarify the abnormal structural alterations in mitochondria caused by the progression of AD in APP/PSEN1 transgenic mice, expressing human amyloid precursor protein, as a model for AD. Amyloid beta (A beta) plaques accumulated and dystrophic neurites (DN) developed in the hippocampus of transgenic AD mouse brains. We also identified the loss of peroxiredoxin 3, an endogenous cytoprotective antioxidant enzyme and the accumulation of A beta in the hippocampal mitochondria of transgenic mice, which differs from those in age-matched wild-type mice. The mitochondria in A beta plaque-detected regions were severely disrupted, and the patterns of ultrastructural abnormalities were classified into three groups: disappearance of cristae, swelling of cristae, and bulging of the outer membrane. These results demonstrated that morpho-functional alterations of mitochondria and AD progression are closely associated and may be beneficial in investigating the function of mitochondria in AD pathogenesis.

  10. Transgenic Mouse Models of Childhood Onset Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Holly R.; Feng, Guoping

    2011-01-01

    Childhood onset psychiatric disorders, such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Mood Disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (OCSD), and Schizophrenia (SZ), affect many school age children leading to a lower quality of life, including difficulties in school and personal relationships that persists into adulthood. Currently, the causes of these psychiatric disorders are poorly understood resulting in difficulty diagnosing affected children, and insufficient treatment options. Family and twin studies implicate a genetic contribution for ADHD, ASD, Mood Disorders, OCSD, and SZ. Identification of candidate genes and chromosomal regions associated with a particular disorder provide targets for directed research, and understanding how these genes influence the disease state will provide valuable insights for improving the diagnosis and treatment of children with psychiatric disorders. Animal models are one important approach in the study of human diseases, allowing for the use of a variety of experimental approaches to dissect the contribution of a specific chromosomal or genetic abnormality in human disorders. While it is impossible to model an entire psychiatric disorder in a single animal model, these models can be extremely valuable in dissecting out the specific role of a gene, pathway, neuron subtype, or brain region in a particular abnormal behavior. In this review we discuss existing transgenic mouse models for childhood onset psychiatric disorders. We compare the strength and weakness of various transgenic animal models proposed for each of the common childhood onset psychiatric disorders, and discuss future directions for the study of these disorders using cutting-edge genetic tools. PMID:21309772

  11. Mechanism of testosterone deficiency in the transgenic sickle cell mouse.

    PubMed

    Musicki, Biljana; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Haolin; Brown, Terry R; Zirkin, Barry R; Burnett, Arthur L

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), but its underlying mechanism is not known. We investigated the possible occurrence and mechanism of testosterone deficiency in a mouse model of human SCD. Transgenic sickle male mice (Sickle) exhibited decreased serum and intratesticular testosterone and increased luteinizing hormone (LH) levels compared with wild type (WT) mice, indicating primary hypogonadism in Sickle mice. LH-, dbcAMP-, and pregnenolone- (but not 22-hydroxycholesterol)- stimulated testosterone production by Leydig cells isolated from the Sickle mouse testis was decreased compared to that of WT mice, implying defective Leydig cell steroidogenesis. There also was reduced protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), but not cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in the Sickle mouse testis. These data suggest that the capacity of P450scc to support testosterone production may be limited by the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria in Sickle mice. The sickle mouse testis exhibited upregulated NADPH oxidase subunit gp91phox and increased oxidative stress, measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and unchanged protein expression of an antioxidant glutathione peroxidase-1. Mice heterozygous for the human sickle globin (Hemi) exhibited intermediate hypogonadal changes between those of WT and Sickle mice. These results demonstrate that testosterone deficiency occurs in Sickle mice, mimicking the human condition. The defects in the Leydig cell steroidogenic pathway in Sickle mice, mainly due to reduced availability of cholesterol for testosterone production, may be related to NADPH oxidase-derived oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that targeting testicular oxidative stress or steroidogenesis mechanisms in SCD offers a potential treatment for improving phenotypic changes associated with testosterone deficiency in this disease.

  12. PGC-1α overexpression exacerbates β-amyloid and tau deposition in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Magali; Stack, Cliona; Elipenahli, Ceyhan; Jainuddin, Shari; Launay, Nathalie; Gerges, Meri; Starkova, Natalia; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Calingasan, Noel Y.; Tampellini, Davide; Pujol, Aurora; Beal, M. Flint

    2014-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α) interacts with various transcription factors involved in energy metabolism and in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. PGC-1α mRNA levels are reduced in a number of neurodegenerative diseases and contribute to disease pathogenesis, since increased levels ameliorate behavioral defects and neuropathology of Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PGC-1α and its downstream targets are reduced both in postmortem brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in transgenic mouse models of AD. Therefore, we investigated whether increased expression of PGC-1α would exert beneficial effects in the Tg19959 transgenic mouse model of AD; Tg19959 mice express the human amyloid precursor gene (APP) with 2 familial AD mutations and develop increased β-amyloid levels, plaque deposition, and memory deficits by 2–3 mo of age. Rather than an improvement, the cross of the Tg19959 mice with mice overexpressing human PGC-1α exacerbated amyloid and tau accumulation. This was accompanied by an impairment of proteasome activity. PGC-1α overexpression induced mitochondrial abnormalities, neuronal cell death, and an exacerbation of behavioral hyperactivity in the Tg19959 mice. These findings show that PGC-1α overexpression exacerbates the neuropathological and behavioral deficits that occur in transgenic mice with mutations in APP that are associated with human AD.—Dumont, M., Stack, C., Elipenahli, C., Jainuddin, S., Launay, N., Gerges, M., Starkova, N., Starkov, A. A., Calingasan, N. Y., Tampellini, D., Pujol, A., Beal, M. F. PGC-1α overexpression exacerbates β-amyloid and tau deposition in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24398293

  13. A transgenic mouse model of hemoglobin S Antilles disease.

    PubMed

    Popp, R A; Popp, D M; Shinpock, S G; Yang, M Y; Mural, J G; Aguinaga, M P; Kopsombut, P; Roa, P D; Turner, E A; Rubin, E M

    1997-06-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) S Antilles is a naturally occurring form of sickling human Hb but causes a more severe phenotype than Hb S. Two homozygous viable Hb S Antilles transgene insertions from Tg58Ru and Tg98Ru mice were bred into MHOAH mice that express high oxygen affinity (P50 approximately 24.5 mm Hg) rather than normal (P50 approximately 40 mm Hg) mouse Hbs. The rationale was that the high oxygen affinity MHOAH Hb, the lower oxygen affinity of Hb S Antilles than Hb S (P50 approximately 40 v 26.5 mm Hg), and the lower solubility of deoxygenated Hb S Antilles than Hb S (approximately 11 v 18 g/dL) would favor deoxygenation and polymerization of human Hb S Antilles in MHOAH mouse red blood cells (RBCs). The Tg58 x Tg98 mice produced have a high and balanced expression (approximately 50% each) of h alpha and h beta(S Antilles) globins, 25% to 35% of their RBCs are misshapen in vivo, and in vitro deoxygenation of their blood induces 30% to 50% of the RBCs to form classical looking, elongated sickle cells with pointed ends. Tg58 x Tg98 mice exhibit reticulocytosis, an elevated white blood cell count and lung and kidney pathology commonly found in sickle cell patients, which should make these mice useful for experimental studies on possible therapeutic intervention of sickle cell disease.

  14. L1 integration in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Babushok, Daria V.; Ostertag, Eric M.; Courtney, Christine E.; Choi, Janice M.; Kazazian, Haig H.

    2006-01-01

    To study integration of the human LINE-1 retrotransposon (L1) in vivo, we developed a transgenic mouse model of L1 retrotransposition that displays de novo somatic L1 insertions at a high frequency, occasionally several insertions per mouse. We mapped 3′ integration sites of 51 insertions by Thermal Asymmetric Interlaced PCR (TAIL–PCR). Analysis of integration locations revealed a broad genomic distribution with a modest preference for intergenic regions. We characterized the complete structures of 33 de novo retrotransposition events. Our results highlight the large number of highly truncated L1s, as over 52% (27/51) of total integrants were <1/3 the length of a full-length element. New integrants carry all structural characteristics typical of genomic L1s, including a number with inversions, deletions, and 5′-end microhomologies to the target DNA sequence. Notably, at least 13% (7/51) of all insertions contain a short stretch of extra nucleotides at their 5′ end, which we postulate result from template-jumping by the L1-encoded reverse transcriptase. We propose a unified model of L1 integration that explains all of the characteristic features of L1 retrotransposition, such as 5′ truncations, inversions, extra nucleotide additions, and 5′ boundary and inversion point microhomologies. PMID:16365384

  15. Transgenic mouse models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    PubMed

    Katsuno, M; Adachi, H; Inukai, A; Sobue, G

    2003-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a late-onset motor neuron disease characterized by proximal muscle atrophy, weakness, contraction fasciculations, and bulbar involvement. Only males develop symptoms, while female carriers usually are asymptomatic. A specific treatment for SBMA has not been established. The molecular basis of SBMA is the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat, which encodes the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract, in the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The pathologic hallmark is nuclear inclusions (NIs) containing the mutant and truncated AR with expanded polyQ in the residual motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord as well as in some other visceral organs. Several transgenic (Tg) mouse models have been created for studying the pathogenesis of SBMA. The Tg mouse model carrying pure 239 CAGs under human AR promoter and another model carrying truncated AR with expanded CAGs show motor impairment and nuclear NIs in spinal motor neurons. Interestingly, Tg mice carrying full-length human AR with expanded polyQ demonstrate progressive motor impairment and neurogenic pathology as well as sexual difference of phenotypes. These models recapitulate the phenotypic expression observed in SBMA. The ligand-dependent nuclear localization of the mutant AR is found to be involved in the disease mechanism, and hormonal therapy is suggested to be a therapeutic approach applicable to SBMA.

  16. Voluntary running and environmental enrichment restores impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J J; Noristani, H N; Olabarria, M; Fletcher, J; Somerville, T D D; Yeh, C Y; Verkhratsky, A

    2011-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects memory and neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis plays an important role in memory function and impaired neurogenesis contributes to cognitive deficits associated with AD. Increased physical/ cognitive activity is associated with both reduced risk of dementia and increased neurogenesis. Previous attempts to restore hippocampal neurogenesis in transgenic mice by voluntary running (RUN) and environmental enrichment (ENR) provided controversial results due to lack of non-transgenic (non-Tg) control and inclusion of social isolation as "standard" housing environment. Here, we determine the effect of RUN and ENR upon hippocampal neurogenesis in a triple transgenic (3xTg-AD) mouse model of AD, which mimics AD pathology in humans. We used single and double immunohistochemistry to determine the area density of hippocampal proliferating cells, measured by the presence of phosphorylated Histone H3 (HH3), and their potential neuronal and glial phenotype by co-localizing the proliferating cells with the immature neuronal marker doublecortin (DCX), mature neuronal marker (NeuN) and specific astroglial marker (GFAP). Our results show that 3xTg-AD mice in control environment exhibit impaired hippocampal neurogenesis compared to non-Tg animals at 9 months of age. Exposure to RUN and ENR housing restores hippocampal neurogenesis in 3xTg-AD animals to non-Tg control levels. Differentiation into neurones and glial cells is affected neither by transgenic status nor by housing environment. These results suggest that hippocampus of 3xTg-AD animals maintains the potential for cellular plasticity. Increase in physical activity and/or cognitive experience enhances neurogenesis and provides a potential for stimulation of cognitive function in AD.

  17. Metabonomic Profiling of TASTPM Transgenic Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zeping; Browne, Edward R.; Liu, Tao; Angel, Thomas E.; Ho, Paul C.; Chun Yong Chan, Eric

    2012-12-07

    Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying early stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is important for the development of new therapies against and diagnosis of AD. In this study, non-targeted metabotyping of TASTPM transgenic AD mice was performed. The metabolic profiles of both brain and plasma of TASTPM mice were characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared to those of wild type C57BL/6J mice. TASTPM mice were metabolically distinct compared to wild type mice (Q28 Y = 0.587 and 0.766 for PLS-DA models derived from brain and plasma, respectively). A number of metabolites were found to be perturbed in TASTPM mice in both brain (D11 fructose, L-valine, L-serine, L-threonine, zymosterol) and plasma (D-glucose, D12 galactose, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, palmitic acid and D-gluconic acid). In addition, enzyme immunoassay confirmed that selected endogenous steroids were significantly perturbed in brain (androstenedione and 17-OH-progesterone) and plasma (cortisol and testosterone) of TASTPM mice. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that perturbations related to amino acid metabolism (brain), steroid biosynthesis (brain), linoleic acid metabolism (plasma) and energy metabolism (plasma) accounted for the differentiation of TASTPM and wild-type

  18. Development of Alzheimer-disease neuroimaging-biomarkers using mouse models with amyloid-precursor protein-transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Teipel, Stefan J; Buchert, Ralph; Thome, Johannes; Hampel, Harald; Pahnke, Jens

    2011-12-01

    There are important recent developments in Alzheimer's disease (AD) translational research, especially with respect to the imaging of amyloid pathology in vivo using MRI and PET technologies. Here we exploit the most widely used transgenic mouse models of amyloid pathology in order to relate the imaging findings to our knowledge about the histopathological phenotype of these models. The development of new diagnostic criteria of AD necessitates the use of biological markers to diagnose AD even in the absence of overt dementia or early symptomatic mild cognitive impairment. The validity of the diagnosis will depend on the availability of an in vivo marker to reflect underlying neurobiological changes of AD. Transgenic models with essential features of AD pathology and mechanisms provide a test setting for the development and evaluation of new biological imaging markers. Among the best established imaging markers of amyloid pathology in transgenic animals are high-field MRI of brain atrophy, proton spectroscopy of neurochemical changes, high-field MRI of amyloid plaque load, and in vivo plaque imaging using radio-labelled ligands with PET. We discuss the implications of the findings as well as the methodological limitations and the specific requirements of these technologies. We furthermore outline future directions of transgene-imaging research. Transgene imaging is an emerging area of translational research that implies strong multi- and interdisciplinary collaborations. It will become ever more valuable with the introduction of new diagnostic standards and novel treatment approaches which will require valid and reliable biological markers to improve the diagnosis and early treatment of AD patients.

  19. Impaired satiation and increased feeding behaviour in the triple-transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Adebakin, Adedolapo; Bradley, Jenna; Gümüsgöz, Sarah; Waters, Elizabeth J; Lawrence, Catherine B

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with non-cognitive symptoms such as changes in feeding behaviour that are often characterised by an increase in appetite. Increased food intake is observed in several mouse models of AD including the triple transgenic (3×TgAD) mouse, but the mechanisms underlying this hyperphagia are unknown. We therefore examined feeding behaviour in 3×TgAD mice and tested their sensitivity to exogenous and endogenous satiety factors by assessing food intake and activation of key brain regions. In the behavioural satiety sequence (BSS), 3×TgAD mice consumed more food after a fast compared to Non-Tg controls. Feeding and drinking behaviours were increased and rest decreased in 3×TgAD mice, but the overall sequence of behaviours in the BSS was maintained. Exogenous administration of the satiety factor cholecystokinin (CCK; 8-30 µg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently reduced food intake in Non-Tg controls and increased inactive behaviour, but had no effect on food intake or behaviour in 3×TgAD mice. CCK (15 µg/kg, i.p.) increased c-Fos protein expression in the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus, and the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and area postrema of the brainstem to the same extent in Non-Tg and 3×TgAD mice, but less c-Fos positive cells were detected in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus of CCK-treated 3×TgAD compared to Non-Tg mice. In response to a fast or a period of re-feeding, there was no difference in the number of c-Fos-positive cells detected in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, NTS and area postrema of 3×TgAD compared to Non-Tg mice. The degree of c-Fos expression in the NTS was positively correlated to food intake in Non-Tg mice, however, this relationship was absent in 3×TgAD mice. These data demonstrate that 3×TgAD mice show increased feeding behaviour and insensitivity to satiation, which is possibly due to defective gut-brain signalling in response to endogenous satiety factors released by food

  20. [The Function of REM Sleep: Implications from Transgenic Mouse Models].

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Mitsuaki; Hayashi, Yu

    2016-10-01

    Our sleep is composed of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep. REM sleep is the major source of dreams, whereas synchronous cortical oscillations, called slow waves, are observed during NREM sleep. Both stages are unique to certain vertebrate species, and therefore, REM and NREM sleep are thought to be involved in higher-order brain functions. While several studies have revealed the importance of NREM sleep in growth hormone secretion, memory consolidation and brain metabolite clearance, the functions of REM sleep are currently almost totally unknown. REM sleep functions cannot be easily indicated from classical REM sleep deprivation experiments, where animals are forced to wake up whenever they enter REM sleep, because such experiments produce extreme stress due to the stimuli and because REM sleep is under strong homeostatic regulation. To overcome these issues, we developed a novel transgenic mouse model in which REM sleep can be manipulated. Using these mice, we found that REM sleep enhances slow wave activity during the subsequent NREM sleep. Slow wave activity is known to contribute to memory consolidation and synaptic plasticity. Thus, REM sleep might be involved in higher-order brain functions through its role in enhancing slow wave activity.

  1. Inflammatory cytokine levels correlate with amyloid load in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nikunj S; Paris, Daniel; Mathura, Venkatarajan; Quadros, Amita N; Crawford, Fiona C; Mullan, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    Background Inflammation is believed to play an important role in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cytokine production is a key pathologic event in the progression of inflammatory cascades. The current study characterizes the cytokine expression profile in the brain of two transgenic mouse models of AD (TgAPPsw and PS1/APPsw) and explores the correlations between cytokine production and the level of soluble and insoluble forms of Aβ. Methods Organotypic brain slice cultures from 15-month-old mice (TgAPPsw, PS1/APPsw and control littermates) were established and multiple cytokine levels were analyzed using the Bio-plex multiple cytokine assay system. Soluble and insoluble forms of Aβ were quantified and Aβ-cytokine relationships were analyzed. Results Compared to control littermates, transgenic mice showed a significant increase in the following pro-inflammatory cytokines: TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12p40, IL-1β, IL-1α and GM-CSF. TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1α and GM-CSF showed a sequential increase from control to TgAPPsw to PS1/APPsw suggesting that the amplitude of this cytokine response is dependent on brain Aβ levels, since PS1/APPsw mouse brains accumulate more Aβ than TgAPPsw mouse brains. Quantification of Aβ levels in the same slices showed a wide range of Aβ soluble:insoluble ratio values across TgAPPsw and PS1/APPsw brain slices. Aβ-cytokine correlations revealed significant relationships between Aβ1–40, 1–42 (both soluble and insoluble) and all the above cytokines that changed in the brain slices. Conclusion Our data confirm that the brains of transgenic APPsw and PS1/APPsw mice are under an active inflammatory stress, and that the levels of particular cytokines may be directly related to the amount of soluble and insoluble Aβ present in the brain suggesting that pathological accumulation of Aβ is a key driver of the neuroinflammatory response. PMID:15762998

  2. Brain inflammation and oxidative stress in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer-like brain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuemang; Chinnici, Cinzia; Tang, Hanguan; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia MY; Praticò, Domenico

    2004-01-01

    Background An increasing body of evidence implicates both brain inflammation and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The relevance of their interaction in vivo, however, is unknown. Previously, we have shown that separate pharmacological targeting of these two components results in amelioration of the amyloidogenic phenotype of a transgenic mouse model of AD-like brain amyloidosis (Tg2576). Methods In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of a combination of an anti-inflammatory agent, indomethacin, and a natural anti-oxidant, vitamin E, in the Tg2576 mice. For this reason, animals were treated continuously from 8 (prior to Aβ deposition) through 15 (when Aβ deposits are abundant) months of age. Results At the end of the study, these therapeutic interventions suppressed brain inflammatory and oxidative stress responses in the mice. This effect was accompanied by significant reductions of soluble and insoluble Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 in neocortex and hippocampus, wherein the burden of Aβ deposits also was significantly decreased. Conclusions The results of the present study support the concept that brain oxidative stress and inflammation coexist in this animal model of AD-like brain amyloidosis, but they represent two distinct therapeutic targets in the disease pathogenesis. We propose that a combination of anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant drugs may be a useful strategy for treating AD. PMID:15500684

  3. A new transgenic mouse model for conditional overexpression of the Polycomb Group protein EZH2.

    PubMed

    Koppens, Martijn A J; Tanger, Ellen; Nacerddine, Karim; Westerman, Bart; Song, Ji-Ying; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    2017-04-01

    The Polycomb Group protein EZH2 is upregulated in most prostate cancers, and its overexpression is associated with poor prognosis. Most insights into the functional role of EZH2 in prostate cancer have been gained using cell lines and EZH2 inactivation studies. However, the question remains whether overexpression of EZH2 can initiate prostate tumourigenesis or drive tumour progression. Appropriate transgenic mouse models that are required to answer such questions are lacking. We developed one such transgenic mouse model for conditional overexpression of Ezh2. In this transgene, Ezh2 and Luciferase are transcribed from a single open reading frame. The latter gene enables intravital bioluminescent imaging of tissues expressing this transgene, allowing the detection of tumour outgrowth and potential metastatic progression over time. Prostate-specific Ezh2 overexpression by crossbreeding with Probasin-Cre mice led to neoplastic prostate lesions at low incidence and with a long latency. Compounding a previously described Bmi1-transgene and Pten-deficiency prostate cancer mouse model with the Ezh2 transgene did not enhance tumour progression or drive metastasis formation. In conclusion, we here report the generation of a wildtype Ezh2 overexpression mouse model that allows for intravital surveillance of tissues with activated transgene. This model will be an invaluable tool for further unravelling the role of EZH2 in cancer.

  4. Novel Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying Human Serum Albumin as a Biomarker of Carcinogenic Exposure.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jonathan; Wang, Yi; Turesky, Robert J; Kluetzman, Kerri; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Ding, Xinxin

    2016-05-16

    Albumin is a commonly used serum protein for studying human exposure to xenobiotic compounds, including therapeutics and environmental pollutants. Often, the reactivity of albumin with xenobiotic compounds is studied ex vivo with human albumin or plasma/serum samples. Some studies have characterized the reactivity of albumin with chemicals in rodent models; however, differences between the orthologous peptide sequences of human and rodent albumins can result in the formation of different types of chemical-protein adducts with different interaction sites or peptide sequences. Our goal is to generate a human albumin transgenic mouse model that can be used to establish human protein biomarkers of exposure to hazardous xenobiotics for human risk assessment via animal studies. We have developed a human albumin transgenic mouse model and characterized the genotype and phenotype of the transgenic mice. The presence of the human albumin gene in the genome of the model mouse was confirmed by genomic PCR analysis, whereas liver-specific expression of the transgenic human albumin mRNA was validated by RT-PCR analysis. Further immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the transgenic human albumin protein is a full-length, mature protein, which is less abundant than the endogenous mouse albumin that coexists in the serum of the transgenic mouse. The transgenic protein was able to form ex vivo adducts with a genotoxic metabolite of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine, a procarcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic amine formed in cooked meat. This novel human albumin transgenic mouse model will facilitate the development and validation of albumin-carcinogen adducts as biomarkers of xenobiotic exposure and/or toxicity in humans.

  5. Grape seed polyphenols and curcumin reduce genomic instability events in a transgenic mouse model for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Philip; Wang, Yan-Jiang; Zhong, Jin-Hua; Kosaraju, Shantha; O'Callaghan, Nathan J; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Fenech, Michael

    2009-02-10

    The study set out to determine (a) whether DNA damage is elevated in mice that carry mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP695swe) and presenilin 1 (PSEN1-dE9) that predispose to Alzheimer's disease (AD) relative to non-transgenic control mice, and (b) whether increasing the intake of dietary polyphenols from curcumin or grape seed extract could reduce genomic instability events in a transgenic mouse model for AD. DNA damage was measured using the micronucleus (MN) assay in both buccal mucosa and erythrocytes and an absolute telomere length assay for both buccal mucosa and olfactory bulb tissue. MN frequency tended to be higher in AD mice in both buccal mucosa (1.7-fold) and polychromatic erythrocytes (1.3-fold) relative to controls. Telomere length was significantly reduced by 91% (p=0.04) and non-significantly reduced by 50% in buccal mucosa and olfactory bulbs respectively in AD mice relative to controls. A significant 10-fold decrease in buccal MN frequency (p=0.01) was found for AD mice fed diets containing curcumin (CUR) or micro-encapsulated grape seed extract (MGSE) and a 7-fold decrease (p=0.02) for AD mice fed unencapsulated grape seed extract (GSE) compared to the AD group on control diet. Similarly, in polychromatic erythrocytes a significant reduction in MN frequency was found for the MGSE cohort (65.3%) (p<0.05), whereas the AD CUR and AD GSE groups were non-significantly reduced by 39.2 and 34.8% respectively compared to the AD Control. A non-significant 2-fold increase in buccal cell telomere length was evident for the CUR, GSE and MGSE groups compared to the AD control group. Olfactory bulb telomere length was found to be non-significantly 2-fold longer in mice fed on the CUR diet compared to controls. These results suggest potential protective effects of polyphenols against genomic instability events in different somatic tissues of a transgenic mouse model for AD.

  6. The problem of genotype and sex differences in life expectancy in transgenic AD mice.

    PubMed

    Rae, Eric A; Brown, Richard E

    2015-10-01

    The lifespan of mice shows genotype, sex and laboratory effects, but little is known about genotype or sex differences in life expectancy of mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This paper examines the lifespan of males and females of different mouse models of AD and their wildtype strains. Genotype and sex dependent differences in longevity have important implications for designing experiments with Alzheimer's mouse models, comparing genotype and sex differences in aging mouse models, designing drug treatment regimes and the translation of mouse data to human clinical studies. We conclude that the concept of aging and age-related disorders in mice must be reconsidered based on genotype and sex differences in mouse life expectancy data. Use of concepts such as relative age, prospective lifespan and proportion of lifespan remaining should be included in studies of age-related changes in mouse brains and behavior. Finally, measures such as the Frailty Index, which is independent of chronological age might be used to determine a common scale of aging for all mouse strains.

  7. Phenylbutyric acid reduces amyloid plaques and rescues cognitive behavior in AD transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jesse C; Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Ladiges, Warren C

    2011-06-01

    Trafficking through the secretory pathway is known to regulate the maturation of the APP-cleaving secretases and APP proteolysis. The coupling of stress signaling and pathological deterioration of the brain in Alzheimer's disease (AD) supports a mechanistic connection between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and neurodegeneration. Consequently, small molecular chaperones, which promote protein folding and minimize ER stress, might be effective in delaying or attenuating the deleterious progression of AD. We tested this hypothesis by treating APPswePS1delta9 AD transgenic mice with the molecular chaperone phenylbutyric acid (PBA) for 14 months at a dose of 1 mg PBA g(-1) of body weight in the drinking water. Phenylbutyric acid treatment increased secretase-mediated APP cleavage, but was not associated with any increase in amyloid biosynthesis. The PBA-treated AD transgenic mice had significantly decreased incidence and size of amyloid plaques throughout the cortex and hippocampus. There was no change in total amyloid levels suggesting that PBA modifies amyloid aggregation or pathogenesis independently of biogenesis. The decrease in amyloid plaques was paralleled by increased memory retention, as PBA treatment facilitated cognitive performance in a spatial memory task in both wild-type and AD transgenic mice. The molecular mechanism underlying the cognitive facilitation of PBA is not clear; however, increased levels of both metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors, as well as ADAM10 and TACE, were observed in the cortex and hippocampus of PBA-treated mice. The data suggest that PBA ameliorates the cognitive and pathological features of AD and supports the investigation of PBA as a therapeutic for AD.

  8. Extra-prostatic transgene-associated neoplastic lesions in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice.

    PubMed

    Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Bolon, Brad; Oglesbee, Michael J; Clinton, Steven K; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih; La Perle, Krista M D

    2015-02-01

    Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice are frequently used in prostate cancer research because their prostates consistently develop a series of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Disease progression in TRAMP mouse prostates culminates in metastatic, poorly differentiated carcinomas with neuroendocrine features. The androgen dependence of the rat probasin promoter largely limits transgene expression to the prostatic epithelium. However, extra-prostatic transgene-positive lesions have been described in TRAMP mice, including renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urethra, and phyllodes-like tumors of the seminal vesicle. Here, we describe the histologic and immunohistochemical features of 2 novel extra-prostatic lesions in TRAMP mice: primary anaplastic tumors of uncertain cell origin in the midbrain and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the submandibular salivary gland. These newly characterized tumors apparently result from transgene expression in extra-prostatic locations rather than representing metastatic prostate neoplasms because lesions were identified in both male and female mice and in male TRAMP mice without histologically apparent prostate tumors. In this article, we also calculate the incidences of the urethral carcinomas and renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, further elucidate the biological behavior of the urethral carcinomas, and demonstrate the critical importance of complete necropsies even when evaluating presumably well characterized phenotypes in genetically engineered mice.

  9. Pomegranate from Oman Alleviates the Brain Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Selvaraju; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Al-Asmi, Abdullah; Al-Adawi, Samir; Vaishnav, Ragini; Braidy, Nady; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress may play a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. Pomegranates (石榴 Shí Liú) contain very high levels of antioxidant polyphenolic substances, as compared to other fruits and vegetables. Polyphenols have been shown to be neuroprotective in different model systems. Here, the effects of the antioxidant-rich pomegranate fruit grown in Oman on brain oxidative stress status were tested in the AD transgenic mouse. The 4-month-old mice with double Swedish APP mutation (APPsw/Tg2576) were purchased from Taconic Farm, NY, USA. Four-month-old Tg2576 mice were fed with 4% pomegranate or control diet for 15 months and then assessed for the influence of diet on oxidative stress. Significant increase in oxidative stress was found in terms of enhanced levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonyls. Concomitantly, decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes was observed in Tg2576 mice treated with control diet. Supplementation with 4% pomegranate attenuated oxidative damage, as evidenced by decreased LPO and protein carbonyl levels and restoration in the activities of the antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione (GSH), and Glutathione S transferase (GST)]. The activities of membrane-bound enzymes [Na+ K+-ATPase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE)] were altered in the brain regions of Tg2576 mouse treated with control diet, and 4% pomegranate supplementation was able to restore the activities of enzymes to comparable values observed in controls. The results suggest that the therapeutic potential of 4% pomegranate in the treatment of AD might be associated with counteracting the oxidative stress by the presence of active phytochemicals in it. PMID:25379464

  10. Progressive neuropathology and cognitive decline in a single Arctic APP transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rönnbäck, Annica; Zhu, Shunwei; Dillner, Karin; Aoki, Mikio; Lilius, Lena; Näslund, Jan; Winblad, Bengt; Graff, Caroline

    2011-02-01

    The Arctic APP mutation (E693G) leads to dementia with clinical features similar to Alzheimer disease (AD), but little is known about the pathogenic mechanism of this mutation. To address this question, we have generated a transgenic mouse model, TgAPParc, with neuron-specific expression of human APP with the Arctic mutation (hAPParc). Heterozygous mice from two separate founder lines with different levels of expression of hAPParc were analyzed with respect to brain morphology and behavior every 3 months until the age of 18 months. Standard histological stainings and immunohistochemistry using a panel of Aβ antibodies showed an age- and dose-dependant progression of amyloid deposition in the brain, starting in the subiculum and spreading to the thalamus. Cognitive behavioral testing revealed deficits in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze test. This study demonstrates that the Arctic APP mutation is sufficient to cause amyloid deposition and cognitive dysfunction, and thus the TgAPParc mouse model provides a valuable tool to study the effect of the Arctic mutation in vivo without possible confounding effect of other APP mutations.

  11. Generation and characterization of a novel CYP2A13--transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kunzhi; Li, Lei; Liu, Zhihua; Hartog, Matthew; Kluetzman, Kerri; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Ding, Xinxin

    2014-08-01

    CYP2A13, CYP2B6, and CYP2F1 are neighboring cytochrome P450 genes on human chromosome 19, and the enzymes that they encode overlap in substrate specificity. A CYP2A13/2B6/2F1-transgenic mouse, in which CYP2A13 and 2F1 are both expressed in the respiratory tract and CYP2B6 is expressed in the liver, was recently generated. We generated a CYP2A13 (only) transgenic mouse so that the specific activity of CYP2A13 can be determined. The CYP2B6 and CYP2F1 genes in the CYP2A13/2B6/2F1 genomic clone were inactivated via genetic manipulations, and CYP2A13 was kept intact. A CYP2A13 (only) transgenic (2A13-TG) mouse was generated using the engineered construct and then characterized to confirm transgene integrity and determine copy numbers. The 2A13-TG mice were normal in gross morphology, development, and fertility. As in the CYP2A13/2B6/2F1-transgenic mouse, CYP2A13 expression in the 2A13-TG mouse was limited to the respiratory tract; in contrast, CYP2B6 and 2F1 proteins were not detected. Additional studies using the CYP2A13-humanized (2A13-TG/Cyp2abfgs-null) mouse produced by intercrossing between 2A13-TG and Cyp2abfgs-null mice confirmed that the transgenic CYP2A13 is active in the bioactivation of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), a lung procarcinogen. The 2A13-TG mouse should be valuable for assessing specific roles of human CYP2A13 in xenobiotic toxicity in the respiratory tract.

  12. Reducing Endogenous α-Synuclein Mitigates the Degeneration of Selective Neuronal Populations in an Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Brian; Desplats, Paula A.; Overk, Cassia R.; Valera-Martin, Elvira; Rissman, Robert A.; Wu, Chengbiao; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Florio, Jazmin; Rockenstein, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the progressive accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) and microtubule associate protein tau, leading to the selective degeneration of neurons in the neocortex, limbic system, and nucleus basalis, among others. Recent studies have shown that α-synuclein (α-syn) also accumulates in the brains of patients with AD and interacts with Aβ and tau, forming toxic hetero-oligomers. Although the involvement of α-syn has been investigated extensively in Lewy body disease, less is known about the role of this synaptic protein in AD. Here, we found that reducing endogenous α-syn in an APP transgenic mouse model of AD prevented the degeneration of cholinergic neurons, ameliorated corresponding deficits, and recovered the levels of Rab3a and Rab5 proteins involved in intracellular transport and sorting of nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Together, these results suggest that α-syn might participate in mechanisms of vulnerability of selected neuronal populations in AD and that reducing α-syn might be a potential approach to protecting these populations from the toxic effects of Aβ. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Reducing endogenous α-synuclein (α-syn) in an APP transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) prevented the degeneration of cholinergic neurons, ameliorated corresponding deficits, and recovered the levels of Rab3a and Rab5 proteins involved in intracellular transport and sorting of nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. These results suggest that α-syn might participate in mechanisms of vulnerability of selected neuronal populations in AD and that reducing α-syn might be a potential approach to protecting these populations from the toxic effects of amyloid β. PMID:27466341

  13. Huperzine A activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling and enhances the nonamyloidogenic pathway in an Alzheimer transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Tao; Xie, Jing-Wei; Wang, Si-Ling; Zhao, Bao-Lu; Teng, Wei-Ping; Wang, Zhan-You

    2011-04-01

    Huperzine A (HupA) is a reversible and selective inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and it has multiple targets when used for Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapy. In this study, we searched for new mechanisms by which HupA could activate Wnt signaling and reduce amyloidosis in AD brain. A nasal gel containing HupA was prepared. No obvious toxicity of intranasal administration of HupA was found in mice. HupA was administered intranasally to β-amyloid (Aβ) precursor protein and presenilin-1 double-transgenic mice for 4 months. We observed an increase in ADAM10 and a decrease in BACE1 and APP695 protein levels and, subsequently, a reduction in Aβ levels and Aβ burden were present in HupA-treated mouse brain, suggesting that HupA enhances the nonamyloidogenic APP cleavage pathway. Importantly, our results further showed that HupA inhibited GSK3α/β activity, and enhanced the β-catenin level in the transgenic mouse brain and in SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing Swedish mutation APP, suggesting that the neuroprotective effect of HupA is not related simply to its AChE inhibition and antioxidation, but also involves other mechanisms, including targeting of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in AD brain.

  14. Expression profiles for macrophage alternative activation genes in AD and in mouse models of AD

    PubMed Central

    Colton, Carol A; Mott, Ryan T; Sharpe, Hayley; Xu, Qing; Van Nostrand, William E; Vitek, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Background Microglia are associated with neuritic plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD) and serve as a primary component of the innate immune response in the brain. Neuritic plaques are fibrous deposits composed of the amyloid beta-peptide fragments (Abeta) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Numerous studies have shown that the immune cells in the vicinity of amyloid deposits in AD express mRNA and proteins for pro-inflammatory cytokines, leading to the hypothesis that microglia demonstrate classical (Th-1) immune activation in AD. Nonetheless, the complex role of microglial activation has yet to be fully explored since recent studies show that peripheral macrophages enter an "alternative" activation state. Methods To study alternative activation of microglia, we used quantitative RT-PCR to identify genes associated with alternative activation in microglia, including arginase I (AGI), mannose receptor (MRC1), found in inflammatory zone 1 (FIZZ1), and chitinase 3-like 3 (YM1). Results Our findings confirmed that treatment of microglia with anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 induces a gene profile typical of alternative activation similar to that previously observed in peripheral macrophages. We then used this gene expression profile to examine two mouse models of AD, the APPsw (Tg-2576) and Tg-SwDI, models for amyloid deposition and for cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) respectively. AGI, MRC1 and YM1 mRNA levels were significantly increased in the Tg-2576 mouse brains compared to age-matched controls while TNFα and NOS2 mRNA levels, genes commonly associated with classical activation, increased or did not change, respectively. Only TNFα mRNA increased in the Tg-SwDI mouse brain. Alternative activation genes were also identified in brain samples from individuals with AD and were compared to age-matched control individuals. In AD brain, mRNAs for TNFα, AGI, MRC1 and the chitinase-3 like 1 and 2 genes (CHI3L1; CHI3L2) were significantly increased

  15. Increased Calcium-Sensing Receptor Immunoreactivity in the Hippocampus of a Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Gardenal, Emanuela; Chiarini, Anna; Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Prà, Ilaria; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez, José J

    2017-01-01

    The Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein coupled, 7-transmembrane domain receptor ubiquitously expressed throughout the body, brain including. The role of CaSR in the CNS is not well understood; its expression is increasing during development, which has been implicated in memory formation and consolidation, and CaSR localization in nerve terminals has been related to synaptic plasticity and neurotransmission. There is an emerging evidence of CaSR involvement in neurodegenerative disorders and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular, where the over-production of β-amyloid peptides was reported to activate CaSR. In the present study, we performed CaSR immunohistochemical and densitometry analysis in the triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD). We found an increase in the expression of CaSR in hippocampal CA1 area and in dentate gyrus in the 3xTg-AD mice when compared to non-transgenic control animals. This increase was significant at 9 months of age and further increased at 12 and 18 months of age. This increase paralleled the accumulation of β-amyloid plaques with age. Increased expression of CaSR favors β-amyloidogenic pathway following direct interactions between β-amyloid and CaSR and hence may contribute to the pathological evolution of the AD. In the framework of this paradigm CaSR may represent a novel therapeutic target.

  16. Increased Calcium-Sensing Receptor Immunoreactivity in the Hippocampus of a Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gardenal, Emanuela; Chiarini, Anna; Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Prà, Ilaria; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez, José J.

    2017-01-01

    The Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein coupled, 7-transmembrane domain receptor ubiquitously expressed throughout the body, brain including. The role of CaSR in the CNS is not well understood; its expression is increasing during development, which has been implicated in memory formation and consolidation, and CaSR localization in nerve terminals has been related to synaptic plasticity and neurotransmission. There is an emerging evidence of CaSR involvement in neurodegenerative disorders and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular, where the over-production of β-amyloid peptides was reported to activate CaSR. In the present study, we performed CaSR immunohistochemical and densitometry analysis in the triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD). We found an increase in the expression of CaSR in hippocampal CA1 area and in dentate gyrus in the 3xTg-AD mice when compared to non-transgenic control animals. This increase was significant at 9 months of age and further increased at 12 and 18 months of age. This increase paralleled the accumulation of β-amyloid plaques with age. Increased expression of CaSR favors β-amyloidogenic pathway following direct interactions between β-amyloid and CaSR and hence may contribute to the pathological evolution of the AD. In the framework of this paradigm CaSR may represent a novel therapeutic target. PMID:28261055

  17. Hereditary and Sporadic Forms of Aβ-Cerebrovascular Amyloidosis and Relevant Transgenic Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Kumar-Singh, Samir

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) refers to the specific deposition of amyloid fibrils in the leptomeningeal and cerebral blood vessel walls, often causing secondary vascular degenerative changes. Although many kinds of peptides are known to be deposited as vascular amyloid, amyloid-β (Aβ)-CAA is the most common type associated with normal aging, sporadic CAA, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Down’s syndrome. Moreover, Aβ-CAA is also associated with rare hereditary cerebrovascular amyloidosis due to mutations within the Aβ domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) such as Dutch and Flemish APP mutations. Genetics and clinicopathological studies on these familial diseases as well as sporadic conditions have already shown that CAA not only causes haemorrhagic and ischemic strokes, but also leads to progressive dementia. Transgenic mouse models based on familial AD mutations have also successfully reproduced many of the features found in human disease, providing us with important insights into the pathogenesis of CAA. Importantly, such studies have pointed out that specific vastopic Aβ variants or an unaltered Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio favor vascular Aβ deposition over parenchymal plaques, but higher than critical levels of Aβ40 are also observed to be anti-amyloidogenic. These data would be important in the development of therapies targeting amyloid in vessels. PMID:19468344

  18. Generation of Transgenic Mouse Fluorescent Reporter Lines for Studying Hematopoietic Development

    PubMed Central

    Vacaru, Andrei M.; Vitale, Joseph; Nieves, Johnathan; Baron, Margaret H.

    2015-01-01

    During the development of the hematopoietic system, at least 8 distinct lineages are generated in the mouse embryo. Transgenic mice expressing fluorescent proteins at various points in the hematopoietic hierarchy, from hematopoietic stem cell to multipotent progenitors to each of the final differentiated cell types, have provided valuable tools for tagging, tracking, and isolating these cells. In this chapter, we discuss general considerations in designing a transgene, survey available fluorescent probes, and methods for confirming and analyzing transgene expression in the hematopoietic systems of the embryo, fetus, and postnatal/adult animal. PMID:25064110

  19. Generation of a transgenic mouse line for conditional expression of human IL-6

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Taiki; Murasawa, Yusuke; Ikai, Rina; Hayakawa, Tomoko; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Ogiso, Noboru; Niida, Shumpei; Watanabe, Ken

    2016-01-01

    IL-6 is a cytokine that is involved in various physiological and pathological conditions, and approaches using gain-of-function transgenic animals have contributed in elucidating IL-6 function. However, studies of the multiple functions of IL-6 in vivo are very time consuming because they require the generation of transgenic mice that harbor the gene encoding IL-6 under the control of specific promoters to mimic different pathologies. Here, we report the establishment of a conditional human IL-6 transgenic mouse, LGL-IL6, which conditionally expresses human IL-6 by taking advantage of the well-characterized Cre recombinase drivers. PMID:27349442

  20. Potential molecular consequences of transgene integration: The R6/2 mouse example.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jessie C; Erdin, Serkan; Chiang, Colby; Hanscom, Carrie; Handley, Renee R; Barker, Douglas D; Stortchevoi, Alex; Blumenthal, Ian; Reid, Suzanne J; Snell, Russell G; MacDonald, Marcy E; Morton, A Jennifer; Ernst, Carl; Gusella, James F; Talkowski, Michael E

    2017-01-25

    Integration of exogenous DNA into a host genome represents an important route to generate animal and cellular models for exploration into human disease and therapeutic development. In most models, little is known concerning structural integrity of the transgene, precise site of integration, or its impact on the host genome. We previously used whole-genome and targeted sequencing approaches to reconstruct transgene structure and integration sites in models of Huntington's disease, revealing complex structural rearrangements that can result from transgenesis. Here, we demonstrate in the R6/2 mouse, a widely used Huntington's disease model, that integration of a rearranged transgene with coincident deletion of 5,444 bp of host genome within the gene Gm12695 has striking molecular consequences. Gm12695, the function of which is unknown, is normally expressed at negligible levels in mouse brain, but transgene integration has resulted in cortical expression of a partial fragment (exons 8-11) 3' to the transgene integration site in R6/2. This transcript shows significant expression among the extensive network of differentially expressed genes associated with this model, including synaptic transmission, cell signalling and transcription. These data illustrate the value of sequence-level resolution of transgene insertions and transcription analysis to inform phenotypic characterization of transgenic models utilized in therapeutic research.

  1. Potential molecular consequences of transgene integration: The R6/2 mouse example

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Jessie C.; Erdin, Serkan; Chiang, Colby; Hanscom, Carrie; Handley, Renee R.; Barker, Douglas D.; Stortchevoi, Alex; Blumenthal, Ian; Reid, Suzanne J.; Snell, Russell G.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Morton, A. Jennifer; Ernst, Carl; Gusella, James F.; Talkowski, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    Integration of exogenous DNA into a host genome represents an important route to generate animal and cellular models for exploration into human disease and therapeutic development. In most models, little is known concerning structural integrity of the transgene, precise site of integration, or its impact on the host genome. We previously used whole-genome and targeted sequencing approaches to reconstruct transgene structure and integration sites in models of Huntington’s disease, revealing complex structural rearrangements that can result from transgenesis. Here, we demonstrate in the R6/2 mouse, a widely used Huntington’s disease model, that integration of a rearranged transgene with coincident deletion of 5,444 bp of host genome within the gene Gm12695 has striking molecular consequences. Gm12695, the function of which is unknown, is normally expressed at negligible levels in mouse brain, but transgene integration has resulted in cortical expression of a partial fragment (exons 8–11) 3’ to the transgene integration site in R6/2. This transcript shows significant expression among the extensive network of differentially expressed genes associated with this model, including synaptic transmission, cell signalling and transcription. These data illustrate the value of sequence-level resolution of transgene insertions and transcription analysis to inform phenotypic characterization of transgenic models utilized in therapeutic research. PMID:28120936

  2. Oral Administration of Thioflavin T Prevents Beta Amyloid Plaque Formation in Double Transgenic AD Mice.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Paule, Merle G; Schmued, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and most common cause of adult-onset dementia. The major hallmarks of AD are the formation of senile amyloid plaques made of beta amyloid and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) which are primarily composed of phosphorylated tau protein. Although numerous agents have been considered as providing protection against AD, identification of potential agents with neuroprotective ability is limited. Thioflavin T has been used in the past to stain amyloid beta plaques in brain. In this study, Thioflavin T (ThT) and vehicle (infant formula) were administered orally by gavage to transgenic (B6C3 APP PS1; AD-Tg) mice beginning at 4 months age and continuing until sacrifice at 9 months of age at 40 mg/kg dose. The number of amyloid plaques was reduced dramatically by ThT treatment in both male and female transgenic mice compared to those in control mice. Additionally, GFAP and Amylo-Glo labeling suggest that astrocytic hypertrophy is minimized in ThT-treated animals. Similarly, CD68 labeling, which detects activated microglia, along with Amylo-Glo labeling, suggests that microglial activation is significantly less in ThT-treated mice. Both Aβ-40 and Aβ-42 concentrations in blood rose significantly in the ThT-treated animals suggesting that ThT may inhibit the deposition, degradation, and/or clearance of Aβ plaques in brain.

  3. Adenovirus serotype 35 vector-induced innate immune responses in dendritic cells derived from wild-type and human CD46-transgenic mice: Comparison with a fiber-substituted Ad vector containing fiber proteins of Ad serotype 35.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Nakashima, Kazuko; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Ichinose, Takako; Kawabata, Kenji; Hayakawa, Takao; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2010-12-01

    Recently, much attention has focused on replication-incompetent adenovirus (Ad) vectors containing fiber proteins derived from species B Ad serotype 35 (Ad35) (Ad5F35) and Ad vectors fully constructed from Ad35 as vaccine vectors expressing antigens. However, differences in the transduction properties, including the induction of innate immunity, of Ad5F35 and Ad35 vectors have not been properly and fully examined, partly because the transduction properties of these Ad vectors should be evaluated using nonhuman primates or human CD46-transgenic (CD46TG) mice, which ubiquitously express the primary receptor of Ad35, human CD46, in a pattern similar to that of humans. In the present study, we evaluated innate immune responses of mouse dendritic cells (mDCs) derived from bone marrow cells of wild-type (WT) and CD46TG mice following transduction with Ad serotype 5 (Ad5), fiber-substituted Ad5F35, or Ad35 vectors. Ad5F35 and Ad35 vectors mediated more efficient transduction in mDCs derived from CD46TG mice (CD46TG-mDCs) than did Ad5 vectors. Upregulation of costimulatory molecules and inflammatory cytokine induction by Ad5F35 and Ad35 vectors were significantly higher than those by Ad5 vectors in CD46TG-mDCs. However, the induction properties of the innate immune responses were different between Ad5F35 and Ad35 vectors. Ad35 vectors induced higher levels of costimulatory molecule expression and inflammatory cytokine production than did Ad5F35 vectors in CD46TG-mDCs. Furthermore, intravenous administration of Ad35 vectors in WT and CD46TG mice resulted in higher levels of serum interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-12 compared with administration of Ad5F35 vectors, which exhibited almost mock-transduced levels of these inflammatory cytokines. This study indicates that innate immune responses by Ad35 and Ad5F35 vectors are distinct even although both Ad vectors recognize human CD46 as a receptor.

  4. Differential regulation of laminin b1 transgene expression in the neonatal and adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sharif, K A; Baker, H; Gudas, L J

    2004-01-01

    Laminins are the major glycoproteins present in basement membrane, a type of extracellular matrix. We showed that the LAMB1 gene, which encodes the laminin beta1 subunit, is transcriptionally activated by retinoic acid in embryonic stem cells. However, little information is available concerning LAMB1 developmental regulation and spatial expression in the adult mouse brain. In this study we used transgenic mice expressing different lengths of LAMB1 promoter driving beta-galactosidase to investigate developmental and adult transcriptional regulation in the regions of the brain in which the laminin beta1 protein is expressed. CNS expression was not observed in transgenic mice carrying a 1.4LAMB1betagal construct. Mice carrying a 2.5LAMB1betagal construct expressed the LAMB1 transgene, as assayed by X-gal staining, only in the molecular layer of the neonatal cerebellum. In contrast, a 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene showed broad regional expression in the adult mouse brain, including the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, colliculi, striatum, and substantia nigra. Similar expression patterns were observed for the endogenous laminin beta1 protein and for the 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene, analyzed with an antibody against the beta-galactosidase protein. The 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene expression in the hippocampal tri-synaptic circuit suggests a role for the LAMB1 gene in learning and memory.

  5. Bioenergetic Defects and Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Models of Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    This study aims to determine what roles bioenergetic dysfunction and oxidative stress play in the etiology of neurodegeneration in Huntington’s ... disease (HE) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), using transgenic mouse models. Studies in this first year employed C-14-2-deoxyglucose in

  6. A transgenic mouse model of neuroepithelial cell specific inducible overexpression of dopamine D1-receptor

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Kumiko; Araki, Kiyomi; McCarthy, Deirdre M.; Sims, John R.; Ren, Jia-Qian; Zhang, Xuan; Bhide, Pradeep G.

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine and its receptors appear in the brain during early embryonic period suggesting a role for dopamine in brain development. In fact, dopamine receptor imbalance resulting from impaired physiological balance between D1- and D2-receptor activities can perturb brain development and lead to persisting changes in brain structure and function. Dopamine receptor imbalance can be produced experimentally using pharmacological or genetic methods. Pharmacological methods tend to activate or antagonize the receptors in all cell types. In the traditional gene knockout models the receptor imbalance occurs during development and also at maturity. Therefore, assaying the effects of dopamine imbalance on specific cell types (e.g. precursor versus postmitotic cells) or at specific periods of brain development (e.g. pre- or postnatal periods) is not feasible in these models. We describe a novel transgenic mouse model based on the tetracycline dependent inducible gene expression system in which dopamine D1-receptor transgene expression is induced selectively in neuroepithelial cells of the embryonic brain at experimenter-chosen intervals of brain development. In this model, doxycycline-induced expression of the transgene causes significant overexpression of the D1-receptor and significant reductions in the incorporation of the S-phase marker bromodeoxyuridine into neuroepithelial cells of the basal and dorsal telencephalon indicating marked effects on telencephalic neurogenesis. The D1-receptor overexpression occurs at higher levels in the medial ganglionic eminence than the lateral ganglionic eminence or cerebral wall. Moreover, although the transgene is induced selectively in the neuroepithelium, D1-receptor protein overexpression appears to persist in postmitotic cells. The mouse model can be modified for neuroepithelial cell-specific inducible expression of other transgenes or induction of the D1-receptor transgene in other cells in specific brain regions by crossbreeding

  7. Type II fuzzy systems for amyloid plaque segmentation in transgenic mouse brains for Alzheimer's disease quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademi, April; Hosseinzadeh, Danoush

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid plaques (AP). Using animal models, AP loads have been manually measured from histological specimens to understand disease etiology, as well as response to treatment. Due to the manual nature of these approaches, obtaining the AP load is labourious, subjective and error prone. Automated algorithms can be designed to alleviate these challenges by objectively segmenting AP. In this paper, we focus on the development of a novel algorithm for AP segmentation based on robust preprocessing and a Type II fuzzy system. Type II fuzzy systems are much more advantageous over the traditional Type I fuzzy systems, since ambiguity in the membership function may be modeled and exploited to generate excellent segmentation results. The ambiguity in the membership function is defined as an adaptively changing parameter that is tuned based on the local contrast characteristics of the image. Using transgenic mouse brains with AP ground truth, validation studies were carried out showing a high degree of overlap and low degree of oversegmentation (0.8233 and 0.0917, respectively). The results highlight that such a framework is able to handle plaques of various types (diffuse, punctate), plaques with varying Aβ concentrations as well as intensity variation caused by treatment effects or staining variability.

  8. Comparative studies using the Morris water maze to assess spatial memory deficits in two transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Stephen R; Hamlin, Adam S; Marks, Nicola; Coulson, Elizabeth J; Smith, Maree T

    2014-10-01

    Evaluation of the efficacy of novel therapeutics for potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) requires an animal model that develops age-related cognitive deficits reproducibly between independent groups of investigators. Herein we assessed comparative temporal changes in spatial memory function in two commercially available transgenic mouse models of AD using the Morris water maze (MWM), incorporating both visible and hidden platform training. Individual cohorts of cDNA-based 'line 85'-derived double-transgenic mice coexpressing the 'Swedish' mutation of amyloid precursor protein (APPSwe) and the presenillin 1 (PS1) 'dE9' mutation were assessed in the MWM at mean ages of 3.6, 9.3 and 14.8 months. We found significant deficits in spatial memory retention in APPSwe/PS1dE9 mice aged 3.6 months and robust deficits in spatial memory acquisition and retention in APPSwe/PS1dE9 mice aged 9.3 months, with a further significant decline by age 14.8 months. β-Amyloid deposits were present in brain sections by 7.25 months of age. In contrast, MWM studies with individual cohorts (aged 4-21 months) of single-transgenic genomic-based APPSwe mice expressing APPSwe on a yeast artificial chromosomal (YAC) construct showed no significant deficits in spatial memory acquisition until 21 months of age. There were no significant deficits in spatial memory retention up to 21 months of age and β-amyloid deposits were not present in brain sections up to 24 months of age. These data, generated using comprehensive study designs, show that APPSwe/PS1dE9 but not APPSwe YAC mice appear to provide a suitably robust model of AD for efficacy assessment of novel AD treatments in development.

  9. Neuroanatomical and functional characterization of CRF neurons of the amygdala using a novel transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    De Francesco, P N; Valdivia, S; Cabral, A; Reynaldo, M; Raingo, J; Sakata, I; Osborne-Lawrence, S; Zigman, J M; Perelló, M

    2015-03-19

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-producing neurons of the amygdala have been implicated in behavioral and physiological responses associated with fear, anxiety, stress, food intake and reward. To overcome the difficulties in identifying CRF neurons within the amygdala, a novel transgenic mouse line, in which the humanized recombinant Renilla reniformis green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) is under the control of the CRF promoter (CRF-hrGFP mice), was developed. First, the CRF-hrGFP mouse model was validated and the localization of CRF neurons within the amygdala was systematically mapped. Amygdalar hrGFP-expressing neurons were located primarily in the interstitial nucleus of the posterior limb of the anterior commissure, but also present in the central amygdala. Secondly, the marker of neuronal activation c-Fos was used to explore the response of amygdalar CRF neurons in CRF-hrGFP mice under different experimental paradigms. C-Fos induction was observed in CRF neurons of CRF-hrGFP mice exposed to an acute social defeat stress event, a fasting/refeeding paradigm or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. In contrast, no c-Fos induction was detected in CRF neurons of CRF-hrGFP mice exposed to restraint stress, forced swimming test, 48-h fasting, acute high-fat diet (HFD) consumption, intermittent HFD consumption, ad libitum HFD consumption, HFD withdrawal, conditioned HFD aversion, ghrelin administration or melanocortin 4 receptor agonist administration. Thus, this study fully characterizes the distribution of amygdala CRF neurons in mice and suggests that they are involved in some, but not all, stress or food intake-related behaviors recruiting the amygdala.

  10. Oxidative stress accelerates amyloid deposition and memory impairment in a double-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Takuya; Kamimura, Naomi; Yokota, Takashi; Iuchi, Katsuya; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Takami, Shinya; Akashiba, Hiroki; Shitaka, Yoshitsugu; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Kimura, Kazumi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2015-02-05

    Oxidative stress is known to play a prominent role in the onset and early stage progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). For example, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation levels are increased in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Here, we created a double-transgenic mouse model of AD to explore the pathological and behavioral effects of oxidative stress. Double transgenic (APP/DAL) mice were constructed by crossing Tg2576 (APP) mice, which express a mutant form of human amyloid precursor protein (APP), with DAL mice expressing a dominant-negative mutant of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), in which oxidative stress is enhanced. Y-maze and object recognition tests were performed at 3 and 6 months of age to evaluate learning and memory. The accumulation of amyloid plaques, deposition of phosphorylated-tau protein, and number of astrocytes in the brain were assessed histopathologically at 3, 6, 9, and 12-15 months of age. The life span of APP/DAL mice was significantly shorter than that of APP or DAL mice. In addition, they showed accelerated amyloid deposition, tau phosphorylation, and gliosis. Furthermore, these mice showed impaired performance on Y-maze and object recognition tests at 3 months of age. These data suggest that oxidative stress accelerates cognitive dysfunction and pathological insults in the brain. APP/DAL mice could be a useful model for exploring new approaches to AD treatment.

  11. Preparation and Observation of Fresh-frozen Sections of the Green Fluorescent Protein Transgenic Mouse Head

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Masahito; Shinohara, Yoshinori; Kato, Ichiro; Hiraga, Koichi; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Demura, Makoto; Mori, Yoshihiro; Shinoda, Hiroyuki; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Kawano, Keiichi

    2006-01-01

    Hard tissue decalcification can cause variation in the constituent protein characteristics. This paper describes a method of preparating of frozen mouse head sections so as to clearly observe the nature of the constituent proteins. Frozen sections of various green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mouse heads were prepared using the film method developed by Kawamoto and Shimizu. This method made specimen dissection without decalcification possible, wherein GFP was clearly observed in an undamaged state. Conversely, using the same method with decalcification made GFP observation in the transgenic mouse head difficult. This new method is suitable for observing GFP marked cells, enabling us to follow the transplanted GFP marked cells within frozen head sections. PMID:17375207

  12. Inducible Cre transgenic mouse strain for skeletal muscle-specific gene targeting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of the Cre/loxP system for gene targeting has been proven to be a powerful tool for understanding gene function. The purpose of this study was to create and characterize an inducible, skeletal muscle-specific Cre transgenic mouse strain. Methods To achieve skeletal muscle-specific expression, the human α-skeletal actin promoter was used to drive expression of a chimeric Cre recombinase containing two mutated estrogen receptor ligand-binding domains. Results Western blot analysis, PCR and β-galactosidase staining confirmed that Cre-mediated recombination was restricted to limb and craniofacial skeletal muscles only after tamoxifen administration. Conclusions A transgenic mouse was created that allows inducible, gene targeting of floxed genes in adult skeletal muscle of different developmental origins. This new mouse will be of great utility to the skeletal muscle community. PMID:22564549

  13. Protective effects of positive lysosomal modulation in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Butler, David; Hwang, Jeannie; Estick, Candice; Nishiyama, Akiko; Kumar, Saranya Santhosh; Baveghems, Clive; Young-Oxendine, Hollie B; Wisniewski, Meagan L; Charalambides, Ana; Bahr, Ben A

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative pathology in which defects in proteolytic clearance of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) likely contribute to the progressive nature of the disorder. Lysosomal proteases of the cathepsin family exhibit up-regulation in response to accumulating proteins including Aβ(1-42). Here, the lysosomal modulator Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK) was used to test whether proteolytic activity can be enhanced to reduce the accumulation events in AD mouse models expressing different levels of Aβ pathology. Systemic PADK injections in APP(SwInd) and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice caused 3- to 8-fold increases in cathepsin B protein levels and 3- to 10-fold increases in the enzyme's activity in lysosomal fractions, while neprilysin and insulin-degrading enzyme remained unchanged. Biochemical analyses indicated the modulation predominantly targeted the active mature forms of cathepsin B and markedly changed Rab proteins but not LAMP1, suggesting the involvement of enhanced trafficking. The modulated lysosomal system led to reductions in both Aβ immunostaining as well as Aβ(x-42) sandwich ELISA measures in APP(SwInd) mice of 10-11 months. More extensive Aβ deposition in 20-22-month APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice was also reduced by PADK. Selective ELISAs found that a corresponding production of the less pathogenic Aβ(1-38) occurs as Aβ(1-42) levels decrease in the mouse models, indicating that PADK treatment leads to Aβ truncation. Associated with Aβ clearance was the elimination of behavioral and synaptic protein deficits evident in the two transgenic models. These findings indicate that pharmacologically-controlled lysosomal modulation reduces Aβ(1-42) accumulation, possibly through intracellular truncation that also influences extracellular deposition, and in turn offsets the defects in synaptic composition and cognitive functions. The selective modulation promotes clearance at different levels of Aβ pathology and provides proof

  14. Neural stem cell transplantation enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Gu, Guo-Jun; Shen, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Gang-Min; Wang, Pei-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, especially a defect in mitochondrial biogenesis, is an early and prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies demonstrated that the number of mitochondria is significantly reduced in susceptible hippocampal neurons from AD patients. Neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation in AD-like mice can compensate for the neuronal loss resulting from amyloid-beta protein deposition. The effects of NSC transplantation on mitochondrial biogenesis and cognitive function in AD-like mice, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we injected NSCs or vehicle into 12-month-old amyloid precursor protein (APP)/PS1 transgenic mice, a mouse model of AD-like pathology. The effects of NSC transplantation on cognitive function, the amount of mitochondrial DNA, the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors and mitochondria-related proteins, and mitochondrial morphology were investigated. Our results show that in NSC-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-NSC) mice, the cognitive function, number of mitochondria, and expression of mitochondria-related proteins, specifically the mitochondrial fission factors (dynamin-related protein 1 [Drp1] and fission 1 [Fis1]) and the mitochondrial fusion factor optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), were significantly increased compared with those in age-matched vehicle-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-Veh) mice, whereas the expression of mitochondrial fusion factors mitofusion 1 (Mfn1) and Mfn2 was significantly decreased. These data indicate that NSC transplantation may enhance mitochondria biogenesis and further rescue cognitive deficits in AD-like mice.

  15. Outstanding Phenotypic Differences in the Profile of Amyloid-β between Tg2576 and APPswe/PS1dE9 Transgenic Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Allué, José Antonio; Sarasa, Leticia; Izco, María; Pérez-Grijalba, Virginia; Fandos, Noelia; Pascual-Lucas, María; Ogueta, Samuel; Pesini, Pedro; Sarasa, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    APPswe/PS1dE9 and Tg2576 are very common transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), used in many laboratories as tools to research the mechanistic process leading to the disease. In order to augment our knowledge about the amyloid-β (Aβ) isoforms present in both transgenic mouse models, we have developed two chromatographic methods, one acidic and the other basic, for the characterization of the Aβ species produced in the brains of the two transgenic mouse models. After immunoprecipitation and micro-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, 10 species of Aβ, surprisingly all of human origin, were detected in the brain of Tg2576 mouse, whereas 39 species, of both murine and human origin, were detected in the brain of the APP/PS1 mouse. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing the identification of such a high number of Aβ species in the brain of the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse, whereas, in contrast, a much lower number of Aβ species were identified in the Tg2576 mouse. Therefore, this study brings to light a relevant phenotypic difference between these two popular mice models of AD. PMID:27258422

  16. The mouse muscle creatine kinase promoter faithfully drives reporter gene expression in transgenic Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wayland; Neff, Eric S; Furlow, J David

    2004-06-17

    Developing Xenopus laevis experience two periods of muscle differentiation, once during embryogenesis and again at metamorphosis. During metamorphosis, thyroid hormone induces both muscle growth in the limbs and muscle death in the tail. In mammals, the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) gene is activated during the differentiation from myoblasts to myocytes and has served as both a marker for muscle development and to drive transgene expression in transgenic mice. Transcriptional control elements are generally highly conserved throughout evolution, potentially allowing mouse promoter use in transgenic X. laevis. This paper compares endogenous X. laevis MCK gene expression and the mouse MCK (mMCK) promoter driving a green fluorescent protein reporter in transgenic X. laevis. The mMCK promoter demonstrated strong skeletal muscle-specific transgene expression in both the juvenile tadpole and adult frog. Therefore, our results clearly demonstrate the functional conservation of regulatory sequences in vertebrate muscle gene promoters and illustrate the utility of using X. laevis transgenesis for detailed comparative study of mammalian promoter activity in vivo.

  17. Cellular, Molecular and Functional Characterisation of YAC Transgenic Mouse Models of Friedreich Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Anjomani Virmouni, Sara; Sandi, Chiranjeevi; Al-Mahdawi, Sahar; Pook, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, caused by a GAA repeat expansion mutation within intron 1 of the FXN gene. We have previously established and performed preliminary characterisation of several human FXN yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) transgenic FRDA mouse models containing GAA repeat expansions, Y47R (9 GAA repeats), YG8R (90 and 190 GAA repeats) and YG22R (190 GAA repeats). Methodology/Principal Findings We now report extended cellular, molecular and functional characterisation of these FXN YAC transgenic mouse models. FXN transgene copy number analysis of the FRDA mice demonstrated that the YG22R and Y47R lines each have a single copy of the FXN transgene while the YG8R line has two copies. Single integration sites of all transgenes were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis of metaphase and interphase chromosomes. We identified significant functional deficits, together with a degree of glucose intolerance and insulin hypersensitivity, in YG8R and YG22R FRDA mice compared to Y47R and wild-type control mice. We also confirmed increased somatic GAA repeat instability in the cerebellum and brain of YG22R and YG8R mice, together with significantly reduced levels of FXN mRNA and protein in the brain and liver of YG8R and YG22R compared to Y47R. Conclusions/Significance Together these studies provide a detailed characterisation of our GAA repeat expansion-based YAC transgenic FRDA mouse models that will help investigations of FRDA disease mechanisms and therapy. PMID:25198290

  18. Hippocampal neurogenesis in the APP/PS1/nestin-GFP triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Q; Zheng, M; Zhang, T; He, G

    2016-02-09

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common causes of dementia. Although the exact mechanisms of AD are not entirely clear, the impairment in adult hippocampal neurogenesis has been reported to play a role in AD. To assess the relationship between AD and neurogenesis, we studied APP/PS1/nestin-green fluorescent protein (GFP) triple transgenic mice, a well-characterized mouse model of AD, which express GFP under the control of the nestin promoter. Different ages of AD mice and their wild-type littermates (WT) were used in our study. Immunofluorescent staining showed that neurogenesis occurred mainly in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) and subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LVs). The expression of neural stem cells (NSCs) (nestin) and neural precursors such as doublecortin (DCX) and GFAP in AD mice were decreased with age, as well as there being a reduction in 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells, when compared to WT. However, the number of maturate neurons (NeuN) was not significantly different between AD mice and wild-type controls, and NeuN changed only slightly with age. By Golgi-Cox staining, the morphologies of dendrites were observed, and significant differences existed between AD mice and wild-type controls. These results suggest that AD has a far-reaching influence on the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, leading to a gradual decrease in the generation of neural progenitors (NPCs), and inhibition of the differentiation and maturation of neurons.

  19. Liver BCATm transgenic mouse model reveals the important role of the liver in maintaining BCAA homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ananieva, Elitsa A; Van Horn, Cynthia G; Jones, Meghan R; Hutson, Susan M

    2017-02-01

    Unlike other amino acids, the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) largely bypass first-pass liver degradation due to a lack of hepatocyte expression of the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm). This sets up interorgan shuttling of BCAAs and liver-skeletal muscle cooperation in BCAA catabolism. To explore whether complete liver catabolism of BCAAs may impact BCAA shuttling in peripheral tissues, the BCATm gene was stably introduced into mouse liver. Two transgenic mouse lines with low and high hepatocyte expression of the BCATm transgene (LivTg-LE and LivTg-HE) were created and used to measure liver and plasma amino acid concentrations and determine whether the first two BCAA enzymatic steps in liver, skeletal muscle, heart and kidney were impacted. Expression of the hepatic BCATm transgene lowered the concentrations of hepatic BCAAs while enhancing the concentrations of some nonessential amino acids. Extrahepatic BCAA metabolic enzymes and plasma amino acids were largely unaffected, and no growth rate or body composition differences were observed in the transgenic animals as compared to wild-type mice. Feeding the transgenic animals a high-fat diet did not reverse the effect of the BCATm transgene on the hepatic BCAA catabolism, nor did the high-fat diet cause elevation in plasma BCAAs. However, the high-fat-diet-fed BCATm transgenic animals experienced attenuation in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the liver and had impaired blood glucose tolerance. These results suggest that complete liver BCAA metabolism influences the regulation of glucose utilization during diet-induced obesity.

  20. Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy of angiogenesis in a transgenic mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song; Oladipupo, Sunday; Yao, Junjie; Santeford, Andrea C.; Maslov, Konstantin; Kovalski, Joanna; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    A major obstacle in studying angiogenesis is the inability to noninvasively image neovascular development in an individual animal. We applied optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) to determine the kinetics of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)-mediated angiogenesis in a transgenic mouse model. During continuous 30-day activation of HIF-1α, we used OR-PAM to monitor alterations in microvasculature in transgenic mice compared to nontransgenic mice. OR-PAM has demonstrated the potential to precisely monitor antiangiogenic therapy of human cancers, allowing for rapid determinations of therapeutic efficacy or resistance.

  1. Fluoro-Jade B staining as useful tool to identify activated microglia and astrocytes in a mouse transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Damjanac, Milena; Rioux Bilan, Agnès; Barrier, Laurence; Pontcharraud, Raymond; Anne, Cantereau; Hugon, Jacques; Page, Guylène

    2007-01-12

    Fluoro-Jade B is known as a high affinity fluorescent marker for the localization of neuronal degeneration during acute neuronal distress. However, one study suggested that fluoro-Jade B stains reactive astroglia in the primate cerebral cortex. In this study, we analyzed the staining of fluoro-Jade B alone or combined with specific markers for detection of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or activated CD68 microglia in the double APP(SL)/PS1 KI transgenic mice of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which display a massive neuronal loss in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Our results showed that fluoro-Jade B did not stain normal and degenerating neurons in this double mouse transgenic model. Fluoro-Jade B was co-localized with Abeta in the core of amyloid deposits and in glia-like cells expressing Abeta. Furthermore, fluoro-Jade B was co-localized with CD68/macrosialin, a specific marker of activated microglia, and with GFAP for astrocytes in APP(SL)/PS1 KI transgenic mice of AD. Taken together, these findings showed that fluoro-Jade B can be used to label activated microglia and astrocytes which are abundant in the brain of these AD transgenic mice. It could stain degenerating neurons as a result of acute insult while it could label activated microglia and astrocytes during a chronic neuronal degenerative process such as AD for example.

  2. Transgenic mouse model of hemifacial microsomia: Cloning and characterization of insertional mutation region on chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Naora, Hiroyuki; Otani, Hiroki; Tanaka, Osamu

    1994-10-01

    The 643 transgenic mouse line carries an autosomal dominant insertional mutation that results in hemifacial microsomia (HFM), including microtia and/or abnormal biting. In this paper, we characterize the transgene integration site in transgenic mice and preintegration site of wildtype mice. The locus, designated Hfm (hemifacial microsomia-associated locus), was mapped to chromosome 10, B1-3, by chromosome in situ hybridization. We cloned the transgene insertion site from the transgenic DNA library. By using the 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking sequences, the preintegration region was isolated. The analysis of these regions showed that a deletion of at least 23 kb DNA occurred in association with the transgene integration. Evolutionarily conserved regions were detected within and beside the deleted region. The result of mating between hemizygotes suggests that the phenotype of the homozygote is lethality in the prenatal period. These results suggests that the Hfm locus is necessary for prenatal development and that this strain is a useful animal model for investigating the genetic predisposition to HFM in humans.

  3. Intraneuronal pyroglutamate-Abeta 3-42 triggers neurodegeneration and lethal neurological deficits in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wirths, Oliver; Breyhan, Henning; Cynis, Holger; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Bayer, Thomas A

    2009-10-01

    It is well established that only a fraction of Abeta peptides in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients start with N-terminal aspartate (Abeta(1D)) which is generated by proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by BACE. N-terminally truncated and pyroglutamate modified Abeta starting at position 3 and ending with amino acid 42 [Abeta(3(pE)-42)] have been previously shown to represent a major species in the brain of AD patients. When compared with Abeta(1-42), this peptide has stronger aggregation propensity and increased toxicity in vitro. Although it is unknown which peptidases remove the first two N-terminal amino acids, the cyclization of Abeta at N-terminal glutamate can be catalyzed in vitro. Here, we show that Abeta(3(pE)-42) induces neurodegeneration and concomitant neurological deficits in a novel mouse model (TBA2 transgenic mice). Although TBA2 transgenic mice exhibit a strong neuronal expression of Abeta(3-42) predominantly in hippocampus and cerebellum, few plaques were found in the cortex, cerebellum, brain stem and thalamus. The levels of converted Abeta(3(pE)-42) in TBA2 mice were comparable to the APP/PS1KI mouse model with robust neuron loss and associated behavioral deficits. Eight weeks after birth TBA2 mice developed massive neurological impairments together with abundant loss of Purkinje cells. Although the TBA2 model lacks important AD-typical neuropathological features like tangles and hippocampal degeneration, it clearly demonstrates that intraneuronal Abeta(3(pE)-42) is neurotoxic in vivo.

  4. High throughput object-based image analysis of β-amyloid plaques in human and transgenic mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Samaroo, Harry D; Opsahl, Alan C; Schreiber, Jan; O'Neill, Sharon M; Marconi, Michael; Qian, Jessie; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Santos; Tate, Barbara; Milici, Anthony J; Bales, Kelly R; Stephenson, Diane T

    2012-02-15

    Advances in imaging technology have enabled automated approaches for quantitative image analysis. In this study, a high content object based image analysis method was developed for quantification of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in postmortem brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) subjects and in transgenic mice over overexpressing Aβ. Digital images acquired from immunohistochemically stained sections of the superior frontal gyrus were analyzed for Aβ plaque burden using a Definiens object-based segmentation approach. Blinded evaluation of Aβ stained sections from AD and aged matched human subjects accurately identified AD cases with one exception. Brains from transgenic mice overexpressing Aβ (PS1APP mice) were also evaluated by our Definiens object based image analysis approach. We observed an age-dependent increase in the amount of Aβ plaque load that we quantified in both the hippocampus and cortex. From the contralateral hemisphere, we measured the amount of Aβ in brain homogenates biochemically and observed a significant correlation between our biochemical measurements and those that we measured by our object based Definiens system in the hippocampus. Assessment of Aβ plaque load in PS1APP mice using a manual segmentation technique (Image-Pro Plus) confirmed the results of our object-based image analysis approach. Image acquisition and analysis of 32 stained human slides and 100 mouse slides were executed in 8 h and 22 h, respectively supporting the relatively high throughput features of the Definiens platform. The data show that digital imaging combined with object based image analysis is a reliable and efficient approach to quantifying Aβ plaques in human and mouse brain.

  5. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Moyer, E. L.; Kumar, A.; Tahimic, Candice C. G.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss can occur due to many challenges such age, radiation, microgravity, and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) play a critical role in bone resorption by osteoclasts (Bartell et al. 2014). We hypothesize that suppression of excess ROS in skeletal cells, both osteoblasts and osteoclasts, regulates skeletal growth and remodeling. To test our hypothesis, we used transgenic mCAT mice which overexpress the human anti-oxidant catalase gene targeted to the mitochondria, the main site for endogenous ROS production. mCAT mice have a longer life-span than wildtype controls and have been used to study various age-related disorders. To stimulate remodeling, 16 week old mCAT mice or wildtype mice were exposed to treatment (hindlimb-unloading and total body-irradiation) or sham treatment conditions (control). Tissues were harvested 2 weeks later for skeletal analysis (microcomputed tomography), biochemical analysis (gene expression and oxidative damage measurements), and ex vivo bone marrow derived cell culture (osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis). mCAT mice expressed the transgene and displayed elevated catalase activity in skeletal tissue and marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclasts grown ex vivo. In addition, when challenged with treatment, bone tissues from wildtype mice showed elevated levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), indicating oxidative damage) whereas mCAT mice did not. Correlation analysis revealed that increased catalase activity significantly correlated with decreased MDA levels and that increased oxidative damage correlated with decreased percent bone volume (BVTV). In addition, ex-vivo cultured osteoblast colony growth correlated with catalase activity in the osteoblasts. Thus, we showed that these transgenic mice can be used as a model to study the relationship between markers of oxidative damage and skeletal properties. mCAT mice displayed reduced BVTV and trabecular number relative to wildtype mice, as well as increased structural model index in the

  6. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, A.-S.; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Kumar, A.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to musculoskeletal disuse and radiation result in bone loss; we hypothesized that these catabolic treatments cause excess reactive oxygen species (ROS), and thereby alter the tight balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used transgenic mice which over-express the human gene for catalase, targeted to mitochondria (MCAT). Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts the ROS hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. MCAT mice were shown previously to display reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress and radiosensitivity of the CNS compared to wild type controls (WT). As expected, MCAT mice expressed the transgene in skeletal tissue, and in marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors cultured ex vivo, and also showed greater catalase activity compared to wildtype (WT) mice (3-6 fold). Colony expansion in marrow cells cultured under osteoblastogenic conditions was 2-fold greater in the MCAT mice compared to WT mice, while the extent of mineralization was unaffected. MCAT mice had slightly longer tibiae than WT mice (2%, P less than 0.01), although cortical bone area was slightly lower in MCAT mice than WT mice (10%, p=0.09). To challenge the skeletal system, mice were treated by exposure to combined disuse (2 wk Hindlimb Unloading) and total body irradiation Cs(137) (2 Gy, 0.8 Gy/min), then bone parameters were analyzed by 2-factor ANOVA to detect possible interaction effects. Treatment caused a 2-fold increase (p=0.015) in malondialdehyde levels of bone tissue (ELISA) in WT mice, but had no effect in MCAT mice. These findings indicate that the transgene conferred protection from oxidative damage caused by treatment. Unexpected differences between WT and MCAT mice emerged in skeletal responses to treatment.. In WT mice, treatment did not alter osteoblastogenesis, cortical bone area, moment of inertia, or bone perimeter, whereas in MCAT mice, treatment increased these

  7. Antroquinonol Lowers Brain Amyloid-β Levels and Improves Spatial Learning and Memory in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Miles C.; Cheng, Irene H.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The deposition of brain amyloid-β peptides (Aβ), which are cleaved from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is one of the pathological hallmarks of AD. Aβ-induced oxidative stress and neuroinflammation play important roles in the pathogenesis of AD. Antroquinonol, a ubiquinone derivative isolated from Antrodia camphorata, has been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines via activating the nuclear transcription factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway, which is downregulated in AD. Therefore, we examined whether antroquinonol could improve AD-like pathological and behavioral deficits in the APP transgenic mouse model. We found that antroquinonol was able to cross the blood-brain barrier and had no adverse effects via oral intake. Two months of antroquinonol consumption improved learning and memory in the Morris water maze test, reduced hippocampal Aβ levels, and reduced the degree of astrogliosis. These effects may be mediated through the increase of Nrf2 and the decrease of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) levels. These findings suggest that antroquinonol could have beneficial effects on AD-like deficits in APP transgenic mouse. PMID:26469245

  8. Data on amyloid precursor protein accumulation, spontaneous physical activity, and motor learning after traumatic brain injury in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yasushi; Shishido, Hajime; Sawanishi, Mayumi; Toyota, Yasunori; Ueno, Masaki; Kubota, Takashi; Kirino, Yutaka; Tamiya, Takashi; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    This data article contains supporting information regarding the research article entitled "Traumatic brain injury accelerates amyloid-β deposition and impairs spatial learning in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease" (H. Shishido, Y. Kishimoto, N. Kawai, Y. Toyota, M. Ueno, T. Kubota, Y. Kirino, T. Tamiya, 2016) [1]. Triple-transgenic (3×Tg)-Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) model mice exhibited significantly poorer spatial learning than sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Correspondingly, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition within the hippocampus was significantly greater in 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after TBI. However, data regarding the short-term and long-term influences of TBI on amyloid precursor protein (APP) accumulation in AD model mice remain limited. Furthermore, there is little data showing whether physical activity and motor learning are affected by TBI in AD model mice. Here, we provide immunocytochemistry data confirming that TBI induces significant increases in APP accumulation in 3×Tg-AD mice at both 7 days and 28 days after TBI. Furthermore, 3×Tg-AD model mice exhibit a reduced ability to acquire conditioned responses (CRs) during delay eyeblink conditioning compared to sham-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice 28 days after TBI. However, physical activity and motor performance are not significantly changed in TBI-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice.

  9. Age-related changes in core body temperature and activity in triple-transgenic Alzheimer's disease (3xTgAD) mice.

    PubMed

    Knight, Elysse M; Brown, Timothy M; Gümüsgöz, Sarah; Smith, Jennifer C M; Waters, Elizabeth J; Allan, Stuart M; Lawrence, Catherine B

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterised, not only by cognitive deficits and neuropathological changes, but also by several non-cognitive behavioural symptoms that can lead to a poorer quality of life. Circadian disturbances in core body temperature and physical activity are reported in AD patients, although the cause and consequences of these changes are unknown. We therefore characterised circadian patterns of body temperature and activity in male triple transgenic AD mice (3xTgAD) and non-transgenic (Non-Tg) control mice by remote radiotelemetry. At 4 months of age, daily temperature rhythms were phase advanced and by 6 months of age an increase in mean core body temperature and amplitude of temperature rhythms were observed in 3xTgAD mice. No differences in daily activity rhythms were seen in 4- to 9-month-old 3xTgAD mice, but by 10 months of age an increase in mean daily activity and the amplitude of activity profiles for 3xTgAD mice were detected. At all ages (4-10 months), 3xTgAD mice exhibited greater food intake compared with Non-Tg mice. The changes in temperature did not appear to be solely due to increased food intake and were not cyclooxygenase dependent because the temperature rise was not abolished by chronic ibuprofen treatment. No β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques or neurofibrillary tangles were noted in the hypothalamus of 3xTgAD mice, a key area involved in temperature regulation, although these pathological features were observed in the hippocampus and amygdala of 3xTgAD mice from 10 months of age. These data demonstrate age-dependent changes in core body temperature and activity in 3xTgAD mice that are present before significant AD-related neuropathology and are analogous to those observed in AD patients. The 3xTgAD mouse might therefore be an appropriate model for studying the underlying mechanisms involved in non-cognitive behavioural changes in AD.

  10. Evaluation of Listeria Monocytogenes Based Vaccines for HER-2/neu in Mouse Transgenic Models of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    surrounding vessels in commonly studied mouse tumors. We have identified two autochthonous mouse mammary tumor models, MMTV-infected and MMTV-neu mice , with...Generate mammary specific inducible Tie2Ex mice a. Cross MMTV-rtTA mice with TRE-Tie2Ex mice (FVB and C3H strain). The Transgenic Mouse Facility...at Penn generated C3H/HeN TRE-Tie2Ex and FVB TRE-Tie2Ex transgenic mice using a TRE-Tie2Ex plasmid. Mouse lines that stably transmitted the

  11. A Mutation of the Prdm9 Mouse Hybrid Sterility Gene Carried by a Transgene.

    PubMed

    Mihola, O; Trachtulec, Z

    2017-01-01

    PRDM9 is a protein with histone-3-methyltransferase activity, which specifies the sites of meiotic recombination in mammals. Deficiency of the Prdm9 gene in the laboratory mouse results in complete arrest of the meiotic prophase of both sexes. Moreover, the combination of certain PRDM9 alleles from different mouse subspecies causes hybrid sterility, e.g., the male-specific meiotic arrest found in the (PWD/Ph × C57BL/6J)F1 animals. The fertility of all these mice can be rescued using a Prdm9-containing transgene. Here we characterized a transgene made from the clone RP24-346I22 that was expected to encompass the entire Prdm9 gene. Both (PWD/Ph × C57BL/6J)F1 intersubspecific hybrid males and Prdm9-deficient laboratory mice of both sexes carrying this transgene remained sterile, suggesting that Prdm9 inactivation occurred in the Tg(RP24-346I22) transgenics. Indeed, comparative qRT-PCR analysis of testicular RNAs from transgene-positive versus negative animals revealed similar expression levels of Prdm9 mRNAs from the exons encoding the C-terminal part of the protein but elevated expression from the regions coding for the N-terminus of PRDM9, indicating that the transgenic carries a new null Prdm9 allele. Two naturally occurring alternative Prdm9 mRNA isoforms were overexpressed in Tg(RP24-346I22), one formed via splicing to a 3'-terminal exon consisting of short interspersed element B2 and one isoform including an alternative internal exon of 28 base pairs. However, the overexpression of these alternative transcripts was apparently insufficient for Prdm9 function or for increasing the fertility of the hybrid males.

  12. Generation and characterization of a transgenic mouse model with hepatic expression of human CYP2A6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Yu; Gu, Jun; Su, Ting; Cui, Huadong; Zhang, Xiuling; D'Agostino, Jaime; Zhuo, Xiaoliang; Yang, Weizhu; Swiatek, Pamela J; Ding, Xinxin

    2005-12-09

    The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize a transgenic mouse model in which CYP2A6, a human P450 enzyme, is expressed specifically in the liver. CYP2A6, which is mainly expressed in human liver, is active toward many xenobiotics. Our transgene construct contained the mouse transthyretin promoter/enhancer, a full-length CYP2A6 cDNA, and a downstream neomycin-resistance gene for positive selection in embryonic stem cells. Hepatic expression of the CYP2A6 transgene was demonstrated by immunoblotting, whereas tissue specificity of CYP2A6 expression was confirmed by RNA-PCR. The transgenic mouse was further characterized after being backcrossed to the B6 strain for six generations. Hepatic microsomes from homozygous transgenic mice had activities significantly higher than those of B6 mice toward coumarin. The in vivo activity of transgenic CYP2A6 was also determined. Systemic clearance of coumarin was significantly higher in the transgenic mice than in B6 controls, consistent with the predicted role of CYP2A6 as the major coumarin hydroxylase in human liver. The CYP2A6-transgenic mouse model should be valuable for studying the in vivo function of this polymorphic human enzyme in drug metabolism and chemical toxicity.

  13. Discovery and bio-optimization of human antibody therapeutics using the XenoMouse® transgenic mouse platform.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Ian N; Gunasekaran, Kannan; King, Chadwick T

    2016-03-01

    Since the late 1990s, the use of transgenic animal platforms has transformed the discovery of fully human therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. The first approved therapy derived from a transgenic platform--the epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist panitumumab to treat advanced colorectal cancer--was developed using XenoMouse(®) technology. Since its approval in 2006, the science of discovering and developing therapeutic monoclonal antibodies derived from the XenoMouse(®) platform has advanced considerably. The emerging array of antibody therapeutics developed using transgenic technologies is expected to include antibodies and antibody fragments with novel mechanisms of action and extreme potencies. In addition to these impressive functional properties, these antibodies will be designed to have superior biophysical properties that enable highly efficient large-scale manufacturing methods. Achieving these new heights in antibody drug discovery will ultimately bring better medicines to patients. Here, we review best practices for the discovery and bio-optimization of monoclonal antibodies that fit functional design goals and meet high manufacturing standards.

  14. Bioenergetic Defects and Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Models of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    Neurology 40:1231-1234. Huntington’s disease. Ann. Neurol. 28:300-301. 57. Arenas, J., Campos , Y., Ribacoba, R., Martin, M. A., Rubio, J. C., 40. Djousse...ameliorate Vargas , M. E., Jokel, E. S., Carpenter, E. M., Zanjani, H., Hurst, motor deficits in a Huntington’s disease transgenic mouse model. R. S... Henri Beaufour, Les Ulis, France Abstract significantly reduced gross brain atrophy, neuronal atrophy There is substantial evidence that excitotoxicity

  15. Bioenergetic Defects and Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Models of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    disease. Neurology 40:1231-1234. Huntington’s disease. Ann. Neurol. 28:3(X)-301. 57. Arenas, J., Campos , Y., Ribacoba, R., Martin, M. A., Rubio, J. C...hydrochloride ameliorate Vargas , M. E., Jokel, E. S., Carpenter, E. M., Zanjani, H., Hurst, motor deficits in a Huntington’s disease transgenic mouse model. R...University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA 4.Department of Biochemical Pharmacology, Institute Henri Beaufour, Les Ulis, France Abstract

  16. Evaluation of oxidative stress in the brain of a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease by in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Akihiro; Emoto, Miho C; Suzuki, Syuuichirou; Iwahara, Naotoshi; Hisahara, Shin; Kawamata, Jun; Suzuki, Hiromi; Yamauchi, Ayano; Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada G; Shimohama, Shun

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized by progressive cognitive dysfunction. Deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides is the most important pathophysiological hallmark of AD. Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species is prominent in AD, and several reports suggest the relationship between a change in redox status and AD pathology containing progressive Aβ deposition, the activation of glial cells, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, we performed immunohistochemical analysis using a transgenic mouse model of AD (APdE9) and evaluated the activity of superoxide dismutase in brain tissue homogenates of APdE9 mice in vitro. Together with those analyses, in vivo changes in redox status with age in both wild-type (WT) and APdE9 mouse brains were measured noninvasively by three-dimensional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging using nitroxide (3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-yloxy) as a redox-sensitive probe. Both methods found similar changes in redox status with age, and in particular a significant change in redox status in the hippocampus was observed noninvasively by EPR imaging between APdE9 mice and age-matched WT mice from 9 to 18 months of age. EPR imaging clearly visualized the accelerated change in redox status of APdE9 mouse brain compared with WT. The evaluation of the redox status in the brain of AD model rodents by EPR imaging should be useful for diagnostic study of AD.

  17. Use of the transgenic mouse in models of AIDS cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, William

    2003-04-01

    Heart disease in AIDS, particularly cardiomyopathy (CM), is an increasingly recognized clinical problem with as yet undefined pathogenetic mechanisms. Among the potential etiologies of AIDS CM are HIV-1 infection of cardiac myocytes and subsequent cardiac dysfunction, opportunistic infection, inflammatory reactions, cytokine effects, and cardiotoxicity of prescribed or illicit drugs. It seems probable that multiple factors may impact on the development of CM in AIDS. Transgenic mice (TG) are useful biological tools to explore mechanisms of cardiac function and disease. In AIDS models, TG offer novel ways to elucidate mechanisms of AIDS CM through combined in vivo and in vitro studies. With targeted and non-targeted TG, structural and functional effects of specific HIV-1 gene products on heart tissue may be addressed. The impact of environmental agents including therapeutics or cardiotoxins may also be defined. To address the complexity of AIDS CM using TG, an experimental approach has been employed in our laboratories to model the clinical condition. We utilize AIDS TG with generalized expression of HIV-1 gene products in CM models with combined antiretroviral regimens to define the cardiovascular effects of AIDS and its therapy on the structure and function of the murine heart. We are developing a series of cardiac specific TG bearing selected HIV-1 genes. These TG target the selected HIV-1 genes expressed in cardiac ventricular myocytes. Tissue-specific targeting of this type enables us to define structural and functional effects of specific HIV-1 gene products on the cardiac myocyte.

  18. Transgenic mouse models of CMT1A and HNPP.

    PubMed

    Suter, U; Nave, K A

    1999-09-14

    We have generated several PMP22 animal mutants with altered PMP22 gene dosage. A moderate increase in the number of PMP22 genes led to hypomyelination comparable to CMT1A, whereas high copy numbers of transgenic PMP22 resulted in phenotypes resembling more severe forms of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies. In contrast, eliminating one of the two normal PMP22 genes by gene targeting caused unstable focal hypermyelination (tomacula) similar to the pathology in HNPP. A related but more severe phenotype was observed in mice that lack PMP22 completely. Detailed analysis of the different PMP22 mutants revealed, in addition to the obvious myelinopathy, distal axonopathy as a characteristic feature. We conclude that the maintenance of axons might be a promising target for therapeutic interventions in these demyelinating hereditary neuropathies. Furthermore, our results strongly support the concept that PMP22-related neuropathies (and most likely also other forms of inherited motor and sensory neuropathies) should be viewed as the consequence of impaired neuron-Schwann cell interactions that are likely already to be operative during development. Such considerations should be taken into account in the design of potential novel treatment strategies.

  19. Negative regulation in correct tissue-specific expression of mouse mammary tumor virus in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, S R; Hsu, C L; Choi, Y; Mok, E; Dudley, J P

    1990-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is an endogenous murine retrovirus that is expressed in the epithelial cells of the mammary and salivary glands, lungs, kidneys, and seminal vesicles and in the lymphoid cells of the spleen and thymus. Several studies have shown that the long terminal repeat (LTR) of this virus can direct the expression of reporter genes to the same tissues in transgenic mice. To determine whether multiple regulatory elements within the LTR are involved in this tissue-specific expression, we have established lines of transgenic mice containing transgenes that have deletions in the MMTV LTR. Deletions of all LTR sequences upstream of -364 or of LTR sequences from -165 to -665 both result in the expression of linked reporter genes such as the simian virus 40 early region or the bacterial enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in novel sites, such as the heart, brain, and skeletal muscle; expression of endogenous MMTV and transgenes containing the full-length LTR is not detected in these organs. Negative regulation appears to involve more than one region, since deletion of sequences between either -201 and -471 or -201 and -344, as well as sequences upstream of -364, results in inappropriate expression in heart, brain, and skeletal muscle. Therefore, a negative regulatory element(s) in the MMTV LTR can suppress transcription from the viral promoter in several different organs. This represents the first example of generalized negative regulatory elements that act in many different tissues in transgenic mice to prevent inappropriate expression of a gene. Images PMID:1700274

  20. CB2 receptor deficiency increases amyloid pathology and alters tau processing in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Jeremy; Vingtdeux, Valerie; Marambaud, Philippe; d'Abramo, Cristina; Jimenez, Heidy; Stauber, Mark; Friedman, Rachel; Davies, Peter

    2014-03-14

    The endocannabinoid CB2 receptor system has been implicated in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In order to investigate the impact of the CB2 receptor system on AD pathology, a colony of mice with a deleted CB2 receptor gene, CNR2, was established on a transgenic human mutant APP background for pathological comparison with CB2 receptor-sufficient transgenic mice. J20 APP (PDGFB-APPSwInd) mice were bred over two generations with CNR2(-/-) (Cnr2(tm1Dgen)/J) mice to produce a colony of J20 CNR2(+/+) and J20 CNR2(-/-) mice. Seventeen J20 CNR2(+/+) mice (12 females, 5 males) and 16 J20 CNR2(-/-) mice (11 females, 5 males) were killed at 12 months, and their brains were interrogated for AD-related pathology with both biochemistry and immunocytochemistry (ICC). In addition to amyloid-dependent endpoints such as soluble Aβ production and plaque deposition quantified with 6E10 staining, the effect of CB2 receptor deletion on total soluble mouse tau production was assayed by using a recently developed high-sensitivity assay. Results revealed that soluble Aβ42 and plaque deposition were significantly increased in J20 CNR2(-/-) mice relative to CNR2(+/+) mice. Microgliosis, quantified with ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1) staining, did not differ between groups, whereas plaque associated microglia was more abundant in J20 CNR2(-/-) mice. Total tau was significantly suppressed in J20 CNR2(-/-) mice relative to J20 CNR2(+/+) mice. The results confirm the constitutive role of the CB2 receptor system both in reducing amyloid plaque pathology in AD and also support tehpotential of cannabinoid therapies targeting CB2 to reduce Aβ; however, the results suggest that interventions may have a divergent effect on tau pathology.

  1. Intraneuronal APP and extracellular Aβ independently cause dendritic spine pathology in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chengyu; Montagna, Elena; Shi, Yuan; Peters, Finn; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Shi, Song; Filser, Severin; Dorostkar, Mario M; Herms, Jochen

    2015-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is thought to be caused by accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ), which is a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Transgenic mice overexpressing APP have been used to recapitulate amyloid-β pathology. Among them, APP23 and APPswe/PS1deltaE9 (deltaE9) mice are extensively studied. APP23 mice express APP with Swedish mutation and develop amyloid plaques late in their life, while cognitive deficits are observed in young age. In contrast, deltaE9 mice with mutant APP and mutant presenilin-1 develop amyloid plaques early but show typical cognitive deficits in old age. To unveil the reasons for different progressions of cognitive decline in these commonly used mouse models, we analyzed the number and turnover of dendritic spines as important structural correlates for learning and memory. Chronic in vivo two-photon imaging in apical tufts of layer V pyramidal neurons revealed a decreased spine density in 4-5-month-old APP23 mice. In age-matched deltaE9 mice, in contrast, spine loss was only observed on cortical dendrites that were in close proximity to amyloid plaques. In both cases, the reduced spine density was caused by decreased spine formation. Interestingly, the patterns of alterations in spine morphology differed between these two transgenic mouse models. Moreover, in APP23 mice, APP was found to accumulate intracellularly and its content was inversely correlated with the absolute spine density and the relative number of mushroom spines. Collectively, our results suggest that different pathological mechanisms, namely an intracellular accumulation of APP or extracellular amyloid plaques, may lead to spine abnormalities in young adult APP23 and deltaE9 mice, respectively. These distinct features, which may represent very different mechanisms of synaptic failure in AD, have to be taken into consideration when translating results from animal studies to the human disease.

  2. Transgenic Mouse Models Enabling Photolabeling of Individual Neurons In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Manuel; Bathellier, Brice; Fontinha, Bruno; Pliota, Pinelopi; Haubensak, Wulf; Rumpel, Simon

    2013-01-01

    One of the biggest tasks in neuroscience is to explain activity patterns of individual neurons during behavior by their cellular characteristics and their connectivity within the neuronal network. To greatly facilitate linking in vivo experiments with a more detailed molecular or physiological analysis in vitro, we have generated and characterized genetically modified mice expressing photoactivatable GFP (PA-GFP) that allow conditional photolabeling of individual neurons. Repeated photolabeling at the soma reveals basic morphological features due to diffusion of activated PA-GFP into the dendrites. Neurons photolabeled in vivo can be re-identified in acute brain slices and targeted for electrophysiological recordings. We demonstrate the advantages of PA-GFP expressing mice by the correlation of in vivo firing rates of individual neurons with their expression levels of the immediate early gene c-fos. Generally, the mouse models described in this study enable the combination of various analytical approaches to characterize living cells, also beyond the neurosciences. PMID:23626779

  3. Phenotypic Alterations in Hippocampal NPY- and PV-Expressing Interneurons in a Presymptomatic Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mahar, Ian; Albuquerque, Marilia Silva; Mondragon-Rodriguez, Siddhartha; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Davoli, Maria Antonietta; Chabot, Jean-Guy; Williams, Sylvain; Mechawar, Naguib; Quirion, Rémi; Krantic, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    Interneurons, key regulators of hippocampal neuronal network excitability and synchronization, are lost in advanced stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Given that network changes occur at early (presymptomatic) stages, we explored whether alterations of interneurons also occur before amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation. Numbers of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactive (IR) cells were decreased in the hippocampus of 1 month-old TgCRND8 mouse AD model in a sub-regionally specific manner. The most prominent change observed was a decrease in the number of PV-IR cells that selectively affected CA1/2 and subiculum, with the pyramidal layer (PY) of CA1/2 accounting almost entirely for the reduction in number of hippocampal PV-IR cells. As PV neurons were decreased selectively in CA1/2 and subiculum, and given that they are critically involved in the control of hippocampal theta oscillations, we then assessed intrinsic theta oscillations in these regions after a 4-aminopyridine (4AP) challenge. This revealed increased theta power and population bursts in TgCRND8 mice compared to non-transgenic (nTg) controls, suggesting a hyperexcitability network state. Taken together, our results identify for the first time AD-related alterations in hippocampal interneuron function as early as at 1 month of age. These early functional alterations occurring before amyloid deposition may contribute to cognitive dysfunction in AD.

  4. Anti-Aß immunotherapy in Alzheimer's disease; relevance of transgenic mouse studies to clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Wilcock, Donna M.; Colton, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic approaches to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease are focused primarily on the Aß peptide which aggregates to form amyloid deposits in the brain. The amyloid hypothesis states that amyloid is the precipitating factor that results in the other pathologies of Alzheimer's, namely neurofibrillary tangles and neurodegeneration, as well as the clinical dementia. One such therapy that has attracted significant attention is anti-Aß immunotherapy. First described in 1999, immunotherapy uses anti-Aß antibodies to lower brain amyloid levels. Active immunization, in which Aß is combined with an adjuvant to stimulate an immune response producing antibodies and passive immunization, in which antibodies are directly injected, were shown to lower brain amyloid levels and improve cognition in multiple transgenic mouse models. Mechanisms of action were studied in these mice and revealed a complex set of mechanisms that depended on the type of antibody used. When active immunization advanced to clinical trials a subset of patients developed meningoencephalitis; an event not predicted in mouse studies. However, it was suspected that a T-cell response due to the type of adjuvant used was the cause of the meningoencephalitis and studies in mice indicated alternative methods of vaccination. Passive immunization has also advanced to phase III clinical trials on the basis of successful transgenic mouse studies. Reports from the active immunization clinical trial indicated that, indeed, amyloid levels in brain were reduced. While APP transgenic mouse models are useful in studying amyloid pathology these mice do not generate significant tau pathology or neuron loss. Continued development of new mouse models that do generate all of these pathologies will be critical in more accurately testing therapeutics and predicting the clinical outcome of such therapeutics. PMID:19096156

  5. Characterization of Kiss1 neurons using transgenic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Cravo, Roberta M.; Margatho, Lisandra O.; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Donato, José; Atkin, Stan; Bookout, Angie L.; Rovinsky, Sherry; Frazão, Renata; Lee, Charlotte E.; Gautron, Laurent; Zigman, Jeffrey M.; Elias, Carol F.

    2010-01-01

    Humans and mice with loss-of-function mutations of the genes encoding kisspeptins (Kiss1) or kisspeptin receptors (Kiss1r) are infertile due to hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Within the hypothalamus, Kiss1 mRNA is expressed in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) and the arcuate nucleus (Arc). In order to better study the different populations of kisspeptin cells we generated Kiss1-Cre transgenic mice. We obtained one line with Cre activity specifically within Kiss1 neurons (line J2-4), as assessed by generating mice with Cre-dependent expression of green fluorescent protein or β-galactosidase. Also, we demonstrated Kiss1 expression in the cerebral cortex and confirmed previous data showing Kiss1 mRNA in the medial nucleus of amygdala and anterodorsal preoptic nucleus. Kiss1 neurons were more concentrated towards the caudal levels of the Arc and higher leptin-responsivity was observed in the most caudal population of Arc Kiss1 neurons. No evidence for direct action of leptin in AVPV Kiss1 neurons was observed. Melanocortin fibers innervated subsets of Kiss1 neurons of the preoptic area and Arc, and both populations expressed MC4R. Specifically in the preoptic area, 18–28% of Kiss1 neurons expressed MC4R. In the Arc, 90% of Kiss1 neurons were glutamatergic, 50% of which also were GABAergic. In the AVPV, 20% of Kiss1 neurons were glutamatergic whereas 75% were GABAergic. The differences observed between the Kiss1 neurons in the preoptic area and the Arc likely represent neuronal evidence for their differential roles in metabolism and reproduction. PMID:21093546

  6. An Intranasal Formulation of Erythropoietin (Neuro-EPO) Prevents Memory Deficits and Amyloid Toxicity in the APPSwe Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Cruz, Yamila; Strehaiano, Manon; Rodríguez Obaya, Teresita; García Rodríguez, Julío César; Maurice, Tangui

    2017-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a cytokine known to have effective cytoprotective action in the brain, particularly in ischemic, traumatic, inflammatory, and neurodegenerative conditions. We previously reported the neuroprotective effect of a low sialic form of EPO, Neuro-EPO, applied intranasally in rodent models of stroke or cerebellar ataxia and in a non-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we analyzed the protective effect of Neuro-EPO in APPSwe mice, a reference transgenic mouse model of AD. Mice were administered 3 times a day, 3 days in the week with Neuro-EPO (125, 250 μg/kg) intranasally, between 12 and 14 months of age. Motor responses, general activity, and memory responses were analyzed during and after treatment. The deficits in spontaneous alternation, place learning in the water-maze, and novel object recognition observed in APPSwe mice were alleviated by the low dose of Neuro-EPO. Oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, trophic factor levels, and a synaptic marker were analyzed in the hippocampus or cortex of the animals. The increases in lipid peroxidation or in GFAP and Iba-1 contents in APPSwe mice were significantly reduced after Neuro-EPO. Activation of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways was analyzed. The increases in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, TNFα, or Fas ligand levels observed in APPSwe mice were reduced by Neuro-EPO. Finally, immunohistochemical and ELISA analyses of Aβ1-42 levels in the APPSwe mouse cortex and hippocampus showed a marked reduction in Aβ deposits and in soluble and insoluble Aβ1-42 forms. This study therefore confirmed the neuroprotective activity of EPO, particularly for an intranasally deliverable formulation, devoid of erythropoietic side effects, in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Neuro-EPO alleviated memory alterations, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, apoptosis induction, and amyloid load in 14-month-old APPSwe mice.

  7. Dietary supplementation of walnuts improves memory deficits and learning skills in transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Muthaiyah, Balu; Essa, Musthafa M; Lee, Moon; Chauhan, Ved; Kaur, Kulbir; Chauhan, Abha

    2014-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies have shown that walnut extract can inhibit amyloid-β (Aβ) fibrillization, can solubilize its fibrils, and has a protective effect against Aβ-induced oxidative stress and cellular death. In this study, we analyzed the effect of dietary supplementation with walnuts on learning skills, memory, anxiety, locomotor activity, and motor coordination in the Tg2576 transgenic (tg) mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD-tg). From the age of 4 months, the experimental groups of AD-tg mice were fed custom-mixed diets containing 6% walnuts (T6) or 9% walnuts (T9), i.e., equivalent to 1 or 1.5 oz, respectively, of walnuts per day in humans. The control groups, i.e., AD-tg and wild-type mice, were fed a diet without walnuts (T0, Wt). These experimental and control mice were examined at the ages of 13-14 months by Morris water maze (for spatial memory and learning ability), T maze (for position discrimination learning ability), rotarod (for psychomotor coordination), and elevated plus maze (for anxiety-related behavior). AD-tg mice on the control diet (T0) showed memory deficit, anxiety-related behavior, and severe impairment in spatial learning ability, position discrimination learning ability, and motor coordination compared to the Wt mice on the same diet. The AD-tg mice receiving the diets with 6% or 9% walnuts (T6 and T9) showed a significant improvement in memory, learning ability, anxiety, and motor development compared to the AD-tg mice on the control diet (T0). There was no statistically significant difference in behavioral performance between the T6/T9 mice on walnuts-enriched diets and the Wt group on the control diet. These findings suggest that dietary supplementation with walnuts may have a beneficial effect in reducing the risk, delaying the onset, or slowing the progression of, or preventing AD.

  8. Time course and progression of wild type α-Synuclein accumulation in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Progressive accumulation of α-synuclein (α-Syn) protein in different brain regions is a hallmark of synucleinopathic diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy. α-Syn transgenic mouse models have been developed to investigate the effects of α-Syn accumulation on behavioral deficits and neuropathology. However, the onset and progression of pathology in α-Syn transgenic mice have not been fully characterized. For this purpose we investigated the time course of behavioral deficits and neuropathology in PDGF-β human wild type α-Syn transgenic mice (D-Line) between 3 and 12 months of age. Results These mice showed progressive impairment of motor coordination of the limbs that resulted in significant differences compared to non-transgenic littermates at 9 and 12 months of age. Biochemical and immunohistological analyses revealed constantly increasing levels of human α-Syn in different brain areas. Human α-Syn was expressed particularly in somata and neurites of a subset of neocortical and limbic system neurons. Most of these neurons showed immunoreactivity for phosphorylated human α-Syn confined to nuclei and perinuclear cytoplasm. Analyses of the phenotype of α-Syn expressing cells revealed strong expression in dopaminergic olfactory bulb neurons, subsets of GABAergic interneurons and glutamatergic principal cells throughout the telencephalon. We also found human α-Syn expression in immature neurons of both the ventricular zone and the rostral migratory stream, but not in the dentate gyrus. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that the PDGF-β α-Syn transgenic mouse model presents with early and progressive accumulation of human α-Syn that is accompanied by motor deficits. This information is essential for the design of therapeutical studies of synucleinopathies. PMID:23302418

  9. Identification of novel SHOX target genes in the developing limb using a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Beiser, Katja U; Glaser, Anne; Kleinschmidt, Kerstin; Scholl, Isabell; Röth, Ralph; Li, Li; Gretz, Norbert; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Karperien, Marcel; Marchini, Antonio; Richter, Wiltrud; Rappold, Gudrun A

    2014-01-01

    Deficiency of the human short stature homeobox-containing gene (SHOX) has been identified in several disorders characterized by reduced height and skeletal anomalies such as Turner syndrome, Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis and Langer mesomelic dysplasia as well as isolated short stature. SHOX acts as a transcription factor during limb development and is expressed in chondrocytes of the growth plates. Although highly conserved in vertebrates, rodents lack a SHOX orthologue. This offers the unique opportunity to analyze the effects of human SHOX expression in transgenic mice. We have generated a mouse expressing the human SHOXa cDNA under the control of a murine Col2a1 promoter and enhancer (Tg(Col2a1-SHOX)). SHOX and marker gene expression as well as skeletal phenotypes were characterized in two transgenic lines. No significant skeletal anomalies were found in transgenic compared to wildtype mice. Quantitative and in situ hybridization analyses revealed that Tg(Col2a1-SHOX), however, affected extracellular matrix gene expression during early limb development, suggesting a role for SHOX in growth plate assembly and extracellular matrix composition during long bone development. For instance, we could show that the connective tissue growth factor gene Ctgf, a gene involved in chondrogenic and angiogenic differentiation, is transcriptionally regulated by SHOX in transgenic mice. This finding was confirmed in human NHDF and U2OS cells and chicken micromass culture, demonstrating the value of the SHOX-transgenic mouse for the characterization of SHOX-dependent genes and pathways in early limb development.

  10. A conditional transgenic mouse line for targeted expression of the stem cell marker LGR5.

    PubMed

    Norum, Jens Henrik; Bergström, Åsa; Andersson, Agneta Birgitta; Kuiper, Raoul V; Hoelzl, Maria A; Sørlie, Therese; Toftgård, Rune

    2015-08-15

    LGR5 is a known marker of embryonic and adult stem cells in several tissues. In a mouse model, Lgr5+ cells have shown tumour-initiating properties, while in human cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma and colon cancer, LGR5 expression levels are increased: however, the effect of increased LGR5 expression is not fully understood. To study the effects of elevated LGR5 expression levels we generated a novel tetracycline-responsive, conditional transgenic mouse line expressing human LGR5, designated TRELGR5. In this transgenic line, LGR5 expression can be induced in any tissue depending on the expression pattern of the chosen transcriptional regulator. For the current study, we used transgenic mice with a tetracycline-regulated transcriptional transactivator linked to the bovine keratin 5 promoter (K5tTA) to drive expression of LGR5 in the epidermis. As expected, expression of human LGR5 was induced in the skin of double transgenic mice (K5tTA;TRELGR5). Inducing LGR5 expression during embryogenesis and early development resulted in macroscopically and microscopically detectable phenotypic changes, including kink tail, sparse fur coat and enlarged sebaceous glands. The fur and sebaceous gland phenotypes were reversible upon discontinued expression of transgenic LGR5, but this was not observed for the kink tail phenotype. There were no apparent phenotypic changes if LGR5 expression was induced at three weeks of age. The results demonstrate that increased expression of LGR5 during embryogenesis and the neonatal period alter skin development and homeostasis.

  11. Brain and Plasma Molecular Characterization of the Pathogenic TBI-AD Interrelationship in Mouse Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0253 TITLE: Brain and Plasma Molecular Characterization of the Pathogenic TBI-AD Interrelationship in Mouse Models ... brain and plasma responses in mouse models of TBI, AD and other neurodegenerative conditions (Abdullah et al., 2014; Abdullah et al., 2013; Crawford...identify age/time-dependent expression of brain proteins and lipids in mouse models of AD (PSAPP and hTau) and of mTBI (single and repetitive mTBI in hTau

  12. Systematic review of the relationship between amyloid-β levels and measures of transgenic mouse cognitive deficit in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Foley, Avery M; Ammar, Zeena M; Lee, Robert H; Mitchell, Cassie S

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is believed to directly affect memory and learning in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is widely suggested that there is a relationship between Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels and cognitive performance. In order to explore the validity of this relationship, we performed a meta-analysis of 40 peer-reviewed, published AD transgenic mouse studies that quantitatively measured Aβ levels in brain tissue after assessing cognitive performance. We examined the relationship between Aβ levels (Aβ40, Aβ42, or the ratio of Aβ42 to Aβ40) and cognitive function as measured by escape latency times in the Morris water maze or exploratory preference percentage in the novel object recognition test. Our systematic review examined five mouse models (Tg2576, APP, PS1, 3xTg, APP(OSK)-Tg), gender, and age. The overall result revealed no statistically significant correlation between quantified Aβ levels and experimental measures of cognitive function. However, enough of the trends were of the same sign to suggest that there probably is a very weak qualitative trend visible only across many orders of magnitude. In summary, the results of the systematic review revealed that mice bred to show elevated levels of Aβ do not perform significantly worse in cognitive tests than mice that do not have elevated Aβ levels. Our results suggest two lines of inquiry: 1) Aβ is a biochemical "side effect" of the AD pathology; or 2) learning and memory deficits in AD are tied to the presence of qualitatively "high" levels of Aβ but are not quantitatively sensitive to the levels themselves.

  13. The Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant MitoQ Prevents Loss of Spatial Memory Retention and Early Neuropathology in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Meagan J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Franklin, James L.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress contribute to the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We examined the ability of the novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ (mitoquinone mesylate: [10-(4,5-dimethoxy-2-methyl-3,6-dioxo-1,4-cycloheexadienlyl) decyl triphenylphosphonium methanesulfonate]) to prevent AD-like pathology in mouse cortical neurons in cell culture and in a triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD). MitoQ attenuated β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced neurotoxicity in cortical neurons and also prevented increased production of reactive species and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in them. To determine whether the mitochondrial protection conferred by MitoQ was sufficient to prevent the emergence of AD-like neuropathology in vivo, we treated young female 3xTg-AD mice with MitoQ for 5 months and analyzed the effect on the progression of AD-like pathologies. Our results show that MitoQ prevented cognitive decline in these mice as well as oxidative stress, Aβ accumulation, astrogliosis, synaptic loss, and caspase activation in their brains. The work presented herein suggests a central role for mitochondria in neurodegeneration and provides evidence supporting the use of mitochondria-targeted therapeutics in diseases involving oxidative stress and metabolic failure, namely AD. PMID:22049413

  14. Accelerated Human Mutant Tau Aggregation by Knocking Out Murine Tau in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kunie; Leroy, Karelle; Héraud, Céline; Yilmaz, Zehra; Authelet, Michèle; Suain, Valèrie; De Decker, Robert; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Many models of human tauopathies have been generated in mice by expression of a human mutant tau with maintained expression of mouse endogenous tau. Because murine tau might interfere with the toxic effects of human mutant tau, we generated a model in which a pathogenic human tau protein is expressed in the absence of wild-type tau protein, with the aim of facilitating the study of the pathogenic role of the mutant tau and to reproduce more faithfully a human tauopathy. The Tg30 line is a tau transgenic mouse model overexpressing human 1N4R double-mutant tau (P301S and G272V) that develops Alzheimer's disease-like neurofibrillary tangles in an age-dependent manner. By crossing Tg30 mice with mice invalidated for their endogenous tau gene, we obtained Tg30xtau−/− mice that express only exogenous human double-mutant 1N4R tau. Although Tg30xtau−/− mice express less tau protein compared with Tg30, they exhibit signs of decreased survival, increased proportion of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in the brain and in the spinal cord, increased number of Gallyas-positive neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus, increased number of inclusions in the spinal cord, and a more severe motor phenotype. Deletion of murine tau accelerated tau aggregation during aging of this mutant tau transgenic model, suggesting that murine tau could interfere with the development of tau pathology in transgenic models of human tauopathies. PMID:21281813

  15. Reference and working memory deficits in the 3xTg-AD mouse between 2 and 15-months of age: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Leanne M; Brown, Richard E

    2015-02-01

    Impairments in working memory (WM) can predict the shift from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the rate at which AD progresses with age. The 3xTg-AD mouse model develops both Aβ plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the neuro-pathological hallmarks of AD, by 6 months of age, but no research has investigated the age-related changes in WM in these mice. Using a cross-sectional design, we tested male and female 3xTg-AD and wildtype control (B6129SF2/J) mice between 2 and 15 months of age for reference and working memory errors in the 8-arm radial maze. The 3xTg-AD mice had deficits in both working and reference memory across the ages tested, rather than showing the predicted age-related memory deficits. Male 3xTg-AD mice showed more working and reference memory errors than females, but there were no sex differences in wildtype control mice. These results indicate that the 3xTg-AD mouse replicates the impairments in WM found in patients with AD. However, these mice show memory deficits as early as two months of age, suggesting that the genes underlying reference and working memory in these mice cause deficits from an early age. The finding that males were affected more than females suggests that more attention should be paid to sex differences in transgenic AD mice.

  16. Improved Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying HLA Class I Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Man; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jie; Wei, Xundong; Phiwpan, Krung; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Xuyu

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I (HLA-I) transgenic mice have proven to be useful models for studying human MHC-related immune responses over the last two decades. However, differences in the processing and presentation machinery between humans and mice may have profound effects on HLA-I restricted antigen presentation. In this study, we generated a novel human TAP-LMP (hTAP-LMP) gene cluster transgenic mouse model carrying an intact human TAP complex and two human immunoproteasome LMP subunits, PSMB8/PSMB9. By crossing the hTAP-LMP strain with different HLA-I transgenic mice, we found that the expression levels of human HLA-I molecules, especially the A3 supertype members (e.g., A11 and A33), were remarkably enhanced in corresponding HLA-I/hTAP-LMP transgenic mice. Moreover, we found that humanized processing and presentation machinery increased antigen presentation of HLA-A11-restricted epitopes and promoted the rapid reduction of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in HLA-A11/hTAP-LMP mice. Together, our study highlights that HLA-I/hTAP-LMP mice are an improved model for studying antigen presentation of HLA-I molecules and their related CTL responses. PMID:27634283

  17. Development of S/MAR minicircles for enhanced and persistent transgene expression in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Argyros, Orestis; Wong, Suet Ping; Fedonidis, Constantinos; Tolmachov, Oleg; Waddington, Simon N; Howe, Steven J; Niceta, Marcello; Coutelle, Charles; Harbottle, Richard P

    2011-05-01

    We have previously described the development of a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) episomal vector system for in vivo application and demonstrated its utility to sustain transgene expression in the mouse liver for at least 6 months following a single administration. Subsequently, we observed that transgene expression is sustained for the lifetime of the animal. The level of expression, however, does drop appreciably over time. We hypothesised that by eliminating the bacterial components in our vectors, we could improve their performance since bacterial sequences have been shown to be responsible for the immunotoxicity of the vector and the silencing of its expression when applied in vivo. We describe here the development of a minimally sized S/MAR vector, which is devoid of extraneous bacterial sequences. This minicircle vector comprises an expression cassette and an S/MAR moiety, providing higher and more sustained transgene expression for several months in the absence of selection, both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast to the expression of our original S/MAR plasmid vector, the novel S/MAR minicircle vectors mediate increased transgene expression, which becomes sustained at about twice the levels observed immediately after administration. These promising results demonstrate the utility of minimally sized S/MAR vectors for persistent, atoxic gene expression.

  18. Transgenic rescue of phenotypic deficits in a mouse model of alternating hemiplegia of childhood.

    PubMed

    Kirshenbaum, Greer S; Dachtler, James; Roder, John C; Clapcote, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Missense mutations in ATP1A3 encoding Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 are the primary cause of alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC). Most ATP1A3 mutations in AHC lie within a cluster in or near transmembrane α-helix TM6, including I810N that is also found in the Myshkin mouse model of AHC. These mutations all substantially reduce Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 activity. Herein, we show that Myshkin mice carrying a wild-type Atp1a3 transgene that confers a 16 % increase in brain-specific total Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity show significant phenotypic improvements compared with non-transgenic Myshkin mice. Interventions to increase the activity of wild-type Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 in AHC patients should be investigated further.

  19. A Transgenic Mouse Line Expressing the Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato in GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Stefanie; Sicker, Marit; Marx, Grit; Winkler, Ulrike; Eulenburg, Volker; Hülsmann, Swen; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic inhibitory neurons are a large population of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) of mammals and crucially contribute to the function of the circuitry of the brain. To identify specific cell types and investigate their functions labelling of cell populations by transgenic expression of fluorescent proteins is a powerful approach. While a number of mouse lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in different subpopulations of GABAergic cells are available, GFP expressing mouse lines are not suitable for either crossbreeding to other mouse lines expressing GFP in other cell types or for Ca2+-imaging using the superior green Ca2+-indicator dyes. Therefore, we have generated a novel transgenic mouse line expressing the red fluorescent protein tdTomato in GABAergic neurons using a bacterial artificial chromosome based strategy and inserting the tdTomato open reading frame at the start codon within exon 1 of the GAD2 gene encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65). TdTomato expression was observed in all expected brain regions; however, the fluorescence intensity was highest in the olfactory bulb and the striatum. Robust expression was also observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons, Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, amacrine cells in the retina as well as in cells migrating along the rostral migratory stream. In cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb and brainstem, 80% to 90% of neurons expressing endogenous GAD65 also expressed the fluorescent protein. Moreover, almost all tdTomato-expressing cells coexpressed GAD65, indicating that indeed only GABAergic neurons are labelled by tdTomato expression. This mouse line with its unique spectral properties for labelling GABAergic neurons will therefore be a valuable new tool for research addressing this fascinating cell type. PMID:26076353

  20. Characterisation of Muta™Mouse λgt10-lacZ transgene: evidence for in vivo rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Shwed, Philip S.; Crosthwait, Jennifer; Douglas, George R.; Seligy, Vern L.

    2010-01-01

    The multicopy λgt10-lacZ transgene shuttle vector of Muta™Mouse serves as an important tool for genotoxicity studies. Here, we describe a model for λgt10-lacZ transgene molecular structure, based on characterisation of transgenes recovered from animals of our intramural breeding colony. Unique nucleotide sequences of the 47 513 bp monomer are reported with GenBank® assigned accession numbers. Besides defining ancestral mutations of the λgt10 used to construct the transgene and the Muta™Mouse precursor (strain 40.6), we validated the sequence integrity of key λ genes needed for the Escherichia coli host-based mutation reporting assay. Using three polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based chromosome scanning and cloning strategies, we found five distinct in vivo transgene rearrangements, which were common to both sexes, and involved copy fusions generating ∼10 defective copies per haplotype. The transgene haplotype was estimated by Southern hybridisation and real-time–polymerase chain reaction, which yielded 29.0 ± 4.0 copies based on spleen DNA of Muta™Mouse, and a reconstructed CD2F1 genome with variable λgt10-lacZ copies. Similar analysis of commercially prepared spleen DNA from Big Blue® mouse yielded a haplotype of 23.5 ± 3.1 copies. The latter DNA is used in calibrating a commercial in vitro packaging kit for E.coli host-based mutation assays of both transgenic systems. The model for λgt10-lacZ transgene organisation, and the PCR-based methods for assessing copy number, integrity and rearrangements, potentially extends the use of Muta™Mouse construct for direct, genomic-type assays that detect the effects of clastogens and aneugens, without depending on an E.coli host, for reporting effects. PMID:20724577

  1. Rescue of Xrcc1 knockout mouse embryo lethality by transgene-complementation.

    PubMed

    Tebbs, Robert S; Thompson, Larry H; Cleaver, James E

    2003-12-09

    Xrcc1 knockout embryos show increased DNA breakage and apoptosis in tissues of the embryo proper prior to death at embryonic day E6.5. An additional deficiency in Trp53 allows Xrcc1(-/-) embryos to enlarge slightly and initiate gastrulation although ultimately death is delayed by less than 24h. Death presumably results from DNA damage that reaches toxic levels in the post-implantation mouse embryo. To investigate the level of XRCC1 protein needed for successful mouse development, we derived Xrcc1 transgene-complemented Xrcc1(-/-) mice that express Xrcc1 within the normal range or at a greatly reduced level (<10% normal). The greatly reduced XRCC1 protein level destabilized the XRCC1 partner protein DNA ligase III (LIG3) but still allowed for successful mouse development and healthy, fertile adults. Fibroblasts from these animals exhibited almost normal alkylation sensitivity measured by differential cytotoxicity. Thus, a large reduction of both XRCC1 and DNA ligase III has no observable effect on mouse embryogenesis and post-natal development, and no significant effect on cellular sensitivity to DNA alkylation. The presence of XRCC1, even at reduced levels of expression, is therefore capable of supporting mouse development and DNA repair.

  2. Constitutive expression of SMAR1 confers susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Bhawna; Malonia, Sunil K.; Majumdar, Subeer S.; Gupta, Pushpa; Wadhwa, Neerja; Badhwar, Archana; Gupta, Umesh D.; Katoch, Vishwa M.; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Studies involving animal models of experimental tuberculosis have elucidated the predominant role of cytokines secreted by T cells and macrophages to be an essential component of the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The immune activities of CD4+ T cells are mediated in part by Th1 cytokine interferon gamma (IFN-γ) which is produced primarily by T cells and natural killer (NK) cells and critical for initiating the immune response against intracellular pathogen such as M. tuberculosis. Nuclear matrix protein SMAR1 plays an important role in V(D)J recombination, T helper cell differentiation and inflammatory diseases. In this study a transgenic mouse model was used to study the role of SMAR1 in M. tuberculosis infection. Methods: Wild type BALB/c, C57BL/6, BALB/c-EGFP-SMAR1 and C57BL/6-SMAR1 transgenic mice were infected with M. tuberculosis (H37Rv). A dose of 100 bacilli was used for infection via respiratory route. Bacterial load in lung and spleen of infected mice was determined at 2, 4, 6 and 8 wk post-infection. Gene expression analysis for Th1 cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was performed in infected lung tissues by quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Results: SMAR1 transgenic mice from both BALB/c and C57BL/6 genetic background displayed higher bacillary load and susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection compared to wild type mice. This susceptibility was attributed due to compromised of Th1 response exhibited by transgenic mice. Interpretation & conclusions: SMAR1 transgenic mice exhibited susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection in vivo irrespective of genetic background. This susceptibility was attributed to downregulation of Th1 response and its hallmark cytokine IFN-γ. Hence, SMAR1 plays an important role in modulating host immune response after M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:26831422

  3. Optical clearing assisted confocal microscopy of ex vivo transgenic mouse skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Eunjoo; Ahn, YoonJoon; Ahn, Jinhyo; Ahn, Soyeon; Kim, Changhwan; Choi, Sanghoon; Boutilier, Richard Martin; Lee, Yongjoong; Kim, Pilhan; Lee, Ho

    2015-10-01

    We examined the optical clearing assisted confocal microscopy of the transgenic mouse skin. The pinna and dorsal skin were imaged with a confocal microscope after the application of glycerol and FocusClear. In case of the glycerol-treated pinna, the clearing was minimal due to the inefficient permeability. However, the imaging depth was improved when the pinna was treated with FocusClear. In case of dorsal skin, we were able to image deeply to the subcutaneous connective tissue with both agents. Various skin structures such as the vessel, epithelium cells, cartilage, dermal cells, and hair follicles were clearly imaged.

  4. Relative transgene expression frequencies in homozygous versus hemizygous transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Su-Ping; Opsahl, Margaret L; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Morley, Steven D; West, John D

    2013-12-01

    We have used a simple binomial model of stochastic transgene inactivation at the level of the chromosome or transgene, rather than the cellular level, for the analysis of two mouse transgenic lines that show variegated patterns of expression. This predicts the percentages of cells that express one, both or neither alleles of the transgene in homozygotes from the observed percentages of cells, which express the transgene in hemizygotes. It adequately explained the relationship between the numbers of cells expressing the transgene in hemizygous and homozygous mosaic 21OH/LacZ mouse adrenals and mosaic BLG/7 mouse mammary glands. The binomial model also predicted that a small proportion of cells in mosaic mammary glands of BLG/7 homozygotes would express both BLG/7 alleles but published data indicated that all cells expressing the transgene showed monoallelic expression. Although it didn't fit all of the BLG/7 data as precisely as a more complex model, which used several ad hoc assumptions to explain these results, the simple binomial model was able to explain the relationship in observed transgene expression frequencies between hemizygous and homozygous mosaic tissues for both 21OH/LacZ and BLG/7 mice. It may prove to be a useful general model for analysing other transgenic animals showing mosaic transgene expression.

  5. A new transgenic mouse line for tetracycline inducible transgene expression in mature melanocytes and the melanocyte stem cells using the Dopachrome tautomerase promoter.

    PubMed

    Woods, Susan L; Bishop, J Michael

    2011-04-01

    We have generated a novel transgenic mouse to direct inducible and reversible transgene expression in the melanocytic compartment. The Dopachrome tautomerase (Dct) control sequences we used are active early in the development of melanocytes and so this system was designed to enable the manipulation of transgene expression during development in utero and in the melanocyte stem cells as well as mature melanocytes. We observed inducible lacZ and GFP reporter transgene activity specifically in melanocytes and melanocyte stem cells in mouse skin. This mouse model will be a useful tool for the pigment cell community to investigate the contribution of candidate genes to normal melanocyte and/or melanoma development in vivo. Deregulated expression of the proto-oncogene MYC has been observed in melanoma, however whether MYC is involved in tumorigenesis in pigment cells has yet to be directly investigated in vivo. We have used our system to over-express MYC in the melanocytic compartment and show for the first time that increased MYC expression can indeed promote melanocytic tumor formation.

  6. Chronic copper exposure exacerbates both amyloid and tau pathology and selectively dysregulates cdk5 in a mouse model of AD.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Cheng, David; Laferla, Frank M

    2009-03-01

    Excess copper exposure is thought to be linked to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. However, the mechanism by which copper affects the CNS remains unclear. To investigate the effect of chronic copper exposure on both beta-amyloid and tau pathologies, we treated young triple transgenic (3xTg-AD) mice with 250 ppm copper-containing water for a period of 3 or 9 months. Copper exposure resulted in altered amyloid precursor protein processing; increased accumulation of the amyloid precursor protein and its proteolytic product, C99 fragment, along with increased generation of amyloid-beta peptides and oligomers. These changes were found to be mediated via up-regulation of BACE1 as significant increases in BACE1 levels and deposits were detected around plaques in mice following copper exposure. Furthermore, tau pathology within hippocampal neurons was exacerbated in copper-exposed 3xTg-AD group. Increased tau phosphorylation was closely correlated with aberrant cdk5/p25 activation, suggesting a role for this kinase in the development of copper-induced tau pathology. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic copper exposure accelerates not only amyloid pathology but also tau pathology in a mouse model of AD.

  7. Transgenic Expression of Ad4BP/SF-1 in Fetal Adrenal Progenitor Cells Leads to Ectopic Adrenal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Mohamad; Oka, Sanae; Parker, Keith L.; Morohashi, Ken-ichirou

    2009-01-01

    Deficiency of adrenal 4 binding protein/steroidogenic factor 1 (Ad4BP/SF-1; NR5A1) impairs adrenal development in a dose-dependent manner, whereas overexpression of Ad4BP/SF-1 is associated with adrenocortical tumorigenesis. Despite its essential roles in adrenal development, the mechanism(s) by which Ad4BP/SF-1 regulates this process remain incompletely understood. We previously identified a fetal adrenal enhancer (FAdE) that stimulates Ad4BP/SF-1 expression in the fetal adrenal gland by a two-step mechanism in which homeobox proteins initiate Ad4BP/SF-1 expression, which then maintains FAdE activity in an autoregulatory loop. In the present study, we examined the effect of transgenic expression of Ad4BP/SF-1 controlled by FAdE on adrenal development. When Ad4BP/SF-1 was overexpressed using a FAdE-Ad4BP/SF-1 transgene, FAdE activity expanded outside of its normal field, resulting in increased adrenal size and the formation of ectopic adrenal tissue in the thorax. The increased size of the adrenal gland did not result from a corresponding increase in cell proliferation, suggesting rather that the increased levels of Ad4BP/SF-1 may divert uncommitted precursors to the steroidogenic lineage. The effects of FAdE-controlled Ad4BP/SF-1 overexpression in mice provide a novel model of ectopic adrenal formation that further supports the critical role of Ad4BP/SF-1 in the determination of steroidogenic cell fate in vivo. PMID:19628584

  8. Expression of a pathogen-induced cysteine protease (AdCP) in tapetum results in male sterility in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pawan; Singh, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Dilip; Vijayan, Sambasivam; Ahmed, Israr; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2014-06-01

    Usable male sterility systems have immense potential in developing hybrid varieties in crop plants, which can also be used as a biological safety containment to prevent horizontal transgene flow. Barnase-Barstar system developed earlier was the first approach to engineer male sterility in plants. In an analogous situation, we have evolved a system of inducing pollen abortion and male sterility in transgenic tobacco by expressing a plant gene coding for a protein with known developmental function in contrast to the Barnase-Barstar system, which deploys genes of prokaryotic origin, i.e., from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. We have used a plant pathogen-induced gene, cysteine protease for inducing male sterility. This gene was identified in the wild peanut, Arachis diogoi differentially expressed when it was challenged with the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata. Arachis diogoi cysteine protease (AdCP) was expressed under the strong tapetum-specific promoter (TA29) and tobacco transformants were generated. Morphological and histological analysis of AdCP transgenic plants showed ablated tapetum and complete pollen abortion in three transgenic lines. Furthermore, transcript analysis displayed the expression of cysteine protease in these male sterile lines and the expression of the protein was identified in western blot analysis using its polyclonal antibody raised in the rabbit system.

  9. Transgenic mouse lines for non-invasive ratiometric monitoring of intracellular chloride

    PubMed Central

    Batti, Laura; Mukhtarov, Marat; Audero, Enrica; Ivanov, Anton; Paolicelli, Rosa Chiara; Zurborg, Sandra; Gross, Cornelius; Bregestovski, Piotr; Heppenstall, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride is the most abundant physiological anion and participates in a variety of cellular processes including trans-epithelial transport, cell volume regulation, and regulation of electrical excitability. The development of tools to monitor intracellular chloride concentration ([Cli]) is therefore important for the evaluation of cellular function in normal and pathological conditions. Recently, several Cl-sensitive genetically encoded probes have been described which allow for non-invasive monitoring of [Cli]. Here we describe two mouse lines expressing a CFP-YFP-based Cl probe called Cl-Sensor. First, we generated transgenic mice expressing Cl-Sensor under the control of the mouse Thy1 mini promoter. Cl-Sensor exhibited good expression from postnatal day two (P2) in neurons of the hippocampus and cortex, and its level increased strongly during development. Using simultaneous whole-cell monitoring of ionic currents and Cl-dependent fluorescence, we determined that the apparent EC50 for Cli was 46 mM, indicating that this line is appropriate for measuring neuronal [Cli] in postnatal mice. We also describe a transgenic mouse reporter line for Cre-dependent conditional expression of Cl-Sensor, which was targeted to the Rosa26 locus and by incorporating a strong exogenous promoter induced robust expression upon Cre-mediated recombination. We demonstrate high levels of tissue-specific expression in two different Cre-driver lines targeting cells of the myeloid lineage and peripheral sensory neurons. Using these mice the apparent EC50 for Cli was estimated to be 61 and 54 mM in macrophages and DRG, respectively. Our data suggest that these mouse lines will be useful models for ratiometric monitoring of Cli in specific cell types in vivo. PMID:23734096

  10. Diet rich in date palm fruits improves memory, learning and reduces beta amyloid in transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Selvaraju; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Braidy, Nady; Awlad-Thani, Kathyia; Vaishnav, Ragini; Al-Adawi, Samir; Al-Asmi, Abdullah; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: At present, the treatment options available to delay the onset or slow down the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not effective. Recent studies have suggested that diet and lifestyle factors may represent protective strategies to minimize the risk of developing AD. Date palm fruits are a good source of dietary fiber and are rich in total phenolics and natural antioxidants, such as anthocyanins, ferulic acid, protocatechuic acid and caffeic acid. These polyphenolic compounds have been shown to be neuroprotective in different model systems. Objective: We investigated whether dietary supplementation with 2% and 4% date palm fruits (grown in Oman) could reduce cognitive and behavioral deficits in a transgenic mouse model for AD (amyloid precursor protein [APPsw]/Tg2576). Materials and Methods: The experimental groups of APP-transgenic mice from the age of 4 months were fed custom-mix diets (pellets) containing 2% and 4% date fruits. We assessed spatial memory and learning ability, psychomotor coordination, and anxiety-related behavior in all the animals at the age of 4 months and after 14 months of treatment using the Morris water maze test, rota-rod test, elevated plus maze test, and open-field test. We have also analyzed the levels of amyloid beta (Aβ) protein (1–40 and 1–42) in plasma of control and experimental animals. Results: Standard diet-fed Tg mice showed significant memory deficits, increased anxiety-related behavior, and severe impairment in spatial learning ability, position discrimination learning ability and motor coordination when compared to wild-type on the same diet and Tg mice fed 2% and 4% date supplementation at the age of 18 months. The levels of both Aβ proteins were significantly lowered in date fruits supplemented groups than the Tg mice without the diet supplement. The neuroprotective effect offered by 4% date fruits diet to AD mice is higher than 2% date fruits diet. Conclusions: Our results suggest that date

  11. A high G418-resistant neo(R) transgenic mouse and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) feeder layers for cytotoxicity and gene targeting in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Aubrecht, Jiri; Goad, Mary E P; Czopik, Agnieszka K; Lerner, Charles P; Johnson, Kevin A; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Schiestl, Robert H

    2011-10-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics have been in use since 1944 with the discovery of streptomycin. The aim of this study was to derive a new, highly resistant multicopy neo(R) transgenic mouse strain, named TgN3Ems, by random insertion of the plasmid, pPGKneobpA, and compare the level of drug resistance of wild-type and transgenic mice in vivo and corresponding primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) in vitro to a model neomycin analog, G418. The expression neoR in transgenic animals caused a 5-fold increase in the approximate lethal dose of G418, compared to wild type. No adverse pathological changes were found for the transgenic mice treated with G418, as they all died within minutes after injection. In contrast, the G418 treatment of wild-type mice resulted in a marked liver and kidney toxicity detected microscopically and via increases of serum biomarkers for liver and kidney damage. In addition, there was a mild bone marrow and lymphoid depletion. In in vitro studies, the transgenic MEFs survived 20-fold higher G418 levels, compared to the wild-type MEF cells. Therefore, TgN3Ems transgenic mice could be used as a source of G418-resistant feeder cells for gene targeting. Since the expression of drug-resistance genes in transgenic animals confers resistance to toxicity, the TgN3Ems mice might serve as a tool applicable in drug design.

  12. Generation of an inducible, cardiomyocyte-specific transgenic mouse model with PPAR β/δ overexpression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Teayoun; Zhelyabovska, Olga; Liu, Jian; Yang, Qinglin

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) consist of three subtypes, each displaying distinctive tissue distribution. In general, the three PPAR subtypes exert overlapping function in transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism. However, each PPAR subtype possesses distinctive functions in different tissues dependent on their expression abundance, endogenous ligands, and the PPAR coregulators in a specific tissue. Transgenesis is an invaluable technique in defining the in vivo function of a particular gene and its protein. Cre/LoxP-mediated gene targeting has been extensively used to explore the tissue-specific function of PPARs. While this tissue-specific loss-of-function approach is extremely useful in determining the essential role of a PPAR, the tissue-specific gain-of-function approach is another important technique used to understand the effects of PPAR activation in a particular tissue. Transgenic overexpression of PPAR in a specific tissue has been used. However, this conventional technique requires generating the transgenic models individually for each target tissue. In this chapter, we describe the methodology for a more efficient generation of transgenic mouse models with a constitutively active form of PPARβ/δ in different tissues.

  13. A Phox2b::FLPo transgenic mouse line suitable for intersectional genetics

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Marie-Rose; d’Autréaux, Fabien; Dymecki, Susan M.; Brunet, Jean-François; Goridis, Christo

    2014-01-01

    Phox2b is a transcription factor expressed in the central and peripheral neurons that control cardiovascular, respiratory and digestive functions and essential for their development. Several populations known or suspected to regulate visceral functions express Phox2b in the developing hindbrain. Extensive cell migration and lack of suitable markers have greatly hampered studying their development. Reasoning that intersectional fate mapping may help to overcome these impediments, we have generated a BAC transgenic mouse line, P2b::FLPo, which expresses codon-optimized FLP recombinase in Phox2b expressing cells. By partnering the P2b::FLPo with the FLP-responsive RC::Fela allele, we show that FLP recombination switches on lineage tracers in the cells that express or have expressed Phox2b, permanently marking them for study across development. Taking advantage of the dualrecombinase feature of RC::Fela, we further show that the P2b::FLPo transgene can be partnered with Lbx1Cre as Cre driver to generate triple transgenics in which neurons having a history of both Phox2b and Lbx1 expression are specifically labelled. Hence, the P2b::FLPo line when partnered with a suitable Cre driver provides a tool for tracking and accessing genetically subsets of Phox2b-expressing neuronal populations, which has not been possible by Cremediated recombination alone. PMID:23592597

  14. Therapeutic Effect of Berberine on Huntington’s Disease Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenxiao; Wei, Wenjie; Gaertig, Marta A.; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) represents a family of neurodegenerative diseases that are caused by misfolded proteins. The misfolded proteins accumulate in the affected brain regions in an age-dependent manner to cause late-onset neurodegeneration. Transgenic mouse models expressing the HD protein, huntingtin, have been widely used to identify therapeutics that may retard disease progression. Here we report that Berberine (BBR), an organic small molecule isolated from plants, has protective effects on transgenic HD (N171-82Q) mice. We found that BBR can reduce the accumulation of mutant huntingtin in cultured cells. More importantly, when given orally, BBR could effectively alleviate motor dysfunction and prolong the survival of transgenic N171-82Q HD mice. We found that BBR could promote the degradation of mutant huntingtin by enhancing autophagic function. Since BBR is an orally-taken drug that has been safely used to treat a number of diseases, our findings suggest that BBR can be tested on different HD animal models and HD patients to further evaluate its therapeutic effects. PMID:26225560

  15. Evaluating Tissue-Specific Recombination in a Pdgfrα-CreERT2 Transgenic Mouse Line

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Megan; Cullen, Carlie L.; Auderset, Loic; Pitman, Kimberley A.; Achatz, Daniela; Gasperini, Robert; Young, Kaylene M.

    2016-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS) platelet derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα) is expressed exclusively by oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), making the Pdgfrα promoter an ideal tool for directing transgene expression in this cell type. Two Pdgfrα-CreERT2 mouse lines have been generated for this purpose which, when crossed with cre-sensitive reporter mice, allow the temporally restricted labelling of OPCs for lineage-tracing studies. These mice have also been used to achieve the deletion of CNS-specific genes from OPCs. However the ability of Pdgfrα-CreERT2 mice to induce cre-mediated recombination in PDGFRα+ cell populations located outside of the CNS has not been examined. Herein we quantify the proportion of PDGFRα+ cells that become YFP-labelled following Tamoxifen administration to adult Pdgfrα-CreERT2::Rosa26-YFP transgenic mice. We report that the vast majority (>90%) of PDGFRα+ OPCs in the CNS, and a significant proportion of PDGFRα+ stromal cells within the bone marrow (~38%) undergo recombination and become YFP-labelled. However, only a small proportion of the PDGFRα+ cell populations found in the sciatic nerve, adrenal gland, pituitary gland, heart, gastrocnemius muscle, kidney, lung, liver or intestine become YFP-labelled. These data suggest that Pdgfrα-CreERT2 transgenic mice can be used to achieve robust recombination in OPCs, while having a minimal effect on most PDGFRα+ cell populations outside of the CNS. PMID:27626928

  16. In vivo analysis of mouse gastrin gene regulation in enhanced GFP-BAC transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Takaishi, Shigeo; Shibata, Wataru; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Jin, Guangchun; Yang, Xiangdong; Ericksen, Russell; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida; Asfaha, Samuel; Quante, Michael; Betz, Kelly S.; Shulkes, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Gastrin is secreted from a subset of neuroendocrine cells residing in the gastric antrum known as G cells, but low levels are also expressed in fetal pancreas and intestine and in many solid malignancies. Although past studies have suggested that antral gastrin is transcriptionally regulated by inflammation, gastric pH, somatostatin, and neoplastic transformation, the transcriptional regulation of gastrin has not previously been demonstrated in vivo. Here, we describe the creation of an enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter (mGAS-EGFP) mouse using a bacterial artificial chromosome that contains the entire mouse gastrin gene. Three founder lines expressed GFP signals in the gastric antrum and the transitional zone to the corpus. In addition, GFP(+) cells could be detected in the fetal pancreatic islets and small intestinal villi, but not in these organs of the adult mice. The administration of acid-suppressive reagents such as proton pump inhibitor omeprazole and gastrin/CCK-2 receptor antagonist YF476 significantly increased GFP signal intensity and GFP(+) cell numbers in the antrum, whereas these parameters were decreased by overnight fasting, octreotide (long-lasting somatostatin ortholog) infusion, and Helicobacter felis infection. GFP(+) cells were also detected in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland and importantly in the colonic tumor cells induced by administration with azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium salt. This transgenic mouse provides a useful tool to study the regulation of mouse gastrin gene in vivo, thus contributing to our understanding of the mechanisms involved in transcriptional control of the gastrin gene. PMID:21051525

  17. In vivo analysis of mouse gastrin gene regulation in enhanced GFP-BAC transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Takaishi, Shigeo; Shibata, Wataru; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Jin, Guangchun; Yang, Xiangdong; Ericksen, Russell; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida; Asfaha, Samuel; Quante, Michael; Betz, Kelly S; Shulkes, Arthur; Wang, Timothy C

    2011-02-01

    Gastrin is secreted from a subset of neuroendocrine cells residing in the gastric antrum known as G cells, but low levels are also expressed in fetal pancreas and intestine and in many solid malignancies. Although past studies have suggested that antral gastrin is transcriptionally regulated by inflammation, gastric pH, somatostatin, and neoplastic transformation, the transcriptional regulation of gastrin has not previously been demonstrated in vivo. Here, we describe the creation of an enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter (mGAS-EGFP) mouse using a bacterial artificial chromosome that contains the entire mouse gastrin gene. Three founder lines expressed GFP signals in the gastric antrum and the transitional zone to the corpus. In addition, GFP(+) cells could be detected in the fetal pancreatic islets and small intestinal villi, but not in these organs of the adult mice. The administration of acid-suppressive reagents such as proton pump inhibitor omeprazole and gastrin/CCK-2 receptor antagonist YF476 significantly increased GFP signal intensity and GFP(+) cell numbers in the antrum, whereas these parameters were decreased by overnight fasting, octreotide (long-lasting somatostatin ortholog) infusion, and Helicobacter felis infection. GFP(+) cells were also detected in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland and importantly in the colonic tumor cells induced by administration with azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium salt. This transgenic mouse provides a useful tool to study the regulation of mouse gastrin gene in vivo, thus contributing to our understanding of the mechanisms involved in transcriptional control of the gastrin gene.

  18. Functional vascular renin-angiotensin system in hypertensive transgenic rats for the mouse renin gene Ren-2.

    PubMed

    Arribas, S; Sánchez-Ferrer, C F; Peiró, C; Ponte, A; Salaices, M; Marín, J

    1994-10-01

    1. Isolated aortic segments from transgenic rats for the mouse renin gene Ren-2 were more sensitive than those from control Sprague-Dawley ones to the vasoconstrictions induced by angiotensin II and to the potentiation of norepinephrine contractions by this peptide. 2. In transgenic, but not in control aorta, pretreatment with angiotensinogen potentiated norepinephrine-induced vasoconstrictions, this effect being abolished by captopril. 3. These results suggest that in the aorta of transgenic rats there is a higher functional tissue renin-angiotensin system that potentiates the vascular reactivity to norepinephrine.

  19. Transgenic mouse models in the study of reproduction: insights into GATA protein function.

    PubMed

    Tevosian, Sergei G

    2014-07-01

    For the past 2 decades, transgenic technology in mice has allowed for an unprecedented insight into the transcriptional control of reproductive development and function. The key factor among the mouse genetic tools that made this rapid advance possible is a conditional transgenic approach, a particularly versatile method of creating gene deletions and substitutions in the mouse genome. A centerpiece of this strategy is an enzyme, Cre recombinase, which is expressed from defined DNA regulatory elements that are active in the tissue of choice. The regulatory DNA element (either genetically engineered or natural) assures Cre expression only in predetermined cell types, leading to the guided deletion of genetically modified (flanked by loxP or 'floxed' by loxP) gene loci. This review summarizes and compares the studies in which genes encoding GATA family transcription factors were targeted either globally or by Cre recombinases active in the somatic cells of ovaries and testes. The conditional gene loss experiments require detailed knowledge of the spatial and temporal expression of Cre activity, and the challenges in interpreting the outcomes are highlighted. These studies also expose the complexity of GATA-dependent regulation of gonadal gene expression and suggest that gene function is highly context dependent.

  20. A transgenic mouse for imaging caspase-dependent apoptosis within the skin.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Divya; Hamilton, Christin A; Bhojani, Mahaveer S; Lee, Kuei C; Dlugosz, Andrej; Ross, Brian D; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2010-07-01

    Apoptosis is an essential process for the maintenance of normal physiology. The ability to noninvasively image apoptosis in living animals would provide unique insights into its role in normal and disease processes. Herein, a recombinant reporter consisting of beta-galactosidase gene flanked by two estrogen receptor regulatory domains and intervening Asp-Glu-Val-Glu sequences was constructed to serve as a tool for in vivo assessment of apoptotic activity. The results demonstrate that when expressed in its intact form, the hybrid reporter had undetectable beta-galactosidase activity. Caspase 3 activation in response to an apoptotic stimulus resulted in cleavage of the reporter, and thereby reconstitution of beta-galactosidase activity. Enzymatic activation of the reporter during an apoptotic event enabled noninvasive measurement of beta-galactosidase activity in living cells, which correlated with traditional measures of apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Using a near-infrared fluorescent substrate of beta-galactosidase (9H-{1,3-dichloro-9,9-dimethylacridin-2-one-7-yl} beta-D-galactopyranoside), noninvasive in vivo imaging of apoptosis was achieved in a xenograft tumor model in response to proapoptotic therapy. Finally, a transgenic mouse model was developed expressing the ER-LACZ-ER reporter within the skin. This reporter and transgenic mouse could serve as a unique tool for the study of apoptosis in living cells and animals, especially in the context of skin biology.

  1. Vascular pathology of 20-month-old hypercholesterolemia mice in comparison to triple-transgenic and APPSwDI Alzheimer’s disease mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Hohsfield, Lindsay A.; Daschil, Nina; Orädd, Greger; Strömberg, Ingrid; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that elevated plasma cholesterol levels (i.e. hypercholesterolemia) serve as a risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, it remains unclear how hypercholesterolemia may contribute to the onset and progression of AD pathology. In order to determine the role of hypercholesterolemia at various stages of AD, we evaluated the effects of high cholesterol diet (5% cholesterol) in wild-type (WT; C57BL6) and triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD; Psen1, APPSwe, tauB301L) mice at 7, 14, and 20 months. The transgenic APP-Swedish/Dutch/Iowa AD mouse model (APPSwDI) was used as a control since these animals are more pathologically-accelerated and are known to exhibit extensive plaque deposition and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Here, we describe the effects of high cholesterol diet on: (1) cognitive function and stress, (2) AD-associated pathologies, (3) neuroinflammation, (4) blood–brain barrier disruption and ventricle size, and (5) vascular dysfunction. Our data show that high dietary cholesterol increases weight, slightly impairs cognitive function, promotes glial cell activation and complement-related pathways, enhances the infiltration of blood-derived proteins and alters vascular integrity, however, it does not induce AD-related pathologies. While normal-fed 3xTg-AD mice display a typical AD-like pathology in addition to severe cognitive impairment and neuroinflammation at 20 months of age, vascular alterations are less pronounced. No microbleedings were seen by MRI, however, the ventricle size was enlarged. Triple-transgenic AD mice, on the other hand, fed a high cholesterol diet do not survive past 14 months of age. Our data indicates that cholesterol does not markedly potentiate AD-related pathology, nor does it cause significant impairments in cognition. However, it appears that high cholesterol diet markedly increases stress-related plasma corticosterone levels as well as some vessel pathologies. Together, our findings

  2. Protective effects of intranasal losartan in the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Danielyan, Lusine; Klein, Roman; Hanson, Leah R; Buadze, Marine; Schwab, Matthias; Gleiter, Christoph H; Frey, William H

    2010-01-01

    The local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the brain is a multitasking system controlling a plethora of essential functions such as neurogenic hypertension, baroreflexes, and sympathetic activity. Aside from its vasoactive actions, brain angiotensin II (AT-II) has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of cognitive decline, and beneficial effects of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in Alzheimer (AD) and Parkinson diseases (PD) are suggested. However, the use of ARBs at antihypertensive dosages would lead to unwanted hypotensive reactions in AD patients. Here we treated the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD with the ARB losartan (10 mg/kg body weight) to determine whether blockade of the AT-II receptor subtype 1 (AT1-R) with intranasal losartan, using at a dosage far below its systemic antihypertensive dose, could maintain its neuroprotective effects independent of its systemic vasoactive action. Intranasal losartan treatment (10 mg/kg every other day for 2 months) of APP/PS1 mice decreased amyloid beta (Abeta) plaques 3.7-fold. Blood serum levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12)p40/p70, IL-1beta, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were increased in the vehicle-treated APP/PS1 mice. Intranasal losartan not only decreased IL-12p40/p70, IL-1beta, and GM-CSF, but also increased IL-10, which suppresses inflammation. Furthermore, losartan markedly increased tyrosine hydroxylase expression in the striatum and locus coeruleus. In conclusion, losartan exerts direct neuroprotective effects via its Abeta-reducing and antiinflammatory effects in the central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, intranasal losartan and potentially other ARBs, at concentrations below their threshold for altering systemic blood pressure, offer a new approach for the treatment of AD.

  3. CB₂ receptor deficiency increases amyloid pathology and alters tau processing in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Jeremy; Vingtdeux, Valerie; Marambaud, Philippe; d'Abramo, Cristina; Jimenez, Heidy; Stauber, Mark; Friedman, Rachel; Davies, Peter

    2013-11-08

    The endocannabinoid CB₂ receptor system has been implicated in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In order to investigate the impact of the CB₂ receptor system on AD pathology, a colony of mice with a deleted CB₂ receptor gene, CNR2, was established on a transgenic human mutant APP background for pathological comparison with CB₂ receptor-sufficient transgenic mice. J20 APP (PDGFB-APPSwInd) mice were bred over two generations with CNR2⁻/⁻ (Cnr2(tm1Dgen)/J) mice to produce a colony of J20 CNR2⁺/⁺ and J20 CNR2⁻/⁻ mice. Seventeen J20 CNR2⁺/⁺ mice (12 females, 5 males) and 16 J20 CNR2⁻/⁻ mice (11 females, 5 males) were killed at 12 months, and their brains were interrogated for AD-related pathology with both biochemistry and immunocytochemistry (ICC). In addition to amyloid-dependent endpoints such as soluble Aβ production and plaque deposition quantified with 6E10 staining, the effect of CB2 receptor deletion on total soluble mouse tau production was assayed by using a recently developed high-sensitivity assay. Results revealed that soluble Aβ42 and plaque deposition were significantly increased in J20 CNR2⁻/⁻ mice relative to CNR2⁺/⁺ mice. Microgliosis, quantified with ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1) staining, did not differ between groups, whereas plaque associated microglia was more abundant in J20 CNR2⁻/⁻ mice. Total tau was significantly suppressed in J20 CNR2⁻/⁻ mice relative to J20 CNR2⁺/⁺ mice. The results confirm the constitutive role of the CB₂ receptor system both in reducing amyloid plaque pathology in AD and also support tehpotential of cannabinoid therapies targeting CB₂ to reduce Aβ; however, the results suggest that interventions may have a divergent effect on tau pathology.

  4. Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0162 TITLE: Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc...CONTRACT NUMBER Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer...Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We previously generated a PB-Cre4/CAG-SMIL transgenic model allowing Cre

  5. Impaired Adult Neurogenesis in the Dentate Gyrus of a Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, José J.; Jones, Victoria C.; Tabuchi, Masashi; Allan, Stuart M.; Knight, Elysse M.; LaFerla, Frank M.; Oddo, Salvatore; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2008-01-01

    It has become generally accepted that new neurones are added and integrated mainly in two areas of the mammalian CNS, the subventricular zone and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, which is of central importance in learning and memory. The newly generated cells display neuronal morphology, are able to generate action potentials and receive functional synaptic inputs, i.e. their properties are similar to those found in mature neurones. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the primary and widespread cause of dementia and is an age-related, progressive and irreversible neurodegenerative disease that deteriorates cognitive functions. Here, we have used male and female triple transgenic mice (3xTg-AD) harbouring three mutant genes (β-amyloid precursor protein, presenilin-1 and tau) and their respective non-transgenic (non-Tg) controls at 2, 3, 4, 6, 9 and 12 months of age to establish the link between AD and neurogenesis. Using immunohistochemistry we determined the area density of proliferating cells within the SGZ of the DG, measured by the presence of phosphorylated Histone H3 (HH3), and their possible co-localisation with GFAP to exclude a glial phenotype. Less than 1% of the HH3 labeled cells co-localised with GFAP. Both non-Tg and 3xTg-AD showed an age-dependent decrease in neurogenesis. However, male 3xTg-AD mice demonstrated a further reduction in the production of new neurones from 9 months of age (73% decrease) and a complete depletion at 12 months, when compared to controls. In addition, female 3xTg-AD mice showed an earlier but equivalent decrease in neurogenesis at 4 months (reduction of 63%) with an almost inexistent rate at 12 months (88% decrease) compared to controls. This reduction in neurogenesis was directly associated with the presence of β-amyloid plaques and an increase in the number of β-amyloid containing neurones in the hippocampus; which in the case of 3xgTg females was directly correlated. These results suggest

  6. Enlargement of the Axial Length and Altered Ultrastructural Features of the Sclera in a Mutant Lumican Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yanzheng; Zhang, Fengju; Zhao, Yanyan; Sun, Mingshen; Tao, Jun; Liang, Yanchuang; Ma, Ling; Yu, Yanqiu; Wang, Jianhua; Hao, Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    Lumican (LUM) is a candidate gene for myopia in the MYP3 locus. In this study, a mutant lumican (L199P) transgenic mouse model was established to investigate the axial length changes and ultrastructural features of the sclera. The mouse model was established by pronuclear microinjection. Transgenic mice and wild-type B6 mice were killed at eight weeks of age. Gene expression levels of LUM and collagen type I (COL1) in the sclera were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and the protein levels were assessed by Western blot analysis. Ocular axial lengths were measured on the enucleated whole eye under a dissecting microscope. Ultrastructural features of collagen fibrils in the sclera were examined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Lumican and collagen type I were both elevated at the transcriptional and protein levels. The mean axial length of eyes in the transgenic mice was significantly longer than that in the wild-type mice (3,231.0 ± 11.2 μm (transgenic group) vs 3,199.7 ± 11.1 μm (controls), p<0.05 =). Some ultrastructural changes were observed in the sclera of the transgenic mice under TEM, such as evident lamellar disorganizations and abnormal inter-fibril spacing. The average collagen fibril diameter was smaller than that in their wild-type counterparts. These results indicate that the ectopic mutant lumican (L199P) may induce enlargement of axial lengths and abnormal structures and distributions of collagen fibrils in mouse sclera. This transgenic mouse model can be used for the mechanistic study of myopia. PMID:27711221

  7. Heterologous expression of the adenosine A1 receptor in transgenic mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Salom, David; Zhang, Li; Harris, Tim; Ballesteros, Juan A; Golczak, Marcin; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kurahara, Carole; Juan, Todd; Jordan, Steven; Salon, John A

    2007-07-17

    Traditional cell-based systems used to express integral membrane receptors have yet to produce protein samples of sufficient quality for structural study. Herein we report an in vivo method that harnesses the photoreceptor system of the retina to heterologously express G protein-coupled receptors in a biochemically homogeneous and pharmacologically functional conformation. As an example we show that the adenosine A1 receptor, when placed under the influence of the mouse opsin promoter and rhodopsin rod outer segment targeting sequence, localized to the photoreceptor cells of transgenic retina. The resulting receptor protein was uniformly glycosylated and pharmacologically well behaved. By comparison, we demonstrated in a control experiment that opsin, when expressed in the liver, had a complex pattern of glycosylation. Upon solubilization, the retinal adenosine A1 receptor retained binding characteristics similar to its starting material. This expression method may prove generally useful for generating high-quality G protein-coupled receptors for structural studies.

  8. A novel transgenic mouse model to study the osteoblast lineage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Maes, Christa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2007-11-01

    Over the past few decades, osteoblast differentiation has been studied extensively in a variety of culture systems and findings from these experiments have shaped our understanding of the bone-forming cell lineage. However, in vitro assays are bound by intrinsic limitations and are unable to effectively mirror many aspects related to osteoblasts in vivo, including their origin, destiny, and life span. Therefore, these fundamental questions strongly advocate the need for novel models to characterize the osteoblast lineage in vivo. Here, we developed a transgenic mouse system to study stage-specific subsets of osteoblast lineage cells. We believe that this system will prove to be a helpful tool in deciphering multiple aspects of osteoblast biology in vivo.

  9. Allotopic expression of ATP6 in the mouse as a transgenic model of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Dunn, David A; Pinkert, Carl A

    2015-01-01

    Progress in animal modeling of polymorphisms and mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is not as developed as nuclear transgenesis due to a host of cellular and physiological distinctions. mtDNA mutation modeling is of critical importance as mutations in the mitochondrial genome give rise to a variety of pathological conditions and play a contributing role in many others. Nuclear localization and transcription of mtDNA genes followed by cytoplasmic translation and transport into mitochondria (allotopic expression, AE) provide an opportunity to create in vivo modeling of a targeted mutation in mitochondrial genes and has been suggested as a strategy for gene replacement therapy in patients harboring mitochondrial DNA mutations. Here, we use our AE approach to transgenic mouse modeling of the pathogenic human T8993G mutation in mtATP6 as a case study for designing AE animal models.

  10. Gene expression analysis of embryonic photoreceptor precursor cells using BAC-Crx-EGFP transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Muranishi, Yuki; Sato, Shigeru; Inoue, Tatsuya; Ueno, Shinji; Koyasu, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Mineo; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2010-02-12

    Crx is a transcription factor which is predominantly expressed in developing and mature photoreceptor cells in the retina, and plays a crucial role in the terminal differentiation of both rods and cones. Crx is one of the earliest-expressed genes specifically in photoreceptor precursors, allowing us to trace photoreceptor precursor cells from embryonic stages to adult stage by visualizing Crx-expressing cells. In the current study, we generated a transgenic mouse line which expresses enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) in the retina driven by the Crx promoter using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis. EGFP-positive cells were observed in the presumptive photoreceptor layer in the retina at embryonic day 15.5 (E15.5), and continued to be expressed in developing and mature photoreceptor cells up to adult stage. We sorted EGFP-positive photoreceptor precursors at E17.5 using fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS), and subsequently performed microarray analysis of the FACS-sorted cells. We observed various photoreceptor genes, especially cone genes, are enriched in the EGFP-positive cells, indicating that embryonic cone photoreceptor precursors are enriched. In addition, we found that most of the EGFP-positive cells were post-mitotic cells. Thus, the transgenic line we established can serve as a useful tool to study both developing and mature photoreceptor cells, including embryonic cone precursors whose analysis has been difficult.

  11. Imaging corneal pathology in a transgenic mouse model using nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubovitsky, Julia G.; Spencer, Joel A.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Andersen, Bogi; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2006-01-01

    A transgenic mouse model with a Clim [co-factor of LIM (a combination of first letters of Lin-11 (C. elegans), ISL1 (rat), and Mec-3 (C. elegans) gene names) domain proteins] gene partially blocked in the epithelial compartment of its tissues is used to establish the sensitivity of intrinsic reflectance nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) to stromal and cellular perturbations in the cornea. Our results indicate dysplasia in the squamous epithelium, irregular collagen arrays in the stroma, and a compromised posterior endothelium in the corneas of these mice. As suggested by biochemical data, the collagen alterations are likely due to collagen III synthesis and deposition during healing and remodeling of transgenic mice corneal stromas. All of the topographic features seen in NLOM images of normal and aberrant corneas are confirmed by coregistration with histological sections. In this work, we also use ratiometric redox fluorometry based on two-photon excited cellular fluorescence from reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)(P)H and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) to study mitocondrial energy metabolism. Employing this method, we detect higher metabolic activity in the endothelial layer of cornea compared to an epithelial layer located further away from the metabolites. The combination of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF) with second harmonic generation (SHG) signals allows imaging to aid in understanding the relationship between alternation of specific genes and structural changes in cells and extracellular matrix.

  12. Transgenic mouse model of IgM+ lymphoproliferative disease mimicking Waldenström macroglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, V S; Sompallae, R; Rosean, T R; Walsh, S; Acevedo, M; Kovalchuk, A L; Han, S-S; Jing, X; Holman, C; Rehg, J E; Herms, S; Sunderland, J S; Morse, H C; Janz, S

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a low-grade incurable immunoglobulin M+ (IgM+) lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma for which a genetically engineered mouse model of de novo tumor development is lacking. On the basis of evidence that the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 6 (IL6), and the survival-enhancing oncoprotein, B cell leukemia 2 (BCL2), have critical roles in the natural history of WM, we hypothesized that the enforced expression of IL6 and BCL2 in mice unable to perform immunoglobulin class switch recombination may result in a lymphoproliferative disease that mimics WM. To evaluate this possibility, we generated compound transgenic BALB/c mice that harbored the human BCL2 and IL6 transgenes, EμSV-BCL2-22 and H2-Ld-hIL6, on the genetic background of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deficiency. We designated these mice BCL2+IL6+AID− and found that they developed—with full genetic penetrance (100% incidence) and suitably short latency (93 days median survival)—a severe IgM+ lymphoproliferative disorder that recapitulated important features of human WM. However, the BCL2+IL6+AID− model also exhibited shortcomings, such as low serum IgM levels and histopathological changes not seen in patients with WM, collectively indicating that further refinements of the model are required to achieve better correlations with disease characteristics of WM. PMID:27813533

  13. Transgenic mouse model of IgM(+) lymphoproliferative disease mimicking Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, V S; Sompallae, R; Rosean, T R; Walsh, S; Acevedo, M; Kovalchuk, A L; Han, S-S; Jing, X; Holman, C; Rehg, J E; Herms, S; Sunderland, J S; Morse, H C; Janz, S

    2016-11-04

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a low-grade incurable immunoglobulin M(+) (IgM(+)) lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma for which a genetically engineered mouse model of de novo tumor development is lacking. On the basis of evidence that the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 6 (IL6), and the survival-enhancing oncoprotein, B cell leukemia 2 (BCL2), have critical roles in the natural history of WM, we hypothesized that the enforced expression of IL6 and BCL2 in mice unable to perform immunoglobulin class switch recombination may result in a lymphoproliferative disease that mimics WM. To evaluate this possibility, we generated compound transgenic BALB/c mice that harbored the human BCL2 and IL6 transgenes, EμSV-BCL2-22 and H2-L(d)-hIL6, on the genetic background of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deficiency. We designated these mice BCL2(+)IL6(+)AID(-) and found that they developed-with full genetic penetrance (100% incidence) and suitably short latency (93 days median survival)-a severe IgM(+) lymphoproliferative disorder that recapitulated important features of human WM. However, the BCL2(+)IL6(+)AID(-) model also exhibited shortcomings, such as low serum IgM levels and histopathological changes not seen in patients with WM, collectively indicating that further refinements of the model are required to achieve better correlations with disease characteristics of WM.

  14. Identification of Neuronal Enhancers of the Proopiomelanocortin Gene by Transgenic Mouse Analysis and Phylogenetic Footprinting

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Flávio S. J.; Santangelo, Andrea M.; Bumaschny, Viviana; Avale, María Elena; Smart, James L.; Low, Malcolm J.; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2005-01-01

    The proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene is expressed in the pituitary and arcuate neurons of the hypothalamus. POMC arcuate neurons play a central role in the control of energy homeostasis, and rare loss-of-function mutations in POMC cause obesity. Moreover, POMC is the prime candidate gene within a highly significant quantitative trait locus on chromosome 2 associated with obesity traits in several human populations. Here, we identify two phylogenetically conserved neuronal POMC enhancers designated nPE1 (600 bp) and nPE2 (150 bp) located approximately 10 to 12 kb upstream of mammalian POMC transcriptional units. We show that mouse or human genomic regions containing these enhancers are able to direct reporter gene expression to POMC hypothalamic neurons, but not the pituitary of transgenic mice. Conversely, deletion of nPE1 and nPE2 in the context of the entire transcriptional unit of POMC abolishes transgene expression in the hypothalamus without affecting pituitary expression. Our results indicate that the nPEs are necessary and sufficient for hypothalamic POMC expression and that POMC expression in the brain and pituitary is controlled by independent sets of enhancers. Our study advances the understanding of the molecular nature of hypothalamic POMC neurons and will be useful to determine whether polymorphisms in POMC regulatory regions play a role in the predisposition to obesity. PMID:15798195

  15. Augmentation of phenotype in a transgenic Parkinson mouse heterozygous for a Gaucher mutation.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Ianai; Kuo, Yien-Ming; Giasson, Benoit I; Nussbaum, Robert L

    2014-12-01

    The involvement of the protein α-synuclein (SNCA) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease is strongly supported by the facts that (i) missense and copy number mutations in the SNCA gene can cause inherited Parkinson's disease; and (ii) Lewy bodies in sporadic Parkinson's disease are largely composed of aggregated SNCA. Unaffected heterozygous carriers of Gaucher disease mutations have an increased risk for Parkinson's disease. As mutations in the GBA gene encoding glucocerebrosidase (GBA) are known to interfere with lysosomal protein degradation, GBA heterozygotes may demonstrate reduced lysosomal SNCA degradation, leading to increased steady-state SNCA levels and promoting its aggregation. We have created mouse models to investigate the interaction between GBA mutations and synucleinopathies. We investigated the rate of SNCA degradation in cultured primary cortical neurons from mice expressing wild-type mouse SNCA, wild-type human SNCA, or mutant A53T SNCA, in a background of either wild-type Gba or heterozygosity for the L444P GBA mutation associated with Gaucher disease. We also tested the effect of this Gaucher mutation on motor and enteric nervous system function in these transgenic animals. We found that human SNCA is stable, with a half-life of 61 h, and that the A53T mutation did not significantly affect its half-life. Heterozygosity for a naturally occurring Gaucher mutation, L444P, reduced GBA activity by 40%, reduced SNCA degradation and triggered accumulation of the protein in culture. This mutation also resulted in the exacerbation of motor and gastrointestinal deficits found in the A53T mouse model of Parkinson's disease. This study demonstrates that heterozygosity for a Gaucher disease-associated mutation in Gba interferes with SNCA degradation and contributes to its accumulation, and exacerbates the phenotype in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

  16. Regulatable transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer disease: onset, reversibility and spreading of Tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Hochgräfe, Katja; Sydow, Astrid; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria

    2013-09-01

    Accumulation of amyloidogenic proteins such as Tau is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease and fronto-temporal dementias. To link Tau pathology to cognitive impairments and defects in synaptic plasticity, we created four inducible Tau transgenic mouse models with expression of pro- and anti-aggregant variants of either full-length human Tau (hTau40/ΔK280 and hTau40/ΔK280/PP) or the truncated Tau repeat domain (Tau(RD)/ΔK280 and Tau(RD)/ΔK280/PP). Here we review the histopathological features caused by pro-aggregant Tau, and correlate them with behavioral deficits and impairments in synaptic transmission. Both pro-aggregant Tau variants cause Alzheimer-like features, including synapse loss, mis-localization of Tau into the somatodendritic compartment, conformational changes and hyperphosphorylation. However, there is a clear difference in the extent of Tau aggregation and neurotoxicity. While pro-aggregant full-length hTau40/ΔK280 leads to a 'pre-tangle' pathology, the repeat domain Tau(RD)/ΔK280 causes massive formation of neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal loss in the hippocampus. However, both Tau variants cause co-aggregation of human and mouse Tau and similar functional impairments. Thus, earlier Tau pathological stages and not necessarily neurofibrillary tangles are critical for the development of cognitive malfunctions. Most importantly, memory and synapses recover after switching off expression of pro-aggregant Tau. The rescue of functional impairments correlates with the rescue of most Tau pathological changes and most strikingly the recovery of synapses. This implies that tauopathies as such are reversible, provided that amyloidogenic Tau is removed. Therefore, our Tau transgenic mice may serve as model systems for in vivo validation of therapeutic strategies and drug candidates with regard to cognition and synaptic function.

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Preserve Working Memory in the 3xTg-AD Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Jiri; Kulijewicz-Nawrot, Magdalena; Rodrigez-Arellano, Jose Julio; Jendelova, Pavla; Sykova, Eva

    2016-01-25

    The transplantation of stem cells may have a therapeutic effect on the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study, we transplanted human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into the lateral ventricle of a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (3xTg-AD) at the age of eight months. We evaluated spatial reference and working memory after MSC treatment and the possible underlying mechanisms, such as the influence of transplanted MSCs on neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the expression levels of a 56 kDa oligomer of amyloid β (Aβ*56), glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate transporters (Glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) and Glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1)) in the entorhinal and prefrontal cortices and the hippocampus. At 14 months of age we observed the preservation of working memory in MSC-treated 3xTg-AD mice, suggesting that such preservation might be due to the protective effect of MSCs on GS levels and the considerable downregulation of Aβ*56 levels in the entorhinal cortex. These changes were observed six months after transplantation, accompanied by clusters of proliferating cells in the SVZ. Since the grafted cells did not survive for the whole experimental period, it is likely that the observed effects could have been transiently more pronounced at earlier time points than at six months after cell application.

  18. Time Course Analysis of Skeletal Muscle Pathology of GDE5 Transgenic Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizawa, Ikumi; Kajihara, Kaori; Kato, Norihisa; Wada, Masanobu; Yanaka, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glycerophosphodiesterase 5 (GDE5) selectively hydrolyses glycerophosphocholine to choline and is highly expressed in type II fiber-rich skeletal muscles. We have previously generated that a truncated mutant of GDE5 (GDE5dC471) that lacks phosphodiesterase activity and shown that transgenic mice overexpressing GDE5dC471 in skeletal muscles show less skeletal muscle mass than control mice. However, the molecular mechanism and pathophysiological features underlying decreased skeletal muscle mass in GDE5dC471 mice remain unclear. In this study, we characterized the skeletal muscle disorder throughout development and investigated the primary cause of muscle atrophy. While type I fiber-rich soleus muscle mass was not altered in GDE5dC471 mice, type II fiber-rich muscle mass was reduced in 8-week-old GDE5dC471 mice. Type II fiber-rich muscle mass continued to decrease irreversibly in 1-year-old transgenic mice with an increase in apoptotic cell. Adipose tissue weight and blood triglyceride levels in 8-week-old and 1-year-old transgenic mice were higher than those in control mice. This study also demonstrated compensatory mRNA expression of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) components, including nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α1, γ, and ε subunits) and acetylcholinesterase in type II fiber-rich quadriceps muscles in GDE5dC471 mice. However, we did not observe morphological changes in NMJs associated with skeletal muscle atrophy in GDE5dC471 mice. We also found that HSP70 protein levels are significantly increased in the skeletal muscles of 2-week-old GDE5dC471 mice and in mouse myoblastic C2C12 cells overexpressing GDE5dC471. These findings suggest that GDE5dC471 mouse is a novel model of early-onset irreversible type II fiber-rich myopathy associated with cellular stress. PMID:27658304

  19. Enhancement of β-amyloid oligomer accumulation after intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin, which involves central insulin signaling in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fangju; Jia, Jianping; Qin, Wei

    2014-11-12

    The β-amyloid (Aβ) oligomer rather than fibrillar Aβ has become the important focus of recent studies on the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Insulin signaling plays important roles in cognitive disease, such as AD. However, in-vivo evidence for the link between central insulin signaling and the Aβ oligomer are lacking, and the mechanisms underlying the effect of central insulin signaling on AD are still elusive. Our team has established the Presenilin-1 Val97Leu mutant transgenic (PS1V97L) AD mouse model with the intraneuronal Aβ oligomer as the potential initiator for other pathologies, but without extracellular amyloid plaque formation. Using this model, we investigated the roles of disturbed central insulin signaling induced by intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin (STZ) in the progression of AD. We observed that PS1V97L mice after intracerebroventricular injection of STZ showed increased Aβ oligomer accumulation and aggravated spatial learning and memory deficit in the absence of diabetes symptoms. Furthermore, STZ administration inhibited the activation of the insulin receptor and enhanced the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, which was accompanied by increased production of carboxy-terminal fragments from the amyloid precursor protein, in the brain of PS1V97L mice. Overall, our study provided in-vivo evidence for a role of central insulin signaling in AD progression.

  20. Dihydropyridine Derivatives Modulate Heat Shock Responses and have a Neuroprotective Effect in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kasza, Ágnes; Hunya, Ákos; Frank, Zsuzsa; Fülöp, Ferenc; Török, Zsolt; Balogh, Gábor; Sántha, Miklós; Bálind, Árpád; Bernáth, Sándor; Blundell, Katie L.I.M.; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Horváth, Ibolya; Zeiler, Hans-Joachim; Hooper, Philip L.; Vigh, László; Penke, Botond

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) have chaperone activity and play a pivotal role in the homeostasis of proteins by preventing misfolding, by clearing aggregated and damaged proteins from cells, and by maintaining proteins in an active state. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is thought to be caused by amyloid-β peptide that triggers tau hyperphosphorylation, which is neurotoxic. Although proteostasis capacity declines with age and facilitates the manifestation of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, the upregulation of chaperones improves prognosis. Our research goal is to identify potent Hsp co-inducers that enhance protein homeostasis for the treatment of AD, especially 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives optimized for their ability to modulate cellular stress responses. Based on favorable toxicological data and Hsp co-inducing activity, LA1011 was selected for the in vivo analysis of its neuroprotective effect in the APPxPS1 mouse model of AD. Here, we report that 6 months of LA1011 administration effectively improved the spatial learning and memory functions in wild type mice and eliminated neurodegeneration in double mutant mice. Furthermore, Hsp co-inducer therapy preserves the number of neurons, increases dendritic spine density, and reduces tau pathology and amyloid plaque formation in transgenic AD mice. In conclusion, the Hsp co-inducer LA1011 is neuroprotective and therefore is a potential pharmaceutical candidate for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases, particularly AD. PMID:27163800

  1. Lithium prevents parkinsonian behavioral and striatal phenotypes in an aged parkin mutant transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lieu, Christopher A; Dewey, Colleen M; Chinta, Shankar J; Rane, Anand; Rajagopalan, Subramanian; Batir, Sean; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Andersen, Julie K

    2014-12-03

    Lithium has long been used as a treatment for the psychiatric disease bipolar disorder. However, previous studies suggest that lithium provides neuroprotective effects in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease. The exact mechanism by which lithium exerts these effects still remains unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of low-dose lithium treatment in an aged mouse model expressing a parkin mutation within dopaminergic neurons. We found that low-dose lithium treatment prevented motor impairment as demonstrated by the open field test, pole test, and rearing behavior. Furthermore, lithium prevented dopaminergic striatal degeneration in parkin animals. We also found that parkin-induced striatal astrogliosis and microglial activation were prevented by lithium treatment. Our results further corroborate the use of this parkin mutant transgenic mouse line as a model for PD for testing novel therapeutics. The findings of the present study also provide further validation that lithium could be re-purposed as a therapy for PD and suggest that anti-inflammatory effects may contribute to its neuroprotective mechanisms.

  2. NF-kB activation as a biomarker of light injury using a transgenic mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocock, Ginger M.; Boretsky, Adam; Wang, Heuy-Ching; Golden, Dallas; Gupta, Praveena; Vargas, Gracie; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Motamedi, Massoud

    2012-03-01

    The spatial and temporal activation of NF-kB (p65) was monitored in the retina of a transgenic mouse model (cis-NFkB-EGFP) in vivo after receiving varying grades of laser induced thermal injury in one eye. Baseline images of the retinas from 26 mice were collected prior to injury and up to five months post-exposure using a Heidelberg Spectralis HRA confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) with a spectral domain optical coherence tomographer (SDOCT). Injured and control eyes were enucleated at discrete time points following laser exposure for cryosectioning to determine localization of NF-kB dependent enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene expression within the retina using fluorescence microscopy. In addition, EGFP basal expression in brain and retinal tissue from the cis-NFkB-EGFP was characterized using two-photon imaging. Regions of the retina exposed to threshold and supra-threshold laser damage evaluated using fluorescence cSLO showed increased EGFP fluorescence localized to the exposed region for a duration that was dependent upon the degree of injury. Fluorescence microscopy of threshold damage revealed EGFP localized to the outer nuclear region and retinal pigment epithelial layer. Basal expression of EGFP imaged using two-photon microscopy was heterogeneously distributed throughout brain tissue and confined to the inner retina. Results show cis-NF-kB-EGFP reporter mouse can be used for in vivo studies of light induced injury to the retina and possibly brain injury.

  3. Retinal and choroidal neovascularization in a transgenic mouse model of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Lutty, G. A.; McLeod, D. S.; Pachnis, A.; Costantini, F.; Fabry, M. E.; Nagel, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    A complication of sickle cell disease is proliferative retinopathy. We investigated the eyes from a transgenic mouse model of sickle cell disease (alpha H beta S[beta MDD] type) to determine if pathological changes occurred in their retinas and choroids. One retina from each animal was processed by flat-embedding adenosine diphosphatase-reacted retinas in glycol methacrylate. The fellow eye from each animal was embedded whole in glycol methacrylate for histopathological analysis of all ocular structures. Retinal vascular occlusions resulted in nonperfused areas of retina and arterio-venous anastomoses. Intra- and extraretinal neovascularization was observed adjacent to nonperfused areas. Retinal pigmented lesions were formed by the migration of retinal pigment epithelial cells into sensory retina, often ensheathing choroidal neovascularization. The incidence of this bilateral chorioretinopathy was 30% in animals older than 15 months of age. The ocular histopathological changes we observed in the mouse model mimicked many aspects of human proliferative sickle cell retinopathy. Furthermore, this is the first genetically derived animal model for chorio-retinal neovascularization. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7519831

  4. Protective Effects of Dietary Supplementation with a Combination of Nutrients in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Xie, Wei; Ma, Lan; Zhu, Jinfeng; Zhang, Yan; Dang, Rui; Wang, Decai; Wu, Yonghui; Wu, Qunhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the effects of intervention with a combination of nutrients in the amyloid precursor protein-presenilin (APP-PSN) C57BL/6J double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Methods A total of 72 2-month-old APP-PSN mice were randomly assigned to three groups. The model group (MG) was fed regular, unsupplemented chow, while the low- and high-dose treatment groups (LG and HG, respectively) were given a combination of nutrients that included phosphatidylserine, blueberry extracts, docosahexaenoic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid as part of their diet. An additional 24 wild-type littermates that were fed unsupplemented chow served as the negative control group (NG). After 3 and 7 months of treatment, the cognitive performance was assessed with the Morris water maze and the shuttle box escape/avoidance task, and the biochemical parameters and oxidative stress were evaluated in both the blood and brain. Results An improvement in antioxidant capacity was observed in the treatment groups relative to the MG at 3 months, while superior behavioral test results were observed in the mice of the HG and NG groups. In the MG, pycnosis was detected in neuronal nuclei, and a loss of neurons was observed in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. At 7 months, the β-amyloid1–42 peptide accumulation was significantly elevated in the MG but was markedly lower in the mice fed the nutrient combination. The antioxidant capacity and behavioral test scores were also higher in these mice. Conclusions Early intervention with a combination of nutrients should be considered as a strategy for preventing cognitive decline and other symptoms associated with AD. PMID:26606074

  5. Generation of a Transgenic Mouse for Colorectal Cancer Research with Intestinal Cre-Expression Limited to the Large Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yingben; Johnson, Robert; DeSmet, Marsha; Snyder, Paul W.; Fleet, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Genetically modified mice have been used for colon cancer research but findings from these models are confounded by expression of cancer in multiple organs. We sought to create a transgenic mouse with Cre recombinase (Cre) expression limited to the epithelial cells of the large intestine and use this model to study colon cancer driven by adenomatosis polyposis coli (APC) gene inactivation. A promoter/enhancer from the mouse carbonic anhydrase I gene was used to generate a Cre expressing transgenic mouse (CAC). After characterizing transgene expression and distribution, CAC mice were crossed to APC580S mice to generate mice with APC inactivation at one (CAC; APC580S/+) or both alleles (CAC; APC580S/580S). Transgene expression was limited to the epithelial cells of the cecum and colon, extended from the crypt base to the luminal surface, and was expressed in approximately 15% of the crypts. No abnormal gross phenotype was seen in 3 or 6 wk CAC; APC580S/+ mice but CAC; APC580S/580S mice had significant mucosal hyperplasia in the colon at 3 wk that developed into tumors by 6 wk. By 10 wk, 20% of CAC; APC580S/+ mice developed adenomatous lesions in the distal colon (3.0±0.4 mm, 1.1 per mouse). Dextran sulfate sodium treatment increased the incidence and number of tumors and this occurred predominantly in distal colon. Our new model has improved features for colon cancer research i.e. transgene expression is limited to the epithelium of the large bowel with normal cells found next to genetically modified cells. PMID:20663863

  6. Onset of hippocampus-dependent memory impairments in 5XFAD transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Girard, Stéphane D; Jacquet, Marlyse; Baranger, Kévin; Migliorati, Martine; Escoffier, Guy; Bernard, Anne; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Féron, François; Rivera, Santiago; Roman, François S; Marchetti, Evelyne

    2014-07-01

    The 5XFAD mice are an early-onset transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in which amyloid plaques are first observed between two and four months of age in the cortical layer five and in the subiculum of the hippocampal formation. Although cognitive alterations have been described in these mice, there are no studies that focused on the onset of hippocampus-dependent memory deficits, which are a hallmark of the prodromal stage of AD. To identify when the first learning and memory impairments appear, 5XFAD mice of two, four, and six months of age were compared with their respective wild-type littermates using the olfactory tubing maze, which is a very sensitive hippocampal-dependent task. Deficits in learning and memory started at four months with a substantial increase at six months of age while no olfactory impairments were observed. The volumetric study using magnetic resonance imaging of the whole brain and specific areas (olfactory bulb, striatum, and hippocampus) did not reveal neuro-anatomical difference. Slight memory deficits appeared at 4 months of age in correlation with an increased astrogliosis and amyloid plaque formation. This early impairment in learning and memory related to the hippocampal dysfunction is particularly suited to assess preclinical therapeutic strategies aiming to delay or suppress the onset of AD.

  7. A New Human DSG2-Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying the Tropism and Pathology of Human Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie; Beyer, Ines; Persson, Jonas; Song, Hui; Li, ZongYi; Richter, Maximilian; Cao, Hua; van Rensburg, Ruan; Yao, Xiaoying; Hudkins, Kelly; Yumul, Roma; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Yu, Mujun; Fender, Pascal; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-01-01

    We have recently reported that a group of human adenoviruses (HAdVs) uses desmoglein 2 (DSG2) as a receptor for infection. Among these are the widely distributed serotypes HAdV-B3 and HAdV-B7, as well as a newly emerged strain derived from HAdV-B14. These serotypes do not infect rodent cells and could not up until now be studied in small-animal models. We therefore generated transgenic mice containing the human DSG2 locus. These mice expressed human DSG2 (hDSG2) at a level and in a pattern similar to those found for humans and nonhuman primates. As an initial application of hDSG2-transgenic mice, we used a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing HAdV-B3 vector (Ad3-GFP) and studied GFP transgene expression by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry subsequent to intranasal and intravenous virus application. After intranasal application, we found efficient transduction of bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells in hDSG2-transgenic mice. Intravenous Ad3-GFP injection into hDSG2-transgenic mice resulted in hDSG2-dependent transduction of epithelial cells in the intestinal and colon mucosa. Our findings give an explanation for clinical symptoms associated with infection by DSG2-interacting HAdVs and provide a rationale for using Ad3-derived vectors in gene therapy. PMID:22457526

  8. Complex interplay between brain function and structure during cerebral amyloidosis in APP transgenic mouse strains revealed by multi-parametric MRI comparison.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Joanes; Derungs, Rebecca; Kulic, Luka; Welt, Tobias; Henkelman, Mark; Nitsch, Roger M; Rudin, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder affecting the aging population. Neuroimaging methods, in particular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have helped reveal alterations in the brain structure, metabolism, and function of patients and in groups at risk of developing AD, yet the nature of these alterations is poorly understood. Neuroimaging in mice is attractive for investigating mechanisms underlying functional and structural changes associated with AD pathology. Several preclinical murine models of AD have been generated based on transgenic insertion of human mutated APP genes. Depending on the specific mutations, mouse strains express different aspects of amyloid pathology, e.g. intracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates, parenchymal plaques, or cerebral amyloid angiopathy. We have applied multi-parametric MRI in three transgenic mouse lines to compare changes in brain function with resting-state fMRI and structure with diffusion tensor imaging and high resolution anatomical imaging. E22ΔAβ developing intracellular Aβ aggregates did not present functional or structural alterations compared to their wild-type littermates. PSAPP mice displaying parenchymal amyloid plaques displayed mild functional changes within the supplementary and barrel field cortices, and increased isocortical volume relative to controls. Extensive reduction in functional connectivity in the sensory-motor cortices and within the default mode network, as well as local volume increase in the midbrain relative to wild-type have been observed in ArcAβ mice bearing intracellular Aβ aggregates as well as parenchymal and vascular amyloid deposits. Patterns of functional and structural changes appear to be strain-specific and not directly related to amyloid deposition.

  9. Liver X Receptor Agonist Modifies the DNA Methylation Profile of Synapse and Neurogenesis-Related Genes in the Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Hernández, A G; Hernández, H G; Restrepo, A; Muñoz, J I; Bayon, G F; Fernández, A F; Fraga, M F; Cardona-Gómez, G P; Arboleda, H; Arboleda, Gonzalo H

    2016-02-01

    The liver X receptor agonist, GW3965, improves cognition in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse models. Here, we determined if short-term GW3965 treatment induces changes in the DNA methylation state of the hippocampus, which are associated with cognitive improvement. Twenty-four-month-old triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice were treated with GW3965 (50 mg/kg/day for 6 days). DNA methylation state was examined by modified bisulfite conversion and hybridization on Illumina Infinium Methylation BeadChip 450 k arrays. The Morris water maze was used for behavioral analysis. Our results show in addition to improvement in cognition methylation changes in 39 of 13,715 interrogated probes in treated 3xTg-AD mice compared with untreated 3xTg-AD mice. These changes in methylation probes include 29 gene loci. Importantly, changes in methylation status were mainly from synapse-related genes (SYP, SYN1, and DLG3) and neurogenesis-associated genes (HMGB3 and RBBP7). Thus, our results indicate that liver X receptors (LXR) agonist treatment induces rapid changes in DNA methylation, particularly in loci associated with genes involved in neurogenesis and synaptic function. Our results suggest a new potential mechanism to explain the beneficial effect of GW3965.

  10. Genetic deletion of TNFRII gene enhances the Alzheimer-like pathology in an APP transgenic mouse model via reduction of phosphorylated IκBα.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; He, Ping; Xie, Junxia; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Li, Rena; Shen, Yong

    2014-09-15

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor II (TNFRII) is one of the TNF receptor superfamily members and our recent pathological studies show that TNFRII is deficient in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms of TNFRII in AD pathogenesis remain unclear. In the present study, by using the gene-targeting approach to delete TNFRII in AD transgenic mouse model, we found that, in the brain of APP23 mice with TNFRII deletion (APP23/TNFRII(-/-)), AD-like pathology, i.e. plaque formation and microglial activation, occurs as early as 6 months of age. To test whether the increased levels of Aβ plaques was due to elevated Aβ, we measured Aβ and found that Aβ levels indeed were significantly increased at this age. Because β-secretase, BACE1, is critical enzyme for Aβ production, we have examined BACE1 and found that BACE1 is increased in both protein levels and enzymatic activity as early as 6 months of age; Having shown that BACE1 promoter region contains NF-κB binding sites, we found that cytoplasmic NF-κB was elevated and SUMO1 binding to IκBα was decreased. To further verify these findings, we have overexpressed TNFRII and identified that overexpressing TNFRII can reverse the findings from APP23/TNFRII(-/-) mice. Altogether, our results demonstrate novel roles of TNFRII in the regulation of Aβ production, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for AD by up-regulating TNFRII levels and elevating phosphorylated IκBα by SUMOylation.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging for monitoring therapeutic response in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease using voxel-based analysis of amyloid plaques

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Ha, Tae Lin; Im, Geun Ho; Yang, Jehoon; Seo, Sang Won; Chung, Julius Juhyun; Chae, Sun Young; Lee, In Su

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have shown the potential of a voxel-based analysis for imaging amyloid plaques and its utility in monitoring therapeutic response in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) mice using manganese oxide nanoparticles conjugated with an antibody of Aβ1-40 peptide (HMON-abAβ40). T1-weighted MR brain images of a drug-treated AD group (n=7), a nontreated AD group (n=7), and a wild-type group (n=7) were acquired using a 7.0 T MRI system before (D−1), 24-h (D+1) after, and 72-h (D+3) after injection with an HMON-abAβ40 contrast agent. For the treatment of AD mice, DAPT was injected intramuscularly into AD transgenic mice (50 mg/kg of body weight). For voxel-based analysis, the skull-stripped mouse brain images were spatially normalized, and these voxels’ intensities were corrected to reduce voxel intensity differences across scans in different mice. Statistical analysis showed higher normalized MR signal intensity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of AD mice over wild-type mice on D+1 and D+3 (P<0.01, uncorrected for multiple comparisons). After the treatment of AD mice, the normalized MR signal intensity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus decreased significantly in comparison with nontreated AD mice on D+1 and D+3 (P<0.01, uncorrected for multiple comparisons). These results were confirmed by histological analysis using a thioflavin staining. This unique strategy allows us to detect brain regions that are subjected to amyloid plaque deposition and has the potential for human applications in monitoring therapeutic response for drug development in AD. PMID:24518227

  12. Ataxin-2 Regulates RGS8 Translation in a New BAC-SCA2 Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Karla P.; Rinehart, Marc D.; Wiest, Shaina; Pflieger, Lance T.; Scoles, Daniel R.; Pulst, Stefan M.

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder with progressive degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) and other neurons caused by expansion of a glutamine (Q) tract in the ATXN2 protein. We generated BAC transgenic lines in which the full-length human ATXN2 gene was transcribed using its endogenous regulatory machinery. Mice with the ATXN2 BAC transgene with an expanded CAG repeat (BAC-Q72) developed a progressive cellular and motor phenotype, whereas BAC mice expressing wild-type human ATXN2 (BAC-Q22) were indistinguishable from control mice. Expression analysis of laser-capture microdissected (LCM) fractions and regional expression confirmed that the BAC transgene was expressed in PCs and in other neuronal groups such as granule cells (GCs) and neurons in deep cerebellar nuclei as well as in spinal cord. Transcriptome analysis by deep RNA-sequencing revealed that BAC-Q72 mice had progressive changes in steady-state levels of specific mRNAs including Rgs8, one of the earliest down-regulated transcripts in the Pcp2-ATXN2[Q127] mouse line. Consistent with LCM analysis, transcriptome changes analyzed by deep RNA-sequencing were not restricted to PCs, but were also seen in transcripts enriched in GCs such as Neurod1. BAC-Q72, but not BAC-Q22 mice had reduced Rgs8 mRNA levels and even more severely reduced steady-state protein levels. Using RNA immunoprecipitation we showed that ATXN2 interacted selectively with RGS8 mRNA. This interaction was impaired when ATXN2 harbored an expanded polyglutamine. Mutant ATXN2 also reduced RGS8 expression in an in vitro coupled translation assay when compared with equal expression of wild-type ATXN2-Q22. Reduced abundance of Rgs8 in Pcp2-ATXN2[Q127] and BAC-Q72 mice supports our observations of a hyper-excitable mGluR1-ITPR1 signaling axis in SCA2, as RGS proteins are linked to attenuating mGluR1 signaling. PMID:25902068

  13. Transgenic Mouse Model Harboring the Transcriptional Fusion Ccl20-Luciferase as a Novel Reporter of Pro-Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Crispo, Martina; Van Maele, Laurye; Tabareau, Julien; Cayet, Delphine; Errea, Agustina; Ferreira, Ana María; Rumbo, Martin; Sirard, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    The chemokine CCL20, the unique ligand of CCR6 functions as an attractant of immune cells. Expression of CCL20 is induced by Toll-like Receptor (TLR) signaling or proinflammatory cytokine stimulation. However CCL20 is also constitutively produced at specific epithelial sites of mucosa. This expression profile is achieved by transcriptional regulation. In the present work we characterized regulatory features of mouse Ccl20 gene. Transcriptional fusions between the mouse Ccl20 promoter and the firefly luciferase (luc) encoding gene were constructed and assessed in in vitro and in vivo assays. We found that liver CCL20 expression and luciferase activity were upregulated by systemic administration of the TLR5 agonist flagellin. Using shRNA and dominant negative form specific for mouse TLR5, we showed that this expression was controlled by TLR5. To address in situ the regulation of gene activity, a transgenic mouse line harboring a functional Ccl20-luc fusion was generated. The luciferase expression was highly concordant with Ccl20 expression in different tissues. Our data indicate that the transgenic mouse model can be used to monitor activation of innate response in vivo. PMID:24265691

  14. Transgenic mouse model harboring the transcriptional fusion ccl20-luciferase as a novel reporter of pro-inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Crispo, Martina; Van Maele, Laurye; Tabareau, Julien; Cayet, Delphine; Errea, Agustina; Ferreira, Ana María; Rumbo, Martin; Sirard, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    The chemokine CCL20, the unique ligand of CCR6 functions as an attractant of immune cells. Expression of CCL20 is induced by Toll-like Receptor (TLR) signaling or proinflammatory cytokine stimulation. However CCL20 is also constitutively produced at specific epithelial sites of mucosa. This expression profile is achieved by transcriptional regulation. In the present work we characterized regulatory features of mouse Ccl20 gene. Transcriptional fusions between the mouse Ccl20 promoter and the firefly luciferase (luc) encoding gene were constructed and assessed in in vitro and in vivo assays. We found that liver CCL20 expression and luciferase activity were upregulated by systemic administration of the TLR5 agonist flagellin. Using shRNA and dominant negative form specific for mouse TLR5, we showed that this expression was controlled by TLR5. To address in situ the regulation of gene activity, a transgenic mouse line harboring a functional Ccl20-luc fusion was generated. The luciferase expression was highly concordant with Ccl20 expression in different tissues. Our data indicate that the transgenic mouse model can be used to monitor activation of innate response in vivo.

  15. A Novel Bacterial Artificial Chromosome-Transgenic Podoplanin–Cre Mouse Targets Lymphoid Organ Stromal Cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Onder, Lucas; Scandella, Elke; Chai, Qian; Firner, Sonja; Mayer, Christian T.; Sparwasser, Tim; Thiel, Volker; Rülicke, Thomas; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    Stromal cells provide the structural foundation of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs), and regulate leukocyte access and cell migration within the different compartments of spleen and lymph nodes (LNs). Furthermore, several stromal cell subsets have been implied in shaping of T cell responses through direct presentation of antigen. Despite significant gain of knowledge on the biology of different SLO-resident stromal cell subsets, their molecular and functional characterization has remained incomplete. To address this need, we have generated a bacterial artificial chromosome-transgenic mouse model that utilizes the podoplanin (pdpn) promoter to express the Cre-recombinase exclusively in stromal cells of SLOs. The characterization of the Pdpn–Cre mouse revealed transgene expression in subsets of fibroblastic reticular cells and lymphatic endothelial cells in LNs. Furthermore, the transgene facilitated the identification of a novel splenic perivascular stromal cell subpopulation that forms web-like structures around central arterioles. Assessment of the in vivo antigen expression in the genetically tagged stromal cells in Pdpn–Cre mice revealed activation of both MHC I and II-restricted TCR transgenic T cells. Taken together, stromal pdpn–Cre expression is well-suited to characterize the phenotype and to dissect the function of lymphoid organ stromal cells. PMID:22566840

  16. Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer 3 Annual Progress Report W81XWH-13-1-0162 Using a Novel...Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer Feng Yang, Ph.D. Department of...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0162 TITLE: Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and

  17. A New Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying the Neurotoxicity of Spermine Oxidase Dosage in the Response to Excitotoxic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cervelli, Manuela; Bellavia, Gabriella; D'Amelio, Marcello; Cavallucci, Virve; Moreno, Sandra; Berger, Joachim; Nardacci, Roberta; Marcoli, Manuela; Maura, Guido; Piacentini, Mauro; Amendola, Roberto; Cecconi, Francesco; Mariottini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Spermine oxidase is a FAD-containing enzyme involved in polyamines catabolism, selectively oxidizing spermine to produce H2O2, spermidine, and 3-aminopropanal. Spermine oxidase is highly expressed in the mouse brain and plays a key role in regulating the levels of spermine, which is involved in protein synthesis, cell division and cell growth. Spermine is normally released by neurons at synaptic sites where it exerts a neuromodulatory function, by specifically interacting with different types of ion channels, and with ionotropic glutamate receptors. In order to get an insight into the neurobiological roles of spermine oxidase and spermine, we have deregulated spermine oxidase gene expression producing and characterizing the transgenic mouse model JoSMOrec, conditionally overexpressing the enzyme in the neocortex. We have investigated the effects of spermine oxidase overexpression in the mouse neocortex by transcript accumulation, immunohistochemical analysis, enzymatic assays and polyamine content in young and aged animals. Transgenic JoSMOrec mice showed in the neocortex a higher H2O2 production in respect to Wild-Type controls, indicating an increase of oxidative stress due to SMO overexpression. Moreover, the response of transgenic mice to excitotoxic brain injury, induced by kainic acid injection, was evaluated by analysing the behavioural phenotype, the immunodistribution of neural cell populations, and the ultrastructural features of neocortical neurons. Spermine oxidase overexpression and the consequently altered polyamine levels in the neocortex affects the cytoarchitecture in the adult and aging brain, as well as after neurotoxic insult. It resulted that the transgenic JoSMOrec mouse line is more sensitive to KA than Wild-Type mice, indicating an important role of spermine oxidase during excitotoxicity. These results provide novel evidences of the complex and critical functions carried out by spermine oxidase and spermine in the mammalian brain. PMID

  18. Evaluation of viral and mammalian promoters for driving transgene expression in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Dosari, Mohammed; Zhang Guisheng; Knapp, Joseph E.; Liu Dexi . E-mail: dliu@pitt.edu

    2006-01-13

    Fifteen luciferase plasmid constructs driven by various promoters including cytomegalovirus (CMV), Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), human serum albumin (SA), {alpha}-1 antitrypsin (AAT), cytochrome P450 CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C18, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, mouse CYP2b10, human amyloid precursor protein (APP), chicken {beta} actin (ACT), nuclear factor {kappa} B (NF{kappa}B), and heat shock protein 70 (HS) promoters were hydrodynamically introduced into mouse hepatocytes, and the level and persistence of luciferase gene expression were examined. Eight hours post-gene transfer, the CMV and AAT promoters showed the highest activity, followed by the CYP2D6, HS, and RSV promoters which were slightly less active. The human serum albumin promoter exhibited the lowest activity among the promoters examined. The time course of gene expression showed a two-phase decline in luciferase activity with a rapid phase within First 5-7 days and a slower decline thereafter. Results from Southern and Northern blot analyses revealed a good correlation between the decline of luciferase activity and the decrease in mRNA level, suggesting promoter silencing as the possible mechanism for the observed transient luciferase gene expression. Inclusion of EBN1 and oriP sequences of Epstein-Barr virus into the plasmid extended the period of active transcription for about one week. These results provide important information concerning the role of promoters in regulating transgene expression and for the proper design of plasmids for gene expression and gene therapy.

  19. A Novel Transgenic Mouse Model of Cardiac Hypertrophy and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Michael A.; Das, Saumya; Pinzon, Pablo Quintero; Knight, Ashley C.; Sosnovik, David E.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Rosenzweig, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a major risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, there are few animal models of AF associated with cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, we describe the in vivo electrophysiological characteristics and histopathology of a mouse model of cardiac hypertrophy that develops AF. Myostatin is a well-known negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth that was recently found to additionally regulate cardiac muscle growth. Using cardiac-specific expression of the inhibitory myostatin pro-peptide, we generated transgenic (TG) mice with dominant-negative regulation of MSTN (DN-MSTN). One line (DN-MSTN TG13) displayed ventricular hypertrophy, as well as spontaneous AF on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG), and was further evaluated. DN-MSTN TG13 had normal systolic function, but displayed atrial enlargement on cardiac MRI, as well as atrial fibrosis histologically. Baseline ECG revealed an increased P wave duration and QRS interval compared with wild-type littermate (WT) mice. Seven of 19 DN-MSTN TG13 mice had spontaneous or inducible AF, while none of the WT mice had atrial arrhythmias (p<0.05). Connexin40 (Cx40) was decreased in DN-MSTN TG13 mice, even in the absence of AF or significant atrial fibrosis, raising the possibility that MSTN signaling may play a role in Cx40 down-regulation and the development of AF in this mouse model. In conclusion, DN-MSTN TG13 mice represent a novel model of AF, in which molecular changes including an initial loss of Cx40 are noted prior to fibrosis and the development of atrial arrhythmias. PMID:23243484

  20. Renal Anemia Model Mouse Established by Transgenic Rescue with an Erythropoietin Gene Lacking Kidney-Specific Regulatory Elements.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Ikuo; Suzuki, Norio; Yamazaki, Shun; Sekine, Hiroki; Minegishi, Naoko; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2017-02-15

    The erythropoietin (Epo) gene is under tissue-specific inducible regulation. Because the kidney is the primary EPO-producing tissue in adults, impaired EPO production in chronic kidney disorders results in serious renal anemia. The Epo gene contains a liver-specific enhancer in the 3' region, but the kidney-specific enhancer for gene expression in renal EPO-producing (REP) cells remains elusive. Here, we examined a conserved upstream element for renal Epo regulation (CURE) region that spans 17.4 kb to 3.6 kb upstream of the Epo gene and harbors several phylogenetically conserved elements. We prepared various Epo gene-reporter constructs utilizing a bacterial artificial chromosome and generated a number of transgenic-mouse lines. We observed that deletion of the CURE region (δCURE) abrogated Epo gene expression in REP cells. Although transgenic expression of the δCURE construct rescued Epo-deficient mice from embryonic lethality, the rescued mice had severe EPO-dependent anemia. These mouse lines serve as an elaborate model for the search for erythroid stimulatory activity and are referred to as AnRED (anemic model with renal EPO deficiency) mice. We also dissected the CURE region by exploiting a minigene harboring four phylogenetically conserved elements in reporter transgenic-mouse analyses. Our analyses revealed that Epo gene regulation in REP cells is a complex process that utilizes multiple regulatory influences.

  1. Enhanced neurofibrillary tangle formation, cerebral atrophy, and cognitive deficits induced by repetitive mild brain injury in a transgenic tauopathy mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yoshiyama, Yasumasa; Uryu, Kunihiro; Higuchi, Makoto; Longhi, Luca; Hoover, Rachel; Fujimoto, Scott; McIntosh, Tracy; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2005-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and repetitive TBI (rTBI) may culminate in dementia pugilistica (DP), a syndrome characterized by progressive dementia, parkinsonism, and the hallmark brain lesions of AD, including neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), formed by abnormal tau filaments and senile plaques (SPs) composed of Abeta fibrils. Previous study showed that mild rTBI (mrTBI) accelerated the deposition of Abeta in the brains of transgenic (Tg) mice (Tg2576) that over-express human Abeta precursor proteins with the familial AD Swedish mutations (APP695swe) and model of AD-like amyloidosis. Here, we report studies of the effects of mrTBI on AD-like tau pathologies in Tg mice expressing the shortest human tau isoform (T44) subjected to mrTBI, causing brain concussion without structural brain damage to simulate injuries linked to DP. Twelve-month-old Tg T44 (n = 18) and wild-type (WT; n = 24) mice were subjected to mrTBI (four times a day, 1 day per week, for 4 weeks; n = 24) or sham treatment (n = 18). Histopathological analysis of mice at 9 months after mrTBI revealed that one of the Tg T44 mice showed extensive telencephalic NFT and cerebral atrophy. Although statistical analysis of neurobehavioral tests at 6 months after mrTBI did not show any significant difference in any of groups of mice, the Tg T44 mouse with extensive NFT had an exceptionally low neurobehavioral score. The reasons for the augmentation of tau pathologies in only one T44 tau Tg mouse subjected to mrTBI remain to be elucidated.

  2. Beyond the monoaminergic hypothesis: neuroplasticity and epigenetic changes in a transgenic mouse model of depression

    PubMed Central

    Massart, Renaud; Mongeau, Raymond; Lanfumey, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    The monoamine hypothesis of depression has dominated our understanding of both the pathophysiology of depression and the action of pharmacological treatments for the last decades, and it has led to the production of several generations of antidepressant agents. However, there are serious limitations to the current monoamine theory, and additional mechanisms, including hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunctions, as well as neurodegenerative and inflammatory alterations, are potentially associated with the pathogenesis of mood disorders. Moreover, new data have recently indicated that epigenetic mechanisms such as histone modifications and DNA methylation could affect diverse pathways leading to depression-like behaviours in animal models. In a transgenic mouse model of depression, in which a downregulation of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) causes a deficit in the HPA axis feedback control, besides alterations in monoamine neurotransmission and neuroplasticity, we found modifications in the expression of many proteins involved in epigenetic regulation, as well as clock genes, in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex, that might be central in the genesis of depressive-like behaviours. PMID:22826347

  3. Aberrant Wound Healing in an Epidermal Interleukin-4 Transgenic Mouse Model of Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Bao, Lei; Chan, Lawrence S; DiPietro, Luisa A; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing in a pre-existing Th2-dominated skin milieu was assessed by using an epidermal specific interleukin-4 (IL-4) transgenic (Tg) mouse model, which develops a pruritic inflammatory skin condition resembling human atopic dermatitis. Our results demonstrated that IL-4 Tg mice had delayed wound closure and re-epithelialization even though these mice exhibited higher degrees of epithelial cell proliferation. Wounds in IL-4 Tg mice also showed a marked enhancement in expression of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, elevated infiltration of inflammatory cells including neutrophils, macrophages, CD3+ lymphocytes, and epidermal dendritic T lymphocytes. In addition, these mice exhibited a significantly higher level of angiogenesis as compared to wild type mice. Furthermore, wounds in IL-4 Tg mice presented with larger amounts of granulation tissue, but had less expression and deposition of collagen. Taken together, an inflamed skin condition induced by IL-4 has a pronounced negative influence on the healing process. Understanding more about the pathogenesis of wound healing in a Th2- dominated environment may help investigators explore new potential therapeutic strategies.

  4. Targeted skipping of human dystrophin exons in transgenic mouse model systemically for antisense drug development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Benrashid, Ehsan; Lu, Peijuan; Cloer, Caryn; Zillmer, Allen; Shaban, Mona; Lu, Qi Long

    2011-01-01

    Antisense therapy has recently been demonstrated with great potential for targeted exon skipping and restoration of dystrophin production in cultured muscle cells and in muscles of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) patients. Therapeutic values of exon skipping critically depend on efficacy of the drugs, antisense oligomers (AOs). However, no animal model has been established to test AO targeting human dystrophin exon in vivo systemically. In this study, we applied Vivo-Morpholino to the hDMD mouse, a transgenic model carrying the full-length human dystrophin gene, and achieved for the first time more than 70% efficiency of targeted human dystrophin exon skipping in vivo systemically. We also established a GFP-reporter myoblast culture to screen AOs targeting human dystrophin exon 50. Antisense efficiency for most AOs is consistent between the reporter cells, human myoblasts and in the hDMD mice in vivo. However, variation in efficiency was also clearly observed. A combination of in vitro cell culture and a Vivo-Morpholino based evaluation in vivo systemically in the hDMD mice therefore may represent a prudent approach for selecting AO drug and to meet the regulatory requirement.

  5. Phenotypic Alterations in Hippocampal NPY- and PV-Expressing Interneurons in a Presymptomatic Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahar, Ian; Albuquerque, Marilia Silva; Mondragon-Rodriguez, Siddhartha; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Davoli, Maria Antonietta; Chabot, Jean-Guy; Williams, Sylvain; Mechawar, Naguib; Quirion, Rémi; Krantic, Slavica

    2017-01-01

    Interneurons, key regulators of hippocampal neuronal network excitability and synchronization, are lost in advanced stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Given that network changes occur at early (presymptomatic) stages, we explored whether alterations of interneurons also occur before amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation. Numbers of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactive (IR) cells were decreased in the hippocampus of 1 month-old TgCRND8 mouse AD model in a sub-regionally specific manner. The most prominent change observed was a decrease in the number of PV-IR cells that selectively affected CA1/2 and subiculum, with the pyramidal layer (PY) of CA1/2 accounting almost entirely for the reduction in number of hippocampal PV-IR cells. As PV neurons were decreased selectively in CA1/2 and subiculum, and given that they are critically involved in the control of hippocampal theta oscillations, we then assessed intrinsic theta oscillations in these regions after a 4-aminopyridine (4AP) challenge. This revealed increased theta power and population bursts in TgCRND8 mice compared to non-transgenic (nTg) controls, suggesting a hyperexcitability network state. Taken together, our results identify for the first time AD-related alterations in hippocampal interneuron function as early as at 1 month of age. These early functional alterations occurring before amyloid deposition may contribute to cognitive dysfunction in AD. PMID:28154533

  6. Targeting NADPH Oxidase Decreases Oxidative Stress in the Transgenic Sickle Cell Mouse Penis

    PubMed Central

    Musicki, Biljana; Liu, Tongyun; Sezen, Sena F.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a state of chronic vasculopathy characterized by endothelial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress, but the sources and mechanisms responsible for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the penis are unknown. Aims We evaluated whether SCD activates NADPH oxidase, induces endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling, and decreases antioxidants in the SCD mouse penis. We further tested the hypothesis that targeting NADPH oxidase decreases oxidative stress in the SCD mouse penis. Methods SCD transgenic (sickle) mice were used as an animal model of SCD. Hemizygous (hemi) mice served as controls. Mice received an NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 mM in drinking water) or vehicle. Penes were excised at baseline for molecular studies. Markers of oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [HNE]), sources of ROS (eNOS uncoupling and NADPH oxidase subunits p67phox, p47phox, and gp91phox), and enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase [SOD]1, SOD2, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase-1 [GPx1]) were measured by Western blot in penes. Main Outcome Measures Sources of ROS, oxidative stress, and enzymatic antioxidants in the SCD penis. Results Relative to hemi mice, SCD increased (P < 0.05) protein expression of NADPH oxidase subunits p67phox, p47phox, and gp91phox, 4-HNE-modified proteins, induced eNOS uncoupling, and reduced Gpx1 expression in the penis. Apocynin treatment of sickle mice reversed (P < 0.05) the abnormalities in protein expressions of p47phox, gp91phox (but not p67phox) and 4-HNE, but only slightly (P > 0.05) prevented eNOS uncoupling in the penis. Apocynin treatment of hemi mice did not affect any of these parameters. Conclusion NADPH oxidase and eNOS uncoupling are sources of oxidative stress in the SCD penis; decreased GPx1 further contributes to oxidative stress. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase upregulation decreases oxidative stress, implying a major role for NADPH oxidase as a ROS source and a

  7. Maternal thyroid hormones are transcriptionally active during embryo–foetal development: results from a novel transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Nucera, Carmelo; Muzzi, Patrizia; Tiveron, Cecilia; Farsetti, Antonella; Regina, Federico La; Foglio, Benedetta; Shih, Shou-Ching; Moretti, Fabiola; Pietra, Linda Della; Mancini, Francesca; Sacchi, Ada; Trimarchi, Francesco; Vercelli, Alessandro; Pontecorvi, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Even though several studies highlighted the role of maternal thyroid hormones (THs) during embryo–foetal development, direct evidence of their interaction with embryonic thyroid receptors (TRs) is still lacking. We generated a transgenic mouse model ubiquitously expressing a reporter gene tracing TH action during development. We engineered a construct (TRE2×) containing two TH-responsive elements controlling the expression of the LacZ reporter gene, which encodes β-galactosidase (β-gal). The specificity of the TRE2× activation by TH was evaluated in NIH3T3 cells by cotransfecting TRE2× along with TRs, retinoic or oestrogen receptors in the presence of their specific ligands. TRE2× transgene was microinjected into the zygotes, implanted in pseudopregnant BDF1 (a first-generation (F1) hybrid from a cross of C57BL/6 female and a DBA/2 male) mice and transgenic mouse models were developed. β-gal expression was assayed in tissue sections of transgenic mouse embryos at different stages of development. In vitro, TRE2× transactivation was observed only following physiological T3 stimulation, mediated exclusively by TRs. In vivo, β-gal staining, absent until embryonic day 9.5–10.5 (E9.5–E10.5), was observed as early as E11.5–E12.5 in different primordia (i.e. central nervous system, sense organs, intestine, etc.) of the TRE2× transgenic embryos, while the foetal thyroid function (FTF) was still inactive. Immunohistochemistry for TRs essentially colocalized with β-gal staining. No β-gal staining was detected in embryos of hypothyroid transgenic mice. Importantly, treatment with T3 in hypothyroid TRE2× transgenic mice rescued β-gal expression. Our results provide in vivo direct evidence that during embryonic life and before the onset of FTF, maternal THs are transcriptionally active through the action of embryonic TRs. This model may have clinical relevance and may be employed to design end-point assays for new molecules affecting THs action

  8. Neuregulin-1 attenuates cognitive function impairments in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, J; Hong, B-H; Kim, Y-J; Yang, E-J; Choi, M; Kim, H; Ahn, S; Baik, T-K; Woo, R-S; Kim, H-S

    2016-01-01

    The neuregulin (NRG) family of epidermal growth factor-related proteins is composed of a wide variety of soluble and membrane-bound proteins that exert their effects via the tyrosine kinase receptors ErbB2-ErbB4. In the nervous system, the functions of NRG1 are essential for peripheral myelination, the establishment and maintenance of neuromuscular and sensorimotor systems and the plasticity of cortical neuronal circuits. In the present study, we report that an intracerebroventricular infusion of NRG1 attenuated cognitive impairments in 13-month-old Tg2576 mice, an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition, according to Golgi-Cox staining, NRG1 rescued the reduction in the number of dendritic spines detected in the brains of Tg2576 mice compared with vehicle (PBS)-infused mice. This result was also corroborated in vitro as NRG1 attenuated the oligomeric amyloid beta peptide1-42 (Aβ1-42)-induced decrease in dendritic spine density in rat primary hippocampal neuron cultures. NRG1 also alleviated the decrease in neural differentiation induced by oligomeric Aβ1-42 in mouse fetal neural stem cells. Collectively, these results suggest that NRG1 has a therapeutic potential for AD by alleviating the reductions in dendritic spine density and neurogenesis found in AD brains. PMID:26913607

  9. Intake of sucrose-sweetened water induces insulin resistance and exacerbates memory deficits and amyloidosis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dongfeng; Lu, Hailin; Lewis, Terry L; Li, Ling

    2007-12-14

    Compelling evidence indicates that excess consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages plays an important role in the epidemic of obesity, a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been associated with a higher incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD). High fat diets promote AD-like pathology in mice. It is not known whether consumption of excess sugar as in calorically sweetened beverages with an otherwise normal diet affects the development of AD. In the present study, we provided 10% sucrose-sweetened water to a transgenic mouse model of AD with a normal rodent diet. Compared with the control mice with no sucrose added in the water, the sucrose group gained more body weight and developed glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, and hypercholesterolemia. These metabolic changes were associated with the exacerbation of memory impairment and a 2-3-fold increase in insoluble amyloid-beta protein levels and deposition in the brain. We further showed that the levels of expression and secretase-cleaved products of amyloid-beta precursor protein were not affected by sucrose intake. The steady-state levels of insulin-degrading enzyme did not change significantly, whereas there was a 2.5-fold increase in brain apoE levels. Therefore, we concluded that the up-regulation of apoE accelerated the aggregation of Abeta, resulting in the exacerbation of cerebral amyloidosis in sucrose-treated mice. These data underscore the potential role of dietary sugar in the pathogenesis of AD and suggest that controlling the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages may be an effective way to curtail the risk of developing AD.

  10. Integration-independent Transgenic Huntington Disease Fragment Mouse Models Reveal Distinct Phenotypes and Life Span in Vivo.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Robert; DeGiacomo, Francesco; Holcomb, Jennifer; Bonner, Akilah; Ring, Karen L; Zhang, Ningzhe; Zafar, Khan; Weiss, Andreas; Lager, Brenda; Schilling, Birgit; Gibson, Bradford W; Chen, Sylvia; Kwak, Seung; Ellerby, Lisa M

    2015-07-31

    The cascade of events that lead to cognitive decline, motor deficits, and psychiatric symptoms in patients with Huntington disease (HD) is triggered by a polyglutamine expansion in the N-terminal region of the huntingtin (HTT) protein. A significant mechanism in HD is the generation of mutant HTT fragments, which are generally more toxic than the full-length HTT. The protein fragments observed in human HD tissue and mouse models of HD are formed by proteolysis or aberrant splicing of HTT. To systematically investigate the relative contribution of the various HTT protein proteolysis events observed in vivo, we generated transgenic mouse models of HD representing five distinct proteolysis fragments ending at amino acids 171, 463, 536, 552, and 586 with a polyglutamine length of 148. All lines contain a single integration at the ROSA26 locus, with expression of the fragments driven by the chicken β-actin promoter at nearly identical levels. The transgenic mice N171-Q148 and N552-Q148 display significantly accelerated phenotypes and a shortened life span when compared with N463-Q148, N536-Q148, and N586-Q148 transgenic mice. We hypothesized that the accelerated phenotype was due to altered HTT protein interactions/complexes that accumulate with age. We found evidence for altered HTT complexes in caspase-2 fragment transgenic mice (N552-Q148) and a stronger interaction with the endogenous HTT protein. These findings correlate with an altered HTT molecular complex and distinct proteins in the HTT interactome set identified by mass spectrometry. In particular, we identified HSP90AA1 (HSP86) as a potential modulator of the distinct neurotoxicity of the caspase-2 fragment mice (N552-Q148) when compared with the caspase-6 transgenic mice (N586-Q148).

  11. Integration-independent Transgenic Huntington Disease Fragment Mouse Models Reveal Distinct Phenotypes and Life Span in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Robert; DeGiacomo, Francesco; Holcomb, Jennifer; Bonner, Akilah; Ring, Karen L.; Zhang, Ningzhe; Zafar, Khan; Weiss, Andreas; Lager, Brenda; Schilling, Birgit; Gibson, Bradford W.; Chen, Sylvia; Kwak, Seung; Ellerby, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    The cascade of events that lead to cognitive decline, motor deficits, and psychiatric symptoms in patients with Huntington disease (HD) is triggered by a polyglutamine expansion in the N-terminal region of the huntingtin (HTT) protein. A significant mechanism in HD is the generation of mutant HTT fragments, which are generally more toxic than the full-length HTT. The protein fragments observed in human HD tissue and mouse models of HD are formed by proteolysis or aberrant splicing of HTT. To systematically investigate the relative contribution of the various HTT protein proteolysis events observed in vivo, we generated transgenic mouse models of HD representing five distinct proteolysis fragments ending at amino acids 171, 463, 536, 552, and 586 with a polyglutamine length of 148. All lines contain a single integration at the ROSA26 locus, with expression of the fragments driven by the chicken β-actin promoter at nearly identical levels. The transgenic mice N171-Q148 and N552-Q148 display significantly accelerated phenotypes and a shortened life span when compared with N463-Q148, N536-Q148, and N586-Q148 transgenic mice. We hypothesized that the accelerated phenotype was due to altered HTT protein interactions/complexes that accumulate with age. We found evidence for altered HTT complexes in caspase-2 fragment transgenic mice (N552-Q148) and a stronger interaction with the endogenous HTT protein. These findings correlate with an altered HTT molecular complex and distinct proteins in the HTT interactome set identified by mass spectrometry. In particular, we identified HSP90AA1 (HSP86) as a potential modulator of the distinct neurotoxicity of the caspase-2 fragment mice (N552-Q148) when compared with the caspase-6 transgenic mice (N586-Q148). PMID:26025364

  12. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD.

  13. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the ‘London’ (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and ‘Swedish’ mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD. PMID:27421117

  14. Vaccination induced changes in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels as an early putative biomarker for cognitive improvement in a transgenic mouse model for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoyang; Bai, Ge; Lin, Linda; Wu, Hengyi; Cai, Jianfeng; Ugen, Kenneth E; Cao, Chuanhai

    2014-01-01

    Several pieces of experimental evidence suggest that administration of anti-β amyloid (Aβ) vaccines, passive anti-Aβ antibodies or anti-inflammatory drugs can reduce Aβ deposition as well as associated cognitive/behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer disease (AD) transgenic (Tg) mouse model and, as such, may have some efficacy in human AD patients as well. In the investigation reported here an Aβ 1-42 peptide vaccine was administered to 16-month old APP+PS1 transgenic (Tg) mice in which Aβ deposition, cognitive memory deficits as well as levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured in response to the vaccination regimen. After vaccination, the anti-Aβ 1-42 antibody-producing mice demonstrated a significant reduction in the sera levels of 4 pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1 α, and IL-12). Importantly, reductions in the cytokine levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were correlated with cognitive/behavioral improvement in the Tg mice. However, no differences in cerebral Aβ deposition in these mice were noted among the different control and experimental groups, i.e., Aβ 1-42 peptide vaccinated, control peptide vaccinated, or non-vaccinated mice. However, decreased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as improved cognitive performance were noted in mice vaccinated with the control peptide as well as those immunized with the Aβ 1-42 peptide. These findings suggest that reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in these mice may be utilized as an early biomarker for vaccination/treatment induced amelioration of cognitive deficits and are independent of Aβ deposition and, interestingly, antigen specific Aβ 1-42 vaccination. Since cytokine changes are typically related to T cell activation, the results imply that T cell regulation may have an important role in vaccination or other immunotherapeutic strategies in an AD mouse model and potentially in AD patients. Overall, these cytokine changes may serve as a predictive marker for AD

  15. Mouse and human BAC transgenes recapitulate tissue-specific expression of the vitamin D receptor in mice and rescue the VDR-null phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong Min; Bishop, Kathleen A; Goellner, Joseph J; O'Brien, Charles A; Pike, J Wesley

    2014-06-01

    The biological actions of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) are mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is expressed in numerous target tissues in a cell type-selective manner. Recent studies using genomic analyses and recombineered bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) have defined the specific features of mouse and human VDR gene loci in vitro. In the current study, we introduced recombineered mouse and human VDR BACs as transgenes into mice and explored their expression capabilities in vivo. Individual transgenic mouse strains selectively expressed BAC-derived mouse or human VDR proteins in appropriate vitamin D target tissues, thereby recapitulating the tissue-specific expression of endogenous mouse VDR. The mouse VDR transgene was also regulated by 1,25(OH)2D3 and dibutyryl-cAMP. When crossed into a VDR-null mouse background, both transgenes restored wild-type basal as well as 1,25(OH)2D3-inducible gene expression patterns in the appropriate tissues. This maneuver resulted in the complete rescue of the aberrant phenotype noted in the VDR-null mouse, including systemic features associated with altered calcium and phosphorus homeostasis and disrupted production of parathyroid hormone and fibroblast growth factor 23, and abnormalities associated with the skeleton, kidney, parathyroid gland, and the skin. This study suggests that both mouse and human VDR transgenes are capable of recapitulating basal and regulated expression of the VDR in the appropriate mouse tissues and restore 1,25(OH)2D3 function. These results provide a baseline for further dissection of mechanisms integral to mouse and human VDR gene expression and offer the potential to explore the consequence of selective mutations in VDR proteins in vivo.

  16. Effects of a dietary ketone ester on hippocampal glycolytic and TCA cycle intermediates and amino acids in a 3xTgAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pawlosky, Robert J; Kemper, Martin F; Kashiwaya, Yoshihero; King, M Todd; Mattson, Mark P; Veech, Richard L

    2017-01-18

    In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in a triple transgenic (3xTgAD) mouse model of AD low glucose metabolism in the brain precedes loss of memory and cognitive decline. The metabolism of ketones in the brain by-passes glycolysis and therefore may correct several deficiencies that are associated with glucose hypometabolism. A dietary supplement composed of an ester of D-β-hydroxybutyrate and R-1,3 butane diol referred to as ketone ester (KE) was incorporated into a rodent diet and fed to 3xTgAD mice for 8 months. At 16.5 months of age animals were euthanized and brains dissected. Analyses were carried out on the hippocampus and frontal cortex for glycolytic and TCA (Tricarboxylic Acid) cycle intermediates, amino acids, oxidized lipids and proteins, and enzymes. There were higher concentrations of D-β-hydroxybutyrate in the hippocampus of KE-fed mice where there were also higher concentrations of TCA cycle and glycolytic intermediates and the energy-linked biomarker, n-acetyl aspartate compared to controls. In the hippocampi of control-fed animals the free mitochondrial [NAD(+) ]/[NADH] ratio were highly oxidized, whereas, in KE-fed animals the mitochondria were reduced. Also, the levels of oxidized protein and lipids were lower and the energy of ATP hydrolysis was greater compared to controls. 3xTgAD mice maintained on a KE-supplemented diet had higher concentrations of glycolytic and TCA cycle metabolites, a more reduced mitochondrial redox potential, and lower amounts of oxidized lipids and proteins in their hippocampi compared to controls. The KE offers a potential therapy to counter fundamental metabolic deficits common to patients and transgenic models. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Fluorescent labeling of both GABAergic and glycinergic neurons in vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT)-venus transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Kakizaki, T; Sakagami, H; Saito, K; Ebihara, S; Kato, M; Hirabayashi, M; Saito, Y; Furuya, N; Yanagawa, Y

    2009-12-15

    Inhibitory neurons play important roles in a number of brain functions. They are composed of GABAergic neurons and glycinergic neurons, and vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) is specifically expressed in these neurons. Since the inhibitory neurons are scattered around in the CNS, it is difficult to identify these cells in living brain preparations. The glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) 67-GFP knock-in mouse has been widely used for the identification of GABAergic neurons, but their GAD67 expression was decreased compared to the wild-type mice. To overcome such a problem and to highlight the function and morphology of inhibitory neurons, we generated four lines of VGAT-Venus transgenic mice (lines #04, #29, #39 and #49) expressing Venus fluorescent protein under the control of mouse VGAT promoter. We found higher expression level of Venus transcripts and proteins as well as brighter fluorescent signal in line #39 mouse brains, compared to brains of other lines examined. By Western blots and spectrofluorometric measurements of forebrain, the line #39 mouse showed stronger GFP immunoreactivity and brighter fluorescent intensity than the GAD67-GFP knock-in mouse. In addition, Venus was present not only in somata, but also in neurites in the line #39 mouse by histological studies. In situ hybridization analysis showed that the expression pattern of Venus in the line #39 mouse was similar to that of endogenous VGAT. Double immunostaining analysis in line #39 mouse showed that Venus-expressing cells are primarily immunoreactive for GABA in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellar cortex and for GABA or glycine in dorsal cochlear nucleus. These results demonstrate that the VGAT-Venus line #39 mouse should be useful for studies on function and morphology of inhibitory neurons in the CNS.

  18. The S100A4 Oncoprotein Promotes Prostate Tumorigenesis in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Hifzur R.; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Parray, Aijaz; Johnson, Jeremy J.; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Shekhani, Mohammad T.; Murtaza, Imtiyaz; Ambartsumian, Noona; Konety, Badrinath R.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    S100A4, a calcium-binding protein, is known for its role in the metastatic spread of tumor cells, a late event of cancer disease. This is the first report showing that S100A4 is not merely a metastatic protein but also an oncoprotein that plays a critical role in the development of tumors. We earlier showed that S100A4 expression progressively increases in prostatic tissues with the advancement of prostate cancer (CaP) in TRAMP, an autochthonous mouse model. To study the functional significance of S100A4 in CaP, we generated a heterozygously deleted S100A4 (TRAMP/S100A4+/−) genotype by crossing TRAMP with S100A4−/− mice. TRAMP/S100A4+/− did not show a lethal phenotype, and transgenes were functional. As compared to age-matched TRAMP littermates, TRAMP/S100A4+/− mice exhibited 1) an increased tumor latency period (P < 0.001), 2) a 0% incidence of metastasis, and 3) reduced prostatic weights (P < 0.001). We generated S100A4-positive clones from S100A4-negative CaP cells and tested their potential. S100A4-positive tumors grew at a faster rate than S100A4-negative tumors in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. The S100A4 protein exhibited growth factor–like properties in multimode (intracellular and extracellular) forms. We observed that 1) the growth-promoting effect of S100A4 is due to its activation of NFκB, 2) S100A4-deficient tumors exhibit reduced NFκB activity, 3) S100A4 regulates NFκB through the RAGE receptor, and 4) S100A4 and RAGE co-localize in prostatic tissues of mice. Keeping in view its growth-promoting role, we suggest that S100A4 qualifies as an excellent candidate to be exploited for therapeutic agents to treat CaP in humans. PMID:24069509

  19. A transgenic mouse model expressing an ERα folding biosensor reveals the effects of Bisphenol A on estrogen receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sekar, Thillai V.; Foygel, Kira; Massoud, Tarik F.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-α (ERα) plays an important role in normal and abnormal physiology of the human reproductive system by interacting with the endogenous ligand estradiol (E2). However, other ligands, either analogous or dissimilar to E2, also bind to ERα. This may create unintentional activation of ER signaling in reproductive tissues that can lead to cancer development. We developed a transgenic mouse model that constitutively expresses a firefly luciferase (FLuc) split reporter complementation biosensor (NFLuc-ER-LBDG521T-CFLuc) to simultaneously evaluate the dynamics and potency of ligands that bind to ERα. We first validated this model using various ER ligands, including Raloxifene, Diethylstilbestrol, E2, and 4-hydroxytamoxifen, by employing FLuc-based optical bioluminescence imaging of living mice. We then used the model to investigate the carcinogenic property of Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental estrogen, by long-term exposure at full and half environmental doses. We showed significant carcinogenic effects on female animals while revealing activated downstream ER signaling as measured by bioluminescence imaging. BPA induced tumor-like outgrowths in female transgenic mice, histopathologically confirmed to be neoplastic and epithelial in origin. This transgenic mouse model expressing an ERα folding-biosensor is useful in evaluation of estrogenic ligands and their downstream effects, and in studying environmental estrogen induced carcinogenesis in vivo. PMID:27721470

  20. Transgenic Mouse Bioassay: Evidence That Rabbits Are Susceptible to a Variety of Prion Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pintado, Belén; Eraña, Hasier; Ordóñez, Montserrat; Márquez, Mercedes; Chianini, Francesca; Fondevila, Dolors; Sánchez-Martín, Manuel A.; Andreoletti, Olivier; Dagleish, Mark P.; Pumarola, Martí; Castilla, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Interspecies transmission of prions is a well-established phenomenon, both experimentally and under field conditions. Upon passage through new hosts, prion strains have proven their capacity to change their properties and this is a source of strain diversity which needs to be considered when assessing the potential risks associated with consumption of prion contaminated protein sources. Rabbits were considered for decades to be a prion resistant species until proven otherwise recently. To determine the extent of rabbit susceptibility to prions and to assess the effects of passage of different prion strains through this species a transgenic mouse model overexpressing rabbit PrPC was developed (TgRab). Intracerebral challenges with prion strains originating from a variety of species including field isolates (ovine SSBP/1 scrapie, Nor98- scrapie; cattle BSE, BSE-L and cervid CWD), experimental murine strains (ME7 and RML) and experimentally obtained ruminant (sheepBSE) and rabbit (de novo NZW) strains were performed. On first passage TgRab were susceptible to the majority of prions (Cattle BSE, SheepBSE, BSE-L, de novo NZW, ME7 and RML) tested with the exception of SSBP/1 scrapie, CWD and Nor98 scrapie. Furthermore, TgRab were capable of propagating strain-specific features such as differences in incubation periods, histological brain lesions, abnormal prion (PrPd) deposition profiles and proteinase-K (PK) resistant western blotting band patterns. Our results confirm previous studies proving that rabbits are not resistant to prion infection and show for the first time that rabbits are susceptible to PrPd originating in a number of other species. This should be taken into account when choosing protein sources to feed rabbits. PMID:26247589

  1. Schizophrenia: a neurodevelopmental disorder--integrative genomic hypothesis and therapeutic implications from a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Stachowiak, M K; Kucinski, A; Curl, R; Syposs, C; Yang, Y; Narla, S; Terranova, C; Prokop, D; Klejbor, I; Bencherif, M; Birkaya, B; Corso, T; Parikh, A; Tzanakakis, E S; Wersinger, S; Stachowiak, E K

    2013-02-01

    Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder featuring complex aberrations in the structure, wiring, and chemistry of multiple neuronal systems. The abnormal developmental trajectory of the brain appears to be established during gestation, long before clinical symptoms of the disease appear in early adult life. Many genes are associated with schizophrenia, however, altered expression of no one gene has been shown to be present in a majority of schizophrenia patients. How does altered expression of such a variety of genes lead to the complex set of abnormalities observed in the schizophrenic brain? We hypothesize that the protein products of these genes converge on common neurodevelopmental pathways that affect the development of multiple neural circuits and neurotransmitter systems. One such neurodevelopmental pathway is Integrative Nuclear FGFR1 Signaling (INFS). INFS integrates diverse neurogenic signals that direct the postmitotic development of embryonic stem cells, neural progenitors and immature neurons, by direct gene reprogramming. Additionally, FGFR1 and its partner proteins link multiple upstream pathways in which schizophrenia-linked genes are known to function and interact directly with those genes. A th-fgfr1(tk-) transgenic mouse with impaired FGF receptor signaling establishes a number of important characteristics that mimic human schizophrenia - a neurodevelopmental origin, anatomical abnormalities at birth, a delayed onset of behavioral symptoms, deficits across multiple domains of the disorder and symptom improvement with typical and atypical antipsychotics, 5-HT antagonists, and nicotinic receptor agonists. Our research suggests that altered FGF receptor signaling plays a central role in the developmental abnormalities underlying schizophrenia and that nicotinic agonists are an effective class of compounds for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  2. Neuroprotection and neuronal differentiation studies using substantia nigra dopaminergic cells derived from transgenic mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Son, J H; Chun, H S; Joh, T H; Cho, S; Conti, B; Lee, J W

    1999-01-01

    The major pathological lesion of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the selective cell death of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in substantia nigra (SN). Although the initial cause and subsequent molecular signaling mechanisms leading to DA cell death underlying the PD process remain elusive, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is thought to exert neuroprotective as well as neurotrophic roles for the survival and differentiation of DA neurons in SN. Addressing molecular mechanisms of BDNF action in both primary embryonic mesencephalic cultures and in vivo animal models has been technically difficult because DA neurons in SN are relatively rare and present with many heterogeneous cell populations in midbrain. We have developed and characterized a DA neuronal cell line of embryonic SN origin that is more accessible to molecular analysis and can be used as an in vitro model system for studying SN DA neurons. A clonal SN DA neuronal progenitor cell line SN4741, arrested at an early DA developmental stage, was established from transgenic mouse embryos containing the targeted expression of the thermolabile SV40Tag in SN DA neurons. The phenotypic and morphological differentiation of the SN4741 cells could be manipulated by environmental cues in vitro. Exogenous BDNF treatment produced significant neuroprotection against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, glutamate, and nitric oxide-induced neurotoxicity in the SN4741 cells. Simultaneous phosphorylation of receptor tyrosine kinase B accompanied the neuroprotection. This SN DA neuronal cell line provides a unique model system to circumvent the limitations associated with primary mesencephalic cultures for the elucidation of molecular mechanisms of BDNF action on DA neurons of the SN.

  3. Transgenic Mouse Bioassay: Evidence That Rabbits Are Susceptible to a Variety of Prion Isolates.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Enric; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Pintado, Belén; Eraña, Hasier; Ordóñez, Montserrat; Márquez, Mercedes; Chianini, Francesca; Fondevila, Dolors; Sánchez-Martín, Manuel A; Andreoletti, Olivier; Dagleish, Mark P; Pumarola, Martí; Castilla, Joaquín

    2015-08-01

    Interspecies transmission of prions is a well-established phenomenon, both experimentally and under field conditions. Upon passage through new hosts, prion strains have proven their capacity to change their properties and this is a source of strain diversity which needs to be considered when assessing the potential risks associated with consumption of prion contaminated protein sources. Rabbits were considered for decades to be a prion resistant species until proven otherwise recently. To determine the extent of rabbit susceptibility to prions and to assess the effects of passage of different prion strains through this species a transgenic mouse model overexpressing rabbit PrPC was developed (TgRab). Intracerebral challenges with prion strains originating from a variety of species including field isolates (ovine SSBP/1 scrapie, Nor98- scrapie; cattle BSE, BSE-L and cervid CWD), experimental murine strains (ME7 and RML) and experimentally obtained ruminant (sheepBSE) and rabbit (de novo NZW) strains were performed. On first passage TgRab were susceptible to the majority of prions (Cattle BSE, SheepBSE, BSE-L, de novo NZW, ME7 and RML) tested with the exception of SSBP/1 scrapie, CWD and Nor98 scrapie. Furthermore, TgRab were capable of propagating strain-specific features such as differences in incubation periods, histological brain lesions, abnormal prion (PrPd) deposition profiles and proteinase-K (PK) resistant western blotting band patterns. Our results confirm previous studies proving that rabbits are not resistant to prion infection and show for the first time that rabbits are susceptible to PrPd originating in a number of other species. This should be taken into account when choosing protein sources to feed rabbits.

  4. Erythropoietin is Neuroprotective in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pallua, Anton; Stefanova, Nadia; Poewe, Werner; Wenning, Gregor K.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a markedly reduced life expectancy. Failure of symptomatic treatment raises an urgent need for disease-modifying strategies. We have investigated the neuroprotective potential of erythropoietin in (proteolipid protein)-α-synuclein transgenic mice exposed to 3-nitropropionic acid featuring multiple system atrophy-like pathology including oligodendroglial α-synuclein inclusions and selective neuronal degeneration. Mice were treated with erythropoietin starting before (early erythropoietin) and after (late erythropoietin) intoxication with 3-nitropropionic acid. Nonintoxicated animals receiving erythropoietin and intoxicated animals treated with saline served as control groups. Behavioral tests included pole test, open field activity, and motor behavior scale. Immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP-32) was analyzed stereologically. Animals receiving erythropoietin before and after 3-nitropropionic acid intoxication scored significantly lower on the motor behavior scale and they performed better in the pole test than controls with no significant difference between early and late erythropoietin administration. Similarly, rearing scores were worse in 3-nitropropionic acid-treated animals with no difference between the erythropoietin subgroups. Immunohistochemistry revealed significant attenuation of 3-nitropropionic acid-induced loss of tyrosine hydroxylase and DARPP-32 positive neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum, respectively, in both erythropoietin-treated groups without significant group difference in the substantia nigra. However, at striatal level, a significant difference between early and late erythropoietin administration was observed. In the combined (proteolipid protein)-α-synuclein 3-nitropropionic acid multiple system atrophy mouse model, erythropoietin appears to rescue

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction in a transgenic mouse model expressing human amyloid precursor protein (APP) with the Arctic mutation.

    PubMed

    Rönnbäck, Annica; Pavlov, Pavel F; Mansory, Mansorah; Gonze, Prisca; Marlière, Nicolas; Winblad, Bengt; Graff, Caroline; Behbahani, Homira

    2016-02-01

    Accumulation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in the brain is an important event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. We have used a transgenic mouse model expressing human amyloid precursor protein (APP) with the Arctic mutation to investigate whether Aβ deposition is correlated with mitochondrial functions in these animals. We found evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (i.e., decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative DNA damage) at 6 months of age, when the mice showed very mild Aβ deposition. More pronounced mitochondrial abnormalities were present in 24-month-old TgAPParc mice with more extensive Aβ pathology. This study demonstrates for the first time mitochondrial dysfunction in transgenic mice with a mutation within the Aβ peptide (the Arctic APP mutation), and confirms previous studies suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress is an early event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. This study demonstrates mitochondrial dysfunction in transgenic mice with a mutation within the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide (the Arctic amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutation). We found evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (i.e. decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative DNA damage) at 6 months of age, when very mild Aβ deposition is present in the mice. Also, the cytochrome c (COX) activity was significantly decreased in mitochondria from transgenic mice at 24 months of age.

  6. Expression of Phenotypic Astrocyte Marker Is Increased in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease versus Age-Matched Controls: A Presymptomatic Stage Study

    PubMed Central

    Doméné, Aurélie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Page, Guylène; Bodard, Sylvie; Klein, Christophe; Delarasse, Cécile; Chalon, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Recent mouse studies of the presymptomatic stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have suggested that proinflammatory changes, such as glial activation and cytokine induction, may occur already at this early stage through unknown mechanisms. Because TNFα contributes to increased Aβ production from the Aβ precursor protein (APP), we assessed a putative correlation between APP/Aβ and TNFα during the presymptomatic stage as well as early astrocyte activation in the hippocampus of 3-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. While Western blots revealed significant APP expression, Aβ was not detectable by Western blot or ELISA attesting that 3-month-old, APPswe/PS1dE9 mice are at a presymptomatic stage of AD-like pathology. Western blots were also used to show increased GFAP expression in transgenic mice that positively correlated with both TNFα and APP, which were also mutually correlated. Subregional immunohistochemical quantification of phenotypic (GFAP) and functional (TSPO) markers of astrocyte activation indicated a selective and significant increase in GFAP-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the dentate gyrus of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. Our data suggest that subtle morphological and phenotypic alterations, compatible with the engagement of astrocyte along the activation pathway, occur in the hippocampus already at the presymptomatic stage of AD. PMID:27672476

  7. Further characterization of the metabolic properties of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from human and mouse apoC-III transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Aalto-Setälä, K; Weinstock, P H; Bisgaier, C L; Wu, L; Smith, J D; Breslow, J L

    1996-08-01

    We previously showed that human apoC-III expression in transgenic mice causes hypertriglyceridemia due to the accumulation of enlarged very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-like particles, with increased triglycerides and apoC-III and decreased apoE. In vivo turnover studies indicated the metabolic basis was decreased particle fractional catabolic rate. The presence of enlarged triglyceride-rich particles with prolonged residence time in plasma implied defective lipolysis, but in vitro these particles were good substrates for purified lipoprotein lipase (LPL). In the current study we further characterize the metabolic properties of these particles. We show that expression of a mouse apoC-III transgene can also cause hypertriglyceridemia with a similar accumulation of a VLDL-like particle with increased apoC-III and decreased apoE. A vitamin A fat tolerance test was used to show that MoCIIITg and HuCIIITg mice had similarly delayed clearance of triglyceride-rich postprandial particles. Thus, the previously observed hypertriglyceridemia caused by human apoC-III transgene expression was not due interspecies incompatibility but a property of apoC-III. In further experiments we showed VLDL from apoC-III transgenic mice interacted poorly with fibroblast lipoprotein receptors and this could be corrected by adding exogenous apoE. In addition, control VLDL interaction could be decreased by exogenous apoC-III. Moreover, the hypertriglyceridemia of HuCIIITg mice could be normalized by crossbreeding with HuETg mice. Thus, a functionally significant reciprocal relationship of apoC-III and apoE exists, presumably due to competition for space on the surface of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Finally, VLDL from HuCIITg and MoCIIITg mice showed decreased binding to heparin-Sepharose. This suggests and additional locus of the defect in these mice could potentially be in the binding of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins to heparan sulfate proteoglycan matrix on the surface of endothelial

  8. A novel sulindac derivative lacking cyclooxygenase-inhibitory activities suppresses carcinogenesis in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Jinhui; Wang, Lei; Quealy, Emily; Gary, Bernard D; Reynolds, Robert C; Piazza, Gary A; Lü, Junxuan

    2010-07-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including sulindac are well documented to be highly effective for cancer chemoprevention. However, their cyclooxygenase (COX)-inhibitory activities cause severe gastrointestinal, renal, and cardiovascular toxicities, limiting their chronic use. Recent studies suggest that COX-independent mechanisms may be responsible for the chemopreventive benefits of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and support the potential for the development of a novel generation of sulindac derivatives lacking COX inhibition for cancer chemoprevention. A prototypic sulindac derivative with a N,N-dimethylammonium substitution called sulindac sulfide amide (SSA) was recently identified to be devoid of COX-inhibitory activity yet displays much more potent tumor cell growth-inhibitory activity in vitro compared with sulindac sulfide. In this study, we investigated the androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathway as a potential target for its COX-independent antineoplastic mechanism and evaluated its chemopreventive efficacy against prostate carcinogenesis using the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate model. The results showed that SSA significantly suppressed the growth of human and mouse prostate cancer cells expressing AR in strong association with G(1) arrest, and decreased AR level and AR-dependent transactivation. Dietary SSA consumption dramatically attenuated prostatic growth and suppressed AR-dependent glandular epithelial lesion progression through repressing cell proliferation in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate mice, whereas it did not significantly affect neuroendocrine carcinoma growth. Overall, the results suggest that SSA may be a chemopreventive candidate against prostate glandular epithelial carcinogenesis.

  9. MDA-7/IL-24 functions as a tumor suppressor gene in vivo in transgenic mouse models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Mitchell E; Shen, Xue-Ning; Das, Swadesh K; Emdad, Luni; Guo, Chunqing; Yuan, Fang; Li, You-Jun; Archer, Michael C; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Windle, Jolene J; Subler, Mark A; Ben-David, Yaacov; Sarkar, Devanand; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Fisher, Paul B

    2015-11-10

    Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/Interleukin-24 (MDA-7/IL-24) is a novel member of the IL-10 gene family that selectively induces apoptosis and toxic autophagy in a broad spectrum of human cancers, including breast cancer, without harming normal cells or tissues. The ability to investigate the critical events underlying cancer initiation and progression, as well as the capacity to test the efficacy of novel therapeutics, has been significantly advanced by the development of genetically engineered mice (GEMs) that accurately recapitulate specific human cancers. We utilized three transgenic mouse models to better comprehend the in vivo role of MDA-7/IL-24 in breast cancer. Using the MMTV-PyMT spontaneous mammary tumor model, we confirmed that exogenously introducing MDA-7/IL-24 using a Cancer Terminator Virus caused a reduction in tumor burden and also produced an antitumor "bystander" effect. Next we performed xenograft studies in a newly created MMTV-MDA-7 transgenic model that over-expresses MDA-7/IL-24 in the mammary glands during pregnancy and lactation, and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed tumor growth following orthotopic injection of a murine PDX tumor cell line (mPDX) derived from a tumor formed in an MMTV-PyMT mouse. We also crossed the MMTV-MDA-7 line to MMTV-Erbb2 transgenic mice and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed the onset of mammary tumor development in this model of spontaneous mammary tumorigenesis as well. Finally, we assessed the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in immune regulation, which can potentially contribute to tumor suppression in vivo. Our findings provide further direct in vivo evidence for the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in tumor suppression in breast cancer in immune-competent transgenic mice.

  10. Ectopic expression of Cripto-1 in transgenic mouse embryos causes hemorrhages, fatal cardiac defects and embryonic lethality

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaolin; Zhao, Wentao; Jia, Junshuang; Lin, Taoyan; Xiao, Gaofang; Wang, Shengchun; Lin, Xia; Liu, Yu; Chen, Li; Qin, Yujuan; Li, Jing; Zhang, Tingting; Hao, Weichao; Chen, Bangzhu; Xie, Raoying; Cheng, Yushuang; Xu, Kang; Yao, Kaitai; Huang, Wenhua; Xiao, Dong; Sun, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Targeted disruption of Cripto-1 in mice caused embryonic lethality at E7.5, whereas we unexpectedly found that ectopic Cripto-1 expression in mouse embryos also led to embryonic lethality, which prompted us to characterize the causes and mechanisms underlying embryonic death due to ectopic Cripto-1 expression. RCLG/EIIa-Cre embryos displayed complex phenotypes between embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) and E17.5, including fatal hemorrhages (E14.5-E15.5), embryo resorption (E14.5-E17.5), pale body surface (E14.5-E16.5) and no abnormal appearance (E14.5-E16.5). Macroscopic and histological examination revealed that ectopic expression of Cripto-1 transgene in RCLG/EIIa-Cre embryos resulted in lethal cardiac defects, as evidenced by cardiac malformations, myocardial thinning, failed assembly of striated myofibrils and lack of heartbeat. In addition, Cripto-1 transgene activation beginning after E8.5 also caused the aforementioned lethal cardiac defects in mouse embryos. Furthermore, ectopic Cripto-1 expression in embryonic hearts reduced the expression of cardiac transcription factors, which is at least partially responsible for the aforementioned lethal cardiac defects. Our results suggest that hemorrhages and cardiac abnormalities are two important lethal factors in Cripto-1 transgenic mice. Taken together, these findings are the first to demonstrate that sustained Cripto-1 transgene expression after E11.5 causes fatal hemorrhages and lethal cardiac defects, leading to embryonic death at E14.5-17.5. PMID:27687577

  11. Transgenic Expression of AQP1 in the Fiber Cells of AQP0 Knockout Mouse: Effects on Lens Transparency

    PubMed Central

    Varadaraj, K.; Kumari, S.S.; Mathias, R.T.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations and knockout of aquaporin 0 (AQP0) result in dominant lens cataract. To date, several functions have been proposed for AQP0; however, two functions, water permeability and cell-to-cell adhesion have been supported by several investigators and only water channel function has been readily authenticated by in vitro and ex vivo studies. Lens shifts protein expression from the more efficient AQP1 in the equatorial epithelial cells to the less efficient water channel, AQP0, in the differentiating secondary fiber cells; perhaps, AQP0 performs a distinctive function. If AQP0 has only water permeability function, can the more efficient water channel AQP1 transgenically expressed in the fiber cells compensate and restore lens transparency in the AQP0 knockout (AQP0-/-) mouse? To investigate, we generated a transgenic wild type mouse line expressing AQP1 in the fiber cells using αA-crystallin promoter. These transgenic mice (TgAQP1+/+) showed increase in fiber cell membrane water permeability without any morphological, anatomical or physiological defects compared to the wild type indicating that the main purpose of the shift in expression from AQP1 to AQP0 may not be to lessen the membrane water permeability. Further, we transgenically expressed AQP1 in the lens fiber cells of AQP0 knockout mouse (TgAQP1+/+/AQP0-/-) to determine whether AQP1 could restore AQP0 water channel function and regain lens transparency. Fiber cells of these mice showed 2.6 times more water permeability than the wild type. Transgene AQP1 reduced the severity of lens cataract and prevented dramatic acceleration of cataractogenesis. However, lens fiber cells showed deformities and lack of compact cellular architecture. Loss of lens transparency due to the absence of AQP0 was not completely restored indicating an additional function for AQP0. In vitro studies showed that AQP0 is capable of cell-to-cell adhesion while AQP1 is not. To our knowledge, this is the first report which uses an animal

  12. Neurodegenerative phenotypes in an A53T α-synuclein transgenic mouse model are independent of LRRK2

    PubMed Central

    Daher, João Paulo L.; Pletnikova, Olga; Biskup, Saskia; Musso, Alessandra; Gellhaar, Sandra; Galter, Dagmar; Troncoso, Juan C.; Lee, Michael K.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Moore, Darren J.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding LRRK2 and α-synuclein cause autosomal dominant forms of familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Fibrillar forms of α-synuclein are a major component of Lewy bodies, the intracytoplasmic proteinaceous inclusions that are a pathological hallmark of idiopathic and certain familial forms of PD. LRRK2 mutations cause late-onset familial PD with a clinical, neurochemical and, for the most part, neuropathological phenotype that is indistinguishable from idiopathic PD. Importantly, α-synuclein-positive Lewy bodies are the most common pathology identified in the brains of PD subjects harboring LRRK2 mutations. These observations may suggest that LRRK2 functions in a common pathway with α-synuclein to regulate its aggregation. To explore the potential pathophysiological interaction between LRRK2 and α-synuclein in vivo, we modulated LRRK2 expression in a well-established human A53T α-synuclein transgenic mouse model with transgene expression driven by the hindbrain-selective prion protein promoter. Deletion of LRRK2 or overexpression of human G2019S-LRRK2 has minimal impact on the lethal neurodegenerative phenotype that develops in A53T α-synuclein transgenic mice, including premature lethality, pre-symptomatic behavioral deficits and human α-synuclein or glial neuropathology. We also find that endogenous or human LRRK2 and A53T α-synuclein do not interact together to influence the number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Taken together, our data suggest that α-synuclein-related pathology, which occurs predominantly in the hindbrain of this A53T α-synuclein mouse model, occurs largely independently from LRRK2 expression. These observations fail to provide support for a pathophysiological interaction of LRRK2 and α-synuclein in vivo, at least within neurons of the mouse hindbrain. PMID:22357653

  13. S-SCAM, A Rare Copy Number Variation Gene, Induces Schizophrenia-Related Endophenotypes in Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nanyan; Zhong, Peng; Shin, Seung Min; Metallo, Jacob; Danielson, Eric; Olsen, Christopher M.; Liu, Qing-song

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating genetic evidence suggests that schizophrenia (SZ) is associated with individually rare copy number variations (CNVs) of diverse genes, often specific to single cases. However, the causality of these rare mutations remains unknown. One of the rare CNVs found in SZ cohorts is the duplication of Synaptic Scaffolding Molecule (S-SCAM, also called MAGI-2), which encodes a postsynaptic scaffolding protein controlling synaptic AMPA receptor levels, and thus the strength of excitatory synaptic transmission. Here we report that, in a transgenic mouse model simulating the duplication conditions, elevation of S-SCAM levels in excitatory neurons of the forebrain was sufficient to induce multiple SZ-related endophenotypes. S-SCAM transgenic mice showed an increased number of lateral ventricles and a reduced number of parvalbumin-stained neurons. In addition, the mice exhibited SZ-like behavioral abnormalities, including hyperlocomotor activity, deficits in prepulse inhibition, increased anxiety, impaired social interaction, and working memory deficit. Notably, the S-SCAM transgenic mice showed a unique sex difference in showing these behavioral symptoms, which is reminiscent of human conditions. These behavioral abnormalities were accompanied by hyperglutamatergic function associated with increased synaptic AMPA receptor levels and impaired long-term potentiation. Importantly, reducing glutamate release by the group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist LY379268 ameliorated the working memory deficits in the transgenic mice, suggesting that hyperglutamatergic function underlies the cognitive functional deficits. Together, these results contribute to validate a causal relationship of the rare S-SCAM CNV and provide supporting evidence for the rare CNV hypothesis in SZ pathogenesis. Furthermore, the S-SCAM transgenic mice provide a valuable new animal model for studying SZ pathogenesis. PMID:25653350

  14. Chronic coexistence of two troponin T isoforms in adult transgenic mouse cardiomyocytes decreased contractile kinetics and caused dilatative remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Bin; Wei, Hongguang; Jin, J-P

    2012-07-01

    Our previous in vivo and ex vivo studies suggested that coexistence of two or more troponin T (TnT) isoforms in adult cardiac muscle decreased cardiac function and efficiency (Huang QQ, Feng HZ, Liu J, Du J, Stull LB, Moravec CS, Huang X, Jin JP, Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 294: C213-C22, 2008; Feng HZ, Jin JP, Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 299: H97-H105, 2010). Here we characterized Ca(2+)-regulated contractility of isolated adult cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice coexpressing a fast skeletal muscle TnT together with the endogenous cardiac TnT. Without the influence of extracellular matrix, coexistence of the two TnT isoforms resulted in lower shortening amplitude, slower shortening and relengthening velocities, and longer relengthening time. The level of resting cytosolic Ca(2+) was unchanged, but the peak Ca(2+) transient was lowered and the durations of Ca(2+) rising and decaying were longer in the transgenic mouse cardiomyocytes vs. the wild-type controls. Isoproterenol treatment diminished the differences in shortening amplitude and shortening and relengthening velocities, whereas the prolonged durations of relengthening and Ca(2+) transient in the transgenic cardiomyocytes remained. At rigor state, a result from depletion of Ca(2+), resting sarcomere length of the transgenic cardiomyocytes became shorter than that in wild-type cells. Inhibition of myosin motor diminished this effect of TnT function on cross bridges. The length but not width of transgenic cardiomyocytes was significantly increased compared with the wild-type controls, corresponding to longitudinal addition of sarcomeres and dilatative remodeling at the cellular level. These dominantly negative effects of normal fast TnT demonstrated that chronic coexistence of functionally distinct variants of TnT in adult cardiomyocytes reduces contractile performance with pathological consequences.

  15. Diversity of Reporter Expression Patterns in Transgenic Mouse Lines Targeting Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone-Expressing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Molet, Jenny; Gunn, Benjamin G.; Ressler, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic mice, including lines targeting corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF or CRH), have been extensively employed to study stress neurobiology. These powerful tools are poised to revolutionize our understanding of the localization and connectivity of CRH-expressing neurons, and the crucial roles of CRH in normal and pathological conditions. Accurate interpretation of studies using cell type-specific transgenic mice vitally depends on congruence between expression of the endogenous peptide and reporter. If reporter expression does not faithfully reproduce native gene expression, then effects of manipulating unintentionally targeted cells may be misattributed. Here, we studied CRH and reporter expression patterns in 3 adult transgenic mice: Crh-IRES-Cre;Ai14 (tdTomato mouse), Crfp3.0CreGFP, and Crh-GFP BAC. We employed the CRH antiserum generated by Vale after validating its specificity using CRH-null mice. We focused the analyses on stress-salient regions, including hypothalamus, amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and hippocampus. Expression patterns of endogenous CRH were consistent among wild-type and transgenic mice. In tdTomato mice, most CRH-expressing neurons coexpressed the reporter, yet the reporter identified a few non-CRH-expressing pyramidal-like cells in hippocampal CA1 and CA3. In Crfp3.0CreGFP mice, coexpression of CRH and the reporter was found in central amygdala and, less commonly, in other evaluated regions. In Crh-GFP BAC mice, the large majority of neurons expressed either CRH or reporter, with little overlap. These data highlight significant diversity in concordant expression of reporter and endogenous CRH among 3 available transgenic mice. These findings should be instrumental in interpreting important scientific findings emerging from the use of these potent neurobiological tools. PMID:26402844

  16. Generation and characterization of a CYP2A13/2B6/2F1-transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuan; Wu, Hong; Li, Lei; Liu, Zhihua; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Weng, Yan; D'Agostino, Jaime; Ling, Guoyu; Zhang, Xiuling; Kluetzman, Kerri; Yao, Yunyi; Ding, Xinxin

    2012-06-01

    CYP2A13, CYP2B6, and CYP2F1, which are encoded by neighboring cytochrome P450 genes on human chromosome 19, are active in the metabolic activation of many drugs, respiratory toxicants, and chemical carcinogens. To facilitate studies on the regulation and function of these human genes, we have generated a CYP2A13/2B6/2F1-transgenic (TG) mouse model (all *1 alleles). Homozygous transgenic mice are normal with respect to gross morphological features, development, and fertility. The tissue distribution of transgenic mRNA expression agreed well with the known respiratory tract-selective expression of CYP2A13 and CYP2F1 and hepatic expression of CYP2B6 in humans. CYP2A13 protein was detected through immunoblot analyses in the nasal mucosa (NM) (∼100 pmol/mg of microsomal protein; similar to the level of mouse CYP2A5) and the lung (∼0.2 pmol/mg of microsomal protein) but not in the liver of the TG mice. CYP2F1 protein, which could not be separated from mouse CYP2F2 in immunoblot analyses, was readily detected in the NM and lung but not the liver of TG/Cyp2f2-null mice, at levels 10- and 40-fold, respectively, lower than that of mouse CYP2F2 in the TG mice. CYP2B6 protein was detected in the liver (∼0.2 pmol/mg of microsomal protein) but not the NM or lung (with a detection limit of 0.04 pmol/mg of microsomal protein) of the TG mice. At least one transgenic protein (CYP2A13) seems to be active, because the NM of the TG mice had greater in vitro and in vivo activities in bioactivation of a CYP2A13 substrate, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (a lung carcinogen), than did the NM of wild-type mice.

  17. Noggin and BMP4 co-modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the APP(swe)/PS1(DeltaE9) transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Song, Min; Wang, Yanyan; Fan, Xiaotang; Xu, Haiwei; Bai, Yun

    2009-07-31

    In addition to the subventricular zone, the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few brain regions in which neurogenesis continues into adulthood. Perturbation of neurogenesis can alter hippocampal function, and previous studies have shown that neurogenesis is dysregulated in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) and its antagonist Noggin have been shown to play important roles both in embryonic development and in the adult nervous system, and may regulate hippocampal neurogenesis. Previous data indicated that increased expression of BMP4 mRNA within the dentate gyrus might contribute to decreased hippocampal cell proliferation in the APP(swe)/PS1(DeltaE9) mouse AD model. However, it is not known whether the BMP antagonist Noggin contributes to the regulation of neurogenesis. We therefore studied the relative expression levels and localization of BMP4 and its antagonist Noggin in the dentate gyrus and whether these correlated with changes in neurogenesis in 6-12 mo old APP(swe)/PS1(DeltaE9) transgenic mice. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label proliferative cells. We report that decreased neurogenesis in the APP/PS1 transgenic mice was accompanied by increased expression of BMP4 and decreased expression of Noggin at both the mRNA and protein levels; statistical analysis showed that the number of proliferative cells at different ages correlated positively with Noggin expression and negatively with BMP4 expression. Intraventricular administration of a chimeric Noggin/Fc protein was used to block the action of endogenous BMP4; this resulted in a significant increase in the number of BrdU-labeled cells in dentate gyrus subgranular zone and hilus in APP/PS1 mice. These results suggest that BMP4 and Noggin co-modulate neurogenesis.

  18. Transgenic GDNF Positively Influences Proliferation, Differentiation, Maturation and Survival of Motor Neurons Produced from Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Daniel; Robledo-Arratia, Yolanda; Hernández-Martínez, Ricardo; Escobedo-Ávila, Itzel; Bargas, José; Velasco, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESC) are pluripotent and thus can differentiate into every cell type present in the body. Directed differentiation into motor neurons (MNs) has been described for pluripotent cells. Although neurotrophic factors promote neuronal survival, their role in neuronal commitment is elusive. Here, we developed double-transgenic lines of mouse ESC (mESC) that constitutively produce glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and also contain a GFP reporter, driven by HB9, which is expressed only by postmitotic MNs. After lentiviral transduction, ESC lines integrated and expressed the human GDNF (hGDNF) gene without altering pluripotency markers before differentiation. Further, GDNF-ESC showed significantly higher spontaneous release of this neurotrophin to the medium, when compared to controls. To study MN induction, control and GDNF cell lines were grown as embryoid bodies and stimulated with retinoic acid and Sonic Hedgehog. In GDNF-overexpressing cells, a significant increase of proliferative Olig2+ precursors, which are specified as spinal MNs, was found. Accordingly, GDNF increases the yield of cells with the pan motor neuronal markers HB9, monitored by GFP expression, and Isl1. At terminal differentiation, almost all differentiated neurons express phenotypic markers of MNs in GDNF cultures, with lower proportions in control cells. To test if the effects of GDNF were present at early differentiation stages, exogenous recombinant hGDNF was added to control ESC, also resulting in enhanced MN differentiation. This effect was abolished by the co-addition of neutralizing anti-GDNF antibodies, strongly suggesting that differentiating ESC are responsive to GDNF. Using the HB9::GFP reporter, MNs were selected for electrophysiological recordings. MNs differentiated from GDNF-ESC, compared to control MNs, showed greater electrophysiological maturation, characterized by increased numbers of evoked action potentials (APs), as well as by the appearance

  19. Transgenic GDNF Positively Influences Proliferation, Differentiation, Maturation and Survival of Motor Neurons Produced from Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Daniel; Robledo-Arratia, Yolanda; Hernández-Martínez, Ricardo; Escobedo-Ávila, Itzel; Bargas, José; Velasco, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESC) are pluripotent and thus can differentiate into every cell type present in the body. Directed differentiation into motor neurons (MNs) has been described for pluripotent cells. Although neurotrophic factors promote neuronal survival, their role in neuronal commitment is elusive. Here, we developed double-transgenic lines of mouse ESC (mESC) that constitutively produce glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and also contain a GFP reporter, driven by HB9, which is expressed only by postmitotic MNs. After lentiviral transduction, ESC lines integrated and expressed the human GDNF (hGDNF) gene without altering pluripotency markers before differentiation. Further, GDNF-ESC showed significantly higher spontaneous release of this neurotrophin to the medium, when compared to controls. To study MN induction, control and GDNF cell lines were grown as embryoid bodies and stimulated with retinoic acid and Sonic Hedgehog. In GDNF-overexpressing cells, a significant increase of proliferative Olig2+ precursors, which are specified as spinal MNs, was found. Accordingly, GDNF increases the yield of cells with the pan motor neuronal markers HB9, monitored by GFP expression, and Isl1. At terminal differentiation, almost all differentiated neurons express phenotypic markers of MNs in GDNF cultures, with lower proportions in control cells. To test if the effects of GDNF were present at early differentiation stages, exogenous recombinant hGDNF was added to control ESC, also resulting in enhanced MN differentiation. This effect was abolished by the co-addition of neutralizing anti-GDNF antibodies, strongly suggesting that differentiating ESC are responsive to GDNF. Using the HB9::GFP reporter, MNs were selected for electrophysiological recordings. MNs differentiated from GDNF-ESC, compared to control MNs, showed greater electrophysiological maturation, characterized by increased numbers of evoked action potentials (APs), as well as by the appearance

  20. Enalapril and ASS inhibit tumor growth in a transgenic mouse model of islet cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Fendrich, V; Lopez, C L; Manoharan, J; Maschuw, K; Wichmann, S; Baier, A; Holler, J P; Ramaswamy, A; Bartsch, D K; Waldmann, J

    2014-10-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role for angiotensin-converting enzymes involving the angiotensin II-receptor 1 (AT1-R) and the cyclooxygenase pathway in carcinogenesis. The effects of ASS and enalapril were assessed in vitro and in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs). The effects of enalapril and ASS on proliferation and expression of the AGTR1A and its target gene vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegfa) were assessed in the neuroendocrine cell line BON1. Rip1-Tag2 mice were treated daily with either 0.6 mg/kg bodyweight of enalapril i.p., 20 mg/kg bodyweight of ASS i.p., or a vehicle in a prevention (weeks 5-12) and a survival group (week 5 till death). Tumor surface, weight of pancreatic glands, immunostaining for AT1-R and nuclear factor kappa beta (NFKB), and mice survival were analyzed. In addition, sections from human specimens of 20 insulinomas, ten gastrinomas, and 12 non-functional pNENs were evaluated for AT1-R and NFKB (NFKB1) expression and grouped according to the current WHO classification. Proliferation was significantly inhibited by enalapril and ASS in BON1 cells, with the combination being the most effective. Treatment with enalapril and ASS led to significant downregulation of known target genes Vegf and Rela at RNA level. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by enalapril and ASS in the prevention group displayed by a reduction of tumor size (84%/67%) and number (30%/45%). Furthermore, daily treatment with enalapril and ASS prolonged the overall median survival compared with vehicle-treated Rip1-Tag2 (107 days) mice by 9 and 17 days (P=0.016 and P=0.013). The AT1-R and the inflammatory transcription factor NFKB were abolished completely upon enalapril and ASS treatment. AT1-R and NFKB expressions were observed in 80% of human pNENs. Enalapril and ASS may provide an approach for chemoprevention and treatment of pNENs.

  1. Generation and Characterization of a Transgenic Mouse Carrying a Functional Human β-Globin Gene with the IVSI-6 Thalassemia Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Irene; Lampronti, Ilaria; Salvatori, Francesca; Fabbri, Enrica; Zuccato, Cristina; Cosenza, Lucia C.; Montagner, Giulia; Borgatti, Monica; Altruda, Fiorella; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Carandina, Gianni; Aiello, Vincenzo; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models that carry mutations causing thalassemia represent a suitable tool to test in vivo new mutation-specific therapeutic approaches. Transgenic mice carrying the β-globin IVSI-6 mutation (the most frequent in Middle-Eastern regions and recurrent in Italy and Greece) are, at present, not available. We report the production and characterization of a transgenic mouse line (TG-β-IVSI-6) carrying the IVSI-6 thalassemia point mutation within the human β-globin gene. In the TG-β-IVSI-6 mouse (a) the transgenic integration region is located in mouse chromosome 7; (b) the expression of the transgene is tissue specific; (c) as expected, normally spliced human β-globin mRNA is produced, giving rise to β-globin production and formation of a human-mouse tetrameric chimeric hemoglobin muα-globin2/huβ-globin2 and, more importantly, (d) the aberrant β-globin-IVSI-6 RNAs are present in blood cells. The TG-β-IVSI-6 mouse reproduces the molecular features of IVSI-6 β-thalassemia and might be used as an in vivo model to characterize the effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting the cryptic sites responsible for the generation of aberrantly spliced β-globin RNA sequences, caused by the IVSI-6 mutation. These experiments are expected to be crucial for the development of a personalized therapy for β-thalassemia. PMID:26097845

  2. First effects of rising amyloid-β in transgenic mouse brain: synaptic transmission and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Damian M.; Liu, Wenfei; Portelius, Erik; Bayram, Sevinç; Yasvoina, Marina; Ho, Sui-Hin; Smits, Hélène; Ali, Shabinah S.; Steinberg, Rivka; Pegasiou, Chrysia-Maria; James, Owain T.; Matarin, Mar; Richardson, Jill C.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John A.; Salih, Dervis A.

    2015-01-01

    Detecting and treating Alzheimer’s disease, before cognitive deficits occur, has become the health challenge of our time. The earliest known event in Alzheimer’s disease is rising amyloid-β. Previous studies have suggested that effects on synaptic transmission may precede plaque deposition. Here we report how relative levels of different soluble amyloid-β peptides in hippocampus, preceding plaque deposition, relate to synaptic and genomic changes. Immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry was used to measure the early rise of different amyloid-β peptides in a mouse model of increasing amyloid-β (‘TASTPM’, transgenic for familial Alzheimer’s disease genes APP/PSEN1). In the third postnatal week, several amyloid-β peptides were above the limit of detection, including amyloid-β40, amyloid-β38 and amyloid-β42 with an intensity ratio of 6:3:2, respectively. By 2 months amyloid-β levels had only increased by 50% and although the ratio of the different peptides remained constant, the first changes in synaptic currents, compared to wild-type mice could be detected with patch-clamp recordings. Between 2 and 4 months old, levels of amyloid-β40 rose by ∼7-fold, but amyloid-β42 rose by 25-fold, increasing the amyloid-β42:amyloid-β40 ratio to 1:1. Only at 4 months did plaque deposition become detectable and only in some mice; however, synaptic changes were evident in all hippocampal fields. These changes included increased glutamate release probability (P < 0.001, n = 7–9; consistent with the proposed physiological effect of amyloid-β) and loss of spontaneous action potential-mediated activity in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) and dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus (P < 0.001, n = 7). Hence synaptic changes occur when the amyloid-β levels and amyloid-β42:amyloid-β40 ratio are still low compared to those necessary for plaque deposition. Genome-wide microarray analysis revealed changes in gene expression at 2–4 months including synaptic genes being

  3. First effects of rising amyloid-β in transgenic mouse brain: synaptic transmission and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Damian M; Liu, Wenfei; Portelius, Erik; Bayram, Sevinç; Yasvoina, Marina; Ho, Sui-Hin; Smits, Hélène; Ali, Shabinah S; Steinberg, Rivka; Pegasiou, Chrysia-Maria; James, Owain T; Matarin, Mar; Richardson, Jill C; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John A; Salih, Dervis A; Edwards, Frances A

    2015-07-01

    Detecting and treating Alzheimer's disease, before cognitive deficits occur, has become the health challenge of our time. The earliest known event in Alzheimer's disease is rising amyloid-β. Previous studies have suggested that effects on synaptic transmission may precede plaque deposition. Here we report how relative levels of different soluble amyloid-β peptides in hippocampus, preceding plaque deposition, relate to synaptic and genomic changes. Immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry was used to measure the early rise of different amyloid-β peptides in a mouse model of increasing amyloid-β ('TASTPM', transgenic for familial Alzheimer's disease genes APP/PSEN1). In the third postnatal week, several amyloid-β peptides were above the limit of detection, including amyloid-β40, amyloid-β38 and amyloid-β42 with an intensity ratio of 6:3:2, respectively. By 2 months amyloid-β levels had only increased by 50% and although the ratio of the different peptides remained constant, the first changes in synaptic currents, compared to wild-type mice could be detected with patch-clamp recordings. Between 2 and 4 months old, levels of amyloid-β40 rose by ∼7-fold, but amyloid-β42 rose by 25-fold, increasing the amyloid-β42:amyloid-β40 ratio to 1:1. Only at 4 months did plaque deposition become detectable and only in some mice; however, synaptic changes were evident in all hippocampal fields. These changes included increased glutamate release probability (P < 0.001, n = 7-9; consistent with the proposed physiological effect of amyloid-β) and loss of spontaneous action potential-mediated activity in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) and dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus (P < 0.001, n = 7). Hence synaptic changes occur when the amyloid-β levels and amyloid-β42:amyloid-β40 ratio are still low compared to those necessary for plaque deposition. Genome-wide microarray analysis revealed changes in gene expression at 2-4 months including synaptic genes being strongly

  4. Long-Term Dietary Supplementation of Pomegranates, Figs and Dates Alleviate Neuroinflammation in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Mohammed; Al-Adawi, Samir; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating age-related neurodegenerative disease with no specific treatment at present. The APPsw/Tg2576 mice exhibit age-related deterioration in memory and learning as well as amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation, and this mouse strain is considered an effective model for studying the mechanism of accelerated brain aging and senescence. The present study was aimed to investigate the beneficial effects of dietary supplements pomegranate, figs, or the dates on suppressing inflammatory cytokines in APPsw/Tg2576 mice. Changes in the plasma cytokines and Aβ, ATP, and inflammatory cytokines were investigated in the brain of transgenic mice. Significantly enhanced levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-9, IL-10, TNF-α and Eotaxin activity were decreased by administration of the diet supplements containing pomegranates, figs, or dates. In addition, putative delays in the formation of senile plaques, as indicated by a decreasing tendency of brain Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 contents, were observed. Thus, novel results mediated by reducing inflammatory cytokines during aging may represent one mechanism by which these supplements exert their beneficial effects against neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. PMID:25807081

  5. Large-Scale Mass Spectrometry Imaging Investigation of Consequences of Cortical Spreading Depression in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreira, Ricardo J.; Shyti, Reinald; Balluff, Benjamin; Abdelmoula, Walid M.; van Heiningen, Sandra H.; van Zeijl, Rene J.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Ferrari, Michel D.; Tolner, Else A.; McDonnell, Liam A.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the electrophysiological correlate of migraine aura. Transgenic mice carrying the R192Q missense mutation in the Cacna1a gene, which in patients causes familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), exhibit increased propensity to CSD. Herein, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was applied for the first time to an animal cohort of transgenic and wild type mice to study the biomolecular changes following CSD in the brain. Ninety-six coronal brain sections from 32 mice were analyzed by MALDI-MSI. All MSI datasets were registered to the Allen Brain Atlas reference atlas of the mouse brain so that the molecular signatures of distinct brain regions could be compared. A number of metabolites and peptides showed substantial changes in the brain associated with CSD. Among those, different mass spectral features showed significant ( t-test, P < 0.05) changes in the cortex, 146 and 377 Da, and in the thalamus, 1820 and 1834 Da, of the CSD-affected hemisphere of FHM1 R192Q mice. Our findings reveal CSD- and genotype-specific molecular changes in the brain of FHM1 transgenic mice that may further our understanding about the role of CSD in migraine pathophysiology. The results also demonstrate the utility of aligning MSI datasets to a common reference atlas for large-scale MSI investigations.

  6. Transgenic mouse model for imaging of ATF4 translational activation-related cellular stress responses in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Iwawaki, Takao; Akai, Ryoko; Toyoshima, Takae; Takeda, Naoki; Ishikawa, Tomo-o; Yamamura, Ken-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a translationally activated protein that plays a role in cellular adaptation to several stresses. Because these stresses are associated with various diseases, the translational control of ATF4 needs to be evaluated from the physiological and pathological points of view. We have developed a transgenic mouse model to monitor the translational activation of ATF4 in response to cellular stress. By using this mouse model, we were able to detect nutrient starvation response, antivirus response, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, and oxidative stress in vitro and ex vivo, as well as in vivo. The reporter system introduced into our mouse model was also shown to work in a stress intensity-dependent manner and a stress duration-dependent manner. The mouse model is therefore a useful tool for imaging ATF4 translational activation at various levels, from cell cultures to whole bodies, and it has a range of useful applications in investigations on the physiological and pathological roles of ATF4-related stress and in the development of clinical drugs for treating ATF4-associated diseases. PMID:28387317

  7. Toxicological aspects of treatment to remove cyanobacterial toxins from drinking water determined using the heterozygous P53 transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Senogles-Derham, P-J; Seawright, A; Shaw, G; Wickramisingh, W; Shahin, M

    2003-06-01

    The presence of toxic cyanobacteria in drinking water reservoirs renders the need to develop treatment methods for the 'safe' removal of their associated toxins. Chlorine has been shown to successfully remove a range of cyanotoxins including microcystins, cylindrospermopsin and saxitoxins. Each cyanotoxin requires specific treatment parameters, particularly solution pH and free chlorine residual. However, currently there has not been any investigation into the toxicological effect of solutions treated for the removal of these cyanotoxins by chlorine. Using the P53(def) transgenic mouse model male and female C57BL/6J hybrid mice were used to investigate potential cancer inducing effects from such oral dosing solutions. Both purified cyanotoxins and toxic cell-free extract cyanobacterial solutions were chlorinated and administered over 90 and 170 days (respectively) in drinking water. No increase in cancer was found in any treatment. The parent cyanotoxins, microcystins, cylindrospermopsin and saxitoxins were readily removed by chlorine. There was no significant increase in the disinfection by-products trihalomethanes or haloacetic acids, levels found were well below guideline values. Histological examination identified no effect of treatment solutions except male mice treated with chlorinated cylindrospermopsin (as a cell free extract). In this instance 40% of males were found to have fatty vacuolation in their livers, cause unknown. It is recommended that further toxicology be undertaken on chlorinated cyanobacterial solutions, particularly for non-genotoxic carcinogenic compounds, for example the Tg. AC transgenic mouse model.

  8. A Novel mouse model of enhanced proteostasis: Full-length human heat shock factor 1 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Anson; Wei, Rochelle; Halade, Dipti; Yoo, Si-Eun; Ran, Qitao; Richardson, Arlan

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Development of mouse overexpressing native human HSF1 in all tissues including CNS. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances heat shock response at whole-animal and cellular level. {yields} HSF1 overexpression protects from polyglutamine toxicity and favors aggresomes. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances proteostasis at the whole-animal and cellular level. -- Abstract: The heat shock response (HSR) is controlled by the master transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 maintains proteostasis and resistance to stress through production of heat shock proteins (HSPs). No transgenic model exists that overexpresses HSF1 in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). We generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 and observed a 2-4-fold increase in HSF1 mRNA and protein expression in all tissues studied of HSF1 transgenic (HSF1{sup +/0}) mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates, including several regions of the CNS. Basal expression of HSP70 and 90 showed only mild tissue-specific changes; however, in response to forced exercise, the skeletal muscle HSR was more elevated in HSF1{sup +/0} mice compared to WT littermates and in fibroblasts following heat shock, as indicated by levels of inducible HSP70 mRNA and protein. HSF1{sup +/0} cells elicited a significantly more robust HSR in response to expression of the 82 repeat polyglutamine-YFP fusion construct (Q82YFP) and maintained proteasome-dependent processing of Q82YFP compared to WT fibroblasts. Overexpression of HSF1 was associated with fewer, but larger Q82YFP aggregates resembling aggresomes in HSF1{sup +/0} cells, and increased viability. Therefore, our data demonstrate that tissues and cells from mice overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 exhibit enhanced proteostasis.

  9. The mouse Crx 5'-upstream transgene sequence directs cell-specific and developmentally regulated expression in retinal photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Akiko; Koike, Chieko; Lippincott, Pia; Cepko, Constance L; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2002-03-01

    Crx, an Otx-like homeobox gene, is expressed primarily in the photoreceptors of the retina and in the pinealocytes of the pineal gland. The CRX homeodomain protein is a transactivator of many photoreceptor/pineal-specific genes in vivo, such as rhodopsin and the cone opsins. Mutations in Crx are associated with the retinal diseases, cone-rod dystrophy-2, retinitis pigmentosa, and Leber's congenital amaurosis, which lead to loss of vision. We have generated transgenic mice, using 5'- and/or 3'-flanking sequences from the mouse Crx homeobox gene fused to the beta-galactosidase (lacZ) reporter gene, and we have investigated the promoter function of the cell-specific and developmentally regulated expression of Crx. All of the independent transgenic lines commonly showed lacZ expression in the photoreceptor cells of the retina and in the pinealocytes of the pineal gland. We characterized the transgenic lines in detail for cell-specific lacZ expression patterns by 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl beta-D-galactoside staining and lacZ immunostaining. The lacZ expression was observed in developing and developed photoreceptor cells. This observation was confirmed by coimmunostaining of dissociated retinal cells with the lacZ and opsin antibodies. The ontogeny analysis indicated that the lacZ expression completely agrees with a temporal expression pattern of Crx during retinal development. This study demonstrates that the mouse Crx 5'-upstream genomic sequence is capable of directing a cell-specific and developmentally regulated expression of Crx in photoreceptor cells.

  10. [Co-integration of BLG-LAtPA and WAP improved the expression of LAtPA in transgenic mouse milk].

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Deng, J X; Cheng, X; Lu, Y F; Yang, X; Huang, P T

    2001-01-01

    In order to improve the expression of longer acting tissue plasminogen activator in the mammary epithelium of transgenic mice, the fragment of BLG-LAtPA hydrid gene was microinjected into mouse embryos with mice whey acid protein gene. Three mouse were tested as being Co-integration of BLG-LAtPA and WAP transgene by PCR and Southern blot. Milk obtained from lactating females contains biologically active tPA, and the concentration of tPA was calculated to be about 10 micrograms/mL.

  11. Cre recombinase-regulated Endothelin1 transgenic mouse lines: novel tools for analysis of embryonic and adult disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Andre L.P.; Clouthier, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (EDN1) influences both craniofacial and cardiovascular development and a number of adult physiological conditions by binding to one or both of the known endothelin receptors, thus initiating multiple signaling cascades. Animal models containing both conventional and conditional loss of the Edn1 gene have been used to dissect EDN1 function in both embryos and adults. However, while transgenic Edn1 over-expression or targeted genomic insertion of Edn1 has been performed to understand how elevated levels of Edn1 result in or exacerbate disease states, an animal model in which Edn1 over-expression can be achieved in a spatiotemporal-specific manner has not been reported. Here we describe the creation of Edn1 conditional over-expression transgenic mouse lines in which the chicken β-actin promoter and an Edn1 cDNA are separated by a strong stop sequence flanked by loxP sites. In the presence of Cre, the stop cassette is removed, leading to Edn1 expression. Using the Wnt1-Cre strain, in which Cre expression is targeted to the Wnt1-expressing domain of the central nervous system (CNS) from which neural crest cells (NCCs) arise, we show that stable CBA-Edn1 transgenic lines with varying EDN1 protein levels develop defects in NCC-derived tissues of the face, though the severity differs between lines. We also show that Edn1 expression can be achieved in other embryonic tissues utilizing other Cre strains, with this expression also resulting in developmental defects. CBA-Edn1 transgenic mice will be useful in investigating diverse aspects of EDN1-mediated-development and disease, including understanding how NCCs achieve and maintain a positional and functional identity and how aberrant EDN1 levels can lead to multiple physiological changes and diseases. PMID:25725491

  12. Gastric Carcinogenesis in the miR-222/221 Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Boram; Yu, Jieun; Han, Tae-Su; Kim, Young-Kook; Hur, Keun; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Kim, Woo-Ho; Kim, Dae-Yong; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Kim, V. Narry; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate various cellular functions, including development, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Different signatures associated with various tissue types, diagnosis, progression, prognosis, staging, and treatment response have been identified by miRNA expression profiling of human tumors. miRNAs function as oncogenes or as tumor suppressors. The relationship between gastric cancer and miRNA garnered attention due to the high incidence of gastric cancer in Asian countries. miR-222/221 expression increases in gastric tumor tissues. The oncogenic effect of miR-222/221 was previously determined in functional studies and xenograft models. In this study, transgenic mice over-expressing miR-222/221 were generated to confirm the effect of miR-222/221 on gastric carcinogenesis. Materials and Methods At 6 weeks of age, 65 transgenic mice and 53 wild-type mice were given drinking water containing N-nitroso-N-methylurea (MNU) for 5 alternating weeks to induce gastric cancer. The mice were euthanized at 36 weeks of age and histologic analysis was performed. Results Hyperplasia was observed in 3.77% of the wild-type mice and in 18.46% of the transgenic mice (p=0.020). Adenoma was observed in 20.75% of the wild-type mice and 26.15% of the transgenic mice (p=0.522). Carcinoma was observed in 32.08% of the wild-type mice and 41.54% of the transgenic mice (p=0.341). The frequency of hyperplasia, adenoma, and carcinoma was higher in transgenic mice, but the difference was statistically significant only in hyperplasia. Conclusion These results suggest that hyperplasia, a gastric pre-cancerous lesion, is associated with miR-222/221 expression but miR-222/221 expression does not affect tumorigenesis itself. PMID:27338035

  13. Chronic Dietary Supplementation of 4% Figs on the Modification of Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Al-Asmi, Abdullah; Vaishnav, Ragini

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the changes in the plasma Aβ, oxidative stress/antioxidants, and membrane bound enzymes in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease (AD) transgenic mice (Tg2576) after dietary supplementation of Omani figs fruits for 15 months along with spatial memory and learning test. AD Tg mice on control diet without figs showed significant impairment in spatial learning ability compared to the wild-type mice on same diet and figs fed Tg mice as well. Significant increase in oxidative stress and reduced antioxidant status were observed in AD Tg mice. 4% figs treated AD Tg mice significantly attenuated oxidative damage, as evident by decreased lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyls and restoration of antioxidant status. Altered activities of membrane bound enzymes (Na+ K+ ATPase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE)) in AD Tg mice brain regions and was restored by figs treatment. Further, figs supplementation might be able to decrease the plasma levels of Aβ (1–40, 1–42) significantly in Tg mice suggesting a putative delay in the formation of plaques, which might be due to the presence of high natural antioxidants in figs. But this study warrants further extensive investigation to find a novel lead for a therapeutic target for AD from figs. PMID:25050360

  14. DOSE-RESPONSE STUDIES OF SODIUM ARSENITE IN THE SKIN OF K6/ODC TRANSGENIC MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has previously been observed that chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic and/or its metabolites increase(s) tumor frequency in the skin of K6/ODC transgenic mice. To identify potential biomarkers and modes of action for this skin tumorigenicity, gene expression profiles w...

  15. Remodeling of mouse milk glycoconjugates by transgenic expression of a human glycosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Prieto, P A; Mukerji, P; Kelder, B; Erney, R; Gonzalez, D; Yun, J S; Smith, D F; Moremen, K W; Nardelli, C; Pierce, M

    1995-12-08

    The mammary gland is a unique biosynthetic tissue that produces a variety of species-specific glycoconjugates, but the factors regulating the production of specific glycoconjugates are not well understood. To explore the underlying regulation, a fusion gene containing a cDNA encoding the human alpha 1,2-fucosyltransferase (alpha 1,2FT), which generates the H-blood group antigen, flanked by the murine whey acidic protein promoter and a polyadenylation signal, was introduced into mice. Milk samples from transgenic animals contained soluble forms of the alpha 1,2FT, as revealed by Western blots of milk samples using an anti-alpha 1,2FT antiserum and by the demonstration of alpha 1,2FT enzyme activity. Milk from transgenic animals also contained large quantities of 2'-fucosyllactose (Fuc alpha 1-2Gal beta 1-4Glc) and modified glycoproteins containing the H-antigen, whereas milk from control animals lacked these glycoconjugates. Expression levels of 2'-fucosyllactose were high in most animals and represented 1/3 to nearly 1/2 of the total milk oligosaccharides. These results demonstrate that heterologous transgenic expression of a glycosyltransferase can result in the expression of both the transgene and its secondary gene products and that the structures of milk oligosaccharides can be remodeled depending on expression of the appropriate enzyme. Furthermore, these results suggest that the lactating mammary gland may be a unique biosynthetic reactor for the production of biologically active oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates.

  16. Opposite regulation of human versus mouse apolipoprotein A-I by fibrates in human apolipoprotein A-I transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Berthou, L; Duverger, N; Emmanuel, F; Langouët, S; Auwerx, J; Guillouzo, A; Fruchart, J C; Rubin, E; Denèfle, P; Staels, B; Branellec, D

    1996-01-01

    The regulation of liver apolipoprotein (apo) A-I gene expression by fibrates was studied in human apo A-I transgenic mice containing a human genomic DNA fragment driving apo A-I expression in liver. Treatment with fenofibrate (0.5% wt/wt) for 7 d increased plasma human apo A-I levels up to 750% and HDL-cholesterol levels up to 200% with a shift to larger particles. The increase in human apo A-I plasma levels was time and dose dependent and was already evident after 3 d at the highest dose (0.5% wt/wt) of fenofibrate. In contrast, plasma mouse apo A-I concentration was decreased after fenofibrate in nontransgenic mice. The increase in plasma human apo A-I levels after fenofibrate treatment was associated with a 97% increase in hepatic human apo A-I mRNA, whereas mouse apo A-I mRNA levels decreased to 51%. In nontransgenic mice, a similar down-regulation of hepatic apo A-I mRNA levels was observed. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that the increase in human apo A-I and the decrease in mouse apo A-I gene expression after fenofibrate occurred at the transcriptional level. Since part of the effects of fibrates are mediated through the nuclear receptor PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor), the expression of the acyl CoA oxidase (ACO) gene was measured as a control of PPAR activation. Both in transgenic and nontransgenic mice, fenofibrate induced ACO mRNA levels up to sixfold. When transgenic mice were treated with gemfibrozil (0.5% wt/wt) plasma human apo A-I and HDL-cholesterol levels increased 32 and 73%, respectively, above control levels. The weaker effect of this compound on human apo A-I and HDL-cholesterol levels correlated with a less pronounced impact on ACO mRNA levels (a threefold increase) suggesting that the level of induction of human apo A-I gene is related to the PPAR activating potency of the fibrate used. Treatment of human primary hepatocytes with fenofibric acid (500 microM) provoked an 83 and 50% increase in apo A-I secretion and

  17. Age-related changes of brain iron load changes in the frontal cortex in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xian-hui, Dong; Wei-juan, Gao; Tie-mei, Shao; Hong-lin, Xie; Jiang-tao, Bai; Jing-yi, Zhao; Xi-qing, Chai

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) as a neurodegenerative brain disorder is a devastating pathology leading to disastrous cognitive impairments and dementia, associated with major social and economic costs to society. Iron can catalyze damaging free radical reactions. With age, iron accumulates in brain frontal cortex regions and may contribute to the risk of AD. In this communication, we investigated the age-related brain iron load changes in the frontal cortex of 6- and 12-month-old C57BL/6J (C57) and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 (APP/PS1) double transgenic mouse by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and Perls' reaction. In the present study, we also evaluated the age-related changes of DMT1 and FPN1 by using Western blot and qPCR. We found that compared with 6-month-old APP/PS1 mice and the 12-month-old C57 mice, the 12-month-old APP/PS1 mice had increased iron load in the frontal cortex. The levels of DMT1 were significantly increased and the FPN1 were significantly reduced in the frontal cortex of the 12-month-old APP/PS1 mice than that in the 6-month-old APP/PS1 mice and 12-month-old C57 mice. We conclude that in AD damage occurs in conjunction with iron accumulation, and the brain iron load associated with loss control of the brain iron metabolism related protein DMT1 and FPN1 expressions.

  18. Enhanced dispersion of repolarization and refractoriness in transgenic mouse hearts promotes reentrant ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Baker, L C; London, B; Choi, B R; Koren, G; Salama, G

    2000-03-03

    The heterogeneous distribution of ion channels in ventricular muscle gives rise to spatial variations in action potential (AP) duration (APD) and contributes to the repolarization sequence in healthy hearts. It has been proposed that enhanced dispersion of repolarization may underlie arrhythmias in diseases with markedly different causes. We engineered dominant negative transgenic mice that have prolonged QT intervals and arrhythmias due to the loss of a slowly inactivating K(+) current. Optical techniques are now applied to map APs and investigate the mechanisms underlying these arrhythmias. Hearts from transgenic and control mice were isolated, perfused, stained with di-4-ANEPPS, and paced at multiple sites to optically map APs, activation, and repolarization sequences at baseline and during arrhythmias. Transgenic hearts exhibited a 2-fold prolongation of APD, less shortening (8% versus 40%) of APDs with decreasing cycle length, altered restitution kinetics, and greater gradients of refractoriness from apex to base compared with control hearts. A premature impulse applied at the apex of transgenic hearts produced sustained reentrant ventricular tachycardia (n=14 of 15 hearts) that did not occur with stimulation at the base (n=8) or at any location in control hearts (n=12). In transgenic hearts, premature impulses initiated reentry by encountering functional lines of conduction block caused by enhanced dispersion of refractoriness. Reentrant VT had stable (>30 minutes) alternating long/short APDs associated with long/short cycle lengths and T wave alternans. Thus, optical mapping of genetically engineered mice may help elucidate some electrophysiological mechanisms that underlie arrhythmias and sudden death in human cardiac disorders.

  19. In vivo demonstration of red cell-endothelial interaction, sickling and altered microvascular response to oxygen in the sickle transgenic mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, D K; Fabry, M E; Costantini, F; Rubin, E M; Nagel, R L

    1995-01-01

    Intravascular sickling, red cell-endothelium interaction, and altered microvascular responses have been suggested to contribute to the pathophysiology of human sickle cell disease, but have never been demonstrated under in vivo flow. To address this issue, we have examined a transgenic mouse line, alphaHbetaSbetaS-Antilles [betaMDD] which has a combined high (78%) expression of beta S and beta S-Antilles globins. In vivo microcirculatory studies using the cremaster muscle preparation showed adhesion of red cells, restricted to postcapillary venules, in transgenic mice but not in control mice. Electron microscopy revealed distinct contacts between the red cell membrane and the endothelium surface. Some red cells exhibiting sickling were regularly observed in the venular flow. Infusion of transgenic mouse red cells into the ex vivo mesocecum vasculature also showed adhesion of mouse red cells exclusively in venules. Under resting conditions (pO2, 15-20 mmHg), there were no differences in the cremaster microvascular diameters of control and transgenic mice; however, transgenic mice showed a drastic reduction in microvascular red cell velocities (Vrbc) with maximal Vrbc decrease (> 60%) occurring in venules, the sites of red cell adhesion and sickling. Local, transient hyperoxia (pO2, 150 mmHg) resulted in striking differences between control and transgenic mice. In controls, oxygen caused a 69% arteriolar constriction, accompanied by 75% reduction in Vrbc. In contrast, in transgenic mice, hyperoxia resulted in only 8% decrease in the arteriolar diameter and in 68% increase in VrBC; the latter is probably due to an improved flow behavior of red cells as a consequence of unsickling. In summary, the high expression of human sickle hemoglobin in the mouse results not only in intravascular sickling but also red cell-endothelium interaction. The altered microvascular response to oxygen could be secondary to blood rheological changes, although possible intrinsic differences

  20. The GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide reduces pathology-specific tau phosphorylation and improves motor function in a transgenic hTauP301L mouse model of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Barkholt, Pernille; Fabricius, Katrine; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-03-01

    In addition to a prominent role in glycemic control, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists exhibit neuroprotective properties. There is mounting experimental evidence that GLP-1 receptor agonists, including liraglutide, may enhance synaptic plasticity, counteract cognitive deficits and ameliorate neurodegenerative features in preclinical models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), predominantly in the context of β-amyloid toxicity. Here we characterized the effects of liraglutide in a transgenic mutant tau (hTauP301L) mouse tauopathy model, which develops age-dependent pathology-specific neuronal tau phosphorylation and neurofibrillary tangle formation with progressively compromised motor function (limb clasping). Liraglutide (500 µg/kg/day, s.c., q.d., n=18) or vehicle (n=18) was administered to hTauP301L mice for 6 months from the age of three months. Vehicle-dosed wild-type FVB/N mice served as normal control (n=17). The onset and severity of hind limb clasping was markedly different in liraglutide and vehicle-dosed transgenic mice. Clasping behavior was observed in 61% of vehicle-dosed hTauP301L mice with a 55% survival rate in 9-month old transgenic mice. In contrast, liraglutide treatment reduced the clasping rate to 39% of hTauP301L mice, and fully prevented clasping-associated lethality resulting in a survival rate of 89%. Stereological analyses demonstrated that hTauP301L mice exhibited hindbrain-dominant neuronal accumulation of phosphorylated tau closely correlated to the severity of clasping behavior. In correspondence, liraglutide treatment significantly reduced neuronal phospho-tau load by 61.9±10.2% (p<0.001) in hTauP301L mice, as compared to vehicle-dosed controls. In conclusion, liraglutide significantly reduced tau pathology in a transgenic mouse tauopathy model.

  1. A transgenic mouse model with inducible Tyrosinase gene expression using the tetracycline (Tet-on) system allows regulated rescue of abnormal chiasmatic projections found in albinism.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Estela; Lavado, Alfonso; Giraldo, Patricia; Cozar, Patricia; Jeffery, Glen; Montoliu, Lluís

    2004-08-01

    Congenital defects in retinal pigmentation, as in oculocutaneous albinism Type I (OCA1), where tyrosinase is defective, result in visual abnormalities affecting the retina and pathways into the brain. Transgenic animals expressing a functional tyrosinase gene on an albino genetic background display a correction of all these abnormalities, implicating a functional role for tyrosinase in normal retinal development. To address the function of tyrosinase in the development of the mammalian visual system, we have generated a transgenic mouse model with inducible expression of the tyrosinase gene using the tetracycline (TET-ON) system. We have produced two types of transgenic mice: first, mice expressing the transactivator rtTA chimeric protein under the control of mouse tyrosinase promoter and its locus control region (LCR), and; second, transgenic mice expressing a mouse tyrosinase cDNA construct driven by a minimal promoter inducible by rtTA in the presence of doxycycline. Inducible experiments have been carried out with selected double transgenic mouse lines. Tyrosinase expression has been induced from early embryo development and its impact assessed with histological and biochemical methods in heterozygous and homozygous double transgenic individuals. We have found an increase of tyrosinase activity in the eyes of induced animals, compared with littermate controls. However, there was significant variability in the activation of this gene, as reported in analogous experiments. In spite of this, we could observe corrected uncrossed chiasmatic pathways, decreased in albinism, in animals induced from their first gestational week. These mice could be instrumental in revealing the role of tyrosinase in mammalian visual development.

  2. MOUSE TRANSGENIC LINES THAT SELECTIVELY LABEL TYPE I, TYPE IIA AND TYPES IIX+B SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    Chakkalakal, Joe V.; Kuang, Shihuan; Buffelli, Mario; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Sanes, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers vary in contractile and metabolic properties. Four main fiber types are present in mammalian trunk and limb muscles; they are called I, IIA, IIX and IIB, ranging from slowest- to fastest-contracting. Individual muscles contain stereotyped proportions of two or more fiber types. Fiber type is determined by a combination of nerve-dependent and –independent influences, leading to formation of “homogeneous motor units” in which all branches of a single motor neuron form synapses on fibers of a single type. Fiber type composition of muscles can be altered in adulthood by multiple factors including exercise, denervation, hormones and aging. To facilitate analysis of muscle development, plasticity and innervation, we generated transgenic mouse lines in which Type I, Type IIA, and Type IIX+B fibers can be selectively labeled with distinguishable fluorophores. We demonstrate their use for motor unit reconstruction and live imaging of nerve-dependent alterations in fiber type. PMID:21898764

  3. Dissection of human papillomavirus E6 and E7 function in transgenic mouse models of cervical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Riley, Rebeccah R; Duensing, Stefan; Brake, Tiffany; Münger, Karl; Lambert, Paul F; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2003-08-15

    Human cervix cancer is caused by high-risk human papillomaviruses encoding E6 and E7 oncoproteins, each of which alter function of distinct targets regulating the cell cycle, apoptosis, and differentiation. Here we determined the molecular contribution of E6 or E7 to neoplastic progression and malignant growth in a transgenic mouse model of cervical carcinogenesis. E7 increased proliferation and centrosome copy number, and produced progression to multifocal microinvasive cervical cancers. E6 elevated centrosome copy number and eliminated detectable p53 protein, but did not produce neoplasia or cancer. E6 plus E7 additionally elevated centrosome copy number and created large, extensively invasive cancers. Centrosome copy number increases and p53 loss likely contributed to malignant growth; however, dysregulated proliferation and differentiation were required for carcinogenic progression.

  4. Early alterations in functional connectivity and white matter structure in a transgenic mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Joanes; Schroeter, Aileen; He, Pan; Tanadini, Matteo; Keist, Ruth; Krstic, Dimitrije; Konietzko, Uwe; Klohs, Jan; Nitsch, Roger M; Rudin, Markus

    2014-10-08

    Impairment of brain functional connectivity (FC) is thought to be an early event occurring in diseases with cerebral amyloidosis, such as Alzheimer's disease. Regions sustaining altered functional networks have been shown to colocalize with regions marked with amyloid plaques burden suggesting a strong link between FC and amyloidosis. Whether the decline in FC precedes amyloid plaque deposition or is a consequence thereof is currently unknown. The sequence of events during early stages of the disease is difficult to capture in humans due to the difficulties in providing an early diagnosis and also in view of the heterogeneity among patients. Transgenic mouse lines overexpressing amyloid precursor proteins develop cerebral amyloidosis and constitute an attractive model system for studying the relationship between plaque and functional changes. In this study, ArcAβ transgenic and wild-type mice were imaged using resting-state fMRI methods across their life-span in a cross-sectional design to analyze changes in FC in relation to the pathology. Transgenic mice show compromised development of FC during the first months of postnatal life compared with wild-type animals, resulting in functional impairments that affect in particular the sensory-motor cortex already in preplaque stage. These functional alterations were accompanied by structural changes as reflected by reduced fractional anisotropy values, as derived from diffusion tensor imaging. Our results suggest cerebral amyloidosis in mice is preceded by impairment of neuronal networks and white matter structures. FC analysis in mice is an attractive tool for studying the implications of impaired neuronal networks in models of cerebral amyloid pathology.

  5. Comparison of motor performance, brain biochemistry and histology of two A30P α-synuclein transgenic mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Piltonen, M; Savolainen, M; Patrikainen, S; Baekelandt, V; Myöhänen, T T; Männistö, P T

    2013-02-12

    Three point mutations in the SNCA gene encoding α-synuclein (aSyn) have been associated with autosomal dominant forms of Parkinson's disease. To better understand the role of the A30P mutant aSyn, we compared two transgenic mouse strains: a knock-in mouse with an introduced A30P point mutation in the wild-type (WT) gene (Snca(tm(A30P))) and a transgenic (Tg) mouse overexpressing the human A30P aSyn gene under the prion promoter [tg(Prnp-SNCA A30P)]. The brain aSyn load, motor performance, brain dopamine (DA) and sensitivity to 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) were studied in these mice. aSyn was evidently accumulating with age in all mice, particularly in tg(Prnp-SNCA A30P) Tg mice. There were no robust changes in basal locomotor activities of the mice of either line at 6 months, but after 1 year, tg(Prnp-SNCA A30P) Tg mice developed severe problems with vertical movements. However, the younger Tg mice had a reduced locomotor response to 1mg/kg of d-amphetamine. Snca(tm(A30P)) mice with the targeted mutation (Tm) were slightly hyperactive at all ages. Less 6-OHDA was required in tg(Prnp-SNCA A30P) Tg (1 μg) than in WT (3μg) mice for an ipsilateral rotational bias by d-amphetamine. That was not seen with the Snca(tm(A30P)) strain. A small dose of 6-OHDA (0.33 μg) led to contralateral rotations and elevated striatal DA in Tg/Tm mice of both lines but otherwise 6-OHDA-induced striatal DA depletion was similar in all mice, indicating no A30P-aSyn-related toxin sensitivity. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid/DA-ratio was elevated in tg(Prnp-SNCA A30P) mice, suggesting an enhanced DA turnover. This ratio and homovanillic acid/DA-ratio were declined in Snca(tm(A30P)) mice. Our results demonstrate that the two differently constructed A30P-aSyn mouse strains have distinct behavioral and biochemical characteristics, some of which are opposite. Since the two lines with the same background were not identically produced, the deviations found may be partially caused by factors other

  6. Rosmarinic Acid Alleviates Neurological Symptoms in the G93A-SOD1 Transgenic Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji-Seon; Choi, Juli; Leem, Yea-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord, resulting in paralysis of voluntary skeletal muscles and eventually death, usually within 2~3 years of symptom onset. The pathophysiology mechanism underlying ALS is not yet clearly understood. Moreover the available medication for treating ALS, riluzole, only modestly improves neurological symptoms and increases survival by a few months. Therefore, improved therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In the present study, we investigated whether rosmarinic acid has a therapeutic potential to alleviate neurological deterioration in the G93A-SOD1 transgenic mouse model of ALS. Treatment of G93A-SOD1 transgenic mice with rosmarinic acid from 7 weeks of age at the dose of 400 mg/kg/day significantly extended survival, and relieved motor function deficits. Specifically, disease onset and symptom progression were delayed by more than one month. These symptomatic improvements were correlated with decreased oxidative stress and reduced neuronal loss in the ventral horns of G93A-SOD1 mice. These results support that rosmarinic acid is a potentially useful supplement for relieving ALS symptoms. PMID:26713081

  7. Functional conservation of Pax6 regulatory elements in humans and mice demonstrated with a novel transgenic reporter mouse

    PubMed Central

    Tyas, David A; Simpson, T Ian; Carr, Catherine B; Kleinjan, Dirk A; van Heyningen, Veronica; Mason, John O; Price, David J

    2006-01-01

    Background The Pax6 transcription factor is expressed during development in the eyes and in specific CNS regions, where it is essential for normal cell proliferation and differentiation. Mice lacking one or both copies of the Pax6 gene model closely humans with loss-of-function mutations in the PAX6 locus. The sequence of the Pax6/PAX6 protein is identical in mice and humans and previous studies have shown structural conservation of the gene's regulatory regions. Results We generated a transgenic mouse expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and neomycin resistance under the control of the entire complement of human PAX6 regulatory elements using a modified yeast artificial chromosome (YAC). Expression of GFP was studied in embryos from 9.5 days on and was confined to cells known to express Pax6. GFP expression was sufficiently strong that expressing cells could be distinguished from non-expressing cells using flow cytometry. Conclusion This work demonstrates the functional conservation of the regulatory elements controlling Pax6/PAX6 expression in mice and humans. The transgene provides an excellent tool for studying the functions of different Pax6/PAX6 regulatory elements in controlling Pax6 expression in animals that are otherwise normal. It will allow the analysis and isolation of cells in which Pax6 is activated, irrespective of the status of the endogenous locus. PMID:16674807

  8. DNA vaccine elicits an efficient antitumor response by targeting the mutant Kras in a transgenic mouse lung cancer model.

    PubMed

    Weng, T-Y; Yen, M-C; Huang, C-T; Hung, J-J; Chen, Y-L; Chen, W-C; Wang, C-Y; Chang, J-Y; Lai, M-D

    2014-10-01

    Mutant Kras (V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) is observed in more than 20% of non-small-cell lung cancers; however, no effective Kras target therapy is available at present. The Kras DNA vaccine may represent as a novel immunotherapeutic agent in lung cancer. In this study, we investigated the antitumor efficacy of the Kras DNA vaccine in a genetically engineered inducible mouse lung tumor model driven by Kras(G12D). Lung tumors were induced by doxycycline, and the therapeutic effects of Kras DNA vaccine were evaluated with delivery of Kras(G12D) plasmids. Mutant Kras(G12D) DNA vaccine significantly decreased the tumor nodules. A dominant-negative mutant Kras(G12D)N17, devoid of oncogenic activity, achieved similar therapeutic effects. The T-helper 1 immune response was enhanced in mice treated with Kras DNA vaccine. Splenocytes from mice receiving Kras DNA vaccine presented an antigen-specific response by treatment with peptides of Kras but not Hras or OVA. The number of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells increased after Kras vaccination. In contrast, Kras DNA vaccine was not effective in the lung tumor in transgenic mice, which was induced by mutant L858R epidermal growth factor receptor. Overall, these results indicate that Kras DNA vaccine produces an effective antitumor response in transgenic mice, and may be useful in treating lung cancer-carrying Ras mutation.

  9. PR-Set7 is degraded in a conditional Cul4A transgenic mouse model of lung cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yang; Xu, Zhidong; Mao, Jian -Hua; ...

    2015-06-01

    Background and objective. Maintenance of genomic integrity is essential to ensure normal organismal development and to prevent diseases such as cancer. PR-Set7 (also known as Set8) is a cell cycle regulated enzyme that catalyses monomethylation of histone 4 at Lys20 (H4K20me1) to promote chromosome condensation and prevent DNA damage. Recent studies show that CRL4CDT2-mediated ubiquitylation of PR-Set7 leads to its degradation during S phase and after DNA damage. This might occur to ensure appropriate changes in chromosome structure during the cell cycle or to preserve genome integrity after DNA damage. Methods. We developed a new model of lung tumor developmentmore » in mice harboring a conditionally expressed allele of Cul4A. We have therefore used a mouse model to demonstrate for the first time that Cul4A is oncogenic in vivo. With this model, staining of PR-Set7 in the preneoplastic and tumor lesions in AdenoCre-induced mouse lungs was performed. Meanwhile we identified higher protein level changes of γ-tubulin and pericentrin by IHC. Results. The level of PR-Set7 down-regulated in the preneoplastic and adenocarcinomous lesions following over-expression of Cul4A. We also identified higher levels of the proteins pericentrin and γ-tubulin in Cul4A mouse lungs induced by AdenoCre. Conclusion. PR-Set7 is a direct target of Cul4A for degradation and involved in the formation of lung tumors in the conditional Cul4A transgenic mouse model.« less

  10. Sildenafil Promotes eNOS Activation and Inhibits NADPH Oxidase in the Transgenic Sickle Cell Mouse Penis

    PubMed Central

    Musicki, Biljana; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.; Champion, Hunter C.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell disease (SCD)-associated vasculopathy in the penis is characterized by aberrant nitric oxide and phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5 signaling, and by increased oxidative stress. Preliminary clinical trials show that continuous treatment with PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil unassociated with sexual activity decreases priapic activity in patients with SCD. However, the mechanism of its vasculoprotective effect in the penis remains unclear. Aims We evaluated whether continuous administration of PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil promotes eNOS function at posttranslational levels and decreases superoxide-producing enzyme NADPH oxidase activity in the sickle cell mouse penis. Methods SCD transgenic mice were used as an animal model of SCD. WT mice served as controls. Mice received treatment with the PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil (100 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 3 weeks. eNOS phosphorylation on Ser-1177 (positive regulatory site), eNOS interactions with heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) (positive regulator), phosphorylated AKT (upstream mediator of eNOS phosphorylation on Ser-1177), an NADPH oxidase catalytic subunit gp91(phox), and a marker of oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [HNE]) were measured by Western blot. Main Outcome Measures Effect of continuous sildenafil treatment on eNOS posttranslational activation, NADPH oxidase catalytic subunit, and oxidative stress in the penis of the sickle cell mouse. Results Continuous treatment with sildenafil reversed (P < 0.05) the abnormalities in protein expressions of P-eNOS (Ser-1177), eNOS/HSP90 interaction, P-AKT, protein expression of gp91(phox), and 4-HNE, in the sickle cell mouse penis. Sildenafil treatment of WT mice did not affect any of these parameters. Conclusion Our findings that sildenafil enhances eNOS activation and inhibits NADPH oxidase function in the sickle cell mouse penis offers a vasculoprotective molecular basis for the therapeutic effect of sildenafil in the penis in association with SCD. PMID:24251665

  11. The novel adaptive rotating beam test unmasks sensorimotor impairments in a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gerstenberger, Julia; Bauer, Anne; Helmschrodt, Christin; Richter, Angelika; Richter, Franziska

    2016-05-01

    Development of disease modifying therapeutics for Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, relies on availability of animal models which recapitulate the disease hallmarks. Only few transgenic mouse models, which mimic overexpression of alpha-synuclein, show dopamine loss, behavioral impairments and protein aggregation. Mice overexpressing human wildtype alpha-synuclein under the Thy-1 promotor (Thy1-aSyn) replicate these features. However, female mice do not exhibit a phenotype. This was attributed to a potentially lower transgene expression located on the X chromosome. Here we support that female mice overexpress human wildtype alpha-synuclein only about 1.5 fold in the substantia nigra, compared to about 3 fold in male mice. Since female Thy1-aSyn mice were shown previously to exhibit differences in corticostriatal communication and synaptic plasticity similar to their male counterparts we hypothesized that female mice use compensatory mechanisms and strategies to not show overt motor deficits despite an underlying endophenotype. In order to unmask these deficits we translated recent findings in PD patients that sensory abnormalities can enhance motor dysfunction into a novel behavioral test, the adaptive rotating beam test. We found that under changing sensory input female Thy1-aSyn mice showed an overt phenotype. Our data supports that the integration of sensorimotor information is likely a major contributor to symptoms of movement disorders and that even low levels of overexpression of human wildtype alpha-synuclein has the potential to disrupt processing of these information. The here described adaptive rotating beam test represents a sensitive behavioral test to detect moderate sensorimotor alterations in mouse models.

  12. Overexpression of the rat inducible 70-kD heat stress protein in a transgenic mouse increases the resistance of the heart to ischemic injury.

    PubMed Central

    Marber, M S; Mestril, R; Chi, S H; Sayen, M R; Yellon, D M; Dillmann, W H

    1995-01-01

    Myocardial protection and changes in gene expression follow whole body heat stress. Circumstantial evidence suggests that an inducible 70-kD heat shock protein (hsp70i), increased markedly by whole body heat stress, contributes to the protection. Transgenic mouse lines were constructed with a cytomegalovirus enhancer and beta-actin promoter driving rat hsp70i expression in heterozygote animals. Unstressed, transgene positive mice expressed higher levels of myocardial hsp70i than transgene negative mice after whole body heat stress. This high level of expression occurred without apparent detrimental effect. The hearts harvested from transgene positive mice and transgene negative littermates were Langendorff perfused and subjected to 20 min of warm (37 degrees C) zero-flow ischemia and up to 120 min of reflow while contractile recovery and creatine kinase efflux were measured. Myocardial infarction was demarcated by triphenyltetrazolium. In transgene positive compared with transgene negative hearts, the zone of infarction was reduced by 40%, contractile function at 30 min of reflow was doubled, and efflux of creatine kinase was reduced by approximately 50%. Our findings suggest for the first time that increased myocardial hsp70i expression results in protection of the heart against ischemic injury and that the antiischemic properties of hsp70i have possible therapeutic relevance. Images PMID:7706448

  13. Doxycycline reduces fibril formation in a transgenic mouse model of AL amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Jennifer Ellis; Ren, Ruiyi; Toraldo, Gianluca; SooHoo, Pam; Guan, Jian; O'Hara, Carl; Jasuja, Ravi; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Liao, Ronglih; Connors, Lawreen H.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic AL amyloidosis results from the aggregation of an amyloidogenic immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain (LC) usually produced by a plasma cell clone in the bone marrow. AL is the most rapidly fatal of the systemic amyloidoses, as amyloid fibrils can rapidly accumulate in tissues including the heart, kidneys, autonomic or peripheral nervous systems, gastrointestinal tract, and liver. Chemotherapy is used to eradicate the cellular source of the amyloidogenic precursor. Currently, there are no therapies that target the process of LC aggregation, fibril formation, or organ damage. We developed transgenic mice expressing an amyloidogenic λ6 LC using the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter to circumvent the disruption of B cell development by premature expression of recombined LC. The CMV-λ6 transgenic mice develop neurologic dysfunction and Congophilic amyloid deposits in the stomach. Amyloid deposition was inhibited in vivo by the antibiotic doxycycline. In vitro studies demonstrated that doxycycline directly disrupted the formation of recombinant LC fibrils. Furthermore, treatment of ex vivo LC amyloid fibrils with doxycycline reduced the number of intact fibrils and led to the formation of large disordered aggregates. The CMV-λ6 transgenic model replicates the process of AL amyloidosis and is useful for testing the antifibril potential of orally available agents. PMID:21998211

  14. Non-invasive imaging of transgenic GFP expression in neonatal mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Gideon; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhuo, Lang

    2007-02-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a traditional biomarker for astrocytes of the central nervous system. In this study, non-invasive in vivo imaging of GFAP-GFP (green fluorescent protein) expression in the brain of neonatal transgenic mice is used as a novel method to investigate the relationship between the expression of the transgene at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 hr post-treatment in mice subjected to a single administration of 12 mg/kg of neurotoxin 1-methyl-4(2'-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (2'-CH 3-MPTP). The GFP elevation was found to peak at 6 hr and lasted to at least 8 hr after the toxin treatment. Histological examination of fixed brain sections using immunohistochemistry (IHC) shows an increase in GFP and GFAP signal from the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and the hippocampus. The results have provided quantitative fluorescence and qualitative histological evidence for the activation of the GFAP-GFP transgene in astrocytes following neurotoxin 2'-CH 3-MPTP administration, suggesting that the model described here could be used to study neuronal degeneration such as Parkinson's disease and in general, developmental neurotoxicity in live animals.

  15. Development of isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for mouse urine metabolomics: quantitative metabolomic study of transgenic mice related to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun; Guo, Kevin; Xia, Jianguo; Zhou, Jianjun; Yang, Jing; Westaway, David; Wishart, David S; Li, Liang

    2014-10-03

    Because of a limited volume of urine that can be collected from a mouse, it is very difficult to apply the common strategy of using multiple analytical techniques to analyze the metabolites to increase the metabolome coverage for mouse urine metabolomics. We report an enabling method based on differential isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for relative quantification of over 950 putative metabolites using 20 μL of urine as the starting material. The workflow involves aliquoting 10 μL of an individual urine sample for ¹²C-dansylation labeling that target amines and phenols. Another 10 μL of aliquot was taken from each sample to generate a pooled sample that was subjected to ¹³C-dansylation labeling. The ¹²C-labeled individual sample was mixed with an equal volume of the ¹³C-labeled pooled sample. The mixture was then analyzed by LC-MS to generate information on metabolite concentration differences among different individual samples. The interday repeatability for the LC-MS runs was assessed, and the median relative standard deviation over 4 days was 5.0%. This workflow was then applied to a metabolomic biomarker discovery study using urine samples obtained from the TgCRND8 mouse model of early onset familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) throughout the course of their pathological deposition of beta amyloid (Aβ). It was showed that there was a distinct metabolomic separation between the AD prone mice and the wild type (control) group. As early as 15-17 weeks of age (presymptomatic), metabolomic differences were observed between the two groups, and after the age of 25 weeks the metabolomic alterations became more pronounced. The metabolomic changes at different ages corroborated well with the phenotype changes in this transgenic mice model. Several useful candidate biomarkers including methionine, desaminotyrosine, taurine, N1-acetylspermidine, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were identified. Some of them were found in previous

  16. Effects of Alzheimer's disease transgenes on neurochemical expression in the mouse brain determined by ¹H MRS in vitro.

    PubMed

    Forster, D M; James, M F; Williams, S R

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic models of human disease can be used to understand pathology and to discover biomarkers of disease presence, progression and response to therapy. Here we report a study of longitudinal metabolic differences between TASTPM transgenic Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice and their wild type counterparts using (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to look for potential biomarkers for use in AD research and drug discovery. Chloroform methanol extractions were performed on the brains of mice aged between 3 and 18 months. (1)H MR spectra were recorded from the aqueous fractions. Absolute metabolite concentrations, determined from resonance integrals relative to an internal standard, were analysed by 2-way ANOVA (genotype x age). Significant effects of age alone were identified for creatine, glutamine and total choline-containing compounds. There was a marked increase in creatine in the oldest (15-18 mo) TASTPM mice. The increase in creatine was unexpected and may be caused by osmotic stress in older animals as plaque load increases. Care should be taken when using creatine as a reference metabolite during scans of these animals in vivo. A significant effect of genotype alone was identified for myo-inositol (MI), which was higher in TASTPM mice at all ages. Succinate, glycerophosphocholine and choline all showed significant effects of age and genotype. No significant effects were detected in N-acetylaspartate (NAA) levels. Increased MI could be a marker of gliosis or microglial activation in TASTPM mice, but the absence of an age dependence for MI levels means it may be a biomarker of disease, but not of disease progression. Decreased succinate is indicative of disrupted neuronal energy metabolism, an effect that has been seen in human AD.

  17. An inducible transgenic mouse breast cancer model for the analysis of tumor antigen specific CD8+ T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Michael; Wanger, Jara; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Deppert, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In Simian virus 40 (SV40) transgenic BALB/c WAP-T mice tumor development and progression is driven by SV40 tumor antigens encoded by inducible transgenes. WAP-T mice constitute a well characterized mouse model for breast cancer with strong similarities to the corresponding human disease. BALB/c mice mount only a weak cellular immune response against SV40 T-antigen (T-Ag). For studying tumor antigen specific CD8+ T-cell responses against transgene expressing cells, we created WAP-TNP mice, in which the transgene additionally codes for the NP118–126-epitope contained within the nucleoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), the immune-dominant T-cell epitope in BALB/c mice. We then investigated in WAP-TNP mice the immune responses against SV40 tumor antigens and the NP-epitope within the chimeric T-Ag/NP protein (T-AgNP). Analysis of the immune-reactivity against T-Ag in WAP-T and of T-AgNP in WAP-TNP mice revealed that, in contrast to wild type (wt) BALB/c mice, WAP-T and WAP-TNP mice were non-reactive against T-Ag. However, like wtBALB/c mice, WAP-T as well as WAP-TNP mice were highly reactive against the immune-dominant LCMV NP-epitope, thereby allowing the analysis of NP-epitope specific cellular immune responses in WAP-TNP mice. LCMV infection of WAP-TNP mice induced a strong, LCMV NP-epitope specific CD8+ T-cell response, which was able to specifically eliminate T-AgNP expressing mammary epithelial cells both prior to tumor formation (i.e. in cells of lactating mammary glands), as well as in invasive tumors. Elimination of tumor cells, however, was only transient, even after repeated LCMV infections. Further studies showed that already non-infected WAP-TNP tumor mice contained LCMV NP-epitope specific CD8+ T-cells, albeit with strongly reduced, though measurable activity. Functional impairment of these ‘endogenous’ NP-epitope specific T-cells seems to be caused by expression of the programmed death-1 protein (PD1), as anti-PD1 treatment of

  18. Relationship between ubiquilin-1 and BACE1 in human Alzheimer's disease and APdE9 transgenic mouse brain and cell-based models.

    PubMed

    Natunen, Teemu; Takalo, Mari; Kemppainen, Susanna; Leskelä, Stina; Marttinen, Mikael; Kurkinen, Kaisa M A; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Sarajärvi, Timo; Viswanathan, Jayashree; Gabbouj, Sami; Solje, Eino; Tahvanainen, Eveliina; Pirttimäki, Tiina; Kurki, Mitja; Paananen, Jussi; Rauramaa, Tuomas; Miettinen, Pasi; Mäkinen, Petra; Leinonen, Ville; Soininen, Hilkka; Airenne, Kari; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Tanila, Heikki; Haapasalo, Annakaisa; Hiltunen, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) and phosphorylated tau in the brain are central events underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Aβ is generated from amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and γ-secretase-mediated cleavages. Ubiquilin-1, a ubiquitin-like protein, genetically associates with AD and affects APP trafficking, processing and degradation. Here, we have investigated ubiquilin-1 expression in human brain in relation to AD-related neurofibrillary pathology and the effects of ubiquilin-1 overexpression on BACE1, tau, neuroinflammation, and neuronal viability in vitro in co-cultures of mouse embryonic primary cortical neurons and microglial cells under acute neuroinflammation as well as neuronal cell lines, and in vivo in the brain of APdE9 transgenic mice at the early phase of the development of Aβ pathology. Ubiquilin-1 expression was decreased in human temporal cortex in relation to the early stages of AD-related neurofibrillary pathology (Braak stages 0-II vs. III-IV). There was a trend towards a positive correlation between ubiquilin-1 and BACE1 protein levels. Consistent with this, ubiquilin-1 overexpression in the neuron-microglia co-cultures with or without the induction of neuroinflammation resulted in a significant increase in endogenously expressed BACE1 levels. Sustained ubiquilin-1 overexpression in the brain of APdE9 mice resulted in a moderate, but insignificant increase in endogenous BACE1 levels and activity, coinciding with increased levels of soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42. BACE1 levels were also significantly increased in neuronal cells co-overexpressing ubiquilin-1 and BACE1. Ubiquilin-1 overexpression led to the stabilization of BACE1 protein levels, potentially through a mechanism involving decreased degradation in the lysosomal compartment. Ubiquilin-1 overexpression did not significantly affect the neuroinflammation response, but decreased neuronal viability in the neuron-microglia co

  19. Evidence that a synthetic amyloid-ß oligomer-binding peptide (ABP) targets amyloid-ß deposits in transgenic mouse brain and human Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Chakravarthy, Balu; Ito, Shingo; Atkinson, Trevor; Gaudet, Chantal; Ménard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Whitfield, James

    2014-03-14

    The synthetic ~5 kDa ABP (amyloid-ß binding peptide) consists of a region of the 228 kDa human pericentrioloar material-1 (PCM-1) protein that selectively and avidly binds in vitro Aβ1-42 oligomers, believed to be key co-drivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but not monomers (Chakravarthy et al., (2013) [3]). ABP also prevents Aß1-42 from triggering the apoptotic death of cultured human SHSY5Y neuroblasts, likely by sequestering Aß oligomers, suggesting that it might be a potential AD therapeutic. Here we support this possibility by showing that ABP also recognizes and binds Aβ1-42 aggregates in sections of cortices and hippocampi from brains of AD transgenic mice and human AD patients. More importantly, ABP targets Aβ1-42 aggregates when microinjected into the hippocampi of the brains of live AD transgenic mice.

  20. Predictive imaging of chemotherapeutic response in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Yoo, Byunghee; Sherman, Sarah; Mukherjee, Pinku; Ross, Alana; Pantazopoulos, Pamela; Petkova, Victoria; Farrar, Christian; Medarova, Zdravka; Moore, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The underglycosylated mucin 1 tumor antigen (uMUC1) is a biomarker that forecasts the progression of adenocarcinomas. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a dual-modality molecular imaging approach based on targeting uMUC1 for monitoring chemotherapeutic response in a transgenic murine model of pancreatic cancer (KCM triple transgenic mice). An uMUC1-specific contrast agent (MN-EPPT) was synthesized for use with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence optical imaging. It consisted of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to the near infrared fluorescent dye Cy5.5 and to a uMUC1-specific peptide (EPPT). KCM triple transgenic mice were given gemcitabine as chemotherapy while control animals received saline injections following the same schedule. Changes in uMUC1 levels following chemotherapy were monitored using T2-weighted MRI and optical imaging before and 24 hr after injection of the MN-EPPT. uMUC1 expression in tumors from both groups was evaluated by histology and qRT-PCR. We observed that the average delta-T2 in the gemcitabine-treated group was significantly reduced compared to the control group indicating lower accumulation of MN-EPPT, and correspondingly, a lower level of uMUC1 expression. In vivo optical imaging confirmed the MRI findings. Fluorescence microscopy of pancreatic tumor sections showed a lower level of uMUC1 expression in the gemcitabine-treated group compared to the control, which was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Our data proved that changes in uMUC1 expression after gemcitabine chemotherapy could be evaluated using MN-EPPT-enhanced in vivo MR and optical imaging. These results suggest that the uMUC1-targeted imaging approach could provide a useful tool for the predictive assessment of therapeutic response. PMID:26996122

  1. Glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in transgenic mouse septum: an anti-GFP immunofluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Verimli, Ural; Sehirli, Umit S

    2016-09-01

    The septum is a basal forebrain region located between the lateral ventricles in rodents. It consists of lateral and medial divisions. Medial septal projections regulate hippocampal theta rhythm whereas lateral septal projections are involved in processes such as affective functions, memory formation, and behavioral responses. Gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons of the septal region possess the 65 and 67 isoforms of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase. Although data on the glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in the septal region generally appears to indicate glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 dominance, different studies have given inconsistent results in this regard. The aim of this study was therefore to obtain information on the distributions of both of these glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms in the septal region in transgenic mice. Two animal groups of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein knock-in transgenic mice were utilized in the experiment. Brain sections from the region were taken for anti-green fluorescent protein immunohistochemistry in order to obtain estimated quantitative data on the number of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons. Following the immunohistochemical procedures, the mean numbers of labeled cells in the lateral and medial septal nuclei were obtained for the two isoform groups. Statistical analysis yielded significant results which indicated that the 65 isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase predominates in both lateral and medial septal nuclei (unpaired two-tailed t-test p < 0.0001 for LS, p < 0.01 for MS). This study is the first to reveal the dominance of glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform 65 in the septal region in glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice.

  2. Early alterations in blood and brain RANTES and MCP-1 expression and the effect of exercise frequency in the 3xTg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Morgan; Jones, Terry E; Lu, Qun; Bareiss, Sonja K

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to protect against cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression, however the dose of exercise required to protect against AD is unknown. Recent studies show that the pathological processes leading to AD cause characteristic alterations in blood and brain inflammatory proteins that are associated with the progression of AD, suggesting that these markers could be used to diagnosis and monitor disease progression. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of exercise frequency on AD blood chemokine profiles, and correlate these findings with chemokine brain expression changes in the triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mouse model. Three month old 3xTg-AD mice were subjected to 12 weeks of moderate intensity wheel running at a frequency of either 1×/week or 3×/week. Blood and cortical tissue were analyzed for expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and regulated and normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES). Alterations in blood RANTES and MCP-1 expression were evident at 3 and 6 month old animals compared to WT animals. Three times per week exercise but not 1×/week exercise was effective at reversing serum and brain RANTES and MCP-1 expression to the levels of WT controls, revealing a dose dependent response to exercise. Analysis of these chemokines showed a strong negative correlation between blood and brain expression of RANTES. The results indicate that alterations in serum and brain inflammatory chemokines are evident as early signs of Alzheimer's disease pathology and that higher frequency exercise was necessary to restore blood and brain inflammatory expression levels in this AD mouse model.

  3. Chemopreventive Effects of Korean Angelica versus Its Major Pyranocoumarins on Two Lineages of Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Su-Ni; Zhang, Jinhui; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Peixin; Puppala, Manohar; Zhang, Yong; Xing, Chengguo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2015-09-01

    We showed previously that daily gavage of Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root ethanolic extract starting 8 weeks of age inhibited growth of prostate epithelium and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NE-Ca) in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Because decursin (D) and its isomer decursinol angelate (DA) are major pyranocoumarins in AGN extract, we tested the hypothesis that D/DA represented active/prodrug compounds against TRAMP carcinogenesis. Three groups of male C57BL/6 TRAMP mice were gavage treated daily with excipient vehicle, AGN (5 mg per mouse), or equimolar D/DA (3 mg per mouse) from 8 weeks to 16 or 28 weeks of age. Measurement of plasma and NE-Ca D, DA, and their common metabolite decursinol indicated similar retention from AGN versus D/DA dosing. The growth of TRAMP dorsolateral prostate (DLP) in AGN- and D/DA-treated mice was inhibited by 66% and 61% at 16 weeks and by 67% and 72% at 28 weeks, respectively. Survival of mice bearing NE-Ca to 28 weeks was improved by AGN, but not by D/DA. Nevertheless, AGN- and D/DA-treated mice had lower NE-Ca burden. Immunohistochemical and mRNA analyses of DLP showed that AGN and D/DA exerted similar inhibition of TRAMP epithelial lesion progression and key cell-cycle genes. Profiling of NE-Ca mRNA showed a greater scope of modulating angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion-metastasis, and inflammation genes by AGN than D/DA. The data therefore support D/DA as probable active/prodrug compounds against TRAMP epithelial lesions, and they cooperate with non-pyranocoumarin compounds to fully express AGN efficacy against NE-Ca.

  4. Cyan fluorescent protein expression in ganglion and amacrine cells in a thy1-CFP transgenic mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Alejandro; Huynh, Uyen-Chi N.; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To characterize cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) expression in the retina of the thy1-CFP (B6.Cg-Tg(Thy1-CFP)23Jrs/J) transgenic mouse line. Methods CFP expression was characterized using morphometric methods and immunohistochemistry with antibodies to neurofilament light (NF-L), neuronal nuclei (NeuN), POU-domain protein (Brn3a) and calretinin, which immunolabel ganglion cells, and syntaxin 1 (HPC-1), glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), GABA plasma membrane transporter-1 (GAT-1), and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), which immunolabel amacrine cells. Results CFP was extensively expressed in the inner retina, primarily in the inner plexiform layer (IPL), ganglion cell layer (GCL), nerve fiber layer, and optic nerve. CFP fluorescent cell bodies were in all retinal regions and their processes ramified in all laminae of the IPL. Some small, weakly CFP fluorescent somata were in the inner nuclear layer (INL). CFP-containing somata in the GCL ranged from 6 to 20 μm in diameter, and they had a density of 2636±347 cells/mm2 at 1.5 mm from the optic nerve head. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated colocalization of CFP with the ganglion cell markers NF-L, NeuN, Brn3a, and calretinin. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies to HPC-1, GAD67, GAT-1, and ChAT indicated that the small, weakly fluorescent CFP cells in the INL and GCL were cholinergic amacrine cells. Conclusions The total number and density of CFP-fluorescent cells in the GCL were within the range of previous estimates of the total number of ganglion cells in the C57BL/6J line. Together these findings suggest that most ganglion cells in the thy1-CFP mouse line 23 express CFP. In conclusion, the thy1-CFP mouse line is highly useful for studies requiring the identification of ganglion cells. PMID:18728756

  5. Chemopreventive effects of Korean Angelica vs. its major pyranocoumarins on two lineages of transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Su-Ni; Zhang, Jinhui; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Peixin; Puppala, Manohar; Zhang, Yong; Xing, Chengguo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2015-01-01

    We showed previously that daily gavage of Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root ethanolic extract starting 8 weeks of age inhibited growth of prostate epithelium and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NE-Ca) in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Since decursin (D) and its isomer decursinol angelate (DA) are major pyranocoumarins in AGN extract, we tested the hypothesis that D/DA represented active/prodrug compounds against TRAMP carcinogenesis. Three groups of male C57BL/6 TRAMP mice were gavage-treated daily with excipient vehicle, AGN (5 mg per mouse) or equimolar D/DA (3 mg per mouse) from 8 weeks to 16 or 28 weeks of age. Measurement of plasma and NE-Ca D, DA and their common metabolite decursinol indicated similar retention from AGN vs. D/DA dosing. The growth of TRAMP dorsolateral prostate (DLP) in AGN-and D/DA-treated mice was inhibited by 66% and 61% at 16 weeks and by 67% and 72% at 28 weeks, respectively. Survival of mice bearing NE-Ca to 28 weeks was improved by AGN, but not by D/DA. Nevertheless, AGN-and D/DA-treated mice had lower NE-Ca burden. Immunohistochemical and mRNA analyses of DLP showed AGN and D/DA exerted similar inhibition of TRAMP epithelial lesion progression and key cell cycle genes. Profiling of NE-Ca mRNA showed a greater scope of modulating angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal-transition, invasion-metastasis and inflammation genes by AGN than D/DA. The data therefore support D/DA as probable active/prodrug compounds against TRAMP epithelial lesions, and they cooperate with non-pyranocoumarin compounds to fully express AGN efficacy against NE-Ca. PMID:26116406

  6. Effect of transgene concentration, flanking matrix attachment regions, and RecA-coating on the efficiency of mouse transgenesis mediated by intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Pedro Nuno; Pérez-Crespo, Miriam; Ramírez, Miguel Angel; Pozueta, Julio; Montoliu, Lluís; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso

    2007-02-01

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) of DNA-loaded sperm cells has been shown to be a valuable tool for the production of transgenic animals, especially when DNA constructs with submegabase magnitude are used. In order to optimize and to understand the mechanism of the ICSI-mediated transgenesis, we have evaluated the impact of transgene DNA concentration, transgene flanking with nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs), and the use of recombinase A (RecA)-coated DNA on the efficiency of mouse transgenesis production by ICSI. Presented data include assays with three DNA constructs; an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) plasmid of 5.4 kb, this plasmid flanked with two MAR elements (2.3 Kb of the human beta-interferon domain boundaries), and a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) construct of approximately 510 kb (the largest transgenic construct introduced by ICSI that we have seen reported). ICSI-mediated transgenesis was done in the B6D2 mouse strain using different concentrations for each construct. Analysis of generated data indicated that ICSI allows the use of higher DNA concentrations than the ones used for pronuclear microinjection, however, when a certain threshold is exceeded, embryo/fetal viability decrease dramatically. In addition, independently of the transgene concentration tested, transgene flanking with MAR sequences did not have a significant impact on the efficiency of this transgenesis method. Finally, we observed that although the overall efficiency of ICSI-mediated transgenesis with fresh spermatozoa and RecA-complexed DNA was similar to the one obtained with the common ICSI-mediated transgenesis approach with frozen-thawed spermatozoa and RecA free DNA, this method was not as efficient in maintaining a low frequency of founder animal mosaicism, suggesting that different mechanisms of transgene integration might result from each procedure.

  7. Linking immune-mediated arterial inflammation and cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Ludewig, Burkhard; Freigang, Stefan; Jäggi, Martin; Kurrer, Michael O.; Pei, Yao-Chang; Vlk, Lenka; Odermatt, Bernhard; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Hengartner, Hans

    2000-01-01

    Arterial inflammatory responses are thought to be a significant component of atherosclerotic disease. We describe here, using a transgenic approach, the mutual perpetuation of immune-mediated arterial inflammation and cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis. Mice expressing the bacterial transgene β-galactosidase exclusively in cardiomyocytes and in smooth muscle cells in lung arteries and the aorta (SM-LacZ), and hypercholesterolemic apolipoprotein E-deficient SM-LacZ mice (SM-LacZ/apoE−/−) developed myocarditis and arteritis after immunization with dendritic cells presenting a β-galactosidase-derived immunogenic peptide. Hypercholesterolemia amplified acute arteritis and perpetuated chronic arterial inflammation in SM-LacZ/apoE−/− mice, but had no major impact on acute myocarditis or the subsequent development of dilated cardiomyopathy. Conversely, arteritis significantly accelerated cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the linkage of immune-mediated arteritis and hypercholesterolemia favors initiation and maintenance of atherosclerotic lesion formation. Therapeutic strategies to prevent or disrupt such self-perpetuating vicious circles may be crucial for the successful treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:11050173

  8. Prediction of S-glutathionylated Proteins Progression in Alzheimer's Transgenic Mouse Model Using Principle Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Kuo, Ching-Chang; Chiu, Alan W.L.; Feng, June

    2014-01-01

    To date, prediction of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is mainly based on clinical criteria because no well-established biochemical biomarkers for routine clinical diagnosis of AD currently exist. We developed an approach to aid in the early diagnosis of AD by using principal component analysis (PCA)-based spectral analysis of oxidized protein electrophoretic profiling. We found that the combination of capillary electrophoresis and PCA analysis of S-glutathionylation distribution characterization can be used in the sample classification and molecular weight (Mw) prediction. The comparison of leave-one-out AD versus non-AD gives the sensitivity of 100% and 93.33% in brain tissues and blood samples, respectively, while the specificity of 100% in brain and 90.0% in blood samples. Our findings demonstrate that PCA of S-glutathionylation electrophoretic profiling detects AD pathology features, and that the molecular weight based electrophoretic profiling of blood and brain S-glutathionylated proteins are sensitive to change, even at the early stage of the disease. Our results offer a previously unexplored diagnostic approach by using electrophoretic characteristics of oxidized proteins to serve as a predictor of AD progression and early stage screening. PMID:22475799

  9. Transgenic mouse model expressing P53R172H, luciferase, EGFP, and KRASG12D in a single open reading frame for live imaging of tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Hye-Lim; Calvisi, Diego F.; Moon, Hyuk; Baek, Sinhwa; Ribback, Silvia; Dombrowski, Frank; Cho, Kyung Joo; Chung, Sook In; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ro, Simon Weonsang

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse cancer models allow tumors to be imaged in vivo via co-expression of a reporter gene with a tumor-initiating gene. However, differential transcriptional and translational regulation between the tumor-initiating gene and the reporter gene can result in inconsistency between the actual tumor size and the size indicated by the imaging assay. To overcome this limitation, we developed a transgenic mouse in which two oncogenes, encoding P53R172H and KRASG12D, are expressed together with two reporter genes, encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and firefly luciferase, in a single open reading frame following Cre-mediated DNA excision. Systemic administration of adenovirus encoding Cre to these mice induced specific transgene expression in the liver. Repeated bioluminescence imaging of the mice revealed a continuous increase in the bioluminescent signal over time. A strong correlation was found between the bioluminescent signal and actual tumor size. Interestingly, all liver tumors induced by P53R172H and KRASG12D in the model were hepatocellular adenomas. The mouse model was also used to trace cell proliferation in the epidermis via live fluorescence imaging. We anticipate that the transgenic mouse model will be useful for imaging tumor development in vivo and for investigating the oncogenic collaboration between P53R172H and KRASG12D. PMID:25623590

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of amyloid plaques using hollow manganese oxide nanoparticles conjugated with antibody aβ1-40 in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Ha, Tae Lin; Im, Geun Ho; Yang, Jehoon; Seo, Sang Won; Lee, In Su; Lee, Jung Hee

    2013-01-09

    In this study, we have shown the feasibility of hollow manganese oxide nanoparticles (HMON) conjugated with an antibody of Aβ1-40 peptide (abAβ40) (HMON-abAβ40) for MRI of amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. MR brain images in APP/PS1 transgenic mice and their nontransgenic littermates were acquired using a 7.0 T MRI system before, and 24 and 72 h after an injection of HMON-abAβ40. After the injection of HMON-abAβ40, we found hyperenhanced spots in the frontal cortex area on T1-weighted MR images for transgenic mice, which corresponded qualitatively to amyloid plaques detected by thioflavin-S staining. For quantitative analysis, percent MR signal changes in six brain regions (olfactory cortex, frontal cortex, cerebral cortex, thalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex) were compared between transgenic and wild-type mice. We found significant increases in the percent MR signal changes in the olfactory cortex, frontal cortex, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus, but there were no significant differences in the thalamus and cerebellar cortex for transgenic mice compared with wild-type mice. This unique strategy allowed us to detect brain regions subjected to amyloid plaque deposition in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mouse models and has a potential to be developed for human applications, which has a current utility in preclinical research, particularly in monitoring therapeutic response for drug development in Alzheimer's disease.

  11. A comprehensive assessment of the SOD1G93A low-copy transgenic mouse, which models human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Kalmar, Bernadett; Essa, Shafa; Ricketts, Thomas; Joyce, Peter; Kent, Rosie; Rowe, Claire; Parker, Andy; Gray, Anna; Hafezparast, Majid; Thorpe, Julian R; Greensmith, Linda; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2011-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that results in the death of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. The disorder generally strikes in mid-life, relentlessly leading to paralysis and death, typically 3-5 years after diagnosis. No effective treatments are available. Up to 10% of ALS is familial, usually autosomal dominant. Several causative genes are known and, of these, mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) is by far the most frequently found, accounting for up to 20% of familial ALS. A range of human mutant SOD1 transgenic mouse strains has been produced, and these largely successfully model the human disease. Of these, the most widely used is the SOD1 mouse, which expresses a human SOD1 transgene with a causative G93A mutation. This mouse model is excellent for many purposes but carries up to 25 copies of the transgene and produces a great excess of SOD1 protein, which might affect our interpretation of disease processes. A variant of this strain carries a deletion of the transgene array such that the copy number is dropped to eight to ten mutant SOD1 genes. This 'deleted' 'low-copy' mouse undergoes a slower course of disease, over many months. Here we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of phenotype, including nerve and muscle physiology and histology, to add to our knowledge of this 'deleted' strain and give baseline data for future studies. We find differences in phenotype that arise from genetic background and sex, and we quantify the loss of nerve and muscle function over time. The slowly progressive pathology observed in this mouse strain could provide us with a more appropriate model for studying early-stage pathological processes in ALS and aid the development of therapies for early-stage treatments.

  12. Expression of neprilysin in skeletal muscle reduces amyloid burden in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinxing; Studzinski, Christa; Beckett, Tina; Guan, Hanjun; Hersh, Matthew A; Murphy, M Paul; Klein, Ronald; Hersh, Louis B

    2009-08-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) is a zinc metallopeptidase that efficiently degrades the amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides believed to be involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease (AD). The focus of this study was to develop a new and tractable therapeutic approach for treating AD using NEP gene therapy. We have introduced adeno-associated virus (AAV) expressing the mouse NEP gene into the hindlimb muscle of 6-month-old human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) (3X-Tg-AD) mice, an age which correlates with early stage AD. Overexpression of NEP in muscle decreased brain soluble Abeta peptide levels by approximately 60% and decreased amyloid deposits by approximately 50%, with no apparent adverse effects. Expression of NEP on muscle did not affect the levels of a number of other physiological peptides known to be in vitro substrates. These findings demonstrate that peripheral expression of NEP and likely other peptidases represents an alternative to direct administration into brain and illustrates the potential for using NEP expression in muscle for the prevention and treatment of AD.

  13. Improved hypothermic short-term storage of isolated mouse islets by adding serum to preservation solutions.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasuko; Okitsu, Teru; Xibao, Liu; Teramae, Hiroki; Okonogi, Atsuhito; Toyoda, Kentaro; Uemoto, Shinji; Fukushima, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Preserving isolated islets at low temperature appears attractive because it can keep islet quantity comparable to freshly isolated islets. In this study, we evaluated the effect of serum as an additive to preservation solutions on islet quality after short-term hypothermic storage. Isolated mouse islets were preserved at 4°C in University of Wisconsin solution (UW) alone, UW with serum, M-Kyoto solution (MK) alone or MK with serum. We then assessed islet quantity, morphology, viability and function in vitro as well as in vivo. Islet quantity after storage in all four solutions was well maintained for up to 120 h. However, islets functioned for different duration; glucose-stimulated insulin release assay revealed that the duration was 72 h when islets were stored in UW with serum and MK with serum, but only 24 h in UW alone, and the islet function disappeared immediately in MK alone. Viability assay confirmed that more than 70% islet cells survived for up to 48 h when islets are preserved in UW with serum and MK with serum, but the viability decreased rapidly in UW alone and MK alone. In in vivo bioassays using 48-h preserved isogeneic islets, all recipient mice restored normal blood glucose concentrations by transplants preserved in UW with serum or MK with serum, whereas 33.3% recipients and no recipient restored diabetes by transplants preserved in UW alone and in MK alone respectively. Adding serum to both UW and MK improves their capability to store isolated islets by maintaining islet functional viability.

  14. EEG, activity, and sleep architecture in a transgenic AβPPswe/PSEN1A246E Alzheimer's disease mouse.

    PubMed

    Jyoti, Amar; Plano, Andrea; Riedel, Gernot; Platt, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Since sleep and electroencephalogram (EEG) disturbances are endophenotypes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients alongside cognitive dysfunction, we here characterized these parameters in transgenic mice carrying transgenes for amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPPswe) and presenilin 1 (PSEN1A246E) at 5 (pre-plaque) and 20 months, relative to PSEN1 and wild-type (WT) mice, using a novel wireless microchip device. While circadian rhythms were not affected, we obtained significantly higher overall activity at 5 months in the AβPP/PSEN1 strain (p < 0.001) compared to both PSEN1 and WT animals. Vigilance staging revealed that AβPP/PSEN1 animals present with an age-independent increase in wakefulness (p < 0.001) and a decrease in non rapid-eye movement (NREM) sleep (p < 0.01). These changes were age- and genotype-dependent only during the light phase, while dark phase activity pattern were equally affected at both ages. In all genotypes, the amount of REM sleep was lower at 20 months indicating a general age-related profile. Spectral power of qEEG changed in AβPP/PSEN1 mice at 5 months during wakefulness and REM sleep; during wakefulness hippocampal delta (0.5-5 Hz) was reduced and theta (5-9 Hz) power enhanced. By contrast, NREM EEG spectra were affected by age and genotype. Interestingly, PSEN1 animals also showed spectral EEG changes, these differed from both WT and AβPP/PSEN1 animals. Our results indicate that AβPP/PSEN1 mice exhibit abnormalities in activity and sleep architecture preceding amyloid plaque deposition as well as age-related changes in cortical EEG power. Though not fully recapitulating the profile of AD patients, this suggests activity and EEG recordings as sensitive and translational biomarkers in murine models.

  15. Investigating the Role of FIP200 in Mammary Carcinogenesis Using a Transgenic Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    the mammary gland of virgin mice however, lactating mice have severe lobulo-alveolar hypoplasia in the mammary gland. After completing the analysis... hypoplasia which renders the dams unable to lactate). In the 1B mating scheme a female mouse with FAKFlox/Flox genotype was mated to a male MMTV...Epithelial-Specific Deletion of the Focal Adhesion Kinase Gene Leads to Severe Lobulo-Alveolar Hypoplasia and Secretory Immaturity of the Murine Mammary

  16. Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer Initiation in a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model by Targeting 15-Lipoxygenase-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    either omega (n)-3 or n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs ) directly impact PCa tumor growth. Furthermore, the FLiMP mice, which overexpress human 15...effects of excessive n-6 LA diet consumption in the progression of PCa. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Linoleic acid ; LO or LOX, lipoxygenase; PUFA , Polyunsaturated... fatty acid ; PCa, Prostate Cancer, MMHCC, Mouse Models of Human Cancer Consortium; IHC, immunohistochemistry; H & E, Hematoxylin and Eosin; FLiMP

  17. Bioenergetic Defects and Oxidative Damage in Transgenic Mouse Models of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-01

    specifically against mitochondrial molecules. Results may give insight into sites for drug targeting in PD. The original Specific Aims for the five years of...before, during and after onset of pathological changes and disease symptoms. HD mouse Unes differ in terms of the site of mutant gene incorporation, CAG...conmienced studies to examine the functional capacities of components of the glucose metabolic pathway in these HD mice, in search of potential sites

  18. The Lgr5 transgene is expressed specifically in glycinergic amacrine cells in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Sukhdeo, Kumar; Koch, Catherine E; Miller, Tyler E; Zhou, Hannah; Rivera, Maricruz; Yan, Kenneth; Cepko, Constance L; Lathia, Justin D; Rich, Jeremy N

    2014-02-01

    Retinal amacrine cells are a diverse set of interneurons within the inner nuclear layer. The canonical Wnt pathway is highly active within mature amacrine cells, but its role remains unclear. Leucine-rich repeat containing G-protein receptor 5 (Lgr5) is a newly identified component of the Wnt receptor complex that potentiates beta-catenin signaling. In multiple epithelial organs Lgr5 marks adult tissue stem cells. We investigated the expression of this gene using Lgr5-eGFP-IRES-CreER transgenic reporter mice. In the eye, Lgr5 was exclusively expressed in glycinergic amacrine cells in adult mice. Amacrine cells are post-mitotic and represent the first neuronal and non-stem cell lineage to express Lgr5. We further interrogated the spatiotemporal labeling of individual amacrine cells with controlled fluorophore expression. This "fluorofilling" technique provides a tool to study amacrine morphology and dissect neural networks.

  19. A double transgenic mouse used to track migrating Schwann cells and regenerating axons following engraftment of injured nerves

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Ayato; Koob, Jason W; Liu, Daniel Z; Tong, Alice Y; Hunter, Daniel A.; Parsadanian, Alexander; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Myckatyn, Terence M.

    2007-01-01

    We propose that double transgenic thy1-CFP(23)/S100-GFP mice whose Schwann cells constitutively express green fluorescent protein (GFP) and axons express cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) can be used to serially evaluate the temporal relationship between nerve regeneration and Schwann cell migration through acellular nerve grafts. Thy1-CFP(23)/S100-GFP and S100-GFP mice received non-fluorescing cold preserved nerve allografts from immunologically disparate donors. In vivo fluorescent imaging of these grafts was then performed at multiple points. The transected sciatic nerve was reconstructed with a 1 cm nerve allograft harvested from a Balb-C mouse and acellularized via 7 weeks of cold preservation prior to transplantation. The presence of regenerated axons and migrating Schwann cells was confirmed with confocal and electron microscopy on fixed tissue. Schwann cells migrated into the acellular graft (163 ± 15 intensity units) from both proximal and distal stumps, and bridged the whole graft within 10 days (388 ± 107 intensity units in the central 4-6 mm segment). Nerve regeneration lagged behind Schwann cell migration with 5 or 6 axons imaged traversing the proximal 4 mm of the graft under confocal microcopy within 10 days, and up to 21 labeled axons crossing the distal coaptation site by 15 days. Corroborative electron and light microscopy 5 mm into the graft demonstrated relatively narrow diameter myelinated (431±31) and unmyelinated (64±9) axons by 28 but not 10 days. Live imaging of the double-transgenic thy1-CFP(23)/S100-GFP murine line enabled serial assessment of Schwann cell-axonal relationships in traumatic nerve injuries reconstructed with acellular nerve allografts. PMID:17628544

  20. Characterisation of a K390R ITK Kinase Dead Transgenic Mouse – Implications for ITK as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Deakin, Angela; Duddy, Graham; Wilson, Steve; Harrison, Steve; Latcham, Judi; Fulleylove, Mick; Fung, Sylvia; Smith, Jason; Pedrick, Mike; McKevitt, Tom; Felton, Leigh; Morley, Joanne; Quint, Diana; Fattah, Dilniya; Hayes, Brian; Gough, Jade; Solari, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-2 inducible tyrosine kinase (ITK) is expressed in T cells and plays a critical role in signalling through the T cell receptor. Evidence, mainly from knockout mice, has suggested that ITK plays a particularly important function in Th2 cells and this has prompted significant efforts to discover ITK inhibitors for the treatment of allergic disease. However, ITK is known to have functions outside of its kinase domain and in general kinase knockouts are often not good models for the behaviour of small molecule inhibitors. Consequently we have developed a transgenic mouse where the wild type Itk allele has been replaced by a kinase dead Itk allele containing an inactivating K390R point mutation (Itk-KD mice). We have characterised the immune phenotype of these naive mice and their responses to airway inflammation. Unlike Itk knockout (Itk−/−) mice, T-cells from Itk-KD mice can polymerise actin in response to CD3 activation. The lymph nodes from Itk-KD mice showed more prominent germinal centres than wild type mice and serum antibody levels were significantly abnormal. Unlike the Itk−/−, γδ T cells in the spleens of the Itk-KD mice had an impaired ability to secrete Th2 cytokines in response to anti-CD3 stimulation whilst the expression of ICOS was not significantly different to wild type. However ICOS expression is markedly increased on αβCD3+ cells from the spleens of naïve Itk-KD compared to WT mice. The Itk-KD mice were largely protected from inflammatory symptoms in an Ovalbumin model of airway inflammation. Consequently, our studies have revealed many similarities but some differences between Itk−/−and Itk-KD transgenic mice. The abnormal antibody response and enhanced ICOS expression on CD3+ cells has implications for the consideration of ITK as a therapeutic target. PMID:25250764

  1. Transgenic mouse model for imaging of interleukin-1β-related inflammation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Iwawaki, Takao; Akai, Ryoko; Oikawa, Daisuke; Toyoshima, Takae; Yoshino, Mayuko; Suzuki, Mitsumi; Takeda, Naoki; Ishikawa, Tomo-o; Kataoka, Yosky; Yamamura, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a biological response associated with symptoms of various diseases, and its study is important in gaining an understanding of the pathological conditions of such diseases and in making strategic plans for promoting healing. It is therefore essential to develop technologies for the detection of inflammatory conditions. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a proinflammatory cytokine produced and secreted mainly by monocytes and macrophages in response to inflammatory stimulation. The activation of IL-1β is regulated through transcriptional induction by the promoter and post-translational processing by the inflammasome. Here we have developed a reporter gene to monitor the activation status of IL-1β by using a dual regulation system and, by using the reporter gene, we have established a mouse model that permits low-invasive visualization of the inflammatory status. Previous reporter systems dependent on the transcription or processing of IL-1β show problems in terms of background noise or signal specificity. Our reporter system overcomes these weaknesses by combining advantages from regulation by a promoter and processing of IL-1β. Our mouse model detected specific physiological inflammation in the liver and pancreas caused by hepatitis or pancreatitis models, respectively. Our reporter gene and mouse model are therefore expected to become useful bioresources for future medical science. PMID:26598133

  2. Dendritic vulnerability in neurodegenerative disease: insights from analyses of cortical pyramidal neurons in transgenic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Christina M.; Rocher, Anne B.; Rodriguez, Alfredo; Crimins, Johanna L.; Dickstein, Dara L.; Wearne, Susan L.; Hof, Patrick R.

    2011-01-01

    In neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, neuronal dendrites and dendritic spines undergo significant pathological changes. Because of the determinant role of these highly dynamic structures in signaling by individual neurons and ultimately in the functionality of neuronal networks that mediate cognitive functions, a detailed understanding of these changes is of paramount importance. Mutant murine models, such as the Tg2576 APP mutant mouse and the rTg4510 tau mutant mouse have been developed to provide insight into pathogenesis involving the abnormal production and aggregation of amyloid and tau proteins, because of the key role that these proteins play in neurodegenerative disease. This review showcases the multidimensional approach taken by our collaborative group to increase understanding of pathological mechanisms in neurodegenerative disease using these mouse models. This approach includes analyses of empirical 3D morphological and electrophysiological data acquired from frontal cortical pyramidal neurons using confocal laser scanning microscopy and whole-cell patch-clamp recording techniques, combined with computational modeling methodologies. These collaborative studies are designed to shed insight on the repercussions of dystrophic changes in neocortical neurons, define the cellular phenotype of differential neuronal vulnerability in relevant models of neurodegenerative disease, and provide a basis upon which to develop meaningful therapeutic strategies aimed at preventing, reversing, or compensating for neurodegenerative changes in dementia. PMID:20177698

  3. Serotonin transporter antagonists target tumor-initiating cells in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Robin M.; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Gwynne, William D.; Giacomelli, Andrew O.; Bisson, Jennifer N.P.; Jensen, Jeremy E.; Dvorkin-Gheva, Anna; Hassell, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data suggests that the initiation and progression of human breast tumors is fueled by a rare subpopulation of tumor cells, termed breast tumor-initiating cells (BTIC), which resist radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Consequently, therapies that abrogate BTIC activity are needed to achieve durable cures for breast cancer patients. To identify such therapies we used a sensitive assay to complete a high-throughput screen of small molecules, including approved drugs, with BTIC-rich mouse mammary tumor cell populations. We found that inhibitors of the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and serotonin receptors, which include approved drugs used to treat mood disorders, were potent inhibitors of mouse BTIC activity as determined by functional sphere-forming assays and the initiation of tumor formation by transplant of drug-exposed tumor cells into syngeneic mice. Moreover, sertraline (Zoloft), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), synergized with docetaxel (Taxotere) to shrink mouse breast tumors in vivo. Hence drugs targeting the serotonergic system might be repurposed to treat breast cancer patients to afford more durable breast cancer remissions. PMID:27447971

  4. The Construction of Transgenic and Gene Knockout/Knockin Mouse Models of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Alfred; McGarry, Michael P.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic and physiological similarities between mice and humans have focused considerable attention on rodents as potential models of human health and disease. Together with the wealth of resources, knowledge, and technologies surrounding the mouse as a model system, these similarities have propelled this species to the forefront of biomedical research. The advent of genomic manipulation has quickly led to the creation and use of genetically engineered mice as powerful tools for cutting edge studies of human disease research, including the discovery, refinement, and utility of many currently available therapeutic regimes. In particular, the creation of genetically modified mice as models of human disease has remarkably changed our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms and cellular pathways underlying disease states. Moreover, the mouse models resulting from gene transfer technologies have been important components correlating an individual’s gene expression profile to the development of disease pathologies. The objective of this review is to provide physician-scientists with an expansive historical and logistical overview of the creation of mouse models of human disease through gene transfer technologies. Our expectation is that this will facilitate on-going disease research studies and may initiate new areas of translational research leading to enhanced patient care. PMID:21800101

  5. Wheel-running in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: protection or symptom?

    PubMed

    Richter, Helene; Ambrée, Oliver; Lewejohann, Lars; Herring, Arne; Keyvani, Kathy; Paulus, Werner; Palme, Rupert; Touma, Chadi; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Sachser, Norbert

    2008-06-26

    Several studies on both humans and animals reveal benefits of physical exercise on brain function and health. A previous study on TgCRND8 mice, a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease, reported beneficial effects of premorbid onset of long-term access to a running wheel on spatial learning and plaque deposition. Our study investigated the effects of access to a running wheel after the onset of Abeta pathology on behavioural, endocrinological, and neuropathological parameters. From day 80 of age, the time when Abeta deposition becomes apparent, TgCRND8 and wildtype mice were kept with or without running wheel. Home cage behaviour was analysed and cognitive abilities regarding object recognition memory and spatial learning in the Barnes maze were assessed. Our results show that, in comparison to Wt mice, Tg mice were characterised by impaired object recognition memory and spatial learning, increased glucocorticoid levels, hyperactivity in the home cage and high levels of stereotypic behaviour. Access to a running wheel had no effects on cognitive or neuropathological parameters, but reduced the amount of stereotypic behaviour in transgenics significantly. Furthermore, wheel-running was inversely correlated with stereotypic behaviour, suggesting that wheel-running may have stereotypic qualities. In addition, wheel-running positively correlated with plaque burden. Thus, in a phase when plaques are already present in the brain, it may be symptomatic of brain pathology, rather than protective. Whether or not access to a running wheel has beneficial effects on Alzheimer-like pathology and symptoms may therefore strongly depend on the exact time when the wheel is provided during development of the disease.

  6. Transgenic expression of interferon-γ in mouse stomach leads to inflammation, metaplasia, and dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Syu, Li-Jyun; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Eaton, Kathryn A; Liu, Zhiping; Tetarbe, Manas; Keeley, Theresa M; Pero, Joanna; Ferris, Jennifer; Wilbert, Dawn; Kaatz, Ashley; Zheng, Xinlei; Qiao, Xiotan; Grachtchouk, Marina; Gumucio, Deborah L; Merchant, Juanita L; Samuelson, Linda C; Dlugosz, Andrzej A

    2012-12-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality worldwide. It arises through a stepwise process that includes prominent inflammation with expression of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and multiple other pro-inflammatory cytokines. We engineered mice expressing IFN-γ under the control of the stomach-specific H(+)/K(+) ATPase β promoter to test the potential role of this cytokine in gastric tumorigenesis. Stomachs of H/K-IFN-γ transgenic mice exhibited inflammation, expansion of myofibroblasts, loss of parietal and chief cells, spasmolytic polypeptide expressing metaplasia, and dysplasia. Proliferation was elevated in undifferentiated and metaplastic epithelial cells in H/K-IFN-γ transgenic mice, and there was increased apoptosis. H/K-IFN-γ mice had elevated levels of mRNA for IFN-γ target genes and the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Intracellular mediators of IFN-γ and IL-6 signaling, pSTAT1 and pSTAT3, respectively, were detected in multiple cell types within stomach. H/K-IFN-γ mice developed dysplasia as early as 3 months of age, and 4 of 39 mice over 1 year of age developed antral polyps or tumors, including one adenoma and one adenocarcinoma, which expressed high levels of nuclear β-catenin. Our data identified IFN-γ as a pivotal secreted factor that orchestrates complex changes in inflammatory, epithelial, and mesenchymal cell populations to drive pre-neoplastic progression in stomach; however, additional alterations appear to be required for malignant conversion.

  7. Transient Expression of Transgenic IL-12 in Mouse Liver Triggers Unremitting Inflammation Mimicking Human Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gil-Farina, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Salido, Eduardo; López-Franco, Esperanza; Rodríguez-García, Estefania; Blasi, Mercedes; Merino, Juana; Aldabe, Rafael; Prieto, Jesús; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2016-09-15

    The etiopathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to develop an animal model of human AIH to gain insight into the immunological mechanisms driving this condition. C57BL/6 mice were i.v. injected with adeno-associated viral vectors encoding murine IL-12 or luciferase under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Organ histology, response to immunosuppressive therapy, and biochemical and immunological parameters, including Ag-specific humoral and cellular response, were analyzed. Mechanistic studies were carried out using genetically modified mice and depletion of lymphocyte subpopulations. Adeno-associated virus IL-12-treated mice developed histological, biochemical, and immunological changes resembling type 1 AIH, including marked and persistent liver mononuclear cell infiltration, hepatic fibrosis, hypergammaglobulinemia, anti-nuclear and anti-smooth muscle actin Abs, and disease remission with immunosuppressive drugs. Interestingly, transgenic IL-12 was short-lived, but endogenous IL-12 expression was induced, and both IL-12 and IFN-γ remained elevated during the entire study period. IFN-γ was identified as an essential mediator of liver damage, and CD4 and CD8 T cells but not NK, NKT, or B cells were essential executors of hepatic injury. Furthermore, both MHC class I and MHC class II expression was upregulated at the hepatocellular membrane, and induction of autoreactive liver-specific T cells was detected. Remarkably, although immunoregulatory mechanisms were activated, they only partially mitigated liver damage. Thus, low and transient expression of transgenic IL-12 in hepatocytes causes loss of tolerance to hepatocellular Ags, leading to chronic hepatitis resembling human AIH type 1. This model provides a practical tool to explore AIH pathogenesis and novel therapies.

  8. Adenovirus replication-competent vectors (KD1, KD3) complement the cytotoxicity and transgene expression from replication-defective vectors (Ad-GFP, Ad-Luc).

    PubMed

    Habib, Nagy A; Mitry, Ragai; Seth, Prem; Kuppuswamy, Mohan; Doronin, Konstantin; Toth, Karoly; Krajcsi, Peter; Tollefson, Ann E; Wold, William S M

    2002-08-01

    The successful clinical application of adenovirus (Ad) in cancer control has been of limited success because of the current inability to infect the majority of cancer cells with a large amount of vector. In this study, we show that when human lung tumors growing in immunodeficient nude mice were coinfected with a replication-defective (RD) Ad vector expressing green fluorescent protein and a replication-competent (RC) Ad vector named KD3, KD3 enhanced the expression of green fluorescent protein throughout the tumor. Also, KD3 and another RC vector named KD1 complemented the expression of luciferase from a RD vector in a human liver tumor xenotransplant in nude mice. Altogether, these results suggest that the combination of a RD vector with a RC vector might be a more effective treatment for cancer than either vector alone due to more widespread dissemination of the virus.

  9. Transgenic mouse lines expressing rat AH receptor variants - A new animal model for research on AH receptor function and dioxin toxicity mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjanvirta, Raimo

    2009-04-15

    Han/Wistar (Kuopio; H/W) rats are exceptionally resistant to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) toxicity mainly because of their mutated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene. In H/W rats, altered splicing of the AHR mRNA generates two AHR proteins: deletion (DEL) and insertion (INS) variants, with the INS isoform being predominantly expressed. To gain further insight into their functional properties, cDNAs of these and rat wild-type (rWT) isoform were transferred into C57BL/6J-derived mice by microinjection. The endogenous mouse AHR was eliminated by selective crossing with Ahr-null mice. A single mouse line was obtained for each of the three constructs. The AHR mRNA levels in tissues were generally close to those of C57BL/6 mice in INS and DEL mice and somewhat higher in rWT mice; in testis, however, all 3 constructs exhibited marked overexpression. The transgenic mouse lines were phenotypically normal except for increased testis weight. Induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes by TCDD occurred similarly to that in C57BL/6 mice, but there tended to be a correlation with AHR concentrations, especially in testis. In contrast to C57BL/6 mice, the transgenics did not display any major gender difference in susceptibility to the acute lethality and hepatotoxicity of TCDD; rWT mice were highly sensitive, DEL mice moderately resistant and INS mice highly resistant. Co-expression of mouse AHR and rWT resulted in augmented sensitivity to TCDD and abolished the natural resistance of female C57BL/6 mice, whereas mice co-expressing mouse AHR and INS were resistant. Thus, these transgenic mouse lines provide a novel promising tool for molecular studies on dioxin toxicity and AHR function.

  10. Impairments in neurogenesis are not tightly linked to depressive behavior in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Iascone, Daniel M; Padidam, Sneha; Pyfer, Mark S; Zhang, Xiaohong; Zhao, Lijuan; Chin, Jeannie

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia, is also associated with depression. Although the precise mechanisms that lead to depression in AD are unknown, the impairments in adult hippocampal neurogenesis observed in AD may play a role. Adult-born neurons play a critical role in regulating both cognition and mood, and reduced hippocampal neurogenesis is associated with depression in other neurological disorders. To assess the relationship between Alzheimer's disease, neurogenesis, and depression, we studied human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) transgenic mice, a well-characterized model of AD. We report that reductions in hippocampal neurogenesis are evident early in disease progression in hAPP mice, but a mild depressive phenotype manifests only in later stages of disease. We found that hAPP mice exhibited a reduction in BrdU-positive cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus, as well as a reduction in doublecortin-expressing cells, relative to nontransgenic controls at 5-7 months of age. These alterations in neurogenesis appeared to worsen with age, as the magnitude of reduction in doublecortin-expressing cells was greater in hAPP mice at 13-15 months of age. Only 13-15 month old hAPP mice exhibited depressive behavior in the tail suspension test. However, mice at both age groups exhibited deficits in spatial memory, which was observed in the Morris water maze test for hippocampus-dependent memory. These findings indicate that neurogenesis impairments are accompanied by cognitive deficits, but are not tightly linked to depressive behavior in hAPP mice.

  11. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells prevents memory impairment in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Takuya; Kamimura, Naomi; Yokota, Takashi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Iuchi, Katsuya; Lee, Hyunjin; Takami, Shinya; Akashiba, Hiroki; Shitaka, Yoshitsugu; Ueda, Masayuki; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Kimura, Kazumi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2015-04-24

    Stem cell transplantation therapy is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of ischemic stroke, and several beneficial aspects have been reported. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), stem cell therapy is expected to provide an efficient therapeutic approach. Indeed, the intracerebral transplantation of stem cells reduced amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and rescued memory deficits in AD model mice. Here, we show that intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMCs) improves cognitive function in two different AD mouse models, DAL and APP mice, and prevents neurodegeneration. GFP-positive BMMCs were isolated from tibiae and femurs of 4-week-old mice and then transplanted intravenously into DAL and APP mice. Transplantation of BMMCs suppressed neuronal loss and restored memory impairment of DAL mice to almost the same level as in wild-type mice. Transplantation of BMMCs to APP mice reduced Aβ deposition in the brain. APP mice treated with BMMCs performed significantly better on behavioral tests than vehicle-injected mice. Moreover, the effects were observed even with transplantation after the onset of cognitive impairment in DAL mice. Together, our results indicate that intravenous transplantation of BMMCs has preventive effects against the cognitive decline in AD model mice and suggest a potential therapeutic effect of BMMC transplantation therapy.

  12. ALTERED EXPRESSION AND DISTRIBUTION OF ZINC TRANSPORTERS IN APP/PS1 TRANSGENIC MOUSE BRAIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathological accumulation of b-amyloid peptide (Ab) is an early and common feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Previous studies have revealed that an elevation of zinc concentration can initiate the deposition of A' that leads to the formation of senile plaques (SP) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy ...

  13. Generating a transgenic mouse line stably expressing human MHC surface antigen from a HAC carrying multiple genomic BACs.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Ishikura, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Takanori; Watanabe, Takashi; Suzuki, Junpei; Nakayama, Manabu; Okamura, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Tuneko; Koseki, Haruhiko; Ohara, Osamu; Ikeno, Masashi; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    The human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector is a promising tool to improve the problematic suppression and position effects of transgene expression frequently seen in transgenic cells and animals produced by conventional plasmid or viral vectors. We generated transgenic mice maintaining a single HAC vector carrying two genomic bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) from human HLA-DR loci (DRA and DRB1). Both transgenes on the HAC in transgenic mice exhibited tissue-specific expression in kidney, liver, lung, spleen, lymph node, bone marrow, and thymus cells in RT-PCR analysis. Stable functional expression of a cell surface HLA-DR marker from both transgenes, DRA and DRB1 on the HAC, was detected by flow cytometric analysis of splenocytes and maintained through at least eight filial generations. These results indicate that the de novo HAC system can allow us to manipulate multiple BAC transgenes with coordinated expression as a surface antigen through the generation of transgenic animals.

  14. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Small T Antigen Induces Cancer and Embryonic Merkel Cell Proliferation in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xuehui; Shuda, Yoko; Ostrowski, Stephen M.; Lukianov, Stefan; Jenkins, Frank J.; Honda, Kord; Maricich, Stephen M.; Moore, Patrick S.; Chang, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes the majority of human Merkel cell carcinomas (MCC) and encodes a small T (sT) antigen that transforms immortalized rodent fibroblasts in vitro. To develop a mouse model for MCV sT-induced carcinogenesis, we generated transgenic mice with a flox-stop-flox MCV sT sequence homologously recombined at the ROSA locus (ROSAsT), allowing Cre-mediated, conditional MCV sT expression. Standard tamoxifen (TMX) administration to adult UbcCreERT2; ROSAsT mice, in which Cre is ubiquitously expressed, resulted in MCV sT expression in multiple organs that was uniformly lethal within 5 days. Conversely, most adult UbcCreERT2; ROSAsT mice survived low-dose tamoxifen administration but developed ear lobe dermal hyperkeratosis and hypergranulosis. Simultaneous MCV sT expression and conditional homozygous p53 deletion generated multi-focal, poorly-differentiated, highly anaplastic tumors in the spleens and livers of mice after 60 days of TMX treatment. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts from these mice induced to express MCV sT exhibited anchorage-independent cell growth. To examine Merkel cell pathology, MCV sT expression was also induced during mid-embryogenesis in Merkel cells of Atoh1CreERT2/+; ROSAsT mice, which lead to significantly increased Merkel cell numbers in touch domes at late embryonic ages that normalized postnatally. Tamoxifen administration to adult Atoh1CreERT2/+; ROSAsT and Atoh1CreERT2/+; ROSAsT; p53flox/flox mice had no effects on Merkel cell numbers and did not induce tumor formation. Taken together, these results show that MCV sT stimulates progenitor Merkel cell proliferation in embryonic mice and is a bona fide viral oncoprotein that induces full cancer cell transformation in the p53-null setting. PMID:26544690

  15. Generation of gene-targeted mice using embryonic stem cells derived from a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Ooshima, Yuki; Nakata, Mitsugu; Yano, Takashi; Matsuoka, Kunio; Watanabe, Sayuri; Maeda, Ryouta; Takahashi, Hideki; Takeyama, Michiyasu; Matsumoto, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Tadatoshi

    2013-06-01

    Gene-targeting technology using mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells has become the "gold standard" for analyzing gene functions and producing disease models. Recently, genetically modified mice with multiple mutations have increasingly been produced to study the interaction between proteins and polygenic diseases. However, introduction of an additional mutation into mice already harboring several mutations by conventional natural crossbreeding is an extremely time- and labor-intensive process. Moreover, to do so in mice with a complex genetic background, several years may be required if the genetic background is to be retained. Establishing ES cells from multiple-mutant mice, or disease-model mice with a complex genetic background, would offer a possible solution. Here, we report the establishment and characterization of novel ES cell lines from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (3xTg-AD mouse, Oddo et al. in Neuron 39:409-421, 2003) harboring 3 mutated genes (APPswe, TauP301L, and PS1M146V) and a complex genetic background. Thirty blastocysts were cultured and 15 stable ES cell lines (male: 11; female: 4) obtained. By injecting these ES cells into diploid or tetraploid blastocysts, we generated germline-competent chimeras. Subsequently, we confirmed that F1 mice derived from these animals showed similar biochemical and behavioral characteristics to the original 3xTg-AD mice. Furthermore, we introduced a gene-targeting vector into the ES cells and successfully obtained gene-targeted ES cells, which were then used to generate knockout mice for the targeted gene. These results suggest that the present methodology is effective for introducing an additional mutation into mice already harboring multiple mutated genes and/or a complex genetic background.

  16. Central nervous system extracellular matrix changes in a transgenic mouse model of bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Costa, Carme; Tortosa, Raül; Vidal, Enric; Padilla, Danielle; Torres, Juan Maria; Ferrer, Isidre; Pumarola, Martí; Bassols, Anna

    2009-11-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy characterised by accumulation of resistant prion protein (PrP(BSE)), neuronal loss, spongiosus and glial cell proliferation. In this study, properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) were investigated in boTg110 transgenic mice over-expressing the bovine cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) and infected with BSE. Using immunohistochemistry with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin as a specific marker for perineuronal nets (PNNs) and antibodies against aggrecan and hyaluronic acid binding protein, loss of ECM was correlated with PrP(BSE) accumulation and activation of astrocytes and microglia. PrP(BSE) accumulation and glial cell activation were detected from the earliest stages of the disease and increased in the terminal stages. Decreases in PNNs, aggrecan and hyaluronic acid were observed only in the terminal stages and correlated with the distribution of PrP(BSE) and activated glial cells. This study suggests that the loss of PNNs, aggrecan and hyaluronic acid is a consequence of PrP(BSE) accumulation. Degradation of ECM in BSE may be due to secretion of degradative enzymes by activated glial cells.

  17. In Situ FTIR Microspectroscopy of Brain Tissue from a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rak,M.; Del Bigio, M.; Mai, S.; Westaway, D.; Gough, K.

    2007-01-01

    Plaques composed of the A{beta} peptide are the main pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease. Dense-core plaques are fibrillar deposits of A{beta}, showing all the classical properties of amyloid including {beta}-sheet secondary structure, while diffuse plaques are amorphous deposits. We studied both plaque types, using synchrotron infrared (IR) microspectroscopy, a technique that allows the chemical composition and average protein secondary structure to be investigated in situ. We examined plaques in hippocampal, cortical and caudal tissue from 5- to 21-month-old TgCRND8 mice, a transgenic model expressing doubly mutant amyloid precursor protein, and displaying impaired hippocampal function and robust pathology from an early age. Spectral analysis confirmed that the congophilic plaque cores were composed of protein in a {beta}-sheet conformation. The amide I maximum of plaque cores was at 1623 cm-1, and unlike for in vitro A{beta} fibrils, the high-frequency (1680-1690 cm-1) component attributed to antiparallel {beta}-sheet was not observed. A significant elevation in phospholipids was found around dense-core plaques in TgCRND8 mice ranging in age from 5 to 21 months. In contrast, diffuse plaques were not associated with IR detectable changes in protein secondary structure or relative concentrations of any other tissue components.

  18. Titration of biologically active amyloid–β seeds in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Rodrigo; Bravo-Alegria, Javiera; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Soto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Experimental evidence in animal models suggests that misfolded Amyloid-β (Aβ) spreads in disease following a prion-like mechanism. Several properties characteristics of infectious prions have been shown for the induction of Aβ aggregates. However, a detailed titration of Aβ misfolding transmissibility and estimation of the minimum concentration of biologically active Aβ seeds able to accelerate pathological changes has not yet been performed. In this study, brain extracts from old tg2576 animals were serially diluted and intra-cerebrally injected into young subjects from the same transgenic line. Animals were sacrificed several months after treatment and brain slices were analyzed for amyloid pathology. We observed that administration of misfolded Aβ was able to significantly accelerate amyloid deposition in young mice, even when the original sample was diluted a million times. The titration curve obtained in this experiment was compared to the natural Aβ load spontaneously accumulated by these mice overtime. Our findings suggest that administration of the largest dose of Aβ seeds led to an acceleration of pathology equivalent to over a year. These results show that active Aβ seeds present in the brain can seed amyloidosis in a titratable manner, similarly as observed for infectious prions. PMID:25879692

  19. Beneficial effects of exercise in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like Tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Belarbi, Karim; Burnouf, Sylvie; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco-Jose; Laurent, Cyril; Lestavel, Sophie; Figeac, Martin; Sultan, Audrey; Troquier, Laetitia; Leboucher, Antoine; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Grosjean, Marie-Eve; Demeyer, Dominique; Obriot, Hélène; Brion, Ingrid; Barbot, Bérangère; Galas, Marie-Christine; Staels, Bart; Humez, Sandrine; Sergeant, Nicolas; Schraen-Maschke, Susanna; Muhr-Tailleux, Anne; Hamdane, Malika; Buée, Luc; Blum, David

    2011-08-01

    Tau pathology is encountered in many neurodegenerative disorders known as tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. Physical activity is a lifestyle factor affecting processes crucial for memory and synaptic plasticity. Whether long-term voluntary exercise has an impact on Tau pathology and its pathophysiological consequences is currently unknown. To address this question, we investigated the effects of long-term voluntary exercise in the THY-Tau22 transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease-like Tau pathology, characterized by the progressive development of Tau pathology, cholinergic alterations and subsequent memory impairments. Three-month-old THY-Tau22 mice and wild-type littermates were assigned to standard housing or housing supplemented with a running wheel. After 9 months of exercise, mice were evaluated for memory performance and examined for hippocampal Tau pathology, cholinergic defects, inflammation and genes related to cholesterol metabolism. Exercise prevented memory alterations in THY-Tau22 mice. This was accompanied by a decrease in hippocampal Tau pathology and a prevention of the loss of expression of choline acetyltransferase within the medial septum. Whereas the expression of most cholesterol-related genes remained unchanged in the hippocampus of running THY-Tau22 mice, we observed a significant upregulation in mRNA levels of NPC1 and NPC2, genes involved in cholesterol trafficking from the lysosomes. Our data support the view that long-term voluntary physical exercise is an effective strategy capable of mitigating Tau pathology and its pathophysiological consequences.

  20. Phase Separation and Crystallization of Hemoglobin C in Transgenic Mouse and Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Canterino, Joseph E.; Galkin, Oleg; Vekilov, Peter G.; Hirsch, Rhoda Elison

    2008-01-01

    Individuals expressing hemoglobin C (β6 Glu→Lys) present red blood cells (RBC) with intraerythrocytic crystals that form when hemoglobin (Hb) is oxygenated. Our earlier in vitro liquid-liquid (L-L) phase separation studies demonstrated that liganded HbC exhibits a stronger net intermolecular attraction with a longer range than liganded HbS or HbA, and that L-L phase separation preceded and enhanced crystallization. We now present evidence for the role of phase separation in HbC crystallization in the RBC, and the role of the RBC membrane as a nucleation center. RBC obtained from both human homozygous HbC patients and transgenic mice expressing only human HbC were studied by bright-field and differential interference contrast video-enhanced microscopy. RBC were exposed to hypertonic NaCl solution (1.5–3%) to induce crystallization within an appropriate experimental time frame. L-L phase separation occurred inside the RBC, which in turn enhanced the formation of intraerythrocytic crystals. RBC L-L phase separation and crystallization comply with the thermodynamic and kinetics laws established through in vitro studies of phase transformations. This is the first report, to the best of our knowledge, to capture a temporal view of intraerythrocytic HbC phase separation, crystal formation, and dissolution. PMID:18621841

  1. Thyroid Hormone Role on Cerebellar Development and Maintenance: A Perspective Based on Transgenic Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Faustino, Larissa C.; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania M.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellum development is sensitive to thyroid hormone (TH) levels, as THs regulate neuronal migration, differentiation, and myelination. Most effects of THs are mediated by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms TRβ1, TRβ2, and TRα1. Studies aimed at identifying TH target genes during cerebellum development have only achieved partial success, as some of these genes do not possess classical TH-responsive elements, and those that do are likely to be temporally and spatially regulated by THs. THs may also affect neurodevelopment by regulating transcription factors that control particular groups of genes. Furthermore, TH action can also be affected by TH transport, which is mediated mainly by monocarboxylate transporter family members. Studies involving transgenic animal models and genome-wide expression analyses have helped to address the unanswered questions regarding the role of TH in cerebellar development. Recently, a growing body of evidence has begun to clarify the molecular, cellular, and functional aspects of THs in the developing cerebellum. This review describes the current findings concerning the effects of THs on cerebellar development and maintenance as well as advances in the genetic animal models used in this field. PMID:24904526

  2. Neuroprotective Effect of SLM, a Novel Carbazole-Based Fluorophore, on SH-SY5Y Cell Model and 3xTg-AD Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoli; Kosaraju, Jayasankar; Zhou, Wei; Tam, Kin Yip

    2017-03-15

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide aggregating to form a neurotoxic plaque, leading to cognitive deficits, is believed to be one of the plausible mechanisms for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Inhibiting Aβ aggregation is supposed to offer a neuroprotective effect to ameliorate AD. A previous report has shown that SLM, a carbazole-based fluorophore, binds to Aβ to inhibit the aggregation. However, it is not entirely clear whether the inhibition of Aβ aggregation alone would lead to the anticipated neuroprotective effects. In the current study, we intended to examine the protective action of SLM against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and to evaluate if SLM can decrease the cognitive and behavioral deficits observed in triple transgenic AD mouse model (3xTg-AD). In the in vitro study, neurotoxicity induced by Aβ42 in human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells was found to be reduced through the treatment with SLM. In the in vivo study, following one month SLM intraperitoneal injection (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg), 3xTg-AD mice were tested on Morris water maze (MWM) and Y-maze for their cognitive ability and sacrificed for biochemical estimations. Results show that SLM treatment improved the learning and memory ability in 3xTg-AD mice in MWM and Y-maze tasks. SLM also mitigated the amyloid burden by decreasing brain Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels and reduced tau phosphorylation, glycogen synthase kinase-3β activity, and neuro-inflammation. From our observations, SLM shows neuroprotection in SH-SY5Y cells against Aβ42 and also in 3xTg-AD mouse model by mitigating the pathological features and behavioral impairments.

  3. Development of a Conditional Transgenic Mouse Model to Test the Fallopian Tube Origin of Serous Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    transgene plasmid to follow up on this next strategy. KEY RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS: • molecular cloning of Ovgp1-lacZ reporter gene plasmid...high-expressing 242 line • molecular cloning of Ovgp1-Cre transgene plasmid REPORTABLE OUTCOMES: • generation of two Ovgp1-lacZ transgenic

  4. Detection and Quantification of 8-Hydroxy-2′-Deoxyguanosine in Alzheimer’s Transgenic Mouse Urine using Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Nestorova, Gergana; Rissman, Robert A.; Feng, June

    2013-01-01

    8-Hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is one of the major forms of oxidative deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage, and is commonly analyzed as an excellent marker of DNA lesions. The purpose of this study was to develop a sensitive method to accurately and rapidly quantify the 8-OHdG by using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF). The method involved the use of specific antibody to detect DNA lesions (8-OHdG) and consecutive fluorescence labeling. Next, the urine sample with 8-OHdG fluorescently labeled along with other constituents was resolved by capillary electrophoretic system and the lesion of interest was detected using fluorescence detector. The limit of detection was 0.18 fmol, which is sufficient sensitivity for detection and quantification of 8-OHdG in untreated urine samples. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was found to be 11.32 % for migration time, and 5.52 % for peak area. To demonstrate the utility of this method, the urinary concentration of 8-OHdG in an Alzheimer’s transgenic mouse model was determined. Collectively, our results indicate that this methodology offers great advantages such as high separation efficiency, good selectivity, low limit of detection (LOD), simplicity and low cost of analysis. PMID:23712533

  5. Gene expression patterns in transgenic mouse models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in myosin regulatory light chain☆

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenrui; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Zhou, Zhiqun; Aguiar-Pulido, Vanessa; Narasimhan, Giri; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2017-01-01

    Using microarray and bioinformatics, we examined the gene expression profiles in transgenic mouse hearts expressing mutations in the myosin regulatory light chain shown to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We focused on two malignant RLC-mutations, Arginine 58→Glutamine (R58Q) and Aspartic Acid 166 → Valine (D166V), and one benign, Lysine 104 → Glutamic Acid (K104E)-mutation. Datasets of differentially expressed genes for each of three mutants were compared to those observed in wild-type (WT) hearts. The changes in the mutant vs. WT samples were shown as fold-change (FC), with stringency FC ≥ 2. Based on the gene profiles, we have identified the major signaling pathways that underlie the R58Q-, D166V- and K104E-HCM phenotypes. The correlations between different genotypes were also studied using network-based algorithms. Genes with strong correlations were clustered into one group and the central gene networks were identified for each HCM mutant. The overall gene expression patterns in all mutants were distinct from the WT profiles. Both malignant mutations shared certain classes of genes that were up or downregulated, but most similarities were noted between D166V and K104E mice, with R58Q hearts showing a distinct gene expression pattern. Our data suggest that all three HCM mice lead to cardiomyopathy in a mutation-specific manner and thus develop HCM through diverse mechanisms. PMID:26906074

  6. Microscopic Delineation of Medulloblastoma Margins in a Transgenic Mouse Model Using a Topically Applied VEGFR-1 Probe1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danni; Chen, Ye; Leigh, Steven Y; Haeberle, Henry; Contag, Christopher H; Liu, Jonathan T C

    2012-01-01

    The unambiguous demarcation of tumor margins is critical at the final stages in the surgical treatment of brain tumors because patient outcomes have been shown to correlate with the extent of resection. Real-time high-resolution imaging with the aid of a tumor-targeting fluorescent contrast agent has the potential to enable intraoperative differentiation of tumor versus normal tissues with accuracy approaching the current gold standard of histopathology. In this study, a monoclonal antibody targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR-1) was conjugated to fluorophores and evaluated as a tumor contrast agent in a transgenic mouse model of medulloblastoma. The probe was administered topically, and its efficacy as an imaging agent was evaluated in vitro using flow cytometry, as well as ex vivo on fixed and fresh tissues through immunohistochemistry and dual-axis confocal microscopy, respectively. Results show a preferential binding to tumor versus normal tissue, suggesting that a topically applied VEGFR-1 probe can potentially be used with real-time intraoperative optical sectioning microscopy to guide brain tumor resections. PMID:23323155

  7. Metabolomic investigation of systemic manifestations associated with Alzheimer's disease in the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Raúl; García-Barrera, Tamara; Vitorica, Javier; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2015-09-01

    There is growing evidence that Alzheimer's disease may be a widespread systemic disorder, so peripheral organs could be affected by pathological mechanisms occurring in this neurodegenerative disease. For this reason, a double metabolomic platform based on the combination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used for the first time to investigate metabolic changes in liver and kidney from the transgenic mice APP/PS1 against wild-type controls. Multivariate statistics showed significant differences in levels of numerous metabolites including phospholipids, sphingolipids, acylcarnitines, steroids, amino acids and other compounds, which denotes that multiple pathways might be associated with systemic pathogenesis of Alzheimer's in this mouse model, such as bioenergetic failures, oxidative stress, altered metabolism of membrane lipids, hyperammonemia or impaired homeostasis of steroids. Furthermore, it is noteworthy that some novel pathological mechanisms were found, such as impaired gluconeogenesis, polyol pathway or metabolism of branched chain amino acids, not previously described for Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, these findings clearly support the hypothesis that Alzheimer's disease may be considered as a systemic disorder.

  8. Progressive synaptic pathology of motor cortical neurons in a BAC transgenic mouse model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Spampanato, Jay; Gu, Xiaofeng; Yang, X. William; Mody, Istvan

    2008-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion in huntingtin. A newly developed BAC transgenic mouse model (BACHD) reproduces phenotypic features of HD including predominantly neuropil associated protein aggregation and progressive motor dysfunction with selective neurodegeneration. Motor dysfunction has been shown to precede neuropathology in BACHD mice. We therefore investigated the progression of synaptic pathology in pyramidal cells and interneurons of the superficial motor cortex of BACHD mice. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed on layer 2/3 primary motor cortical pyramidal cells and PV interneurons from BACHD mice at 3 months, when the mice begin to demonstrate mild motor dysfunction, and at 6 months, when the motor dysfunction is more severe. Changes in synaptic variances were detectable at 3 months and at 6 months BACHD mice display progressive synaptic pathology in the form of reduced cortical excitation and loss of inhibition onto pyramidal cells. These results suggest that progressive alterations of the superficial cortical circuitry may contribute to the decline of motor function in BACHD mice. The synaptic pathology occurs prior to neuronal degeneration and may therefore prove useful as a target for future therapeutic design. PMID:18854207

  9. Dose response of benzo(a)pyrene-induced mutagenesis using the BigBlue{reg_sign} transgenic mouse assay

    SciTech Connect

    Kotturi, G.; Holcroft, J.; Boer, J. de

    1997-10-01

    To investigate the dose response of benzo(a)pyrene-induced mutagenesis, groups of five BigBlue{reg_sign} transgenic mice were injected with a single intra-peritoneal dose were injected with corn oil containing benzo(a)pyrene to achieve the following concentrations: 0, 62.5, 125, 250, 500 mg/kg. Tissues were harvested after a 14 day expression time and analysed for mutational events. DNA adducts were measured in the liver of mice that were sacrificed 1 day after injection. The mutant frequency in the mouse liver linearly increased from 5.2 to 53.5 x 10{sup -5} in a dose-specific manner from 0 to 500 mg/kg benzo(a)pyrene. Mutants were sequenced to give an estimate of the number of clonal events as a function of benzo(a) pyrene with a total of 20 exposed animals (4 doses and five animals/dose), we established frequently mutated sites or `mutational hotspots` as well as a full mutational spectrum. Various other factors associated with the BigBlue{reg_sign} assay were analysed such as the effect of plating density on the purity of mutant plaques during the phage purification step.

  10. Characterization of the BAC Id3-enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse line for in vivo imaging of astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lamantia, Cassandra; Tremblay, Marie-Eve; Majewska, Ania

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Astrocytes are highly ramified glial cells with critical roles in brain physiology and pathology. Recently, breakthroughs in imaging technology have expanded our understanding of astrocyte function in vivo. The in vivo study of astrocytic dynamics, however, is limited by the tools available to label astrocytes and their processes. Here, we characterize the bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic Id3-EGFP knock-in mouse to establish its usefulness for in vivo imaging of astrocyte processes. Using fixed brain sections, we observed enhanced green fluorescent protein expression in astrocytes and blood vessel walls throughout the brain, although the extent and cell type specificity of expression depended on the brain area and developmental age. Using in vivo two-photon imaging, we visualized astrocytes in cortical layers 1–3 in both thin skull and window preparations. In adult animals, astrocytic cell bodies and fine processes could be followed over many hours. Our results suggest that Id3 mice could be used for in vivo imaging of astrocytes and blood vessels in development and adulthood. PMID:26157970

  11. The development of an online database for interventions tested in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Egan, K J; Vesterinen, H M; McCann, S K; Sena, E S; MacLeod, M R

    2015-08-01

    Despite many efforts by the research community, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still an incurable neurodegenerative condition that affects an estimated 44 million individuals worldwide and this figure is expected to increase to 135 million by the year 2050. As the research community currently reflects on previous endeavours, it is essential that we maximize the use of existing knowledge to inform future trials in the field. This article describes the development of a systematically identified data set relating to over 300 interventions tested in over 10,000 animals. The data set includes cohort-level information for six structural outcomes and six behavioural assessments. We encourage others to use this dataset to inform the design of future animal experiments modelling AD and to promote effective translation to human health.

  12. Noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging detection of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related microvascular alterations using superparamagnetic iron oxide particles in APP transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease: application to passive Abeta immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Nicolau; Gérard, Christelle; Abramowski, Dorothée; Cannet, Catherine; Staufenbiel, Matthias

    2011-01-19

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a common feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). More advanced stages are accompanied by microhemorrhages and vasculitis. Peripheral blood-borne macrophages are intimately linked to cerebrovascular pathology coincident with AD. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to noninvasively study microvascular lesions in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mouse AD models. Foci of signal attenuation were detected in cortical and thalamic brain regions of aged APP23 mice. Their strength and number was considerably enhanced by intravenous administration of iron oxide nanoparticles, which are taken up by macrophages through absorptive endocytosis, 24 h before image acquisition. The number of cortical sites displaying signal attenuation increased with age. Histology at these sites demonstrated the presence of iron-containing macrophages in the vicinity of CAA-affected blood vessels. A fraction of the sites additionally showed thickened vessel walls and vasculitis. Consistent with the visualization of CAA-associated lesions, MRI detected a much smaller number of attenuated signal sites in APP23xPS45 mice, for which a strong presenilin mutation caused a shift toward amyloid β(42), thus reducing vascular amyloid. Similar results were obtained with APP24 and APP51 mice, which develop significantly less CAA and microvascular pathology than APP23. In a longitudinal study, we noninvasively demonstrated the reinforced formation of microvascular pathology during passive amyloid β immunotherapy of APP23 mice. Histology confirmed that foci of signal attenuation reflected an increase in CAA-related lesions. Our data demonstrate that MRI has the sensitivity to noninvasively monitor the development of vascular pathology and its possible enhancement by amyloid β immunotherapy in transgenic mice modeling AD.

  13. Vulnerability of calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin in a transgenic/knock-in APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer disease together with disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Verdaguer, Ester; Brox, Susana; Petrov, Dmitry; Olloquequi, Jordi; Romero, Rafael; de Lemos, M Luisa; Camins, Antoni; Auladell, Carme

    2015-09-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of β-amyloid protein in the brain (in both soluble and insoluble forms) and by the presence of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), leading to neurotoxicity. The exact mechanisms whereby Aβ triggers brain alterations are unclear. However, accumulating evidence suggests that a deregulation of Ca(2+) signaling may play a major role in disease progression. Calcium-buffering proteins, including calbindin-D28K (CB), calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV), may offer neuroprotection by maintaining calcium homeostasis. Although marked reductions in these proteins have been observed in the brains of mice and humans with AD, their contribution to AD pathology remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to analyze distribution patterns of CB(+,) CR(+) and PV(+) interneurons in different areas of the hippocampus, a brain region that is severely affected in AD. A transgenic knock-in APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of familial AD was used. The data were obtained from the brains of 3- and 12-month-old animals. These ages roughly correspond to an early mature adult (prior to clinical manifestations) and a late middle-age (clinical symptoms readily detectable) phase in human AD patients. Immunostaining revealed increases in CB and PV immunoreactivity (IR) in the hippocampus of 3-month-old transgenic mice, compared to wild-type animals. Possibly, these proteins are upregulated in an attempt to control cellular homeostasis and synaptic plasticity. However, the pattern of CB-IR was reversed in 12-month-old animals, potentially indicating a loss of cellular capacity to respond to pathophysiological processes. In addition, at this age, a noticeable increase in PV-IR was observed, suggesting the presence of hippocampal network hyperactivity in older AD-like mice. Our results indicate that CaBP(+) neuronal subpopulations play a role in adult neurogenesis and in AD pathology, particularly at early disease

  14. Effect of rice-expressed amyloid β in the Tg2576 Alzheimer's disease transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Nojima, Jun; Maeda, Azusa; Aoki, Sho; Suo, Satoshi; Yanagihara, Dai; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Taiji; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2011-08-26

    One of the main hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is senile plaques composed of amyloid β (Aβ). We developed a new edible vaccine: rice expressing GFP-Aβ42. In a previous report, we described the production of anti-Aβ antibodies in B6 mice fed Aβ rice mixed with cholera toxin B subunit (CTB). In this report, we investigated whether Aβ rice had therapeutic effects in the Tg2576 AD model mice. The anti-Aβ antibody titer was increased and levels of intracerebral Aβ (soluble and insoluble) and serum Aβ decreased. Because the value of IgG1/IgG2a in the Aβ feeding group was >1, immunization via Aβ rice may induce a non-inflammatory Th2 reaction. We also found that the Aβ vaccine improved memory, as assessed in a Y-maze test. The number of arm entries in the Y-maze test was lower in the Aβ feeding group than in the control group. These results suggest that the new edible vaccine Aβ rice may have therapeutic effects in AD.

  15. Mitochondrial DNMT3A and DNA methylation in skeletal muscle and CNS of transgenic mouse models of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Margaret; Gertz, Barry; Chestnut, Barry A.; Martin, Lee J.

    2013-01-01

    Cytosine methylation is an epigenetic modification of DNA catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases. Cytosine methylation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is believed to have relative underrepresentation; however, possible tissue and cell differences in mtDNA methylation and relationships to neurodegenerative disease have not been examined. We show by immunoblotting that DNA methyltransferase 3A (Dnmt3a) isoform is present in pure mitochondria of adult mouse CNS, skeletal muscle, and testes, and adult human cerebral cortex. Dnmt1 was not detected in adult mouse CNS or skeletal muscle mitochondria but appeared bound to the outer mitochondrial membrane. Immunofluorescence confirmed the mitochondrial localization of Dnmt3a and showed 5-methylcytosine (5mC) immunoreactivity in mitochondria of neurons and skeletal muscle myofibers. DNA pyrosequencing of two loci (D-loop and 16S rRNA gene) and twelve cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites in mtDNA directly showed a tissue differential presence of 5mC. Because mitochondria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but the disease mechanisms are uncertain, we evaluated mitochondrial Dnmt3a and 5mC levels in human superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) transgenic mouse models of ALS. Mitochondrial Dnmt3a protein levels were reduced significantly in skeletal muscle and spinal cord at presymptomatic or early disease. Immunofluorescence showed that 5mC immunoreactivity was present in mitochondria of neurons and skeletal myofibers, and 5mC immunoreactivity became aggregated in motor neurons of ALS mice. DNA pyrosequencing revealed significant abnormalities in 16S rRNA gene methylation in ALS mice. Immunofluorescence showed that 5mC immunoreactivity can be sequestered into autophagosomes and that mitophagy was increased and mitochondrial content was decreased in skeletal muscle in ALS mice. This study reveals a tissue-preferential mitochondrial localization of Dnmt3a and presence of cytosine methylation in mt

  16. Global Analysis of S-nitrosylation Sites in the Wild Type (APP) Transgenic Mouse Brain-Clues for Synaptic Pathology *

    PubMed Central

    Zaręba-Kozioł, Monika; Szwajda, Agnieszka; Dadlez, Michał; Wysłouch-Cieszyńska, Aleksandra; Lalowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by an early synaptic loss, which strongly correlates with the severity of dementia. The pathogenesis and causes of characteristic AD symptoms are not fully understood. Defects in various cellular cascades were suggested, including the imbalance in production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Alterations in S-nitrosylation of several proteins were previously demonstrated in various AD animal models and patients. In this work, using combined biotin-switch affinity/nano-LC-MS/MS and bioinformatic approaches we profiled endogenous S-nitrosylation of brain synaptosomal proteins from wild type and transgenic mice overexpressing mutated human Amyloid Precursor Protein (hAPP). Our data suggest involvement of S-nitrosylation in the regulation of 138 synaptic proteins, including MAGUK, CamkII, or synaptotagmins. Thirty-eight proteins were differentially S-nitrosylated in hAPP mice only. Ninety-five S-nitrosylated peptides were identified for the first time (40% of total, including 33 peptides exclusively in hAPP synaptosomes). We verified differential S-nitrosylation of 10 (26% of all identified) synaptosomal proteins from hAPP mice, by Western blotting with specific antibodies. Functional enrichment analysis linked S-nitrosylated proteins to various cellular pathways, including: glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, calcium homeostasis, ion, and vesicle transport, suggesting a basic role of this post-translational modification in the regulation of synapses. The linkage of SNO-proteins to axonal guidance and other processes related to APP metabolism exclusively in the hAPP brain, implicates S-nitrosylation in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24895380

  17. Humulus japonicus inhibits the progression of Alzheimer's disease in a APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae-Shin; Ryu, Young-Kyoung; Park, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Jae Yun; Go, Jun; Noh, Jung-Ran; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Choi, Dong-Hee; Oh, Won-Keun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Shim

    2017-01-01

    Humulus japonicus Siebold & Zucc. (HJ) has traditionally been administered to patients with pulmonary disease, skin disease and hypertension in Korea, and it is considered to exert anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti-mycobacterial effects. However, its effects against Alzheimer's disease (AD) have yet to be explored. Thus, this study was carried out to investigate whether HJ has a beneficial effect on the progression of AD in an animal model. A methanolic extract of HJ (500 mg/kg/day) was intragastrically administered to 5-month-old APP/PS1 transgenic (Tg-APP/PS1) mice for 2.5 months. Novel object recognition and Y-maze alteration tests were used to assess cognitive function, and an immunohistochemical assay was performed to assess amyloid β (Aβ) deposition, tau phosphorylation and gliosis. An in vitro assay using a microglial cell line was also performed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of HJ. Our results revealed that HJ significantly decreased the mRNA and protein expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) induced by lipopolysaccharide in the microglial cell line. The administration of HJ for 2 months improved the cognitive function of Tg-APP/PS1 mice. HJ notably reduced the area occupied by Aβ and neurofibrillary tangles, and the number of activated astrocytes and microglia in the cortex of Tg-APP/PS1 mice. The findings of our study suggest that HJ has the therapeutic potential to inhibit the progression of AD and to improve cognitive deterioration in Tg-APP/PS1 mice. PMID:28004107

  18. Safety of striatal infusion of siRNA in a transgenic Huntington's disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Sarah; Mondo, Erica; Pfister, Edith; Mick, Eric; Friedline, Randall H.; Kim, Jason K.; Sapp, Ellen; DiFiglia, Marian; Aronin, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Background The immune system In Huntington's disease (HD) is activated and may overreact to some therapies. RNA interference using siRNA lowers mutant huntingtin (mHTT) protein but could increase immune responses. Objective To examine the innate immune response following siRNA infusion into the striatum of wild-type (WT) and HD transgenic (YAC128) mice. Methods siRNAs (2′-O-methyl phosphorothioated) were infused unilaterally into striatum of four month-old WT and YAC128 mice for 28 days. Microglia number and morphology (resting (normal), activated, dystrophic), cytokine levels, and DARPP32-positive neurons were measured in striatum immediately or 14 days post-infusion. Controls included contralateral untreated striatum, and PBS and sham treated striata. Results The striata of untreated YAC128 mice had significantly fewer resting microglia and more dystrophic microglia than WT mice, but no difference from WT in the proportion of activated microglia or total number of microglia. siRNA infusion increased the total number of microglia in YAC128 mice compared to PBS treated and untreated striata and increased the proportion of activated microglia in WT and YAC128 mice compared to untreated striata and sham treated groups. Cytokine levels were low and siRNA infusion resulted in only modest changes in those levels. siRNA infusion did not change the number of DARPP32-positive neurons. Conclusion Findings suggest that siRNA infusion may be a safe method for lowering mHTT levels in the striatum in young animals, since treatment does not produce a robust cytokine response or cause neurotoxicity. The potential long-term effects of a sustained increase in total and activated microglia after siRNA infusion in HD mice need to be explored. PMID:26444021

  19. Mouse insulin cells expressing an inducible RIPCre transgene are functionally impaired.

    PubMed

    Teitelman, Gladys; Kedees, Mamdouh

    2015-02-06

    We used cre-lox technology to test whether the inducible expression of Cre minimize the deleterious effect of the enzyme on beta cell function. We studied mice in which Cre is linked to a modified estrogen receptor (ER), and its expression is controlled by the rat insulin promoter (RIP). Following the injection of tamoxifen (TM), CreER- migrates to the nucleus and promotes the appearance of a reporter protein, enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP), in cells. Immunocytochemical analysis indicated that 46.6 ± 2.1% insulin cells of adult RIPCreER- EYFP expressed EYFP. RIPCreER-EYFP (+TM) mice were normoglycemic throughout the study, and their glucose tolerance test results were similar to control CD-1 mice. However, an extended exposure to reagents that stimulate insulin synthesis was detrimental to the survival of IN+EYFP+cells. The administration of an inhibitor of the enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase (DPP4i), which prevents the cleavage of glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1), to adult RIPCreER-EYFP mice lead to a decrease in the percentage of IN+EYFP+ to 17.5 ± 1.73 and a significant increase in apoptotic cells in islets. Similarly, a 2-week administration of the GLP-1 analog exendin 4 (ex-4) induced an almost complete ablation of IN+ expressing a different reporter protein and a significant decrease in the beta cell mass and rate of beta cell proliferation. Since normal beta cells do not die when induced to increase insulin synthesis, our observations indicate that insulin cells expressing an inducible RIPCre transgene are functionally deficient. Studies employing these mice should carefully consider the pitfalls of the Cre-Lox technique.

  20. Development of Cerebral Microbleeds in the APP23-Transgenic Mouse Model of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy—A 9.4 Tesla MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Björn; Venus, Alexander; Heiler, Patrick; Schad, Lothar; Ebert, Anne; Hennerici, Michael G.; Grudzenski, Saskia; Fatar, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) around cerebral arteries and capillaries and leads to an increased risk for vascular dementia, spontaneous lobar hemorrhage, convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage, and transient focal neurological episodes, which might be an indicator of imminent spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. In CAA cerebral microbleeds (cMBs) with a cortical/juxtacortical distribution are frequently observed in standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo MRI of transgenic mouse models of CAA may serve as a useful tool to investigate translational aspects of the disease. Materials and Methods: APP23-transgenic mice demonstrate cerebrovascular Aβ deposition with subsequent neuropathological changes characteristic for CAA. We performed a 9.4 Tesla high field MRI study using T2, T2* and time of flight-magnetic resonance angiograpy (TOF-MRA) sequences in APP23-transgenic mice and wildtype (wt) littermates at the age of 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 months, respectively. Numbers, size, and location of cMBs are reported. Results: T2* imaging demonstrated cMBs (diameter 50–300 μm) located in the neocortex and, to a lesser degree, in the thalamus. cMBs were detected at the earliest at 16 months of age. Numbers increased exponentially with age, with 2.5 ± 2 (median ± interquartilrange) at 16 months, 15 ± 6 at 20 months, and 31.5 ± 17 at 24 months of age, respectively. Conclusion: We report the temporal and spatial development of cMBs in the aging APP23-transgenic mouse model which develops characteristic pathological patterns known from human CAA. We expect this mouse model to serve as a useful tool to non-invasively monitor mid- and longterm translational aspects of CAA and to investigate experimental therapeutic strategies in longitudinal studies. PMID:27458375

  1. Systematic behavioral evaluation of Huntington’s disease transgenic and knock-in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Menalled, Liliana; El-Khodor, Bassem F.; Patry, Monica; Suarez-Farinas, Mayte; Orenstein, Samantha; Zahasky, Benjamin; Leahy, Christina; Wheeler, Vanessa; Yang, X. William; MacDonald, Marcy; Morton, Jennifer A.; Bates, Gill; Leeds, Janet; Park, Larry; Howland, David; Signer, Ethan; Tobin, Allan; Brunner, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is one of the few neurodegenerative diseases with a known genetic cause, knowledge that has enabled the creation of animal models using genetic manipulations that aim to recapitulate HD pathology. The study of behavioral and neuropathological phenotypes of these HD models, however, has been plagued by inconsistent results across laboratories stemming from the lack of standardized husbandry and testing conditions, in addition to the intrinsic differences between the models. We have compared different HD models using standardized conditions to identify the most robust phenotypic differences, best suited for preclinical therapeutic efficacy studies. With a battery of tests of sensory-motor function, such as the open field and prepulse inhibition tests, we replicate previous results showing a strong and progressive behavioral deficit in the R6/2 line with an average of 129 CAG repeats in a mixed CBA/J and C57BL/6J background. We present the first behavioral characterization of a new model, an R6/2 line with an average of 248 CAG repeats in a pure C57BL/6J background, which also showed a progressive and robust phenotype. The BACHD in a FVB/N background showed robust and progressive behavioral phenotype, while the YAC128 full-length model on either an FVB/N or a C57BL/6J background generally showed milder deficits. Finally, the HdhQ111 knock-in mouse on a CD1 background showed very mild deficits. This first extensive standardized cross-characterization of several HD animal models under standardized conditions highlights several behavioral outcomes, such as hypoactivity, amenable to standardized preclinical therapeutic drug screening. PMID:19464370

  2. Beneficial effects of the transgenic expression of human sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 on pig-to-mouse islet xenograft survival.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ji-Jing; Yeom, Hye-Jeong; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Lee, Jae-Ghi; Lee, Eun Won; Cho, Bumrae; Lee, Han Sin; Kim, Su Jin; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Kim, Sung Joo; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2016-02-01

    Both human soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor-Fc (sTNF-αR-Fc) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) transgenic pigs have been generated previously for xenotransplantation. Here, we investigated whether overexpression of sTNF-αR-Fc or HO-1 in pig islets prolongs islet xenograft survival. Adult porcine islets were isolated from human sTNF-αR-Fc or HO-1 transgenic and wild type pigs, and were transplanted into diabetic nude mice. Effects of the expression of both genes on islet apoptosis, chemokine expression, cellular infiltration, antibody production, and islet xenograft survival were analyzed. Human sTNF-αR-Fc transgenic pigs successfully expressed sTNF-αR-Fc in the islets; human HO-1 transgenic pigs expressed significant levels of HO-1 in the islets. Pig-to-mouse islet xenograft survival was significantly prolonged in both the sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 groups compared with that in the wild type group. Both the sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 groups exhibited suppressed intragraft expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and decreased perigraft infiltration of immune cells. However, there was no difference in the anti-pig antibody levels between the groups. Apoptosis of islet cells during the early engraftment was suppressed only in the HO-1 group. Porcine islets from both sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 transgenic pigs prolonged xenograft survival by suppressing islet cell apoptosis or secondary inflammatory responses following islet death, indicating that these transgenic pigs might have applications in successful islet xenotransplantation.

  3. Phosphodiesterase-10A Inverse Changes in Striatopallidal and Striatoentopeduncular Pathways of a Transgenic Mouse Model of DYT1 Dystonia.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Vincenza; Castelli, Valentina; Giorgi, Mauro; Cardarelli, Silvia; Saverioni, Ilaria; Palumbo, Francesca; Bonsi, Paola; Pisani, Antonio; Giampà, Carmela; Sorge, Roberto; Biagioni, Stefano; Fusco, Francesca R; Sancesario, Giuseppe

    2017-02-22

    We report that changes of phosphodiesterase-10A (PDE10A) can map widespread functional imbalance of basal ganglia circuits in a mouse model of DYT1 dystonia overexpressing mutant torsinA. PDE10A is a key enzyme in the catabolism of second messenger cAMP and cGMP, whose synthesis is stimulated by D1 receptors and inhibited by D2 receptors preferentially expressed in striatoentopeducuncular/substantia nigra or striatopallidal pathways, respectively. PDE10A was studied in control mice (NT) and in mice carrying human wild-type torsinA (hWT) or mutant torsinA (hMT). Quantitative analysis of PDE10A expression was assessed in different brain areas by rabbit anti-PDE10A antibody immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. PDE10A-dependent cAMP hydrolyzing activity and PDE10A mRNA were also assessed. Striatopallidal neurons were identified by rabbit anti-enkephalin antibody.In NT mice, PDE10A is equally expressed in medium spiny striatal neurons and in their projections to entopeduncular nucleus/substantia nigra and to external globus pallidus. In hMT mice, PDE10A content selectively increases in enkephalin-positive striatal neuronal bodies; moreover, PDE10A expression and activity in hMT mice, compared with NT mice, significantly increase in globus pallidus but decrease in entopeduncular nucleus/substantia nigra. Similar changes of PDE10A occur in hWT mice, but such changes are not always significant. However, PDE10A mRNA expression appears comparable among NT, hWT, and hMT mice.In DYT1 transgenic mice, the inverse changes of PDE10A in striatoentopeduncular and striatopallidal projections might result over time in an imbalance between direct and indirect pathways for properly focusing movement. The decrease of PDE10A in the striatoentopeduncular/nigral projections might lead to increased intensity and duration of D1-stimulated cAMP/cGMP signaling; conversely, the increase of PDE10A in the striatopallidal projections might lead to increased intensity and duration of D2

  4. Transcriptome comparison of distinct osteolineage subsets in the hematopoietic stem cell niche using a triple fluorescent transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Vionnie W.C.; Lymperi, Stefania; Ferraro, Francesca; Scadden, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The bone marrow niche is recognized as a central player in maintaining and regulating the behavior of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Specific gain-of and loss-of function experiments perturbing a range of osteolineage cells or their secreted proteins had been shown to affect stem cell maintenance (Calvi et al, 2003 [1]; Stier et al., 2005 [2]; Zhang et al., 2003 [3]; Nilsson et al., 2005 [4]; Greenbaum et al., 2013 [5]) and engraftment (Adam et al., 2006, 2009 [6], [7]). We used specific in vivo cell deletion approaches to dissect the niche cell-parenchymal cell dependency in a complex bone marrow microenvironment. Endogenous deletion of osteocalcin-expressing (Ocn+) cells led to a loss of T immune cells (Yu et al., 2015 [8]. Ocn+ cells express the Notch ligand DLL4 to communicate with T-competent progenitors, and thereby ensuring T precursor production and expression of chemotactic molecules on their cell surface for subsequent thymic seeding. In contrast, depletion of osterix-expressing (Osx+) osteoprogenitors led to reduced B immune cells. These distinct hematopoietic phenotypes suggest specific pairing of mesenchymal niche cells and parenchymal hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow to create unique functional units to support hematopoiesis. Here, we present the global gene expression profiles of these osteolineage subtypes utilizing a triple fluorescent transgenic mouse model (OsxCre+;Rosa-mCh+;Ocn:Topaz+) that labels Osx+ cells red, Ocn+ cells green, and Osx+ Ocn+ cells yellow. This system allows isolation of distinct osteolineage subsets within the same animal by flow cytometry. Array data that have been described in our study [8] are also publically available from NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) with the accession number GSE66042. Differences in gene expression may correlate with functional difference in supporting hematopoiesis. PMID:26484277

  5. Evaluation of an α synuclein sensitized dendritic cell based vaccine in a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Ugen, Kenneth E; Lin, Xiaoyang; Bai, Ge; Liang, Zhanhua; Cai, Jianfeng; Li, Kunyun; Song, Shijie; Cao, Chuanhai; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop a cell-based vaccine against the Parkinson disease (PD) associated protein α-synuclein (α-Syn) 3 peptides were synthesized based upon predicted B cell epitopes within the full length α-Syn protein sequence. These peptide fragments as well as the full length recombinant human α-Syn (rh- α-Syn) protein were used to sensitize mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) ex vivo, followed by intravenous delivery of these sensitized DCs into transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the human A53T variant of α-Syn. ELISA analysis and testing of behavioral locomotor function by rotometry were performed on all mice after the 5th vaccination as well as just prior to euthanasia. The results indicated that vaccination with peptide sensitized DCs (PSDC) as well as DCs sensitized by rh-α-Syn induced specific anti-α-Syn antibodies in all immunized mice. In terms of rotometry performance, a measure of locomotor activity correlated to brain dopamine levels, mice vaccinated with PSDC or rh- α-Syn sensitized DCs performed significantly better than non-vaccinated Tg control mice during the final assessment (i.e. at 17 months of age) before euthanasia. As well, measurement of levels of brain IL-1α, a cytokine hypothesized to be associated with neuroinflammation, demonstrated that this proinflammatory molecule was significantly reduced in the PSDC and rh- α-Syn sensitized DC vaccinated mice compared to the non-vaccinated Tg control group. Overall, α-Syn antigen-sensitized DC vaccination was effective in generating specific anti- α-Syn antibodies and improved locomotor function without eliciting an apparent general inflammatory response, indicating that this strategy may be a safe and effective treatment for PD.

  6. Regulation of fos-lacZ fusion gene expression in primary mouse epidermal keratinocytes isolated from transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bollag, W B; Xiong, Y; Ducote, J; Harmon, C S

    1994-01-01

    The expression of a fos-lacZ fusion gene was studied in primary mouse epidermal keratinocytes obtained from transgenic mice. This gene construct contains the entire upstream regulatory sequence of c-fos, and expression of the endogenous and fusion gene was shown by Northern analysis to correlate upon induction with the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Using a chromogenic substrate of beta-galactosidase, we also demonstrated that expression of the fusion gene product, like that of Fos, was localized to the cell nucleus. In addition, we showed that epidermal keratinocytes responded to dialysed fetal bovine serum (FBS), TPA and high-calcium medium with enhanced Fos-lacZ expression and an inhibition of proliferation. The time course of induction of Fos-lacZ expression was similar for dialysed FBS and TPA, with a peak approximately 2 h after exposure. Exposure for approximately 24 h to an elevated extracellular calcium concentration was required to elicit an increase in Fos-lacZ expression. The lack of an immediate effect of raising medium calcium levels on Fos-lacZ expression contrasted with the rapidity of its effect on DNA synthesis, which was significantly inhibited within 6-8 h. In addition, we found that the protein kinase C inhibitor Ro 31-7549 blocked Fos-lacZ expression induced by TPA but had little or no effect on that elicited by high calcium levels. Thus, although our results indicate that the fos gene product may be involved in mediating epidermal keratinocyte growth arrest in response to differentiative agents such as FBS, TPA and high medium calcium levels, the exact role of this gene product remains unclear. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8198544

  7. Regulation of fos-lacZ fusion gene expression in primary mouse epidermal keratinocytes isolated from transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bollag, W B; Xiong, Y; Ducote, J; Harmon, C S

    1994-05-15

    The expression of a fos-lacZ fusion gene was studied in primary mouse epidermal keratinocytes obtained from transgenic mice. This gene construct contains the entire upstream regulatory sequence of c-fos, and expression of the endogenous and fusion gene was shown by Northern analysis to correlate upon induction with the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Using a chromogenic substrate of beta-galactosidase, we also demonstrated that expression of the fusion gene product, like that of Fos, was localized to the cell nucleus. In addition, we showed that epidermal keratinocytes responded to dialysed fetal bovine serum (FBS), TPA and high-calcium medium with enhanced Fos-lacZ expression and an inhibition of proliferation. The time course of induction of Fos-lacZ expression was similar for dialysed FBS and TPA, with a peak approximately 2 h after exposure. Exposure for approximately 24 h to an elevated extracellular calcium concentration was required to elicit an increase in Fos-lacZ expression. The lack of an immediate effect of raising medium calcium levels on Fos-lacZ expression contrasted with the rapidity of its effect on DNA synthesis, which was significantly inhibited within 6-8 h. In addition, we found that the protein kinase C inhibitor Ro 31-7549 blocked Fos-lacZ expression induced by TPA but had little or no effect on that elicited by high calcium levels. Thus, although our results indicate that the fos gene product may be involved in mediating epidermal keratinocyte growth arrest in response to differentiative agents such as FBS, TPA and high medium calcium levels, the exact role of this gene product remains unclear.

  8. Two transgenic mouse models for β-subunit components of succinate-CoA ligase yielding pleiotropic metabolic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Kacso, Gergely; Ravasz, Dora; Doczi, Judit; Németh, Beáta; Madgar, Ory; Saada, Ann; Ilin, Polina; Miller, Chaya; Ostergaard, Elsebet; Iordanov, Iordan; Adams, Daniel; Vargedo, Zsuzsanna; Araki, Masatake; Araki, Kimi; Nakahara, Mai; Ito, Haruka; Gál, Aniko; Molnár, Mária J.; Nagy, Zsolt; Patocs, Attila; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Succinate-CoA ligase (SUCL) is a heterodimer enzyme composed of Suclg1 α-subunit and a substrate-specific Sucla2 or Suclg2 β-subunit yielding ATP or GTP, respectively. In humans, the deficiency of this enzyme leads to encephalomyopathy with or without methylmalonyl aciduria, in addition to resulting in mitochondrial DNA depletion. We generated mice lacking either one Sucla2 or Suclg2 allele. Sucla2 heterozygote mice exhibited tissue- and age-dependent decreases in Sucla2 expression associated with decreases in ATP-forming activity, but rebound increases in cardiac Suclg2 expression and GTP-forming activity. Bioenergetic parameters including substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP) were not different between wild-type and Sucla2 heterozygote mice unless a submaximal pharmacological inhibition of SUCL was concomitantly present. mtDNA contents were moderately decreased, but blood carnitine esters were significantly elevated. Suclg2 heterozygote mice exhibited decreases in Suclg2 expression but no rebound increases in Sucla2 expression or changes in bioenergetic parameters. Surprisingly, deletion of one Suclg2 allele in Sucla2 heterozygote mice still led to a rebound but protracted increase in Suclg2 expression, yielding double heterozygote mice with no alterations in GTP-forming activity or SLP, but more pronounced changes in mtDNA content and blood carnitine esters, and an increase in succinate dehydrogenase activity. We conclude that a partial reduction in Sucla2 elicits rebound increases in Suclg2 expression, which is sufficiently dominant to overcome even a concomitant deletion of one Suclg2 allele, pleiotropically affecting metabolic pathways associated with SUCL. These results as well as the availability of the transgenic mouse colonies will be of value in understanding SUCL deficiency. PMID:27496549

  9. Lipid droplet binding thalidomide analogs activate endoplasmic reticulum stress and suppress hepatocellular carcinoma in a chemically induced transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most frequent and aggressive primary tumor of the liver and it has limited treatment options. Results In this study, we report the in vitro and in vivo effects of two novel amino-trifluoro-phtalimide analogs, Ac-915 and Ac-2010. Both compounds bind lipid droplets and endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and interact with several proteins with chaperone functions (HSP60, HSP70, HSP90, and protein disulfide isomerase) as determined by affinity chromatography and resonant waveguide optical biosensor technology. Both compounds inhibited protein disulfide isomerase activity and induced cell death of different HCC cells at sub or low micromolar ranges detected by classical biochemical end-point assay as well as with real-time label-free measurements. Besides cell proliferation inhibiton, analogs also inhibited cell migration even at 250 nM. Relative biodistribution of the analogs was analysed in native tissue sections of different organs after administration of drugs, and by using fluorescent confocal microscopy based on the inherent blue fluorescence of the compounds. The analogs mainly accumulated in the liver. The effects of Ac-915 and Ac-2010 were also demonstrated on the advanced stages of hepatocarcinogenesis in a transgenic mouse model of N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN)-induced HCC. Significantly less tumor development was found in the livers of the Ac-915- or Ac-2010-treated groups compared with control mice, characterized by less liver tumor incidence, fewer tumors and smaller tumor size. Conclusion These results imply that these amino-trifluoro-phthalimide analogs could serve potent clinical candidates against HCC alone or in combination with dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:24268070

  10. Effect of rapamycin on mouse chronic lymphocytic leukemia and the development of nonhematopoietic malignancies in Emu-TCL1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zanesi, Nicola; Aqeilan, Rami; Drusco, Alessandra; Kaou, Mohamed; Sevignani, Cinzia; Costinean, Stefan; Bortesi, Laura; La Rocca, Gaspare; Koldovsky, Pavel; Volinia, Stefano; Mancini, Rita; Calin, George; Scott, Charles P; Pekarsky, Yuri; Croce, Carlo M

    2006-01-15

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in the world. The TCL1 gene, responsible for prolymphocytic T cell leukemia, is also overexpressed in human B cell malignancies and overexpression of the Tcl1 protein occurs frequently in CLL. Aging transgenic mice that overexpress TCL1 under control of the mu immunoglobulin gene enhancer, develop a CD5+ B cell lymphoproliferative disorder mimicking human CLL and implicating TCL1 in the pathogenesis of CLL. In the current study, we exploited this transgenic mouse to investigate two different CLL-related issues: potential treatment of CLL and characterization of neoplasms that accompany CLL. We successfully transplanted CLL cells into syngeneic mice that led to CLL development in the recipient mice. This approach allowed us to verify the involvement of the Tcl1/Akt/mTOR biochemical pathway in the disease by testing the ability of a specific pharmacologic agent, rapamycin, to slow CLL. We also showed that 36% of these transgenic mice were affected by solid malignancies, in which the expression of the Tcl1 protein was absent. These findings indicate that other oncogenic mechanism(s) may be involved in the development of solid tumors in Emu-TCL1 transgenic mice.

  11. The ToI-beta transgenic mouse: a model to study the specific role of NF-kappaB in beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Eldor, Roy; Baum, Ketty; Abel, Roy; Sever, Dror; Melloul, Danielle

    2009-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the infiltration of inflammatory cells into pancreatic islets of Langerhans, followed by the selective and progressive destruction of insulin-secreting beta-cells. Islet infiltrating leukocytes secrete cytokines including IL-1beta and IFN-gamma, which contribute to beta-cell death. In vitro evidence suggests that cytokine-induced activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB is an important component of the signal triggering beta-cell apoptosis. To study the role of NF-kappaB in vivo we generated a transgenic mouse line expressing a degradation-resistant NF-kappaB protein inhibitor (DeltaNIkappaBalpha) and the luciferase gene, acting specifically in beta-cells, in an inducible and reversible manner, by using the tet-on regulation system. Using this new mouse model, termed the ToI-beta mouse (for Tet-Ondelta I kappaB in beta-cells) we have previously shown in vitro, that islets expressing the DeltaNIkappaBalpha protein were resistant to the deleterious effects of IL-1beta and IFN-gamma, as assessed by reduced NO production and beta-cell apoptosis. In vivo, a nearly complete protection against multiple low dose streptozocin-induced diabetes was observed, with reduced intra-islet lymphocytic infiltration. In the present study we demonstrate the tight regulated and reversible expression of the DeltaNIkappaBalpha transgene in the ToI-beta mouse model as well as the effect of its overexpression on glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. The results show a lack of effect of transgene induction on both in vivo glucose tolerance tests and in vitro islet insulin secretion and content. Furthermore, to prove the tight control of induction in the model, luciferase mediated light emission was only detected at constant levels in Dox-treated double transgenic mice or islets as well as in a model of islet transplantation. Upon removal of the inducing stimulus, complete reversal of both NF-kappaB inhibition and luciferase activity were

  12. ApoE-directed therapeutics rapidly clear β-amyloid and reverse deficits in AD mouse models.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Paige E; Cirrito, John R; Wesson, Daniel W; Lee, C Y Daniel; Karlo, J Colleen; Zinn, Adriana E; Casali, Brad T; Restivo, Jessica L; Goebel, Whitney D; James, Michael J; Brunden, Kurt R; Wilson, Donald A; Landreth, Gary E

    2012-03-23

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with impaired clearance of β-amyloid (Aβ) from the brain, a process normally facilitated by apolipoprotein E (apoE). ApoE expression is transcriptionally induced through the action of the nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and liver X receptors in coordination with retinoid X receptors (RXRs). Oral administration of the RXR agonist bexarotene to a mouse model of AD resulted in enhanced clearance of soluble Aβ within hours in an apoE-dependent manner. Aβ plaque area was reduced more than 50% within just 72 hours. Furthermore, bexarotene stimulated the rapid reversal of cognitive, social, and olfactory deficits and improved neural circuit function. Thus, RXR activation stimulates physiological Aβ clearance mechanisms, resulting in the rapid reversal of a broad range of Aβ-induced deficits.

  13. Primary over-expression of AβPP in muscle does not lead to the development of inclusion body myositis in a new lineage of the MCK-AβPP transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yue-Bei; Johnsen, Russell D; Griffiths, Lisa; Needham, Merrilee; Fabian, Victoria A; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Steve D; Mastaglia, Frank L

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether primary over-expression of AβPP in skeletal muscle results in the development of features of inclusion body myositis (IBM) in a new lineage of the MCK-AβPP transgenic mouse. Quantitative histological, immunohistochemical and western blotting studies were performed on muscles from 3 to 18 month old transgenic and wild-type C57BL6/SJL mice. Electron microscopy was also performed on muscle sections from selected animals. Although western blotting confirmed that there was over-expression of full length AβPP in transgenic mouse muscles, deposition of amyloid-β and fibrillar amyloid could not be demonstrated histochemically or with electron microscopy. Additionally, other changes typical of IBM such as rimmed vacuoles, cytochrome C oxidase-deficient fibres, upregulation of MHC antigens, lymphocytic inflammatory infiltration and T cell fibre invasion were absent. The most prominent finding in both transgenic and wild-type animals was the presence of tubular aggregates which was age-related and largely restricted to male animals. Expression of full length AβPP in this MCK-AβPP mouse lineage did not reach the levels required for immunodetection or deposition of amyloid-β as in the original transgenic strains, and was not associated with the development of pathological features of IBM. These negative results emphasise the potential pitfalls of re-deriving transgenic mouse strains in different laboratories.

  14. Mouse mammary tumor virus infection accelerates mammary carcinogenesis in Wnt-1 transgenic mice by insertional activation of int-2/Fgf-3 and hst/Fgf-4.

    PubMed Central

    Shackleford, G M; MacArthur, C A; Kwan, H C; Varmus, H E

    1993-01-01

    Transgenic mice carrying the Wnt-1 protooncogene modified for expression in mammary epithelial cells exhibit hyperplastic mammary glands and stochastically develop mammary carcinomas, suggesting that additional events are necessary for tumorigenesis. To induce such events and to identify the genes involved, we have infected Wnt-1 transgenic mice with mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), intending to insertionally activate, and thereby molecularly tag, cooperating protooncogenes. Infection of breeding female Wnt-1 transgenics decreased the average age at which tumors appeared from approximately 4 months to approximately 2.5 months and increased the average number of primary tumors per mouse from 1-2 to > 5. A smaller effect was observed in virgin females, and infection of transgenic males showed no significant effect on tumor latency. More than half of the tumors from the infected breeding group contained one or more newly acquired MMTV proviruses in a pattern suggesting that most cells in tumors arose from a single infected cell. Analyses of provirus-containing tumors for induced or altered expression of int-2/Fgf-3, hst/Fgf-4, int-3, and Wnt-3 showed activation of int-2 in 39% of tumors, hst in 3%, and both int-2 and hst in 3%. DNA analyses with probes for protooncogenes and MMTV confirmed that the activations resulted from proviral insertions. There was no evidence for proviral insertions at the int-3, Wnt-3, or Wnt-1 loci. These findings provide further evidence that fibroblast growth factors Int-2 and Hst can cooperate with Wnt-1, another secreted factor, in mammary tumorigenesis, and they illustrate the capacity of this system to identify cooperating oncogenes. Images PMID:8380647

  15. Functional over-load saves motor units in the SOD1-G93A transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, T; Tyreman, N; Li, S; Putman, C T; Hegedus, J

    2010-02-01

    The fastest, most forceful motor units are lost progressively during asymptomatic disease in the SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. As the disease progresses the surviving motor units must increase their levels of activity to sustain posture and movement. If activity-dependent conversion of motor units to more fatigue resistant types increased their resilience and hence survival, we hypothesized that an experimental increase in motor unit activity in the hindlimb muscles of the SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse should "save" those motor units that are normally lost in the first 90 days of age. To test this hypothesis, we partially denervated hindlimb muscles in SOD1(G93A) and their corresponding control SOD1(WT) transgenic mice by avulsion of either L4 or L5 spinal roots at 40 days of age. Whole muscle and single motor unit isometric twitch forces were recorded and the numbers intact motor units in fast-twitch tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius, extensor digitorum longus muscles and the slow-twitch soleus muscle were calculated at 90 days of age. We found that the rapid age-dependent decline in numbers of functional motor units in fast-twitch muscles of the SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice was dramatically reduced by the functional hyperactivity in the partially denervated muscles and, that these muscles comprised a significantly higher component of type IIA and type IID/X fibers than those muscles that were innervated by nerves in intact spinal roots. We conclude that the vulnerable motor units are saved by increasing their neuromuscular activity and consequently, converting them to slower, less forceful, fatigue resistant motor units.

  16. The G gamma / T-15 transgenic mouse model of androgen-independent prostate cancer: target cells of carcinogenesis and the effect of the vitamin D analogue EB 1089.

    PubMed

    Perez-Stable, Carlos M; Schwartz, Gary G; Farinas, Adan; Finegold, Milton; Binderup, Lise; Howard, Guy A; Roos, Bernard A

    2002-06-01

    Transgenic mouse models of prostate cancer provide unique opportunities to understand the molecular events in prostate carcinogenesis and for the preclinical testing of new therapies. We studied the G gamma T-15 transgenic mouse line, which contains the human fetal globin promoter linked to SV40 T antigen (Tag) and which develops androgen-independent prostate cancer. Using the immunohistochemistry of normal mouse prostates before tumor formation, we showed that the target cells of carcinogenesis in G gamma T-15 mice are located in the basal epithelial layer. We tested the efficacy of the 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) analogue, EB 1089, to chemoprevent prostate cancer in these transgenic mice. Compared with treatment with placebo, treatment with EB 1089 at three different time points before the onset of prostate tumors in mice did not prevent or delay tumor onset. However, EB 1089 significantly inhibited prostate tumor growth. At the highest dose, EB 1089 inhibited prostate tumor growth by 60% (P = 0.0003) and the growth in the number of metastases, although this dose also caused significant hypercalcemia and weight loss. We conducted several in vitro experiments to explore why EB 1089 did not prevent the occurrence of the primary tumors. EB 1089 significantly inhibited the growth of a Tag-expressing human prostate epithelial cell line, BPH-1, and an androgen-insensitive subline of LNCaP cells [which was not inhibited by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)]. Thus, neither Tag expression nor androgen insensitivity explain the absence of chemopreventive effect. Conversely, neither 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) nor EB 1089 inhibited the growth of the normal rat prostate basal epithelial cell line NRP-152. It is likely that EB 1089 was not effective in delaying the growth of the primary tumor in G gamma T-15 transgenic mice because the target cells of carcinogenesis in these mice are located in the basal epithelial layer. We conclude that G gamma T-15 transgenic mice are a useful model for testing vitamin D

  17. Nicotinamide restores cognition in AD transgenic mice via a mechanism involving sirtuin inhibition and selective reduction of Thr231-phosphotau

    PubMed Central

    Green, Kim N.; Steffan, Joan S.; Martinez-Coria, Hilda; Sun, Xuemin; Schreiber, Steven S.; Thompson, Leslie Michels; LaFerla, Frank M.

    2008-01-01

    Memory loss is the signature feature of Alzheimer’s disease and therapies that prevent or delay its onset are urgently needed. Effective preventive strategies likely offer the greatest and most widespread benefits. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors increase histone acetylation and enhance memory and synaptic plasticity. We evaluated the efficacy of nicotinamide, a competitive inhibitor of the sirtuins or class III NAD+-dependent HDACs in 3xTg-AD mice, and found that it restored cognitive deficits associated with pathology. Nicotinamide selectively reduces a specific phospho-species of tau (Thr231) that is associated with microtubule depolymerization, in a manner similar to inhibition of SirT1. Nicotinamide also dramatically increased acetylated-α-tubulin, a primary substrate of SirT2, and MAP2c, both of which are linked to increased microtubule stability. Reduced phosphoThr231-tau was related to a reduction of mono-ubiquitin-conjugated tau, suggesting that this post-translationally modified form of tau may be rapidly degraded. Overexpression of a Thr231-phospho-mimic tau in vitro increased clearance and decreased accumulation of tau compared to wild-type tau. These preclinical findings suggest that oral nicotinamide may represent a safe treatment for AD and other tauopathies, and that phosphorylation of tau at Thr231 may regulate tau stability. PMID:18987186

  18. Optimised and Rapid Pre-clinical Screening in the SOD1G93A Transgenic Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Richard J.; Bennett, Ellen J.; Kennerley, Aneurin J.; Sharp, Paul; Sunyach, Claire; Kasher, Paul; Berwick, Jason; Pettmann, Brigitte; Battaglia, Guiseppe; Azzouz, Mimoun; Grierson, Andrew; Shaw, Pamela J.

    2011-01-01

    The human SOD1G93A transgenic mouse has been used extensively since its development in 1994 as a model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In that time, a great many insights into the toxicity of mutant SOD1 have been gained using this and other mutant SOD transgenic mouse models. They all demonstrate a selective toxicity towards motor neurons and in some cases features of the pathology seen in the human disease. These models have two major drawbacks. Firstly the generation of robust preclinical data in these models has been highlighted as an area for concern. Secondly, the amount of time required for a single preclinical experiment in these models (3–4 months) is a hurdle to the development of new therapies. We have developed an inbred C57BL/6 mouse line from the original mixed background (SJLxC57BL/6) SOD1G93A transgenic line and show here that the disease course is remarkably consistent and much less prone to background noise, enabling reduced numbers of mice for testing of therapeutics. Secondly we have identified very early readouts showing a large decline in motor function compared to normal mice. This loss of motor function has allowed us to develop an early, sensitive and rapid screening protocol for the initial phases of denervation of muscle fibers, observed in this model. We describe multiple, quantitative readouts of motor function that can be used to interrogate this early mechanism. Such an approach will increase throughput for reduced costs, whilst reducing the severity of the experimental procedures involved. PMID:21876739

  19. Optimised and rapid pre-clinical screening in the SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Mead, Richard J; Bennett, Ellen J; Kennerley, Aneurin J; Sharp, Paul; Sunyach, Claire; Kasher, Paul; Berwick, Jason; Pettmann, Brigitte; Battaglia, Guiseppe; Azzouz, Mimoun; Grierson, Andrew; Shaw, Pamela J

    2011-01-01

    The human SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse has been used extensively since its development in 1994 as a model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In that time, a great many insights into the toxicity of mutant SOD1 have been gained using this and other mutant SOD transgenic mouse models. They all demonstrate a selective toxicity towards motor neurons and in some cases features of the pathology seen in the human disease. These models have two major drawbacks. Firstly the generation of robust preclinical data in these models has been highlighted as an area for concern. Secondly, the amount of time required for a single preclinical experiment in these models (3-4 months) is a hurdle to the development of new therapies. We have developed an inbred C57BL/6 mouse line from the original mixed background (SJLxC57BL/6) SOD1(G93A) transgenic line and show here that the disease course is remarkably consistent and much less prone to background noise, enabling reduced numbers of mice for testing of therapeutics. Secondly we have identified very early readouts showing a large decline in motor function compared to normal mice. This loss of motor function has allowed us to develop an early, sensitive and rapid screening protocol for the initial phases of denervation of muscle fibers, observed in this model. We describe multiple, quantitative readouts of motor function that can be used to interrogate this early mechanism. Such an approach will increase throughput for reduced costs, whilst reducing the severity of the experimental procedures involved.

  20. SPION-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Alzheimer’s Disease Plaques in AβPP/PS-1 Transgenic Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; Solberg, Nathan O.; Chamberlain, Ryan; Orlando, Robert A.; Heidrich, John E.; Brown, David C.; Brady, Christina I.; Vander Jagt, Thomas A.; Garwood, Michael; Vander Jagt, David L.

    2016-01-01

    In our program to develop non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods for the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), we have synthesized antibody-conjugated, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for use as an in vivo agent for MRI detection of amyloid-β plaques in AD. Here we report studies in AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice, which demonstrate the ability of novel anti-AβPP conjugated SPIONs to penetrate the blood-brain barrier to act as a contrast agent for MR imaging of plaques. The conspicuity of the plaques increased from an average Z-score of 5.1 ± 0.5 to 8.3 ± 0.2 when the plaque contrast to noise ratio was compared in control AD mice with AD mice treated with SPIONs. The number of MRI-visible plaques per brain increased from 347 ± 45 in the control AD mice, to 668 ± 86 in the SPION treated mice. These results indicated that our SPION enhanced amyloid-β detection method delivers an efficacious, non-invasive MRI detection method in transgenic mice. PMID:23229079

  1. A 3.7 kb Fragment of the Mouse Scn10a Gene Promoter Directs Neural Crest But Not Placodal Lineage EGFP Expression in a Transgenic Animal

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Van B.; Ikeda, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.8 is expressed almost exclusively in primary sensory neurons. The mechanism restricting Nav1.8 expression is not entirely clear, but we have previously described a 3.7 kb fragment of the Scn10a promoter capable of recapitulating the tissue-specific expression of Nav1.8 in transfected neurons and cell lines (Puhl and Ikeda, 2008). To validate these studies in vivo, a transgenic mouse encoding EGFP under the control of this putative sensory neuron specific promoter was generated and characterized in this study. Approximately 45% of dorsal root ganglion neurons of transgenic mice were EGFP-positive (mean diameter = 26.5 μm). The majority of EGFP-positive neurons bound isolectin B4, although a small percentage (∼10%) colabeled with markers of A-fiber neurons. EGFP expression correlated well with the presence of Nav1.8 transcript (95%), Nav1.8-immunoreactivity (70%), and TTX-R INa (100%), although not all Nav1.8-expressing neurons expressed EGFP. Several cranial sensory ganglia originating from neurogenic placodes, such as the nodose ganglion, failed to express EGFP, suggesting that additional regulatory elements dictate Scn10a expression in placodal-derived sensory neurons. EGFP was also detected in discrete brain regions of transgenic mice. Quantitative PCR and Nav1.8-immunoreactivity confirmed Nav1.8 expression in the amygdala, brainstem, globus pallidus, lateral and paraventricular hypothalamus, and olfactory tubercle. TTX-R INa recorded from EGFP-positive hypothalamic neurons demonstrate the usefulness of this transgenic line to study novel roles of Nav1.8 beyond sensory neurons. Overall, Scn10a-EGFP transgenic mice recapitulate the majority of the Nav1.8 expression pattern in neural crest-derived sensory neurons. PMID:25995484

  2. A 3.7 kb fragment of the mouse Scn10a gene promoter directs neural crest but not placodal lineage EGFP expression in a transgenic animal.

    PubMed

    Lu, Van B; Ikeda, Stephen R; Puhl, Henry L

    2015-05-20

    Under physiological conditions, the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.8 is expressed almost exclusively in primary sensory neurons. The mechanism restricting Nav1.8 expression is not entirely clear, but we have previously described a 3.7 kb fragment of the Scn10a promoter capable of recapitulating the tissue-specific expression of Nav1.8 in transfected neurons and cell lines (Puhl and Ikeda, 2008). To validate these studies in vivo, a transgenic mouse encoding EGFP under the control of this putative sensory neuron specific promoter was generated and characterized in this study. Approximately 45% of dorsal root ganglion neurons of transgenic mice were EGFP-positive (mean diameter = 26.5 μm). The majority of EGFP-positive neurons bound isolectin B4, although a small percentage (∼10%) colabeled with markers of A-fiber neurons. EGFP expression correlated well with the presence of Nav1.8 transcript (95%), Nav1.8-immunoreactivity (70%), and TTX-R INa (100%), although not all Nav1.8-expressing neurons expressed EGFP. Several cranial sensory ganglia originating from neurogenic placodes, such as the nodose ganglion, failed to express EGFP, suggesting that additional regulatory elements dictate Scn10a expression in placodal-derived sensory neurons. EGFP was also detected in discrete brain regions of transgenic mice. Quantitative PCR and Nav1.8-immunoreactivity confirmed Nav1.8 expression in the amygdala, brainstem, globus pallidus, lateral and paraventricular hypothalamus, and olfactory tubercle. TTX-R INa recorded from EGFP-positive hypothalamic neurons demonstrate the usefulness of this transgenic line to study novel roles of Nav1.8 beyond sensory neurons. Overall, Scn10a-EGFP transgenic mice recapitulate the majority of the Nav1.8 expression pattern in neural crest-derived sensory neurons.

  3. Noggin and BMP4 co-modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jun; Song, Min; Wang, Yanyan; Fan, Xiaotang; Xu, Haiwei; Bai, Yun

    2009-07-31

    In addition to the subventricular zone, the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few brain regions in which neurogenesis continues into adulthood. Perturbation of neurogenesis can alter hippocampal function, and previous studies have shown that neurogenesis is dysregulated in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) and its antagonist Noggin have been shown to play important roles both in embryonic development and in the adult nervous system, and may regulate hippocampal neurogenesis. Previous data indicated that increased expression of BMP4 mRNA within the dentate gyrus might contribute to decreased hippocampal cell proliferation in the APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} mouse AD model. However, it is not known whether the BMP antagonist Noggin contributes to the regulation of neurogenesis. We therefore studied the relative expression levels and localization of BMP4 and its antagonist Noggin in the dentate gyrus and whether these correlated with changes in neurogenesis in 6-12 mo old APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} transgenic mice. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label proliferative cells. We report that decreased neurogenesis in the APP/PS1 transgenic mice was accompanied by increased expression of BMP4 and decreased expression of Noggin at both the mRNA and protein levels; statistical analysis showed that the number of proliferative cells at different ages correlated positively with Noggin expression and negatively with BMP4 expression. Intraventricular administration of a chimeric Noggin/Fc protein was used to block the action of endogenous BMP4; this resulted in a significant increase in the number of BrdU-labeled cells in dentate gyrus subgranular zone and hilus in APP/PS1 mice. These results suggest that BMP4 and Noggin co-modulate neurogenesis.

  4. Role of the 5HT3 Receptor in Alcohol Drinking and Aggression Using A Transgenic Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    F(1,35) = 33.85, P < 0.0005] and N5 generations [F(1,35) = 6.33, P < 0.017]. Interactions of background and transgene presence were found for N1 [F... interaction was found for the N5 generation as well [F(2,51) = 4.55, P < 0.15]. Figure 2. Contextual conditioning is influenced by 5-HT3 receptor...2,51) = 164.56, P < 0.0005] and transgene presence [F(1,51) = 51.66, P < 0.0005] were found, as was an interaction between background and transgene

  5. Cell survival and differentiation with nanocrystalline glass-like carbon using substantia nigra dopaminergic cells derived from transgenic mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Pablo; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Guzmán de Villoria, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Regenerative medicine requires, in many cases, physical supports to facilitate appropriate cellular architecture, cell polarization and the improvement of the correct differentiation processes of embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent cells or adult cells. Because the interest in carbon nanomaterials has grown within the last decade in light of a wide variety of applications, the aim of this study was to test and evaluate the suitability and cytocompatibility of a particular nanometer-thin nanocrystalline glass-like carbon film (NGLC) composed of curved graphene flakes joined by an amorphous carbon matrix. This material is a disordered structure with high transparency and electrical conductivity. For this purpose, we used a cell line (SN4741) from substantia nigra dopaminergic cells derived from transgenic mouse embryos. Cells were cultured either in a powder of increasing concentrations of NGLC microflakes (82±37μm) in the medium or on top of nanometer-thin films bathed in the same culture medium. The metabolism activity of SN4741 cells in presence of NGLC was assessed using methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium (MTT) and apoptosis/necrosis flow cytometry assay respectively. Growth and proliferation as well as senescence were demonstrated by western blot (WB) of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), monoclonal phosphorylate Histone 3 (serine 10) (PH3) and SMP30 marker. Specific dopaminergic differentiation was confirmed by the WB analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Cell maturation and neural capability were characterized using specific markers (SYP: synaptophysin and GIRK2: G-protein-regulated inward-rectifier potassium channel 2 protein) via immunofluorescence and coexistence measurements. The results demonstrated cell positive biocompatibility with different concentrations of NGLC. The cells underwent a process of adaptation of SN4741 cells to NGLC where their metabolism decreases. This process is related to a decrease of PH3 expression and

  6. Cell survival and differentiation with nanocrystalline glass-like carbon using substantia nigra dopaminergic cells derived from transgenic mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Losada, Noela; Romero, Pablo; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Guzmán de Villoria, Roberto; Aguirre, Jose A

    2017-01-01

    Regenerative medicine requires, in many cases, physical supports to facilitate appropriate cellular architecture, cell polarization and the improvement of the correct differentiation processes of embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent cells or adult cells. Because the interest in carbon nanomaterials has grown within the last decade in light of a wide variety of applications, the aim of this study was to test and evaluate the suitability and cytocompatibility of a particular nanometer-thin nanocrystalline glass-like carbon film (NGLC) composed of curved graphene flakes joined by an amorphous carbon matrix. This material is a disordered structure with high transparency and electrical conductivity. For this purpose, we used a cell line (SN4741) from substantia nigra dopaminergic cells derived from transgenic mouse embryos. Cells were cultured either in a powder of increasing concentrations of NGLC microflakes (82±37μm) in the medium or on top of nanometer-thin films bathed in the same culture medium. The metabolism activity of SN4741 cells in presence of NGLC was assessed using methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium (MTT) and apoptosis/necrosis flow cytometry assay respectively. Growth and proliferation as well as senescence were demonstrated by western blot (WB) of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), monoclonal phosphorylate Histone 3 (serine 10) (PH3) and SMP30 marker. Specific dopaminergic differentiation was confirmed by the WB analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Cell maturation and neural capability were characterized using specific markers (SYP: synaptophysin and GIRK2: G-protein-regulated inward-rectifier potassium channel 2 protein) via immunofluorescence and coexistence measurements. The results demonstrated cell positive biocompatibility with different concentrations of NGLC. The cells underwent a process of adaptation of SN4741 cells to NGLC where their metabolism decreases. This process is related to a decrease of PH3 expression and

  7. Utility of a human FcRn transgenic mouse model in drug discovery for early assessment and prediction of human pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Avery, Lindsay B; Wang, Mengmeng; Kavosi, Mania S; Joyce, Alison; Kurz, Jeffrey C; Fan, Yao-Yun; Dowty, Martin E; Zhang, Minlei; Zhang, Yiqun; Cheng, Aili; Hua, Fei; Jones, Hannah M; Neubert, Hendrik; Polzer, Robert J; O'Hara, Denise M

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies continue to develop as an emerging drug class, with a need for preclinical tools to better predict in vivo characteristics. Transgenic mice expressing human neonatal Fc receptor (hFcRn) have potential as a preclinical pharmacokinetic (PK) model to project human PK of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Using a panel of 27 mAbs with a broad PK range, we sought to characterize and establish utility of this preclinical animal model and provide guidance for its application in drug development of mAbs. This set of mAbs was administered to both hemizygous and homozygous hFcRn transgenic mice (Tg32) at a single intravenous dose, and PK parameters were derived. Higher hFcRn protein tissue expression was confirmed by liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry in Tg32 homozygous versus hemizygous mice. Clearance (CL) was calculated using non-compartmental analysis and correlations were assessed to historical data in wild-type mouse, non-human primate (NHP), and human. Results show that mAb CL in hFcRn Tg32 homozygous mouse correlate with human (r(2) = 0.83, r = 0.91, p < 0.01) better than NHP (r(2) = 0.67, r = 0.82, p < 0.01) for this dataset. Applying simple allometric scaling using an empirically derived best-fit exponent of 0.93 enabled the prediction of human CL from the Tg32 homozygous mouse within 2-fold error for 100% of mAbs tested. Implementing the Tg32 homozygous mouse model in discovery and preclinical drug development to predict human CL may result in an overall decreased usage of monkeys for PK studies, enhancement of the early selection of lead molecules, and ultimately a decrease in the time for a drug candidate to reach the clinic.

  8. The effect of PN-1, a Traditional Chinese Prescription, on the Learning and Memory in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Ling; Liang, Liang; Liu, Yu; Yang, Ya-Jun; Huang, Lan; Zhu, Hua; Ma, Chun-Mei; Qin, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is a complete medical system that has been practiced for more than 3000 years. Prescription number 1 (PN-1) consists of several Chinese medicines and is designed according to TCM theories to treat patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. The evidence of clinical practice suggests the benefit effects of PN-1 on cognitive deficits of dementia patients. We try to prove and explain this by using contemporary methodology and transgenic animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The behavioral studies were developed to evaluate the memory of transgenic animals after intragastric administration of PN-1 for 3 months. Amyloid beta-protein (Aβ) neuropathology was quantified using immunohistochemistry and ELISA. The western blotting was used to detect the levels of plasticity associated proteins. The safety of PN-1 on mice was also assessed through multiple parameters. Results showed that PN-1 could effectively relieve learning and memory impairment of transgenic animals. Possible mechanisms showed that PN-1 could significantly reduce plaque burden and Aβ levels and boost synaptic plasticity. Our observations showed that PN-1 could improve learning and memory ability through multiple mechanisms without detectable side effects on mice. We propose that PN-1 is a promising alternative treatment for AD in the future. PMID:23476695

  9. Effects of triptolide on hippocampal microglial cells and astrocytes in the APP/PS1 double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-ming; Zhang, Yan; Tang, Liang; Chen, Yong-heng; Gao, Qian; Bao, Mei-hua; Xiang, Ju; Lei, De-liang

    2016-01-01

    The principal pathology of Alzheimer's disease includes neuronal extracellular deposition of amyloid-beta peptides and formation of senile plaques, which in turn induce neuroinflammation in the brain. Triptolide, a natural extract from the vine-like herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, has potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive efficacy. Therefore, we determined if triptolide can inhibit activation and proliferation of microglial cells and astrocytes in the APP/PS1 double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. We used 1 or 5 μg/kg/d triptolide to treat APP/PS1 double transgenic mice (aged 4–4.5 months) for 45 days. Unbiased stereology analysis found that triptolide dose-dependently reduced the total number of microglial cells, and transformed microglial cells into the resting state. Further, triptolide (5 μg/kg/d) also reduced the total number of hippocampal astrocytes. Our in vivo test results indicate that triptolide suppresses activation and proliferation of microglial cells and astrocytes in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 double transgenic mice with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27857756

  10. Co-delivery of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase prevents loss of expression of an antigenic transgene in dystrophic mouse muscles.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D; Al-Khalidi, R; Edgar, S; An, Q; Wang, Y; Young, C; Nowis, D; Gorecki, D C

    2017-02-01

    A significant problem affecting gene therapy approaches aiming at achieving long-term transgene expression is the immune response against the protein product of the therapeutic gene, which can reduce or eliminate the therapeutic effect. The problem is further exacerbated when therapy involves targeting an immunogenic tissue and/or one with a pre-existing inflammatory phenotype, such as dystrophic muscles. In this proof-of-principle study, we co-expressed a model antigen, bacterial β-galactosidase, with an immunosuppressive factor, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1), in muscles of the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This treatment prevented loss of expression of the transgene concomitant with significantly elevated expression of T-regulatory (Treg) markers in the IDO1-expressing muscles. Moreover, co-expression of IDO1 resulted in reduced serum levels of anti-β-gal antibodies. These data indicate that co-expression of genes encoding immunomodulatory enzymes controlling kynurenine pathways provide a viable strategy for preventing loss of transgenes targeted into dystrophic muscles with pre-existing inflammation.

  11. TCL1 transgenic mouse model as a tool for the study of therapeutic targets and microenvironment in human B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bresin, A; D'Abundo, L; Narducci, M G; Fiorenza, M T; Croce, C M; Negrini, M; Russo, G

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a B-cell malignancy with a mature phenotype. In spite of its relatively indolent nature, no radical cure is as yet available. CLL is not associated with either a unique cytogenetic or a molecular defect, which might have been a potential therapeutic target. Instead, several factors are involved in disease development, such as environmental signals which interact with genetic abnormalities to promote survival, proliferation and an immune surveillance escape. Among these, PI3-Kinase signal pathway alterations are nowadays considered to be clearly important. The TCL1 gene, an AKT co-activator, is the cause of a mature T-cell leukemia, as well as being highly expressed in all B-CLL. A TCL1 transgenic mouse which reproduces leukemia with a distinct immunophenotype and similar to the course of the human B-CLL was developed several years ago and is widely used by many groups. This is a review of the CLL biology arising from work of many independent investigators who have used TCL1 transgenic mouse model focusing on pathogenetic, microenviroment and therapeutic targets. PMID:26821067

  12. TCL1 transgenic mouse model as a tool for the study of therapeutic targets and microenvironment in human B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bresin, A; D'Abundo, L; Narducci, M G; Fiorenza, M T; Croce, C M; Negrini, M; Russo, G

    2016-01-28

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a B-cell malignancy with a mature phenotype. In spite of its relatively indolent nature, no radical cure is as yet available. CLL is not associated with either a unique cytogenetic or a molecular defect, which might have been a potential therapeutic target. Instead, several factors are involved in disease development, such as environmental signals which interact with genetic abnormalities to promote survival, proliferation and an immune surveillance escape. Among these, PI3-Kinase signal pathway alterations are nowadays considered to be clearly important. The TCL1 gene, an AKT co-activator, is the cause of a mature T-cell leukemia, as well as being highly expressed in all B-CLL. A TCL1 transgenic mouse which reproduces leukemia with a distinct immunophenotype and similar to the course of the human B-CLL was developed several years ago and is widely used by many groups. This is a review of the CLL biology arising from work of many independent investigators who have used TCL1 transgenic mouse model focusing on pathogenetic, microenviroment and therapeutic targets.

  13. Intranasal formulation of erythropoietin (EPO) showed potent protective activity against amyloid toxicity in the Aβ₂₅₋₃₅ non-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Tangui; Mustafa, Muhammad-Hariri; Desrumaux, Catherine; Keller, Emeline; Naert, Gaëlle; de la C García-Barceló, María; Rodríguez Cruz, Yamila; Garcia Rodríguez, Julío César

    2013-11-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) promotes neurogenesis and neuroprotection. We here compared the protection induced by two EPO formulations in a rodent model of Alzheimer's disease (AD): rHu-EPO and a low sialic form, Neuro-EPO. We used the intracerebroventricular administration of aggregated Aβ₂₅₋₃₅ peptide, a non-transgenic AD model. rHu-EPO was tested at 125-500 µg/kg intraperitoneally and Neuro-EPO at 62-250 µg/kg intranasally (IN). Behavioural procedures included spontaneous alternation, passive avoidance, water-maze and object recognition, to address spatial and non-spatial, short- and long-term memories. Biochemical markers of Aβ₂₅₋₃₅ toxicity in the mouse hippocampus were examined and cell loss in the CA1 layer was determined. rHu-EPO and Neuro-EPO led to a significant prevention of Aβ₂₅₋₃₅-induced learning deficits. Both EPO formulations prevented the induction of lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus, showing an antioxidant activity. rHu-EPO (250 µg/kg) or Neuro-EPO (125 µg/kg) prevented the Aβ₂₅₋₃₅-induced increase in Bax level, TNFα and IL-1β production and decrease in Akt activation. A significant prevention of the Aβ₂₅₋₃₅-induced cell loss in CA1 was also observed. EPO is neuroprotective in the Aβ₂₅₋₃₅ AD model, confirming its potential as an endogenous neuroprotection system that could be boosted for therapeutic efficacy. We here identified a new IN formulation of EPO showing high neuroprotective activity. Considering its efficacy, ease and safety, IN Neuro-EPO is a new promising therapeutic agent in AD.

  14. Heterogeneous transgene expression in the retinas of the TH-RFP, TH-Cre, TH-BAC-Cre and DAT-Cre mouse lines

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Helen E.; de Sevilla Müller, Luis Pérez; Hardi, Claudia N.; McMahon, Douglas G.; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic mouse lines are essential tools for understanding the connectivity, physiology and function of neuronal circuits, including those in the retina. This report compares transgene expression in the retina of a tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-red fluorescent protein (RFP) line with three catecholamine-related Cre recombinase lines [TH-bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-, TH-, and dopamine transporter (DAT)-Cre] that were crossed with a ROSA26-tdTomato reporter line. Retinas were evaluated and immunostained with commonly used antibodies including those directed to TH, GABA and glycine to characterize the RFP or tdTomato fluorescent-labeled amacrine cells, and an antibody directed to RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing to identify ganglion cells. In TH-RFP retinas, types 1 and 2 dopamine (DA) amacrine cells were identified by their characteristic cellular morphology and type 1 DA cells by their expression of TH immunoreactivity. In the TH-BAC-, TH-, and DAT-tdTomato retinas, less than 1%, ~6%, and 0%, respectively, of the fluorescent cells were the expected type 1 DA amacrine cells. Instead, in the TH-BAC-tdTomato retinas, fluorescently labeled AII amacrine cells were predominant, with some medium somal diameter ganglion cells. In TH-tdTomato retinas, fluorescence was in multiple neurochemical amacrine cell types, including four types of polyaxonal amacrine cells. In DAT-tdTomato retinas, fluorescence was in GABA immunoreactive amacrine cells, including two types of bistratified and two types of monostratified amacrine cells. Although each of the Cre lines were generated with the intent to specifically label DA cells, our findings show a cellular diversity in Cre expression in the adult retina and indicate the importance of careful characterization of transgene labeling patterns. These mouse lines with their distinctive cellular labeling patterns will be useful tools for future studies of retinal function and visual processing. PMID:26335381

  15. Chronic treatment with the GLP1 analogue liraglutide increases cell proliferation and differentiation into neurons in an AD mouse model.

    PubMed

    Parthsarathy, Vadivel; Hölscher, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenesis is a life long process, but the rate of cell proliferation and differentiation decreases with age. In Alzheimer's patients, along with age, the presence of Aβ in the brain inhibits this process by reducing stem cell proliferation and cell differentiation. GLP-1 is a growth factor that has neuroprotective properties. GLP1 receptors are present on neuronal progenitor cells, and the GLP-1 analogue liraglutide has been shown to increase cell proliferation in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model. Here we investigated acute and chronic effects of liraglutide on progenitor cell proliferation, neuroblast differentiation and their subsequent differentiation into neurons in wild type and APP/PS-1 mice at different ages. APP/PS1 and their littermate controls, aged 3, 6, 12, 15 months were injected acutely or chronically with 25 nmol/kg liraglutide. Acute treatment with liraglutide showed an increase in cell proliferation in APP/PS1 mice, but not in controls whereas chronic treatment increased cell proliferation at all ages (BrdU and Ki67 markers). Moreover, numbers of immature neurons (DCX) were increased in both acute and chronic treated animals at all ages. Most newly generated cells differentiated into mature neurons (NeuN marker). A significant increase was observed with chronically treated 6, 12, 15 month APP/PS1 and WT groups. These results demonstrate that liraglutide, which is currently on the market as a treatment for type 2 diabetes (Victoza(TM)), increases neurogenesis, which may have beneficial effects in neurodegenerative disorders like AD.

  16. Overexpression and nuclear accumulation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in a transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Senatorov, Vladimir V; Charles, Vinod; Reddy, P H; Tagle, Dan A; Chuang, De-Maw

    2003-03-01

    Huntington's disease is due to an expansion of CAG repeats in the huntingtin gene. Huntingtin interacts with several proteins including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). We performed immunohistochemical analysis of GAPDH expression in the brains of transgenic mice carrying the huntingtin gene with 89 CAG repeats. In all wild-type animals examined, GAPDH was evenly distributed among the different cell types throughout the brain. In contrast, the majority of transgenic mice showed GAPDH overexpression, with the most prominent GAPDH changes observed in the caudate putamen, globus pallidus, neocortex, and hippocampal formation. Double staining for NeuN and GFAP revealed that GAPDH overexpression occurred exclusively in neurons. Nissl staining analysis of the neocortex and caudate putamen indicated 24 and 27% of cell loss in transgenic mice, respectively. Subcellular fluorescence analysis revealed a predominant increase in GAPDH immunostaining in the nucleus. Thus, we conclude that mutation of huntingtin is associated with GAPDH overexpression and nuclear translocation in discrete populations of brain neurons.

  17. The HPV16 E7 Oncoprotein Disrupts Dendritic Cell Function and Induces the Systemic Expansion of CD11b+Gr1+ Cells in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Damian-Morales, Gabriela; Serafín-Higuera, Nicolás; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario Adán; Cortés-Malagón, Enoc M.; Bonilla-Delgado, José; Rodríguez-Uribe, Genaro; Ocadiz-Delgado, Rodolfo; Lambert, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein on dendritic cells (DCs) and CD11b+Gr1+ cells using the K14E7 transgenic mouse model. Materials and Methods. The morphology of DCs was analyzed in male mouse skin on epidermal sheets using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Flow cytometry was used to determine the percentages of DCs and CD11b+Gr1+ cells in different tissues and to evaluate the migration of DCs. Results. In the K14E7 mouse model, the morphology of Langerhans cells and the migratory activity of dendritic cells were abnormal. An increase in CD11b+Gr1+ cells was observed in the blood and skin of K14E7 mice, and molecules related to CD11b+Gr1+ chemoattraction (MCP1 and S100A9) were upregulated. Conclusions. These data suggest that the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein impairs the function and morphology of DCs and induces the systemic accumulation of CD11b+Gr1+ cells. PMID:27478837

  18. A high-fat diet containing whole walnuts (Juglans regia) reduces tumour size and growth along with plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary fat is linked to prostate cancer (PCa), the most commonly diagnosed male cancer, but the nature and strength of the relationships between total fat, n-6 and n-3 fatty acids and PCa remain incompletely understood. Transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice (N=10-12 per grou...

  19. Characterization of the MUC1.Tg/MIN Transgenic Mouse as a Model for Studying Antigen-Specific Immunotherapy of Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Akporiaye, Emmanuel T.; Bradley-Dunlop, Deborah; Gendler, Sandra J.; Mukherjee, Pinku; Madsen, Cathy S.; Hahn, Tobias; Besselsen, David G.; Dial, Sharon M.; Cui, Haiyan; Trevor, Katrina

    2007-01-01

    A bigenic MUC1.Tg/MIN mouse model was developed by crossing Apc/MIN/+ (MIN) mice with human MUC1 transgenic mice to evaluate MUC1 antigen-specific immunotherapy of intestinal adenomas. The MUC1.Tg/MIN mice developed adenomas at a rate comparable to that of MIN mice and had similar levels of serum MUC1 antigen. A MUC1-based vaccine consisting of MHC class I-restricted MUC1 peptides, a MHC class II-restricted pan-helper peptide, unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotide and GM-CSF caused flattening of adenomas and significantly reduced the number of large adenomas. Immunization was successful in generating a MUC1-directed immune response evidenced by increased MUC1 peptide-specific anti-tumor cytotoxicity and IFN-γ secretion by lymphocytes. PMID:17707958

  20. Transgenic mouse models generated by hydrodynamic transfection for genetic studies of liver cancer and preclinical testing of anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hye-Lim; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Lee, Jong Doo; Ro, Simon Weonsang

    2016-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide; however, the genetic mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis are incompletely understood. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models of HCC have been developed to elucidate the role of individual cancer-related genes in hepatocarcinogenesis. However, the expensive and time-consuming processes related to generating a GEM model discourage the development of diverse genotype models. Recently, a simple and inexpensive liver-specific transgenic approach was developed, in which a hydrodynamics-based transfection (HT) method was coupled with the Sleeping Beauty transposase system. Various HT models in which different oncogenic pathways are activated and/or tumor-suppressing pathways inactivated have been developed in recent years. The applicability of HT models in liver cancer research is expected to broaden and ultimately elucidate the cooperation between oncogenic signaling pathways and aid in designing molecular therapy to target altered pathways.

  1. Current Protocols in Mouse Biology Tissue-specific regulation of oncogene expression using Cre-inducible ROSA26 knock-in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Carofino, Brandi L.; Justice, Monica J.

    2015-01-01

    Cre-inducible mouse models are often utilized for the spatial and temporal expression of oncogenes. With the wide number of Cre recombinase lines available, inducible transgenesis represents a tractable approach to achieve discrete oncogene expression. Here, we describe a protocol for targeting Cre-inducible genes using a loxP-STOP-loxP approach to the ubiquitously expressed ROSA26 locus. Gene targeting provides several advantages over standard transgenic techniques, including a known site of integration and previously characterized pattern of expression. Historically, an inherent instability of ROSA26 targeting vectors has hampered the efficiency of developing ROSA26 knock-in lines. In this protocol, we provide individual steps for utilizing Gateway recombination for cloning, and detailed instructions for screening targeted ES cell clones. By following this protocol, one can achieve germline transmission of a ROSA26 knock-in line within several months. PMID:26069083

  2. In vivo effects of APP are not exacerbated by BACE2 co-overexpression: behavioural characterization of a double transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Azkona, Garikoitz; Levannon, Ditsa; Groner, Yoram; Dierssen, Mara

    2010-11-01

    Down syndrome, the most common genetic disorder leading to mental retardation, is caused by the presence of all or part of an extra copy of chromosome 21. At relatively early ages, Down syndrome patients develop progressive formation and extracellular aggregation of amyloid-β peptide, considered as one of the causal factors for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. This neuropathological hallmark has been attributed to the overexpression of APP but could also be contributed by other HSA21 genes. BACE2 maps to HSA21 and is homologous to BACE1, a β-secretase involved in the amyloidogenic pathway of APP proteolysis, and thus it has been hypothesized that the co-overexpression of both genes could contribute to Alzheimer's like neuropathology present in Down syndrome. The aim of the present study has been to analyse the impact of the co-overexpression of BACE2 and APP, using a double transgenic mouse model. Double transgenic mice did not present any neurological or sensorimotor alterations, nor genotype-dependent anxiety-like behaviour or age-associated cognitive dysfunction. Interestingly, TgBACE2-APP mice showed deregulation of BACE2 expression levels that were significantly increased with respect to single TgBACE2 mice. Co-overexpression of BACE2 and APP did not increase amyloid-β peptide concentration in brain. Our results suggest that the in vivo effects of APP are not exacerbated by BACE2 co-overexpression but may have some protective effects in specific behavioural and cognitive domains in transgenic mice.

  3. A selectable system for mutation detection in the Big Blue lacI transgenic mouse system: what happens to the mutational spectra over time.

    PubMed

    Knöll, A; Jacobson, D P; Nishino, H; Kretz, P L; Short, J M; Sommer, S S

    1996-06-10

    Transgenic animals offer a powerful tool to study the mechanisms of spontaneous and induced mutagenesis in vivo. Herein we used a test version of a growth selectable assay to obtain spontaneous mutants in a lacI target transgene recovered from lacI transgenic B6C3F1 mice (Big Blue). This selection system may have certain advantages relative to the more established plaque screening system for mutation detection because: (1) the plating density of the phage is up to 60 times higher in the selectable assay, reducing the number of plates needed to be screened for a comparable amount of mutants; and (2) the mutant frequency obtained from the selectable assay is higher compared to the plaque assay, possibly due to a higher sensitivity for weaker mutants. However, the longer incubation time of the growth selectable assay might allow E. coli host derived mutants to appear. To address this issue, we investigated the sequence changes in the amino-terminal domain of the lacI gene of 405 mutants derived from the liver, spleen, brain, germ cells and skin of five untreated 6-week-old mice. The mutant colonies were isolated after 60, 84, 108 and 150 h of incubation under growth selectable conditions. Tissue-specific differences in the mutational pattern obtained after 60 and 84 h disappear after a longer time of incubation, possibly due to an increasing contribution of E. coli derived mutants. The evolving selectable systems offer the potential to increase screening efficiency, but the results suggest caution in interpreting data from this system because repair by E. coli of DNA lesions or mismatched heteroduplexes either originating in mouse in vivo or produced by ex vivo manipulation as well as de novo mutations in E. coli might contribute significantly to the observed mutational spectra at each timepoint.

  4. Heat shock protein 70 chaperone overexpression ameliorates phenotypes of the spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy transgenic mouse model by reducing nuclear-localized mutant androgen receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Minamiyama, Makoto; Sang, Chen; Pagoulatos, Gerassimos; Angelidis, Charalampos; Kusakabe, Moriaki; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Doyu, Manabu; Sobue, Gen

    2003-03-15

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an inherited motor neuron disease caused by the expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract within the androgen receptor (AR). The nuclear inclusions consisting of the mutant AR protein are characteristic and combine with many components of ubiquitin-proteasome and molecular chaperone pathways, raising the possibility that misfolding and altered degradation of mutant AR may be involved in the pathogenesis. We have reported that the overexpression of heat shock protein (HSP) chaperones reduces mutant AR aggregation and cell death in a neuronal cell model (Kobayashi et al., 2000). To determine whether increasing the expression level of chaperone improves the phenotype in a mouse model, we cross-bred SBMA transgenic mice with mice overexpressing the inducible form of human HSP70. We demonstrated that high expression of HSP70 markedly ameliorated the motor function of the SBMA model mice. In double-transgenic mice, the nuclear-localized mutant AR protein, particularly that of the large complex form, was significantly reduced. Monomeric mutant AR was also reduced in amount by HSP70 overexpression, suggesting the enhanced degradation of mutant AR. These findings suggest that HSP70 overexpression ameliorates SBMA phenotypes in mice by reducing nuclear-localized mutant AR, probably caused by enhanced mutant AR degradation. Our study may provide the basis for the development of an HSP70-related therapy for SBMA and other polyQ diseases.

  5. In vivo immunomodulatory effects of Antrodia camphorata polysaccharides in a T1/T2 doubly transgenic mouse model for inhibiting infection of Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, P.-C.; Hsu, C.-Y.; Chen, C.-C.; Lee, K.-M.

    2008-03-01

    Antrodia camphorata (A. camphorata) is a fungus commonly used for treatment of viral hepatitis and cancer in Chinese folk medicine. Extract of A. camphorate is reported to possess anti-inflammatory, antihepatitis B virus and anticancer activities. In this study, we tested the in vivo effects of polysaccharides derived from A. camphorata (AC-PS) on immune function by detection of cytokine expression and evaluation of the immune phenotype in a T1/T2 doubly transgenic mouse model. The protective effect of AC-PS in mice was tested by infection with Schistosoma mansoni. The induction of large amounts of IFN-{gamma}, IL-2 and TNF-a mRNA were detected after 2 and 4 weeks of oral AC-PS administration in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. In transgenic mice, 3 to 6 weeks of oral AC-PS administration increased the proportion of CD4{sup +} T cells and B cells within the spleen. More specifically, there was an increase of Th1 CD4{sup +} T cells and Be1 cells among spleen cells as observed by detection the of Type1/Type2 marker molecules. By using a disease model of parasitic infection, we found that AC-PS treatment inhibited infection with S. mansoni in BALB/C and C57BL/6 mice. AC-PS appears to influence the immune system of mice into developing Th1 responses and have potential for preventing infection with S. mansoni.

  6. PR-Set7 is degraded in a conditional Cul4A transgenic mouse model of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yang; Xu, Zhidong; Mao, Jian -Hua; Hsieh, David; Au, Alfred; Jablons, David M.; Li, Hui; You, Lian

    2015-06-01

    Background and objective. Maintenance of genomic integrity is essential to ensure normal organismal development and to prevent diseases such as cancer. PR-Set7 (also known as Set8) is a cell cycle regulated enzyme that catalyses monomethylation of histone 4 at Lys20 (H4K20me1) to promote chromosome condensation and prevent DNA damage. Recent studies show that CRL4CDT2-mediated ubiquitylation of PR-Set7 leads to its degradation during S phase and after DNA damage. This might occur to ensure appropriate changes in chromosome structure during the cell cycle or to preserve genome integrity after DNA damage. Methods. We developed a new model of lung tumor development in mice harboring a conditionally expressed allele of Cul4A. We have therefore used a mouse model to demonstrate for the first time that Cul4A is oncogenic in vivo. With this model, staining of PR-Set7 in the preneoplastic and tumor lesions in AdenoCre-induced mouse lungs was performed. Meanwhile we identified higher protein level changes of γ-tubulin and pericentrin by IHC. Results. The level of PR-Set7 down-regulated in the preneoplastic and adenocarcinomous lesions following over-expression of Cul4A. We also identified higher levels of the proteins pericentrin and γ-tubulin in Cul4A mouse lungs induced by AdenoCre. Conclusion. PR-Set7 is a direct target of Cul4A for degradation and involved in the formation of lung tumors in the conditional Cul4A transgenic mouse model.

  7. Amyloid Plaque and Neurofibrillary Tangle Pathology in a Regulatable Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Jennifer B.; Ramsden, Martin; Forster, Colleen; Sherman, Mathew A.; McGowan, Eileen; Ashe, Karen H.

    2008-01-01

    Transgenic mouse models that independently express mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP) and tau have proven useful for the study of the neurological consequences of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque and neurofibrillary tangle pathologies. Studies using these mice have yielded essential discoveries with regard to specific aspects of neuronal dysfunction and degeneration that characterize the brain during Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other age-dependent tauopathies. Most recent transgenic studies have focused on the creation of regulatable models that allow the temporal control of transgene expression. To study a more complete model of AD pathology, we designed a new regulatable transgenic mouse that harbors both APP and tau transgenes. Here, we present a novel transgenic mouse model, rTg3696AB, which expresses human APPNLI and tauP301L driven by the CaMKII promoter system. Subsequent generation of Aβ and 4R0N tau in the brain resulted in the development of three neuropathological features of AD: Aβ plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and neurodegeneration. Importantly, transgene expression in these mice is regulatable, permitting temporal control of gene expression and the investigation of transgene suppression. PMID:18669616

  8. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Protective Effects of Quercetin Against Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Progressive Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in Cell Culture and MitoPark Transgenic Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ay, Muhammet; Luo, Jie; Langley, Monica; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G

    2017-04-04

    Quercetin, one of the major flavonoids in plants, has been recently reported to have neuroprotective effects against neurodegenerative processes. However, since the molecular signaling mechanisms governing these effects are not well clarified, we evaluated quercetin's effect on the neuroprotective signaling events in dopaminergic neuronal models and further tested its efficacy in the MitoPark transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Western blotting analysis revealed that quercetin significantly induced the activation of two major cell survival kinases, protein kinase D1 (PKD1) and Akt in MN9D dopaminergic neuronal cells. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition or siRNA knockdown of PKD1 blocked the activation of Akt, suggesting that PKD1 acts as an upstream regulator of Akt in quercetin-mediated neuroprotective signaling. Quercetin also enhanced CREB phosphorylation and expression of the CREB target gene BDNF. Results from qRT-PCR, Western blot analysis, mtDNA content analysis, and MitoTracker assay experiments revealed that quercetin augmented mitochondrial biogenesis. Quercetin also increased mitochondrial bioenergetics capacity and protected MN9D cells against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. To further evaluate the neuroprotective efficacy of quercetin against the mitochondrial dysfunction underlying PD, we used the progressive dopaminergic neurodegenerative MitoPark transgenic mouse model of PD. Oral administration of quercetin significantly reversed behavioral deficits, striatal dopamine depletion, and TH neuronal cell loss in MitoPark mice. Together, our findings demonstrate that quercetin activates PKD1-Akt cell survival signaling axis and suggest that further exploration of quercetin as a promising neuroprotective agent for treating PD may offer clinical benefits. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of the SCF signaling pathway on leukemia stem cell-mediated ATL initiation and progression in an HBZ transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kuribayashi, Wakako; Takizawa, Kazuya; Sugata, Kenji; Kuramitsu, Madoka; Momose, Haruka; Sasaki, Eita; Hiradate, Yuki; Furuhata, Keiko; Asada, Yoshihisa; Iwama, Atsushi; Matsuoka, Masao; Mizukami, Takuo; Hamaguchi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a malignant disease caused by human T-lymphotropic virus type 1. In aggressive ATL, the response to chemotherapy is extremely poor. We hypothesized that this poor response is due to the existence of chemotherapy-resistant cells, such as leukemic stem cells. Previously, we successfully identified an ATL stem cell (ATLSC) candidate as the c-kit+/CD38−/CD71− cells in an ATL mouse model using Tax transgenic mice. Here, with a new ATL mouse model using HBZ-transgenic mice, we further discovered that the functional ATLSC candidate, which commonly expresses c-kit, is drug-resistant and has the ability to initiate tumors and reconstitute lymphomatous cells. We characterized the ATLSCs as c-kit+/CD4−/CD8− cells and found that they have a similar gene expression profile as T cell progenitors. Additionally, we found that AP-1 gene family members, including Junb, Jund, and Fosb, were up-regulated in the ATLSC fraction. The results of an in vitro assay showed that ATLSCs cultured with cytokines known to promote stem cell expansion, such as stem cell factor (SCF), showed highly proliferative activity and maintained their stem cell fraction. Inhibition of c-kit–SCF signaling with the neutralizing antibody ACK2 affected ATLSC self-renewal and proliferation. Experiments in Sl/Sld mice, which have a mutation in the membrane-bound c-kit ligand, found that ATL development was completely blocked in these mice. These results clearly suggest that the c-kit–SCF signal plays a key role in ATLSC self-renewal and in ATL initiation and disease progression. PMID:27340921

  10. Toxicity of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon in a transgenic mouse model of the human paraoxonase (PON1) Q192R polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Toby B.; Walter, Betsy J.; Shih, Diana M.; Tward, Aaron D.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Timchalk, Chuck; Richter, Rebecca J.; Costa, Lucio G.; Furlong, Clement E.

    2005-08-01

    The Q192R polymorphism of paraoxonase (PON1) has been shown to affect hydrolysis of organophosphorus compounds. The Q192 and R192 alloforms exhibit equivalent catalytic efficiencies of hydrolysis for diazoxon, the oxon form of the pesticide (DZ). However, the R192 alloform has a higher catalytic efficiency of hydrolysis than does the Q192 alloform for chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO), the oxon form of the pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPS). The current study examined the relevance of these observations for in-vivo exposures to chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon. Methods Using a transgenic mouse model we examined the relevance of the Q192R polymorphism for exposure to CPS and CPO in vivo. Transgenic mice were generated that expressed either human PON1Q192 or PON1R192 at equivalent levels, in the absence of endogenous mouse PON1. Dose-response and time course experiments were performed on adult mice exposed dermally to CPS or CPO. Morbidity and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the brain and diaphragm were determined in the first 24 h following exposure. Results Mice expressing PON1Q192 were significantly more sensitive to CPO, and to a lesser extent CPS, than were mice expressing PON1R192. The time course of inhibition following exposure to 1.2 mg/kg CPO revealed maximum inhibition of brain AChE at 6?12 h, with PON1R192, PON1Q192, and PON1? /? mice exhibiting 40, 70 and 85% inhibition, respectively, relative to control mice. The effect of PON1 removal on the dose?response curve for CPS exposure was remarkably consistent with a PBPK/PD model of CPS exposure. Conclusion These results indicate that individuals expressing only the PON1Q192 allele would be more sensitive to the adverse effects of CPO or CPS exposure, especially if they are expressing a low level of plasma PON1Q192.

  11. Role of the 5HT3 Receptor in Alcohol Drinking and Aggression Using a Transgenic Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    found for each N1 [F(1,35) = 56.0, P < 0.0005], N3, [F(1,35) = 33.85, P < 0.0005] and N5 6 generations [F(1,35) = 6.33, P < 0.017]. Interactions of...presence was also found for N1 [F(1,51) = 10.9, P < 0.003] and N5 [F(1,51) = 11.32, P < 0.001]. A background x transgene presence interaction was...0.0005] were found, as was an interaction between background and transgene presence [F(2,51) = 13.93, P < 0.0005]. For the measure of percent time spent

  12. Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Esquerda-Canals, Gisela; Montoliu-Gaya, Laia; Güell-Bosch, Jofre; Villegas, Sandra

    2017-03-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that nowadays affects more than 40 million people worldwide and it is predicted to exponentially increase in the coming decades. Because no curative treatment exists, research on the pathophysiology of the disease, as well as the testing of new drugs, are mandatory. For these purposes, animal models constitute a valuable, although perfectible tool. This review takes a tour through several aspects of mouse models of AD, such as the generation of transgenic models, the relevance of the promoter driving the expression of the transgenes, and the concrete transgenes used to simulate AD pathophysiology. Then, transgenic mouse lines harboring mutated human genes at several loci such as APP, PSEN1, APOEɛ4, and ob (leptin) are reviewed. Therefore, not only the accumulation of the Aβ peptide is emulated but also cholesterol and insulin metabolism. Further novel information about the disease will allow for the development of more accurate animal models, which in turn will undoubtedly be helpful for bringing preclinical research closer to clinical trials in humans.

  13. CAG repeat lengths ≥335 attenuate the phenotype in the R6/2 Huntington’s disease transgenic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Dragatsis, I.; Goldowitz, D.; Del Mar, N.; Deng, Y.P.; Meade, C.A.; Liu, Li; Sun, Z.; Dietrich, P.; Yue, J.; Reiner, A.

    2015-01-01

    With spontaneous elongation of the CAG repeat in the R6/2 transgene to ≥335, resulting in a transgene protein too large for passive entry into nuclei via the nuclear pore, we observed an abrupt increase in lifespan to >20 weeks, compared to the 12 weeks common in R6/2 mice with 150 repeats. In the ≥335 CAG mice, large ubiquitinated aggregates of mutant protein were common in neuronal dendrites and perikaryal cytoplasm, but intranuclear aggregates were small and infrequent. Message and protein for the ≥335 CAG transgene were reduced to one-third that in 150 CAG R6/2 mice. Neurological and neurochemical abnormalities were delayed in onset and less severe than in 150 CAG R6/2 mice. These findings suggest that polyQ length and pathogenicity in Huntington’s disease may not be linearly related, and pathogenicity may be less severe with extreme repeats. Both diminished mutant protein and reduced nuclear entry may contribute to phenotype attenuation. PMID:19027857

  14. Transgenic expression and activation of PGC-1α protect dopaminergic neurons in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mudò, Giuseppa; Mäkelä, Johanna; Di Liberto, Valentina; Tselykh, Timofey V; Olivieri, Melania; Piepponen, Petteri; Eriksson, Ove; Mälkiä, Annika; Bonomo, Alessandra; Kairisalo, Minna; Aguirre, Jose A; Korhonen, Laura; Belluardo, Natale; Lindholm, Dan

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress occur in Parkinson's disease (PD), but little is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling these events. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional coactivator that is a master regulator of oxidative stress and mitochondrial metabolism. We show here that transgenic mice overexpressing PGC-1α in dopaminergic neurons are resistant against cell degeneration induced by the neurotoxin MPTP. The increase in neuronal viability was accompanied by elevated levels of mitochondrial antioxidants SOD2 and Trx2 in the substantia nigra of transgenic mice. PGC-1α overexpression also protected against MPTP-induced striatal loss of dopamine, and mitochondria from PGC-1α transgenic mice showed an increased respiratory control ratio compared with wild-type animals. To modulate PGC-1α, we employed the small molecular compound, resveratrol (RSV) that protected dopaminergic neurons against the MPTP-induced cell degeneration almost to the same extent as after PGC-1α overexpression. As studied in vitro, RSV activated PGC-1α in dopaminergic SN4741 cells via the deacetylase SIRT1, and enhanced PGC-1α gene transcription with increases in SOD2 and Trx2. Taken together, the results reveal an important function of PGC-1α in dopaminergic neurons to combat oxidative stress and increase neuronal viability. RSV and other compounds acting via SIRT1/PGC-1α may prove useful as neuroprotective agents in PD and possibly in other neurological disorders.

  15. Cardiac Fas-Dependent and Mitochondria-Dependent Apoptotic Pathways in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bor-Tsang; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Tasi, Ching-Yi; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Kao, Chung-Lan; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Shin-Da

    2016-04-01

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. Heart disease is the second leading cause of death in patients with Huntington's disease. This study was to evaluate whether cardiac Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways are activated in transgenic mice with Huntington's disease. Sixteen Huntington's disease transgenic mice (HD) and sixteen wild-type (WT) littermates were studied at 10.5 weeks of age. The cardiac characteristics, myocardial architecture, and two major apoptotic pathways in the excised left ventricle from mice were measured by histopathological analysis, Western blotting, and TUNEL assays. The whole heart weight and the left ventricular weight decreased significantly in the HD group, as compared to the WT group. Abnormal myocardial architecture, enlarged interstitial spaces, and more cardiac TUNEL-positive cells were observed in the HD group. The key components of Fas-dependent apoptosis (TNF-alpha, TNFR1, Fas ligand, Fas death receptors, FADD, activated caspase-8, and activated caspase-3) and the key components of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis (Bax, Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio, cytosolic cytochrome c, activated caspase-9, and activated caspase-3) increased significantly in the hearts of the HD group. Cardiac Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways were activated in transgenic mice with Huntington's disease, which might provide one of possible mechanisms to explain why patients with Huntington's disease will develop heart failure.

  16. Effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone on sleep and brain interstitial fluid amyloid-β in an APP transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Liao, Fan; Zhang, Tony J; Mahan, Thomas E; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by impairment of cognitive function, extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, and synaptic and neuronal loss. There is substantial evidence that the aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain plays a key role in the pathogenesis of AD and that Aβ aggregation is a concentration dependent process. Recently, it was found that Aβ levels in the brain interstitial fluid (ISF) are regulated by the sleep-wake cycle in both humans and mice; ISF Aβ is higher during wakefulness and lower during sleep. Intracerebroventricular infusion of orexin increased wakefulness and ISF Aβ levels, and chronic sleep deprivation significantly increased Aβ plaque formation in amyloid precursor protein transgenic (APP) mice. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is a well-documented sleep regulatory substance which promotes non-rapid eye movement sleep. GHRHR(lit/lit) mice that lack functional GHRH receptor have shorter sleep duration and longer wakefulness during light periods. The current study was undertaken to determine whether manipulating sleep by interfering with GHRH signaling affects brain ISF Aβ levels in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 (PS1APP) transgenic mice that overexpress mutant forms of APP and PSEN1 that cause autosomal dominant AD. We found that intraperitoneal injection of GHRH at dark onset increased sleep and decreased ISF Aβ and that delivery of a GHRH antagonist via reverse-microdialysis suppressed sleep and increased ISF Aβ. The diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ in PS1APP/GHRHR(lit/lit) mice was significantly smaller than that in PS1APP/GHRHR(lit/+) mice. However despite decreased sleep in GHRHR deficient mice, this was not associated with an increase in Aβ accumulation later in life. One of several possibilities for the finding is the fact that GHRHR deficient mice have GHRH-dependent but sleep-independent factors which protect against Aβ deposition.

  17. Generation and Characterization of Transgenic Mice Expressing Mouse Ins1 Promoter for Pancreatic β-Cell-Specific Gene Overexpression and Knockout.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yulong; Su, Yutong; Shan, Aijing; Jiang, Xiuli; Ma, Qinyun; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang; Cao, Yanan

    2015-07-01

    The technologies for pancreatic β-cell-specific gene overexpression or knockout are fundamental for investigations of functional genes in vivo. Here we generated the Ins1-Cre-Dsred and Ins1-rtTA mouse models, which expressed the Cre recombinase or reverse tetracycline regulatable transactivator (rtTA) without hGH minigene under the control of mouse Ins1 promoter. Our data showed that the Cre-mediated recombination and rtTA-mediated activation could be efficiently detected at embryonic day 13.5 when these models were crossed with the reporter mice (ROSA(mT/mG) or tetO-HIST1H2BJ/GFP). The Cre and rtTA expression was restricted to β-cells without leakage in the brain and other tissues. Moreover, both the transgenic lines showed normal glucose tolerance and insulin secretion. These results suggested that the Ins1-Cre-Dsred and Ins1-rtTA mice could be used to knock out or overexpress target genes in embryos and adults to facilitate β-cell researches.

  18. Immunogenicity of Structurally Perturbed Hen Egg Lysozyme Adsorbed to Silicone Oil Microdroplets in Wild-Type and Transgenic Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Carly F; Soucie, Kaitlin R; Song, Jane S; Strauch, Pamela; Torres, Raul M; Carpenter, John F; Ragheb, Jack A; Randolph, Theodore W

    2017-02-16

    Silicone oil microdroplets may act as adjuvants, promoting unwanted immune responses against both foreign and self-proteins. Proteins often unfold upon adsorption to silicone oil microdroplets, but it is unclear how such unfolding might affect the immune response. In this study, we found that hen egg lysozyme (HEL) readily adsorbed to silicone oil microdroplets and perturbed the conformation of HEL. We compared the immune response to injections of HEL formulated in the presence and absence of silicone oil microdroplets in both wild-type mice and transgenic littermates that express a soluble form of HEL (sHEL), thus rendering them immunologically tolerant to this nominal self-antigen. Following 2 subcutaneous injections of a HEL formulation containing silicone oil microdroplets, wild-type mice exhibited a stronger IgG1 antibody response against HEL compared to the response in wild-type mice that administered an oil-free HEL formulation. However, when HEL was subcutaneously administered to sHEL-transgenic mice, immunological tolerance to sHEL was not broken in the presence of silicone oil microdroplets. Thus, although structural perturbations in proteins adsorbed to silicone oil microdroplets may augment the immune response, in the case of endogenously expressed proteins, such structural perturbations may not be sufficient to result in a breach of immunological tolerance.

  19. Lessons from mouse chimaera experiments with a reiterated transgene marker: revised marker criteria and a review of chimaera markers.

    PubMed

    Keighren, Margaret A; Flockhart, Jean; Hodson, Benjamin A; Shen, Guan-Yi; Birtley, James R; Notarnicola-Harwood, Antonio; West, John D

    2015-08-01

    Recent reports of a new generation of ubiquitous transgenic chimaera markers prompted us to consider the criteria used to evaluate new chimaera markers and develop more objective assessment methods. To investigate this experimentally we used several series of fetal and adult chimaeras, carrying an older, multi-copy transgenic marker. We used two additional independent markers and objective, quantitative criteria for cell selection and cell mixing to investigate quantitative and spatial aspects of developmental neutrality. We also suggest how the quantitative analysis we used could be simplified for future use with other markers. As a result, we recommend a five-step procedure for investigators to evaluate new chimaera markers based partly on criteria proposed previously but with a greater emphasis on examining the developmental neutrality of prospective new markers. These five steps comprise (1) review of published information, (2) evaluation of marker detection, (3) genetic crosses to check for effects on viability and growth, (4) comparisons of chimaeras with and without the marker and (5) analysis of chimaeras with both cell populations labelled. Finally, we review a number of different chimaera markers and evaluate them using the extended set of criteria. These comparisons indicate that, although the new generation of ubiquitous fluorescent markers are the best of those currently available and fulfil most of the criteria required of a chimaera marker, further work is required to determine whether they are developmentally neutral.

  20. FLZ Alleviates the Memory Deficits in Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease via Decreasing Beta-Amyloid Production and Tau Hyperphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Kong, Xiang-Chen; Tai, Wen-Jiao; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide and mainly characterized by the aggregated β-amyloid (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau. FLZ is a novel synthetic derivative of natural squamosamide and has been proved to improve memory deficits in dementia animal models. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanisms of FLZ’s neuroprotective effect in APP/PS1 double transgenic mice and SH-SY5Y (APPwt/swe) cells. The results showed that treatment with FLZ significantly improved the memory deficits of APP/PS1 transgenic mice and decreased apoptosis of SH-SY5Y (APPwt/swe) cells. FLZ markedly attenuated Aβ accumulation and tau phosphorylation both in vivo and in vitro. Mechanistic study showed that FLZ interfered APP processing, i.e., FLZ decreased β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) phosphorylation, APP-carboxy-terminal fragment (APP-CTF) production and β-amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) expression. These results indicated that FLZ reduced Aβ production through inhibiting amyloidogenic pathway. The mechanistic study about FLZ’s inhibitory effect on tau phosphorylation revealed t the involvement of Akt/glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) pathway. FLZ treatment increased Akt activity and inhibited GSK3β activity both in vivo and in vitro. The inhibitory effect of FLZ on GSK3β activity and tau phosphorylation was suppressed by inhibiting Akt activity, indicating that Akt/GSK3β pathway might be the possible mechanism involved in the inhibitory effect of FLZ on tau hyperphosphorylation. These results suggested FLZ might be a potential anti-AD drug as it not only reduced Aβ production via inhibition amyloidogenic APP processing pathway, but also attenuated tau hyperphosphoylation mediated by Akt/GSK3β. PMID:24223757

  1. Stat3 links activated keratinocytes and immunocytes required for development of psoriasis in a novel transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sano, Shigetoshi; Chan, Keith Syson; Carbajal, Steve; Clifford, John; Peavey, Mary; Kiguchi, Kaoru; Itami, Satoshi; Nickoloff, Brian J; DiGiovanni, John

    2005-01-01

    Here we report that epidermal keratinocytes in psoriatic lesions are characterized by activated Stat3. Transgenic mice with keratinocytes expressing a constitutively active Stat3 (K5.Stat3C mice) develop a skin phenotype either spontaneously, or in response to wounding, that closely resembles psoriasis. Keratinocytes from K5.Stat3C mice show upregulation of several molecules linked to the pathogenesis of psoriasis. In addition, the development of psoriatic lesions in K5.Stat3C mice requires cooperation between Stat3 activation in keratinocytes and activated T cells. Finally, abrogation of Stat3 function by a decoy oligonucleotide inhibits the onset and reverses established psoriatic lesions in K5.Stat3C mice. Thus, targeting Stat3 may be potentially therapeutic in the treatment of psoriasis.

  2. Novel Transgenic Mouse Models Develop Retinal Changes Associated with Early Diabetic Retinopathy Similar to Those Observed in Rats with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Changmei; Zhang, Zifeng; Zhang, Peng; Makita, Jun; Kawada, Hiroyoshi; Blessing, Karen; Kador, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal capillary pericyte degeneration has been linked to aldose reductase (AR) activity in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Since the development of DR in mice and rats has been reported to differ and that this may be linked to differences in retinal sorbitol levels, we have established new murine models of early onset diabetes mellitus as tools for investigating the role of AR in DR. Transgenic diabetic mouse models were developed by crossbreeding diabetic C57BL/6-Ins2Akita/J (AK) with transgenic C57BL mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP), human aldose reductase (hAR) or both in vascular tissues containing smooth muscle actin-α (SMAA). Changes in retinal sorbitol levels were determined by HPLC while changes of growth factors and signaling were investigated by Western Blots. Retinal vascular changes were quantitatively analyzed on elastase-digestion flat mounts. Results show that sorbitol levels were higher in neural retinas of diabetic AK-SMAA-GFP-hAR compared to AK-SMAA-GFP mice. AK-SMAA-GFP-hAR mice showed induction of the retinal growth factors VEGF, IGF-1, bFGF and TGFβ, as well as signaling changes in P-Akt, P-SAPK/JNK, and P-44/42 MAPK. Increased loss of nuclei per capillary length and a significant increase in the percentage of acellular capillaries presented in 18 week old AK-SMAA-GFP-hAR mice. These changes are similar to those observed in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Retinal changes in both mice and rats were prevented by inhibition of AR. These studies confirm that the increased expression of AR in mice results in the development of retinal changes associated with the early stages of DR that are similar to those observed in rats. PMID:24370601

  3. Genotoxicity of o-aminoazotoluene (AAT) determined by the Ames test, the in vitro chromosomal aberration test, and the transgenic mouse gene mutation assay.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, K; Hirano, N; Sugiura, M; Nakagawa, S; Kimura, M

    2000-11-20

    o-Aminoazotoluene (AAT) has been evaluated as a possible human carcinogen (Class 2B) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The Ames test found it to be mutagenic in the presence of a metabolic activation system, whereas it has little clastogenicity either in vitro or in vivo in the chromosomal aberration assay. AAT is also carcinogenic in the lung or liver of mice and rats given long-term administrations. Therefore, metabolites generated in the liver etc. may have gene mutation activity, and carcinogenesis would occur. We examined the mutagenicity of AAT in a gene mutation assay, using lacZ transgenic mice (MutaMice) and a positive selection method. AAT showed positive results for organs with metabolic functions, such as liver and colon and other organs. Positive results were also seen in an Ames test in the presence of metabolic activation and negative results seen in a chromosomal aberration test. Therefore, AAT had the potential to cause gene mutation in the presence of metabolic activation systems in vitro and the same reaction was confirmed in vivo with organs with metabolic function, such as liver and colon, but little clastogenicity in vitro or in vivo. Thus, metabolites with gene mutation activity may be responsible for the carcinogenicity of AAT. The transgenic mouse mutation assay proved to be useful for concurrent assessment of in vivo mutagenicity in multiple organs and to supplement the standard in vivo genotoxicity tests, such as the micronucleus assay which is limited to bone marrow as the only target organ.

  4. Tissue-specific in vivo genetic toxicity of nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons assessed using the Muta™Mouse transgenic rodent assay

    PubMed Central

    Long, Alexandra S.; Lemieux, Christine L.; Arlt, Volker M.; White, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Test batteries to screen chemicals for mutagenic hazard include several endpoints regarded as effective for detecting genotoxic carcinogens. Traditional in vivo methods primarily examine clastogenic endpoints in haematopoietic tissues. Although this approach is effective for identifying systemically distributed clastogens, some mutagens may not induce clastogenic effects; moreover, genotoxic effects may be restricted to the site of contact and/or related tissues. An OECD test guideline for transgenic rodent (TGR) gene mutation assays was released in 2011, and the TGR assays permit assessment of mutagenicity in any tissue. This study assessed the responses of two genotoxicity endpoints following sub-chronic oral exposures of male Muta™Mouse to 9 carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Clastogenicity was assessed via induction of micronuclei in peripheral blood, and mutagenicity via induction of lacZ transgene mutations in bone marrow, glandular stomach, small intestine, liver, and lung. Additionally, the presence of bulky PAH-DNA adducts was examined. Five of the 9 PAHs elicited positive results across all endpoints in at least one tissue, and no PAHs were negative or equivocal across all endpoints. All PAHs were positive for lacZ mutations in at least one tissue (sensitivity = 100%), and for 8 PAHs, one or more initial sites of chemical contact (i.e., glandular stomach, liver, small intestine) yielded a greater response than bone marrow. Five PAHs were positive in the micronucleus assay (sensitivity = 56%). Furthermore, all PAHs produced DNA adducts in at least one tissue. The results demonstrate the utility of the TGR assay for mutagenicity assessment, especially for compounds that may not be systemically distributed. PMID:26603514

  5. Expansion of the Parkinson disease-associated SNCA-Rep1 allele upregulates human alpha-synuclein in transgenic mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Kenneth D; Ge, Dongliang; Manninger, Paul; Linnertz, Colton; Rossoshek, Anna; Orrison, Bonnie M; Bernard, David J; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Schlossmacher, Michael G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Chiba-Falek, Ornit

    2009-09-01

    Alpha-synuclein (SNCA) gene has been implicated in the development of rare forms of familial Parkinson disease (PD). Recently, it was shown that an increase in SNCA copy numbers leads to elevated levels of wild-type SNCA-mRNA and protein and is sufficient to cause early-onset, familial PD. A critical question concerning the molecular pathogenesis of PD is what contributory role, if any, is played by the SNCA gene in sporadic PD. The expansion of SNCA-Rep1, an upstream, polymorphic microsatellite of the SNCA gene, is associated with elevated risk for sporadic PD. However, whether SNCA-Rep1 is the causal variant and the underlying mechanism with which its effect is mediated by remained elusive. We report here the effects of three distinct SNCA-Rep1 variants in the brains of 72 mice transgenic for the entire human SNCA locus. Human SNCA-mRNA and protein levels were increased 1.7- and 1.25-fold, respectively, in homozygotes for the expanded, PD risk-conferring allele compared with homozygotes for the shorter, protective allele. When adjusting for the total SNCA-protein concentration (endogenous mouse and transgenic human) expressed in each brain, the expanded risk allele contributed 2.6-fold more to the SNCA steady-state than the shorter allele. Furthermore, targeted deletion of Rep1 resulted in the lowest human SNCA-mRNA and protein concentrations in murine brain. In contrast, the Rep1 effect was not observed in blood lysates from the same mice. These results demonstrate that Rep1 regulates human SNCA expression by enhancing its transcription in the adult nervous system and suggest that homozygosity for the expanded Rep1 allele may mimic locus multiplication, thereby elevating PD risk.

  6. Kava chalcone, flavokawain A, inhibits urothelial tumorigenesis in the UPII-SV40T transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongbo; Xu, Xia; Li, Xuesen; Liu, Shuman; Simoneau, Anne R; He, Feng; Wu, Xue-Ru; Zi, Xiaolin

    2013-12-01

    Flavokawain A (FKA) is the predominant chalcone identified from the kava plant. We have previously shown that FKA preferentially inhibits the growth of p53 defective bladder cancer cell lines. Here, we examined whether FKA could inhibit bladder cancer development and progression in vivo in the UPII-SV40T transgenic model that resembles human urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) with defects in the p53 and the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein pathways. Genotyped UPII-SV40T mice were fed orally with vehicle control (AIN-93M) or FKA (6 g/kg food; 0.6%) for 318 days starting at 28 days of age. More than 64% of the male mice fed with FKA-containing food survived beyond 318 days of age, whereas only about 38% of the male mice fed with vehicle control food survived to that age (P = 0.0383). The mean bladder weights of surviving male transgenic mice with the control diet versus the FKA diet were 234.6 ± 72.5 versus 96.1 ± 69.4 mg (P = 0.0002). FKA was excreted primarily through the urinary tract and concentrated in the urine up to 8.4 μmol/L, averaging about 38 times (males) and 15 times (females) more concentrated than in the plasma (P = 0.0001). FKA treatment inhibited the occurrence of high-grade papillary UCC, a precursor to invasive urothelial cancer, by 42.1%. A decreased expression of Ki67, survivin, and X-linked inhibitor of apoptotic proteins (XIAP) and increased expression of p27 and DR5, and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic cells were observed in the urothelial tissue of FKA-fed mice. These results suggest a potential of FKA in preventing the recurrence and progression of non-muscle-invasive UCC.

  7. Myeloid Engraftment in Humanized Mice: Impact of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Treatment and Transgenic Mouse Strain.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Alice M; Harmon, Cathal; Whelan, Sarah; O'Brien, Eóin C; O'Reilly, Vincent P; Crotty, Paul; Kelly, Pamela; Ryan, Michelle; Hickey, Fionnuala B; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Little, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Poor myeloid engraftment remains a barrier to experimental use of humanized mice. Focusing primarily on peripheral blood cells, we compared the engraftment profile of NOD-scid-IL2Rγc(-/-) (NSG) mice with that of NSG mice transgenic for human membrane stem cell factor (hu-mSCF mice), NSG mice transgenic for human interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and stem cell factor (SGM3 mice). hu-mSCF and SGM3 mice showed enhanced engraftment of human leukocytes compared to NSG mice, and this was reflected in the number of human neutrophils and monocytes present in these strains. Importantly, discrete classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocyte populations were identifiable in the blood of NSG and hu-mSCF mice, while the nonclassical population was absent in the blood of SGM3 mice. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) treatment increased the number of blood monocytes in NSG and hu-mSCF mice, and neutrophils in NSG and SGM3 mice; however, this effect appeared to be at least partially dependent on the stem cell donor used to engraft the mice. Furthermore, GCSF treatment resulted in a preferential expansion of nonclassical monocytes in both NSG and hu-mSCF mice. Human tubulointerstitial CD11c(+) cells were present in the kidneys of hu-mSCF mice, while monocytes and neutrophils were identified in the liver of all strains. Bone marrow-derived macrophages prepared from NSG mice were most effective at phagocytosing polystyrene beads. In conclusion, hu-mSCF mice provide the best environment for the generation of human myeloid cells, with GCSF treatment further enhancing peripheral blood human monocyte cell numbers in this strain.

  8. Functional imaging of the angiogenic switch in a transgenic mouse model of human breast cancer by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Consolino, Lorena; Longo, Dario Livio; Dastrù, Walter; Cutrin, Juan Carlos; Dettori, Daniela; Lanzardo, Stefania; Oliviero, Salvatore; Cavallo, Federica; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-15

    Tumour progression depends on several sequential events that include the microenvironment remodelling processes and the switch to the angiogenic phenotype, leading to new blood vessels recruitment. Non-invasive imaging techniques allow the monitoring of functional alterations in tumour vascularity and cellularity. The aim of this work was to detect functional changes in vascularisation and cellularity through Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) and Diffusion Weighted (DW) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) modalities during breast cancer initiation and progression of a transgenic mouse model (BALB-neuT mice). Histological examination showed that BALB-neuT mammary glands undergo a slow neoplastic progression from simple hyperplasia to invasive carcinoma, still preserving normal parts of mammary glands. DCE-MRI results highlighted marked functional changes in terms of vessel permeability (K(trans) , volume transfer constant) and vascularisation (vp , vascular volume fraction) in BALB-neuT hyperplastic mammary glands if compared to BALB/c ones. When breast tissue progressed from simple to atypical hyperplasia, a strong increase in DCE-MRI biomarkers was observed in BALB-neuT in comparison to BALB/c mice (K(trans)  = 5.3 ± 0.7E-4 and 3.1 ± 0.5E-4; vp  = 7.4 ± 0.8E-2 and 4.7 ± 0.6E-2 for BALB-neuT and BALB/c, respectively) that remained constant during the successive steps of the neoplastic transformation. Consistent with DCE-MRI observations, microvessel counting revealed a significant increase in tumour vessels. Our study showed that DCE-MRI estimates can accurately detect the angiogenic switch at early step of breast cancer carcinogenesis. These results support the view that this imaging approach is an excellent tool to characterize microvasculature changes, despite only small portions of the mammary glands developed neoplastic lesions in a transgenic mouse model.

  9. Examination of the Role of DNA Methylation Changes in Prostate Cancer using the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    and lymph node tissues. I next measured Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and Dnmt3b mRNA expression, B1 repetitive element methylation, and global (5mdC) levels...tumor progression, we were unsure of how they may change in the TRAMP Dnmt1 Hypomorphic mice (1-3). Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and Dnmt3b mRNA expression are...significantly decreased in R/+ and N/R mice compared to WT TRAMP mouse prostate tissue (Fig. 8d-f). Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b mRNA expression shows some

  10. BRAFV600E-Associated Gene Expression Profile: Early Changes in the Transcriptome, Based on a Transgenic Mouse Model of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rusinek, Dagmara; Swierniak, Michal; Chmielik, Ewa; Kowal, Monika; Kowalska, Malgorzata; Cyplinska, Renata; Czarniecka, Agnieszka; Piglowski, Wojciech; Korfanty, Joanna; Chekan, Mykola; Krajewska, Jolanta; Szpak-Ulczok, Sylwia; Jarzab, Michal; Widlak, Wieslawa; Jarzab, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanisms driving the papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) are still poorly understood. The most frequent genetic alteration in PTC is the BRAFV600E mutation–its impact may extend even beyond PTC genomic profile and influence the tumor characteristics and even clinical behavior. Methods In order to identify BRAF-dependent signature of early carcinogenesis in PTC, a transgenic mouse model with BRAFV600E-induced PTC was developed. Mice thyroid samples were used in microarray analysis and the data were referred to a human thyroid dataset. Results Most of BRAF(+) mice developed malignant lesions. Nevertheless, 16% of BRAF(+) mice displayed only benign hyperplastic lesions or apparently asymptomatic thyroids. After comparison of non-malignant BRAF(+) thyroids to BRAF(−) ones, we selected 862 significantly deregulated genes. When the mouse BRAF-dependent signature was transposed to the human HG-U133A microarray, we identified 532 genes, potentially indicating the BRAF signature (representing early changes, not related to developed malignant tumor). Comparing BRAF(+) PTCs to healthy human thyroids, PTCs without BRAF and RET alterations and RET(+), RAS(+) PTCs, 18 of these 532 genes displayed significantly deregulated expression in all subgroups. All 18 genes, among them 7 novel and previously not reported, were validated as BRAFV600E-specific in the dataset of independent PTC samples, made available by The Cancer Genome Atlas Project. Conclusion The study identified 7 BRAF-induced genes that are specific for BRAF V600E-driven PTC and not previously reported as related to BRAF mutation or thyroid carcinoma: MMD, ITPR3, AACS, LAD1, PVRL3, ALDH3B1, and RASA1. The full signature of BRAF-related 532 genes may encompass other BRAF-related important transcripts and require further study. PMID:26625260

  11. The influence of the HPG axis on stress response and depressive-like behaviour in a transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Du, X; Pang, T Y; Mo, C; Renoir, T; Wright, D J; Hannan, A J

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG tandem repeat mutation encoding a polyglutamine tract expansion in the huntingtin protein. Depression is among the most common affective symptoms in HD but the pathophysiology is unclear. We have previously discovered sexually dimorphic depressive-like behaviours in the R6/1 transgenic mouse model of HD at a pre-motor symptomatic age. Interestingly, only female R6/1 mice display this phenotype. Sexual dimorphism has not been explored in the human HD population despite the well-established knowledge that the clinical depression rate in females is almost twice that of males. Female susceptibility suggests a role of sex hormones, which have been shown to modulate stress response. There is evidence suggesting that the gonads are adversely affected in HD patients, which could alter sex hormone levels. The present study examined the role sex hormones play on stress response in the R6/1 mouse model of HD, in particular, its modulatory effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and depression-like behaviour. We found that the gonads of female R6/1 mice show atrophy at an early age. Expression levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) were decreased in the hypothalamus of female HD mice, relative to wild-type female littermates, as were serum testosterone levels. Female serum estradiol levels were not significantly changed. Gonadectomy surgery reduced HPA-axis activity in female mice but had no effect on behavioural phenotypes. Furthermore, expression of the oestrogen receptor (ER) α gene was found to be higher in the adrenal cells of female HD mice. Finally, administration of an ERβ agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN) rescued depressive-like behaviour in the female HD mice. Our findings provide new insight into the pathogenesis of sexually dimorphic neuroendocrine, physiological and behavioural endophenotypes in HD, and suggest a new avenue for therapeutic

  12. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Decrease in Body Weight of a Transgenic Knock-in Mouse Model for TDP-43*

    PubMed Central

    Stribl, Carola; Samara, Aladin; Trümbach, Dietrich; Peis, Regina; Neumann, Manuela; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Rathkolb, Birgit; Wolf, Eckhard; Beckers, Johannes; Horsch, Marion; Neff, Frauke; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Koob, Sebastian; Reichert, Andreas S.; Hans, Wolfgang; Rozman, Jan; Klingenspor, Martin; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel Karl; Becker, Lore; Klopstock, Thomas; Glasl, Lisa; Hölter, Sabine M.; Wurst, Wolfgang; Floss, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The majority of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases as well as many patients suffering from frontotemporal lobar dementia (FTLD) with ubiquitinated inclusion bodies show TDP-43 pathology, the protein encoded by the TAR DNA-binding protein (Tardbp) gene. We used recombinase-mediated cassette exchange to introduce an ALS patient cDNA into the mouse Tdp-43 locus. Expression levels of human A315T TDP-43 protein were 300% elevated in heterozygotes, whereas the endogenous mouse Tdp-43 was decreased to 20% of wild type levels as a result of disturbed feedback regulation. Heterozygous TDP-43A315TKi mutants lost 10% of their body weight and developed insoluble TDP-43 protein starting as early as 3 months after birth, a pathology that was exacerbated with age. We analyzed the splicing patterns of known Tdp-43 target genes as well as genome-wide gene expression levels in different tissues that indicated mitochondrial dysfunction. In heterozygous mutant animals, we observed a relative decrease in expression of Parkin (Park2) and the fatty acid transporter CD36 along with an increase in fatty acids, HDL cholesterol, and glucose in the blood. As seen in transmission electron microscopy, neuronal cells in motor cortices of TDP-43A315TKi animals had abnormal neuronal mitochondrial cristae formation. Motor neurons were reduced to 90%, but only slight motoric impairment was detected. The observed phenotype was interpreted as a predisease model, which might be valuable for the identification of further environmental or genetic triggers of neurodegeneration. PMID:24515116

  13. Classical natural ovine scrapie prions detected in practical volumes of blood by lamb and transgenic mouse bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, Thomas C.; Zhuang, Dongyue; Schneider, David A.; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A.; Young, Alan J.; Stanton, James B.; Davis, William C.; O'Rourke, Katherine I.

    2015-01-01

    Scrapie is diagnosed antemortem in sheep by detecting misfolded isoforms of prion protein (PrPSc) in lymphoid follicles of the rectal mucosa and nictitating membranes. Assay sensitivity is limited if (a) the biopsy is collected early during disease development, (b) an insufficient number of follicles is collected, or (c) peripheral accumulation of PrPSc is reduced or delayed. A blood test would be convenient for mass live animal scrapie testing. Currently approved techniques, however, have their own detection limits. Novel detection methods may soon offer a non-animal-based, rapid platform with detection sensitivities that rival the prion bioassay. In anticipation, we sought to determine if diseased animals could be routinely identified with a bioassay using B lymphocytes isolated from blood sample volumes commonly collected for diagnostic purposes in small ruminants. Scrapie transmission was detected in five of six recipient lambs intravenously transfused with B lymphocytes isolated from 5~10 mL of blood from a naturally scrapie-infected sheep. Additionally, scrapie transmission was observed in 18 ovinized transgenic Tg338 mice intracerebrally inoculated with B lymphocytes isolated from 5~10 mL of blood from two naturally scrapie-infected sheep. Based on our findings, we anticipate that these blood sample volumes should be of diagnostic value. PMID:25549221

  14. Enhanced antitumor activity and mechanism of biodegradable polymeric micelles-encapsulated chetomin in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinjie; Li, Guoyou; Deng, Senyi; Ouyang, Liang; Li, Ling; Liu, Lei; Luo, Na; Song, Xiangrong; He, Gu; Gong, Changyang; Wei, Yuquan

    2014-09-01

    Chetomin is a promising molecule with anti-tumor activities in the epipolythiodioxopiperazine family of fungal secondary metabolites; however, strong hydrophobicity has limited its further applications. In this work, chetomin was encapsulated into polymeric micelles to obtain an aqueous formulation, and the chetomin loaded micelles (Che-M) exhibited small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency. When the concentration of copolymer was higher than the critical gelation concentration, the Che-M could form a thermosensitive hydrogel (Che-H), which was free-flowing sol at ambient temperature and converted into a non-flowing gel at body temperature. The molecular modeling study has indicated that chetomin interacted with PCL as a core, which was embraced by PEG as a shell. Che-M showed equal cytotoxicity with free chetomin, but the apoptosis inducing effects of Che-M were more significant. Besides, Che-M could increase the GSSG level, decrease the GSH level, and increase the ROS in CT26 cells. Furthermore, stronger inhibitory effects of Che-M were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis and tumor growth in transgenic zebrafish models. In addition, Che-M was effective in inhibiting tumor growth and prolonging survival in a subcutaneous CT26 tumor model. In a colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis model, both Che-M and Che-H showed excellent therapeutic effects, but Che-H was more effective. In conclusion, Che-M and Che-H may serve as candidates for cancer therapy.

  15. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated quercetin suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinjie; Deng, Senyi; Li, Ling; Sun, Lu; Yang, Xi; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Lei; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2013-11-01

    Quercetin (Que) loaded polymeric micelles were prepared to obtain an aqueous formulation of Que with enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activities. A simple solid dispersion method was used, and the obtained Que micelles had a small particle size (about 31 nm), high drug loading, and high encapsulation efficiency. Que micelles showed improved cellular uptake, an enhanced apoptosis induction effect, and stronger inhibitory effects on proliferation, migration, and invasion of 4T1 cells than free Que. The enhanced in vitro antiangiogenesis effects of Que micelles were proved by the results that Que micelles significantly suppressed proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Subsequently, transgenic zebrafish models were employed to investigate anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effects of Que micelles, in which stronger inhibitory effects of Que micelles were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor growth, and tumor metastasis. Furthermore, in a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor model, Que micelles were more effective in suppressing tumor growth and spontaneous pulmonary metastasis, and prolonging the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Besides, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent assays suggested that tumors in the Que micelle-treated group showed more apoptosis, fewer microvessels, and fewer proliferation-positive cells. In conclusion, Que micelles, which are synthesized as an aqueous formulation of Que, possess enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity, which can serve as potential candidates for cancer therapy.

  16. Receptor-mediated oral delivery of a bioencapsulated green fluorescent protein expressed in transgenic chloroplasts into the mouse circulatory system

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Arati; Koya, Vijay; Samsam, Mohtashem; Daniell, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Oral delivery of biopharmaceutical proteins expressed in plant cells should reduce their cost of production, purification, processing, cold storage, transportation, and delivery. However, poor intestinal absorption of intact proteins is a major challenge. To overcome this limitation, we investigate here the concept of receptor-mediated oral delivery of chloroplast-expressed foreign proteins. Therefore, the transmucosal carrier cholera toxin B-subunit and green fluorescent protein (CTB-GFP), separated by a furin cleavage site, was expressed via the tobacco chloroplast genome. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses confirmed site-specific transgene integration and homoplasmy. Immunoblot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of monomeric and pentameric forms of CTB-GFP, up to 21.3% of total soluble proteins. An in vitro furin cleavage assay confirmed integrity of the engineered furin cleavage site, and a GM1 binding assay confirmed the functionality of CTB-GFP pentamers. Following oral administration of CTB-GFP expressing leaf material to mice, GFP was observed in the mice intestinal mucosa, liver, and spleen in fluorescence and immunohistochemical studies, while CTB remained in the intestinal cell. This report of receptor-mediated oral delivery of a foreign protein into the circulatory system opens the door for low-cost production and delivery of human therapeutic proteins. PMID:16603603

  17. A transgenic, mesodermal specific, Dkk1 mouse model recapitulates a spectrum of human congenital limb reduction defects.

    PubMed

    Dela Cruz, Filemon; Terry, Melissa; Matushansky, Igor

    2012-04-01

    Congenital limb reduction defects occurring in isolation of other developmental abnormalities continue to be an important medical problem in which little progress has been made. Herein we generated transgenic mice expressing Dkk1 in an appendicular mesodermal pattern. Prx1-Dkk1 mice recapitulate a full spectrum of human congenital limb reduction defects, without other developmental issues, and have normal life-spans. Importantly, a close examination of the inheritance pattern suggests that there is a significant degree of incomplete penetrance as progeny of phenotypically positive or phenotypically negative, but genotypically positive Prx1-Dkk1 mice, consistently give rise to both phenotypically positive mice and phenotypically normal-appearing mice. Thus, this heterogeneous phenotype is reproducible with each generation regardless of the phenotype of the parents. We further go on to identify that mesenchymal stem cells from Prx1-Dkk1 mice have limited proliferative ability, but normal differentiation potential, which may explain the mechanism for the limb reduction defects observed. We believe Prx1-Dkk1 mice may prove useful in the future to study the mechanisms underlying the development of congenital limb reduction defects.

  18. Delineation of the central melanocortin circuitry controlling the kidneys by a virally mediated transsynaptic tracing study in transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao Tao; Liu, Bao Wen; He, Zhi Gang; Feng, Li; Liu, San Guang; Xiang, Hong Bing

    2016-01-01

    To examine if brain neurons involved in the efferent control of the kidneys possess melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4-R) and/or tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH). Retrograde tracing pseudorabies virus (PRV)-614 was injected into the kidneys in adult male MC4R-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice. After a survival time of 3-7 days, spinal cord and brain were removed and sectioned, and processed for PRV-614 visualization. The neurochemical phenotype of PRV-614-positive neurons was identified using double or triple immunocytochemical labeling against PRV-614, MC4R, or TPH. Double and triple labeling was quantified using microscopy. The majority of PRV-614 immunopositive neurons which also expressed immunoreactivity for MC4R were located in the ipsilateral intermediolateral cell column (IML) of the thoracic spinal cord, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, and raphe pallidus (RPa), nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) and ventromedial medulla (VMM) of the brainstem. Triple-labeled MC4R/PRV-614/TPH neurons were concentrated in the PVN, RPa, NRM and VMM. These data strongly suggest that central MC4R and TPH are involved in the efferent neuronal control of the kidneys. PMID:27626491

  19. Classical natural ovine scrapie prions detected in practical volumes of blood by lamb and transgenic mouse bioassays.

    PubMed

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Truscott, Thomas C; Zhuang, Dongyue; Schneider, David A; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A; Young, Alan J; Stanton, James B; Davis, William C; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2015-01-01

    Scrapie is diagnosed antemortem in sheep by detecting misfolded isoforms of prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in lymphoid follicles of the rectal mucosa and nictitating membranes. Assay sensitivity is limited if (a) the biopsy is collected early during disease development, (b) an insufficient number of follicles is collected, or (c) peripheral accumulation of PrP(Sc) is reduced or delayed. A blood test would be convenient for mass live animal scrapie testing. Currently approved techniques, however, have their own detection limits. Novel detection methods may soon offer a non-animal-based, rapid platform with detection sensitivities that rival the prion bioassay. In anticipation, we sought to determine if diseased animals could be routinely identified with a bioassay using B lymphocytes isolated from blood sample volumes commonly collected for diagnostic purposes in small ruminants. Scrapie transmission was detected in five of six recipient lambs intravenously transfused with B lymphocytes isolated from 5~10 mL of blood from a naturally scrapie-infected sheep. Additionally, scrapie transmission was observed in 18 ovinized transgenic Tg338 mice intracerebrally inoculated with B lymphocytes isolated from 5~10 mL of blood from two naturally scrapie-infected sheep. Based on our findings, we anticipate that these blood sample volumes should be of diagnostic value.

  20. Prazosin, an α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, prevents memory deterioration in the APP23 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Katsouri, Loukia; Vizcaychipi, Marcela P; McArthur, Simon; Harrison, Ian; Suárez-Calvet, Marc; Lleo, Alberto; Lloyd, Dafydd G; Ma, Daqing; Sastre, Magdalena

    2013-04-01

    Noradrenergic deficits have been described in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex of Alzheimer's disease brains, which are secondary to locus coeruleus degeneration. Locus coeruleus is the brain stem nucleus responsible for synthesis of noradrenaline and from where all noradrenergic neurons project. In addition, it has been suggested that noradrenaline might play a role in modulating inflammatory responses in Alzheimer's disease. In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of various agonists and antagonists for adrenergic receptors on amyloid precursor protein processing. Among them, we found that prazosin, an α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, was able to reduce the generation of amyloid β in N2a cells. Treatment of transgenic APP23 mice with prazosin prevented memory deficits over time. Although prazosin did not influence amyloid plaque load, it induced astrocytic proliferation and increased the release of apolipoprotein E and anti-inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that chronic treatment with prazosin leads to an anti-inflammatory response with potential beneficial effects on cognitive performance.

  1. Hyperpolarization-activated current Ih in mouse trigeminal sensory neurons in a transgenic mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1.

    PubMed

    Eroli, Francesca; Vilotti, Sandra; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Nistri, Andrea

    2017-03-29

    Transgenic knock-in (KI) mice that express CaV2.1 channels containing an R192Q gain-of-function mutation in the α1A subunit known to cause familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 in patients, exhibit key disease characteristics and provide a useful tool to investigate pathophysiological mechanisms of pain transduction. Previously, KI trigeminal sensory neurons were shown to exhibit constitutive hyperexcitability due to up-regulation of ATP-gated P2X3 receptors that trigger spike activity at a more negative threshold. This implies that intrinsic neuronal conductances may shape action potential generation in response to ATP, which could act as a mediator of migraine headache. Here we investigated whether the hyperpolarization-activated conductance Ih, mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (HCN) channels, contributes to sub-threshold behavior and firing in wild-type (WT) and KI trigeminal ganglia (TG) neurons. Whereas most WT and KI trigeminal neurons expressed Ih current, blocked by the specific inhibitor ZD7288, it was smaller in KI neurons despite similar activation and deactivation kinetics. HCN1 and HCN2 were the most abundantly expressed subunits in TG, both in situ and in culture. In KI TG neurons, HCN2 subunits were predominantly present in the cytoplasm, not at the plasma membrane, likely accounting for the smaller Ih of such cells. ZD7288 hyperpolarized the membrane potential, thereby raising the firing threshold, and prolonging the spike trajectory to generate fewer spikes due to P2X3 receptor activation. The low amplitude of Ih in KI TG neurons suggests that down-regulation of Ih current in sub-threshold behavior acts as a compensatory mechanism to limit sensory hyperexcitability, manifested under certain stressful stimuli.

  2. Flavokawain A induces deNEDDylation and Skp2 degradation leading to inhibition of tumorigenesis and cancer progression in the TRAMP transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuesen; Yokoyama, Noriko N.; Zhang, Saiyang; Ding, Lina; Liu, Hong-min; Lilly, Michael B.; Mercola, Dan; Zi, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    S phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) has been shown to be required for spontaneous tumor development that occurs in the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) deficient mice. Here we have demonstrated that flavokawain A (FKA), a novel chalcone from the kava plant, selectively inhibited the growth of pRb deficient cell lines and resulted in a proteasome-dependent and ubiquitination-mediated Skp2 degradation. Degradation of Skp2 by FKA was found to be involved in a functional Cullin1, but independent of Cdh1 expression. Further studies have demonstrated that FKA docked into the ATP binding pocket of the precursor cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8)-activating enzyme (NAE) complex, inhibited NEDD8 conjugations to both Cullin1 and Ubc12 in PC3 cells and Ubc12 NEDDylation in an in vitro assay. Finally, dietary feeding of the autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice with FKA inhibited the formation of high-grade prostatic intra-epithelial neoplasia lesions (HG-PIN) and prostate adenocarcinomas, reduced the tumor burden and completely abolished distant organ metastasis. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed that dietary FKA feeding resulted in marked anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects via down-regulation of Skp2 and NEDD8 and up-regulation of p27/Kip1 in the prostate of TRAMP mice. Our findings therefore provide evidence that FKA is a promising NEDDylation inhibitor for targeting Skp2 degradation in prostate cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:26497688

  3. Flavokawain A induces deNEDDylation and Skp2 degradation leading to inhibition of tumorigenesis and cancer progression in the TRAMP transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuesen; Yokoyama, Noriko N; Zhang, Saiyang; Ding, Lina; Liu, Hong-min; Lilly, Michael B; Mercola, Dan; Zi, Xiaolin

    2015-12-08

    S phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) has been shown to be required for spontaneous tumor development that occurs in the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) deficient mice. Here we have demonstrated that flavokawain A (FKA), a novel chalcone from the kava plant, selectively inhibited the growth of pRb deficient cell lines and resulted in a proteasome-dependent and ubiquitination-mediated Skp2 degradation. Degradation of Skp2 by FKA was found to be involved in a functional Cullin1, but independent of Cdh1 expression. Further studies have demonstrated that FKA docked into the ATP binding pocket of the precursor cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8)-activating enzyme (NAE) complex, inhibited NEDD8 conjugations to both Cullin1 and Ubc12 in PC3 cells and Ubc12 NEDDylation in an in vitro assay. Finally, dietary feeding of the autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice with FKA inhibited the formation of high-grade prostatic intra-epithelial neoplasia lesions (HG-PIN) and prostate adenocarcinomas, reduced the tumor burden and completely abolished distant organ metastasis. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed that dietary FKA feeding resulted in marked anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects via down-regulation of Skp2 and NEDD8 and up-regulation of p27/Kip1 in the prostate of TRAMP mice. Our findings therefore provide evidence that FKA is a promising NEDDylation inhibitor for targeting Skp2 degradation in prostate cancer prevention and treatment.

  4. Decreased expression of Toll-like receptor 4 and 5 during progression of prostate transformation in transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Ju-Hee; Park, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Chang, Seo-Na; Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Park, Jae-Hak; Kim, Dong-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been considered an important risk factor for development of prostate cancer. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize microbial moieties or endogenous molecules and play an important role in the triggering and promotion of inflammation. In this study, we examined whether expression of TLR4 and TLR5 was associated with progression of prostate transformation in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. The expression of TLR4 and TLR5 was evaluated by immunohistochemisty in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded prostate tissue from wild-type (WT) and TRAMP mice. Normal prostate tissue from WT mice showed strong expression of TLR4 and TLR5. However, TLR4 expression in the prostate tissue from TRAMP mice gradually decreased as pathologic grade became more aggressive. TLR5 expression in the prostate tissue from TRAMP mice also decreased in low-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), high-grade PIN and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Overall, our results suggest that decreased expression of TLR4 and TLR5 may contribute to prostate tumorigenesis.

  5. Mapping of neurotrophins and their receptors in the adult mouse brain and their role in the pathogenesis of a transgenic murine model of bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Marco-Salazar, P; Márquez, M; Fondevila, D; Rabanal, R M; Torres, J M; Pumarola, M; Vidal, E

    2014-05-01

    Neurotrophins are a family of growth factors that act on neuronal cells. The neurotrophins include nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin (NT)-3, -4 and -5. The action of neurotrophins depends on two transmembrane-receptor signalling systems: (1) the tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) family of tyrosine kinase receptors (Trk A, Trk B and Trk C) and (2) the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)). The interaction between neurotrophic factors and their receptors may be involved in the mechanisms that regulate the differential susceptibility of neuronal populations in neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of neurotrophins in the pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) using a transgenic mouse overexpressing bovine prnp (BoTg 110). Histochemistry for Lycopersicum esculentum agglutinin, haematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry for the abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrP(d)), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), NGF, BDNF, NT-3 and the receptors Trk A, Trk B, Trk C and p75(NTR) was performed. The lesions and the immunolabelling patterns were assessed semiquantitatively in different areas of the brain. No significant differences in the immunolabelling of neurotrophins and their receptors were observed between BSE-inoculated and control animals, except for p75(NTR), which showed increased expression correlating with the distribution of lesions, PrP(d) deposition and gliosis in the BSE-inoculated mice.

  6. Altered serotonin receptor expression is associated with depression-related behavior in the R6/1 transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Pang, Terence Y C; Du, Xin; Zajac, Michelle S; Howard, Monique L; Hannan, Anthony J

    2009-02-15

    Dysregulation of the serotonergic signaling system has been implicated in the pathology of mood disorders including depression, and various rodent models of disrupted serotonergic signaling display depression-related behavioral phenotypes. Depression is a common neuropsychiatric feature of preclinical Huntington's disease (HD) but the underlying changes in the HD brain contributing to the development of depression are unknown. Using the R6/1 transgenic mouse model of HD, we show that pre-motor symptomatic HD mice display sex-specific depressive-related behaviors on the forced-swim (FST), tail-suspension (TST) and novelty-suppressed feeding (NSFT) tests while having muted responses to acute anti-depressant administration. The baseline behaviors of HD mice were similar to the behavioral phenotypes of serotonin (5-HT) receptor and transporter null mutants, and gene expression of specific serotonin receptors were subsequently found to be reduced in the hippocampus and cortex of HD mice. Female HD mice had an additional deficit in cortical expression of serotonin transporter (SerT). Environmental enrichment normalized the FST behavioral response of female HD mice corresponding with increased gene expression of specific 5-HT receptors in the hippocampus and cortex. Our findings implicate altered serotonergic signaling as the basis for the development of depression during the preclinical stages of HD.

  7. State of the field: An informatics-based systematic review of the SOD1-G93A amyotrophic lateral sclerosis transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Renaid B; Irvin, Cameron W; Tilva, Keval R; Mitchell, Cassie S

    2015-01-01

    Numerous sub-cellular through system-level disturbances have been identified in over 1300 articles examining the superoxide dismutase-1 guanine 93 to alanine (SOD1-G93A) transgenic mouse amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathophysiology. Manual assessment of such a broad literature base is daunting. We performed a comprehensive informatics-based systematic review or 'field analysis' to agnostically compute and map the current state of the field. Text mining of recaptured articles was used to quantify published data topic breadth and frequency. We constructed a nine-category pathophysiological function-based ontology to systematically organize and quantify the field's primary data. Results demonstrated that the distribution of primary research belonging to each category is: systemic measures an motor function, 59%; inflammation, 46%; cellular energetics, 37%; proteomics, 31%; neural excitability, 22%; apoptosis, 20%; oxidative stress, 18%; aberrant cellular chemistry, 14%; axonal transport, 10%. We constructed a SOD1-G93A field map that visually illustrates and categorizes the 85% most frequently assessed sub-topics. Finally, we present the literature-cited significance of frequently published terms and uncover thinly investigated areas. In conclusion, most articles individually examine at least two categories, which is indicative of the numerous underlying pathophysiological interrelationships. An essential future path is examination of cross-category pathophysiological interrelationships and their co-correspondence to homeostatic regulation and disease progression.

  8. Distribution of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in the Alzheimer's disease transgenic mouse after a single intravenous injection.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Na Kyung; Lee, Jeongmin; Hwang, Jung Won; Choi, Soo Jin; Hwang, Hyeri; Hyung, Brian; Chang, Jong Wook; Na, Duk L

    2016-03-02

    The aim of this study was to track the migration of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) administered through a single intravenous injection and to observe the consequential therapeutic effects in a transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Ten-month-old APP/PS1 mice received a total injection of 1×10 cells through the lateral tail vein and were killed 1, 4, and 7 days after administration. On the basis of immunohistochemical analysis, hUCB-MSCs were not detected in the brain at any of the time points. Instead, most of the injected mesenchymal stem cells were found to be distributed in the lung, heart, and liver. In terms of the molecular effects, statistically significant differences in the amyloid β protein, neprilysin, and SOX2 levels were not observed among the groups. On the basis of the results from this study, we suggest that single intravenously administered hUCB-MSCs are not delivered to the brain and also do not have a significant influence on Alzheimer's disease pathology.

  9. A transgenic mouse model demonstrates a dominant negative effect of a point mutation in the RPS19 gene associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Emily E; Dacosta, Lydie; Mohandas, Narla; Elliott, Gene; Bodine, David M

    2010-10-14

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited erythroblastopenia associated with mutations in at least 8 different ribosomal protein genes. Mutations in the gene encoding ribosomal protein S19 (RPS19) have been identified in approximately 25% of DBA families. Most of these mutations disrupt either the translation or stability of the RPS19 protein and are predicted to cause DBA by haploinsufficiency. However, approximately 30% of RPS19 mutations are missense mutations that do not alter the stability of the RPS19 protein and are hypothesized to act by a dominant negative mechanism. To formally test this hypothesis, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing an RPS19 mutation in which an arginine residue is replaced with a tryptophan residue at codon 62 (RPS19R62W). Constitutive expression of RPS19R62W in developing mice was lethal. Conditional expression of RPS19R62W resulted in growth retardation, a mild anemia with reduced numbers of erythroid progenitors, and significant inhibition of terminal erythroid maturation, similar to DBA. RNA profiling demonstrated more than 700 dysregulated genes belonging to the same pathways that are disrupted in RNA profiles of DBA patient cells. We conclude that RPS19R62W is a dominant negative DBA mutation.

  10. TGF alpha and v-fos cooperation in transgenic mouse epidermis induces aberrant keratinocyte differentiation and stable, autonomous papillomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, X J; Greenhalgh, D A; Lu, X R; Bickenbach, J R; Roop, D R

    1995-01-19

    To assess the synergistic effect of growth and transcription factor deregulation on carcinogenesis in vivo, mating experiments were performed between transgenic mice expressing human TGF alpha or v-fos exclusively in the epidermis by means of a human keratin K1-based targeting vector (HK1.fos, HK1.TGF alpha and HK1.fos/alpha). While HK1.TGF alpha mice exhibited mild epidermal hyperplasia resulting in a wrinkled appearance, this hyperplasia was significantly increased in HK1.fos/alpha mice which also exhibited a novel opalescent and peeling skin phenotype. HK1.fos/alpha keratinocyte differentiation was considerably deregulated with cornified cells appearing in the granular layer, granular cells in the spinous layer and a sixfold increase in BrdU labeling over normal. In addition, hyperplastic HK1.fos/alpha epidermis exhibited aberrant loricrin, filaggrin and novel K13 expression associated with v-fos expression. Unlike adult HK1.TGF alpha controls, hyperplasia persisted in HK1.fos/alpha adults which also rapidly developed autonomous squamous cell papillomas. These results demonstrate that v-fos and TGF alpha over-expression can cooperate to reprogram keratinocyte differentiation and elicit the early stages of neoplasia. Moreover, TGF alpha over-expression appeared to play an early, initiating role in HK1.fos/alpha papilloma etiology, and a promotion role in the accelerated appearance of v-fos wound-associated preneoplastic phenotypes. However, the stable persistence of HK1.fos/alpha papillomas for up to 12 months, suggests that additional events are required for malignant conversion.

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection does not promote hepatocellular cancer in a transgenic mouse model of hepatitis C virus pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    García, Alexis; Feng, Yan; Parry, Nicola MA; McCabe, Amanda; Mobley, Melissa W; Lertpiriyapong, Kvin; Whary, Mark T; Fox, James G

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect millions of people and can induce cancer. We investigated if H. pylori infection promoted HCV-associated liver cancer. Helicobacter-free C3B6F1 wild-type (WT) and C3B6F1-Tg(Alb1-HCVN)35Sml (HT) male and female mice were orally inoculated with H. pylori SS1 or sterile media. Mice were euthanized at ~12 mo postinoculation and samples were collected for analyses. There were no significant differences in hepatocellular tumor promotion between WT and HT mice; however, HT female mice developed significantly larger livers with more hepatic steatosis than WT female mice. H. pylori did not colonize the liver nor promote hepatocellular tumors in WT or HT mice. In the stomach, H. pylori induced more corpus lesions in WT and HT female mice than in WT and HT male mice, respectively. The increased corpus pathology in WT and HT female mice was associated with decreased gastric H. pylori colonization, increased gastric and hepatic interferon gamma expression, and increased serum Th1 immune responses against H. pylori. HT male mice appeared to be protected from H. pylori-induced corpus lesions. Furthermore, during gastric H. pylori infection, HT male mice were protected from gastric antral lesions and hepatic steatosis relative to WT male mice and these effects were associated with increased serum TNF-α. Our findings indicate that H. pylori is a gastric pathogen that does not promote hepatocellular cancer and suggest that the HCV transgene is associated with amelioration of specific liver and gastric lesions observed during concurrent H. pylori infection in mice. PMID:23929035

  12. Production of mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by gateway technology and transgenic rice cell culture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Kuo; Huang, Li-Fen; Ho, Shin-Lon; Liao, Chun-Yu; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Lai, Ying-Hui; Yu, Su-May; Lu, Chung-An

    2012-05-01

    To establish a production platform for recombinant proteins in rice suspension cells, we first constructed a Gateway-compatible binary T-DNA destination vector. It provided a reliable and effective method for the rapid directional cloning of target genes into plant cells through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. We used the approach to produce mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) in a rice suspension cell system. The promoter for the αAmy3 amylase gene, which is induced strongly by sugar depletion, drove the expression of mGM-CSF. The resulting recombinant protein was fused with the αAmy3 signal peptide and was secreted into the culture medium. The production of rice-derived mGM-CSF (rmGM-CSF) was scaled up successfully in a 2-L bioreactor, in which the highest yield of rmGM-CSF was 24.6 mg/L. Due to post-translational glycosylation, the molecular weight of rmGM-CSF was larger than that of recombinant mGM-CSF produced in Escherichia coli. The rmGM-CSF was bioactive and could stimulate the proliferation of a murine myeloblastic leukemia cell line, NSF-60.

  13. Chemopreventive and therapeutic efficacy of orally active tyrosine kinase inhibitors in a transgenic mouse model of gallbladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kiguchi, Kaoru; Ruffino, Lynnsie; Kawamoto, Toru; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Digiovanni, John

    2005-08-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is the second most common primary hepatobiliary cancer after hepatocellular cancer. At the time of diagnosis, most BTC are at an advanced stage and are unresectable. There is presently no effective curative treatment of the advanced disease nor is there any effective clinical therapy that will prevent the development of BTC. All of these factors render gallbladder cancer nearly incurable with a poor survival rate. The aim of our study was to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of gallbladder carcinoma as the advancement of more effective treatment options would significantly improve prognosis. In the present study, we examined the effect of gefitinib, a selective epidermal growth factor receptor/tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR/TKI), on the development of gallbladder carcinoma in BK5.erbB2 mice. In addition, we examined the effect of another quinazoline derivative, GW2974, which is able to block the activation of both the EGFR and erbB2, in this model. Animals were treated with either 400 ppm gefitinib or 200 ppm GW2974 as a supplement in the diet using either a chemopreventive or therapeutic protocol. The results show that both compounds were potent chemopreventive and therapeutic agents in this mouse model of human BTC. The results also suggest that activation of the EGFR plays an important role in development of BTC in this model and that targeting both the EGFR and erbB2 may be an effective strategy for treatment of this disease.

  14. Increased metal content in the TDP-43A315T transgenic mouse model of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Theresa N. T.; Lim, Nastasia K. H.; Grubman, Alexandra; Li, Qiao-Xin; Volitakis, Irene; White, Anthony R.; Crouch, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Disrupted metal homeostasis is a consistent feature of neurodegenerative disease in humans and is recapitulated in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and neuronal ceriod lipofuscinosis. While the definitive pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disease in humans remains to be fully elucidated, disease-like symptoms in the mouse models are all driven by the presence or over-expression of a putative pathogenic protein, indicating an in vivo relationship between expression of these proteins, disrupted metal homeostasis and the symptoms of neuronal failure. Recently it was established that mutant TAR DNA binding protein-43 (TDP-43) is associated with the development of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and ALS. Subsequent development of transgenic mice that express human TDP-43 carrying the disease-causing A315T mutation has provided new opportunity to study the underlying mechanisms of TDP-43-related neurodegenerative disease. We assessed the cognitive and locomotive phenotype of TDP-43 A315T mice and their wild-type littermates and also assessed bulk metal content of brain and spinal cord tissues. Metal levels in the brain were not affected by the expression of mutant TDP-43, but zinc, copper, and manganese levels were all increased in the spinal cords of TDP-43 A315T mice when compared to wild-type littermates. Performance of the TDP-43 A315T mice in the Y-maze test for cognitive function was not significantly different to wild-type mice. By contrast, performance of the TDP-43 A315T in the rotarod test for locomotive function was consistently worse than wild-type mice. These preliminary in vivo data are the first to show that expression of a disease-causing form of TDP-43 is sufficient to disrupt metal ion homeostasis in the central nervous system. Disrupted metal ion homeostasis in the spinal cord but not the brain may explain why the TDP-43 A315T mice show symptoms of locomotive decline and not cognitive

  15. Evaluation of the in vivo genotoxic potential of three carcinogenic aromatic amines using the Big Blue{trademark} transgenic mouse mutation assay

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, W.; Ahiabor, R.; Blanco, B.

    1996-12-31

    Three genotoxic mouse carcinogens, 4-chloro-o-phenylenediamine (4-C-o-PDA), 2-nitro-p-phenylenediamine (2-N-p-PDA), and 2,4-diaminotoluene (2,4-DAT), were tested in the Big Blue{trademark} transgenic mouse mutation assay. Each experiment consisted of a vehicle control group with ten Big Blue{trademark} C57BL/6 mice, five of either sex, and an equally sized group treated with a high dose of the test chemical. In addition, four animals were treated with the vehicle and six animals with the test compound for the measurement of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation to determine cellular proliferation. The doses used in the main study were 200 mg/kg/day for 4-C-o-PDA, 150 mg/kg/day for 2-N-p-PDA, and 80 mg/kg/day for 2,4-DAT. There was no increase in BrdU incorporation immediately after treatment with 4-C-o-PDA or with 2,4-DAT. However, 10 days after the last treatment with 2,4-DAT, a strong mitogenic effect was found with both techniques. 4-C-o-PDA, a liver carcinogen in both genders of mice, induced a small, statistically significant increase of the mutant frequencies in females, none in males. 2-N-p-PDA was found positive in males and was clearly negative in females. 2,4-DAT, a liver carcinogen in female mice, was positive in females and negative in males when the animals were killed 10 days after the last treatment. After an expression time of 28 days, 2,4-DAT induced a statistically significant increase in both sexes. The effect in females was marginally stronger than after 10 days` expression time and almost identical to the effect observed in makes under these test conditions. In conclusion, the experiments showed that the Big Blue{trademark} assay detects the genotoxicity of the three carcinogenic monocyclic aromatic amines tested. However, it seems that the sex specificity of the carcinogenic effects of these compounds is not reflected by the mutagenicity data in Big Blue{trademark} mice. 39 refs., 6 tabs.

  16. The S100A4 Oncoprotein Promotes Prostate Tumorigenesis in a Transgenic Mouse Model: Regulating NFκB through the RAGE Receptor.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Hifzur R; Adhami, Vaqar M; Parray, Aijaz; Johnson, Jeremy J; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A; Shekhani, Mohammad T; Murtaza, Imtiyaz; Ambartsumian, Noona; Konety, Badrinath R; Mukhtar, Hasan; Saleem, Mohammad

    2013-05-01

    S100A4, a calcium-binding protein, is known for its role in the metastatic spread of tumor cells, a late event of cancer disease. This is the first report showing that S100A4 is not merely a metastatic protein but also an oncoprotein that plays a critical role in the development of tumors. We earlier showed that S100A4 expression progressively increases in prostatic tissues with the advancement of prostate cancer (CaP) in TRAMP, an autochthonous mouse model. To study the functional significance of S100A4 in CaP, we generated a heterozygously deleted S100A4 (TRAMP/S100A4(+/-)) genotype by crossing TRAMP with S100A4(-/-) mice. TRAMP/S100A4(+/-) did not show a lethal phenotype, and transgenes were functional. As compared to age-matched TRAMP littermates, TRAMP/S100A4(+/-) mice exhibited 1) an increased tumor latency period (P < 0.001), 2) a 0% incidence of metastasis, and 3) reduced prostatic weights (P < 0.001). We generated S100A4-positive clones from S100A4-negative CaP cells and tested their potential. S100A4-positive tumors grew at a faster rate than S100A4-negative tumors in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. The S100A4 protein exhibited growth factor-like properties in multimode (intracellular and extracellular) forms. We observed that 1) the growth-promoting effect of S100A4 is due to its activation of NFκB, 2) S100A4-deficient tumors exhibit reduced NFκB activity, 3) S100A4 regulates NFκB through the RAGE receptor, and 4) S100A4 and RAGE co-localize in prostatic tissues of mice. Keeping in view its growth-promoting role, we suggest that S100A4 qualifies as an excellent candidate to be exploited for therapeutic agents to treat CaP in humans.

  17. Dose-dependent benefits of quercetin on tumorigenesis in the C3(1)/SV40Tag transgenic mouse model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, JL; Davis, JM; McClellan, JL; Enos, RT; Carson, JA; Fayad, R; Nagarkatti, M; Nagarkatti, PS; Altomare, D; Creek, KE; Murphy, EA

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer related death in women. Quercetin is a flavonol shown to have anti-carcinogenic actions. However, few studies have investigated the dose-dependent effects of quercetin on tumorigenesis and none have used the C3(1)/SV40 Tag breast cancer mouse model. At 4 weeks of age female C3(1)/SV40 Tag mice were randomized to one of four dietary treatments (n = 15–16/group): control (no quercetin), low-dose quercetin (0.02% diet), moderate-dose quercetin (0.2% diet), or high-dose quercetin (2% diet). Tumor number and volume was assessed twice a week and at sacrifice (20 wks). Results showed an inverted ‘U’ dose-dependent effect of dietary quercetin on tumor number and volume; at sacrifice the moderate dose was most efficacious and reduced tumor number 20% and tumor volume 78% compared to control mice (C3-Con: 9.0 ± 0.9; C3-0.2%: 7.3 ± 0.9) and (C3-Con: 2061.8 ± 977.0 mm3; and C3-0.2%: 462.9 ± 75.9 mm3). Tumor volume at sacrifice was also reduced by the moderate dose compared to the high and low doses (C3-2%: 1163.2 ± 305.9 mm3; C3-0.02%: 1401.5 ± 555.6 mm3), as was tumor number (C3-2%: 10.7 ± 1.3 mm3; C3-0.02%: 8.1 ± 1.1 mm3). Gene expression microarray analysis performed on mammary glands from C3-Con and C3-0.2% mice determined that 31 genes were down-regulated and 9 genes were up-regulated more than 2-fold (P < 0.05) by quercetin treatment. We report the novel finding that there is a distinct dose-dependent effect of quercetin on tumor number and volume in a transgenic mouse model of human breast cancer, which is associated with a specific gene expression signature related to quercetin treatment. PMID:25482952

  18. EGFR-targeted therapy results in dramatic early lung tumor regression accompanied by imaging response and immune infiltration in EGFR mutant transgenic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Abhilash; Lee, Min-Jung; Niu, Gang; Medina-Echeverz, José; Tomita, Yusuke; Lizak, Martin J.; Cultraro, Constance M.; Simpson, Robert Mark; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Trepel, Jane B.; Guha, Udayan

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma patients harboring kinase domain mutations in Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have significant clinical benefit from EGFR-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Although a majority of patients experience clinical symptomatic benefit immediately, an objective response can only be demonstrated after 6-8 weeks of treatment. Evaluation of patient response by imaging shows that 30-40% of patients do not respond due to intrinsic resistance to these TKIs. We investigated immediate-early effects of EGFR-TKI treatment in mutant EGFR-driven transgenic mouse models by FDG-PET and MRI and correlated the effects on the tumor and the tumor microenvironment. Within 24 hours of erlotinib treatment we saw approximately 65% tumor regression in mice with TKI-sensitive EGFRL858R lung adenocarcinoma. However, mice with EGFRL858R/T790M-driven tumors did not respond to either erlotinib or afatinib monotherapy, but did show a significant tumor response to afatinib-cetuximab combination treatment. The imaging responses correlated with the inhibition of downstream EGFR signaling, increased apoptosis, and decreased proliferation in the tumor tissues. In EGFRL858R-driven tumors, we saw a significant increase in CD45+ leukocytes, NK cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and lymphocytes, particularly CD8+ T cells. In response to erlotinib, these dendritic cells and macrophages had significantly higher MHC class II expression, indicating increased antigen-presenting capabilities. Together, results of our study provide novel insight into the immediate-early therapeutic response to EGFR TKIs in vivo. PMID:27494838

  19. Circadian dysfunction may be a key component of the non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease: insights from a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Willison, L. David; Kudo, Takashi; Loh, Dawn H.; Kuljis, Dika; Colwell, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disorders are nearly ubiquitous among patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and they manifest early in the disease process. While there are a number of possible mechanisms underlying these sleep disturbances, a primary dysfunction of the circadian system should be considered as a contributing factor. Our laboratory’s behavioral phenotyping of a well-validated transgenic mouse model of PD reveals that the electrical activity of neurons within the master pacemaker of the circadian system, the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), is already disrupted at the onset of motor symptoms, although the core features of the intrinsic molecular oscillations in the SCN remain functional. Our observations suggest that the fundamental circadian deficit in these mice lies in the signaling output from the SCN, which may be caused by known mechanisms in PD etiology: oxidative stress and mitochondrial disruption. Disruption of the circadian system is expected to have pervasive effects throughout the body and may itself lead to neurological and cardiovascular disorders. In fact, there is much overlap in the non-motor symptoms experienced by PD patients and in the consequences of circadian disruption. This raises the possibility that the sleep and circadian dysfunction experienced by PD patients may not merely be a subsidiary of the motor symptoms, but an integral part of the disease. Furthermore, we speculate that circadian dysfunction can even accelerate the pathology underlying PD. If these hypotheses are correct, more aggressive treatment of the circadian misalignment and sleep disruptions in PD patients early in the pathogenesis of the disease may be powerful positive modulators of disease progression and patient quality of life. PMID:23353924

  20. Expression of a tumor necrosis factor-alpha transgene in murine lung causes lymphocytic and fibrosing alveolitis. A mouse model of progressive pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Y; Araki, K; Vesin, C; Garcia, I; Kapanci, Y; Whitsett, J A; Piguet, P F; Vassalli, P

    1995-01-01

    The murine TNF-alpha gene was expressed under the control of the human surfactant protein SP-C promoter in transgenic mice. A number of the SP-C TNF-alpha mice died at birth or after a few weeks with very severe lung lesions. Surviving mice transmitted a pulmonary disease to their offspring, the severity and evolution of which was related to the level of TNF-alpha mRNA in the lung; TNF-alpha RNA was detected in alveolar epithelium, presumably in type II epithelial cells. In a longitudinal study of two independent mouse lines, pulmonary pathology, at 1-2 mo of age, consisted of a leukocytic alveolitis with a predominance of T lymphocytes. Leukocyte infiltration was associated with endothelial changes and increased levels of mRNA for the endothelial adhesion molecule VCAM-1. In the following months, alveolar spaces enlarged in association with thickening of the alveolar walls due to an accumulation of desmin-containing fibroblasts, collagen fibers, and lymphocytes. Alveolar surfaces were lined by regenerating type II epithelial cells, and alveolar spaces contained desquamating epithelial cells in places. Platelet trapping in the damaged alveolar capillaries was observed. Pulmonary pathology in the SP-C TNF-alpha mice bears a striking resemblance to human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, in which increased expression of TNF-alpha in type II epithelial cells has also been noted. These mice provide a valuable animal model for understanding the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis and exploring possible therapeutic approaches. Images PMID:7542280

  1. Dysregulation of the endocannabinoid signaling system in the cerebellum and brainstem in a transgenic mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type-3.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cueto, Carmen; Hernández-Gálvez, Mariluz; Hillard, Cecilia J; Maciel, Patricia; García-García, Luis; Valdeolivas, Sara; Pozo, Miguel A; Ramos, José A; Gómez-Ruiz, María; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier

    2016-12-17

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type-3 (SCA-3) is a rare disease but it is the most frequent type within the autosomal dominant inherited ataxias. The disease lacks an effective treatment to alleviate major symptoms and to modify disease progression. Our recent findings that endocannabinoid receptors and enzymes are significantly altered in the post-mortem cerebellum of patients affected by autosomal-dominant hereditary ataxias suggest that targeting the endocannabinoid signaling system may be a promising therapeutic option. Our goal was to investigate the status of the endocannabinoid signaling system in a transgenic mouse model of SCA-3, in the two CNS structures most affected in this disease - cerebellum and brainstem. These animals exhibited progressive motor incoordination, imbalance, abnormal gait, muscle weakness, and dystonia, in parallel to reduced in vivo brain glucose metabolism, deterioration of specific neuron subsets located in the dentate nucleus and pontine nuclei, small changes in microglial morphology, and reduction in glial glutamate transporters. Concerning the endocannabinoid signaling, our data indicated no changes in CB2 receptors. By contrast, CB1 receptors increased in the Purkinje cell layer, in particular in terminals of basket cells, but they were reduced in the dentate nucleus. We also measured the levels of endocannabinoid lipids and found reductions in anandamide and oleoylethanolamide in the brainstem. These changes correlated with an increase in the FAAH enzyme in the brainstem, which also occurred in some cerebellar areas, whereas other endocannabinoid-related enzymes were not altered. Collectively, our results in SCA-3 mutant mice confirm a possible dysregulation in the endocannabinoid system in the most important brain structures affected in this type of ataxia, suggesting that a pharmacological manipulation addressed to correct these changes could be a promising option in SCA-3.

  2. Longitudinal Characterization of [18F]-FDG and [18F]-AV45 Uptake in the Double Transgenic TASTPM Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Ann-Marie; wyffels, Leonie; Verhaeghe, Jeroen; Richardson, Jill C.; Schmidt, Mark; Stroobants, Sigrid; Langlois, Xavier; Staelens, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to monitor the timing of amyloid-β deposition in relation to changes in brain function using in vivo imaging with [18F]-AV45 and [18F]-FDG in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. TASTPM transgenic mice and wild-type controls were scanned longitudinally with [18F]-AV45 and [18F]-FDG before (3 months of age) and at multiple time points after the onset of amyloid deposition (6, 9, 12, and 15 months of age). As expected with increasing amyloidosis, TASTPM mice demonstrated progressive age-dependent increases in [18F]-AV45 uptake that were significantly higher than for WT from 9 months onwards and correlated to ex vivo measures of amyloid burden. The metabolism of [18F]-AV45 produces several brain penetrant radiometabolites and normalization to a reference region helps to negate this non-specific binding and improve the sensitivity of [18F]-AV45. The observed trajectory of [18F]-FDG alterations deviated from our proposed hypothesis of gradual decreases with worsening amyloidosis. While [18F]-FDG uptake in TASTPM mice was significantly lower than that of WT at 9 months, reduced [18F]-FDG was not associated with aging in TASTPM mice. Moreover, [18F]-FDG uptake did not correlate to measures of ex vivo amyloid burden. Our findings suggest that while amyloid-β is sufficient to induce hypometabolism, these pathologies are not linked in a dose-dependent manner in TASTPM mice. PMID:27911309

  3. Detection of in situ mammary cancer in a transgenic mouse model: in vitro and in vivo MRI studies demonstrate histopathologic correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, S. A.; Conzen, S. D.; Fan, X.; Krausz, T.; Zamora, M.; Foxley, S.; River, J.; Newstead, G. M.; Karczmar, G. S.

    2008-10-01

    Improving the prevention and detection of preinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is expected to lower both morbidity and mortality from breast cancer. Transgenic mouse models can be used as a 'test bed' to develop new imaging methods and to evaluate the efficacy of candidate preventive therapies. We hypothesized that despite its microscopic size, early murine mammary cancer, including DCIS, might be accurately detected by MRI. C3(1) SV40 TAg female mice (n = 23) between 10 and 18 weeks of age were selected for study. Eleven mice were subjected to in vitro imaging using a T2-weighted spin echo sequence and 12 mice were selected for in vivo imaging using a T1-weighted gradient echo, a T2-weighted spin echo and high spectral and spatial resolution imaging sequences. The imaged glands were carefully dissected, formalin fixed and paraffin embedded, and then H&E stained sections were obtained. The ratio of image-detected versus histologically detected cancers was obtained by reviewing the MR images and H&E sections independently and using histology as the gold standard. MR images were able to detect 12/12 intramammary lymph nodes, 1/1 relatively large (~5 mm) tumor, 17/18 small (~1 mm) tumors and 13/16 ducts distended with DCIS greater than 300 µm. Significantly, there were no false positives—i.e., image detection always corresponded to a histologically detectable cancer in this model. These results indicate that MR imaging can reliably detect both preinvasive in situ and early invasive mammary cancers in mice with high sensitivity. This technology is an important step toward the more effective use of non-invasive imaging in pre-clinical studies of breast cancer prevention, detection and treatment.

  4. Oral TNFα Modulation Alters Neutrophil Infiltration, Improves Cognition and Diminishes Tau and Amyloid Pathology in the 3xTgAD Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Gabbita, S. Prasad; Johnson, Ming F.; Kobritz, Naomi; Eslami, Pirooz; Poteshkina, Aleksandra; Varadarajan, Sridhar; Turman, John; Zemlan, Frank; Harris-White, Marni E.

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines such as TNFα can polarize microglia/macrophages into different neuroinflammatory types. Skewing of the phenotype towards a cytotoxic state is thought to impair phagocytosis and has been described in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Neuroinflammation can be perpetuated by a cycle of increasing cytokine production and maintenance of a polarized activation state that contributes to AD progression. In this study, 3xTgAD mice, age 6 months, were treated orally with 3 doses of the TNFα modulating compound isoindolin-1,3 dithione (IDT) for 10 months. We demonstrate that IDT is a TNFα modulating compound both in vitro and in vivo. Following long-term IDT administration, mice were assessed for learning & memory and tissue and serum were collected for analysis. Results demonstrate that IDT is safe for long-term treatment and significantly improves learning and memory in the 3xTgAD mouse model. IDT significantly reduced paired helical filament tau and fibrillar amyloid accumulation. Flow cytometry of brain cell populations revealed that IDT increased the infiltrating neutrophil population while reducing TNFα expression in this population. IDT is a safe and effective TNFα and innate immune system modulator. Thus small molecule, orally bioavailable modulators are promising therapeutics for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26436670

  5. Pathology associated memory deficits in Swedish mutant genome-based amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hock, Brian J; Lattal, K Matthew; Kulnane, Laura Shapiro; Abel, Ted; Lamb, Bruce T

    2009-12-01

    To gain insight into the relationship between pathological alterations and memory deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD), a number of amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic animal models have been generated containing familial AD mutations. The most commonly utilized method involves a cDNA-based approach, utilizing heterologous promoters to drive expression of specific APP isoforms. As a result of the assumptions inherent in the design of each model, the different cDNA-based transgenic mouse models have revealed different relationships between the biochemical, pathological and behavioral alterations observed in these models. Here we provide further characterization of a genomic-based, amyloid precursor protein yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of AD, R1.40, that makes few assumptions regarding disease pathogenesis to study the relationship between brain pathology and altered behavior. Aged R1.40 transgenic and control mice were tested for learning and memory in the Morris water maze and for working memory in the Y maze. Results from the water maze demonstrated intact learning in the both control and R1.40 mice, but impairments in the long-term retention of this information in the transgenic mice, but not controls. Interestingly, however, long-term memory deficits did not correlate with the presence of Abeta deposits within the group of animals examined. By contrast, age-related working memory impairments were also observed in the Y maze in the R1.40 mice, and these deficits correlated with the presence of Abeta deposits. Our results demonstrate unique behavioral alterations in the R1.40 mouse model of AD that are likely both dependent and independent of Abeta deposition.

  6. Transgenic Farm Animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of recombinant DNA technology has enabled scientists to isolate single genes, analyze and modify their nucleotide structure(s), make copies of these isolated genes, and insert copies of these genes into the genome of plants and animals. The transgenic technology of adding genes to li...

  7. Efficient Generation of Mice with Consistent Transgene Expression by FEEST

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lei; Jiang, Yonghua; Mu, Libing; Liu, Yanbin; Wang, Fengchao; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Aiqun; Tang, Nan; Chen, Ting; Luo, Minmin; Yu, Lei; Gao, Shaorong; Chen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic mouse models are widely used in biomedical research; however, current techniques for producing transgenic mice are limited due to the unpredictable nature of transgene expression. Here, we report a novel, highly efficient technique for the generation of transgenic mice with single-copy integration of the transgene and guaranteed expression of the gene-of-interest (GOI). We refer to this technique as functionally enriched ES cell transgenics, or FEEST. ES cells harboring an inducible Cre gene enabled the efficient selection of transgenic ES cell clones using hygromycin before Cre-mediated recombination. Expression of the GOI was confirmed by assaying for the GFP after Cre recombination. As a proof-of-principle, we produced a transgenic mouse line containing Cre-activatable tTA (cl-tTA6). This tTA mouse model was able to induce tumor formation when crossed with a transgenic mouse line containing a doxycycline-inducible oncogene. We also showed that the cl-tTA6 mouse is a valuable tool for faithfully recapitulating the clinical course of tumor development. We showed that FEEST can be easily adapted for other genes by preparing a transgenic mouse model of conditionally activatable EGFR L858R. Thus, FEEST is a technique with the potential to generate transgenic mouse models at a genome-wide scale. PMID:26573149

  8. In vivo (1)H MRS and (31)P MRSI of the response to cyclocreatine in transgenic mouse liver expressing creatine kinase.

    PubMed

    Cui, Min-Hui; Jayalakshmi, Kamaiah; Liu, Laibin; Guha, Chandan; Branch, Craig A

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has been explored as a therapeutic alternative to liver transplantation, but a means to monitor the success of the procedure is lacking. Published findings support the use of in vivo (31)P MRSI of creatine kinase (CK)-expressing hepatocytes to monitor proliferation of implanted hepatocytes. Phosphocreatine tissue level depends upon creatine (Cr) input to the CK enzyme reaction, but Cr measurement by (1)H MRS suffers from low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We examine the possibility of using the Cr analog cyclocreatine (CCr, a substrate for CK), which is quickly phosphorylated to phosphocyclocreatine (PCCr), as a higher SNR alternative to Cr. (1)H MRS and (31)P MRSI were employed to measure the effect of incremental supplementation of CCr upon PCCr, γ-ATP, pH and Pi /ATP in the liver of transgenic mice expressing the BB isoform of CK (CKBB) in hepatocytes. Water supplementation with 0.1% CCr led to a peak total PCCr level of 17.15 ± 1.07 mmol/kg wet weight by 6 weeks, while adding 1.0% CCr led to a stable PCCr liver level of 18.12 ± 3.91 mmol/kg by the fourth day of feeding. PCCr was positively correlated with CCr, and ATP concentration and pH declined with increasing PCCr. Feeding with 1% CCr in water induced an apparent saturated level of PCCr, suggesting that CCr quantization may not be necessary for quantifying expression of CK in mice. These findings support the possibility of using (31)P MRS to noninvasively monitor hepatocyte transplant success with CK-expressing hepatocytes.

  9. Pomegranate polyphenols and extract inhibit nuclear factor of activated T-cell activity and microglial activation in vitro and in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Puig, Kendra L; Combs, Colin K

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) brain is characterized by extracellular plaques of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide with reactive microglia. This study aimed to determine whether a dietary intervention could attenuate microgliosis. Memory was assessed in 12-mo-old male amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS1) transgenic mice via Barnes maze testing followed by division into either a control-fed group provided free access to normal chow and water or a treatment group provided free access to normal chow and drinking water supplemented with pomegranate extract (6.25 mL/L) for 3 mo followed by repeat Barnes maze testing for both groups. Three months of pomegranate feeding decreased the path length to escape of mice compared with their initial 12-mo values (P < 0.05) and their control-fed counterparts (P < 0.05). Brains of the 3-mo study pomegranate-fed mice had lower tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) concentrations (P < 0.05) and lower nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT) transcriptional activity (P < 0.05) compared with controls. Brains of the 3-mo pomegranate or control mice were also compared with an additional control group of 12-mo-old mice for histologic analysis. Immunocytochemistry showed that pomegranate- but not control-fed mice had attenuated microgliosis (P < 0.05) and Aβ plaque deposition (P < 0.05) compared with 12-mo-old mice. An additional behavioral study again used 12-mo-old male APP/PS1 mice tested by T-maze followed by division into a control group provided with free access to normal chow and sugar supplemented drinking water or a treatment group provided with normal chow and pomegranate extract-supplemented drinking water (6.25 mL/L) for 1 mo followed by repeat T-maze testing in both groups. One month of pomegranate feeding increased spontaneous alternations versus control-fed mice (P < 0.05). Cell culture experiments verified that 2 polyphenol components of pomegranate extract, punicalagin and ellagic acid, attenuated NFAT activity in a reporter cell

  10. Passive immunization targeting the N-terminal projection domain of tau decreases tau pathology and improves cognition in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease and tauopathies.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chun-ling; Chen, Xia; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2015-04-01

    Intraneuronal accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain is a histopathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and a family of related neurodegenerative disorders collectively called tauopathies. At present there is no effective treatment available for these progressive neurodegenerative diseases which are clinically characterized by dementia in mid to old-age. Here we report the treatment of 14-17-months-old 3xTg-AD mice with tau antibodies 43D (tau 6-18) and 77E9 (tau 184-195) to the